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Sample records for 4-dimensional intravital microscopy

  1. Intravital multiphoton microscopy for imaging hepatobiliary function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng-Chieh; Sun, Tzu-Lin; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Yang, Shu-Mei; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    Liver is the chemical factory in body responsible for important functions such as metabolism and detoxification. When liver can not be regenerated in time to amend damages that has occurred, failure of hepatic functions can result. Traditionally, the study of liver pathology has depended on histological techniques, but such methods are limited to ex-vivo observation. In order to study hepatic metabolism in vivo, we have designed a hepatic imaging chamber made of biocompatible titanium alloy (6V4Al-Ti, ELI grade). In combination with multiphoton and second harmonic generation microscopy, our approach allows the intravital observation of hepatic intravital activities to be achieved. Processes such as hepatic metabolism and disease progression can be studied using this methodology.

  2. Intravital Microscopy for THz-Bio Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pilhan

    Intravital microscopy is a high-resolution imaging technique to observe biological phenomena in living organisms. It often also stated as in vivo microscopy. Literal meaning of in vivo is "within the living" and there is another term, ex vivo of which literal meaning is "out of the living". Both terms are commonly used to describe the status of sample at the moment of biological manipulations or investigations are done. In vivo study is a form of research using whole living organism in experiment to investigate a certain biological phenomenon in its natural environment, whereas ex vivo study uses non-living subjects such as tissues or organs dissected from dead animal. In addition, in vitro of which literal meaning is "within the glass" is another commonly used term. In vitro study is a form of research using small living subject such as cell in a controlled environment such as petri dish or test tube. Cell culture, the process of growing cells in a petri dish, is the most common form of in vitro study. Figure 1 summarizes the status of samples for biological study categorized by in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo.

  3. Deep insights: intravital imaging with two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schießl, Ina Maria; Castrop, Hayo

    2016-09-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy is widely used to assess the structure and function of organs in live animals. Although different tissues vary in their accessibility for intravital multiphoton imaging, considerable progress has been made in the imaging quality of all tissues due to substantial technical improvements in the relevant imaging components, such as optics, excitation laser, detectors, and signal analysis software. In this review, we provide an overview of the technical background of intravital multiphoton microscopy. Then, we note a few seminal findings that were made through the use of multiphoton microscopy. Finally, we address the technical limitations of the method and provide an outlook for how these limitations may be overcome through future technical developments. PMID:27352273

  4. Intravital Microscopy for Imaging the Tumor Microenvironment in Live Mice.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Victor; Jenne, Craig; Mahoney, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    The development of intravital microscopy has provided unprecedented capacity to study the tumor microenvironment in live mice. The dynamic behavior of cancer, stromal, vascular, and immune cells can be monitored in real time, in situ, in both primary tumors and metastatic lesions, allowing treatment responses to be observed at single cell resolution and therapies tracked in vivo. These features provide a unique opportunity to elucidate the cellular mechanisms underlying the biology and treatment of cancer. We describe here a method for imaging the microenvironment of subcutaneous tumors grown in mice using intravital microscopy. PMID:27581025

  5. Intravital microscopy to image membrane trafficking in live rats

    PubMed Central

    Masedunskas, Andrius; Sramkova, Monika; Parente, Laura; Weigert, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Summary Intravital microscopy (IVM) is a powerful tool that enables imaging various biological processes in live animals. Here, we describe a series of procedures designed to image subcellular structures, such as endsosomes and secretory vesicles in the salivary glands (SGs) of live rats. To this aim, we used fluorescently labeled molecules and/or fluorescently-tagged proteins that were transiently transfected in the live animal. PMID:23027003

  6. Intravital microscopy of the lung: minimizing invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Fiole, Daniel; Tournier, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    In vivo microscopy has recently become a gold standard in lung immunology studies involving small animals, largely benefiting from the democratization of multiphoton microscopy allowing for deep tissue imaging. This technology represents currently our only way of exploring the lungs and inferring what happens in human respiratory medicine. The interest of lung in vivo microscopy essentially relies upon its relevance as a study model, fulfilling physiological requirements in comparison with in vitro and ex vivo experiments. However, strategies developed in order to overcome movements of the thorax caused by breathing and heartbeats remain the chief drawback of the technique and a major source of invasiveness. In this context, minimizing invasiveness is an unavoidable prerequisite for any improvement of lung in vivo microscopy. This review puts into perspective the main techniques enabling lung in vivo microscopy, providing pros and cons regarding invasiveness. PMID:26846880

  7. Intraoperative intravital microscopy permits the study of human tumour vessels

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Daniel T.; Muhitch, Jason B.; Kim, Minhyung; Doyen, Kurt C.; Bogner, Paul N.; Evans, Sharon S.; Skitzki, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour vessels have been studied extensively as they are critical sites for drug delivery, anti-angiogenic therapies and immunotherapy. As a preclinical tool, intravital microscopy (IVM) allows for in vivo real-time direct observation of vessels at the cellular level. However, to date there are no reports of intravital high-resolution imaging of human tumours in the clinical setting. Here we report the feasibility of IVM examinations of human malignant disease with an emphasis on tumour vasculature as the major site of tumour-host interactions. Consistent with preclinical observations, we show that patient tumour vessels are disorganized, tortuous and ∼50% do not support blood flow. Human tumour vessel diameters are larger than predicted from immunohistochemistry or preclinical IVM, and thereby have lower wall shear stress, which influences delivery of drugs and cellular immunotherapies. Thus, real-time clinical imaging of living human tumours is feasible and allows for detection of characteristics within the tumour microenvironment. PMID:26883450

  8. Intraoperative intravital microscopy permits the study of human tumour vessels.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Daniel T; Muhitch, Jason B; Kim, Minhyung; Doyen, Kurt C; Bogner, Paul N; Evans, Sharon S; Skitzki, Joseph J

    2016-02-17

    Tumour vessels have been studied extensively as they are critical sites for drug delivery, anti-angiogenic therapies and immunotherapy. As a preclinical tool, intravital microscopy (IVM) allows for in vivo real-time direct observation of vessels at the cellular level. However, to date there are no reports of intravital high-resolution imaging of human tumours in the clinical setting. Here we report the feasibility of IVM examinations of human malignant disease with an emphasis on tumour vasculature as the major site of tumour-host interactions. Consistent with preclinical observations, we show that patient tumour vessels are disorganized, tortuous and ∼50% do not support blood flow. Human tumour vessel diameters are larger than predicted from immunohistochemistry or preclinical IVM, and thereby have lower wall shear stress, which influences delivery of drugs and cellular immunotherapies. Thus, real-time clinical imaging of living human tumours is feasible and allows for detection of characteristics within the tumour microenvironment.

  9. Intravital confocal Raman microscopy with multiplexed SERS contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McVeigh, Patrick Z.; Wilson, Brian C.

    2012-03-01

    Intravital microscopy has been demonstrated to be a powerful technique for studying the delivery of contrast or therapeutic agents to tumours growing in a realistic 3D environment at high resolution. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active nanoparticle contrast agents provide the ability to improve in-vivo detection of tumour tissue through multiplex detection of their uniquely bright spectral lines. However, most work to date has been carried out in-vitro or in ex-vivo tissues. Here we present the results from confocal Raman microscopy in a dorsal skinfold window chamber in mice using SERS-active gold nanoparticle contrast agents directed towards an overexpressed tumour receptor tyrosine kinase.

  10. Motion compensation using a suctioning stabilizer for intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Lee, Sungon; Gorbatov, Rostic; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Motion artifacts continue to present a major challenge to single cell imaging in cardiothoracic organs such as the beating heart, blood vessels, or lung. In this study, we present a new water-immersion suctioning stabilizer that enables minimally invasive intravital fluorescence microscopy using water-based stick objectives. The stabilizer works by reducing major motion excursions and can be used in conjunction with both prospective or retrospective gating approaches. We show that the new approach offers cellular resolution in the beating murine heart without perturbing normal physiology. In addition, because this technique allows multiple areas to be easily probed, it offers the opportunity for wide area coverage at high resolution. PMID:24086796

  11. Multiphoton intravital microscopy setup to visualize the mouse mammary gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Javier; Herrera Torres, Ana M.; Masedunskas, Andrius; Baratti, Mariana O.; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, light microscopy-based techniques have been extended to live mammalian models leading to the development of a new imaging approach called intravital microscopy (IVM). Although IVM has been introduced at the beginning of the last century, its major advancements have occurred in the last twenty years with the development of non-linear microscopy that has enabled performing deep tissue imaging. IVM has been utilized to address many biological questions in basic research and is now a fundamental tool that provide information on tissues such as morphology, cellular architecture, and metabolic status. IVM has become an indispensable tool in numerous areas. This study presents and describes the practical aspects of IVM necessary to visualize epithelial cells of live mouse mammary gland with multiphoton techniques.

  12. Intravital video microscopy measurements of retinal blood flow in mice.

    PubMed

    Harris, Norman R; Watts, Megan N; Leskova, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in retinal blood flow can contribute to, or be a consequence of, ocular disease and visual dysfunction. Therefore, quantitation of altered perfusion can aid research into the mechanisms of retinal pathologies. Intravital video microscopy of fluorescent tracers can be used to measure vascular diameters and bloodstream velocities of the retinal vasculature, specifically the arterioles branching from the central retinal artery and of the venules leading into the central retinal vein. Blood flow rates can be calculated from the diameters and velocities, with the summation of arteriolar flow, and separately venular flow, providing values of total retinal blood flow. This paper and associated video describe the methods for applying this technique to mice, which includes 1) the preparation of the eye for intravital microscopy of the anesthetized animal, 2) the intravenous infusion of fluorescent microspheres to measure bloodstream velocity, 3) the intravenous infusion of a high molecular weight fluorescent dextran, to aid the microscopic visualization of the retinal microvasculature, 4) the use of a digital microscope camera to obtain videos of the perfused retina, and 5) the use of image processing software to analyze the video. The same techniques can be used for measuring retinal blood flow rates in rats. PMID:24429840

  13. Intravital assessment of myelin molecular order with polarimetric multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Rutledge, Danette J.; Bélanger, Erik; Dill, Dorothy; Macklin, Wendy B.; Côté, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Myelin plays an essential role in the nervous system and its disruption in diseases such as multiple sclerosis may lead to neuronal death, thus causing irreversible functional impairments. Understanding myelin biology is therefore of fundamental and clinical importance, but no tools currently exist to describe the fine spatial organization of myelin sheaths in vivo. Here we demonstrate intravital quantification of the myelin molecular structure using a microscopy method based on polarization-resolved coherent Raman scattering. Developmental myelination was imaged noninvasively in live zebrafish. Longitudinal imaging of individual axons revealed changes in myelin organization beyond the diffraction limit. Applied to promyelination drug screening, the method uniquely enabled the identification of focal myelin regions with differential architectures. These observations indicate that the study of myelin biology and the identification of therapeutic compounds will largely benefit from a method to quantify the myelin molecular organization in vivo. PMID:27538357

  14. Advanced Motion Compensation Methods for Intravital Optical Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Lee, Sungon; Feruglio, Paolo Fumene; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-03-01

    Intravital microscopy has emerged in the recent decade as an indispensible imaging modality for the study of the micro-dynamics of biological processes in live animals. Technical advancements in imaging techniques and hardware components, combined with the development of novel targeted probes and new mice models, have enabled us to address long-standing questions in several biology areas such as oncology, cell biology, immunology and neuroscience. As the instrument resolution has increased, physiological motion activities have become a major obstacle that prevents imaging live animals at resolutions analogue to the ones obtained in vitro. Motion compensation techniques aim at reducing this gap and can effectively increase the in vivo resolution. This paper provides a technical review of some of the latest developments in motion compensation methods, providing organ specific solutions.

  15. Advanced Motion Compensation Methods for Intravital Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Lee, Sungon; Feruglio, Paolo Fumene; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has emerged in the recent decade as an indispensible imaging modality for the study of the micro-dynamics of biological processes in live animals. Technical advancements in imaging techniques and hardware components, combined with the development of novel targeted probes and new mice models, have enabled us to address long-standing questions in several biology areas such as oncology, cell biology, immunology and neuroscience. As the instrument resolution has increased, physiological motion activities have become a major obstacle that prevents imaging live animals at resolutions analogue to the ones obtained in vitro. Motion compensation techniques aim at reducing this gap and can effectively increase the in vivo resolution. This paper provides a technical review of some of the latest developments in motion compensation methods, providing organ specific solutions. PMID:24273405

  16. Intravital assessment of myelin molecular order with polarimetric multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Rutledge, Danette J.; Bélanger, Erik; Dill, Dorothy; Macklin, Wendy B.; Côté, Daniel C.

    2016-08-01

    Myelin plays an essential role in the nervous system and its disruption in diseases such as multiple sclerosis may lead to neuronal death, thus causing irreversible functional impairments. Understanding myelin biology is therefore of fundamental and clinical importance, but no tools currently exist to describe the fine spatial organization of myelin sheaths in vivo. Here we demonstrate intravital quantification of the myelin molecular structure using a microscopy method based on polarization-resolved coherent Raman scattering. Developmental myelination was imaged noninvasively in live zebrafish. Longitudinal imaging of individual axons revealed changes in myelin organization beyond the diffraction limit. Applied to promyelination drug screening, the method uniquely enabled the identification of focal myelin regions with differential architectures. These observations indicate that the study of myelin biology and the identification of therapeutic compounds will largely benefit from a method to quantify the myelin molecular organization in vivo.

  17. Intravital assessment of myelin molecular order with polarimetric multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Rutledge, Danette J; Bélanger, Erik; Dill, Dorothy; Macklin, Wendy B; Côté, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Myelin plays an essential role in the nervous system and its disruption in diseases such as multiple sclerosis may lead to neuronal death, thus causing irreversible functional impairments. Understanding myelin biology is therefore of fundamental and clinical importance, but no tools currently exist to describe the fine spatial organization of myelin sheaths in vivo. Here we demonstrate intravital quantification of the myelin molecular structure using a microscopy method based on polarization-resolved coherent Raman scattering. Developmental myelination was imaged noninvasively in live zebrafish. Longitudinal imaging of individual axons revealed changes in myelin organization beyond the diffraction limit. Applied to promyelination drug screening, the method uniquely enabled the identification of focal myelin regions with differential architectures. These observations indicate that the study of myelin biology and the identification of therapeutic compounds will largely benefit from a method to quantify the myelin molecular organization in vivo. PMID:27538357

  18. Quantifying endocytosis in vivo using intravital two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Ruben M; Molitoris, Bruce A

    2008-01-01

    The recent introduction of multiphoton microscopy coupled with advances in optics, computer sciences, designer fluorophores, molecular labeling, and previously developed physiologic approaches have empowered investigators to quantitatively study the cell-specific dynamic events, such as endocytosis, within a functioning organ with subcellular resolution. This rapidly emerging field of investigation, with superior spatial and temporal resolution and high sensitivity, enables investigators to track molecules and determine their mode of cellular uptake, intracellular trafficking, and metabolism in a cell-specific fashion in complex heterogeneous organs such as the kidney with repeated determinations possible over a prolonged period of time. This approach is enhanced by the ability to obtain and quantify volumetric data with using up to three different fluorophores simultaneously. We have utilized this intravital approach to understand and quantify kidney proximal tubule cell uptake and intracellular distribution and metabolism of fluorescently labeled molecules, including folic acid, gentamicin, and small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA). Limitations of this technique include tissue penetration, which is the major barrier to successful clinical utilization of this technology. However, its use in preclinical animal models offers new insight into physiologic processes and the pathophysiology and treatment of disease processes. PMID:18369960

  19. Intravital microscopy as a tool to study drug delivery in preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The technical developments in the field of non-linear microscopy have made intravital microscopy one of the most successful techniques for studying physiological and pathological processes in live animals. Intravital microscopy has been utilized to address many biological questions in basic research and is now a fundamental tool for preclinical studies, with an enormous potential for clinical applications. The ability to dynamically image cellular and subcellular structures combined with the possibility to perform longitudinal studies have empowered investigators to use this discipline to study the mechanisms of action of therapeutic agents and assess the efficacy on their targets in vivo. The goal of this review is to provide a general overview of the recent advances in intravital microscopy and to discuss some of its applications in preclinical studies. PMID:20933026

  20. Shedding light on cutaneous innate immune responses: the intravital microscopy approach.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rohit; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    The skin is under constant assault by environmental factors and microbes. Innate immune cells in epidermis and dermis regulate immune responses against pathogens while maintaining tolerance against commensal bacteria and autoantigens. The introduction of intravital imaging approaches, in particular multiphoton microscopy, has enabled studying the cellular and molecular regulation of cutaneous immunity in real time within intact skin. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of innate immune cell behaviour in the skin, as unravelled by intravital microscopy, with emphasis on the function of myeloid cells, including dendritic cells, neutrophils and monocytes.

  1. Early development of cutaneous cancer revealed by intravital nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Lin, Wei-Chou; Chen, Yang-Fang; Chen, Shean-Jen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-09-01

    We performed intravital multiphoton microscopy to image and analyze normal and carcinogen treated skin tissues of nude mice in vivo. Using intravital images and the quantitative pixel to pixel ratiometric processing of multiphoton autofluorescence to second harmonic generation index (MAFSI), we can visualize the interaction between epithelial cells and extracellular matrix. We found that as the imaging depth increases, MAFSI has different distribution in normal and treated cutaneous specimens. Since the treated skin eventually became squamous cell carcinoma, our results show that the physiological changes to mouse skin en route to become cancer can be effectively tracked by multiphoton microscopy.

  2. Automated motion artifact removal for intravital microscopy, without a priori information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungon; Vinegoni, Claudio; Sebas, Matthew; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-03-01

    Intravital fluorescence microscopy, through extended penetration depth and imaging resolution, provides the ability to image at cellular and subcellular resolution in live animals, presenting an opportunity for new insights into in vivo biology. Unfortunately, physiological induced motion components due to respiration and cardiac activity are major sources of image artifacts and impose severe limitations on the effective imaging resolution that can be ultimately achieved in vivo. Here we present a novel imaging methodology capable of automatically removing motion artifacts during intravital microscopy imaging of organs and orthotopic tumors. The method is universally applicable to different laser scanning modalities including confocal and multiphoton microscopy, and offers artifact free reconstructions independent of the physiological motion source and imaged organ. The methodology, which is based on raw data acquisition followed by image processing, is here demonstrated for both cardiac and respiratory motion compensation in mice heart, kidney, liver, pancreas and dorsal window chamber.

  3. Automated motion artifact removal for intravital microscopy, without a priori information.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungon; Vinegoni, Claudio; Sebas, Matthew; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-03-28

    Intravital fluorescence microscopy, through extended penetration depth and imaging resolution, provides the ability to image at cellular and subcellular resolution in live animals, presenting an opportunity for new insights into in vivo biology. Unfortunately, physiological induced motion components due to respiration and cardiac activity are major sources of image artifacts and impose severe limitations on the effective imaging resolution that can be ultimately achieved in vivo. Here we present a novel imaging methodology capable of automatically removing motion artifacts during intravital microscopy imaging of organs and orthotopic tumors. The method is universally applicable to different laser scanning modalities including confocal and multiphoton microscopy, and offers artifact free reconstructions independent of the physiological motion source and imaged organ. The methodology, which is based on raw data acquisition followed by image processing, is here demonstrated for both cardiac and respiratory motion compensation in mice heart, kidney, liver, pancreas and dorsal window chamber.

  4. Intravital Microscopy of Leukocyte-endothelial and Platelet-leukocyte Interactions in Mesenterial Veins in Mice.

    PubMed

    Herr, Nadine; Mauler, Maximilian; Bode, Christoph; Duerschmied, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is a method that can be used to investigate different processes in different regions and vessels in living animals. In this protocol, we describe intravital microscopy of mesentery veins. This can be performed in a short period of time with reproducible results showing leukocyte-endothelial interactions in vivo. We describe an inflammatory setting after LPS challenge of the endothelium. But in this model one can apply many different types of inflammatory conditions, like bacterial, chemical or biological and investigate the administration of drugs and their direct effects on the living animal and its impact on leukocyte recruitment. This protocol has been applied successfully to a number of different treatments of mice and their effects on inflammatory response in vessels. Herein, we describe the visualization of leukocytes and platelets by fluorescently labeling these with rhodamine 6G. Additionally, any specific imaging can be performed using targeted fluorescently labeled molecules.

  5. Quantitating therapeutic disruption of tumor blood flow with intravital video microscopy.

    PubMed

    Iga, Arthur M; Sarkar, Sandip; Sales, Kevin M; Winslet, Marc C; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2006-12-15

    Vascular-disrupting agents (VDA) kill tumor cells by selectively disrupting blood circulation in tumors. In vivo analysis of this intensely studied class of anticancer agents is invaluable for preclinical assessment of pharmacodynamic end points and effective therapeutic windows. In this review, we consider the role of intravital video microscopy in measuring tumor vascular response to VDAs, the potential of which lies in the opportunity to quantitate specific variables and to obtain real-time information on how VDAs affect tumor microcirculation.

  6. Characterization and prevention of phototoxic effects in intravital fluorescence microscopy in the hamster dorsal skinfold model.

    PubMed

    Steinbauer, M; Harris, A G; Abels, C; Messmer, K

    2000-07-01

    Intravital microscopy is widely used to study the microcirculation. However, the use of fluorescent dyes can induce phototoxic effects which may affect the measurements, particularly in tissue exposed to oxidative stress. The aim of the study was to determine the threshold light dose at which fluorescent microscopy is associated with phototoxic effects in the hamster dorsal skinfold chamber under normal and pathological conditions. The extent of phototoxicity in the microcirculation in the hamster skinfold chamber was investigated using intravital fluorescent microscopy during 60 min of illumination (1048 mW/cm2) applying two different concentrations of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran under baseline conditions (groups A and B) and following 4 h of ischemia (groups C and D). In the second part of the study the microvasculature was analyzed regarding phototoxic effects during a standardized intravital microscopic examination after 4 h of pressure induced ischemia. Groups I and II (n=7) were studied using epiillumination after injection of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran plus rhodamine 6G or rhodamine 6G only. In group III (n=7) only transillumination was used. Arteriolar vasospasm, microvascular perfusion failure, thrombus formation, and enhanced leukocyte endothelium interaction were observed as signs of a phototoxic effect in normal tissue. However, the light doses needed to induce these effects clearly exceeded those during standard examinations. The induction of a 4-h ischemia and reperfusion further enhanced these effects. Despite the predamage by ischemia/reperfusion the comparison of epiillumination and transillumination microscopy using a standard protocol showed no differences regarding the parameters analyzed at any time. This indicates that epiillumination and the fluorescent dyes per se did not affect the experimental results. These results show that ischemia/reperfusion studies in the dorsal skinfold chamber of the Syrian golden hamster can be

  7. Intravital microscopy: a novel tool to study cell biology in living animals

    PubMed Central

    Weigert, Roberto; Sramkova, Monika; Parente, Laura; Masedunskas, Andrius

    2011-01-01

    Intravital microscopy encompasses various optical microscopy techniques aimed at visualizing biological processes in live animals. In the last decade, the development of non-linear optical microscopy resulted in an enormous increase of in vivo studies, which have addressed key biological questions in fields such as neurobiology, immunology and tumor biology. Recently, few studies have shown that subcellular processes can be imaged dynamically in the live animal at a resolution comparable to that achieved in cell cultures, providing new opportunities to study cell biology under physiological conditions. The overall aim of this review is to give the reader a general idea of the potential applications of intravital microscopy with a particular emphasis on subcellular imaging. An overview of some of the most exciting studies in this field will be presented using resolution as a main organizing criteria. Indeed, first we will focus on those studies in which organs where imaged at the tissue level, then on those focusing on single cells imaging, and finally on those imaging subcellular organelles and structures. PMID:20372919

  8. The mouse dorsal skinfold chamber as a model for the study of thrombolysis by intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Boulaftali, Yacine; Lamrani, Lamia; Rouzaud, Marie-Catherine; Loyau, Stéphane; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Bouton, Marie-Christine; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2012-05-01

    Although intravital microscopy models of thrombosis in mice have contributed to dissect the mechanisms of thrombus formation and stability, they have not been well adapted to study long-term evolution of occlusive thrombi. Here, we assessed the suitability of the dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) for the study of thrombolysis and testing of thrombolytic agents by intravital microscopy. We show that induction of FeCl3-induced occlusive thrombosis is achievable in microvessels of DSCs, and that thrombi formed in DSCs can be visualised by intravital microscopy using brightfield transmitted light, or fluorescent staining of thrombus components such as fibrinogen, platelets, leukocytes, and von Willebrand factor. Direct application of control saline or recombinant tissue-plasminogen activator (rtPA) to FeCl3-produced thrombi in DSCs did not affect thrombus size or induce recanalisation. However, in the presence of hirudin, rtPA treatment caused a rapid dose-dependent lysis of occlusive thrombi, resulting in recanalisation within 1 hour after treatment. Skin haemorrhage originating from vessels located inside and outside the FeCl3-injured area was also observed in DSCs of rtPA-treated mice. We further show that rtPA-induced thrombolysis was enhanced in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-deficient (PAI-1-/-) mice, and dropped considerably as the time between occlusion and treatment application increased. Together, our results show that by allowing visualization and measurement of thrombus lysis and potential bleeding complications of thrombolytic treatments, the DSC provides a model for studying endogenous fibrinolysis and for first-line screening of thrombolytic agents. Furthermore, using this system, we found that thrombin and clot aging impair the thrombolytic action of rtPA towards FeCl3-produced thrombi.

  9. High-Resolution Molecular Imaging Via Intravital Microscopy: Illuminating Vascular Biology In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Taqueti, Viviany R.; Jaffer, Farouc A.

    2012-01-01

    Complications of atherosclerosis and thrombosis are leading causes of death worldwide. While experimental investigations have yielded valuable insights into key molecular and cellular phenomena in these diseases of medium- and large-sized vessels, direct visualization of relevant in vivo biological processes has been limited. However, recent developments in molecular imaging technology, specifically fluorescence imaging agents coupled with high-resolution, high-speed intravital microscopy (IVM), are now enabling dynamic and longitudinal investigations into the mechanisms and progression of many vascular diseases. Here we review recent advances in IVM that have provided new in vivo biological insights into atherosclerosis and thrombosis. PMID:23135362

  10. Probing the role of the actin cytoskeleton during regulated exocytosis by intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Milberg, Oleg; Tora, Muhibullah; Shitara, Akiko; Masedunskas, Andrius

    2015-01-01

    Summary The actin cytoskeleton plays a fundamental role in controlling several steps during regulated exocytosis. Here we describe a combination of procedures that are aimed at studying the dynamics and the mechanism of the actin cytoskeleton in the salivary glands of live rodents, a model for exocrine secretion. Our approach relies on intravital microscopy, an imaging technique that enables imaging biological events in live animals at a subcellular resolution, and it is complemented by the use of pharmacological agents and indirect immunofluorescence in the salivary tissue. PMID:24947398

  11. Assessment of microcirculatory effects of glycine by intravital microscopy in rats.

    PubMed

    Podoprigora, Guennady I; Blagosklonov, Oleg; Angoué, Orland; Boulahdour, Hatem; Nartsissov, Yaroslav R

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies using laboratory animal models have shown a potential vasoactive effect of natural metabolites such as glycine. The present study used intravital microscopy in laboratory rat models to study the microcirculation in the brain pial and mesentery vessels. To investigate the pial microvasculature, a stereotaxis-like animal fixing device was used. The intravital microscopy unit consisted of a binocular microscope equipped with a digital photo-video camera, processor, monitor and printer. Using reflected light, a special contact lens with an amplified focus depth provided high-resolution images of nontransparent tissue objects that typically have insufficient light exposure. Glycine had a vasodilatory effect on microvessels in the rat brain and mesenterium. The diameter of pial arterioles increased after glycine application especially markedly (up to 250% of initial size). These changes were not observed when physiological saline was used. Even a very small amount of glycine (a drop on the needle) was sufficient to stop the early stages of histamine-induced blood stasis development in 3-5 s in mesenterial microvessels. The vasodilatory effect of glycine on the pial microcirculation correlates with its reported positive therapeutic effect in cerebral ischemic stroke. The ability of glycine to avoid or prevent histamine-induced microcirculatory alterations in mesenterial microvessels may have potential clinical applications. PMID:23366470

  12. Multicolor Fluorescent Intravital Live Microscopy (FILM) for Surgical Tumor Resection in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Figueiredo, Jose L.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Background Complete surgical resection of neoplasia remains one of the most efficient tumor therapies. However, malignant cell clusters are often left behind during surgery due to the inability to visualize and differentiate them against host tissue. Here we establish the feasibility of multicolor fluorescent intravital live microscopy (FILM) where multiple cellular and/or unique tissue compartments are stained simultaneously and imaged in real time. Methodology/Principal Findings Theoretical simulations of imaging probe localization were carried out for three agents with specificity for cancer cells, stromal host response, or vascular perfusion. This transport analysis gave insight into the probe pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution, facilitating the experimental design and allowing predictions to be made about the localization of the probes in other animal models and in the clinic. The imaging probes were administered systemically at optimal time points based on the simulations, and the multicolor FILM images obtained in vivo were then compared to conventional pathological sections. Our data show the feasibility of real time in vivo pathology at cellular resolution and molecular specificity with excellent agreement between intravital and traditional in vitro immunohistochemistry. Conclusions/Significance Multicolor FILM is an accurate method for identifying malignant tissue and cells in vivo. The imaging probes distributed in a manner similar to predictions based on transport principles, and these models can be used to design future probes and experiments. FILM can provide critical real time feedback and should be a useful tool for more effective and complete cancer resection. PMID:19956597

  13. Autonomous T cell trafficking examined in vivo with intravital two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mark J.; Wei, Sindy H.; Cahalan, Michael D.; Parker, Ian

    2003-03-01

    The recirculation of T cells between the blood and secondary lymphoid organs requires that T cells are motile and sensitive to tissue-specific signals. T cell motility has been studied in vitro, but the migratory behavior of individual T cells in vivo has remained enigmatic. Here, using intravital two-photon laser microscopy, we imaged the locomotion and trafficking of naïve CD4+ T cells in the inguinal lymph nodes of anesthetized mice. Intravital recordings deep within the lymph node showed T cells flowing rapidly in the microvasculature and captured individual homing events. Within the diffuse cortex, T cells displayed robust motility with an average velocity of 11 μm·min1. T cells cycled between states of low and high motility roughly every 2 min, achieving peak velocities >25 μm·min1. An analysis of T cell migration in 3D space revealed a default trafficking program analogous to a random walk. Our results show that naïve T cells do not migrate collectively, as they might under the direction of pervasive chemokine gradients. Instead, they appear to migrate as autonomous agents, each cell taking an independent trafficking path. Our results call into question the role of chemokine gradients for basal T cell trafficking within T cell areas and suggest that antigen detection may result from a stochastic process through which a random walk facilitates contact with antigen-presenting dendritic cells.

  14. Automated filtering of intrinsic movement artifacts during two-photon intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Soulet, Denis; Paré, Alexandre; Coste, Julien; Lacroix, Steve

    2013-01-01

    In vivo imaging using two-photon microscopy is an essential tool to explore the dynamic of physiological events deep within biological tissues for short or extended periods of time. The new capabilities offered by this technology (e.g. high tissue penetrance, low toxicity) have opened a whole new era of investigations in modern biomedical research. However, the potential of using this promising technique in tissues of living animals is greatly limited by the intrinsic irregular movements that are caused by cardiac and respiratory cycles and muscular and vascular tone. Here, we show real-time imaging of the brain, spinal cord, sciatic nerve and myenteric plexus of living mice using a new automated program, named Intravital_Microscopy_Toolbox, that removes frames corrupted with motion artifacts from time-lapse videos. Our approach involves generating a dissimilarity score against precalculated reference frames in a specific reference channel, thus allowing the gating of distorted, out-of-focus or translated frames. Since the algorithm detects the uneven peaks of image distortion caused by irregular animal movements, the macro allows a fast and efficient filtering of the image sequence. In addition, extra features have been implemented in the macro, such as XY registration, channel subtraction, extended field of view with maximum intensity projection, noise reduction with average intensity projections, and automated timestamp and scale bar overlay. Thus, the Intravital_Microscopy_Toolbox macro for ImageJ provides convenient tools for biologists who are performing in vivo two-photon imaging in tissues prone to motion artifacts.

  15. Integrated intravital microscopy and mathematical modeling to optimize nanotherapeutics delivery to tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Ven, Anne L.; Wu, Min; Lowengrub, John; McDougall, Steven R.; Chaplain, Mark A. J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Ferrari, Mauro; Frieboes, Hermann B.

    2012-03-01

    Inefficient vascularization hinders the optimal transport of cell nutrients, oxygen, and drugs to cancer cells in solid tumors. Gradients of these substances maintain a heterogeneous cell-scale microenvironment through which drugs and their carriers must travel, significantly limiting optimal drug exposure. In this study, we integrate intravital microscopy with a mathematical model of cancer to evaluate the behavior of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems designed to circumvent biophysical barriers. We simulate the effect of doxorubicin delivered via porous 1000 x 400 nm plateloid silicon particles to a solid tumor characterized by a realistic vasculature, and vary the parameters to determine how much drug per particle and how many particles need to be released within the vasculature in order to achieve remission of the tumor. We envision that this work will contribute to the development of quantitative measures of nanoparticle design and drug loading in order to optimize cancer treatment via nanotherapeutics.

  16. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-15

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 {mu}m, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 {mu}m diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 {mu}m was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  17. In vivo evaluation of venular glycocalyx during hemorrhagic shock in rats using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Torres Filho, Ivo; Torres, Luciana N; Sondeen, Jill L; Polykratis, I Amy; Dubick, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhage is responsible for a large percentage of trauma-related deaths but the mechanisms underlying tissue ischemia are complex and not well understood. Despite the evidence linking glycocalyx degradation and hemorrhagic shock, there is no direct data obtained in vivo showing glycocalyx thickness reduction in skeletal muscle venules after hemorrhage. We hypothesize that damage to the endothelial glycocalyx is a key element in hemorrhage pathophysiology and tested the hypothesis that hemorrhage causes glycocalyx degradation in cremaster muscle microvessels. We utilized intravital microscopy to estimate glycocalyx thickness in 48 microvessels while other microvascular parameters were measured using non-invasive techniques. Systemic physiological parameters and blood chemistry were simultaneously collected. We studied 27 post-capillary venules (<16 μm diameter) of 8 anesthetized rats subjected to hemorrhage (40% of total blood volume). Six control rats were equally instrumented but not bled. Dextrans of different molecular weights labeled with FITC or Texas Red were injected. Glycocalyx thickness was estimated from the widths of the fluorescence columns and from anatomical diameter. While control rats did not show remarkable responses, a statistically significant decrease of about 59% in glycocalyx thickness was measured in venules after hemorrhagic shock. Venular glycocalyx thickness and local blood flow changes were correlated: venules with the greatest flow reductions showed the largest decreases in glycocalyx. These changes may have a significant impact in shock pathophysiology. Intravital microscopy and integrated systems such as the one described here may be important tools to identify mechanisms by which resuscitation fluids may improve tissue recovery and outcome following hemorrhage.

  18. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 μm, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 μm diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 μm was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  19. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy: An emerging technique for intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K

    2012-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates-only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment.

  20. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy: An emerging technique for intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K

    2012-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates-only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24353926

  1. Intravital correlated microscopy reveals differential macrophage and microglial dynamics during resolution of neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    van Ham, Tjakko J.; Brady, Colleen A.; Kalicharan, Ruby D.; Oosterhof, Nynke; Kuipers, Jeroen; Veenstra-Algra, Anneke; Sjollema, Klaas A.; Peterson, Randall T.; Kampinga, Harm H.; Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    2014-01-01

    Many brain diseases involve activation of resident and peripheral immune cells to clear damaged and dying neurons. Which immune cells respond in what way to cues related to brain disease, however, remains poorly understood. To elucidate these in vivo immunological events in response to brain cell death we used genetically targeted cell ablation in zebrafish. Using intravital microscopy and large-scale electron microscopy, we defined the kinetics and nature of immune responses immediately following injury. Initially, clearance of dead cells occurs by mononuclear phagocytes, including resident microglia and macrophages of peripheral origin, whereas amoeboid microglia are exclusively involved at a later stage. Granulocytes, on the other hand, do not migrate towards the injury. Remarkably, following clearance, phagocyte numbers decrease, partly by phagocyte cell death and subsequent engulfment of phagocyte corpses by microglia. Here, we identify differential temporal involvement of microglia and peripheral macrophages in clearance of dead cells in the brain, revealing the chronological sequence of events in neuroinflammatory resolution. Remarkably, recruited phagocytes undergo cell death and are engulfed by microglia. Because adult zebrafish treated at the larval stage lack signs of pathology, it is likely that this mode of resolving immune responses in brain contributes to full tissue recovery. Therefore, these findings suggest that control of such immune cell behavior could benefit recovery from neuronal damage. PMID:24973753

  2. Fluorescent imaging of endothelial glycocalyx layer with wheat germ agglutinin using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hanae; Ushiyama, Akira; Kawakami, Hayato; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Matsubara, Sachie; Iijima, Takehiko

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial glycocalyx (GCX) is located on the apical surface of vascular endothelial cells and is composed of a negatively-charged network of proteoglycans and glycoproteins. The GCX plays an important role in maintaining the integrity of vascular walls and preventing leakage of plasma. Therefore, degradation of the GCX is believed to lead to pathological leakage of plasma. Because the GCX is a very thin layer, its ultrastructural image has been demonstrated on electron microscope. To explore the function of the GCX, it should be visualized by a microscope in vivo. Thus, we developed in vivo visualization technique of the GCX under fluorescence microscopy using a mouse dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) model. To label and visualize the GCX, we used fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled lectin, which has a high specificity for sugar moieties. We examined the affinity of the different lectins to epivascular regions under an intravital fluorescent microscope. Among seven different lectins we examined, FITC labeled Triticum vulgaris (wheat germ) agglutinin (WGA) delineated the GCX most clearly. Binding of WGA to the GCX was inhibited by chitin hydrolysate, which contained WGA-binding polysaccharide chains. Furthermore, the septic condition attenuated this structure, suggesting structural degradation of endothelial GCX layer. In conclusion, FITC-labeled WGA lectin enabled visualization of endothelial GCX under in vivo fluorescence microscopy.

  3. Improving spinning disk confocal microscopy by preventing pinhole cross-talk for intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shimozawa, Togo; Yamagata, Kazuo; Kondo, Takefumi; Hayashi, Shigeo; Shitamukai, Atsunori; Konno, Daijiro; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Takayama, Jun; Onami, Shuichi; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kosugi, Yasuhito; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Fujita, Katsumasa; Mimori-Kiyosue, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    A recent key requirement in life sciences is the observation of biological processes in their natural in vivo context. However, imaging techniques that allow fast imaging with higher resolution in 3D thick specimens are still limited. Spinning disk confocal microscopy using a Yokogawa Confocal Scanner Unit, which offers high-speed multipoint confocal live imaging, has been found to have wide utility among cell biologists. A conventional Confocal Scanner Unit configuration, however, is not optimized for thick specimens, for which the background noise attributed to “pinhole cross-talk,” which is unintended pinhole transmission of out-of-focus light, limits overall performance in focal discrimination and reduces confocal capability. Here, we improve spinning disk confocal microscopy by eliminating pinhole cross-talk. First, the amount of pinhole cross-talk is reduced by increasing the interpinhole distance. Second, the generation of out-of-focus light is prevented by two-photon excitation that achieves selective-plane illumination. We evaluate the effect of these modifications and test the applicability to the live imaging of green fluorescent protein-expressing model animals. As demonstrated by visualizing the fine details of the 3D cell shape and submicron-size cytoskeletal structures inside animals, these strategies dramatically improve higher-resolution intravital imaging. PMID:23401517

  4. Future Perspective of Single-Molecule FRET Biosensors and Intravital FRET Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Eishu; Kiyokawa, Etsuko

    2016-09-20

    Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a nonradiative energy transfer process between two fluorophores located in close proximity to each other. To date, a variety of biosensors based on the principle of FRET have been developed to monitor the activity of kinases, proteases, GTPases or lipid concentration in living cells. In addition, generation of biosensors that can monitor physical stresses such as mechanical power, heat, or electric/magnetic fields is also expected based on recent discoveries on the effects of these stressors on cell behavior. These biosensors can now be stably expressed in cells and mice by transposon technologies. In addition, two-photon excitation microscopy can be used to detect the activities or concentrations of bioactive molecules in vivo. In the future, more sophisticated techniques for image acquisition and quantitative analysis will be needed to obtain more precise FRET signals in spatiotemporal dimensions. Improvement of tissue/organ position fixation methods for mouse imaging is the first step toward effective image acquisition. Progress in the development of fluorescent proteins that can be excited with longer wavelength should be applied to FRET biosensors to obtain deeper structures. The development of computational programs that can separately quantify signals from single cells embedded in complicated three-dimensional environments is also expected. Along with the progress in these methodologies, two-photon excitation intravital FRET microscopy will be a powerful and valuable tool for the comprehensive understanding of biomedical phenomena.

  5. Future Perspective of Single-Molecule FRET Biosensors and Intravital FRET Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Eishu; Kiyokawa, Etsuko

    2016-09-20

    Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a nonradiative energy transfer process between two fluorophores located in close proximity to each other. To date, a variety of biosensors based on the principle of FRET have been developed to monitor the activity of kinases, proteases, GTPases or lipid concentration in living cells. In addition, generation of biosensors that can monitor physical stresses such as mechanical power, heat, or electric/magnetic fields is also expected based on recent discoveries on the effects of these stressors on cell behavior. These biosensors can now be stably expressed in cells and mice by transposon technologies. In addition, two-photon excitation microscopy can be used to detect the activities or concentrations of bioactive molecules in vivo. In the future, more sophisticated techniques for image acquisition and quantitative analysis will be needed to obtain more precise FRET signals in spatiotemporal dimensions. Improvement of tissue/organ position fixation methods for mouse imaging is the first step toward effective image acquisition. Progress in the development of fluorescent proteins that can be excited with longer wavelength should be applied to FRET biosensors to obtain deeper structures. The development of computational programs that can separately quantify signals from single cells embedded in complicated three-dimensional environments is also expected. Along with the progress in these methodologies, two-photon excitation intravital FRET microscopy will be a powerful and valuable tool for the comprehensive understanding of biomedical phenomena. PMID:27475975

  6. Intravital Microscopy for Imaging Subcellular Structures in Live Mice Expressing Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Masedunskas, Andrius; Porat-Shliom, Natalie; Tora, Muhibullah; Milberg, Oleg; Weigert, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe a procedure to image subcellular structures in live rodents that is based on the use of confocal intravital microscopy. As a model organ, we use the salivary glands of live mice since they provide several advantages. First, they can be easily exposed to enable access to the optics, and stabilized to facilitate the reduction of the motion artifacts due to heartbeat and respiration. This significantly facilitates imaging and tracking small subcellular structures. Second, most of the cell populations of the salivary glands are accessible from the surface of the organ. This permits the use of confocal microscopy that has a higher spatial resolution than other techniques that have been used for in vivo imaging, such as two-photon microscopy. Finally, salivary glands can be easily manipulated pharmacologically and genetically, thus providing a robust system to investigate biological processes at a molecular level. In this study we focus on a protocol designed to follow the kinetics of the exocytosis of secretory granules in acinar cells and the dynamics of the apical plasma membrane where the secretory granules fuse upon stimulation of the beta-adrenergic receptors. Specifically, we used a transgenic mouse that co-expresses cytosolic GFP and a membrane-targeted peptide fused with the fluorescent protein tandem-Tomato. However, the procedures that we used to stabilize and image the salivary glands can be extended to other mouse models and coupled to other approaches to label in vivo cellular components, enabling the visualization of various subcellular structures, such as endosomes, lysosomes, mitochondria, and the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:24022089

  7. Localization of near-infrared contrast agents in tumors by intravital microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Andreas; Schneider, Guenther; Riefke, Bjoern; Licha, Kai; Semmler, Wolfhard

    1999-01-01

    In this contribution we use intravital microscopy to study the dynamics of extravasation into normal and tumor tissue of several hydrophilic cyanine dyes used as near-infrared (NIR) contrast agents. The technique provides information about the angiographic properties of the dyes and about their interaction with tumor tissue under dynamic conditions in vivo. In our previous work we demonstrated that several NIR- absorbing fluorescent dyes enable in vivo fluorescence detection of tumors in mice and rats. However, the mechanism leading to dye accumulation and enhanced fluorescence in tumors is not fully understood. Increased extravasation of dyes into tumor tissue due to pathologically altered tumor vessels may be an important factor in this process. Indocyanine green (ICG) displayed predominantly intravascular distribution and rapid elimination resulting in enhanced fluorescence signal of vessels during the first 15 min after administration only. No elevated extravasation into tumor tissue was observed with ICG. A hydrophilic indotricarbocyanine derivative with a high molecular weight displayed prolonged intravascular distribution and increased fluorescence signal of the vasculature compared to surrounding tissue for up to five hours. Rapid extravasation and accumulation in tumor areas, yielding elevated contrast of tumors up to 15 min after administration, was observed with hydrophilic, low molecular weight indotricarbocyanine derivatives.

  8. Multiphoton Microscopy Applied for Real-Time Intravital Imaging of Bacterial Infections In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Choong, Ferdinand X.; Sandoval, Ruben M.; Molitoris, Bruce A.; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta

    2014-01-01

    To understand the underlying mechanisms of bacterial infections, researchers have for long addressed the molecular interactions occurring when the bacterium interacts with host target cells. In these studies, primarily based on in vitro systems, molecular details have been revealed along with increased knowledge regarding the general infection process. With the recent advancements in in vivo imaging techniques, we are now in a position to bridge a transition from classical minimalistic in vitro approaches to allow infections to be studied in its native complexity—the live organ. Techniques such as multiphoton microscopy (MPM) allow cellular-level visualization of the dynamic infection process in real time within the living host. Studies in which all interplaying factors, such as the influences of the immune, lymphatic, and vascular systems can be accounted for, are likely to provide new insights to our current understanding of the infection process. MPM imaging becomes extra powerful when combined with advanced surgical procedure, allowing studies of the illusive early hours of infection. In this chapter, our intention is to provide a general view on how to design and carry out intravital imaging of a bacterial infection. While exemplifying this using a spatiotemporally well-controlled uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) infection in rat kidneys, we hope to provide the reader with general considerations that can be adapted to other bacterial infections in organs other than the kidney. PMID:22341218

  9. Dorsal Skinfold Chamber Preparation in Mice: Studying Angiogenesis by Intravital Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sckell, Axel; Leunig, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy represents an internationally accepted and sophisticated experimental method to study angiogenesis, microcirculation, and many other parameters in a wide variety of neoplastic and nonneoplastic tissues. Since 1924, when the first transparent chamber model in animals was introduced, many other chamber models have been described in the literature for studying angiogenesis and microcirculation. Because angiogenesis is an active and dynamic process, one of the major strengths of chamber models is the possibility of monitoring angiogenesis in vivo continuously for up to several weeks with high spatial and temporal resolution. In addition, after the termination of experiments, tissue samples can be excised easily and further examined by various ex vivo methods such as histology, immunohistochemistry, and molecular biology. This chapter describes the protocol for the surgical preparation of a dorsal skinfold chamber in mice as well as the method to implant tumors in this chamber for further investigations of angiogenesis and other microcirculatory parameters. However, the application of the dorsal skinfold chamber model is not limited to the investigation of neoplastic tissues. To this end, the investigation of angiogenesis and other microcirculatory parameters of nonneoplastic tissues such as tendons, osteochondral grafts, or pancreatic islets has been an object of interest.

  10. Long term intravital multiphoton microscopy imaging of immune cells in healthy and diseased liver using CXCR6.Gfp reporter mice.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Felix; Niemietz, Patricia M; Peusquens, Julia; Ergen, Can; Kohlhepp, Marlene; Mossanen, Jana C; Schneider, Carlo; Vogt, Michael; Tolba, Rene H; Trautwein, Christian; Martin, Christian; Tacke, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Liver inflammation as a response to injury is a highly dynamic process involving the infiltration of distinct subtypes of leukocytes including monocytes, neutrophils, T cell subsets, B cells, natural killer (NK) and NKT cells. Intravital microscopy of the liver for monitoring immune cell migration is particularly challenging due to the high requirements regarding sample preparation and fixation, optical resolution and long-term animal survival. Yet, the dynamics of inflammatory processes as well as cellular interaction studies could provide critical information to better understand the initiation, progression and regression of inflammatory liver disease. Therefore, a highly sensitive and reliable method was established to study migration and cell-cell-interactions of different immune cells in mouse liver over long periods (about 6 hr) by intravital two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) in combination with intensive care monitoring. The method provided includes a gentle preparation and stable fixation of the liver with minimal perturbation of the organ; long term intravital imaging using multicolor multiphoton microscopy with virtually no photobleaching or phototoxic effects over a time period of up to 6 hr, allowing tracking of specific leukocyte subsets; and stable imaging conditions due to extensive monitoring of mouse vital parameters and stabilization of circulation, temperature and gas exchange. To investigate lymphocyte migration upon liver inflammation CXCR6.gfp knock-in mice were subjected to intravital liver imaging under baseline conditions and after acute and chronic liver damage induced by intraperitoneal injection(s) of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). CXCR6 is a chemokine receptor expressed on lymphocytes, mainly on Natural Killer T (NKT)-, Natural Killer (NK)- and subsets of T lymphocytes such as CD4 T cells but also mucosal associated invariant (MAIT) T cells1. Following the migratory pattern and positioning of CXCR6.gfp+ immune cells allowed a

  11. Automatic detection of motion blur in intravital video microscopy image sequences via directional statistics of log-Gabor energy maps.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Ricardo J; Pinto, Carlos H Villa; da Silva, Bruno C Gregório; Bernardes, Danielle; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana

    2015-02-01

    Intravital microscopy is an important experimental tool for the study of cellular and molecular mechanisms of the leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the microcirculation of various tissues and in different inflammatory conditions of in vivo specimens. However, due to the limited control over the conditions of the image acquisition, motion blur and artifacts, resulting mainly from the heartbeat and respiratory movements of the in vivo specimen, will very often be present. This problem can significantly undermine the results of either visual or computerized analysis of the acquired video images. Since only a fraction of the total number of images are usually corrupted by severe motion blur, it is necessary to have a procedure to automatically identify such images in the video for either further restoration or removal. This paper proposes a new technique for the detection of motion blur in intravital video microscopy based on directional statistics of local energy maps computed using a bank of 2D log-Gabor filters. Quantitative assessment using both artificially corrupted images and real microscopy data were conducted to test the effectiveness of the proposed method. Results showed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.95 (AUC = 0.95; 95 % CI 0.93-0.97) when tested on 329 video images visually ranked by four observers.

  12. Evaluation of pulsatile and nonpulsatile flow in capillaries of goat skeletal muscle using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, J J; Tyml, K; Menkis, A H; Novick, R J; Mckenzie, F N

    1994-11-01

    It is commonly believed that pulsatile flow generated by the pumping action of the heart is dampened out by the time it reaches the microcirculation. In clinical practice, most of the cardiopulmonary bypass pumps and ventricular assist devices are nonpulsatile. To test the hypothesis that pulsatile flow generated by the heart does exist at the microvascular level, intravital microscopy of a large animal model (goat) was developed to visualize and to videorecord the surface microcirculation of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle from the right forelimb. Density of perfused capillaries and red blood cell velocity in capillaries were measured in five goats during pulsatile perfusion provided by the heart and during a subsequent 3-hr period of nonpulsatile perfusion provided by a centrifugal ventricular assist device (Centrimed, Sarns 3M) that bypassed the heart. Throughout the experiment, the heart rate, innominate artery mean blood pressure, and flow remained unchanged. During the pulsatile regimen, velocities showed regular fluctuations that coincided with the period of the cardiac cycle (range of periods: 0.5-0.8 sec). The peak velocity amplitudes (range: 0.25-0.55 mm/sec) correlated directly with the amplitude of the pulse pressure. During the nonpulsatile regimen, no such correlations were seen. During pulsatile flow and during the 3-hr nonpulsatile period, capillary density remained stable at 24 capillaries/mm of test line but there were significant increases in red cell velocity, from 0.8 to 1.2 mm/sec (P < 0.05), and in coefficient of variation of velocity (used as an index of flow heterogeneity), from 19 to 34% (P < 0.05). We conclude that (1) pulsatility exists in the capillary bed and that it directly correlates with the pumping action of the heart and (2) nonpulsatile flow produced by the ventricular assist device does not cause an acute deterioration in microvascular perfusion. We interpret the increase in heterogeneity of flow as an early sign of

  13. Direct observation of liposome uptake by leukocytes in vivo in skin blood vessels using intravital fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Mordon, Serge R.; Begu, Sylvie; Desmettre, Thomas

    2000-04-01

    This study aimed to observe liposome uptake by leukocytes in vivo. The study was performed on skin by using a dorsal skin-fold chamber implanted in golden hamsters using intravital microscopy. 5,6-CF-encapsulated PEGylated liposomes were injected intravenously. The skin microcirculation was observed with an intravital Eclipse E800 Nikon microscope fitted with a Xenon light source and an epi-fluorescence assembly. An ultra-high sensitivity video-camera mounted on the microscope projected the image onto a monitor, and the images were recorded for playback analysis with a digital video cassette recorder. An acute inflammatory response was obtained by removing one complete layer of skin and the underlying fascia and avascular tissue on the opposing side of the flap corresponding to an area equivalent to the window aperture. Using these model and set-up, leukocyte rolling and adhesion were easily observed and the entry of PEGylated liposomes into hamster blood leukocytes was studied for a period of 6 hours. PEGylated liposomes were clearly identified alone inside the blood flow and inside the leukocytes as soon as the inflammatory reaction appeared. This study shows for the first time that blood leukocytes in their natural milieu of whole blood are capable of interacting with, and taking up liposomes. This observation is in accordance with previous in vitro studies.

  14. Holographic intravital microscopy for 2-D and 3-D imaging intact circulating blood cells in microcapillaries of live mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Choe, Kibaek; Park, Inwon; Kim, Pilhan; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is an essential tool that reveals behaviours of live cells under conditions close to natural physiological states. So far, although various approaches for imaging cells in vivo have been proposed, most require the use of labelling and also provide only qualitative imaging information. Holographic imaging approach based on measuring the refractive index distributions of cells, however, circumvent these problems and offer quantitative and label-free imaging capability. Here, we demonstrate in vivo two- and three-dimensional holographic imaging of circulating blood cells in intact microcapillaries of live mice. The measured refractive index distributions of blood cells provide morphological and biochemical properties including three-dimensional cell shape, haemoglobin concentration, and haemoglobin contents at the individual cell level. With the present method, alterations in blood flow dynamics in live healthy and sepsis-model mice were also investigated.

