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Sample records for 4-dimensional intravital microscopy

  1. Intravital microscopy in historic and contemporary immunology.

    PubMed

    Secklehner, Judith; Lo Celso, Cristina; Carlin, Leo M

    2017-07-01

    In this review, we discuss intravital microscopy of immune cells, starting from its historic origins to current applications in diverse organs. It is clear from a quantitative review of the literature that intravital microscopy is a key tool in both historic and contemporary immunological research, providing unique advances in our understanding of immune responses. We have chosen to focus this review on how intravital microscopy methodologies are used to image specific organs or systems and we present recent descriptions of fundamental immunological processes that could not have been achieved by other methods. The following target organs/systems are discussed in more detail: cremaster muscle, skin (ear and dorsal skin fold chamber), lymph node, liver, lung, mesenteric vessels, carotid artery, bone marrow, brain, spleen, foetus and lastly vessels of the knee joint.

  2. Understanding liver immunology using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Marques, Pedro Elias; Oliveira, André Gustavo; Chang, Lynne; Paula-Neto, Heitor Affonso; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-09-01

    The liver has come a long way since it was considered only a metabolic organ attached to the gastrointestinal tract. The simultaneous ascension of immunology and intravital microscopy evidenced the liver as a central axis in the immune system, controlling immune responses to local and systemic agents as well as disease tolerance. The multiple hepatic cell populations are organized in a vascular environment that promotes intimate cellular interactions, including initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses, rapid leukocyte recruitment, pathogen clearance and production of a variety of immune mediators. In this review, we focus on the advances in liver immunology supported by intravital microscopy in diseases such as isquemia/reperfusion, acute liver injury and infections.

  3. Intravital multiphoton microscopy for imaging hepatobiliary function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng-Chieh; Sun, Tzu-Lin; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Yang, Shu-Mei; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    Liver is the chemical factory in body responsible for important functions such as metabolism and detoxification. When liver can not be regenerated in time to amend damages that has occurred, failure of hepatic functions can result. Traditionally, the study of liver pathology has depended on histological techniques, but such methods are limited to ex-vivo observation. In order to study hepatic metabolism in vivo, we have designed a hepatic imaging chamber made of biocompatible titanium alloy (6V4Al-Ti, ELI grade). In combination with multiphoton and second harmonic generation microscopy, our approach allows the intravital observation of hepatic intravital activities to be achieved. Processes such as hepatic metabolism and disease progression can be studied using this methodology.

  4. Intravital microscopy: new insights into cellular interactions.

    PubMed

    Gavins, Felicity N E

    2012-10-01

    Inflammation is the body's way of combating invading pathogens or noxious stimuli. Under normal conditions, the complex host response of rubor, dolor, calor, tumor, and functio laesa is essential for survival and the return to homeostasis. However, unregulated inflammation is all too often observed in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, stroke, and cancer. The host inflammatory response is governed by a number of tightly regulated processes that enable cellular trafficking to occur at the sites of damage to ultimately ensure the resolution of inflammation. Intravital microscopy (IVM) provides quantitative, qualitative, and dynamic insights into cell biology and these cellular interactions. This review highlights the pros and cons of this specialized technique and how it has evolved to help understand the physiology and pathophysiology of inflammatory events in a number of different disease states, leading to a number of potential therapeutic targets for drug discovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Visualization of hepatobiliary excretory function by intravital multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Hsiao-Ching; Yang, Shu-Mei; Sun, Tzu-Lin; Lo, Wen; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Huang, Guan Tarn; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Lee, Hsuan-Shu

    2007-01-01

    Intravital imaging of hepatobiliary excretion is vital for elucidating liver metabolism. In this work, we describe a novel method to observe the intravital dynamics of the uptake, processing, and excretion of an organic anion, 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (6-CFDA) in the hepatobiliary system. This is achieved by the use of multiphoton microscopy and an intravital hepatic imaging chamber. The high-quality images show sequential uptake and processing of 6-CFDA from the hepatocytes and the subsequent excretion into bile canaliculi within approximately 50 min. This is a promising technique to study intravital hepatic physiology and metabolism.

  6. Intravital Microscopy for THz-Bio Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pilhan

    Intravital microscopy is a high-resolution imaging technique to observe biological phenomena in living organisms. It often also stated as in vivo microscopy. Literal meaning of in vivo is "within the living" and there is another term, ex vivo of which literal meaning is "out of the living". Both terms are commonly used to describe the status of sample at the moment of biological manipulations or investigations are done. In vivo study is a form of research using whole living organism in experiment to investigate a certain biological phenomenon in its natural environment, whereas ex vivo study uses non-living subjects such as tissues or organs dissected from dead animal. In addition, in vitro of which literal meaning is "within the glass" is another commonly used term. In vitro study is a form of research using small living subject such as cell in a controlled environment such as petri dish or test tube. Cell culture, the process of growing cells in a petri dish, is the most common form of in vitro study. Figure 1 summarizes the status of samples for biological study categorized by in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo.

  7. Intraoperative intravital microscopy permits the study of human tumour vessels

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Daniel T.; Muhitch, Jason B.; Kim, Minhyung; Doyen, Kurt C.; Bogner, Paul N.; Evans, Sharon S.; Skitzki, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour vessels have been studied extensively as they are critical sites for drug delivery, anti-angiogenic therapies and immunotherapy. As a preclinical tool, intravital microscopy (IVM) allows for in vivo real-time direct observation of vessels at the cellular level. However, to date there are no reports of intravital high-resolution imaging of human tumours in the clinical setting. Here we report the feasibility of IVM examinations of human malignant disease with an emphasis on tumour vasculature as the major site of tumour-host interactions. Consistent with preclinical observations, we show that patient tumour vessels are disorganized, tortuous and ∼50% do not support blood flow. Human tumour vessel diameters are larger than predicted from immunohistochemistry or preclinical IVM, and thereby have lower wall shear stress, which influences delivery of drugs and cellular immunotherapies. Thus, real-time clinical imaging of living human tumours is feasible and allows for detection of characteristics within the tumour microenvironment. PMID:26883450

  8. Motion compensation using a suctioning stabilizer for intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Lee, Sungon; Gorbatov, Rostic; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Motion artifacts continue to present a major challenge to single cell imaging in cardiothoracic organs such as the beating heart, blood vessels, or lung. In this study, we present a new water-immersion suctioning stabilizer that enables minimally invasive intravital fluorescence microscopy using water-based stick objectives. The stabilizer works by reducing major motion excursions and can be used in conjunction with both prospective or retrospective gating approaches. We show that the new approach offers cellular resolution in the beating murine heart without perturbing normal physiology. In addition, because this technique allows multiple areas to be easily probed, it offers the opportunity for wide area coverage at high resolution. PMID:24086796

  9. Multiphoton intravital microscopy setup to visualize the mouse mammary gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Javier; Herrera Torres, Ana M.; Masedunskas, Andrius; Baratti, Mariana O.; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, light microscopy-based techniques have been extended to live mammalian models leading to the development of a new imaging approach called intravital microscopy (IVM). Although IVM has been introduced at the beginning of the last century, its major advancements have occurred in the last twenty years with the development of non-linear microscopy that has enabled performing deep tissue imaging. IVM has been utilized to address many biological questions in basic research and is now a fundamental tool that provide information on tissues such as morphology, cellular architecture, and metabolic status. IVM has become an indispensable tool in numerous areas. This study presents and describes the practical aspects of IVM necessary to visualize epithelial cells of live mouse mammary gland with multiphoton techniques.

  10. In vivo Evaluation of Venular Glycocalyx during Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats using Intravital Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Brief Communication In vivo evaluation of venular glycocalyx during hemorrhagic shock in rats using intravital microscopy☆,☆☆ Ivo Torres Filho...pathophysiology and tested the hypothesis that hemorrhage causes glycocalyx degrada- tion in cremaster muscle microvessels. We utilized intravital microscopy...bound (Reitsma et al., 2007; Weinbaum et al., 2007). Intravital microscopy has been an invaluable resource for in vivo measurements of critically

  11. Imaging Nanotherapeutics in Inflamed Vasculature by Intravital Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenjia

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy (IVM) is the application of light microscopy to real time study biology of live animal tissues in intact and physiological conditions with the high spatial and temporal resolution. Advances in imaging systems, genetic animal models and imaging probes, IVM has offered quantitative and dynamic insight into cell biology, immunology, neurobiology and cancer. In this review, we will focus on the targeting of nanotherapeutics to inflamed vasculature. We will introduce the basic concept and principle of IVM and demonstrate that IVM is a powerful tool used to quantitatively determine the molecular mechanisms of interactions between nanotherapeutics and neutrophils or endothelium in living mice. In the future, it is needed to develop new imaging systems and novel imaging contrast agents to better understand molecular mechanisms of tissue processing of nanotherapeutics in vivo. PMID:27877245

  12. Intravital assessment of myelin molecular order with polarimetric multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Rutledge, Danette J.; Bélanger, Erik; Dill, Dorothy; Macklin, Wendy B.; Côté, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Myelin plays an essential role in the nervous system and its disruption in diseases such as multiple sclerosis may lead to neuronal death, thus causing irreversible functional impairments. Understanding myelin biology is therefore of fundamental and clinical importance, but no tools currently exist to describe the fine spatial organization of myelin sheaths in vivo. Here we demonstrate intravital quantification of the myelin molecular structure using a microscopy method based on polarization-resolved coherent Raman scattering. Developmental myelination was imaged noninvasively in live zebrafish. Longitudinal imaging of individual axons revealed changes in myelin organization beyond the diffraction limit. Applied to promyelination drug screening, the method uniquely enabled the identification of focal myelin regions with differential architectures. These observations indicate that the study of myelin biology and the identification of therapeutic compounds will largely benefit from a method to quantify the myelin molecular organization in vivo. PMID:27538357

  13. Intravital microscopy of biosensor activities and intrinsic metabolic states.

    PubMed

    Winfree, Seth; Hato, Takashi; Day, Richard N

    2017-09-01

    Intravital microscopy (IVM) is an imaging tool that is capable of detecting subcellular signaling or metabolic events as they occur in tissues in the living animal. Imaging in highly scattering biological tissues, however, is challenging because of the attenuation of signal in images acquired at increasing depths. Depth-dependent signal attenuation is the major impediment to IVM, limiting the depth from which significant data can be obtained. Therefore, making quantitative measurements by IVM requires methods that use internal calibration, or alternatively, a completely different way of evaluating the signals. Here, we describe how ratiometric imaging of genetically encoded biosensor probes can be used to make quantitative measurements of changes in the activity of cell signaling pathways. Then, we describe how fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used for label-free measurements of the metabolic states of cells within the living animal. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Advanced Motion Compensation Methods for Intravital Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Lee, Sungon; Feruglio, Paolo Fumene; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has emerged in the recent decade as an indispensible imaging modality for the study of the micro-dynamics of biological processes in live animals. Technical advancements in imaging techniques and hardware components, combined with the development of novel targeted probes and new mice models, have enabled us to address long-standing questions in several biology areas such as oncology, cell biology, immunology and neuroscience. As the instrument resolution has increased, physiological motion activities have become a major obstacle that prevents imaging live animals at resolutions analogue to the ones obtained in vitro. Motion compensation techniques aim at reducing this gap and can effectively increase the in vivo resolution. This paper provides a technical review of some of the latest developments in motion compensation methods, providing organ specific solutions. PMID:24273405

  15. Intravital assessment of myelin molecular order with polarimetric multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Rutledge, Danette J.; Bélanger, Erik; Dill, Dorothy; Macklin, Wendy B.; Côté, Daniel C.

    2016-08-01

    Myelin plays an essential role in the nervous system and its disruption in diseases such as multiple sclerosis may lead to neuronal death, thus causing irreversible functional impairments. Understanding myelin biology is therefore of fundamental and clinical importance, but no tools currently exist to describe the fine spatial organization of myelin sheaths in vivo. Here we demonstrate intravital quantification of the myelin molecular structure using a microscopy method based on polarization-resolved coherent Raman scattering. Developmental myelination was imaged noninvasively in live zebrafish. Longitudinal imaging of individual axons revealed changes in myelin organization beyond the diffraction limit. Applied to promyelination drug screening, the method uniquely enabled the identification of focal myelin regions with differential architectures. These observations indicate that the study of myelin biology and the identification of therapeutic compounds will largely benefit from a method to quantify the myelin molecular organization in vivo.

  16. Improved intravital microscopy via synchronization of respiration and holder stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungon; Vinegoni, Claudio; Feruglio, Paolo Fumene; Weissleder, Ralph

    2012-09-01

    A major challenge in high-resolution intravital confocal and multiphoton microscopy is physiologic tissue movement during image acquisition. Of the various physiological sources of movement, respiration has arguably the largest and most wide-ranging effect. We describe a technique for achieving stabilized microscopy imaging using a dual strategy. First, we designed a mechanical stabilizer for constraining physical motion; this served to simultaneously increase the in-focus range over which data can be acquired as well as increase the reproducibility of imaging a certain position within each confocal imaging plane. Second, by implementing a retrospective breathing-gated imaging modality, we performed selective image extraction gated to a particular phase of the respiratory cycle. Thanks to the high reproducibility in position, all gated images presented a high degree of correlation over time. The images obtained using this technique not only showed significant improvements over images acquired without the stabilizer, but also demonstrated accurate in vivo imaging during longitudinal studies. The described methodology is easy to implement with any commercial imaging system, as are used by most biological imaging laboratories, and can be used for both confocal and multiphoton laser scanning microscopy.

  17. Highly Resolved Intravital Striped-illumination Microscopy of Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Volker; Sporbert, Anje

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring cellular communication by intravital deep-tissue multi-photon microscopy is the key for understanding the fate of immune cells within thick tissue samples and organs in health and disease. By controlling the scanning pattern in multi-photon microscopy and applying appropriate numerical algorithms, we developed a striped-illumination approach, which enabled us to achieve 3-fold better axial resolution and improved signal-to-noise ratio, i.e. contrast, in more than 100 µm tissue depth within highly scattering tissue of lymphoid organs as compared to standard multi-photon microscopy. The acquisition speed as well as photobleaching and photodamage effects were similar to standard photo-multiplier-based technique, whereas the imaging depth was slightly lower due to the use of field detectors. By using the striped-illumination approach, we are able to observe the dynamics of immune complex deposits on secondary follicular dendritic cells – on the level of a few protein molecules in germinal centers. PMID:24748007

  18. Procedures and applications of long-term intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Prunier, Chloé; Chen, Na; Ritsma, Laila; Vrisekoop, Nienke

    2017-09-01

    Intravital microscopy (IVM) is increasingly used in biomedical research to study dynamic processes at cellular and subcellular resolution in their natural environment. Long-term IVM especially can be applied to visualize migration and proliferation over days to months within the same animal without recurrent surgeries. Skin can be repetitively imaged without surgery. To intermittently visualize cells in other organs, such as liver, mammary gland and brain, different imaging windows including the abdominal imaging window (AIW), dermal imaging window (DIW) and cranial imaging window (CIW) have been developed. In this review, we describe the procedure of window implantation and pros and cons of each technique as well as methods to retrace a position of interest over time. In addition, different fluorescent biosensors to facilitate the tracking of cells for different purposes, such as monitoring cell migration and proliferation, are discussed. Finally, we consider new techniques and possibilities of how long-term IVM can be even further improved in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermostatic tissue platform for intravital microscopy: 'the hanging drop' model.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Dragan; Frieling, Helge; Lauer, Kai-Stephan; Bac, Vo Hoai; Richter, Joern; Wendt, Michael; Lehmann, Christian; Usichenko, Taras; Meissner, Konrad; Gruendling, Matthias

    2006-11-01

    Intravital microscopy imposes the particular problem of the combined control of the body temperature of the animal and the local temperature of the observed organ or tissues. We constructed and tested, in the rat ileum microcirculation preparation, a new organ-support platform. The platform consisted of an organ bath filled with physiological solution, and contained a suction tube, a superfusion tube, an intestine-support hand that was attached to a micromanipulator and a thermometer probe. To cover the intestine we used a cover glass plate with a plastic ring glued on its upper surface. After a routine procedure (anaesthesia, monitoring and surgery), the intestine segment (2-3 cm long) was gently exteriorized and placed on the 'hand' of the organ support. A small part of the intestine formed a small 'island' in the bath that was filled with physiological salt solution. The cover glass was secured in place. The physiological salt solution from the superfusion tube, which was pointed to the lower surface of the cover glass, formed a 'hanging drop'. The objective of the microscope was then immersed into distilled water that was formed by the cover glass plastic ring. The 'hanging drop' technique prevented any tissue quenching, ensured undisturbed microcirculation, provided for stable temperature and humidity, and permitted a clear visual field.

  20. IMART software for correction of motion artifacts in images collected in intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kenneth W; Lorenz, Kevin S; Salama, Paul; Delp, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is a uniquely powerful tool, providing the ability to characterize cell and organ physiology in the natural context of the intact, living animal. With the recent development of high-resolution microscopy techniques such as confocal and multiphoton microscopy, intravital microscopy can now characterize structures at subcellular resolution and capture events at sub-second temporal resolution. However, realizing the potential for high resolution requires remarkable stability in the tissue. Whereas the rigid structure of the skull facilitates high-resolution imaging of the brain, organs of the viscera are free to move with respiration and heartbeat, requiring additional apparatus for immobilization. In our experience, these methods are variably effective, so that many studies are compromised by residual motion artifacts. Here we demonstrate the use of IMART, a software tool for removing motion artifacts from intravital microscopy images collected in time series or in three dimensions. PMID:26090271

  1. Utilization of 3D printing for an intravital microscopy platform to study the intestinal microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Burkovskiy, I; Lehmann, C; Jiang, C; Zhou, J

    2016-11-01

    Intravital microscopy of the intestine is a sophisticated technique that allows qualitative and quantitative in vivo observation of dynamic cellular interactions and blood flow at a high resolution. Physiological conditions of the animal and in particular of the observed organ, such as temperature and moisture are crucial for intravital imaging. Often, the microscopy stage with the animal or the organ of interest imposes limitations on how well the animal can be maintained. In addition, the access for additional oxygen supply or drug administration during the procedure is rather restricted. To address these limitations, we developed a novel intravital microscopy platform, allowing us to have improved access to the animal during the intravital microscopy procedure, as well as improved microenvironmental maintenance. The production process of this prototype platform is based on 3D printing of device parts in a single-step process. The simplicity of production and the advantages of this versatile and customizable design are shown and discussed in this paper. Our design potentially represents a major step forward in facilitating intestinal intravital imaging using fluorescent microscopy.

  2. Intravital microscopy as a tool to study drug delivery in preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The technical developments in the field of non-linear microscopy have made intravital microscopy one of the most successful techniques for studying physiological and pathological processes in live animals. Intravital microscopy has been utilized to address many biological questions in basic research and is now a fundamental tool for preclinical studies, with an enormous potential for clinical applications. The ability to dynamically image cellular and subcellular structures combined with the possibility to perform longitudinal studies have empowered investigators to use this discipline to study the mechanisms of action of therapeutic agents and assess the efficacy on their targets in vivo. The goal of this review is to provide a general overview of the recent advances in intravital microscopy and to discuss some of its applications in preclinical studies. PMID:20933026

  3. Using quantitative intravital multiphoton microscopy to dissect hepatic transport in rats.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kenneth W; Ryan, Jennifer C

    2017-09-01

    Hepatic solute transport is a complex process whose disruption is associated with liver disease and drug-induced liver injury. Intravital multiphoton fluorescence excitation microscopy provides the spatial and temporal resolution necessary to characterize hepatic transport at the level of individual hepatocytes in vivo and thus to identify the mechanisms and cellular consequences of cholestasis. Here we present an overview of the use of fluorescence microscopy for studies of hepatic transport in living animals, and describe how we have combined methods of intravital microscopy and digital image analysis to dissect the effects of drugs and pathological conditions on the function of hepatic transporters in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Caught in the Act: Intravital Multiphoton Microscopy of Host-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Heather D.; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2009-01-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy provides a unique opportunity to discover and characterize biological phenomena in the natural context of living organisms. Here we provide an overview of multiphoton microscopy with particular attention to its application for studying host-pathogen interactions. PMID:19154984

  5. Early development of cutaneous cancer revealed by intravital nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Lin, Wei-Chou; Chen, Yang-Fang; Chen, Shean-Jen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-09-01

    We performed intravital multiphoton microscopy to image and analyze normal and carcinogen treated skin tissues of nude mice in vivo. Using intravital images and the quantitative pixel to pixel ratiometric processing of multiphoton autofluorescence to second harmonic generation index (MAFSI), we can visualize the interaction between epithelial cells and extracellular matrix. We found that as the imaging depth increases, MAFSI has different distribution in normal and treated cutaneous specimens. Since the treated skin eventually became squamous cell carcinoma, our results show that the physiological changes to mouse skin en route to become cancer can be effectively tracked by multiphoton microscopy.

  6. Two-photon microscopy of deep intravital tissues and its merits in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Wang, B-G; König, K; Halbhuber, K-J

    2010-04-01

    Multiphoton excitation laser scanning microscopy, relying on the simultaneous absorption of two or more photons by a molecule, is one of the most exciting recent developments in biomedical imaging. Thanks to its superior imaging capability of deeper tissue penetration and efficient light detection, this system becomes more and more an inspiring tool for intravital bulk tissue imaging. Two-photon excitation microscopy including 2-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generated signal microscopy is the most common multiphoton microscopic application. In the present review we take diverse ocular tissues as intravital samples to demonstrate the advantages of this approach. Experiments with registration of intracellular 2-photon fluorescence and extracellular collagen second harmonic generated signal microscopy in native ocular tissues are focused. Data show that the in-tandem combination of 2-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generated signal microscopy as two-modality microscopy allows for in situ co-localization imaging of various microstructural components in the whole-mount deep intravital tissues. New applications and recent developments of this high technology in clinical studies such as 2-photon-controlled drug release, in vivo drug screening and administration in skin and kidney, as well as its uses in tumourous tissues such as melanoma and glioma, in diseased lung, brain and heart are additionally reviewed. Intrinsic emission two-modal 2-photon microscopy/tomography, acting as an efficient and sensitive non-injurious imaging approach featured by high contrast and subcellular spatial resolution, has been proved to be a promising tool for intravital deep tissue imaging and clinical studies. Given the level of its performance, we believe that the non-linear optical imaging technique has tremendous potentials to find more applications in biomedical fundamental and clinical research in the near future.

  7. Automated motion artifact removal for intravital microscopy, without a priori information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungon; Vinegoni, Claudio; Sebas, Matthew; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-03-01

    Intravital fluorescence microscopy, through extended penetration depth and imaging resolution, provides the ability to image at cellular and subcellular resolution in live animals, presenting an opportunity for new insights into in vivo biology. Unfortunately, physiological induced motion components due to respiration and cardiac activity are major sources of image artifacts and impose severe limitations on the effective imaging resolution that can be ultimately achieved in vivo. Here we present a novel imaging methodology capable of automatically removing motion artifacts during intravital microscopy imaging of organs and orthotopic tumors. The method is universally applicable to different laser scanning modalities including confocal and multiphoton microscopy, and offers artifact free reconstructions independent of the physiological motion source and imaged organ. The methodology, which is based on raw data acquisition followed by image processing, is here demonstrated for both cardiac and respiratory motion compensation in mice heart, kidney, liver, pancreas and dorsal window chamber.

  8. Imaging the beating heart in the mouse using intravital microscopy techniques

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Aguirre, Aaron D; Lee, Sungon; Weissleder, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    Real-time microscopic imaging of moving organs at single-cell resolution represents a major challenge in studying complex biology in living systems. Motion of the tissue from the cardiac and respiratory cycles severely limits intravital microscopy by compromising ultimate spatial and temporal imaging resolution. However, significant recent advances have enabled single-cell resolution imaging to be achieved in vivo. In this protocol, we describe experimental procedures for intravital microscopy based on a combination of thoracic surgery, tissue stabilizers and acquisition gating methods, which enable imaging at the single-cell level in the beating heart in the mouse. Setup of the model is typically completed in 1 h, which allows 2 h or more of continuous cardiac imaging. This protocol can be readily adapted for the imaging of other moving organs, and it will therefore broadly facilitate in vivo high-resolution microscopy studies. PMID:26492138

  9. Intravital Microscopy Imaging Approaches for Image-Guided Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kirui, Dickson K.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Rapid technical advances in the field of non-linear microscopy have made intravital microscopy a vital pre-clinical tool for research and development of imaging-guided drug delivery systems. The ability to dynamically monitor the fate of macromolecules in live animals provides invaluable information regarding properties of drug carriers (size, charge, and surface coating), physiological, and pathological processes that exist between point-of-injection and the projected of site of delivery, all of which influence delivery and effectiveness of drug delivery systems. In this Review, we highlight how integrating intravital microscopy imaging with experimental designs (in vitro analyses and mathematical modeling) can provide unique information critical in the design of novel disease-relevant drug delivery platforms with improved diagnostic and therapeutic indexes. The Review will provide the reader an overview of the various applications for which intravital microscopy has been used to monitor the delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents and discuss some of their potential clinical applications. PMID:25901526

  10. Intravital Microscopy in the Cremaster Muscle Microcirculation for Endothelial Dysfunction Studies.

    PubMed

    Rius, Cristina; Sanz, María J

    2015-01-01

    The intravital microscopy in the mouse cremaster muscle microcirculation is a method widely used to visualize in vivo blood cells interacting with the endothelium and within the vessels. Therefore, it is a suitable technique to study leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions along every stage of the canonical leukocyte recruitment cascade: rolling, adhesion, intravascular crawling, and migration both in postcapillary venules and arterioles of the mouse cremasteric microcirculation. This technique also enables to assess vessel functionality, since hemodynamic parameters such as shear stress, flow rate, and vasodilatation/vasoconstriction, among other vascular events, can be additionally determined. Furthermore, response to multiple drugs and mechanisms underlying blood cells interactions within the vascular system can be studied in a real scenario. This chapter describes a protocol for intravital microscopy in the mouse cremaster muscle microcirculation.

  11. Intravital two-photon microscopy of immune cell dynamics in corneal lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Steven, Philipp; Bock, Felix; Hüttmann, Gereon; Cursiefen, Claus

    2011-01-01

    The role of lymphatic vessels in tissue and organ transplantation as well as in tumor growth and metastasis has drawn great attention in recent years. We now developed a novel method using non-invasive two-photon microscopy to simultaneously visualize and track specifically stained lymphatic vessels and autofluorescent adjacent tissues such as collagen fibrils, blood vessels and immune cells in the mouse model of corneal neovascularization in vivo. The mouse cornea serves as an ideal tissue for this technique due to its easy accessibility and its inducible and modifiable state of pathological hem- and lymphvascularization. Neovascularization was induced by suture placement in corneas of Balb/C mice. Two weeks after treatment, lymphatic vessels were stained intravital by intrastromal injection of a fluorescently labeled LYVE-1 antibody and the corneas were evaluated in vivo by two-photon microscopy (TPM). Intravital TPM was performed at 710 nm and 826 nm excitation wavelengths to detect immunofluorescence and tissue autofluorescence using a custom made animal holder. Corneas were then harvested, fixed and analyzed by histology. Time lapse imaging demonstrated the first in vivo evidence of immune cell migration into lymphatic vessels and luminal transport of individual cells. Cells immigrated within 1-5.5 min into the vessel lumen. Mean velocities of intrastromal corneal immune cells were around 9 µm/min and therefore comparable to those of T-cells and macrophages in other mucosal surfaces. To our knowledge we here demonstrate for the first time the intravital real-time transmigration of immune cells into lymphatic vessels. Overall this study demonstrates the valuable use of intravital autofluorescence two-photon microscopy in the model of suture-induced corneal vascularizations to study interactions of immune and subsequently tumor cells with lymphatic vessels under close as possible physiological conditions.

  12. Usefulness of Intravital Multiphoton Microscopy in Visualizing Study of Mouse Cochlea and Volume Changes in the Scala Media.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hyun Mi; Lee, Sun Hee; Kong, Tae Hoon; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Choi, Jin Sil; Seo, Young Joon

    2017-01-01

    Conventional microscopy has limitations in viewing the cochlear microstructures due to three-dimensional spiral structure and the overlying bone. But these issues can be overcome by imaging the cochlea in vitro with intravital multiphoton microscopy (MPM). By using near-infrared lasers for multiphoton excitation, intravital MPM can detect endogenous fluorescence and second harmonic generation of tissues. In this study, we used intravital MPM to visualize various cochlear microstructures without any staining and non-invasively analyze the volume changes of the scala media (SM) without removing the overlying cochlear bone. The intravital MPM images revealed various tissue types, ranging from thin membranes to dense bone, as well as the spiral ganglion beneath the cochlear bone. The two-dimensional, cross-sectional, and serial z-stack intravital MPM images also revealed the spatial dilation of the SM in the temporal bone of pendrin-deficient mice. These findings suggest that intravital MPM might serve as a new method for obtaining microanatomical information regarding the cochlea, similar to standard histopathological analyses in the animal study for the cochlea. Given the capability of intravital MPM for detecting an increase in the volume of the SM in pendrin-deficient mice, it might be a promising new tool for assessing the pathophysiology of hearing loss in the future.

  13. Usefulness of Intravital Multiphoton Microscopy in Visualizing Study of Mouse Cochlea and Volume Changes in the Scala Media

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Hyun Mi; Lee, Sun Hee; Kong, Tae Hoon; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Choi, Jin Sil; Seo, Young Joon

    2017-01-01

    Conventional microscopy has limitations in viewing the cochlear microstructures due to three-dimensional spiral structure and the overlying bone. But these issues can be overcome by imaging the cochlea in vitro with intravital multiphoton microscopy (MPM). By using near-infrared lasers for multiphoton excitation, intravital MPM can detect endogenous fluorescence and second harmonic generation of tissues. In this study, we used intravital MPM to visualize various cochlear microstructures without any staining and non-invasively analyze the volume changes of the scala media (SM) without removing the overlying cochlear bone. The intravital MPM images revealed various tissue types, ranging from thin membranes to dense bone, as well as the spiral ganglion beneath the cochlear bone. The two-dimensional, cross-sectional, and serial z-stack intravital MPM images also revealed the spatial dilation of the SM in the temporal bone of pendrin-deficient mice. These findings suggest that intravital MPM might serve as a new method for obtaining microanatomical information regarding the cochlea, similar to standard histopathological analyses in the animal study for the cochlea. Given the capability of intravital MPM for detecting an increase in the volume of the SM in pendrin-deficient mice, it might be a promising new tool for assessing the pathophysiology of hearing loss in the future. PMID:28824523

  14. Correlating Intravital Multi-Photon Microscopy to 3D Electron Microscopy of Invading Tumor Cells Using Anatomical Reference Points

    PubMed Central

    Karreman, Matthia A.; Mercier, Luc; Schieber, Nicole L.; Shibue, Tsukasa; Schwab, Yannick; Goetz, Jacky G.

    2014-01-01

    Correlative microscopy combines the advantages of both light and electron microscopy to enable imaging of rare and transient events at high resolution. Performing correlative microscopy in complex and bulky samples such as an entire living organism is a time-consuming and error-prone task. Here, we investigate correlative methods that rely on the use of artificial and endogenous structural features of the sample as reference points for correlating intravital fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. To investigate tumor cell behavior in vivo with ultrastructural accuracy, a reliable approach is needed to retrieve single tumor cells imaged deep within the tissue. For this purpose, fluorescently labeled tumor cells were subcutaneously injected into a mouse ear and imaged using two-photon-excitation microscopy. Using near-infrared branding, the position of the imaged area within the sample was labeled at the skin level, allowing for its precise recollection. Following sample preparation for electron microscopy, concerted usage of the artificial branding and anatomical landmarks enables targeting and approaching the cells of interest while serial sectioning through the specimen. We describe here three procedures showing how three-dimensional (3D) mapping of structural features in the tissue can be exploited to accurately correlate between the two imaging modalities, without having to rely on the use of artificially introduced markers of the region of interest. The methods employed here facilitate the link between intravital and nanoscale imaging of invasive tumor cells, enabling correlating function to structure in the study of tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:25479106

  15. Intravital microscopy: a novel tool to study cell biology in living animals.

    PubMed

    Weigert, Roberto; Sramkova, Monika; Parente, Laura; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Masedunskas, Andrius

    2010-05-01

    Intravital microscopy encompasses various optical microscopy techniques aimed at visualizing biological processes in live animals. In the last decade, the development of non-linear optical microscopy resulted in an enormous increase of in vivo studies, which have addressed key biological questions in fields such as neurobiology, immunology and tumor biology. Recently, few studies have shown that subcellular processes can be imaged dynamically in the live animal at a resolution comparable to that achieved in cell cultures, providing new opportunities to study cell biology under physiological conditions. The overall aim of this review is to give the reader a general idea of the potential applications of intravital microscopy with a particular emphasis on subcellular imaging. An overview of some of the most exciting studies in this field will be presented using resolution as a main organizing criterion. Indeed, first we will focus on those studies in which organs were imaged at the tissue level, then on those focusing on single cells imaging, and finally on those imaging subcellular organelles and structures.

  16. Intravital microscopy: a novel tool to study cell biology in living animals

    PubMed Central

    Weigert, Roberto; Sramkova, Monika; Parente, Laura; Masedunskas, Andrius

    2011-01-01

    Intravital microscopy encompasses various optical microscopy techniques aimed at visualizing biological processes in live animals. In the last decade, the development of non-linear optical microscopy resulted in an enormous increase of in vivo studies, which have addressed key biological questions in fields such as neurobiology, immunology and tumor biology. Recently, few studies have shown that subcellular processes can be imaged dynamically in the live animal at a resolution comparable to that achieved in cell cultures, providing new opportunities to study cell biology under physiological conditions. The overall aim of this review is to give the reader a general idea of the potential applications of intravital microscopy with a particular emphasis on subcellular imaging. An overview of some of the most exciting studies in this field will be presented using resolution as a main organizing criteria. Indeed, first we will focus on those studies in which organs where imaged at the tissue level, then on those focusing on single cells imaging, and finally on those imaging subcellular organelles and structures. PMID:20372919

  17. The mouse dorsal skinfold chamber as a model for the study of thrombolysis by intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Boulaftali, Yacine; Lamrani, Lamia; Rouzaud, Marie-Catherine; Loyau, Stéphane; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Bouton, Marie-Christine; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2012-01-01

    Although intravital microscopy models of thrombosis in mice have contributed to dissect the mechanisms of thrombus formation and stability, they have not been well adapted to study long-term evolution of occlusive thrombi. Here, we assessed the suitability of the dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) for the study of thrombolysis and testing of thrombolytic agents by intravital microscopy. We show that induction of FeCl3-induced occlusive thrombosis is achievable in microvessels of DSCs, and that thrombi formed in DSCs can be visualized by intravital microscopy using brightfield transmitted light, or fluorescent staining of thrombus components such as fibrinogen, platelets, leukocytes, and von Willebrand factor. Direct application of control saline or recombinant tissue-plasminogen activator (rtPA) to FeCl3-produced thrombi in DSCs did not affect thrombus size or induce recanalization. However, in the presence of hirudin, rtPA treatment caused a rapid dose-dependent lysis of occlusive thrombi, resulting in recanalization within 1 hour after treatment. Skin hemorrhage originating from vessels located inside and outside the FeCl3-injured area was also observed in DSCs of rtPA-treated mice. We further show that rtPA-induced thrombolysis was enhanced in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-deficient (PAI-1−/−) mice, and dropped considerably as the time between occlusion and treatment application increased. Together, our results show that by allowing visualization and measurement of thrombus lysis and potential bleeding complications of thrombolytic treatments, the DSC provides a model for studying endogenous fibrinolysis and for first-line screening of thrombolytic agents. Furthermore, using this system, we found that thrombin and clot aging impair the thrombolytic action of rtPA towards FeCl3-produced thrombi. PMID:22552380

  18. Intravital microscopy imaging of macrophage localization to immunogenic particles and co-localized tissue oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Choe, Se-woon; Acharya, Abhinav P; Keselowsky, Benjamin G; Sorg, Brian S

    2010-09-01

    Well-designed biomaterial polymer particle-based vaccines will optimally promote immune cell antigen-presenting behavior while minimizing adverse inflammatory responses to the particles and encapsulated drugs or adjuvants. It is important in the design of particle-based vaccines to consider possible harmful effects of immune response on tissue at the vaccination site. Intravital microscopy with rodent dorsal skin window chambers enables in vivo serial observations in the same animal, and such models which have been used to study angiogenesis and macrophage response to implanted biomaterials may also be useful for the development of particle-based vaccines. To our knowledge there have been no reports where intravital microscopy has documented real-time immune cell localization and potentially harmful co-localized tissue effects. In this proof-of-principle study we used fluorescence and spectral imaging intravital microscopy of mouse window chambers to measure macrophage localization and co-localized tissue microvessel hemoglobin saturation changes in response to an immunogenic stimulus from polymer particles loaded with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) serving as a model vaccine/adjuvant system. We observed greater and faster macrophage localization to stronger inflammatory stimuli from LPS-loaded particle doses, a trend of decreased microvessel oxygenation with increased macrophage accumulation and, in an extreme case, complete microvessel collapse accompanied by tissue necrosis. Our technique may be useful for optimizing design of particle-based vaccines and may give insight into the use of hemoglobin saturation as a biomarker of tissue inflammation for clinical investigations of particle-based vaccines. 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Intravital microscopy of the spleen: quantitative analysis of parasite mobility and blood flow.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Mireia; Martin-Jaular, Lorena; Calvo, Maria; del Portillo, Hernando A

    2012-01-14

    The advent of intravital microscopy in experimental rodent malaria models has allowed major advances to the knowledge of parasite-host interactions. Thus, in vivo imaging of malaria parasites during pre-erythrocytic stages have revealed the active entrance of parasites into skin lymph nodes, the complete development of the parasite in the skin, and the formation of a hepatocyte-derived merosome to assure migration and release of merozoites into the blood stream. Moreover, the development of individual parasites in erythrocytes has been recently documented using 4D imaging and challenged our current view on protein export in malaria. Thus, intravital imaging has radically changed our view on key events in Plasmodium development. Unfortunately, studies of the dynamic passage of malaria parasites through the spleen, a major lymphoid organ exquisitely adapted to clear infected red blood cells are lacking due to technical constraints. Using the murine model of malaria Plasmodium yoelii in Balb/c mice, we have implemented intravital imaging of the spleen and reported a differential remodeling of it and adherence of parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs) to barrier cells of fibroblastic origin in the red pulp during infection with the non-lethal parasite line P.yoelii 17X as opposed to infections with the P.yoelii 17XL lethal parasite line. To reach these conclusions, a specific methodology using ImageJ free software was developed to enable characterization of the fast three-dimensional movement of single-pRBCs. Results obtained with this protocol allow determining velocity, directionality and residence time of parasites in the spleen, all parameters addressing adherence in vivo. In addition, we report the methodology for blood flow quantification using intravital microscopy and the use of different colouring agents to gain insight into the complex microcirculatory structure of the spleen. ETHICS STATEMENT: All the animal studies were performed at the animal facilities of

  20. Intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Pittet, Mikael J; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-11-23

    Until recently, the idea of observing life deep within the tissues of a living mouse, at a resolution sufficient to pick out cellular behaviors and molecular signals underlying them, remained a much-coveted dream. Now, a new era of intravital fluorescence microscopy has dawned. In this Primer, we review the technologies that made this revolution possible and demonstrate how intravital imaging is beginning to provide quantitative and dynamic insights into cell biology, immunology, tumor biology, and neurobiology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Expanding two-photon intravital microscopy to the infrared by means of optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Herz, Josephine; Siffrin, Volker; Hauser, Anja E; Brandt, Alexander U; Leuenberger, Tina; Radbruch, Helena; Zipp, Frauke; Niesner, Raluca A

    2010-02-17

    Chronic inflammation in various organs, such as the brain, implies that different subpopulations of immune cells interact with the cells of the target organ. To monitor this cellular communication both morphologically and functionally, the ability to visualize more than two colors in deep tissue is indispensable. Here, we demonstrate the pronounced power of optical parametric oscillator (OPO)-based two-photon laser scanning microscopy for dynamic intravital imaging in hardly accessible organs of the central nervous and of the immune system, with particular relevance for long-term investigations of pathological mechanisms (e.g., chronic neuroinflammation) necessitating the use of fluorescent proteins. Expanding the wavelength excitation farther to the infrared overcomes the current limitations of standard Titanium:Sapphire laser excitation, leading to 1), simultaneous imaging of fluorophores with largely different excitation and emission spectra (e.g., GFP-derivatives and RFP-derivatives); and 2), higher penetration depths in tissue (up to 80%) at higher resolution and with reduced photobleaching and phototoxicity. This tool opens up new opportunities for deep-tissue imaging and will have a tremendous impact on the choice of protein fluorophores for intravital applications in bioscience and biomedicine, as we demonstrate in this work.

  2. Automated Identification and Localization of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in 3D Intravital Microscopy Data

    PubMed Central

    Khorshed, Reema A.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Duarte, Delfim; Scott, Mark K.; Akinduro, Olufolake A.; Rashidi, Narges M.; Spitaler, Martin; Lo Celso, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Summary Measuring three-dimensional (3D) localization of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) within the bone marrow microenvironment using intravital microscopy is a rapidly expanding research theme. This approach holds the key to understanding the detail of HSC-niche interactions, which are critical for appropriate stem cell function. Due to the complex tissue architecture of the bone marrow and to the progressive introduction of scattering and signal loss at increasing imaging depths, there is no ready-made software to handle efficient segmentation and unbiased analysis of the data. To address this, we developed an automated image analysis tool that simplifies and standardizes the biological interpretation of 3D HSC microenvironment images. The algorithm identifies HSCs and measures their localization relative to surrounding osteoblast cells and bone collagen. We demonstrate here the effectiveness, consistency, and accuracy of the proposed approach compared to current manual analysis and its wider applicability to analyze other 3D bone marrow components. PMID:26120058

  3. Integrated intravital microscopy and mathematical modeling to optimize nanotherapeutics delivery to tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Ven, Anne L.; Wu, Min; Lowengrub, John; McDougall, Steven R.; Chaplain, Mark A. J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Ferrari, Mauro; Frieboes, Hermann B.

    2012-03-01

    Inefficient vascularization hinders the optimal transport of cell nutrients, oxygen, and drugs to cancer cells in solid tumors. Gradients of these substances maintain a heterogeneous cell-scale microenvironment through which drugs and their carriers must travel, significantly limiting optimal drug exposure. In this study, we integrate intravital microscopy with a mathematical model of cancer to evaluate the behavior of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems designed to circumvent biophysical barriers. We simulate the effect of doxorubicin delivered via porous 1000 x 400 nm plateloid silicon particles to a solid tumor characterized by a realistic vasculature, and vary the parameters to determine how much drug per particle and how many particles need to be released within the vasculature in order to achieve remission of the tumor. We envision that this work will contribute to the development of quantitative measures of nanoparticle design and drug loading in order to optimize cancer treatment via nanotherapeutics.

  4. An intravital microscopy model to study early pancreatic inflammation in type 1 diabetes in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Christian; Fisher, Nicholas B.; Tugwell, Barna; Zhou, Juan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intravital microscopy (IVM) of the pancreas has been proven to be an invaluable tool in pancreatitis, transplantation and ischemia/reperfusion research. Also in type 1 diabetes (T1D) pancreatic IVM offers unique advantages for the elucidation of the disease process. Female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice develop T1D spontaneously by 40 weeks of age. Our goal was to establish an IVM-based method to study early pancreatic inflammation in NOD mice, which can be used to screen novel medications to prevent or delay T1D in future studies. This included evaluation of leukocyte-endothelial interactions as well as disturbances of capillary perfusion in the pancreatic microcirculation. PMID:28243521

  5. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-15

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 {mu}m, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 {mu}m diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 {mu}m was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  6. Tracking neutrophil intraluminal crawling, transendothelial migration and chemotaxis in tissue by intravital video microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Najia; Lei, Xi; Liu, Lixin

    2011-09-24

    The recruitment of circulating leukocytes from blood stream to the inflamed tissue is a crucial and complex process of inflammation(1,2). In the postcapillary venules of inflamed tissue, leukocytes initially tether and roll on the luminal surface of venular wall. Rolling leukocytes arrest on endothelium and undergo firm adhesion in response to chemokine or other chemoattractants on the venular surface. Many adherent leukocytes relocate from the initial site of adhesion to the junctional extravasation site in endothelium, a process termed intraluminal crawling(3). Following crawling, leukocytes move across endothelium (transmigration) and migrate in extravascular tissue toward the source of chemoattractant (chemotaxis)(4). Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool for visualizing leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in vivo and revealing cellular and molecular mechanisms of leukocyte recruitment(2,5). In this report, we provide a comprehensive description of using brightfield intravital microscopy to visualize and determine the detailed processes of neutrophil recruitment in mouse cremaster muscle in response to the gradient of a neutrophil chemoattractant. To induce neutrophil recruitment, a small piece of agarose gel (~1-mm(3) size) containing neutrophil chemoattractant MIP-2 (CXCL2, a CXC chemokine) or WKYMVm (Trp-Lys-Tyr-Val-D-Met, a synthetic analog of bacterial peptide) is placed on the muscle tissue adjacent to the observed postcapillary venule. With time-lapsed video photography and computer software ImageJ, neutrophil intraluminal crawling on endothelium, neutrophil transendothelial migration and the migration and chemotaxis in tissue are visualized and tracked. This protocol allows reliable and quantitative analysis of many neutrophil recruitment parameters such as intraluminal crawling velocity, transmigration time, detachment time, migration velocity, chemotaxis velocity and chemotaxis index in tissue. We demonstrate that using this protocol, these

  7. Multiple Administrations of Viral Nanoparticles Alter in Vivo Behavior-Insights from Intravital Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Sourabh; Dorand, R Dixon; Myers, Jay T; Woods, Sarah E; Gulati, Neetu M; Stewart, Phoebe L; Commandeur, Ulrich; Huang, Alex Y; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-05-09

    Multiple administrations of nanoparticle-based formulations are often a clinical requirement for drug delivery and diagnostic imaging applications. Steady pharmacokinetics of nanoparticles is desirable to achieve efficient therapeutic or diagnostic outcomes over such repeat administrations. While clearance through mononuclear phagocytic system is a key determinant of nanoparticle persistence in vivo, multiple administrations could potentially result in altered pharmacokinetics by evoking innate or adaptive immune responses. Plant viral nanoparticles (VNPs) represent an emerging class of programmable nanoparticle platform technologies that offer a highly organized proteinaceous architecture and multivalency for delivery of large payloads of drugs and molecular contrast agents. These very structural features also render them susceptible to immune recognition and subsequent accelerated systemic clearance that could potentially affect overall efficiency. While the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of VNPs have been reported, the biological response following repeat administrations remains an understudied area of investigation. Here, we demonstrate that weekly administration of filamentous plant viruses results in the generation of increasing levels of circulating, carrier-specific IgM and IgG antibodies. Furthermore, PVX specific immunoglobulins from the serum of immunized animals quickly form aggregates when incubated with PVX in vitro. Such aggregates of VNP-immune complexes are also observed in the mouse vasculature in vivo following repeat injections when imaged in real time using intravital two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM). The size of aggregates diminishes at later time points, coinciding with antibody class switching from IgM to IgG. Together, our results highlight the need for careful in vivo assessment of (viral) nanoparticle-based platform technologies, especially in studying their performance after repeat administration. We also demonstrate

  8. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography.

    PubMed

    Umetani, K; Fukushima, K

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 μm, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 μm diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 μm was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  9. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 μm, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 μm diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 μm was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  10. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy: An emerging technique for intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K

    2012-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates-only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment.

  11. Fluorescent imaging of endothelial glycocalyx layer with wheat germ agglutinin using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hanae; Ushiyama, Akira; Kawakami, Hayato; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Matsubara, Sachie; Iijima, Takehiko

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial glycocalyx (GCX) is located on the apical surface of vascular endothelial cells and is composed of a negatively-charged network of proteoglycans and glycoproteins. The GCX plays an important role in maintaining the integrity of vascular walls and preventing leakage of plasma. Therefore, degradation of the GCX is believed to lead to pathological leakage of plasma. Because the GCX is a very thin layer, its ultrastructural image has been demonstrated on electron microscope. To explore the function of the GCX, it should be visualized by a microscope in vivo. Thus, we developed in vivo visualization technique of the GCX under fluorescence microscopy using a mouse dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) model. To label and visualize the GCX, we used fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled lectin, which has a high specificity for sugar moieties. We examined the affinity of the different lectins to epivascular regions under an intravital fluorescent microscope. Among seven different lectins we examined, FITC labeled Triticum vulgaris (wheat germ) agglutinin (WGA) delineated the GCX most clearly. Binding of WGA to the GCX was inhibited by chitin hydrolysate, which contained WGA-binding polysaccharide chains. Furthermore, the septic condition attenuated this structure, suggesting structural degradation of endothelial GCX layer. In conclusion, FITC-labeled WGA lectin enabled visualization of endothelial GCX under in vivo fluorescence microscopy.

  12. Improving spinning disk confocal microscopy by preventing pinhole cross-talk for intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shimozawa, Togo; Yamagata, Kazuo; Kondo, Takefumi; Hayashi, Shigeo; Shitamukai, Atsunori; Konno, Daijiro; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Takayama, Jun; Onami, Shuichi; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kosugi, Yasuhito; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Fujita, Katsumasa; Mimori-Kiyosue, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    A recent key requirement in life sciences is the observation of biological processes in their natural in vivo context. However, imaging techniques that allow fast imaging with higher resolution in 3D thick specimens are still limited. Spinning disk confocal microscopy using a Yokogawa Confocal Scanner Unit, which offers high-speed multipoint confocal live imaging, has been found to have wide utility among cell biologists. A conventional Confocal Scanner Unit configuration, however, is not optimized for thick specimens, for which the background noise attributed to “pinhole cross-talk,” which is unintended pinhole transmission of out-of-focus light, limits overall performance in focal discrimination and reduces confocal capability. Here, we improve spinning disk confocal microscopy by eliminating pinhole cross-talk. First, the amount of pinhole cross-talk is reduced by increasing the interpinhole distance. Second, the generation of out-of-focus light is prevented by two-photon excitation that achieves selective-plane illumination. We evaluate the effect of these modifications and test the applicability to the live imaging of green fluorescent protein-expressing model animals. As demonstrated by visualizing the fine details of the 3D cell shape and submicron-size cytoskeletal structures inside animals, these strategies dramatically improve higher-resolution intravital imaging. PMID:23401517

  13. Intravital correlated microscopy reveals differential macrophage and microglial dynamics during resolution of neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    van Ham, Tjakko J.; Brady, Colleen A.; Kalicharan, Ruby D.; Oosterhof, Nynke; Kuipers, Jeroen; Veenstra-Algra, Anneke; Sjollema, Klaas A.; Peterson, Randall T.; Kampinga, Harm H.; Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    2014-01-01

    Many brain diseases involve activation of resident and peripheral immune cells to clear damaged and dying neurons. Which immune cells respond in what way to cues related to brain disease, however, remains poorly understood. To elucidate these in vivo immunological events in response to brain cell death we used genetically targeted cell ablation in zebrafish. Using intravital microscopy and large-scale electron microscopy, we defined the kinetics and nature of immune responses immediately following injury. Initially, clearance of dead cells occurs by mononuclear phagocytes, including resident microglia and macrophages of peripheral origin, whereas amoeboid microglia are exclusively involved at a later stage. Granulocytes, on the other hand, do not migrate towards the injury. Remarkably, following clearance, phagocyte numbers decrease, partly by phagocyte cell death and subsequent engulfment of phagocyte corpses by microglia. Here, we identify differential temporal involvement of microglia and peripheral macrophages in clearance of dead cells in the brain, revealing the chronological sequence of events in neuroinflammatory resolution. Remarkably, recruited phagocytes undergo cell death and are engulfed by microglia. Because adult zebrafish treated at the larval stage lack signs of pathology, it is likely that this mode of resolving immune responses in brain contributes to full tissue recovery. Therefore, these findings suggest that control of such immune cell behavior could benefit recovery from neuronal damage. PMID:24973753

  14. Visualizing dynamics of sub-hepatic distribution of nanoparticles using intravital multiphoton fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Li, Feng-Chieh; Souris, Jeffrey S; Yang, Chung-Shi; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Chen, Chin-Tu; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2012-05-22

    Nanoparticles that do not undergo renal excretion or in vivo degradation into biocompatible debris often accumulate in the reticuloendothelial system, also know as the mononuclear phagocyte system, with undesired consequences that limit their clinical utility. In this work, we report the first application of intravital multiphoton fluorescence microscopy to dynamically track the hepatic metabolism of nanoparticles with subcellular resolution in real time. Using fluorescently labeled mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) in mice as a prototypical model, we observed significant hepatocyte uptake of positively charged, but not negatively charged, moieties. Conversely, in vivo imaging of negatively charged, but not positively charged, MSNs reveals an overwhelming propensity for the former's rapid uptake by Kupffer cells in liver sinusoids. Since the only prerequisite for these studies was that nanoparticles are fluorescently labeled and not of a specific composition or structure, the techniques we present can readily be extended to a wide variety of nanoparticle structures and surface modifications (e.g., shape, charge, hydrophobicity, PEGylation) in the preclinical assessment and tailoring of their hepatotoxicities and clearances.

  15. Just Look! Intravital Microscopy as the Best Means to Study Kidney Cell Death Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Schießl, Ina Maria; Hammer, Anna; Riquier-Brison, Anne; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2016-05-01

    Kidney cell death plays a key role in the progression of life-threatening renal diseases, such as acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease. Injured and dying epithelial and endothelial cells take part in complex communication with the innate immune system, which drives the progression of cell death and the decrease in renal function. To improve our understanding of kidney cell death dynamics and its impact on renal disease, a study approach is needed that facilitates the visualization of renal function and morphology in real time. Intravital multiphoton microscopy of the kidney has been used for more than a decade and made substantial contributions to our understanding of kidney physiology and pathophysiology. It is a unique tool that relates renal structure and function in a time- and spatial-dependent manner. Basic renal function, such as microvascular blood flow regulation and glomerular filtration, can be determined in real time and homeostatic alterations, which are linked inevitably to cell death and can be depicted down to the subcellular level. This review provides an overview of the available techniques to study kidney dysfunction and inflammation in terms of cell death in vivo, and addresses how this novel approach can be used to improve our understanding of cell death dynamics in renal disease.

  16. Intra-vital microscopy of lung tissue: A simulation based analysis of the image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Maria; Schirrmann, Kerstin; Schnabel, Christian; Meissner, Sven; Kertzscher, Ulrich; Kirsten, Lars; Koch, Edmund

    2013-06-01

    In the course of pulmonary research, understanding alveolar tissue dynamics plays a critical role in the treatment of patients suffering from acute lung diseases. As a gold standard technique for monitoring micro scale changes of lung tissue, real-time intra-vital microscopy (IVM) has been established to evaluate the behavior of the alveolar tissue. To allow profound qualitative and quantitative conclusions, characteristic features of the obtained images have to be thoroughly understood. These factors are strongly influenced by the imaging setup and physiological condition of the lung. To circumvent misinterpretations, a ray-tracing approach has been applied in this study using an idealized geometry of the mouse lung parenchyma deduced from optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a complementary imaging technique. Basic features of IVM images are double ring structures and disappearing of alveoli related to liquid infiltration. Ray propagation analysis reveals the formation of these features by two major reflection processes: partial reflection and total internal reflection. The results give rise to quantification errors of the alveolar area related to reflexes misinterpreted as alveolar borders and should further be used to yield a correction factor for future IVM lung tissue studies.

  17. Automated Identification and Localization of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in 3D Intravital Microscopy Data.

    PubMed

    Khorshed, Reema A; Hawkins, Edwin D; Duarte, Delfim; Scott, Mark K; Akinduro, Olufolake A; Rashidi, Narges M; Spitaler, Martin; Lo Celso, Cristina

    2015-07-14

    Measuring three-dimensional (3D) localization of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) within the bone marrow microenvironment using intravital microscopy is a rapidly expanding research theme. This approach holds the key to understanding the detail of HSC-niche interactions, which are critical for appropriate stem cell function. Due to the complex tissue architecture of the bone marrow and to the progressive introduction of scattering and signal loss at increasing imaging depths, there is no ready-made software to handle efficient segmentation and unbiased analysis of the data. To address this, we developed an automated image analysis tool that simplifies and standardizes the biological interpretation of 3D HSC microenvironment images. The algorithm identifies HSCs and measures their localization relative to surrounding osteoblast cells and bone collagen. We demonstrate here the effectiveness, consistency, and accuracy of the proposed approach compared to current manual analysis and its wider applicability to analyze other 3D bone marrow components. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Intravital microscopy evaluation of angiogenesis and its effects on glucose sensor performance

    PubMed Central

    Koschwanez, H.E.; Reichert, W.M.; Klitzman, B.

    2009-01-01

    An optical window model for the rodent dorsum was used to perform chronic and quantitative intravital microscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry of microvascular networks adjacent to functional and non-functional glucose sensors. The one-sided configuration afforded direct, real-time observation of the tissue response to bare (unmodified, smooth surface) sensors and sensors coated with porous poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA). Microvessel length density and red blood cell flux (blood perfusion) within 1mm of the sensors were measured bi-weekly over two weeks. When non-functional sensors were fully implanted beneath the windows the porous coated sensors had twofold more vasculature and significantly higher blood perfusion than bare sensors on Day 14. When functional sensors were implanted percutaneously, as in clinical use, no differences in baseline current, neovascularization or tissue perfusion were observed between bare and porous coated sensors. However, percutaneously implanted bare sensors had two-fold more vascularity than fully implanted bare sensors by Day 14, indicating other factors, such as micromotion, might be stimulating angiogenesis. Despite increased angiogenesis adjacent to percutaneous sensors, modest sensor current attenuation occurred over 14 days, suggesting that factors other than angiogenesis may play a dominant role in determining sensor function. PMID:19911378

  19. Liver microcirculation analysis by red blood cell motion modeling in intravital microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Walid S; Schmugge, Stephen J; Kraftchick, Jerrod P; Clemens, Mark G; Shin, Min C

    2008-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has been used to visualize the microcirculation by imaging fluorescent labeled red blood cells (RBCs). Traditionally, microcirculation has been modeled by computing the mean velocity of a few, randomly selected, manually tracked RBCs. However, this protocol is tedious, time consuming, and subjective with technician related bias. We present a new method for analyzing the microcirculation by modeling the RBC motion through automatic tracking. The tracking of RBCs is challenging as in each image, as many as 200 cells move through a complex network of vessels at a wide range of speeds while deforming in shape. To reliably detect RBCs traveling at a wide range of speeds, a window of temporal template matching is applied. Then, cells appearing in successive frames are corresponded based on the motion behavior constraints in terms of the direction, magnitude, and path. The performance evaluation against a ground truth indicates the detection accuracy up to 84% TP at 6% FP and a correspondence accuracy of 89%. We include an in-depth discussion on comparison of the microcirculation based on motion modeling from the proposed automated method against a mean velocity from manual analysis protocol in terms of precision, objectivity, and sensitivity.

  20. Real-time intravital microscopy of individual nanoparticle dynamics in liver and tumors of live mice

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Anne L; Kim, Pilhan; Ferrari, Mauro; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is emerging as an important experimental tool for the research and development of multi-functional therapeutic nanoconstructs. The direct visualization of nanoparticle dynamics within live animals provides invaluable insights into the mechanisms that regulate nanotherapeutics transport and cell-particle interactions. Here we present a protocol to image the dynamics of nanoparticles within the liver and tumors of live mice immediately following systemic injection using a high-speed (30-400 fps) confocal or multi-photon laser-scanning fluorescence microscope. Techniques for quantifying the real-time accumulation and cellular association of individual particles with a size ranging from several tens of nanometers to micrometers are described, as well as an experimental strategy for labeling Kupffer cells in the liver in vivo. Experimental design considerations and controls are provided, as well as minimum equipment requirements. The entire protocol takes approximately 4-8 hours and yields quantitative information. These techniques can serve to study a wide range of kinetic parameters that drive nanotherapeutics delivery, uptake, and treatment response. PMID:25383179

  1. Use of intravital microscopy to study the microvascular behavior of microbubble-based ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Michel; Broillet, Anne; Tardy, Isabelle; Pochon, Sibylle; Bussat, Philippe; Bettinger, Thierry; Helbert, Alexandre; Costa, Maria; Tranquart, François

    2012-04-01

    The study describes the use of intravital microscopy (IVM) to assess the behavior of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), including targeted UCAs, in the microcirculation of rodents. IVM was performed on various exteriorized organs: hamster cheek pouch, rat mesentery, liver, spinotrapezius muscle, and mouse cremaster muscle. A dorsal skin-fold chamber with MatBIII tumor cells was also implanted in rats. Nontargeted UCAs (SonoVue(®) and BR14) and targeted UCAs (BR55 and P-selectin targeted microbubbles) were tested. IVM was used to measure microbubble size, determine their persistence, and observe their behavior in the blood circulation. Intravenous and intra-arterial injections of high doses of UCAs did not modify the local microvascular hemodynamics. No microbubble coalescence and no increased size were observed. Adhesion of some microbubbles to leukocytes was observed in various microcirculation models. Microbubbles are captured by Kupffer cells in the liver. Targeted microbubbles were shown to adhere specifically to endothelial receptors without compromising local blood flow. These results support the safety of both targeted and nontargeted UCAs as no microvascular flow alteration or plugging of microvessels were observed. They confirm that binding observed with targeted microbubbles are due to the binding of these microbubbles to specific endothelial receptors. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Treadmill exercise induces neutrophil recruitment into muscle tissue in a reactive oxygen species-dependent manner. An intravital microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Nunes-Silva, Albená; Bernardes, Priscila T T; Rezende, Bárbara M; Lopes, Fernando; Gomes, Elisa C; Marques, Pedro E; Lima, Paulo M A; Coimbra, Cândido C; Menezes, Gustavo B; Teixeira, Mauro M; Pinho, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is a physiological stress capable of inducing the interaction of neutrophils with muscle endothelial cells and their transmigration into tissue. Mechanisms driving this physiological inflammatory response are not known. Here, we investigate whether production of reactive oxygen species is relevant for neutrophil interaction with endothelial cells and recruitment into the quadriceps muscle in mice subjected to the treadmill fatiguing exercise protocol. Mice exercised until fatigue by running for 56.3±6.8 min on an electric treadmill. Skeletal muscle was evaluated by intravital microscopy at different time points after exercise, and then removed to assess local oxidative stress and histopathological analysis. We observed an increase in plasma lactate and creatine kinase (CK) concentrations after exercise. The numbers of monocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in blood increased 12 and 24 hours after the exercise. Numbers of rolling and adherent leukocytes increased 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours post-exercise, as assessed by intravital microscopy. Using LysM-eGFP mice and confocal intravital microscopy technology, we show that the number of transmigrating neutrophils increased 12 hours post-exercise. Mutant gp91phox-/- (non-functional NADPH oxidase) mice and mice treated with apocynin showed diminished neutrophil recruitment. SOD treatment promoted further adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes 12 hours after the exercise. These findings confirm our hypothesis that treadmill exercise increases the recruitment of leukocytes to the postcapillary venules, and NADPH oxidase-induced ROS plays an important role in this process.