  15. Simultaneous three-dimensional optical coherence tomography and intravital microscopy for imaging subpleural pulmonary alveoli in isolated rabbit lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Sven; Knels, Lilla; Krueger, Alexander; Koch, Thea; Koch, Edmund

    2009-09-01

    There is a growing interest in analyzing lung mechanics at the level of the alveoli in order to understand stress-related pathogenesis and possibly avoid ventilator associated lung injury. Emerging quantitative models to simulate fluid mechanics and the associated stresses and strains on delicate alveolar walls require realistic quantitative input on alveolar geometry and its dynamics during ventilation. Here, three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (OCT) and conventional intravital microscopy are joined in one setup to investigate the geometric changes of subpleural alveoli during stepwise pressure increase and release in an isolated and perfused rabbit lung model. We describe good qualitative agreement and quantitative correlation between the OCT data and video micrographs. Our main finding is the inflation and deflation of individual alveoli with noticeable hysteresis. Importantly, this three-dimensional geometry data can be extracted and converted into input data for numerical simulations.

  16. Holographic intravital microscopy for 2-D and 3-D imaging intact circulating blood cells in microcapillaries of live mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Choe, Kibaek; Park, Inwon; Kim, Pilhan; Park, Yongkeun

    2016-09-01

    Intravital microscopy is an essential tool that reveals behaviours of live cells under conditions close to natural physiological states. So far, although various approaches for imaging cells in vivo have been proposed, most require the use of labelling and also provide only qualitative imaging information. Holographic imaging approach based on measuring the refractive index distributions of cells, however, circumvent these problems and offer quantitative and label-free imaging capability. Here, we demonstrate in vivo two- and three-dimensional holographic imaging of circulating blood cells in intact microcapillaries of live mice. The measured refractive index distributions of blood cells provide morphological and biochemical properties including three-dimensional cell shape, haemoglobin concentration, and haemoglobin contents at the individual cell level. With the present method, alterations in blood flow dynamics in live healthy and sepsis-model mice were also investigated.

  17. Holographic intravital microscopy for 2-D and 3-D imaging intact circulating blood cells in microcapillaries of live mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Choe, Kibaek; Park, Inwon; Kim, Pilhan; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is an essential tool that reveals behaviours of live cells under conditions close to natural physiological states. So far, although various approaches for imaging cells in vivo have been proposed, most require the use of labelling and also provide only qualitative imaging information. Holographic imaging approach based on measuring the refractive index distributions of cells, however, circumvent these problems and offer quantitative and label-free imaging capability. Here, we demonstrate in vivo two- and three-dimensional holographic imaging of circulating blood cells in intact microcapillaries of live mice. The measured refractive index distributions of blood cells provide morphological and biochemical properties including three-dimensional cell shape, haemoglobin concentration, and haemoglobin contents at the individual cell level. With the present method, alterations in blood flow dynamics in live healthy and sepsis-model mice were also investigated. PMID:27605489

  18. Holographic intravital microscopy for 2-D and 3-D imaging intact circulating blood cells in microcapillaries of live mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Choe, Kibaek; Park, Inwon; Kim, Pilhan; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is an essential tool that reveals behaviours of live cells under conditions close to natural physiological states. So far, although various approaches for imaging cells in vivo have been proposed, most require the use of labelling and also provide only qualitative imaging information. Holographic imaging approach based on measuring the refractive index distributions of cells, however, circumvent these problems and offer quantitative and label-free imaging capability. Here, we demonstrate in vivo two- and three-dimensional holographic imaging of circulating blood cells in intact microcapillaries of live mice. The measured refractive index distributions of blood cells provide morphological and biochemical properties including three-dimensional cell shape, haemoglobin concentration, and haemoglobin contents at the individual cell level. With the present method, alterations in blood flow dynamics in live healthy and sepsis-model mice were also investigated. PMID:27605489

  19. Combined application of dynamic light scattering imaging and fluorescence intravital microscopy in vascular biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, V.; Ziv, K.; Addadi, Y.; Madar-Balakirski, N.; Meglinski, I.; Neeman, M.; Harmelin, A.

    2010-08-01

    The dynamic light scattering imaging (DLSI) system combined with the conventional fluorescence intravital microscope (FIM) has been applied for the examination of blood and lymph vessels in the mouse ear in vivo. While the CCD camera can be shared by both techniques the combined application of DLSI and FIM allows rapid switching between the modalities. In current study temporal speckles fluctuations are used for rendering blood vessels structure and monitoring blood perfusion with the higher spatial resolution, whereas FIM provides the images of lymphatic vessels. The results clearly demonstrate that combined application of DLSI and FIM approaches provides synchronic in vivo images of blood and lymph vessels with higher contrast and specificity. The use of this new dual-modal diagnostic system is particularly important and has a great potential to significantly expand the capabilities of vascular diagnostics providing synchronic in vivo images of blood and lymph vessels.

  20. Intravital microscopy of the capillary perfusion in the corium limbi of the third toe of the minipig.

    PubMed

    Hiebl, B; Mrowietz, C; Braune, S; Franke, R P; Plendl, J; Jung, F

    2009-01-01

    Several methods are available today for the investigation of microcirculation in animal models, but they can be invasive and time-consuming depending on the area investigated. In particular, non-invasive methods that can be conducted rapidly and without dye or tracer injections are in demand. The cutaneous microcirculation can be easily studied in the dorsal corium limbi of the third toe of the porcine forelimb using intravital microscopy - analogous to nail fold capillary microscopy in humans. The capillary microscopy system consists of a reflected-light microscope with a cold light source, green and infrared filters and a video camera. The video sequences were recorded using the image capture system Framegrabber (Imagenation PXC-200) and a PC (with an Intel Core 2 Duo processor, 1024 MB RAM, 160 GB hard disk, Windows XP Pro), and stored via a DVD recorder (Panasonic LQ-MD800). Quantification of capillary erythrocyte flow velocities was performed using the computer-assisted image analysis system Cap Image Version 8.5 which includes a movie tool as a video sequence storage medium. The method allows estimation of capillary density and tortuosity as well as capillary circulation in the anesthetized pig within a few minutes. First measurements were made after anesthesia induction followed by further measurements during anesthesia maintenance (3 minutes each). No differences in capillary circulation were found. The present method is thus very well suited for long-term microcirculation measurements in pigs, e.g., to evaluate therapeutic interventions in the ischemic limb model. PMID:19713612

  1. Intravital two-photon microscopy of host-pathogen interactions in a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus skin abscess formation.

    PubMed

    Liese, Jan; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; van Strijp, Jos A G; Novick, Richard P; Dustin, Michael L

    2013-06-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is a frequent cause of severe skin infections. The ability to control the infection is largely dependent on the rapid recruitment of neutrophils (PMN). To gain more insight into the dynamics of PMN migration and host-pathogen interactions in vivo, we used intravital two-photon (2-P) microscopy to visualize S. aureus skin infections in the mouse. Reporter S. aureus strains expressing fluorescent proteins were developed, which allowed for detection of the bacteria in vivo. By employing LysM-EGFP mice to visualize PMN, we observed the rapid appearance of PMN in the extravascular space of the dermis and their directed movement towards the focus of infection, which led to the delineation of an abscess within 1 day. Moreover, tracking of transferred labelled bone-marrow neutrophils showed that PMN localization to the site of infection is dependent on the presence of G-protein-coupled receptors on the PMN, whereas Interleukin-1 receptor was required on host cells other than PMN. Furthermore, the S. aureus complement inhibitor Ecb could block PMN accumulation at thesite of infection. Our results establish that 2-P microscopy is a powerful tool to investigate the orchestration of the immune cells, S. aureus location and gene expression in vivo on a single cell level.

  2. 4D intravital microscopy uncovers critical strain differences for the roles of PECAM and CD99 in leukocyte diapedesis.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, David P; Watson, Richard L; Muller, William A

    2016-09-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM) is an essential component of the inflammatory response. In vitro studies with human cells have demonstrated that platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM) functions upstream of CD99 during TEM; however, results in vivo with mice have been apparently contradictory. In this study we use four-dimensional (4D) intravital microscopy to demonstrate that the site and order of function of PECAM and CD99 in vivo are dependent on the strain of mice. In FVB/n mice, PECAM functions upstream of CD99, as in human cells in vitro, and blocking antibodies against either molecule arrest neutrophils before they traverse the endothelium. However, in C57BL/6 mice, PECAM and CD99 appear to function at a different step, as the same antibodies arrest leukocyte migration through the endothelial basement membrane. These results are the first direct comparison of PECAM and CD99 function in different murine strains as well as the first demonstration of the sequential function of PECAM and CD99 in vivo. PMID:27422987

  3. Improving Signal Levels in Intravital Multiphoton Microscopy using an Objective Correction Collar.

    PubMed

    Muriello, Pamela A; Dunn, Kenneth W

    2008-04-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has enabled biologists to collect high-resolution images hundreds of microns into biological tissues, including tissues of living animals. While the depth of imaging exceeds that possible from any other form of light microscopy, multiphoton microscopy is nonetheless generally limited to depths of less than a millimeter. Many of the advantages of multiphoton microscopy for deep tissue imaging accrue from the unique nature of multiphoton fluorescence excitation. However, the quadratic relationship between illumination level and fluorescence excitation makes multiphoton microscopy especially susceptible to factors that degrade the illumination focus. Here we examine the effect of spherical aberration on multiphoton microscopy in fixed kidney tissues and in the kidneys of living animals. We find that spherical aberration, as evaluated from axial asymmetry in the point spread function, can be corrected by adjustment of the correction collar of a water immersion objective lens. Introducing a compensatory positive spherical aberration into the imaging system decreased the depth-dependence of signal levels in images collected from living animals, increasing signal by up to 50%.

  4. Improving Signal Levels in Intravital Multiphoton Microscopy using an Objective Correction Collar

    PubMed Central

    Muriello, Pamela A.; Dunn, Kenneth W.

    2008-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has enabled biologists to collect high-resolution images hundreds of microns into biological tissues, including tissues of living animals. While the depth of imaging exceeds that possible from any other form of light microscopy, multiphoton microscopy is nonetheless generally limited to depths of less than a millimeter. Many of the advantages of multiphoton microscopy for deep tissue imaging accrue from the unique nature of multiphoton fluorescence excitation. However, the quadratic relationship between illumination level and fluorescence excitation makes multiphoton microscopy especially susceptible to factors that degrade the illumination focus. Here we examine the effect of spherical aberration on multiphoton microscopy in fixed kidney tissues and in the kidneys of living animals. We find that spherical aberration, as evaluated from axial asymmetry in the point spread function, can be corrected by adjustment of the correction collar of a water immersion objective lens. Introducing a compensatory positive spherical aberration into the imaging system decreased the depth-dependence of signal levels in images collected from living animals, increasing signal by up to 50%. PMID:19343075

  5. Intravital imaging of the effects of 5-fluorouracil on the murine liver microenvironment using 2-photon laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    OKIGAMI, MASATO; TANAKA, KOJI; INOUE, YASUHIRO; SAIGUSA, SUSUMU; OKUGAWA, YOSHINAGA; TOIYAMA, YUJI; MOHRI, YASUHIKO; KUSUNOKI, MASATO

    2016-01-01

    5-fluorouracil (5FU) is often used in the treatment of colorectal cancer. 5FU improves the median overall and disease-free survival rates and reduces recurrence rates in patients who have undergone curative surgical resection. However, in the adjuvant setting, whether 5FU eradicates clinically undetectable micrometastases in target organs such as the liver, or whether 5-FU inhibits the adhesion of circulating tumor cells has not yet been established. In the present study, 5FU was administered following the inoculation of red fluorescent protein-expressing HT29 cells into green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic nude mice to examine its inhibitory effect. 2-photon laser scanning microscopy was performed at selected time points for time-series imaging of liver metastasis of GFP-transgenic mice. The cell number in vessels was quantified to evaluate the response of the tumor microenvironment to chemotherapy. HT29 cells were visualized in hepatic sinusoids at the single-cell level. A total of 2 hours after the injection (early stage), time-series imaging revealed that the number of caught tumor cells gradually reduced over time. In the 5FU treatment group, no significant difference was observed in the cell number in the early stage. One week after the injection (late stage), a difference in morphology was observed. The results of the present study indicated that 5FU eradicated clinically undetectable micrometastases in liver tissues by acting as a cytotoxic agent opposed to preventing adhesion. The present study indicated that time-series intravital 2-photon laser scanning microscopic imaging of metastatic tumor xenografts may facilitate the screening and evaluation of novel chemotherapeutic agents with less interindividual variability. PMID:27073493

  6. A Novel Intravital Imaging Window for Longitudinal Microscopy of the Mouse Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Bochner, Filip; Fellus-Alyagor, Liat; Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Shinar, Shiri; Neeman, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The ovary is a dynamic organ that undergoes dramatic remodeling throughout the ovulatory cycle. Maturation of the ovarian follicle, release of the oocyte in the course of ovulation as well as formation and degradation of corpus luteum involve tightly controlled remodeling of the extracellular matrix and vasculature. Ovarian tumors, regardless of their tissue of origin, dynamically interact with the ovarian microenvironment. Their activity in the tissue encompasses recruitment of host stroma and immune cells, attachment of tumor cells to mesothelial layer, degradation of the extracellular matrix and tumor cell migration. High-resolution dynamic imaging of such processes is particularly challenging for internal organs. The implementation of a novel imaging window as reported here enabled longitudinal microscopy of ovarian physiology and orthotopic tumor invasion. PMID:26207832

  7. Combination of an optical parametric oscillator and quantum-dots 655 to improve imaging depth of vasculature by intravital multicolor two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Clément; Lamasse, Lisa; Jaouen, Alexandre; Rougon, Geneviève; Debarbieux, Franck

    2016-06-01

    Simultaneous imaging of different cell types and structures in the mouse central nervous system (CNS) by intravital two-photon microscopy requires the characterization of fluorophores and advances in approaches to visualize them. We describe the use of a two-photon infrared illumination generated by an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) on quantum-dots 655 (QD655) nanocrystals to improve resolution of the vasculature deeper in the mouse brain both in healthy and pathological conditions. Moreover, QD655 signal can be unmixed from the DsRed2, CFP, EGFP and EYFP fluorescent proteins, which enhances the panel of multi-parametric correlative investigations both in the cortex and the spinal cord.

  8. Analyzing Structure and Function of Vascularization in Engineered Bone Tissue by Video-Rate Intravital Microscopy and 3D Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yonggang; Tsigkou, Olga; Spencer, Joel A; Lin, Charles P; Neville, Craig; Grottkau, Brian

    2015-10-01

    Vascularization is a key challenge in tissue engineering. Three-dimensional structure and microcirculation are two fundamental parameters for evaluating vascularization. Microscopic techniques with cellular level resolution, fast continuous observation, and robust 3D postimage processing are essential for evaluation, but have not been applied previously because of technical difficulties. In this study, we report novel video-rate confocal microscopy and 3D postimage processing techniques to accomplish this goal. In an immune-deficient mouse model, vascularized bone tissue was successfully engineered using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) scaffold. Video-rate (30 FPS) intravital confocal microscopy was applied in vitro and in vivo to visualize the vascular structure in the engineered bone and the microcirculation of the blood cells. Postimage processing was applied to perform 3D image reconstruction, by analyzing microvascular networks and calculating blood cell viscosity. The 3D volume reconstructed images show that the hMSCs served as pericytes stabilizing the microvascular network formed by HUVECs. Using orthogonal imaging reconstruction and transparency adjustment, both the vessel structure and blood cells within the vessel lumen were visualized. Network length, network intersections, and intersection densities were successfully computed using our custom-developed software. Viscosity analysis of the blood cells provided functional evaluation of the microcirculation. These results show that by 8 weeks, the blood vessels in peripheral areas function quite similarly to the host vessels. However, the viscosity drops about fourfold where it is only 0.8 mm away from the host. In summary, we developed novel techniques combining intravital microscopy and 3D image processing to analyze the vascularization in engineered bone. These techniques have broad

  9. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Cell Division Orientation in Epidermal Basal Layer Using Intravital Two-Photon Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal structures are different among body sites, and proliferative keratinocytes in the epidermis play an important role in the maintenance of the epidermal structures. In recent years, intravital skin imaging has been used in mammalian skin research for the investigation of cell behaviors, but most of these experiments were performed with rodent ears. Here, we established a non-invasive intravital imaging approach for dorsal, ear, hind paw, or tail skin using R26H2BEGFP hairless mice. Using four-dimensional (x, y, z, and time) imaging, we successfully visualized mitotic cell division in epidermal basal cells. A comparison of cell division orientation relative to the basement membrane in each body site revealed that most divisions in dorsal and ear epidermis occurred in parallel, whereas the cell divisions in hind paw and tail epidermis occurred both in parallel and oblique orientations. Based on the quantitative analysis of the four-dimensional images, we showed that the epidermal thickness correlated with the basal cell density and the rate of the oblique divisions. PMID:27657513

  10. Combination of an optical parametric oscillator and quantum-dots 655 to improve imaging depth of vasculature by intravital multicolor two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ricard, Clément; Lamasse, Lisa; Jaouen, Alexandre; Rougon, Geneviève; Debarbieux, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous imaging of different cell types and structures in the mouse central nervous system (CNS) by intravital two-photon microscopy requires the characterization of fluorophores and advances in approaches to visualize them. We describe the use of a two-photon infrared illumination generated by an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) on quantum-dots 655 (QD655) nanocrystals to improve resolution of the vasculature deeper in the mouse brain both in healthy and pathological conditions. Moreover, QD655 signal can be unmixed from the DsRed2, CFP, EGFP and EYFP fluorescent proteins, which enhances the panel of multi-parametric correlative investigations both in the cortex and the spinal cord. PMID:27375951

  11. Wide field intravital imaging by two-photon-excitation digital-scanned light-sheet microscopy (2p-DSLM) with a high-pulse energy laser

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Atsushi; Oshima, Yusuke; Kajiura-Kobayashi, Hiroko; Nonaka, Shigenori; Imamura, Takeshi; Naruse, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Digital-scanned light-sheet microscopy (DSLM) illuminates a sample in a plane and captures single-photon–excitation fluorescence images with a camera from a direction perpendicular to the light sheet. This method is potentially useful for observing biological specimens, because image acquisition is relatively fast, resulting in reduction of phototoxicity. However, DSLM cannot be effectively applied to high-scattering materials due to the image blur resulting from thickening of the light sheet by scattered photons. However, two-photon–excitation DSLM (2p-DSLM) enables collection of high-contrast image with near infrared (NIR) excitation. In conventional 2p-DSLM, the minimal excitation volume for two-photon excitation restricts the field of view. In this study, we achieved wide-field 2p-DSLM by using a high–pulse energy fiber laser, and then used this technique to perform intravital imaging of a small model fish species, medaka (Oryzias latipes). Wide fields of view (>700 μm) were achieved by using a low–numerical aperture (NA) objective lens and high–peak energy NIR excitation at 1040 nm. We also performed high-speed imaging at near-video rate and successfully captured the heartbeat movements of a living medaka fish at 20 frames/sec. PMID:25360352

  12. In situ quantitative monitoring of polyplexes and polyplex micelles in the blood circulation using intravital real-time confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Yu; Miyata, Kanjiro; Oba, Makoto; Fukushima, Shigeto; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2011-04-30

    Surface modification using poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is a widely used strategy to improve the biocompatibility of cationic polymer-based nonviral gene vectors (polyplexes). A novel method based on intravital real-time confocal laser scanning microscopy (IVRTCLSM) was applied to quantify the dynamic states of polyplexes in the bloodstream, thereby demonstrating the efficacy of PEGylation to prevent their agglomeration. Blood flow in the earlobe blood vessels of experimental animals was monitored in a noninvasive manner to directly observe polyplexes in the circulation. Polyplexes formed distinct aggregates immediately after intravenous injection, followed by interaction with platelets. To quantify aggregate formation and platelet interaction, the coefficient of variation and Pearson's correlation coefficient were adopted. In contrast, polyplex micelles prepared through self-assembly of plasmid DNA with PEG-based block catiomers had dense PEG palisades, revealing no formation of aggregates without visible interaction with platelets during circulation. This is the first report of in situ monitoring and quantification of the availability of PEGylation to prevent polyplexes from agglomeration over time in the blood circulation. This shows the high utility of IVRTCLSM in drug and gene delivery research.

  13. Periodicity in tumor vasculature targeting kinetics of ligand-functionalized nanoparticles studied by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cebulla, Jana; Huuse, Else Marie; Davies, Catharina de L.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Larsson, Henrik B.W.; Haraldseth, Olav

    2014-01-01

    In the past two decades advances in the development of targeted nanoparticles have facilitated their application as molecular imaging agents and targeted drug delivery vehicles. Nanoparticle-enhanced molecular imaging of the angiogenic tumor vasculature has been of particular interest. Not only because angiogenesis plays an important role in various pathologies, but also since endothelial cell surface receptors are directly accessible for relatively large circulating nanoparticles. Typically, nanoparticle targeting towards these receptors is studied by analyzing the contrast distribution on tumor images acquired before and at set time points after administration. Although several exciting proof-of-concept studies demonstrated qualitative assessment of relative target concentration and distribution, these studies did not provide quantitative information on the nanoparticle targeting kinetics. These kinetics will not only depend on nanoparticle characteristics, but also on receptor binding and recycling. In this study, we monitored the in vivo targeting kinetics of αvβ3-integrin specific nanoparticles with intravital microscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and using compartment modeling we were able to quantify nanoparticle targeting rates. As such, this approach can facilitate optimization of targeted nanoparticle design and it holds promise for providing more quantitative information on in vivo receptor levels. Interestingly, we also observed a periodicity in the accumulation kinetics of αvβ3-integrin targeted nanoparticles and hypothesize that this periodicity is caused by receptor binding, internalization and recycling dynamics. Taken together, this demonstrates that our experimental approach provides new insights in in vivo nanoparticle targeting, which may proof useful for vascular targeting in general. PMID:23982332

  14. Intravital Microscopic Interrogation of Peripheral Taste Sensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myunghwan; Lee, Woei Ming; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-03-01

    Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool in neuroscience but has not been adapted to the taste sensory organ due to anatomical constraint. Here we developed an imaging window to facilitate microscopic access to the murine tongue in vivo. Real-time two-photon microscopy allowed the visualization of three-dimensional microanatomy of the intact tongue mucosa and functional activity of taste cells in response to topically administered tastants in live mice. Video microscopy also showed the calcium activity of taste cells elicited by small-sized tastants in the blood circulation. Molecular kinetic analysis suggested that intravascular taste sensation takes place at the microvilli on the apical side of taste cells after diffusion of the molecules through the pericellular capillaries and tight junctions in the taste bud. Our results demonstrate the capabilities and utilities of the new tool for taste research in vivo.

  15. Intravital microscopic interrogation of peripheral taste sensation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myunghwan; Lee, Woei Ming; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-03-02

    Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool in neuroscience but has not been adapted to the taste sensory organ due to anatomical constraint. Here we developed an imaging window to facilitate microscopic access to the murine tongue in vivo. Real-time two-photon microscopy allowed the visualization of three-dimensional microanatomy of the intact tongue mucosa and functional activity of taste cells in response to topically administered tastants in live mice. Video microscopy also showed the calcium activity of taste cells elicited by small-sized tastants in the blood circulation. Molecular kinetic analysis suggested that intravascular taste sensation takes place at the microvilli on the apical side of taste cells after diffusion of the molecules through the pericellular capillaries and tight junctions in the taste bud. Our results demonstrate the capabilities and utilities of the new tool for taste research in vivo.

  16. Intravital autofluorescence 2-photon microscopy of murine intestinal mucosa with ultra-broadband femtosecond laser pulse excitation: image quality, photodamage, and inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Antje; Krapf, Lisa; Orzekowsky-Schroeder, Regina; Koop, Norbert; Vogel, Alfred; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2015-11-01

    Ultra-broadband excitation with ultrashort pulses may enable simultaneous excitation of multiple endogenous fluorophores in vital tissue. Imaging living gut mucosa by autofluorescence 2-photon microscopy with more than 150 nm broad excitation at an 800-nm central wavelength from a sub-10 fs titanium-sapphire (Ti:sapphire) laser with a dielectric mirror based prechirp was compared to the excitation with 220 fs pulses of a tunable Ti:sapphire laser at 730 and 800 nm wavelengths. Excitation efficiency, image quality, and photochemical damage were evaluated. At similar excitation fluxes, the same image brightness was achieved with both lasers. As expected, with ultra-broadband pulses, fluorescence from NAD(P)H, flavines, and lipoproteins was observed simultaneously. However, nonlinear photodamage apparent as hyperfluorescence with functional and structural alterations of the tissue occurred earlier when the laser power was adjusted to the same image brightness. After only a few minutes, the immigration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes into the epithelium and degranulation of these cells, a sign of inflammation, was observed. Photodamage is promoted by the higher peak irradiances and/or by nonoptimal excitation of autofluorescence at the longer wavelength. We conclude that excitation with a tunable narrow bandwidth laser is preferable to ultra-broadband excitation for autofluorescence-based 2-photon microscopy, unless the spectral phase can be controlled to optimize excitation conditions.

  17. Intravital Multiphoton Imaging of the Kidney: Tubular Structure and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Small, David M; Sanchez, Washington Y; Gobe, Glenda C

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) allows the visualization of dynamic pathophysiological events in real time in live animals. Intravital imaging can be applied to investigate novel mechanisms and treatments of different forms of kidney disease as well as improve our understanding of normal kidney physiology. Using rodent models, in conjunction with endogenous fluorescence and infused exogenous fluorescent dyes, measurement can be made of renal processes such as glomerular permeability, juxtaglomerular apparatus function, interactions of the tubulointerstitium, tubulovascular interactions, vascular flow rate, and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Subcellular processes including mitochondrial dynamics, reactive oxygen species production, cytosolic ion concentrations, and death processes of apoptosis and necrosis can also be seen and measured by MPM. The current methods chapter presents an overview of MPM with a focus on techniques for intravital kidney imaging and gives examples of instances where intravital MPM has been utilized to study renal pathophysiology. Suggestions are provided for MPM methods within the confines of intravital microscopy and selected kidney structure. MPM is undoubtedly a powerful new technique for application in experimental nephrology, and we believe it will continue to create new paradigms for understanding and treating kidney disease.

  18. Scanning microfluorometry in intravital microvascular research.

    PubMed

    Witte, S

    1989-01-01

    Our own development of fluorometric scanning techniques in intravital microscopy of the microcirculation is described. Very tiny amount of fluorometric substances are detected with a high temporal and locational resolution. The everted small intestinal mesentery of the rat serves as a model. We have given a detailed description of the microscopes used, the optical systems, the conditions of measurement of the microfluorometry, the scanning techniques and the evaluation of the measurement data. The present state of technical development detects 10(-12) g of a fluorochromed plasma protein in 8 ms in a measurement field of 2 microns 2. The four-digit measurement data of a scanning line of 200 microns length in 0.25 micron locational resolution are registered in about 2 s.

  19. [Bone and Stem Cells. Intravital imaging of bone marrow microenvironment].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hiroki; Kikuta, Junichi; Ishii, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    Various kinds of cell types, such as osteoclasts, osteoblasts, hematopoietic cells, and mesenchymal cells, have been reported to exist in the bone marrow and communicate with each other. Although there have been many previous studies about bone marrow microenvironment, most of them were analyzed by conventional methods such as histological analysis and flow cytometry. These methods could not observe the dynamic cell movement in living bone marrow. Recently rapid development of fluorescent imaging techniques enables us to understand the cellular dynamics in vivo . That's why we have originally established an advanced imaging system for visualizing living bone tissues with intravital two-photon microscopy. Here we show the latest data and the detailed methodology of intravital imaging of bone marrow microenvironment, and also discuss its further application.

  20. Elucidation of monocyte/macrophage dynamics and function by intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rua, Rejane; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are a diverse population of innate immune cells that play a critical role in homeostasis and inflammation. These cells are surveillant by nature and closely monitor the vasculature and surrounding tissue during states of health and disease. Given their abundance and strategic positioning throughout the body, myeloid cells are among the first responders to any inflammatory challenge and are active participants in most immune-mediated diseases. Recent studies have shed new light on myeloid cell dynamics and function by use of an imaging technique referred to as intravital microscopy (IVM). This powerful approach allows researchers to gain real-time insights into monocytes and macrophages performing homeostatic and inflammatory tasks in living tissues. In this review, we will present a contemporary synopsis of how intravital microscopy has revolutionized our understanding of myeloid cell contributions to vascular maintenance, microbial defense, autoimmunity, tumorigenesis, and acute/chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26162402

  1. Dynamic analysis of immune inflammation and bone destruction by intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Kikuta, Junichi; Ishii, Masaru

    2016-01-01

      Rapid development of fluorescent imaging techniques enables us to understand cellular dynamics in vivo. We have originally established an advanced imaging system for visualizing living bone tissues with intravital two-photon microscopy. By means of the system, we have recently succeeded in visualization of the in vivo behavior of living mature osteoclasts on the bone surface, and identified different functional subsets of osteoclasts in terms of their motility and function, i.e., 'static - bone resorptive' and 'moving - non resorptive'. Pathological conditions changed the composition of these populations as well as the total number of mature osteoclasts. We also found that RANKL-bearing Th17 cells could control bone resorption of mature osteoclasts, demonstrating novel actions of Th17. Furthermore, we have also developed the imaging system to visualize bone destruction by osteoclasts in arthritic joints using intravital two-photon microscopy. In this review, we summarize the latest data of intravital imaging of osteoclast dynamics, and also discuss its further application. PMID:27212598

  2. Fluorescent Tobacco mosaic virus-Derived Bio-Nanoparticles for Intravital Two-Photon Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Niehl, Annette; Appaix, Florence; Boscá, Sonia; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Nicoud, Jean-François; Bolze, Frédéric; Heinlein, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Multi-photon intravital imaging has become a powerful tool to investigate the healthy and diseased brain vasculature in living animals. Although agents for multi-photon fluorescence microscopy of the microvasculature are available, issues related to stability, bioavailability, toxicity, cost or chemical adaptability remain to be solved. In particular, there is a need for highly fluorescent dyes linked to particles that do not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) in brain diseases like tumor or stroke to estimate the functional blood supply. Plant virus particles possess a number of distinct advantages over other particles, the most important being the multi-valency of chemically addressable sites on the particle surface. This multi-valency, together with biological compatibility and inert nature, makes plant viruses ideal carriers for in vivo imaging agents. Here, we show that the well-known Tobacco mosaic virus is a suitable nanocarrier for two-photon dyes and for intravital imaging of the mouse brain vasculature. PMID:26793221

  3. Intravital Microscopic Methods to Evaluate Anti-inflammatory Effects and Signaling Mechanisms Evoked by Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Zuidema, Mozow Y.; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous signaling molecule with potent anti-inflammatory properties. Exogenous application of H2S donors, administered either acutely during an inflammatory response or as an antecedent preconditioning intervention that invokes the activation of anti-inflammatory cell survival programs, effectively limits leukocyte rolling, adhesion and emigration, generation of reactive oxygen species, chemokine and cell adhesion molecule expression, endothelial barrier disruption,capillary perfusion deficits, and parenchymal cell dysfunction and injury. This chapter focuses on intravital microscopic methods that can be used to assess the anti-inflammatory effects exerted by H2S, as well as to explore the cellular signaling mechanisms by which this gaseous molecule limits the aforementioned inflammatory responses. Recent advances include use of intravital multiphoton microscopy and optical biosensor technology to explore signaling mechanisms in vivo. PMID:25747477

  4. Visualizing the Tumor Microenvironment of Liver Metastasis by Spinning Disk Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Babes, Liane; Kubes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has evolved into an invaluable technique to study the complexity of tumors by visualizing individual cells in live organisms. Here, we describe a method for employing intravital spinning disk confocal microscopy to picture high-resolution tumor-stroma interactions in real time. We depict in detail the surgical procedures to image various tumor microenvironments and different cellular components in the liver.

  5. Intravital leukocyte detection using the gradient inverse coefficient of variation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gang; Ray, Nilanjan; Acton, Scott T

    2005-07-01

    The problem of identifying and counting rolling leukocytes within intravital microscopy is of both theoretical and practical interest. Currently, methods exist for tracking rolling leukocytes in vivo, but these methods rely on manual detection of the cells. In this paper we propose a technique for accurately detecting rolling leukocytes based on Bayesian classification. The classification depends on a feature score, the gradient inverse coefficient of variation (GICOV), which serves to discriminate rolling leukocytes from a cluttered environment. The leukocyte detection process consists of three sequential steps: the first step utilizes an ellipse matching algorithm to coarsely identify the leukocytes by finding the ellipses with a locally maximal GICOV. In the second step, starting from each of the ellipses found in the first step, a B-spline snake is evolved to refine the leukocytes boundaries by maximizing the associated GICOV score. The third and final step retains only the extracted contours that have a GICOV score above the analytically determined threshold. Experimental results using 327 rolling leukocytes were compared to those of human experts and currently used methods. The proposed GICOV method achieves 78.6% leukocyte detection accuracy with 13.1% false alarm rate.

  6. Intravital imaging of hair-cell development and regeneration in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Teixeira, Filipe; Muzzopappa, Mariana; Swoger, Jim; Mineo, Alessandro; Sharpe, James; López-Schier, Hernán

    2013-01-01

    Direct videomicroscopic visualization of organ formation and regeneration in toto is a powerful strategy to study cellular processes that often cannot be replicated in vitro. Intravital imaging aims at quantifying changes in tissue architecture or subcellular organization over time during organ development, regeneration or degeneration. A general feature of this approach is its reliance on the optical isolation of defined cell types in the whole animals by transgenic expression of fluorescent markers. Here we describe a simple and robust method to analyze sensory hair-cell development and regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line by high-resolution intravital imaging using laser-scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM). The main advantage of studying hair-cell regeneration in the lateral line is that it occurs throughout the life of the animal, which allows its study in the most natural context. We detail protocols to achieve continuous videomicroscopy for up to 68 hours, enabling direct observation of cellular behavior, which can provide a sensitive assay for the quantitative classification of cellular phenotypes and cell-lineage reconstruction. Modifications to this protocol should facilitate pharmacogenetic assays to identify or validate otoprotective or reparative drugs for future clinical strategies aimed at preserving aural function in humans. PMID:24130521

  7. Extended Time-lapse Intravital Imaging of Real-time Multicellular Dynamics in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Harney, Allison S; Wang, Yarong; Condeelis, John S; Entenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, host stromal cells interact with tumor cells to promote tumor progression, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. Multicellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment can lead to transient events including directional tumor cell motility and vascular permeability. Quantification of tumor vascular permeability has frequently used end-point experiments to measure extravasation of vascular dyes. However, due to the transient nature of multicellular interactions and vascular permeability, the kinetics of these dynamic events cannot be discerned. By labeling cells and vasculature with injectable dyes or fluorescent proteins, high-resolution time-lapse intravital microscopy has allowed the direct, real-time visualization of transient events in the tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a method for using multiphoton microscopy to perform extended intravital imaging in live mice to directly visualize multicellular dynamics in the tumor microenvironment. This method details cellular labeling strategies, the surgical preparation of a mammary skin flap, the administration of injectable dyes or proteins by tail vein catheter and the acquisition of time-lapse images. The time-lapse sequences obtained from this method facilitate the visualization and quantitation of the kinetics of cellular events of motility and vascular permeability in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27341448

  8. Extended Time-lapse Intravital Imaging of Real-time Multicellular Dynamics in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Harney, Allison S.; Wang, Yarong; Condeelis, John S.; Entenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, host stromal cells interact with tumor cells to promote tumor progression, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. Multicellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment can lead to transient events including directional tumor cell motility and vascular permeability. Quantification of tumor vascular permeability has frequently used end-point experiments to measure extravasation of vascular dyes. However, due to the transient nature of multicellular interactions and vascular permeability, the kinetics of these dynamic events cannot be discerned. By labeling cells and vasculature with injectable dyes or fluorescent proteins, high-resolution time-lapse intravital microscopy has allowed the direct, real-time visualization of transient events in the tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a method for using multiphoton microscopy to perform extended intravital imaging in live mice to directly visualize multicellular dynamics in the tumor microenvironment. This method details cellular labeling strategies, the surgical preparation of a mammary skin flap, the administration of injectable dyes or proteins by tail vein catheter and the acquisition of time-lapse images. The time-lapse sequences obtained from this method facilitate the visualization and quantitation of the kinetics of cellular events of motility and vascular permeability in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27341448

  9. Imaging Circulating Tumor Cells in Freely Moving Awake Small Animals Using a Miniaturized Intravital Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Sasportas, Laura Sarah; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis, the cause for 90% of cancer mortality, is a complex and poorly understood process involving the invasion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into blood vessels. These cells have potential prognostic value as biomarkers for early metastatic risk. But their rarity and the lack of specificity and sensitivity in measuring them render their interrogation by current techniques very challenging. How and when these cells are circulating in the blood, on their way to potentially give rise to metastasis, is a question that remains largely unanswered. In order to provide an insight into this "black box" using non-invasive imaging, we developed a novel miniature intravital microscopy (mIVM) strategy capable of real-time long-term monitoring of CTCs in awake small animals. We established an experimental 4T1-GL mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, in which tumor cells express both fluorescent and bioluminescent reporter genes to enable both single cell and whole body tumor imaging. Using mIVM, we monitored blood vessels of different diameters in awake mice in an experimental model of metastasis. Using an in-house software algorithm we developed, we demonstrated in vivo CTC enumeration and computation of CTC trajectory and speed. These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals. PMID:24497977

  10. Correlative intravital imaging of cGMP signals and vasodilation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Thunemann, Martin; Schmidt, Kjestine; de Wit, Cor; Han, Xiaoxing; Jain, Rakesh K.; Fukumura, Dai; Feil, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important signaling molecule and drug target in the cardiovascular system. It is well known that stimulation of the vascular nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway results in vasodilation. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP signals themselves and the cGMP concentrations within specific cardiovascular cell types in health, disease, and during pharmacotherapy with cGMP-elevating drugs are largely unknown. To facilitate the analysis of cGMP signaling in vivo, we have generated transgenic mice that express fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cGMP sensor proteins. Here, we describe two models of intravital FRET/cGMP imaging in the vasculature of cGMP sensor mice: (1) epifluorescence-based ratio imaging in resistance-type vessels of the cremaster muscle and (2) ratio imaging by multiphoton microscopy within the walls of subcutaneous blood vessels accessed through a dorsal skinfold chamber. Both methods allow simultaneous monitoring of NO-induced cGMP transients and vasodilation in living mice. Detailed protocols of all steps necessary to perform and evaluate intravital imaging experiments of the vasculature of anesthetized mice including surgery, imaging, and data evaluation are provided. An image segmentation approach is described to estimate FRET/cGMP changes within moving structures such as the vessel wall during vasodilation. The methods presented herein should be useful to visualize cGMP or other biochemical signals that are detectable with FRET-based biosensors, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate or Ca2+, and to correlate them with respective vascular responses. With further refinement and combination of transgenic mouse models and intravital imaging technologies, we envision an exciting future, in which we are able to “watch” biochemistry, (patho-)physiology, and pharmacotherapy in the context of a living mammalian organism. PMID:25352809

  11. Intravital two-photon imaging: a versatile tool for dissecting the immune system.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Taeko; Ishii, Masaru

    2011-03-01

    During the past decade, multi-photon or 'two-photon' excitation microscopy has launched a new era in the field of biological imaging. The near-infrared excitation laser for two-photon microscopy can penetrate thicker specimens, enabling the visualisation of living cell behaviour deep within tissues and organs without thin sectioning. The minimised photobleaching and toxicity enables the visualisation of live and intact specimens for extended periods. In this brief review, recent findings in intravital two-photon imaging for the physiology and pathology of the immune system are discussed. The immune system configures highly dynamic networks, where many cell types actively travel throughout the body and interact with each other in specific areas. Hence, real-time intravital imaging may be a powerful tool for dissecting the mechanisms of this dynamic system. The most unique characteristic of the immune system is its highly dynamic nature. A variety of cell types, such as lymphocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are continuously circulating throughout the body, migrating through the peripheral tissues and interacting with each other in their respective niches. Conventional methodologies in immunology, such as flow cytometry, cell or tissue culture, biochemistry and histology, have brought tremendous achievement within this field, although the dynamics of immune cells in an entire animal remain less clear. Technological progress of fluorescence microscopy has enabled us to visualise the intact biological phenomenon that has been uninvestigated. Among the advancements, the recent emergence and prevalence of two-photon, excitation-based, laser microscopy has revolutionised the research field, such that the dynamic behaviour of cells deep inside living organs can be visualised and analysed.

  12. Fungal Infection in the Brain: What We Learned from Intravital Imaging.

    PubMed

    Shi, Meiqing; Mody, Christopher H

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 1.2 billion people suffer from fungal diseases worldwide. Arguably, the most serious manifestation occurs when pathogenic fungi infect the brain, often causing fatal meningoencephalitis. For most fungi, infection occurs via the vascular route. The organism must first be arrested in the brain microvasculature and transmigrate into the brain parenchyma across the blood-brain barrier. As a result, host immune cells are recruited into the brain to contain the fungi. However, it remains poorly understood how fungi traffic to, and migrate into the brain and how immune cells interact with invading fungi in the brain. A new era of intravital fluorescence microscopy has begun to provide insights. We are able to employ this powerful approach to study dynamic interactions of disseminating fungi with brain endothelial cells as well as resident and recruited immune cells during the brain infection. In this review, with a focus on Cryptococcus neoformans, we will provide an overview of the application of intravital imaging in fungal infections in the brain, discuss recent findings and speculate on possible future research directions. PMID:27532000

  13. Intravital Imaging – Dynamic Insights into Natural Killer T Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Pei Xiong; Kubes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells were first recognized more than two decades ago as a separate and distinct lymphocyte lineage that modulates an expansive range of immune responses. As innate immune cells, NKT cells are activated early during inflammation and infection, and can subsequently stimulate or suppress the ensuing immune response. As a result, researchers hope to harness the immunomodulatory properties of NKT cells to treat a variety of diseases. However, many questions still remain unanswered regarding the biology of NKT cells, including how these cells traffic from the thymus to peripheral organs and how they play such contrasting roles in different immune responses and diseases. In this new era of intravital fluorescence microscopy, we are now able to employ this powerful tool to provide quantitative and dynamic insights into NKT cell biology including cellular dynamics, patrolling, and immunoregulatory functions with exquisite resolution. This review will highlight and discuss recent studies that use intravital imaging to understand the spectrum of NKT cell behavior in a variety of animal models. PMID:26042123

  14. Fungal Infection in the Brain: What We Learned from Intravital Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Meiqing; Mody, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 1.2 billion people suffer from fungal diseases worldwide. Arguably, the most serious manifestation occurs when pathogenic fungi infect the brain, often causing fatal meningoencephalitis. For most fungi, infection occurs via the vascular route. The organism must first be arrested in the brain microvasculature and transmigrate into the brain parenchyma across the blood–brain barrier. As a result, host immune cells are recruited into the brain to contain the fungi. However, it remains poorly understood how fungi traffic to, and migrate into the brain and how immune cells interact with invading fungi in the brain. A new era of intravital fluorescence microscopy has begun to provide insights. We are able to employ this powerful approach to study dynamic interactions of disseminating fungi with brain endothelial cells as well as resident and recruited immune cells during the brain infection. In this review, with a focus on Cryptococcus neoformans, we will provide an overview of the application of intravital imaging in fungal infections in the brain, discuss recent findings and speculate on possible future research directions. PMID:27532000

  15. Intravital Imaging of Axonal Interactions with Microglia and Macrophages in a Mouse Dorsal Column Crush Injury

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Teresa A.; Barkauskas, Deborah S.; Myers, Jay T.; Huang, Alex Y.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury causes an inflammatory reaction involving blood-derived macrophages and central nervous system (CNS)-resident microglia. Intra-vital two-photon microscopy enables the study of macrophages and microglia in the spinal cord lesion in the living animal. This can be performed in adult animals with a traumatic injury to the dorsal column. Here, we describe methods for distinguishing macrophages from microglia in the CNS using an irradiation bone marrow chimera to obtain animals in which only macrophages or microglia are labeled with a genetically encoded green fluorescent protein. We also describe a injury model that crushes the dorsal column of the spinal cord, thereby producing a simple, easily accessible, rectangular lesion that is easily visualized in an animal through a laminectomy. Furthermore, we will outline procedures to sequentially image the animals at the anatomical site of injury for the study of cellular interactions during the first few days to weeks after injury. PMID:25489963

  16. Visualizing the Tumor Microenvironment of Liver Metastasis by Spinning Disk Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Babes, Liane; Kubes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has evolved into an invaluable technique to study the complexity of tumors by visualizing individual cells in live organisms. Here, we describe a method for employing intravital spinning disk confocal microscopy to picture high-resolution tumor-stroma interactions in real time. We depict in detail the surgical procedures to image various tumor microenvironments and different cellular components in the liver. PMID:27581024

  17. Intravital imaging reveals distinct responses of depleting dynamic tumor-associated macrophage and dendritic cell subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Lohela, Marja; Casbon, Amy-Jo; Olow, Aleksandra; Bonham, Lynn; Branstetter, Daniel; Weng, Ning; Smith, Jeffrey; Werb, Zena

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells comprise a major part of the stromal microenvironment and support cancer progression by multiple mechanisms. High numbers of tumor myeloid cells correlate with poor prognosis in breast cancer and are coupled with the angiogenic switch and malignant progression. However, the specific roles and regulation of heterogeneous tumor myeloid populations are incompletely understood. CSF-1 is a major myeloid cell mitogen, and signaling through its receptor CSF-1R is also linked to poor outcomes. To characterize myeloid cell function in tumors, we combined confocal intravital microscopy with depletion of CSF-1R–dependent cells using a neutralizing CSF-1R antibody in the mouse mammary tumor virus long-terminal region-driven polyoma middle T antigen breast cancer model. The depleted cells shared markers of tumor-associated macrophages and dendritic cells (M-DCs), matching the phenotype of tumor dendritic cells that take up antigens and interact with T cells. We defined functional subgroups within the M-DC population by imaging endocytic and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Anti–CSF-1R treatment altered stromal dynamics and impaired both survival of M-DCs and accumulation of new M-DCs, but did not deplete Gr-1+ neutrophils or block doxorubicin-induced myeloid cell recruitment, and had a minimal effect on lung myeloid cells. Nevertheless, prolonged treatment led to delayed tumor growth, reduced vascularity, and decreased lung metastasis. Because the myeloid infiltrate in metastatic lungs differed significantly from that in mammary tumors, the reduction in metastasis may result from the impact on primary tumors. The combination of functional analysis by intravital imaging with cellular characterization has refined our understanding of the effects of experimental targeted therapies on the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25385645

  18. Intravital fluorescence microscopic study of the behavior of long-circulating liposomes during microvascular thrombosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvoisselle, Jean-Marie; Begu, Sylvie; Tourne-Peteilh, Corine; Buys, Bruno; Mordon, Serge R.

    2002-06-01

    Treatment of thrombosis depends on the selectivity of thrombolytic agents to the clot. It has been already demonstrated that liposomes can provide a better selectivity of such agents to the clot site. We have recently shown that intravital fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool to image in situ and in real time the labeling of leukocytes by long circulating liposomes. The aim of this study was to monitor the in vivo behavior of such liposomes in a clot site. Carboxyfluorescein-loaded long circulating liposomes were prepared and characterized in term of size and permeability. The liposomes suspension was injected intravenously to golden hamsters. The skin microcirculation was observed using a dorsal skin-fold chamber by fluorescence microscopy. Thrombosis were obtained as the consequence of the inflammatory response due to the surgery. Using this model, fluorescent dots were observed at the site of the clot. Liposomes accumulate at the clot site whatever the mechanism (passive deposition or uptake). There is a period of latency and 30 seconds after the blood flow stop, fluorescence increases very rapidly and a bright fluorescent spot is observed at the site of the clot. Further studies are needed to determine the exact localization of liposomes in the clot and the mechanism of interaction.

  19. Intravital imaging of embryonic and tumor neovasculature using viral nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Hon Sing; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Ablack, Amber; Destito, Giuseppe; Zijlstra, Andries; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Manchester, Marianne; Lewis, John D

    2011-01-01

    Viral nanoparticles are a novel class of biomolecular agents that take advantage of the natural circulatory and targeting properties of viruses to allow the development of therapeutics, vaccines and imaging tools. We have developed a multivalent nanoparticle platform based on the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) that facilitates particle labeling at high density with fluorescent dyes and other functional groups. Compared with other technologies, CPMV-based viral nanoparticles are particularly suited for long-term intravital vascular imaging because of their biocompatibility and retention in the endothelium with minimal side effects. The stable, long-term labeling of the endothelium allows the identification of vasculature undergoing active remodeling in real time. In this study, we describe the synthesis, purification and fluorescent labeling of cpMV nanoparticles, along with their use for imaging of vascular structure and for intravital vascular mapping in developmental and tumor angiogenesis models. Dye-labeled viral nanoparticles can be synthesized and purified in a single day, and imaging studies can be conducted over hours, days or weeks, depending on the application. PMID:20671724

  20. Intravital imaging reveals new ancillary mechanisms co-opted by cancer cells to drive tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Morghan C.; Timpson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Intravital imaging is providing new insights into the dynamics of tumor progression in native tissues and has started to reveal the layers of complexity found in cancer. Recent advances in intravital imaging have allowed us to look deeper into cancer behavior and to dissect the interactions between tumor cells and the ancillary host niche that promote cancer development. In this review, we provide an insight into the latest advances in cancer biology achieved by intravital imaging, focusing on recently discovered mechanisms by which tumor cells manipulate normal tissue to facilitate disease progression. PMID:27239290

  1. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in 4-dimensional heterotic string

    SciTech Connect

    Maharana, J.

    1989-07-01

    The evolution of a 4-dimensional heterotic string is considered in the background of its massless excitations such as graviton, antisymmetric tensor, gauge fields and scalar bosons. The compactified bosonic coordinates are fermionized. The world-sheet supersymmetry requirement enforces Thirring-like four fermion coupling to the background scalar fields. The non-abelian gauge symmetry is exhibited through the Ward identities of the S-matrix elements. The spontaneous symmetry breaking mechanism is exhibited through the broken Ward identities. An effective 4-dimensional action is constructed and the consequence of spontaneous symmetry breaking is envisaged for the effective action. 19 refs.

  2. Long- and short-term intravital imaging reveals differential spatiotemporal recruitment and function of myelomonocytic cells after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Fenrich, Keith K; Weber, Pascal; Rougon, Geneviève; Debarbieux, Franck

    2013-01-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), resident and peripheral myelomonocytic cells are recruited to the injury site and play a role in injury progression. These cells are important for clearing cellular debris, and can modulate the retraction and growth of axons in vitro. However, their precise spatiotemporal recruitment dynamics is unknown, and their respective roles after SCI remain heavily debated. Using chronic, quantitative intravital two-photon microscopy of adult mice with SCI, here we show that infiltrating lysozyme M (LysM(+)) and resident CD11c(+) myelomonocytic cells have distinct spatiotemporal recruitment profiles, and exhibit changes in morphology, motility, phagocytic activity and axon interaction patterns over time. This study provides the first in vivo description of the influx of inflammatory and resident myelomonocytic cells into the injured spinal cord and their interactions with cut axons, and underscores the importance of precise timing and targeting of specific cell populations in developing therapies for SCI. PMID:23918770

  3. What ticks do under your skin: two-photon intravital imaging of Ixodes scapularis feeding in the presence of the lyme disease spirochete.

    PubMed

    Bockenstedt, Linda K; Gonzalez, David; Mao, Jialing; Li, Ming; Belperron, Alexia A; Haberman, Ann

    2014-03-01

    Lyme disease, due to infection with the Ixodes-tick transmitted spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common tick-transmitted disease in the northern hemisphere. Our understanding of the tick-pathogen-vertebrate host interactions that sustain an enzootic cycle for B. burgdorferi is incomplete. In this article, we describe a method for imaging the feeding of Ixodes scapularis nymphs in real-time using two-photon intravital microscopy and show how this technology can be applied to view the response of Lyme borrelia in the skin of an infected host to tick feeding.

  4. What Ticks Do Under Your Skin: Two-Photon Intravital Imaging of Ixodes Scapularis Feeding in the Presence of the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Bockenstedt, Linda K.; Gonzalez, David; Mao, Jialing; Li, Ming; Belperron, Alexia A.; Haberman, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, due to infection with the Ixodes-tick transmitted spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common tick-transmitted disease in the northern hemisphere. Our understanding of the tick-pathogen-vertebrate host interactions that sustain an enzootic cycle for B. burgdorferi is incomplete. In this article, we describe a method for imaging the feeding of Ixodes scapularis nymphs in real-time using two-photon intravital microscopy and show how this technology can be applied to view the response of Lyme borrelia in the skin of an infected host to tick feeding. PMID:24600332

  5. Using 2-Photon Microscopy to Understand Albuminuria

    PubMed Central

    Molitoris, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Intravital 2-photon microscopy, along with the development of fluorescent probes and innovative software, has rapidly advanced the study of intracellular and intercellular processes at the organ level. Researchers can quantify the distribution, behavior, and dynamic interactions of up to four labeled chemical probes and proteins simultaneously and repeatedly in four dimensions (3D + time) with subcellular resolution in real time. Transgenic fluorescently labeled proteins, delivery of plasmids, and photo-activatable probes enhance these possibilities. Thus, multi-photon microscopy has greatly extended our ability to understand cell biology intra-vitally at cellular and subcellular levels. For example, evaluation of rat surface glomeruli and accompanying proximal tubules has shown the long held paradigm regarding limited albumin filtration under physiologic conditions is to be questioned. Furthermore, the role of proximal tubules in determining albuminuria under physiologic and disease conditions was supported by direct visualization and quantitative analysis. PMID:25125750

  6. Intravital imaging of intestinal lacteals unveils lipid drainage through contractility.

    PubMed

    Choe, Kibaek; Jang, Jeon Yeob; Park, Intae; Kim, Yeseul; Ahn, Soyeon; Park, Dae-Young; Hong, Young-Kwon; Alitalo, Kari; Koh, Gou Young; Kim, Pilhan

    2015-11-01

    Lacteals are lymphatic vessels located at the center of each intestinal villus and provide essential transport routes for lipids and other lipophilic molecules. However, it is unclear how absorbed molecules are transported through the lacteal. Here, we used reporter mice that express GFP under the control of the lymphatic-specific promoter Prox1 and a custom-built confocal microscope and performed intravital real-time visualization of the absorption and transport dynamics of fluorescence-tagged fatty acids (FAs) and various exogenous molecules in the intestinal villi in vivo. These analyses clearly revealed transepithelial absorption of these molecules via enterocytes, diffusive distribution over the lamina propria, and subsequent transport through lacteals. Moreover, we observed active contraction of lacteals, which seemed to be directly involved in dietary lipid drainage. Our analysis revealed that the smooth muscles that surround each lacteal are responsible for contractile dynamics and that lacteal contraction is ultimately controlled by the autonomic nervous system. These results indicate that the lacteal is a unique organ-specific lymphatic system and does not merely serve as a passive conduit but as an active pump that transports lipids. Collectively, using this efficient imaging method, we uncovered drainage of absorbed molecules in small intestinal villus lacteals and the involvement of lacteal contractibility. PMID:26436648

  7. Intravital imaging of intestinal lacteals unveils lipid drainage through contractility

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Kibaek; Jang, Jeon Yeob; Park, Intae; Kim, Yeseul; Ahn, Soyeon; Park, Dae-Young; Hong, Young-Kwon; Alitalo, Kari; Koh, Gou Young; Kim, Pilhan

    2015-01-01

    Lacteals are lymphatic vessels located at the center of each intestinal villus and provide essential transport routes for lipids and other lipophilic molecules. However, it is unclear how absorbed molecules are transported through the lacteal. Here, we used reporter mice that express GFP under the control of the lymphatic-specific promoter Prox1 and a custom-built confocal microscope and performed intravital real-time visualization of the absorption and transport dynamics of fluorescence-tagged fatty acids (FAs) and various exogenous molecules in the intestinal villi in vivo. These analyses clearly revealed transepithelial absorption of these molecules via enterocytes, diffusive distribution over the lamina propria, and subsequent transport through lacteals. Moreover, we observed active contraction of lacteals, which seemed to be directly involved in dietary lipid drainage. Our analysis revealed that the smooth muscles that surround each lacteal are responsible for contractile dynamics and that lacteal contraction is ultimately controlled by the autonomic nervous system. These results indicate that the lacteal is a unique organ-specific lymphatic system and does not merely serve as a passive conduit but as an active pump that transports lipids. Collectively, using this efficient imaging method, we uncovered drainage of absorbed molecules in small intestinal villus lacteals and the involvement of lacteal contractibility. PMID:26436648

  8. Live-Animal Imaging of Renal Function by Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kenneth W.; Sutton, Timothy A.; Sandoval, Ruben M.

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy, microscopy of living animals, is a powerful research technique that combines the resolution and sensitivity found in microscopic studies of cultured cells with the relevance and systemic influences of cells in the context of the intact animal. The power of intravital microscopy has recently been extended with the development of multiphoton fluorescence microscopy systems capable of collecting optical sections from deep within the kidney at subcellular resolution, supporting high-resolution characterizations of the structure and function of glomeruli, tubules, and vasculature in the living kidney. Fluorescent probes are administered to an anesthetized, surgically prepared animal, followed by image acquisition for up to 3 hr. Images are transferred via a high-speed network to specialized computer systems for digital image analysis. This general approach can be used with different combinations of fluorescent probes to evaluate processes such as glomerular permeability, proximal tubule endocytosis, microvascular flow, vascular permeability, mitochondrial function, and cellular apoptosis/necrosis. PMID:23042524

  9. Quantum error correcting codes and 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guth, Larry; Lubotzky, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    Using 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds, we construct some new homological quantum error correcting codes. They are low density parity check codes with linear rate and distance nɛ. Their rate is evaluated via Euler characteristic arguments and their distance using {Z}_2-systolic geometry. This construction answers a question of Zémor ["On Cayley graphs, surface codes, and the limits of homological coding for quantum error correction," in Proceedings of Second International Workshop on Coding and Cryptology (IWCC), Lecture Notes in Computer Science Vol. 5557 (2009), pp. 259-273], who asked whether homological codes with such parameters could exist at all.

  10. Quantum error correcting codes and 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Guth, Larry; Lubotzky, Alexander

    2014-08-15

    Using 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds, we construct some new homological quantum error correcting codes. They are low density parity check codes with linear rate and distance n{sup ε}. Their rate is evaluated via Euler characteristic arguments and their distance using Z{sub 2}-systolic geometry. This construction answers a question of Zémor [“On Cayley graphs, surface codes, and the limits of homological coding for quantum error correction,” in Proceedings of Second International Workshop on Coding and Cryptology (IWCC), Lecture Notes in Computer Science Vol. 5557 (2009), pp. 259–273], who asked whether homological codes with such parameters could exist at all.

  11. Intravital Imaging Reveals Angiotensin II-Induced Transcytosis of Albumin by Podocytes.

    PubMed

    Schießl, Ina Maria; Hammer, Anna; Kattler, Veronika; Gess, Bernhard; Theilig, Franziska; Witzgall, Ralph; Castrop, Hayo

    2016-03-01

    Albuminuria is a hallmark of kidney disease of various etiologies and usually caused by deterioration of glomerular filtration barrier integrity. We recently showed that angiotensin II (Ang II) acutely increases albumin filtration in the healthy kidney. Here, we used intravital microscopy to assess the effects of Ang II on podocyte function in rats. Acute infusion of 30, 60, or 80 ng/kg per minute Ang II enhanced the endocytosis of albumin by activation of the type 1 Ang II receptor and resulted in an average (±SEM) of 3.7±2.2, 72.3±18.6 (P<0.001), and 239.4±34.6 µm(3) (P<0.001) albumin-containing vesicles per glomerulus, respectively, compared with none at baseline or 10 ng/kg per minute Ang II. Immunostaining of Ang II-infused kidneys confirmed the presence of albumin-containing vesicles, which colocalized with megalin, in podocin-positive cells. Furthermore, podocyte endocytosis of albumin was markedly reduced in the presence of gentamicin, a competitive inhibitor of megalin-dependent endocytosis. Ang II infusion increased the concentration of albumin in the subpodocyte space, a potential source for endocytic protein uptake, and gentamicin further increased this concentration. Some endocytic vesicles were acidified and colocalized with LysoTracker. Most vesicles migrated from the capillary to the apical aspect of the podocyte and were eventually released into the urinary space. This transcytosis accounted for approximately 10% of total albumin filtration. In summary, the transcellular transport of proteins across the podocyte constitutes a new pathway of glomerular protein filtration. Ang II enhances the endocytosis and transcytosis of plasma albumin by podocytes, which may eventually impair podocyte function.

  12. Thin and open vessel windows for intra-vital fluorescence imaging of murine cochlear blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaorui; Zhang, Fei; Urdang, Zachary; Dai, Min; Neng, Lingling; Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    Normal microvessel structure and function in the cochlea is essential for maintaining the ionic and metabolic homeostasis required for hearing function. Abnormal cochlear microcirculation has long been considered an etiologic factor in hearing disorders. A better understanding of cochlear blood flow (CoBF) will enable more effective amelioration of hearing disorders that result from aberrant blood flow. However, establishing the direct relationship between CoBF and other cellular events in the lateral wall and response to physio-pathological stress remains a challenge due to the lack of feasible interrogation methods and difficulty in accessing the inner ear. Here we report on new methods for studying the CoBF in a mouse model using a thin or open vessel-window in combination with fluorescence intra-vital microscopy (IVM). An open vessel-window enables investigation of vascular cell biology and blood flow permeability, including pericyte (PC) contractility, bone marrow cell migration, and endothelial barrier leakage, in wild type and fluorescent protein-labeled transgenic mouse models with high spatial and temporal resolution. Alternatively, the thin vessel-window method minimizes disruption of the homeostatic balance in the lateral wall and enables study CoBF under relatively intact physiological conditions. A thin vessel-window method can also be used for time-based studies of physiological and pathological processes. Although the small size of the mouse cochlea makes surgery difficult, the methods are sufficiently developed for studying the structural and functional changes in CoBF under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:24780131

  13. [Forensic medical diagnostics of intra-vitality of the strangulation mark by morphological methods].

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, D V; Zbrueva, Yu V; Putintsev, V A; Denisova, O P

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study WaS to overview the current domestic and foreign literature concerning the up-to-date methods employed for the expert evaluation of intra-vitality of the strangulation mark. The secondary objective was to propose the new approaches for addressing this problem. The methods of expert diagnostics with a view to determining the time of infliction of injuries as exemplified by mechanical asphyxia are discussed. It is concluded that immunohistochemical and morphometric studies provide the most promising tools for the evaluation of intra-vitality of the strangulation mark for the purpose of forensic medical expertise.

  14. [Forensic medical diagnostics of intra-vitality of the strangulation mark by morphological methods].

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, D V; Zbrueva, Yu V; Putintsev, V A; Denisova, O P

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study WaS to overview the current domestic and foreign literature concerning the up-to-date methods employed for the expert evaluation of intra-vitality of the strangulation mark. The secondary objective was to propose the new approaches for addressing this problem. The methods of expert diagnostics with a view to determining the time of infliction of injuries as exemplified by mechanical asphyxia are discussed. It is concluded that immunohistochemical and morphometric studies provide the most promising tools for the evaluation of intra-vitality of the strangulation mark for the purpose of forensic medical expertise. PMID:27358932

  15. In vivo cell cycle profiling in xenograft tumors by quantitative intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chittajallu, Deepak R; Florian, Stefan; Kohler, Rainer H; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Orth, James D; Weissleder, Ralph; Danuser, Gaudenz; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of cell-cycle state at a single-cell level is essential to understand fundamental three-dimensional biological processes such as tissue development and cancer. Analysis of 3D in vivo images, however, is very challenging. Today’s best practice, manual annotation of select image events, generates arbitrarily sampled data distributions, unsuitable for reliable mechanistic inferences. Here, we present an integrated workflow for quantitative in vivo cell-cycle profiling. It combines image analysis and machine learning methods for automated 3D segmentation and cell-cycle state identification of individual cell-nuclei with widely varying morphologies embedded in complex tumor environments. We applied our workflow to quantify cell-cycle effects of three antimitotic cancer drugs over 8 days in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma xenografts in living mice using a dataset of 38,000 cells and compared the induced phenotypes. In contrast to 2D culture, observed mitotic arrest was relatively low, suggesting involvement of additional mechanisms in their antitumor effect in vivo. PMID:25867850

  16. A Lie based 4-dimensional higher Chern-Simons theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchini, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    We present and study a model of 4-dimensional higher Chern-Simons theory, special Chern-Simons (SCS) theory, instances of which have appeared in the string literature, whose symmetry is encoded in a skeletal semistrict Lie 2-algebra constructed from a compact Lie group with non discrete center. The field content of SCS theory consists of a Lie valued 2-connection coupled to a background closed 3-form. SCS theory enjoys a large gauge and gauge for gauge symmetry organized in an infinite dimensional strict Lie 2-group. The partition function of SCS theory is simply related to that of a topological gauge theory localizing on flat connections with degree 3 second characteristic class determined by the background 3-form. Finally, SCS theory is related to a 3-dimensional special gauge theory whose 2-connection space has a natural symplectic structure with respect to which the 1-gauge transformation action is Hamiltonian, the 2-curvature map acting as moment map.

  17. Repeatability of intravital capillaroscopic measurement of capillary density.

    PubMed

    Lamah, M; Chaudhry, H; Mortimer, P S; Dormandy, J A

    1996-01-01

    The reliability of intravital capillaroscopy for determining capillary density (CD) of skin has been questioned because it depends upon the variability of the measuring process and subjective interpretation of data as well as the intrinsic heterogeneity of capillary spacing. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of a standardised method for measuring CD of the skin of the dorsum of foot. In each of 30 subjects (10 controls and 20 patients with peripheral vascular disease), the foot was systematically mapped by examining 20 sites on the dorsum of foot and 2 sites on each toe, using white light (native) videomicroscopy at 40 x magnification. Off-line analysis of videoprints was then undertaken to determine CD at each site, by counting capillaries within areas of acceptable photographic quality only, having first defined the criteria for counting capillaries. The mean values were then calculated and taken to represent the CD of the foot or toes. Repeatability of the measuring equipment was first assessed by noting the presence or absence of each corresponding capillary in 2 prints, taken at intervals of hours or days (in 10 subjects) or months (in 2 patients), of an identical area of skin which was marked by a microtattoo on the first occasion. On average, 95% of corresponding capillaries were identified in both prints (from controls and patients), thus implying little intrinsic temporal variation of capillary anatomy as well as excellent repeatability of the measuring equipment. Repeatability of data analysis was assessed by the same observer reading the same 20 prints in a blinded manner on three separate occasions (intraobserver repeatability), and 2 observers reading the same 24 prints (interobserver repeatability). The mean coefficient of intraobserver variation of CD estimate was 5.6% and the interobserver correlation coefficient was 0.94. Finally, overall repeatability of the method was assessed by repeating the procedure on a subsequent

  18. Tumor Microvasculature and Microenvironment: Novel Insights Through Intravital Imaging in Pre-Clinical Models

    PubMed Central

    Fukumura, Dai; Duda, Dan G.; Munn, Lance L.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Intravital imaging techniques have provided unprecedented insight into tumor microcirculation and microenvironment. For example, these techniques allowed quantitative evaluations of tumor blood vasculature to uncover its abnormal organization, structure and function (e.g., hyper-permeability, heterogeneous and compromised blood flow). Similarly, imaging of functional lymphatics has documented their absence inside tumors. These abnormalities result in elevated interstitial fluid pressure and hinder the delivery of therapeutic agents to tumors. In addition, they induce a hostile microenvironment characterized by hypoxia and acidosis, as documented by intravital imaging. The abnormal microenvironment further lowers the effectiveness of anti-tumor treatments such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. In addition to these mechanistic insights, intravital imaging may also offer new opportunities to improve therapy. For example, tumor angiogenesis results in immature, dysfunctional vessels—primarily caused by an imbalance in production of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors by the tumors. Restoring the balance of pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling in tumors can “normalize” tumor vasculature and thus, improve its function, as demonstrated by intravital imaging studies in preclinical models and in cancer patients. Administration of cytotoxic therapy during periods of vascular normalization has the potential to enhance treatment efficacy. PMID:20374484

  19. Dynamic 4-dimensional microscope system with automated background leveling.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Goldie; Creath, Katherine

    2012-09-13

    This paper describes recent advances in developing an automatic background leveling algorithm for a new, novel interference microscope system and presents images and data of live biological samples. The specially designed optical system enables instantaneous 4-dimensional video measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without the need for contrast agents. "Label-free" measurements of biological objects in reflection using harmless light levels are possible without the need for scanning and vibration isolation. This instrument utilizes a pixelated phase mask enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns taking advantage of the polarization properties of light enabling phase image movies in real time at video rates to track dynamic motions and volumetric changes. Optical thickness data are derived from phase images. This data is processed with an automatic background leveling routine which separates the objects from the background by thresholding the calculated gradient magnitude of the optical thickness data. Low-order Zernike surfaces are fit to the unmasked background pixels and the resulting background shape is removed. This method effectively eliminates background shape for datasets containing both large and small objects. By applying this method to many sequential frames, it results in all the frames having the same mean background value across all frames which is essential for quantitatively montoring time-dependent processes. PMID:25309097

  20. Dynamic phase imaging utilizing a 4-dimensional microscope system.

    PubMed

    Creath, Katherine

    2011-02-21

    This paper describes a new, novel interference Linnik microscope system and presents images and data of live biological samples. The specially designed optical system enables instantaneous 4-dimensional video measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without the need for contrast agents. This "label-free", vibration insensitive imaging system enables measurement of biological objects in reflection using harmless light levels with a variety of magnifications and wavelengths with fields of view from several hundred microns up to a millimeter. At the core of the instrument is a phase measurement camera (PMC) enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns utilizing a pixelated phase mask taking advantage of the polarization properties of light. Utilizing this technology enables the creation of phase image movies in real time at video rates so that dynamic motions and volumetric changes can be tracked. Objects are placed on a reflective surface in liquid under a coverslip. Phase values are converted to optical thickness data enabling volumetric, motion and morphological studies. Data from a number of different organisms such as flagellates and rotifers will be presented, as will measurements of human breast cancer cells with the addition of various agents that break down the cells. These data highlight examples of monitoring different biological processes and motions. PMID:24357901

  1. Progress in multidisciplinary sensing of the 4-dimensional ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, Tommy

    2009-05-01

    Many luminaries of oceanography have articulated the problem of adequately sampling a multiplicity of interdisciplinary ocean processes. Progress has accelerated within the past two decades as societal and naval interests in monitoring and predicting the state of the ocean environment has heightened. Oceanographers are capitalizing on a host of new platform and sensing technologies. Some recent programs contributing to improved 4-dimensional open and coastal ocean multi-disciplinary observations are used to highlight the development of new integrated optical, chemical, and physical measurement systems that can be deployed from stationary and mobile platforms to telemeter data in near real-time or real-time. For example, the NOPP O-SCOPE and MOSEAN projects have developed and tested several optical and chemical sensors in deep waters off Bermuda and Hawaii, at OWS 'P' in the North Pacific Ocean, and in coastal waters off Santa Barbara and Monterey, California. Most of the testing for these projects has been conducted using moorings; however, NOPP instrumentation is also being used on mobile platforms including AUVs, profiling floats, and gliders. Progress in adequately sampling the temporal and spatial variability of selected ocean 'sampling volumes' using multi-platform, multi-disciplinary sampling is described using examples from selected recent programs.

  2. Dynamic phase imaging utilizing a 4-dimensional microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creath, Katherine

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes a new, novel interference Linnik microscope system and presents images and data of live biological samples. The specially designed optical system enables instantaneous 4-dimensional video measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without the need for contrast agents. This "label-free", vibration insensitive imaging system enables measurement of biological objects in reflection using harmless light levels with a variety of magnifications and wavelengths with fields of view from several hundred microns up to a millimeter. At the core of the instrument is a phase measurement camera (PMC) enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns utilizing a pixelated phase mask taking advantage of the polarization properties of light. Utilizing this technology enables the creation of phase image movies in real time at video rates so that dynamic motions and volumetric changes can be tracked. Objects are placed on a reflective surface in liquid under a coverslip. Phase values are converted to optical thickness data enabling volumetric, motion and morphological studies. Data from a number of different organisms such as flagellates and rotifers will be presented, as will measurements of human breast cancer cells with the addition of various agents that break down the cells. These data highlight examples of monitoring different biological processes and motions.

  3. In Vivo Fluorescence Microscopy: Lessons From Observing Cell Behavior in Their Native Environment

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Myunghwan; Kwok, Sheldon J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic imaging techniques to visualize cellular behaviors in their natural environment play a pivotal role in biomedical research. Here, we review how recent technical advances in intravital microscopy have enabled unprecedented access to cellular physiology in various organs of mice in normal and diseased states. PMID:25559154

  4. From morphology to biochemical state – intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R.; Feger, Julia S.; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A.; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-03-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients’ bedsides. These ‘optical biopsies’ generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy.

  5. REAL-TIME INTRAVITAL IMAGING ESTABLISHES TUMOUR-ASSOCIATED MACROPHAGES AS THE EXTRASKELETAL TARGET OF BISPHOSPHONATE ACTION IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Junankar, Simon; Shay, Gemma; Jurczyluk, Julie; Ali, Naveid; Down, Jenny; Pocock, Nicholas; Parker, Andrew; Nguyen, Akira; Sun, Shuting; Kashemirov, Boris; McKenna, Charles E.; Croucher, Peter I.; Swarbrick, Alexander; Weilbaecher, Katherine; Phan, Tri Giang; Rogers, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have shown that bisphosphonate drugs improve breast cancer patient survival independent of their anti-resorptive effects on the skeleton. However, since bisphosphonates bind rapidly to bone mineral, the exact mechanisms of their anti-tumour action, particularly on cells outside of bone, remain unknown. Here we used real-time intravital two-photon microscopy to show extensive leakage of fluorescent bisphosphonate from the vasculature in 4T1 mouse mammary tumours, where it initially binds to areas of small, granular microcalcifications that are engulfed by tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs), but not tumour cells. Importantly, we also observed uptake of radiolabeled bisphosphonate in the primary breast tumour of a patient and showed the resected tumour to be infiltrated with TAMs and to contain similar granular microcalcifications. These data represent the first compelling in vivo evidence that bisphosphonates can target cells in tumours outside the skeleton and that their anti-tumour activity is likely to be mediated via TAMs. PMID:25312016

  6. From morphology to biochemical state – intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin

    PubMed Central

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R.; Feger, Julia S.; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A.; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-01-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients’ bedsides. These ‘optical biopsies’ generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27004454

  7. Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yanle; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

  8. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca2+). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca2+ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:25544762

  9. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Carlotta; Bonora, Massimo; Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-30

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca²⁺). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca²⁺ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca²⁺ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway.

  10. Validation of a device for the active manipulation of the tumor microenvironment during intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James K.; Entenberg, David; Wang, Yarong; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Padgen, Michael; Clark, Ashley; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A.; Castracane, James; Condeelis, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is recognized as playing a significant role in the behavior of tumor cells and their progression to metastasis. However, tools to manipulate the tumor microenvironment directly, and image the consequences of this manipulation with single cell resolution in real time in vivo, are lacking. We describe here a method for the direct, local manipulation of microenvironmental parameters through the use of an implantable Induction Nano Intravital Device (iNANIVID) and simultaneous in vivo visualization of the results at single-cell resolution. As a proof of concept, we deliver both a sustained dose of EGF to tumor cells while intravital imaging their chemotactic response as well as locally induce hypoxia in defined microenvironments in solid tumors.

  11. The Use of Fluorescent Proteins for Intravital Imaging of Cancer Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hulit, James; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Gligorijevic, Bojana; Entenberg, David; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Condeelis, John; Segall, Jeffrey E.

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of cancer cell behavior in the primary tumor in living animals provides an opportunity to explore the process of invasion and intravasation in the complex microenvironment that is present in vivo. In this chapter, we describe the methods that we have developed for performing intravital imaging of mammary tumors. We provide procedures for generating tumors through injection of tumor cell lines, and multiphoton imaging using a skin-flap tumor dissection and a mammary imaging window. PMID:22700401

  12. [Frontiers in Live Bone Imaging Researches. Novel drug discovery by means of intravital bone imaging technology].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Masaru

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in intravital bone imaging technology has enabled us to grasp the real cellular behaviors and functions in vivo , revolutionizing the field of drug discovery for novel therapeutics against intractable bone diseases. In this chapter, I introduce various updated information on pharmacological actions of several antibone resorptive agents, which could only be derived from advanced imaging techniques, and also discuss the future perspectives of this new trend in drug discovery.

  13. Cardiovascular Imaging Using Two-Photon Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Scherschel, John A.; Rubart, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Two-photon excitation microscopy has become the standard technique for high resolution deep tissue and intravital imaging. It provides intrinsic three-dimensional resolution in combination with increased penetration depth compared to single-photon confocal microscopy. This article will describe the basic physical principles of two-photon excitation and will review its multiple applications to cardiovascular imaging, including second harmonic generation and fluorescence laser scanning microscopy. In particular, the capability and limitations of multiphoton microscopy to assess functional heterogeneity on a cellular scale deep within intact, Langendorff-perfused hearts are demonstrated. It will also discuss the use of two-photon excitation-induced release of caged compounds for the study of intracellular calcium signaling and intercellular dye transfer. PMID:18986603

  14. Intravital imaging of hair follicle regeneration in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Cristiana M; Park, Sangbum; Mesa, Kailin R; Wolfel, Markus; Gonzalez, David G; Haberman, Ann M; Rompolas, Panteleimon; Greco, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Hair follicles are mammalian skin organs that periodically and stereotypically regenerate from a small pool of stem cells. Hence, hair follicles are a widely studied model for stem cell biology and regeneration. This protocol describes the use of two-photon laser-scanning microscopy (TPLSM) to study hair regeneration within a living, uninjured mouse. TPLSM provides advantages over conventional approaches, including enabling time-resolved imaging of single hair follicle stem cells. Thus, it is possible to capture behaviors including apoptosis, proliferation and migration, and to revisit the same cells for in vivo lineage tracing. In addition, a wide range of fluorescent reporter mouse lines facilitates TPLSM in the skin. This protocol also describes TPLSM laser ablation, which can spatiotemporally manipulate specific cellular populations of the hair follicle or microenvironment to test their regenerative contributions. The preparation time is variable depending on the goals of the experiment, but it generally takes 30–60 min. Imaging time is dependent on the goals of the experiment. Together, these components of TPLSM can be used to develop a comprehensive understanding of hair regeneration during homeostasis and injury. PMID:26110716

  15. An intravital microscopic study of the hepatic microcirculation in cirrhotic mice models: relationship between fibrosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vanheule, Eline; Geerts, Anja M; Van Huysse, Jacques; Schelfhout, Daphné; Praet, Marleen; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; De Vos, Martine; Colle, Isabelle

    2008-12-01

    This intravital fluorescence microscopy (IVFM) study validates cirrhotic mice models and describes the different intrahepatic alterations and the role of angiogenesis in the liver during genesis of cirrhosis. Cirrhosis was induced by subcutaneous injection of carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) and by common bile duct ligation (CBDL) in mice. Diameters of sinusoids, portal venules (PV), central venules (CV) and shunts were measured at different time points by IVFM. Thereafter, liver samples were taken for sirius red, CD31, Ki67, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) evaluation by immunohistochemistry (IHC). In parallel with fibrogenesis, hepatic microcirculation was markedly disturbed in CCl(4) and CBDL mice with a significant decrease in sinusoidal diameter compared to control mice. In CCl(4) mice, CV were enlarged, with marked sinusoidal-free spaces around CV. In contrast, PV were enlarged in CBDL mice and bile lakes were observed. In both mice models, intrahepatic shunts developed gradually after induction. During genesis of cirrhosis using CD31 IHC we observed a progressive increase in the number of blood vessels within the fibrotic septa area and a progressively increase in staining by Ki67, VEGF and alpha-SMA of endothelial cells, hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells respectively. In vivo study of the hepatic microcirculation demonstrated a totally disturbed intrahepatic architecture, with narrowing of sinusoids in both cirrhotic mice models. The diameters of CV and PV increased and large shunts, bypassing the sinusoids, were seen after both CCl(4) and CBDL induction. Thus present study shows that there is angiogenesis in the liver during cirrhogenesis, and this is probably due partially to an increased production of VEGF.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Human Cancer Cell Extravasation Using Intravital Imaging.

    PubMed

    Willetts, Lian; Bond, David; Stoletov, Konstantin; Lewis, John D

    2016-01-01

    microscopy techniques. PMID:27581012

  17. A practical method for monitoring FRET-based biosensors in living animals using two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wen; Rubart, Michael; Ryan, Jennifer; Xiao, Xiao; Qiao, Chunping; Hato, Takashi; Davidson, Michael W; Dunn, Kenneth W; Day, Richard N

    2015-12-01

    The commercial availability of multiphoton microscope systems has nurtured the growth of intravital microscopy as a powerful technique for evaluating cell biology in the relevant context of living animals. In parallel, new fluorescent protein (FP) biosensors have become available that enable studies of the function of a wide range of proteins in living cells. Biosensor probes that exploit Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) are among the most sensitive indicators of an array of cellular processes. However, differences between one-photon and two-photon excitation (2PE) microscopy are such that measuring FRET by 2PE in the intravital setting remains challenging. Here, we describe an approach that simplifies the use of FRET-based biosensors in intravital 2PE microscopy. Based on a systematic comparison of many different FPs, we identified the monomeric (m) FPs mTurquoise and mVenus as particularly well suited for intravital 2PE FRET studies, enabling the ratiometric measurements from linked FRET probes using a pair of experimental images collected simultaneously. The behavior of the FPs is validated by fluorescence lifetime and sensitized emission measurements of a set of FRET standards. The approach is demonstrated using a modified version of the AKAR protein kinase A biosensor, first in cells in culture, and then in hepatocytes in the liver of living mice. The approach is compatible with the most common 2PE microscope configurations and should be applicable to a variety of different FRET probes. PMID:26333599

  18. Intravital imaging technology reveals immune system dynamics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescent 'intravital' imaging is a new research technique by which the interior of living tissues and organs (in living bodies, if possible) can be observed, revealing the kinetics of cell and molecular processes in real time. Recent technological innovations in optical equipment and fluorescence imaging techniques have enabled a variety of cellular phenomena in different tissues and organs to be characterized under completely native conditions. This shift from static to dynamic biology constitutes the beginning of a new era in biomedical sciences. PMID:27238377

  19. Intravital lectin perfusion analysis of vascular permeability in human micro- and macro- blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Debbage, P L; Sölder, E; Seidl, S; Hutzler, P; Hugl, B; Ofner, D; Kreczy, A

    2001-10-01

    We previously applied intravital lectin perfusion in mouse models to elucidate mechanisms underlying vascular permeability. The present work transfers this technique to human models, analysing vascular permeability in macro- and microvessels. Human vascular endothelial surface carbohydrate biochemistry differs significantly from its murine counterpart, lacking alpha-galactosyl epitopes and expressing the L-fucose moiety in the glycocalyx; the poly-N-lactosamine glycan backbone is common to all mammals. We examined extensively lectin binding specificities in sections and in vivo, and then applied the poly-N-lactosamine-specific lectin LEA and the L-fucose-specific lectin UEA-I in human intravital perfusions. Transendothelial transport differed in macrovessels and microvessels. In microvessels of adult human fat tissue, rectal wall and rectal carcinomas, slow transendothelial transport by vesicles was followed by significant retention at the subendothelial basement membrane; paracellular passage was not observed. Passage time exceeded 1 h. Thus we found barrier mechanisms resembling those we described previously in murine tissues. In both adult and fetal macrovessels, the vena saphena magna and the umbilical vein, respectively, rapid passage across the endothelial lining was observed, the tracer localising completely in the subendothelial tissues within 15 min; vesicular transport was more rapid than in microvessels, and retention at the subendothelial basement membrane briefer.

  20. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe-/-Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages "dancing on the spot" and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells.

  1. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    PubMed Central

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe−/−Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages “dancing on the spot” and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells. PMID:25710308

  2. Setup and use of a two-laser multiphoton microscope for multichannel intravital fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Entenberg, David; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Gligorijevic, Bojana; Roussos, Evanthia T; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Condeelis, John

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing biological mechanisms dependent upon the interaction of many cell types in vivo requires both multiphoton microscope systems capable of expanding the number and types of fluorophores that can be imaged simultaneously while removing the wavelength and tunability restrictions of existing systems, and enhanced software for extracting critical cellular parameters from voluminous 4D data sets. We present a procedure for constructing a two-laser multiphoton microscope that extends the wavelength range of excitation light, expands the number of simultaneously usable fluorophores and markedly increases signal to noise via ‘over-clocking’ of detection. We also utilize a custom-written software plug-in that simplifies the quantitative tracking and analysis of 4D intravital image data. We begin by describing the optics, hardware, electronics and software required, and finally the use of the plug-in for analysis. We demonstrate the use of the setup and plug-in by presenting data collected via intravital imaging of a mouse model of breast cancer. The procedure may be completed in ~24 h. PMID:21959234

  3. Preoperative localization of parathyroid adenomas using 4-dimensional computed tomography: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Ellika, Shehanaz; Patel, Suresh; Aho, Todd; Marin, Horia

    2013-08-01

    Accurate preoperative localization is the key to successful parathyroid surgery in the era of minimally invasive parathyroid surgery. This article presents and discusses the embryologic basis of parathyroid gland and ectopic location and different imaging modalities helpful in diagnosing and localizing parathyroid adenomas and/or hyperplasia. We also aim to review the current surgical concepts in treatment of parathyroid adenomas and/or hyperplasia, the utility of 4-dimensional computed tomography for accurate preoperative localization of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands, imaging classification of adenomas and/or hyperplasia, and, finally, present some of the limitations of 4-dimensional computed tomography.

  4. Intravital imaging of multicolor-labeled tumor immune microenvironment through skin-fold window chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuhong; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Tumor immune microenvironment became very important for the tumor immunotherapy. There were several kinds of immune cells in tumor stromal, and they played very different roles in tumor growth. In order to observe the behaviors of multiple immune cells in tumor microenvironment and the interaction between immune cells and tumor cells at the same time, we generated a multicolor-labeled tumor immune microenvironment model. The tumor cells and immune cells were labeled by different fluorescent proteins. By using of skin-fold window chamber implanted into mice and intravital imaging technology, we could dynamically observe the different immune cells in tumor microenvironment. After data analysis from the video, we could know the behavior of TILs, DCs and Tregs in tumor immune microenvironment; furthermore, we could know these immune cells play different roles in the tumor microenvironment.

  5. Impact of rapamycin on phenotype and tolerogenic function of dendritic cells via intravital optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Meijie; Zhang, Zhihong

    2014-03-01

    Rapamycin (RAPA) as a unique tolerance-promoting therapeutic drug is crucial to successful clinical organ transplantation. DC (Dendritic cells) play a critical role in antigen presentation to T cells to initiate immune responses involved in tissue rejection. Although the influence of RAPA on DC differentiation and maturation had been reported by some research groups, it is still controversial and unclear right now. In addition, it is also lack of study on investigating the role of DC in DTH reaction via intravital optical imaging. Herein, we investigated the effect of rapamycin on phenotype and function of bone marrow monocyte-derived DC both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments by flow cytometry (FACS) showed that DC displayed decreased cell size and lower expression levels of surface molecule CD80 induced by RAPA; Furthermore, the phagocytic ability to OVA of DC was inhibited by RAPA started from 1 h to 2 h post co-incubation, but recovered after 4 h; In addition, the capacity of DC to activate naïve OT-II T cell proliferation was also inhibited at 3 day post co-incubation, but had no effect at 5 day, the data indicated this effect was reversible when removing the drug. More importantly, the DC-T interaction was monitored both in vitro and in intravital lymph node explant, and showed that RAPA-DC had a significant lower proportion of long-lived (>15min) contacts. Thus, RAPA displayed immunosuppressive to phenotypic and functional maturation of DC, and this phenomenon induced by RAPA may favorable in the clinical organ transplantation in future.

  6. Digital correction of motion artefacts in microscopy image sequences collected from living animals using rigid and nonrigid registration.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, K S; Salama, P; Dunn, K W; Delp, E J

    2012-02-01

    Digital image analysis is a fundamental component of quantitative microscopy. However, intravital microscopy presents many challenges for digital image analysis. In general, microscopy volumes are inherently anisotropic, suffer from decreasing contrast with tissue depth, lack object edge detail and characteristically have low signal levels. Intravital microscopy introduces the additional problem of motion artefacts, resulting from respiratory motion and heartbeat from specimens imaged in vivo. This paper describes an image registration technique for use with sequences of intravital microscopy images collected in time-series or in 3D volumes. Our registration method involves both rigid and nonrigid components. The rigid registration component corrects global image translations, whereas the nonrigid component manipulates a uniform grid of control points defined by B-splines. Each control point is optimized by minimizing a cost function consisting of two parts: a term to define image similarity, and a term to ensure deformation grid smoothness. Experimental results indicate that this approach is promising based on the analysis of several image volumes collected from the kidney, lung and salivary gland of living rodents. PMID:22092443

  7. Digital correction of motion artefacts in microscopy image sequences collected from living animals using rigid and nonrigid registration.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, K S; Salama, P; Dunn, K W; Delp, E J

    2012-02-01

    Digital image analysis is a fundamental component of quantitative microscopy. However, intravital microscopy presents many challenges for digital image analysis. In general, microscopy volumes are inherently anisotropic, suffer from decreasing contrast with tissue depth, lack object edge detail and characteristically have low signal levels. Intravital microscopy introduces the additional problem of motion artefacts, resulting from respiratory motion and heartbeat from specimens imaged in vivo. This paper describes an image registration technique for use with sequences of intravital microscopy images collected in time-series or in 3D volumes. Our registration method involves both rigid and nonrigid components. The rigid registration component corrects global image translations, whereas the nonrigid component manipulates a uniform grid of control points defined by B-splines. Each control point is optimized by minimizing a cost function consisting of two parts: a term to define image similarity, and a term to ensure deformation grid smoothness. Experimental results indicate that this approach is promising based on the analysis of several image volumes collected from the kidney, lung and salivary gland of living rodents.

  8. Intravital and whole-organ imaging reveals capture of melanoma-derived antigen by lymph node subcapsular macrophages leading to widespread deposition on follicular dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Moalli, Federica; Proulx, Steven T; Schwendener, Reto; Detmar, Michael; Schlapbach, Christoph; Stein, Jens V

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant antigens expressed by tumor cells, such as in melanoma, are often associated with humoral immune responses, which may in turn influence tumor progression. Despite recent data showing the central role of adaptive immune responses on cancer spread or control, it remains poorly understood where and how tumor-derived antigen (TDA) induces a humoral immune response in tumor-bearing hosts. Based on our observation of TDA accumulation in B cell areas of lymph nodes (LNs) from melanoma patients, we developed a pre-metastatic B16.F10 melanoma model expressing a fluorescent fusion protein, tandem dimer tomato, as a surrogate TDA. Using intravital two-photon microscopy (2PM) and whole-mount 3D LN imaging of tumor-draining LNs in immunocompetent mice, we report an unexpectedly widespread accumulation of TDA on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), which were dynamically scanned by circulating B cells. Furthermore, 2PM imaging identified macrophages located in the subcapsular sinus of tumor-draining LNs to capture subcellular TDA-containing particles arriving in afferent lymph. As a consequence, depletion of macrophages or genetic ablation of B cells and FDCs resulted in dramatically reduced TDA capture in tumor-draining LNs. In sum, we identified a major pathway for the induction of humoral responses in a melanoma model, which may be exploitable to manipulate anti-TDA antibody production during cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25821451

  9. Intravital and Whole-Organ Imaging Reveals Capture of Melanoma-Derived Antigen by Lymph Node Subcapsular Macrophages Leading to Widespread Deposition on Follicular Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moalli, Federica; Proulx, Steven T.; Schwendener, Reto; Detmar, Michael; Schlapbach, Christoph; Stein, Jens V.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant antigens expressed by tumor cells, such as in melanoma, are often associated with humoral immune responses, which may in turn influence tumor progression. Despite recent data showing the central role of adaptive immune responses on cancer spread or control, it remains poorly understood where and how tumor-derived antigen (TDA) induces a humoral immune response in tumor-bearing hosts. Based on our observation of TDA accumulation in B cell areas of lymph nodes (LNs) from melanoma patients, we developed a pre-metastatic B16.F10 melanoma model expressing a fluorescent fusion protein, tandem dimer tomato, as a surrogate TDA. Using intravital two-photon microscopy (2PM) and whole-mount 3D LN imaging of tumor-draining LNs in immunocompetent mice, we report an unexpectedly widespread accumulation of TDA on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), which were dynamically scanned by circulating B cells. Furthermore, 2PM imaging identified macrophages located in the subcapsular sinus of tumor-draining LNs to capture subcellular TDA-containing particles arriving in afferent lymph. As a consequence, depletion of macrophages or genetic ablation of B cells and FDCs resulted in dramatically reduced TDA capture in tumor-draining LNs. In sum, we identified a major pathway for the induction of humoral responses in a melanoma model, which may be exploitable to manipulate anti-TDA antibody production during cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25821451

  10. Intravital Microscopy for Identifying Tumor Vessels in Patients With Stage IA-IV Melanoma That is Being Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IA Skin Melanoma; Stage IB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  11. Ultrabright organic dots with aggregation-induced emission characteristics for real-time two-photon intravital vasculature imaging.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dan; Goh, Chi Ching; Feng, Guangxue; Zhao, Zujin; Liu, Jie; Liu, Rongrong; Tomczak, Nikodem; Geng, Junlong; Tang, Ben Zhong; Ng, Lai Guan; Liu, Bin

    2013-11-13

    Ultrabright organic dots with aggregation-induced emission characteristics (AIE dots) are prepared and shown to exhibit a high quantum yield, a, large two-photon absorption cross-section, and low in vivo toxicity. Real-time two-photon intravital blood vascular imaging in various tissues substantiates that the AIE dots are effective probes for in vivo vasculature imaging in a deep and high-contrast manner.

  12. Time-Resolved 4-Dimensional Computed-Tomography Angiography Can Correctly Identify Carotid Pseudo-Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Ng, Felix C; Datta, Mineesh; Choi, Philip M C

    2016-04-01

    Correct identification of symptomatic high-grade internal carotid artery stenosis from low-grade or total chronic occlusion is critical for patient selection for urgent carotid endarterectomy. Carotid pseudo-occlusion is a flow-related artifact on noninvasive imaging that can lead to an incorrect diagnosis of total internal carotid artery occlusion, thereby denying an eligible patient for appropriate surgical treatment. We present an 82-year-old man with a symptomatic critical internal carotid artery, which was detected on time-resolved 4-dimensional computed-tomography angiography, whereas single-phase computed-tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and Doppler ultrasonography suggested apparent occlusion. To our understanding, the use of 4-dimensional computed-tomography angiography to identify carotid pseudo-occlusion has not been previously reported.

  13. A 4-Dimensional Representation of Antennal Lobe Output Based on an Ensemble of Characterized Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Erich M.; Huetteroth, Wolf; Schachtner, Joachim; Daly, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    A central problem facing studies of neural encoding in sensory systems is how to accurately quantify the extent of spatial and temporal responses. In this study, we take advantage of the relatively simple and stereotypic neural architecture found in invertebrates. We combine standard electrophysiological techniques, recently developed population analysis techniques, and novel anatomical methods to form an innovative 4-dimensional view of odor output representations in the antennal lobe of the moth Manduca sexta. This novel approach allows quantification of olfactory responses of characterized neurons with spike time resolution. Additionally, arbitrary integration windows can be used for comparisons with other methods such as imaging. By assigning statistical significance to changes in neuronal firing, this method can visualize activity across the entire antennal lobe. The resulting 4-dimensional representation of antennal lobe output complements imaging and multi-unit experiments yet provides a more comprehensive and accurate view of glomerular activation patterns in spike time resolution. PMID:19464513

  14. Six-color intravital two-photon imaging of brain tumors and their dynamic microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ricard, Clément; Debarbieux, Franck Christian

    2014-01-01

    The majority of intravital studies on brain tumor in living animal so far rely on dual color imaging. We describe here a multiphoton imaging protocol to dynamically characterize the interactions between six cellular components in a living mouse. We applied this methodology to a clinically relevant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) model designed in reporter mice with targeted cell populations labeled by fluorescent proteins of different colors. This model permitted us to make non-invasive longitudinal and multi-scale observations of cell-to-cell interactions. We provide examples of such 5D (x,y,z,t,color) images acquired on a daily basis from volumes of interest, covering most of the mouse parietal cortex at subcellular resolution. Spectral deconvolution allowed us to accurately separate each cell population as well as some components of the extracellular matrix. The technique represents a powerful tool for investigating how tumor progression is influenced by the interactions of tumor cells with host cells and the extracellular matrix micro-environment. It will be especially valuable for evaluating neuro-oncological drug efficacy and target specificity. The imaging protocol provided here can be easily translated to other mouse models of neuropathologies, and should also be of fundamental interest for investigations in other areas of systems biology. PMID:24605087

  15. Electron Microscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)

  16. Intravital Imaging of Vascular Transmigration by the Lyme Spirochete: Requirement for the Integrin Binding Residues of the B. burgdorferi P66 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Devender; Ristow, Laura C.; Shi, Meiqing; Mukherjee, Priyanka; Caine, Jennifer A.; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kubes, Paul; Coburn, Jenifer; Chaconas, George

    2015-01-01

    Vascular extravasation, a key step in systemic infection by hematogenous microbial pathogens, is poorly understood, but has been postulated to encompass features similar to vascular transmigration by leukocytes. The Lyme disease spirochete can cause a variety of clinical manifestations, including arthritis, upon hematogenous dissemination. This pathogen encodes numerous surface adhesive proteins (adhesins) that may promote extravasation, but none have yet been implicated in this process. In this work we report the novel use of intravital microscopy of the peripheral knee vasculature to study transmigration of the Lyme spirochete in living Cd1d-/-mice. In the absence of iNKT cells, major immune modulators in the mouse joint, spirochetes that have extravasated into joint-proximal tissue remain in the local milieu and can be enumerated accurately. We show that BBK32, a fibronectin and glycosaminoglycan adhesin of B. burgdorferi involved in early steps of endothelial adhesion, is not required for extravasation from the peripheral knee vasculature. In contrast, almost no transmigration occurs in the absence of P66, an outer membrane protein that has porin and integrin adhesin functions. Importantly, P66 mutants specifically defective in integrin binding were incapable of promoting extravasation. P66 itself does not promote detectable microvascular interactions, suggesting that vascular adhesion of B. burgdorferi mediated by other adhesins, sets the stage for P66-integrin interactions leading to transmigration. Although integrin-binding proteins with diverse functions are encoded by a variety of bacterial pathogens, P66 is the first to have a documented and direct role in vascular transmigration. The emerging picture of vascular escape by the Lyme spirochete shows similarities, but distinct differences from leukocyte transmigration. PMID:26684456

  17. Scaling Limits and Critical Behaviour of the 4 -Dimensional n -Component |\\varphi |^4 Spin Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauerschmidt, Roland; Brydges, David C.; Slade, Gordon

    2014-08-01

    We consider the n -component |\\varphi |^4 spin model on {mathbb {Z}}^4 , for all n ge 1 , with small coupling constant. We prove that the susceptibility has a logarithmic correction to mean field scaling, with exponent n+2/n+8 for the logarithm. We also analyse the asymptotic behaviour of the pressure as the critical point is approached, and prove that the specific heat has fractional logarithmic scaling for n =1,2,3 ; double logarithmic scaling for n=4 ; and is bounded when n>4 . In addition, for the model defined on the 4 -dimensional discrete torus, we prove that the scaling limit as the critical point is approached is a multiple of a Gaussian free field on the continuum torus, whereas, in the subcritical regime, the scaling limit is Gaussian white noise with intensity given by the susceptibility. The proofs are based on a rigorous renormalisation group method in the spirit of Wilson, developed in a companion series of papers to study the 4-dimensional weakly self-avoiding walk, and adapted here to the |\\varphi |^4 model.

  18. Intravital Computer Morphometry on Protozoa: A Method for Monitoring of the Morphofunctional Disorders in Cells Exposed in the Cell Phone Communication Electromagnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Uskalova, D V; Igolkina, Yu V; Sarapultseva, E I

    2016-08-01

    Morphofunctional disorders in unicellular aquatic protozoa - Spirostomum ambiguum infusorians after 30-, 60-, and 360-min exposure in electromagnetic field at a radiation frequency of 1 GHz and energy flow density of 50 μW/cm(2) were analyzed by intravital computer morphometry. Significant disorders in morphometric values correlated with low mobility of the protozoa. The results suggested the use of intravital computer morphometry on the protozoa for early diagnosis of radiation-induced effects of the mobile communication electromagnetic field, for example, low mobility of spermatozoa.

  19. Intravital Computer Morphometry on Protozoa: A Method for Monitoring of the Morphofunctional Disorders in Cells Exposed in the Cell Phone Communication Electromagnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Uskalova, D V; Igolkina, Yu V; Sarapultseva, E I

    2016-08-01

    Morphofunctional disorders in unicellular aquatic protozoa - Spirostomum ambiguum infusorians after 30-, 60-, and 360-min exposure in electromagnetic field at a radiation frequency of 1 GHz and energy flow density of 50 μW/cm(2) were analyzed by intravital computer morphometry. Significant disorders in morphometric values correlated with low mobility of the protozoa. The results suggested the use of intravital computer morphometry on the protozoa for early diagnosis of radiation-induced effects of the mobile communication electromagnetic field, for example, low mobility of spermatozoa. PMID:27591872

  20. Analytical Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

  1. Evaluation of 4-dimensional Computed Tomography to 4-dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Deformable Image Registration for Lung Cancer Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Balik, Salim; Weiss, Elisabeth; Jan, Nuzhat; Roman, Nicholas; Sleeman, William C.; Fatyga, Mirek; Christensen, Gary E.; Zhang, Cheng; Murphy, Martin J.; Lu, Jun; Keall, Paul; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate 2 deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for the purpose of contour mapping to support image-guided adaptive radiation therapy with 4-dimensional cone-beam CT (4DCBCT). Methods and Materials: One planning 4D fan-beam CT (4DFBCT) and 7 weekly 4DCBCT scans were acquired for 10 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients. The gross tumor volume was delineated by a physician in all 4D images. End-of-inspiration phase planning 4DFBCT was registered to the corresponding phase in weekly 4DCBCT images for day-to-day registrations. For phase-to-phase registration, the end-of-inspiration phase from each 4D image was registered to the end-of-expiration phase. Two DIR algorithms—small deformation inverse consistent linear elastic (SICLE) and Insight Toolkit diffeomorphic demons (DEMONS)—were evaluated. Physician-delineated contours were compared with the warped contours by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), average symmetric distance, and false-positive and false-negative indices. The DIR results are compared with rigid registration of tumor. Results: For day-to-day registrations, the mean DSC was 0.75 ± 0.09 with SICLE, 0.70 ± 0.12 with DEMONS, 0.66 ± 0.12 with rigid-tumor registration, and 0.60 ± 0.14 with rigid-bone registration. Results were comparable to intraobserver variability calculated from phase-to-phase registrations as well as measured interobserver variation for 1 patient. SICLE and DEMONS, when compared with rigid-bone (4.1 mm) and rigid-tumor (3.6 mm) registration, respectively reduced the average symmetric distance to 2.6 and 3.3 mm. On average, SICLE and DEMONS increased the DSC to 0.80 and 0.79, respectively, compared with rigid-tumor (0.78) registrations for 4DCBCT phase-to-phase registrations. Conclusions: Deformable image registration achieved comparable accuracy to reported interobserver delineation variability and higher accuracy than rigid-tumor registration. Deformable image registration

  2. Intravital Imaging of Neutrophil Priming Using IL-1β Promoter-driven DsRed Reporter Mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yi; Liu, Yun; Takashima, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in human blood circulation and are quickly recruited to inflammatory sites. Priming is a critical event that enhances the phagocytic functionality of neutrophils. Although extensive studies have unveiled the existence and importance of neutrophil priming during infection and injury, means of visualizing this process in vivo have been unavailable. The protocol provided enables monitoring of the dynamic process of neutrophil priming in living animals by combining three methodologies: 1) DsRed reporter signal - used as a measure of priming 2) in vivo neutrophil labeling - achieved by injection of fluorescence-conjugated anti-lymphocyte antigen 6G (Ly6G) monoclonal antibody (mAb) and 3) intravital confocal imaging. Several critical steps are involved in this protocol: oxazolone-induced mouse ear skin inflammation, appropriate sedation of animals, repeated injections of anti-Ly6G mAb, and prevention of focus drift during imaging. Although a few limitations have been observed, such as the limit of continuous imaging time (~ 8 hr) in one mouse and the leakage of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran from blood vessels in the inflammatory state, this protocol provides a fundamental framework for intravital imaging of primed neutrophil behavior and function, which can easily be expanded to examination of other immune cells in mouse inflammation models. PMID:27403648

  3. Temperature and Energy of 4-Dimensional Axisymmetric Black Holes from Entropic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ren; Zhang, Li-Chun; Wu, Yue-Qin; Li, Huai-Fan

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the temperature and energy on holographic screens for 4-dimensional axisymmetric black holes with the entropic force idea proposed by Verlinde. According to the principle of thermal equilibrium, the location of holographic screen outside the axisymmetric black hole horizon is not a equivalent radius surface. The location of isothermal holographic screen outside the axisymmetric black hole horizon is obtained. Using the equipartition rule, we derive the correction expression of energy of isothermal holographic screen. When holographic screens are far away the black hole horizon, the entropic force of charged rotating particles can be expressed as Newton's law of gravity. When the screen crosses the event horizon, the temperature of the screen agrees with the Hawking temperature and the entropic force gives rise to the surface gravity for both of the black holes.

  4. Long-term time-lapse multimodal microscopy for tracking cell dynamics in live tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Benedikt W.; Valero, Maria C.; Chaney, Eric J.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Marni D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2011-02-01

    High speed intravital microscopy has emerged as an essential tool for studying cellular dynamics in live tissue. A limitation of this technique, however, is that the timescale that a sample can be continuously imaged is limited by practical considerations to several hours. Long term observation of live tissue is of great interest for a variety of research areas. We present methods for observing long term cellular dynamics in live tissue based on three-dimensional registration of time-lapse intravital microscopy images. For these experiments we utilized a custom multimodal microscope that allows simultaneous and co-registered acquisition of optical coherence (OCM) and multiphoton (MPM) microscopy images. OCM allows the structure of a sample to be visualized based on backscattered light while MPM excited fluorescence allows individual cells and cell function to be visualized. The OCM images of tissue structure are used to register data sets taken at different time points. The transformations of the OCM images are applied to MPM images to determine the migration of cell populations. This method of image registration is applied to in vivo tracking of bone-marrow derived GFP-labeled stem cells in mouse skin following bone marrow transplants from GFP donors into species-matched wildtype hosts. The use of three-dimensional image registration of time-lapse microscopy images enables tracking these cells after local cutaneous injury, and for investigating the role of skin stem cells in wound healing.