  3. Treadmill Exercise Induces Neutrophil Recruitment into Muscle Tissue in a Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Manner. An Intravital Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Nunes-Silva, Albená; Bernardes, Priscila T. T.; Rezende, Bárbara M.; Lopes, Fernando; Gomes, Elisa C.; Marques, Pedro E.; Lima, Paulo M. A.; Coimbra, Cândido C.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Pinho, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is a physiological stress capable of inducing the interaction of neutrophils with muscle endothelial cells and their transmigration into tissue. Mechanisms driving this physiological inflammatory response are not known. Here, we investigate whether production of reactive oxygen species is relevant for neutrophil interaction with endothelial cells and recruitment into the quadriceps muscle in mice subjected to the treadmill fatiguing exercise protocol. Mice exercised until fatigue by running for 56.3±6.8 min on an electric treadmill. Skeletal muscle was evaluated by intravital microscopy at different time points after exercise, and then removed to assess local oxidative stress and histopathological analysis. We observed an increase in plasma lactate and creatine kinase (CK) concentrations after exercise. The numbers of monocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in blood increased 12 and 24 hours after the exercise. Numbers of rolling and adherent leukocytes increased 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours post-exercise, as assessed by intravital microscopy. Using LysM-eGFP mice and confocal intravital microscopy technology, we show that the number of transmigrating neutrophils increased 12 hours post-exercise. Mutant gp91phox-/- (non-functional NADPH oxidase) mice and mice treated with apocynin showed diminished neutrophil recruitment. SOD treatment promoted further adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes 12 hours after the exercise. These findings confirm our hypothesis that treadmill exercise increases the recruitment of leukocytes to the postcapillary venules, and NADPH oxidase-induced ROS plays an important role in this process. PMID:24798414

  4. Long Term Intravital Multiphoton Microscopy Imaging of Immune Cells in Healthy and Diseased Liver Using CXCR6.Gfp Reporter Mice

    PubMed Central

    Peusquens, Julia; Ergen, Can; Kohlhepp, Marlene; Mossanen, Jana C.; Schneider, Carlo; Vogt, Michael; Tolba, Rene H.; Trautwein, Christian; Martin, Christian; Tacke, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Liver inflammation as a response to injury is a highly dynamic process involving the infiltration of distinct subtypes of leukocytes including monocytes, neutrophils, T cell subsets, B cells, natural killer (NK) and NKT cells. Intravital microscopy of the liver for monitoring immune cell migration is particularly challenging due to the high requirements regarding sample preparation and fixation, optical resolution and long-term animal survival. Yet, the dynamics of inflammatory processes as well as cellular interaction studies could provide critical information to better understand the initiation, progression and regression of inflammatory liver disease. Therefore, a highly sensitive and reliable method was established to study migration and cell-cell-interactions of different immune cells in mouse liver over long periods (about 6 hr) by intravital two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) in combination with intensive care monitoring. The method provided includes a gentle preparation and stable fixation of the liver with minimal perturbation of the organ; long term intravital imaging using multicolor multiphoton microscopy with virtually no photobleaching or phototoxic effects over a time period of up to 6 hr, allowing tracking of specific leukocyte subsets; and stable imaging conditions due to extensive monitoring of mouse vital parameters and stabilization of circulation, temperature and gas exchange. To investigate lymphocyte migration upon liver inflammation CXCR6.gfp knock-in mice were subjected to intravital liver imaging under baseline conditions and after acute and chronic liver damage induced by intraperitoneal injection(s) of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). CXCR6 is a chemokine receptor expressed on lymphocytes, mainly on Natural Killer T (NKT)-, Natural Killer (NK)- and subsets of T lymphocytes such as CD4 T cells but also mucosal associated invariant (MAIT) T cells1. Following the migratory pattern and positioning of CXCR6.gfp+ immune cells allowed a

  5. Future Perspective of Single-Molecule FRET Biosensors and Intravital FRET Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Eishu; Kiyokawa, Etsuko

    2016-09-20

    Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a nonradiative energy transfer process between two fluorophores located in close proximity to each other. To date, a variety of biosensors based on the principle of FRET have been developed to monitor the activity of kinases, proteases, GTPases or lipid concentration in living cells. In addition, generation of biosensors that can monitor physical stresses such as mechanical power, heat, or electric/magnetic fields is also expected based on recent discoveries on the effects of these stressors on cell behavior. These biosensors can now be stably expressed in cells and mice by transposon technologies. In addition, two-photon excitation microscopy can be used to detect the activities or concentrations of bioactive molecules in vivo. In the future, more sophisticated techniques for image acquisition and quantitative analysis will be needed to obtain more precise FRET signals in spatiotemporal dimensions. Improvement of tissue/organ position fixation methods for mouse imaging is the first step toward effective image acquisition. Progress in the development of fluorescent proteins that can be excited with longer wavelength should be applied to FRET biosensors to obtain deeper structures. The development of computational programs that can separately quantify signals from single cells embedded in complicated three-dimensional environments is also expected. Along with the progress in these methodologies, two-photon excitation intravital FRET microscopy will be a powerful and valuable tool for the comprehensive understanding of biomedical phenomena. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists on rat dural artery diameter in an intravital microscopy model

    PubMed Central

    Chan, KY; Gupta, S; de Vries, R; Danser, AHJ; Villalón, CM; Muñoz-Islas, E; Maassen Van Den Brink, A

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: During migraine, trigeminal nerves may release calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), inducing cranial vasodilatation and central nociception; hence, trigeminal inhibition or blockade of craniovascular CGRP receptors may prevent this vasodilatation and abort migraine headache. Several preclinical studies have shown that glutamate receptor antagonists affect the pathophysiology of migraine. This study investigated whether antagonists of NMDA (ketamine and MK801), AMPA (GYKI52466) and kainate (LY466195) glutamate receptors affected dural vasodilatation induced by α-CGRP, capsaicin and periarterial electrical stimulation in rats, using intravital microscopy. Experimental approach: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized and the overlying bone was thinned to visualize the dural artery. Then, vasodilator responses to exogenous (i.v. α-CGRP) and endogenous (released by i.v. capsaicin and periarterial electrical stimulation) CGRP were elicited in the absence or presence of the above antagonists. Key results: α-CGRP, capsaicin and periarterial electrical stimulation increased dural artery diameter. Ketamine and MK801 inhibited the vasodilator responses to capsaicin and electrical stimulation, while only ketamine attenuated those to α-CGRP. In contrast, GYKI52466 only attenuated the vasodilatation to exogenous α-CGRP, while LY466195 did not affect the vasodilator responses to endogenous or exogenous CGRP. Conclusions and implications: Although GYKI52466 has not been tested clinically, our data suggest that it would not inhibit migraine via vascular mechanisms. Similarly, the antimigraine efficacy of LY466195 seems unrelated to vascular CGRP-mediated pathways and/or receptors. In contrast, the cranial vascular effects of ketamine and MK801 may represent a therapeutic mechanism, although the same mechanism might contribute, peripherally, to cardiovascular side effects. PMID:20590623

  7. Automatic detection of motion blur in intravital video microscopy image sequences via directional statistics of log-Gabor energy maps.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Ricardo J; Pinto, Carlos H Villa; da Silva, Bruno C Gregório; Bernardes, Danielle; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana

    2015-02-01

    Intravital microscopy is an important experimental tool for the study of cellular and molecular mechanisms of the leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the microcirculation of various tissues and in different inflammatory conditions of in vivo specimens. However, due to the limited control over the conditions of the image acquisition, motion blur and artifacts, resulting mainly from the heartbeat and respiratory movements of the in vivo specimen, will very often be present. This problem can significantly undermine the results of either visual or computerized analysis of the acquired video images. Since only a fraction of the total number of images are usually corrupted by severe motion blur, it is necessary to have a procedure to automatically identify such images in the video for either further restoration or removal. This paper proposes a new technique for the detection of motion blur in intravital video microscopy based on directional statistics of local energy maps computed using a bank of 2D log-Gabor filters. Quantitative assessment using both artificially corrupted images and real microscopy data were conducted to test the effectiveness of the proposed method. Results showed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.95 (AUC = 0.95; 95 % CI 0.93-0.97) when tested on 329 video images visually ranked by four observers.

  8. Automated measurement of blood flow velocity and direction and hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the rat lung using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Gabi; Fontanella, Andrew; Palmer, Gregory; Shan, Siqing; Radiloff, Daniel R; Zhao, Yulin; Irwin, David; Hamilton, Karyn; Boico, Alina; Piantadosi, Claude A; Blueschke, Gert; Dewhirst, Mark; McMahon, Timothy; Schroeder, Thies

    2013-01-15

    Intravital microscopy of the pulmonary microcirculation in research animals is of great scientific interest for its utility in identifying regional changes in pulmonary microcirculatory blood flow. Although feasibility studies have been reported, the pulmonary window can be further refined into a practical tool for pharmaceutical research and drug development. We have established a method to visualize and quantify dynamic changes in three key features of lung function: microvascular red blood cell velocity, flow direction, and hemoglobin saturation. These physiological parameters were measured in an acute closed-chest pulmonary window, which allows real-time images to be captured by fluorescence and multispectral absorption microscopy; images were subsequently quantified using computerized analysis. We validated the model by quantifying changes in microcirculatory blood flow and hemoglobin saturation in two ways: 1) after changes in inspired oxygen content and 2) after pharmacological reduction of pulmonary blood flow via treatment with the β1 adrenergic receptor blocker metoprolol. This robust and relatively simple system facilitates pulmonary intravital microscopy in laboratory rats for pharmacological and physiological research.

  9. Direct observation of liposome uptake by leukocytes in vivo in skin blood vessels using intravital fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Mordon, Serge R.; Begu, Sylvie; Desmettre, Thomas

    2000-04-01

    This study aimed to observe liposome uptake by leukocytes in vivo. The study was performed on skin by using a dorsal skin-fold chamber implanted in golden hamsters using intravital microscopy. 5,6-CF-encapsulated PEGylated liposomes were injected intravenously. The skin microcirculation was observed with an intravital Eclipse E800 Nikon microscope fitted with a Xenon light source and an epi-fluorescence assembly. An ultra-high sensitivity video-camera mounted on the microscope projected the image onto a monitor, and the images were recorded for playback analysis with a digital video cassette recorder. An acute inflammatory response was obtained by removing one complete layer of skin and the underlying fascia and avascular tissue on the opposing side of the flap corresponding to an area equivalent to the window aperture. Using these model and set-up, leukocyte rolling and adhesion were easily observed and the entry of PEGylated liposomes into hamster blood leukocytes was studied for a period of 6 hours. PEGylated liposomes were clearly identified alone inside the blood flow and inside the leukocytes as soon as the inflammatory reaction appeared. This study shows for the first time that blood leukocytes in their natural milieu of whole blood are capable of interacting with, and taking up liposomes. This observation is in accordance with previous in vitro studies.

  10. Development of synchrotron radiation x-ray intravital microscopy for in vivo imaging of rat heart vascular function.

    PubMed

    Umetani, Keiji; Pearson, James T; Schwenke, Daryl O; Shirai, Mikiyasu

    2011-01-01

    This study elucidates the vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation in closed-chest rats to evaluate endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilatory ability and to investigate disease mechanisms. For this study, we developed an X-ray intravital microscopy system using a microangiography technique and a synchrotron radiation source at SPring-8. An X-ray direct-conversion type detector with 7-μm spatial resolution was used for real-time imaging. Microangiographic images were stored in a digital frame memory system at a maximum rate of 30 frame/s with a 1024 × 1024-pixel, 10-bit format. In imaging experiments, the small coronary arteries were visualized after iodine contrast agent injection into the coronary artery.

  11. Holographic intravital microscopy for 2-D and 3-D imaging intact circulating blood cells in microcapillaries of live mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Choe, Kibaek; Park, Inwon; Kim, Pilhan; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is an essential tool that reveals behaviours of live cells under conditions close to natural physiological states. So far, although various approaches for imaging cells in vivo have been proposed, most require the use of labelling and also provide only qualitative imaging information. Holographic imaging approach based on measuring the refractive index distributions of cells, however, circumvent these problems and offer quantitative and label-free imaging capability. Here, we demonstrate in vivo two- and three-dimensional holographic imaging of circulating blood cells in intact microcapillaries of live mice. The measured refractive index distributions of blood cells provide morphological and biochemical properties including three-dimensional cell shape, haemoglobin concentration, and haemoglobin contents at the individual cell level. With the present method, alterations in blood flow dynamics in live healthy and sepsis-model mice were also investigated. PMID:27605489

  12. Holographic intravital microscopy for 2-D and 3-D imaging intact circulating blood cells in microcapillaries of live mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Choe, Kibaek; Park, Inwon; Kim, Pilhan; Park, Yongkeun

    2016-09-01

    Intravital microscopy is an essential tool that reveals behaviours of live cells under conditions close to natural physiological states. So far, although various approaches for imaging cells in vivo have been proposed, most require the use of labelling and also provide only qualitative imaging information. Holographic imaging approach based on measuring the refractive index distributions of cells, however, circumvent these problems and offer quantitative and label-free imaging capability. Here, we demonstrate in vivo two- and three-dimensional holographic imaging of circulating blood cells in intact microcapillaries of live mice. The measured refractive index distributions of blood cells provide morphological and biochemical properties including three-dimensional cell shape, haemoglobin concentration, and haemoglobin contents at the individual cell level. With the present method, alterations in blood flow dynamics in live healthy and sepsis-model mice were also investigated.

  13. Combined application of dynamic light scattering imaging and fluorescence intravital microscopy in vascular biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, V.; Ziv, K.; Addadi, Y.; Madar-Balakirski, N.; Meglinski, I.; Neeman, M.; Harmelin, A.

    2010-08-01

    The dynamic light scattering imaging (DLSI) system combined with the conventional fluorescence intravital microscope (FIM) has been applied for the examination of blood and lymph vessels in the mouse ear in vivo. While the CCD camera can be shared by both techniques the combined application of DLSI and FIM allows rapid switching between the modalities. In current study temporal speckles fluctuations are used for rendering blood vessels structure and monitoring blood perfusion with the higher spatial resolution, whereas FIM provides the images of lymphatic vessels. The results clearly demonstrate that combined application of DLSI and FIM approaches provides synchronic in vivo images of blood and lymph vessels with higher contrast and specificity. The use of this new dual-modal diagnostic system is particularly important and has a great potential to significantly expand the capabilities of vascular diagnostics providing synchronic in vivo images of blood and lymph vessels.

  14. Quantitative intravital two-photon excitation microscopy reveals absence of pulmonary vaso-occlusion in unchallenged Sickle Cell Disease mice.

    PubMed

    Bennewitz, Margaret F; Watkins, Simon C; Sundd, Prithu

    2014-07-07

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder that leads to red blood cell (RBC) sickling, hemolysis and the upregulation of adhesion molecules on sickle RBCs. Chronic hemolysis in SCD results in a hyper-inflammatory state characterized by activation of circulating leukocytes, platelets and endothelial cells even in the absence of a crisis. A crisis in SCD is often triggered by an inflammatory stimulus and can lead to the acute chest syndrome (ACS), which is a type of lung injury and a leading cause of mortality among SCD patients. Although it is believed that pulmonary vaso-occlusion could be the phenomenon contributing to the development of ACS, the role of vaso-occlusion in ACS remains elusive. Intravital imaging of the cremaster microcirculation in SCD mice has been instrumental in establishing the role of neutrophil-RBC-endothelium interactions in systemic vaso-occlusion; however, such studies, although warranted, have never been done in the pulmonary microcirculation of SCD mice. Here, we show that two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy can be used to perform quantitative analysis of neutrophil and RBC trafficking in the pulmonary microcirculation of SCD mice. We provide the experimental approach that enables microscopic observations under physiological conditions and use it to show that RBC and neutrophil trafficking is comparable in SCD and control mice in the absence of an inflammatory stimulus. The intravital imaging scheme proposed in this study can be useful in elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanism of pulmonary vaso-occlusion in SCD mice following an inflammatory stimulus.

  15. Quantitative intravital two-photon excitation microscopy reveals absence of pulmonary vaso-occlusion in unchallenged Sickle Cell Disease mice

    PubMed Central

    Bennewitz, Margaret F; Watkins, Simon C; Sundd, Prithu

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder that leads to red blood cell (RBC) sickling, hemolysis and the upregulation of adhesion molecules on sickle RBCs. Chronic hemolysis in SCD results in a hyper-inflammatory state characterized by activation of circulating leukocytes, platelets and endothelial cells even in the absence of a crisis. A crisis in SCD is often triggered by an inflammatory stimulus and can lead to the acute chest syndrome (ACS), which is a type of lung injury and a leading cause of mortality among SCD patients. Although it is believed that pulmonary vaso-occlusion could be the phenomenon contributing to the development of ACS, the role of vaso-occlusion in ACS remains elusive. Intravital imaging of the cremaster microcirculation in SCD mice has been instrumental in establishing the role of neutrophil-RBC-endothelium interactions in systemic vaso-occlusion; however, such studies, although warranted, have never been done in the pulmonary microcirculation of SCD mice. Here, we show that two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy can be used to perform quantitative analysis of neutrophil and RBC trafficking in the pulmonary microcirculation of SCD mice. We provide the experimental approach that enables microscopic observations under physiological conditions and use it to show that RBC and neutrophil trafficking is comparable in SCD and control mice in the absence of an inflammatory stimulus. The intravital imaging scheme proposed in this study can be useful in elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanism of pulmonary vaso-occlusion in SCD mice following an inflammatory stimulus. PMID:25995970

  16. Visualizing leukocyte trafficking in the living brain with 2-photon intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Saparna; Danne, Karyn J.; Qin, Jim; Cavanagh, Lois L.; Smith, Adrian; Hickey, Michael J.; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Intravital imaging of the superficial brain tissue in mice represents a powerful tool for the dissection of the cellular and molecular cues underlying inflammatory and infectious central nervous system (CNS) diseases. We present here a step-by-step protocol that will enable a non-specialist to set up a two-photon brain-imaging model. The protocol offers a two-part approach that is specifically optimized for imaging leukocytes but can be easily adapted to answer varied CNS-related biological questions. The protocol enables simultaneous visualization of fluorescently labeled immune cells, the pial microvasculature and extracellular structures such as collagen fibers at high spatial and temporal resolution. Intracranial structures are exposed through a cranial window, and physiologic conditions are maintained during extended imaging sessions via continuous superfusion of the brain surface with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF). Experiments typically require 1–2 h of preparation, which is followed by variable periods of immune cell tracking. Our methodology converges the experience of two laboratories over the past 10 years in diseased animal models such as cerebral ischemia, lupus, cerebral malaria, and toxoplasmosis. We exemplify the utility of this protocol by tracking leukocytes in transgenic mice in the pial vessels under steady-state conditions. PMID:23316136

  17. Effects of antihypertensive drugs on capillary rarefaction in spontaneously hypertensive rats: intravital microscopy and histologic analysis.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Bruno; Lessa, Marcos A; Nascimento, Alessandro R; Rodrigues, Carlos Ab; Henriques, Maria das Graças; Garzoni, Luciana R; Levy, Bernard I; Tibiriçá, Eduardo

    2008-04-01

    We investigated the effects of chronic oral antihypertensive treatment on functional and structural capillary rarefaction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) were used as a normotensive control group. In untreated rats, intravital videomicroscopy showed that functional capillary density was lower in SHR skeletal muscle (WKY 395 +/- 17 and SHR 258 +/- 13 capillaries/mm, P < 0.01) and ear skin (WKY 391 +/- 18 and SHR 210 +/- 15 capillaries/mm, P < 0.01). A linear relationship was seen between skeletal muscle and skin capillary densities (r = 0.654, P < 0.0001). Histologic analysis showed that SHR had a lower capillary-to-fiber ratio in the skeletal muscle (WKY 1.74 +/- 0.08 and SHR 1.40 +/- 0.06, P < 0.01). Capillary volume density-to-fiber volume density ratio in the left ventricle of SHR was also reduced (WKY 0.55 +/- 0.09 and SHR 0.42 +/- 0.09, P < 0.01). The animals were treated with the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril, the angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1) receptor antagonist losartan, the beta-blocker atenolol, or the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, resulting in similar reductions in systolic blood pressure (19.8%, 19.1%, 17.4%, and 18.2%, respectively, P > 0.05). Atenolol did not induce any change in functional capillary density of SHR. Losartan and nifedipine completely reversed functional capillary rarefaction in both muscle and cutaneous tissues, whereas enalapril significantly increased functional capillary density only in the skin. The skeletal muscle capillary-to-fiber ratio was normalized by enalapril, losartan, and nifedipine. Treatments with enalapril or losartan normalized the cardiac structural capillary rarefaction of SHRs, whereas atenolol and nifedipine had no effect. Our results suggest that different pharmacologic classes of antihypertensive drugs with similar effect on blood pressure differ in terms of their effect on the microcirculation.

  18. Intravital two-photon microscopy of host-pathogen interactions in a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus skin abscess formation.

    PubMed

    Liese, Jan; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; van Strijp, Jos A G; Novick, Richard P; Dustin, Michael L

    2013-06-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is a frequent cause of severe skin infections. The ability to control the infection is largely dependent on the rapid recruitment of neutrophils (PMN). To gain more insight into the dynamics of PMN migration and host-pathogen interactions in vivo, we used intravital two-photon (2-P) microscopy to visualize S. aureus skin infections in the mouse. Reporter S. aureus strains expressing fluorescent proteins were developed, which allowed for detection of the bacteria in vivo. By employing LysM-EGFP mice to visualize PMN, we observed the rapid appearance of PMN in the extravascular space of the dermis and their directed movement towards the focus of infection, which led to the delineation of an abscess within 1 day. Moreover, tracking of transferred labelled bone-marrow neutrophils showed that PMN localization to the site of infection is dependent on the presence of G-protein-coupled receptors on the PMN, whereas Interleukin-1 receptor was required on host cells other than PMN. Furthermore, the S. aureus complement inhibitor Ecb could block PMN accumulation at thesite of infection. Our results establish that 2-P microscopy is a powerful tool to investigate the orchestration of the immune cells, S. aureus location and gene expression in vivo on a single cell level.

  19. Improving signal levels in intravital multiphoton microscopy using an objective correction collar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muriello, Pamela A.; Dunn, Kenneth W.

    2008-04-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has enabled biologists to collect high-resolution images hundreds of microns into biological tissues, including tissues of living animals. While the depth of imaging exceeds that possible from any other form of light microscopy, multiphoton microscopy is nonetheless generally limited to depths of less than a millimeter. Many of the advantages of multiphoton microscopy for deep tissue imaging accrue from the unique nature of multiphoton fluorescence excitation. However, the quadratic relationship between illumination level and fluorescence excitation makes multiphoton microscopy especially susceptible to factors that degrade the illumination focus. Here we examine the effect of spherical aberration on multiphoton microscopy in fixed kidney tissues and in the kidneys of living animals. We find that spherical aberration, as evaluated from axial asymmetry in the point-spread function, can be corrected by adjustment of the correction collar of a water immersion objective lens. Introducing a compensatory positive spherical aberration into the imaging system decreases the depth-dependence of signal levels in images collected from living animals, increasing signal by up to 50%.

  20. Quantification of Cy-5 siRNA signal in the intra-vital multi-photon microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Chen, Antong; Dogdas, Belma; Mehta, Saurin; Haskell, Kathleen; Ng, Bruce; Keough, Ed; Howell, Bonnie; Meacham, D Adam; Aslamkhan, Amy G; Davide, Joseph; Stanton, Matthew; Bagchi, Ansuman; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura; Tao, Weikang

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic mice with Tie2- green fluorescent protein (GFP) are used as a model to study the kinetic distribution of the Cy5-siRNA delivered by lipid nanoparticles (LNP) into the liver. After the mouse is injected with the LNP, it undergoes a procedure of intra-vital multi-photon microscopy imaging over a period of two hours, during which the process for the nanoparticle to diffuse into the hepatocytes from the vasculature system is monitored. Since the images are obtained in-vivo, the quantification of Cy5 kinetics suffers from the moving field of view (FOV). A method is proposed to register the sequence of images through template matching. Based on the semi-automatic segmentations of the vessels in the common FOV, the registered images are segmented into three regions of interest (ROI) in which the Cy5 signals are quantified. Computation of the percentage signal strength in the ROIs over time allows for the analysis of the diffusion of Cy5-siRNA into the hepatocytes, and helps demonstrate the effectiveness of the Cy5-siRNA delivery vehicle.

  1. Cutaneous penetration of the topically applied photosensitizer Pc 4 as detected by intravital 2-photon laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Alex Y; Myers, Jay T; Barkauskas, Deborah; Howell, Scott J; Oleinick, Nancy L; McCormick, Thomas S; Cooper, Kevin D; Baron, Elma D; Lam, Minh

    2012-09-01

    The fundamental mechanism of photodynamic therapy (PDT)-induced cell death has been characterized, but early critical PDT events in vivo remain incompletely defined. With the recent development in advanced fluorescence imaging modalities, such as intravital 2-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM), researchers are now able to investigate and visualize biological processes with high resolution in real time. This powerful imaging technology allows deep tissue visualization with single-cell resolution, thus providing dynamic information on the 3-dimensional architectural makeup of the tissue. The main goal of this study was to determine the cutaneous penetration of a topically applied photosensitizer, the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4, into the skin of live animals and to assess the effective absorption of Pc 4 through the skin barrier. Our 2P-LSM images indicate that Pc 4 penetrates to the epidermal/dermal junction of mouse skin. The data also indicate that the degree of Pc 4 absorption is dose dependent. These findings represent initial steps that may help in improving the clinical utilization of topical Pc 4-PDT.

  2. Cutaneous penetration of the topically applied photosensitizer Pc 4 as detected by intravital 2-photon laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Alex Y.; Myers, Jay T.; Barkauskas, Deborah; Howell, Scott J.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; McCormick, Thomas S.; Cooper, Kevin D.; Baron, Elma D.; Lam, Minh

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental mechanism of photodynamic therapy (PDT)-induced cell death has been characterized, but early critical PDT events in vivo remain incompletely defined. With the recent development in advanced fluorescence imaging modalities, such as intravital 2-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM), researchers are now able to investigate and visualize biological processes with high resolution in real time. This powerful imaging technology allows deep tissue visualization with single-cell resolution, thus providing dynamic information on the 3-dimensional architectural makeup of the tissue. The main goal of this study was to determine the cutaneous penetration of a topically applied photosensitizer, the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4, into the skin of live animals and to assess the effective absorption of Pc 4 through the skin barrier. Our 2P-LSM images indicate that Pc 4 penetrates to the epidermal/dermal junction of mouse skin. The data also indicate that the degree of Pc 4 absorption is dose dependent. These findings represent initial steps that may help in improving the clinical utilization of topical Pc 4-PDT. PMID:22959802

  3. Two photon microscopy intravital study of DC-mediated anti-tumor response of NK cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccia, Michele; Gorletta, Tatiana; Sironi, Laura; Zanoni, Ivan; Salvetti, Cristina; Collini, Maddalena; Granucci, Francesca; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2010-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in the activation of Natural Killer cells (NKs) that are responsible for anti-tumor innate immune responses. The focus of this report is on the role of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) activated-DCs in inducing NK cell-mediated anti-tumor responses. Mice transplanted sub-cute (s.c.) with AK7 cells, a mesothelioma cell line sensitive to NK cell responses, are injected with fluorescent NK cells and DC activation is then induced by s.c. injection of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using 4 dimensional tracking we follow the kinetic behavior of NK cells at the Draining Lymph-Node (DLN). As control, noninflammatory conditions are also evaluated. Our data suggest that NK cells are recruited to the DLN where they can interact with activated-DCs with a peculiar kinetic behavior: short lived interactions interleaved by rarer longer ones. We also found that the changes in the NK dynamic behavior in inflammatory conditions clearly affect relevant motility parameters such as the instantaneous and average velocity and the effective diffusion coefficient. This observation suggests that NK cells and activated-DCs might efficiently interact in the DLN, where cells could be activated. Therefore the interaction between activated-DCs and NK cells in DLN is not only a reality but it may be also crucial for the start of the immune response of the NKs.

  4. 4-Dimensional light-sheet microscopy to elucidate shear stress modulation of cardiac trabeculation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juhyun; Fei, Peng; Packard, René R. Sevag; Kang, Hanul; Xu, Hao; Baek, Kyung In; Jen, Nelson; Chen, Junjie; Yen, Hilary; Chi, Neil C.; Ho, Chih-Ming; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2016-01-01

    Hemodynamic shear forces are intimately linked with cardiac development, during which trabeculae form a network of branching outgrowths from the myocardium. Mutations that alter Notch signaling also result in trabeculation defects. Here, we assessed whether shear stress modulates trabeculation to influence contractile function. Specifically, we acquired 4D (3D + time) images with light sheets by selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) for rapid scanning and deep axial penetration during zebrafish morphogenesis. Reduction of blood viscosity via gata1a morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) reduced shear stress, resulting in downregulation of Notch signaling and attenuation of trabeculation. Arrest of cardiomyocyte contraction either by troponin T type 2a (tnnt2a) MO or in weak atriumm58 (wea) mutants resulted in reduced shear stress and downregulation of Notch signaling and trabeculation. Integrating 4D SPIM imaging with synchronization algorithm demonstrated that coinjection of neuregulin1 mRNA with gata1 MO rescued trabeculation to restore contractile function in association with upregulation of Notch-related genes. Crossbreeding of Tg(flk:mCherry) fish, which allows visualization of the vascular system with the Tg(tp1:gfp) Notch reporter line, revealed that shear stress–mediated Notch activation localizes to the endocardium. Deleting endocardium via the clochesk4 mutants downregulated Notch signaling, resulting in nontrabeculated ventricle. Subjecting endothelial cells to pulsatile flow in the presence of the ADAM10 inhibitor corroborated shear stress–activated Notch signaling to modulate trabeculation. PMID:27018592

  5. 4-Dimensional light-sheet microscopy to elucidate shear stress modulation of cardiac trabeculation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhyun; Fei, Peng; Packard, René R Sevag; Kang, Hanul; Xu, Hao; Baek, Kyung In; Jen, Nelson; Chen, Junjie; Yen, Hilary; Kuo, C-C Jay; Chi, Neil C; Ho, Chih-Ming; Li, Rongsong; Hsiai, Tzung K

    2016-05-02

    Hemodynamic shear forces are intimately linked with cardiac development, during which trabeculae form a network of branching outgrowths from the myocardium. Mutations that alter Notch signaling also result in trabeculation defects. Here, we assessed whether shear stress modulates trabeculation to influence contractile function. Specifically, we acquired 4D (3D + time) images with light sheets by selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) for rapid scanning and deep axial penetration during zebrafish morphogenesis. Reduction of blood viscosity via gata1a morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) reduced shear stress, resulting in downregulation of Notch signaling and attenuation of trabeculation. Arrest of cardiomyocyte contraction either by troponin T type 2a (tnnt2a) MO or in weak atriumm58 (wea) mutants resulted in reduced shear stress and downregulation of Notch signaling and trabeculation. Integrating 4D SPIM imaging with synchronization algorithm demonstrated that coinjection of neuregulin1 mRNA with gata1 MO rescued trabeculation to restore contractile function in association with upregulation of Notch-related genes. Crossbreeding of Tg(flk:mCherry) fish, which allows visualization of the vascular system with the Tg(tp1:gfp) Notch reporter line, revealed that shear stress-mediated Notch activation localizes to the endocardium. Deleting endocardium via the clochesk4 mutants downregulated Notch signaling, resulting in nontrabeculated ventricle. Subjecting endothelial cells to pulsatile flow in the presence of the ADAM10 inhibitor corroborated shear stress-activated Notch signaling to modulate trabeculation.

  6. Fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy (Cell-viZio) facilitates extended imaging in the field of microcirculation. A comparison with intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Laemmel, Elisabeth; Genet, Magalie; Le Goualher, Georges; Perchant, Aymeric; Le Gargasson, Jean-François; Vicaut, Eric

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the capability of fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy (FCFM) to provide in vivo microvascular observations. FCFM is specifically designed for in vivo in situ observation thanks to a probe composed of a fiber bundle and micro-optics having a diameter as small as 650 microm. In the first part of the study, we compared the main characteristics of FCFM with those of intravital fluorescence microscopy (IFM). A mouse cremaster preparation was used as a common basis to allow for imaging with both modalities. We discussed the feasibility of obtaining quantitative measurements usually provided by IFM in the context of FCFM: morphometry, capillary permeability, functional capillary density, vasoconstriction and dilation effects. In addition, the possibility to visualize fluorescent red blood cells or leukocytes was also evaluated. Phototoxicity issues and limitations of FCFM were also discussed. We showed that FCFM allows observations and measurements usually provided by IFM and that the real-time capability of the system, as well as the flexibility and small diameter of the optical probe enable micro-invasiveness and can extend imaging capabilities for in vivo in situ observations when compared to IFM.

  7. Stabilizing 3D in vivo intravital microscopy images with an iteratively refined soft-tissue model for immunology experiments.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Conde, Iván; Caetano, Susana S; Tadokoro, Carlos E; Olivieri, David N

    2015-09-01

    We describe a set of new algorithms and a software tool, StabiTissue, for stabilizing in vivo intravital microscopy images that suffer from soft-tissue background movement. Because these images lack predetermined anchors and are dominated by noise, we use a pixel weighted image alignment together with a correction for nonlinear tissue deformations. We call this correction a poor man׳s diffeomorphic map since it ascertains the nonlinear regions of the image without resorting to a full integral equation method. To determine the quality of the image stabilization, we developed an ensemble sampling method that quantifies the coincidence between image pairs from randomly distributed image regions. We obtain global stabilization alignment through an iterative constrained simulated annealing optimization procedure. To show the accuracy of our algorithm with existing software, we measured the misalignment error rate in datasets taken from two different organs and compared the results to a similar and popular open-source solution. Present open-source stabilization software tools perform poorly because they do not treat the specific needs of the IV-2pM datasets with soft-tissue deformation, speckle noise, full 5D inter- and intra-stack motion error correction, and undefined anchors. In contrast, the results of our tests demonstrate that our method is more immune to noise and provides better performance for datasets' possessing nonlinear tissue deformations. As a practical application of our software, we show how our stabilization improves cell tracking, where the presence of background movement would degrade track information. We also provide a qualitative comparison of our software with other open-source libraries/applications. Our software is freely available at the open source repository http://sourceforge.net/projects/stabitissue/.

  8. Intravital imaging of the effects of 5-fluorouracil on the murine liver microenvironment using 2-photon laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    OKIGAMI, MASATO; TANAKA, KOJI; INOUE, YASUHIRO; SAIGUSA, SUSUMU; OKUGAWA, YOSHINAGA; TOIYAMA, YUJI; MOHRI, YASUHIKO; KUSUNOKI, MASATO

    2016-01-01

    5-fluorouracil (5FU) is often used in the treatment of colorectal cancer. 5FU improves the median overall and disease-free survival rates and reduces recurrence rates in patients who have undergone curative surgical resection. However, in the adjuvant setting, whether 5FU eradicates clinically undetectable micrometastases in target organs such as the liver, or whether 5-FU inhibits the adhesion of circulating tumor cells has not yet been established. In the present study, 5FU was administered following the inoculation of red fluorescent protein-expressing HT29 cells into green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic nude mice to examine its inhibitory effect. 2-photon laser scanning microscopy was performed at selected time points for time-series imaging of liver metastasis of GFP-transgenic mice. The cell number in vessels was quantified to evaluate the response of the tumor microenvironment to chemotherapy. HT29 cells were visualized in hepatic sinusoids at the single-cell level. A total of 2 hours after the injection (early stage), time-series imaging revealed that the number of caught tumor cells gradually reduced over time. In the 5FU treatment group, no significant difference was observed in the cell number in the early stage. One week after the injection (late stage), a difference in morphology was observed. The results of the present study indicated that 5FU eradicated clinically undetectable micrometastases in liver tissues by acting as a cytotoxic agent opposed to preventing adhesion. The present study indicated that time-series intravital 2-photon laser scanning microscopic imaging of metastatic tumor xenografts may facilitate the screening and evaluation of novel chemotherapeutic agents with less interindividual variability. PMID:27073493

  9. From optical bench to cageside: intravital microscopy on the long road to rational vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Heather D.; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary No anti-viral vaccine is perfect. For some important pathogens, there are no effective vaccines. Many current vaccines are based on the working principles of Jenner and Pasteur, i.e. empiric administration of attenuated or inactivated forms of the pathogen. Tapping the full potential of vaccination requires a thorough understanding of the mechanism of immune activation by pathogens and their individual components. Though the rate of discovery continues to accelerate, the complexity of the immune system is daunting, particularly when integrated into the overall physiology of the host. Here, we review the application of multiphoton microscopy to examine host-pathogen interactions, focusing on our recent efforts to understand mouse CD8+ T-cell responses to viruses at the level of cellular interactions in lymph nodes draining the infection site. We also discuss our recent efforts to understand the influence of the sympathetic nervous system on antiviral immunity, with the ultimate goal of appreciating the traditional elements of immunity as just one facet of the total organismal response to infection and immunization. PMID:21198674

  10. From optical bench to cageside: intravital microscopy on the long road to rational vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Heather D; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2011-01-01

    No antiviral vaccine is perfect. For some important pathogens, there are no effective vaccines. Many current vaccines are based on the working principles of Jenner and Pasteur, that is, empiric administration of attenuated or inactivated forms of the pathogen. Tapping the full potential of vaccination requires a thorough understanding of the mechanism of immune activation by pathogens and their individual components. Though the rate of discovery continues to accelerate, the complexity of the immune system is daunting, particularly when integrated into the overall physiology of the host. Here, we review the application of multiphoton microscopy to examine host-pathogen interactions, focusing on our recent efforts to understand mouse CD8(+) T-cell responses to viruses at the level of cellular interactions in lymph nodes draining the infection site. We also discuss our recent efforts to understand the influence of the sympathetic nervous system on antiviral immunity, with the ultimate goal of appreciating the traditional elements of immunity as just one facet of the total organismal response to infection and immunization. Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Combination of an optical parametric oscillator and quantum-dots 655 to improve imaging depth of vasculature by intravital multicolor two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Clément; Lamasse, Lisa; Jaouen, Alexandre; Rougon, Geneviève; Debarbieux, Franck

    2016-06-01

    Simultaneous imaging of different cell types and structures in the mouse central nervous system (CNS) by intravital two-photon microscopy requires the characterization of fluorophores and advances in approaches to visualize them. We describe the use of a two-photon infrared illumination generated by an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) on quantum-dots 655 (QD655) nanocrystals to improve resolution of the vasculature deeper in the mouse brain both in healthy and pathological conditions. Moreover, QD655 signal can be unmixed from the DsRed2, CFP, EGFP and EYFP fluorescent proteins, which enhances the panel of multi-parametric correlative investigations both in the cortex and the spinal cord.

  12. Detection of Stem Cell Transplant Rejection with Ferumoxytol MR Imaging: Correlation of MR Imaging Findings with Those at Intravital Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E; Chan, Carmel; Lenkov, Olga; Taghavigarmestani, Seyedmeghdad; Nazekati, Toktam; Nejadnik, Hossein; Chapelin, Fanny; Khurana, Aman; Tong, Xinming; Yang, Fan; Pisani, Laura; Longaker, Michael; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2017-08-01

    Purpose To determine whether endogenous labeling of macrophages with clinically applicable nanoparticles enables noninvasive detection of innate immune responses to stem cell transplants with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods Work with human stem cells was approved by the institutional review board and the stem cell research oversight committee, and animal experiments were approved by the administrative panel on laboratory animal care. Nine immunocompetent Sprague-Dawley rats received intravenous injection of ferumoxytol, and 18 Jax C57BL/6-Tg (Csf1r-EGFP-NGFR/FKBP1A/TNFRSF6) 2Bck/J mice received rhodamine-conjugated ferumoxytol. Then, 48 hours later, immune-matched or mismatched stem cells were implanted into osteochondral defects of the knee joints of experimental rats and calvarial defects of Jax mice. All animals underwent serial MR imaging and intravital microscopy (IVM) up to 4 weeks after surgery. Macrophages of Jax C57BL/6-Tg (Csf1r-EGFP-NGFR/FKBP1A/TNFRSF6) 2Bck/J mice express enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), which enables in vivo correlation of ferumoxytol enhancement at MR imaging with macrophage quantities at IVM. All quantitative data were compared between experimental groups by using a mixed linear model and t tests. Results Immune-mismatched stem cell implants demonstrated stronger ferumoxytol enhancement than did matched stem cell implants. At 4 weeks, T2 values of mismatched implants were significantly lower than those of matched implants in osteochondral defects of female rats (mean, 10.72 msec for human stem cells and 11.55 msec for male rat stem cells vs 15.45 msec for sex-matched rat stem cells; P = .02 and P = .04, respectively) and calvarial defects of recipient mice (mean, 21.7 msec vs 27.1 msec, respectively; P = .0444). This corresponded to increased recruitment of enhanced GFP- and rhodamine-ferumoxytol-positive macrophages into stem cell transplants, as visualized with IVM and histopathologic examination

  13. Long-term High-Resolution Intravital Microscopy in the Lung with a Vacuum Stabilized Imaging Window

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Tirado, Carolina; Kitamura, Takanori; Kato, Yu; Pollard, Jeffery W.; Condeelis, John S.; Entenberg, David

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis to secondary sites such as the lung, liver and bone is a traumatic event with a mortality rate of approximately 90% 1. Of these sites, the lung is the most difficult to assess using intravital optical imaging due to its enclosed position within the body, delicate nature and vital role in sustaining proper physiology. While clinical modalities (positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT)) are capable of providing noninvasive images of this tissue, they lack the resolution necessary to visualize the earliest seeding events, with a single pixel consisting of nearly a thousand cells. Current models of metastatic lung seeding postulate that events just after a tumor cell's arrival are deterministic for survival and subsequent growth. This means that real-time intravital imaging tools with single cell resolution 2 are required in order to define the phenotypes of the seeding cells and test these models. While high resolution optical imaging of the lung has been performed using various ex vivo preparations, these experiments are typically single time-point assays and are susceptible to artifacts and possible erroneous conclusions due to the dramatically altered environment (temperature, profusion, cytokines, etc.) resulting from removal from the chest cavity and circulatory system 3. Recent work has shown that time-lapse intravital optical imaging of the intact lung is possible using a vacuum stabilized imaging window 2,4,5 however, typical imaging times have been limited to approximately 6 hr. Here we describe a protocol for performing long-term intravital time-lapse imaging of the lung utilizing such a window over a period of 12 hr. The time-lapse image sequences obtained using this method enable visualization and quantitation of cell-cell interactions, membrane dynamics and vascular perfusion in the lung. We further describe an image processing technique that gives an unprecedentedly clear view of the

  14. Visualizing the Acute Effects of Vascular-Targeted Therapy In Vivo Using Intravital Microscopy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Correlation with Endothelial Apoptosis, Cytokine Induction, and Treatment Outcome1

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Mukund; Spernyak, Joseph A; Maiery, Patricia G; Cheney, Richard T; Mazurchuk, Richard; Bellnier, David A

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The acute effects of the vascular-disrupting agent 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA) were investigated in vivo using intravital microscopy (IVM) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Changes in vascular permeability and blood flow of syngeneic CT-26 murine colon adenocarcinomas were assessed at 4 and 24 hours after DMXAA treatment (30 mg/kg, i.p.) and correlated with induction of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), endothelial damage [CD31/terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)], and treatment outcome. Intravital imaging revealed a marked increase in vascular permeability 4 hours after treatment, consistent with increases in intratumoral mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α. Parallel contrast-enhanced MRI studies showed a ∼ 4-fold increase in longitudinal relaxation rates (ΔR1), indicative of increased contrast agent accumulation within the tumor. Dual immunostained tumor sections (CD31/TdT) revealed evidence of endothelial apoptosis at this time point. Twenty-four hours after treatment, extensive hemorrhage and complete disruption of vascular architecture were observed with IVM, along with a significant reduction in ΔR1; and virtual absence of CD31 immunostaining. DMXAA-induced tumor vascular damage resulted in significant long-term (60-day) cures compared to untreated controls. Multimodality imaging approaches are useful in visualizing the effects of antivascular therapy in vivo. Such approaches allow cross validation and correlation of findings with underlying molecular changes contributing to treatment outcome. PMID:17356709

  15. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Cell Division Orientation in Epidermal Basal Layer Using Intravital Two-Photon Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal structures are different among body sites, and proliferative keratinocytes in the epidermis play an important role in the maintenance of the epidermal structures. In recent years, intravital skin imaging has been used in mammalian skin research for the investigation of cell behaviors, but most of these experiments were performed with rodent ears. Here, we established a non-invasive intravital imaging approach for dorsal, ear, hind paw, or tail skin using R26H2BEGFP hairless mice. Using four-dimensional (x, y, z, and time) imaging, we successfully visualized mitotic cell division in epidermal basal cells. A comparison of cell division orientation relative to the basement membrane in each body site revealed that most divisions in dorsal and ear epidermis occurred in parallel, whereas the cell divisions in hind paw and tail epidermis occurred both in parallel and oblique orientations. Based on the quantitative analysis of the four-dimensional images, we showed that the epidermal thickness correlated with the basal cell density and the rate of the oblique divisions. PMID:27657513

  16. Analyzing Structure and Function of Vascularization in Engineered Bone Tissue by Video-Rate Intravital Microscopy and 3D Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yonggang; Tsigkou, Olga; Spencer, Joel A; Lin, Charles P; Neville, Craig; Grottkau, Brian

    2015-10-01

    Vascularization is a key challenge in tissue engineering. Three-dimensional structure and microcirculation are two fundamental parameters for evaluating vascularization. Microscopic techniques with cellular level resolution, fast continuous observation, and robust 3D postimage processing are essential for evaluation, but have not been applied previously because of technical difficulties. In this study, we report novel video-rate confocal microscopy and 3D postimage processing techniques to accomplish this goal. In an immune-deficient mouse model, vascularized bone tissue was successfully engineered using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) scaffold. Video-rate (30 FPS) intravital confocal microscopy was applied in vitro and in vivo to visualize the vascular structure in the engineered bone and the microcirculation of the blood cells. Postimage processing was applied to perform 3D image reconstruction, by analyzing microvascular networks and calculating blood cell viscosity. The 3D volume reconstructed images show that the hMSCs served as pericytes stabilizing the microvascular network formed by HUVECs. Using orthogonal imaging reconstruction and transparency adjustment, both the vessel structure and blood cells within the vessel lumen were visualized. Network length, network intersections, and intersection densities were successfully computed using our custom-developed software. Viscosity analysis of the blood cells provided functional evaluation of the microcirculation. These results show that by 8 weeks, the blood vessels in peripheral areas function quite similarly to the host vessels. However, the viscosity drops about fourfold where it is only 0.8 mm away from the host. In summary, we developed novel techniques combining intravital microscopy and 3D image processing to analyze the vascularization in engineered bone. These techniques have broad

  17. Analyzing Structure and Function of Vascularization in Engineered Bone Tissue by Video-Rate Intravital Microscopy and 3D Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yonggang; Tsigkou, Olga; Spencer, Joel A.; Lin, Charles P.; Neville, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Vascularization is a key challenge in tissue engineering. Three-dimensional structure and microcirculation are two fundamental parameters for evaluating vascularization. Microscopic techniques with cellular level resolution, fast continuous observation, and robust 3D postimage processing are essential for evaluation, but have not been applied previously because of technical difficulties. In this study, we report novel video-rate confocal microscopy and 3D postimage processing techniques to accomplish this goal. In an immune-deficient mouse model, vascularized bone tissue was successfully engineered using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a poly (d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) scaffold. Video-rate (30 FPS) intravital confocal microscopy was applied in vitro and in vivo to visualize the vascular structure in the engineered bone and the microcirculation of the blood cells. Postimage processing was applied to perform 3D image reconstruction, by analyzing microvascular networks and calculating blood cell viscosity. The 3D volume reconstructed images show that the hMSCs served as pericytes stabilizing the microvascular network formed by HUVECs. Using orthogonal imaging reconstruction and transparency adjustment, both the vessel structure and blood cells within the vessel lumen were visualized. Network length, network intersections, and intersection densities were successfully computed using our custom-developed software. Viscosity analysis of the blood cells provided functional evaluation of the microcirculation. These results show that by 8 weeks, the blood vessels in peripheral areas function quite similarly to the host vessels. However, the viscosity drops about fourfold where it is only 0.8 mm away from the host. In summary, we developed novel techniques combining intravital microscopy and 3D image processing to analyze the vascularization in engineered bone. These techniques have broad

  18. Combination of an optical parametric oscillator and quantum-dots 655 to improve imaging depth of vasculature by intravital multicolor two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ricard, Clément; Lamasse, Lisa; Jaouen, Alexandre; Rougon, Geneviève; Debarbieux, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous imaging of different cell types and structures in the mouse central nervous system (CNS) by intravital two-photon microscopy requires the characterization of fluorophores and advances in approaches to visualize them. We describe the use of a two-photon infrared illumination generated by an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) on quantum-dots 655 (QD655) nanocrystals to improve resolution of the vasculature deeper in the mouse brain both in healthy and pathological conditions. Moreover, QD655 signal can be unmixed from the DsRed2, CFP, EGFP and EYFP fluorescent proteins, which enhances the panel of multi-parametric correlative investigations both in the cortex and the spinal cord. PMID:27375951

  19. Intravital imaging of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Hato, Takashi; Winfree, Seth; Dagher, Pierre C

    2017-04-11

    Two-photon intravital microscopy is a powerful tool that allows the examination of dynamic cellular processes in the live animal with unprecedented resolution. Indeed, it offers the ability to address unique biological questions that may not be solved by other means. While two-photon intravital microscopy has been successfully applied to study many organs, the kidney presents its own unique challenges that need to be overcome in order to optimize and validate imaging data. For kidney imaging, the complexity of renal architecture and salient autofluorescence merit special considerations as these elements directly impact image acquisition and data interpretation. Here, using illustrative cases, we provide practical guides and discuss issues that may arise during two-photon live imaging of the rodent kidney.

  20. Thrombotic distal middle cerebral artery occlusion produced by topical FeCl3 application: a novel model suitable for intravital microscopy and thrombolysis studies

    PubMed Central

    Karatas, Hulya; Erdener, Sefik Evren; Gursoy-Ozdemir, Yasemin; Gurer, Gunfer; Soylemezoglu, Figen; Dunn, Andrew K; Dalkara, Turgay

    2011-01-01

    Intravital or multiphoton microscopy and laser-speckle imaging have become popular because they allow live monitoring of several processes during cerebral ischemia. Available rodent models have limitations for these experiments; e.g., filament occlusion of the proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA) is difficult to perform under a microscope, whereas distal occlusion methods may damage the MCA and the peri-arterial cortex. We found that placement of a 10% FeCl3-soaked filter paper strip (0.3 × 1 mm2) on the duramater over the trunk of the distal MCA through a cranial window for 3 minutes induced intraarterial thrombus without damaging the peri-arterial cortex in the mouse. This caused a rapid regional cerebral blood flow decrease within 10 minutes and total occlusion of the MCA segment under the filter paper in 17±2 minutes, which resulted in a typical cortical infarct of 27±4 mm3 at 24 hours and moderate sensorimotor deficits. There was no significant hemispheric swelling or hemorrhage or mortality at 24 hours. Reperfusion was obtained in half of the mice with tissue plasminogen activator, which allowed live monitoring of clot lysis along with restoration of tissue perfusion and MCA flow. In conclusion, this relatively simple and noninvasive stroke model is easy to perform under a microscope, making it suitable for live imaging and thrombolysis studies. PMID:21326267

  1. Visualization of bone marrow monocyte mobilization using Cx3cr1gfp/+Flt3L−/− reporter mouse by multiphoton intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, Maximilien; Chong, Shu Zhen; Devi, Sapna; Chew, Weng Keong; Lee, Bernett; Poidinger, Michael; Ginhoux, Florent; Tan, Suet Mien; Ng, Lai Guan

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes are innate immune cells that play critical roles in inflammation and immune defense. A better comprehension of how monocytes are mobilized and recruited is fundamental to understand their biologic role in disease and steady state. The BM represents a major “checkpoint” for monocyte homeostasis, as it is the primary site for their production and release. Our study determined that the Cx3cr1gfp/+ mouse strain is currently the most ideal model for the visualization of monocyte behavior in the BM by multiphoton intravital microscopy. However, we observed that DCs are also labeled with high levels of GFP and thus, interfere with the accuracy of monocyte tracking in vivo. Hence, we generated a Cx3cr1gfp/+Flt3L−/− reporter mouse and showed that whereas monocyte numbers were not affected, DC numbers were reduced significantly, as DCs but not monocytes depend on Flt3 signaling for their development. We thus verified that mobilization of monocytes from the BM in Cx3cr1gfp/+Flt3L−/− mice is intact in response to LPS. Collectively, our study demonstrates that the Cx3cr1gfp/+Flt3L−/− reporter mouse model represents a powerful tool to visualize monocyte activities in BM and illustrates the potential of a Cx3cr1gfp/+-based, multifunctionality fluorescence reporter approach to dissect monocyte function in vivo. PMID:25516753

  2. The Use of Spinning-Disk Confocal Microscopy for the Intravital Analysis of Platelet Dynamics in Response to Systemic and Local Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Jenne, Craig N.; Wong, Connie H. Y.; Petri, Björn; Kubes, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Platelets are central players in inflammation and are an important component of the innate immune response. The ability to visualize platelets within the live host is essential to understanding their role in these processes. Past approaches have involved adoptive transfer of labelled platelets, non-specific dyes, or the use of fluorescent antibodies to tag platelets in vivo. Often, these techniques result in either the activation of the platelet, or blockade of specific platelet receptors. In this report, we describe two new methods for intravital visualization of platelet biology, intravenous administration of labelled anti-CD49b, which labels all platelets, and CD41-YFP transgenic mice, in which a percentage of platelets express YFP. Both approaches label endogenous platelets and allow for their visualization using spinning-disk confocal fluorescent microscopy. Following LPS-induced inflammation, we were able to measure a significant increase in both the number and size of platelet aggregates observed within the vasculature of a number of different tissues. Real-time observation of these platelet aggregates reveals them to be large, dynamic structures that are continually expanding and sloughing-off into circulation. Using these techniques, we describe for the first time, platelet recruitment to, and behaviour within numerous tissues of the mouse, both under control conditions and following LPS induced inflammation. PMID:21949865

  3. Wide field intravital imaging by two-photon-excitation digital-scanned light-sheet microscopy (2p-DSLM) with a high-pulse energy laser.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Atsushi; Oshima, Yusuke; Kajiura-Kobayashi, Hiroko; Nonaka, Shigenori; Imamura, Takeshi; Naruse, Kiyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Digital-scanned light-sheet microscopy (DSLM) illuminates a sample in a plane and captures single-photon-excitation fluorescence images with a camera from a direction perpendicular to the light sheet. This method is potentially useful for observing biological specimens, because image acquisition is relatively fast, resulting in reduction of phototoxicity. However, DSLM cannot be effectively applied to high-scattering materials due to the image blur resulting from thickening of the light sheet by scattered photons. However, two-photon-excitation DSLM (2p-DSLM) enables collection of high-contrast image with near infrared (NIR) excitation. In conventional 2p-DSLM, the minimal excitation volume for two-photon excitation restricts the field of view. In this study, we achieved wide-field 2p-DSLM by using a high-pulse energy fiber laser, and then used this technique to perform intravital imaging of a small model fish species, medaka (Oryzias latipes). Wide fields of view (>700 μm) were achieved by using a low-numerical aperture (NA) objective lens and high-peak energy NIR excitation at 1040 nm. We also performed high-speed imaging at near-video rate and successfully captured the heartbeat movements of a living medaka fish at 20 frames/sec.

  4. In situ quantitative monitoring of polyplexes and polyplex micelles in the blood circulation using intravital real-time confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Yu; Miyata, Kanjiro; Oba, Makoto; Fukushima, Shigeto; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2011-04-30

    Surface modification using poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is a widely used strategy to improve the biocompatibility of cationic polymer-based nonviral gene vectors (polyplexes). A novel method based on intravital real-time confocal laser scanning microscopy (IVRTCLSM) was applied to quantify the dynamic states of polyplexes in the bloodstream, thereby demonstrating the efficacy of PEGylation to prevent their agglomeration. Blood flow in the earlobe blood vessels of experimental animals was monitored in a noninvasive manner to directly observe polyplexes in the circulation. Polyplexes formed distinct aggregates immediately after intravenous injection, followed by interaction with platelets. To quantify aggregate formation and platelet interaction, the coefficient of variation and Pearson's correlation coefficient were adopted. In contrast, polyplex micelles prepared through self-assembly of plasmid DNA with PEG-based block catiomers had dense PEG palisades, revealing no formation of aggregates without visible interaction with platelets during circulation. This is the first report of in situ monitoring and quantification of the availability of PEGylation to prevent polyplexes from agglomeration over time in the blood circulation. This shows the high utility of IVRTCLSM in drug and gene delivery research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The power of single and multibeam two-photon microscopy for high-resolution and high-speed deep tissue and intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Niesner, Raluca; Andresen, Volker; Neumann, Jens; Spiecker, Heinrich; Gunzer, Matthias

    2007-10-01

    Two-photon microscopy is indispensable for deep tissue and intravital imaging. However, current technology based on single-beam point scanning has reached sensitivity and speed limits because higher performance requires higher laser power leading to sample degradation. We utilize a multifocal scanhead splitting a laser beam into a line of 64 foci, allowing sample illumination in real time at full laser power. This technology requires charge-coupled device field detection in contrast to conventional detection by photomultipliers. A comparison of the optical performance of both setups shows functional equivalence in every measurable parameter down to penetration depths of 200 microm, where most actual experiments are executed. The advantage of photomultiplier detection materializes at imaging depths >300 microm because of their better signal/noise ratio, whereas only charge-coupled devices allow real-time detection of rapid processes (here blood flow). We also find that the point-spread function of both devices strongly depends on tissue constitution and penetration depth. However, employment of a depth-corrected point-spread function allows three-dimensional deconvolution of deep-tissue data up to an image quality resembling surface detection.

  6. Periodicity in tumor vasculature targeting kinetics of ligand-functionalized nanoparticles studied by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hak, Sjoerd; Cebulla, Jana; Huuse, Else Marie; Davies, Catharina de L; Mulder, Willem J M; Larsson, Henrik B W; Haraldseth, Olav

    2014-01-01

    In the past two decades advances in the development of targeted nanoparticles have facilitated their application as molecular imaging agents and targeted drug delivery vehicles. Nanoparticle-enhanced molecular imaging of the angiogenic tumor vasculature has been of particular interest. Not only because angiogenesis plays an important role in various pathologies, but also since endothelial cell surface receptors are directly accessible for relatively large circulating nanoparticles. Typically, nanoparticle targeting towards these receptors is studied by analyzing the contrast distribution on tumor images acquired before and at set time points after administration. Although several exciting proof-of-concept studies demonstrated qualitative assessment of relative target concentration and distribution, these studies did not provide quantitative information on the nanoparticle targeting kinetics. These kinetics will not only depend on nanoparticle characteristics, but also on receptor binding and recycling. In this study, we monitored the in vivo targeting kinetics of αvβ3-integrin specific nanoparticles with intravital microscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and using compartment modeling we were able to quantify nanoparticle targeting rates. As such, this approach can facilitate optimization of targeted nanoparticle design and it holds promise for providing more quantitative information on in vivo receptor levels. Interestingly, we also observed a periodicity in the accumulation kinetics of αvβ3-integrin targeted nanoparticles and hypothesize that this periodicity is caused by receptor binding, internalization and recycling dynamics. Taken together, this demonstrates that our experimental approach provides new insights in in vivo nanoparticle targeting, which may proof useful for vascular targeting in general.

  7. Combining Intravital Fluorescent Microscopy (IVFM) with Genetic Models to Study Engraftment Dynamics of Hematopoietic Cells to Bone Marrow Niches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Kamocka, Malgorzata M; Zollman, Amy; Carlesso, Nadia

    2017-03-21

    Increasing evidence indicates that normal hematopoiesis is regulated by distinct microenvironmental cues in the BM, which include specialized cellular niches modulating critical hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) functions(1)(,)(2). Indeed, a more detailed picture of the hematopoietic microenvironment is now emerging, in which the endosteal and the endothelial niches form functional units for the regulation of normal HSC and their progeny(3)(,)(4)(,)(5). New studies have revealed the importance of perivascular cells, adipocytes and neuronal cells in maintaining and regulating HSC function(6)(,)(7)(,)(8). Furthermore, there is evidence that cells from different lineages, i.e. myeloid and lymphoid cells, home and reside in specific niches within the BM microenvironment. However, a complete mapping of the BM microenvironment and its occupants is still in progress. Transgenic mouse strains expressing lineage specific fluorescent markers or mice genetically engineered to lack selected molecules in specific cells of the BM niche are now available. Knock-out and lineage tracking models, in combination with transplantation approaches, provide the opportunity to refine the knowledge on the role of specific "niche" cells for defined hematopoietic populations, such as HSC, B-cells, T-cells, myeloid cells and erythroid cells. This strategy can be further potentiated by merging the use of two-photon microscopy of the calvarium. By providing in vivo high resolution imaging and 3-D rendering of the BM calvarium, we can now determine precisely the location where specific hematopoietic subsets home in the BM and evaluate the kinetics of their expansion over time. Here, Lys-GFP transgenic mice (marking myeloid cells)(9) and RBPJ knock-out mice (lacking canonical Notch signaling)(10) are used in combination with IVFM to determine the engraftment of myeloid cells to a Notch defective BM microenvironment.

  8. Intravital imaging of metastasis in adult Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, David C; Hynes, Richard O

    2017-09-25

    Metastasis is a major clinical problem whose biology is not yet fully understood. This lack of understanding is especially true for the events at the metastatic site, which include arrest, extravasation, and growth into macrometastases. Intravital imaging is a powerful technique that has shown great promise in increasing our understanding of these events. To date, most intravital imaging studies have been performed in mice, which has limited its adoption. Zebrafish are also a common system for the intravital imaging of metastasis. However, as imaging in embryos is technically simpler, relatively few studies have used adult zebrafish to study metastasis and none have followed individual cells at the metastatic site over time. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that adult casper zebrafish offer a convenient model system for performing intravital imaging of the metastatic site over time with single-cell resolution. ZMEL1 zebrafish melanoma cells were injected into 6 to 10-week-old casper fish using an intravenous injection protocol. Because casper fish are transparent even as adults, they could be imaged without surgical intervention. Individual cells were followed over the course of 2 weeks as they arrested, extravasated, and formed macroscopic metastases. Our injection method reliably delivered cells into circulation and led to the formation of tumors in multiple organs. Cells in the skin and sub-dermal muscle could be imaged at high resolution over 2 weeks using confocal microscopy. Arrest was visualized and determined to be primarily due to size restriction. Following arrest, extravasation was seen to occur between 1 and 6 days post-injection. Once outside of the vasculature, cells were observed migrating as well as forming protrusions. Casper fish are a useful model for studying the events at the metastatic site using intravital imaging. The protocols described in this study are relatively simple. Combined with the reasonably low cost of zebrafish, they

  9. Intravital imaging in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Kidokoro, Kengo; Riquier-Brison, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The review aims to provide a brief summary and evaluation of the current state of research that uses multiphoton fluorescence microscopy for intravital kidney imaging. Recent findings Direct visualization of the glomerular filter, proximal and distal tubule segments, and the renal vasculature in the living, intact kidney in zebrafish, mouse, and rat models with high temporal and spatial resolution provided new insights into the function of the normal and diseased kidney. New technical developments in fluorescence excitation and detection, in combination with transgenic animal models for cell function and fate mapping, and serial imaging of the same glomerulus in the same animal over several days further advanced the field of nephrology research, and the understanding of disease mechanisms. Summary Intravital multiphoton imaging has solved many critical technical barriers in kidney research and allowed the dynamic portrayal of the structure and function of various renal cell types in vivo. It has become a widely used research technique, with significant past achievements, and tremendous potential for future development and applications for the study and better understanding of kidney diseases. PMID:27008595

  10. Fluorescein Derivatives in Intravital Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Thomas A.; Bunel, Florestan; Roberts, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Intravital fluorescence microscopy enables the direct imaging of fluorophores in vivo and advanced techniques such as fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) enable the simultaneous detection of multiple fluorophores. Consequently, it is now possible to record distribution and metabolism of a chemical in vivo and to optimise the delivery of fluorophores in vivo. Recent clinical applications with fluorescein and other intravital fluorescent stains have occurred in neurosurgery, dermatology [including photodynamic therapy (PDT)] and endomicroscopy. Potential uses have been identified in periodontal disease, skin graft and cancer surgery. Animal studies have demonstrated that diseased tissue can be specifically stained with fluorophore conjugates. This review focuses on the fluorescein derived fluorophores in common clinical use and provides examples of novel applications from studies in tissue samples. PMID:24709799

  11. Contrast enhanced MRI and intravital fluorescence microscopy indicate improved tumor microcirculation in highly vascularized melanomas upon short-term anti-VEGFR treatment.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, M E; Strieth, S; Luedemann, S; Kleespies, A; Nöth, U; Passon, A; Brix, G; Jauch, K W; Bruns, C J; Dellian, M

    2008-07-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapy by blocking VEGF signalling combined with standard chemotherapy is a novel strategy for clinical cancer treatment. The mechanisms for enhanced antitumoral effects are still a matter of controversial debate. Tumor vessel "normalization" upon anti-angiogenic therapy leading to improved drug delivery has been proposed as possible mechanism. Therefore, aim of the study was to investigate tumor microvascular function upon anti-VEGFR treatment in highly vascularized melanomas. A detailed intravital-microscopic analysis of tumor microcirculation including the distribution pattern of vessel diameters and blood flow velocities was performed in melanomas grown in dorsal skinfold chambers of hamsters. Animals with highly vascularized established tumors were treated by a VEGFR tyrosin kinase inhibitor (SU5416) on 3 repetitive days. Tumor tissue oxygenation was measured by phosphorescence quenching technique. Overall tumor microcirculation of subcutaneous tumors was investigated by contrast enhanced MRI (CE-MRI). Vessel density was significantly decreased in treated animals. A significant shift in the distribution patterns towards increased vessel diameters and faster red blood cell velocities in remaining tumor vessels was observed upon anti-VEGF treatment, compensating reduced vascular density. Moreover, a trend towards elevated pO(2) levels in treated tumors was observed. Compared to controls, inflow kinetics of tumors quantified by CE-MRI as well as overall uptake of contrast agent in tumor tissue were significantly increased following short-term SU5416 treatment. In conclusion the results confirm temporarily improved tumor microvascular function in highly vascularized melanomas upon short term anti-VEGFR treatment leading to enhanced tumor blood supply and oxygenation potentially improving the efficacy of simultaneous chemo- or radiotherapy.