  5. Fast and precise targeting of single tumor cells in vivo by multimodal correlative microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Karreman, Matthia A.; Mercier, Luc; Schieber, Nicole L.; Solecki, Gergely; Allio, Guillaume; Winkler, Frank; Ruthensteiner, Bernhard; Goetz, Jacky G.; Schwab, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intravital microscopy provides dynamic understanding of multiple cell biological processes, but its limited resolution has so far precluded structural analysis. Because it is difficult to capture rare and transient events, only a few attempts have been made to observe specific developmental and pathological processes in animal models using electron microscopy. The multimodal correlative approach that we propose here combines intravital microscopy, microscopic X-ray computed tomography and three-dimensional electron microscopy. It enables a rapid (c.a. 2 weeks) and accurate (<5 µm) correlation of functional imaging to ultrastructural analysis of single cells in a relevant context. We demonstrate the power of our approach by capturing single tumor cells in the vasculature of the cerebral cortex and in subcutaneous tumors, providing unique insights into metastatic events. Providing a significantly improved throughput, our workflow enables multiple sampling, a prerequisite for making correlative imaging a relevant tool to study cell biology in vivo. Owing to the versatility of this workflow, we envision broad applications in various fields of biological research, such as cancer or developmental biology. PMID:26659665

  6. Correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loussert Fonta, Céline; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years correlative microscopy, combining the power and advantages of different imaging system, e.g., light, electrons, X-ray, NMR, etc., has become an important tool for biomedical research. Among all the possible combinations of techniques, light and electron microscopy, have made an especially big step forward and are being implemented in more and more research labs. Electron microscopy profits from the high spatial resolution, the direct recognition of the cellular ultrastructure and identification of the organelles. It, however, has two severe limitations: the restricted field of view and the fact that no live imaging can be done. On the other hand light microscopy has the advantage of live imaging, following a fluorescently tagged molecule in real time and at lower magnifications the large field of view facilitates the identification and location of sparse individual cells in a large context, e.g., tissue. The combination of these two imaging techniques appears to be a valuable approach to dissect biological events at a submicrometer level. Light microscopy can be used to follow a labelled protein of interest, or a visible organelle such as mitochondria, in time, then the sample is fixed and the exactly same region is investigated by electron microscopy. The time resolution is dependent on the speed of penetration and fixation when chemical fixatives are used and on the reaction time of the operator for cryo-fixation. Light microscopy can also be used to identify cells of interest, e.g., a special cell type in tissue or cells that have been modified by either transfections or RNAi, in a large population of non-modified cells. A further application is to find fluorescence labels in cells on a large section to reduce searching time in the electron microscope. Multiple fluorescence labelling of a series of sections can be correlated with the ultrastructure of the individual sections to get 3D information of the distribution of the marked proteins: array

  7. Correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loussert Fonta, Céline; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years correlative microscopy, combining the power and advantages of different imaging system, e.g., light, electrons, X-ray, NMR, etc., has become an important tool for biomedical research. Among all the possible combinations of techniques, light and electron microscopy, have made an especially big step forward and are being implemented in more and more research labs. Electron microscopy profits from the high spatial resolution, the direct recognition of the cellular ultrastructure and identification of the organelles. It, however, has two severe limitations: the restricted field of view and the fact that no live imaging can be done. On the other hand light microscopy has the advantage of live imaging, following a fluorescently tagged molecule in real time and at lower magnifications the large field of view facilitates the identification and location of sparse individual cells in a large context, e.g., tissue. The combination of these two imaging techniques appears to be a valuable approach to dissect biological events at a submicrometer level. Light microscopy can be used to follow a labelled protein of interest, or a visible organelle such as mitochondria, in time, then the sample is fixed and the exactly same region is investigated by electron microscopy. The time resolution is dependent on the speed of penetration and fixation when chemical fixatives are used and on the reaction time of the operator for cryo-fixation. Light microscopy can also be used to identify cells of interest, e.g., a special cell type in tissue or cells that have been modified by either transfections or RNAi, in a large population of non-modified cells. A further application is to find fluorescence labels in cells on a large section to reduce searching time in the electron microscope. Multiple fluorescence labelling of a series of sections can be correlated with the ultrastructure of the individual sections to get 3D information of the distribution of the marked proteins: array

  8. Optimizing 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Sampling for Respiratory Motion Analysis of Pancreatic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H.N.; Senneville, Baudouin D. de

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimum sampling strategy for retrospective reconstruction of 4-dimensional (4D) MR data for nonrigid motion characterization of tumor and organs at risk for radiation therapy purposes. Methods and Materials: For optimization, we compared 2 surrogate signals (external respiratory bellows and internal MRI navigators) and 2 MR sampling strategies (Cartesian and radial) in terms of image quality and robustness. Using the optimized protocol, 6 pancreatic cancer patients were scanned to calculate the 4D motion. Region of interest analysis was performed to characterize the respiratory-induced motion of the tumor and organs at risk simultaneously. Results: The MRI navigator was found to be a more reliable surrogate for pancreatic motion than the respiratory bellows signal. Radial sampling is most benign for undersampling artifacts and intraview motion. Motion characterization revealed interorgan and interpatient variation, as well as heterogeneity within the tumor. Conclusions: A robust 4D-MRI method, based on clinically available protocols, is presented and successfully applied to characterize the abdominal motion in a small number of pancreatic cancer patients.

  9. 4-dimensional model of carbon dioxide seasonal deposition on Mars based on HEND/Odyssey data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, M. L.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Sanin, A. B.; Tretyakov, V. I.

    The carbon dioxide seasonal cycle has been studied on Mars using data from High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND) onboard mission Mars Odyssey. The primary task of the HEND experiment is measuring of martian neutron albedo from orbit around Mars. The neutron spectroscopy can be easily used not only for detection of subsurface water bearing layers but also for following up time history of CO2 deposit seasonally condensed from atmosphere down to martian surface. Condensation and sublimation of atmospheric CO2 is happened in vicinity of Mars near polar regions (>60N and >60S) which are characterized by presence of enormous amount of subsurface water ice (20-80% by mass). Atmospheric CO2 deposit covered the surface by relative thick layer with thickness 30-100cm. It effectively hides underlying water ice layers from orbit observations causing significant changes of neutron leakage flux. Detection of these changes allows to deconvolve CO2 cycle time history and estimate column density (g/cm2) and mass (kg) of CO2 deposit. Observations of particular regions on south and north may be combined in 4-dimensional model of CO2 deposit showing how its thickness/mass changes at different regions with time. The primary goal of this study is to present our estimations of CO2 condensed mass on north and south as function of martian seasons during entire martian year. We also add comparison between estimation from HEND data and predictions of AMES climate models.

  10. Exploratory nuclear microprobe data visualisation using 3- and 4-dimensional biological volume rendering tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Harry J.; Ren, Minqin; van Kan, Jeroen A.; Watt, Frank; White, Dan

    2007-07-01

    The emergence of Confocal Microscopy (CM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) as everyday tools in cellular level biology has stimulated development of 3D data visualisation software. Conventional 2-dimensional images of cell (optical) sections obtained in a transmission electron or optical microscopes and more sophisticated multidimensional imaging methods require processing software capable of 3D rendering and mathematically transforming data in 3-, 4-, or more dimensions. The richness of data obtained from the different nuclear microscopy imaging techniques and often parallel information channels (X-ray, secondary electron, Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy) is often not obvious because subtleties and interrelations in the data could not be rendered in a human interpretable way. In this exploratory study we have applied the BioImageXD software, originally developed for rendering of multidimensional CM data, to some different nuclear microscopy data. Cells-on-Silicon STIM data from a human breast cancer cell line and elemental maps from lesions on rabbit aorta have been visualised. Mathematical filtering and averaging combined with hardware accelerated 3D rendering enabled dramatically clear visualisation of inter-cellular regions comprising extra cellular matrix proteins that were otherwise difficult to visualise, and also sub cellular structures. For elemental mapping, the use of filtered correlation surfaces and colour channels clearly revealed the interrelations in the data structures that are not easily discernible in the PIXE elemental maps.

  11. 5D-intravital tomography as a novel tool for non-invasive in-vivo analysis of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans G.; Gregory, Axel; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; Schwarz, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Stracke, Frank; Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2010-02-01

    Some years ago, CE-marked clinical multiphoton systems for 3D imaging of human skin with subcellular resolution have been launched. These tomographs provide optical biopsies with submicron resolution based on two-photon excited autofluorescence (NAD(P)H, flavoproteins, keratin, elastin, melanin, porphyrins) and second harmonic generation by collagen. The 3D tomograph was now transferred into a 5D imaging system by the additional detection of the emission spectrum and the fluorescence lifetime based on spatially and spectrally resolved time-resolved single photon counting. The novel 5D intravital tomograph (5D-IVT) was employed for the early detection of atopic dermatitis and the analysis of treatment effects.

  12. Intravital fluorescence imaging of mouse brain using implantable semiconductor devices and epi-illumination of biological tissue

    PubMed Central

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Haruta, Makito; Nagasaki, Mizuki; Takehara, Hironari; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The application of the fluorescence imaging method to living animals, together with the use of genetically engineered animals and synthesized photo-responsive compounds, is a powerful method for investigating brain functions. Here, we report a fluorescence imaging method for the brain surface and deep brain tissue that uses compact and mass-producible semiconductor imaging devices based on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. An image sensor chip was designed to be inserted into brain tissue, and its size was 1500 × 450 μm. Sample illumination is also a key issue for intravital fluorescence imaging. Hence, for the uniform illumination of the imaging area, we propose a new method involving the epi-illumination of living biological tissues, and we performed investigations using optical simulations and experimental evaluation. PMID:26137364

  13. Photoacoustic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a hybrid in vivo imaging technique that acoustically detects optical contrast via the photoacoustic effect. Unlike pure optical microscopic techniques, PAM takes advantage of the weak acoustic scattering in tissue and thus breaks through the optical diffusion limit (~1 mm in soft tissue). With its excellent scalability, PAM can provide high-resolution images at desired maximum imaging depths up to a few millimeters. Compared with backscattering-based confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography, PAM provides absorption contrast instead of scattering contrast. Furthermore, PAM can image more molecules, endogenous or exogenous, at their absorbing wavelengths than fluorescence-based methods, such as wide-field, confocal, and multi-photon microscopy. Most importantly, PAM can simultaneously image anatomical, functional, molecular, flow dynamic and metabolic contrasts in vivo. Focusing on state-of-the-art developments in PAM, this Review discusses the key features of PAM implementations and their applications in biomedical studies. PMID:24416085

  14. Endoscopic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Konstantin; Sung, Kung-Bin; Collier, Tom; Clark, Anne; Arifler, Dizem; Lacy, Alicia; Descour, Michael; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    In vivo endoscopic optical microscopy provides a tool to assess tissue architecture and morphology with contrast and resolution similar to that provided by standard histopathology – without need for physical tissue removal. In this article, we focus on optical imaging technologies that have the potential to dramatically improve the detection, prevention, and therapy of epithelial cancers. Epithelial pre-cancers and cancers are associated with a variety of morphologic, architectural, and molecular changes, which currently can be assessed only through invasive, painful biopsy. Optical imaging is ideally suited to detecting cancer-related alterations because it can detect biochemical and morphologic alterations with sub-cellular resolution throughout the entire epithelial thickness. Optical techniques can be implemented non-invasively, in real time, and at low cost to survey the tissue surface at risk. Our manuscript focuses primarily on modalities that currently are the most developed: reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). However, recent advances in fluorescence-based endoscopic microscopy also are reviewed briefly. We discuss the basic principles of these emerging technologies and their current and potential applications in early cancer detection. We also present research activities focused on development of exogenous contrast agents that can enhance the morphological features important for cancer detection and that have the potential to allow vital molecular imaging of cancer-related biomarkers. In conclusion, we discuss future improvements to the technology needed to develop robust clinical devices. PMID:14646041

  15. SU-E-T-267: Proton Pencil Beam Scanning for Mediastinal Lymphoma: 4-Dimensional Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, C; Plastaras, J; Tochner, Z; Hill-Kayser, C; Hahn, S; Both, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) for the treatment of mediastinal lymphoma. Methods: A group of 6 patients were planned using an anterior field with PBS. Spots with ∼5 mm σ were used for all patients, while large spots (∼10 mm σ) were employed for patients with motion perpendicular to the beam (≥5 mm). We considered volumetric repainting such that, in each fraction, the same field would be delivered twice. Four-dimensional dose was calculated on initial and verification 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans (2—3) based on respiratory trace and beam delivery sequence. This was implemented by binning the spots into separate plans on each 4D-CT phase respectively. Four starting phases were sampled for each painting and 4 energy switching times (0.5 s, 1 s, 3 s, and 5 s) were tested, resulting in 2560 dose distributions for the cohort. Plan robustness was measured for target and critical structures in terms of the percentage difference between delivered dose and planned dose. Results: For 5 of the 6 patients, the ITV (internal target volume) D98% was degraded by <3% (standard deviations ∼ 0.1%) when averaged over the whole course (up to 5% per fraction). Deviations of mean lung dose, heart maximum dose, and cord maximum dose were within 5% of prescribed dose. For one patient with motion perpendicular to the beam (up to 5 mm), the degradation of ITV D98% was 9% over the whole course (12% per fraction), which was mitigated to 1% (3% per fraction) by employing large spots and repainting. No significant difference in coverage was observed for different energy switching times. Conclusion: This feasibility study demonstrates that, for mediastinal lymphoma, the PBS plan robustness can be maintained during delivery when target motion is measured and volumetric repainting and/or large spots are employed. This work was supported by Ion Beam Application.

  16. The 4-Dimensional Plant: Effects of Wind-Induced Canopy Movement on Light Fluctuations and Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Alexandra J.; Retkute, Renata; Preston, Simon P.; Jensen, Oliver E.; Pound, Michael P.; Pridmore, Tony P.; Murchie, Erik H.

    2016-01-01

    accurate modeling of mechanical canopy excitation (here coined the 4-dimensional plant) and some associated biological and applied implications of such techniques. We hypothesize that biomechanical plant properties are a specific adaptation to achieve wind-induced photosynthetic enhancement and we outline how traits facilitating canopy excitation could be used as a route for improving crop yield. PMID:27708654

  17. Management of Respiration-Induced Motion With 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT) for Pancreas Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, An; Liang, Zhiwen; Erickson, Beth; Li, X. Allen

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to quantify respiration-induced organ motions for pancreatic cancer patients and to explore strategies to account for these motions. Methods and Materials: Both 3-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) and 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scans were acquired sequentially for 15 pancreatic cancer patients, including 10 randomly selected patients and 5 patients selected from a subgroup of patients with large tumor respiratory motions. 3DCTs were fused with 2 sets of 4DCT data at the end of exhale phase (50%) and the end of inhale phase (0%). The target was delineated on the 50% and 0% phase CT sets, and the organs at risk were drawn on the 3DCT. These contours were populated to the CT sets at other respiratory phases based on deformable image registration. Internal target volumes (ITV) were generated by tracing the target contours of all phases (ITV{sub 10}), 3 phases of 0%, 20% and 50% (ITV{sub 3}), and 2 phases of 0% and 50% (ITV{sub 2}). ITVs generated from phase images were compared using percentage of volume overlap, Dice coefficient, geometric centers, and average surface distance. Results: Volume variations of pancreas, kidneys, and liver as a function of respiratory phases were small (<5%) during respiration. For the 10 randomly selected patients, peak-to-peak amplitudes of liver, left kidney, right kidney, and the target along the superior-inferior (SI) direction were 7.9 ± 3.2 mm, 7.1 ± 3.1 mm, 5.7 ± 3.2 mm, and 5.9 ± 2.8 mm, respectively. The percentage of volume overlap and Dice coefficient were 92% ± 1% and 96% ± 1% between ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub 2} and 96% ± 1% and 98% ± 1% between ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub 3}, respectively. The percentage of volume overlap between ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub 3} was 93.6 ± 1.1 for patients with tumor motion >8 mm. Conclusions: Appropriate motion management strategies are proposed for radiation treatment planning of pancreatic tumors based on magnitudes of tumor

  18. Clinical Validation of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Ventilation With Pulmonary Function Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Douglas; Schubert, Leah; Diot, Quentin; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas; Martel, Mary K.; Linderman, Derek; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Miften, Moyed; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: A new form of functional imaging has been proposed in the form of 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation. Because 4DCTs are acquired as part of routine care for lung cancer patients, calculating ventilation maps from 4DCTs provides spatial lung function information without added dosimetric or monetary cost to the patient. Before 4DCT-ventilation is implemented it needs to be clinically validated. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) provide a clinically established way of evaluating lung function. The purpose of our work was to perform a clinical validation by comparing 4DCT-ventilation metrics with PFT data. Methods and Materials: Ninety-eight lung cancer patients with pretreatment 4DCT and PFT data were included in the study. Pulmonary function test metrics used to diagnose obstructive lung disease were recorded: forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and FEV1/forced vital capacity. Four-dimensional CT data sets and spatial registration were used to compute 4DCT-ventilation images using a density change–based and a Jacobian-based model. The ventilation maps were reduced to single metrics intended to reflect the degree of ventilation obstruction. Specifically, we computed the coefficient of variation (SD/mean), ventilation V20 (volume of lung ≤20% ventilation), and correlated the ventilation metrics with PFT data. Regression analysis was used to determine whether 4DCT ventilation data could predict for normal versus abnormal lung function using PFT thresholds. Results: Correlation coefficients comparing 4DCT-ventilation with PFT data ranged from 0.63 to 0.72, with the best agreement between FEV1 and coefficient of variation. Four-dimensional CT ventilation metrics were able to significantly delineate between clinically normal versus abnormal PFT results. Conclusions: Validation of 4DCT ventilation with clinically relevant metrics is essential. We demonstrate good global agreement between PFTs and 4DCT-ventilation, indicating that 4DCT

  19. Planning 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT) Cannot Adequately Represent Daily Intrafractional Motion of Abdominal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Jiajia; Santanam, Lakshmi; Noel, Camille; Parikh, Parag J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) can adequately represent daily motion of abdominal tumors in regularly fractionated and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) patients. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional tumor motion of 10 patients with abdominal tumors (4 pancreas-fractionated and 6 liver-stereotactic patients) with implanted fiducials was measured based on daily orthogonal fluoroscopic movies over 38 treatment fractions. The needed internal margin for at least 90% of tumor coverage was calculated based on a 95th and fifth percentile of daily 3-dimensional tumor motion. The planning internal margin was generated by fusing 4DCT motion from all phase bins. The disagreement between needed and planning internal margin was analyzed fraction by fraction in 3 motion axes (superior-inferior [SI], anterior-posterior [AP], and left-right [LR]). The 4DCT margin was considered as an overestimation/underestimation of daily motion when disagreement exceeded at least 3 mm in the SI axis and/or 1.2 mm in the AP and LR axes (4DCT image resolution). The underlying reasons for this disagreement were evaluated based on interfractional and intrafractional breathing variation. Results: The 4DCT overestimated daily 3-dimensional motion in 39% of the fractions in 7 of 10 patients and underestimated it in 53% of the fractions in 8 of 10 patients. Median underestimation was 3.9 mm, 3.0 mm, and 1.7 mm in the SI axis, AP axis, and LR axis, respectively. The 4DCT was found to capture irregular deep breaths in 3 of 10 patients, with 4DCT motion larger than mean daily amplitude by 18 to 21 mm. The breathing pattern varied from breath to breath and day to day. The intrafractional variation of amplitude was significantly larger than intrafractional variation (2.7 mm vs 1.3 mm) in the primary motion axis (ie, SI axis). The SBRT patients showed significantly larger intrafractional amplitude variation than fractionated patients (3.0 mm vs 2

  20. Modeling Pancreatic Tumor Motion Using 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography and Surrogate Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Huguet, Florence; Yorke, Ellen D.; Davidson, Margaret; Zhang, Zhigang; Jackson, Andrew; Mageras, Gig S.; Wu, Abraham J.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To assess intrafractional positional variations of pancreatic tumors using 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT), their impact on gross tumor volume (GTV) coverage, the reliability of biliary stent, fiducial seeds, and the real-time position management (RPM) external marker as tumor surrogates for setup of respiratory gated treatment, and to build a correlative model of tumor motion. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the respiration-correlated 4D-CT images acquired during simulation of 36 patients with either a biliary stent (n=16) or implanted fiducials (n=20) who were treated with RPM respiratory gated intensity modulated radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Respiratory displacement relative to end-exhalation was measured for the GTV, the biliary stent, or fiducial seeds, and the RPM marker. The results were compared between the full respiratory cycle and the gating interval. Linear mixed model was used to assess the correlation of GTV motion with the potential surrogate markers. Results: The average ± SD GTV excursions were 0.3 ± 0.2 cm in the left-right direction, 0.6 ± 0.3 cm in the anterior-posterior direction, and 1.3 ± 0.7 cm in the superior-inferior direction. Gating around end-exhalation reduced GTV motion by 46% to 60%. D95% was at least the prescribed 56 Gy in 76% of patients. GTV displacement was associated with the RPM marker, the biliary stent, and the fiducial seeds. The correlation was better with fiducial seeds and with biliary stent. Conclusions: Respiratory gating reduced the margin necessary for radiation therapy for pancreatic tumors. GTV motion was well correlated with biliary stent or fiducial seed displacements, validating their use as surrogates for daily assessment of GTV position during treatment. A patient-specific internal target volume based on 4D-CT is recommended both for gated and not-gated treatment; otherwise, our model can be used to predict the degree of GTV motion.

  1. High-Quality T2-Weighted 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Radiation Therapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Dongsu; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Low, Daniel A.; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa; Hu, Yanle

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to improve triggering efficiency of the prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4DMRI) method and to develop a 4DMRI imaging protocol that could offer T2 weighting for better tumor visualization, good spatial coverage and spatial resolution, and respiratory motion sampling within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications. Methods and Materials: The respiratory state splitting (RSS) and multi-shot acquisition (MSA) methods were analytically compared and validated in a simulation study by using the respiratory signals from 10 healthy human subjects. The RSS method was more effective in improving triggering efficiency. It was implemented in prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4DMRI. 4DMRI image datasets were acquired from 5 healthy human subjects. Liver motion was estimated using the acquired 4DMRI image datasets. Results: The simulation study showed the RSS method was more effective for improving triggering efficiency than the MSA method. The average reductions in 4DMRI acquisition times were 36% and 10% for the RSS and MSA methods, respectively. The human subject study showed that T2-weighted 4DMRI with 10 respiratory states, 60 slices at a spatial resolution of 1.5 × 1.5 × 3.0 mm{sup 3} could be acquired in 9 to 18 minutes, depending on the individual's breath pattern. Based on the acquired 4DMRI image datasets, the ranges of peak-to-peak liver displacements among 5 human subjects were 9.0 to 12.9 mm, 2.5 to 3.9 mm, and 0.5 to 2.3 mm in superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and left-right directions, respectively. Conclusions: We demonstrated that with the RSS method, it was feasible to acquire high-quality T2-weighted 4DMRI within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications.

  2. Substrate-Free Self-Assembled SiOx-Core Nanodots from Alkylalkoxysilane as a Multicolor Photoluminescence Source for Intravital Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Ying; Hsieh, Chiung-Wen; Kung, Mei-Lang; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2013-01-01

    Intravital fluorescence imaging has great potential in biological and biomedical research, as it provides the ability to directly observe biological structures and processes in their natural state. Contrast agents for intravital imaging applications should exhibit good biocompatibility, multiphoton fluorescence, and long emission. Carbon nanodots and semiconductor nanocrystals meet these requirements in most cases, with the added benefit that their properties can be ‘tuned' for specific applications by controlling the size and surface chemistry of the nanoparticles. Here, we report on a simple heat-assisted strategy to fabricate SiOx-core self-assembled nanodots using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) materials. Our results demonstrate that substrate-free self-assembled nanodots from alkylalkoxysilane exhibit controllable structural and chemical characteristics that are well suited for applications in biological, biomedical, and clinical research, and may find further use in optoelectronic and sensor devices. PMID:23609156

  3. Intravital Two-Photon Imaging of Lymphocytes Crossing High Endothelial Venules and Cortical Lymphatics in the Inguinal Lymph Node.

    PubMed

    Park, Chung; Hwang, Il-Young; Kehrl, John H

    2016-01-01

    Lymphocyte recirculation through lymph nodes (LNs) requires their crossing of endothelial barriers present in blood vessels and lymphatics by means of chemoattractant-triggered cell migration. The chemoattractant-chemoattractant receptor axes that predominately govern the trafficking of lymphocytes into, and out of, LNs are CCL19/CCR7 and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 (S1PR1), respectively. Blood-borne lymphocytes downregulate S1PR1 and use CCR7 signaling to adhere to high endothelial venules (HEVs) for transmigration. During their LN residency, recirculating lymphocytes reacquire S1PR1 and attenuate their sensitivity to chemokines. Eventually lymphocytes exit the LN by entering the cortical or medullary lymphatics, a process that depends upon S1PR1 signaling. Upon entering into the lymph, lymphocytes lose their polarity, downregulate their sensitivity to S1P due to the high concentration of S1P, and upregulate their sensitivity to chemokines. However, many of the details of lymphocyte transmigration across endothelial barriers remain poorly understood. Intravital two-photon imaging with advanced microscope technologies not only allows the real-time observation of immune cells in intact LN of a live mouse, but also provides a means to monitor the interactions between circulating lymphocytes and stromal barriers. Here, we describe procedures to visualize lymphocytes engaging and crossing HEVs, and approaching and crossing the cortical lymphatic endothelium to enter the efferent lymph in live mice. PMID:27271904

  4. Intravital imaging of cardiac function at the single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Aaron D.; Vinegoni, Claudio; Sebas, Matt; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of cardiomyocyte biology is limited by the lack of methods to interrogate single-cell physiology in vivo. Here we show that contracting myocytes can indeed be imaged with optical microscopy at high temporal and spatial resolution in the beating murine heart, allowing visualization of individual sarcomeres and measurement of the single cardiomyocyte contractile cycle. Collectively, this has been enabled by efficient tissue stabilization, a prospective real-time cardiac gating approach, an image processing algorithm for motion-artifact-free imaging throughout the cardiac cycle, and a fluorescent membrane staining protocol. Quantification of cardiomyocyte contractile function in vivo opens many possibilities for investigating myocardial disease and therapeutic intervention at the cellular level. PMID:25053815

  5. Tyrosine kinase-mediated axial motility of basal cells revealed by intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Jeremy; Kim, Bongki; Hill, Eric; Visconti, Pablo; Krapf, Dario; Vinegoni, Claudio; Weissleder, Ralph; Brown, Dennis; Breton, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells are generally considered to be static relative to their neighbours. Basal cells in pseudostratified epithelia display a single long cytoplasmic process that can cross the tight junction barrier to reach the lumen. Using in vivo microscopy to visualize the epididymis, a model system for the study of pseudostratified epithelia, we report here the surprising discovery that these basal cell projections—which we call axiopodia—periodically extend and retract over time. We found that axiopodia extensions and retractions follow an oscillatory pattern. This movement, which we refer to as periodic axial motility (PAM), is controlled by c-Src and MEK1/2–ERK1/2. Therapeutic inhibition of tyrosine kinase activity induces a retraction of these projections. Such unexpected cell motility may reflect a novel mechanism by which specialized epithelial cells sample the luminal environment. PMID:26868824

  6. Intravital Confocal and Two-photon Imaging of Dual-color Cells and Extracellular Matrix Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Ufuk; Andresen, Volker; Baggett, Brenda; Utzinger, Urs

    2013-01-01

    To optimize imaging of cells in three dimensional culture we studied confocal backscattering, Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and autofluorescence as source of contrast in extracellular matrix (ECM) mimics and evaluated the attenuation as well as bleaching of endogenous cellular fluorescence signals. All common ECM mimics exhibit contrast observable with confocal reflectance microscopy. SHG imaging on collagen I based hydrogels provides high contrast and good optical penetration depth. Agarose is a useful embedding medium because it allows for large optical penetration and exhibits minimal autofluorescence while still providing good reflectance to detect voids in the embedding medium. We labeled breast cancer cells’ outline with DsRed2 and nucleus with eGFP. DsRed2 can be excited with confocal imaging at 568nm, and with two photon excitation (TPE) in the red and longer NIR. eGFP was excited at 488nm for confocal and in the NIR for TPE. While there is small difference in the bleaching rate for eGFP between confocal and TPE we observed significant difference for DsRed2 where bleaching is strongest during TPE in the red wavelengths and smallest during confocal imaging. After a few hundred microns depth in a collagen I hydrogel, TPE fluorescence becomes twice as strong compared to confocal imaging. PMID:23380006

  7. Characterization of tumor microvascular structure and permeability: comparison between magnetic resonance imaging and intravital confocal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Reitan, Nina Kristine; Thuen, Marte; Goa, Pål Erik; de Lange Davies, Catharina

    2010-01-01

    Solid tumors are characterized by abnormal blood vessel organization, structure, and function. These abnormalities give rise to enhanced vascular permeability and may predict therapeutic responses. The permeability and architecture of the microvasculature in human osteosarcoma tumors growing in dorsal window chambers in athymic mice were measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Dextran (40 kDa) and Gadomer were used as molecular tracers for CLSM and DCE-MRI, respectively. A significant correlation was found between permeability indicators. The extravasation rate Ki as measured by CLSM correlated positively with DCE-MRI parameters, such as the volume transfer constant Ktrans and the initial slope of the contrast agent concentration-time curve. This demonstrates that these two techniques give complementary information. Extravasation was further related to microvascular structure and was found to correlate with the fractal dimension and vascular density. The structural parameter values that were obtained from CLSM images were higher for abnormal tumor vasculature than for normal vessels. PMID:20615006

  8. Noninvasive intravital cellular diagnosis of atopic dermatitis by using harmonic optical virtual biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Szu-Yu; Lee, Jyh-Hong; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2007-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is now very common in people who live in cities, especially for babies and children. Since the cause of AD is still not completely understood and each person may have his own mixed symptoms that can change over time, diagnosis of AD can not be done precisely. Unlike some skin diseases, physical biopsy is rarely used in diagnosing AD on account of its low urgency. Thus, only indirect diagnoses, like asking for a medical history to learn about the symptoms and to rule out other diseases can be carried out. To gain insight into cellular details of AD for long-term diagnosing without physical biopsy, a noninvasive in vivo tool with a sub-micron subsurface resolution and high penetrability has to be used. In this presentation, we show that harmonic optical virtual biopsy can provide the required noninvasive cellular imaging, and is ideal for future clinical diagnosis of AD. Harmonic optical microscopy has been demonstrated to have the capability to reveal cellular morphology of human skin from epidermis to dermis layer. Third harmonic generation (THG), which is sensitive to inhomogeneous interfaces, can show the structures of skins, and can be used to reveal the morphological changes, for example, the thicken cuticle which is a common symptom of AD. Second harmonic generation (SHG), which occurs in non-centrosymmetric structures, has excellent contrast in collagen fibers and can show the pathological changes of dermis layer. Utilizing both THG and SHG, useful information may be given to facilitate the diagnosis of AD.

  9. Spatiotemporal Analyses of Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis via Intravital Imaging in Cranial Bone Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunlan; Ness, Vincent P.; Yang, Xiaochuan; Chen, Hongli; Luo, Jiebo; Brown, Edward B; Zhang, Xinping

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis and angiogenesis are two integrated components in bone repair and regeneration. A deeper understanding of osteogenesis and angiogenesis has been hampered by technical difficulties of analyzing bone and neovasculature simultaneously in spatiotemporal scales and in three-dimensional formats. To overcome these barriers, a cranial defect window chamber model was established that enabled high-resolution, longitudinal, and real-time tracking of angiogenesis and bone defect healing via Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy (MPLSM). By simultaneously probing new bone matrix via second harmonic generation (SHG), neovascular networks via intravenous perfusion of fluorophore, and osteoblast differentiation via 2.3kb collagen type I promoter driven GFP (Col2.3GFP), we examined the morphogenetic sequence of cranial bone defect healing and further established the spatiotemporal analyses of osteogenesis and angiogenesis coupling in repair and regeneration. We demonstrated that bone defect closure was initiated in the residual bone around the edge of the defect. The expansion and migration of osteoprogenitors into the bone defect occurred during the first 3 weeks of healing, coupled with vigorous microvessel angiogenesis at the leading edge of the defect. Subsequent bone repair was marked by matrix deposition and active vascular network remodeling within new bone. Implantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) isolated from Col2.3GFP mice further showed that donor-dependent bone formation occurred rapidly within the first 3 weeks of implantation, in concert with early angiogenesis. The subsequent bone wound closure was largely host-dependent, associated with localized modest induction of angiogenesis. The establishment of a live imaging platform via cranial window provides a unique tool to understand osteogenesis and angiogenesis in repair and regeneration, enabling further elucidation of the spatiotemporal regulatory mechanisms of osteoprogenitor cell interactions

  10. Imaging liver biology in vivo using conventional confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Marques, Pedro E; Antunes, Maísa M; David, Bruna A; Pereira, Rafaela V; Teixeira, Mauro M; Menezes, Gustavo B

    2015-02-01

    Imaging of live animals using intravital microscopy (IVM) has provided a substantial advance in our understanding of cell biology. Here we describe how to adapt a conventional, relatively low-cost laser-scanning microscope to operate as a versatile imaging station. We present the surgical procedures needed to perform liver confocal IVM in mice, thereby allowing one to image different cells in their native environment, including hepatocytes, endothelial cells and leukocytes, as well as to analyze their morphology and function under physiological or pathological conditions. In addition, we propose a plethora of working doses of antibodies and probes to stain multiple cells and molecules simultaneously in vivo. Considering the central role of the liver in metabolism and immunity and the growing interest in the relationship between immune and parenchymal cells, this protocol, in which 20 min of preparation yields up to 4 h of imaging, provides useful insights for various research fields. In addition, the protocol can be easily adapted to investigate adipose tissue, mesentery, intestines, spleen and virtually any abdominal organ.

  11. Cell-based and in vivo spectral analysis of fluorescent proteins for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomonnson, Emma; Mihalko, Laura Anne; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2012-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy of cells and subcellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins is the state-of-the-art technology for longitudinal imaging studies in tissues and living animals. Successful analysis of separate cell populations or signaling events by intravital microscopy requires optimal pairing of multiphoton excitation wavelengths with spectrally distinct fluorescent proteins. While prior studies have analyzed two photon absorption properties of isolated fluorescent proteins, there is limited information about two photon excitation and fluorescence emission profiles of fluorescent proteins expressed in living cells and intact tissues. Multiphoton microscopy was used to analyze fluorescence outputs of multiple blue, green, and red fluorescent proteins in cultured cells and orthotopic tumor xenografts of human breast cancer cells. It is shown that commonly used orange and red fluorescent proteins are excited efficiently by 750 to 760 nm laser light in living cells, enabling dual color imaging studies with blue or cyan proteins without changing excitation wavelength. It is also shown that small incremental changes in excitation wavelength significantly affect emission intensities from fluorescent proteins, which can be used to optimize multi-color imaging using a single laser wavelength. These data will direct optimal selection of fluorescent proteins for multispectral two photon microscopy.

  12. Comparative Assessment of Liver Tumor Motion Using Cine–Magnetic Resonance Imaging Versus 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Apisarnthanarax, Smith; Yin, Lingshu; Zou, Wei; Rosen, Mark; Plastaras, John P.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Metz, James M.; Teo, Boon-Keng

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the extent of tumor motion between 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) and cine-MRI in patients with hepatic tumors treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with liver tumors who underwent 4DCT and 2-dimensional biplanar cine-MRI scans during simulation were retrospectively reviewed to determine the extent of target motion in the superior–inferior, anterior–posterior, and lateral directions. Cine-MRI was performed over 5 minutes. Tumor motion from MRI was determined by tracking the centroid of the gross tumor volume using deformable image registration. Motion estimates from 4DCT were performed by evaluation of the fiducial, residual contrast (or liver contour) positions in each CT phase. Results: Sixteen patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (n=11), cholangiocarcinoma (n=3), and liver metastasis (n=2) were reviewed. Cine-MRI motion was larger than 4DCT for the superior–inferior direction in 50% of patients by a median of 3.0 mm (range, 1.5-7 mm), the anterior–posterior direction in 44% of patients by a median of 2.5 mm (range, 1-5.5 mm), and laterally in 63% of patients by a median of 1.1 mm (range, 0.2-4.5 mm). Conclusions: Cine-MRI frequently detects larger differences in hepatic intrafraction tumor motion when compared with 4DCT most notably in the superior–inferior direction, and may be useful when assessing the need for or treating without respiratory management, particularly in patients with unreliable 4DCT imaging. Margins wider than the internal target volume as defined by 4DCT were required to encompass nearly all the motion detected by cine-MRI for some of the patients in this study.

  13. Determination of Internal Target Volume for Radiation Treatment Planning of Esophageal Cancer by Using 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaojian; Lu, Haijun; Tai, An; Johnstone, Candice; Gore, Elizabeth; Li, X. Allen

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To determine an efficient strategy for the generation of the internal target volume (ITV) for radiation treatment planning for esophageal cancer using 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Methods and Materials: 4DCT sets acquired for 20 patients with esophageal carcinoma were analyzed. Each of the 4DCT sets was binned into 10 respiratory phases. For each patient, the gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated on the 4DCT set at each phase. Various strategies to derive ITV were explored, including the volume from the maximum intensity projection (MIP; ITV{sub M}IP), unions of the GTVs from selected multiple phases ITV2 (0% and 50% phases), ITV3 (ITV2 plus 80%), and ITV4 (ITV3 plus 60%), as well as the volumes expanded from ITV2 and ITV3 with a uniform margin. These ITVs were compared to ITV10 (the union of the GTVs for all 10 phases) and the differences were measured with the overlap ratio (OR) and relative volume ratio (RVR) relative to ITV10 (ITVx/ITV10). Results: For all patients studied, the average GTV from a single phase was 84.9% of ITV10. The average ORs were 91.2%, 91.3%, 94.5%, and 96.4% for ITV{sub M}IP, ITV2, ITV3, and ITV4, respectively. Low ORs were associated with irregular breathing patterns. ITV3s plus 1 mm uniform margins (ITV3+1) led to an average OR of 98.1% and an average RVR of 106.4%. Conclusions: The ITV generated directly from MIP underestimates the range of the respiration motion for esophageal cancer. The ITV generated from 3 phases (ITV3) may be used for regular breathers, whereas the ITV generated from 4 phases (ITV4) or ITV3 plus a 1-mm uniform margin may be applied for irregular breathers.

  14. Dictionary of Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Julian

    2005-10-01

    The past decade has seen huge advances in the application of microscopy in all areas of science. This welcome development in microscopy has been paralleled by an expansion of the vocabulary of technical terms used in microscopy: terms have been coined for new instruments and techniques and, as microscopes reach even higher resolution, the use of terms that relate to the optical and physical principles underpinning microscopy is now commonplace. The Dictionary of Microscopy was compiled to meet this challenge and provides concise definitions of over 2,500 terms used in the fields of light microscopy, electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, x-ray microscopy and related techniques. Written by Dr Julian P. Heath, Editor of Microscopy and Analysis, the dictionary is intended to provide easy navigation through the microscopy terminology and to be a first point of reference for definitions of new and established terms. The Dictionary of Microscopy is an essential, accessible resource for: students who are new to the field and are learning about microscopes equipment purchasers who want an explanation of the terms used in manufacturers' literature scientists who are considering using a new microscopical technique experienced microscopists as an aide mémoire or quick source of reference librarians, the press and marketing personnel who require definitions for technical reports.

  15. On Darboux's approach to R-separability of variables. Classification of conformally flat 4-dimensional binary metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szereszewski, A.; Sym, A.

    2015-09-01

    are binary metrics. In this paper we solve the following problem: to classify all conformally flat (of arbitrary signature) 4-dimensional binary metrics. Among them there are 1) those that are separable in the sense of SRE metrics Kalnins-Miller (1978 Trans. Am. Math. Soc. 244 241-61 1982 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 15 2699-709 1984 Adv. Math. 51 91-106 1983 SIAM J. Math. Anal. 14 126-37) and 2) new examples of non-Stäckel R-separability in 4 dimensions.

  16. Label-Free Determination of Hemodynamic Parameters in the Microcirculaton with Third Harmonic Generation Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dietzel, Steffen; Pircher, Joachim; Nekolla, A. Katharina; Gull, Mazhar; Brändli, André W.; Pohl, Ulrich; Rehberg, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Determination of blood flow velocity and related hemodynamic parameters is an important aspect of physiological studies which in many settings requires fluorescent labeling. Here we show that Third Harmonic Generation (THG) microscopy is a suitable tool for label-free intravital investigations of the microcirculation in widely-used physiological model systems. THG microscopy is a non-fluorescent multi-photon scanning technique combining the advantages of label-free imaging with restriction of signal generation to a focal spot. Blood flow was visualized and its velocity was measured in adult mouse cremaster muscle vessels, non-invasively in mouse ear vessels and in Xenopus tadpoles. In arterioles, THG line scanning allowed determination of the flow pulse velocity curve and hence the heart rate. By relocating the scan line we obtained velocity profiles through vessel diameters, allowing shear rate calculations. The cell free layer containing the glycocalyx was also visualized. Comparison of the current microscopic resolution with theoretical, diffraction limited resolution let us conclude that an about sixty-fold THG signal intensity increase may be possible with future improved optics, optimized for 1200–1300 nm excitation. THG microscopy is compatible with simultaneous two-photon excited fluorescence detection. It thus also provides the opportunity to determine important hemodynamic parameters in parallel to common fluorescent observations without additional label. PMID:24933027

  17. Two-Photon Microscopy Allows Imaging and Characterization of Cochlear Microvasculature In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bertlich, Mattis; Weiss, Bernhard; Dietzel, Steffen; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of cochlear blood flow has been discussed as factor in the pathophysiology of various inner ear disorders. However, the microscopic study of cochlear microcirculation is limited due to small scale and anatomical constraints. Here, two-photon fluorescence microscopy is applied to visualize cochlear microvessels. Guinea pigs were injected with Fluorescein isothiocyanate- or Texas red-dextrane as plasma marker. Intravital microscopy was performed in four animals and explanted cochleae from four animals were studied. The vascular architecture of the cochlea was visualized up to a depth of 90.0 ± 22.7 μm. Imaging yielded a mean contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of 3.3 ± 1.7. Mean diameter in vivo was 16.5 ± 6.0 μm for arterioles and 8.0 ± 2.4 μm for capillaries. In explanted cochleae, the diameter of radiating arterioles and capillaries was measured with 12.2 ± 1.6 μm and 6.6 ± 1.0 μm, respectively. The difference between capillaries and arterioles was statistically significant in both experimental setups (P < 0.001 and P = 0.022, two-way ANOVA). Measured vessel diameters in vivo and ex vivo were in agreement with published data. We conclude that two-photon fluorescence microscopy allows the investigation of cochlear microvessels and is potentially a valuable tool for inner ear research. PMID:25883941

  18. Axial Plane Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin; Wong, Zi Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We present axial plane optical microscopy (APOM) that can, in contrast to conventional microscopy, directly image a sample's cross-section parallel to the optical axis of an objective lens without scanning. APOM combined with conventional microscopy simultaneously provides two orthogonal images of a 3D sample. More importantly, APOM uses only a single lens near the sample to achieve selective-plane illumination microscopy, as we demonstrated by three-dimensional (3D) imaging of fluorescent pollens and brain slices. This technique allows fast, high-contrast, and convenient 3D imaging of structures that are hundreds of microns beneath the surfaces of large biological tissues. PMID:25434770

  19. Light sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Mickoleit, Michaela; Huisken, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This chapter introduces the concept of light sheet microscopy along with practical advice on how to design and build such an instrument. Selective plane illumination microscopy is presented as an alternative to confocal microscopy due to several superior features such as high-speed full-frame acquisition, minimal phototoxicity, and multiview sample rotation. Based on our experience over the last 10 years, we summarize the key concepts in light sheet microscopy, typical implementations, and successful applications. In particular, sample mounting for long time-lapse imaging and the resulting challenges in data processing are discussed in detail.

  20. [Artefacts of confocal microscopy].

    PubMed

    Vekshin, N L; Frolov, M S

    2014-01-01

    Typical artefacts caused by using confocal fluorescent microscopy while studying living cells are considered. The role of light scattering, mobility, staining, local concentrations, etc. is discussed.

  1. Axial Plane Optical Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin; Wong, Zi Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-12-01

    We present axial plane optical microscopy (APOM) that can, in contrast to conventional microscopy, directly image a sample's cross-section parallel to the optical axis of an objective lens without scanning. APOM combined with conventional microscopy simultaneously provides two orthogonal images of a 3D sample. More importantly, APOM uses only a single lens near the sample to achieve selective-plane illumination microscopy, as we demonstrated by three-dimensional (3D) imaging of fluorescent pollens and brain slices. This technique allows fast, high-contrast, and convenient 3D imaging of structures that are hundreds of microns beneath the surfaces of large biological tissues.

  2. Pulmonary Ventilation Imaging Based on 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography: Comparison With Pulmonary Function Tests and SPECT Ventilation Images

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kabus, Sven; Lorenz, Cristian; Mittra, Erik; Hong, Julian C.; Chung, Melody; Eclov, Neville; To, Jacqueline; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT)-based pulmonary ventilation imaging is an emerging functional imaging modality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological significance of 4D-CT ventilation imaging by comparison with pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements and single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation images, which are the clinical references for global and regional lung function, respectively. Methods and Materials: In an institutional review board–approved prospective clinical trial, 4D-CT imaging and PFT and/or SPECT ventilation imaging were performed in thoracic cancer patients. Regional ventilation (V{sub 4DCT}) was calculated by deformable image registration of 4D-CT images and quantitative analysis for regional volume change. V{sub 4DCT} defect parameters were compared with the PFT measurements (forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV{sub 1}; % predicted) and FEV{sub 1}/forced vital capacity (FVC; %). V{sub 4DCT} was also compared with SPECT ventilation (V{sub SPECT}) to (1) test whether V{sub 4DCT} in V{sub SPECT} defect regions is significantly lower than in nondefect regions by using the 2-tailed t test; (2) to quantify the spatial overlap between V{sub 4DCT} and V{sub SPECT} defect regions with Dice similarity coefficient (DSC); and (3) to test ventral-to-dorsal gradients by using the 2-tailed t test. Results: Of 21 patients enrolled in the study, 18 patients for whom 4D-CT and either PFT or SPECT were acquired were included in the analysis. V{sub 4DCT} defect parameters were found to have significant, moderate correlations with PFT measurements. For example, V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU} defect volume increased significantly with decreasing FEV{sub 1}/FVC (R=−0.65, P<.01). V{sub 4DCT} in V{sub SPECT} defect regions was significantly lower than in nondefect regions (mean V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU} 0.049 vs 0.076, P<.01). The average DSCs for the spatial overlap with SPECT ventilation defect regions were only moderate (V

  3. Lasers for nonlinear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wise, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Various versions of nonlinear microscopy are revolutionizing the life sciences, almost all of which are made possible because of the development of ultrafast lasers. In this article, the main properties and technical features of short-pulse lasers used in nonlinear microscopy are summarized. Recent research results on fiber lasers that will impact future instruments are also discussed.

  4. Intravital FRAP Imaging using an E-cadherin-GFP Mouse Reveals Disease- and Drug-Dependent Dynamic Regulation of Cell-Cell Junctions in Live Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Erami, Zahra; Herrmann, David; Warren, Sean C.; Nobis, Max; McGhee, Ewan J.; Lucas, Morghan C.; Leung, Wilfred; Reischmann, Nadine; Mrowinska, Agata; Schwarz, Juliane P.; Kadir, Shereen; Conway, James R.W.; Vennin, Claire; Karim, Saadia A.; Campbell, Andrew D.; Gallego-Ortega, David; Magenau, Astrid; Murphy, Kendelle J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Law, Andrew M.; Walters, Stacey N.; Grey, Shane T.; Croucher, David R.; Zhang, Lei; Herzog, Herbert; Hardeman, Edna C.; Gunning, Peter W.; Ormandy, Christopher J.; Evans, T.R. Jeffry; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen J.; Morton, Jennifer P.; Anderson, Kurt I.; Timpson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions play a prominent role in maintaining the epithelial architecture. The disruption or deregulation of these adhesions in cancer can lead to the collapse of tumor epithelia that precedes invasion and subsequent metastasis. Here we generated an E-cadherin-GFP mouse that enables intravital photobleaching and quantification of E-cadherin mobility in live tissue without affecting normal biology. We demonstrate the broad applications of this mouse by examining E-cadherin regulation in multiple tissues, including mammary, brain, liver, and kidney tissue, while specifically monitoring E-cadherin mobility during disease progression in the pancreas. We assess E-cadherin stability in native pancreatic tissue upon genetic manipulation involving Kras and p53 or in response to anti-invasive drug treatment and gain insights into the dynamic remodeling of E-cadherin during in situ cancer progression. FRAP in the E-cadherin-GFP mouse, therefore, promises to be a valuable tool to fundamentally expand our understanding of E-cadherin-mediated events in native microenvironments. PMID:26725115

  5. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Capucine L.; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A.; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs. PMID:27698437

  6. Knocking at the brain’s door: intravital two-photon imaging of autoreactive T cell interactions with CNS structures

    PubMed Central

    Flügel, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Since the first applications of two-photon microscopy in immunology 10 years ago, the number of studies using this advanced technology has increased dramatically. The two-photon microscope allows long-term visualization of cell motility in the living tissue with minimal phototoxicity. Using this technique, we examined brain autoantigen-specific T cell behavior in experimental autoimmune encephalitomyelitis, the animal model of human multiple sclerosis. Even before disease symptoms appear, the autoreactive T cells arrive at their target organ. There they crawl along the intraluminal surface of central nervous system (CNS) blood vessels before they extravasate. In the perivascular environment, the T cells meet phagocytes that present autoantigens. This contact activates the T cells to penetrate deep into the CNS parenchyma, where the infiltrated T cells again can find antigen, be further activated, and produce cytokines, resulting in massive immune cell recruitment and clinical disease. PMID:20623286

  7. Advances in Urine Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Becker, Gavin J; Garigali, Giuseppe; Fogazzi, Giovanni B

    2016-06-01

    Urine microscopy is an important tool for the diagnosis and management of several conditions affecting the kidneys and urinary tract. In this review, we describe the automated instruments, based either on flow cytometry or digitized microscopy, that are currently in use in large clinical laboratories. These tools allow the examination of large numbers of samples in short periods. We also discuss manual urinary microscopy commonly performed by nephrologists, which we encourage. After discussing the advantages of phase contrast microscopy over bright field microscopy, we describe the advancements of urine microscopy in various clinical conditions. These include persistent isolated microscopic hematuria (which can be classified as glomerular or nonglomerular on the basis of urinary erythrocyte morphology), drug- and toxin-related cystalluria (which can be a clue for the diagnosis of acute kidney injury associated with intrarenal crystal precipitation), and some inherited conditions (eg, adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency, which is associated with 2,8-dihydroxyadenine crystalluria, and Fabry disease, which is characterized by unique urinary lamellated fatty particles). Finally, we describe the utility of identifying "decoy cells" and atypical malignant cells, which can be easily done with phase contrast microscopy in unfixed samples. PMID:26806004

  8. Fractals in microscopy.

    PubMed

    Landini, G

    2011-01-01

    Fractal geometry, developed by B. Mandelbrot, has provided new key concepts necessary to the understanding and quantification of some aspects of pattern and shape randomness, irregularity, complexity and self-similarity. In the field of microscopy, fractals have profound implications in relation to the effects of magnification and scaling on morphology and to the methodological approaches necessary to measure self-similar structures. In this article are reviewed the fundamental concepts on which fractal geometry is based, their relevance to the microscopy field as well as a number of technical details that can help improving the robustness of morphological analyses when applied to microscopy problems.

  9. Super resolution fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Bates, Mark; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2010-01-01

    Achieving a spatial resolution that is not limited by the diffraction of light, recent developments of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques allow the observation of many biological structures not resolvable in conventional fluorescence microscopy. New advances in these techniques now give them the ability to image three-dimensional (3D) structures, measure interactions by multicolor colocalization, and record dynamic processes in living cells at the nanometer scale. It is anticipated that super-resolution fluorescence microscopy will become a widely used tool for cell and tissue imaging to provide previously unobserved details of biological structures and processes. PMID:19489737

  10. Clinical specular microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, L.W.; Laing, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides the general ophthalmologist with a guide to the clinical applications of specular microscopy. Important material is included on laser injury, cataract surgery, corneal transplants, glaucoma, uveitis, and trauma.

  11. Advances in small animal mesentery models for in vivo flow cytometry, dynamic microscopy, and drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Tuchin, Valery V; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2007-01-01

    Using animal mesentery with intravital optical microscopy is a well-established experimental model for studying blood and lymph microcirculation in vivo. Recent advances in cell biology and optical techniques provide the basis for extending this model for new applications, which should generate significantly improved experimental data. This review summarizes the achievements in this specific area, including in vivo label-free blood and lymph photothermal flow cytometry, super-sensitive fluorescence image cytometry, light scattering and speckle flow cytometry, microvessel dynamic microscopy, infrared (IR) angiography, and high-speed imaging of individual cells in fast flow. The capabilities of these techniques, using the rat mesentery model, were demonstrated in various studies; e.g., real-time quantitative detection of circulating and migrating individual blood and cancer cells, studies on vascular dynamics with a focus on lymphatics under normal conditions and under different interventions (e.g. lasers, drugs, nicotine), assessment of lymphatic disturbances from experimental lymphedema, monitoring cell traffic between blood and lymph systems, and high-speed imaging of cell transient deformability in flow. In particular, the obtained results demonstrated that individual cell transportation in living organisms depends on cell type (e.g., normal blood or leukemic cells), the cell’s functional state (e.g., live, apoptotic, or necrotic), and the functional status of the organism. Possible future applications, including in vivo early diagnosis and prevention of disease, monitoring immune response and apoptosis, chemo- and radio-sensitivity tests, and drug screening, are also discussed. PMID:17226898

  12. Imaging immune response of skin mast cells in vivo with two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunqiang; Pastila, Riikka K.; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has provided insightful information of the dynamic process of immune cells in vivo. However, the use of exogenous labeling agents limits its applications. There is no method to perform functional imaging of mast cells, a population of innate tissue-resident immune cells. Mast cells are widely recognized as the effector cells in allergy. Recently their roles as immunoregulatory cells in certain innate and adaptive immune responses are being actively investigated. Here we report in vivo mouse skin mast cells imaging with two-photon microscopy using endogenous tryptophan as the fluorophore. We studied the following processes. 1) Mast cells degranulation, the first step in the mast cell activation process in which the granules are released into peripheral tissue to trigger downstream reactions. 2) Mast cell reconstitution, a procedure commonly used to study mast cells functioning by comparing the data from wild type mice, mast cell-deficient mice, and mast-cell deficient mice reconstituted with bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Imaging the BMMCs engraftment in tissue reveals the mast cells development and the efficiency of BMMCs reconstitution. We observed the reconstitution process for 6 weeks in the ear skin of mast cell-deficient Kit wsh/ w-sh mice by two-photon imaging. Our finding is the first instance of imaging mast cells in vivo with endogenous contrast.

  13. Intravital multiphoton imaging of the selective uptake of water-dispersible quantum dots into sinusoidal liver cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaowen; Grice, Jeffrey E; Zhu, Yian; Liu, David; Sanchez, Washington Y; Li, Zhen; Crawford, Darrell H G; Le Couteur, David G; Cogger, Victoria C; Liu, Xin; Xu, Zhi Ping; Roberts, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Although many studies reporting the organ-level biodistribution of nanoparticles (NPs) in animals, very few have addressed the fate of NPs in organs at the cellular level. The liver appears to be the main organ for accumulation of NPs after intravenous injection. In this study, for the first time, the in vivo spatiotemporal disposition of recently developed mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA)-capped cadmium telluride/cadmium sulfide (CdTe/CdS) quantum dots (QDs) is explored in rat liver using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) coupled with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), with subcellular resolution (∼1 μm). With high fluorescence efficiency and largely improved stability in the biological environment, these QDs show a distinct distribution pattern in the liver compared to organic dyes, rhodamine 123 and fluorescein. After intravenous injection, fluorescent molecules are taken up by hepatocytes and excreted into the bile, while negatively charged QDs are retained in the sinusoids and selectively taken up by sinusoidal cells (Kupffer cells and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells), but not by hepatocytes within 3 h. The results could help design NPs targeting the specific types of liver cells and choose the fluorescent markers for appropriate cellular imaging.

  14. Intravital multiphoton tomography as an appropriate tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Mess, Christian; Dimitrova, Valentina; Schwarz, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2011-03-01

    Increasing incidence of inflammatory skin diseases such as Atopic Dermatitis (AD) has been noted in the past years. According to recent estimations around 15% of newborn subjects are affected with a disease severity that requires medical treatment. Although its pathogenesis is multifactorial, recent reports indicate that an impaired physical skin barrier predispose for the development of AD. The major part of this barrier is formed by the stratum corneum (SC) wherein corneocytes are embedded in a complex matrix of proteins and lipids. Its components were synthesized in the stratum granulosum (SG) and secreted via lamellar bodies at the SC/SG interface. Within a clinical in vivo study we focused on the skin metabolism at the SC/SG interface in AD affected patients in comparison to healthy subjects. Measurement of fluorescence life-time of NADH provides access to the metabolic state of skin. Due to the application of a 5D intravital tomographic skin analysis we facilitate the non-invasive investigation of human epidermis in the longitudinal course of AD therapy. We could ascertain by blinded analysis of 40 skin areas of 20 patients in a three month follow-up that the metabolic status at the SC/SG interface was altered in AD compromised skin even in non-lesional, apparent healthy skin regions. This illustrates an impaired skin barrier formation even at non-affected skin of AD subjects appearing promotive for the development of acute skin inflammation. Therefore, our findings allow a deeper understanding of the individual disease development and the improved management of the therapeutic intervention in clinical application.

  15. Intravital multiphoton tomography as a novel tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2010-02-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory disease of human skin. Its pathogenesis is still unknown; however, dysfunctions of the epidermal barrier and the immune response are regarded as key factors for the development of AD. In our study we applied intravital multiphoton tomography (5D-IVT), equipped with a spectral-FLIM module for in-vivo and ex-vivo analysis of human skin affected with AD. In addition to the morphologic skin analysis, FLIM technology gain access to the metabolic status of the epidermal cells referring to the NADH specific fluorescence lifetime. We evaluated a characteristic 5D-IVT skin pattern of AD in comparison to histological sections and detected a correlation with the disease activity measured by SCORAD. FLIM analysis revealed a shift of the mean fluorescence lifetime (taum) of NADH, indicating an altered metabolic activity. Within an ex-vivo approach we have investigated cryo-sections of human skin with or without barrier defects. Spectral-FLIM allows the detection of autofluorescent signals that reflect the pathophysiological conditions of the defect skin barrier. In our study the taum value was shown to be different between healthy and affected skin. Application of the 5D-IVT allows non-invasive in-vivo imaging of human skin with a penetration depth of 150 μm. We could show that affected skin could be distinguished from healthy skin by morphological criteria, by FLIM and by spectral-FLIM. Further studies will evaluate the application of the 5D-IVT technology as a diagnostic tool and to monitor the therapeutic efficacy.

  16. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  17. Controllable tomography phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-03-01

    Tomography phase microscopy (TPM) is a new microscopic method that can quantitatively yield the volumetric 3D distribution of a sample's refractive index (RI), which is significant for cell biology research. In this paper, a controllable TPM system is introduced. In this system a circulatory phase-shifting method and piezoelectric ceramic are used which enable the TPM system to record the 3D RI distribution at a more controllable speed, from 1 to 40 fps, than in the other TPM systems reported. The resolution of the RI distribution obtained by this controllable TPM is much better than that in images recorded by phase contrast microscopy and interference tomography microscopy. The realization of controllable TPM not only allows for the application of TPM to the measurement of kinds of RI sample, but also contributes to academic and technological support for the practical use of TPM.

  18. Imaging interferometric microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Christian J; Kuznetsova, Yuliya; Brueck, S R J

    2003-08-15

    We introduce and demonstrate a new microscopy concept: imaging interferometric microscopy (IIM), which is related to holography, synthetic-aperture imaging, and off-axis-dark-field illumination techniques. IIM is a wavelength-division multiplex approach to image formation that combines multiple images covering different spatial-frequency regions to form a composite image with a resolution much greater than that permitted by the same optical system using conventional techniques. This new type of microscopy involves both off-axis coherent illumination and reinjection of appropriate zero-order reference beams. Images demonstrate high resolution, comparable with that of a high-numerical-aperture (NA) objective, while they retain the long working distance, the large depth of field, and the large field of view of a low-NA objective. A Fourier-optics model of IIM is in good agreement with the experiment. PMID:12943079

  19. Optical imaging. Expansion microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W; Boyden, Edward S

    2015-01-30

    In optical microscopy, fine structural details are resolved by using refraction to magnify images of a specimen. We discovered that by synthesizing a swellable polymer network within a specimen, it can be physically expanded, resulting in physical magnification. By covalently anchoring specific labels located within the specimen directly to the polymer network, labels spaced closer than the optical diffraction limit can be isotropically separated and optically resolved, a process we call expansion microscopy (ExM). Thus, this process can be used to perform scalable superresolution microscopy with diffraction-limited microscopes. We demonstrate ExM with apparent ~70-nanometer lateral resolution in both cultured cells and brain tissue, performing three-color superresolution imaging of ~10(7) cubic micrometers of the mouse hippocampus with a conventional confocal microscope.

  20. Practical structured illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rego, E Hesper; Shao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is a method that can double the spatial resolution of wide-field fluorescence microscopy in three dimensions by using spatially structured illumination light. In this chapter, we introduce the basic principles of SIM and describe in detail several different implementations based on either a diffraction grating or liquid crystal spatial light modulators. We also describe nonlinear SIM, a method that in theory can achieve unlimited resolution. In addition, we discuss a number of key points important for high-resolution imaging. PMID:25391800

  1. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Laura M; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E; Roth, Charles M; Moghe, Prabhas V; Pierce, Mark C

    2015-11-01

    Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4 : Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic. PMID:26603495

  2. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Laura M; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E; Roth, Charles M; Moghe, Prabhas V; Pierce, Mark C

    2015-11-01

    Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4 : Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic.

  3. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Laura M.; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-11-01

    Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic.

  4. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability. PMID:20696933

  5. Light microscopy digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Joubert, James; Sharma, Deepak

    2011-10-01

    This unit presents an overview of digital imaging hardware used in light microscopy. CMOS, CCD, and EMCCDs are the primary sensors used. The strengths and weaknesses of each define the primary applications for these sensors. Sensor architecture and formats are also reviewed. Color camera design strategies and sensor window cleaning are also described in the unit.

  6. Video Telescope Operating Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Divers, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    Exotic pet veterinarians frequently have to operate on small animals, and magnification is commonly used. Existing endoscopy equipment can be used with a mechanical arm and telescope to enable video telescope operating microscopy. The additional equipment items and their specifics are described, and several case examples are provided. PMID:26117519

  7. Video Telescope Operating Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Divers, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    Exotic pet veterinarians frequently have to operate on small animals, and magnification is commonly used. Existing endoscopy equipment can be used with a mechanical arm and telescope to enable video telescope operating microscopy. The additional equipment items and their specifics are described, and several case examples are provided.

  8. Scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Shigeru; Bard, Allen J; Fan, Fu-Ren F; Mirkin, Michael V; Unwin, Patrick R

    2008-01-01

    This review describes work done in scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) since 2000 with an emphasis on new applications and important trends, such as nanometer-sized tips. SECM has been adapted to investigate charge transport across liquid/liquid interfaces and to probe charge transport in thin films and membranes. It has been used in biological systems like single cells to study ion transport in channels, as well as cellular and enzyme activity. It is also a powerful and useful tool for the evaluation of the electrocatalytic activities of different materials for useful reactions, such as oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation. SECM has also been used as an electrochemical tool for studies of the local properties and reactivity of a wide variety of materials, including metals, insulators, and semiconductors. Finally, SECM has been combined with several other nonelectrochemical techniques, such as atomic force microscopy, to enhance and complement the information available from SECM alone.

  9. Multimodal Nonlinear Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Shuhua; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Because each nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging modality is sensitive to specific molecules or structures, multimodal NLO imaging capitalizes the potential of NLO microscopy for studies of complex biological tissues. The coupling of multiphoton fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) has allowed investigation of a broad range of biological questions concerning lipid metabolism, cancer development, cardiovascular disease, and skin biology. Moreover, recent research shows the great potential of using CARS microscope as a platform to develop more advanced NLO modalities such as electronic-resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing, stimulated Raman scattering, and pump-probe microscopy. This article reviews the various approaches developed for realization of multimodal NLO imaging as well as developments of new NLO modalities on a CARS microscope. Applications to various aspects of biological and biomedical research are discussed. PMID:24353747

  10. Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-10-12

    Dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM) combines the benefits of high spatial resolution electron microscopy with the high temporal resolution of ultrafast lasers. The incorporation of these two components into a single instrument provides a perfect platform for in situ observations of material processes. However, previous DTEM applications have focused on observing structural changes occurring in samples exposed to high vacuum. Therefore, in order to expand the pump-probe experimental regime to more natural environmental conditions, in situ gas and liquid chambers must be coupled with Dynamic TEM. This chapter describes the current and future applications of in situ liquid DTEM to permit time-resolved atomic scale observations in an aqueous environment, Although this chapter focuses mostly on in situ liquid imaging, the same research potential exists for in situ gas experiments and the successful integration of these techniques promises new insights for understanding nanoparticle, catalyst and biological protein dynamics with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution.

  11. Computation in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Earl J

    2016-01-01

    Some uses of the computer and computation in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy are reviewed. The theory of image calculation using Bloch wave and multislice methods with and without aberration correction is reviewed and some applications are discussed. The inverse problem of reconstructing the specimen structure from an experimentally measured electron microscope image is discussed. Some future directions of software development are given. PMID:26697863

  12. Scanning Mueller polarimetric microscopy.

    PubMed

    Le Gratiet, Aymeric; Dubreuil, Matthieu; Rivet, Sylvain; Le Grand, Yann

    2016-09-15

    A full Mueller polarimeter was implemented on a commercial laser-scanning microscope. The new polarimetric microscope is based on high-speed polarization modulation by spectral coding using a wavelength-swept laser as a source. Calibration as well as estimation of the measurement errors of the device are reported. The acquisition of Mueller images at the speed of a scanning microscope is demonstrated for the first time. Mueller images of mineral and biological samples illustrate this new polarimetric microscopy. PMID:27628391

  13. Higher harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2005-01-01

    Higher harmonic-generation, including second harmonic generation and third harmonic generation, leaves no energy deposition to the interacted matters due to its virtual-level transition characteristic, providing a truly non-invasive modality and is ideal for in vivo imaging of live specimens without any preparation. Second harmonic generation microscopy provides images on stacked membranes and arranged proteins with organized nano-structures due to the bio-photonic crystalline effect. Third harmonic generation microscopy provides general cellular or subcellular interface imaging due to optical inhomogeneity. Due to their virtual-transition nature, no saturation or bleaching in the generated signal is expected. With no energy release, continuous viewing without compromising sample viability can thus be achieved. Combined with its nonlinearity, higher harmonic generation microscopy provides sub-micron three-dimensional sectioning capability and millimeter penetration in live samples without using fluorescence and exogenous markers, offering morphological, structural, functional, and cellular information of biomedical specimens without modifying their natural biological and optical environments.

  14. Ion photon emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Doyle, B. L.; Banks, J. C.; Battistella, A.; Gennaro, G.; McDaniel, F. D.; Mellon, M.; Vittone, E.; Vizkelethy, G.; Wing, N. D.

    2003-09-01

    A new ion-induced emission microscopy has been invented and demonstrated, which is called ion photon emission microscopy (IPEM). It employs a low current, broad ion beam impinging on a sample, previously coated or simply covered with a few microns of a fast, highly efficient phosphor layer. The light produced at the single ion impact point is collected with an optical microscope and projected at high magnification onto a single photon position sensitive detector (PSD). This allows maps of the ion strike effects to be produced, effectively removing the need for a microbeam. Irradiation in air and even the use of alpha particle sources with no accelerator are possible. Potential applications include ion beam induced charge collection studies of semiconducting and insulating materials, single event upset studies on microchips and even biological cells in radiobiological effectiveness experiments. We describe the IPEM setup, including a 60× OM-40 microscope with a 1.5 mm hole for the beam transmission and a Quantar PSD with 60 μm pixel. Bicron plastic scintillator blades of 10 μm were chosen as a phosphor for their nanosecond time resolution, homogeneity, utility and commercial availability. The results given in this paper are for a prototype IPEM system. They indicate a resolution of ˜12 μm, the presence of a spatial halo and a He-ion efficiency of ˜20%. This marks the first time that nuclear microscopy has been performed with a radioactive source.

  15. Correlated Light and Electron Microscopy/Electron Tomography of Mitochondria In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Guy A.; Sun, Mei G.; Frey, Terrence G.

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional light microscopy and three-dimensional electron microscopy (electron tomography) separately provide very powerful tools to study cellular structure and physiology, including the structure and physiology of mitochondria. Fluorescence microscopy allows one to study processes in live cells with specific labels and stains that follow the movement of labeled proteins and changes within cellular compartments but does not have sufficient resolution to define the ultrastructure of intracellular organelles such as mitochondria. Electron microscopy and electron tomography provide the highest resolution currently available to study mitochondrial ultrastructure but cannot follow processes in living cells. We describe the combination of these two techniques in which fluorescence confocal microscopy is used to study structural and physiologic changes in mitochondria within apoptotic HeLa cells to define the apoptotic timeframe. Cells can then be selected at various stages of the apoptotic timeframe for examination at higher resolution by electron microscopy and electron tomography. This is a form of “virtual” 4-dimensional electron microscopy that has revealed interesting structural changes in the mitochondria of HeLa cells during apoptosis. The same techniques can be applied, with modification, to study other dynamic processes within cells in other experimental contexts. PMID:19348881

  16. Stimulated parametric emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Keisuke; Kataoka, Shogo; Murase, Rena; Watanabe, Wataru; Higashi, Tsunehito; Kawakami, Shigeki; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Fukui, Kiichi; Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2006-01-01

    We propose a novel microscopy technique based on the four-wave mixing (FWM) process that is enhanced by two-photon electronic resonance induced by a pump pulse along with stimulated emission induced by a dump pulse. A Ti:sapphire laser and an optical parametric oscillator are used as light sources for the pump and dump pulses, respectively. We demonstrate that our proposed FWM technique can be used to obtain a one-dimensional image of ethanol-thinned Coumarin 120 solution sandwiched between a hole-slide glass and a cover slip, and a two-dimensional image of a leaf of Camellia sinensis.

  17. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  18. Quantitative optical phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barty, A; Nugent, K A; Paganin, D; Roberts, A

    1998-06-01

    We present a new method for the extraction of quantitative phase data from microscopic phase samples by use of partially coherent illumination and an ordinary transmission microscope. The technique produces quantitative images of the phase profile of the sample without phase unwrapping. The technique is able to recover phase even in the presence of amplitude modulation, making it significantly more powerful than existing methods of phase microscopy. We demonstrate the technique by providing quantitatively correct phase images of well-characterized test samples and show that the results obtained for more-complex samples correlate with structures observed with Nomarski differential interference contrast techniques.

  19. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, António J; Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-18

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  20. Multi-pass microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juffmann, Thomas; Klopfer, Brannon B.; Frankort, Timmo L. I.; Haslinger, Philipp; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2016-09-01

    Microscopy of biological specimens often requires low light levels to avoid damage. This yields images impaired by shot noise. An improved measurement accuracy at the Heisenberg limit can be achieved exploiting quantum correlations. If sample damage is the limiting resource, an equivalent limit can be reached by passing photons through a specimen multiple times sequentially. Here we use self-imaging cavities and employ a temporal post-selection scheme to present full-field multi-pass polarization and transmission micrographs with variance reductions of 4.4+/-0.8 dB (11.6+/-0.8 dB in a lossless setup) and 4.8+/-0.8 dB, respectively, compared with the single-pass shot-noise limit. If the accuracy is limited by the number of detected probe particles, our measurements show a variance reduction of 25.9+/-0.9 dB. The contrast enhancement capabilities in imaging and in diffraction studies are demonstrated with nanostructured samples and with embryonic kidney 293T cells. This approach to Heisenberg-limited microscopy does not rely on quantum state engineering.

  1. Magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  2. Multi-pass microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Juffmann, Thomas; Klopfer, Brannon B.; Frankort, Timmo L.I.; Haslinger, Philipp; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Microscopy of biological specimens often requires low light levels to avoid damage. This yields images impaired by shot noise. An improved measurement accuracy at the Heisenberg limit can be achieved exploiting quantum correlations. If sample damage is the limiting resource, an equivalent limit can be reached by passing photons through a specimen multiple times sequentially. Here we use self-imaging cavities and employ a temporal post-selection scheme to present full-field multi-pass polarization and transmission micrographs with variance reductions of 4.4±0.8 dB (11.6±0.8 dB in a lossless setup) and 4.8±0.8 dB, respectively, compared with the single-pass shot-noise limit. If the accuracy is limited by the number of detected probe particles, our measurements show a variance reduction of 25.9±0.9 dB. The contrast enhancement capabilities in imaging and in diffraction studies are demonstrated with nanostructured samples and with embryonic kidney 293T cells. This approach to Heisenberg-limited microscopy does not rely on quantum state engineering. PMID:27670525

  3. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  4. SLM-based microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasler, Malte; Haist, Tobias; Osten, Wolfgang

    2012-04-01

    In microscopy it is customary to use a wide variety of imaging methods. Unfortunately, for most of these it is necessary to physically change the setup (filters, special objectives, etc.). We present a programmable microscope in which an integrated spatial light modulator (SLM) is incorporated in order to realize a number of otherwise physically intricate modifications. We employ a HDTV LCOS SLM (Holoeye Pluto, 1920x1080 pixel, 8 μm pixel pitch), 2 different LED illuminations in reflection and transmission, an Olympus UmPlanFl 50x objective with a NA of 0.8 and a CCD camera (SVS-Vistek eco204 1/3") with 1024x768 resolution. By the use of computer generated holograms (CGHs) we are able to recreate a number of classical phase contrast imaging techniques such as Zernike phase contrast or DIC, and modify them in unconventional ways. Additionally, the SLM enables us to compensate various kinds of aberrations. Other imaging methods like stereovision for three dimensional object reconstruction on a microscopic scale, structured illumination or confocal microscopy are also possible if the setup is extended to a state in which not only the imaging light but also the illumination light is propagated over an SLM with a CGH.

  5. In vivo microdissection and live embryo imaging by two-photon microscopy to study Drosophila melanogaster early development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supatto, Willy; Brouzes, Eric; Farge, Emmanuel; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel

    2004-09-01

    Animal embryo development exhibits a complex choreography of cell movements highly regulated both in time and space. This sequence of morphogenetic movements is initiated at gastrulation and is tightly controlled by a cascade of developmental gene expression. We have recently reported that developmental gene expression can in turn be mechanically regulated by morphogenetic movements during Drosophila melanogaster early development. In order to study this phenomenon of mechanically induced gene expression, it is necessary to develop new techniques of in vivo investigation. We show that the combination of femtosecond pulse intratissue surgery and two-photon-excitation fluorescence (2PEF) microscopy is a powerful tool for (i) disrupting natural morphogenetic movements and (ii) imaging native and disrupted morphogenetic movements during Drosophila development. (i) First, non-linear-absorption-mediated photo-disruption makes it possible to perform controlled intra-vital micro-dissections resulting in the modulation of morphogenetic movements and subsequent mechano-sensitive gene expression. (ii) Second, in vivo 2PEF microscopy of transgenic GFP systems appears to be an excellent technique for long-term in vivo imaging of the complex morphogenetic movements involved in normal or perturbed Drosophila gastrulation. Together, these two techniques provide a powerful novel approach to study embryo development.

  6. In vivo two-photon microscopy study of short-term effects of microbeam irradiation on normal mouse brain microvasculature

    SciTech Connect

    Serduc, Raphael . E-mail: rserduc@ujf-grenoble.fr; Verant, Pascale; Vial, Jean-Claude; Farion, Regine; Rocas, Linda; Remy, Chantal; Fadlallah, Taoufik M.S.; Brauer, Elke M.S.; Bravin, Alberto; Laissue, Jean; Blattmann, Hans; Sanden, Boudewijn van der

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the early effects of microbeam irradiation on the vascular permeability and volume in the parietal cortex of normal nude mice using two-photon microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Methods and Materials: The upper part of the left hemisphere of 55 mice was irradiated anteroposteriorly using 18 vertically oriented beams (width 25 {mu}m, interdistance 211 {mu}m; peak entrance doses: 312 or 1000 Gy). At different times after microbeam exposure, the microvasculature in the cortex was analyzed using intravital two-photon microscopy after intravascular injection of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextrans and sulforhodamine B (SRB). Changes of the vascular volume were observed at the FITC wavelength over a maximum depth of 650 {mu}m from the dura. The vascular permeability was detected as extravasations of SRB. Results: For all times (12 h to 1 month) after microbeam irradiation and for both doses, the FITC-dextran remained in the vessels. No significant change in vascular volume was observed between 12 h and 3 months after irradiation. Diffusion of SRB was observed in microbeam irradiated regions from 12 h until 12 days only after a 1000 Gy exposure. Conclusion: No radiation damage to the microvasculature was detected in normal brain tissue after a 312 Gy microbeam irradiation. This dose would be more appropriate than 1000 Gy for the treatment of brain tumors using crossfired microbeams.

  7. Silver stain for electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbett, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Ammoniacal silver stain used for light microscopy was adapted advantageously for use with very thin biological sections required for electron microscopy. Silver stain can be performed in short time, has more contrast, and is especially useful for low power electron microscopy.

  8. Characterization of Polymer Blends: Optical Microscopy (*Polarized, Interference and Phase Contrast Microscopy*) and Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan; Darling, Seth B.

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 15 surveys the characterization of macro, micro and meso morphologies of polymer blends by optical microscopy. Confocal Microscopy offers the ability to view the three dimensional morphology of polymer blends, popular in characterization of biological systems. Confocal microscopy uses point illumination and a spatial pinhole to eliminate out-of focus light in samples that are thicker than the focal plane.

  9. Trichomonads under Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Benchimol, Marlene

    2004-10-01

    Trichomonads are flagellate protists, and among them Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus are the most studied because they are parasites of the urogenital tract of humans and cattle, respectively. Microscopy provides new insights into the cell biology and morphology of these parasites, and thus allows better understanding of the main aspects of their physiology. Here, we review the ultrastructure of T. foetus and T. vaginalis, stressing the participation of the axostyle in the process of cell division and showing that the pseudocyst may be a new form in the trichomonad cell cycle and not simply a degenerative form. Other organelles, such as the Golgi and hydrogenosomes, are also reviewed. The virus present in trichomonads is discussed. PMID:15525428

  10. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-04-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens.

  11. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens. PMID:27103155

  12. Single atom microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P; Lupini, Andrew R; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Pennycook, Stephen J; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2012-12-01

    We show that aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy operating at low accelerating voltages is able to analyze, simultaneously and with single atom resolution and sensitivity, the local atomic configuration, chemical identities, and optical response at point defect sites in monolayer graphene. Sequential fast-scan annular dark-field (ADF) imaging provides direct visualization of point defect diffusion within the graphene lattice, with all atoms clearly resolved and identified via quantitative image analysis. Summing multiple ADF frames of stationary defects produce images with minimized statistical noise and reduced distortions of atomic positions. Electron energy-loss spectrum imaging of single atoms allows the delocalization of inelastic scattering to be quantified, and full quantum mechanical calculations are able to describe the delocalization effect with good accuracy. These capabilities open new opportunities to probe the defect structure, defect dynamics, and local optical properties in 2D materials with single atom sensitivity.

  13. Hyperspectral light sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jahr, Wiebke; Schmid, Benjamin; Schmied, Christopher; Fahrbach, Florian O; Huisken, Jan

    2015-01-01

    To study the development and interactions of cells and tissues, multiple fluorescent markers need to be imaged efficiently in a single living organism. Instead of acquiring individual colours sequentially with filters, we created a platform based on line-scanning light sheet microscopy to record the entire spectrum for each pixel in a three-dimensional volume. We evaluated data sets with varying spectral sampling and determined the optimal channel width to be around 5 nm. With the help of these data sets, we show that our setup outperforms filter-based approaches with regard to image quality and discrimination of fluorophores. By spectral unmixing we resolved overlapping fluorophores with up to nanometre resolution and removed autofluorescence in zebrafish and fruit fly embryos. PMID:26329685

  14. Hyperspectral light sheet microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahr, Wiebke; Schmid, Benjamin; Schmied, Christopher; Fahrbach, Florian O.; Huisken, Jan

    2015-09-01

    To study the development and interactions of cells and tissues, multiple fluorescent markers need to be imaged efficiently in a single living organism. Instead of acquiring individual colours sequentially with filters, we created a platform based on line-scanning light sheet microscopy to record the entire spectrum for each pixel in a three-dimensional volume. We evaluated data sets with varying spectral sampling and determined the optimal channel width to be around 5 nm. With the help of these data sets, we show that our setup outperforms filter-based approaches with regard to image quality and discrimination of fluorophores. By spectral unmixing we resolved overlapping fluorophores with up to nanometre resolution and removed autofluorescence in zebrafish and fruit fly embryos.

  15. Hyperspectral light sheet microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jahr, Wiebke; Schmid, Benjamin; Schmied, Christopher; Fahrbach, Florian O.; Huisken, Jan

    2015-01-01

    To study the development and interactions of cells and tissues, multiple fluorescent markers need to be imaged efficiently in a single living organism. Instead of acquiring individual colours sequentially with filters, we created a platform based on line-scanning light sheet microscopy to record the entire spectrum for each pixel in a three-dimensional volume. We evaluated data sets with varying spectral sampling and determined the optimal channel width to be around 5 nm. With the help of these data sets, we show that our setup outperforms filter-based approaches with regard to image quality and discrimination of fluorophores. By spectral unmixing we resolved overlapping fluorophores with up to nanometre resolution and removed autofluorescence in zebrafish and fruit fly embryos. PMID:26329685

  16. Spectral Domain Phase Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendargo, Hansford C.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    Spectral domain phase microscopy (SDPM) is a functional extension of optical coherence tomography (OCT) using common-path interferometry to produce phase-referenced images of dynamic samples. Like OCT, axial resolution in SDPM is determined by the source coherence length, while lateral resolution is limited by diffraction in the microscope optics. However, the quantitative phase information SDPM generates is sensitive to nanometer-scale displacements of scattering structures. The use of a common-path optical geometry yields an imaging system with high phase stability. Due to coherence gating, SDPM can achieve full depth discrimination, allowing for independent motion resolution of subcellular structures throughout the sample volume. Here we review the basic theory of OCT and SDPM along with applications of SDPM in cellular imaging to measure topology, Doppler flow in single-celled organisms, time-resolved motions, rheological information of the cytoskeleton, and optical signaling of neural activation. Phase imaging limitations, artifacts, and sensitivity considerations are discussed.

  17. Sensitivity of photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Building on its high spatial resolution, deep penetration depth and excellent image contrast, 3D photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has grown tremendously since its first publication in 2005. Integrating optical excitation and acoustic detection, PAM has broken through both the optical diffusion and optical diffraction limits. PAM has 100% relative sensitivity to optical absorption (i.e., a given percentage change in the optical absorption coefficient yields the same percentage change in the photoacoustic amplitude), and its ultimate detection sensitivity is limited only by thermal noise. Focusing on the engineering aspects of PAM, this Review discusses the detection sensitivity of PAM, compares the detection efficiency of different PAM designs, and summarizes the imaging performance of various endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. It then describes representative PAM applications with high detection sensitivity, and outlines paths to further improvement. PMID:25302158

  18. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens. PMID:27103155

  19. Single atom microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P; Lupini, Andrew R; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Pennycook, Stephen J; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2012-12-01

    We show that aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy operating at low accelerating voltages is able to analyze, simultaneously and with single atom resolution and sensitivity, the local atomic configuration, chemical identities, and optical response at point defect sites in monolayer graphene. Sequential fast-scan annular dark-field (ADF) imaging provides direct visualization of point defect diffusion within the graphene lattice, with all atoms clearly resolved and identified via quantitative image analysis. Summing multiple ADF frames of stationary defects produce images with minimized statistical noise and reduced distortions of atomic positions. Electron energy-loss spectrum imaging of single atoms allows the delocalization of inelastic scattering to be quantified, and full quantum mechanical calculations are able to describe the delocalization effect with good accuracy. These capabilities open new opportunities to probe the defect structure, defect dynamics, and local optical properties in 2D materials with single atom sensitivity. PMID:23146658

  20. Trichomonads under Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Benchimol, Marlene

    2004-10-01

    Trichomonads are flagellate protists, and among them Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus are the most studied because they are parasites of the urogenital tract of humans and cattle, respectively. Microscopy provides new insights into the cell biology and morphology of these parasites, and thus allows better understanding of the main aspects of their physiology. Here, we review the ultrastructure of T. foetus and T. vaginalis, stressing the participation of the axostyle in the process of cell division and showing that the pseudocyst may be a new form in the trichomonad cell cycle and not simply a degenerative form. Other organelles, such as the Golgi and hydrogenosomes, are also reviewed. The virus present in trichomonads is discussed.

  1. Interference reflection microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barr, Valarie A; Bunnell, Stephen C

    2009-12-01

    Interference reflection microscopy (IRM) is an optical technique used to study cell adhesion or cell mobility on a glass coverslip. The interference of reflected light waves generates images with high contrast and definition. IRM can be used to examine almost any cell that will rest upon a glass surface, although it is most useful in examining sites of close contact between a cell and substratum. This unit presents methods for obtaining IRM images of cells with particular emphasis on IRM imaging with a laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM), as most LSCM are already capable of recording these images without any modification of the instrument. Techniques are presented for imaging fixed and live cells, as well as simultaneous multi-channel capture of fluorescence and reflection images.

  2. Ion Microscopy on Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredotti, Claudio

    Because of its physical properties (strong radiation hardness, wide energy gap with a consequent extremely low dark current, very large electron and hole mobility) diamond is a very good candidate for nuclear particle detection, particularly in harsh environments or in conditions of strong radiation damage. Being commonly polycrystalline, diamond samples obtained by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) are not homogeneous, not only from the morphological point of view, but also from the electronic one. As a consequence, as it was indicated quite early starting from 1995, charge collection properties such as charge collection efficiency (cce) are not uniform, but they are depending on the site hit by incoming particle. Moreover, these properties are influenced by previous irradiations which are used in order to improve them and, finally, they are also dependent on the thickness of the sample, since the electronic non uniformity extends also in depth by affecting the profile of the electrical field from top to bottom electrode of the nuclear detector in the standard "sandwich" arrangement. By the use of focussed ion beams, it is possible to investigate these non uniformities by the aid of techniques like IBIC (Ion Beam Induced Charge) and IBIL (Ion Beam Induced Luminescence) with a space resolution of the order of 1 m. This relatively new kind of microscopy, which is called "ion microscopy", is capable not only to give 2D maps of cce, which can be quite precisely compared with morphological images obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (generally the grains display a much better cce than intergrain regions), but also to give the electric field profile from one electrode to the other one in a "lateral" arrangement of the ion beam. IBIL, by supplying 2D maps of luminescence intensity at different wavelength, can give information about the presence of specific radiative recombination centers and their distribution in the material. Finally, a new technique called XBIC (X

  3. Ultrasonic Force Microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Oleg; Briggs, Andrew

    Ultrasonic Force Microscopy, or UFM, allows combination of two apparently mutually exclusive requirements for the nanomechanical probe—high stiffness for the efficient indentation and high mechanical compliance that brings force sensitivity. Somewhat inventively, UFM allows to combine these two virtues in the same cantilever by using indention of the sample at high frequency, when cantilever is very rigid, but detecting the result of this indention at much lower frequency. That is made possible due to the extreme nonlinearity of the nanoscale tip-surface junction force-distance dependence, that acts as "mechanical diode" detecting ultrasound in AFM. After introducing UFM principles, we discuss features of experimental UFM implementation, and the theory of contrast in this mode, progressing to quantitative measurements of contact stiffness. A variety of UFM applications ranging from semiconductor quantum nanostructures, graphene, very large scale integrated circuits, and reinforced ceramics to polymer composites and biological materials is presented via comprehensive imaging gallery accompanied by the guidance for the optimal UFM measurements of these materials. We also address effects of adhesion and topography on the elasticity imaging and the approaches for reducing artifacts connected with these effects. This is complemented by another extremely useful feature of UFM—ultrasound induced superlubricity that allows damage free imaging of materials ranging from stiff solid state devices and graphene to biological materials. Finally, we proceed to the exploration of time-resolved nanoscale phenomena using nonlinear mixing of multiple vibration frequencies in ultrasonic AFM—Heterodyne Force Microscopy, or HFM, that also include mixing of ultrasonic vibration with other periodic physical excitations, eg. electrical, photothermal, etc. Significant section of the chapter analyzes the ability of UFM and HFM to detect subsurface mechanical inhomogeneities, as well as

  4. Virtual microscopy in pathology education.

    PubMed

    Dee, Fred R

    2009-08-01

    Technology for acquisition of virtual slides was developed in 1985; however, it was not until the late 1990s that desktop computers had enough processing speed to commercialize virtual microscopy and apply the technology to education. By 2000, the progressive decrease in use of traditional microscopy in medical student education had set the stage for the entry of virtual microscopy into medical schools. Since that time, it has been successfully implemented into many pathology courses in the United States and around the world, with surveys indicating that about 50% of pathology courses already have or expect to implement virtual microscopy. Over the last decade, in addition to an increasing ability to emulate traditional microscopy, virtual microscopy has allowed educators to take advantage of the accessibility, efficiency, and pedagogic versatility of the computer and the Internet. The cost of virtual microscopy in education is now quite reasonable after taking into account replacement cost for microscopes, maintenance of glass slides, and the fact that 1-dimensional microscope space can be converted to multiuse computer laboratories or research. Although the current technology for implementation of virtual microscopy in histopathology education is very good, it could be further improved upon by better low-power screen resolution and depth of field. Nevertheless, virtual microscopy is beginning to play an increasing role in continuing education, house staff education, and evaluation of competency in histopathology. As Z-axis viewing (focusing) becomes more efficient, virtual microscopy will also become integrated into education in cytology, hematology, microbiology, and urinalysis.

  5. Nuclear microscopy: biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Frank; Landsberg, Judith P.

    1993-05-01

    Recent developments in high energy ion beam techniques and technology have enabled the scanning proton microprobe (SPM) to make advances in biomedical research. In particular the combination of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) to measure the elemental concentrations of inorganic elements, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) to characterise the organic matrix, and scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) to provide information on the density and structure of the sample, represents a powerful set of techniques which can be applied simultaneously to the specimen under investigation. This paper reviews briefly the biomedical work using the proton microprobe that has been carried out since the 2nd Int. Conf. on Nuclear Microprobe Technology and Applications held in Melbourne, 1990. Three recent and diverse examples of medical research are also presented from work carried out using the Oxford SPM. The first is a preliminary experiment carried out using human hair as a monitor for potential toxicity, using PIXE elemental mapping across the hair cross section to differentiate between elements contained within the hair and contamination from external sources. The second example is in the use of STIM to map individual cells in freeze-dried tissue, showing the possibility of the in situ microanalysis of cells and their extracellular environment. The third is the use of PIXE, RBS and STIM to identify and analyse the elemental constituents of neuritic plaque cores in untreated freeze-dried Alzheimer's tissue. This work resolves a current controversy by revealing an absence of aluminium levels in plaque cores at the 15 ppm level.

  6. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  7. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  8. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  9. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  10. Microscopy of semiconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennycook, S. J.

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of the trip was to present an invited talk at the 7th Oxford Conference on Microscopy of Semiconducting Materials entitled, High-Resolution Z-Contrast Imaging of Heterostructures and Superlattices, (Oxford, United Kingdom) and to visit VG Microscopes, East Grinstead, for discussions on the progress of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) 300-kV high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), which is currently on order. The traveler also visited three other institutions with 100-kV STEMs that either have or intend to purchase the necessary modifications to provide Z-contrast capability similar to that of the existing ORNL machine. Specifically, Max-Planck Institut fuer Metallforschung (Stuttgart, Germany); Cambridge University, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy (Cambridge, United Kingdom); and Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University (Cambridge, United Kingdom) were visited. In addition, discussions were held with C. Humphreys on the possibility of obtaining joint funding for collaborative research involving electron beam writing and Z-contrast imaging in the Cambridge and Oak Ridge STEMs, respectively.

  11. Verification of Planning Target Volume Settings in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy by Using In-Treatment 4-Dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Wataru; Yamashita, Hideomi; Kida, Satoshi; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Sakumi, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Haga, Akihiro

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate setup error and tumor motion during beam delivery by using 4-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) and to assess the adequacy of the planning target volume (PTV) margin for lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT-SBRT). Methods and Materials: Fifteen lung cancer patients treated by single-arc VMAT-SBRT were selected in this analysis. All patients were treated with an abdominal compressor. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on maximum inspiration and maximum expiration CT datasets from 4D CT respiratory sorting and merged into internal target volumes (ITVs). The PTV margin was isotropically taken as 5 mm. Registration was automatically performed using “pre-3D” CBCT. Treatment was performed with a D95 prescription of 50 Gy delivered in 4 fractions. The 4D tumor locations during beam delivery were determined using in-treatment 4D CBCT images acquired in each fraction. Then, the discrepancy between the actual tumor location and the ITV was evaluated in the lateral, vertical, and longitudinal directions. Results: Overall, 55 4D CBCT sets during VMAT-SBRT were successfully obtained. The amplitude of tumor motion was less than 10 mm in all directions. The average displacements between ITV and actual tumor location during treatment were 0.41 ± 0.93 mm, 0.15 ± 0.58 mm, and 0.60 ± 0.99 mm for the craniocaudal, left-right, and anteroposterior directions, respectively. The discrepancy in each phase did not exceed 5 mm in any direction. Conclusions: With in-treatment 4D CBCT, we confirmed the required PTV margins when the registration for moving target was performed using pre-3D CBCT. In-treatment 4D CBCT is a direct method for quantitatively assessing the intrafractional location of a moving target.

  12. A Pilot Evaluation of a 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Scheme Based on Simultaneous Motion Estimation and Image Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Jun; Gu, Xuejun; Pan, Tinsu; Wang, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a 4-dimensional (4-D) cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) reconstruction scheme based on simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) through patient studies. Methods and Materials: The SMEIR algorithm contains 2 alternating steps: (1) motion-compensated CBCT reconstruction using projections from all phases to reconstruct a reference phase 4D-CBCT by explicitly considering the motion models between each different phase and (2) estimation of motion models directly from projections by matching the measured projections to the forward projection of the deformed reference phase 4D-CBCT. Four lung cancer patients were scanned for 4 to 6 minutes to obtain approximately 2000 projections for each patient. To evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm on a conventional 1-minute CBCT scan, the number of projections at each phase was reduced by a factor of 5, 8, or 10 for each patient. Then, 4D-CBCTs were reconstructed from the down-sampled projections using Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, total variation (TV) minimization, prior image constrained compressive sensing (PICCS), and SMEIR. Using the 4D-CBCT reconstructed from the fully sampled projections as a reference, the relative error (RE) of reconstructed images, root mean square error (RMSE), and maximum error (MaxE) of estimated tumor positions were analyzed to quantify the performance of the SMEIR algorithm. Results: The SMEIR algorithm can achieve results consistent with the reference 4D-CBCT reconstructed with many more projections per phase. With an average of 30 to 40 projections per phase, the MaxE in tumor position detection is less than 1 mm in SMEIR for all 4 patients. Conclusion: The results from a limited number of patients show that SMEIR is a promising tool for high-quality 4D-CBCT reconstruction and tumor motion modeling.

  13. Epi-Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Donna J.; Brown, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    Epi-fluorescence microscopy is available in most life sciences research laboratories, and when optimized can be a central laboratory tool. In this chapter, the epi-fluorescence light path is introduced and the various components are discussed in detail. Recommendations are made for incident lamp light sources, excitation and emission filters, dichroic mirrors, objective lenses, and charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras in order to obtain the most sensitive epi-fluorescence microscope. The even illumination of metal-halide lamps combined with new “hard” coated filters and mirrors, a high resolution monochrome CCD camera, and a high NA objective lens are all recommended for high resolution and high sensitivity fluorescence imaging. Recommendations are also made for multicolor imaging with the use of monochrome cameras, motorized filter turrets, individual filter cubes, and corresponding dyes that are the best choice for sensitive, high resolution multicolor imaging. Images should be collected using Nyquist sampling and should be corrected for background intensity contributions and nonuniform illumination across the field of view. Photostable fluorescent probes and proteins that absorb a lot of light (i.e., high extinction co-efficients) and generate a lot of fluorescence signal (i.e., high quantum yields) are optimal. A neuronal immune-fluorescence labeling protocol is also presented. Finally, in order to maximize the utility of sensitive wide-field microscopes and generate the highest resolution images with high signal-to-noise, advice for combining wide-field epi-fluorescence imaging with restorative image deconvolution is presented. PMID:23026996

  14. Dynamic light scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzakpasu, Rhonda

    An optical microscope technique, dynamic light scattering microscopy (DLSM) that images dynamically scattered light fluctuation decay rates is introduced. Using physical optics we show theoretically that within the optical resolution of the microscope, relative motions between scattering centers are sufficient to produce significant phase variations resulting in interference intensity fluctuations in the image plane. The time scale for these intensity fluctuations is predicted. The spatial coherence distance defining the average distance between constructive and destructive interference in the image plane is calculated and compared with the pixel size. We experimentally tested DLSM on polystyrene latex nanospheres and living macrophage cells. In order to record these rapid fluctuations, on a slow progressive scan CCD camera, we used a thin laser line of illumination on the sample such that only a single column of pixels in the CCD camera is illuminated. This allowed the use of the rate of the column-by-column readout transfer process as the acquisition rate of the camera. This manipulation increased the data acquisition rate by at least an order of magnitude in comparison to conventional CCD cameras rates defined by frames/s. Analysis of the observed fluctuations provides information regarding the rates of motion of the scattering centers. These rates, acquired from each position on the sample are used to create a spatial map of the fluctuation decay rates. Our experiments show that with this technique, we are able to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio and can monitor fast intensity fluctuations, on the order of milliseconds. DLSM appears to provide dynamic information about fast motions within cells at a sub-optical resolution scale and provides a new kind of spatial contrast.

  15. Electronic Blending in Virtual Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maybury, Terrence S.; Farah, Camile S.

    2010-01-01

    Virtual microscopy (VM) is a relatively new technology that transforms the computer into a microscope. In essence, VM allows for the scanning and transfer of glass slides from light microscopy technology to the digital environment of the computer. This transition is also a function of the change from print knowledge to electronic knowledge, or as…

  16. Multi-contrast Photoacoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie

    Photoacoustic microscopy is a hybrid imaging modality with high spatial resolution, moderate imaging depth, excellent imaging contrast and functional imaging capability. Taking full advantage of this powerful weapon, we have investigated different anatomical, functional, flow dynamic and metabolic parameter measurements using photoacoustic microscopy. Specifically, Evans-blue dye was used to enhance photoacoustic microscopy of capillaries; label-free transverse and axial blood flow was measured based on bandwidth broadening and time shift of the photoacoustic signals; metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified in vivo from all the five parameters measured by photoacoustic microcopy; whole cross-sectional imaging of small intestine was achieved on a double-illumination photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of focus and imaging depth; hemodynamic imaging was performed on a MEMS-mirror enhanced photoacoustic microscopy with a cross-sectional imaging rate of 400 Hz. As a maturing imaging technique, PAM is expected to find new applications in both fundamental life science and clinical practice.

  17. TH-E-17A-06: Anatomical-Adaptive Compressed Sensing (AACS) Reconstruction for Thoracic 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, C; Kipritidis, J; OBrien, R; Cooper, B; Kuncic, Z; Keall, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used for clinical thoracic 4-dimensional (4D) cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction suffers from noise and streaking artifacts due to projection under-sampling. Compressed sensing theory enables reconstruction of under-sampled datasets via total-variation (TV) minimization, but TV-minimization algorithms such as adaptive-steepest-descent-projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) often converge slowly and are prone to over-smoothing anatomical details. These disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating general anatomical knowledge via anatomy segmentation. Based on this concept, we have developed an anatomical-adaptive compressed sensing (AACS) algorithm for thoracic 4D-CBCT reconstruction. Methods: AACS is based on the ASD-POCS framework, where each iteration consists of a TV-minimization step and a data fidelity constraint step. Prior to every AACS iteration, four major thoracic anatomical structures - soft tissue, lungs, bony anatomy, and pulmonary details - were segmented from the updated solution image. Based on the segmentation, an anatomical-adaptive weighting was applied to the TV-minimization step, so that TV-minimization was enhanced at noisy/streaky regions and suppressed at anatomical structures of interest. The image quality and convergence speed of AACS was compared to conventional ASD-POCS using an XCAT digital phantom and a patient scan. Results: For the XCAT phantom, the AACS image represented the ground truth better than the ASD-POCS image, giving a higher structural similarity index (0.93 vs. 0.84) and lower absolute difference (1.1*10{sup 4} vs. 1.4*10{sup 4}). For the patient case, while both algorithms resulted in much less noise and streaking than FDK, the AACS image showed considerably better contrast and sharpness of the vessels, tumor, and fiducial marker than the ASD-POCS image. In addition, AACS converged over 50% faster than ASD-POCS in both cases. Conclusions: The proposed AACS

  18. Audio-Visual Biofeedback Does Not Improve the Reliability of Target Delineation Using Maximum Intensity Projection in 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei; Neuner, Geoffrey A.; George, Rohini; Wang, Zhendong; Sasor, Sarah; Huang, Xuan; Regine, William F.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether coaching patients' breathing would improve the match between ITV{sub MIP} (internal target volume generated by contouring in the maximum intensity projection scan) and ITV{sub 10} (generated by combining the gross tumor volumes contoured in 10 phases of a 4-dimensional CT [4DCT] scan). Methods and Materials: Eight patients with a thoracic tumor and 5 patients with an abdominal tumor were included in an institutional review board-approved prospective study. Patients underwent 3 4DCT scans with: (1) free breathing (FB); (2) coaching using audio-visual (AV) biofeedback via the Real-Time Position Management system; and (3) coaching via a spirometer system (Active Breathing Coordinator or ABC). One physician contoured all scans to generate the ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub MIP}. The match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10} was quantitatively assessed with volume ratio, centroid distance, root mean squared distance, and overlap/Dice coefficient. We investigated whether coaching (AV or ABC) or uniform expansions (1, 2, 3, or 5 mm) of ITV{sub MIP} improved the match. Results: Although both AV and ABC coaching techniques improved frequency reproducibility and ABC improved displacement regularity, neither improved the match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10} over FB. On average, ITV{sub MIP} underestimated ITV{sub 10} by 19%, 19%, and 21%, with centroid distance of 1.9, 2.3, and 1.7 mm and Dice coefficient of 0.87, 0.86, and 0.88 for FB, AV, and ABC, respectively. Separate analyses indicated a better match for lung cancers or tumors not adjacent to high-intensity tissues. Uniform expansions of ITV{sub MIP} did not correct for the mismatch between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10}. Conclusions: In this pilot study, audio-visual biofeedback did not improve the match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10}. In general, ITV{sub MIP} should be limited to lung cancers, and modification of ITV{sub MIP} in each phase of the 4DCT data set is recommended.

  19. Microscopy techniques in flavivirus research.

    PubMed

    Chong, Mun Keat; Chua, Anthony Jin Shun; Tan, Terence Tze Tong; Tan, Suat Hoon; Ng, Mah Lee

    2014-04-01

    The Flavivirus genus is composed of many medically important viruses that cause high morbidity and mortality, which include Dengue and West Nile viruses. Various molecular and biochemical techniques have been developed in the endeavour to study flaviviruses. However, microscopy techniques still have irreplaceable roles in the identification of novel virus pathogens and characterization of morphological changes in virus-infected cells. Fluorescence microscopy contributes greatly in understanding the fundamental viral protein localizations and virus-host protein interactions during infection. Electron microscopy remains the gold standard for visualizing ultra-structural features of virus particles and infected cells. New imaging techniques and combinatory applications are continuously being developed to push the limit of resolution and extract more quantitative data. Currently, correlative live cell imaging and high resolution three-dimensional imaging have already been achieved through the tandem use of optical and electron microscopy in analyzing biological specimens. Microscopy techniques are also used to measure protein binding affinities and determine the mobility pattern of proteins in cells. This chapter will consolidate on the applications of various well-established microscopy techniques in flavivirus research, and discuss how recently developed microscopy techniques can potentially help advance our understanding in these membrane viruses.

  20. Soil microstructure and electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, P.; Fryer, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the process of comparing Martian soils with terrestial soils, high resolution electron microscopy and associated techniques should be used to examine the finer soil particles, and various techniques of electron and optical microscopy should be used to examine the undisturbed structure of Martian soils. To examine the structure of fine grained portions of the soil, transmission electron microscopy may be required. A striking feature of many Martian soils is their red color. Although the present-day Martian climate appears to be cold, this color is reminiscent of terrestial tropical red clays. Their chemical contents are broadly similar.

  1. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  2. Vertically scanned laser sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Di; Arranz, Alicia; Zhu, Shouping; Yang, Yujie; Shi, Liangliang; Wang, Jun; Shen, Chen; Tian, Jie; Ripoll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Laser sheet microscopy is a widely used imaging technique for imaging the three-dimensional distribution of a fluorescence signal in fixed tissue or small organisms. In laser sheet microscopy, the stripe artifacts caused by high absorption or high scattering structures are very common, greatly affecting image quality. To solve this problem, we report here a two-step procedure which consists of continuously acquiring laser sheet images while vertically displacing the sample, and then using the variational stationary noise remover (VSNR) method to further reduce the remaining stripes. Images from a cleared murine colon acquired with a vertical scan are compared with common stitching procedures demonstrating that vertically scanned light sheet microscopy greatly improves the performance of current light sheet microscopy approaches without the need for complex changes to the imaging setup and allows imaging of elongated samples, extending the field of view in the vertical direction.

  3. Confocal microscopy in transmitted light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodt, Hans-Ulrich; Becker, Klaus

    2003-10-01

    We developed a confocal microscope for transmitted light to visualize fine details in phase objects like unstained biological specimens. The main difficulty of confocal microscopy in transmission is the alignment of illumination and detector pinholes. This alignment was achieved by using "electronic pinholes" on the detector side. As a first step, we were able to image cells in onion skin at greater depths and with higher resolution than by using conventional microscopy.

  4. Accuracy of Routine Treatment Planning 4-Dimensional and Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Computed Tomography Delineation of the Left Anterior Descending Artery in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    White, Benjamin M.; Vennarini, Sabina; Lin, Lilie; Freedman, Gary; Santhanam, Anand; Low, Daniel A.; Both, Stefan

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of radiation therapy treatment planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) CT to accurately contour the left anterior descending artery (LAD), a primary indicator of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity for patients undergoing radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Ten subjects were prospectively imaged with a cardiac-gated MRI protocol to determine cardiac motion effects, including the displacement of a region of interest comprising the LAD. A series of planar views were obtained and resampled to create a 3-dimensional (3D) volume. A 3D optical flow deformable image registration algorithm determined tissue displacement during the cardiac cycle. The measured motion was then used as a spatial boundary to characterize motion blurring of the radiologist-delineated LAD structure for a cohort of 10 consecutive patients enrolled prospectively on a breast study including 4DCT and DIBH scans. Coronary motion–induced blurring artifacts were quantified by applying an unsharp filter to accentuate the LAD structure despite the presence of motion blurring. The 4DCT maximum inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases were coregistered to determine the LAD displacement during tidal respiration, as visualized in 4DCT. Results: The average 90th percentile heart motion for the region of interest was 0.7 ± 0.1 mm (left–right [LR]), 1.3 ± 0.6 mm (superior–inferior [SI]), and 0.6 ± 0.2 mm (anterior–posterior [AP]) in the cardiac-gated MRI cohort. The average relative increase in the number of voxels comprising the LAD contour was 69.4% ± 4.5% for the DIBH. The LAD volume overestimation had the dosimetric impact of decreasing the reported mean LAD dose by 23% ± 9% on average in the DIBH. During tidal respiration the average relative LAD contour increase was 69.3% ± 5.9% and 67.9% ± 4.6% for inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases, respectively. The average 90th

  5. Semi-solid tumor model in Xenopus laevis/gilli cloned tadpoles for intravital study of neovascularization, immune cells and melanophore infiltration.

    PubMed

    Haynes-Gimore, Nikesha; Banach, Maureen; Brown, Edward; Dawes, Ryan; Edholm, Eva-Stina; Kim, Minsoo; Robert, Jacques

    2015-12-15

    Tumors have the ability to grow as a self-sustaining entity within the body. This autonomy is in part accomplished by the tumor cells ability to induce the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) and by controlling cell trafficking inside the tumor mass. These abilities greatly reduce the efficacy of many cancer therapies and pose challenges for the development of more effective cancer treatments. Hence, there is a need for animal models suitable for direct microscopy observation of blood vessel formation and cell trafficking, especially during early stages of tumor establishment. Here, we have developed a reliable and cost effective tumor model system in tadpoles of the amphibian Xenopus laevis. Tadpoles are ideally suited for direct microscopy observation because of their small size and transparency. Using the thymic lymphoid tumor line 15/0 derived from, and transplantable into, the X. laevis/gilli isogenic clone LG-15, we have adapted a system that consists in transplanting 15/0 tumor cells embedded into rat collagen under the dorsal skin of LG-15 tadpole recipients. This system recapitulates many facets of mammalian tumorigenesis and permits real time visualization of the active formation of the tumor microenvironment induced by 15/0 tumor cells including neovascularization, collagen rearrangements as well as infiltration of immune cells and melanophores.