  12. Recent advances in intravital imaging of dynamic biological systems.

    PubMed

    Kikuta, Junichi; Ishii, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has opened a new era in the field of biological imaging. Focal excitation of fluorophores by simultaneous attack of multiple (normally "two") photons generates images with high spatial resolution, and use of near-infrared lasers for multiphoton excitation allows penetration of thicker specimens, enabling biologists to visualize living cellular dynamics deep inside tissues and organs without thin sectioning. Moreover, the minimized photo-bleaching and toxicity associated with multiphoton techniques is beneficial for imaging of live specimens for extended observation periods. Here we focus on recent findings using intravital multiphoton imaging of dynamic biological systems such as the immune system and bone homeostasis. The immune system comprises highly dynamic networks, in which many cell types actively travel throughout the body and interact with each other in specific areas. Therefore, real-time intravital imaging represents a powerful tool for understanding the mechanisms underlying this dynamic system.

  13. Intravital Microscopic Interrogation of Peripheral Taste Sensation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Myunghwan; Lee, Woei Ming; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool in neuroscience but has not been adapted to the taste sensory organ due to anatomical constraint. Here we developed an imaging window to facilitate microscopic access to the murine tongue in vivo. Real-time two-photon microscopy allowed the visualization of three-dimensional microanatomy of the intact tongue mucosa and functional activity of taste cells in response to topically administered tastants in live mice. Video microscopy also showed the calcium activity of taste cells elicited by small-sized tastants in the blood circulation. Molecular kinetic analysis suggested that intravascular taste sensation takes place at the microvilli on the apical side of taste cells after diffusion of the molecules through the pericellular capillaries and tight junctions in the taste bud. Our results demonstrate the capabilities and utilities of the new tool for taste research in vivo. PMID:25726964

  14. Intravital Microscopic Interrogation of Peripheral Taste Sensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myunghwan; Lee, Woei Ming; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-03-01

    Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool in neuroscience but has not been adapted to the taste sensory organ due to anatomical constraint. Here we developed an imaging window to facilitate microscopic access to the murine tongue in vivo. Real-time two-photon microscopy allowed the visualization of three-dimensional microanatomy of the intact tongue mucosa and functional activity of taste cells in response to topically administered tastants in live mice. Video microscopy also showed the calcium activity of taste cells elicited by small-sized tastants in the blood circulation. Molecular kinetic analysis suggested that intravascular taste sensation takes place at the microvilli on the apical side of taste cells after diffusion of the molecules through the pericellular capillaries and tight junctions in the taste bud. Our results demonstrate the capabilities and utilities of the new tool for taste research in vivo.

  15. Intravital microscopic interrogation of peripheral taste sensation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myunghwan; Lee, Woei Ming; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-03-02

    Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool in neuroscience but has not been adapted to the taste sensory organ due to anatomical constraint. Here we developed an imaging window to facilitate microscopic access to the murine tongue in vivo. Real-time two-photon microscopy allowed the visualization of three-dimensional microanatomy of the intact tongue mucosa and functional activity of taste cells in response to topically administered tastants in live mice. Video microscopy also showed the calcium activity of taste cells elicited by small-sized tastants in the blood circulation. Molecular kinetic analysis suggested that intravascular taste sensation takes place at the microvilli on the apical side of taste cells after diffusion of the molecules through the pericellular capillaries and tight junctions in the taste bud. Our results demonstrate the capabilities and utilities of the new tool for taste research in vivo.

  16. Intravital autofluorescence 2-photon microscopy of murine intestinal mucosa with ultra-broadband femtosecond laser pulse excitation: image quality, photodamage, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Antje; Krapf, Lisa; Orzekowsky-Schroeder, Regina; Koop, Norbert; Vogel, Alfred; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2015-11-01

    Ultra-broadband excitation with ultrashort pulses may enable simultaneous excitation of multiple endogenous fluorophores in vital tissue. Imaging living gut mucosa by autofluorescence 2-photon microscopy with more than 150 nm broad excitation at an 800-nm central wavelength from a sub-10 fs titanium-sapphire (Ti:sapphire) laser with a dielectric mirror based prechirp was compared to the excitation with 220 fs pulses of a tunable Ti:sapphire laser at 730 and 800 nm wavelengths. Excitation efficiency, image quality, and photochemical damage were evaluated. At similar excitation fluxes, the same image brightness was achieved with both lasers. As expected, with ultra-broadband pulses, fluorescence from NAD(P)H, flavines, and lipoproteins was observed simultaneously. However, nonlinear photodamage apparent as hyperfluorescence with functional and structural alterations of the tissue occurred earlier when the laser power was adjusted to the same image brightness. After only a few minutes, the immigration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes into the epithelium and degranulation of these cells, a sign of inflammation, was observed. Photodamage is promoted by the higher peak irradiances and/or by nonoptimal excitation of autofluorescence at the longer wavelength. We conclude that excitation with a tunable narrow bandwidth laser is preferable to ultra-broadband excitation for autofluorescence-based 2-photon microscopy, unless the spectral phase can be controlled to optimize excitation conditions.

  17. Intravital autofluorescence 2-photon microscopy of murine intestinal mucosa with ultra-broadband femtosecond laser pulse excitation: image quality, photodamage, and inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Antje; Krapf, Lisa; Orzekowsky-Schroeder, Regina; Koop, Norbert; Vogel, Alfred; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2015-11-01

    Ultra-broadband excitation with ultrashort pulses may enable simultaneous excitation of multiple endogenous fluorophores in vital tissue. Imaging living gut mucosa by autofluorescence 2-photon microscopy with more than 150 nm broad excitation at an 800-nm central wavelength from a sub-10 fs titanium-sapphire (Ti:sapphire) laser with a dielectric mirror based prechirp was compared to the excitation with 220 fs pulses of a tunable Ti:sapphire laser at 730 and 800 nm wavelengths. Excitation efficiency, image quality, and photochemical damage were evaluated. At similar excitation fluxes, the same image brightness was achieved with both lasers. As expected, with ultra-broadband pulses, fluorescence from NAD(P)H, flavines, and lipoproteins was observed simultaneously. However, nonlinear photodamage apparent as hyperfluorescence with functional and structural alterations of the tissue occurred earlier when the laser power was adjusted to the same image brightness. After only a few minutes, the immigration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes into the epithelium and degranulation of these cells, a sign of inflammation, was observed. Photodamage is promoted by the higher peak irradiances and/or by nonoptimal excitation of autofluorescence at the longer wavelength. We conclude that excitation with a tunable narrow bandwidth laser is preferable to ultra-broadband excitation for autofluorescence-based 2-photon microscopy, unless the spectral phase can be controlled to optimize excitation conditions.

  18. Internalization of fluorescent dextrans in the submandibular salivary glands of live animals: a study combining intravital two-photon microscopy and second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto

    2008-02-01

    Here we show that a combination of two-photon microscopy and second harmonic generation can be successfully used to study endocytosis in the submandibular salivary glands of live animals. First, we have characterized the threedimensional structure of the acini and the ducts forming the parenchyma of the excised glands by exciting various endogenous molecules, which highlight the shape of the cells and various components of the extracellular matrix. Next, by time-lapse imaging we show the dynamic distribution of fluorescent probes injected systemically. This was achieved by using a custom-made holder aimed to reduce the motion artifacts associated with the heartbeat and the respiration in the live animals. Finally, we show that fluorescent dextrans are internalized primarily by the supporting cells in the salivary glands, a characteristic shared by other secretory organs such as the pancreas.

  19. In vivo imaging of induction of heat-shock protein-70 gene expression with fluorescence reflectance imaging and intravital confocal microscopy following brain ischaemia in reporter mice.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, Xavier; Santalucía, Tomàs; Fortin, Pierre-Yves; Purroy, Jesús; Calvo, Maria; Salas-Perdomo, Angélica; Justicia, Carles; Couillaud, Franck; Planas, Anna M

    2013-02-01

    Stroke induces strong expression of the 72-kDa heat-shock protein (HSP-70) in the ischaemic brain, and neuronal expression of HSP-70 is associated with the ischaemic penumbra. The aim of this study was to image induction of Hsp-70 gene expression in vivo after brain ischaemia using reporter mice. A genomic DNA sequence of the Hspa1b promoter was used to generate an Hsp70-mPlum far-red fluorescence reporter vector. The construct was tested in cellular systems (NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line) by transient transfection and examining mPlum and Hsp-70 induction under a challenge. After construct validation, mPlum transgenic mice were generated. Focal brain ischaemia was induced by transient intraluminal occlusion of the middle cerebral artery and the mice were imaged in vivo with fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) with an intact skull, and with confocal microscopy after opening a cranial window. Cells transfected with the Hsp70-mPlum construct showed mPlum fluorescence after stimulation. One day after induction of ischaemia, reporter mice showed a FRI signal located in the HSP-70-positive zone within the ipsilateral hemisphere, as validated by immunohistochemistry. Live confocal microscopy allowed brain tissue to be visualized at the cellular level. mPlum fluorescence was observed in vivo in the ipsilateral cortex 1 day after induction of ischaemia in neurons, where it is compatible with penumbra and neuronal viability, and in blood vessels in the core of the infarction. This study showed in vivo induction of Hsp-70 gene expression in ischaemic brain using reporter mice. The fluorescence signal showed in vivo the induction of Hsp-70 in penumbra neurons and in the vasculature within the ischaemic core.

  20. Structural Behavior of the Endothelial Glycocalyx Is Associated With Pathophysiologic Status in Septic Mice: An Integrated Approach to Analyzing the Behavior and Function of the Glycocalyx Using Both Electron and Fluorescence Intravital Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hanae; Ushiyama, Akira; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Matsubara, Sachie; Kawakami, Hayato; Iijima, Takehiko

    2017-09-01

    The endothelial surface layer (ESL) regulates vascular permeability to maintain fluid homeostasis. The glycocalyx (GCX), which has a complex and fragile ultrastructure, is an important component of the ESL. Abnormalities of the GCX have been hypothesized to trigger pathological hyperpermeability. Here, we report an integrated in vivo analysis of the morphological and functional properties of the GCX in a vital organ. We examined the behavior of the ESL and GCX, using both electron microscopy (EM) and intravital microscopy (IVM). We also compared morphological changes in the ESL of mouse skin in a glycosidase-treated and control group. Combined approaches were also used to examine both morphology and function in a lipopolysaccharide-induced septic model and the pathophysiological features of leukocyte-endothelial interactions and in vivo vascular permeability. Using IVM, we identified an illuminated part of the ESL as the GCX and confirmed our observation using morphological and biochemical means. In septic mice, we found that the GCX was thinner than in nonseptic controls in both an EM image analysis (0.98 ± 2.08 nm vs 70.68 ± 36.36 nm, P< .001) and an IVM image analysis (0.36 ± 0.15 μm vs 1.07 ± 0.39 μm, P< .001). Under septic conditions, syndecan-1, a representative core protein of the GCX, was released into the blood serum at a higher rate in septic animals (7.33 ± 3.46 ng/mL) when compared with controls (below the limit of detection, P< .001). Significant increases in leukocyte-endothelial interactions, defined as the numbers of rolling or firm-sticking leukocytes, and molecular hyperpermeability to the interstitium were also observed after GCX shedding in vivo. Using IVM, we visualized an illuminated part of the ESL layer that was subsequently confirmed as the GCX using EM. Severe sepsis induced morphological degradation of the GCX, accompanied by shedding of the syndecan-1 core protein and an increase in leukocyte-endothelial interactions affecting the

  1. Intravital Multiphoton Imaging of the Kidney: Tubular Structure and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Small, David M; Sanchez, Washington Y; Gobe, Glenda C

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) allows the visualization of dynamic pathophysiological events in real time in live animals. Intravital imaging can be applied to investigate novel mechanisms and treatments of different forms of kidney disease as well as improve our understanding of normal kidney physiology. Using rodent models, in conjunction with endogenous fluorescence and infused exogenous fluorescent dyes, measurement can be made of renal processes such as glomerular permeability, juxtaglomerular apparatus function, interactions of the tubulointerstitium, tubulovascular interactions, vascular flow rate, and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Subcellular processes including mitochondrial dynamics, reactive oxygen species production, cytosolic ion concentrations, and death processes of apoptosis and necrosis can also be seen and measured by MPM. The current methods chapter presents an overview of MPM with a focus on techniques for intravital kidney imaging and gives examples of instances where intravital MPM has been utilized to study renal pathophysiology. Suggestions are provided for MPM methods within the confines of intravital microscopy and selected kidney structure. MPM is undoubtedly a powerful new technique for application in experimental nephrology, and we believe it will continue to create new paradigms for understanding and treating kidney disease.

  2. Time-Saving Benefits of Intravital Staining.

    PubMed

    Macgillivray, Catherine; Sylvan, Jeremy; Lee, Richard T; Huang, Hayden

    2008-09-01

    One of the challenges in labeling tissues for fluorescence microscopy is minimizing sample processing while maintaining or improving the information generated by the fluorescent label. Generally, tissues are extracted, fixed, and embedded in mounting media (such as paraffin), sectioned, and then postprocessed by removing the paraffin, blocking, labeling, and washing. Despite all of these steps, the consistency of labeling quality can vary as a result of several factors, including heterogeneity in labeling efficiency from slide to slide, the necessity of postprocessing to obtain information on sequential sections of tissue, interference from the mounting media, and loss of native three-dimensional structural information, especially in thicker sections. A method for embedding and processing tissues that have been labeled by intravital staining is described in this study. Intravital staining is the process in which live-cell dyes and other labels are injected into the bloodstream before fixation of the tissues. Tissues processed this way can be imaged upon sectioning without further staining and retain their native, three-dimensional information, thereby improving the information retained by the labels and speeding up sample processing.

  3. Surgical preparation of rats and mice for intravital microscopic imaging of abdominal organs.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, George J

    2017-09-01

    Intravital microscopy is a powerful research tool that can provide insight into cellular and subcellular events that take place in organs in the body. However, meaningful results can only be obtained from animals whose physiology is preserved during the process of microscopy. Here I discuss the importance of preserving the overall state of health of the animal, methods of anesthesia, surgical techniques for intravital microscopy of various abdominal organs, methods to maintain and monitor the physiology of the animal during microscopy and associated peri- and post-operative recovery considerations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Bone and Stem Cells. Intravital imaging of bone marrow microenvironment].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hiroki; Kikuta, Junichi; Ishii, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    Various kinds of cell types, such as osteoclasts, osteoblasts, hematopoietic cells, and mesenchymal cells, have been reported to exist in the bone marrow and communicate with each other. Although there have been many previous studies about bone marrow microenvironment, most of them were analyzed by conventional methods such as histological analysis and flow cytometry. These methods could not observe the dynamic cell movement in living bone marrow. Recently rapid development of fluorescent imaging techniques enables us to understand the cellular dynamics in vivo . That's why we have originally established an advanced imaging system for visualizing living bone tissues with intravital two-photon microscopy. Here we show the latest data and the detailed methodology of intravital imaging of bone marrow microenvironment, and also discuss its further application.

  5. Intravital Fluorescence Videomicroscopy to Study Tumor Angiogenesis and Microcirculation1

    PubMed Central

    Vajkoczy, Peter; Ullrich, Axel; Meager, Michael D

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Angiogenesis and microcirculation play a central role in growth and metastasis of human neoplasms, and, thus, represent a major target for novel treatment strategies. Mechanistic analysis of processes involved in tumor vascularization, however, requires sophisticated in vivo experimental models and techniques. Intravital microscopy allows direct assessment of tumor angiogenesis, microcirculation and overall perfusion. Its application to the study of tumor-induced neovascularization further provides information on molecular transport and delivery, intra- and extravascular cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix interaction, as well as tumor oxygenation and metabolism. With the recent advances in the field of bioluminescence and fluorescent reporter genes, appropriate for in vivo imaging, the intravital fluorescent microscopic approach has to be considered a powerful tool to study microvascular, cellular and molecular mechanisms of tumor growth. PMID:10933068

  6. Context-dependent intravital imaging of therapeutic response using intramolecular FRET biosensors.

    PubMed

    Conway, James R W; Warren, Sean C; Timpson, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Intravital microscopy represents a more physiologically relevant method for assessing therapeutic response. However, the movement into an in vivo setting brings with it several additional considerations, the primary being the context in which drug activity is assessed. Microenvironmental factors, such as hypoxia, pH, fibrosis, immune infiltration and stromal interactions have all been shown to have pronounced effects on drug activity in a more complex setting, which is often lost in simpler two- or three-dimensional assays. Here we present a practical guide for the application of intravital microscopy, looking at the available fluorescent reporters and their respective expression systems and analysis considerations. Moving in vivo, we also discuss the microscopy set up and methods available for overlaying microenvironmental context to the experimental readouts. This enables a smooth transition into applying higher fidelity intravital imaging to improve the drug discovery process. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Intravital real-time study of tissue response to controlled laser-induced cavitation using 500-ps UV laser pulses focused in murine gut mucosa under online dosimetry and spectrally resolved 2-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzekowsky-Schroeder, Regina; Klinger, Antje; Schüth, Anna; Freidank, Sebastian; Hüttmann, Gereon; Gebert, Andreas; Vogel, Alfred

    2010-02-01

    We present a novel experimental setup to intravitally induce and monitor tissue lesions intravitally at a subcellular level in murine small intestinal mucosa. Using single 355-nm, 500-ps laser pulses coupled to a two-photon microscope, we induced optical breakdown with subsequent cavitation bubble formation in the tissue. Imaging was based on spectrally resolved two-photon excited tissue autofluorescence, while online-dosimetry of the induced microbubbles was done by a cw probe-beam scattering technique. From the scattering signal, the bubble size and dynamics could be deduced on a ns time scale. In turn, this signal could be used to control the damage size. This was important for reproducible production of minute effects in the tissue, despite strong biological variations in tissue response to pulsed laser irradiation. After producing local UV damage, cells appeared dark, probably due to destruction of mitochondria and loss of NAD(P)H fluorescence. Within 10 min after cell damage, epithelial cells adjacent to the injured area migrated into the wound to cover the denuded area, resulting in extrusion of the damaged cells from the epithelial layer. Using the nuclear acid stain propidium iodide, we could show that UV pulses induced cell membrane damage with subsequent necrosis, rather than apoptosis. For lesions without disruption of the basement membrane, we did not detect migration of immune cells toward the injured area within observation periods of up to 5 hours. This model will be used in further studies to investigate the intrinsic repair system and immune response to laserinduced lesions of intestinal epithelium in vivo.

  8. Intravital characterization of tumor cell migration in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beerling, Evelyne; Oosterom, Ilse; Voest, Emile; Lolkema, Martijn; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Curing pancreatic cancer is difficult as metastases often determine the poor clinical outcome. To gain more insight into the metastatic behavior of pancreatic cancer cells, we characterized migratory cells in primary pancreatic tumors using intravital microscopy. We visualized the migratory behavior of primary tumor cells of a genetically engineered pancreatic cancer mouse model and found that pancreatic tumor cells migrate with a mesenchymal morphology as single individual cells or collectively as a stream of non-cohesive single motile cells. These findings may improve our ability to conceive treatments that block metastatic behavior. PMID:28243522

  9. Intravital multiphoton imaging of mouse tibialis anterior muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Jasmine; Goh, Chi Ching; Devi, Sapna; Keeble, Jo; See, Peter; Ginhoux, Florent; Ng, Lai Guan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intravital imaging by multiphoton microscopy is a powerful tool to gain invaluable insight into tissue biology and function. Here, we provide a step-by-step tissue preparation protocol for imaging the mouse tibialis anterior skeletal muscle. Additionally, we include steps for jugular vein catheterization that allow for well-controlled intravenous reagent delivery. Preparation of the tibialis anterior muscle is minimally invasive, reducing the chances of inducing damage and inflammation prior to imaging. The tibialis anterior muscle is useful for imaging leukocyte interaction with vascular endothelium, and to understand muscle contraction biology. Importantly, this model can be easily adapted to study neuromuscular diseases and myopathies. PMID:28243520

  10. Imaging windows for long-term intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Alieva, Maria; Ritsma, Laila; Giedt, Randy J; Weissleder, Ralph; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2014-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is increasingly used to visualize and quantitate dynamic biological processes at the (sub)cellular level in live animals. By visualizing tissues through imaging windows, individual cells (e.g., cancer, host, or stem cells) can be tracked and studied over a time-span of days to months. Several imaging windows have been developed to access tissues including the brain, superficial fascia, mammary glands, liver, kidney, pancreas, and small intestine among others. Here, we review the development of imaging windows and compare the most commonly used long-term imaging windows for cancer biology: the cranial imaging window, the dorsal skin fold chamber, the mammary imaging window, and the abdominal imaging window. Moreover, we provide technical details, considerations, and trouble-shooting tips on the surgical procedures and microscopy setups for each imaging window and explain different strategies to assure imaging of the same area over multiple imaging sessions. This review aims to be a useful resource for establishing the long-term intravital imaging procedure. PMID:28243510

  11. Time-lapsed, large-volume, high-resolution intravital imaging for tissue-wide analysis of single cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Entenberg, David; Pastoriza, Jessica M; Oktay, Maja H; Voiculescu, Sonia; Wang, Yarong; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio; Condeelis, John

    2017-09-01

    Pathologists rely on microscopy to diagnose disease states in tissues and organs. They utilize both high-resolution, high-magnification images to interpret the staining and morphology of individual cells, as well as low-magnification overviews to give context and location to these cells. Intravital imaging is a powerful technique for studying cells and tissues in their native, live environment and can yield sub-cellular resolution images similar to those used by pathologists. However, technical limitations prevent the straightforward acquisition of low-magnification images during intravital imaging, and they are hence not typically captured. The serial acquisition, mosaicking, and stitching together of many high-resolution, high-magnification fields of view is a technique that overcomes these limitations in fixed and ex vivo tissues. The technique however, has not to date been widely applied to intravital imaging as movements caused by the living animal induce image distortions that are difficult to compensate for computationally. To address this, we have developed techniques for the stabilization of numerous tissues, including extremely compliant tissues, that have traditionally been extremely difficult to image. We present a novel combination of these stabilization techniques with mosaicked and stitched intravital imaging, resulting in a process we call Large-Volume High-Resolution Intravital Imaging (LVHR-IVI). The techniques we present are validated and make large volume intravital imaging accessible to any lab with a multiphoton microscope. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Elucidation of monocyte/macrophage dynamics and function by intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rua, Rejane; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are a diverse population of innate immune cells that play a critical role in homeostasis and inflammation. These cells are surveillant by nature and closely monitor the vasculature and surrounding tissue during states of health and disease. Given their abundance and strategic positioning throughout the body, myeloid cells are among the first responders to any inflammatory challenge and are active participants in most immune-mediated diseases. Recent studies have shed new light on myeloid cell dynamics and function by use of an imaging technique referred to as intravital microscopy (IVM). This powerful approach allows researchers to gain real-time insights into monocytes and macrophages performing homeostatic and inflammatory tasks in living tissues. In this review, we will present a contemporary synopsis of how intravital microscopy has revolutionized our understanding of myeloid cell contributions to vascular maintenance, microbial defense, autoimmunity, tumorigenesis, and acute/chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26162402

  13. Non-invasive intravital imaging of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas in live mice.

    PubMed

    Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Thompson, Jamie; Melis, Nicolas; Weigert, Roberto

    2017-09-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most common cancers with a 50% 5-year survival rate. Understanding the mechanisms that control development, progression, and spreading of the tumor to distal sites is of paramount importance to develop effective therapies. Here, we describe a minimally invasive procedure, which enables performing intravital microscopy of the mouse tongue in models for oral cancer and provides structural and dynamic information of the tumors at cellular and subcellular level. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Two-Photon Intravital Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of the Kidney Reveals Cell-Type Specific Metabolic Signatures.

    PubMed

    Hato, Takashi; Winfree, Seth; Day, Richard; Sandoval, Ruben M; Molitoris, Bruce A; Yoder, Mervin C; Wiggins, Roger C; Zheng, Yi; Dunn, Kenneth W; Dagher, Pierre C

    2017-03-01

    In the live animal, tissue autofluorescence arises from a number of biologically important metabolites, such as the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. Because autofluorescence changes with metabolic state, it can be harnessed as a label-free imaging tool with which to study metabolism in vivo Here, we used the combination of intravital two-photon microscopy and frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to map cell-specific metabolic signatures in the kidneys of live animals. The FLIM images are analyzed using the phasor approach, which requires no prior knowledge of metabolite species and can provide unbiased metabolic fingerprints for each pixel of the lifetime image. Intravital FLIM revealed the metabolic signatures of S1 and S2 proximal tubules to be distinct and resolvable at the subcellular level. Notably, S1 and distal tubules exhibited similar metabolic profiles despite apparent differences in morphology and autofluorescence emission with traditional two-photon microscopy. Time-lapse imaging revealed dynamic changes in the metabolic profiles of the interstitium, urinary lumen, and glomerulus-areas that are not resolved by traditional intensity-based two-photon microscopy. Finally, using a model of endotoxemia, we present examples of the way in which intravital FLIM can be applied to study kidney diseases and metabolism. In conclusion, intravital FLIM of intrinsic metabolites is a bias-free approach with which to characterize and monitor metabolism in vivo, and offers the unique opportunity to uncover dynamic metabolic changes in living animals with subcellular resolution.

  15. Intravital imaging of the mouse popliteal lymph node.

    PubMed

    Liou, H L Rachel; Myers, Jay T; Barkauskas, Deborah S; Huang, Alex Y

    2012-02-08

    Lymph nodes (LNs) are secondary lymphoid organs, which are strategically located throughout the body to allow for trapping and presentation of foreign antigens from peripheral tissues to prime the adaptive immune response. Juxtaposed between innate and adaptive immune responses, the LN is an ideal site to study immune cell interactions. Lymphocytes (T cells, B cells and NK cells), dendritic cells (DCs), and macrophages comprise the bulk of bone marrow-derived cellular elements of the LN. These cells are strategically positioned in the LN to allow efficient surveillance of self antigens and potential foreign antigens. The process by which lymphocytes successfully encounter cognate antigens is a subject of intense investigation in recent years, and involves an integration of molecular contacts including antigen receptors, adhesion molecules, chemokines, and stromal structures such as the fibro-reticular network. Prior to the development of high-resolution real-time fluorescent in vivo imaging, investigators relied on static imaging, which only offers answers regarding morphology, position, and architecture. While these questions are fundamental in our understanding of immune cell behavior, the limitations intrinsic with this technique does not permit analysis to decipher lymphocyte trafficking and environmental clues that affect dynamic cell behavior. Recently, the development of intravital two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM) has allowed investigators to view the dynamic movements and interactions of individual cells within live LNs in situ. In particular, we and others have applied this technique to image cellular behavior and interactions within the popliteal LN, where its compact, dense nature offers the advantage of multiplex data acquisition over a large tissue area with diverse tissue sub-structures. It is important to note that this technique offers added benefits over explanted tissue imaging techniques, which require disruption of blood, lymph flow

  16. Fluorescent Tobacco mosaic virus-Derived Bio-Nanoparticles for Intravital Two-Photon Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Niehl, Annette; Appaix, Florence; Boscá, Sonia; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Nicoud, Jean-François; Bolze, Frédéric; Heinlein, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Multi-photon intravital imaging has become a powerful tool to investigate the healthy and diseased brain vasculature in living animals. Although agents for multi-photon fluorescence microscopy of the microvasculature are available, issues related to stability, bioavailability, toxicity, cost or chemical adaptability remain to be solved. In particular, there is a need for highly fluorescent dyes linked to particles that do not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) in brain diseases like tumor or stroke to estimate the functional blood supply. Plant virus particles possess a number of distinct advantages over other particles, the most important being the multi-valency of chemically addressable sites on the particle surface. This multi-valency, together with biological compatibility and inert nature, makes plant viruses ideal carriers for in vivo imaging agents. Here, we show that the well-known Tobacco mosaic virus is a suitable nanocarrier for two-photon dyes and for intravital imaging of the mouse brain vasculature. PMID:26793221

  17. Intravital Microscopic Methods to Evaluate Anti-inflammatory Effects and Signaling Mechanisms Evoked by Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Zuidema, Mozow Y.; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous signaling molecule with potent anti-inflammatory properties. Exogenous application of H2S donors, administered either acutely during an inflammatory response or as an antecedent preconditioning intervention that invokes the activation of anti-inflammatory cell survival programs, effectively limits leukocyte rolling, adhesion and emigration, generation of reactive oxygen species, chemokine and cell adhesion molecule expression, endothelial barrier disruption,capillary perfusion deficits, and parenchymal cell dysfunction and injury. This chapter focuses on intravital microscopic methods that can be used to assess the anti-inflammatory effects exerted by H2S, as well as to explore the cellular signaling mechanisms by which this gaseous molecule limits the aforementioned inflammatory responses. Recent advances include use of intravital multiphoton microscopy and optical biosensor technology to explore signaling mechanisms in vivo. PMID:25747477

  18. Fluorescent Tobacco mosaic virus-Derived Bio-Nanoparticles for Intravital Two-Photon Imaging.

    PubMed

    Niehl, Annette; Appaix, Florence; Boscá, Sonia; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Nicoud, Jean-François; Bolze, Frédéric; Heinlein, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Multi-photon intravital imaging has become a powerful tool to investigate the healthy and diseased brain vasculature in living animals. Although agents for multi-photon fluorescence microscopy of the microvasculature are available, issues related to stability, bioavailability, toxicity, cost or chemical adaptability remain to be solved. In particular, there is a need for highly fluorescent dyes linked to particles that do not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) in brain diseases like tumor or stroke to estimate the functional blood supply. Plant virus particles possess a number of distinct advantages over other particles, the most important being the multi-valency of chemically addressable sites on the particle surface. This multi-valency, together with biological compatibility and inert nature, makes plant viruses ideal carriers for in vivo imaging agents. Here, we show that the well-known Tobacco mosaic virus is a suitable nanocarrier for two-photon dyes and for intravital imaging of the mouse brain vasculature.

  19. [Frontiers in Live Bone Imaging Researches. Intravital imaging of osteoclast dynamics].

    PubMed

    Kikuta, Junichi; Ishii, Masaru

    2015-06-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing giant polykaryons that differentiate from mononuclear macrophage/monocyte-lineage hematopoietic precursors. Upon the stimulation of essential factors such as M-CSF and RANKL, osteoclast precursor monocytes attach to the bone surface ( "migration" ), fuse with each other to form giant cells ( "differentiation" ) and mediate bone resorption ( "function" ). To reveal the regulatory mechanism of these three dynamic steps of osteoclastic activity, we have originally established an advanced imaging system for visualizing living bone tissues with intravital multiphoton microscopy. By means of the system, we have recently succeeded in visualization of osteoclast migration, differentiation, and function in living bone tissues in vivo. In this review we summarize the latest data of intravital imaging of osteoclast dynamics, and discuss novel lines of osteoclast-targeted therapies that will impact future treatment of bone destructive diseases.

  20. Intravital imaging of dendritic spine plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sau Wan Lai, Cora

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic part of most excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Recent works have suggested that the structural and functional plasticity of dendritic spines have been associated with information coding and memories. Advances in imaging and labeling techniques enable the study of dendritic spine dynamics in vivo. This perspective focuses on intravital imaging studies of dendritic spine plasticity in the neocortex. I will introduce imaging tools for studying spine dynamics and will further review current findings on spine structure and function under various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:28243511

  1. Methodological advances in imaging intravital axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Sleigh, James N; Vagnoni, Alessio; Twelvetrees, Alison E; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2017-01-01

    Axonal transport is the active process whereby neurons transport cargoes such as organelles and proteins anterogradely from the cell body to the axon terminal and retrogradely in the opposite direction. Bi-directional transport in axons is absolutely essential for the functioning and survival of neurons and appears to be negatively impacted by both aging and diseases of the nervous system, such as Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The movement of individual cargoes along axons has been studied in vitro in live neurons and tissue explants for a number of years; however, it is currently unclear as to whether these systems faithfully and consistently replicate the in vivo situation. A number of intravital techniques originally developed for studying diverse biological events have recently been adapted to monitor axonal transport in real-time in a range of live organisms and are providing novel insight into this dynamic process. Here, we highlight these methodological advances in intravital imaging of axonal transport, outlining key strengths and limitations while discussing findings, possible improvements, and outstanding questions.

  2. Methodological advances in imaging intravital axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Sleigh, James N.; Vagnoni, Alessio; Twelvetrees, Alison E.; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2017-01-01

    Axonal transport is the active process whereby neurons transport cargoes such as organelles and proteins anterogradely from the cell body to the axon terminal and retrogradely in the opposite direction. Bi-directional transport in axons is absolutely essential for the functioning and survival of neurons and appears to be negatively impacted by both aging and diseases of the nervous system, such as Alzheimer’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The movement of individual cargoes along axons has been studied in vitro in live neurons and tissue explants for a number of years; however, it is currently unclear as to whether these systems faithfully and consistently replicate the in vivo situation. A number of intravital techniques originally developed for studying diverse biological events have recently been adapted to monitor axonal transport in real-time in a range of live organisms and are providing novel insight into this dynamic process. Here, we highlight these methodological advances in intravital imaging of axonal transport, outlining key strengths and limitations while discussing findings, possible improvements, and outstanding questions. PMID:28344778

  3. Microscopy

    Treesearch

    Patricia A. Moss; Les Groom

    2001-01-01

    Microscopy is the study and interpretation of images produced by a microscope. "Interpretation" is the keyword, because the microscope enables one to see structures that are too small or too close together to be resolved by the unaided eye. (The human eye cannot separate two points or lines that are closer together than 0.1 mm.) it is important to...

  4. From good to bad: Intravital imaging of the hijack of physiological processes by cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Suijkerbuijk, Saskia J E; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2017-08-15

    Homeostasis of tissues is tightly regulated at the cellular, tissue and organismal level. Interestingly, tumor cells have found ways to hijack many of these physiological processes at all the different levels. Here we review how intravital microscopy techniques have provided new insights into our understanding of tissue homeostasis and cancer progression. In addition, we highlight the different strategies that tumor cells have adopted to use these physiological processes for their own benefit. We describe how visualization of these dynamic processes in living mice has broadened to our view on cancer initiation and progression. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Extended Time-lapse Intravital Imaging of Real-time Multicellular Dynamics in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Harney, Allison S.; Wang, Yarong; Condeelis, John S.; Entenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, host stromal cells interact with tumor cells to promote tumor progression, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. Multicellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment can lead to transient events including directional tumor cell motility and vascular permeability. Quantification of tumor vascular permeability has frequently used end-point experiments to measure extravasation of vascular dyes. However, due to the transient nature of multicellular interactions and vascular permeability, the kinetics of these dynamic events cannot be discerned. By labeling cells and vasculature with injectable dyes or fluorescent proteins, high-resolution time-lapse intravital microscopy has allowed the direct, real-time visualization of transient events in the tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a method for using multiphoton microscopy to perform extended intravital imaging in live mice to directly visualize multicellular dynamics in the tumor microenvironment. This method details cellular labeling strategies, the surgical preparation of a mammary skin flap, the administration of injectable dyes or proteins by tail vein catheter and the acquisition of time-lapse images. The time-lapse sequences obtained from this method facilitate the visualization and quantitation of the kinetics of cellular events of motility and vascular permeability in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27341448

  6. Imaging windows for long-term intravital imaging: General overview and technical insights.

    PubMed

    Alieva, Maria; Ritsma, Laila; Giedt, Randy J; Weissleder, Ralph; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2014-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is increasingly used to visualize and quantitate dynamic biological processes at the (sub)cellular level in live animals. By visualizing tissues through imaging windows, individual cells (e.g., cancer, host, or stem cells) can be tracked and studied over a time-span of days to months. Several imaging windows have been developed to access tissues including the brain, superficial fascia, mammary glands, liver, kidney, pancreas, and small intestine among others. Here, we review the development of imaging windows and compare the most commonly used long-term imaging windows for cancer biology: the cranial imaging window, the dorsal skin fold chamber, the mammary imaging window, and the abdominal imaging window. Moreover, we provide technical details, considerations, and trouble-shooting tips on the surgical procedures and microscopy setups for each imaging window and explain different strategies to assure imaging of the same area over multiple imaging sessions. This review aims to be a useful resource for establishing the long-term intravital imaging procedure.

  7. Imaging Circulating Tumor Cells in Freely Moving Awake Small Animals Using a Miniaturized Intravital Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Sasportas, Laura Sarah; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis, the cause for 90% of cancer mortality, is a complex and poorly understood process involving the invasion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into blood vessels. These cells have potential prognostic value as biomarkers for early metastatic risk. But their rarity and the lack of specificity and sensitivity in measuring them render their interrogation by current techniques very challenging. How and when these cells are circulating in the blood, on their way to potentially give rise to metastasis, is a question that remains largely unanswered. In order to provide an insight into this "black box" using non-invasive imaging, we developed a novel miniature intravital microscopy (mIVM) strategy capable of real-time long-term monitoring of CTCs in awake small animals. We established an experimental 4T1-GL mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, in which tumor cells express both fluorescent and bioluminescent reporter genes to enable both single cell and whole body tumor imaging. Using mIVM, we monitored blood vessels of different diameters in awake mice in an experimental model of metastasis. Using an in-house software algorithm we developed, we demonstrated in vivo CTC enumeration and computation of CTC trajectory and speed. These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals. PMID:24497977

  8. Viral nanoparticles as tools for intravital vascular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, John D; Destito, Giuseppe; Zijlstra, Andries; Gonzalez, Maria J; Quigley, James P; Manchester, Marianne; Stuhlmann, Heidi

    2008-01-01

    A significant impediment to the widespread use of noninvasive in vivo vascular imaging techniques is the current lack of suitable intravital imaging probes. We describe here a new strategy to use viral nanoparticles as a platform for the multivalent display of fluorescent dyes to image tissues deep inside living organisms. The bioavailable cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) can be fluorescently labeled to high densities with no measurable quenching, resulting in exceptionally bright particles with in vivo dispersion properties that allow high-resolution intravital imaging of vascular endothelium for periods of at least 72 h. We show that CPMV nanoparticles can be used to visualize the vasculature and blood flow in living mouse and chick embryos to a depth of up to 500 μm. Furthermore, we show that the intravital visualization of human fibrosarcoma-mediated tumor angiogenesis using fluorescent CPMV provides a means to identify arterial and venous vessels and to monitor the neovascularization of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:16501571

  9. Correlative intravital imaging of cGMP signals and vasodilation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Thunemann, Martin; Schmidt, Kjestine; de Wit, Cor; Han, Xiaoxing; Jain, Rakesh K.; Fukumura, Dai; Feil, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important signaling molecule and drug target in the cardiovascular system. It is well known that stimulation of the vascular nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway results in vasodilation. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP signals themselves and the cGMP concentrations within specific cardiovascular cell types in health, disease, and during pharmacotherapy with cGMP-elevating drugs are largely unknown. To facilitate the analysis of cGMP signaling in vivo, we have generated transgenic mice that express fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cGMP sensor proteins. Here, we describe two models of intravital FRET/cGMP imaging in the vasculature of cGMP sensor mice: (1) epifluorescence-based ratio imaging in resistance-type vessels of the cremaster muscle and (2) ratio imaging by multiphoton microscopy within the walls of subcutaneous blood vessels accessed through a dorsal skinfold chamber. Both methods allow simultaneous monitoring of NO-induced cGMP transients and vasodilation in living mice. Detailed protocols of all steps necessary to perform and evaluate intravital imaging experiments of the vasculature of anesthetized mice including surgery, imaging, and data evaluation are provided. An image segmentation approach is described to estimate FRET/cGMP changes within moving structures such as the vessel wall during vasodilation. The methods presented herein should be useful to visualize cGMP or other biochemical signals that are detectable with FRET-based biosensors, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate or Ca2+, and to correlate them with respective vascular responses. With further refinement and combination of transgenic mouse models and intravital imaging technologies, we envision an exciting future, in which we are able to “watch” biochemistry, (patho-)physiology, and pharmacotherapy in the context of a living mammalian organism. PMID:25352809

  10. Fungal Infection in the Brain: What We Learned from Intravital Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Meiqing; Mody, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 1.2 billion people suffer from fungal diseases worldwide. Arguably, the most serious manifestation occurs when pathogenic fungi infect the brain, often causing fatal meningoencephalitis. For most fungi, infection occurs via the vascular route. The organism must first be arrested in the brain microvasculature and transmigrate into the brain parenchyma across the blood–brain barrier. As a result, host immune cells are recruited into the brain to contain the fungi. However, it remains poorly understood how fungi traffic to, and migrate into the brain and how immune cells interact with invading fungi in the brain. A new era of intravital fluorescence microscopy has begun to provide insights. We are able to employ this powerful approach to study dynamic interactions of disseminating fungi with brain endothelial cells as well as resident and recruited immune cells during the brain infection. In this review, with a focus on Cryptococcus neoformans, we will provide an overview of the application of intravital imaging in fungal infections in the brain, discuss recent findings and speculate on possible future research directions. PMID:27532000

  11. Neutrophil Extravasation Cascade: What Can We Learn from Two-photon Intravital Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang A

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells (leukocytes or white blood cells) move actively and sensitively based on body conditions. Despite their important role as protectors inside the body, it is difficult to directly observe the spatiotemporal momentum of leukocytes. With advances in imaging technology, the introduction of two-photon microscopy has enabled researchers to look deeper inside tissues in a three-dimensional manner. In observations of immune cell movement along the blood vessel, vascular permeability and innate immune cell movements remain unclear. Here, we describe the neutrophil extravasation cascade, which were observed using a two-photon intravital imaging technique. We also provide evidence for novel mechanisms such as neutrophil body extension and microparticle formation as well as their biological roles during migration. PMID:28035206

  12. Intravital Imaging of Axonal Interactions with Microglia and Macrophages in a Mouse Dorsal Column Crush Injury

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Teresa A.; Barkauskas, Deborah S.; Myers, Jay T.; Huang, Alex Y.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury causes an inflammatory reaction involving blood-derived macrophages and central nervous system (CNS)-resident microglia. Intra-vital two-photon microscopy enables the study of macrophages and microglia in the spinal cord lesion in the living animal. This can be performed in adult animals with a traumatic injury to the dorsal column. Here, we describe methods for distinguishing macrophages from microglia in the CNS using an irradiation bone marrow chimera to obtain animals in which only macrophages or microglia are labeled with a genetically encoded green fluorescent protein. We also describe a injury model that crushes the dorsal column of the spinal cord, thereby producing a simple, easily accessible, rectangular lesion that is easily visualized in an animal through a laminectomy. Furthermore, we will outline procedures to sequentially image the animals at the anatomical site of injury for the study of cellular interactions during the first few days to weeks after injury. PMID:25489963

  13. Intravital FRET: Probing Cellular and Tissue Function in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Radbruch, Helena; Bremer, Daniel; Mothes, Ronja; Günther, Robert; Rinnenthal, Jan Leo; Pohlan, Julian; Ulbricht, Carolin; Hauser, Anja E.; Niesner, Raluca

    2015-01-01

    The development of intravital Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) is required to probe cellular and tissue function in the natural context: the living organism. Only in this way can biomedicine truly comprehend pathogenesis and develop effective therapeutic strategies. Here we demonstrate and discuss the advantages and pitfalls of two strategies to quantify FRET in vivo—ratiometrically and time-resolved by fluorescence lifetime imaging—and show their concrete application in the context of neuroinflammation in adult mice. PMID:26006244

  14. A Novel Model of Intravital Platelet Imaging Using CD41-ZsGreen1 Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Makoto; Tomizawa, Atsuyuki; Ohno, Kousaku; Jakubowski, Joseph A.; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play pivotal roles in both hemostasis and thrombosis. Although models of intravital platelet imaging are available for thrombosis studies in mice, few are available for rat studies. The present effort aimed to generate fluorescent platelets in rats and assess their dynamics in a rat model of arterial injury. We generated CD41-ZsGreen1 transgenic rats, in which green fluorescence protein ZsGreen1 was expressed specifically in megakaryocytes and thus platelets. The transgenic rats exhibited normal hematological and biochemical values with the exception of body weight and erythroid parameters, which were slightly lower than those of wild-type rats. Platelet aggregation, induced by 20 μM ADP and 10 μg/ml collagen, and blood clotting times were not significantly different between transgenic and wild-type rats. Saphenous arteries of transgenic rats were injured with 10% FeCl3, and the formation of fluorescent thrombi was evaluated using confocal microscopy. FeCl3 caused time-dependent increases in the mean fluorescence intensity of injured arteries of vehicle-treated rats. Prasugrel (3 mg/kg, p.o.), administered 2 h before FeCl3, significantly inhibited fluorescence compared with vehicle-treated rats (4.5 ± 0.4 vs. 14.9 ± 2.4 arbitrary fluorescence units at 30 min, respectively, n = 8, P = 0.0037). These data indicate that CD41-ZsGreen1 transgenic rats represent a useful model for intravital imaging of platelet-mediated thrombus formation and the evaluation of antithrombotic agents. PMID:27128503

  15. A novel model for ectopic, chronic, intravital multiphoton imaging of bone marrow vasculature and architecture in split femurs

    PubMed Central

    Bălan, Mirela; Kiefer, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    Creating a model for intravital visualization of femoral bone marrow, a major site of hematopoiesis in adult mammalian organisms, poses a serious challenge, in that it needs to overcome bone opacity and the inaccessibility of marrow. Furthermore, meaningful analysis of bone marrow developmental and differentiation processes requires the repetitive observation of the same site over long periods of time, which we refer to as chronic imaging. To surmount these issues, we developed a chronic intravital imaging model that allows the observation of split femurs, ectopically transplanted into a dorsal skinfold chamber of a host mouse. Repeated, long term observations are facilitated by multiphoton microscopy, an imaging technique that combines superior imaging capacity at greater tissue depth with low phototoxicity. The transplanted, ectopic femur was stabilized by its sterile environment and rapidly connected to the host vasculature, allowing further development and observation of extended processes. After optimizing transplant age and grafting procedure, we observed the development of new woven bone and maturation of secondary ossification centers in the transplanted femurs, preceded by the sprouting of a sinusoidal-like vascular network, which was almost entirely composed of femoral endothelial cells. After two weeks, the transplant was still populated with stromal and haematopoietic cells belonging both to donor and host. Over this time frame, the transplant partially retained myeloid progenitor cells with single and multi-lineage differentiation capacity. In summary, our model allowed repeated intravital imaging of bone marrow angiogenesis and hematopoiesis. It represents a promising starting point for the development of improved chronic optical imaging models for femoral bone marrow. PMID:28243515

  16. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C.; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L.; Padera, Timothy P.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates—only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24353926

  17. Intravital imaging of embryonic and tumor neovasculature using viral nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Hon Sing; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Ablack, Amber; Destito, Giuseppe; Zijlstra, Andries; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Manchester, Marianne; Lewis, John D

    2011-01-01

    Viral nanoparticles are a novel class of biomolecular agents that take advantage of the natural circulatory and targeting properties of viruses to allow the development of therapeutics, vaccines and imaging tools. We have developed a multivalent nanoparticle platform based on the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) that facilitates particle labeling at high density with fluorescent dyes and other functional groups. Compared with other technologies, CPMV-based viral nanoparticles are particularly suited for long-term intravital vascular imaging because of their biocompatibility and retention in the endothelium with minimal side effects. The stable, long-term labeling of the endothelium allows the identification of vasculature undergoing active remodeling in real time. In this study, we describe the synthesis, purification and fluorescent labeling of cpMV nanoparticles, along with their use for imaging of vascular structure and for intravital vascular mapping in developmental and tumor angiogenesis models. Dye-labeled viral nanoparticles can be synthesized and purified in a single day, and imaging studies can be conducted over hours, days or weeks, depending on the application. PMID:20671724

  18. Intravital fluorescence microscopic study of the behavior of long-circulating liposomes during microvascular thrombosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvoisselle, Jean-Marie; Begu, Sylvie; Tourne-Peteilh, Corine; Buys, Bruno; Mordon, Serge R.

    2002-06-01

    Treatment of thrombosis depends on the selectivity of thrombolytic agents to the clot. It has been already demonstrated that liposomes can provide a better selectivity of such agents to the clot site. We have recently shown that intravital fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool to image in situ and in real time the labeling of leukocytes by long circulating liposomes. The aim of this study was to monitor the in vivo behavior of such liposomes in a clot site. Carboxyfluorescein-loaded long circulating liposomes were prepared and characterized in term of size and permeability. The liposomes suspension was injected intravenously to golden hamsters. The skin microcirculation was observed using a dorsal skin-fold chamber by fluorescence microscopy. Thrombosis were obtained as the consequence of the inflammatory response due to the surgery. Using this model, fluorescent dots were observed at the site of the clot. Liposomes accumulate at the clot site whatever the mechanism (passive deposition or uptake). There is a period of latency and 30 seconds after the blood flow stop, fluorescence increases very rapidly and a bright fluorescent spot is observed at the site of the clot. Further studies are needed to determine the exact localization of liposomes in the clot and the mechanism of interaction.

  19. Intravital imaging reveals new ancillary mechanisms co-opted by cancer cells to drive tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Morghan C.; Timpson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Intravital imaging is providing new insights into the dynamics of tumor progression in native tissues and has started to reveal the layers of complexity found in cancer. Recent advances in intravital imaging have allowed us to look deeper into cancer behavior and to dissect the interactions between tumor cells and the ancillary host niche that promote cancer development. In this review, we provide an insight into the latest advances in cancer biology achieved by intravital imaging, focusing on recently discovered mechanisms by which tumor cells manipulate normal tissue to facilitate disease progression. PMID:27239290

  20. Intravital Placenta Imaging Reveals Microcirculatory Dynamics Impact on Sequestration and Phagocytosis of Plasmodium-Infected Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Luciana Vieira; Tadokoro, Carlos Eduardo; Gómez-Conde, Iván; Olivieri, David N.; Penha-Gonçalves, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Malaria in pregnancy is exquisitely aggressive, causing a range of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes prominently linked to Plasmodium-infected erythrocyte cytoadherence to fetal trophoblast. To elucidate the physiopathology of infected erythrocytes (IE) sequestration in the placenta we devised an experimental system for intravital placental examination of P. berghei-infected mice. BALB/c females were mated to C57Bl/6 CFP+ male mice and infected with GFP+ P. berghei IE, and at gestational day 18, placentas were exposed for time-lapse imaging acquisition under two-photon microscopy. Real-time images and quantitative measurements revealed that trophoblast conformational changes transiently restrain blood flow in the mouse placental labyrinth. The complex dynamics of placental microcirculation promotes IE accumulation in maternal blood spaces with low blood flow and allows the establishment of stable IE-trophoblast contacts. Further, we show that the fate of sequestered IE includes engulfment by both macrophagic and trophoblastic fetal-derived cells. These findings reinforce the current paradigm that IE interact with the trophoblast and provide definitive evidence on two novel pathogenesis mechanisms: (1) trophoblast layer controls placental microcirculation promoting IE sequestration; and (2) fetal-derived placental cells engulf sequestered IE. PMID:23382682

  1. From morphology to biochemical state - intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R.; Feger, Julia S.; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A.; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-03-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients’ bedsides. These ‘optical biopsies’ generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy.

  2. A cerebellar window for intravital imaging of normal and disease states in mice.

    PubMed

    Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Badeaux, Mark; Roberge, Sylvie; Batista, Ana; Kirkpatrick, Ned; Snuderl, Matija; Amoozgar, Zohreh; Seano, Giorgio; Ferraro, Gino B; Chatterjee, Sampurna; Xu, Lei; Fukumura, Dai; Duda, Dan G; Jain, Rakesh K

    2017-11-01

    The cerebellum is a prominent part of the vertebrate hindbrain that is critically involved in the regulation of important body functions such as movement coordination, maintenance of balance and posture, and motor control. Here, we describe a cerebellar window that provides access to the mouse cerebellum for intravital imaging, thereby allowing for a detailed characterization of the dynamic processes in this region of the brain. First, the skull overlying the cerebellum is removed, and then the window is applied to the region of interest. Windows may be exchanged depending on the desired imaging modality. This technique has a variety of applications. In the setting of medulloblastoma, spontaneous or orthotopically implanted lesions can be imaged, and tumor morphology and size can be monitored using ultrasonography. Multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy (MPLSM) or optical-frequency-domain imaging (OFDI) can be applied for in vivo visualization and analysis of cellular and vascular structures in a variety of disease states, including malignancies and ataxia telangiectasia. This protocol describes a novel and rapid method for cerebellar window construction that can be set up in under an hour.

  3. Parallelized TCSPC for Dynamic Intravital Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging: Quantifying Neuronal Dysfunction in Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Radbruch, Helena; Andresen, Volker; Mossakowski, Agata; Siffrin, Volker; Seelemann, Thomas; Spiecker, Heinrich; Moll, Ingrid; Herz, Josephine; Hauser, Anja E.; Zipp, Frauke; Behne, Martin J.; Niesner, Raluca

    2013-01-01

    Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy has revolutionized our view on vital processes by revealing motility and interaction patterns of various cell subsets in hardly accessible organs (e.g. brain) in living animals. However, current technology is still insufficient to elucidate the mechanisms of organ dysfunction as a prerequisite for developing new therapeutic strategies, since it renders only sparse information about the molecular basis of cellular response within tissues in health and disease. In the context of imaging, Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) is one of the most adequate tools to probe molecular mechanisms of cell function. As a calibration-free technique, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is superior for quantifying FRET in vivo. Currently, its main limitation is the acquisition speed in the context of deep-tissue 3D and 4D imaging. Here we present a parallelized time-correlated single-photon counting point detector (p-TCSPC) (i) for dynamic single-beam scanning FLIM of large 3D areas on the range of hundreds of milliseconds relevant in the context of immune-induced pathologies as well as (ii) for ultrafast 2D FLIM in the range of tens of milliseconds, a scale relevant for cell physiology. We demonstrate its power in dynamic deep-tissue intravital imaging, as compared to multi-beam scanning time-gated FLIM suitable for fast data acquisition and compared to highly sensitive single-channel TCSPC adequate to detect low fluorescence signals. Using p-TCSPC, 256×256 pixel FLIM maps (300×300 µm2) are acquired within 468 ms while 131×131 pixel FLIM maps (75×75 µm2) can be acquired every 82 ms in 115 µm depth in the spinal cord of CerTN L15 mice. The CerTN L15 mice express a FRET-based Ca-biosensor in certain neuronal subsets. Our new technology allows us to perform time-lapse 3D intravital FLIM (4D FLIM) in the brain stem of CerTN L15 mice affected by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and, thereby, to truly quantify neuronal

  4. Long-term time-lapse multimodal intravital imaging of regeneration and bone-marrow-derived cell dynamics in skin

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Benedikt W.; Chaney, Eric J.; Marjanovic, Marina; Adie, Steven G.; De Lisio, Michael; Valero, M. Carmen; Boppart, Marni D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for translating cell-based therapies is understanding the dynamics of cells and cell populations in complex in vivo environments. Intravital microscopy has shown great promise for directly visualizing cell behavior in vivo. However, current methods are limited to relatively short imaging times (hours), by ways to track cell and cell population dynamics over extended time-lapse periods (days to weeks to months), and by relatively few imaging contrast mechanisms that persist over extended investigations. We present technology to visualize and quantify complex, multifaceted dynamic changes in natural deformable skin over long time periods using novel multimodal imaging and a non-rigid image registration method. These are demonstrated in green fluorescent protein (GFP) bone marrow (BM) transplanted mice to study dynamic skin regeneration. This technology provides a novel perspective for studying dynamic biological processes and will enable future studies of stem, immune, and tumor cell biology in vivo. PMID:25089085

  5. Covariant 4-dimensional fuzzy spheres, matrix models and higher spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, Marcus; Steinacker, Harold C.

    2017-09-01

    We study in detail generalized 4-dimensional fuzzy spheres with twisted extra dimensions. These spheres can be viewed as SO(5) -equivariant projections of quantized coadjoint orbits of SO(6) . We show that they arise as solutions in Yang-Mills matrix models, which naturally leads to higher-spin gauge theories on S 4. Several types of embeddings in matrix models are found, including one with self-intersecting fuzzy extra dimensions \

  6. The mouse cortical meninges are the site of immune responses to many different pathogens, and are accessible to intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Coles, Jonathan A; Stewart-Hutchinson, Phillip J; Myburgh, Elmarie; Brewer, James M

    2017-08-15

    A wide range of viral and microbial infections are known to cause meningitis, and there is evidence that the meninges are the gateway to pathogenic invasion of the brain parenchyma. Hence observation of these regions has wide application to understanding host-pathogen interactions. Interactions between pathogens and cells of the immune response can be modified by changes in their environment, such as suppression of the flow of blood and lymph, and, particularly in the case of the meninges, with their unsupported membranes, invasive dissection can alter the tissue architecture. For these reasons, intravital imaging through the unperforated skull is the method of choice. We give a protocol for a simple method of two-photon microscopy through the thinned cortical skull of the anesthetized mouse to enable real-time imaging with sub-micron resolution through the meninges and into the superficial brain parenchyma. In reporter mice in which selected cell types express fluorescent proteins, imaging after infection with fluorescent pathogens (lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, Trypanosoma brucei or Plasmodium berghei) has shown strong recruitment to the cortical meninges of immune cells, including neutrophils, T cells, and putative dendritic cells and macrophages. Without special labeling, the boundaries between the dura mater, the leptomeninx, and the parenchyma are not directly visualized in intravital two-photon microscopy, but other landmarks and characteristics, which we illustrate, allow the researcher to identify the compartment being imaged. While most infectious meningitides are localized mainly in the dura mater, others involve recruitment of immune cells to the leptomeninx. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. What Ticks Do Under Your Skin: Two-Photon Intravital Imaging of Ixodes Scapularis Feeding in the Presence of the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Bockenstedt, Linda K.; Gonzalez, David; Mao, Jialing; Li, Ming; Belperron, Alexia A.; Haberman, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, due to infection with the Ixodes-tick transmitted spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common tick-transmitted disease in the northern hemisphere. Our understanding of the tick-pathogen-vertebrate host interactions that sustain an enzootic cycle for B. burgdorferi is incomplete. In this article, we describe a method for imaging the feeding of Ixodes scapularis nymphs in real-time using two-photon intravital microscopy and show how this technology can be applied to view the response of Lyme borrelia in the skin of an infected host to tick feeding. PMID:24600332

  8. Development of novel murine mammary imaging windows to examine wound healing effects on leukocyte trafficking in mammary tumors with intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sobolik, Tammy; Su, Ying-Jun; Ashby, Will; Schaffer, David K.; Wells, Sam; Wikswo, John P.; Zijlstra, Andries; Richmond, Ann

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We developed mammary imaging windows (MIWs) to evaluate leukocyte infiltration and cancer cell dissemination in mouse mammary tumors imaged by confocal microscopy. Previous techniques relied on surgical resection of a skin flap to image the tumor microenvironment restricting imaging time to a few hours. Utilization of mammary imaging windows offers extension of intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment. We have characterized strengths and identified some previously undescribed potential weaknesses of MIW techniques. Through iterative enhancements of a transdermal portal we defined conditions for improved quality and extended confocal imaging time for imaging key cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:28243517

  9. Development of novel murine mammary imaging windows to examine wound healing effects on leukocyte trafficking in mammary tumors with intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Sobolik, Tammy; Su, Ying-Jun; Ashby, Will; Schaffer, David K; Wells, Sam; Wikswo, John P; Zijlstra, Andries; Richmond, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We developed mammary imaging windows (MIWs) to evaluate leukocyte infiltration and cancer cell dissemination in mouse mammary tumors imaged by confocal microscopy. Previous techniques relied on surgical resection of a skin flap to image the tumor microenvironment restricting imaging time to a few hours. Utilization of mammary imaging windows offers extension of intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment. We have characterized strengths and identified some previously undescribed potential weaknesses of MIW techniques. Through iterative enhancements of a transdermal portal we defined conditions for improved quality and extended confocal imaging time for imaging key cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

  10. In vivo microscopy.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János

    2016-04-01

    This article summarizes the past, present, and future promise of multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy for intravital kidney imaging. During the past 15years, several high-power visual research approaches have been developed using multiphoton imaging to study the normal functions of the healthy, intact, living kidney, and the various molecular and cellular mechanisms of the development of kidney diseases. In this review, the main focus will be on intravital multiphoton imaging of the glomerulus, the structure and function of the glomerular filtration barrier, especially the podocyte. Examples will be given for the combination of two powerful research tools, in vivo multiphoton imaging and mouse genetics using commercially available whole animal models for the detailed characterization of glomerular cell types, their function and fate, and for the better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of glomerular pathologies. One of the new modalities of multiphoton imaging, serial imaging of the same glomerulus in the same animal over several days will be emphasized for its potential for further advancing the field of nephrology research.

  11. Intravital Fluorescence Excitation in Whole-Animal Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bixler, Joel N; Kong, Ying; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Maitland, Kristen C

    2016-01-01

    Whole-animal fluorescence imaging with recombinant or fluorescently-tagged pathogens or cells enables real-time analysis of disease progression and treatment response in live animals. Tissue absorption limits penetration of fluorescence excitation light, particularly in the visible wavelength range, resulting in reduced sensitivity to deep targets. Here, we demonstrate the use of an optical fiber bundle to deliver light into the mouse lung to excite fluorescent bacteria, circumventing tissue absorption of excitation light in whole-animal imaging. We present the use of this technology to improve detection of recombinant reporter strains of tdTomato-expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guerin) bacteria in the mouse lung. A microendoscope was integrated into a whole-animal fluorescence imager to enable intravital excitation in the mouse lung with whole-animal detection. Using this technique, the threshold of detection was measured as 103 colony forming units (CFU) during pulmonary infection. In comparison, the threshold of detection for whole-animal fluorescence imaging using standard epi-illumination was greater than 106 CFU.

  12. Intravital Fluorescence Excitation in Whole-Animal Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bixler, Joel N.; Kong, Ying; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-animal fluorescence imaging with recombinant or fluorescently-tagged pathogens or cells enables real-time analysis of disease progression and treatment response in live animals. Tissue absorption limits penetration of fluorescence excitation light, particularly in the visible wavelength range, resulting in reduced sensitivity to deep targets. Here, we demonstrate the use of an optical fiber bundle to deliver light into the mouse lung to excite fluorescent bacteria, circumventing tissue absorption of excitation light in whole-animal imaging. We present the use of this technology to improve detection of recombinant reporter strains of tdTomato-expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guerin) bacteria in the mouse lung. A microendoscope was integrated into a whole-animal fluorescence imager to enable intravital excitation in the mouse lung with whole-animal detection. Using this technique, the threshold of detection was measured as 103 colony forming units (CFU) during pulmonary infection. In comparison, the threshold of detection for whole-animal fluorescence imaging using standard epi-illumination was greater than 106 CFU. PMID:26901051

  13. Quantum error correcting codes and 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Guth, Larry; Lubotzky, Alexander

    2014-08-15

    Using 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds, we construct some new homological quantum error correcting codes. They are low density parity check codes with linear rate and distance n{sup ε}. Their rate is evaluated via Euler characteristic arguments and their distance using Z{sub 2}-systolic geometry. This construction answers a question of Zémor [“On Cayley graphs, surface codes, and the limits of homological coding for quantum error correction,” in Proceedings of Second International Workshop on Coding and Cryptology (IWCC), Lecture Notes in Computer Science Vol. 5557 (2009), pp. 259–273], who asked whether homological codes with such parameters could exist at all.

  14. Quantum error correcting codes and 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guth, Larry; Lubotzky, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    Using 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds, we construct some new homological quantum error correcting codes. They are low density parity check codes with linear rate and distance nɛ. Their rate is evaluated via Euler characteristic arguments and their distance using {Z}_2-systolic geometry. This construction answers a question of Zémor ["On Cayley graphs, surface codes, and the limits of homological coding for quantum error correction," in Proceedings of Second International Workshop on Coding and Cryptology (IWCC), Lecture Notes in Computer Science Vol. 5557 (2009), pp. 259-273], who asked whether homological codes with such parameters could exist at all.

  15. Live-Animal Imaging of Renal Function by Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kenneth W.; Sutton, Timothy A.; Sandoval, Ruben M.

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy, microscopy of living animals, is a powerful research technique that combines the resolution and sensitivity found in microscopic studies of cultured cells with the relevance and systemic influences of cells in the context of the intact animal. The power of intravital microscopy has recently been extended with the development of multiphoton fluorescence microscopy systems capable of collecting optical sections from deep within the kidney at subcellular resolution, supporting high-resolution characterizations of the structure and function of glomeruli, tubules, and vasculature in the living kidney. Fluorescent probes are administered to an anesthetized, surgically prepared animal, followed by image acquisition for up to 3 hr. Images are transferred via a high-speed network to specialized computer systems for digital image analysis. This general approach can be used with different combinations of fluorescent probes to evaluate processes such as glomerular permeability, proximal tubule endocytosis, microvascular flow, vascular permeability, mitochondrial function, and cellular apoptosis/necrosis. PMID:23042524

  16. Thin and open vessel windows for intra-vital fluorescence imaging of murine cochlear blood flow.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaorui; Zhang, Fei; Urdang, Zachary; Dai, Min; Neng, Lingling; Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Nuttall, Alfred L

    2014-07-01

    Normal microvessel structure and function in the cochlea is essential for maintaining the ionic and metabolic homeostasis required for hearing function. Abnormal cochlear microcirculation has long been considered an etiologic factor in hearing disorders. A better understanding of cochlear blood flow (CoBF) will enable more effective amelioration of hearing disorders that result from aberrant blood flow. However, establishing the direct relationship between CoBF and other cellular events in the lateral wall and response to physio-pathological stress remains a challenge due to the lack of feasible interrogation methods and difficulty in accessing the inner ear. Here we report on new methods for studying the CoBF in a mouse model using a thin or open vessel-window in combination with fluorescence intra-vital microscopy (IVM). An open vessel-window enables investigation of vascular cell biology and blood flow permeability, including pericyte (PC) contractility, bone marrow cell migration, and endothelial barrier leakage, in wild type and fluorescent protein-labeled transgenic mouse models with high spatial and temporal resolution. Alternatively, the thin vessel-window method minimizes disruption of the homeostatic balance in the lateral wall and enables study CoBF under relatively intact physiological conditions. A thin vessel-window method can also be used for time-based studies of physiological and pathological processes. Although the small size of the mouse cochlea makes surgery difficult, the methods are sufficiently developed for studying the structural and functional changes in CoBF under normal and pathological conditions.

  17. Intravital Imaging Reveals Angiotensin II-Induced Transcytosis of Albumin by Podocytes.

    PubMed

    Schießl, Ina Maria; Hammer, Anna; Kattler, Veronika; Gess, Bernhard; Theilig, Franziska; Witzgall, Ralph; Castrop, Hayo

    2016-03-01

    Albuminuria is a hallmark of kidney disease of various etiologies and usually caused by deterioration of glomerular filtration barrier integrity. We recently showed that angiotensin II (Ang II) acutely increases albumin filtration in the healthy kidney. Here, we used intravital microscopy to assess the effects of Ang II on podocyte function in rats. Acute infusion of 30, 60, or 80 ng/kg per minute Ang II enhanced the endocytosis of albumin by activation of the type 1 Ang II receptor and resulted in an average (±SEM) of 3.7±2.2, 72.3±18.6 (P<0.001), and 239.4±34.6 µm(3) (P<0.001) albumin-containing vesicles per glomerulus, respectively, compared with none at baseline or 10 ng/kg per minute Ang II. Immunostaining of Ang II-infused kidneys confirmed the presence of albumin-containing vesicles, which colocalized with megalin, in podocin-positive cells. Furthermore, podocyte endocytosis of albumin was markedly reduced in the presence of gentamicin, a competitive inhibitor of megalin-dependent endocytosis. Ang II infusion increased the concentration of albumin in the subpodocyte space, a potential source for endocytic protein uptake, and gentamicin further increased this concentration. Some endocytic vesicles were acidified and colocalized with LysoTracker. Most vesicles migrated from the capillary to the apical aspect of the podocyte and were eventually released into the urinary space. This transcytosis accounted for approximately 10% of total albumin filtration. In summary, the transcellular transport of proteins across the podocyte constitutes a new pathway of glomerular protein filtration. Ang II enhances the endocytosis and transcytosis of plasma albumin by podocytes, which may eventually impair podocyte function.

  18. Intravital Imaging Reveals Angiotensin II–Induced Transcytosis of Albumin by Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schießl, Ina Maria; Hammer, Anna; Kattler, Veronika; Gess, Bernhard; Theilig, Franziska; Witzgall, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Albuminuria is a hallmark of kidney disease of various etiologies and usually caused by deterioration of glomerular filtration barrier integrity. We recently showed that angiotensin II (Ang II) acutely increases albumin filtration in the healthy kidney. Here, we used intravital microscopy to assess the effects of Ang II on podocyte function in rats. Acute infusion of 30, 60, or 80 ng/kg per minute Ang II enhanced the endocytosis of albumin by activation of the type 1 Ang II receptor and resulted in an average (±SEM) of 3.7±2.2, 72.3±18.6 (P<0.001), and 239.4±34.6 µm3 (P<0.001) albumin-containing vesicles per glomerulus, respectively, compared with none at baseline or 10 ng/kg per minute Ang II. Immunostaining of Ang II–infused kidneys confirmed the presence of albumin-containing vesicles, which colocalized with megalin, in podocin-positive cells. Furthermore, podocyte endocytosis of albumin was markedly reduced in the presence of gentamicin, a competitive inhibitor of megalin-dependent endocytosis. Ang II infusion increased the concentration of albumin in the subpodocyte space, a potential source for endocytic protein uptake, and gentamicin further increased this concentration. Some endocytic vesicles were acidified and colocalized with LysoTracker. Most vesicles migrated from the capillary to the apical aspect of the podocyte and were eventually released into the urinary space. This transcytosis accounted for approximately 10% of total albumin filtration. In summary, the transcellular transport of proteins across the podocyte constitutes a new pathway of glomerular protein filtration. Ang II enhances the endocytosis and transcytosis of plasma albumin by podocytes, which may eventually impair podocyte function. PMID:26116357

  19. Photodynamic therapy induces selective extravasation of macromolecules: Insights using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Debefve, E; Cheng, C; Schaefer, S C; Yan, H; Ballini, J-P; van den Bergh, H; Lehr, H-A; Ruffieux, C; Ris, H-B; Krueger, T

    2010-01-21

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with Visudyne acts by direct cellular phototoxicity and/or by an indirect vascular-mediated effect. Here, we demonstrate that the vessel integrity interruption by PDT can promote the extravasation of a macromolecular agent in normal tissue. To obtain extravasation in normal tissue PDT conditions were one order of magnitude more intensive than the ones in tissue containing neovessels reported in the literature. Fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-D, 2000 kDa), a macromolecular agent, was intravenously injected 10 min before (LK0 group, n=14) or 2h (LK2 group, n=16) after Visudyne-mediated PDT in nude mice bearing a dorsal skin fold chamber. Control animals had no PDT (CTRL group, n=8). The extravasation of FITC-D from blood vessels in striated muscle tissue was observed in both groups in real-time for up to 2500 s after injection. We also monitored PDT-induced leukocyte rolling in vivo and assessed, by histology, the corresponding inflammatory reaction score in the dorsal skin fold chambers. In all animals, at the applied PDT conditions, FITC-D extravasation was significantly enhanced in the PDT-treated areas as compared to the surrounding non-treated areas (p<0.0001). There was no FITC-D leakage in the control animals. Animals from the LK0 group had significantly less FITC-D extravasation than those from the LK2 group (p=0.0002). In the LK0 group FITC-D leakage correlated significantly with the inflammation (p<0.001). At the selected conditions, Visudyne-mediated PDT promotes vascular leakage and FITC-D extravasation into the interstitial space of normal tissue. The intensity of vascular leakage depends on the time interval between PDT and FITC-D injection. This concept could be used to locally modulate the delivery of macromolecules in vivo. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Intravital microscopy of localized stem cell delivery using microbubbles and acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Kokhuis, T J A; Skachkov, I; Naaijkens, B A; Juffermans, L J M; Kamp, O; Kooiman, K; van der Steen, A F W; Versluis, M; de Jong, N

    2015-01-01

    The use of stem cells for the repair of damaged cardiac tissue after a myocardial infarction holds great promise. However, a common finding in experimental studies is the low number of cells delivered at the area at risk. To improve the delivery, we are currently investigating a novel delivery platform in which stem cells are conjugated with targeted microbubbles, creating echogenic complexes dubbed StemBells. These StemBells vibrate in response to incoming ultrasound waves making them susceptible to acoustic radiation force. The acoustic force can then be employed to propel circulating StemBells from the centerline of the vessel to the wall, facilitating localized stem cell delivery. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of manipulating StemBells acoustically in vivo after injection using a chicken embryo model. Bare stem cells or unsaturated stem cells (<5 bubbles/cell) do not respond to ultrasound application (1 MHz, peak negative acoustical pressure P_ = 200 kPa, 10% duty cycle). However, stem cells which are fully saturated with targeted microbubbles (>30 bubbles/cell) can be propelled toward and arrested at the vessel wall. The mean translational velocities measured are 61 and 177 μm/s for P- = 200 and 450 kPa, respectively. This technique therefore offers potential for enhanced and well-controlled stem cell delivery for improved cardiac repair after a myocardial infarction. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. In vivo cell cycle profiling in xenograft tumors by quantitative intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chittajallu, Deepak R; Florian, Stefan; Kohler, Rainer H; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Orth, James D; Weissleder, Ralph; Danuser, Gaudenz; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of cell-cycle state at a single-cell level is essential to understand fundamental three-dimensional biological processes such as tissue development and cancer. Analysis of 3D in vivo images, however, is very challenging. Today’s best practice, manual annotation of select image events, generates arbitrarily sampled data distributions, unsuitable for reliable mechanistic inferences. Here, we present an integrated workflow for quantitative in vivo cell-cycle profiling. It combines image analysis and machine learning methods for automated 3D segmentation and cell-cycle state identification of individual cell-nuclei with widely varying morphologies embedded in complex tumor environments. We applied our workflow to quantify cell-cycle effects of three antimitotic cancer drugs over 8 days in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma xenografts in living mice using a dataset of 38,000 cells and compared the induced phenotypes. In contrast to 2D culture, observed mitotic arrest was relatively low, suggesting involvement of additional mechanisms in their antitumor effect in vivo. PMID:25867850

  2. Lyapunov exponent diagrams of a 4-dimensional Chua system.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, Cristiane; Albuquerque, Holokx A; Rubinger, Rero M; Rech, Paulo C

    2011-09-01

    We report numerical results on the existence of periodic structures embedded in chaotic and hyperchaotic regions on the Lyapunov exponent diagrams of a 4-dimensional Chua system. The model was obtained from the 3-dimensional Chua system by the introduction of a feedback controller. Both the largest and the second largest Lyapunov exponents were considered in our colorful Lyapunov exponent diagrams, and allowed us to characterize periodic structures and regions of chaos and hyperchaos. The shrimp-shaped periodic structures appear to be malformed on some of Lyapunov exponent diagrams, and they present two different bifurcation scenarios to chaos when passing the boundaries of itself, namely via period-doubling and crisis. Hyperchaos-chaos transition can also be observed on the Lyapunov exponent diagrams for the second largest exponent.

  3. Time dependent electromagnetic fields and 4-dimensional Stokes' theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andosca, Ryan; Singleton, Douglas

    2016-11-01

    Stokes' theorem is central to many aspects of physics—electromagnetism, the Aharonov-Bohm effect, and Wilson loops to name a few. However, the pedagogical examples and research work almost exclusively focus on situations where the fields are time-independent so that one need only deal with purely spatial line integrals (e.g., ∮ A . d x ) and purely spatial area integrals (e.g., ∫ ( ∇ × A ) . d a = ∫ B . d a ). Here, we address this gap by giving some explicit examples of how Stokes' theorem plays out with time-dependent fields in a full 4-dimensional spacetime context. We also discuss some unusual features of Stokes' theorem with time-dependent fields related to gauge transformations and non-simply connected topology.

  4. A Lie based 4-dimensional higher Chern-Simons theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchini, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    We present and study a model of 4-dimensional higher Chern-Simons theory, special Chern-Simons (SCS) theory, instances of which have appeared in the string literature, whose symmetry is encoded in a skeletal semistrict Lie 2-algebra constructed from a compact Lie group with non discrete center. The field content of SCS theory consists of a Lie valued 2-connection coupled to a background closed 3-form. SCS theory enjoys a large gauge and gauge for gauge symmetry organized in an infinite dimensional strict Lie 2-group. The partition function of SCS theory is simply related to that of a topological gauge theory localizing on flat connections with degree 3 second characteristic class determined by the background 3-form. Finally, SCS theory is related to a 3-dimensional special gauge theory whose 2-connection space has a natural symplectic structure with respect to which the 1-gauge transformation action is Hamiltonian, the 2-curvature map acting as moment map.

  5. Immunohistochemical expression of fibronectin in the lungs of fire victims proves intravital reaction in fatal burns.

    PubMed

    Bohnert, Michael; Anderson, Jürina; Rothschild, Markus A; Böhm, Joachim

    2010-11-01

    Immunohistochemical studies about the presence of fibronectin in the lungs were performed in a group of 73 fire victims (63 cases of intravital and 10 cases of postmortem burn) as well as in an unselected control group of 55 individuals not exposed to fire before death. The cases of intravital burn showed a significantly stronger fibronectin expression than the control cases and the cases of postmortem burn. Fibronectin was mainly present in macrophages of the peribronchial lung parenchyma and, not associated with cells, in the matrix of peribronchial tissue. Our findings suggest that higher levels of fibronectin expression in the lung tissue of burn victims compared to fire-unrelated deaths may serve as an indicator of an early intravital inflammatory response to fire damage.

  6. Dynamic phase imaging utilizing a 4-dimensional microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creath, Katherine

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes a new, novel interference Linnik microscope system and presents images and data of live biological samples. The specially designed optical system enables instantaneous 4-dimensional video measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without the need for contrast agents. This "label-free", vibration insensitive imaging system enables measurement of biological objects in reflection using harmless light levels with a variety of magnifications and wavelengths with fields of view from several hundred microns up to a millimeter. At the core of the instrument is a phase measurement camera (PMC) enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns utilizing a pixelated phase mask taking advantage of the polarization properties of light. Utilizing this technology enables the creation of phase image movies in real time at video rates so that dynamic motions and volumetric changes can be tracked. Objects are placed on a reflective surface in liquid under a coverslip. Phase values are converted to optical thickness data enabling volumetric, motion and morphological studies. Data from a number of different organisms such as flagellates and rotifers will be presented, as will measurements of human breast cancer cells with the addition of various agents that break down the cells. These data highlight examples of monitoring different biological processes and motions.

  7. Dynamic phase imaging utilizing a 4-dimensional microscope system

    PubMed Central

    Creath, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a new, novel interference Linnik microscope system and presents images and data of live biological samples. The specially designed optical system enables instantaneous 4-dimensional video measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without the need for contrast agents. This "label-free", vibration insensitive imaging system enables measurement of biological objects in reflection using harmless light levels with a variety of magnifications and wavelengths with fields of view from several hundred microns up to a millimeter. At the core of the instrument is a phase measurement camera (PMC) enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns utilizing a pixelated phase mask taking advantage of the polarization properties of light. Utilizing this technology enables the creation of phase image movies in real time at video rates so that dynamic motions and volumetric changes can be tracked. Objects are placed on a reflective surface in liquid under a coverslip. Phase values are converted to optical thickness data enabling volumetric, motion and morphological studies. Data from a number of different organisms such as flagellates and rotifers will be presented, as will measurements of human breast cancer cells with the addition of various agents that break down the cells. These data highlight examples of monitoring different biological processes and motions. PMID:24357901

  8. Where are we? The anatomy of the murine cortical meninges revisited for intravital imaging, immunology, and clearance of waste from the brain.

    PubMed

    Coles, Jonathan A; Myburgh, Elmarie; Brewer, James M; McMenamin, Paul G

    2017-09-01

    Rapid progress is being made in understanding the roles of the cerebral meninges in the maintenance of normal brain function, in immune surveillance, and as a site of disease. Most basic research on the meninges and the neural brain is now done on mice, major attractions being the availability of reporter mice with fluorescent cells, and of a huge range of antibodies useful for immunocytochemistry and the characterization of isolated cells. In addition, two-photon microscopy through the unperforated calvaria allows intravital imaging of the undisturbed meninges with sub-micron resolution. The anatomy of the dorsal meninges of the mouse (and, indeed, of all mammals) differs considerably from that shown in many published diagrams: over cortical convexities, the outer layer, the dura, is usually thicker than the inner layer, the leptomeninx, and both layers are richly vascularized and innervated, and communicate with the lymphatic system. A membrane barrier separates them and, in disease, inflammation can be localized to one layer or the other, so experimentalists must be able to identify the compartment they are studying. Here, we present current knowledge of the functional anatomy of the meninges, particularly as it appears in intravital imaging, and review their role as a gateway between the brain, blood, and lymphatics, drawing on information that is scattered among works on different pathologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Two-Photon Intravital Multicolor Imaging Combined with Inducible Gene Expression to Distinguish Metastatic Behavior of Breast Cancer Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Le Dévédec, Sylvia E.; Lalai, Reshma; Pont, Chantal; de Bont, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to use multicolor intravital imaging together with an inducible cell model to compare metastatic behavior of control and genetically modified breast cancer cell populations within the intact primary tumor of a mouse. Procedure GFP-MTLn3-ErbB1 cells were generated with doxycycline-regulated conditional transgene expression using lentiviral TREAutoR3-cyan fluorescent protein (CFP). CFP expression together with tumor cell motility is monitored in vitro and in vivo. Results Effective and tight control of doxycycline-induced CFP expression was observed both in vitro and in vivo. Intravital multiphoton microscopy on intact orthotopic tumors allowed a clear discrimination between GFP-only and (GFP + CFP) cell populations, which enables direct comparison of the motility behavior of two different cell populations in the same microenvironment in vivo. Conclusions This system is robust and versatile for conditional gene expression and can be used to study the role of individual candidate metastasis genes in vitro and in vivo. This technology will allow investigations of cellular events in cancer metastasis and in particular intravasation within a primary tumor. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11307-010-0307-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20396956

  10. Tumor Microvasculature and Microenvironment: Novel Insights Through Intravital Imaging in Pre-Clinical Models

    PubMed Central

    Fukumura, Dai; Duda, Dan G.; Munn, Lance L.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Intravital imaging techniques have provided unprecedented insight into tumor microcirculation and microenvironment. For example, these techniques allowed quantitative evaluations of tumor blood vasculature to uncover its abnormal organization, structure and function (e.g., hyper-permeability, heterogeneous and compromised blood flow). Similarly, imaging of functional lymphatics has documented their absence inside tumors. These abnormalities result in elevated interstitial fluid pressure and hinder the delivery of therapeutic agents to tumors. In addition, they induce a hostile microenvironment characterized by hypoxia and acidosis, as documented by intravital imaging. The abnormal microenvironment further lowers the effectiveness of anti-tumor treatments such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. In addition to these mechanistic insights, intravital imaging may also offer new opportunities to improve therapy. For example, tumor angiogenesis results in immature, dysfunctional vessels—primarily caused by an imbalance in production of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors by the tumors. Restoring the balance of pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling in tumors can “normalize” tumor vasculature and thus, improve its function, as demonstrated by intravital imaging studies in preclinical models and in cancer patients. Administration of cytotoxic therapy during periods of vascular normalization has the potential to enhance treatment efficacy. PMID:20374484

  11. Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yanle; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

  12. Individualized 4-dimensional computed tomography proton treatment for pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Vassantachart, April; Mifflin, Rachel; Slater, Jerry D; Yang, Gary Y

    2017-01-01

    Background The goal of this study is to determine whether a phase or reconstruction of a 10-phase 4 dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scan can be used as the primary planning scan for proton treatment of the pancreas, thus eliminating the need for second a slow CT or free breathing CT. Methods Ten patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma were simulated with 4D CT and a proton treatment plan generated based upon one of three primary planning scans, the T0 phase, T50 phase or average reconstruction. These plans were then exported to each of the remaining phases of the 4D CT and the dose to 95% of the target (D95) calculated. Plans were deemed adequate if the D95 remained at 99% of the prescribed dose or greater. Results For the ten patients in this study anterior abdominal motion was found to range from 2–27 mm (mean 7.50±6.79 mm). For 9 of 10 patients the anterior abdominal motion was ≤8 mm and all three primary planning scans provided adequate target coverage, resulting in minimum D95 coverage per plan of T0_plan 99.7%, T50_plan 99.3% and AVE_plan 99%. However no plan provided adequate target coverage on the single patient with the largest anterior abdominal motion, 27 mm, and cranio-caudal motion, 20 mm, with minimum D95 values of T0_plan 96.3%, T50_plan 68%, and AVE_plan 68%. Conclusions The primary plans tested based up on the T0, T50 and average reconstructions provided adequate D95 coverage throughout the respiratory cycle as long as the anterior abdominal motion was ≤8 mm and can be considered for use as the primary proton planning scan. PMID:28890818

  13. Tracking the stochastic fate of cells of the renin lineage after podocyte depletion using multicolor reporters and intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Diana G.; Rusiniak, Michael E.; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S.; Gomez, R. Ariel; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Gross, Kenneth W.; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2017-01-01

    Podocyte depletion plays a major role in focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS). Because cells of the renin lineage (CoRL) serve as adult podocyte and parietal epithelial cell (PEC) progenitor candidates, we generated Ren1cCre/R26R-ConfettiTG/WT and Ren1dCre/R26R-ConfettiTG/WT mice to determine CoRL clonality during podocyte replacement. Four CoRL reporters (GFP, YFP, RFP, CFP) were restricted to cells in the juxtaglomerular compartment (JGC) at baseline. Following abrupt podocyte depletion in experimental FSGS, all four CoRL reporters were detected in a subset of glomeruli at day 28, where they co-expressed de novo four podocyte proteins (podocin, nephrin, WT-1 and p57) and two glomerular parietal epithelial cell (PEC) proteins (claudin-1, PAX8). To monitor the precise migration of a subset of CoRL over a 2w period following podocyte depletion, intravital multiphoton microscopy was used. Our findings demonstrate direct visual support for the migration of single CoRL from the JGC to the parietal Bowman’s capsule, early proximal tubule, mesangium and glomerular tuft. In summary, these results suggest that following podocyte depletion, multi-clonal CoRL migrate to the glomerulus and replace podocyte and PECs in experimental FSGS. PMID:28329012

  14. Reduction of Tubular Flow Rate as a Mechanism of Oliguria in the Early Phase of Endotoxemia Revealed by Intravital Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Kent; Kitamura, Hiroaki; Kuwabara, Takashige; Mori, Kiyoshi; Mukoyama, Masashi; Nishiyama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Urine output is widely used as a criterion for the diagnosis of AKI. Although several potential mechanisms of septic AKI have been identified, regulation of urine flow after glomerular filtration has not been evaluated. This study evaluated changes in urine flow in mice with septic AKI. The intratubular urine flow rate was monitored in real time by intravital imaging using two-photon laser microscopy. The tubular flow rate, as measured by freely filtered dye (FITC-inulin or Lucifer yellow), time-dependently declined after LPS injection. At 2 hours, the tubular flow rate was slower in mice injected with LPS than in mice injected with saline, whereas BP and GFR were similar in the two groups. Importantly, fluorophore-conjugated LPS selectively accumulated in the proximal tubules that showed reduced tubular flow at 2 hours and luminal obstruction with cell swelling at 24 hours. Delipidation of LPS or deletion of Toll-like receptor 4 in mice abolished these effects, whereas neutralization of TNF-α had little effect on LPS-induced tubular flow retention. Rapid intravenous fluid resuscitation within 6 hours improved the tubular flow rate only when accompanied by the dilation of obstructed proximal tubules with accumulated LPS. These findings suggest that LPS reduces the intratubular urine flow rate during early phases of endotoxemia through a Toll-like receptor 4–dependent mechanism, and that the efficacy of fluid resuscitation may depend on the response of tubules with LPS accumulation. PMID:25855781

  15. Tracking the stochastic fate of cells of the renin lineage after podocyte depletion using multicolor reporters and intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Kaverina, Natalya V; Kadoya, Hiroyuki; Eng, Diana G; Rusiniak, Michael E; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Gomez, R Ariel; Pippin, Jeffrey W; Gross, Kenneth W; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Shankland, Stuart J

    2017-01-01

    Podocyte depletion plays a major role in focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS). Because cells of the renin lineage (CoRL) serve as adult podocyte and parietal epithelial cell (PEC) progenitor candidates, we generated Ren1cCre/R26R-ConfettiTG/WT and Ren1dCre/R26R-ConfettiTG/WT mice to determine CoRL clonality during podocyte replacement. Four CoRL reporters (GFP, YFP, RFP, CFP) were restricted to cells in the juxtaglomerular compartment (JGC) at baseline. Following abrupt podocyte depletion in experimental FSGS, all four CoRL reporters were detected in a subset of glomeruli at day 28, where they co-expressed de novo four podocyte proteins (podocin, nephrin, WT-1 and p57) and two glomerular parietal epithelial cell (PEC) proteins (claudin-1, PAX8). To monitor the precise migration of a subset of CoRL over a 2w period following podocyte depletion, intravital multiphoton microscopy was used. Our findings demonstrate direct visual support for the migration of single CoRL from the JGC to the parietal Bowman's capsule, early proximal tubule, mesangium and glomerular tuft. In summary, these results suggest that following podocyte depletion, multi-clonal CoRL migrate to the glomerulus and replace podocyte and PECs in experimental FSGS.

  16. REAL-TIME INTRAVITAL IMAGING ESTABLISHES TUMOUR-ASSOCIATED MACROPHAGES AS THE EXTRASKELETAL TARGET OF BISPHOSPHONATE ACTION IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Junankar, Simon; Shay, Gemma; Jurczyluk, Julie; Ali, Naveid; Down, Jenny; Pocock, Nicholas; Parker, Andrew; Nguyen, Akira; Sun, Shuting; Kashemirov, Boris; McKenna, Charles E.; Croucher, Peter I.; Swarbrick, Alexander; Weilbaecher, Katherine; Phan, Tri Giang; Rogers, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have shown that bisphosphonate drugs improve breast cancer patient survival independent of their anti-resorptive effects on the skeleton. However, since bisphosphonates bind rapidly to bone mineral, the exact mechanisms of their anti-tumour action, particularly on cells outside of bone, remain unknown. Here we used real-time intravital two-photon microscopy to show extensive leakage of fluorescent bisphosphonate from the vasculature in 4T1 mouse mammary tumours, where it initially binds to areas of small, granular microcalcifications that are engulfed by tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs), but not tumour cells. Importantly, we also observed uptake of radiolabeled bisphosphonate in the primary breast tumour of a patient and showed the resected tumour to be infiltrated with TAMs and to contain similar granular microcalcifications. These data represent the first compelling in vivo evidence that bisphosphonates can target cells in tumours outside the skeleton and that their anti-tumour activity is likely to be mediated via TAMs. PMID:25312016

  17. From morphology to biochemical state – intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin

    PubMed Central

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R.; Feger, Julia S.; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A.; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-01-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients’ bedsides. These ‘optical biopsies’ generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27004454

  18. Intravital multiphoton imaging reveals multicellular streaming as a crucial component of in vivo cell migration in human breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Patsialou, Antonia; Bravo-Cordero, Jose Javier; Wang, Yarong; Entenberg, David; Liu, Huiping; Clarke, Michael; Condeelis, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death in breast cancer patients. Cell migration is an essential component of almost every step of the metastatic cascade, especially the early step of invasion inside the primary tumor. In this report, we have used intravital multiphoton microscopy to visualize the different migration patterns of human breast tumor cells in live primary tumors. We used xenograft tumors of MDA-MB-231 cells as well as a low passage xenograft tumor from orthotopically injected patient-derived breast tumor cells. Direct visualization of human tumor cells in vivo shows two patterns of high-speed migration inside primary tumors: a. single cells and b. multicellular streams (i.e., cells following each other in a single file but without cohesive cell junctions). Critically, we found that only streaming and not random migration of single cells was significantly correlated with proximity to vessels, with intravasation and with numbers of elevated circulating tumor cells in the bloodstream. Finally, although the two human tumors were derived from diverse genetic backgrounds, we found that their migratory tumor cells exhibited coordinated gene expression changes that led to the same end-phenotype of enhanced migration involving activating actin polymerization and myosin contraction. Our data are the first direct visualization and assessment of in vivo migration within a live patient-derived breast xenograft tumor. PMID:25013744

  19. Real-Time Intravital Imaging of RGD–Quantum Dot Binding to Luminal Endothelium in Mouse Tumor Neovasculature

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bryan Ronain; Cheng, Zhen; De, Abhijit; Koh, Ai Leen; Sinclair, Robert; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscale materials have increasingly become subject to intense investigation for use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. However, there is a fundamental dearth in cellular-level understanding of how nanoparticles interact within the tumor environment in living subjects. Adopting quantum dots (qdots) for their excellent brightness, photostability, monodispersity, and fluorescent yield, we link arginine–glycine–aspartic acid (RGD) peptides to target qdots specifically to newly formed/forming blood vessels expressing αvβ3 integrins. Using this model nanoparticle system, we exploit intravital microscopy with subcellular (∼0.5 μm) resolution to directly observe and record, for the first time, the binding of nanoparticle conjugates to tumor blood vessels in living subjects. This generalizable method enabled us to show that in this model qdots do not extravasate and, unexpectedly, that they only bind as aggregates rather than individually. This level of understanding is critical on the path toward ensuring regulatory approval of nanoparticles in humans for disease diagnostics and therapeutics. Equally vital, the work provides a platform by which to design and optimize molecularly targeted nanoparticles including quantum dots for applications in living subjects. PMID:18386933

  20. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca2+). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca2+ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:25544762

  1. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Carlotta; Bonora, Massimo; Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-30

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca²⁺). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca²⁺ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca²⁺ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway.

  2. Validation of a device for the active manipulation of the tumor microenvironment during intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James K.; Entenberg, David; Wang, Yarong; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Padgen, Michael; Clark, Ashley; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A.; Castracane, James; Condeelis, John S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The tumor microenvironment is recognized as playing a significant role in the behavior of tumor cells and their progression to metastasis. However, tools to manipulate the tumor microenvironment directly, and image the consequences of this manipulation with single cell resolution in real time in vivo, are lacking. We describe here a method for the direct, local manipulation of microenvironmental parameters through the use of an implantable Induction Nano Intravital Device (iNANIVID) and simultaneous in vivo visualization of the results at single-cell resolution. As a proof of concept, we deliver both a sustained dose of EGF to tumor cells while intravital imaging their chemotactic response as well as locally induce hypoxia in defined microenvironments in solid tumors. PMID:27790386

  3. [Frontiers in Live Bone Imaging Researches. Novel drug discovery by means of intravital bone imaging technology].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Masaru

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in intravital bone imaging technology has enabled us to grasp the real cellular behaviors and functions in vivo , revolutionizing the field of drug discovery for novel therapeutics against intractable bone diseases. In this chapter, I introduce various updated information on pharmacological actions of several antibone resorptive agents, which could only be derived from advanced imaging techniques, and also discuss the future perspectives of this new trend in drug discovery.

  4. Intravital imaging of podocyte calcium in glomerular injury and disease

    PubMed Central

    Burford, James L.; Villanueva, Karie; Lam, Lisa; Riquier-Brison, Anne; Hackl, Matthias J.; Pippin, Jeffrey; Shankland, Stuart J.; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) signaling mediates physiological and pathological processes in multiple organs, including the renal podocyte; however, in vivo podocyte [Ca2+]i dynamics are not fully understood. Here we developed an imaging approach that uses multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to directly visualize podocyte [Ca2+]i dynamics within the intact kidneys of live mice expressing a fluorescent calcium indicator only in these cells. [Ca2+]i was at a low steady-state level in control podocytes, while Ang II infusion caused a minor elevation. Experimental focal podocyte injury triggered a robust and sustained elevation of podocyte [Ca2+]i around the injury site and promoted cell-to-cell propagating podocyte [Ca2+]i waves along capillary loops. [Ca2+]i wave propagation was ameliorated by inhibitors of purinergic [Ca2+]i signaling as well as in animals lacking the P2Y2 purinergic receptor. Increased podocyte [Ca2+]i resulted in contraction of the glomerular tuft and increased capillary albumin permeability. In preclinical models of renal fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, high podocyte [Ca2+]i correlated with increased cell motility. Our findings provide a visual demonstration of the in vivo importance of podocyte [Ca2+]i in glomerular pathology and suggest that purinergic [Ca2+]i signaling is a robust and key pathogenic mechanism in podocyte injury. This in vivo imaging approach will allow future detailed investigation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of glomerular disease in the intact living kidney. PMID:24713653

  5. Intravital imaging of podocyte calcium in glomerular injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Burford, James L; Villanueva, Karie; Lam, Lisa; Riquier-Brison, Anne; Hackl, Matthias J; Pippin, Jeffrey; Shankland, Stuart J; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2014-05-01

    Intracellular calcium ([Ca²⁺]i) signaling mediates physiological and pathological processes in multiple organs, including the renal podocyte; however, in vivo podocyte [Ca²⁺]i dynamics are not fully understood. Here we developed an imaging approach that uses multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to directly visualize podocyte [Ca²⁺]i dynamics within the intact kidneys of live mice expressing a fluorescent calcium indicator only in these cells. [Ca²⁺]i was at a low steady-state level in control podocytes, while Ang II infusion caused a minor elevation. Experimental focal podocyte injury triggered a robust and sustained elevation of podocyte [Ca²⁺]i around the injury site and promoted cell-to-cell propagating podocyte [Ca²⁺]i waves along capillary loops. [Ca²⁺]i wave propagation was ameliorated by inhibitors of purinergic [Ca²⁺]i signaling as well as in animals lacking the P2Y2 purinergic receptor. Increased podocyte [Ca²⁺]i resulted in contraction of the glomerular tuft and increased capillary albumin permeability. In preclinical models of renal fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, high podocyte [Ca²⁺]i correlated with increased cell motility. Our findings provide a visual demonstration of the in vivo importance of podocyte [Ca²⁺]i in glomerular pathology and suggest that purinergic [Ca²⁺]i signaling is a robust and key pathogenic mechanism in podocyte injury. This in vivo imaging approach will allow future detailed investigation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of glomerular disease in the intact living kidney.

  6. Intravital Imaging of Neutrophil Recruitment Reveals the Efficacy of FPR1 Blockade in Hepatic Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Honda, Masaki; Takeichi, Takayuki; Hashimoto, Shintaro; Yoshii, Daiki; Isono, Kaori; Hayashida, Shintaro; Ohya, Yuki; Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2017-02-15

    Neutrophils are considered responsible for the pathophysiological changes resulting from hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, which is a complication of trauma, shock, liver resection, and transplantation. Recently, evidence is accumulating that formyl-peptide receptor (FPR) signaling constitutes an important danger signal that guides neutrophils to sites of inflammation. This study aimed to investigate dynamic neutrophil recruitment using two-photon laser-scanning microscopy (TPLSM) in response to FPR1 blockade during hepatic I/R. LysM-eGFP mice were subjected to partial warm hepatic I/R. They were pretreated with an FPR1 antagonist, cyclosporine H (CsH), or formyl peptide, fMLF. Liver was imaged after hepatic laser irradiation or I/R using the TPLSM technique. CsH treatment alleviated hepatic I/R injury, as evidenced by decreased serum transaminase levels, reduced hepatocyte necrosis/apoptosis, and diminished inflammatory cytokine, chemokine, and oxidative stress. In contrast, systemic administration of fMLF showed few effects. Time-lapse TPLSM showed that FPR1 blockade inhibited the accumulation of neutrophils in the necrotic area induced by laser irradiation in vivo. In the CsH-treated I/R group, the number and crawling velocity of neutrophils in the nonperfused area were lower than those in the control group. Meanwhile, FPR1 blockade did not affect monocyte/macrophage recruitment. Hepatic I/R promoted the retention of neutrophils and their active behavior in the spleen, whereas CsH treatment prevented their changes. Intravital TPLSM revealed that formyl-peptide-FPR1 signaling is responsible for regulating neutrophil chemotaxis to allow migration into the necrotic area in hepatic I/R. Our findings suggest effective approaches for elucidating the mechanisms of immune cell responses in hepatic I/R.

  7. A practical method for monitoring FRET-based biosensors in living animals using two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Wen; Rubart, Michael; Ryan, Jennifer; Xiao, Xiao; Qiao, Chunping; Hato, Takashi; Davidson, Michael W.; Dunn, Kenneth W.

    2015-01-01

    The commercial availability of multiphoton microscope systems has nurtured the growth of intravital microscopy as a powerful technique for evaluating cell biology in the relevant context of living animals. In parallel, new fluorescent protein (FP) biosensors have become available that enable studies of the function of a wide range of proteins in living cells. Biosensor probes that exploit Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) are among the most sensitive indicators of an array of cellular processes. However, differences between one-photon and two-photon excitation (2PE) microscopy are such that measuring FRET by 2PE in the intravital setting remains challenging. Here, we describe an approach that simplifies the use of FRET-based biosensors in intravital 2PE microscopy. Based on a systematic comparison of many different FPs, we identified the monomeric (m) FPs mTurquoise and mVenus as particularly well suited for intravital 2PE FRET studies, enabling the ratiometric measurements from linked FRET probes using a pair of experimental images collected simultaneously. The behavior of the FPs is validated by fluorescence lifetime and sensitized emission measurements of a set of FRET standards. The approach is demonstrated using a modified version of the AKAR protein kinase A biosensor, first in cells in culture, and then in hepatocytes in the liver of living mice. The approach is compatible with the most common 2PE microscope configurations and should be applicable to a variety of different FRET probes. PMID:26333599

  8. Comparison of intravital thinned skull and cranial window approaches to study CNS immunobiology in the mouse cortex

    PubMed Central

    Dorand, R Dixon; Barkauskas, Deborah S; Evans, Teresa A; Petrosiute, Agne; Huang, Alex Y

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent imaging coupled with high-resolution femtosecond pulsed infrared lasers allows for interrogation of cellular interactions deeper in living tissues than ever imagined. Intravital imaging of the central nervous system (CNS) has provided insights into neuronal development, synaptic transmission, and even immune interactions. In this review we will discuss the two most common intravital approaches for studying the cerebral cortex in the live mouse brain for pre-clinical studies, the thinned skull and cranial window techniques, and focus on the advantages and drawbacks of each approach. In addition, we will discuss the use of neuronal physiologic parameters as determinants of successful surgical and imaging preparation. PMID:25568834

  9. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    PubMed Central

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe−/−Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages “dancing on the spot” and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells. PMID:25710308

  10. Intravital lectin perfusion analysis of vascular permeability in human micro- and macro- blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Debbage, P L; Sölder, E; Seidl, S; Hutzler, P; Hugl, B; Ofner, D; Kreczy, A

    2001-10-01

    We previously applied intravital lectin perfusion in mouse models to elucidate mechanisms underlying vascular permeability. The present work transfers this technique to human models, analysing vascular permeability in macro- and microvessels. Human vascular endothelial surface carbohydrate biochemistry differs significantly from its murine counterpart, lacking alpha-galactosyl epitopes and expressing the L-fucose moiety in the glycocalyx; the poly-N-lactosamine glycan backbone is common to all mammals. We examined extensively lectin binding specificities in sections and in vivo, and then applied the poly-N-lactosamine-specific lectin LEA and the L-fucose-specific lectin UEA-I in human intravital perfusions. Transendothelial transport differed in macrovessels and microvessels. In microvessels of adult human fat tissue, rectal wall and rectal carcinomas, slow transendothelial transport by vesicles was followed by significant retention at the subendothelial basement membrane; paracellular passage was not observed. Passage time exceeded 1 h. Thus we found barrier mechanisms resembling those we described previously in murine tissues. In both adult and fetal macrovessels, the vena saphena magna and the umbilical vein, respectively, rapid passage across the endothelial lining was observed, the tracer localising completely in the subendothelial tissues within 15 min; vesicular transport was more rapid than in microvessels, and retention at the subendothelial basement membrane briefer.

  11. Setup and use of a two-laser multiphoton microscope for multichannel intravital fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Entenberg, David; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Gligorijevic, Bojana; Roussos, Evanthia T; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Condeelis, John

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing biological mechanisms dependent upon the interaction of many cell types in vivo requires both multiphoton microscope systems capable of expanding the number and types of fluorophores that can be imaged simultaneously while removing the wavelength and tunability restrictions of existing systems, and enhanced software for extracting critical cellular parameters from voluminous 4D data sets. We present a procedure for constructing a two-laser multiphoton microscope that extends the wavelength range of excitation light, expands the number of simultaneously usable fluorophores and markedly increases signal to noise via ‘over-clocking’ of detection. We also utilize a custom-written software plug-in that simplifies the quantitative tracking and analysis of 4D intravital image data. We begin by describing the optics, hardware, electronics and software required, and finally the use of the plug-in for analysis. We demonstrate the use of the setup and plug-in by presenting data collected via intravital imaging of a mouse model of breast cancer. The procedure may be completed in ~24 h. PMID:21959234

  12. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe-/-Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages "dancing on the spot" and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells.

  13. Some blackhole and compactification solutions of noncanonical global monopole in 4-dimensional spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetyo, I.; Ramadhan, H. S.

    2017-07-01

    Here we present some solutions with noncanonical global monopole in nonlinear sigma model in 4-dimensional spacetime. We discuss some blackhole solutions and its horizons. We also obtain some compactification solutions. We list some possible compactification channels from 4-space to 2 × 2-spaces of constant curvatures.

  14. Intravital imaging of multicolor-labeled tumor immune microenvironment through skin-fold window chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuhong; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Tumor immune microenvironment became very important for the tumor immunotherapy. There were several kinds of immune cells in tumor stromal, and they played very different roles in tumor growth. In order to observe the behaviors of multiple immune cells in tumor microenvironment and the interaction between immune cells and tumor cells at the same time, we generated a multicolor-labeled tumor immune microenvironment model. The tumor cells and immune cells were labeled by different fluorescent proteins. By using of skin-fold window chamber implanted into mice and intravital imaging technology, we could dynamically observe the different immune cells in tumor microenvironment. After data analysis from the video, we could know the behavior of TILs, DCs and Tregs in tumor immune microenvironment; furthermore, we could know these immune cells play different roles in the tumor microenvironment.

  15. Viral nanoparticles decorated with novel EGFL7 ligands enable intravital imaging of tumor neovasculature.

    PubMed

    Cho, Choi-Fong; Yu, Lihai; Nsiama, Tienabe K; Kadam, Alisha N; Raturi, Arun; Shukla, Sourabh; Amadei, Giulio A; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Luyt, Leonard G; Lewis, John D

    2017-08-24

    Angiogenesis is a dynamic process fundamental to the development of solid tumors. Epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7) is a protein whose expression is restricted to endothelial cells undergoing active remodeling that has emerged as a key mediator of this process. EGFL7 expression is associated with poor outcome in several cancers, making it a promising target for imaging or therapeutic strategies. Here, EGFL7 is explored as a molecular target for active neovascularization. Using a combinatorial peptide screening approach, we describe the discovery and characterization of a novel high affinity EGFL7-binding peptide, E7p72, that specifically targets human endothelial cells. Viral nanoparticles decorated with E7p72 peptides specifically target tumor-associated neovasculature with high specificity as assessed by intravital imaging. This work highlights the value of EGFL7 as a target for angiogenic vessels and opens the door for novel targeted therapeutic approaches.

  16. Impact of rapamycin on phenotype and tolerogenic function of dendritic cells via intravital optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Meijie; Zhang, Zhihong

    2014-03-01

    Rapamycin (RAPA) as a unique tolerance-promoting therapeutic drug is crucial to successful clinical organ transplantation. DC (Dendritic cells) play a critical role in antigen presentation to T cells to initiate immune responses involved in tissue rejection. Although the influence of RAPA on DC differentiation and maturation had been reported by some research groups, it is still controversial and unclear right now. In addition, it is also lack of study on investigating the role of DC in DTH reaction via intravital optical imaging. Herein, we investigated the effect of rapamycin on phenotype and function of bone marrow monocyte-derived DC both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments by flow cytometry (FACS) showed that DC displayed decreased cell size and lower expression levels of surface molecule CD80 induced by RAPA; Furthermore, the phagocytic ability to OVA of DC was inhibited by RAPA started from 1 h to 2 h post co-incubation, but recovered after 4 h; In addition, the capacity of DC to activate naïve OT-II T cell proliferation was also inhibited at 3 day post co-incubation, but had no effect at 5 day, the data indicated this effect was reversible when removing the drug. More importantly, the DC-T interaction was monitored both in vitro and in intravital lymph node explant, and showed that RAPA-DC had a significant lower proportion of long-lived (>15min) contacts. Thus, RAPA displayed immunosuppressive to phenotypic and functional maturation of DC, and this phenomenon induced by RAPA may favorable in the clinical organ transplantation in future.

  17. Intravital Microscopy for Identifying Tumor Vessels in Patients With Stage IA-IV Melanoma That is Being Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IA Skin Melanoma; Stage IB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  18. Digital Correction of Motion Artifacts in Microscopy Image Sequences Collected from Living Animals Using Rigid and Non-Rigid Registration

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Kevin S.; Salama, Paul; Dunn, Kenneth W.; Delp, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    Digital image analysis is a fundamental component of quantitative microscopy. However, intravital microscopy presents many challenges for digital image analysis. In general, microscopy volumes are inherently anisotropic, suffer from decreasing contrast with tissue depth, lack object edge detail, and characteristically have low signal levels. Intravital microscopy introduces the additional problem of motion artifacts, resulting from respiratory motion and heartbeat from specimens imaged in vivo. This paper describes an image registration technique for use with sequences of intravital microscopy images collected in time-series or in 3D volumes. Our registration method involves both rigid and non-rigid components. The rigid registration component corrects global image translations, while the non-rigid component manipulates a uniform grid of control points defined by B-splines. Each control point is optimized by minimizing a cost function consisting of two parts: a term to define image similarity, and a term to ensure deformation grid smoothness. Experimental results indicate that this approach is promising based on the analysis of several image volumes collected from the kidney, lung, and salivary gland of living rodents. PMID:22092443

  19. Intravital and whole-organ imaging reveals capture of melanoma-derived antigen by lymph node subcapsular macrophages leading to widespread deposition on follicular dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Moalli, Federica; Proulx, Steven T; Schwendener, Reto; Detmar, Michael; Schlapbach, Christoph; Stein, Jens V

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant antigens expressed by tumor cells, such as in melanoma, are often associated with humoral immune responses, which may in turn influence tumor progression. Despite recent data showing the central role of adaptive immune responses on cancer spread or control, it remains poorly understood where and how tumor-derived antigen (TDA) induces a humoral immune response in tumor-bearing hosts. Based on our observation of TDA accumulation in B cell areas of lymph nodes (LNs) from melanoma patients, we developed a pre-metastatic B16.F10 melanoma model expressing a fluorescent fusion protein, tandem dimer tomato, as a surrogate TDA. Using intravital two-photon microscopy (2PM) and whole-mount 3D LN imaging of tumor-draining LNs in immunocompetent mice, we report an unexpectedly widespread accumulation of TDA on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), which were dynamically scanned by circulating B cells. Furthermore, 2PM imaging identified macrophages located in the subcapsular sinus of tumor-draining LNs to capture subcellular TDA-containing particles arriving in afferent lymph. As a consequence, depletion of macrophages or genetic ablation of B cells and FDCs resulted in dramatically reduced TDA capture in tumor-draining LNs. In sum, we identified a major pathway for the induction of humoral responses in a melanoma model, which may be exploitable to manipulate anti-TDA antibody production during cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Intravital and Whole-Organ Imaging Reveals Capture of Melanoma-Derived Antigen by Lymph Node Subcapsular Macrophages Leading to Widespread Deposition on Follicular Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moalli, Federica; Proulx, Steven T.; Schwendener, Reto; Detmar, Michael; Schlapbach, Christoph; Stein, Jens V.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant antigens expressed by tumor cells, such as in melanoma, are often associated with humoral immune responses, which may in turn influence tumor progression. Despite recent data showing the central role of adaptive immune responses on cancer spread or control, it remains poorly understood where and how tumor-derived antigen (TDA) induces a humoral immune response in tumor-bearing hosts. Based on our observation of TDA accumulation in B cell areas of lymph nodes (LNs) from melanoma patients, we developed a pre-metastatic B16.F10 melanoma model expressing a fluorescent fusion protein, tandem dimer tomato, as a surrogate TDA. Using intravital two-photon microscopy (2PM) and whole-mount 3D LN imaging of tumor-draining LNs in immunocompetent mice, we report an unexpectedly widespread accumulation of TDA on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), which were dynamically scanned by circulating B cells. Furthermore, 2PM imaging identified macrophages located in the subcapsular sinus of tumor-draining LNs to capture subcellular TDA-containing particles arriving in afferent lymph. As a consequence, depletion of macrophages or genetic ablation of B cells and FDCs resulted in dramatically reduced TDA capture in tumor-draining LNs. In sum, we identified a major pathway for the induction of humoral responses in a melanoma model, which may be exploitable to manipulate anti-TDA antibody production during cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25821451

  1. Red blood cells affect the margination of microparticles in synthetic microcapillaries and intravital microcirculation as a function of their size and shape.

    PubMed

    D'Apolito, Rosa; Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Taraballi, Francesca; Minardi, Silvia; Kirui, Dickson; Liu, Xuewu; Cevenini, Armando; Palomba, Roberto; Ferrari, Mauro; Salvatore, Francesco; Tasciotti, Ennio; Guido, Stefano

    2015-11-10

    A key step in particle-based drug delivery throughmicrocirculation is particlemigration from blood flow to vesselwalls, also known as “margination”,which promotes particle contact and adhesion to the vesselwall. Margination and adhesion should be independently addressed as two distinct phenomena, considering that the former is a fundamental prerequisite to achieve particle adhesion and subsequent extravasation. Although margination has beenmodeled by numerical simulations and investigated inmodel systems in vitro, experimental studies including red blood cells (RBCs) are lacking. Here, we evaluate the effect of RBCs on margination through microfluidic studies in vitro and by intravital microscopy in vivo.We showthatmargination,which is almost absent when particles are suspended in a cell-free medium, is drastically enhanced by RBCs. This effect is size- and shape-dependent, larger spherical/discoid particles being more effectively marginated both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings can be explained by the collision of particles with RBCs that induces the drifting of the particles towards the vessel walls where they become trapped in the cell-free layer. These results are relevant for the design of drug delivery strategies based on systemically administered carriers.

  2. A 4-Dimensional Representation of Antennal Lobe Output Based on an Ensemble of Characterized Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Erich M.; Huetteroth, Wolf; Schachtner, Joachim; Daly, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    A central problem facing studies of neural encoding in sensory systems is how to accurately quantify the extent of spatial and temporal responses. In this study, we take advantage of the relatively simple and stereotypic neural architecture found in invertebrates. We combine standard electrophysiological techniques, recently developed population analysis techniques, and novel anatomical methods to form an innovative 4-dimensional view of odor output representations in the antennal lobe of the moth Manduca sexta. This novel approach allows quantification of olfactory responses of characterized neurons with spike time resolution. Additionally, arbitrary integration windows can be used for comparisons with other methods such as imaging. By assigning statistical significance to changes in neuronal firing, this method can visualize activity across the entire antennal lobe. The resulting 4-dimensional representation of antennal lobe output complements imaging and multi-unit experiments yet provides a more comprehensive and accurate view of glomerular activation patterns in spike time resolution. PMID:19464513

  3. Implications of Intravital Imaging of Murine Germinal Centers on the Control of B Cell Selection and Division.

    PubMed

    Binder, Sebastian C; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Intravital imaging of antibody optimization in germinal center (GC) reactions has set a new dimension in the understanding of the humoral immune response during the last decade. The inclusion of spatio-temporal cellular dynamics in the research on GCs required analysis using the agent-based mathematical models. In this study, we integrate the available intravital imaging data from various research groups and incorporate these into a quantitative mathematical model of GC reactions and antibody affinity maturation. Interestingly, the integration of data concerning the spatial organization of GCs and B cell motility allows to draw conclusions on the strength of the selection pressure and the control of B cell division by T follicular helper cells.

  4. Implications of Intravital Imaging of Murine Germinal Centers on the Control of B Cell Selection and Division

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Sebastian C.; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Intravital imaging of antibody optimization in germinal center (GC) reactions has set a new dimension in the understanding of the humoral immune response during the last decade. The inclusion of spatio-temporal cellular dynamics in the research on GCs required analysis using the agent-based mathematical models. In this study, we integrate the available intravital imaging data from various research groups and incorporate these into a quantitative mathematical model of GC reactions and antibody affinity maturation. Interestingly, the integration of data concerning the spatial organization of GCs and B cell motility allows to draw conclusions on the strength of the selection pressure and the control of B cell division by T follicular helper cells. PMID:28066409

  5. Electron Microscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)

  6. Intravital Imaging Reveals Ghost Fibers as Architectural Units Guiding Myogenic Progenitors during Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Webster, Micah T; Manor, Uri; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Fan, Chen-Ming

    2016-02-04

    How resident stem cells and their immediate progenitors rebuild tissues of pre-injury organization and size for proportional regeneration is not well understood. Using 3D, time-lapse intravital imaging for direct visualization of the muscle regeneration process in live mice, we report that extracellular matrix remnants from injured skeletal muscle fibers, "ghost fibers," govern muscle stem/progenitor cell behaviors during proportional regeneration. Stem cells were immobile and quiescent without injury whereas their activated progenitors migrated and divided after injury. Unexpectedly, divisions and migration were primarily bi-directionally oriented along the ghost fiber longitudinal axis, allowing for spreading of progenitors throughout ghost fibers. Re-orienting ghost fibers impacted myogenic progenitors' migratory paths and division planes, causing disorganization of regenerated muscle fibers. We conclude that ghost fibers are autonomous, architectural units necessary for proportional regeneration after tissue injury. This finding reinforces the need to fabricate bioengineered matrices that mimic living tissue matrices for tissue regeneration therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intravital fiber-optic fluorescence imaging for monitoring ovarian carcinoma progression and treatment response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Celli, Jonathan P.; Evans, Conor L.; Zhong, Wei; Rizvi, Imran; Mai, Zhiming; Mertz, Jerome; Yun, Seok H.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2009-06-01

    Our laboratory has constructed a custom fluorescence microendoscope for detecting and monitoring tumor nodules in a mouse model of metastatic ovarian carcinoma (OVCA). The microendoscope is being applied for tumor recognition and for quantifying tumor burden reduction following photodynamic therapy (PDT). Benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA), a photosensitizing agent for PDT, is administered to the mice and imaged with the microendoscope prior to PDT. BPD-MA fluorescence is a convenient means for locating tumor sites and quantifying tumor burden (despite the fact that BPD-MA is a non-targeted contrast agent). The miniature, flexible microendoscope probe is delivered via a 14-gauge catheter for imaging metastases along the outer surfaces of the internal organs and the inner walls of the peritoneal cavity. The minimal invasiveness of this approach facilitates frequent imaging of the mice in order to monitor cancer progression and treatment response. We present promising data for intravital imaging of treatment response following PDT and new developments in the microendoscope instrumentation for improved image quality.

  8. Long-term intravital imaging of the multicolor-coded tumor microenvironment during combination immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Shuhong; Li, Hui; Lu, Lisen; Qi, Zhongyang; Liu, Lei; Chen, Lu; Shen, Guanxin; Fu, Ling; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    The combined-immunotherapy of adoptive cell therapy (ACT) and cyclophosphamide (CTX) is one of the most efficient treatments for melanoma patients. However, no synergistic effects of CTX and ACT on the spatio-temporal dynamics of immunocytes in vivo have been described. Here, we visualized key cell events in immunotherapy-elicited immunoreactions in a multicolor-coded tumor microenvironment, and then established an optimal strategy of metronomic combined-immunotherapy to enhance anti-tumor efficacy. Intravital imaging data indicated that regulatory T cells formed an 'immunosuppressive ring' around a solid tumor. The CTX-ACT combined-treatment elicited synergistic immunoreactions in tumor areas, which included relieving the immune suppression, triggering the transient activation of endogenous tumor-infiltrating immunocytes, increasing the accumulation of adoptive cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and accelerating the infiltration of dendritic cells. These insights into the spatio-temporal dynamics of immunocytes are beneficial for optimizing immunotherapy and provide new approaches for elucidating the mechanisms underlying the involvement of immunocytes in cancer immunotherapy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14756.001 PMID:27855783

  9. Field evaluation of an intravital diagnostic test of Echinococcus multilocularis infection in red foxes.

    PubMed

    Reiterová, K; Miterpáková, M; Turceková, L'; Antolová, D; Dubinský, P

    2005-03-10

    Echinococcus multilocularis parasitizes the small intestine of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and other carnivores, and has a wide distribution throughout the northern hemisphere. This cestode is the causative agent of human alveolar echinococcosis, a life-threatening helminth zoonosis. In 2000-2002, 2130 red foxes were examined for its presence in Slovakia, with a total prevalence of 30.7%. The data on occurrence were obtained by the combination of necropsy of small intestines from red foxes and coproantigen detection in faecal samples. The correlation between the number of detected specimens and the value of optical density of copro-ELISA test was found. When worm burdens were low (1-25 specimens) the sensitivity of the method was 31.3+/-8.64%, when worm burdens were >50 specimens, 81.8+/-0.66%, and with high worm burdens (>1000 specimens) the sensitivity reached 100+/-0.34%. E. multilocularis presence was detected using the nested PCR method from the eggs in the faecal samples with a 100% specificity. In epidemiological surveys of this zoonosis, it is of crucial importance to detect animals with a high level of infection, which are responsible for the bulk of environmental contamination. The advantage of copro-ELISA test lies in allowing the intravital diagnostics to be employed within the epidemiological survey of E. multilocularis occurrence in the protected and urban areas.

  10. Expanding Applications of the Nano Intravital Device as a Platform for Exploring Tumor Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgen, Michael R.

    The tumor microenvironment has been demonstrated to be a key determinant in the progression of cancer. Unfortunately, the mechanisms behind the different microenvironments (cytokine gradients, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, etc) have not been fully elucidated. Identifying these mechanisms can lead to targeted, individualized therapy to prevent metastasis. The Nano Intravital Device (NANIVID) is a microfabricated, implantable device designed to initiate specific microenvironments in vivo so that the time course of the effects can be observed. With both spatial and temporal control over the induced environments, the affected regions of the tumor can be compared to the rest of the tumor. The NANIVID was first used to establish cytokine gradients to monitor the migration of invasive cancer cells. The three projects that comprise this work expand the applications of the NANIVID to establish the device as a robust platform for investigating tumor microenvironment interactions. The first project released chemical mimics from the device to induce the cellular hypoxic response in tumors to determine how hypoxia affects the fate of disseminated tumor cells. The second project used the NANIVID in combination with an atomic force microscope to investigate the altered mechanics of migrating invasive cancer cells. The final project was to develop a cell counter to monitor the isolation of the invasive subpopulation of cells that were drawn into the device using a chemoattractant. These three projects demonstrate the potential of the NANIVID as a platform for investigating the tumor microenvironment.

  11. Ablation of atrial fibrillation using novel 4-dimensional catheter tracking within autoregistered left atrial angiograms.

    PubMed

    Rolf, Sascha; Sommer, Philipp; Gaspar, Thomas; John, Silke; Arya, Arash; Hindricks, Gerhard; Piorkowski, Christopher

    2012-08-01

    We describe a novel fluoroscopy coregistered, 4-dimensional catheter tracking technology (MediGuide Technology [MGT]) used for treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation. The aim of the study was to investigate (1) the feasibility of nonfluoroscopic catheter manipulation within dynamic left atrial chamber models; (2) the integration of the technology into an established electroanatomical mapping system; and (3) potential clinical impact. Forty-nine patients received atrial fibrillation ablation using MGT-enabled NavX-EnSite. Matched patients ablated with a conventional NavX-EnSite system served as a control group. MGT was used for the deployment of diagnostic catheters within preacquired cine loops, for nonfluoroscopic chamber mapping within dynamic angiograms, and for 4-dimensional tagging of anatomical landmarks. Integration with the electroanatomical mapping system allowed correction of field distortions and a reference tool to detect and correct map shifts. Catheter ablation was done without MGT because the ablation catheter was not MGT enabled. MGT worked safely and stably in all 49 patients. Catheter deployment within the preacquired cine loops was successfully performed in 45 of 49 (92%) patients. Catheter tracking within dynamic left atrial angiograms allowed nearly nonfluoroscopic creation of NavX-EnSite geometries with subsequent computed tomography model registration in all 49 patients. Overall, MGT significantly reduced total procedural fluoroscopy time (median [quartiles]) from 31 minutes (25, 43 minutes) to 16 minutes (10, 23 minutes) and irradiation dose from 14 453±7403 to 7363±5827 cGy*cm(2) (mean±SD), respectively (P<0.001). MGT is a tracking technology that allows 4-dimensional visualization of dedicated catheters within moving chamber models. Integration of the MGT with an established electroanatomical mapping system provided algorithms to facilitate mapping in the electroanatomical mapping system environment. As a first measurable

  12. The classification of the Weyl conformal tensor in 4-dimensional manifolds of neutral signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Graham

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a simple account of the algebraic classification of the Weyl conformal tensor on a 4-dimensional manifold with metric g of neutral signature (+ , + , - , -) . The classification is algebraically similar to the well-known Petrov classification in the Lorentz case and the various algebraic types and corresponding canonical forms are obtained. Criteria concerning principal, totally null 2-spaces are explored and which lead to principal null directions similar to those of L. Bel in the Lorentz case. The uniqueness, or otherwise, of the tetrads in which the canonical forms appear are investigated and some topological and differentiability properties of the algebraic types are also established.

  13. Analytical Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

  14. Intravital imaging of mesenchymal stem cell trafficking and association with platelets and neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Grace Sock Leng; Yang, Zijiang; Carman, Christopher V.; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Lin, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    Early events of MSC adhesion to and transmigration through the vascular wall following systemic infusion are important for MSC trafficking to inflamed sites, yet are poorly characterized in vivo. Here, we used intravital confocal imaging to determine the acute extravasation kinetics and distribution of culture-expanded MSC (2-6 hours post-infusion) in a murine model of dermal inflammation. By 2 h post-infusion, among the MSC that arrested within the inflamed ear dermis, 47.8±8.2% of MSC had either initiated or completed transmigration into the extravascular space. Arrested and transmigrating MSC were equally distributed within both small capillaries and larger venules. This suggested existence of an active adhesion mechanism, since venule diameters were greater than those of the MSC. Heterotypic intravascular interactions between distinct blood cell types have been reported to facilitate the arrest and extravasation of leukocytes and circulating tumor cells. We found that 42.8±24.8% of intravascular MSC were in contact with neutrophil-platelet clusters. A role for platelets in MSC trafficking was confirmed by platelet depletion, which significantly reduced the preferential homing of MSC to the inflamed ear, though the total percentage of MSC in contact with neutrophils was maintained. Interestingly, although platelet depletion increased vascular permeability in the inflamed ear, there was decreased MSC accumulation. This suggests that increased vascular permeability is unnecessary for MSC trafficking to inflamed sites. These findings represent the first glimpse into MSC extravasation kinetics and microvascular distribution in vivo, and further clarify the roles of active adhesion, the intravascular cellular environment and vascular permeability in MSC trafficking. PMID:25263183

  15. Intravital Imaging of the Kidney in a Rat Model of Salt-Sensitive Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Endres, Bradley T; Sandoval, Ruben M; Rhodes, George J; Campos-Bilderback, Silvia B; Kamocka, Malgorzata M; McDermott-Roe, Christopher; Staruschenko, Alexander; Molitoris, Bruce A; Geurts, Aron M; Palygin, Oleg

    2017-04-12

    Hypertension is one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide, and a major risk factor for renal failure and cardiovascular disease. The role of albuminuria, a common feature of hypertension and robust predictor of cardiorenal disorders, remains incompletely understood. The goal of this study was to investigate the mechanisms leading to albuminuria in the kidney of a rat model of hypertension, the Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rat. To determine the relative contributions of the glomerulus and proximal tubule (PT) to albuminuria, we applied intravital two-photon-based imaging to investigate the complex renal physiological changes that occur during salt-induced hypertension. Following a high salt diet, SS rats exhibited elevated blood pressure, increased glomerular sieving of albumin (GSCalb=0.0686), relative permeability to albumin (+∆16%) and impaired volume hemodynamics (-∆14%). Serum albumin, but not serum globulins or creatinine, concentration was decreased (-0.54g/dL), which was concomitant with increased filtration of albumin (3.7 vs 0.8 g per day normal diet). Pathologically, hypertensive animals had significant tubular damage as indicated by increased prevalence of granular casts, expansion and necrosis of PT epithelial cells (+∆2.20score/image), progressive augmentation of red blood cell velocity (+∆269µm/s) and micro vessel diameter (+∆4.3µm), and increased vascular injury (+∆0.61leakage/image). Therefore, development of salt-induced hypertension can be triggered by fast and progressive pathogenic remodeling of PT epithelia, which can be associated with changes in albumin handling. Collectively, these results indicate that both the glomerulus and the PT contribute to albuminuria and dual treatment of glomerular filtration and albumin reabsorption may represent an effective treatment of salt-sensitive hypertension.