  6. Sustainable, Rapid Synthesis of Bright-Luminescent CuInS2-ZnS Alloyed Nanocrystals: Multistage Nano-xenotoxicity Assessment and Intravital Fluorescence Bioimaging in Zebrafish-Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetty, S. Shashank; Praneetha, S.; Basu, Sandeep; Sachidanandan, Chetana; Murugan, A. Vadivel

    2016-05-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) luminescent CuInS2-ZnS alloyed nanocrystals (CIZS-NCs) for highly fluorescence bioimaging have received considerable interest in recent years. Owing, they became a desirable alternative to heavy-metal based-NCs and organic dyes with unique optical properties and low-toxicity for bioimaging and optoelectronic applications. In the present study, bright and robust CIZS-NCs have been synthesized within 5 min, as-high-as 230 °C without requiring any inert-gas atmosphere via microwave-solvothermal (MW-ST) method. Subsequently, the in vitro and in vivo nano-xenotoxicity and cellular uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs were investigated in L929, Vero, MCF7 cell lines and zebrafish-embryos. We observed minimal toxicity and acute teratogenic consequences upto 62.5 μg/ml of the CIZS-NCs in zebrafish-embryos. We also observed spontaneous uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs by 3 dpf older zebrafish-embryos that are evident through bright red fluorescence-emission at a low concentration of 7.8 μg/mL. Hence, we propose that the rapid, low-cost, large-scale “sustainable” MW-ST synthesis of CIZS-NCs, is an ideal bio-nanoprobe with good temporal and spatial resolution for rapid labeling, long-term in vivo tracking and intravital-fluorescence-bioimaging (IVBI).

  7. Quantitative phase-amplitude microscopy I: optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barone-Nugent, E D; Barty, A; Nugent, K A

    2002-06-01

    In this paper, the application of a new optical microscopy method (quantitative phase-amplitude microscopy) to biological imaging is explored, and the issue of resolution and image quality is examined. The paper begins by presenting a theoretical analysis of the method using the optical transfer function formalism of Streibl (1985). The effect of coherence on the formation of the phase image is explored, and it is shown that the resolution of the method is not compromised over that of a conventional bright-field image. It is shown that the signal-to-noise ratio of the phase recovery, however, does depend on the degree of coherence in the illumination. Streibl (1985) notes that partially coherent image formation is a non-linear process because of the intermingling of amplitude and phase information. The work presented here shows that the quantitative phase-amplitude microscopy method acts to linearize the image formation process, and that the phase and amplitude information is properly described using a transfer function analysis. The theoretical conclusions are tested experimentally using an optical microscope and the theoretical deductions are confirmed. Samples for microscopy influence both the phase and amplitude of the light wave and it is demonstrated that the new phase recovery method can separate the amplitude and phase information, something not possible using traditional phase microscopy. In the case of a coherent wave, knowledge of the phase and amplitude constitutes complete information that can be used to emulate other forms of microscopy. This capacity is demonstrated by recovering the phase of a sample and using the data to emulate a differential interference contrast image.

  8. In vivo correlation mapping microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, James; Alexandrov, Sergey; Owens, Peter; Subhash, Hrebesh; Leahy, Martin

    2016-04-01

    To facilitate regular assessment of the microcirculation in vivo, noninvasive imaging techniques such as nailfold capillaroscopy are required in clinics. Recently, a correlation mapping technique has been applied to optical coherence tomography (OCT), which extends the capabilities of OCT to microcirculation morphology imaging. This technique, known as correlation mapping optical coherence tomography, has been shown to extract parameters, such as capillary density and vessel diameter, and key clinical markers associated with early changes in microvascular diseases. However, OCT has limited spatial resolution in both the transverse and depth directions. Here, we extend this correlation mapping technique to other microscopy modalities, including confocal microscopy, and take advantage of the higher spatial resolution offered by these modalities. The technique is achieved as a processing step on microscopy images and does not require any modification to the microscope hardware. Results are presented which show that this correlation mapping microscopy technique can extend the capabilities of conventional microscopy to enable mapping of vascular networks in vivo with high spatial resolution in both the transverse and depth directions.

  9. Correlative Fluorescence and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schirra, Randall T.; Zhang, Peijun

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (CFEM) is a multimodal technique that combines dynamic and localization information from fluorescence methods with ultrastructural data from electron microscopy, to give new information about how cellular components change relative to the spatiotemporal dynamics within their environment. In this review, we will discuss some of the basic techniques and tools of the trade for utilizing this attractive research method, which is becoming a very powerful tool for biology labs. The information obtained from correlative methods has proven to be invaluable in creating consensus between the two types of microscopy, extending the capability of each, and cutting the time and expense associate with using each method separately for comparative analysis. The realization of the advantages of these methods in cell biology have led to rapid improvement in the protocols and have ushered in a new generation of instruments to reach the next level of correlation – integration. PMID:25271959

  10. Structured line illumination Raman microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kozue; Palonpon, Almar F.; Smith, Nicholas I.; Chiu, Liang-da; Kasai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Kawata, Satoshi; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2015-01-01

    In the last couple of decades, the spatial resolution in optical microscopy has increased to unprecedented levels by exploiting the fluorescence properties of the probe. At about the same time, Raman imaging techniques have emerged as a way to image inherent chemical information in a sample without using fluorescent probes. However, in many applications, the achievable resolution is limited to about half the wavelength of excitation light. Here we report the use of structured illumination to increase the spatial resolution of label-free spontaneous Raman microscopy, generating highly detailed spatial contrast from the ensemble of molecular information in the sample. Using structured line illumination in slit-scanning Raman microscopy, we demonstrate a marked improvement in spatial resolution and show the applicability to a range of samples, including both biological and inorganic chemical component mapping. This technique is expected to contribute towards greater understanding of chemical component distributions in organic and inorganic materials. PMID:26626144

  11. Structured line illumination Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kozue; Palonpon, Almar F.; Smith, Nicholas I.; Chiu, Liang-Da; Kasai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Kawata, Satoshi; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2015-12-01

    In the last couple of decades, the spatial resolution in optical microscopy has increased to unprecedented levels by exploiting the fluorescence properties of the probe. At about the same time, Raman imaging techniques have emerged as a way to image inherent chemical information in a sample without using fluorescent probes. However, in many applications, the achievable resolution is limited to about half the wavelength of excitation light. Here we report the use of structured illumination to increase the spatial resolution of label-free spontaneous Raman microscopy, generating highly detailed spatial contrast from the ensemble of molecular information in the sample. Using structured line illumination in slit-scanning Raman microscopy, we demonstrate a marked improvement in spatial resolution and show the applicability to a range of samples, including both biological and inorganic chemical component mapping. This technique is expected to contribute towards greater understanding of chemical component distributions in organic and inorganic materials.

  12. Correlative microscopy of detergent granules.

    PubMed

    van Dalen, G; Nootenboom, P; Heussen, P C M

    2011-03-01

    The microstructure of detergent products for textile cleaning determines to a large extent the physical properties of these products. Correlative microscopy was used to reveal the microstructure by reconciling images obtained by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray microtomography and Fourier transform infrared microscopy. These techniques were applied on the same location of a subsample of a spray-dried detergent base powder embedded in polyacrylate. In this way, the three-dimensional internal and external structure of detergent granules could be investigated from milli to nano scale with detailed spatial information about the components present. This will generate knowledge how to design optimal microstructures for laundry products to obtain product properties demanded by the market. This method is also very useful for other powder systems used in a large variety of industries (e.g. for pharmaceutical, food, ceramic and metal industries).

  13. Microscopy in Camillo Golgi's times.

    PubMed

    Merico, G

    1999-08-01

    The research by Camillo Golgi in histology and pathology dates from 1865, the year in which he obtained his MD degree, to 1923, when his last scientific article was published. Beginning in the mid 1855s, microscope manufacturers in Europe started producing objectives based on the principle of immersion introduced in 1847 by Giovan Battista Amici. The immersion objectives greatly improved the resolution of microscopic observations at high magnifications. From 1860 to 1872, technological improvements in microscope optics and the practicality of their use provided a larger community of investigators effective tools needed to study the structure of the nervous system. This progress in microscopy was associated with the application of new histological techniques, mastered by the chromoargentic reaction introduced by Golgi in 1873. In 1872, further progress in microscopy stemmed from the application of notions of applied physics to the production of microscope optics. These developments in microscopy will be briefly reviewed here.

  14. Confocal microscopy and exfoliative cytology

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Shyam Prasad; Ramani, Pratibha; Nainani, Purshotam

    2013-01-01

    Context: Early detection of potentially malignant lesions and invasive squamous-cell carcinoma in the oral cavity could be greatly improved through techniques that permit visualization of subtle cellular changes indicative of the neoplastic transformation process. One such technique is confocal microscopy. Combining rapidity with reliability, an innovative idea has been put forward using confocal microscope in exfoliative cytology. Aims: The main objective of this study was to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis and the results were compared with that of the standard PAP stain. Settings and Design: Confocal microscope, acridine orange (AO) stain, PAP (Papanicolaou) stain. The study was designed to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis. In the process, smears of patients with (clinically diagnosed and/or suspected) oral squamous cell carcinoma as well as those of controls (normal people) were stained with acridine orange and observed under confocal microscope. The results were compared with those of the standard PAP method. Materials and Methods: Samples of buccal mucosa smears from normal patients and squamous cell carcinoma patients were made, fixed in 100% alcohol, followed by AO staining. The corresponding set of smears was stained with PAP stain using rapid PAP stain kit. The results obtained were compared with those obtained with AO confocal microscopy. Results: The study had shown nuclear changes (malignant cells) in the smears of squamous cell carcinoma patients as increased intensity of fluorescence of the nucleus, when observed under confocal microscope. Acridine orange confocal microscopy showed good amount of sensitivity and specificity (93%) in identifying malignant cells in exfoliative cytological smears. Conclusion: Confocal microscopy was found to have good sensitivity in the identification of cancer (malignant) cells in exfoliative cytology, at par with the PAP method. The rapidity of processing and screening a

  15. The future of electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yimei; Durr, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifies to the importance of modern microscopy.

  16. The future of electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Yimei; Durr, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifiesmore » to the importance of modern microscopy.« less

  17. Multiphoton Microscopy for Ophthalmic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Emily A.; Masihzadeh, Omid; Lei, Tim C.; Ammar, David A.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2011-01-01

    We review multiphoton microscopy (MPM) including two-photon autofluorescence (2PAF), second harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG), fluorescence lifetime (FLIM), and coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) with relevance to clinical applications in ophthalmology. The different imaging modalities are discussed highlighting the particular strength that each has for functional tissue imaging. MPM is compared with current clinical ophthalmological imaging techniques such as reflectance confocal microscopy, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescence imaging. In addition, we discuss the future prospects for MPM in disease detection and clinical monitoring of disease progression, understanding fundamental disease mechanisms, and real-time monitoring of drug delivery. PMID:21274261

  18. Optical microscopy versus scanning electron microscopy in urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Marickar, Y M Fazil; Lekshmi, P R; Varma, Luxmi; Koshy, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Stone analysis is incompletely done in many clinical centers. Identification of the stone component is essential for deciding future prophylaxis. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) still remains a distant dream for routine hospital work. It is in this context that optical microscopy is suggested as an alternate procedure. The objective of this article was to assess the utility of an optical microscope which gives magnification of up to 40x and gives clear picture of the surface of the stones. In order to authenticate the morphological analysis of urinary stones, SEM and elemental distribution analysis were performed. A total of 250 urinary stones of different compositions were collected from stone clinic, photographed, observed under an optical microscope, and optical photographs were taken at different angles. Twenty-five representative samples among these were gold sputtered to make them conductive and were fed into the SEM machine. Photographs of the samples were taken at different angles at magnifications up to 4,000. Elemental distribution analysis (EDAX) was done to confirm the composition. The observations of the two studies were compared. The different appearances of the stones under optical illuminated microscopy were mostly standardized appearances, namely bosselations of pure whewellite, spiculations of weddellite, bright yellow colored appearance of uric acid, and dirty white amorphous appearance of phosphates. SEM and EDAX gave clearer pictures and gave added confirmation of the stone composition. From the references thus obtained, it was possible to confirm the composition by studying the optical microscopic pictures. Higher magnification capacity of the SEM and the EDAX patterns are useful to give reference support for performing optical microscopy work. After standardization, routine analysis can be performed with optical microscopy. The advantage of the optical microscope is that, it

  19. [History of microscopy in Spain].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Galiano, D

    1994-12-01

    Nowadays, many Spanish research centers have excellent electronic microscopy services. The current situation, however, should not allow us to forget that the initial steps of microscopy in Spain were very difficult. The construction of excellent optical microscopies in the late XIX century, and their almost immediate introduction in Spain, coincides with a period of thriving scientific activity in our country. Both micrography and histology saw the highlights of their development in Spain, with scientists such as Ramón y Cajal, Río Hortega, Ferrán, Simarro, among others, all of them widely known at present. This article evokes briefly the vicissitudes of Spanish microscopy, from its very beginning in 1843, when the Allgemeine Anatomie by Jacob Henle was translated into Spanish, to present. Scientific historical facts in this article are often accompanied with anecdotes, which show the human aspect of those great scientists. The persevering task carried out by researchers whose names have been recorded in the history of Spanish science and technology, have established the grounds in which our current development is based.

  20. Biocompatible Green and Red Fluorescent Organic Dots with Remarkably Large Two-Photon Action Cross Sections for Targeted Cellular Imaging and Real-Time Intravital Blood Vascular Visualization.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jiayun; Cai, Xiaolei; Lou, Xiaoding; Feng, Guangxue; Min, Xuehong; Luo, Wenwen; He, Bairong; Goh, Chi Ching; Ng, Lai Guan; Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Zujin; Liu, Bin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2015-07-15

    Fluorescent organic dots are emerging as promising bioimaging reagents because of their high brightness, good photostability, excellent biocompatibility, and facile surface functionalization. Organic dots with large two-photon absorption (TPA) cross sections are highly desired for two-photon fluorescence microscopy. In this work, we report two biocompatible and photostable organic dots fabricated by encapsulating tetraphenylethene derivatives within DSPE-PEG matrix. The two organic dots show absorption maxima at 425 and 483 nm and emit green and red fluorescence at 560 and 645 nm, with high fluorescence quantum yields of 64% and 22%, respectively. Both organic dots exhibit excellent TPA property in the range of 800-960 nm, affording upon excitation at 820 nm remarkably large TPA cross sections of 1.2×10(6) and 2.5×10(6) GM on the basis of dot concentration. The bare fluorophores and their organic dots are biocompatible and have been used to stain living cells for one- and two-photon fluorescence bioimagings. The cRGD-modified organic dots can selectively target integrin αvβ3 overexpressing breast cancer cells for targeted imaging. The organic dots are also applied for real-time two-photon fluorescence in vivo visualization of the blood vasculature of mouse ear, providing the spatiotemporal information about the whole blood vascular network. These results demonstrate that the present fluorescent organic dots are promising candidates for living cell and tissue imaging.

  1. Nonlinear microscopy for material characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Reed Alan

    Making use of femtosecond laser sources, nonlinear microscopy provides access to previously unstudied aspects of materials. By probing third order nonlinear optical signals determined by the nonlinear susceptibility chi (3), which is present in all materials, we gain insight not available by conventional linear or electron microscopy. Third-harmonic (TH) microscopy is applied to supplement laser-induced damage studies of dielectric oxide thin film optical coatings. We present high contrast (S/N> 100 : 1) TH imaging of ≈17 nm nanoindentations, individual 10 nm gold nanoparticles, nascent scandia and hafnia films, and laser induced material modification both above and below damage threshold conditions in hafnia thin-films. These results imply that TH imaging is potentially sensitive to laser-induced strain as well as to nanoscale defects or contamination in oxide films. Compared to other sensitive imaging techniques such as Nomarski and dark field, TH imaging exhibits dramatically increased sensitivity to typical material modifications undergone during the formation of optical damage as evidenced by a dynamic range ≈106 : 1. Four-wave mixing (FWM) microscopy is employed to investigate delay dependent FWM signals and their implied characteristic resonant response times in multiple solvents. Mathematical modeling of resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) and stimulated parametric emission (SPE) processes supplement the FWM studies and suggest a resonant CARS process that accounts for ≈95% of the total visible FWM signal which probes a characteristic material response time ≈100 fs. This signal enhancement likely indicates the net effects of probing several Raman active C-H stretch bands near 2950 cm-1. This FWM technique may be applied to characterize the dominant resonant response of the sample under study. Furthermore this technique presents the newfound capability to provide estimates of characteristic

  2. Sustainable, Rapid Synthesis of Bright-Luminescent CuInS2-ZnS Alloyed Nanocrystals: Multistage Nano-xenotoxicity Assessment and Intravital Fluorescence Bioimaging in Zebrafish-Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Chetty, S. Shashank; Praneetha, S.; Basu, Sandeep; Sachidanandan, Chetana; Murugan, A. Vadivel

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) luminescent CuInS2-ZnS alloyed nanocrystals (CIZS-NCs) for highly fluorescence bioimaging have received considerable interest in recent years. Owing, they became a desirable alternative to heavy-metal based-NCs and organic dyes with unique optical properties and low-toxicity for bioimaging and optoelectronic applications. In the present study, bright and robust CIZS-NCs have been synthesized within 5 min, as-high-as 230 °C without requiring any inert-gas atmosphere via microwave-solvothermal (MW-ST) method. Subsequently, the in vitro and in vivo nano-xenotoxicity and cellular uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs were investigated in L929, Vero, MCF7 cell lines and zebrafish-embryos. We observed minimal toxicity and acute teratogenic consequences upto 62.5 μg/ml of the CIZS-NCs in zebrafish-embryos. We also observed spontaneous uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs by 3 dpf older zebrafish-embryos that are evident through bright red fluorescence-emission at a low concentration of 7.8 μg/mL. Hence, we propose that the rapid, low-cost, large-scale “sustainable” MW-ST synthesis of CIZS-NCs, is an ideal bio-nanoprobe with good temporal and spatial resolution for rapid labeling, long-term in vivo tracking and intravital-fluorescence-bioimaging (IVBI). PMID:27188464

  3. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2016-07-12

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  4. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-02-20

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  5. Contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, B.J.

    1985-10-01

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation offers the biologist and especially the microscopist, a way to morphologically study specimens that could not be imaged by conventional TEM, STEM or SEM methods (i.e. hydrated samples, samples easily damaged by an electron beam, electron dense samples, thick specimens, unstained low contrast specimens) at spatial resolutions approaching those of the TEM, with the additional possibility to obtain compositional (elemental) information about the sample as well. Although flash x-ray sources offer faster exposure times, synchrotron radiation provides a highly collimated, intense radiation that can be tuned to select specific discrete ranges of x-ray wavelengths or specific individual wavelengths which optimize imaging or microanalysis of a specific sample. This paper presents an overview of the applications of x-ray contact microscopy to biological research and some current research results using monochromatic synchrotron radiation to image biological samples. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Limits to magnetic resonance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Paul; Mansfield, Peter, Sir

    2002-10-01

    The last quarter of the twentieth century saw the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) grow from a laboratory demonstration to a multi-billion dollar worldwide industry. There is a clinical body scanner in almost every hospital of the developed nations. The field of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), after mostly being abandoned by researchers in the first decade of MRI, has become an established branch of the science. This paper reviews the development of MRM over the last decade with an emphasis on the current state of the art. The fundamental principles of imaging and signal detection are examined to determine the physical principles which limit the available resolution. The limits are discussed with reference to liquid, solid and gas phase microscopy. In each area, the novel approaches employed by researchers to push back the limits of resolution are discussed. Although the limits to resolution are well known, the developments and applications of MRM have not reached their limit.

  7. Electron microscopy of electromagnetic waveforms.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, A; Baum, P

    2016-07-22

    Rapidly changing electromagnetic fields are the basis of almost any photonic or electronic device operation. We report how electron microscopy can measure collective carrier motion and fields with subcycle and subwavelength resolution. A collimated beam of femtosecond electron pulses passes through a metamaterial resonator that is previously excited with a single-cycle electromagnetic pulse. If the probing electrons are shorter in duration than half a field cycle, then time-frozen Lorentz forces distort the images quasi-classically and with subcycle time resolution. A pump-probe sequence reveals in a movie the sample's oscillating electromagnetic field vectors with time, phase, amplitude, and polarization information. This waveform electron microscopy can be used to visualize electrodynamic phenomena in devices as small and fast as available. PMID:27463670

  8. Electron microscopy of electromagnetic waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, A.; Baum, P.

    2016-07-01

    Rapidly changing electromagnetic fields are the basis of almost any photonic or electronic device operation. We report how electron microscopy can measure collective carrier motion and fields with subcycle and subwavelength resolution. A collimated beam of femtosecond electron pulses passes through a metamaterial resonator that is previously excited with a single-cycle electromagnetic pulse. If the probing electrons are shorter in duration than half a field cycle, then time-frozen Lorentz forces distort the images quasi-classically and with subcycle time resolution. A pump-probe sequence reveals in a movie the sample’s oscillating electromagnetic field vectors with time, phase, amplitude, and polarization information. This waveform electron microscopy can be used to visualize electrodynamic phenomena in devices as small and fast as available.

  9. Electron microscopy of electromagnetic waveforms.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, A; Baum, P

    2016-07-22

    Rapidly changing electromagnetic fields are the basis of almost any photonic or electronic device operation. We report how electron microscopy can measure collective carrier motion and fields with subcycle and subwavelength resolution. A collimated beam of femtosecond electron pulses passes through a metamaterial resonator that is previously excited with a single-cycle electromagnetic pulse. If the probing electrons are shorter in duration than half a field cycle, then time-frozen Lorentz forces distort the images quasi-classically and with subcycle time resolution. A pump-probe sequence reveals in a movie the sample's oscillating electromagnetic field vectors with time, phase, amplitude, and polarization information. This waveform electron microscopy can be used to visualize electrodynamic phenomena in devices as small and fast as available.

  10. A history of urine microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J Stewart

    2015-11-01

    The naked-eye appearance of the urine must have been studied by shamans and healers since the Stone Age, and an elaborate interpretation of so-called Uroscopy began around 600 AD as a form of divination. A 1000 years later, the first primitive monocular and compound microscopes appeared in the Netherlands, and along with many other objects and liquids, urine was studied from around 1680 onwards as the enlightenment evolved. However, the crude early instruments did not permit fine study because of chromatic and linear/spherical blurring. Only after complex multi-glass lenses which avoided these problems had been made and used in the 1820s in London by Lister, and in Paris by Chevalier and Amici, could urinary microscopy become a practical, clinically useful tool in the 1830s. Clinical urinary microscopy was pioneered by Rayer and his pupils in Paris (especially Vigla), in the late 1830s, and spread to UK and Germany in the 1840s, with detailed descriptions and interpretations of cells and formed elements of the urinary sediment by Nasse, Henle, Robinson and Golding Bird. Classes were held, most notably by Donné in Paris. After another 50 years, optical microscopy had reached its apogee, with magnifications of over 1000 times obtainable free of aberration, using immersion techniques. Atlases of the urinary sediment were published in all major European countries and in the US. Polarised light and phase contrast was used also after 1900 to study urine, and by the early 20th century, photomicroscopy (pioneered by Donné and Daguerre 50 years previously, but then ignored) became usual for teaching and recording. In the 1940s electron microscopy began, followed by detection of specific proteins and cells using immunofluorescent antibodies. All this had been using handheld methodology. Around 1980, machine-assisted observations began, and have dominated progress since.

  11. A history of urine microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J Stewart

    2015-11-01

    The naked-eye appearance of the urine must have been studied by shamans and healers since the Stone Age, and an elaborate interpretation of so-called Uroscopy began around 600 AD as a form of divination. A 1000 years later, the first primitive monocular and compound microscopes appeared in the Netherlands, and along with many other objects and liquids, urine was studied from around 1680 onwards as the enlightenment evolved. However, the crude early instruments did not permit fine study because of chromatic and linear/spherical blurring. Only after complex multi-glass lenses which avoided these problems had been made and used in the 1820s in London by Lister, and in Paris by Chevalier and Amici, could urinary microscopy become a practical, clinically useful tool in the 1830s. Clinical urinary microscopy was pioneered by Rayer and his pupils in Paris (especially Vigla), in the late 1830s, and spread to UK and Germany in the 1840s, with detailed descriptions and interpretations of cells and formed elements of the urinary sediment by Nasse, Henle, Robinson and Golding Bird. Classes were held, most notably by Donné in Paris. After another 50 years, optical microscopy had reached its apogee, with magnifications of over 1000 times obtainable free of aberration, using immersion techniques. Atlases of the urinary sediment were published in all major European countries and in the US. Polarised light and phase contrast was used also after 1900 to study urine, and by the early 20th century, photomicroscopy (pioneered by Donné and Daguerre 50 years previously, but then ignored) became usual for teaching and recording. In the 1940s electron microscopy began, followed by detection of specific proteins and cells using immunofluorescent antibodies. All this had been using handheld methodology. Around 1980, machine-assisted observations began, and have dominated progress since. PMID:26079823

  12. Hyperspectral holographic Fourier-microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenkov, G. S.; Kalenkov, S. G.; Shtan'ko, A. E.

    2015-04-01

    A detailed theory of the method of holographic recording of hyperspectral wave fields is developed. New experimentally obtained hyperspectral holographic images of microscopic objects are presented. The possibilities of the method are demonstrated experimentally using the examples of urgent microscopy problems: speckle noise suppression, obtaining hyperspectral image of a microscopic object, as well as synthesis of a colour image and obtaining an optical profile of a phase object.

  13. Multiphoton microscopy of atheroslcerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilledahl, Magnus B.; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Haugen, Olav A.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2007-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a techniques that fascilitates three dimensional imaging of intact, unstained tissue. Especially connective tissue has a relatively strong nonlinear optical response and can easily be imaged. Atherosclerosis is a disease where lipids accumulate in the vessel wall and there is a thickening of the intima by growth of a cap of connective tissue. The mechanical strength of this fibrous cap is of clinically importance. If the cap ruptures a thrombosis forms which can block a coronary vessel and therby causing myocardial infarction. Multiphoton microscopy can be used to image the fibrous cap and thereby determine the thickness of the cap and the structure of the connective fibres. This could possibly be developed into a diagnostic and clincal tool to monitor the vulnerability of a plaque and also to better understand the development of a plaque and effects of treatment. We have collected multiphoton microscopy images from atherosclerotic plaque in human aorta, both two photon excited fluorescens and second harmonic generated signal. The feasability of using this technique to determine the state of the plaque is explored.

  14. Multi-photon excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  15. Multi-photon excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments.

  16. Multi-photon excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  17. Paleomagnetic Analysis Using SQUID Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Lima, Eduardo A.; Fong, Luis E.; Baudenbacher, Franz J.

    2007-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopes are a new generation of instruments that map magnetic fields with unprecedented spatial resolution and moment sensitivity. Unlike standard rock magnetometers, SQUID microscopes map magnetic fields rather than measuring magnetic moments such that the sample magnetization pattern must be retrieved from source model fits to the measured field data. In this paper, we presented the first direct comparison between paleomagnetic analyses on natural samples using joint measurements from SQUID microscopy and moment magnetometry. We demonstrated that in combination with apriori geologic and petrographic data, SQUID microscopy can accurately characterize the magnetization of lunar glass spherules and Hawaiian basalt. The bulk moment magnitude and direction of these samples inferred from inversions of SQUID microscopy data match direct measurements on the same samples using moment magnetometry. In addition, these inversions provide unique constraints on the magnetization distribution within the sample. These measurements are among the most sensitive and highest resolution quantitative paleomagnetic studies of natural remanent magnetization to date. We expect that this technique will be able to extend many other standard paleomagnetic techniques to previously inaccessible microscale samples.

  18. Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy and Raman Microscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harootunian, Alec Tate

    1987-09-01

    Both a one dimensional near-field scanning optical microscope and Raman microprobe were constructed. In near -field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) a subwavelength aperture is scanned in the near-field of the object. Radiation transmitted through the aperture is collected to form an image as the aperture scans over the object. The resolution of an NSOM system is essentially wavelength independent and is limited by the diameter of the aperture used to scan the object. NSOM was developed in an effort to provide a nondestructive in situ high spatial resolution probe while still utilizing photons at optical wavelengths. The Raman microprobe constructed provided vibrational Raman information with spatial resolution equivalent that of a conventional diffraction limited microscope. Both transmission studies and near-field diffration studies of subwavelength apertures were performed. Diffraction theories for a small aperture in an infinitely thin conducting screen, a slit in a thick conducting screen, and an aperture in a black screen were examined. All three theories indicate collimation of radiation to the size to the size of the subwavelength aperture or slit in the near-field. Theoretical calculations and experimental results indicate that light transmitted through subwavelength apertures is readily detectable. Light of wavelength 4579 (ANGSTROM) was transmitted through apertures with diameters as small as 300 (ANGSTROM). These studies indicate the feasibility of constructing an NSOM system. One dimensional transmission and fluorescence NSOM systems were constructed. Apertures in the tips of metallized glass pipettes width inner diameters of less than 1000 (ANGSTROM) were used as a light source in the NSOM system. A tunneling current was used to maintain the aperture position in the near-field. Fluorescence NSOM was demonstrated for the first time. Microspectroscopic and Raman microscopic studies of turtle cone oil droplets were performed. Both the Raman vibrational

  19. Time lapse in vivo microscopy reveals distinct dynamics of microglia-tumor environment interactions-a new role for the tumor perivascular space as highway for trafficking microglia.

    PubMed

    Bayerl, Simon Heinrich; Niesner, Raluca; Cseresnyes, Zoltan; Radbruch, Helena; Pohlan, Julian; Brandenburg, Susan; Czabanka, Marcus Alexander; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Microglial cells are critical for glioma growth and progression. However, only little is known about intratumoral microglial behavior and the dynamic interaction with the tumor. Currently the scarce understanding of microglial appearance in malignant gliomas merely originates from histological studies and in vitro investigations. In order to understand the pattern of microglia activity, motility and migration we designed an intravital study in an orthotopic murine glioma model using CX3CR1-eGFP(GFP/wt) mice. We analysed the dynamics of intratumoral microglia accumulation and activity, as well as microglia/tumor blood vessel interaction by epi-illumination and 2-photon laser scanning microscopy. We further investigated cellular and tissue function, including the enzyme activity of intratumoral and microglial NADPH oxidase measured by in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging. We identified three morphological phenotypes of tumor-associated microglia cells with entirely different motility patterns. We found that NADPH oxidase activation is highly divergent in these microglia subtypes leading to different production levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We observed that microglia motility is highest within the perivascular niche, suggesting relevance of microglia/tumor blood vessel interactions. In line, reduction of tumor blood vessels by antivascular therapy confirmed the relevance of the tumor vessel compartment on microglia biology in brain tumors. In summary, we provide new insights into in vivo microglial behavior, regarding both morphology and function, in malignant gliomas. GLIA 2016;64:1210-1226.

  20. Magnetic resonance microscopy versus light microscopy in human embryology teaching.

    PubMed

    Puerta-Fonollá, J; Vázquez-Osorio, T; Ruiz-Cabello, J; Murillo-González, J; Peña-Melián, A

    2004-07-01

    A study was carried out on the application of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) in teaching prenatal human development. Human embryos measuring 8 mm, 15 mm, 18.5 mm, and 22 mm were fixed in a 4% paraformaldehyde solution and sections obtained with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were compared to those prepared for light microscopy (LM), using the same embryos. The MRM and LM slices were of a similar quality. In the MRM sections, embryonic organs and systems were clearly visible, particularly the peripheral and central nervous systems, and the cardiovascular and digestive systems. The digitalization and clarity of the MRM images make them an ideal teaching aid that is suitable for students during the first years of a health-science degree, particularly medicine. As well as providing students with their first experience of MRM, these images allow students to access, at any time, all embryos used, to assess changes in the positions of different organs throughout their stages of development, and to acquire spatial vision, an absolute requirement in the study of human anatomy. We recommend that this technique be incorporated into the wealth of standard embryonic teaching methods already in use.

  1. Combining fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goda, Kazuhito; Hatta-Ohashi, Yoko; Akiyoshi, Ryutaro; Sugiyama, Takashi; Sakai, Ikuko; Takahashi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hirobumi

    2015-08-01

    Bioluminescence microscopy has revealed that gene expression in individual cells can respond differently to the same stimulus. To understand this phenomenon, it is important to sequentially observe the series of events from cellular signal transduction to gene expression regulated by specific transcription factors derived from signaling cascades in individual cells. However, these processes have been separately analyzed with fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy. Furthermore, in culture medium, the background fluorescence of luciferin-a substrate of luciferase in promoter assays of gene expression in cultured cells-confounds the simultaneous observation of fluorescence and bioluminescence. Therefore, we optimized conditions for optical filter sets based on spectral properties and the luciferin concentration based on cell permeability for fluorescence observation combined with bioluminescence microscopy. An excitation and emission filter set (492-506 nm and 524-578 nm) was suitable for green fluorescent protein and yellow fluorescent protein imaging of cells, and >100 μM luciferin was acceptable in culture medium based on kinetic constants and the estimated intracellular concentration. Using these parameters, we present an example of sequential fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopic observation of signal transduction (translocation of protein kinase C alpha from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane) coupled with activation of gene expression by nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide B in individual cells and show that the gene expression response is not completely concordant with upstream signaling following stimulation with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. Our technique is a powerful imaging tool for analysis of heterogeneous gene expression together with upstream signaling in live single cells.

  2. Atomic and Molecular Photodetachment Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondel, Christophe

    2004-05-01

    Detachment from a negative ion leads to the emission of a nearly unperturbed free electron wave. Detachment in the presence of an electric field thus gives a unique opportunity to study the propagation of a matter wave submitted to uniform acceleration from a pointlike source. As the expression of the corresponding Green function shows, spatially resolved detection of the detached electron should reveal the existence of interference fringes, which can be interpreted as the interference between the well-known pairs of parabolic trajectories of elementary ballistics. Whereas no real free-fall experiment has been able yet to materialize those fringes, photodetachment microscopy experiments carried out since 1996 have now produced electron interference patterns from five different atomic anions. The orders of magnitude of the fringe interval and the spatial resolution of electron detectors are such that these interference patterns can be observed only in relatively weak electric fields and at low energies above the detachment thresholds. The sensitivity of the pattern with respect to the ejection energy of the electron is an interferometric way for measuring the energy brought in excess by the detaching photon, and the electron affinity of the parent neutral itself. The free-electron approximation used to analyze photodetachment microscopy images can be questioned when one deals with a big atom or a molecular anion. The first molecular photodetachment microscopy experiments were carried out recently on OH^-. They still show an observable electron interference pattern, even though OH can be left in a high angular momentum state. On a quantitative basis, the electron interferograms still appear very robust with respect to either internal or external perturbations, which should make it possible to compress the error bars on electron affinities well below 1 μeV, even in the molecular case.

  3. Combining fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goda, Kazuhito; Hatta-Ohashi, Yoko; Akiyoshi, Ryutaro; Sugiyama, Takashi; Sakai, Ikuko; Takahashi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hirobumi

    2015-08-01

    Bioluminescence microscopy has revealed that gene expression in individual cells can respond differently to the same stimulus. To understand this phenomenon, it is important to sequentially observe the series of events from cellular signal transduction to gene expression regulated by specific transcription factors derived from signaling cascades in individual cells. However, these processes have been separately analyzed with fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy. Furthermore, in culture medium, the background fluorescence of luciferin-a substrate of luciferase in promoter assays of gene expression in cultured cells-confounds the simultaneous observation of fluorescence and bioluminescence. Therefore, we optimized conditions for optical filter sets based on spectral properties and the luciferin concentration based on cell permeability for fluorescence observation combined with bioluminescence microscopy. An excitation and emission filter set (492-506 nm and 524-578 nm) was suitable for green fluorescent protein and yellow fluorescent protein imaging of cells, and >100 μM luciferin was acceptable in culture medium based on kinetic constants and the estimated intracellular concentration. Using these parameters, we present an example of sequential fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopic observation of signal transduction (translocation of protein kinase C alpha from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane) coupled with activation of gene expression by nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide B in individual cells and show that the gene expression response is not completely concordant with upstream signaling following stimulation with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. Our technique is a powerful imaging tool for analysis of heterogeneous gene expression together with upstream signaling in live single cells. PMID:26096873

  4. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Callahan, Daniel E.; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-06-09

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time: quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  5. Slow-sound photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Zhou, Yong; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-01-01

    We propose to enhance the axial resolution of photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) by reducing the speed of sound within the imaging region of interest. With silicone oil immersion, we have achieved a finest axial resolution of 5.8 μm for PAM, as validated by phantom experiments. The axial resolution was also enhanced in vivo when mouse ears injected with silicone oil were imaged. When tissue-compatible low-speed liquid becomes available, this approach may find broad applications in PAM as well as in other imaging modalities, such as photoacoustic computed tomography and ultrasound imaging. PMID:23696693

  6. Nanosecond microscopy with spectroscopic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Christoph; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2006-03-01

    We demonstrate coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy in a wide-field setup with nanosecond laser pulse excitation. In contrast to confocal setups, the image of a sample can be recorded with a single pair of excitation pulses. For this purpose, the excitation geometry is specially designed in order to satisfy the phase matching condition over the whole sample area. The spectral, temporal and spatial sensitivity of the method is demonstrated by imaging test samples, i.e. oil vesicles in sunflower seeds, on a nanosecond timescale. The method provides snapshot imaging in 3 ns with a spectral resolution of 25 cm-1.

  7. Aperture scanning Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-01-01

    Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is implemented through aperture scanning by an LCOS spatial light modulator at the back focal plane of the objective lens. This FPM configuration enables the capturing of the complex scattered field for a 3D sample both in the transmissive mode and the reflective mode. We further show that by combining with the compressive sensing theory, the reconstructed 2D complex scattered field can be used to recover the 3D sample scattering density. This implementation expands the scope of application for FPM and can be beneficial for areas such as tissue imaging and wafer inspection. PMID:27570705

  8. Multicolor stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Fa-Ke; Ji, Minbiao; Fu, Dan; Ni, Xiaohui; Freudiger, Christian W.; Holtom, Gary; Xie, X. Sunney

    2012-08-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy has opened up a wide range of biochemical imaging applications by probing a particular Raman-active molecule vibrational mode in the specimen. However, the original implementation with picosecond pulse excitation can only realize rapid chemical mapping with a single Raman band. Here we present a novel SRS microscopic technique using a grating-based pulse shaper for excitation and a grating-based spectrograph for detection to achieve simultaneous multicolor SRS imaging with high sensitivity and high acquisition speeds. In particular, we use a linear combination of the measured CH2 and CH3 stretching signals to map the distributions of protein and lipid contents simultaneously.

  9. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Callahan, Daniel E.; Parvin, Bahram

    2011-05-24

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  10. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Callahan, Daniel E; Parvin, Bahram

    2013-10-01

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  11. Dynamic force microscopy in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreier, M.; Anselmetti, D.; Richmond, T.; Dammer, U.; Guentherodt, H.-J.

    1994-11-01

    We applied dynamic force microscopy in a liquid environment to silanized and derivatized glass surfaces, InGaAs, as well as to biological materials such as hexagonally packed intermediate layers of deinococcus radiodurans. The vertical and lateral resolution were estimated to be less than 1 A and 7 - 10 nm, respectively. Upon immersing the cantilever into water, the resonance frequency was found to be reduced by a factor of two and the Q factor was lowered to 20 - 30. The experimental working distance between sensor and sample was determined with approach curves indicating that the range of interaction in water is much shorter compared to air.

  12. Superresolution microscopy with quantum emitters.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Osip; Levitt, Jonathan M; Tenne, Ron; Itzhakov, Stella; Deutsch, Zvicka; Oron, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The optical diffraction limit imposes a bound on imaging resolution in classical optics. Over the last twenty years, many theoretical schemes have been presented for overcoming the diffraction barrier in optical imaging using quantum properties of light. Here, we demonstrate a quantum superresolution imaging method taking advantage of nonclassical light naturally produced in fluorescence microscopy due to photon antibunching, a fundamentally quantum phenomenon inhibiting simultaneous emission of multiple photons. Using a photon counting digital camera, we detect antibunching-induced second and third order intensity correlations and perform subdiffraction limited quantum imaging in a standard wide-field fluorescence microscope.

  13. Synthetic incoherence for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Levine, Zachary H; Dunstan, Robyn M

    2007-08-01

    Tomographic studies of submicrometer samples in materials science using electron microscopy have been inhibited by diffraction effects. In the present work, we describe a practical method for ameliorating these effects. First, we find an analytic expression for the mutual coherence function for hollow-cone illumination. Then, we use this analytic expression to propose a Gaussian weighting of hollow-cone illumination, which we name tapered solid-cone illumination, and present an analytic expression for its mutual coherence function. Finally, we investigate numerically an n-ring approximation to tapered solid-cone illumination. The results suggest a method for removing diffraction effects and hence enabling tomography.

  14. Confocal microscopy in microgravity research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, A. P. H.; Brakenhoff, G. J.; Woldringh, C. L.; Aalders, J. W. G.; Imhof, J. P.; van Kralingen, P.; Mels, W. A.; Schreinemakers, P.; Zegers, A.

    We have studied the application and the feasibility of confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) in microgravity research. Its superior spatial resolution and 3D imaging capabilities and its use of light as a probe, render this instrument ideally suited for the study of living biological material on a (sub-)cellular level. In this paper a number of pertinent biological microgravity experiments is listed, concentrating on the direct observation of developing cells and cellular structures under microgravity condition. A conceptual instrument design is also presented, aimed at sounding rocket application followed by Biorack/Biolab application at a later stage.

  15. Nonlinear microscopy of collagen fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupler, M.; Pena, A.-M.; Hernest, M.; Tharaux, P.-L.; Fabre, A.; Marchal-Somme, J.; Crestani, B.; Débarre, D.; Martin, J.-L.; Beaurepaire, E.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2007-02-01

    We used intrinsic Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) by fibrillar collagen to visualize the three-dimensional architecture of collagen fibrosis at the micrometer scale using laser scanning nonlinear microscopy. We showed that SHG signals are highly specific to fibrillar collagen and provide a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in tissues. Moreover, recording simultaneously other nonlinear optical signals in a multimodal setup, we visualized the tissue morphology using Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) signals from endogenous chromophores such as NADH or elastin. We then compared different methods to determine accurate indexes of collagen fibrosis using nonlinear microscopy, given that most collagen fibrils are smaller than the microscope resolution and that second harmonic generation is a coherent process. In order to define a robust method to process our three-dimensional images, we either calculated the fraction of the images occupied by a significant SHG signal, or averaged SHG signal intensities. We showed that these scores provide an estimation of the extension of renal and pulmonary fibrosis in murine models, and that they clearly sort out the fibrotic mice.

  16. RGB digital lensless holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2013-11-01

    The recent introduction of color digital lensless holographic microscopy (CDLHM) has shown the possibility of imaging microscopic specimens at full color without the need of lenses. Owing to the simplicity, robustness, and compactness of the digital lensless holographic microscopes (DLHM), they have been presented as the ideal candidates to being developed into portable holographic microscopes. However, in the case of CDLHM the utilization of three independent lasers hinders the portability option for this microscope. In this contribution an alternative to reduce the complexity of CDLHM aimed to recover the portability of this microscopy technology is presented. A super-bright white-light light-emitting diode (LED) is spectrally and spatially filtered to produce the needed illumination by CDLHM to work. CDLHM with LED illumination is used to image at full color a section of the head of a drosophila melanogaster fly (fruit fly). The LED-CDLHM method shows the capability of imaging objects of 2μm size in comparison with the micrometer resolution reported for LASER-CDLHM.

  17. Virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changho; Lee, Donghyun; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2015-07-01

    A virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy at 1064 nm wavelength (VISPAM) system was designed and fabricated by integrating a commercial type surgical microscope and laser scanning photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) with a 1064 nm pulsed laser. Based on simple augmented reality device, VISPAM could simultaneously provide 2D depth-resolved photoacoustic and magnified microscope images of surgery regions on the same vision of surgeon via an eyepiece of the microscope. The invisible 1064 nm laser removed the interruption of surgical sight due to visible laser scanning of previous report, and decreased the danger of tissue damage caused by over irradiated laser. In addition, to approach the real practical surgery application, a needle-type transducer was utilized without a water bath for PA signal coupling. In order to verify our system's performance, we conducted needle guiding as ex vivo phantom study and needle guiding and injection of carbon particles mixtures into a melanoma tumor region as in vivo study. We expect that VISPAM can be essential tool of brain and ophthalmic microsurgery.

  18. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  19. Developing Photo Activated Localization Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Harald

    2015-03-01

    Photo Activated Localization Microscopy, PALM, acquires super-resolution images by activating a subset of activatable fluorescent labels and estimating the center of the each molecular label to sub-diffractive accuracy. When this process is repeated thousands of times for different subsets of molecules, then an image can be rendered from all the center coordinates of the molecules. I will describe the circuitous story of its development that began with another super-resolution technique, NSOM, developed by my colleague Eric Betzig, who imaged single molecules at room temperature, and later we spectrally resolved individual luminescent centers of quantum wells. These two observations inspired a generalized path to localization microscopy, but that path was abandoned because no really useful fluorescent labels were available. After a decade of nonacademic industrial pursuits and the subsequent freedom of unemployment, we came across a class of genetically expressible fluorescent proteins that were switchable or convertible that enabled the concept to be implemented and be biologically promising. The past ten years have been very active with many groups exploring applications and enhancements of this concept. Demonstrating significant biological relevance will be the metric if its success.

  20. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM).

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael W; Loftus, Andrew F; Dunn, Sarah E; Joens, Matthew S; Fitzpatrick, James A J

    2015-01-05

    The development of confocal microscopy techniques introduced the ability to optically section fluorescent samples in the axial dimension, perpendicular to the image plane. These approaches, via the placement of a pinhole in the conjugate image plane, provided superior resolution in the axial (z) dimension resulting in nearly isotropic optical sections. However, increased axial resolution, via pinhole optics, comes at the cost of both speed and excitation efficiency. Light sheet fluorescent microscopy (LSFM), a century-old idea made possible with modern developments in both excitation and detection optics, provides sub-cellular resolution and optical sectioning capabilities without compromising speed or excitation efficiency. Over the past decade, several variations of LSFM have been implemented each with its own benefits and deficiencies. Here we discuss LSFM fundamentals and outline the basic principles of several major light-sheet-based imaging modalities (SPIM, inverted SPIM, multi-view SPIM, Bessel beam SPIM, and stimulated emission depletion SPIM) while considering their biological relevance in terms of intrusiveness, temporal resolution, and sample requirements.

  1. Pinhole shifting lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramshesh, Venkat K; Lemasters, John J

    2008-01-01

    Lifetime imaging microscopy is a powerful tool to probe biological phenomena independent of luminescence intensity and fluorophore concentration. We describe time-resolved imaging of long-lifetime luminescence with an unmodified commercial laser scanning confocal/multiphoton microscope. The principle of the measurement is displacement of the detection pinhole to collect delayed luminescence from a position lagging the rasting laser beam. As proof of principle, luminescence from microspheres containing europium (Eu(3+)), a red emitting probe, was compared to that of short-lifetime green-fluorescing microspheres and/or fluorescein and rhodamine in solution. Using 720-nm two-photon excitation and a pinhole diameter of 1 Airy unit, the short-lifetime fluorescence of fluorescein, rhodamine and green microspheres disappeared much more rapidly than the long-lifetime phosphorescence of Eu(3+) microspheres as the pinhole was repositioned in the lagging direction. In contrast, repositioning of the pinhole in the leading and orthogonal directions caused equal loss of short- and long-lifetime luminescence. From measurements at different lag pinhole positions, a lifetime of 270 micros was estimated for the Eu(3+) microspheres, consistent with independent measurements. This simple adaptation is the basis for quantitative 3-D lifetime imaging microscopy. PMID:19123648

  2. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  3. Kelvin probe force microscopy in liquid using electrochemical force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, Jason I; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, M Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2015-01-01

    Summary Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid–gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe–sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface. PMID:25671164

  4. Kelvin probe force microscopy in liquid using electrochemical force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, Jason I; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, M Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V; Rodriguez, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid-liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid-liquid interface.

  5. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rodriguez, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.

  6. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rodriguez, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q watermore » and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.« less

  7. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  8. Differential Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Chandler, Eric V.; Hoover, Erich E.; Young, Michael D.; Ding, Shi-you; Sylvester, Anne W.; Kleinfeld, David; Squier, Jeff A.

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) in the biological and medical sciences has become an important tool for obtaining high resolution images at video rates. While current implementations of MMM achieve very high frame rates, they are limited in their applicability to essentially those biological samples that exhibit little or no scattering. In this paper, we report on a method for MMM in which imaging detection is not necessary (single element point detection is implemented), and is therefore fully compatible for use in imaging through scattering media. Further, we demonstrate that this method leads to a new type of MMM wherein it is possible to simultaneously obtain multiple images and view differences in excitation parameters in a single shot. PMID:27390511

  9. Superresolution microscopy with transient binding.

    PubMed

    Molle, Julia; Raab, Mario; Holzmeister, Susanne; Schmitt-Monreal, Daniel; Grohmann, Dina; He, Zhike; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2016-06-01

    For single-molecule localization based superresolution, the concentration of fluorescent labels has to be thinned out. This is commonly achieved by photophysically or photochemically deactivating subsets of molecules. Alternatively, apparent switching of molecules can be achieved by transient binding of fluorescent labels. Here, a diffusing dye yields bright fluorescent spots when binding to the structure of interest. As the binding interaction is weak, the labeling is reversible and the dye ligand construct diffuses back into solution. This approach of achieving superresolution by transient binding (STB) is reviewed in this manuscript. Different realizations of STB are discussed and compared to other localization-based superresolution modalities. We propose the development of labeling strategies that will make STB a highly versatile tool for superresolution microscopy at highest resolution. PMID:26773299

  10. Note: Direct piezoelectric effect microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mori, T J A; Stamenov, P; Dorneles, L S

    2015-07-01

    An alternative method for investigating piezoelectric surfaces is suggested, exploiting the direct piezoeffect. The technique relies on acoustic (ultrasonic) excitation of the imaged surface and mapping of the resulting oscillatory electric potential. The main advantages arise from the spatial resolution of the conductive scanning probe microscopy in combination with the relatively large magnitude of the forward piezo signal Upf, which can be of the order of tens of mV even for non-ferroelectric piezoelectric materials. The potency of this experimental strategy is illustrated with measurements on well-crystallized quartz surfaces, where Upf ∼ 50 mV, for a piezoelectric coefficient of d33 = - 2.27  ×  10(-12) m/V, and applied stress of about T3 ∼ 5.7 kPa.

  11. Superresolution microscopy with transient binding.

    PubMed

    Molle, Julia; Raab, Mario; Holzmeister, Susanne; Schmitt-Monreal, Daniel; Grohmann, Dina; He, Zhike; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2016-06-01

    For single-molecule localization based superresolution, the concentration of fluorescent labels has to be thinned out. This is commonly achieved by photophysically or photochemically deactivating subsets of molecules. Alternatively, apparent switching of molecules can be achieved by transient binding of fluorescent labels. Here, a diffusing dye yields bright fluorescent spots when binding to the structure of interest. As the binding interaction is weak, the labeling is reversible and the dye ligand construct diffuses back into solution. This approach of achieving superresolution by transient binding (STB) is reviewed in this manuscript. Different realizations of STB are discussed and compared to other localization-based superresolution modalities. We propose the development of labeling strategies that will make STB a highly versatile tool for superresolution microscopy at highest resolution.

  12. Direct Detectors for Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, R. N.; Moldovan, G.; Kirkland, A. I.

    2014-06-01

    There is interest in improving the detectors used to capture images in transmission electron microscopy. Detectors with an improved modulation transfer function at high spatial frequencies allow for higher resolution in images at lower magnification, which leads to an increased effective field of view. Detectors with improved detective quantum efficiency are important for low dose applications. One way in which these performance enhancements can be achieved is through direct detection, where primary electrons are converted directly into suitable electrical signals by the detector rather than relying on an indirect electron to photon conversion before detection. In this paper we present the characterisation of detector performance for a number of different direct detection technologies, and compare these technologies to traditional indirect detectors. Overall our results show that direct detection enables a significant improvement in all aspects of detector performance.

  13. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy in Neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Albert; Nebel, Michaela; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2010-07-01

    This article reviews recent work involving the application of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to the study of individual cultured living cells, with an emphasis on topographical and functional imaging of neuronal and secretory cells of the nervous and endocrine system. The basic principles of biological SECM and associated negative amperometric-feedback and generator/collector-mode SECM imaging are discussed, and successful use of the methodology for screening soft and fragile membranous objects is outlined. The drawbacks of the constant-height mode of probe movement and the benefits of the constant-distance mode of SECM operation are described. Finally, representative examples of constant-height and constant-distance mode SECM on a variety of live cells are highlighted to demonstrate the current status of single-cell SECM in general and of SECM in neuroscience in particular.

  14. Time-resolved fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Suhling, Klaus; French, Paul M W; Phillips, David

    2005-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy, the fluorescence emission can be characterised not only by intensity and position, but also by lifetime, polarization and wavelength. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) can report on photophysical events that are difficult or impossible to observe by fluorescence intensity imaging, and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy imaging (TR-FAIM) can measure the rotational mobility of a fluorophore in its environment. We compare different FLIM methods: a chief advantage of wide-field time-gating and phase modulation methods is the speed of acquisition whereas for time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) based confocal scanning it is accuracy in the fluorescence decay. FLIM has been used to image interactions between proteins such as receptor oligomerisation and to reveal protein phosphorylation by detecting fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In addition, FLIM can also probe the local environment of fluorophores, reporting, for example, on the local pH, refractive index, ion or oxygen concentration without the need for ratiometric measurements.