  16. Intravital Imaging of Vascular Transmigration by the Lyme Spirochete: Requirement for the Integrin Binding Residues of the B. burgdorferi P66 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Devender; Ristow, Laura C.; Shi, Meiqing; Mukherjee, Priyanka; Caine, Jennifer A.; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kubes, Paul; Coburn, Jenifer; Chaconas, George

    2015-01-01

    Vascular extravasation, a key step in systemic infection by hematogenous microbial pathogens, is poorly understood, but has been postulated to encompass features similar to vascular transmigration by leukocytes. The Lyme disease spirochete can cause a variety of clinical manifestations, including arthritis, upon hematogenous dissemination. This pathogen encodes numerous surface adhesive proteins (adhesins) that may promote extravasation, but none have yet been implicated in this process. In this work we report the novel use of intravital microscopy of the peripheral knee vasculature to study transmigration of the Lyme spirochete in living Cd1d -/-mice. In the absence of iNKT cells, major immune modulators in the mouse joint, spirochetes that have extravasated into joint-proximal tissue remain in the local milieu and can be enumerated accurately. We show that BBK32, a fibronectin and glycosaminoglycan adhesin of B. burgdorferi involved in early steps of endothelial adhesion, is not required for extravasation from the peripheral knee vasculature. In contrast, almost no transmigration occurs in the absence of P66, an outer membrane protein that has porin and integrin adhesin functions. Importantly, P66 mutants specifically defective in integrin binding were incapable of promoting extravasation. P66 itself does not promote detectable microvascular interactions, suggesting that vascular adhesion of B. burgdorferi mediated by other adhesins, sets the stage for P66-integrin interactions leading to transmigration. Although integrin-binding proteins with diverse functions are encoded by a variety of bacterial pathogens, P66 is the first to have a documented and direct role in vascular transmigration. The emerging picture of vascular escape by the Lyme spirochete shows similarities, but distinct differences from leukocyte transmigration. PMID:26684456

  17. 4-Dimensional MRI and Attenuation Map Generation in PET/MRI with 4-Dimensional PET-Derived Deformation Matrices: Study of Feasibility for Lung Cancer Applications.

    PubMed

    Fayad, Hadi; Schmidt, Holger; Küstner, Thomas; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2017-05-01

    Respiratory motion may reduce accuracy in the fusion of functional and anatomic images from combined PET/MRI systems. Methodologies for the correction of respiratory motion in PET acquisitions with such systems are mostly based on the use of respiration-synchronized MRI acquisitions to derive motion fields. Existing approaches based on tagging acquisitions may introduce artifacts in MR images, whereas motion model approaches require the acquisition of training datasets. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility of generating 4-dimensional (4D) MR images and associated attenuation maps (AMs) from the combination of a single static MR image and motion fields obtained from simultaneously acquired 4D non-attenuation-corrected (NAC) PET images. Methods: Four-dimensional PET/MRI datasets were acquired for 11 patients on a simultaneous PET/MRI system. The 4D PET datasets were retrospectively binned into 4 motion amplitude frames corresponding to the simultaneously acquired T1-weighted 4D MR images. A T1-weighted 3-dimensional MRI sequence with Dixon-based fat and water separation was also acquired at the end of expiration for PET attenuation correction purposes. All reconstructed 4D NAC PET images were then elastically registered to the single end-of-expiration NAC PET image. The derived motion fields were subsequently applied to the end-of-expiration frame of the acquired 4D MRI volume and the AM derived from the Dixon MR image to generate respiration-synchronized MR images and corresponding AMs. Results: The accuracy of the proposed method was assessed by comparing the generated and acquired images according to metrics such as overall correlation coefficients and differences in distances of anatomic landmarks on the generated and acquired MRI datasets. High correlation coefficients (mean ± SD: 0.93 ± 0.03) and small differences (2.69 ± 0.5 mm) were obtained. Moreover, small tissue classification differences (2.23% ± 0.68%) between generated and 4

  18. Evaluation of 4-dimensional Computed Tomography to 4-dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Deformable Image Registration for Lung Cancer Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Balik, Salim; Weiss, Elisabeth; Jan, Nuzhat; Roman, Nicholas; Sleeman, William C.; Fatyga, Mirek; Christensen, Gary E.; Zhang, Cheng; Murphy, Martin J.; Lu, Jun; Keall, Paul; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate 2 deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for the purpose of contour mapping to support image-guided adaptive radiation therapy with 4-dimensional cone-beam CT (4DCBCT). Methods and Materials: One planning 4D fan-beam CT (4DFBCT) and 7 weekly 4DCBCT scans were acquired for 10 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients. The gross tumor volume was delineated by a physician in all 4D images. End-of-inspiration phase planning 4DFBCT was registered to the corresponding phase in weekly 4DCBCT images for day-to-day registrations. For phase-to-phase registration, the end-of-inspiration phase from each 4D image was registered to the end-of-expiration phase. Two DIR algorithms—small deformation inverse consistent linear elastic (SICLE) and Insight Toolkit diffeomorphic demons (DEMONS)—were evaluated. Physician-delineated contours were compared with the warped contours by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), average symmetric distance, and false-positive and false-negative indices. The DIR results are compared with rigid registration of tumor. Results: For day-to-day registrations, the mean DSC was 0.75 ± 0.09 with SICLE, 0.70 ± 0.12 with DEMONS, 0.66 ± 0.12 with rigid-tumor registration, and 0.60 ± 0.14 with rigid-bone registration. Results were comparable to intraobserver variability calculated from phase-to-phase registrations as well as measured interobserver variation for 1 patient. SICLE and DEMONS, when compared with rigid-bone (4.1 mm) and rigid-tumor (3.6 mm) registration, respectively reduced the average symmetric distance to 2.6 and 3.3 mm. On average, SICLE and DEMONS increased the DSC to 0.80 and 0.79, respectively, compared with rigid-tumor (0.78) registrations for 4DCBCT phase-to-phase registrations. Conclusions: Deformable image registration achieved comparable accuracy to reported interobserver delineation variability and higher accuracy than rigid-tumor registration. Deformable image registration

  19. Synchrotron 4-dimensional imaging of two-phase flow through porous media

    PubMed Central

    Kim, F.H.; Penumadu, D.; Patel, P.; Xiao, X.; Garboczi, E.J.; Moylan, S.P.; Donmez, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Near real-time visualization of complex two-phase flow in a porous medium was demonstrated with dynamic 4-dimensional (4D) (3D + time) imaging at the 2-BM beam line of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. Advancing fluid fronts through tortuous flow paths and their interactions with sand grains were clearly captured, and formations of air bubbles and capillary bridges were visualized. The intense X-ray photon flux of the synchrotron facility made 4D imaging possible, capturing the dynamic evolution of both solid and fluid phases. Computed Tomography (CT) scans were collected every 12 s with a pixel size of 3.25 µm. The experiment was carried out to improve understanding of the physics associated with two-phase flow. The results provide a source of validation data for numerical simulation codes such as Lattice-Boltzmann, which are used to model multi-phase flow through porous media. PMID:27891248

  20. In Vivo Time-Course Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis in Colorectal Liver Metastases in the Same Living Mice Using Two-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Koji; Morimoto, Yuhki; Toiyama, Yuji; Matsushita, Kohei; Kawamura, Mikio; Koike, Yuhki; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Araki, Toshimitsu; Mizoguchi, Akira; Kusunoki, Masato

    2012-01-01

    In vivo real-time visualization of the process of angiogenesis in secondary tumors in the same living animals presents a major challenge in metastasis research. We developed a technique for intravital imaging of colorectal liver metastasis development in live mice using two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM). We also developed time-series TPLSM in which intravital TPLSM procedures were performed several times over periods of days to months. Red fluorescent protein-expressing colorectal cancer cells were inoculated into the spleens of green fluorescent protein-expressing mice. First- and second-round intravital TPLSM allowed visualization of viable cancer cells (red) in hepatic sinusoids or the space of Disse. Third-round intravital TPLSM demonstrated liver metastatic colonies consisting of viable cancer cells and surrounding stroma with tumor vessels (green). In vivo time-course imaging of tumor angiogenesis in the same living mice using time-series TPLSM could be an ideal tool for antiangiogenic drug evaluation, reducing the effects of interindividual variation. PMID:22131993

  1. Intravital Computer Morphometry on Protozoa: A Method for Monitoring of the Morphofunctional Disorders in Cells Exposed in the Cell Phone Communication Electromagnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Uskalova, D V; Igolkina, Yu V; Sarapultseva, E I

    2016-08-01

    Morphofunctional disorders in unicellular aquatic protozoa - Spirostomum ambiguum infusorians after 30-, 60-, and 360-min exposure in electromagnetic field at a radiation frequency of 1 GHz and energy flow density of 50 μW/cm(2) were analyzed by intravital computer morphometry. Significant disorders in morphometric values correlated with low mobility of the protozoa. The results suggested the use of intravital computer morphometry on the protozoa for early diagnosis of radiation-induced effects of the mobile communication electromagnetic field, for example, low mobility of spermatozoa.

  2. Intravital excitation increases detection sensitivity for pulmonary tuberculosis by whole-body imaging with β-lactamase reporter enzyme fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Cheng, Yunfeng; Durkee, Madeleine S; Xie, Hexin; Rao, Jianghong; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Maitland, Kristen C

    2017-06-01

    Tuberculosis is a pulmonary disease with an especially high mortality rate in immuno-compromised populations, specifically children and HIV positive individuals. The causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is a very slow growing and difficult organism to work with, making both diagnosis and development of effective treatments cumbersome. We utilize a fiber-optic fluorescence microendoscope integrated with a whole-body imaging system for in vivo Mtb detection. The system exploits an endogenous enzyme of Mtb (β-lactamase, or BlaC) using a BlaC-specific NIR fluorogenic substrate. In the presence of BlaC, this substrate is cleaved and becomes fluorescent. Using intravital illumination of the lung to excite this probe, sensitivity of the optical system increases over trans- and epi-illumination methods of whole-body fluorescence imaging. We demonstrate that integration of these imaging technologies with BlaC-specific fluorescent reporter probe improves the level of detection to ∼100 colony forming units, a 100× increase in sensitivity in comparison to epi-illumination and a 10× increase in sensitivity in comparison to previous work in intravital excitation of tdTomato-expressing Mtb. This lower detection threshold enables the study of early stage bacterial infections with clinical strains of Mtb and longitudinal studies of disease pathogenesis and therapeutic efficacy with multiple time points in a single animal. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Correlative Microscopy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microscopy and Imaging offers many opportunities to collaborate and cooperate with scientists in many different fields nationally and internationally. Images have proven to be very important components in basic research, product development and understanding structure/function relationships in addit...

  4. Correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loussert Fonta, Céline; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years correlative microscopy, combining the power and advantages of different imaging system, e.g., light, electrons, X-ray, NMR, etc., has become an important tool for biomedical research. Among all the possible combinations of techniques, light and electron microscopy, have made an especially big step forward and are being implemented in more and more research labs. Electron microscopy profits from the high spatial resolution, the direct recognition of the cellular ultrastructure and identification of the organelles. It, however, has two severe limitations: the restricted field of view and the fact that no live imaging can be done. On the other hand light microscopy has the advantage of live imaging, following a fluorescently tagged molecule in real time and at lower magnifications the large field of view facilitates the identification and location of sparse individual cells in a large context, e.g., tissue. The combination of these two imaging techniques appears to be a valuable approach to dissect biological events at a submicrometer level. Light microscopy can be used to follow a labelled protein of interest, or a visible organelle such as mitochondria, in time, then the sample is fixed and the exactly same region is investigated by electron microscopy. The time resolution is dependent on the speed of penetration and fixation when chemical fixatives are used and on the reaction time of the operator for cryo-fixation. Light microscopy can also be used to identify cells of interest, e.g., a special cell type in tissue or cells that have been modified by either transfections or RNAi, in a large population of non-modified cells. A further application is to find fluorescence labels in cells on a large section to reduce searching time in the electron microscope. Multiple fluorescence labelling of a series of sections can be correlated with the ultrastructure of the individual sections to get 3D information of the distribution of the marked proteins: array

  5. Long-term time-lapse multimodal microscopy for tracking cell dynamics in live tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Benedikt W.; Valero, Maria C.; Chaney, Eric J.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Marni D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2011-02-01

    High speed intravital microscopy has emerged as an essential tool for studying cellular dynamics in live tissue. A limitation of this technique, however, is that the timescale that a sample can be continuously imaged is limited by practical considerations to several hours. Long term observation of live tissue is of great interest for a variety of research areas. We present methods for observing long term cellular dynamics in live tissue based on three-dimensional registration of time-lapse intravital microscopy images. For these experiments we utilized a custom multimodal microscope that allows simultaneous and co-registered acquisition of optical coherence (OCM) and multiphoton (MPM) microscopy images. OCM allows the structure of a sample to be visualized based on backscattered light while MPM excited fluorescence allows individual cells and cell function to be visualized. The OCM images of tissue structure are used to register data sets taken at different time points. The transformations of the OCM images are applied to MPM images to determine the migration of cell populations. This method of image registration is applied to in vivo tracking of bone-marrow derived GFP-labeled stem cells in mouse skin following bone marrow transplants from GFP donors into species-matched wildtype hosts. The use of three-dimensional image registration of time-lapse microscopy images enables tracking these cells after local cutaneous injury, and for investigating the role of skin stem cells in wound healing.

  6. Fast and precise targeting of single tumor cells in vivo by multimodal correlative microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Karreman, Matthia A.; Mercier, Luc; Schieber, Nicole L.; Solecki, Gergely; Allio, Guillaume; Winkler, Frank; Ruthensteiner, Bernhard; Goetz, Jacky G.; Schwab, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intravital microscopy provides dynamic understanding of multiple cell biological processes, but its limited resolution has so far precluded structural analysis. Because it is difficult to capture rare and transient events, only a few attempts have been made to observe specific developmental and pathological processes in animal models using electron microscopy. The multimodal correlative approach that we propose here combines intravital microscopy, microscopic X-ray computed tomography and three-dimensional electron microscopy. It enables a rapid (c.a. 2 weeks) and accurate (<5 µm) correlation of functional imaging to ultrastructural analysis of single cells in a relevant context. We demonstrate the power of our approach by capturing single tumor cells in the vasculature of the cerebral cortex and in subcutaneous tumors, providing unique insights into metastatic events. Providing a significantly improved throughput, our workflow enables multiple sampling, a prerequisite for making correlative imaging a relevant tool to study cell biology in vivo. Owing to the versatility of this workflow, we envision broad applications in various fields of biological research, such as cancer or developmental biology. PMID:26659665

  7. Optimizing 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Sampling for Respiratory Motion Analysis of Pancreatic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H.N.; Senneville, Baudouin D. de

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimum sampling strategy for retrospective reconstruction of 4-dimensional (4D) MR data for nonrigid motion characterization of tumor and organs at risk for radiation therapy purposes. Methods and Materials: For optimization, we compared 2 surrogate signals (external respiratory bellows and internal MRI navigators) and 2 MR sampling strategies (Cartesian and radial) in terms of image quality and robustness. Using the optimized protocol, 6 pancreatic cancer patients were scanned to calculate the 4D motion. Region of interest analysis was performed to characterize the respiratory-induced motion of the tumor and organs at risk simultaneously. Results: The MRI navigator was found to be a more reliable surrogate for pancreatic motion than the respiratory bellows signal. Radial sampling is most benign for undersampling artifacts and intraview motion. Motion characterization revealed interorgan and interpatient variation, as well as heterogeneity within the tumor. Conclusions: A robust 4D-MRI method, based on clinically available protocols, is presented and successfully applied to characterize the abdominal motion in a small number of pancreatic cancer patients.

  8. Vertebrate limb development: moving from classical morphogen gradients to an integrated 4-dimensional patterning system.

    PubMed

    Bénazet, Jean-Denis; Zeller, Rolf

    2009-10-01

    A wealth of classical embryological manipulation experiments taking mainly advantage of the chicken limb buds identified the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) and the zone of polarizing activity (ZPA) as the respective ectodermal and mesenchymal key signaling centers coordinating proximodistal (PD) and anteroposterior (AP) limb axis development. These experiments inspired Wolpert's French flag model, which is a classic among morphogen gradient models. Subsequent molecular and genetic analysis in the mouse identified retinoic acid as proximal signal, and fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and sonic hedgehog (SHH) as the essential instructive signals produced by AER and ZPA, respectively. Recent studies provide good evidence that progenitors are specified early with respect to their PD and AP fates and that morpho-regulatory signaling is also required for subsequent proliferative expansion of the specified progenitor pools. The determination of particular fates seems to occur rather late and depends on additional signals such as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), which indicates that cells integrate signaling inputs over time and space. The coordinate regulation of PD and AP axis patterning is controlled by an epithelial-mesenchymal feedback signaling system, in which transcriptional regulation of the BMP antagonist Gremlin1 integrates inputs from the BMP, SHH, and FGF pathways. Vertebrate limb-bud development is controlled by a 4-dimensional (4D) patterning system integrating positive and negative regulatory feedback loops, rather than thresholds set by morphogen gradients.

  9. Expansion Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W.; Boyden, Edward S.

    2014-01-01

    In optical microscopy, fine structural details are resolved by using refraction to magnify images of a specimen. Here we report the discovery that, by synthesizing a swellable polymer network within a specimen, it can be physically expanded, resulting in physical magnification. By covalently anchoring specific labels located within the specimen directly to the polymer network, labels spaced closer than the optical diffraction limit can be isotropically separated and optically resolved, a process we call expansion microscopy (ExM). Thus, this process can be used to perform scalable super-resolution microscopy with diffraction-limited microscopes. We demonstrate ExM with effective ~70 nm lateral resolution in both cultured cells and brain tissue, performing three-color super-resolution imaging of ~107 μm3 of the mouse hippocampus with a conventional confocal microscope. PMID:25592419

  10. Quantification of Pediatric Abdominal Organ Motion With a 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Method.

    PubMed

    Uh, Jinsoo; Krasin, Matthew J; Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu; Tinkle, Christopher; Lucas, John T; Merchant, Thomas E; Hua, Chiaho

    2017-09-01

    To characterize respiration-induced abdominal organ motion in children receiving radiation treatment with a 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method. We analyzed free-breathing coronal 4D MRI datasets acquired from 35 patients (aged 1-20 years) with abdominal tumors. A deformable image registration of the 4D MRI datasets was performed to derive motion trajectories of selected anatomic landmarks, from which organ motions were quantified. The association between organ motion and patient characteristics was investigated and compared with previous studies. The relation between patient height and organ motion was further investigated to predict organ motion in prospective patients. Organ motion and its individual variation were reduced in younger patients (eg, kidney peak-to-peak motion <5 mm for all but 1 patient aged ≤8 years), although special motion management may be warranted in some adolescents. The liver and spleen exhibited greater motion than did the kidneys, while intraorgan variation was present. The motions in the liver and kidneys agreed with those reported by the previous 4D computed tomography studies. Individual variations of organ motion in younger patients were due, in part, to changes in respiration rate, which ostensibly reflected the effect of anesthesia. The prediction of organ motion was limited by large individual variations, particularly for older patients. The 4D MRI acquisition method and motion analysis described in this study provide a nonionizing approach to understand age-associated organ motion, which aids in the planning of abdominal radiation therapy for pediatric patients. Use of 4D MRI facilitates monitoring of changes in target motion patterns during treatment courses and in various studies of the effect of organ motion on radiation treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Intravital fluorescence imaging of mouse brain using implantable semiconductor devices and epi-illumination of biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Haruta, Makito; Nagasaki, Mizuki; Takehara, Hironari; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2015-05-01

    The application of the fluorescence imaging method to living animals, together with the use of genetically engineered animals and synthesized photo-responsive compounds, is a powerful method for investigating brain functions. Here, we report a fluorescence imaging method for the brain surface and deep brain tissue that uses compact and mass-producible semiconductor imaging devices based on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. An image sensor chip was designed to be inserted into brain tissue, and its size was 1500 × 450 μm. Sample illumination is also a key issue for intravital fluorescence imaging. Hence, for the uniform illumination of the imaging area, we propose a new method involving the epi-illumination of living biological tissues, and we performed investigations using optical simulations and experimental evaluation.

  12. 5D-intravital tomography as a novel tool for non-invasive in-vivo analysis of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans G.; Gregory, Axel; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; Schwarz, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Stracke, Frank; Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2010-02-01

    Some years ago, CE-marked clinical multiphoton systems for 3D imaging of human skin with subcellular resolution have been launched. These tomographs provide optical biopsies with submicron resolution based on two-photon excited autofluorescence (NAD(P)H, flavoproteins, keratin, elastin, melanin, porphyrins) and second harmonic generation by collagen. The 3D tomograph was now transferred into a 5D imaging system by the additional detection of the emission spectrum and the fluorescence lifetime based on spatially and spectrally resolved time-resolved single photon counting. The novel 5D intravital tomograph (5D-IVT) was employed for the early detection of atopic dermatitis and the analysis of treatment effects.

  13. Intravital fluorescence imaging of mouse brain using implantable semiconductor devices and epi-illumination of biological tissue

    PubMed Central

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Haruta, Makito; Nagasaki, Mizuki; Takehara, Hironari; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The application of the fluorescence imaging method to living animals, together with the use of genetically engineered animals and synthesized photo-responsive compounds, is a powerful method for investigating brain functions. Here, we report a fluorescence imaging method for the brain surface and deep brain tissue that uses compact and mass-producible semiconductor imaging devices based on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. An image sensor chip was designed to be inserted into brain tissue, and its size was 1500 × 450 μm. Sample illumination is also a key issue for intravital fluorescence imaging. Hence, for the uniform illumination of the imaging area, we propose a new method involving the epi-illumination of living biological tissues, and we performed investigations using optical simulations and experimental evaluation. PMID:26137364

  14. Cross-Sectional Shape of Rat Mesenteric Arterioles at Branching Studied by Confocal Laser Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Atushi; Minamiyama, Motomu; Niimi, Hideyuki

    This study was aimed to investigate the cross-sectional shape of mesenteric arterioles at branching, using confocal laser microscopy. Wistar rats (8 weeks, male) were anesthetized with thiobutabarbital sodium. Blood flow and microvascular network in the mesentery were observed using video microscopy. The rat intestine with mesentery was extracted and the intestinal vasculature was perfused with Krebs-Ringer and then fixed with paraformaldehyde under a static pressure of 100mmHg. A section of mesentery was isolated from the intestine, and spread up to the in vivo geometry based on the intravital microscopic observation. The mesentery section was stained with tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC)-phalloidin. The samples were observed under a confocal laser microscope. The cross-sectional image was re-sliced to measure the cross-sectional area and major/minor axes of the best fitting ellipse. The aspect ratio was defined in terms of the minor/major diameter ratio. The extended focus image of mesenteric arterioles showed that the cross-sectional shape was not circular but elliptic-like. The cross-sectional area of the parent vessel decreased from proximal to distal positions. The mean aspect ratio of the parent vessel was approximately 0.5, while that of the branching vessel was approximately 0.8. The flattened shape and variation of the cross-sectional area of arterioles requires some correction of in vivo data of the two-dimensional mesenteric microvasculature obtained using intravital microscopy.

  15. Positron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Xu, J.

    1995-02-01

    The negative work function property that some materials have for positrons make possible the development of positron reemission microscopy (PRM). Because of the low energies with which the positrons are emitted, some unique applications, such as the imaging of defects, can be made. The history of the concept of PRM, and its present state of development will be reviewed. The potential of positron microprobe techniques will be discussed also.

  16. SU-E-T-267: Proton Pencil Beam Scanning for Mediastinal Lymphoma: 4-Dimensional Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, C; Plastaras, J; Tochner, Z; Hill-Kayser, C; Hahn, S; Both, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) for the treatment of mediastinal lymphoma. Methods: A group of 6 patients were planned using an anterior field with PBS. Spots with ∼5 mm σ were used for all patients, while large spots (∼10 mm σ) were employed for patients with motion perpendicular to the beam (≥5 mm). We considered volumetric repainting such that, in each fraction, the same field would be delivered twice. Four-dimensional dose was calculated on initial and verification 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans (2—3) based on respiratory trace and beam delivery sequence. This was implemented by binning the spots into separate plans on each 4D-CT phase respectively. Four starting phases were sampled for each painting and 4 energy switching times (0.5 s, 1 s, 3 s, and 5 s) were tested, resulting in 2560 dose distributions for the cohort. Plan robustness was measured for target and critical structures in terms of the percentage difference between delivered dose and planned dose. Results: For 5 of the 6 patients, the ITV (internal target volume) D98% was degraded by <3% (standard deviations ∼ 0.1%) when averaged over the whole course (up to 5% per fraction). Deviations of mean lung dose, heart maximum dose, and cord maximum dose were within 5% of prescribed dose. For one patient with motion perpendicular to the beam (up to 5 mm), the degradation of ITV D98% was 9% over the whole course (12% per fraction), which was mitigated to 1% (3% per fraction) by employing large spots and repainting. No significant difference in coverage was observed for different energy switching times. Conclusion: This feasibility study demonstrates that, for mediastinal lymphoma, the PBS plan robustness can be maintained during delivery when target motion is measured and volumetric repainting and/or large spots are employed. This work was supported by Ion Beam Application.

  17. Visualization and Quantification of Olivine Carbonation Using 4-dimensional Synchrotron Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, T.; Zhu, W.; Lisabeth, H. P.; Fusseis, F.

    2016-12-01

    Olivine carbonation reaction, in which CO2 is chemically incorporated to form carbonate, results in a solid volume increase. It is proposed that the excess solids could fracture the host rock, create new reactive surfaces and propel the reaction to completion. However, how fracturing takes place during reactions is still elusive. We conducted in-situ dynamic microtomography experiments to investigate the evolution of pore structure of olivine aggregate undergoing mineral carbonation. Sintered San Carlos olivine samples with initial porosities of 10-15% were reacted with a NaHCO3 aqueous solution at 200°C, under a constant confining pressure of 15 MPa and pore pressure of 10 MPa. Using the synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography, 3-dimensional pore structure was documented over 7 days without interrupting the reaction. The resulting 4-dimensional (3-dimension + time) dataset permits a detailed investigation of the reaction process at a spatial resolution of 0.65 micron. The data shows that the surface morphology of olivine is constantly changing. At the beginning, a volume reduction of olivine is observed, which is consistent with the vigorous dissolution suggested in other studies. As the reaction proceeds, the growth of idiomorphic magnesite crystals on the surface of the olivine grains becomes easily recognizable. The circumference of magnesite shows a constant growth throughout the experiment, with no indication of self-limiting. Porosity analysis reveals that, after an initial porosity increase of 2-4% (as a consequence of the rapid dissolution), the porosity of the sample interior decreases continuously. In contrast, porosity of surface layers continues to increase or stays constant. This difference indicates a non-uniform precipitation of reaction products within the sample. Such non-uniformity leads to a larger volume expansion of the sample interior. Stretching due to volume mismatch initiates tensile cracks. Crack coalescence to form large fractures and

  18. Management of Respiration-Induced Motion With 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT) for Pancreas Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, An; Liang, Zhiwen; Erickson, Beth; Li, X. Allen

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to quantify respiration-induced organ motions for pancreatic cancer patients and to explore strategies to account for these motions. Methods and Materials: Both 3-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) and 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scans were acquired sequentially for 15 pancreatic cancer patients, including 10 randomly selected patients and 5 patients selected from a subgroup of patients with large tumor respiratory motions. 3DCTs were fused with 2 sets of 4DCT data at the end of exhale phase (50%) and the end of inhale phase (0%). The target was delineated on the 50% and 0% phase CT sets, and the organs at risk were drawn on the 3DCT. These contours were populated to the CT sets at other respiratory phases based on deformable image registration. Internal target volumes (ITV) were generated by tracing the target contours of all phases (ITV{sub 10}), 3 phases of 0%, 20% and 50% (ITV{sub 3}), and 2 phases of 0% and 50% (ITV{sub 2}). ITVs generated from phase images were compared using percentage of volume overlap, Dice coefficient, geometric centers, and average surface distance. Results: Volume variations of pancreas, kidneys, and liver as a function of respiratory phases were small (<5%) during respiration. For the 10 randomly selected patients, peak-to-peak amplitudes of liver, left kidney, right kidney, and the target along the superior-inferior (SI) direction were 7.9 ± 3.2 mm, 7.1 ± 3.1 mm, 5.7 ± 3.2 mm, and 5.9 ± 2.8 mm, respectively. The percentage of volume overlap and Dice coefficient were 92% ± 1% and 96% ± 1% between ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub 2} and 96% ± 1% and 98% ± 1% between ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub 3}, respectively. The percentage of volume overlap between ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub 3} was 93.6 ± 1.1 for patients with tumor motion >8 mm. Conclusions: Appropriate motion management strategies are proposed for radiation treatment planning of pancreatic tumors based on magnitudes of tumor

  19. Modeling Pancreatic Tumor Motion Using 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography and Surrogate Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Huguet, Florence; Yorke, Ellen D.; Davidson, Margaret; Zhang, Zhigang; Jackson, Andrew; Mageras, Gig S.; Wu, Abraham J.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To assess intrafractional positional variations of pancreatic tumors using 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT), their impact on gross tumor volume (GTV) coverage, the reliability of biliary stent, fiducial seeds, and the real-time position management (RPM) external marker as tumor surrogates for setup of respiratory gated treatment, and to build a correlative model of tumor motion. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the respiration-correlated 4D-CT images acquired during simulation of 36 patients with either a biliary stent (n=16) or implanted fiducials (n=20) who were treated with RPM respiratory gated intensity modulated radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Respiratory displacement relative to end-exhalation was measured for the GTV, the biliary stent, or fiducial seeds, and the RPM marker. The results were compared between the full respiratory cycle and the gating interval. Linear mixed model was used to assess the correlation of GTV motion with the potential surrogate markers. Results: The average ± SD GTV excursions were 0.3 ± 0.2 cm in the left-right direction, 0.6 ± 0.3 cm in the anterior-posterior direction, and 1.3 ± 0.7 cm in the superior-inferior direction. Gating around end-exhalation reduced GTV motion by 46% to 60%. D95% was at least the prescribed 56 Gy in 76% of patients. GTV displacement was associated with the RPM marker, the biliary stent, and the fiducial seeds. The correlation was better with fiducial seeds and with biliary stent. Conclusions: Respiratory gating reduced the margin necessary for radiation therapy for pancreatic tumors. GTV motion was well correlated with biliary stent or fiducial seed displacements, validating their use as surrogates for daily assessment of GTV position during treatment. A patient-specific internal target volume based on 4D-CT is recommended both for gated and not-gated treatment; otherwise, our model can be used to predict the degree of GTV motion.

  20. The 4-Dimensional Plant: Effects of Wind-Induced Canopy Movement on Light Fluctuations and Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Alexandra J; Retkute, Renata; Preston, Simon P; Jensen, Oliver E; Pound, Michael P; Pridmore, Tony P; Murchie, Erik H

    2016-01-01

    accurate modeling of mechanical canopy excitation (here coined the 4-dimensional plant) and some associated biological and applied implications of such techniques. We hypothesize that biomechanical plant properties are a specific adaptation to achieve wind-induced photosynthetic enhancement and we outline how traits facilitating canopy excitation could be used as a route for improving crop yield.

  1. High-Quality T2-Weighted 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Radiation Therapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Dongsu; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Low, Daniel A.; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa; Hu, Yanle

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to improve triggering efficiency of the prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4DMRI) method and to develop a 4DMRI imaging protocol that could offer T2 weighting for better tumor visualization, good spatial coverage and spatial resolution, and respiratory motion sampling within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications. Methods and Materials: The respiratory state splitting (RSS) and multi-shot acquisition (MSA) methods were analytically compared and validated in a simulation study by using the respiratory signals from 10 healthy human subjects. The RSS method was more effective in improving triggering efficiency. It was implemented in prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4DMRI. 4DMRI image datasets were acquired from 5 healthy human subjects. Liver motion was estimated using the acquired 4DMRI image datasets. Results: The simulation study showed the RSS method was more effective for improving triggering efficiency than the MSA method. The average reductions in 4DMRI acquisition times were 36% and 10% for the RSS and MSA methods, respectively. The human subject study showed that T2-weighted 4DMRI with 10 respiratory states, 60 slices at a spatial resolution of 1.5 × 1.5 × 3.0 mm{sup 3} could be acquired in 9 to 18 minutes, depending on the individual's breath pattern. Based on the acquired 4DMRI image datasets, the ranges of peak-to-peak liver displacements among 5 human subjects were 9.0 to 12.9 mm, 2.5 to 3.9 mm, and 0.5 to 2.3 mm in superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and left-right directions, respectively. Conclusions: We demonstrated that with the RSS method, it was feasible to acquire high-quality T2-weighted 4DMRI within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications.

  2. Planning 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT) Cannot Adequately Represent Daily Intrafractional Motion of Abdominal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Jiajia; Santanam, Lakshmi; Noel, Camille; Parikh, Parag J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) can adequately represent daily motion of abdominal tumors in regularly fractionated and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) patients. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional tumor motion of 10 patients with abdominal tumors (4 pancreas-fractionated and 6 liver-stereotactic patients) with implanted fiducials was measured based on daily orthogonal fluoroscopic movies over 38 treatment fractions. The needed internal margin for at least 90% of tumor coverage was calculated based on a 95th and fifth percentile of daily 3-dimensional tumor motion. The planning internal margin was generated by fusing 4DCT motion from all phase bins. The disagreement between needed and planning internal margin was analyzed fraction by fraction in 3 motion axes (superior-inferior [SI], anterior-posterior [AP], and left-right [LR]). The 4DCT margin was considered as an overestimation/underestimation of daily motion when disagreement exceeded at least 3 mm in the SI axis and/or 1.2 mm in the AP and LR axes (4DCT image resolution). The underlying reasons for this disagreement were evaluated based on interfractional and intrafractional breathing variation. Results: The 4DCT overestimated daily 3-dimensional motion in 39% of the fractions in 7 of 10 patients and underestimated it in 53% of the fractions in 8 of 10 patients. Median underestimation was 3.9 mm, 3.0 mm, and 1.7 mm in the SI axis, AP axis, and LR axis, respectively. The 4DCT was found to capture irregular deep breaths in 3 of 10 patients, with 4DCT motion larger than mean daily amplitude by 18 to 21 mm. The breathing pattern varied from breath to breath and day to day. The intrafractional variation of amplitude was significantly larger than intrafractional variation (2.7 mm vs 1.3 mm) in the primary motion axis (ie, SI axis). The SBRT patients showed significantly larger intrafractional amplitude variation than fractionated patients (3.0 mm vs 2

  3. Clinical Validation of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Ventilation With Pulmonary Function Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Douglas; Schubert, Leah; Diot, Quentin; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas; Martel, Mary K.; Linderman, Derek; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Miften, Moyed; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: A new form of functional imaging has been proposed in the form of 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation. Because 4DCTs are acquired as part of routine care for lung cancer patients, calculating ventilation maps from 4DCTs provides spatial lung function information without added dosimetric or monetary cost to the patient. Before 4DCT-ventilation is implemented it needs to be clinically validated. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) provide a clinically established way of evaluating lung function. The purpose of our work was to perform a clinical validation by comparing 4DCT-ventilation metrics with PFT data. Methods and Materials: Ninety-eight lung cancer patients with pretreatment 4DCT and PFT data were included in the study. Pulmonary function test metrics used to diagnose obstructive lung disease were recorded: forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and FEV1/forced vital capacity. Four-dimensional CT data sets and spatial registration were used to compute 4DCT-ventilation images using a density change–based and a Jacobian-based model. The ventilation maps were reduced to single metrics intended to reflect the degree of ventilation obstruction. Specifically, we computed the coefficient of variation (SD/mean), ventilation V20 (volume of lung ≤20% ventilation), and correlated the ventilation metrics with PFT data. Regression analysis was used to determine whether 4DCT ventilation data could predict for normal versus abnormal lung function using PFT thresholds. Results: Correlation coefficients comparing 4DCT-ventilation with PFT data ranged from 0.63 to 0.72, with the best agreement between FEV1 and coefficient of variation. Four-dimensional CT ventilation metrics were able to significantly delineate between clinically normal versus abnormal PFT results. Conclusions: Validation of 4DCT ventilation with clinically relevant metrics is essential. We demonstrate good global agreement between PFTs and 4DCT-ventilation, indicating that 4DCT

  4. The 4-Dimensional Plant: Effects of Wind-Induced Canopy Movement on Light Fluctuations and Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Alexandra J.; Retkute, Renata; Preston, Simon P.; Jensen, Oliver E.; Pound, Michael P.; Pridmore, Tony P.; Murchie, Erik H.

    2016-01-01

    accurate modeling of mechanical canopy excitation (here coined the 4-dimensional plant) and some associated biological and applied implications of such techniques. We hypothesize that biomechanical plant properties are a specific adaptation to achieve wind-induced photosynthetic enhancement and we outline how traits facilitating canopy excitation could be used as a route for improving crop yield. PMID:27708654

  5. Clinical validation of 4-dimensional computed tomography ventilation with pulmonary function test data.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Douglas; Schubert, Leah; Diot, Quentin; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas; Martel, Mary K; Linderman, Derek; Gaspar, Laurie E; Miften, Moyed; Kavanagh, Brian D; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy

    2015-06-01

    A new form of functional imaging has been proposed in the form of 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation. Because 4DCTs are acquired as part of routine care for lung cancer patients, calculating ventilation maps from 4DCTs provides spatial lung function information without added dosimetric or monetary cost to the patient. Before 4DCT-ventilation is implemented it needs to be clinically validated. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) provide a clinically established way of evaluating lung function. The purpose of our work was to perform a clinical validation by comparing 4DCT-ventilation metrics with PFT data. Ninety-eight lung cancer patients with pretreatment 4DCT and PFT data were included in the study. Pulmonary function test metrics used to diagnose obstructive lung disease were recorded: forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and FEV1/forced vital capacity. Four-dimensional CT data sets and spatial registration were used to compute 4DCT-ventilation images using a density change-based and a Jacobian-based model. The ventilation maps were reduced to single metrics intended to reflect the degree of ventilation obstruction. Specifically, we computed the coefficient of variation (SD/mean), ventilation V20 (volume of lung ≤20% ventilation), and correlated the ventilation metrics with PFT data. Regression analysis was used to determine whether 4DCT ventilation data could predict for normal versus abnormal lung function using PFT thresholds. Correlation coefficients comparing 4DCT-ventilation with PFT data ranged from 0.63 to 0.72, with the best agreement between FEV1 and coefficient of variation. Four-dimensional CT ventilation metrics were able to significantly delineate between clinically normal versus abnormal PFT results. Validation of 4DCT ventilation with clinically relevant metrics is essential. We demonstrate good global agreement between PFTs and 4DCT-ventilation, indicating that 4DCT-ventilation provides a reliable assessment of lung

  6. Multimodal microscopy of immune cells and melanoma for longitudinal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entenberg, David; Aranda, Iana; Li, Yongbiao; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo; Schaer, David; Li, Yanyun

    2006-02-01

    Intravital microscopy of cancer is a well established tool that provides direct visualization of the tumor cycle. It traditionally involves one of several strategies: invasive subcutaneous (SC) implantation of tumors followed by surgical opening of skin flaps for imaging, techniques utilizing skin fold chambers and implanted optical windows or intradermal injections under 200μm from the skin surface. All of these techniques allow the use of fluorescent proteins as markers for biologically significant constituents. However, observation methods utilizing skin-flaps, skin-fold chambers and optical windows are invasive and tend to alter the immune environment of the tissue and/or limit the duration of studies that can be performed. If implanted correctly, intradermally injected tumors can be minimally invasive, will not require biopsies or surgical intervention to observe and are accessible for direct transdermal imaging with a number of in vivo modalities. We present our work in the development of a small animal intravital microscopy workstation that allows the acquisition of different contrast imaging modalities: reflectance confocal, wide field epifluorescence, multiphoton and second harmonic generation (SHG). The images are acquired pair-wise simultaneously and sequentially in time. The aim of our instrumentation is to gather all information generated by the single probing beam via the reflected or back-scattered signal, SHG signal and various fluorescence signals. Additionally, we also present our development of a microscopic tissue navigation technique to mark, label and track sites of interest. This technique enables us to revisit sites periodically and record, with different imaging contrasts, their biological changes over time.

  7. Visualizing the podocyte with multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Charbel C.; Khayat, Mark F.; Yeo, Tet-Kin; Pyagay, Petr E.; Wang, Amy; Asuncion, Allan M.; Sharma, Kumar; Yu, Weiming; Chen, Sheldon

    2012-01-01

    The podocyte is a highly specialized kidney glomerular epithelial cell that plays an essential role in glomerular filtration and is believed to be the target of numerous glomerular diseases leading to proteinuria. Despite the leaps in our understanding of podocyte biology, new methodologies are needed to facilitate research into the cell. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to image the nephrin knockout/green fluorescent protein (GFP) knock-in heterozygote (Nphs1tm1Rkl/J) mouse. The nephrin promoter restricts GFP expression to the podocytes that fluoresce green under excitation. From the exterior of an intact kidney, MPM can peer into the renal parenchyma and visualize the podocytes that outline the globular shape of the glomeruli. Details as fine as the podocyte’s secondary processes can be resolved. In contrast, podocytes exhibit no fluorescence in the wildtype mouse and are invisible to MPM. Phenotypically, there are no significant differences between wildtype and Nphs1tm1Rkl/J mice in body weight, urinary albumin excretion, creatinine clearance, or glomerular depth. Interestingly, the glomeruli are closer to the kidney capsule in female mice, making the gender the preferred choice for MPM. For the first time, green fluorescent podocytes in a mouse model free of confounding phenotypes can be visualized unequivocally and in the “positive” by MPM, facilitating intravital studies of the podocyte. PMID:23022193

  8. Substrate-Free Self-Assembled SiOx-Core Nanodots from Alkylalkoxysilane as a Multicolor Photoluminescence Source for Intravital Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Ying; Hsieh, Chiung-Wen; Kung, Mei-Lang; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2013-01-01

    Intravital fluorescence imaging has great potential in biological and biomedical research, as it provides the ability to directly observe biological structures and processes in their natural state. Contrast agents for intravital imaging applications should exhibit good biocompatibility, multiphoton fluorescence, and long emission. Carbon nanodots and semiconductor nanocrystals meet these requirements in most cases, with the added benefit that their properties can be ‘tuned' for specific applications by controlling the size and surface chemistry of the nanoparticles. Here, we report on a simple heat-assisted strategy to fabricate SiOx-core self-assembled nanodots using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) materials. Our results demonstrate that substrate-free self-assembled nanodots from alkylalkoxysilane exhibit controllable structural and chemical characteristics that are well suited for applications in biological, biomedical, and clinical research, and may find further use in optoelectronic and sensor devices. PMID:23609156

  9. Intravital imaging of a spheroid-based orthotopic model of melanoma in the mouse ear skin

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Keefe T.; Jones, Stephen W.; Brighton, Hailey E.; Bo, Tao; Cochran, Shelly D.; Sharpless, Norman E.; Bear, James E.

    2017-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a powerful tool that enables the visualization of fluorescently tagged tumor cells and their stromal interactions within tissues in vivo. We have developed an orthotopic model of implanting multicellular melanoma tumor spheroids into the dermis of the mouse ear skin without the requirement for invasive surgery. Here, we demonstrate the utility of this approach to observe the primary tumor, single cell actin dynamics, and tumor-associated vasculature. These methods can be broadly applied to investigate an array of biological questions regarding tumor cell behavior in vivo. PMID:28748125

  10. New techniques for motion-artifact-free in vivo cardiac microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Lee, Sungon; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Intravital imaging microscopy (i.e., imaging in live animals at microscopic resolution) has become an indispensable tool for studying the cellular micro-dynamics in cancer, immunology and neurobiology. High spatial and temporal resolution, combined with large penetration depth and multi-reporter visualization capability make fluorescence intravital microscopy compelling for heart imaging. However, tissue motion caused by cardiac contraction and respiration critically limits its use. As a result, in vitro cell preparations or non-contracting explanted heart models are more commonly employed. Unfortunately, these approaches fall short of understanding the more complex host physiology that may be dynamic and occur over longer periods of time. In this review, we report on novel technologies, which have been recently developed by our group and others, aimed at overcoming motion-induced artifacts and capable of providing in vivo subcellular resolution imaging in the beating mouse heart. The methods are based on mechanical stabilization, image processing algorithms, gated/triggered acquisition schemes or a combination of both. We expect that in the immediate future all these methodologies will have considerable applications in expanding our understanding of the cardiac biology, elucidating cardiomyocyte function and interactions within the organism in vivo, and ultimately improving the treatment of cardiac diseases. PMID:26029116

  11. 4-dimensional functional profiling in the convulsant-treated larval zebrafish brain.

    PubMed

    Winter, Matthew J; Windell, Dylan; Metz, Jeremy; Matthews, Peter; Pinion, Joe; Brown, Jonathan T; Hetheridge, Malcolm J; Ball, Jonathan S; Owen, Stewart F; Redfern, Will S; Moger, Julian; Randall, Andrew D; Tyler, Charles R

    2017-07-26

    Functional neuroimaging, using genetically-encoded Ca(2+) sensors in larval zebrafish, offers a powerful combination of high spatiotemporal resolution and higher vertebrate relevance for quantitative neuropharmacological profiling. Here we use zebrafish larvae with pan-neuronal expression of GCaMP6s, combined with light sheet microscopy and a novel image processing pipeline, for the 4D profiling of chemoconvulsant action in multiple brain regions. In untreated larvae, regions associated with autonomic functionality, sensory processing and stress-responsiveness, consistently exhibited elevated spontaneous activity. The application of drugs targeting different convulsant mechanisms (4-Aminopyridine, Pentylenetetrazole, Pilocarpine and Strychnine) resulted in distinct spatiotemporal patterns of activity. These activity patterns showed some interesting parallels with what is known of the distribution of their respective molecular targets, but crucially also revealed system-wide neural circuit responses to stimulation or suppression. Drug concentration-response curves of neural activity were identified in a number of anatomically-defined zebrafish brain regions, and in vivo larval electrophysiology, also conducted in 4dpf larvae, provided additional measures of neural activity. Our quantification of network-wide chemoconvulsant drug activity in the whole zebrafish brain illustrates the power of this approach for neuropharmacological profiling in applications ranging from accelerating studies of drug safety and efficacy, to identifying pharmacologically-altered networks in zebrafish models of human neurological disorders.

  12. Intravital imaging of mouse colonic adenoma using MMP-based molecular probes with multi-channel fluorescence endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Oh, Gyungseok; Yoo, Su Woong; Jung, Yebin; Ryu, Yeon-Mi; Park, Youngrong; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Kim, Ki Hean; Kim, Sungjee; Myung, Seung-Jae; Chung, Euiheon

    2014-05-01

    Intravital imaging has provided molecular, cellular and anatomical insight into the study of tumor. Early detection and treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases can be enhanced with specific molecular markers and endoscopic imaging modalities. We present a wide-field multi-channel fluorescence endoscope to screen GI tract for colon cancer using multiple molecular probes targeting matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) conjugated with quantum dots (QD) in AOM/DSS mouse model. MMP9 and MMP14 antibody (Ab)-QD conjugates demonstrate specific binding to colonic adenoma. The average target-to-background (T/B) ratios are 2.10 ± 0.28 and 1.78 ± 0.18 for MMP14 Ab-QD and MMP9 Ab-QD, respectively. The overlap between the two molecular probes is 67.7 ± 8.4%. The presence of false negative indicates that even more number of targeting could increase the sensitivity of overall detection given heterogeneous molecular expression in tumors. Our approach indicates potential for the screening of small or flat lesions that are precancerous.

  13. The mechanism of anti-CD20–mediated B cell depletion revealed by intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Montalvao, Fabricio; Garcia, Zacarias; Celli, Susanna; Breart, Béatrice; Deguine, Jacques; Van Rooijen, Nico; Bousso, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Anti-CD20 Ab therapy has proven successful for treating B cell malignancies and a number of autoimmune diseases. However, how anti-CD20 Abs operate in vivo to mediate B cell depletion is not fully understood. In particular, the anatomical location, the type of effector cells, and the mechanism underlying anti-CD20 therapy remain uncertain. Here, we found that the liver is a major site for B cell depletion and that recirculation accounts for the decrease in B cell numbers observed in secondary lymphoid organs. Using intravital imaging, we established that, upon anti-CD20 treatment, Kupffer cells (KCs) mediate the abrupt arrest and subsequent engulfment of B cells circulating in the liver sinusoids. KCs were also effective in depleting malignant B cells in a model of spontaneous lymphoma. Our results identify Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis by KCs as a primary mechanism of anti-CD20 therapy and provide an experimental framework for optimizing the efficacy of therapeutic Abs. PMID:24177426

  14. Intravital imaging of mouse colonic adenoma using MMP-based molecular probes with multi-channel fluorescence endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gyungseok; Yoo, Su Woong; Jung, Yebin; Ryu, Yeon-Mi; Park, Youngrong; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Kim, Ki Hean; Kim, Sungjee; Myung, Seung-Jae; Chung, Euiheon

    2014-01-01

    Intravital imaging has provided molecular, cellular and anatomical insight into the study of tumor. Early detection and treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases can be enhanced with specific molecular markers and endoscopic imaging modalities. We present a wide-field multi-channel fluorescence endoscope to screen GI tract for colon cancer using multiple molecular probes targeting matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) conjugated with quantum dots (QD) in AOM/DSS mouse model. MMP9 and MMP14 antibody (Ab)-QD conjugates demonstrate specific binding to colonic adenoma. The average target-to-background (T/B) ratios are 2.10 ± 0.28 and 1.78 ± 0.18 for MMP14 Ab-QD and MMP9 Ab-QD, respectively. The overlap between the two molecular probes is 67.7 ± 8.4%. The presence of false negative indicates that even more number of targeting could increase the sensitivity of overall detection given heterogeneous molecular expression in tumors. Our approach indicates potential for the screening of small or flat lesions that are precancerous. PMID:24877024

  15. Intravital imaging of the cellular dynamics of LysM-positive cells in a murine corneal suture model.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Mayumi; Koga, Ayaka; Kikuta, Junichi; Yamada, Keiko; Kojima, Sachi; Shinomiya, Katsuhiko; Ishii, Masaru; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2016-03-01

    Corneal suturing is a surgical procedure used in patients with corneal trauma or transplants. It was reported that endogenous neutrophils are brightly labelled in gene-targeted mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under the control of the endogenous lysozyme M promoter (LysM-eGFP mice). We applied intravital imaging methods to analyse in vivo the dynamics of LysM-positive granulocytes (neutrophils) in LysM-eGFP mice with corneal sutures and examined their role in the elicitation of neutrophil infiltration. We found that in the presuturing state, neutrophils strongly positive for LysM were located in the periphery of the corneal stromal layer; none were present in the centre of the cornea. After introducing a corneal suture, neutrophils accumulated in limbal vessels and then migrated to the corneal side and the conjunctival side, suggesting that they derived from limbal vessels. Thereafter they accumulated towards the central corneal area, arriving at the suture about 7 h after its placement. Although corneal sutures may elicit the continuous infiltration of neutrophils, their number was markedly decreased by day 1 after suture removal and continued to decrease thereafter. Our results showed that corneal sutures may elicit the continuous infiltration of neutrophils. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Differential Mechanisms Associated with Vascular Disrupting Action of Electrochemotherapy: Intravital Microscopy on the Level of Single Normal and Tumor Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Markelc, Bostjan; Sersa, Gregor; Cemazar, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Electropermeabilization/electroporation (EP) provides a tool for the introduction of molecules into cells and tissues. In electrochemotherapy (ECT), cytotoxic drugs are introduced into cells in tumors, and nucleic acids are introduced into cells in gene electrotransfer. The normal and tumor tissue blood flow modifying effects of EP and the vascular disrupting effect of ECT in tumors have already been determined. However, differential effects between normal vs. tumor vessels, to ensure safety in the clinical application of ECT, have not been determined yet. Therefore, the aim of our study was to determine the effects of EP and ECT with bleomycin on the HT-29 human colon carcinoma tumor model and its surrounding blood vessels. The response of blood vessels to EP and ECT was monitored in real time, directly at the single blood vessel level, by in vivo optical imaging in a dorsal window chamber in SCID mice with 70 kDa fluorescently labeled dextrans. The response of tumor blood vessels to EP and ECT started to differ within the first hour. Both therapies induced a vascular lock, decreased functional vascular density (FVD) and increased the diameter of functional blood vessels within the tumor. The effects were more pronounced for ECT, which destroyed the tumor blood vessels within 24 h. Although the vasculature surrounding the tumor was affected by EP and ECT, it remained functional. The study confirms the current model of tumor blood flow modifying effects of EP and provides conclusive evidence that ECT is a vascular disrupting therapy with a specific effect on the tumor blood vessels. PMID:23555705

  17. Differential mechanisms associated with vascular disrupting action of electrochemotherapy: intravital microscopy on the level of single normal and tumor blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Markelc, Bostjan; Sersa, Gregor; Cemazar, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Electropermeabilization/electroporation (EP) provides a tool for the introduction of molecules into cells and tissues. In electrochemotherapy (ECT), cytotoxic drugs are introduced into cells in tumors, and nucleic acids are introduced into cells in gene electrotransfer. The normal and tumor tissue blood flow modifying effects of EP and the vascular disrupting effect of ECT in tumors have already been determined. However, differential effects between normal vs. tumor vessels, to ensure safety in the clinical application of ECT, have not been determined yet. Therefore, the aim of our study was to determine the effects of EP and ECT with bleomycin on the HT-29 human colon carcinoma tumor model and its surrounding blood vessels. The response of blood vessels to EP and ECT was monitored in real time, directly at the single blood vessel level, by in vivo optical imaging in a dorsal window chamber in SCID mice with 70 kDa fluorescently labeled dextrans. The response of tumor blood vessels to EP and ECT started to differ within the first hour. Both therapies induced a vascular lock, decreased functional vascular density (FVD) and increased the diameter of functional blood vessels within the tumor. The effects were more pronounced for ECT, which destroyed the tumor blood vessels within 24 h. Although the vasculature surrounding the tumor was affected by EP and ECT, it remained functional. The study confirms the current model of tumor blood flow modifying effects of EP and provides conclusive evidence that ECT is a vascular disrupting therapy with a specific effect on the tumor blood vessels.

  18. In vivo longitudinal visualization of bone marrow engraftment process in mouse calvaria using two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Le, Viet-Hoan; Lee, Seunghun; Lee, Seungwon; Wang, Taejun; Hyuk Jang, Won; Yoon, Yeoreum; Kwon, Soonjae; Kim, Hyekang; Lee, Seung-Woo; Hean Kim, Ki

    2017-03-09

    Intravital microscopy of mouse calvarial bone marrow (BM) is a powerful method for studying hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and the BM microenvironment at the cellular level. However, the current method used to access the mouse calvaria allows for only a few imaging times in the same mouse because of scar formation and inflammation induced by multiple surgeries. Longitudinal imaging of the BM may help better understand its microenvironment. In this study, a mouse calvarial window model was developed for longitudinal imaging that involves attaching a cover glass window onto the mouse calvaria and sealing the surrounding exposed area with cyanoacrylate glue and dental cement. The model was used for the longitudinal two-photon microscopy (TPM) imaging of the BM engraftment process. The same BM cavity sites were imaged multiple times over 4 weeks after BM transplantation (BMT). Temporal changes in the BM microenvironment, such as the reconstitution of transplanted BM cells and the recovery of vasculature, were observed and analysed qualitatively and quantitatively. Longitudinal intravital microscopy using the mouse calvarial window model was successfully demonstrated and may be useful for further BM studies.

  19. In vivo longitudinal visualization of bone marrow engraftment process in mouse calvaria using two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Le, Viet-Hoan; Lee, Seunghun; Lee, Seungwon; Wang, Taejun; Hyuk Jang, Won; Yoon, Yeoreum; Kwon, Soonjae; Kim, Hyekang; Lee, Seung-Woo; Hean Kim, Ki

    2017-01-01

    Intravital microscopy of mouse calvarial bone marrow (BM) is a powerful method for studying hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and the BM microenvironment at the cellular level. However, the current method used to access the mouse calvaria allows for only a few imaging times in the same mouse because of scar formation and inflammation induced by multiple surgeries. Longitudinal imaging of the BM may help better understand its microenvironment. In this study, a mouse calvarial window model was developed for longitudinal imaging that involves attaching a cover glass window onto the mouse calvaria and sealing the surrounding exposed area with cyanoacrylate glue and dental cement. The model was used for the longitudinal two-photon microscopy (TPM) imaging of the BM engraftment process. The same BM cavity sites were imaged multiple times over 4 weeks after BM transplantation (BMT). Temporal changes in the BM microenvironment, such as the reconstitution of transplanted BM cells and the recovery of vasculature, were observed and analysed qualitatively and quantitatively. Longitudinal intravital microscopy using the mouse calvarial window model was successfully demonstrated and may be useful for further BM studies. PMID:28276477

  20. All ASD complex and real 4-dimensional Einstein spaces with Λ≠0 admitting a nonnull Killing vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudecki, Adam

    2016-12-01

    Anti-self-dual (ASD) 4-dimensional complex Einstein spaces with nonzero cosmological constant Λ equipped with a nonnull Killing vector are considered. It is shown that any conformally nonflat metric of such spaces can be always brought to a special form and the Einstein field equations can be reduced to the Boyer-Finley-Plebański equation (Toda field equation). Some alternative forms of the metric are discussed. All possible real slices (neutral, Euclidean and Lorentzian) of ASD complex Einstein spaces with Λ≠0 admitting a nonnull Killing vector are found.

  1. Intravital Confocal and Two-photon Imaging of Dual-color Cells and Extracellular Matrix Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Ufuk; Andresen, Volker; Baggett, Brenda; Utzinger, Urs

    2013-01-01

    To optimize imaging of cells in three dimensional culture we studied confocal backscattering, Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and autofluorescence as source of contrast in extracellular matrix (ECM) mimics and evaluated the attenuation as well as bleaching of endogenous cellular fluorescence signals. All common ECM mimics exhibit contrast observable with confocal reflectance microscopy. SHG imaging on collagen I based hydrogels provides high contrast and good optical penetration depth. Agarose is a useful embedding medium because it allows for large optical penetration and exhibits minimal autofluorescence while still providing good reflectance to detect voids in the embedding medium. We labeled breast cancer cells’ outline with DsRed2 and nucleus with eGFP. DsRed2 can be excited with confocal imaging at 568nm, and with two photon excitation (TPE) in the red and longer NIR. eGFP was excited at 488nm for confocal and in the NIR for TPE. While there is small difference in the bleaching rate for eGFP between confocal and TPE we observed significant difference for DsRed2 where bleaching is strongest during TPE in the red wavelengths and smallest during confocal imaging. After a few hundred microns depth in a collagen I hydrogel, TPE fluorescence becomes twice as strong compared to confocal imaging. PMID:23380006

  2. Noninvasive intravital cellular diagnosis of atopic dermatitis by using harmonic optical virtual biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Szu-Yu; Lee, Jyh-Hong; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2007-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is now very common in people who live in cities, especially for babies and children. Since the cause of AD is still not completely understood and each person may have his own mixed symptoms that can change over time, diagnosis of AD can not be done precisely. Unlike some skin diseases, physical biopsy is rarely used in diagnosing AD on account of its low urgency. Thus, only indirect diagnoses, like asking for a medical history to learn about the symptoms and to rule out other diseases can be carried out. To gain insight into cellular details of AD for long-term diagnosing without physical biopsy, a noninvasive in vivo tool with a sub-micron subsurface resolution and high penetrability has to be used. In this presentation, we show that harmonic optical virtual biopsy can provide the required noninvasive cellular imaging, and is ideal for future clinical diagnosis of AD. Harmonic optical microscopy has been demonstrated to have the capability to reveal cellular morphology of human skin from epidermis to dermis layer. Third harmonic generation (THG), which is sensitive to inhomogeneous interfaces, can show the structures of skins, and can be used to reveal the morphological changes, for example, the thicken cuticle which is a common symptom of AD. Second harmonic generation (SHG), which occurs in non-centrosymmetric structures, has excellent contrast in collagen fibers and can show the pathological changes of dermis layer. Utilizing both THG and SHG, useful information may be given to facilitate the diagnosis of AD.

  3. Microcirculatory effects of a homeopathic preparation in patients with mild vertigo: an intravital microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Klopp, R; Niemer, W; Weiser, M

    2005-01-01

    The effects of the homeopathic preparation Vertigoheel on variables related to microcirculation were investigated using vital microscopy techniques in patients with vestibular vertigo. In a non-randomized, open study, 16 patients given Vertigoheel were compared with 16 untreated patients. Measurements were carried out in two areas (defined by selecting 60 blood-cell perfused nodal points of arterioles, venules, and capillaries with a mean diameter > or = 40 microm): the cuticulum/subcuticulum of the inside left lower arm and an area 5 mm behind the left earlobe. After 12 weeks of treatment, patients receiving the homeopathic preparation exhibited an increased number of nodal points, increased flow rates of erythrocytes in both arterioles and venules, increased vasomotion, and a slight reduction in hematocrit vs. baseline. None of these changes were observed in the control group and the differences between treatment groups were statistically significant. Partial oxygen pressure increased significantly in the Vertigoheel group compared with the control group. In addition, in Vertigoheel patients, significantly increased numbers of cell-wall adhering leucocytes were observed, accompanied by increased local concentrations of the adhesion molecules ICAM-1. The microcirculatory changes were associated with a reduction in the severity of vertigo in the actively treated patients, both as assessed by the treating physician and by the patients themselves. The data support a pharmacological effect on microcirculation from the treatment.

  4. Characterization of tumor microvascular structure and permeability: comparison between magnetic resonance imaging and intravital confocal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitan, Nina Kristine; Thuen, Marte; Goa, Pa˚L. Erik; de Lange Davies, Catharina

    2010-05-01

    Solid tumors are characterized by abnormal blood vessel organization, structure, and function. These abnormalities give rise to enhanced vascular permeability and may predict therapeutic responses. The permeability and architecture of the microvasculature in human osteosarcoma tumors growing in dorsal window chambers in athymic mice were measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Dextran (40 kDa) and Gadomer were used as molecular tracers for CLSM and DCE-MRI, respectively. A significant correlation was found between permeability indicators. The extravasation rate Ki as measured by CLSM correlated positively with DCE-MRI parameters, such as the volume transfer constant Ktrans and the initial slope of the contrast agent concentration-time curve. This demonstrates that these two techniques give complementary information. Extravasation was further related to microvascular structure and was found to correlate with the fractal dimension and vascular density. The structural parameter values that were obtained from CLSM images were higher for abnormal tumor vasculature than for normal vessels.

  5. In vivo imaging of the tumor and its associated microenvironment using combined CARS / 2-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Martin; Downes, Andy; Chau, You-Ying; Serrels, Bryan; Hastie, Nick; Elfick, Alistair; Brunton, Valerie; Frame, Margaret; Serrels, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The use of confocal and multi-photon microscopy for intra-vital cancer imaging has impacted on our understanding of cancer cell behavior and interaction with the surrounding tumor microenvironment in vivo. However, many studies to-date rely on the use fluorescent dyes or genetically encoded probes that enable visualization of a structure or cell population of interest, but do not illuminate the complexity of the surrounding tumor microenvironment. Here, we show that multi-modal microscopy combining 2-photon fluorescence with CARS can begin to address this deficit, enabling detailed imaging of the tumor niche without the need for additional labeling. This can be performed on live tumor-bearing animals through optical observation windows, permitting real-time and longitudinal imaging of dynamic processes within the tumor niche. PMID:28243514

  6. Spatiotemporal Analyses of Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis via Intravital Imaging in Cranial Bone Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunlan; Ness, Vincent P.; Yang, Xiaochuan; Chen, Hongli; Luo, Jiebo; Brown, Edward B; Zhang, Xinping

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis and angiogenesis are two integrated components in bone repair and regeneration. A deeper understanding of osteogenesis and angiogenesis has been hampered by technical difficulties of analyzing bone and neovasculature simultaneously in spatiotemporal scales and in three-dimensional formats. To overcome these barriers, a cranial defect window chamber model was established that enabled high-resolution, longitudinal, and real-time tracking of angiogenesis and bone defect healing via Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy (MPLSM). By simultaneously probing new bone matrix via second harmonic generation (SHG), neovascular networks via intravenous perfusion of fluorophore, and osteoblast differentiation via 2.3kb collagen type I promoter driven GFP (Col2.3GFP), we examined the morphogenetic sequence of cranial bone defect healing and further established the spatiotemporal analyses of osteogenesis and angiogenesis coupling in repair and regeneration. We demonstrated that bone defect closure was initiated in the residual bone around the edge of the defect. The expansion and migration of osteoprogenitors into the bone defect occurred during the first 3 weeks of healing, coupled with vigorous microvessel angiogenesis at the leading edge of the defect. Subsequent bone repair was marked by matrix deposition and active vascular network remodeling within new bone. Implantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) isolated from Col2.3GFP mice further showed that donor-dependent bone formation occurred rapidly within the first 3 weeks of implantation, in concert with early angiogenesis. The subsequent bone wound closure was largely host-dependent, associated with localized modest induction of angiogenesis. The establishment of a live imaging platform via cranial window provides a unique tool to understand osteogenesis and angiogenesis in repair and regeneration, enabling further elucidation of the spatiotemporal regulatory mechanisms of osteoprogenitor cell interactions

  7. Defining the quantitative limits of intravital two-photon lymphocyte tracking

    PubMed Central

    Textor, Johannes; Peixoto, Antonio; Henrickson, Sarah E.; Sinn, Mathieu; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Westermann, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy has substantially advanced our understanding of cellular dynamics in the immune system. Cell migration can now be imaged in real time in the living animal. Strikingly, the migration of naive lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid tissue appears predominantly random. It is unclear, however, whether directed migration may escape detection in this random background. Using a combination of mathematical modeling and experimental data, we investigate the extent to which modern two-photon imaging can rule out biologically relevant directed migration. For naive T cells migrating in uninfected lymph nodes (LNs) at average 3D speeds of around 18 μm/min, we rule out uniform directed migration of more than 1.7 μm/min at the 95% confidence level, confirming that T cell migration is indeed mostly random on a timescale of minutes. To investigate whether this finding still holds for longer timescales, we use a 3D simulation of the naive T cell LN transit. A pure random walk predicts a transit time of around 16 h, which is in good agreement with experimental results. A directional bias of only 0.5 μm/min—less than 3% of the cell speed—would already accelerate the transit twofold. These results jointly strengthen the random walk analogy for naive T cell migration in LNs, but they also emphasize that very small deviations from random migration can still be important. Our methods are applicable to cells of any type and can be used to reanalyze existing datasets. PMID:21734152

  8. Intravital Förster resonance energy transfer imaging reveals osteopontin-mediated polymorphonuclear leukocyte activation by tumor cell emboli.

    PubMed

    Kamioka, Yuji; Takakura, Kanako; Sumiyama, Kenta; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2017-02-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) cause paraneoplastic leukemoid reactions and facilitate tumor cell metastasis. However, the interaction of MDSCs with tumor cells in live tissue has not been adequately visualized. To accomplish this task, we developed an intravital imaging protocol to observe metastasized tumor cells in mouse lungs. For visualization of the activation of MDSCs, bone marrow cells derived from transgenic mice expressing a Förster resonance energy transfer biosensor for ERK were implanted into host mice. Under a two-photon excitation microscope, numerous polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) were found to infiltrate the lungs of tumor-bearing mice in which 4T1 mammary tumor cells were implanted into the footpads. By Förster resonance energy transfer imaging, we found ERK activation in PMNs around the 4T1 tumor emboli in the lungs. Because antibody array analysis implied the involvement of osteopontin (OPN) in the metastasis of 4T1 cells, we further analyzed the effect of OPN knockdown. The OPN knockdown in 4T1 cells did not affect the cell growth, but markedly suppressed lung metastasis of 4T1 cells and ERK activation in PMNs in the lung. Intravenous injection of recombinant OPN restored the lung metastasis of OPN-deficient 4T1 cells, suggesting that OPN functioned in a paracrine manner. It has been reported that ERK activation of neutrophils causes NETosis and that PMNs promote metastasis of tumor cells by NETosis. In agreement with previous reports, the NETosis inhibitor DNase I inhibited lung metastasis of 4T1 cells. These observations suggest that OPN promotes metastasis of 4T1 cells by activating PMNs and inducing NETosis. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  9. Improved estimates of the dynamical state of the North Pacific Ocean from a 4 dimensional variational data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Shuhei; Awaji, Toshiyuki; Sugiura, Nozomi; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Baba, Kinji; Horiuchi, Kazutoshi; Komori, Nobumasa

    2003-08-01

    A 4-dimensional variational data assimilation system has been used to better define the mean seasonal state of the North Pacific. The synthesis of available observational records and a sophisticated general circulation model produces a dynamically consistent time-varying dataset which exhibits realistic features of the global ocean circulation and requires no artificial sources or sinks for the temperature and salinity fields. The dataset enables us to clarify the water mass formation and movement processes. A sensitivity experiment using our system reveals that the origin of the North Pacific Intermediate Water can be traced back to the Okhotsk and Bering Seas in the subarctic region and to the subtropical Kuroshio region further south, consistent with recent observational findings. This result illustrates that the ocean state derived from our data assimilation has greater information and forecast potential than that obtained from earlier methods.

  10. Utilization of 4-Dimensional Data Visualization Modeling to Evaluate Burial Ground Contaminants at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Brindley, T. L.; Tarantino, J. J.; Locke, A. L.; Dollins, D. W.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes how 4-Dimensional (4D) Data Visualization Modeling was used to evaluate historical data and to help guide the decisions for the sampling necessary to complete a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for the burial ground sites at the Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). DOE at the Paducah Site is primarily involved in environmental cleanup and landlord activities. The scope of this project was to prepare a work plan for identifying the data available and the data required to conduct an RI/FS for the Burial Ground Operable Unit (BGOU) located within and near PGDP. The work plan focuses on collecting existing information about contamination in and around the burial grounds and determining what additional data are required to support an assessment of risks to human health and the environment and to support future decisions regarding actions to reduce these risks. (authors)

  11. Intravital imaging of Ca2+ signals in lymphocytes of Ca2+ biosensor transgenic mice: indication of autoimmune diseases before the pathological onset

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Soichiro; Usami, Takako; Kikuta, Junichi; Ishii, Masaru; Sasano, Tetsuo; Sugiyama, Koji; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Nakasho, Eiji; Takayanagi, Hiroshi; Tedder, Thomas F.; Karasuyama, Hajime; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Adachi, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ion (Ca2+) signaling is a typical phenomenon mediated through immune receptors, such as the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR), and it is important for their biological activities. To analyze the signaling of immune receptors together with their in vivo dynamics, we generated stable transgenic mice with the Föster/fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based Ca2+ indicator yellow cameleon 3.60 (YC3.60), based on the Cre/loxP system (YC3.60flox). We successfully obtained mice with specific YC3.60 expression in immune or nerve cells as well as mice with ubiquitous expression of this indicator. We established five-dimensional (5D) (x, y, z, time, and Ca2+) intravital imaging of lymphoid tissues, including the bone marrow. Furthermore, in autoimmune-prone models, the CD22−/− and C57BL/6- lymphoproliferation (lpr)/lpr mouse, Ca2+ fluxes were augmented, although they did not induce autoimmune disease. Intravital imaging of Ca2+ signals in lymphocytes may improve assessment of the risk of autoimmune diseases in model animals. PMID:26732477

  12. Bridging fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Development of new fluorescent probes and fluorescence microscopes has led to new ways to study cell biology. With the emergence of specialized microscopy units at most universities and research centers, the use of these techniques is well within reach for a broad research community. A major breakthrough in fluorescence microscopy in biology is the ability to follow specific targets on or in living cells, revealing dynamic localization and/or function of target molecules. One of the inherent limitations of fluorescence microscopy is the resolution. Several efforts are undertaken to overcome this limit. The traditional and most well-known way to achieve higher resolution imaging is by electron microscopy. Moreover, electron microscopy reveals organelles, membranes, macromolecules, and thus aids in the understanding of cellular complexity and localization of molecules of interest in relation to other structures. With the new probe development, a solid bridge between fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy is being built, even leading to correlative imaging. This connection provides several benefits, both scientifically as well as practically. Here, I summarize recent developments in bridging microscopy. PMID:18575880

  13. Understanding the relationship between image quality and motion velocity in gated computed tomography: preliminary work for 4-dimensional musculoskeletal imaging.

    PubMed

    Tay, Shian Chao; Primak, Andrew N; Fletcher, Joel G; Schmidt, Bernhard; An, Kai-Nan; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2008-01-01

    To study the effect of motion velocity on image quality to determine the requirements for 4-dimensional (4D; ie, 3D + time) musculoskeletal computed tomographic (CT) imaging. A phantom with resolution targets in both axial (x-y) and coronal (x-z) planes was attached to a motion device and scanned with 64-slice CT using a retrospectively gated CT protocol with pitch values of 0.1 and 0.2. Data were acquired with the phantom at rest and while moving periodically along the x axis at several velocities. Spatial resolution and motion artifacts were assessed both for the axial and coronal targets. A linear relationship was found between motion artifact severity and phantom velocity. Spatial resolution was better preserved in the coronal target. However, coronal images displayed banding artifacts, with band displacements being linearly related to motion velocity. The 4D CT imaging of periodically moving objects with velocities up to 20 mm/s is feasible using a pitch value of 0.1 and a motion frequency of 30 cycles per minute.

  14. Comparative Assessment of Liver Tumor Motion Using Cine–Magnetic Resonance Imaging Versus 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Apisarnthanarax, Smith; Yin, Lingshu; Zou, Wei; Rosen, Mark; Plastaras, John P.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Metz, James M.; Teo, Boon-Keng

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the extent of tumor motion between 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) and cine-MRI in patients with hepatic tumors treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with liver tumors who underwent 4DCT and 2-dimensional biplanar cine-MRI scans during simulation were retrospectively reviewed to determine the extent of target motion in the superior–inferior, anterior–posterior, and lateral directions. Cine-MRI was performed over 5 minutes. Tumor motion from MRI was determined by tracking the centroid of the gross tumor volume using deformable image registration. Motion estimates from 4DCT were performed by evaluation of the fiducial, residual contrast (or liver contour) positions in each CT phase. Results: Sixteen patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (n=11), cholangiocarcinoma (n=3), and liver metastasis (n=2) were reviewed. Cine-MRI motion was larger than 4DCT for the superior–inferior direction in 50% of patients by a median of 3.0 mm (range, 1.5-7 mm), the anterior–posterior direction in 44% of patients by a median of 2.5 mm (range, 1-5.5 mm), and laterally in 63% of patients by a median of 1.1 mm (range, 0.2-4.5 mm). Conclusions: Cine-MRI frequently detects larger differences in hepatic intrafraction tumor motion when compared with 4DCT most notably in the superior–inferior direction, and may be useful when assessing the need for or treating without respiratory management, particularly in patients with unreliable 4DCT imaging. Margins wider than the internal target volume as defined by 4DCT were required to encompass nearly all the motion detected by cine-MRI for some of the patients in this study.

  15. Determination of Internal Target Volume for Radiation Treatment Planning of Esophageal Cancer by Using 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaojian; Lu, Haijun; Tai, An; Johnstone, Candice; Gore, Elizabeth; Li, X. Allen

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To determine an efficient strategy for the generation of the internal target volume (ITV) for radiation treatment planning for esophageal cancer using 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Methods and Materials: 4DCT sets acquired for 20 patients with esophageal carcinoma were analyzed. Each of the 4DCT sets was binned into 10 respiratory phases. For each patient, the gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated on the 4DCT set at each phase. Various strategies to derive ITV were explored, including the volume from the maximum intensity projection (MIP; ITV{sub M}IP), unions of the GTVs from selected multiple phases ITV2 (0% and 50% phases), ITV3 (ITV2 plus 80%), and ITV4 (ITV3 plus 60%), as well as the volumes expanded from ITV2 and ITV3 with a uniform margin. These ITVs were compared to ITV10 (the union of the GTVs for all 10 phases) and the differences were measured with the overlap ratio (OR) and relative volume ratio (RVR) relative to ITV10 (ITVx/ITV10). Results: For all patients studied, the average GTV from a single phase was 84.9% of ITV10. The average ORs were 91.2%, 91.3%, 94.5%, and 96.4% for ITV{sub M}IP, ITV2, ITV3, and ITV4, respectively. Low ORs were associated with irregular breathing patterns. ITV3s plus 1 mm uniform margins (ITV3+1) led to an average OR of 98.1% and an average RVR of 106.4%. Conclusions: The ITV generated directly from MIP underestimates the range of the respiration motion for esophageal cancer. The ITV generated from 3 phases (ITV3) may be used for regular breathers, whereas the ITV generated from 4 phases (ITV4) or ITV3 plus a 1-mm uniform margin may be applied for irregular breathers.

  16. Levator hiatus dimensions in late pregnancy and the process of labor: a 3- and 4-dimensional transperineal ultrasound study.

    PubMed

    Siafarikas, Franziska; Stær-Jensen, Jette; Hilde, Gunvor; Bø, Kari; Ellström Engh, Marie

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of the investigation were to study the association between levator hiatus dimensions in late pregnancy and both the length of second stage of labor and also the delivery mode in women delivering their first child. In this cohort study, 231 nulliparous women were examined with 3- and 4-dimensional transperineal ultrasonography at 37 weeks of gestation. The anteroposterior, transverse diameter, and the area of levator hiatus were measured at rest, during levator ani muscle contraction, and during Valsalva maneuver. The second stage of labor was divided into passive and active second stage and delivery modes into normal vaginal or instrumental deliveries. Spearman correlation coefficient, independent-sample t test, and standard logistic regression were used for analysis. Larger levator hiatus dimensions at rest and during contraction at 37 weeks of gestation correlated with a shorter duration of the active second stage in women with normal vaginal delivery (Spearman correlation coefficient, -0.13 to -0.35, P ≤ .08). Women having normal vaginal deliveries had significantly larger transverse diameter at rest, during contraction, and during Valsalva maneuver compared with women having instrumental deliveries (mean difference, 0.29; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.16-0.41; mean difference, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.21-0.44 and mean difference, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.06-0.42; P < .05). The same was true for the levator hiatus area at rest and during contraction (mean difference, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.37-2.07 and mean difference, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.22-1.46; P < .01). These estimates were unchanged by adjustments in the logistic regression analysis. Larger levator hiatus dimensions in late pregnancy had a significant association with a shorter active second stage of labor and normal vaginal delivery. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative assessment of liver tumor motion using cine-magnetic resonance imaging versus 4-dimensional computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Annemarie T; Apisarnthanarax, Smith; Yin, Lingshu; Zou, Wei; Rosen, Mark; Plastaras, John P; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Metz, James M; Teo, Boon-Keng

    2015-04-01

    To compare the extent of tumor motion between 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) and cine-MRI in patients with hepatic tumors treated with radiation therapy. Patients with liver tumors who underwent 4DCT and 2-dimensional biplanar cine-MRI scans during simulation were retrospectively reviewed to determine the extent of target motion in the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and lateral directions. Cine-MRI was performed over 5 minutes. Tumor motion from MRI was determined by tracking the centroid of the gross tumor volume using deformable image registration. Motion estimates from 4DCT were performed by evaluation of the fiducial, residual contrast (or liver contour) positions in each CT phase. Sixteen patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (n=11), cholangiocarcinoma (n=3), and liver metastasis (n=2) were reviewed. Cine-MRI motion was larger than 4DCT for the superior-inferior direction in 50% of patients by a median of 3.0 mm (range, 1.5-7 mm), the anterior-posterior direction in 44% of patients by a median of 2.5 mm (range, 1-5.5 mm), and laterally in 63% of patients by a median of 1.1 mm (range, 0.2-4.5 mm). Cine-MRI frequently detects larger differences in hepatic intrafraction tumor motion when compared with 4DCT most notably in the superior-inferior direction, and may be useful when assessing the need for or treating without respiratory management, particularly in patients with unreliable 4DCT imaging. Margins wider than the internal target volume as defined by 4DCT were required to encompass nearly all the motion detected by cine-MRI for some of the patients in this study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dictionary of Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Julian

    2005-10-01

    The past decade has seen huge advances in the application of microscopy in all areas of science. This welcome development in microscopy has been paralleled by an expansion of the vocabulary of technical terms used in microscopy: terms have been coined for new instruments and techniques and, as microscopes reach even higher resolution, the use of terms that relate to the optical and physical principles underpinning microscopy is now commonplace. The Dictionary of Microscopy was compiled to meet this challenge and provides concise definitions of over 2,500 terms used in the fields of light microscopy, electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, x-ray microscopy and related techniques. Written by Dr Julian P. Heath, Editor of Microscopy and Analysis, the dictionary is intended to provide easy navigation through the microscopy terminology and to be a first point of reference for definitions of new and established terms. The Dictionary of Microscopy is an essential, accessible resource for: students who are new to the field and are learning about microscopes equipment purchasers who want an explanation of the terms used in manufacturers' literature scientists who are considering using a new microscopical technique experienced microscopists as an aide mémoire or quick source of reference librarians, the press and marketing personnel who require definitions for technical reports.

  19. Basic confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carolyn L

    2011-07-01

    This unit introduces the reader to the basic principles of confocal microscopy and the design and capabilities of current confocal microscopes. The advantages and disadvantages of confocal microscopy compared to other techniques for fluorescence imaging are described. There are also practical guidelines for sample preparation and optimization of imaging parameters, as well as examples of some of the applications of confocal microscopy.

  20. Smart imaging of acute lung injury: exploration of myeloperoxidase activity using in vivo endoscopic confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chagnon, Frédéric; Bourgouin, Alexandra; Lebel, Réjean; Bonin, Marc-André; Marsault, Eric; Lepage, Martin; Lesur, Olivier

    2015-09-15

    The pathophysiology of acute lung injury (ALI) is well characterized, but its real-time assessment at bedside remains a challenge. When patients do not improve after 1 wk despite supportive therapies, physicians have to consider open lung biopsy (OLB) to identify the process(es) at play. Sustained inflammation and inadequate repair are often observed in this context. OLB is neither easy to perform in a critical setting nor exempt from complications. Herein, we explore intravital endoscopic confocal fluorescence microscopy (ECFM) of the lung in vivo combined with the use of fluorescent smart probe(s) activated by myeloperoxidase (MPO). MPO is a granular enzyme expressed by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and alveolar macrophages (AMs), catalyzing the synthesis of hypoclorous acid, a by-product of hydrogen peroxide. Activation of these probes was first validated in vitro in relevant cells (i.e., AMs and PMNs) and on MPO-non-expressing cells (as negative controls) and then tested in vivo using three rat models of ALI and real-time intravital imaging with ECFM. Semiquantitative image analyses revealed that in vivo probe-related cellular/background fluorescence was associated with corresponding enhanced lung enzymatic activity and was partly prevented by specific MPO inhibition. Additional ex vivo phenotyping was performed, confirming that fluorescent cells were neutrophil elastase(+) (PMNs) or CD68(+) (AMs). This work is a first step toward "virtual biopsy" of ALI without OLB. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Vibrational spectroscopic imaging and multiphoton microscopy of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Galli, Roberta; Uckermann, Ortrud; Winterhalder, Martin J; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim H; Geiger, Kathrin D; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Zumbusch, Andreas; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2012-10-16

    Spinal cord injury triggers a series of complex biochemical alterations of nervous tissue. Up to now, such cellular events could not be studied without conventional tissue staining. The development of optical, label-free imaging techniques could provide powerful monitoring tools with the potential to be applied in vivo. In this work, we assess the ability of vibrational spectroscopy to generate contrast at molecular level between normal and altered regions in a rat model of spinal cord injury. Using tissue sections, we demonstrate that Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and spontaneous Raman spectroscopy are able to identify the lesion, the surrounding scar, and unharmed normal tissue, delivering insight into the biochemical events induced by the injury and allowing mapping of tissue degeneration. The FT-IR and Raman spectroscopic imaging provides the basis for fast multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, endogenous two-photon fluorescence, and second harmonic generation). The latter proves to be a fast tool for imaging of the lesion on unstained tissue samples, based on the alteration in lipid content, extracellular matrix composition, and microglia/macrophages distribution pattern. The results establish these technologies in the field of regeneration in central nervous system, with the long-term goal to extend them to intravital use, where fast and nonharmful imaging is required.

  2. Coherent imaging with incoherent light in digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmelik, Radim

    2012-01-01

    Digital holographic microscope (DHM) allows for imaging with a quantitative phase contrast. In this way it becomes an important instrument, a completely non-invasive tool for a contrast intravital observation of living cells and a cell drymass density distribution measurement. A serious drawback of current DHMs is highly coherent illumination which makes the lateral resolution worse and impairs the image quality by a coherence noise and a parasitic interference. An uncompromising solution to this problem can be found in the Leith concept of incoherent holography. An off-axis hologram can be formed with arbitrary degree of light coherence in systems equipped with an achromatic interferometer and thus the resolution and the image quality typical for an incoherent-light wide-field microscopy can be achieved. In addition, advanced imaging modes based on limited coherence can be utilized. The typical example is a coherence-gating effect which provides a finite axial resolution and makes DHM image similar to that of a confocal microscope. These possibilities were described theoretically using the formalism of three-dimensional coherent transfer functions and proved experimentally by the coherence-controlled holographic microscope which is DHM based on the Leith achromatic interferometer. Quantitative-phase-contrast imaging is demonstrated with incoherent light by the living cancer cells observation and their motility evaluation. The coherence-gating effect was proved by imaging of model samples through a scattering layer and living cells inside an opalescent medium.

  3. Longitudinal Intravital Imaging of the Retina Reveals Long-term Dynamics of Immune Infiltration and Its Effects on the Glial Network in Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis, without Evident Signs of Neuronal Dysfunction in the Ganglion Cell Layer

    PubMed Central

    Bremer, Daniel; Pache, Florence; Günther, Robert; Hornow, Jürgen; Andresen, Volker; Leben, Ruth; Mothes, Ronja; Zimmermann, Hanna; Brandt, Alexander U.; Paul, Friedemann; Hauser, Anja E.; Radbruch, Helena; Niesner, Raluca

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of autoimmune retinal inflammation is the infiltration of the retina with cells of the innate and adaptive immune system, leading to detachment of the retinal layers and even to complete loss of the retinal photoreceptor layer. As the only optical system in the organism, the eye enables non-invasive longitudinal imaging studies of these local autoimmune processes and of their effects on the target tissue. Moreover, as a window to the central nervous system (CNS), the eye also reflects general neuroinflammatory processes taking place at various sites within the CNS. Histological studies in murine neuroinflammatory models, such as experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, indicate that immune infiltration is initialized by effector CD4+ T cells, with the innate compartment (neutrophils, macrophages, and monocytes) contributing crucially to tissue degeneration that occurs at later phases of the disease. However, how the immune attack is orchestrated by various immune cell subsets in the retina and how the latter interact with the target tissue under in vivo conditions is still poorly understood. Our study addresses this gap with a novel approach for intravital two-photon microscopy, which enabled us to repeatedly track CD4+ T cells and LysM phagocytes during the entire course of EAU and to identify a specific radial infiltration pattern of these cells within the inflamed retina, starting from the optic nerve head. In contrast, highly motile CX3CR1+ cells display an opposite radial motility pattern, toward the optic nerve head. These inflammatory processes induce modifications of the microglial network toward an activated morphology, especially around the optic nerve head and main retinal blood vessels, but do not affect the neurons within the ganglion cell layer. Thanks to the new technology, non-invasive correlation of clinical scores of CNS-related pathologies with immune infiltrate behavior and subsequent

  4. Cell-based and in vivo spectral analysis of fluorescent proteins for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomonnson, Emma; Mihalko, Laura Anne; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2012-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy of cells and subcellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins is the state-of-the-art technology for longitudinal imaging studies in tissues and living animals. Successful analysis of separate cell populations or signaling events by intravital microscopy requires optimal pairing of multiphoton excitation wavelengths with spectrally distinct fluorescent proteins. While prior studies have analyzed two photon absorption properties of isolated fluorescent proteins, there is limited information about two photon excitation and fluorescence emission profiles of fluorescent proteins expressed in living cells and intact tissues. Multiphoton microscopy was used to analyze fluorescence outputs of multiple blue, green, and red fluorescent proteins in cultured cells and orthotopic tumor xenografts of human breast cancer cells. It is shown that commonly used orange and red fluorescent proteins are excited efficiently by 750 to 760 nm laser light in living cells, enabling dual color imaging studies with blue or cyan proteins without changing excitation wavelength. It is also shown that small incremental changes in excitation wavelength significantly affect emission intensities from fluorescent proteins, which can be used to optimize multi-color imaging using a single laser wavelength. These data will direct optimal selection of fluorescent proteins for multispectral two photon microscopy.

  5. In vivo longitudinal visualization of bone marrow engraftment process in mouse calvarium bone marrow with two-photon microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Viet Hoan; Lee, Seunghun; Kim, Ki Hean; Lee, Seungwon; Lee, Seung-Woo

    2017-02-01

    Bone marrow transplantation became the standard choice for treatment of many leukemias, tumors and metabolic diseases. Understanding the dynamic behavior of bone marrow niches, especially in case of bone marrow transplantation is critical to improve the efficiency of the treatment. Intravital microscopy was demonstrated to be a powerful tool to study physiological structure of bone marrow niche. However, current method of intravital microscopy has difficulty in longitudinal monitoring the same bone marrow niche site due to the invasion of the prior-imaging surgery. In this study, we introduce a method to improve the bone marrow niche imaging process and enable the longitudinal imaging of murine calvarium bone marrow. Mouse model for calvarium bone marrow imaging was made by attaching cover glass window to the calvarium bone. Longitudinal imaging of whole bone marrow engraftment process was carried out to demonstrate the advantage of our mouse model. Qualitative and quantitative analysis were also executed on the image data. The result provided a dynamic and full visualization of the bone marrow engraftment process. The study was expected to provide helpful tool for bone marrow studies and useful information for bone marrow transplantation in future.

  6. Visualization of living terminal hypertrophic chondrocytes of growth plate cartilage in situ by differential interference contrast microscopy and time-lapse cinematography.

    PubMed

    Farnum, C E; Turgai, J; Wilsman, N J

    1990-09-01

    The functional unit within the growth plate consists of a column of chondrocytes that passes through a sequence of phases including proliferation, hypertrophy, and death. It is important to our understanding of the biology of the growth plate to determine if distal hypertrophic cells are viable, highly differentiated cells with the potential of actively controlling terminal events of endochondral ossification prior to their death at the chondro-osseous junction. This study for the first time reports on the visualization of living hypertrophic chondrocytes in situ, including the terminal hypertrophic chondrocyte. Chondrocytes in growth plate explants are visualized using rectified differential interference contrast microscopy. We record and measure, using time-lapse cinematography, the rate of movement of subcellular organelles at the limit of resolution of this light microscopy system. Control experiments to assess viability of hypertrophic chondrocytes include coincubating organ cultures with the intravital dye fluorescein diacetate to assess the integrity of the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic esterases. In this system, all hypertrophic chondrocytes, including the very terminal chondrocyte, exist as rounded, fully hydrated cells. By the criteria of intravital dye staining and organelle movement, distal hypertrophic chondrocytes are identical to chondrocytes in the proliferative and early hypertrophic cell zones.

  7. 4-Dimensionally Guided 3-Dimensional Color-Doppler Ultrasonography Quantifies Carotid Artery Stenosis With High Reproducibility and Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Macharzina, Roland Richard; Kocher, Sascha; Messé, Steven R; Rutkowski, Thomas; Hoffmann, Fabian; Vogt, Matthias; Vach, Werner; Fan, Nian; Rastan, Aljoscha; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Zeller, Thomas

    2017-07-13

    The purpose was to analyze the agreement and binary accuracy of the degree of internal carotid artery stenosis (ICAS) as determined by 4-dimensionally (4D) real-time gray-scale guided 3-dimensional (3D) color-Doppler ultrasonography (3DC-US) (4D/3DC-US) compared with catheter angiography (CA) and duplex ultrasonography (DUS). This study hypothesized that 4D/3DC-US is noninferior to CA and DUS in grading ICAS in selected patients. Clinical stratification in patients with ICAS largely depends on a patient's symptomatic status and the degree of stenosis. Screening with 4D/3DC-US was prospectively performed in 93 study patients (with 122 ICASs), thus yielding 80 patients for analysis (with 103 ICASs) after excluding patients with insufficient image quality, previous revascularization, and contraindications to CA. The ultrasound examination (10 MHz) consisted of consensus conform DUS examination and independent real-time 4D-guided gray-scale views for orientation followed by static 3DC-US NASCET (North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial) percent stenosis quantification using off-line multiplanar rendering. Multiplanar selective CA of the same ICASs was quantified with dedicated software in a blinded fashion. Quantitative CA of 103 stenoses with a mean degree of 65 ± 17% was compared with 4D/3DC-US, with a resulting concordance correlation coefficient of 0.89 and a standard deviation of differences (SDD) of 8.1% at a bias of +1.7%. Binary 50% and 70% stenosis detection with 4D/3DC-US revealed a sensitivity of 97% and 87%, respectively, and a specificity of 92% and 84%, respectively. Interobserver SDD for CA of 52 stenoses (7.2%) did not differ from SDD for 4D/3DC-US and CA (p = 0.274). Accuracy of 50% stenosis detection by 4D/3DC-US was tendentially higher compared with DUS (96% vs. 91%). The 4D/3DC-US method provides reliable and accurate stenosis quantification and binary classification with good diagnostic accuracy compared with CA and DUS. Copyright

  8. On Darboux's approach to R-separability of variables. Classification of conformally flat 4-dimensional binary metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szereszewski, A.; Sym, A.

    2015-09-01

    are binary metrics. In this paper we solve the following problem: to classify all conformally flat (of arbitrary signature) 4-dimensional binary metrics. Among them there are 1) those that are separable in the sense of SRE metrics Kalnins-Miller (1978 Trans. Am. Math. Soc. 244 241-61 1982 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 15 2699-709 1984 Adv. Math. 51 91-106 1983 SIAM J. Math. Anal. 14 126-37) and 2) new examples of non-Stäckel R-separability in 4 dimensions.

  9. Basic confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carolyn L

    2008-01-01

    This unit introduces the reader to the basic principles of confocal microscopy and the design and capabilities of current confocal microscopes. The advantages and disadvantages of confocal microscopy compared to other techniques for fluorescence imaging are described. There are also practical guidelines for sample preparation and optimization of imaging parameters, as well as examples of some of the applications of confocal microscopy. (c) 2008 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Fluorescence (Multiwave) Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Welzel, J; Kästle, Raphaela; Sattler, Elke C

    2016-10-01

    In addition to reflectance confocal microscopy, multiwave confocal microscopes with different laser wavelengths in combination with exogenous fluorophores allow fluorescence mode confocal microscopy in vivo and ex vivo. Fluorescence mode confocal microscopy improves the contrast between the epithelium and the surrounding soft tissue and allows the depiction of certain structures, like epithelial tumors, nerves, and glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Correlation mapping microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, James; Alexandrov, Sergey; Owens, Peter; Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Leahy, Martin J.

    2015-03-01

    Changes in the microcirculation are associated with conditions such as Raynauds disease. Current modalities used to assess the microcirculation such as nailfold capillaroscopy are limited due to their depth ambiguity. A correlation mapping technique was recently developed to extend the capabilities of Optical Coherence Tomography to generate depth resolved images of the microcirculation. Here we present the extension of this technique to microscopy modalities, including confocal microscopy. It is shown that this correlation mapping microscopy technique can extend the capabilities of conventional microscopy to enable mapping of vascular networks in vivo with high spatial resolution.

  12. Light sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Mickoleit, Michaela; Huisken, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This chapter introduces the concept of light sheet microscopy along with practical advice on how to design and build such an instrument. Selective plane illumination microscopy is presented as an alternative to confocal microscopy due to several superior features such as high-speed full-frame acquisition, minimal phototoxicity, and multiview sample rotation. Based on our experience over the last 10 years, we summarize the key concepts in light sheet microscopy, typical implementations, and successful applications. In particular, sample mounting for long time-lapse imaging and the resulting challenges in data processing are discussed in detail.

  13. Axial Plane Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin; Wong, Zi Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We present axial plane optical microscopy (APOM) that can, in contrast to conventional microscopy, directly image a sample's cross-section parallel to the optical axis of an objective lens without scanning. APOM combined with conventional microscopy simultaneously provides two orthogonal images of a 3D sample. More importantly, APOM uses only a single lens near the sample to achieve selective-plane illumination microscopy, as we demonstrated by three-dimensional (3D) imaging of fluorescent pollens and brain slices. This technique allows fast, high-contrast, and convenient 3D imaging of structures that are hundreds of microns beneath the surfaces of large biological tissues. PMID:25434770

  14. Pulmonary Ventilation Imaging Based on 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography: Comparison With Pulmonary Function Tests and SPECT Ventilation Images

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kabus, Sven; Lorenz, Cristian; Mittra, Erik; Hong, Julian C.; Chung, Melody; Eclov, Neville; To, Jacqueline; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT)-based pulmonary ventilation imaging is an emerging functional imaging modality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological significance of 4D-CT ventilation imaging by comparison with pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements and single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation images, which are the clinical references for global and regional lung function, respectively. Methods and Materials: In an institutional review board–approved prospective clinical trial, 4D-CT imaging and PFT and/or SPECT ventilation imaging were performed in thoracic cancer patients. Regional ventilation (V{sub 4DCT}) was calculated by deformable image registration of 4D-CT images and quantitative analysis for regional volume change. V{sub 4DCT} defect parameters were compared with the PFT measurements (forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV{sub 1}; % predicted) and FEV{sub 1}/forced vital capacity (FVC; %). V{sub 4DCT} was also compared with SPECT ventilation (V{sub SPECT}) to (1) test whether V{sub 4DCT} in V{sub SPECT} defect regions is significantly lower than in nondefect regions by using the 2-tailed t test; (2) to quantify the spatial overlap between V{sub 4DCT} and V{sub SPECT} defect regions with Dice similarity coefficient (DSC); and (3) to test ventral-to-dorsal gradients by using the 2-tailed t test. Results: Of 21 patients enrolled in the study, 18 patients for whom 4D-CT and either PFT or SPECT were acquired were included in the analysis. V{sub 4DCT} defect parameters were found to have significant, moderate correlations with PFT measurements. For example, V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU} defect volume increased significantly with decreasing FEV{sub 1}/FVC (R=−0.65, P<.01). V{sub 4DCT} in V{sub SPECT} defect regions was significantly lower than in nondefect regions (mean V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU} 0.049 vs 0.076, P<.01). The average DSCs for the spatial overlap with SPECT ventilation defect regions were only moderate (V

  15. Investigation of the Dynamical Structure and Diffusion in a System of Hamiltonian Type: 4-Dimensional Symplectic Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorovic, N.

    2009-09-01

    The Nekhoroshev theorem (Nekhoroshev 1977) is one of the most important theorems in modern Hamiltonian dynamics. This theorem applies to quasi integrable Hamiltonian systems of type H(I,\\varphi)=h(I)+\\varepsilon f (I, \\varphi), where h(I) is the integrable approximation, f(I, \\varphi) the perturbing function, \\varepsilon is a small perturbing parameter, Iin R^n are the actions and \\varphi in T^n the angles of the system. With some additional geometrical and analytical properties, the theorem provides the stability of actions in exponentially long times. In recent years it has been shown that with some modifications the Nekhoroshev theorem can be applied to the problems in Solar system dynamics (Morbidelli and Guzzo 1997, Guzzo et al 2002, Efthymiopoulos and Sándor 2105, Pavlović and Guzzo 2008). In this work, we are interested to observe numerically a Nekhoroshev like behavior on a model given with a 4-dimensional symplectic map. The model is not in the quasi-integrable form, i.e. independently from the perturbation it contains some additional hyperbolic structures (they appear in the model as primary resonances). Since the hyperbolic structures exist even for zero perturbation, the system will belong to the class of the so called a priori unstable systems. The main numerical tool used here was the Fast Lyapunov Indicator- FLI, introduced in (Froschlé et al. 1997, 2000). As an indicator of chaotic motion, FLI gives very precise and fast information about the chaoticity of an orbit. Also, among regular orbits, FLI is able to differentiate resonant from nonresonant motions. This property of FLI allows us to visualize the studied system and to obtain the Arnold web of the model (Froschlé et al. 2000). In such a way it was possible to observe the transition from a stable Nekhoroshev like structure (regular orbits dominate) to a globally chaotic system where resonances overlap, also known as Chirikov regime. Numerically, this transition happens when between 50

  16. Lasers for nonlinear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wise, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Various versions of nonlinear microscopy are revolutionizing the life sciences, almost all of which are made possible because of the development of ultrafast lasers. In this article, the main properties and technical features of short-pulse lasers used in nonlinear microscopy are summarized. Recent research results on fiber lasers that will impact future instruments are also discussed.

  17. In vivo optical imaging of cancer metastasis using multiphoton microscopy: a short review

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Koji; Toiyama, Yuji; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Okigami, Masato; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Araki, Toshimitsu; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Mizoguchi, Akira; Kusunoki, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Intravital (in vivo) microscopy using fluorescently-tagged proteins is a valuable tool for imaging the expression of a specific protein, its subcellular location and the dynamics of specific cell populations in living animals. Recently, multiphoton microscopy including two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) has been used in the field of tumor biology due to its ability to image target organs at higher magnification and at deeper depths from the tissue surface for longer time periods. We developed a method of in vivo real-time imaging for tumor metastasis using TPLSM with an organ stabilizing system, which allow us to observe not only a single tumor cell and its microenvironment for a long time, but also to observe the same organ of the same mouse at multiple time points in preclinical models. Here, we presented in vivo real-time images of 1) tumor cell arrest, 2) tumor cell-platelet interaction, 3) tumor cell-leukocyte interaction, and 4) metastatic colonization at the secondary organs as representative steps of metastatic process of experimental liver metastasis models using TPLSM. PMID:24936213

  18. Two-Photon Microscopy Allows Imaging and Characterization of Cochlear Microvasculature In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bertlich, Mattis; Weiss, Bernhard; Dietzel, Steffen; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of cochlear blood flow has been discussed as factor in the pathophysiology of various inner ear disorders. However, the microscopic study of cochlear microcirculation is limited due to small scale and anatomical constraints. Here, two-photon fluorescence microscopy is applied to visualize cochlear microvessels. Guinea pigs were injected with Fluorescein isothiocyanate- or Texas red-dextrane as plasma marker. Intravital microscopy was performed in four animals and explanted cochleae from four animals were studied. The vascular architecture of the cochlea was visualized up to a depth of 90.0 ± 22.7 μm. Imaging yielded a mean contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of 3.3 ± 1.7. Mean diameter in vivo was 16.5 ± 6.0 μm for arterioles and 8.0 ± 2.4 μm for capillaries. In explanted cochleae, the diameter of radiating arterioles and capillaries was measured with 12.2 ± 1.6 μm and 6.6 ± 1.0 μm, respectively. The difference between capillaries and arterioles was statistically significant in both experimental setups (P < 0.001 and P = 0.022, two-way ANOVA). Measured vessel diameters in vivo and ex vivo were in agreement with published data. We conclude that two-photon fluorescence microscopy allows the investigation of cochlear microvessels and is potentially a valuable tool for inner ear research. PMID:25883941

  19. Label-Free Determination of Hemodynamic Parameters in the Microcirculaton with Third Harmonic Generation Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dietzel, Steffen; Pircher, Joachim; Nekolla, A. Katharina; Gull, Mazhar; Brändli, André W.; Pohl, Ulrich; Rehberg, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Determination of blood flow velocity and related hemodynamic parameters is an important aspect of physiological studies which in many settings requires fluorescent labeling. Here we show that Third Harmonic Generation (THG) microscopy is a suitable tool for label-free intravital investigations of the microcirculation in widely-used physiological model systems. THG microscopy is a non-fluorescent multi-photon scanning technique combining the advantages of label-free imaging with restriction of signal generation to a focal spot. Blood flow was visualized and its velocity was measured in adult mouse cremaster muscle vessels, non-invasively in mouse ear vessels and in Xenopus tadpoles. In arterioles, THG line scanning allowed determination of the flow pulse velocity curve and hence the heart rate. By relocating the scan line we obtained velocity profiles through vessel diameters, allowing shear rate calculations. The cell free layer containing the glycocalyx was also visualized. Comparison of the current microscopic resolution with theoretical, diffraction limited resolution let us conclude that an about sixty-fold THG signal intensity increase may be possible with future improved optics, optimized for 1200–1300 nm excitation. THG microscopy is compatible with simultaneous two-photon excited fluorescence detection. It thus also provides the opportunity to determine important hemodynamic parameters in parallel to common fluorescent observations without additional label. PMID:24933027

  20. Find your way with X-Ray: Using microCT to correlate in vivo imaging with 3D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Karreman, Matthia A; Ruthensteiner, Bernhard; Mercier, Luc; Schieber, Nicole L; Solecki, Gergely; Winkler, Frank; Goetz, Jacky G; Schwab, Yannick

    2017-01-01

    Combining in vivo imaging with electron microscopy (EM) uniquely allows monitoring rare and critical events in living tissue, followed by their high-resolution visualization in their native context. A major hurdle, however, is to keep track of the region of interest (ROI) when moving from intravital microscopy (IVM) to EM. Here, we present a workflow that relies on correlating IVM and microscopic X-ray computed tomography to predict the position of the ROI inside the EM-processed sample. The ROI can then be accurately and quickly targeted using ultramicrotomy and imaged using EM. We outline how this procedure is used to retrieve and image tumor cells arrested in the vasculature of the mouse brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Superresolution microscopy for microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Coltharp, Carla; Xiao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review provides a practical introduction to superresolution microscopy from the perspective of microbiological research. Because of the small sizes of bacterial cells, superresolution methods are particularly powerful and suitable for revealing details of cellular structures that are not resolvable under conventional fluorescence light microscopy. Here we describe the methodological concepts behind three major categories of super-resolution light microscopy: photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), structured illumination microscopy (SIM) and stimulated emission-depletion (STED) microscopy. We then present recent applications of each of these techniques to microbial systems, which have revealed novel conformations of cellular structures and described new properties of in vivo protein function and interactions. Finally, we discuss the unique issues related to implementing each of these superresolution techniques with bacterial specimens and suggest avenues for future development. The goal of this review is to provide the necessary technical background for interested microbiologists to choose the appropriate super-resolution method for their biological systems, and to introduce the practical considerations required for designing and analysing superresolution imaging experiments. PMID:22947061

  2. Super resolution fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Bates, Mark; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2010-01-01

    Achieving a spatial resolution that is not limited by the diffraction of light, recent developments of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques allow the observation of many biological structures not resolvable in conventional fluorescence microscopy. New advances in these techniques now give them the ability to image three-dimensional (3D) structures, measure interactions by multicolor colocalization, and record dynamic processes in living cells at the nanometer scale. It is anticipated that super-resolution fluorescence microscopy will become a widely used tool for cell and tissue imaging to provide previously unobserved details of biological structures and processes. PMID:19489737

  3. Knocking at the brain’s door: intravital two-photon imaging of autoreactive T cell interactions with CNS structures

    PubMed Central

    Flügel, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Since the first applications of two-photon microscopy in immunology 10 years ago, the number of studies using this advanced technology has increased dramatically. The two-photon microscope allows long-term visualization of cell motility in the living tissue with minimal phototoxicity. Using this technique, we examined brain autoantigen-specific T cell behavior in experimental autoimmune encephalitomyelitis, the animal model of human multiple sclerosis. Even before disease symptoms appear, the autoreactive T cells arrive at their target organ. There they crawl along the intraluminal surface of central nervous system (CNS) blood vessels before they extravasate. In the perivascular environment, the T cells meet phagocytes that present autoantigens. This contact activates the T cells to penetrate deep into the CNS parenchyma, where the infiltrated T cells again can find antigen, be further activated, and produce cytokines, resulting in massive immune cell recruitment and clinical disease. PMID:20623286

  4. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Capucine L.; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A.; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs. PMID:27698437

  5. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Capucine L; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-10-04

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs.

  6. Development of early post-ischemic injury in the liver as evaluated by a double staining method combining an intravital dye exclusion test and alizarin red S.

    PubMed

    Jennische, E

    1985-11-01

    The early development of post-ischemic cell injury was investigated in rat livers. Rats were subjected to 90 minutes of liver ischemia, followed by periods of re-perfusion from 10 minutes to 3 hours. The ischemia-induced injury was quantified by using a double staining method. An intravital dye exclusion test with Evans blue was combined with a histochemical stain for calcium, Alizarin red S (ARS). It was found that the markers identified two populations of injured cells, positive for Evans blue (EBA) and ARS respectively. The number of injured cells increased successively during the re-perfusion period. The overlapping between the two populations was small during the early post-ischemic phase but increased with increasing re-perfusion time. Treatment with ruthenium red, a blocker of mitochondrial calcium uptake, during the re-perfusion period significantly reduced the number of ARS-positive cells, while the number of EBA-positive cells was not affected. It is suggested that the two markers used identify cell populations, which are injured by different mechanisms operating in the post-ischemic phase. These mechanisms may or may not be dependent on calcium.

  7. Intravital FRAP Imaging using an E-cadherin-GFP Mouse Reveals Disease- and Drug-Dependent Dynamic Regulation of Cell-Cell Junctions in Live Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Erami, Zahra; Herrmann, David; Warren, Sean C.; Nobis, Max; McGhee, Ewan J.; Lucas, Morghan C.; Leung, Wilfred; Reischmann, Nadine; Mrowinska, Agata; Schwarz, Juliane P.; Kadir, Shereen; Conway, James R.W.; Vennin, Claire; Karim, Saadia A.; Campbell, Andrew D.; Gallego-Ortega, David; Magenau, Astrid; Murphy, Kendelle J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Law, Andrew M.; Walters, Stacey N.; Grey, Shane T.; Croucher, David R.; Zhang, Lei; Herzog, Herbert; Hardeman, Edna C.; Gunning, Peter W.; Ormandy, Christopher J.; Evans, T.R. Jeffry; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen J.; Morton, Jennifer P.; Anderson, Kurt I.; Timpson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions play a prominent role in maintaining the epithelial architecture. The disruption or deregulation of these adhesions in cancer can lead to the collapse of tumor epithelia that precedes invasion and subsequent metastasis. Here we generated an E-cadherin-GFP mouse that enables intravital photobleaching and quantification of E-cadherin mobility in live tissue without affecting normal biology. We demonstrate the broad applications of this mouse by examining E-cadherin regulation in multiple tissues, including mammary, brain, liver, and kidney tissue, while specifically monitoring E-cadherin mobility during disease progression in the pancreas. We assess E-cadherin stability in native pancreatic tissue upon genetic manipulation involving Kras and p53 or in response to anti-invasive drug treatment and gain insights into the dynamic remodeling of E-cadherin during in situ cancer progression. FRAP in the E-cadherin-GFP mouse, therefore, promises to be a valuable tool to fundamentally expand our understanding of E-cadherin-mediated events in native microenvironments. PMID:26725115

  8. Kinetics of milk lipid droplet transport, growth, and secretion revealed by intravital imaging: lipid droplet release is intermittently stimulated by oxytocin.

    PubMed

    Masedunskas, Andrius; Chen, Yun; Stussman, Rebecca; Weigert, Roberto; Mather, Ian H

    2017-04-01

    The lipid droplet (LD) fraction of milk has attracted special attention because it supplies preformed lipids for neonatal development, and the assembled LDs are secreted by a unique apocrine mechanism. Because many aspects of this key process remain uncharacterized, we developed a facile method for the intravital imaging of mammary cells in transgenic mice that express fluorescently tagged marker proteins. Using these techniques, we describe the first kinetic analysis of LD growth and secretion at peak lactation in real time. LD transit from basal to apical regions was slow (0-2 μm/min) and frequently intermittent. Droplets grew by the fusion of preexisting droplets, with no restriction on the size of fusogenic partners. Most droplet expansion took several hours and occurred in apical nucleation centers, either close to or in association with the apical surface. Droplets even continued to expand as they were emerging from the cell. Contrary to expectations, LDs attached to the apical plasma membrane but still associated with the cytoplasm were released after oxytocin-mediated contraction of the myoepithelium. Thus milk LD secretion is an intermittently regulated process. This novel procedure will have broad application for investigating trafficking events within the mammary epithelium in real time.

  9. Presence of soot in the respiratory tract and esophagus as an element of consultative process addressing intravital staying in fire atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Raczkowska, Zuzanna; Borowska-Solonynko, Aleksandra; Samojłowicz, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    This paper was prepared in view of consultative difficulties which occur during autopsies of bodies found at the seat of fire. The most difficult problem in such cases is establishing--in absence of typical signs of intravitality--whether the deceased was alive during the fire and inhaling the fire atmosphere; especially when the concentration of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) in blood is higher than 10% and soot is found in the respiratory tract. The authors analyzed 241 reports of autopsies which had been performed at Institute of Forensic Medicine, Warsaw Medical University, between 2006 and 2011. The following data were analyzed: age, gender, the place where the body was found, blood concentration of COHb and alcohol and the presence of soot in the upper and lower respiratory tract, as well as in the esophagus. It was noted that if the concentration of COHb was higher, soot was more frequently present in the respiratory tract and esophagus. At the same time, the presence, as well as absence of soot was noted regardless of COHb concentration in blood, including 0% concentration. In cases of performing autopsies on bodies found at the seat of fire, examining the upper and down respiratory tract seems to be irrelevant in terms of its consultative usefulness; however, the presence of soot in the esophagus concomitant with low COHb concentration in blood is important in this context.

  10. Complementarity of variable-magnification and spectral-separation fluorescence imaging systems for noninvasive detection of metastasis and intravital detection of single cancer cells in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Ma, Huaiyu; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Ming; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-02-01

    Imaging of tumor growth, progression and metastasis with fluorescent proteins in mouse models is a powerful technology. A limit to fluorescent-protein imaging has been for non-invasive deep-seated tumors, such as those in the lung. In the present study, the Maestro spectral-separation fluorescence imaging system and the OV100 variable-magnification imaging system were compared for noninvasive detection of metastasis in fluorescent protein-expressing orthotopic lung, liver, pancreas, and colon cancer in nude mouse tumor models, as well as for intravital single-cell imaging. Sensitivity, multispectral capability, contrast, and single cell resolution were investigated. The Maestro system outperformed the OV100 for noninvasive imaging of primary and metastatic tumors. The Maestro system detected brain tumor metastasis five days earlier than did the OV100. The Maestro had greater depth of detection compared with the OV100. By separating skin and food autofluorescence, the Maestro provided high-contrast images. The Maestro system was able to produce composite images with more unmixed components and detected more different color signals simultaneously than did the OV100. However, the OV100 system had higher resolution and was able to detect single cells in vivo unlike the Maestro. The present study demonstrates that the two instruments are complementary for imaging of all stages of cancer in mice, including single-cell trafficking and the superiority of in vivo fluorescent-protein imaging over luciferase imaging.

  11. Clinical specular microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, L.W.; Laing, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides the general ophthalmologist with a guide to the clinical applications of specular microscopy. Important material is included on laser injury, cataract surgery, corneal transplants, glaucoma, uveitis, and trauma.

  12. Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Chinn, Diane; Stolz, Christopher J.; Wu, Zhouling; Huber, Robert; Weinzapfel, Carolyn

    2006-07-11

    Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

  13. Stimulated Emission Depletion Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Blom, Hans; Widengren, Jerker

    2017-06-14

    Despite its short history, diffraction-unlimited fluorescence microscopy techniques have already made a substantial imprint in the biological sciences. In this review, we describe how stimulated emission depletion (STED) imaging originally evolved, how it compares to other optical super-resolution imaging techniques, and what advantages it provides compared to previous golden-standards for biological microscopy, such as diffraction-limited optical microscopy and electron microscopy. We outline the prerequisites for successful STED imaging experiments, emphasizing the equally critical roles of instrumentation, sample preparation, and photophysics, and describe major evolving strategies for how to push the borders of STED imaging even further in life science. Finally, we provide examples of how STED nanoscopy can be applied, within three different fields with particular potential for STED imaging experiments: neuroscience, plasma membrane biophysics, and subcellular clinical diagnostics. In these areas, and in many more, STED imaging can be expected to play an increasingly important role in the future.

  14. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  15. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Tyler S.; Marks, Daniel L.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art methods in high-resolution three-dimensional optical microscopy require that the focus be scanned through the entire region of interest. However, an analysis of the physics of the light–sample interaction reveals that the Fourier-space coverage is independent of depth. Here we show that, by solving the inverse scattering problem for interference microscopy, computed reconstruction yields volumes with a resolution in all planes that is equivalent to the resolution achieved only at the focal plane for conventional high-resolution microscopy. In short, the entire illuminated volume has spatially invariant resolution, thus eliminating the compromise between resolution and depth of field. We describe and demonstrate a novel computational image-formation technique called interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM). ISAM has the potential to broadly impact real-time three-dimensional microscopy and analysis in the fields of cell and tumour biology, as well as in clinical diagnosis where in vivo imaging is preferable to biopsy. PMID:25635181

  16. Imaging immune response of skin mast cells in vivo with two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunqiang; Pastila, Riikka K.; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has provided insightful information of the dynamic process of immune cells in vivo. However, the use of exogenous labeling agents limits its applications. There is no method to perform functional imaging of mast cells, a population of innate tissue-resident immune cells. Mast cells are widely recognized as the effector cells in allergy. Recently their roles as immunoregulatory cells in certain innate and adaptive immune responses are being actively investigated. Here we report in vivo mouse skin mast cells imaging with two-photon microscopy using endogenous tryptophan as the fluorophore. We studied the following processes. 1) Mast cells degranulation, the first step in the mast cell activation process in which the granules are released into peripheral tissue to trigger downstream reactions. 2) Mast cell reconstitution, a procedure commonly used to study mast cells functioning by comparing the data from wild type mice, mast cell-deficient mice, and mast-cell deficient mice reconstituted with bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Imaging the BMMCs engraftment in tissue reveals the mast cells development and the efficiency of BMMCs reconstitution. We observed the reconstitution process for 6 weeks in the ear skin of mast cell-deficient Kit wsh/ w-sh mice by two-photon imaging. Our finding is the first instance of imaging mast cells in vivo with endogenous contrast.

  17. Advances in small animal mesentery models for in vivo flow cytometry, dynamic microscopy, and drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Tuchin, Valery V; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2007-01-01

    Using animal mesentery with intravital optical microscopy is a well-established experimental model for studying blood and lymph microcirculation in vivo. Recent advances in cell biology and optical techniques provide the basis for extending this model for new applications, which should generate significantly improved experimental data. This review summarizes the achievements in this specific area, including in vivo label-free blood and lymph photothermal flow cytometry, super-sensitive fluorescence image cytometry, light scattering and speckle flow cytometry, microvessel dynamic microscopy, infrared (IR) angiography, and high-speed imaging of individual cells in fast flow. The capabilities of these techniques, using the rat mesentery model, were demonstrated in various studies; e.g., real-time quantitative detection of circulating and migrating individual blood and cancer cells, studies on vascular dynamics with a focus on lymphatics under normal conditions and under different interventions (e.g. lasers, drugs, nicotine), assessment of lymphatic disturbances from experimental lymphedema, monitoring cell traffic between blood and lymph systems, and high-speed imaging of cell transient deformability in flow. In particular, the obtained results demonstrated that individual cell transportation in living organisms depends on cell type (e.g., normal blood or leukemic cells), the cell’s functional state (e.g., live, apoptotic, or necrotic), and the functional status of the organism. Possible future applications, including in vivo early diagnosis and prevention of disease, monitoring immune response and apoptosis, chemo- and radio-sensitivity tests, and drug screening, are also discussed. PMID:17226898

  18. Signal improvement in multiphoton microscopy by reflection with simple mirrors near the sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehberg, Markus; Krombach, Fritz; Pohl, Ulrich; Dietzel, Steffen

    2010-03-01

    In conventional fluorescence or confocal microscopy, emitted light is generated not only in the focal plane but also above and below. The situation is different in multiphoton-induced fluorescence and multiphoton-induced higher harmonic generation. Here, restriction of signal generation to a single focal point permits that all emitted photons can contribute to image formation if collected, regardless of their path through the specimen. Often, the intensity of the emitted light is rather low in biological specimens. We present a method to significantly increase the fraction of photons collected by an epi (backward) detector by placing a simple mirror, an aluminum-coated coverslip, directly under the sample. Samples investigated include fluorescent test slides, collagen gels, and thin-layered, intact mouse skeletal muscles. Quantitative analysis revealed an intensity increase of second- and third-harmonic generated signal in skeletal muscle of nine- and sevenfold respectively, and of fluorescent signal in test slides of up to twofold. Our approach thus allows significant signal improvement also for situations were a forward detection is impossible, e.g., due to the anatomy of animals in intravital microscopy.

  19. Optical imaging. Expansion microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W; Boyden, Edward S

    2015-01-30

    In optical microscopy, fine structural details are resolved by using refraction to magnify images of a specimen. We discovered that by synthesizing a swellable polymer network within a specimen, it can be physically expanded, resulting in physical magnification. By covalently anchoring specific labels located within the specimen directly to the polymer network, labels spaced closer than the optical diffraction limit can be isotropically separated and optically resolved, a process we call expansion microscopy (ExM). Thus, this process can be used to perform scalable superresolution microscopy with diffraction-limited microscopes. We demonstrate ExM with apparent ~70-nanometer lateral resolution in both cultured cells and brain tissue, performing three-color superresolution imaging of ~10(7) cubic micrometers of the mouse hippocampus with a conventional confocal microscope.

  20. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Intravital Microscopy was successfully employed for investigating EG sheddÍng in hemorrhagic shock/resuscitation for the very first time; 2) Intravital ...during Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats using Intravital Microscopy. Submitted to Microvascular Research, 2012 (under review). FINAL REPORT Laboratory or...Glycocalyx using Intravital Microscopy. In Preparation. IO) PATENT OR COPYRIGHT APPLICATIONS KESULTING FROM NRC ASSOCIATESHIP KESEARCH Provide titles

  1. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tearney, G.J.; Webb, R.H.; Bouma, B.E.

    1998-08-01

    An endoscope-compatible, submicrometer-resolution scanning confocal microscopy imaging system is presented. This approach, spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM), uses a quasi-monochromatic light source and a transmission diffraction grating to detect the reflectivity simultaneously at multiple points along a transverse line within the sample. Since this method does not require fast spatial scanning within the probe, the equipment can be miniaturized and incorporated into a catheter or endoscope. Confocal images of an electron microscope grid were acquired with SECM to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Optical Society of America}

  2. Conventional transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Winey, Mark; Meehl, Janet B.; O'Toole, Eileen T.; Giddings, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to make contributions to cell biology for well over 50 years, and TEM continues to be an important technology in our field. We briefly present for the neophyte the components of a TEM-based study, beginning with sample preparation through imaging of the samples. We point out the limitations of TEM and issues to be considered during experimental design. Advanced electron microscopy techniques are listed as well. Finally, we point potential new users of TEM to resources to help launch their project. PMID:24482357

  3. Intravital multiphoton tomography as a novel tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2010-02-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory disease of human skin. Its pathogenesis is still unknown; however, dysfunctions of the epidermal barrier and the immune response are regarded as key factors for the development of AD. In our study we applied intravital multiphoton tomography (5D-IVT), equipped with a spectral-FLIM module for in-vivo and ex-vivo analysis of human skin affected with AD. In addition to the morphologic skin analysis, FLIM technology gain access to the metabolic status of the epidermal cells referring to the NADH specific fluorescence lifetime. We evaluated a characteristic 5D-IVT skin pattern of AD in comparison to histological sections and detected a correlation with the disease activity measured by SCORAD. FLIM analysis revealed a shift of the mean fluorescence lifetime (taum) of NADH, indicating an altered metabolic activity. Within an ex-vivo approach we have investigated cryo-sections of human skin with or without barrier defects. Spectral-FLIM allows the detection of autofluorescent signals that reflect the pathophysiological conditions of the defect skin barrier. In our study the taum value was shown to be different between healthy and affected skin. Application of the 5D-IVT allows non-invasive in-vivo imaging of human skin with a penetration depth of 150 μm. We could show that affected skin could be distinguished from healthy skin by morphological criteria, by FLIM and by spectral-FLIM. Further studies will evaluate the application of the 5D-IVT technology as a diagnostic tool and to monitor the therapeutic efficacy.

  4. Intravital multiphoton tomography as an appropriate tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Mess, Christian; Dimitrova, Valentina; Schwarz, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2011-03-01

    Increasing incidence of inflammatory skin diseases such as Atopic Dermatitis (AD) has been noted in the past years. According to recent estimations around 15% of newborn subjects are affected with a disease severity that requires medical treatment. Although its pathogenesis is multifactorial, recent reports indicate that an impaired physical skin barrier predispose for the development of AD. The major part of this barrier is formed by the stratum corneum (SC) wherein corneocytes are embedded in a complex matrix of proteins and lipids. Its components were synthesized in the stratum granulosum (SG) and secreted via lamellar bodies at the SC/SG interface. Within a clinical in vivo study we focused on the skin metabolism at the SC/SG interface in AD affected patients in comparison to healthy subjects. Measurement of fluorescence life-time of NADH provides access to the metabolic state of skin. Due to the application of a 5D intravital tomographic skin analysis we facilitate the non-invasive investigation of human epidermis in the longitudinal course of AD therapy. We could ascertain by blinded analysis of 40 skin areas of 20 patients in a three month follow-up that the metabolic status at the SC/SG interface was altered in AD compromised skin even in non-lesional, apparent healthy skin regions. This illustrates an impaired skin barrier formation even at non-affected skin of AD subjects appearing promotive for the development of acute skin inflammation. Therefore, our findings allow a deeper understanding of the individual disease development and the improved management of the therapeutic intervention in clinical application.

  5. Video Telescope Operating Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Divers, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    Exotic pet veterinarians frequently have to operate on small animals, and magnification is commonly used. Existing endoscopy equipment can be used with a mechanical arm and telescope to enable video telescope operating microscopy. The additional equipment items and their specifics are described, and several case examples are provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-08-24

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability.

  7. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability. PMID:20696933

  8. Principles of multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kenneth W; Young, Pamela A

    2006-01-01

    Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy is a powerful, important tool in biomedical research that offers low photon toxicity and higher spatial and temporal resolution than other in vivo imaging modalities. The capability to collect images hundreds of micrometers into biological tissues provides an invaluable tool for studying cellular and subcellular processes in the context of tissues and organs in living animals. Multiphoton microscopy is based upon two-photon excitation of fluorescence that occurs only in a sub-femtoliter volume at the focus; by scanning the focus through a sample, 2- and 3-dimensional images can be collected. The complex 3-dimensional organization of the kidney makes it especially appropriate for multiphoton microscopic analysis, which has been used to characterize numerous aspects of renal physiology and pathophysiology in living rats and mice. However, the ability to collect fluorescence images deep into biological tissues raises unique problems not encountered in other forms of optical microscopy, including issues of probe access, and tissue optics. Future improvements in multiphoton fluorescence microscopy will involve optimizing objectives for the unique characteristics of multiphoton fluorescence imaging, improving the speed at which images may be collected and extending the depth to which imaging may be conducted. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Light microscopy digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Joubert, James; Sharma, Deepak

    2011-10-01

    This unit presents an overview of digital imaging hardware used in light microscopy. CMOS, CCD, and EMCCDs are the primary sensors used. The strengths and weaknesses of each define the primary applications for these sensors. Sensor architecture and formats are also reviewed. Color camera design strategies and sensor window cleaning are also described in the unit.