  15. Stochastic scanning multiphoton multifocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jureller, Justin E; Kim, Hee Y; Scherer, Norbert F

    2006-04-17

    Multiparticle tracking with scanning confocal and multiphoton fluorescence imaging is increasingly important for elucidating biological function, as in the transport of intracellular cargo-carrying vesicles. We demonstrate a simple rapid-sampling stochastic scanning multifocal multiphoton microscopy (SS-MMM) fluorescence imaging technique that enables multiparticle tracking without specialized hardware at rates 1,000 times greater than conventional single point raster scanning. Stochastic scanning of a diffractive optic generated 10x10 hexagonal array of foci with a white noise driven galvanometer yields a scan pattern that is random yet space-filling. SS-MMM creates a more uniformly sampled image with fewer spatio-temporal artifacts than obtained by conventional or multibeam raster scanning. SS-MMM is verified by simulation and experimentally demonstrated by tracking microsphere diffusion in solution. PMID:19516485

  16. Overcoming Polarization Aberrations In Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Eric W.

    1988-06-01

    A long-standing problem in polarized light microscopy has been the inability, due to polarization aberrations, to achieve simultaneously high spatial resolution and high contrast. The rotation of the plane of polarization at oblique interfaces between crossed polars causes the pupil function to resemble a dark cross rather than being uniformly dark. Likewise, the point spread function has the visual appearance of a four-leaf clover rather than the ideal Airy disk, and is also space-variant. Images formed with these systems are severely degraded. In this paper the theory of polarization aberrations is applied to the analysis of three solutions to this problem: Reducing the system aperture to block troublesome high-aperture rays; the AVEC-POL method, in which high bias compensation introduces counterbalancing aberrations; and the polarization rectifier, an optical element designed to introduce equal and opposite rotations of the electric vector.

  17. Phase Aberrations in Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Marchesini, S; Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Howells, M R; Spence, J H; Cui, C; Weierstall, U; Minor, A M

    2005-09-29

    In coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy the diffraction pattern generated by a sample illuminated with coherent x-rays is recorded, and a computer algorithm recovers the unmeasured phases to synthesize an image. By avoiding the use of a lens the resolution is limited, in principle, only by the largest scattering angles recorded. However, the imaging task is shifted from the experiment to the computer, and the algorithm's ability to recover meaningful images in the presence of noise and limited prior knowledge may produce aberrations in the reconstructed image. We analyze the low order aberrations produced by our phase retrieval algorithms. We present two methods to improve the accuracy and stability of reconstructions.

  18. Interference techniques in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Mehmet

    We developed a set of interference-based optical microscopy techniques to study biological structures through nanometer-scale axial localization of fluorescent biomarkers. Spectral self-interference fluorescence microscopy (SSFM) utilizes interference of direct and reflected waves emitted from fluorescent molecules in the vicinity of planar reflectors to reveal the axial position of the molecules. A comprehensive calculation algorithm based on Green's function formalism is presented to verify the validity of approximations used in a far-field approach that describes the emission of fluorescent markers near interfaces. Using the validated model, theoretical limits of axial localization were determined with emphasis given to numerical aperture (NA) dependence of localization uncertainty. SSFM was experimentally demonstrated in conformational analysis of nucleoproteins. In particular, interaction between surface-tethered 75-mer double strand DNA and integration host factor (IHF) protein was probed on Si-SiO2 substrates by determining the axial position of fluorescent labels attached to the free ends of DNA molecules. Despite its sub-nanometer precision axial localization capability, SSFM lacks high lateral resolution due to the low-NA requirement for planar reflectors. We developed a second technique, 4Pi-SSFM, which improves the lateral resolution of a conventional SSFM system by an order of magnitude while achieving nanometer-scale axial localization precision. Using two opposing high-NA objectives, fluorescence signal is interferometrically collected and spectral interference pattern is recorded. Axial position of emitters is found from analysis of the spectra. The 4Pi-SSFM technique was experimentally demonstrated by determining the surface profiles of fabricated glass surfaces and outer membranes of Shigella, a type of Gram-negative bacteria. A further discussion is presented to localize surface O antigen, which is an important oligosaccharide structure in the

  19. Energy dependent 4-dimensional multiple scattering distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschalär, C.

    1984-12-01

    A complete analytic solution in Fourier space is presented of the four dimensional small angle, multiple scattering distribution MSD in angle and space, produced by an energy dependent single scattering cross section from an initial pencil beam of heavy particles. Independently, simple integrals are derived for the central moments of the energy dependent MSD in the continuous-slowing-down approximation. The distributions of the projections t and x of the scattering angle and displacement into a plane through the axis of propagation are evaluated numerically for a truncated Rutherford scattering cross section using a fast Fourier transform. The resulting MSDs for a wide range of particles, initial and final momenta, and scattering materials are found to be approximately represented by one-dimensional set of standard distributions symmetrized by a linear transformation in t- x-space.

  20. Experimental investigation of 4-dimensional superspace crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Rasing, T.; Janner, A.

    1983-09-01

    The symmetry of incommensurate crystals can be described by higher dimensional space groups in the so called superspace approach. The basic ideas are explained and used for showing that superspace groups provide an adequate frame for analyzing experimental results on incommensurate crystals.

  1. Photoacoustic microscopy of human teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Bin; Cai, Xin; Favazza, Christopher; Yao, Junjie; Li, Li; Duong, Steven; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Holtzman, Jennifer; Wilder-Smith, Petra; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) utilizes short laser pulses to deposit energy into light absorbers and sensitively detects the ultrasonic waves the absorbers generate in response. PAM directly renders a three-dimensional spatial distribution of sub-surface optical absorbers. Unlike other optical imaging technologies, PAM features label-free optical absorption contrast and excellent imaging depths. Standard dental imaging instruments are limited to X-ray and CCD cameras. Subsurface optical dental imaging is difficult due to the highly-scattering enamel and dentin tissue. Thus, very few imaging methods can detect dental decay or diagnose dental pulp, which is the innermost part of the tooth, containing the nerves, blood vessels, and other cells. Here, we conducted a feasibility study on imaging dental decay and dental pulp with PAM. Our results showed that PAM is sensitive to the color change associated with dental decay. Although the relative PA signal distribution may be affected by surface contours and subsurface reflections from deeper dental tissue, monitoring changes in the PA signals (at the same site) over time is necessary to identify the progress of dental decay. Our results also showed that deep-imaging, near-infrared (NIR) PAM can sensitively image blood in the dental pulp of an in vitro tooth. In conclusion, PAM is a promising tool for imaging both dental decay and dental pulp.

  2. Holographic microscopy in low coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmelík, Radim; Petráček, Jiří; Slabá, Michala; Kollárová, Věra; Slabý, Tomáš; Čolláková, Jana; Komrska, Jiří; Dostál, Zbyněk.; Veselý, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Low coherence of the illumination substantially improves the quality of holographic and quantitative phase imaging (QPI) by elimination of the coherence noise and various artefacts and by improving the lateral resolution compared to the coherent holographic microscopy. Attributes of coherence-controlled holographic microscope (CCHM) designed and built as an off-axis holographic system allowing QPI within the range from complete coherent to incoherent illumination confirmed these expected advantages. Low coherence illumination also furnishes the coherence gating which constraints imaging of some spatial frequencies of an object axially thus forming an optical section in the wide sense. In this way the depth discrimination capability of the microscope is introduced at the price of restricting the axial interval of possible numerical refocusing. We describe theoretically these effects for the whole range of illumination coherence. We also show that the axial refocusing constraints can be overcome using advanced mode of imaging based on mutual lateral shift of reference and object image fields in CCHM. Lowering the spatial coherence of illumination means increasing its numerical aperture. We study how this change of the illumination geometry influences 3D objects QPI and especially the interpretation of live cells QPI in terms of the dry mass density measurement. In this way a strong dependence of the imaging process on the light coherence is demonstrated. The theoretical calculations and numerical simulations are supported by experimental data including a chance of time-lapse watching of live cells even in optically turbid milieu.

  3. Lensfree microscopy on a cellphone.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Derek; Mudanyali, Onur; Oztoprak, Cetin; Isikman, Serhan O; Sencan, Ikbal; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-07-21

    We demonstrate lensfree digital microscopy on a cellphone. This compact and light-weight holographic microscope installed on a cellphone does not utilize any lenses, lasers or other bulky optical components and it may offer a cost-effective tool for telemedicine applications to address various global health challenges. Weighing approximately 38 grams (<1.4 ounces), this lensfree imaging platform can be mechanically attached to the camera unit of a cellphone where the samples are loaded from the side, and are vertically illuminated by a simple light-emitting diode (LED). This incoherent LED light is then scattered from each micro-object to coherently interfere with the background light, creating the lensfree hologram of each object on the detector array of the cellphone. These holographic signatures captured by the cellphone permit reconstruction of microscopic images of the objects through rapid digital processing. We report the performance of this lensfree cellphone microscope by imaging various sized micro-particles, as well as red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and a waterborne parasite (Giardia lamblia).

  4. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-01

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM.

  5. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  6. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. PMID:25554301

  7. Electron microscopy and forensic practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrlý, Marek; Turková, Ivana

    2013-05-01

    Electron microanalysis in forensic practice ranks among basic applications used in investigation of traces (latents, stains, etc.) from crime scenes. Applying electron microscope allows for rapid screening and receiving initial information for a wide range of traces. SEM with EDS/WDS makes it possible to observe topography surface and morphology samples and examination of chemical components. Physical laboratory of the Institute of Criminalistics Prague use SEM especially for examination of inorganic samples, rarely for biology and other material. Recently, possibilities of electron microscopy have been extended considerably using dual systems with focused ion beam. These systems are applied mainly in study of inner micro and nanoparticles , thin layers (intersecting lines in graphical forensic examinations, analysis of layers of functional glass, etc.), study of alloys microdefects, creating 3D particles and aggregates models, etc. Automated mineralogical analyses are a great asset to analysis of mineral phases, particularly soils, similarly it holds for cathode luminescence, predominantly colour one and precise quantitative measurement of their spectral characteristics. Among latest innovations that are becoming to appear also at ordinary laboratories are TOF - SIMS systems and micro Raman spectroscopy with a resolution comparable to EDS/WDS analysis (capable of achieving similar level as through EDS/WDS analysis).

  8. Disposable optics for microscopy diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Vilmi, Pauliina; Varjo, Sami; Sliz, Rafal; Hannuksela, Jari; Fabritius, Tapio

    2015-01-01

    The point-of-care testing (POCT) is having increasing role on modern health care systems due to a possibility to perform tests for patients conveniently and immediately. POCT includes lot of disposable devices because of the environment they are often used. For a disposable system to be reasonably utilized, it needs to be high in quality but low in price. Optics based POCT systems are interesting approach to be developed, and here we describe a low-cost fabrication process for microlens arrays for microscopy. Lens arrays having average lens diameter of 222 μm with 300 μm lens pitch were fabricated. The lenses were characterized to have standard deviation of 0.06 μm in height and 4.61 μm in diameter. The resolution limit of 3.9μm is demonstrated with real images, and the images were compared with ones made with glass and polycarbonate lens arrays. The image quality is at the same level than with the glass lenses and the manufacturing costs are very low, thus making them suitable for POCT applications. PMID:26586153

  9. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  10. Electron microscopy of pharmaceutical systems.

    PubMed

    Klang, Victoria; Valenta, Claudia; Matsko, Nadejda B

    2013-01-01

    During the last decades, the focus of research in pharmaceutical technology has steadily shifted towards the development and optimisation of nano-scale drug delivery systems. As a result, electron microscopic methods are increasingly employed for the characterisation of pharmaceutical systems such as nanoparticles and microparticles, nanoemulsions, microemulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles, different types of vesicles, nanofibres and many more. Knowledge of the basic properties of these systems is essential for an adequate microscopic analysis. Classical transmission and scanning electron microscopic techniques frequently have to be adapted for an accurate analysis of formulation morphology, especially in case of hydrated colloidal systems. Specific techniques such as environmental scanning microscopy or cryo preparation are required for their investigation. Analytical electron microscopic techniques such as electron energy-loss spectroscopy or energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are additional assets to determine the elemental composition of the systems, but are not yet standard tools in pharmaceutical research. This review provides an overview of pharmaceutical systems of interest in current research and strategies for their successful electron microscopic analysis. Advantages and limitations of the different methodological approaches are discussed and recent findings of interest are presented. PMID:22921788

  11. Ferromagnetic Resonance Force Microscopy Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Midzor, Melissa; Cross, Michael; Wigen, Philip; Hammel, Chris; Roukes, Michael

    2001-03-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) has been used to investigate magnetostatic waves on microscopic samples of YIG. This work elucidates the nature of scanned probe (local) imaging in ferromagnetically-coupled systems. Scanning was performed with a specially-designed ultrasharp tip with Permalloy (NiFe) deposited solely in the tip region, to yield a spatial sensitivity of <10um. This has provided the first direct imaging of fundamental and higher order magnetostatic modes in micromagnetic systems. The modal dependence upon applied field and sample size was measured and compares well with theoretical models. However, unlike traditional ferromagnetic resonance detection technique, MRFM not only serves as a non-perturbative detection tool of magnetostatic modes, but also can locally change their dispersion relations via the strong field gradients generated from the cantilever tip. As a result, when the tip is positioned closely to the YIG surface, certain modes of the magnetostatic waves are either enhanced or depressed, depending on their respective wavelengths. This corresponds to the fact when the tip is further away, the dispersion of the FMR modes is mainly determined by the sample size. As the tip moves closer to the surface, a new regime emerges where the FMR dispersion is dominated by the local magnetic field. A quantitative model based on DE theory is proposed, and it explains the main features of the observed tip influence on different magnetostatic modes.

  12. Disposable optics for microscopy diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Vilmi, Pauliina; Varjo, Sami; Sliz, Rafal; Hannuksela, Jari; Fabritius, Tapio

    2015-11-20

    The point-of-care testing (POCT) is having increasing role on modern health care systems due to a possibility to perform tests for patients conveniently and immediately. POCT includes lot of disposable devices because of the environment they are often used. For a disposable system to be reasonably utilized, it needs to be high in quality but low in price. Optics based POCT systems are interesting approach to be developed, and here we describe a low-cost fabrication process for microlens arrays for microscopy. Lens arrays having average lens diameter of 222 μm with 300 μm lens pitch were fabricated. The lenses were characterized to have standard deviation of 0.06 μm in height and 4.61 μm in diameter. The resolution limit of 3.9μm is demonstrated with real images, and the images were compared with ones made with glass and polycarbonate lens arrays. The image quality is at the same level than with the glass lenses and the manufacturing costs are very low, thus making them suitable for POCT applications.

  13. Disposable optics for microscopy diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmi, Pauliina; Varjo, Sami; Sliz, Rafal; Hannuksela, Jari; Fabritius, Tapio

    2015-11-01

    The point-of-care testing (POCT) is having increasing role on modern health care systems due to a possibility to perform tests for patients conveniently and immediately. POCT includes lot of disposable devices because of the environment they are often used. For a disposable system to be reasonably utilized, it needs to be high in quality but low in price. Optics based POCT systems are interesting approach to be developed, and here we describe a low-cost fabrication process for microlens arrays for microscopy. Lens arrays having average lens diameter of 222 μm with 300 μm lens pitch were fabricated. The lenses were characterized to have standard deviation of 0.06 μm in height and 4.61 μm in diameter. The resolution limit of 3.9μm is demonstrated with real images, and the images were compared with ones made with glass and polycarbonate lens arrays. The image quality is at the same level than with the glass lenses and the manufacturing costs are very low, thus making them suitable for POCT applications.

  14. Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Stephen J; Colliex, C.

    2012-01-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, multiple signals can be simultaneously collected, including the transmitted and scattered electron signals (bright field and annular dark field or Z-contrast images), along with spectroscopic signals such as inelastically scattered electrons and emitted photons. In the last few years, the successful development of aberration correctors for the electron microscope has transformed the field of electron microscopy, opening up new possibilities for correlating structure to functionality. Aberration correction not only allows for enhanced structural resolution with incident probes into the sub-angstrom range, but can also provide greater probe currents to facilitate mapping of intrinsically weak spectroscopic signals at the nanoscale or even the atomic level. In this issue of MRS Bulletin, we illustrate the power of the new generation of electron microscopes with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy. We show the mapping of elemental distributions at atomic resolution and also the mapping of electronic and optical properties at unprecedented spatial resolution, with applications ranging from graphene to plasmonic nanostructures, and oxide interfaces to biology.

  15. PLS photoemission electron microscopy beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Tai-Hee; Kim, Ki-jeong; Hwang, C. C.; Rah, S.; Park, C. Y.; Kim, Bongsoo

    2001-07-01

    The performance of a recently commissioned beamline at the Pohang Light Source (PLS) is described. The beamline, which is located at 4B1 at PLS, is a Varied Line Spacing (VLS) Plane Grating Monochromator (PGM) beamline. VLS PGM has become very popular because of the simple scanning mechanism and the fixed exit slit. The beamline which takes 3 mrad horizontal beam fan from bending magnet, covers the energy range 200-1000 eV for Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Magnetic Circular Dichroism (MCD) experiments. Simplicity of the optics and high flux with medium resolution were the design goals for these applications. The beamline consists of a horizontal focusing mirror, a vertical focusing mirror, VLS plane grating and exit slit. The source of PLS could be used as a virtual entrance slit because of its small size and stability. The flux and the resolution of the beamline at the experimental station have been measured using an ion chamber and a calibrated photodiode. Test images of PEEM from a standard sample were taken to illustrate the further performance of the beamline and PEEM station.

  16. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-27

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM.

  17. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-15

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  18. Servo-controlled intravital microscope system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, M. N.; Wayland, H. J.; Chapman, C. P. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A microscope system is described for viewing an area of a living body tissue that is rapidly moving, by maintaining the same area in the field-of-view and in focus. A focus sensing portion of the system includes two video cameras at which the viewed image is projected, one camera being slightly in front of the image plane and the other slightly behind it. A focus sensing circuit for each camera differentiates certain high frequency components of the video signal and then detects them and passes them through a low pass filter, to provide dc focus signal whose magnitudes represent the degree of focus. An error signal equal to the difference between the focus signals, drives a servo that moves the microscope objective so that an in-focus view is delivered to an image viewing/recording camera.

  19. Kinetic Crystallography by Raman Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Paul R.; Chen, Yuanyuan; Gong, Bo; Kalp, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectra, obtained using a Raman microscope, offer an unique and incisive approach to follow interactions and reactions inside a single crystal under soak-in or soak-out conditions. The utility of this approach derives from the finding that the Raman spectra from single macromolecular crystals, under normal (non-resonance) conditions, are extremely stable, with a low “light background,” and provide ideal platforms for Raman difference spectroscopy. In turn, this allows the interrogation of sub-molecular changes in very large and complex macromolecular environments. There is often great synergy with X-ray crystallography, with the Raman spectroscopist providing crystallography colleagues with the best soak-in conditions to generate a targeted intermediate for flash freezing and X-ray analysis. On the other hand, X-ray structures at points along a reaction pathway provide invaluable benchmarks for interpreting the Raman data from populations seen by Raman to be changing in real-time. These principles will be illustrated by two reactions: The first involves a complex, branching reaction pathway underlying the inhibition of β-lactamases by clinically important pharmaceutical compounds, where different combinations of drug and enzyme function in different regions of the pathway. The second shows how temporal data can be derived for several events in the initiation step of RNA synthesis—more specifically, when one GTP molecule is joined to one ATP molecule to form a G•A dimer in the active site of a 115,000 Dalton crystalline RNA polymerase. Finally, we will summarize the extension of Raman microscopy to nucleic acid crystals and the information that has been obtained for RNA-based enzymes. PMID:20797452

  20. The 2015 super-resolution microscopy roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, Stefan W.; Sahl, Steffen J.; Bates, Mark; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Heintzmann, Rainer; Booth, Martin J.; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Shtengel, Gleb; Hess, Harald; Tinnefeld, Philip; Honigmann, Alf; Jakobs, Stefan; Testa, Ilaria; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim; Ewers, Helge; Davis, Simon J.; Eggeling, Christian; Klenerman, David; Willig, Katrin I.; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Castello, Marco; Diaspro, Alberto; Cordes, Thorben

    2015-11-01

    Far-field optical microscopy using focused light is an important tool in a number of scientific disciplines including chemical, (bio)physical and biomedical research, particularly with respect to the study of living cells and organisms. Unfortunately, the applicability of the optical microscope is limited, since the diffraction of light imposes limitations on the spatial resolution of the image. Consequently the details of, for example, cellular protein distributions, can be visualized only to a certain extent. Fortunately, recent years have witnessed the development of ‘super-resolution’ far-field optical microscopy (nanoscopy) techniques such as stimulated emission depletion (STED), ground state depletion (GSD), reversible saturated optical (fluorescence) transitions (RESOLFT), photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM), stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), structured illumination microscopy (SIM) or saturated structured illumination microscopy (SSIM), all in one way or another addressing the problem of the limited spatial resolution of far-field optical microscopy. While SIM achieves a two-fold improvement in spatial resolution compared to conventional optical microscopy, STED, RESOLFT, PALM/STORM, or SSIM have all gone beyond, pushing the limits of optical image resolution to the nanometer scale. Consequently, all super-resolution techniques open new avenues of biomedical research. Because the field is so young, the potential capabilities of different super-resolution microscopy approaches have yet to be fully explored, and uncertainties remain when considering the best choice of methodology. Thus, even for experts, the road to the future is sometimes shrouded in mist. The super-resolution optical microscopy roadmap of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics addresses this need for clarity. It provides guidance to the outstanding questions through a collection of short review articles from experts in the field, giving a thorough

  1. Microscopy & microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michael, Joseph R.

    2016-01-08

    The article provides information about an upcoming conference from the program chair. The Microscopy Society of America (MSA), the Microanalysis Society (MAS), and the International Metallographic Society (IMS) invite participation in Microscopy & Microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio, July 24 through July 28, 2016.

  2. Analytical transmission electron microscopy in materials science

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, H.L.

    1980-01-01

    Microcharacterization of materials on a scale of less than 10 nm has been afforded by recent advances in analytical transmission electron microscopy. The factors limiting accurate analysis at the limit of spatial resolution for the case of a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy are examined in this paper.

  3. Digital microscopy. Bringing new technology into focus.

    PubMed

    2010-06-01

    Digital microscopy enables the scanning of microscope slides so that they can be viewed, analyzed, and archived on a computer. While the technology is not yet widely accepted by pathologists, a switch to digital microscopy systems seems to be inevitable in the near future.

  4. Digital microscopy. Bringing new technology into focus.

    PubMed

    2010-06-01

    Digital microscopy enables the scanning of microscope slides so that they can be viewed, analyzed, and archived on a computer. While the technology is not yet widely accepted by pathologists, a switch to digital microscopy systems seems to be inevitable in the near future. PMID:21309285

  5. Electron microscopy of atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Po-Fu

    Electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EM/EDS) is a powerful tool for single particle analysis. However, the accuracy with which atmospheric particle compositions can be quantitatively determined by EDS is often hampered by substrate-particle interactions, volatilization losses in the low pressure microscope chamber, electron beam irradiation and use of inaccurate quantitation factors. A pseudo-analytical solution was derived to calculate the temperature rise due to the dissipation of the electron energy on a particle-substrate system. Evaporative mass loss for a spherical cap-shaped sulfuric acid particle resting on a thin film supported by a TEM grid during electron beam impingement has been studied. Measured volatilization rates were found to be in very good agreement with theoretical predictions. The method proposed can also be used to estimate the vapor pressure of a species by measuring the decay of X-ray intensities. Several types of substrates were studied. We found that silver-coated silicon monoxide substrates give carbon detection limits comparable to commercially available substrates. An advantage of these substrates is that the high thermal conductivity of the silver reduces heating due to electron beam impingement. In addition, exposure of sulfuric acid samples to ammonia overnight substantially reduces sulfur loss in the electron beam. Use of size-dependent k-factors determined from particles of known compositions shows promise for improving the accuracy of atmospheric particle compositions measured by EM/EDS. Knowledge accumulated during the course of this thesis has been used to analyze atmospheric particles (Minneapolis, MN) selected by the TDMA and collected by an aerodynamic focusing impactor. 'Less' hygroscopic particles, which do not grow to any measurable extent when humidified to ~90% relative humidity, included chain agglomerates, spheres, flakes, and irregular shapes. Carbon was the predominant element detected in

  6. Nanopatterning by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qian

    For the first time, we fabricated nanostructures of a ferroelectric polymer, poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluorethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] on gold substrate via dip-pen nanolithography ink. Lines as thin as 32 nm and dot radius as small as 20 nm have been fabricated. The P(VDF-TrFE) molecules were well oriented on the gold substrate. The hydrophobic P(VDF-TrFE) produced a black contrast in the lateral force microscopy (LFM) images. The DPN-generated P(VDF-TrFE) patterns hold ferroelectric properties. The interaction between the P(VDF-TrFE) and the gold substrate was Van der Waals' interaction. The growth of dot radii/line-width was proportional to t1/2. We studied the influence of experimental conditions on dip-pen nanolithography. The results show: The transport rate of ink increased as the temperature increased for all of the inks. For P(VDF-TrFE), a deviation from Arrhenius plot at about 55°C was observed. It may be caused by a ferroelectric phase transition. Surface roughness influenced both the contrast in LFM images and the transport rate of ink. Surfaces with less roughness resulted in good contrast in LFM images, while rough surfaces resulted in poor contrast. The transport rate of ink increased as the roughness decreased; however, the extent of the influence was strongly ink-dependent. The influence of relative humidity depended on the solubility of the ink in water. The transport rate of hydrophilic inks increased as the relative humidity increased, while the transport rate of hydrophobic inks experienced small change as the relative humidity increased. At the same condition, a tip with a larger curvature radius could generate a larger pattern than a tip with a smaller curvature radius due to a bigger contact point or the formation of a meniscus with a larger size. The chemical affinity was also one of the key controlling parameters for DPN. It is necessary to consider the ink affinity to both the substrate and the tip when designing a new DPN system. We

  7. Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Supraja

    Time domain Optical Coherence Tomography (TD-OCT), first reported in 1991, makes use of the low temporal coherence properties of a NIR broadband laser to create depth sectioning of up to 2mm under the surface using optical interferometry and point to point scanning. Prior and ongoing work in OCT in the research community has concentrated on improving axial resolution through the development of broadband sources and speed of image acquisition through new techniques such as Spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT). In SD-OCT, an entire depth scan is acquired at once with a low numerical aperture (NA) objective lens focused at a fixed point within the sample. In this imaging geometry, a longer depth of focus is achieved at the expense of lateral resolution, which is typically limited to 10 to 20 mum. Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM), introduced in 1994, combined the advantages of high axial resolution obtained in OCT with high lateral resolution obtained by increasing the NA of the microscope placed in the sample arm. However, OCM presented trade-offs caused by the inverse quadratic relationship between the NA and the DOF of the optics used. For applications requiring high lateral resolution, such as cancer diagnostics, several solutions have been proposed including the periodic manual re-focusing of the objective lens in the time domain as well as the spectral domain C-mode configuration in order to overcome the loss in lateral resolution outside the DOF. In this research, we report for the first time, high speed, sub-cellular imaging (lateral resolution of 2 mum) in OCM using a Gabor domain image processing algorithm with a custom designed and fabricated dynamic focus microscope interfaced to a Ti:Sa femtosecond laser centered at 800 nm within an SD-OCM configuration. It is envisioned that this technology will provide a non-invasive replacement for the current practice of multiple biopsies for skin cancer diagnosis. The research reported here presents three important advances

  8. Virtual microscopy:applications to hematology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Szu-Hee

    2005-01-01

    Virtual microscopy is the simulation of microscopy over a computer network. A virtual slide is a giant digital image file of a glass slide that can be displayed, panned, zoomed, and focused in a virtual slide viewer on a computer screen. Virtual slides represent a revolutionary advance over glass slides. They are easy to file, store, retrieve, annotate, and mark and can be preserved indefinitely. Furthermore, they are easy to duplicate and distribute and can be integrated into electronic patient records. Large virtual slides can be readily transmitted to users over a standard broadband connection. With the recent introduction of viewers that can focus virtual slides, virtual microscopy can simulate all the functions of real microscopy. Virtual microscopy has significant advantages over real microscopy in education and in proficiency testing. In education, virtual microscopy enables "anytime, anywhere" learning and has been favorably received by students and teachers. In proficiency surveys, all users view the same image, virtual slides are easy to distribute, and the slides do not deteriorate. Potential applications for hematology proficiency surveys include blood and bone marrow morphology, differential cell counts, cytochemistry and immunocytochemistry, detection of malarial parasites, and other tests. Virtual microscopy enables proficiency surveys of critical clinical parameters, such as the bone marrow blast count, and implementation of "locate and identify" exercises. It is conceivable that with the next generation of technological developments, virtual microscopy can be extended to diagnostic applications. Important goals are to minimize slide file size without loss of relevant detail, to establish diagnostic equivalence, and to automate virtual slide capture with high throughput for integration into laboratory information systems. Key factors that will drive implementation include user-friendliness, cost, data storage requirements, and throughput speed

  9. X-ray microscopy using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Pounds, J.G.; Rivers, M.L.; Schidlovsky, G.; Smith, J.V.; Spanne, P.; Sutton, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    The system for x-ray microscopy now being developed at the X-26 beam line of the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is described here. Examples of the use of x-ray microscopy for trace element geochemistry, biology and medicine, and materials investigations are given to emphasize the scientific applications of the technique. Future directions for the improvement and further development of the X-26 microscope and of the x-ray microscopy field in general are discussed. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Fast Fluorescence Microscopy with Light Sheets.

    PubMed

    Daetwyler, Stephan; Huisken, Jan

    2016-08-01

    In light sheet microscopy, optical sectioning by selective fluorescence excitation with a sheet of light is combined with fast full-frame acquisition. This illumination scheme provides minimal photobleaching and phototoxicity. Complemented with remote focusing and multi-view acquisition, light sheet microscopy is the method of choice for acquisition of very fast biological processes, large samples, and high-throughput applications in areas such as neuroscience, plant biology, and developmental biology. This review explains why light sheet microscopes are much faster and gentler than other established fluorescence microscopy techniques. New volumetric imaging schemes and highlights of selected biological applications are also discussed. PMID:27638692

  11. Visualizing quantitative microscopy data: History and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Sailem, Heba Z.; Cooper, Sam; Bakal, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Data visualization is a fundamental aspect of science. In the context of microscopy-based studies, visualization typically involves presentation of the images themselves. However, data visualization is challenging when microscopy experiments entail imaging of millions of cells, and complex cellular phenotypes are quantified in a high-content manner. Most well-established visualization tools are inappropriate for displaying high-content data, which has driven the development of new visualization methodology. In this review, we discuss how data has been visualized in both classical and high-content microscopy studies; as well as the advantages, and disadvantages, of different visualization methods. PMID:26906253

  12. Tomographic phase microscopy and its biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wonshik

    2012-12-01

    Conventional interferometric microscopy techniques such as digital holographic microscopy and quantitative phase microscopy are often classified as 3D imaging techniques because a recorded complex field image can be numerically propagated to a different depth. In a strict sense, however, a single complex field image contains only 2D information on a specimen. The measured 2D image is only a subset of the 3D structure. For the 3D mapping of an object, multiple independent 2D images are to be taken, for example at multiple incident angles or wavelengths, and then combined by the so-called optical diffraction tomography (ODT). In this Letter, tomographic phase microscopy (TPM) is reviewed that experimentally realizes the concept of the ODT for the 3D mapping of biological cells in their native state, and some of its interesting biological and biomedical applications are introduced. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Automated optical microscopy of coated particle fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kercher, Andrew K; Hunn, John D; Price, Jeffery R; Pappano, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Fundamental technological advances have occurred during the 20 year hiatus in US research on coated particle nuclear fuel. As part of the recent US Department of Energy s Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has utilized advancements in computer automation, digital imaging, and image analysis to modernize US optical microscopy techniques for coated particle nuclear fuel. Automated optical microscopy has enabled detailed and objective analysis of individual particles (hundreds of measurements per particle) and of large sample sizes that far exceed the capabilities of conventional manual microscopy methods (analysis of 1500-5000 particles is common). Demonstrative examples of the capabilities of this automated optical microscopy are given for: (a) shadow imaging of kernels, coated fuel particles, and graphite matrix overcoated particles and (b) cross-sectional analysis of coated fuel particles to determine layer thicknesses.

  14. An alternative lamp for fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brighton, W. D.; Grulich, R.

    1972-01-01

    There has been marked development in reagents, filters and microscope equipment for fluorescence microscopy and particularly for immunofluorescence studies. The use of a different and more efficient lamp for excitation of fluorochromes is now reported. PMID:4550854

  15. Multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Crawford, Darrell; Burczynski, Frank J.; Liu, Xin; Liau, Ian; Roberts, Michael S.

    2014-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is the preferred method when in vivo deep-tissue imaging is required. This review presents the application of multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function. In particular, multiphoton microscopy is useful in imaging intracellular events, such as mitochondrial depolarization and cellular metabolism in terms of NAD(P)H changes with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The morphology of hepatocytes can be visualized without exogenously administered fluorescent dyes by utilizing their autofluorescence and second harmonic generation signal of collagen, which is useful in diagnosing liver disease. More specific imaging, such as studying drug transport in normal and diseased livers are achievable, but require exogenously administered fluorescent dyes. If these techniques can be translated into clinical use to assess liver function, it would greatly improve early diagnosis of organ viability, fibrosis, and cancer.

  16. Biomolecular Imaging with Coherent Nonlinear Vibrational Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chao-Yu; Boik, John; Potma, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    Optical imaging with spectroscopic vibrational contrast is a label-free solution for visualizing, identifying, and quantifying a wide range of biomolecular compounds in biological materials. Both linear and nonlinear vibrational microscopy techniques derive their imaging contrast from infrared active or Raman allowed molecular transitions, which provide a rich palette for interrogating chemical and structural details of the sample. Yet nonlinear optical methods, which include both second-order sum-frequency generation (SFG) and third-order coherent Raman scattering (CRS) techniques, offer several improved imaging capabilities over their linear precursors. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy features unprecedented vibrational imaging speeds, provides strategies for higher spatial resolution, and gives access to additional molecular parameters. These advances have turned vibrational microscopy into a premier tool for chemically dissecting live cells and tissues. This review discusses the molecular contrast of SFG and CRS microscopy and highlights several of the advanced imaging capabilities that have impacted biological and biomedical research. PMID:23245525

  17. Coatings and alternatives for SEM microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.H.

    1995-03-01

    Several methods of preparing samples of low electrical conductivity for conventional scanning electron microscopy are reviewed. Two new methods are chromium sputter-coating and low-voltage electron microscopy with a field emission gun. Photomicrographs of different coatings at high magnification show the structure of each coating. Advantages and disadvantages of each material are presented. Results with sputtered coatings are compared to an evaporated carbon coating.

  18. Investigation of wear phenomena by microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The various wear mechanisms involved in the loss of material from metallic and nonmetallic surfaces are discussed. The results presented indicate how various microscopy techniques used in conjunction with other analytical tools can assist in the elucidation of a wear mechanism. Without question, microscopy is the single most important tool for the study of the wear of surfaces, to assess and address inherent mechanisms of the material removal process.

  19. Subwavelength optical microscopy in the far field

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Qingqing; Zubairy, M. Suhail; Al-Amri, M.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2011-06-15

    We present a procedure for subwavelength optical microscopy. The identical atoms are distributed on a plane and shined with a standing wave. We rotate the plane to different angles and record the resonant fluorescence spectra in the far field, from which we can obtain their distance and location information. This procedure also works for atomic separation above one wavelength and therefore provides a seamless microscopy.

  20. Scanning probe microscopy on new dental alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, B.; Geis-Gerstorfer, J.; Ziegler, C.

    Surface analytical methods such as scanning force microscopy (SFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the surface properties of amalgam substitutes as tooth filling materials. In particular the corrosion and the passivation behavior of new gallium restorative materials were studied. To give relevant practical data, the measurements were performed with and without the alloys being stored in artificial saliva to simulate physiological oral conditions.

  1. Imaging DNA Structure by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Alice L B; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a microscopy technique that uses a sharp probe to trace a sample surface at nanometre resolution. For biological applications, one of its key advantages is its ability to visualize substructure of single molecules and molecular complexes in an aqueous environment. Here, we describe the application of AFM to determine superstructure and secondary structure of surface-bound DNA. The method is also readily applicable to probe DNA-DNA interactions and DNA-protein complexes.

  2. Advanced electron microscopy for advanced materials.

    PubMed

    Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Bals, Sara; Van Aert, Sandra; Verbeeck, Jo; Van Dyck, Dirk

    2012-11-01

    The idea of this Review is to introduce newly developed possibilities of advanced electron microscopy to the materials science community. Over the last decade, electron microscopy has evolved into a full analytical tool, able to provide atomic scale information on the position, nature, and even the valency atoms. This information is classically obtained in two dimensions (2D), but can now also be obtained in 3D. We show examples of applications in the field of nanoparticles and interfaces.

  3. Integrated fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Agronskaia, Alexandra V; Valentijn, Jack A; van Driel, Linda F; Schneijdenberg, Chris T W M; Humbel, Bruno M; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Verkleij, Arie J; Koster, Abraham J; Gerritsen, Hans C

    2008-11-01

    Correlative microscopy is a powerful technique that combines the strengths of fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. The first enables rapid searching for regions of interest in large fields of view while the latter exhibits superior resolution over a narrow field of view. Routine use of correlative microscopy is seriously hampered by the cumbersome and elaborate experimental procedures. This is partly due to the use of two separate microscopes for fluorescence and electron microscopy. Here, an integrated approach to correlative microscopy is presented based on a laser scanning fluorescence microscope integrated in a transmission electron microscope. Using this approach the search for features in the specimen is greatly simplified and the time to carry out the experiment is strongly reduced. The potential of the integrated approach is demonstrated at room temperature on specimens of rat intestine cells labeled with AlexaFluor488 conjugated to wheat germ agglutinin and on rat liver peroxisomes immunolabeled with anti-catalase antibodies and secondary AlexaFluor488 antibodies and 10nm protein A-gold.

  4. The emergence of multifrequency force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ricardo; Herruzo, Elena T

    2012-04-01

    In atomic force microscopy a cantilever with a sharp tip attached to it is scanned over the surface of a sample, and information about the surface is extracted by measuring how the deflection of the cantilever - which is caused by interactions between the tip and the surface - varies with position. In the most common form of atomic force microscopy, dynamic force microscopy, the cantilever is made to vibrate at a specific frequency, and the deflection of the tip is measured at this frequency. But the motion of the cantilever is highly nonlinear, and in conventional dynamic force microscopy, information about the sample that is encoded in the deflection at frequencies other than the excitation frequency is irreversibly lost. Multifrequency force microscopy involves the excitation and/or detection of the deflection at two or more frequencies, and it has the potential to overcome limitations in the spatial resolution and acquisition times of conventional force microscopes. Here we review the development of five different modes of multifrequency force microscopy and examine its application in studies of proteins, the imaging of vibrating nanostructures, measurements of ion diffusion and subsurface imaging in cells.

  5. The emergence of multifrequency force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ricardo; Herruzo, Elena T

    2012-04-01

    In atomic force microscopy a cantilever with a sharp tip attached to it is scanned over the surface of a sample, and information about the surface is extracted by measuring how the deflection of the cantilever - which is caused by interactions between the tip and the surface - varies with position. In the most common form of atomic force microscopy, dynamic force microscopy, the cantilever is made to vibrate at a specific frequency, and the deflection of the tip is measured at this frequency. But the motion of the cantilever is highly nonlinear, and in conventional dynamic force microscopy, information about the sample that is encoded in the deflection at frequencies other than the excitation frequency is irreversibly lost. Multifrequency force microscopy involves the excitation and/or detection of the deflection at two or more frequencies, and it has the potential to overcome limitations in the spatial resolution and acquisition times of conventional force microscopes. Here we review the development of five different modes of multifrequency force microscopy and examine its application in studies of proteins, the imaging of vibrating nanostructures, measurements of ion diffusion and subsurface imaging in cells. PMID:22466857

  6. Self-labelling enzymes as universal tags for fluorescence microscopy, super-resolution microscopy and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liss, Viktoria; Barlag, Britta; Nietschke, Monika; Hensel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Research in cell biology demands advanced microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy (FM), super-resolution microscopy (SRM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an approach to combine data on the dynamics of proteins or protein complexes in living cells with the ultrastructural details in the low nanometre scale. To correlate both data sets, markers functional in FM, SRM and TEM are required. Genetically encoded markers such as fluorescent proteins or self-labelling enzyme tags allow observations in living cells. Various genetically encoded tags are available for FM and SRM, but only few tags are suitable for CLEM. Here, we describe the red fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) as a multimodal marker for CLEM. TMR is used as fluorochrome coupled to ligands of genetically encoded self-labelling enzyme tags HaloTag, SNAP-tag and CLIP-tag in FM and SRM. We demonstrate that TMR can additionally photooxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) to an osmiophilic polymer visible on TEM sections, thus being a marker suitable for FM, SRM and TEM. We evaluated various organelle markers with enzymatic tags in mammalian cells labelled with TMR-coupled ligands and demonstrate the use as efficient and versatile DAB photooxidizer for CLEM approaches. PMID:26643905

  7. Ultrastructure of Candida albicans pleomorphic forms: phase-contrast microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Siennicka, Katarzyna; Kurzatkowski, Wiesław

    2012-01-01

    A modified method of glutaraldeyde-osmium tetroxide fixation was adjusted to characterize the ultrastructure of Candida albicans pleomorphic forms, using phase-contrast microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The discovered morphological criteria defining the individual morphotypes are discussed in terms of mycological and histopathological diagnostics of candidiasis. The relations are discussed between fungal pleomorphism, virulence and susceptibility of different morphotypes to fungicides.

  8. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy for the study of fungi interactions.

    PubMed

    Sempere, F; Santamarina, M P

    2011-03-01

    The application of the cryo-scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy for the study of the interactions at different environmental conditions between Penicillium oxalicum and Fusarium verticillioides is described. A dual microculture was developed for the light microscopy analysis of the interaction. The microscope and macroscopic examinations were compared. Analysis of Petri plates revealed that F. verticillioides was a competitor for space and nutrients while P. oxalicum was a mycoparasite under the microscopic observations.

  9. Development and testing of hyperbaric atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy for biological applications.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, D P; McNally, H A; Dean, J B

    2012-05-01

    A commercially available atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscope were installed and tested inside a custom-designed hyperbaric chamber to provide the capability to study the effects of hyperbaric gases on biological preparations, including cellular mechanism of oxidative stress. In this report, we list details of installing and testing atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy inside a hyperbaric chamber. The pressure vessel was designed to accommodate a variety of imaging equipment and ensures full functionality at ambient and hyperbaric conditions (≤85 psi). Electrical, gas and fluid lines were installed to enable remote operation of instrumentation under hyperbaric conditions, and to maintain viable biological samples with gas-equilibrated superfusate and/or drugs. Systems were installed for vibration isolation and temperature regulation to maintain atomic force microscopy performance during compression and decompression. Results of atomic force microscopy testing demonstrate sub-nanometre resolution at hyperbaric pressure in dry scans and fluid scans, in both contact mode and tapping mode. Noise levels were less when measurements were taken under hyperbaric pressure with air, helium (He) and nitrogen (N(2) ). Atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy measurements were made on a variety of living cell cultures exposed to hyperbaric gases (He, N(2) , O(2) , air). In summary, atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy were installed and tested for use at hyperbaric pressures and enables the study of cellular and molecular effects of hyperbaric gases and pressure per se in biological preparations.

  10. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. Rameez; Yao, Junjie; Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    pH is a tightly regulated indicator of metabolic activity. In mammalian systems, imbalance of pH regulation may result from or result in serious illness. Even though the regulation system of pH is very robust, tissue pH can be altered in many diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus. Traditional high-resolution optical imaging techniques, such as confocal microscopy, routinely image pH in cells and tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent dyes, which change their fluorescence properties with the surrounding pH. Since strong optical scattering in biological tissue blurs images at greater depths, high-resolution pH imaging is limited to penetration depths of 1mm. Here, we report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of commercially available pH-sensitive fluorescent dye in tissue phantoms. Using both opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we explored the possibility of recovering the pH values in tissue phantoms. In this paper, we demonstrate that PAM was capable of recovering pH values up to a depth of 2 mm, greater than possible with other forms of optical microscopy.

  11. X-ray microscopy of human malaria

    SciTech Connect

    Magowan, C.; Brown, J.T.; Mohandas, N.; Meyer-Ilse, W.

    1997-04-01

    Associations between intracellular organisms and host cells are complex and particularly difficult to examine. X-ray microscopy provides transmission images of subcellular structures in intact cells at resolutions superior to available methodologies. The spatial resolution is 50-60nm with a 1 micron depth of focus, superior to anything achievable with light microscopy. Image contrast is generated by differences in photoelectric absorption by the atoms in different areas (i.e. subcellular structures) throughout the full thickness of the sample. Absorption due to carbon dominates among all the elements in the sample at 2.4 nm x-ray wavelength. Thus images show features or structures, in a way not usually seen by other types of microscopy. The authors used soft x-ray microscopy to investigate structural development of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in normal and genetically abnormal erythrocytes, and in infected erythrocytes treated with compounds that have anti-malarial effects. X-ray microscopy showed newly elaborated structures in the cytosol of unstained, intact erythrocytes, redistribution of mass (carbon) in infected erythrocytes, and aberrant parasite morphology. Better understanding of the process of intracellular parasite maturation and the interactions between the parasite and its host erythrocyte can help define new approaches to the control of this deadly disease.

  12. DIAGNOSIS OF MALARIA BY MAGNETIC DEPOSITION MICROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    ZIMMERMAN, PETER A.; THOMSON, JODI M.; FUJIOKA, HISASHI; COLLINS, WILLIAM E.; ZBOROWSKI, MACIEJ

    2013-01-01

    Although malaria contributes to a significant public health burden, malaria diagnosis relies heavily on either non-specific clinical symptoms or blood smear microscopy methods developed in the 1930s. These approaches severely misrepresent the number of infected individuals and the reservoir of parasites in malaria-endemic communities and undermine efforts to control disease. Limitations of conventional microscopy-based diagnosis center on time required to examine slides, time required to attain expertise sufficient to diagnose infection accurately, and attrition from the limited number of existing malaria microscopy experts. Earlier studies described magnetic properties of Plasmodium falciparum but did not refine methods to diagnosis infection by all four human malaria parasite species. Here, following specific technical procedures, we show that it is possible to concentrate all four human malaria parasite species, at least 40-fold, on microscope slides using very inexpensive magnets through an approach termed magnetic deposition microscopy. This approach delivered greater sensitivity than a thick smear preparation while maintaining the clarity of a thin smear to simplify species-specific diagnosis. Because the magnetic force necessary to concentrate parasites on the slide is focused at a precise position relative to the magnet surface, it is possible to examine a specific region of the slide for parasitized cells and avoid the time-consuming process of scanning the entire slide surface. These results provide insight regarding new strategies for performing malaria blood smear microscopy. PMID:16606985

  13. CARS microscopy of Alzheimer's diseased brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enejder, Annika; Kiskis, Juris; Fink, Helen; Nyberg, Lena; Thyr, Jakob; Li, Jia-Yi

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder currently without cure, characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques surrounded by dystrophic neurites. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanisms, biochemical analysis (protein immunoblot) of plaque extracts reveals that they consist of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides assembled as oligomers, protofibrils and aggregates. Their spatial distribution has been confirmed by Thioflavin-S or immuno-staining with fluorescence microscopy. However, it is increasingly understood that the protein aggregation is only one of several mechanism that causes neuronal dysfunction and death. This raises the need for a more complete biochemical analysis. In this study, we have complemented 2-photon fluorescence microscopy of Thioflavin-S and Aβ immuno-stained human AD plaques with CARS microscopy. We show that the chemical build-up of AD plaques is more complex and that Aβ staining does not provide the complete picture of the spatial distribution or the molecular composition of AD plaques. CARS images provide important complementary information to that obtained by fluorescence microscopy, motivating a broader introduction of CARS microscopy in the AD research field.

  14. [Pili annulati. A scanning electron microscopy study].

    PubMed

    Lalević-Vasić, B; Polić, D

    1988-01-01

    A case of ringed hair studied by light and electron microscopy is reported. The patient, a 20-year old girl, had been presenting with the hair abnormality since birth. At naked eye examination the hairs were dry, 6 to 7 cm long, and they showed dull and shining areas giving the scalp hair a scintillating appearance (fig. 1). Several samples of hair were taken and examined by light microscopy under white and polarized light. Hair shafts and cryo-fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS. 1. Light microscopy. Lesions were found in every hair examined. There were abnormal, opaque and fusiform areas alternating with normal areas all along the hair shaft (fig. 2). The abnormal areas resulted from intracortical air-filled cavities. Fractures similar to those of trichorrhexis nodosa were found in the opaque areas of the distal parts of the hairs. 2. Scanning electron microscopy. A. Hair shaft surface. The abnormal areas showed a longitudinal, "curtain-like" folding of the cuticular cells which had punctiform depressions on their surface and worn free edges (fig. 4, 5, 6); trichorrhexis-type fractures were seen in the distal parts of the hair shafts (fig. 7, 8). Normal areas regularly presented with longitudinal, superficial, short and non-systematized depressions (fig. 9); the cuticular cells were worn, and there were places where the denuded cortex showed dissociated cortical fibres (fig. 10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Lighting up microscopy with random Raman lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokr, Brett H.; Nodurft, Dawson T.; Thompson, Jonathan V.; Bixler, Joel N.; Noojin, Gary D.; Redding, Brandon; Thomas, Robert J.; Cao, Hui; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Scully, Marlan O.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    Wide-field microscopy, where full images are obtained simultaneously, is limited by the power available from speckle-free light sources. Currently, the vast majority of wide-field microscopes use either mercury arc lamps, or LEDs as the illumination source. The power available from these sources limits wide-field fluorescent microscopy to tens of microseconds temporal resolution. Lasers, while capable of producing high power and short pulses, have high spatial coherence. This leads to the formation of laser speckle that makes such sources unsuitable for wide-field imaging applications. Random Raman lasers offer the best of both worlds by producing laser-like intensities, short, nanosecond-scale, pulses, and low spatial coherence, speckle-free, output. These qualities combine to make random Raman lasers 4 orders of magnitude brighter than traditional wide-field microscopy light sources. Furthermore, the unique properties of random Raman lasers make possible the entirely new possibilities of wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging or wide-field Raman microscopy. We will introduce the relevant physics that give rise to the unique properties of random Raman lasing, and demonstrate early proof of principle results demonstrating random Raman lasing emission being used as an imaging light source. Finally, we will discuss future directions and elucidate the benefits of using random Raman lasers as a wide-field microscopy light source.

  16. Time-Adjusted Internal Target Volume: A Novel Approach Focusing on Heterogeneity of Tumor Motion Based on 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Imaging for Radiation Therapy Planning of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Kimura, Tomoki; Nakashima, Takeo; Ochi, Yusuke; Takahashi, Ippei; Doi, Yoshiko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Ozawa, Syuichi; Murakami, Yuji; Wadasaki, Koichi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To consider nonuniform tumor motion within the internal target volume (ITV) by defining time-adjusted ITV (TTV), a volume designed to include heterogeneity of tumor existence on the basis of 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Methods and Materials: We evaluated 30 lung cancer patients. Breath-hold CT (BH-CT) and free-breathing 4D-CT scans were acquired for each patient. The tumors were manually delineated using a lung CT window setting (window, 1600 HU; level, −300 HU). Tumor in BH-CT images was defined as gross tumor volume (GTV), and the sum of tumors in 4D-CT images was defined as ITV-4D. The TTV images were generated from the 4D-CT datasets, and the tumor existence probability within ITV-4D was calculated. We calculated the TTV{sub 80} value, which is the percentage of the volume with a tumor existence probability that exceeded 80% on ITV-4D. Several factors that affected the TTV{sub 80} value, such as the ITV-4D/GTV ratio or tumor centroid deviation, were evaluated. Results: Time-adjusted ITV images were acquired for all patients, and tumor respiratory motion heterogeneity was visualized. The median (range) ITV-4D/GTV ratio and median tumor centroid deviation were 1.6 (1.0-4.1) and 6.3 mm (0.1-30.3 mm), respectively. The median TTV{sub 80} value was 43.3% (2.9-98.7%). Strong correlations were observed between the TTV{sub 80} value and the ITV-4D/GTV ratio (R=−0.71) and tumor centroid deviation (R=−0.72). The TTV images revealed the tumor motion pattern features within ITV. Conclusions: The TTV images reflected nonuniform tumor motion, and they revealed the tumor motion pattern features, suggesting that the TTV concept may facilitate various aspects of radiation therapy planning of lung cancer while incorporating respiratory motion in the future.

  17. Wet electron microscopy with quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Timp, Winston; Watson, Nicki; Sabban, Alon; Zik, Ory; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-09-01

    Wet electron microscopy (EM) is a new imaging method with the potential to allow higher spatial resolution of samples. In contrast to most EM methods, it requires little time to perform and does not require complicated equipment or difficult steps. We used this method on a common murine macrophage cell line, IC-21, in combination with various stains and preparations, to collect high resolution images of the actin cytoskeleton. Most importantly, we demonstrated the use of quantum dots in conjunction with this technique to perform light/electron correlation microscopy. We found that wet EM is a useful tool that fits into a niche between the simplicity of light microscopy and the high spatial resolution of EM. PMID:16989089

  18. Fluorescence microscopy: A tool to study autophagy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Shashank; Manjithaya, Ravi

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy is a cellular recycling process through which a cell degrades old and damaged cellular components such as organelles and proteins and the degradation products are reused to provide energy and building blocks. Dysfunctional autophagy is reported in several pathological situations. Hence, autophagy plays an important role in both cellular homeostasis and diseased conditions. Autophagy can be studied through various techniques including fluorescence based microscopy. With the advancements of newer technologies in fluorescence microscopy, several novel processes of autophagy have been discovered which makes it an essential tool for autophagy research. Moreover, ability to tag fluorescent proteins with sub cellular targets has enabled us to evaluate autophagy processes in real time under fluorescent microscope. In this article, we demonstrate different aspects of autophagy in two different model organisms i.e. yeast and mammalian cells, with the help of fluorescence microscopy.

  19. Coherent Nonlinear Optical Imaging: Beyond Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Wei; Freudiger, Christian W.; Lu, Sijia; Xie, X. Sunney

    2012-01-01

    The quest for ultrahigh detection sensitivity with spectroscopic contrasts other than fluorescence has led to various novel approaches to optical microscopy of biological systems. Coherent nonlinear optical imaging, especially the recently developed nonlinear dissipation microscopy, including stimulated Raman scattering and two photon absorption, and pump-probe microscopy, including stimulated emission, excited state absorption and ground state depletion, provide distinct and powerful image contrasts for non-fluorescent species. Thanks to high-frequency modulation transfer scheme, they exhibit superb detection sensitivity. By directly interrogating vibrational and/or electronic energy levels of molecules, they offer high molecular specificity. Here we review the underlying principles, excitation and detection schemes, as well as exemplary biomedical applications of this emerging class of molecular imaging techniques. PMID:21453061

  20. Environmental scanning electron microscopy in cell biology.

    PubMed

    McGregor, J E; Staniewicz, L T L; Guthrie Neé Kirk, S E; Donald, A M

    2013-01-01

    Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) (1) is an imaging technique which allows hydrated, insulating samples to be imaged under an electron beam. The resolution afforded by this technique is higher than conventional optical microscopy but lower than conventional scanning electron microscopy (CSEM). The major advantage of the technique is the minimal sample preparation needed, making ESEM quick to use and the images less susceptible to the artifacts that the extensive sample preparation usually required for CSEM may introduce. Careful manipulation of both the humidity in the microscope chamber and the beam energy are nevertheless essential to prevent dehydration and beam damage artifacts. In some circumstances it is possible to image live cells in the ESEM (2).In the following sections we introduce the fundamental principles of ESEM imaging before presenting imaging protocols for plant epidermis, mammalian cells, and bacteria. In the first two cases samples are imaged using the secondary electron (topographic) signal, whereas a transmission technique is employed to image bacteria.