  10. Photoacoustic computed microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lei; Xi, Lei; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is emerging as a powerful technique for imaging microvasculature at depths beyond the ~1 mm depth limit associated with confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy and optical coherence tomography. PAM, however, is currently qualitative in nature and cannot quantitatively measure important functional parameters including oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), deoxyhemoglobin (HbR), oxygen saturation (sO2), blood flow (BF) and rate of oxygen metabolism (MRO2). Here we describe a new photoacoustic microscopic method, termed photoacoustic computed microscopy (PACM) that combines current PAM technique with a model-based inverse reconstruction algorithm. We evaluate the PACM approach using tissue-mimicking phantoms and demonstrate its in vivo imaging ability of quantifying HbO2, HbR, sO2, cerebral BF and cerebral MRO2 at the small vessel level in a rodent model. This new technique provides a unique tool for neuroscience research and for visualizing microvasculature dynamics involved in tumor angiogenesis and in inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:24828539

  11. Nonlinear optical microscopy for immunoimaging: a custom optimized system of high-speed, large-area, multicolor imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Cui, Quan; Zhang, Zhihong; Fu, Ling; Luo, Qingming

    2015-02-01

    The nonlinear optical microscopy has become the current state-of-the-art for intravital imaging. Due to its advantages of high resolution, superior tissue penetration, lower photodamage and photobleaching, as well as intrinsic z-sectioning ability, this technology has been widely applied in immunoimaging for a decade. However, in terms of monitoring immune events in native physiological environment, the conventional nonlinear optical microscope system has to be optimized for live animal imaging. Generally speaking, three crucial capabilities are desired, including high-speed, large-area and multicolor imaging. Among numerous high-speed scanning mechanisms used in nonlinear optical imaging, polygon scanning is not only linearly but also dispersion-freely with high stability and tunable rotation speed, which can overcome disadvantages of multifocal scanning, resonant scanner and acousto-optical deflector (AOD). However, low frame rate, lacking large-area or multicolor imaging ability make current polygonbased nonlinear optical microscopes unable to meet the requirements of immune event monitoring. We built up a polygon-based nonlinear optical microscope system which was custom optimized for immunoimaging with high-speed, large-are and multicolor imaging abilities. Firstly, we validated the imaging performance of the system by standard methods. Then, to demonstrate the ability to monitor immune events, migration of immunocytes observed by the system based on typical immunological models such as lymph node, footpad and dorsal skinfold chamber are shown. Finally, we take an outlook for the possible advance of related technologies such as sample stabilization and optical clearing for more stable and deeper intravital immunoimaging. This study will be helpful for optimizing nonlinear optical microscope to obtain more comprehensive and accurate information of immune events.

  12. Nonlinear optical microscopy for immunoimaging: a custom optimized system of high-speed, large-area, multicolor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Cui, Quan; Zhang, Zhihong; Luo, Qingming

    2015-01-01

    Background The nonlinear optical microscopy has become the current state-of-the-art for intravital imaging. Due to its advantages of high resolution, superior tissue penetration, lower photodamage and photobleaching, as well as intrinsic z-sectioning ability, this technology has been widely applied in immunoimaging for a decade. However, in terms of monitoring immune events in native physiological environment, the conventional nonlinear optical microscope system has to be optimized for live animal imaging. Generally speaking, three crucial capabilities are desired, including high-speed, large-area and multicolor imaging. Among numerous high-speed scanning mechanisms used in nonlinear optical imaging, polygon scanning is not only linearly but also dispersion-freely with high stability and tunable rotation speed, which can overcome disadvantages of multifocal scanning, resonant scanner and acousto-optical deflector (AOD). However, low frame rate, lacking large-area or multicolor imaging ability make current polygonbased nonlinear optical microscopes unable to meet the requirements of immune event monitoring. Methods We built up a polygon-based nonlinear optical microscope system which was custom optimized for immunoimaging with high-speed, large-are and multicolor imaging abilities. Results Firstly, we validated the imaging performance of the system by standard methods. Then, to demonstrate the ability to monitor immune events, migration of immunocytes observed by the system based on typical immunological models such as lymph node, footpad and dorsal skinfold chamber are shown. Finally, we take an outlook for the possible advance of related technologies such as sample stabilization and optical clearing for more stable and deeper intravital immunoimaging. Conclusions This study will be helpful for optimizing nonlinear optical microscope to obtain more comprehensive and accurate information of immune events. PMID:25694951

  13. Polarized Light Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique which employs the use of polarizing filters to obtain substantial optical property information about the material which is being observed. This information can be combined with other microscopy techniques to confirm or elucidate the identity of an unknown material, determine whether a particular contaminant is present (as with asbestos analysis), or to provide important information that can be used to refine a manufacturing or chemical process. PLM was the major microscopy technique in use for identification of materials for nearly a century since its introduction in 1834 by William Fox Talbot, as other techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy), XPD (X-ray Powder Diffraction), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) had not yet been developed. Today, it is still the only technique approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for asbestos analysis, and is often the technique first applied for identification of unknown materials. PLM uses different configurations in order to determine different material properties. With each configuration additional clues can be gathered, leading to a conclusion of material identity. With no polarizing filter, the microscope can be used just as a stereo optical microscope, and view qualities such as morphology, size, and number of phases. With a single polarizing filter (single polars), additional properties can be established, such as pleochroism, individual refractive indices, and dispersion staining. With two polarizing filters (crossed polars), even more can be deduced: isotropy vs. anisotropy, extinction angle, birefringence/degree of birefringence, sign of elongation, and anomalous polarization colors, among others. With the use of PLM many of these properties can be determined in a matter of seconds, even for those who are not highly trained. McCrone, a leader in the field of polarized light microscopy, often

  14. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Laura M.; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic. PMID:26603495

  15. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Laura M.; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-11-01

    Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic.

  16. Quad stereo-microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Rebecca F.; Gibson, Graham M.; Lee, Michael P.; Padgett, Miles J.; Phillips, David B.

    2014-09-01

    Stereo-microscopy is a technique that enables a sample to be imaged from two directions simultaneously, allowing the tracking of microscopic objects in three dimensions. This is achieved by illuminating the sample from different directions, each illumination direction producing an individual image. These images are superimposed in the image plane but can be easily separated using a diffractive optical element in the Fourier plane of the imaging arm. Therefore this enables 3-dimensional coordinates to be reconstructed using simple 2-dimensional image tracking and parallax. This is a powerful technique when combined with holographic optical tweezers (HOT), where multiple objects can be trapped and tracked simultaneously in three dimensions. In this work, we extend this concept to four different illumination directions: quad stereo-microscopy. This allows us to measure the accuracy of tracking in three dimensions, and to optimise the system.

  17. Quantitative deconvolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    The light microscope is an essential tool for the study of cells, organelles, biomolecules, and subcellular dynamics. A paradox exists in microscopy whereby the higher the needed lateral resolution, the more the image is degraded by out-of-focus information. This creates a significant need to generate axial contrast whenever high lateral resolution is required. One strategy for generating contrast is to measure or model the optical properties of the microscope and to use that model to algorithmically reverse some of the consequences of high-resolution imaging. Deconvolution microscopy implements model-based methods to enable the full diffraction-limited resolution of the microscope to be exploited even in complex and living specimens.

  18. Multimodal Nonlinear Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Shuhua; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Because each nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging modality is sensitive to specific molecules or structures, multimodal NLO imaging capitalizes the potential of NLO microscopy for studies of complex biological tissues. The coupling of multiphoton fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) has allowed investigation of a broad range of biological questions concerning lipid metabolism, cancer development, cardiovascular disease, and skin biology. Moreover, recent research shows the great potential of using CARS microscope as a platform to develop more advanced NLO modalities such as electronic-resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing, stimulated Raman scattering, and pump-probe microscopy. This article reviews the various approaches developed for realization of multimodal NLO imaging as well as developments of new NLO modalities on a CARS microscope. Applications to various aspects of biological and biomedical research are discussed. PMID:24353747

  19. Blind digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Patrick N.; Wiegandt, Florian; Treacher, Daniel J.; Mang, Matthias M.; Gianani, Ilaria; Schiavi, Andrea; Lloyd, David T.; O'Keeffe, Kevin; Hooker, Simon M.; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2017-03-01

    A blind variant of digital holographic microscopy is presented that removes the requirement for a well-characterized, highly divergent reference beam. This is achieved by adopting an off-axis recording geometry where a sequence of holograms is recorded as the reference is tilted, and an iterative algorithm that estimates the amplitudes and phases of both beams while simultaneously enhancing the numerical aperture. Numerical simulations have demonstrated the accuracy and robustness of this approach when applied to the coherent imaging problem.

  20. Ion photon emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Doyle, B. L.; Banks, J. C.; Battistella, A.; Gennaro, G.; McDaniel, F. D.; Mellon, M.; Vittone, E.; Vizkelethy, G.; Wing, N. D.

    2003-09-01

    A new ion-induced emission microscopy has been invented and demonstrated, which is called ion photon emission microscopy (IPEM). It employs a low current, broad ion beam impinging on a sample, previously coated or simply covered with a few microns of a fast, highly efficient phosphor layer. The light produced at the single ion impact point is collected with an optical microscope and projected at high magnification onto a single photon position sensitive detector (PSD). This allows maps of the ion strike effects to be produced, effectively removing the need for a microbeam. Irradiation in air and even the use of alpha particle sources with no accelerator are possible. Potential applications include ion beam induced charge collection studies of semiconducting and insulating materials, single event upset studies on microchips and even biological cells in radiobiological effectiveness experiments. We describe the IPEM setup, including a 60× OM-40 microscope with a 1.5 mm hole for the beam transmission and a Quantar PSD with 60 μm pixel. Bicron plastic scintillator blades of 10 μm were chosen as a phosphor for their nanosecond time resolution, homogeneity, utility and commercial availability. The results given in this paper are for a prototype IPEM system. They indicate a resolution of ˜12 μm, the presence of a spatial halo and a He-ion efficiency of ˜20%. This marks the first time that nuclear microscopy has been performed with a radioactive source.

  1. Multimodal multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Légaré, François; Pfeffer, Christian P.; Ganikhanov, Feruz

    2009-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a powerful technique for high spatial resolution thick tissue imaging. In its simple version, it uses a high repetition rate femtosecond oscillator laser source focussed and scanned across biological sample that contains fluorophores. However, not every biological structure is inherently fluorescent or can be stained without causing biochemical changes. To circumvent these limitations, other non-invasive nonlinear optical imaging approaches are currently being developed and investigated with regard to different applications. These techniques are: (1) second harmonic generation (SHG), (2) third harmonic generation (THG), and (3) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. The main advantage of the above mentioned techniques is that they derive their imaging contrast from optical nonlinearities that do not involve fluorescence process. As a particular application example we investigated collagen arrays. We show that combining SHG-THG-CARS onto a single imaging platform provides complementary information about the sub-micron architecture of the tissue. SHG microscopy reveals the fibrillar architecture of collagen arrays and confirm a rather high degree of heterogeneity of χ(2) within the focal volume, THG highlights the boundaries between the collagen sheets, and CH2 spectroscopic contrast with CARS.

  2. Probing the immune and healing response of murine intestinal mucosa by time-lapse 2-photon microscopy of laser-induced lesions with real-time dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Orzekowsky-Schroeder, Regina; Klinger, Antje; Freidank, Sebastian; Linz, Norbert; Eckert, Sebastian; Hüttmann, Gereon; Gebert, Andreas; Vogel, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Gut mucosa is an important interface between body and environment. Immune response and healing processes of murine small intestinal mucosa were investigated by intravital time-lapse two-photon excited autofluorescence microscopy of the response to localized laser-induced damage. Epithelial lesions were created by 355-nm, 500-ps pulses from a microchip laser that produced minute cavitation bubbles. Size and dynamics of these bubbles were monitored using a novel interferometric backscattering technique with 80 nm resolution. Small bubbles (< 2.5 µm maximum radius) merely resulted in autofluorescence loss of the target cell. Larger bubbles (7-25 µm) affected several cells and provoked immigration of immune cells (polymorphonuclear leucocytes). Damaged cells were expelled into the lumen, and the epithelium healed within 2 hours by stretching and migration of adjacent epithelial cells. PMID:25360369

  3. Laser-induced (endo)vascular photothermal effects studied by combined brightfield and fluorescence microscopy in hamster dorsal skin fold venules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezemer, R.; Heger, M.; van den Wijngaard, J. P. H.; Mordon, S. R.; van Gemert, M. J. C.; Beek, J. F.

    2007-07-01

    The putative features of the (endo)vascular photothermal response, characterized by laser-induced thermal denaturation of blood and vessel wall constituents, have been elucidated individually, but not simultaneously in dynamic, isolated in vivo systems. A hamster dorsal skin fold model in combination with brightfield/fluorescence intravital microscopy was used to examine the effect of laser pulse duration and blood flow velocity on the size of the thermal coagulum, its attachment behavior, and laser-mediated vasomotion. The size of the coagulum and the extent of vasoconstriction and latent vasodilation were proportional to the laser pulse duration, but pulse duration had no effect on coagulum attachment/dislodgement. Blood flow velocity exhibited no significant effect on the studied parameters. The (endo)vascular photothermal response is governed predominantly by laser energy deposition and to a marginal extent by blood flow velocity.

  4. Light Microscopy Microscope Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-02-04

    Ground testing for the first confocal Light Microscopy Microscope (LMM) Experiment. Procter and Gamble is working with NASA Glenn scientists to prepare for a study that examines product stabilizers in a microgravity environment. The particles in the tube glow orange because they have been fluorescently tagged with a dye that reacts to green laser lights to allow construction of a 3D image point by point. The experiment, which will be sent to the ISS later this year, will help P&G develop improved product stabilizers to extend shelf life and develop more environmentally friendly packaging.

  5. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  6. Electrochemical force microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Collins, Liam F.; Rodriguez, Brian J.

    2017-01-10

    A system and method for electrochemical force microscopy are provided. The system and method are based on a multidimensional detection scheme that is sensitive to forces experienced by a biased electrode in a solution. The multidimensional approach allows separation of fast processes, such as double layer charging, and charge relaxation, and slow processes, such as diffusion and faradaic reactions, as well as capturing the bias dependence of the response. The time-resolved and bias measurements can also allow probing both linear (small bias range) and non-linear (large bias range) electrochemical regimes and potentially the de-convolution of charge dynamics and diffusion processes from steric effects and electrochemical reactivity.

  7. Silver stain for electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbett, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Ammoniacal silver stain used for light microscopy was adapted advantageously for use with very thin biological sections required for electron microscopy. Silver stain can be performed in short time, has more contrast, and is especially useful for low power electron microscopy.

  8. Multi-pass microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Juffmann, Thomas; Klopfer, Brannon B.; Frankort, Timmo L.I.; Haslinger, Philipp; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Microscopy of biological specimens often requires low light levels to avoid damage. This yields images impaired by shot noise. An improved measurement accuracy at the Heisenberg limit can be achieved exploiting quantum correlations. If sample damage is the limiting resource, an equivalent limit can be reached by passing photons through a specimen multiple times sequentially. Here we use self-imaging cavities and employ a temporal post-selection scheme to present full-field multi-pass polarization and transmission micrographs with variance reductions of 4.4±0.8 dB (11.6±0.8 dB in a lossless setup) and 4.8±0.8 dB, respectively, compared with the single-pass shot-noise limit. If the accuracy is limited by the number of detected probe particles, our measurements show a variance reduction of 25.9±0.9 dB. The contrast enhancement capabilities in imaging and in diffraction studies are demonstrated with nanostructured samples and with embryonic kidney 293T cells. This approach to Heisenberg-limited microscopy does not rely on quantum state engineering. PMID:27670525

  9. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  10. Magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  11. Multi-pass microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juffmann, Thomas; Klopfer, Brannon B.; Frankort, Timmo L. I.; Haslinger, Philipp; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2016-09-01

    Microscopy of biological specimens often requires low light levels to avoid damage. This yields images impaired by shot noise. An improved measurement accuracy at the Heisenberg limit can be achieved exploiting quantum correlations. If sample damage is the limiting resource, an equivalent limit can be reached by passing photons through a specimen multiple times sequentially. Here we use self-imaging cavities and employ a temporal post-selection scheme to present full-field multi-pass polarization and transmission micrographs with variance reductions of 4.4+/-0.8 dB (11.6+/-0.8 dB in a lossless setup) and 4.8+/-0.8 dB, respectively, compared with the single-pass shot-noise limit. If the accuracy is limited by the number of detected probe particles, our measurements show a variance reduction of 25.9+/-0.9 dB. The contrast enhancement capabilities in imaging and in diffraction studies are demonstrated with nanostructured samples and with embryonic kidney 293T cells. This approach to Heisenberg-limited microscopy does not rely on quantum state engineering.

  12. Applications of second-harmonic generation imaging microscopy in ovarian and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tilbury, Karissa; Campagnola, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    In this perspective, we discuss how the nonlinear optical technique of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has been used to greatly enhance our understanding of the tumor microenvironment (TME) of breast and ovarian cancer. Striking changes in collagen architecture are associated with these epithelial cancers, and SHG can image these changes with great sensitivity and specificity with submicrometer resolution. This information has not historically been exploited by pathologists but has the potential to enhance diagnostic and prognostic capabilities. We summarize the utility of image processing tools that analyze fiber morphology in SHG images of breast and ovarian cancer in human tissues and animal models. We also describe methods that exploit the SHG physical underpinnings that are effective in delineating normal and malignant tissues. First we describe the use of polarization-resolved SHG that yields metrics related to macromolecular and supramolecular structures. The coherence and corresponding phase-matching process of SHG results in emission directionality (forward to backward), which is related to sub-resolution fibrillar assembly. These analyses are more general and more broadly applicable than purely morphology-based analyses; however, they are more computationally intensive. Intravital imaging techniques are also emerging that incorporate all of these quantitative analyses. Now, all these techniques can be coupled with rapidly advancing miniaturization of imaging systems to afford their use in clinical situations including enhancing pathology analysis and also in assisting in real-time surgical determination of tumor margins.

  13. Applications of Second-Harmonic Generation Imaging Microscopy in Ovarian and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tilbury, Karissa; Campagnola, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    In this perspective, we discuss how the nonlinear optical technique of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has been used to greatly enhance our understanding of the tumor microenvironment (TME) of breast and ovarian cancer. Striking changes in collagen architecture are associated with these epithelial cancers, and SHG can image these changes with great sensitivity and specificity with submicrometer resolution. This information has not historically been exploited by pathologists but has the potential to enhance diagnostic and prognostic capabilities. We summarize the utility of image processing tools that analyze fiber morphology in SHG images of breast and ovarian cancer in human tissues and animal models. We also describe methods that exploit the SHG physical underpinnings that are effective in delineating normal and malignant tissues. First we describe the use of polarization-resolved SHG that yields metrics related to macromolecular and supramolecular structures. The coherence and corresponding phase-matching process of SHG results in emission directionality (forward to backward), which is related to sub-resolution fibrillar assembly. These analyses are more general and more broadly applicable than purely morphology-based analyses; however, they are more computationally intensive. Intravital imaging techniques are also emerging that incorporate all of these quantitative analyses. Now, all these techniques can be coupled with rapidly advancing miniaturization of imaging systems to afford their use in clinical situations including enhancing pathology analysis and also in assisting in real-time surgical determination of tumor margins. PMID:25987830

  14. The skin immune atlas: three-dimensional analysis of cutaneous leukocyte subsets by multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tong, Philip L; Roediger, Ben; Kolesnikoff, Natasha; Biro, Maté; Tay, Szun S; Jain, Rohit; Shaw, Lisa E; Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Site-specific differences in skin response to pathogens and in the course of cutaneous inflammatory diseases are well appreciated. The composition and localization of cutaneous leukocytes has been studied extensively using histology and flow cytometry. However, the precise three-dimensional (3D) distribution of distinct immune cell subsets within skin at different body sites requires visualization of intact living skin. We used intravital multiphoton microscopy in transgenic reporter mice in combination with quantitative flow cytometry to generate a 3D immune cell atlas of mouse skin. The 3D location of innate and adaptive immune cells and site-specific differences in the densities of macrophages, T cells, and mast cells at four defined sites (ear, back, footpad, and tail) is presented. The combinatorial approach further demonstrates an as yet unreported age-dependent expansion of dermal gamma-delta T cells. Localization of dermal immune cells relative to anatomical structures was also determined. Although dendritic cells were dispersed homogeneously within the dermis, mast cells preferentially localized to the perivascular space. Finally, we show the functional relevance of site-specific mast cell disparities using the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis model. These approaches are applicable to assessing immune cell variations and potential functional consequences in the setting of infection, as well as the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin conditions.

  15. Second-harmonic generation and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy through a rodent mammary imaging window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Pamela A.; Nazir, Muhammad; Szulczewski, Michael J.; Keely, Patricia J.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2012-03-01

    Tumor-Associated Collagen Signatures (TACS) have been identified that manifest in specific ways during breast tumor progression and that correspond to patient outcome. There are also compelling metabolic changes associated with carcinoma invasion and progression. We have characterized the difference in the autofluorescent properties of metabolic co-factors, NADH and FAD, between normal and carcinoma breast cell lines. Also, we have shown in vitro that increased collagen density alters metabolic genes which are associated with glycolysis and leads to a more invasive phenotype. Establishing the relationship between collagen density, cellular metabolism, and metastasis in physiologically relevant cancer models is crucial for developing cancer therapies. To study cellular metabolism with respect to collagen density in vivo, we use multiphoton fluorescence excitation microscopy (MPM) in conjunction with a rodent mammary imaging window implanted in defined mouse cancer models. These models are ideal for the study of collagen changes in vivo, allowing determination of corresponding metabolic changes in breast cancer invasion and progression. To measure cellular metabolism, we collect fluorescence lifetime (FLIM) signatures of NADH and FAD, which are known to change based on the microenvironment of the cells. Additionally, MPM systems are capable of collecting second harmonic generation (SHG) signals which are a nonlinear optical property of collagen. Therefore, MPM, SHG, and FLIM are powerful tools with great potential for characterizing key features of breast carcinoma in vivo. Below we present the current efforts of our collaborative group to develop intravital approaches based on these imaging techniques to look at defined mouse mammary models.

  16. Use of two-photon microscopy to study Leishmania major infection of the skin.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Matheus Batista; Hohman, Leah Shan; Egen, Jackson G; Peters, Nathan C

    2017-08-15

    Intra-vital two-photon microscopy (2P-IVM) allows for in-situ investigation of tissue organization, cell behavior and the dynamic interactions between different cell types in their natural environment. This methodology has also expanded our understanding of the immune response against pathogens. Leishmania are protozoan intracellular parasites that have adapted to successfully establish infection within the context of an inflammatory response in the skin following transmission by the bite of an infected sand fly. The generation of fluorescent transgenic parasites coupled with the increased availability of different types of fluorescent transgenic reporter mice has facilitated the study of the host-parasite interaction in the skin, significantly impacting our understanding of cutaneous leishmaniasis. In this review we will discuss 2P-IVM in the context of Leishmania infection of the mouse ear skin and describe a simple and minimally invasive procedure that allows long-term imaging of this host-pathogen interaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Image Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajapaksa, Indrajith

    In this thesis we describe an enhancement to the Atomic force microscope (AFM) to simultaneously gather topographic features and spectroscopic information .Compared to the current state of the art of near-field excitation and far-field detection AFM imaging techniques our system uses a radical new approach near-field excitation and near-field detection. By placing the detector in the near-field we achieve high signal to noise and single molecular resolution. The origin of our near-field detector signal is the image force gradient due to the interaction of the stimulated molecular dipole with its image on the metal probe. We designed and built an optical and electronic system to capture this signal and simultaneously image nano-scale surface topography and optical image force gradient. By varying the wavelength of the excitation beam we measure the induced optical image force gradient spectra of molecules on surface. These spectra show good agreement with the absorption spectra of the bulk molecules measured by conventional absorption spectroscopy. We show that image force gradient is directly proportional to the optical absorption dipole strength. Using Finite Element 3D electromagnetic simulations and using Lorentz model for the excited molecular dipole we showed that the image force gradient has a decay length of 1nm, making the theoretical resolution of this microscopy technique approximately 1 nm. This rapid decay was measured experimentally .This resolution was seen by the high contrasting spectroscopic images of molecules on the surface. In follow on experiments this technique was extended to provide surface Raman spectroscopy and microscopy at molecular resolution. We create an image force gradient interaction through optical parametric down conversion between stimulated Raman excited molecules on a surface and a cantilevered nanometer scale probe brought very close to it. Spectroscopy and microscopy on clusters of molecules have been performed. Single

  18. Applications of subsurface microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tetard, Laurene; Passian, Ali; Farahi, Rubye H; Voy, Brynn H; Thundat, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Exploring the interior of a cell is of tremendous importance in order to assess the effects of nanomaterials on biological systems. Outside of a controlled laboratory environment, nanomaterials will most likely not be conveniently labeled or tagged so that their translocation within a biological system cannot be easily identified and quantified. Ideally, the characterization of nanomaterials within a cell requires a nondestructive, label-free, and subsurface approach. Subsurface nanoscale imaging represents a real challenge for instrumentation. Indeed the tools available for high resolution characterization, including optical, electron or scanning probe microscopies, mainly provide topography images or require taggants that fluoresce. Although the intercellular environment holds a great deal of information, subsurface visualization remains a poorly explored area. Recently, it was discovered that by mechanically perturbing a sample, it was possible to observe its response in time with nanoscale resolution by probing the surface with a micro-resonator such as a microcantilever probe. Microcantilevers are used as the force-sensing probes in atomic force microscopy (AFM), where the nanometer-scale probe tip on the microcantilever interacts with the sample in a highly controlled manner to produce high-resolution raster-scanned information of the sample surface. Taking advantage of the existing capabilities of AFM, we present a novel technique, mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM), which has the ability to probe subsurface structures such as non-labeled nanoparticles embedded in a cell. In MSAFM mechanical actuators (PZTs) excite the probe and the sample at different frequencies as depicted in the first figure of this chapter. The nonlinear nature of the tip-sample interaction, at the point of contact of the probe and the surface of the sample, in the contact mode AFM configuration permits the mixing of the elastic waves. The new dynamic system comprises new

  19. Characterization of Polymer Blends: Optical Microscopy (*Polarized, Interference and Phase Contrast Microscopy*) and Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan; Darling, Seth B.

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 15 surveys the characterization of macro, micro and meso morphologies of polymer blends by optical microscopy. Confocal Microscopy offers the ability to view the three dimensional morphology of polymer blends, popular in characterization of biological systems. Confocal microscopy uses point illumination and a spatial pinhole to eliminate out-of focus light in samples that are thicker than the focal plane.

  20. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens. PMID:27103155

  1. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-04-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens.

  2. Microscopy of photoionisation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aseyev, S. A.; Mironov, B. N.; Minogin, V. G.; Cherkun, Aleksandr P.; Chekalin, Sergei V.

    2013-04-01

    A method is demonstrated which combines the ionisation of free molecules by a sharply focused femtosecond laser beam and projection microscopy in a divergent electric field. The electric field is produced in vacuum between a metallic tip and a flat positionsensitive charged particle detector. The method enables investigation of photoionisation processes in low-density gases with a subdiffraction spatial resolution and can be used as well in profile measurements for sharply focused, intense laser beams. In a demonstration experiment, a femtosecond laser beam with a peak intensity of ~1014 W cm-2 was focused to a 40-μm-diameter waist in vacuum near a millimetre-size tip and ~2-μm spatial resolution was achieved. According to our estimates, the use of a sharper tip will ensure a submicron spatial resolution, which is a crucial condition for the spatial diagnostics of sharply focused short-wavelength VUV radiation and X-rays.

  3. Waveguide optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Alexandre A.

    1997-08-01

    The theoretical aspects of the light scattering on the statistical irregularities of the planar optical waveguide are described. The analysis of direct and inverse light scattering problems is accomplished. The theoretical investigation predicts: the lateral resolution can attain approximately 20 nm and the vertical resolution (in rms height) can attain approximately 1 angstrom. The limiting lateral resolution is a approximately 15-times less than Abbe's diffraction limit. Thus the superresolution may be accomplished by the waveguide optical microscopy (WOM). The increasing of WOM's resolution depends on a-priori information of the irregularities and on a sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio. A possible using of WOM for bioecological researchers has been mentioned.

  4. Hyperspectral light sheet microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahr, Wiebke; Schmid, Benjamin; Schmied, Christopher; Fahrbach, Florian O.; Huisken, Jan

    2015-09-01

    To study the development and interactions of cells and tissues, multiple fluorescent markers need to be imaged efficiently in a single living organism. Instead of acquiring individual colours sequentially with filters, we created a platform based on line-scanning light sheet microscopy to record the entire spectrum for each pixel in a three-dimensional volume. We evaluated data sets with varying spectral sampling and determined the optimal channel width to be around 5 nm. With the help of these data sets, we show that our setup outperforms filter-based approaches with regard to image quality and discrimination of fluorophores. By spectral unmixing we resolved overlapping fluorophores with up to nanometre resolution and removed autofluorescence in zebrafish and fruit fly embryos.

  5. Photon scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Goudonnet, J.P.; Salomon, L.; De Fornel, F.; Chabrier, G. . Lab. de Physique du Solide); Warmack, R.J.; Ferrell, T.L. )

    1990-01-01

    The Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (PSTM) is the photon analogue of the electron Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM). It uses the evanescent field due to the total internal reflection of a light beam in a Total Internal Reflection (TIR) prism. The sample, mounted on the base of the prism, modulates the evanescent field. A sharpened optical fiber probes this field, and the collected light is processed to generate an image of the topography and the chemical composition of the surface. We give, in this paper, a description of the microscope and discuss the influence of several parameters such as -- polarization of light, angle of incidence, shape of the end of the fiber -- on the resolution. Images of various samples -- glass samples, teflon spheres -- are presented. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Sensitivity of photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Building on its high spatial resolution, deep penetration depth and excellent image contrast, 3D photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has grown tremendously since its first publication in 2005. Integrating optical excitation and acoustic detection, PAM has broken through both the optical diffusion and optical diffraction limits. PAM has 100% relative sensitivity to optical absorption (i.e., a given percentage change in the optical absorption coefficient yields the same percentage change in the photoacoustic amplitude), and its ultimate detection sensitivity is limited only by thermal noise. Focusing on the engineering aspects of PAM, this Review discusses the detection sensitivity of PAM, compares the detection efficiency of different PAM designs, and summarizes the imaging performance of various endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. It then describes representative PAM applications with high detection sensitivity, and outlines paths to further improvement. PMID:25302158

  7. [Confocal laser scanning microscopy].

    PubMed

    Ulrich, M

    2015-07-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) allows the in vivo evaluation of melanocytic and nonmelanocytic skin tumours with high sensitivity and specificity. RCM represents an optical imaging technique, which enables us to examine the skin at high resolution. Today, RCM represents not only an interesting tool for dermatologic research but has also been introduced as a diagnostic tool in every day clinical practice. As such, RCM is applied for improvement of skin cancer diagnosis adjunct to clinical and dermatoscopic examination. In combination with dermatoscopy RCM has shown an increased specificity with similar sensitivity. In this regard RCM helps to decrease the rate of unnecessary biopsies of benign lesions. Despite its use in dermatooncology RCM may also be used for diagnosis and monitoring of inflammatory diseases. Future developments include technical improvements, teledermatology solutions and the application of ex vivo RCM in Moh's micrographic surgery.

  8. Interference reflection microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barr, Valarie A; Bunnell, Stephen C

    2009-12-01

    Interference reflection microscopy (IRM) is an optical technique used to study cell adhesion or cell mobility on a glass coverslip. The interference of reflected light waves generates images with high contrast and definition. IRM can be used to examine almost any cell that will rest upon a glass surface, although it is most useful in examining sites of close contact between a cell and substratum. This unit presents methods for obtaining IRM images of cells with particular emphasis on IRM imaging with a laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM), as most LSCM are already capable of recording these images without any modification of the instrument. Techniques are presented for imaging fixed and live cells, as well as simultaneous multi-channel capture of fluorescence and reflection images. Copyright 2009 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Extraterrestrial optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Soffen, G A

    1969-07-01

    An examination of the literature concerned with the use of microscopy for planetary investigation reveals a serious deficiency of current efforts. Many scientists have recommended the use of a microscope for planetary investigation [Biology and the Exploration of Mars, C. S. Pittendrigh, W. Vishniac, and J. P. T. Pearman, Eds. (National Academy of Science-National Research Council, Washington, D. C., 1966), (a) D. Mazia, p. 31; (b) J. Lederberg, p. 137; (c) S. Fox, pp. 219, 226; (d) D. Glaser, p. 326; (e) D. Glaser, J. McCarthy, and M. Minsky, pp. 333, 341; (f) D. G. Rea, pp. 347-426; (g) P. G. Conger, pp. 409-414; (h) M. H. Fernandez, pp. 414-425; (i) D. Schwartz, pp.425-426 . H. P. Klein, Some Biological Problems in the Search for Extraterrestrial Life (American Astronautical Society, Washington, D. C., 1968).] but few are involved in developing the experiment. Since this is a particularly timely period for the preparation of planetary lander experiments, the reasons for this lack of effort would appear to be limited resources or an unclear course of action, rather than lack of interest. Microscopy used for planetary investigation is chiefly the interest of the biologist and the mineralogist. In both cases the desire to use magnifying optics in order to observe objects of submillimeter size is based upon the rich body of knowledge we have acquired from observing the terrestrial microcosm. In addition to purely imaging, certain special optical techniques, e.g., polarimetry, colorimetry, phase contrast, etc., can be used to enhance the interpretation of microscopic imaging data. This interaction of the optical with the chemical or structural aspects of nature can be used to great advantage in the exploration of extraterrestrial biology and mineralogy.

  10. Ultrasonic Force Microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Oleg; Briggs, Andrew

    Ultrasonic Force Microscopy, or UFM, allows combination of two apparently mutually exclusive requirements for the nanomechanical probe—high stiffness for the efficient indentation and high mechanical compliance that brings force sensitivity. Somewhat inventively, UFM allows to combine these two virtues in the same cantilever by using indention of the sample at high frequency, when cantilever is very rigid, but detecting the result of this indention at much lower frequency. That is made possible due to the extreme nonlinearity of the nanoscale tip-surface junction force-distance dependence, that acts as "mechanical diode" detecting ultrasound in AFM. After introducing UFM principles, we discuss features of experimental UFM implementation, and the theory of contrast in this mode, progressing to quantitative measurements of contact stiffness. A variety of UFM applications ranging from semiconductor quantum nanostructures, graphene, very large scale integrated circuits, and reinforced ceramics to polymer composites and biological materials is presented via comprehensive imaging gallery accompanied by the guidance for the optimal UFM measurements of these materials. We also address effects of adhesion and topography on the elasticity imaging and the approaches for reducing artifacts connected with these effects. This is complemented by another extremely useful feature of UFM—ultrasound induced superlubricity that allows damage free imaging of materials ranging from stiff solid state devices and graphene to biological materials. Finally, we proceed to the exploration of time-resolved nanoscale phenomena using nonlinear mixing of multiple vibration frequencies in ultrasonic AFM—Heterodyne Force Microscopy, or HFM, that also include mixing of ultrasonic vibration with other periodic physical excitations, eg. electrical, photothermal, etc. Significant section of the chapter analyzes the ability of UFM and HFM to detect subsurface mechanical inhomogeneities, as well as

  11. Progress in the Correlative Atomic Force Microscopy and Optical Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lulu; Cai, Mingjun; Tong, Ti; Wang, Hongda

    2017-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has evolved from the originally morphological imaging technique to a powerful and multifunctional technique for manipulating and detecting the interactions between molecules at nanometer resolution. However, AFM cannot provide the precise information of synchronized molecular groups and has many shortcomings in the aspects of determining the mechanism of the interactions and the elaborate structure due to the limitations of the technology, itself, such as non-specificity and low imaging speed. To overcome the technical limitations, it is necessary to combine AFM with other complementary techniques, such as fluorescence microscopy. The combination of several complementary techniques in one instrument has increasingly become a vital approach to investigate the details of the interactions among molecules and molecular dynamics. In this review, we reported the principles of AFM and optical microscopy, such as confocal microscopy and single-molecule localization microscopy, and focused on the development and use of correlative AFM and optical microscopy.

  12. Progress in the Correlative Atomic Force Microscopy and Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lulu; Cai, Mingjun; Tong, Ti; Wang, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has evolved from the originally morphological imaging technique to a powerful and multifunctional technique for manipulating and detecting the interactions between molecules at nanometer resolution. However, AFM cannot provide the precise information of synchronized molecular groups and has many shortcomings in the aspects of determining the mechanism of the interactions and the elaborate structure due to the limitations of the technology, itself, such as non-specificity and low imaging speed. To overcome the technical limitations, it is necessary to combine AFM with other complementary techniques, such as fluorescence microscopy. The combination of several complementary techniques in one instrument has increasingly become a vital approach to investigate the details of the interactions among molecules and molecular dynamics. In this review, we reported the principles of AFM and optical microscopy, such as confocal microscopy and single-molecule localization microscopy, and focused on the development and use of correlative AFM and optical microscopy. PMID:28441775

  13. In vivo microdissection and live embryo imaging by two-photon microscopy to study Drosophila melanogaster early development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supatto, Willy; Brouzes, Eric; Farge, Emmanuel; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel

    2004-09-01

    Animal embryo development exhibits a complex choreography of cell movements highly regulated both in time and space. This sequence of morphogenetic movements is initiated at gastrulation and is tightly controlled by a cascade of developmental gene expression. We have recently reported that developmental gene expression can in turn be mechanically regulated by morphogenetic movements during Drosophila melanogaster early development. In order to study this phenomenon of mechanically induced gene expression, it is necessary to develop new techniques of in vivo investigation. We show that the combination of femtosecond pulse intratissue surgery and two-photon-excitation fluorescence (2PEF) microscopy is a powerful tool for (i) disrupting natural morphogenetic movements and (ii) imaging native and disrupted morphogenetic movements during Drosophila development. (i) First, non-linear-absorption-mediated photo-disruption makes it possible to perform controlled intra-vital micro-dissections resulting in the modulation of morphogenetic movements and subsequent mechano-sensitive gene expression. (ii) Second, in vivo 2PEF microscopy of transgenic GFP systems appears to be an excellent technique for long-term in vivo imaging of the complex morphogenetic movements involved in normal or perturbed Drosophila gastrulation. Together, these two techniques provide a powerful novel approach to study embryo development.

  14. Virtual microscopy in pathology education.

    PubMed

    Dee, Fred R

    2009-08-01

    Technology for acquisition of virtual slides was developed in 1985; however, it was not until the late 1990s that desktop computers had enough processing speed to commercialize virtual microscopy and apply the technology to education. By 2000, the progressive decrease in use of traditional microscopy in medical student education had set the stage for the entry of virtual microscopy into medical schools. Since that time, it has been successfully implemented into many pathology courses in the United States and around the world, with surveys indicating that about 50% of pathology courses already have or expect to implement virtual microscopy. Over the last decade, in addition to an increasing ability to emulate traditional microscopy, virtual microscopy has allowed educators to take advantage of the accessibility, efficiency, and pedagogic versatility of the computer and the Internet. The cost of virtual microscopy in education is now quite reasonable after taking into account replacement cost for microscopes, maintenance of glass slides, and the fact that 1-dimensional microscope space can be converted to multiuse computer laboratories or research. Although the current technology for implementation of virtual microscopy in histopathology education is very good, it could be further improved upon by better low-power screen resolution and depth of field. Nevertheless, virtual microscopy is beginning to play an increasing role in continuing education, house staff education, and evaluation of competency in histopathology. As Z-axis viewing (focusing) becomes more efficient, virtual microscopy will also become integrated into education in cytology, hematology, microbiology, and urinalysis.

  15. Sample preparation for STED microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Christian A; Neumann, Daniel; Schmidt, Roman; Egner, Alexander; Jakobs, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Since the discovery of the diffraction barrier in the late nineteenth century, it has been commonly accepted that with far-field optical microscopy it is not possible to resolve structural details considerably finer than half the wavelength of light. The emergence of STED microscopy showed that, at least for fluorescence imaging, these limits can be overcome. Since STED microscopy is a far-field technique, in principle, the same sample preparation as for conventional confocal microscopy may be utilized. The increased resolution, however, requires additional precautions to ensure the structural preservation of the specimen. We present robust protocols to generate test samples for STED microscopy. These protocols for bead samples and immunolabeled mammalian cells may be used as starting points to adapt existing labeling strategies for the requirements of sub-diffraction resolution microscopy.

  16. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  17. Microscopy of semiconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennycook, S. J.

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of the trip was to present an invited talk at the 7th Oxford Conference on Microscopy of Semiconducting Materials entitled, High-Resolution Z-Contrast Imaging of Heterostructures and Superlattices, (Oxford, United Kingdom) and to visit VG Microscopes, East Grinstead, for discussions on the progress of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) 300-kV high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), which is currently on order. The traveler also visited three other institutions with 100-kV STEMs that either have or intend to purchase the necessary modifications to provide Z-contrast capability similar to that of the existing ORNL machine. Specifically, Max-Planck Institut fuer Metallforschung (Stuttgart, Germany); Cambridge University, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy (Cambridge, United Kingdom); and Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University (Cambridge, United Kingdom) were visited. In addition, discussions were held with C. Humphreys on the possibility of obtaining joint funding for collaborative research involving electron beam writing and Z-contrast imaging in the Cambridge and Oak Ridge STEMs, respectively.

  18. Nuclear microscopy: biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Frank; Landsberg, Judith P.

    1993-05-01

    Recent developments in high energy ion beam techniques and technology have enabled the scanning proton microprobe (SPM) to make advances in biomedical research. In particular the combination of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) to measure the elemental concentrations of inorganic elements, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) to characterise the organic matrix, and scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) to provide information on the density and structure of the sample, represents a powerful set of techniques which can be applied simultaneously to the specimen under investigation. This paper reviews briefly the biomedical work using the proton microprobe that has been carried out since the 2nd Int. Conf. on Nuclear Microprobe Technology and Applications held in Melbourne, 1990. Three recent and diverse examples of medical research are also presented from work carried out using the Oxford SPM. The first is a preliminary experiment carried out using human hair as a monitor for potential toxicity, using PIXE elemental mapping across the hair cross section to differentiate between elements contained within the hair and contamination from external sources. The second example is in the use of STIM to map individual cells in freeze-dried tissue, showing the possibility of the in situ microanalysis of cells and their extracellular environment. The third is the use of PIXE, RBS and STIM to identify and analyse the elemental constituents of neuritic plaque cores in untreated freeze-dried Alzheimer's tissue. This work resolves a current controversy by revealing an absence of aluminium levels in plaque cores at the 15 ppm level.

  19. Mueller polarimetric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laude-Boulesteix, Blandine; De Martino, Antonello; Le Naour, Gilles; Genestie, Catherine; Schwartz, Laurent; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Drevillon, Bernard

    2004-07-01

    We present a multispectral polarimetric imaging system well suited for complete Mueller matrix microscopy. The source is a spectrally filtered halogen light bulb, and the image is formed on a fast CCD camera The light polarization is modulated before the sample and analyzed after the sample by using nematic liquid crystal modulators.. The whole Mueller matrix image of the sample is typically measured over 5 seconds for a good signal-to-noise ratio. The instrument design, together with an original and easy-to-operate calibration procedure provides a high polarimetric accuracy over wide ranges of wavelengths and magnifications. Mueller polarimetry provides separate images of scalar and vector retardation and dichroism of the sample, together with its depolarizing power, while all these effects do contribute simultaneously to the contrasts observed in standard polarized microsopy. Polarimetric images of several samples, namely an unstained rabbit cornea, a picrosirius red stained hepatic biopsy, and a rat artery specifically stained for collagen III are shown and discussed

  20. Microscopy of photoionisation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Aseyev, S A; Mironov, B N; Minogin, V G; Cherkun, Aleksandr P; Chekalin, Sergei V

    2013-04-30

    A method is demonstrated which combines the ionisation of free molecules by a sharply focused femtosecond laser beam and projection microscopy in a divergent electric field. The electric field is produced in vacuum between a metallic tip and a flat positionsensitive charged particle detector. The method enables investigation of photoionisation processes in low-density gases with a subdiffraction spatial resolution and can be used as well in profile measurements for sharply focused, intense laser beams. In a demonstration experiment, a femtosecond laser beam with a peak intensity of {approx}10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2} was focused to a 40-{mu}m-diameter waist in vacuum near a millimetre-size tip and {approx}2-{mu}m spatial resolution was achieved. According to our estimates, the use of a sharper tip will ensure a submicron spatial resolution, which is a crucial condition for the spatial diagnostics of sharply focused short-wavelength VUV radiation and X-rays. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  1. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  2. Photon scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reddick, R.C.; Warmack, R.J.; Chilcott, D.W.; Sharp, S.L.; Ferrell, T.L. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN )

    1990-12-01

    An optical tunneling microscope is presented that operates in exactly the same way as the electron scanning tunneling microscope (ESTM). It takes advantage of evanescent fields generated by the total internal reflection (TIR) of light at the interface between materials of different optical densities. The photon scanning tunneling microscope (PSTM) employs an optically conducting probe tip to map spatial variations in the evanescent and scattered field intensity distributions adjacent to a sample surface, which forms or is placed on the TIR surface. These variations are due to the local topography, morphology, and optical activity of the surface and form the basis of imaging. Evanescent field theory is discussed and the evanescent field intensity as a function of surface-probe separation is calculated using several probe tip models. After a description of PSTM construction and operation, evanescent field intensity measurements are shown to agree with the model calculations. PSTM images of various sample surfaces demonstrate subwavelength resolution exceeding that of conventional optical microscopy, especially in the vertical dimension. Limitations and interpretation of PSTM images are discussed as well as the PSTMs applicability to other forms of surface analysis.

  3. Intrinsic Friction Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Daniel; Overney, Rene

    2008-03-01

    A novel scanning probe methodology based on lateral force microscopy is presented wherein kinetic friction measurements, obtained as a function of velocity for various temperatures, are used to deduce apparent Arrhenius-type activation energies for surface and subsurface molecular mobilities. Depending on the coupling strength (cooperativity) between molecular mobilities involved the dissipation energy can carry a significant entropic energy contribution, accounting for the majority of the apparent Arrhenius activation energy. The intrinsic friction methodology also provides a means of directly separating enthalpic energy contributions from entropic ones by employing absolute rate theory. As such, the degree of cooperativity in the system is readily apparent. This methodology is illustrated with nanoscale tribological experiments on two systems, (1) monodisperse, atactic polystyrene and (2) self assembling molecular glassy chromophores. In polystyrene, dissipation was found to be a discrete function of loading, where the γ-relaxation (phenyl group rotation) was recovered for ultra low loads and the β-relaxation (local backbone translation) for higher loads in the same temperature range, indicating sensitivity to surface and subsurface mobilities. For self assembling glassy chromophores, the degree of intermolecular cooperativity was deduced using the methodology, resulting in an increased understanding of the interactions between self assembling molecules.

  4. Grueneisen Relaxation Photoacoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lidai; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-10-01

    The temperature-dependent property of the Grueneisen parameter has been employed in photoacoustic imaging mainly to measure tissue temperature. Here we explore this property using a different approach and develop Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy (GR-PAM), a technique that images nonradiative absorption with confocal optical resolution. GR-PAM sequentially delivers two identical laser pulses with a microsecond-scale time delay. The first laser pulse generates a photoacoustic signal and thermally tags the in-focus absorbers. When the second laser pulse excites the tagged absorbers within the thermal relaxation time, a photoacoustic signal stronger than the first one is produced, owing to the temperature dependence of the Grueneisen parameter. GR-PAM detects the amplitude difference between the two colocated photoacoustic signals, confocally imaging the nonradiative absorption. We greatly improved axial resolution from 45 μm to 2.3 μm and, at the same time, slightly improved lateral resolution from 0.63 μm to 0.41 μm. In addition, the optical sectioning capability facilitates the measurement of the absolute absorption coefficient without fluence calibration.

  5. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  6. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  7. Verification of Planning Target Volume Settings in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy by Using In-Treatment 4-Dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Wataru; Yamashita, Hideomi; Kida, Satoshi; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Sakumi, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Haga, Akihiro

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate setup error and tumor motion during beam delivery by using 4-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) and to assess the adequacy of the planning target volume (PTV) margin for lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT-SBRT). Methods and Materials: Fifteen lung cancer patients treated by single-arc VMAT-SBRT were selected in this analysis. All patients were treated with an abdominal compressor. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on maximum inspiration and maximum expiration CT datasets from 4D CT respiratory sorting and merged into internal target volumes (ITVs). The PTV margin was isotropically taken as 5 mm. Registration was automatically performed using “pre-3D” CBCT. Treatment was performed with a D95 prescription of 50 Gy delivered in 4 fractions. The 4D tumor locations during beam delivery were determined using in-treatment 4D CBCT images acquired in each fraction. Then, the discrepancy between the actual tumor location and the ITV was evaluated in the lateral, vertical, and longitudinal directions. Results: Overall, 55 4D CBCT sets during VMAT-SBRT were successfully obtained. The amplitude of tumor motion was less than 10 mm in all directions. The average displacements between ITV and actual tumor location during treatment were 0.41 ± 0.93 mm, 0.15 ± 0.58 mm, and 0.60 ± 0.99 mm for the craniocaudal, left-right, and anteroposterior directions, respectively. The discrepancy in each phase did not exceed 5 mm in any direction. Conclusions: With in-treatment 4D CBCT, we confirmed the required PTV margins when the registration for moving target was performed using pre-3D CBCT. In-treatment 4D CBCT is a direct method for quantitatively assessing the intrafractional location of a moving target.

  8. Verification of planning target volume settings in volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy by using in-treatment 4-dimensional cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Wataru; Yamashita, Hideomi; Kida, Satoshi; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Sakumi, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Haga, Akihiro

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate setup error and tumor motion during beam delivery by using 4-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) and to assess the adequacy of the planning target volume (PTV) margin for lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT-SBRT). Fifteen lung cancer patients treated by single-arc VMAT-SBRT were selected in this analysis. All patients were treated with an abdominal compressor. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on maximum inspiration and maximum expiration CT datasets from 4D CT respiratory sorting and merged into internal target volumes (ITVs). The PTV margin was isotropically taken as 5 mm. Registration was automatically performed using "pre-3D" CBCT. Treatment was performed with a D95 prescription of 50 Gy delivered in 4 fractions. The 4D tumor locations during beam delivery were determined using in-treatment 4D CBCT images acquired in each fraction. Then, the discrepancy between the actual tumor location and the ITV was evaluated in the lateral, vertical, and longitudinal directions. Overall, 55 4D CBCT sets during VMAT-SBRT were successfully obtained. The amplitude of tumor motion was less than 10 mm in all directions. The average displacements between ITV and actual tumor location during treatment were 0.41 ± 0.93 mm, 0.15 ± 0.58 mm, and 0.60 ± 0.99 mm for the craniocaudal, left-right, and anteroposterior directions, respectively. The discrepancy in each phase did not exceed 5 mm in any direction. With in-treatment 4D CBCT, we confirmed the required PTV margins when the registration for moving target was performed using pre-3D CBCT. In-treatment 4D CBCT is a direct method for quantitatively assessing the intrafractional location of a moving target. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Pilot Evaluation of a 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Scheme Based on Simultaneous Motion Estimation and Image Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Jun; Gu, Xuejun; Pan, Tinsu; Wang, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a 4-dimensional (4-D) cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) reconstruction scheme based on simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) through patient studies. Methods and Materials: The SMEIR algorithm contains 2 alternating steps: (1) motion-compensated CBCT reconstruction using projections from all phases to reconstruct a reference phase 4D-CBCT by explicitly considering the motion models between each different phase and (2) estimation of motion models directly from projections by matching the measured projections to the forward projection of the deformed reference phase 4D-CBCT. Four lung cancer patients were scanned for 4 to 6 minutes to obtain approximately 2000 projections for each patient. To evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm on a conventional 1-minute CBCT scan, the number of projections at each phase was reduced by a factor of 5, 8, or 10 for each patient. Then, 4D-CBCTs were reconstructed from the down-sampled projections using Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, total variation (TV) minimization, prior image constrained compressive sensing (PICCS), and SMEIR. Using the 4D-CBCT reconstructed from the fully sampled projections as a reference, the relative error (RE) of reconstructed images, root mean square error (RMSE), and maximum error (MaxE) of estimated tumor positions were analyzed to quantify the performance of the SMEIR algorithm. Results: The SMEIR algorithm can achieve results consistent with the reference 4D-CBCT reconstructed with many more projections per phase. With an average of 30 to 40 projections per phase, the MaxE in tumor position detection is less than 1 mm in SMEIR for all 4 patients. Conclusion: The results from a limited number of patients show that SMEIR is a promising tool for high-quality 4D-CBCT reconstruction and tumor motion modeling.

  10. Turbulent Kinetic Energy Assessed by Multipoint 4-Dimensional Flow Magnetic Resonance Imaging Provides Additional Information Relative to Echocardiography for the Determination of Aortic Stenosis Severity.

    PubMed

    Binter, Christian; Gotschy, Alexander; Sündermann, Simon H; Frank, Michelle; Tanner, Felix C; Lüscher, Thomas F; Manka, Robert; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2017-06-01

    Turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), assessed by 4-dimensional (4D) flow magnetic resonance imaging, is a measure of energy loss in disturbed flow as it occurs, for instance, in aortic stenosis (AS). This work investigates the additional information provided by quantifying TKE for the assessment of AS severity in comparison to clinical echocardiographic measures. Fifty-one patients with AS (67±15 years, 20 female) and 10 healthy age-matched controls (69±5 years, 5 female) were prospectively enrolled to undergo multipoint 4D flow magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were split into 2 groups (severe and mild/moderate AS) according to their echocardiographic mean pressure gradient. TKE values were integrated over the aortic arch to obtain peak TKE. Integrating over systole yielded total TKEsys and by normalizing for stroke volume, normalized TKEsys was obtained. Mean pressure gradient and TKE correlated only weakly (R(2)=0.26 for peak TKE and R(2)=0.32 for normalized TKEsys) in the entire study population including control subjects, while no significant correlation was observed in the AS patient group. In the patient population with dilated ascending aorta, both peak TKE and total TKEsys were significantly elevated (P<0.01), whereas mean pressure gradient was significantly lower (P<0.05). Patients with bicuspid aortic valves also showed significantly increased TKE metrics (P<0.01), although no significant difference was found for mean pressure gradient. Elevated TKE levels imply higher energy losses associated with bicuspid aortic valves and dilated ascending aortic geometries that are not assessable by current echocardiographic measures. These findings indicate that TKE may provide complementary information to echocardiography, helping to distinguish within the heterogeneous population of patients with moderate to severe AS. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 4-dimensional variational data assimilation systems . Part II - Performance and application to the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Andrew M.; Arango, Hernan G.; Broquet, Gregoire; Edwards, Chris; Veneziani, Milena; Powell, Brian; Foley, Dave; Doyle, James D.; Costa, Dan; Robinson, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 4-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation systems have been systematically applied to the mesoscale circulation environment of the California Current to demonstrate the performance and practical utility of the various components of ROMS 4D-Var. In particular, we present a comparison of three approaches to 4D-Var, namely: the primal formulation of the incremental strong constraint approach; the dual formulation “physical-space statistical analysis system”; and the dual formulation indirect representer approach. In agreement with theoretical considerations all three approaches converge to the same ocean circulation estimate when using the same observations and prior information. However, the rate of convergence of the dual formulation was found to be inferior to that of the primal formulation. Other aspects of the 4D-Var performance that relate to the use of multiple outer-loops, preconditioning, and the weak constraint are also explored. A systematic evaluation of the impact of the various components of the 4D-Var control vector (i.e. the initial conditions, surface forcing and open boundary conditions) is also presented. It is shown that correcting for uncertainties in the model initial conditions exerts the largest influence on the ability of the model to fit the available observations. Various important diagnostics of 4D-Var are also examined, including estimates of the posterior error, the information content of the observation array, and innovation-based consistency checks on the prior error assumptions. Using these diagnostic tools, we find that more than 90% of the observations assimilated into the model provide redundant information. This is a symptom of the large percentage of satellite data that are used and to some extent the nature of the data processing employed. This is the second in a series of three papers describing the ROMS 4D-Var systems.

  12. Prenatal screening for fetal face and clefting in a prospective study on low-risk population: can 3- and 4-dimensional ultrasound enhance visualization and detection rate?

    PubMed

    Tonni, Gabriele; Centini, Giovanni; Rosignoli, Lucia

    2005-10-01

    A study of 1856 second trimester low-risk pregnancies was conducted over a period of 12 months to evaluate the detection rate of cleft lip and palate by 3- and 4-dimensional (3D, 4D) ultrasonography. To image the fetal face and profile, a protocol regarding the use of external or internal hand stimulation or a repeated scan was followed, and the time taken to perform 3D scan was compared to that of a conventional 2D ultrasound. One case of unilateral right cleft lip and a cleft lip plus cleft palate were both identified, giving a prevalence of 1.1 per 1000 live births and a prenatal detection rate of 100%. The average imaging time for fetal face/profile view was significantly less with 3D when compared to 2D (5.33 vs 6.2 seconds, P < .001) and diagnosis at first scan without external or internal hand stimulation was feasible in 78% by 2D versus 87% by 3D technique (P < .0001). Cleft lip and palate were isolated prenatal findings and newborn karyotyping showed normal chromosomal maps in both cases. With the use of this standardized protocol, we were able to image the fetal face and profile view in all cases. We underline the critical role of sonographic expertise in screening for these anomalies and the great enhancement in imaging soft tissues and bone lesions by using 3D ultrasound. We advocate that screening for cleft lip and palate be included in future standard ultrasound examination in the second trimester of pregnancy.

  13. Epi-Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Donna J.; Brown, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    Epi-fluorescence microscopy is available in most life sciences research laboratories, and when optimized can be a central laboratory tool. In this chapter, the epi-fluorescence light path is introduced and the various components are discussed in detail. Recommendations are made for incident lamp light sources, excitation and emission filters, dichroic mirrors, objective lenses, and charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras in order to obtain the most sensitive epi-fluorescence microscope. The even illumination of metal-halide lamps combined with new “hard” coated filters and mirrors, a high resolution monochrome CCD camera, and a high NA objective lens are all recommended for high resolution and high sensitivity fluorescence imaging. Recommendations are also made for multicolor imaging with the use of monochrome cameras, motorized filter turrets, individual filter cubes, and corresponding dyes that are the best choice for sensitive, high resolution multicolor imaging. Images should be collected using Nyquist sampling and should be corrected for background intensity contributions and nonuniform illumination across the field of view. Photostable fluorescent probes and proteins that absorb a lot of light (i.e., high extinction co-efficients) and generate a lot of fluorescence signal (i.e., high quantum yields) are optimal. A neuronal immune-fluorescence labeling protocol is also presented. Finally, in order to maximize the utility of sensitive wide-field microscopes and generate the highest resolution images with high signal-to-noise, advice for combining wide-field epi-fluorescence imaging with restorative image deconvolution is presented. PMID:23026996

  14. Electronic Blending in Virtual Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maybury, Terrence S.; Farah, Camile S.

    2010-01-01

    Virtual microscopy (VM) is a relatively new technology that transforms the computer into a microscope. In essence, VM allows for the scanning and transfer of glass slides from light microscopy technology to the digital environment of the computer. This transition is also a function of the change from print knowledge to electronic knowledge, or as…

  15. Multi-contrast Photoacoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie

    Photoacoustic microscopy is a hybrid imaging modality with high spatial resolution, moderate imaging depth, excellent imaging contrast and functional imaging capability. Taking full advantage of this powerful weapon, we have investigated different anatomical, functional, flow dynamic and metabolic parameter measurements using photoacoustic microscopy. Specifically, Evans-blue dye was used to enhance photoacoustic microscopy of capillaries; label-free transverse and axial blood flow was measured based on bandwidth broadening and time shift of the photoacoustic signals; metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified in vivo from all the five parameters measured by photoacoustic microcopy; whole cross-sectional imaging of small intestine was achieved on a double-illumination photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of focus and imaging depth; hemodynamic imaging was performed on a MEMS-mirror enhanced photoacoustic microscopy with a cross-sectional imaging rate of 400 Hz. As a maturing imaging technique, PAM is expected to find new applications in both fundamental life science and clinical practice.

  16. Studies in scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror

    1995-06-01

    The following is a final report on our work in the field of Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM), which has been funded by the AFOSR under Contract #F49620-92-J-0164. The AFOSR funding was instrumental in the establishment of a multi-lab facility at the Optical Sciences Center, which performs research in SPM using two ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) STM facilities, and several Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) facilities. The fabrication and characterization work performed in the SPM Laboratory is supplemented by infrared (IR) spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), available in other departments on campus. The report covers the following areas: (1) GaAs and CdSe Structures, (2) Optical Interactions on a nm and nsec Scales, (3) Fullerenes on Gold, (4) Fullerenes on MoS2, (5) Fullerenes on Si, (6) SiC, (7) Nanotubes, (8) Scanning Force Microscopy, and (9) Biology.

  17. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Millet, Larry; Mir, Mustafa; Ding, Huafeng; Unarunotai, Sakulsuk; Rogers, John; Gillette, Martha U; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-01-17

    We present spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) as a new optical microscopy technique, capable of measuring nanoscale structures and dynamics in live cells via interferometry. SLIM combines two classic ideas in light imaging: Zernike's phase contrast microscopy, which renders high contrast intensity images of transparent specimens, and Gabor's holography, where the phase information from the object is recorded. Thus, SLIM reveals the intrinsic contrast of cell structures and, in addition, renders quantitative optical path-length maps across the sample. The resulting topographic accuracy is comparable to that of atomic force microscopy, while the acquisition speed is 1,000 times higher. We illustrate the novel insight into cell dynamics via SLIM by experiments on primary cell cultures from the rat brain. SLIM is implemented as an add-on module to an existing phase contrast microscope, which may prove instrumental in impacting the light microscopy field at a large scale.

  18. Chip-scale microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoan

    2012-08-01

    Chip-scale microscopy imaging platforms are pivotal for improving the efficiency of modern biomedical and bioscience experiments. Their integration with other lab-on-a-chip techniques would allow rapid, reliable and high-throughput sample analysis for applications in diverse disciplines. In typical chip-scale microscopy imaging platforms, the light path can be generalized to the following steps: photons leave the light source, interact with the sample and finally are detected by the sensor. Based on the light path of these platforms, the current review aims to provide some insights on design strategies for chip-scale microscopy. Specifically, we analyze current chip-scale microscopy approaches from three aspects: illumination design, sample manipulation and substrate/imager modification. We also discuss some opportunities for future developments of chip-scale microscopy, such as time multiplexed structured illumination and hydrodynamic focusing for high throughput sample manipulation.

  19. Atomic force microscopy combined with optical microscopy for cells investigation.

    PubMed

    Cascione, Mariafrancesca; de Matteis, Valeria; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Leporatti, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    This review reports on the combined use of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and several type of optical/fluorescence/laser scanning microscopy for investigating cells. It is shown that the hybrid systems of AFM with optical-derived microscopies enable to study in detail cell surface properties (such as topography), their mechanical properties (e.g., Young's modulus) mechanotransduction phenomena and allow to gain insight into biological-related pathways and mechanisms in the complex nanoworld of cells. Microsc. Res. Tech. 80:109-123, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Internal Motion Tracking Should Be Used to Validate 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Abdominal Radiation Therapy Patients.