  1. Artifacts in single-molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Burgert, Anne; Letschert, Sebastian; Doose, Sören; Sauer, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy provides subdiffraction resolution images with virtually molecular resolution. Through the availability of commercial instruments and open-source reconstruction software, achieving super resolution is now public domain. However, despite its conceptual simplicity, localization microscopy remains prone to user errors. Using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, we investigate the impact of irradiation intensity, label density and photoswitching behavior on the distribution of membrane proteins in reconstructed super-resolution images. We demonstrate that high emitter densities in combination with inappropriate photoswitching rates give rise to the appearance of artificial membrane clusters. Especially, two-dimensional imaging of intrinsically three-dimensional membrane structures like microvilli, filopodia, overlapping membranes and vesicles with high local emitter densities is prone to generate artifacts. To judge the quality and reliability of super-resolution images, the single-molecule movies recorded to reconstruct the images have to be carefully investigated especially when investigating membrane organization and cluster analysis.

  2. Challenges in quantitative single molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shivanandan, A; Deschout, H; Scarselli, M; Radenovic, A

    2014-10-01

    Single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM), which can provide up to an order of magnitude improvement in spatial resolution over conventional fluorescence microscopy, has the potential to be a highly useful tool for quantitative biological experiments. It has already been used for this purpose in varied fields in biology, ranging from molecular biology to neuroscience. In this review article, we briefly review the applications of SMLM in quantitative biology, and also the challenges involved and some of the solutions that have been proposed. Due to its advantages in labeling specificity and the relatively low overcounting caused by photoblinking when photo-activable fluorescent proteins (PA-FPs) are used as labels, we focus specifically on Photo-Activated Localization Microscopy (PALM), even though the ideas presented might be applicable to SMLM in general. Also, we focus on the following three quantitative measurements: single molecule counting, analysis of protein spatial distribution heterogeneity and co-localization analysis.

  3. High-Throughput Nonlinear Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    So, Peter T.C.; Yew, Elijah Y.S.; Rowlands, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution microscopy methods based on different nonlinear optical (NLO) contrast mechanisms are finding numerous applications in biology and medicine. While the basic implementations of these microscopy methods are relatively mature, an important direction of continuing technological innovation lies in improving the throughput of these systems. Throughput improvement is expected to be important for studying fast kinetic processes, for enabling clinical diagnosis and treatment, and for extending the field of image informatics. This review will provide an overview of the fundamental limitations on NLO microscopy throughput. We will further cover several important classes of high-throughput NLO microscope designs with discussions on their strengths and weaknesses and their key biomedical applications. Finally, this review will close with a perspective of potential future technological improvements in this field. PMID:24359736

  4. Space station microscopy: Beyond the box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, N. R.; Pierson, Duane L.; Mishra, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Microscopy aboard Space Station Freedom poses many unique challenges for in-flight investigations. Disciplines such as material processing, plant and animal research, human reseach, enviromental monitoring, health care, and biological processing have diverse microscope requirements. The typical microscope not only does not meet the comprehensive needs of these varied users, but also tends to require excessive crew time. To assess user requirements, a comprehensive survey was conducted among investigators with experiments requiring microscopy. The survey examined requirements such as light sources, objectives, stages, focusing systems, eye pieces, video accessories, etc. The results of this survey and the application of an Intelligent Microscope Imaging System (IMIS) may address these demands for efficient microscopy service in space. The proposed IMIS can accommodate multiple users with varied requirements, operate in several modes, reduce crew time needed for experiments, and take maximum advantage of the restrictive data/ instruction transmission environment on Freedom.

  5. A near-field optical microscopy nanoarray

    SciTech Connect

    Semin, D.J.; Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M.; Kwller, A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Multiplexing near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) by the use of a nanoarray with parallel imaging is studied. The fabrication, characterization, and utilization of nanoarrays with {approximately} 100 nm diameter apertures spaced 500 nm center-to- center is presented. Extremely uniform nanoarrays with {approximately} 10{sup 8} apertures were fabricated by electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. The nanoarrays were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this paper we utilize these nanoarrays in a laser-illuminated microscope with parallel detection on a charge- coupled device (CCD). Detection of B-phycoerythrin (B-PE) molecules using near-field illumination is presented. In principle, our system can be used to obtain high lateral resolution NSOM images over a wide-field of view (e.g. 50-100 {mu}m) within seconds.

  6. Wet electron microscopy with quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Timp, Winston; Watson, Nicki; Sabban, Alon; Zik, Ory; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-09-01

    Wet electron microscopy (EM) is a new imaging method with the potential to allow higher spatial resolution of samples. In contrast to most EM methods, it requires little time to perform and does not require complicated equipment or difficult steps. We used this method on a common murine macrophage cell line, IC-21, in combination with various stains and preparations, to collect high resolution images of the actin cytoskeleton. Most importantly, we demonstrated the use of quantum dots in conjunction with this technique to perform light/electron correlation microscopy. We found that wet EM is a useful tool that fits into a niche between the simplicity of light microscopy and the high spatial resolution of EM.

  7. Light microscopy: an ongoing contemporary revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenburger, Siegfried; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2015-04-01

    The optical microscope is one of the oldest scientific instruments that is still used in forefront research. Ernst Abbe's nineteenth century formulation of the resolution limit in microscopy let generations of scientists believe that optical studies of individual molecules and resolving subwavelength structures were not feasible. The Nobel Prize in 2014 for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy marks a clear recognition that the old beliefs have to be revisited. In this article, we present a critical overview of various recent developments in optical microscopy. In addition to the popular super-resolution fluorescence methods, we discuss the prospects of various other techniques and imaging contrasts and consider some of the fundamental and practical challenges that lie ahead.

  8. Magnetic exchange force microscopy with atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Uwe; Schwarz, Alexander; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2007-03-29

    The ordering of neighbouring atomic magnetic moments (spins) leads to important collective phenomena such as ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism. A full understanding of magnetism on the nanometre scale therefore calls for information on the arrangement of spins in real space and with atomic resolution. Spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy accomplishes this but can probe only conducting materials. Force microscopy can be used on any sample independent of its conductivity. In particular, magnetic force microscopy is well suited to exploring ferromagnetic domain structures. However, atomic resolution cannot be achieved because data acquisition involves the sensing of long-range magnetostatic forces between tip and sample. Magnetic exchange force microscopy has been proposed for overcoming this limitation: by using an atomic force microscope with a magnetic tip, it should be possible to detect the short-range magnetic exchange force between tip and sample spins. Here we show for a prototypical antiferromagnetic insulator, the (001) surface of nickel oxide, that magnetic exchange force microscopy can indeed reveal the arrangement of both surface atoms and their spins simultaneously. In contrast with previous attempts to implement this method, we use an external magnetic field to align the magnetic polarization at the tip apex so as to optimize the interaction between tip and sample spins. This allows us to observe the direct magnetic exchange coupling between the spins of the tip atom and sample atom that are closest to each other, and thereby demonstrate the potential of magnetic exchange force microscopy for investigations of inter-spin interactions at the atomic level.

  9. Advanced Electron Microscopy in Materials Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Jarausch, K.

    2009-06-01

    Aberration correction has opened a new frontier in electron microscopy by overcoming the limitations of conventional round lenses, providing sub-angstrom-sized probes and extending information limits. The imaging and analytical performance of these corrector-equipped microscopes affords an unprecedented opportunity to study structure-property relationships of matter at the atomic scale. This new generation of microscopes is able to retrieve high-quality structural information comparable to neutron and synchrotron x-ray experiments, but with local atomic resolution. These advances in instrumentation are accelerating the research and development of various functional materials ranging from those for energy generation, conversion, transportation and storage to those for catalysis and nano-device applications. The dramatic improvements in electron-beam illumination and detection also present a host of new challenges for the interpretation and optimization of experiments. During 7-9 November 2007, a workshop, entitled 'Aberration Corrected Electron Microscopy in Material Physics', was convened at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratories (BNL) to address these opportunities and challenges. The workshop was co-sponsored by Hitachi High Technologies, a leader in electron microscopy instrumentation, and BNL's Institute of Advanced Electron Microscopy, a leader in materials physics research using electron microscopy. The workshop featured presentations by internationally prominent scientists working at the frontiers of electron microscopy, both on developing instrumentation and applying it in materials physics. The meeting, structured to stimulate scientific exchanges and explore new capabilities, brought together {approx}100 people from over 10 countries. This special issue complies many of the advances in instrument performance and materials physics reported by the invited speakers and attendees at the workshop.

  10. Observation of DNA Molecules Using Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    This article describes experiments for an undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory that aim to observe individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). dsDNA molecules are observed under several different conditions to discuss their chemical and physical properties. In…

  11. Widefield subsurface microscopy of integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Köklü, Fatih Hakan; Quesnel, Justin I; Vamivakas, Anthony N; Ippolito, Stephen B; Goldberg, Bennett B; Unlü, M Selim

    2008-06-23

    We apply the numerical aperture increasing lens technique to widefield subsurface imaging of silicon integrated circuits. We demonstrate lateral and longitudinal resolutions well beyond the limits of conventional backside imaging. With a simple infrared widefield microscope (lambda(0) = 1.2 microm), we demonstrate a lateral spatial resolution of 0.26 microm (0.22 lambda(0)) and a longitudinal resolution of 1.24 microm (1.03 lambda(0)) for backside imaging through the silicon substrate of an integrated circuit. We present a spatial resolution comparison between widefield and confocal microscopy, which are essential in integrated circuit analysis for emission and excitation microscopy, respectively.

  12. Super-resolution optical microscopy: multiple choices.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo

    2010-02-01

    The recent invention of super-resolution optical microscopy enables the visualization of fine features in biological samples with unprecedented clarity. It creates numerous opportunities in biology because vast amount of previously obscured subcellular processes now can be directly observed. Rapid development in this field in the past two years offers many imaging modalities that address different needs but they also complicates the choice of the 'perfect' method for answering a specific question. Here I will briefly describe the principles of super-resolution optical microscopy techniques and then focus on comparing their characteristics in various aspects of practical applications. PMID:19897404

  13. Electron Microscopy of Natural and Epitaxial Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posthill, J. B.; George, T.; Malta, D. P.; Humphreys, T. P.; Rudder, R. A.; Hudson, G. C.; Thomas, R. E.; Markunas, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiconducting diamond films have the potential for use as a material in which to build active electronic devices capable of operating at high temperatures or in high radiation environments. Ultimately, it is preferable to use low-defect-density single crystal diamond for device fabrication. We have previously investigated polycrystalline diamond films with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and homoepitaxial films with SEM-based techniques. This contribution describes some of our most recent observations of the microstructure of natural diamond single crystals and homoepitaxial diamond thin films using TEM.

  14. Super-Resolved Traction Force Microscopy (STFM).

    PubMed

    Colin-York, Huw; Shrestha, Dilip; Felce, James H; Waithe, Dominic; Moeendarbary, Emad; Davis, Simon J; Eggeling, Christian; Fritzsche, Marco

    2016-04-13

    Measuring small forces is a major challenge in cell biology. Here we improve the spatial resolution and accuracy of force reconstruction of the well-established technique of traction force microscopy (TFM) using STED microscopy. The increased spatial resolution of STED-TFM (STFM) allows a greater than 5-fold higher sampling of the forces generated by the cell than conventional TFM, accessing the nano instead of the micron scale. This improvement is highlighted by computer simulations and an activating RBL cell model system.

  15. Fidelity imaging for atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, Sayan Salapaka, Murti

    2015-01-05

    Atomic force microscopy is widely employed for imaging material at the nanoscale. However, real-time measures on image reliability are lacking in contemporary atomic force microscopy literature. In this article, we present a real-time technique that provides an image of fidelity for a high bandwidth dynamic mode imaging scheme. The fidelity images define channels that allow the user to have additional authority over the choice of decision threshold that facilitates where the emphasis is desired, on discovering most true features on the sample with the possible detection of high number of false features, or emphasizing minimizing instances of false detections. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of fidelity imaging.

  16. Simulation study of dual-space microscopy.

    PubMed

    Desai, Darshan B; Zhelyeznyakov, Maksym V; Alanzi, Shaima A S; Grave de Peralta, Luis

    2016-09-10

    We explore the convergence of the dual-space microscopy (DSM) phase-recovery algorithm. DSM is an optical microscopy technique based on simultaneous observation of an object in the position and momentum spaces. We present one-dimensional (1D) simulations of this technique, demonstrating that the DSM technique is capable to resolve periodic and nonperiodic structures with a resolution well below the Rayleigh resolution limit. Using a simple and faster 1D version of the full 2D DSM algorithm, we simulated the DSM technique for thousands of different samples. Our results demonstrate that the DSM algorithm always converges rapidly to the correct optical disturbance. PMID:27661365

  17. Reconstruction of electrostatic force microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassburg, E.; Boag, A.; Rosenwaks, Y.

    2005-08-01

    An efficient algorithm to restore the actual surface potential image from Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements of semiconductors is presented. The three-dimensional potential of the tip-sample system is calculated using an integral equation-based boundary element method combined with modeling the semiconductor by an equivalent dipole-layer and image-charge model. The derived point spread function of the measuring tip is then used to restore the actual surface potential from the measured image, using noise filtration and deconvolution algorithms. The model is then used to restore high-resolution Kelvin probe microscopy images of semiconductor surfaces.

  18. Active Pixel Sensors for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denes, P.; Bussat, J.-M.; Lee, Z.; Radmillovic, V.

    2007-09-01

    The technology used for monolithic CMOS imagers, popular for cell phone cameras and other photographic applications, has been explored for charged particle tracking by the high-energy physics community for several years. This technology also lends itself to certain imaging detector applications in electron microscopy. We have been developing such detectors for several years at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and we and others have shown that this technology can offer excellent point-spread function, direct detection and high readout speed. In this paper, we describe some of the design constraints peculiar to electron microscopy and summarize where such detectors could play a useful role.

  19. Acoustic microscopy in the food industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, N.; Povey, M.; Corona, E.; Benedito, J.; Parker, N.

    2012-12-01

    Acoustic microscopy has been used for many years to image and measure the elastic properties of materials across a wide range of scientific disciplines. However the application of this technique in the food industry is scarce. In this paper we outline the operation of a reflection-mode acoustic microscope and discuss some of the issues relevant to its operation in the food sector. We then present two relevant case studies in which we employ acoustic microscopy to analyse potato cells and the fat structure in Iberian ham and chorizo.

  20. Aberration corrected Lorentz scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    McVitie, S; McGrouther, D; McFadzean, S; MacLaren, D A; O'Shea, K J; Benitez, M J

    2015-05-01

    We present results from an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope which has been customised for high resolution quantitative Lorentz microscopy with the sample located in a magnetic field free or low field environment. We discuss the innovations in microscope instrumentation and additional hardware that underpin the imaging improvements in resolution and detection with a focus on developments in differential phase contrast microscopy. Examples from materials possessing nanometre scale variations in magnetisation illustrate the potential for aberration corrected Lorentz imaging as a tool to further our understanding of magnetism on this lengthscale.

  1. Multimodal CARS microscopy of structured carbohydrate biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Slepkov, Aaron D.; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pegoraro, Adrian F.; Moffatt, Douglas J.; Stolow, Albert

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy for the study of structured condensed carbohydrate systems. Simultaneous second-harmonic generation (SHG) and spectrally-scanned CARS microscopy was used to elucidate structure, alignment, and density in cellulose cotton fibers and in starch grains undergoing rapid heat-moisture swelling. Our results suggest that CARS response of the O-H stretch region (3000 cm−1–3400 cm−1), together with the commonly-measured C-H stretch (2750 cm−1–2970 cm−1) and SHG provide potentially important structural information and contrast in these materials. PMID:21258555

  2. Graphene-enabled electron microscopy and correlated super-resolution microscopy of wet cells.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Michal; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Moon, Seonah; Xu, Ke

    2015-06-11

    The application of electron microscopy to hydrated biological samples has been limited by high-vacuum operating conditions. Traditional methods utilize harsh and laborious sample dehydration procedures, often leading to structural artefacts and creating difficulties for correlating results with high-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Here, we utilize graphene, a single-atom-thick carbon meshwork, as the thinnest possible impermeable and conductive membrane to protect animal cells from vacuum, thus enabling high-resolution electron microscopy of wet and untreated whole cells with exceptional ease. Our approach further allows for facile correlative super-resolution and electron microscopy of wet cells directly on the culturing substrate. In particular, individual cytoskeletal actin filaments are resolved in hydrated samples through electron microscopy and well correlated with super-resolution results.

  3. Graphene-enabled electron microscopy and correlated super-resolution microscopy of wet cells

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Michal; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Moon, Seonah; Xu, Ke

    2015-01-01

    The application of electron microscopy to hydrated biological samples has been limited by high-vacuum operating conditions. Traditional methods utilize harsh and laborious sample dehydration procedures, often leading to structural artefacts and creating difficulties for correlating results with high-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Here, we utilize graphene, a single-atom-thick carbon meshwork, as the thinnest possible impermeable and conductive membrane to protect animal cells from vacuum, thus enabling high-resolution electron microscopy of wet and untreated whole cells with exceptional ease. Our approach further allows for facile correlative super-resolution and electron microscopy of wet cells directly on the culturing substrate. In particular, individual cytoskeletal actin filaments are resolved in hydrated samples through electron microscopy and well correlated with super-resolution results. PMID:26066680

  4. Dissecting tripartite synapses with STED microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Panatier, Aude; Arizono, Misa; Nägerl, U. Valentin

    2014-01-01

    The concept of the tripartite synapse reflects the important role that astrocytic processes are thought to play in the function and regulation of neuronal synapses in the mammalian nervous system. However, many basic aspects regarding the dynamic interplay between pre- and postsynaptic neuronal structures and their astrocytic partners remain to be explored. A major experimental hurdle has been the small physical size of the relevant glial and synaptic structures, leaving them largely out of reach for conventional light microscopic approaches such as confocal and two-photon microscopy. Hence, most of what we know about the organization of the tripartite synapse is based on electron microscopy, which does not lend itself to investigating dynamic events and which cannot be carried out in parallel with functional assays. The development and application of superresolution microscopy for neuron–glia research is opening up exciting experimental opportunities in this regard. In this paper, we provide a basic explanation of the theory and operation of stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, outlining the potential of this recent superresolution imaging modality for advancing our understanding of the morpho-functional interactions between astrocytes and neurons that regulate synaptic physiology. PMID:25225091

  5. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A; Berer, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  6. Microscopy of single-layer carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Su; Zhou, Dan

    1994-07-01

    Single-layer carbon nanotubes produced with yttrium carbide as catalyst have been studied with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The morphology, condition of iamging and the method of measurement to determine the actual diameter of a single-layer carbon nanotube have been detailed and the growth mechanism of single-layer carbon nanotubes has been discussed in this research.

  7. Dark-field differential dynamic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bayles, Alexandra V; Squires, Todd M; Helgeson, Matthew E

    2016-02-28

    Differential dynamic microscopy (DDM) is an emerging technique to measure the ensemble dynamics of colloidal and complex fluid motion using optical microscopy in systems that would otherwise be difficult to measure using other methods. To date, DDM has successfully been applied to linear space invariant imaging modes including bright-field, fluorescence, confocal, polarised, and phase-contrast microscopy to study diverse dynamic phenomena. In this work, we show for the first time how DDM analysis can be extended to dark-field imaging, i.e. a linear space variant (LSV) imaging mode. Specifically, we present a particle-based framework for describing dynamic image correlations in DDM, and use it to derive a correction to the image structure function obtained by DDM that accounts for scatterers with non-homogeneous intensity distributions as they move within the imaging plane. To validate the analysis, we study the Brownian motion of gold nanoparticles, whose plasmonic structure allows for nanometer-scale particles to be imaged under dark-field illumination, in Newtonian liquids. We find that diffusion coefficients of the nanoparticles can be reliably measured by dark-field DDM, even under optically dense concentrations where analysis via multiple-particle tracking microrheology fails. These results demonstrate the potential for DDM analysis to be applied to linear space variant forms of microscopy, providing access to experimental systems unavailable to other imaging modes. PMID:26822331

  8. Microscopy using source and detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Castello, Marco; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Duocastella, Martí; Diaspro, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    There are basically two types of microscope, which we call conventional and scanning. The former type is a full-field imaging system. In the latter type, the object is illuminated with a probe beam, and a signal detected. We can generalize the probe to a patterned illumination. Similarly we can generalize the detection to a patterned detection. Combining these we get a range of different modalities: confocal microscopy, structured illumination (with full-field imaging), spinning disk (with multiple illumination points), and so on. The combination allows the spatial frequency bandwidth of the system to be doubled. In general we can record a four dimensional (4D) image of a 2D object (or a 6D image from a 3D object, using an acoustic tuneable lens). The optimum way to directly reconstruct the resulting image is by image scanning microscopy (ISM). But the 4D image is highly redundant, so deconvolution-based approaches are also relevant. ISM can be performed in fluorescence, bright field or interference microscopy. Several different implementations have been described, with associated advantages and disadvantages. In two-photon microscopy, the illumination and detection point spread functions are very different. This is also the case when using pupil filters or when there is a large Stokes shift.

  9. Light Microscopy Module (LMM)-Emulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Howard G.; Smith, Trent M.; Richards, Stephanie E.

    2016-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is a microscope facility developed at Glenn Research Center (GRC) that provides researchers with powerful imaging capability onboard the International Space Station (ISS). LMM has the ability to have its hardware recongured on-orbit to accommodate a wide variety of investigations, with the capability of remotely acquiring and downloading digital images across multiple levels of magnication.

  10. Selective plane illumination microscopy on a chip.

    PubMed

    Paiè, Petra; Bragheri, Francesca; Bassi, Andrea; Osellame, Roberto

    2016-04-26

    Selective plane illumination microscopy can image biological samples at a high spatiotemporal resolution. Complex sample preparation and system alignment normally limit the throughput of the method. Using femtosecond laser micromachining, we created an integrated optofluidic device that allows obtaining continuous flow imaging, three-dimensional reconstruction and high-throughput analysis of large multicellular spheroids at a subcellular resolution.

  11. Confocal microscopy imaging of solid tissue

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a technique that is capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer acquired images as a virtual 3-dimensional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning ...

  12. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: AXIAL RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: Axial resolution.
    Robert M. Zucker, PhD

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  13. Spatial resolution in vector potential photoelectron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, R.

    2014-03-15

    The experimental spatial resolution of vector potential photoelectron microscopy is found to be much higher than expected because of the cancellation of one of the expected contributions to the point spread function. We present a new calculation of the spatial resolution with support from finite element ray tracing, and experimental results.

  14. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A; Berer, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain.

  15. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH).

  16. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A.; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  17. Value of Reflected Light Microscopy in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasteris, Jill Dill

    1983-01-01

    Briefly reviews some optical and other physical properties of minerals that can be determined in reflected/incident light. Topics include optical properties of minerals, reflectance, internal reflections, color, bireflectance and reflection pleochroism, anisotropism, zonation, and reflected light microscopy as a teaching tool in undergraduate…

  18. Low voltage transmission electron microscopy of graphene.

    PubMed

    Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Zhao, Jiong; Gorantla, Sandeep Madhukar; Martinez, Ignacio Guillermo Gonzalez; Wiedermann, Jerzy; Lee, Changgu; Eckert, Juergen; Rummeli, Mark Hermann

    2015-02-01

    The initial isolation of graphene in 2004 spawned massive interest in this two-dimensional pure sp(2) carbon structure due to its incredible electrical, optical, mechanical, and thermal effects. This in turn led to the rapid development of various characterization tools for graphene. Examples include Raman spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. However, the one tool with the greatest prowess for characterizing and studying graphene is the transmission electron microscope. State-of-the-art (scanning) transmission electron microscopes enable one to image graphene with atomic resolution, and also to conduct various other characterizations simultaneously. The advent of aberration correctors was timely in that it allowed transmission electron microscopes to operate with reduced acceleration voltages, so that damage to graphene is avoided while still providing atomic resolution. In this comprehensive review, a brief introduction is provided to the technical aspects of transmission electron microscopes relevant to graphene. The reader is then introduced to different specimen preparation techniques for graphene. The different characterization approaches in both transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy are then discussed, along with the different aspects of electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The use of graphene for other electron microscopy approaches such as in-situ investigations is also presented.

  19. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augspurger, Ashley E.; Stender, Anthony S.; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Fang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also…

  20. The rapidly changing face of electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, John Meurig; Leary, Rowan K.; Eggeman, Alexander S.; Midgley, Paul A.

    2015-07-01

    This short but wide-ranging review is intended to convey to chemical physicists and others engaged in the interfaces between solid-state chemistry and solid-state physics the growing power and extensive applicability of multiple facets of the technique of electron microscopy.

  1. Scanning Probe Microscopy of Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Obadiah G.

    Nanostructured composites of organic semiconductors are a promising class of materials for the manufacture of low-cost solar cells. Understanding how the nanoscale morphology of these materials affects their efficiency as solar energy harvesters is crucial to their eventual potential for large-scale deployment for primary power generation. In this thesis we describe the use of optoelectronic scanning-probe based microscopy methods to study this efficiency-structure relationship with nanoscale resolution. In particular, our objective is to make spatially resolved measurements of each step in the power conversion process from photons to an electric current, including charge generation, transport, and recombination processes, and correlate them with local device structure. We have achieved two aims in this work: first, to develop and apply novel electrically sensitive scanning probe microscopy experiments to study the optoelectronic materials and processes discussed above; and second, to deepen our understanding of the physics underpinning our experimental techniques. In the first case, we have applied conductive-, and photoconductive atomic force (cAFM & pcAFM) microscopy to measure both local photocurrent collection and dark charge transport properties in a variety of model and novel organic solar cell composites, including polymer/fullerene blends, and polymer-nanowire/fullerene blends, finding that local heterogeneity is the rule, and that improvements in the uniformity of specific beneficial nanostructures could lead to large increases in efficiency. We have used scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) and time resolved-electrostatic force microscopy (trEFM) to characterize all-polymer blends, quantifying their sensitivity to photochemical degradation and the subsequent formation of local charge traps. We find that while trEFM provides a sensitive measure of local quantum efficiency, SKPM is generally unsuited to measurements of efficiency, less sensitive than tr

  2. NMR Microscopy - Micron-Level Resolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Wing-Chi Edmund

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been developed into a powerful and widely used diagnostic tool since the invention of techniques using linear magnetic field gradients in 1973. The variety of imaging contrasts obtainable in MRI, such as spin density, relaxation times and flow rate, gives MRI a significant advantage over other imaging techniques. For common diagnostic applications, image resolutions have been in the order of millimeters with slice thicknesses in centimeters. For many research applications, however, resolutions in the order of tens of microns or smaller are needed. NMR Imaging in these high resolution disciplines is known as NMR microscopy. Compared with conventional microscopy, NMR microscopy has the advantage of being non-invasive and non-destructive. The major obstacles of NMR microscopy are low signal-to-noise ratio and effects due to spin diffusion. To overcome these difficulties, more sensitive RF probes and very high magnetic field gradients have to be used. The most effective way to increase sensitivity is to build smaller probes. Microscope probes of different designs have been built and evaluated. Magnetic field gradient coils that can produce linear field gradients up to 450 Gauss/cm were also assembled. In addition, since microscope probes often employ remote capacitors for RF tuning, the associated signal loss in the transmission line was studied. Imaging experiments have been carried out in a 2.1 Tesla small bore superconducting magnet using the typical two-dimensional spin warp imaging technique. Images have been acquired for both biological and non-biological samples. The highest resolution was obtained in an image of a nerve bundle from the spinal cord of a racoon and has an in-plane resolution of 4 microns. These experiments have demonstrated the potential application of NMR microscopy to pathological research, nervous system study and non -destructive testings of materials. One way to further improve NMR microscopy is

  3. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Adelaide; Martins, Marco; De Beule, Pieter A A

    2015-09-01

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate.

  4. Atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy on the cytoskeleton of permeabilised and embedded cells.

    PubMed

    Meller, Karl; Theiss, Carsten

    2006-03-01

    We describe a technical method of cell permeabilisation and embedding to study the organisation and distribution of intracellular proteins with aid of atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy in identical areas. While confocal laser scanning microscopy is useful for the identification of certain proteins subsequent labelling with markers or antibodies, atomic force microscopy allows the observation of macromolecular structures in fixed and living cells. To demonstrate the field of application of this preparatory technique, cells were permeabilised, fixed, and the actin cytoskeleton was stained with phalloidin-rhodamine. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to show the organisation of these microfilaments, e.g. geodesic dome structures. Thereafter, cells were embedded in Durcupan water-soluble resin, followed by UV-polymerisation of resin at 4 degrees C. This procedure allowed intracellular visualisation of the cell nucleus or cytoskeletal elements by atomic force microscopy, for instance to analyse the globular organisation of actin filaments. Therefore, this method offers a great potential to combine both microscopy techniques in order to understand and interpret intracellular protein relations, for example, the biochemical and morphological interaction of the cytoskeleton. PMID:16360280

  5. Traditional microscopy instruction versus process-oriented virtual microscopy instruction: a naturalistic experiment with control group

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Virtual microscopy is being introduced in medical education as an approach for learning how to interpret information in microscopic specimens. It is, however, far from evident how to incorporate its use into existing teaching practice. The aim of the study was to explore the consequences of introducing virtual microscopy tasks into an undergraduate pathology course in an attempt to render the instruction more process-oriented. The research questions were: 1) How is virtual microscopy perceived by students? 2) Does work on virtual microscopy tasks contribute to improvement in performance in microscopic pathology in comparison with attending assistant-led demonstrations only? Method During a one-week period, an experimental group completed three sets of virtual microscopy homework assignments in addition to attending demonstrations. A control group attended the demonstrations only. Performance in microscopic pathology was measured by a pre-test and a post-test. Student perceptions of regular instruction and virtual microscopy were collected one month later by administering the Inventory of Intrinsic Motivation and open-ended questions. Results The students voiced an appreciation for virtual microscopy for the purposes of the course and for self-study. As for learning gains, the results indicated that learning was speeded up in a subgroup of students consisting of conscientious high achievers. Conclusions The enriched instruction model may be suited as such for elective courses following the basic course. However, the instructional model needs further development to be suited for basic courses. PMID:21489203

  6. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Adelaide; Martins, Marco; De Beule, Pieter A A

    2015-09-01

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate. PMID:26429446

  7. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A. A.

    2015-09-15

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate.

  8. Phase and fluorescence imaging by combination of digital holographic microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Xiangyu; Nitta, Kouichi; Matoba, Osamu; Xia, Peng; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2015-04-01

    Hybrid digital holographic microscopy that combines fluorescence microscopy and digital holographic microscopy into a single system for biological applications is proposed. In the proposed system, a phase image and a fluorescence image can be obtained simultaneously by selecting the different wavelengths of the fluorescent light and the phase measurement. Especially for biological applications, the cell structure can be obtained by the phase imaging based on digital holography and nucleus of the cell can be obtained by the fluorescence imaging. The measurement of fluorescence beads and egera densa presented the feasibility of simultaneous detection of both a phase image and a fluorescence image.

  9. Investigation of the depletion layer by scanning capacitance force microscopy with Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uruma, Takeshi; Satoh, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hidekazu

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a scanning probe microscope (SPM) that combines atomic force microscopy (AFM) with both Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM — to measure the surface potential) and scanning capacitance force microscopy (SCFM — to measure the differential capacitance). The surface physical characteristics of a commercial Si Schottky barrier diode (Si-SBD), with and without an applied reverse bias, were measured over the same area by our AFM/KFM/SCFM system. We thus investigated the discrete power device by calculating the depletion-layer width and drawing an energy-band diagram.

  10. Photoemission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum's magnetosome chains.

    PubMed

    Keutner, Christoph; von Bohlen, Alex; Berges, Ulf; Espeter, Philipp; Schneider, Claus M; Westphal, Carsten

    2014-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are of great interdisciplinary interest, since a vast field of applications from magnetic recording media to medical nanorobots is conceivable. A key feature for a further understanding is the detailed knowledge about the magnetosome chain within the bacteria. We report on two preparation procedures suitable for UHV experiments in reflective geometry. Further, we present the results of scanning electron microscopy, as well as the first photoemission electron microscopy experiments, both accessing the magnetosomes within intact magnetotactic bacteria and compare these to scanning electron microscopy data from the literature. From the images, we can clearly identify individual magnetosomes within their chains.

  11. Correlative atomic force microscopy and localization-based super-resolution microscopy: revealing labelling and image reconstruction artefacts.

    PubMed

    Monserrate, Aitor; Casado, Santiago; Flors, Cristina

    2014-03-17

    Hybrid microscopy: A correlative microscopy tool that combines in situ super-resolution fluorescence microscopy based on single-molecule localization and atomic force microscopy is presented. Direct comparison with high- resolution topography allows the authors to improve fluorescence labeling and image analysis in super-resolution imaging.

  12. Reconstruction in interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy: comparison with optical coherence tomography and digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Colin J R; Kou, Shan Shan; Depeursinge, Christian

    2012-03-01

    It is shown that the spatial frequencies recorded in interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy do not correspond to exact backscattering [as they do in unistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR)] and that the reconstruction process based on SAR is therefore based on an approximation. The spatial frequency response is developed based on the three-dimensional coherent transfer function approach and compared with that in optical coherence tomography and digital holographic microscopy.

  13. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bench, Graham S.; Balhorn, Rod; Friz, Alexander M.

    1995-05-01

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  14. Stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Wei; Freudiger, Christian W.; Lu, Sijia; He, Chengwei; Kang, Jing X.; Xie, X. Sunney

    2009-02-01

    Label-free chemical contrast is highly desirable in biomedical imaging. Spontaneous Raman microscopy provides specific vibrational signatures of chemical bonds, but is often hindered by low sensitivity. Here we report a 3D multi-photon vibrational imaging technique based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). The sensitivity of SRS is significantly greater than that of spontaneous Raman scattering, and is further enhanced by high-frequency (MHz) phase-sensitive detection. SRS microscopy has a major advantage over previous coherent Raman techniques in that it offers background-free and easily interpretable chemical contrast. We show a variety of biomedical applications, such as differentiating distributions of omega-3 fatty acids and saturated lipids in living cells, imaging of brain and skin tissues based on intrinsic lipid contrast.

  15. Frictional microscopy of polymers and nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotomin, S. V.; Ezhov, A. A.; Sollogoub, C.; Yarikov, D.

    2014-05-01

    The mechanical and frictional properties of polystyrene, polymethylmethacrylate and nanocomposites with montmorillonite were studied by using the microindentation technique and frictional microscopy. The micromechanical tests revealed a decrease in the modulus and microhardness of the composite compared with those of a neat polystyrene, with a minimum of their values at 1-3 wt.% of the filler, but a local maximum of the tensile modulus of the filled polymer arose and increased at the same filler concentration. The frictional microscopy revealed anisotropy of the friction coefficient of the nanocomposite and to its noticeable dependence on the content of the filler. The maximum value of the friction coefficient was also reached at 1-3 wt.% of the filler and corresponds to the greatest degree of interplanar distance in the layered silicate and to minimum microhardness and elastic modulus of the composite surface.

  16. Circumventing photodamage in live-cell microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Magidson, Valentin; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool in cell biology. This technique allows researchers to visualize the dynamics of tissue, cells, individual organelles and macromolecular assemblies inside the cell. Unfortunately, fluorescence microscopy is not completely ‘non-invasive’ as the high-intensity excitation light required for excitation of fluorophores is inherently toxic for live cells. Physiological changes induced by excessive illumination can lead to artifacts and abnormal responses. In this chapter we review major factors that contribute to phototoxicity and discuss practical solutions for circumventing photodamage. These solutions include the proper choice of image acquisition parameters, optimization of filter sets, hardware synchronization, and the use of intelligent illumination to avoid unnecessary light exposure. PMID:23931522

  17. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G.S.; Balhorn, R.; Friz, A.M.; Freeman, S.P.H.T.

    1994-09-28

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  18. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by inmore » this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.« less

  19. Comparative microscopy study of Vibrio cholerae flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konnov, Nikolai P.; Baiburin, Vil B.; Zadnova, Svetlana P.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    1999-06-01

    A fine structure of bacteria flagella is an important problem of molecular cell biology. Bacteria flagella are the self-assembled structures that allow to use the flagellum protein in a number of biotechnological applications. However, at present, there is a little information about high resolution scanning probe microscopy study of flagellum structure, in particular, about investigation of Vibrio cholerae flagella. In our lab have been carried out the high resolution comparative investigation of V. cholerae flagella by means of various microscopes: tunneling (STM), scanning force (SFM) and electron transmission. As a scanning probe microscope is used designed in our lab versatile SPM with replaceable measuring heads. Bacteria were grown, fixed and treated according to the conventional techniques. For STM investigations samples were covered with Pt/Ir thin films by rotated vacuum evaporation, in SFM investigations were used uncovered samples. Electron microscopy of the negatively stained bacteria was used as a test procedure.

  20. Exploring the living cochlea using confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ulfendahl, Mats; Boutet de Monvel, Jacques; Le Calvez, Sophie

    2002-01-01

    To obtain a more integrated view of the cellular behaviour of the cochlea it is essential to observe not only wider regions of the exposed turns but also to visualize structures below the reticular lamina. Using confocal microscopy and in vitro preparations of guinea pig and mouse inner ears, cellular structures within the intact organ of Corti can be visualized at high resolution. The approach thus offers a means to investigate detailed cellular events, e.g. structural reorganization following acoustic overstimulation. Confocal microscope images, although sharper than images acquired using regular light microscopy, are still subject to problems related to light scattering within the optical system and low signal-to-noise ratio. Significant image restoration can, however, be obtained by applying a combination of wavelet denoising techniques and deconvolution algorithms. Future work will focus both on more dynamical cellular events and on new in vivo models where the inner ear is visualized at a better functional state.

  1. Fast interferometric second harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Couture, Charles-André; Légaré, Katherine; Pinsard, Maxime; Rivard, Maxime; Brown, Cameron; Légaré, François

    2016-01-01

    We report the implementation of fast Interferometric Second Harmonic Generation (I-SHG) microscopy to study the polarity of non-centrosymmetric structures in biological tissues. Using a sample quartz plate, we calibrate the spatially varying phase shift introduced by the laser scanning system. Compensating this phase shift allows us to retrieve the correct phase distribution in periodically poled lithium niobate, used as a model sample. Finally, we used fast interferometric second harmonic generation microscopy to acquire phase images in tendon. Our results show that the method exposed here, using a laser scanning system, allows to recover the polarity of collagen fibrils, similarly to standard I-SHG (using a sample scanning system), but with an imaging time about 40 times shorter. PMID:26977349

  2. Multiscale photoacoustic microscopy and computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is probably the fastest growing biomedical imaging technology owing to its capability of high-resolution sensing of rich optical contrast in vivo at depths beyond the optical transport mean free path (~1 mm in the skin). Existing high-resolution optical imaging technologies, such as confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, have fundamentally impacted biomedicine but cannot reach such depths. Taking advantage of low ultrasonic scattering, PAT indirectly improves tissue transparency by 100 to 1000 fold and consequently enables deeply penetrating functional and molecular imaging at high spatial resolution. Further, PAT holds the promise of in vivo imaging at multiple length scales ranging from subcellular organelles to organs with the same contrast origin, an important application in multiscale systems biology research. PMID:20161535

  3. Resonance response of scanning force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.Y.; Warmack, R.J.; Thundat, T.; Allison, D.P. ); Huang, A. )

    1994-08-01

    A variational method is used to calculate the deflection and the fundamental and harmonic resonance frequencies of commercial V-shaped and rectangular atomic force microscopy cantilevers. The effective mass of V-shaped cantilevers is roughly half that calculated for the equivalent rectangular cantilevers. Damping by environmental gases, including air, nitrogen, argon, and helium, affects the frequency of maximum response and to a much greater degree the quality factor [ital Q]. Helium has the lowest viscosity, resulting in the highest [ital Q], and thus provides the best sensitivity in noncontact force microscopy. Damping in liquids is dominated by an increase in effective mass of the cantilever due to an added mass of the liquid being dragged with that cantilever.

  4. Confocal multiview light-sheet microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Gustavo de; Norlin, Nils; Gunther, Stefan; Albert, Marvin; Panavaite, Laura; Fiuza, Ulla-Maj; Peri, Francesca; Hiiragi, Takashi; Krzic, Uros; Hufnagel, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Selective-plane illumination microscopy has proven to be a powerful imaging technique due to its unsurpassed acquisition speed and gentle optical sectioning. However, even in the case of multiview imaging techniques that illuminate and image the sample from multiple directions, light scattering inside tissues often severely impairs image contrast. Here we combine multiview light-sheet imaging with electronic confocal slit detection implemented on modern camera sensors. In addition to improved imaging quality, the electronic confocal slit detection doubles the acquisition speed in multiview setups with two opposing illumination directions allowing simultaneous dual-sided illumination. Confocal multiview light-sheet microscopy eliminates the need for specimen-specific data fusion algorithms, streamlines image post-processing, easing data handling and storage. PMID:26602977

  5. Advances in Light Microscopy for Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Wilt, Brian A.; Burns, Laurie D.; Ho, Eric Tatt Wei; Ghosh, Kunal K.; Mukamel, Eran A.

    2010-01-01

    Since the work of Golgi and Cajal, light microscopy has remained a key tool for neuroscientists to observe cellular properties. Ongoing advances have enabled new experimental capabilities using light to inspect the nervous system across multiple spatial scales, including ultrastructural scales finer than the optical diffraction limit. Other progress permits functional imaging at faster speeds, at greater depths in brain tissue, and over larger tissue volumes than previously possible. Portable, miniaturized fluorescence microscopes now allow brain imaging in freely behaving mice. Complementary progress on animal preparations has enabled imaging in head-restrained behaving animals, as well as time-lapse microscopy studies in the brains of live subjects. Mouse genetic approaches permit mosaic and inducible fluorescence-labeling strategies, whereas intrinsic contrast mechanisms allow in vivo imaging of animals and humans without use of exogenous markers. This review surveys such advances and highlights emerging capabilities of particular interest to neuroscientists. PMID:19555292

  6. RECENT PROGRESS IN MULTIFOCAL MULTIPHOTON MICROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    LIU, LIXIN; SHAO, YONGHONG; NIU, HANBEN

    2013-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) has recently become an important tool in biomedicine for performing three-dimensional fast fluorescence imaging. Using various beamsplitting techniques, MMM splits the near-infrared laser beam into multiple beamlets and produces a multifocal array on the sample for parallel multiphoton excitation and then records fluorescence signal from all foci simultaneously with an area array detector, which significantly improves the imaging speed of multiphoton microscopy and allows for high efficiency in use of the excitation light. In this paper, we discuss the features of several MMM setups using different beamsplitting devices, including a Nipkow spinning disk, a microlens array, a set of beamsplitting mirrors, or a diffractive optical element (DOE). In particular, we present our recent work on the development of an MMM using a spatial light modulator (SLM). PMID:24363782

  7. Camera array based light field microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xing; Wu, Jiamin; Zheng, Guoan; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for high-resolution light field microscopy imaging by using a camera array. In this approach, we apply a two-stage relay system for expanding the aperture plane of the microscope into the size of an imaging lens array, and utilize a sensor array for acquiring different sub-apertures images formed by corresponding imaging lenses. By combining the rectified and synchronized images from 5 × 5 viewpoints with our prototype system, we successfully recovered color light field videos for various fast-moving microscopic specimens with a spatial resolution of 0.79 megapixels at 30 frames per second, corresponding to an unprecedented data throughput of 562.5 MB/s for light field microscopy. We also demonstrated the use of the reported platform for different applications, including post-capture refocusing, phase reconstruction, 3D imaging, and optical metrology. PMID:26417490

  8. Confocal Raman Microscopy in Pharmaceutical Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefele, Thomas F.; Paulus, Kurt

    There is a wide range of applications of confocal Raman microscopy in pharmaceutical development. It is a powerful tool to probe the distribution of components within a formulation, to characterize homogeneity of pharmaceutical samples, to determine solid state of drug substances and excipients and to characterize contaminations and foreign particulates. The information obtained by confocal Raman microscopy is extremely useful, sometimes even crucial, for drug substance design, for the development of solid and liquid formulations, as a tool for process analytics and for patent infringements and counterfeit analysis. In this chapter, those aspects and applications will be presented, focusing on solid drug formulations. This chapter will also reveal the advantages and demonstrate the synergies of Raman mapping as compared to similar imaging methods such as SEM/EDX, NIR and MIR imaging.

  9. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  10. Three-Dimensional Reflectance Traction Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher A. R.; Groves, Nicholas Scott; Sun, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Cells in three-dimensional (3D) environments exhibit very different biochemical and biophysical phenotypes compared to the behavior of cells in two-dimensional (2D) environments. As an important biomechanical measurement, 2D traction force microscopy can not be directly extended into 3D cases. In order to quantitatively characterize the contraction field, we have developed 3D reflectance traction microscopy which combines confocal reflection imaging and partial volume correlation postprocessing. We have measured the deformation field of collagen gel under controlled mechanical stress. We have also characterized the deformation field generated by invasive breast cancer cells of different morphologies in 3D collagen matrix. In contrast to employ dispersed tracing particles or fluorescently-tagged matrix proteins, our methods provide a label-free, computationally effective strategy to study the cell mechanics in native 3D extracellular matrix. PMID:27304456

  11. Differential dynamic microscopy for anisotropic colloidal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Reufer, Mathias; Martinez, Vincent A; Schurtenberger, Peter; Poon, Wilson C K

    2012-03-13

    Differential dynamic microscopy (DDM) is a low-cost, high-throughput technique recently developed for characterizing the isotropic diffusion of spherical colloids using white-light optical microscopy. (1) We develop the theory for applying DDM to probe the dynamics of anisotropic colloidal samples such as various ordered phases, or particles interacting with an external field. The q-dependent dynamics can be measured in any direction in the image plane. We demonstrate the method on a dilute aqueous dispersion of anisotropic magnetic particles (hematite) aligned in a magnetic field. The measured diffusion coefficients parallel and perpendicular to the field direction are in good agreement with theoretical values. We show how these measurements allow us to extract the orientational order parameter S(2) of the system.

  12. Thiobacillus ferrooxidans detection using immunoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Coto, O; Fernández, A I; León, T; Rodríguez, D

    1992-11-01

    A specific, fast and very sensitive immunoelectron microscopy method was developed to morphologically and serologically distinguish different cultures of iron oxidizers. Bacteria isolated from the acidic waters of "Matahambre" and "Mina Delita" mines (Cuba) were characterized. An antiserum specific to Thiobacillus ferrooxidans did not react with other bacteria also present in the acidic waters of mine drainage. Our results suggest the occurrence of some strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, Thiobacillus thiooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans in these waters.

  13. Comprehensive volumetric confocal microscopy with adaptive focusing

    PubMed Central

    Kang, DongKyun; Yoo, Hongki; Jillella, Priyanka; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive microscopy of distal esophagus could greatly improve the screening and surveillance of esophageal diseases such as Barrett’s esophagus by providing histomorphologic information over the entire region at risk. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a high-speed reflectance confocal microscopy technology that can be configured to image the entire distal esophagus by helically scanning the beam using optics within a balloon-centering probe. It is challenging to image the human esophagus in vivo with balloon-based SECM, however, because patient motion and anatomic tissue surface irregularities decenter the optics, making it difficult to keep the focus at a predetermined location within the tissue as the beam is scanned. In this paper, we present a SECM probe equipped with an adaptive focusing mechanism that can compensate for tissue surface irregularity and dynamic focal variation. A tilted arrangement of the objective lens is employed in the SECM probe to provide feedback signals to an adaptive focusing mechanism. The tilted configuration also allows the probe to obtain reflectance confocal data from multiple depth levels, enabling the acquisition of three-dimensional volumetric data during a single scan of the probe. A tissue phantom with a surface area of 12.6 cm2 was imaged using the new SECM probe, and 8 large-area reflectance confocal microscopy images were acquired over the depth range of 56 μm in 20 minutes. Large-area SECM images of excised swine small intestine tissue were also acquired, enabling the visualization of villous architecture, epithelium, and lamina propria. The adaptive focusing mechanism was demonstrated to enable acquisition of in-focus images even when the probe was not centered and the tissue surface was irregular. PMID:21698005

  14. Carbon studies by scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Applications of in situ and ex situ scanning probe microscopy (SPM) are described. Scanning probe microscopic methods are based on monitoring the interaction between a tip and substrate. SPM has been used to study various aspects of carbon behavior, including modification of the highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface and its users as an electrode. The surface morphology of other forms of carbon, such as carbon black, carbon fibrils, and coal are also studied. Pit formation by thermal gasification of HOPG occurs by a nucleation and lateral growth mechanism. Effects of different surface treatments on pit nucleation are studied by SPM and other methods for reproducible pit production. Characterization of surface properties on the basal and edge planes show effects of thermal treatment. Measurements of the monolayer pit depth show variation with experimental conditions. The electrodeposition and stripping of lead on pitted HOPG has been studied by in situ and ex situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Pb deposits preferentially formed at step and pit edges and resembles crystallite growth on a microelectrode disk. The author discusses effects of tip potential on deposition during in situ STM. After stripping, scanning microscopy and XPS indicated that residual Pb species remained on the surface. The selective etching of recessed features of various shapes in HOPG in air was accomplished using STM. Etching of the surface was restricted to the scan area and only occurred with positive biases. Lines with widths as small as 10 nm and squares 25 [times] 25 nm could be formed with monolayer depth (0.34 nm) in the HOPG. Electrochemical STM was used to study in situ the early stages of polyaniline film growth on pitted HOPG. The mechanism of polymerization was studied using three different potential schemes. A growth mechanism for polyaniline on an HOPG electrode is proposed.

  15. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    SciTech Connect

    Augspurger, Ashley E; Stender, Anthony S; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J; Fang, Ning

    2014-06-10

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also observe and measure individual crystal growth during a replacement reaction between copper and silver nitrate. The experiment allows for quantitative, qualitative, and image data analyses for undergraduate students.

  16. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  17. Application perspectives of localization microscopy in virology.

    PubMed

    Cremer, C; Kaufmann, R; Gunkel, M; Polanski, F; Müller, P; Dierkes, R; Degenhard, S; Wege, C; Hausmann, M; Birk, U

    2014-07-01

    Localization microscopy approaches allowing an optical resolution down to the single-molecule level in fluorescence-labeled biostructures have already found a variety of applications in cell biology, as well as in virology. Here, we focus on some perspectives of a special localization microscopy embodiment, spectral precision distance/position determination microscopy (SPDM). SPDM permits the use of conventional fluorophores or fluorescent proteins together with standard sample preparation conditions employing an aqueous buffered milieu and typically monochromatic excitation. This allowed superresolution imaging and studies on the aggregation state of modified tobacco mosaic virus particles on the nanoscale with a single-molecule localization accuracy of better than 8 nm, using standard fluorescent dyes in the visible spectrum. To gain a better understanding of cell entry mechanisms during influenza A virus infection, SPDM was used in conjunction with algorithms for distance and cluster analyses to study changes in the distribution of virus particles themselves or in the distribution of infection-related proteins, the hepatocyte growth factor receptors, in the cell membrane on the single-molecule level. Not requiring TIRF (total internal reflection) illumination, SPDM was also applied to study the molecular arrangement of gp36.5/m164 glycoprotein (essentially associated with murine cytomegalovirus infection) in the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear membrane inside cells with single-molecule resolution. On the basis of the experimental evidence so far obtained, we finally discuss additional application perspectives of localization microscopy approaches for the fast detection and identification of viruses by multi-color SPDM and combinatorial oligonucleotide fluorescence in situ hybridization, as well as SPDM techniques for optimization of virus-based nanotools and biodetection devices.

  18. Analytical transmission electron microscopy in minerals processing

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, H.L.; Hsieh, K.C.; Twigg, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    A review of the possibilities of performing microchemical analysis in thin sections using a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy of x-rays is given. Particular attention is paid to the factors that limit accurate analysis at the highest spatial resolution. As an example of the use of these techniques applied to a potential problem in minerals processing, the identification of pyrite and pyrrhotite particles in Illinois, Herrin number 6 coal is presented.

  19. Energy dissipation in multifrequency atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pukhova, Valentina; Banfi, Francesco; Ferrini, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    The instantaneous displacement, velocity and acceleration of a cantilever tip impacting onto a graphite surface are reconstructed. The total dissipated energy and the dissipated energy per cycle of each excited flexural mode during the tip interaction is retrieved. The tip dynamics evolution is studied by wavelet analysis techniques that have general relevance for multi-mode atomic force microscopy, in a regime where few cantilever oscillation cycles characterize the tip-sample interaction. PMID:24778976

  20. High-resolution imaging by scanning electron microscopy of semithin sections in correlation with light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koga, Daisuke; Kusumi, Satoshi; Shodo, Ryusuke; Dan, Yukari; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we introduce scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of semithin resin sections. In this technique, semithin sections were adhered on glass slides, stained with both uranyl acetate and lead citrate, and observed with a backscattered electron detector at a low accelerating voltage. As the specimens are stained in the same manner as conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the contrast of SEM images of semithin sections was similar to TEM images of ultrathin sections. Using this technique, wide areas of semithin sections were also observed by SEM, without the obstruction of grids, which was inevitable for traditional TEM. This study also applied semithin section SEM to correlative light and electron microscopy. Correlative immunofluorescence microscopy and immune-SEM were performed in semithin sections of LR white resin-embedded specimens using a FluoroNanogold-labeled secondary antibody. Because LR white resin is hydrophilic and electron stable, this resin is suitable for immunostaining and SEM observation. Using correlative microscopy, the precise localization of the primary antibody was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and SEM. This method has great potential for studies examining the precise localization of molecules, including Golgi- and ER-associated proteins, in correlation with LM and SEM.