    PubMed

    Rankine, Leith; Wan, Hanlin; Parikh, Parag; Maughan, Nichole; Poulsen, Per; DeWees, Todd; Klein, Eric; Santanam, Lakshmi

    2016-06-01

    To demonstrate that fiducial tracking during pretreatment Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) can accurately measure tumor motion and that this method should be used to validate 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) margins before each treatment fraction. For 31 patients with abdominal tumors and implanted fiducial markers, tumor motion was measured daily with CBCT and fluoroscopy for 202 treatment fractions. Fiducial tracking and maximum-likelihood algorithms extracted 3-dimensional fiducial trajectories from CBCT projections. The daily internal margin (IM) (ie, range of fiducial motion) was calculated for CBCT and fluoroscopy as the 5th-95th percentiles of displacement in each cardinal direction. The planning IM from simulation 4DCT (IM4DCT) was considered adequate when within ±1.2 mm (anterior-posterior, left-right) and ±3 mm (superior-inferior) of the daily measured IM. We validated CBCT fiducial tracking as an accurate predictive measure of intrafraction motion by comparing the daily measured IMCBCT with the daily IM measured by pretreatment fluoroscopy (IMpre-fluoro); these were compared with pre- and posttreatment fluoroscopy (IMfluoro) to identify those patients who could benefit from imaging during treatment. Four-dimensional CT could not accurately predict intrafractional tumor motion for ≥80% of fractions in 94% (IMCBCT), 97% (IMpre-fluoro), and 100% (IMfluoro) of patients. The IMCBCT was significantly closer to IMpre-fluoro than IM4DCT (P<.01). For patients with median treatment time t < 7.5 minutes, IMCBCT was in agreement with IMfluoro for 93% of fractions (superior-inferior), compared with 63% for the t > 7.5 minutes group, demonstrating the need for patient-specific intratreatment imaging. Tumor motion determined from 4DCT simulation does not accurately predict the daily motion observed on CBCT or fluoroscopy. Cone-beam CT could replace fluoroscopy for pretreatment verification of simulation IM4DCT, reducing patient setup time and imaging dose. Patients with

  1. TH-E-17A-06: Anatomical-Adaptive Compressed Sensing (AACS) Reconstruction for Thoracic 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, C; Kipritidis, J; OBrien, R; Cooper, B; Kuncic, Z; Keall, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used for clinical thoracic 4-dimensional (4D) cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction suffers from noise and streaking artifacts due to projection under-sampling. Compressed sensing theory enables reconstruction of under-sampled datasets via total-variation (TV) minimization, but TV-minimization algorithms such as adaptive-steepest-descent-projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) often converge slowly and are prone to over-smoothing anatomical details. These disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating general anatomical knowledge via anatomy segmentation. Based on this concept, we have developed an anatomical-adaptive compressed sensing (AACS) algorithm for thoracic 4D-CBCT reconstruction. Methods: AACS is based on the ASD-POCS framework, where each iteration consists of a TV-minimization step and a data fidelity constraint step. Prior to every AACS iteration, four major thoracic anatomical structures - soft tissue, lungs, bony anatomy, and pulmonary details - were segmented from the updated solution image. Based on the segmentation, an anatomical-adaptive weighting was applied to the TV-minimization step, so that TV-minimization was enhanced at noisy/streaky regions and suppressed at anatomical structures of interest. The image quality and convergence speed of AACS was compared to conventional ASD-POCS using an XCAT digital phantom and a patient scan. Results: For the XCAT phantom, the AACS image represented the ground truth better than the ASD-POCS image, giving a higher structural similarity index (0.93 vs. 0.84) and lower absolute difference (1.1*10{sup 4} vs. 1.4*10{sup 4}). For the patient case, while both algorithms resulted in much less noise and streaking than FDK, the AACS image showed considerably better contrast and sharpness of the vessels, tumor, and fiducial marker than the ASD-POCS image. In addition, AACS converged over 50% faster than ASD-POCS in both cases. Conclusions: The proposed AACS

  2. Audio-Visual Biofeedback Does Not Improve the Reliability of Target Delineation Using Maximum Intensity Projection in 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei; Neuner, Geoffrey A.; George, Rohini; Wang, Zhendong; Sasor, Sarah; Huang, Xuan; Regine, William F.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether coaching patients' breathing would improve the match between ITV{sub MIP} (internal target volume generated by contouring in the maximum intensity projection scan) and ITV{sub 10} (generated by combining the gross tumor volumes contoured in 10 phases of a 4-dimensional CT [4DCT] scan). Methods and Materials: Eight patients with a thoracic tumor and 5 patients with an abdominal tumor were included in an institutional review board-approved prospective study. Patients underwent 3 4DCT scans with: (1) free breathing (FB); (2) coaching using audio-visual (AV) biofeedback via the Real-Time Position Management system; and (3) coaching via a spirometer system (Active Breathing Coordinator or ABC). One physician contoured all scans to generate the ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub MIP}. The match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10} was quantitatively assessed with volume ratio, centroid distance, root mean squared distance, and overlap/Dice coefficient. We investigated whether coaching (AV or ABC) or uniform expansions (1, 2, 3, or 5 mm) of ITV{sub MIP} improved the match. Results: Although both AV and ABC coaching techniques improved frequency reproducibility and ABC improved displacement regularity, neither improved the match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10} over FB. On average, ITV{sub MIP} underestimated ITV{sub 10} by 19%, 19%, and 21%, with centroid distance of 1.9, 2.3, and 1.7 mm and Dice coefficient of 0.87, 0.86, and 0.88 for FB, AV, and ABC, respectively. Separate analyses indicated a better match for lung cancers or tumors not adjacent to high-intensity tissues. Uniform expansions of ITV{sub MIP} did not correct for the mismatch between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10}. Conclusions: In this pilot study, audio-visual biofeedback did not improve the match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10}. In general, ITV{sub MIP} should be limited to lung cancers, and modification of ITV{sub MIP} in each phase of the 4DCT data set is recommended.

  3. Spatiotemporal image correlation with spherical sampling and high-definition flow: new 4-dimensional method for assessment of tissue vascularization changes during the cardiac cycle: reproducibility analysis.

    PubMed

    Kudla, Marek J; Alcázar, Juan Luis

    2012-01-01

    To describe and assess the interobserver reproducibility of a new method for evaluation of ovarian vascularization using spatiotemporal image correlation-high definition flow (STIC-HDF). Stored 4-dimensional (4D) STIC-HDF volume data from 39 healthy pre-menopausal fertile women (aged <35 years) examined in the follicular part of the menstrual cycle by transvaginal sonography were assessed by two different examiners blinded from each other (one in Spain the other in Poland). Using 1-cm(3) spherical sampling, the vascularization index (VI) from the most vascularized part of the ovarian stroma was calculated at two different moments of the cardiac cycle (systole and diastole). System settings were kept constant for all patients (pulse repetition frequency, 0.6 kHz; gain, 0.2) with a depth of 40 mm. Analysis was performed offline using 4D software on a personal computer. On the basis of VI and vascularization-flow index (VFI) values during systole and diastole, 4 new 4D indices were defined: 4D systolic/diastolic volumetric index (4D-SDVI = VI(syst)/VI(diast)), 4D hemodynamic volumetric index (4D-HVI = [VI(syst) + VI(diast)]/[VI(syst) - VI(diast)]), 4D systolic/diastolic vascularization-flow index (4D-SDVFI = VFI(syst)/VFI(diast)), and 4D hemodynamic vascularization-flow index (4D-HVFI = [VFI(syst) + VFI(diast)]/[VFI(syst)- VFI(diast)]). Reproducibility of measurements was estimated by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The systolic VI, diastolic VI, 4D-SDVI, 4D-HVI, systolic VFI, diastolic VFI, and 4D-HVFI showed good reproducibility (ICC, 0.992, 0.994, 0.879, 0.915, 0.995, 0.995, and 0.893, respectively). The 4D-SDVFI showed moderate reproducibility (ICC, 0.797). We describe 4 new 4D vascular indices for assessing tissue vascularization using STIC-HDF technology. Assessment of ovarian vascularization using this STIC-HDF spherical sampling is reliable. The calculation of these new indices is reproducible between two different examiners.

  4. Array confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Shaun

    Confocal microscopes utilize point illumination and pinhole detection to reject out-of-focus light. Because of the point illumination and detection pinhole, confocal microscopes typically utilize point scanning for imaging, which limits the overall acquisition speed. Due to the excellent optical sectioning capabilities of confocal microscopes, they are excellent tools for the study of three-dimensional objects at the microscopic scale. Fluorescence confocal microscopy is especially useful in biomedical imaging due to its high sensitivity and specificity. However, all designs for confocal microscopes must balance tradeoffs between the numerical aperture (NA), field of view (FOV), acquisition speed, and cost during the design process. In this dissertation, two different designs for an array confocal microscope are proposed to significantly increase the acquisition speed of confocal microscopes. An array confocal microscope scans an array of beams in the object plane to parallelize the confocal microscope to significantly reduce the acquisition time. If N beams are used in the array confocal microscope, the acquisition time is reduced by a factor of N. The first design scans an array of miniature objectives over the object plane to overcome the trade-off between FOV and NA. The array of objectives is laterally translated and each objective scans a small portion of the total FOV. Therefore, the number of objectives used in the array limits the FOV, and the FOV is increased without sacrificing NA. The second design utilizes a single objective with a high NA, large FOV, and large working distance designed specifically for whole brain imaging. This array confocal microscope is designed to speed up the acquisition time required for whole brain imaging. Utilizing an objective with a large FOV and scanning using multiple beams in the array significantly reduces the time required to image large three-dimensional volumes. Both array confocal microscope designs use beam

  5. Microscopy techniques in flavivirus research.

    PubMed

    Chong, Mun Keat; Chua, Anthony Jin Shun; Tan, Terence Tze Tong; Tan, Suat Hoon; Ng, Mah Lee

    2014-04-01

    The Flavivirus genus is composed of many medically important viruses that cause high morbidity and mortality, which include Dengue and West Nile viruses. Various molecular and biochemical techniques have been developed in the endeavour to study flaviviruses. However, microscopy techniques still have irreplaceable roles in the identification of novel virus pathogens and characterization of morphological changes in virus-infected cells. Fluorescence microscopy contributes greatly in understanding the fundamental viral protein localizations and virus-host protein interactions during infection. Electron microscopy remains the gold standard for visualizing ultra-structural features of virus particles and infected cells. New imaging techniques and combinatory applications are continuously being developed to push the limit of resolution and extract more quantitative data. Currently, correlative live cell imaging and high resolution three-dimensional imaging have already been achieved through the tandem use of optical and electron microscopy in analyzing biological specimens. Microscopy techniques are also used to measure protein binding affinities and determine the mobility pattern of proteins in cells. This chapter will consolidate on the applications of various well-established microscopy techniques in flavivirus research, and discuss how recently developed microscopy techniques can potentially help advance our understanding in these membrane viruses.

  6. Fluorescence confocal microscopy for pathologists.

    PubMed

    Ragazzi, Moira; Piana, Simonetta; Longo, Caterina; Castagnetti, Fabio; Foroni, Monica; Ferrari, Guglielmo; Gardini, Giorgio; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy is a non-invasive method of optical imaging that may provide microscopic images of untreated tissue that correspond almost perfectly to hematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides. Nowadays, following two confocal imaging systems are available: (1) reflectance confocal microscopy, based on the natural differences in refractive indices of subcellular structures within the tissues; (2) fluorescence confocal microscopy, based on the use of fluorochromes, such as acridine orange, to increase the contrast epithelium-stroma. In clinical practice to date, confocal microscopy has been used with the goal of obviating the need for excision biopsies, thereby reducing the need for pathological examination. The aim of our study was to test fluorescence confocal microscopy on different types of surgical specimens, specifically breast, lymph node, thyroid, and colon. The confocal images were correlated to the corresponding histological sections in order to provide a morphologic parallel and to highlight current limitations and possible applications of this technology for surgical pathology practice. As a result, neoplastic tissues were easily distinguishable from normal structures and reactive processes such as fibrosis; the use of fluorescence enhanced contrast and image quality in confocal microscopy without compromising final histologic evaluation. Finally, the fluorescence confocal microscopy images of the adipose tissue were as accurate as those of conventional histology and were devoid of the frozen-section-related artefacts that can compromise intraoperative evaluation. Despite some limitations mainly related to black/white images, which require training in imaging interpretation, this study confirms that fluorescence confocal microscopy may represent an alternative to frozen sections in the assessment of margin status in selected settings or when the conservation of the specimen is crucial. This is the first study to employ fluorescent confocal microscopy on

  7. Research With Scanning Tip Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-31

    08ro P noiwe bae?041Le Research With Scanning Tip Microscopy AFOSR-89-0498 V AUTHOS)i Professor Dror Sarid 7. PFOUImNG 00ANIZATION NAMEIS) AND...forces and (b) surfaces. UNCLASS UNCLASS UNCLASS UL FINAL REPORT TO THE AFOSR ൱-, to J4ti. r Aat io Research in Scanning Tip Microscopy Dror Sarid Dtst...microscopy have been used to investigate (a) forces and (b) surfaces. a. Forces 1. Dror Sarid , Douglas lams, Volker Weissenberger, and L. Stephen Bell

  8. Horizontal microscopy in square capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Pavel E.

    1992-07-01

    Intracellular protoplasmic movements may, due to gravity, have a vertical component greater or different from the horizontal one. This makes horizontal microscopy indispensable in the search for the cellular sensor of gravity. The possibility of the latter being a cell organelle assigns special significance to high-resolution microscopy. A horizontal suction device for picking up a cell and its high-resolution horizontal microscopy in a rectangular capillary may be helpful for detection of gravity-related shifts of cellular organelles in vivo.

  9. Soil microstructure and electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, P.; Fryer, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the process of comparing Martian soils with terrestial soils, high resolution electron microscopy and associated techniques should be used to examine the finer soil particles, and various techniques of electron and optical microscopy should be used to examine the undisturbed structure of Martian soils. To examine the structure of fine grained portions of the soil, transmission electron microscopy may be required. A striking feature of many Martian soils is their red color. Although the present-day Martian climate appears to be cold, this color is reminiscent of terrestial tropical red clays. Their chemical contents are broadly similar.

  10. Correlative microscopy of detergent granules.

    PubMed

    van Dalen, G; Nootenboom, P; Heussen, P C M

    2011-03-01

    The microstructure of detergent products for textile cleaning determines to a large extent the physical properties of these products. Correlative microscopy was used to reveal the microstructure by reconciling images obtained by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray microtomography and Fourier transform infrared microscopy. These techniques were applied on the same location of a subsample of a spray-dried detergent base powder embedded in polyacrylate. In this way, the three-dimensional internal and external structure of detergent granules could be investigated from milli to nano scale with detailed spatial information about the components present. This will generate knowledge how to design optimal microstructures for laundry products to obtain product properties demanded by the market. This method is also very useful for other powder systems used in a large variety of industries (e.g. for pharmaceutical, food, ceramic and metal industries). © 2010 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Studies in Scanning Probe Microscopy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    refereed journals, as well as two books titled Scanning Force Microscopy, With Applications to Electric, Magnetic, and Atomic Forces published by Oxford University Press in 1991 and a revised edition in 1994.

  12. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  13. En face coherence microscopy [Invited

    PubMed Central

    Thouvenin, Olivier; Grieve, Kate; Xiao, Peng; Apelian, Clement; Boccara, A. Claude

    2017-01-01

    En face coherence microscopy or flying spot or full field optical coherence tomography or microscopy (FF-OCT/FF-OCM) belongs to the OCT family because the sectioning ability is mostly linked to the source coherence length. In this article we will focus our attention on the advantages and the drawbacks of the following approaches: en face versus B scan tomography in terms of resolution, coherent versus incoherent illumination and influence of aberrations, and scanning versus full field imaging. We then show some examples to illustrate the diverse applications of en face coherent microscopy and show that endogenous or exogenous contrasts can add valuable information to the standard morphological image. To conclude we discuss a few domains that appear promising for future development of en face coherence microscopy. PMID:28270972

  14. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  15. Vertically scanned laser sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Di; Arranz, Alicia; Zhu, Shouping; Yang, Yujie; Shi, Liangliang; Wang, Jun; Shen, Chen; Tian, Jie; Ripoll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Laser sheet microscopy is a widely used imaging technique for imaging the three-dimensional distribution of a fluorescence signal in fixed tissue or small organisms. In laser sheet microscopy, the stripe artifacts caused by high absorption or high scattering structures are very common, greatly affecting image quality. To solve this problem, we report here a two-step procedure which consists of continuously acquiring laser sheet images while vertically displacing the sample, and then using the variational stationary noise remover (VSNR) method to further reduce the remaining stripes. Images from a cleared murine colon acquired with a vertical scan are compared with common stitching procedures demonstrating that vertically scanned light sheet microscopy greatly improves the performance of current light sheet microscopy approaches without the need for complex changes to the imaging setup and allows imaging of elongated samples, extending the field of view in the vertical direction.

  16. Computer microscopy in lymphoma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozhenkova, A. V.; Tupitsin, N. N.; Frenkel, M. A.; Falaleeva, N. A.; Nikitaev, V. G.; Polyakov, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    The article describes the application of computer microscopy with multi-spectral camera for the comparative characteristics of normal lymphocytes and lymphoid cells in follicular lymphoma. Wavelet functions are used to quantify parameters of the cells nuclei images.

  17. Confocal microscopy in transmitted light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodt, Hans-Ulrich; Becker, Klaus

    2003-10-01

    We developed a confocal microscope for transmitted light to visualize fine details in phase objects like unstained biological specimens. The main difficulty of confocal microscopy in transmission is the alignment of illumination and detector pinholes. This alignment was achieved by using "electronic pinholes" on the detector side. As a first step, we were able to image cells in onion skin at greater depths and with higher resolution than by using conventional microscopy.

  18. Magnetic Force Microscopy in Liquids.

    PubMed

    Ares, Pablo; Jaafar, Miriam; Gil, Adriana; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Asenjo, Agustina

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the use of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to acquire images of magnetic nanostructures in liquid environments is presented. Optimization of the MFM signal acquisition in liquid media is performed and it is applied to characterize the magnetic signal of magnetite nanoparticles. The ability for detecting magnetic nanostructures along with the well-known capabilities of atomic force microscopy in liquids suggests potential applications in fields such as nanomedicine, nanobiotechnology, or nanocatalysis.

  19. Accuracy of Routine Treatment Planning 4-Dimensional and Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Computed Tomography Delineation of the Left Anterior Descending Artery in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    White, Benjamin M.; Vennarini, Sabina; Lin, Lilie; Freedman, Gary; Santhanam, Anand; Low, Daniel A.; Both, Stefan

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of radiation therapy treatment planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) CT to accurately contour the left anterior descending artery (LAD), a primary indicator of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity for patients undergoing radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Ten subjects were prospectively imaged with a cardiac-gated MRI protocol to determine cardiac motion effects, including the displacement of a region of interest comprising the LAD. A series of planar views were obtained and resampled to create a 3-dimensional (3D) volume. A 3D optical flow deformable image registration algorithm determined tissue displacement during the cardiac cycle. The measured motion was then used as a spatial boundary to characterize motion blurring of the radiologist-delineated LAD structure for a cohort of 10 consecutive patients enrolled prospectively on a breast study including 4DCT and DIBH scans. Coronary motion–induced blurring artifacts were quantified by applying an unsharp filter to accentuate the LAD structure despite the presence of motion blurring. The 4DCT maximum inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases were coregistered to determine the LAD displacement during tidal respiration, as visualized in 4DCT. Results: The average 90th percentile heart motion for the region of interest was 0.7 ± 0.1 mm (left–right [LR]), 1.3 ± 0.6 mm (superior–inferior [SI]), and 0.6 ± 0.2 mm (anterior–posterior [AP]) in the cardiac-gated MRI cohort. The average relative increase in the number of voxels comprising the LAD contour was 69.4% ± 4.5% for the DIBH. The LAD volume overestimation had the dosimetric impact of decreasing the reported mean LAD dose by 23% ± 9% on average in the DIBH. During tidal respiration the average relative LAD contour increase was 69.3% ± 5.9% and 67.9% ± 4.6% for inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases, respectively. The average 90th

  20. Intraindividual quantitative and qualitative comparison of gadopentetate dimeglumine and gadobutrol in time-resolved contrast-enhanced 4-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography in minipigs.

    PubMed

    Hadizadeh, Dariusch Reza; Jost, Gregor; Pietsch, Hubertus; Weibrecht, Martin; Perkuhn, Michael; Boschewitz, Jack Maria; Keil, Vera Catharina; Träber, Frank; Kukuk, Guido Matthias; Schild, Hans Heinz; Willinek, Winfried Albert

    2014-07-01

    The concentration and relaxivities of contrast agents affect quantitative and qualitative image quality in contrast-enhanced time-resolved 4-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (4D-MRA). Gadobutrol has a high relaxivity and is the only gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent approved for clinical use at a 1 M concentration. This promises to confer superior bolus characteristics by generating a steeper and shorter bolus with a higher peak Gd concentration. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively examine bolus characteristics of 1 M gadobutrol compared with 0.5 M gadopentetate dimeglumine and to evaluate image quality in thoracoabdominal 4D-MRA. A total of 7 Goettingen minipigs received dynamic computed tomography (CT) on a clinical 64-slice CT (transverse slices, 80 kV, 20 seconds, 0.3 s/dynamic frame) and 4D-MRA (time-resolved imaging with stochastic trajectories; 1. transverse slices, 30 seconds, 0.49 s/frame; 2. coronal slices, 70 seconds, 1.3 s/frame) on a 1.5-T clinical whole-body magnetic resonance imaging under general anesthesia using gadopentetate dimeglumine and gadobutrol in an intraindividual comparative study. Computed tomography attenuations were converted into Gd concentrations on the basis of previous phantom experiments. Quantitative analysis included measurements of the full width at half maximum, time-to-peak intervals, and peak of each bolus in dynamic CT and transverse 4D-MRA. These studies were carried out at equivalent contrast agent flow rates of 1 mL/s. Quantitative analysis (7 arteries and veins) and qualitative image analysis were performed on coronal thoracoabdominal 4D-MRA studies carried out at flow rates of 1 mL/s and, in the case of gadopentetate dimeglumine, also at molarity-adjusted flow rates of 2 mL/s. The bolus in both transverse 4D-MRA and dynamic CT was significantly narrower (full width at half maximum), earlier (time to peak), and higher (signal intensity enhancement in 4D-MRA, Gd concentration in dynamic CT) when

  1. Non-Invasive Multi-Dimensional Two-Photon Microscopy enables optical fingerprinting (TPOF) of immune cells.

    PubMed

    Gehlsen, Uta; Szaszák, Marta; Gebert, Andreas; Koop, Norbert; Hüttmann, Gereon; Steven, Philipp

    2015-06-01

    Mucosal surfaces are constantly exposed to pathogens and show high immunological activity. In a broad variety of ocular surface disorders inflammation is common, but underlying mechanisms are often not fully understood. However, the main clinical problem is that inflammatory processes are difficult to characterize and quantify due to the impossibility of repeated tissue probing of the delicate ocular surface. Therefore non-invasive optical methods are thought to have the potential for intravital investigation of ocular surface inflammation. This study demonstrates the general potential of two-photon microscopy to non-invasively detect and discriminate key players of inflammation in the ocular surface by using intrinsic fluorescence-based features without the necessity of tissue probing or the use of dyes. The use of wavelength dependent measurements of fluorescence lifetime, in addition to autofluorescence intensity enables a functional differentiation of isolated immune cells in vitro at excitation wavelengths between 710 to 830 nm. Mixed cell cultures and first in vivo results indicate the use of excitation wavelength of 710 to 750 nm for further experiments and future use in patients. Two photon based autofluorescence features of immune cells enables non-invasive differentiation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. In vivo correlation mapping microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, James; Alexandrov, Sergey; Owens, Peter; Subhash, Hrebesh; Leahy, Martin

    2016-04-01

    To facilitate regular assessment of the microcirculation in vivo, noninvasive imaging techniques such as nailfold capillaroscopy are required in clinics. Recently, a correlation mapping technique has been applied to optical coherence tomography (OCT), which extends the capabilities of OCT to microcirculation morphology imaging. This technique, known as correlation mapping optical coherence tomography, has been shown to extract parameters, such as capillary density and vessel diameter, and key clinical markers associated with early changes in microvascular diseases. However, OCT has limited spatial resolution in both the transverse and depth directions. Here, we extend this correlation mapping technique to other microscopy modalities, including confocal microscopy, and take advantage of the higher spatial resolution offered by these modalities. The technique is achieved as a processing step on microscopy images and does not require any modification to the microscope hardware. Results are presented which show that this correlation mapping microscopy technique can extend the capabilities of conventional microscopy to enable mapping of vascular networks in vivo with high spatial resolution in both the transverse and depth directions.

  3. Semi-solid tumor model in Xenopus laevis/gilli cloned tadpoles for intravital study of neovascularization, immune cells and melanophore infiltration.

    PubMed

    Haynes-Gimore, Nikesha; Banach, Maureen; Brown, Edward; Dawes, Ryan; Edholm, Eva-Stina; Kim, Minsoo; Robert, Jacques

    2015-12-15

    Tumors have the ability to grow as a self-sustaining entity within the body. This autonomy is in part accomplished by the tumor cells ability to induce the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) and by controlling cell trafficking inside the tumor mass. These abilities greatly reduce the efficacy of many cancer therapies and pose challenges for the development of more effective cancer treatments. Hence, there is a need for animal models suitable for direct microscopy observation of blood vessel formation and cell trafficking, especially during early stages of tumor establishment. Here, we have developed a reliable and cost effective tumor model system in tadpoles of the amphibian Xenopus laevis. Tadpoles are ideally suited for direct microscopy observation because of their small size and transparency. Using the thymic lymphoid tumor line 15/0 derived from, and transplantable into, the X. laevis/gilli isogenic clone LG-15, we have adapted a system that consists in transplanting 15/0 tumor cells embedded into rat collagen under the dorsal skin of LG-15 tadpole recipients. This system recapitulates many facets of mammalian tumorigenesis and permits real time visualization of the active formation of the tumor microenvironment induced by 15/0 tumor cells including neovascularization, collagen rearrangements as well as infiltration of immune cells and melanophores.

  4. Semi-Solid Tumor model in Xenopus laevis/gilli cloned tadpoles for Intravital study of neovascularization, immune cells and melanophore infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Haynes-Gimore, Nikesha; Banach, Maureen; Brown, Edward; Dawes, Ryan; Edholm, Eva-Stina; Kim, Minsoo; Robert, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Tumors have the ability to grow as a self-sustaining entity within the body. This autonomy is in part accomplished by the tumor cells ability to induce the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) and by controlling cell trafficking inside the tumor mass. These abilities greatly reduce the efficacy of many cancer therapies and pose challenges for the development of more effective cancer treatments. Hence, there is a need for animal models suitable for direct microscopy observation of blood vessel formation and cell trafficking, especially during early stages of tumor establishment. Here, we have developed a reliable and cost effective tumor model system in tadpoles of the amphibian Xenopus laevis. Tadpoles are ideally suited for direct microscopy observation because of their small size and transparency. Using the thymic lymphoid tumor line 15/0 derived from, and transplantable into, the X. laevis/gilli isogenic clone LG-15, we have adapted a system that consists in transplanting 15/0 tumor cells embedded into rat collagen under the dorsal skin of LG-15 tadpole recipients. This system recapitulates many facets of mammalian tumorigenesis and permits real time visualization of the active formation of the tumor microenvironment induced by 15/0 tumor cells including neovascularization, collagen rearrangements as well as infiltration of immune cells and melanophores. PMID:25601449

  5. Imaging IGF-I uptake in growth plate cartilage using in vivo multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Serrat, Maria A; Ion, Gabriela

    2017-08-10

    Bones elongate through endochondral ossification in cartilaginous growth plates located at ends of primary long bones. Linear growth ensues from a cascade of biochemical signals initiated by actions of systemic and local regulators on growth plate chondrocytes. Although cellular processes are well defined, there is a fundamental gap in understanding how growth regulators are physically transported from surrounding blood vessels into and through dense, avascular cartilage matrix. Intravital imaging using in vivo multiphoton microscopy is one promising strategy to overcome this barrier by quantitatively tracking molecular delivery to cartilage from the vasculature in real time. We previously used in vivo multiphoton imaging to show that hindlimb heating increases vascular access of large molecules to growth plates using 10-, 40-, and 70 kDa dextran tracers. In order to comparatively evaluate transport of similarly sized physiological regulators, we developed and validated methods for measuring uptake of biologically active IGF-I into proximal tibial growth plates of live 5-week old mice. We demonstrate that fluorescently labeled IGF-I (8.2 kDa) is readily taken up in the growth plate and localizes to chondrocytes. Bioactivity tests performed on cultured metatarsal bones confirmed that the labeled protein is functional, assessed by phosphorylation of its signaling kinase Akt. This methodology, which can be broadly applied to many different proteins and tissues, is relevant for understanding factors that affect delivery of biologically relevant molecules to the skeleton in real time. Results may lead to the development of drug-targeting strategies to treat a wide range of bone and cartilage pathologies. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  6. Quantifying glomerular permeability of fluorescent macromolecules using 2-photon microscopy in Munich Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Ruben M; Molitoris, Bruce A

    2013-04-17

    Kidney diseases involving urinary loss of large essential macromolecules, such as serum albumin, have long been thought to be caused by alterations in the permeability barrier comprised of podocytes, vascular endothelial cells, and a basement membrane working in unison. Data from our laboratory using intravital 2-photon microscopy revealed a more permeable glomerular filtration barrier (GFB) than previously thought under physiologic conditions, with retrieval of filtered albumin occurring in an early subset of cells called proximal tubule cells (PTC)(1,2,3). Previous techniques used to study renal filtration and establishing the characteristic of the filtration barrier involved micropuncture of the lumen of these early tubular segments with sampling of the fluid content and analysis(4). These studies determined albumin concentration in the luminal fluid to be virtually non-existent; corresponding closely to what is normally detected in the urine. However, characterization of dextran polymers with defined sizes by this technique revealed those of a size similar to serum albumin had higher levels in the tubular lumen and urine; suggesting increased permeability(5). Herein is a detailed outline of the technique used to directly visualize and quantify glomerular fluorescent albumin permeability in vivo. This method allows for detection of filtered albumin across the filtration barrier into Bowman's space (the initial chamber of urinary filtration); and also allows quantification of albumin reabsorption by proximal tubules and visualization of subsequent albumin transcytosis(6). The absence of fluorescent albumin along later tubular segments en route to the bladder highlights the efficiency of the retrieval pathway in the earlier proximal tubule segments. Moreover, when this technique was applied to determine permeability of dextrans having a similar size to albumin virtually identical permeability values were reported(2). These observations directly support the need to

  7. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    l) Intravital Microscopy was successfully employed for investigating EG sheddÍng in hemorrhagic shock/resuscitation for the very first time; 2... Intravital microscopy integrated with systemic hemodynamics evaluations may be essential and more accurate tools to identify changes and study mechanisms...Glycocalyx during Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats using Intravital Microscopy. Submitted to Microvascular Research, 2012 (under review). FINAL REPORT Laboratory

  8. Systemic and Microvascular Effects of Resuscitation with Blood Products After Severe Hemorrhage in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    thickness, blood flow, and microvascular permeability were studied using intravital microscopy. Hemodynamics and coagulation tests (rotational...Microcirculation; packed red blood cells; intravital microscopy; ROTEM; plasma proteins; rats. Current US military guidance for the resuscitation of warfighters...was used for coagulation assays (rotational thromboelast- ometry [ROTEM], TEM Innovations GmbH, Germany). Intravital Microscopy and Animal Preparation

  9. Structured line illumination Raman microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kozue; Palonpon, Almar F.; Smith, Nicholas I.; Chiu, Liang-da; Kasai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Kawata, Satoshi; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2015-01-01

    In the last couple of decades, the spatial resolution in optical microscopy has increased to unprecedented levels by exploiting the fluorescence properties of the probe. At about the same time, Raman imaging techniques have emerged as a way to image inherent chemical information in a sample without using fluorescent probes. However, in many applications, the achievable resolution is limited to about half the wavelength of excitation light. Here we report the use of structured illumination to increase the spatial resolution of label-free spontaneous Raman microscopy, generating highly detailed spatial contrast from the ensemble of molecular information in the sample. Using structured line illumination in slit-scanning Raman microscopy, we demonstrate a marked improvement in spatial resolution and show the applicability to a range of samples, including both biological and inorganic chemical component mapping. This technique is expected to contribute towards greater understanding of chemical component distributions in organic and inorganic materials. PMID:26626144

  10. Computational 'microscopy' of cellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Arnarez, Clément; Periole, Xavier; Marrink, Siewert J

    2016-01-15

    Computational 'microscopy' refers to the use of computational resources to simulate the dynamics of a molecular system. Tuned to cell membranes, this computational 'microscopy' technique is able to capture the interplay between lipids and proteins at a spatio-temporal resolution that is unmatched by other methods. Recent advances allow us to zoom out from individual atoms and molecules to supramolecular complexes and subcellular compartments that contain tens of millions of particles, and to capture the complexity of the crowded environment of real cell membranes. This Commentary gives an overview of the main concepts of computational 'microscopy' and describes the state-of-the-art methods used to model cell membrane processes. We illustrate the power of computational modelling approaches by providing a few in-depth examples of large-scale simulations that move up from molecular descriptions into the subcellular arena. We end with an outlook towards modelling a complete cell in silico.

  11. Instantaneous Spatial Light Interference Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Huafeng; Popescu, Gabriel

    2010-01-18

    We present Instantaneous Spatial Light Interference Microscopy (iSLIM) as a new quantitative phase method that combines the benefits of white light illumination in Zernike's phase contrast microscopy and phase stability associated diffraction phase microscopy. iSLIM is implemented as an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope, and enables new features to quantitative phase imaging: diminished speckle effects due to white light illumination, multimodal investigation potential due to overlaying with other modalities of the microscope (e.g. fluorescence, DIC, phase contrast), and spectroscopic potential due to the broad band light. We show proof of principle results by multicolor phase imaging of microsphere and red blood cells, and dynamic imaging of nanoscale cell membrane fluctuations.

  12. SPECTROSCOPY/MICROSCOPY: Nonlinear Raman microscopy eyes clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear Raman microscopy is an emerging technique in biomedical imaging. An inexpensive prototype system, based on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), demonstrates value for real-time, minimally invasive chemical analysis of cells and tissues. It overcomes drawbacks of both Raman and CARS, and in doing so demonstrates potential for clinical application–including blood analysis and breast cancer detection. PMID:26435878

  13. Confocal microscopy and exfoliative cytology

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Shyam Prasad; Ramani, Pratibha; Nainani, Purshotam

    2013-01-01

    Context: Early detection of potentially malignant lesions and invasive squamous-cell carcinoma in the oral cavity could be greatly improved through techniques that permit visualization of subtle cellular changes indicative of the neoplastic transformation process. One such technique is confocal microscopy. Combining rapidity with reliability, an innovative idea has been put forward using confocal microscope in exfoliative cytology. Aims: The main objective of this study was to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis and the results were compared with that of the standard PAP stain. Settings and Design: Confocal microscope, acridine orange (AO) stain, PAP (Papanicolaou) stain. The study was designed to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis. In the process, smears of patients with (clinically diagnosed and/or suspected) oral squamous cell carcinoma as well as those of controls (normal people) were stained with acridine orange and observed under confocal microscope. The results were compared with those of the standard PAP method. Materials and Methods: Samples of buccal mucosa smears from normal patients and squamous cell carcinoma patients were made, fixed in 100% alcohol, followed by AO staining. The corresponding set of smears was stained with PAP stain using rapid PAP stain kit. The results obtained were compared with those obtained with AO confocal microscopy. Results: The study had shown nuclear changes (malignant cells) in the smears of squamous cell carcinoma patients as increased intensity of fluorescence of the nucleus, when observed under confocal microscope. Acridine orange confocal microscopy showed good amount of sensitivity and specificity (93%) in identifying malignant cells in exfoliative cytological smears. Conclusion: Confocal microscopy was found to have good sensitivity in the identification of cancer (malignant) cells in exfoliative cytology, at par with the PAP method. The rapidity of processing and screening a

  14. Confocal microscopy and exfoliative cytology.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Shyam Prasad; Ramani, Pratibha; Nainani, Purshotam

    2013-05-01

    Early detection of potentially malignant lesions and invasive squamous-cell carcinoma in the oral cavity could be greatly improved through techniques that permit visualization of subtle cellular changes indicative of the neoplastic transformation process. One such technique is confocal microscopy. Combining rapidity with reliability, an innovative idea has been put forward using confocal microscope in exfoliative cytology. The main objective of this study was to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis and the results were compared with that of the standard PAP stain. Confocal microscope, acridine orange (AO) stain, PAP (Papanicolaou) stain. The study was designed to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis. In the process, smears of patients with (clinically diagnosed and/or suspected) oral squamous cell carcinoma as well as those of controls (normal people) were stained with acridine orange and observed under confocal microscope. The results were compared with those of the standard PAP method. Samples of buccal mucosa smears from normal patients and squamous cell carcinoma patients were made, fixed in 100% alcohol, followed by AO staining. The corresponding set of smears was stained with PAP stain using rapid PAP stain kit. The results obtained were compared with those obtained with AO confocal microscopy. The study had shown nuclear changes (malignant cells) in the smears of squamous cell carcinoma patients as increased intensity of fluorescence of the nucleus, when observed under confocal microscope. Acridine orange confocal microscopy showed good amount of sensitivity and specificity (93%) in identifying malignant cells in exfoliative cytological smears. Confocal microscopy was found to have good sensitivity in the identification of cancer (malignant) cells in exfoliative cytology, at par with the PAP method. The rapidity of processing and screening a specimen resulted in saving of time. It added a certain amount of objectivity to the

  15. DHMI: dynamic holographic microscopy interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xuefei; Zheng, Yujie; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a powerful in-vitro biological imaging tool. In this paper, we report a fully automated off-axis digital holographic microscopy system completed with a graphical user interface in the Matlab environment. The interface primarily includes Fourier domain processing, phase reconstruction, aberration compensation and autofocusing. A variety of imaging operations such as region of interest selection, de-noising mode (filtering and averaging), low frame rate imaging for immediate reconstruction and high frame rate imaging routine ( 27 fps) are implemented to facilitate ease of use.

  16. The future of electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yimei; Durr, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifies to the importance of modern microscopy.

  17. The future of electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Yimei; Durr, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifiesmore » to the importance of modern microscopy.« less

  18. Optical microscopy versus scanning electron microscopy in urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Marickar, Y M Fazil; Lekshmi, P R; Varma, Luxmi; Koshy, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Stone analysis is incompletely done in many clinical centers. Identification of the stone component is essential for deciding future prophylaxis. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) still remains a distant dream for routine hospital work. It is in this context that optical microscopy is suggested as an alternate procedure. The objective of this article was to assess the utility of an optical microscope which gives magnification of up to 40x and gives clear picture of the surface of the stones. In order to authenticate the morphological analysis of urinary stones, SEM and elemental distribution analysis were performed. A total of 250 urinary stones of different compositions were collected from stone clinic, photographed, observed under an optical microscope, and optical photographs were taken at different angles. Twenty-five representative samples among these were gold sputtered to make them conductive and were fed into the SEM machine. Photographs of the samples were taken at different angles at magnifications up to 4,000. Elemental distribution analysis (EDAX) was done to confirm the composition. The observations of the two studies were compared. The different appearances of the stones under optical illuminated microscopy were mostly standardized appearances, namely bosselations of pure whewellite, spiculations of weddellite, bright yellow colored appearance of uric acid, and dirty white amorphous appearance of phosphates. SEM and EDAX gave clearer pictures and gave added confirmation of the stone composition. From the references thus obtained, it was possible to confirm the composition by studying the optical microscopic pictures. Higher magnification capacity of the SEM and the EDAX patterns are useful to give reference support for performing optical microscopy work. After standardization, routine analysis can be performed with optical microscopy. The advantage of the optical microscope is that, it

  19. Sustainable, Rapid Synthesis of Bright-Luminescent CuInS2-ZnS Alloyed Nanocrystals: Multistage Nano-xenotoxicity Assessment and Intravital Fluorescence Bioimaging in Zebrafish-Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetty, S. Shashank; Praneetha, S.; Basu, Sandeep; Sachidanandan, Chetana; Murugan, A. Vadivel

    2016-05-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) luminescent CuInS2-ZnS alloyed nanocrystals (CIZS-NCs) for highly fluorescence bioimaging have received considerable interest in recent years. Owing, they became a desirable alternative to heavy-metal based-NCs and organic dyes with unique optical properties and low-toxicity for bioimaging and optoelectronic applications. In the present study, bright and robust CIZS-NCs have been synthesized within 5 min, as-high-as 230 °C without requiring any inert-gas atmosphere via microwave-solvothermal (MW-ST) method. Subsequently, the in vitro and in vivo nano-xenotoxicity and cellular uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs were investigated in L929, Vero, MCF7 cell lines and zebrafish-embryos. We observed minimal toxicity and acute teratogenic consequences upto 62.5 μg/ml of the CIZS-NCs in zebrafish-embryos. We also observed spontaneous uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs by 3 dpf older zebrafish-embryos that are evident through bright red fluorescence-emission at a low concentration of 7.8 μg/mL. Hence, we propose that the rapid, low-cost, large-scale “sustainable” MW-ST synthesis of CIZS-NCs, is an ideal bio-nanoprobe with good temporal and spatial resolution for rapid labeling, long-term in vivo tracking and intravital-fluorescence-bioimaging (IVBI).

  20. Four-dimensional electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-04-09

    The discovery of the electron over a century ago and the realization of its dual character have given birth to one of the two most powerful imaging instruments: the electron microscope. The electron microscope's ability to resolve three-dimensional (3D) structures on the atomic scale is continuing to affect different fields, including materials science and biology. In this Review, we highlight recent developments and inventions made by introducing the fourth dimension of time in electron microscopy. Today, ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) enables a resolution that is 10 orders of magnitude better than that of conventional microscopes, which are limited by the video-camera rate of recording. After presenting the central concept involved, that of single-electron stroboscopic imaging, we discuss prototypical applications, which include the visualization of complex structures when unfolding on different length and time scales. The developed UEM variant techniques are several, and here we illucidate convergent-beam and near-field imaging, as well as tomography and scanning-pulse microscopy. We conclude with current explorations in imaging of nanomaterials and biostructures and an outlook on possible future directions in space-time, 4D electron microscopy.

  1. Color-televised medical microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, M. A.; Peck, J. C.

    1968-01-01

    Color television microscopy used at laboratory range magnifications, reproduces a slide image with sufficient fidelity for medical laboratory and instructional use. The system is used for instant pathological reporting between operating room and remotely located pathologist viewing a biopsy through this medium.

  2. Recent Advances In Light Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shinya

    1989-12-01

    The combination of the light microscope with modern electronic imaging, storage, and processing devices has brought about a virtual revolution in microscopy. Dynamic structures in living cells can now be visualized with a clarity, speed, and resolution never before achieved in differential interference. contrast OTC or Nomarsky), fluorescence, polarized light, dark field, and other modes of microscopy (Fig. 1); the gliding motion, and growth and shortening, of individual molecular filaments of microtubules and factin can be followed in real time, directly on the monitor screen, (Fig. 2); and the changing concentration, and distribution. of ions and specific protein molecules can be followed, moment by moment, in physiologically active cells.1,2 In polarized light and phase contrast microscopy, optical sections as thin as 0.1 um are now attainable (Fig. 3). These images can be viewed as through-focal stacks or stereo pairs, revealing 3-dimensional architecture of biological fine structure at very high. resolution (Fig. 4). The basic principles and methods of application of video microscopy are discussed in inoue,3 and recent developments have been summarized in a conference proceedings4 (see also ref. 5,6,7).

  3. Second harmonic microscopy of axonemes.

    PubMed

    Odin, Christophe; Heichette, Claire; Chretien, Denis; Le Grand, Yann

    2009-05-25

    We performed Second Harmonic Microscopy of axonemes obtained from sea urchin sperm. Using polarization analysis and a trade-off between signal and photodamage, we were able to determine, for the first time to our knowledge, the nonlinear susceptibility chizxx/chixzx = 1.1+/-0.2 and chizzz/chixzx = 4+/-0.5 of axonemes.

  4. Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM).

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianquan; Ma, Hongqiang; Liu, Yang

    2017-07-05

    Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy, a class of optical microscopy techniques at a spatial resolution below the diffraction limit, has revolutionized the way we study biology, as recognized by the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2014. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), a widely used SR technique, is based on the principle of single molecule localization. STORM routinely achieves a spatial resolution of 20 to 30 nm, a ten-fold improvement compared to conventional optical microscopy. Among all SR techniques, STORM offers a high spatial resolution with simple optical instrumentation and standard organic fluorescent dyes, but it is also prone to image artifacts and degraded image resolution due to improper sample preparation or imaging conditions. It requires careful optimization of all three aspects-sample preparation, image acquisition, and image reconstruction-to ensure a high-quality STORM image, which will be extensively discussed in this unit. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. HelioScan: a software framework for controlling in vivo microscopy setups with high hardware flexibility, functional diversity and extendibility.

    PubMed

    Langer, Dominik; van 't Hoff, Marcel; Keller, Andreas J; Nagaraja, Chetan; Pfäffli, Oliver A; Göldi, Maurice; Kasper, Hansjörg; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2013-04-30

    Intravital microscopy such as in vivo imaging of brain dynamics is often performed with custom-built microscope setups controlled by custom-written software to meet specific requirements. Continuous technological advancement in the field has created a need for new control software that is flexible enough to support the biological researcher with innovative imaging techniques and provide the developer with a solid platform for quickly and easily implementing new extensions. Here, we introduce HelioScan, a software package written in LabVIEW, as a platform serving this dual role. HelioScan is designed as a collection of components that can be flexibly assembled into microscope control software tailored to the particular hardware and functionality requirements. Moreover, HelioScan provides a software framework, within which new functionality can be implemented in a quick and structured manner. A specific HelioScan application assembles at run-time from individual software components, based on user-definable configuration files. Due to its component-based architecture, HelioScan can exploit synergies of multiple developers working in parallel on different components in a community effort. We exemplify the capabilities and versatility of HelioScan by demonstrating several in vivo brain imaging modes, including camera-based intrinsic optical signal imaging for functional mapping of cortical areas, standard two-photon laser-scanning microscopy using galvanometric mirrors, and high-speed in vivo two-photon calcium imaging using either acousto-optic deflectors or a resonant scanner. We recommend HelioScan as a convenient software framework for the in vivo imaging community. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy: Computed Imaging for Scanned Coherent Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brynmor. J.; Marks, Daniel. L.; Ralston, Tyler. S.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen. A.

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional image formation in microscopy is greatly enhanced by the use of computed imaging techniques. In particular, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM) allows the removal of out-of-focus blur in broadband, coherent microscopy. Earlier methods, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), utilize interferometric ranging, but do not apply computed imaging methods and therefore must scan the focal depth to acquire extended volumetric images. ISAM removes the need to scan the focus by allowing volumetric image reconstruction from data collected at a single focal depth. ISAM signal processing techniques are similar to the Fourier migration methods of seismology and the Fourier reconstruction methods of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). In this article ISAM is described and the close ties between ISAM and SAR are explored. ISAM and a simple strip-map SAR system are placed in a common mathematical framework and compared to OCT and radar respectively. This article is intended to serve as a review of ISAM, and will be especially useful to readers with a background in SAR. PMID:20948975

  7. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy: Computed Imaging for Scanned Coherent Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brynmor J; Marks, Daniel L; Ralston, Tyler S; Carney, P Scott; Boppart, Stephen A

    2008-06-01

    Three-dimensional image formation in microscopy is greatly enhanced by the use of computed imaging techniques. In particular, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM) allows the removal of out-of-focus blur in broadband, coherent microscopy. Earlier methods, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), utilize interferometric ranging, but do not apply computed imaging methods and therefore must scan the focal depth to acquire extended volumetric images. ISAM removes the need to scan the focus by allowing volumetric image reconstruction from data collected at a single focal depth. ISAM signal processing techniques are similar to the Fourier migration methods of seismology and the Fourier reconstruction methods of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). In this article ISAM is described and the close ties between ISAM and SAR are explored. ISAM and a simple strip-map SAR system are placed in a common mathematical framework and compared to OCT and radar respectively. This article is intended to serve as a review of ISAM, and will be especially useful to readers with a background in SAR.

  8. Nonlinear microscopy for material characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Reed Alan

    Making use of femtosecond laser sources, nonlinear microscopy provides access to previously unstudied aspects of materials. By probing third order nonlinear optical signals determined by the nonlinear susceptibility chi (3), which is present in all materials, we gain insight not available by conventional linear or electron microscopy. Third-harmonic (TH) microscopy is applied to supplement laser-induced damage studies of dielectric oxide thin film optical coatings. We present high contrast (S/N> 100 : 1) TH imaging of ≈17 nm nanoindentations, individual 10 nm gold nanoparticles, nascent scandia and hafnia films, and laser induced material modification both above and below damage threshold conditions in hafnia thin-films. These results imply that TH imaging is potentially sensitive to laser-induced strain as well as to nanoscale defects or contamination in oxide films. Compared to other sensitive imaging techniques such as Nomarski and dark field, TH imaging exhibits dramatically increased sensitivity to typical material modifications undergone during the formation of optical damage as evidenced by a dynamic range ≈106 : 1. Four-wave mixing (FWM) microscopy is employed to investigate delay dependent FWM signals and their implied characteristic resonant response times in multiple solvents. Mathematical modeling of resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) and stimulated parametric emission (SPE) processes supplement the FWM studies and suggest a resonant CARS process that accounts for ≈95% of the total visible FWM signal which probes a characteristic material response time ≈100 fs. This signal enhancement likely indicates the net effects of probing several Raman active C-H stretch bands near 2950 cm-1. This FWM technique may be applied to characterize the dominant resonant response of the sample under study. Furthermore this technique presents the newfound capability to provide estimates of characteristic

  9. Biocompatible Green and Red Fluorescent Organic Dots with Remarkably Large Two-Photon Action Cross Sections for Targeted Cellular Imaging and Real-Time Intravital Blood Vascular Visualization.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jiayun; Cai, Xiaolei; Lou, Xiaoding; Feng, Guangxue; Min, Xuehong; Luo, Wenwen; He, Bairong; Goh, Chi Ching; Ng, Lai Guan; Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Zujin; Liu, Bin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2015-07-15

    Fluorescent organic dots are emerging as promising bioimaging reagents because of their high brightness, good photostability, excellent biocompatibility, and facile surface functionalization. Organic dots with large two-photon absorption (TPA) cross sections are highly desired for two-photon fluorescence microscopy. In this work, we report two biocompatible and photostable organic dots fabricated by encapsulating tetraphenylethene derivatives within DSPE-PEG matrix. The two organic dots show absorption maxima at 425 and 483 nm and emit green and red fluorescence at 560 and 645 nm, with high fluorescence quantum yields of 64% and 22%, respectively. Both organic dots exhibit excellent TPA property in the range of 800-960 nm, affording upon excitation at 820 nm remarkably large TPA cross sections of 1.2×10(6) and 2.5×10(6) GM on the basis of dot concentration. The bare fluorophores and their organic dots are biocompatible and have been used to stain living cells for one- and two-photon fluorescence bioimagings. The cRGD-modified organic dots can selectively target integrin αvβ3 overexpressing breast cancer cells for targeted imaging. The organic dots are also applied for real-time two-photon fluorescence in vivo visualization of the blood vasculature of mouse ear, providing the spatiotemporal information about the whole blood vascular network. These results demonstrate that the present fluorescent organic dots are promising candidates for living cell and tissue imaging.

  10. Electron microscopy of electromagnetic waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, A.; Baum, P.

    2016-07-01

    Rapidly changing electromagnetic fields are the basis of almost any photonic or electronic device operation. We report how electron microscopy can measure collective carrier motion and fields with subcycle and subwavelength resolution. A collimated beam of femtosecond electron pulses passes through a metamaterial resonator that is previously excited with a single-cycle electromagnetic pulse. If the probing electrons are shorter in duration than half a field cycle, then time-frozen Lorentz forces distort the images quasi-classically and with subcycle time resolution. A pump-probe sequence reveals in a movie the sample’s oscillating electromagnetic field vectors with time, phase, amplitude, and polarization information. This waveform electron microscopy can be used to visualize electrodynamic phenomena in devices as small and fast as available.

  11. Image Processing in Medical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Kendall

    1986-01-01

    Full automation in medical microscopy has been accomplished in the field of clinical determination of the white blood cell differential count. Manufacture of differential counting microscopes commenced in 1974, and approximately 1,000 of these robots are now in the field. They analyze images of human white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets at the global rate of approximately 100,000 slides per day. This incredible throughout represents automated image analysis and pattern recognition at the rate of 5 billion images per year and represents a major accomplishments in the application of machine vision in medicine. In other areas, such as cytology and cytogenetics, automated computer vision is still in the research phase. This paper discusses the state of the art in blood smear analysis automation and in other related areas including multi-resolution microscopy where images are currently being generated over a 64:1 magnification containing from one-quarter megapixel to one gigapixel in full color.

  12. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2016-07-12

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  13. Contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, B.J.

    1985-10-01

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation offers the biologist and especially the microscopist, a way to morphologically study specimens that could not be imaged by conventional TEM, STEM or SEM methods (i.e. hydrated samples, samples easily damaged by an electron beam, electron dense samples, thick specimens, unstained low contrast specimens) at spatial resolutions approaching those of the TEM, with the additional possibility to obtain compositional (elemental) information about the sample as well. Although flash x-ray sources offer faster exposure times, synchrotron radiation provides a highly collimated, intense radiation that can be tuned to select specific discrete ranges of x-ray wavelengths or specific individual wavelengths which optimize imaging or microanalysis of a specific sample. This paper presents an overview of the applications of x-ray contact microscopy to biological research and some current research results using monochromatic synchrotron radiation to image biological samples. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Bilateral fitting subtracting confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiqian; Sheng, Zhong; Qiu, Lirong; Wang, Yun; Shao, Rongjun

    2016-12-20

    This paper proposes a bilateral fitting subtracting confocal microscopy (BFSCM) based on the optical arrangement of conventional confocal microscopy (CM). BFSCM first uses the data in both sides of a confocal axial response curve, which are very sensitive to the axial position of the sample, for respective linear fitting to obtain two fitting straight lines, and then obtains a difference confocal line by subtraction of the two fitting lines. Finally, it calculates the zero position of the difference confocal line to precisely capture the focus position of the confocal system, and thereby achieving a high-precision measurement of the 3D structure of the sample. The theoretical analyses and experiments indicate that BFSCM can improve the axial resolution, and has anti-interference capability and focusing ability with bipolar absolute zero point tracking, while it does not change the structure and lateral resolution of CM. BFSCM provides a novel method for the improvement of CM axial resolution.

  15. Materials science through electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Hiroshi

    1992-03-01

    Electron microscopy has greatly contributed as a powerful tool in both the characterization and identification of materials in the atomic scale. In these contributions, the most important advantage is it's ability for dynamic study of phenomena, i.e., in situ experiments. This research has been carried out using high voltage electron microscopes, but some results have been obtained with high resolution electron microscopes under critical conditions. Electron microscopy has been improved further to become an indispensable ?Micro-Laboratory? in which formation of various advance materials can also be carried out precisely in the atomic scale. Electron beam science and engineering is a typical example in this research field, and detailed processes of crystalline-amorphous transition and electron irradiation induced foreign atom implantation have been clarified by this method. Recently, new applications to the research fields of non-linear material behavior, such as the behavior of atom clusters and the role of electric dipoles on diffusion, have been carried out.

  16. Selective sensitivity in Kerr microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, I. V.; Schäfer, R.

    2017-07-01

    A new technique for contrast separation in wide-field magneto-optical Kerr microscopy is introduced. Utilizing the light from eight light emitting diodes, guided to the microscope by glass fibers and being switched synchronously with the camera exposure, domain images with orthogonal in-plane sensitivity can be displayed simultaneously at real-time, and images with pure in-plane or polar contrast can be obtained. The benefit of this new method of contrast separation is demonstrated for Permalloy films, a NdFeB sinter magnet, and a cobalt crystal. Moreover, the new technique is shown to strongly enhance the sensitivity of Kerr microscopy by eliminating parasitic contrast contributions occurring in conventional setups. A doubling of the in-plane domain contrast and a sensitivity to Kerr rotations as low as 0.6 mdeg is demonstrated.

  17. Scanning Probe Microscopy Markup Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolhuis, T.; Pasop, J. R.; Abelmann, L.; Lodder, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    The numerous, proprietary file formats for Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) have caused problems in the field of both off-line quantitative, data analysis and comparison, as well as long-term archiving of measurement results. Because of the eminent roll SPM's are playing in the multidisciplinary scientific world of today, an open, XML-based, standard SPM data format, called Scanning Probe Microscopy Markup Language (SPML) is proposed. XML (eXtensible Markup Language) has proven to be well applicable for standardized, structured, scientific data formats in many other disciplines. The structure of SPML will be explained briefly. The versatility of SPML as well as the possibilities of documenting, publishing, searching and exchanging SPM-data will be shown in examples. This paper gives an overview of the proposed data format, while the complete description can be found at http://spml.net.

  18. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-02-20

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  19. Holographic microscopy studies of emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherow, W. K.

    1981-01-01

    A holographic microscopy system that records and observes the dynamic properties of separation of dispersed immiscible fluids is described. The holographic construction system and reconstruction system that were used to obtain particle size and distribution information from the holograms are discussed. The holographic microscopy system is used to observed the phase separating processes in immiscible fluids that were isothermally cooled into the two phase region. Nucleation, growth rates, coalescence, and particle motion are successfully demonstrated with this system. Thus a holographic particle sizing system with a resolution of 2 micrometers and a field of view of 100 cu cm was developed that provides the capability of testing the theories of separating immiscible fluids for particle number densities in the range of 10 to 10 to the 7th power particles.

  20. Rotational scanning atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ulčinas, A; Vaitekonis, Š

    2017-03-10

    A non-raster scanning technique for atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging which combines rotational and translational motion is presented. The use of rotational motion for the fast scan axis allows us to significantly increase the scanning speed while imaging a large area (diameter > 30 μm). An image reconstruction algorithm and the factors influencing the resolution of the technique are discussed. The experimental results show the potential of the rotational scanning technique for high-throughput large area AFM investigation.

  1. Rotational scanning atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulčinas, A.; Vaitekonis, Š.

    2017-03-01

    A non-raster scanning technique for atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging which combines rotational and translational motion is presented. The use of rotational motion for the fast scan axis allows us to significantly increase the scanning speed while imaging a large area (diameter > 30 μm). An image reconstruction algorithm and the factors influencing the resolution of the technique are discussed. The experimental results show the potential of the rotational scanning technique for high-throughput large area AFM investigation.

  2. Hyperspectral holographic Fourier-microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kalenkov, G S; Kalenkov, S G; Shtan'ko, A E

    2015-04-30

    A detailed theory of the method of holographic recording of hyperspectral wave fields is developed. New experimentally obtained hyperspectral holographic images of microscopic objects are presented. The possibilities of the method are demonstrated experimentally using the examples of urgent microscopy problems: speckle noise suppression, obtaining hyperspectral image of a microscopic object, as well as synthesis of a colour image and obtaining an optical profile of a phase object. (holography)

  3. Electron Microscopy of Intracellular Protozoa.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    the erythrocytes infected with P. falciparum. Scannning electron microscopy demonstrated numerous cone-shaped knobs evenly distributed over the entire...Mystromys albicaudatus and are being used as an excellent model of American cutaneous leishmaniasis In anti-leishmanial drug screen tests at WRAIR1 s...available liquid media for rapid cultivation. J Parasitol 1978, 76:309- .316. - 16 - I- ~. . . ... .. . . " " :" "". . REFERENCES (cont’d) 17. Cohn ZA

  4. A history of urine microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J Stewart

    2015-11-01

    The naked-eye appearance of the urine must have been studied by shamans and healers since the Stone Age, and an elaborate interpretation of so-called Uroscopy began around 600 AD as a form of divination. A 1000 years later, the first primitive monocular and compound microscopes appeared in the Netherlands, and along with many other objects and liquids, urine was studied from around 1680 onwards as the enlightenment evolved. However, the crude early instruments did not permit fine study because of chromatic and linear/spherical blurring. Only after complex multi-glass lenses which avoided these problems had been made and used in the 1820s in London by Lister, and in Paris by Chevalier and Amici, could urinary microscopy become a practical, clinically useful tool in the 1830s. Clinical urinary microscopy was pioneered by Rayer and his pupils in Paris (especially Vigla), in the late 1830s, and spread to UK and Germany in the 1840s, with detailed descriptions and interpretations of cells and formed elements of the urinary sediment by Nasse, Henle, Robinson and Golding Bird. Classes were held, most notably by Donné in Paris. After another 50 years, optical microscopy had reached its apogee, with magnifications of over 1000 times obtainable free of aberration, using immersion techniques. Atlases of the urinary sediment were published in all major European countries and in the US. Polarised light and phase contrast was used also after 1900 to study urine, and by the early 20th century, photomicroscopy (pioneered by Donné and Daguerre 50 years previously, but then ignored) became usual for teaching and recording. In the 1940s electron microscopy began, followed by detection of specific proteins and cells using immunofluorescent antibodies. All this had been using handheld methodology. Around 1980, machine-assisted observations began, and have dominated progress since.

  5. Multi-photon excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  6. Multi-photon excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-06-06

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments.

  7. Multiphoton microscopy of atheroslcerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilledahl, Magnus B.; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Haugen, Olav A.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2007-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a techniques that fascilitates three dimensional imaging of intact, unstained tissue. Especially connective tissue has a relatively strong nonlinear optical response and can easily be imaged. Atherosclerosis is a disease where lipids accumulate in the vessel wall and there is a thickening of the intima by growth of a cap of connective tissue. The mechanical strength of this fibrous cap is of clinically importance. If the cap ruptures a thrombosis forms which can block a coronary vessel and therby causing myocardial infarction. Multiphoton microscopy can be used to image the fibrous cap and thereby determine the thickness of the cap and the structure of the connective fibres. This could possibly be developed into a diagnostic and clincal tool to monitor the vulnerability of a plaque and also to better understand the development of a plaque and effects of treatment. We have collected multiphoton microscopy images from atherosclerotic plaque in human aorta, both two photon excited fluorescens and second harmonic generated signal. The feasability of using this technique to determine the state of the plaque is explored.

  8. Paleomagnetic Analysis Using SQUID Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Lima, Eduardo A.; Fong, Luis E.; Baudenbacher, Franz J.

    2007-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopes are a new generation of instruments that map magnetic fields with unprecedented spatial resolution and moment sensitivity. Unlike standard rock magnetometers, SQUID microscopes map magnetic fields rather than measuring magnetic moments such that the sample magnetization pattern must be retrieved from source model fits to the measured field data. In this paper, we presented the first direct comparison between paleomagnetic analyses on natural samples using joint measurements from SQUID microscopy and moment magnetometry. We demonstrated that in combination with apriori geologic and petrographic data, SQUID microscopy can accurately characterize the magnetization of lunar glass spherules and Hawaiian basalt. The bulk moment magnitude and direction of these samples inferred from inversions of SQUID microscopy data match direct measurements on the same samples using moment magnetometry. In addition, these inversions provide unique constraints on the magnetization distribution within the sample. These measurements are among the most sensitive and highest resolution quantitative paleomagnetic studies of natural remanent magnetization to date. We expect that this technique will be able to extend many other standard paleomagnetic techniques to previously inaccessible microscale samples.

  9. Holographic opto-fluidic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bishara, Waheb; Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-12-20

    Over the last decade microfluidics has created a versatile platform that has significantly advanced the ways in which micro-scale organisms and objects are controlled, processed and investigated, by improving the cost, compactness and throughput aspects of analysis. Microfluidics has also expanded into optics to create reconfigurable and flexible optical devices such as reconfigurable lenses, lasers, waveguides, switches, and on-chip microscopes. Here we present a new opto-fluidic microscopy modality, i.e., Holographic Opto-fluidic Microscopy (HOM), based on lensless holographic imaging. This imaging modality complements the miniaturization provided by microfluidics and would allow the integration of microscopy into existing on-chip microfluidic devices with various functionalities. Our imaging modality utilizes partially coherent in-line holography and pixel super-resolution to create high-resolution amplitude and phase images of the objects flowing within micro-fluidic channels, which we demonstrate by imaging C. elegans, Giardia lamblia, and Mulberry pollen. HOM does not involve complicated fabrication processes or precise alignment, nor does it require a highly uniform flow of objects within microfluidic channels.

  10. Paleomagnetic Analysis Using SQUID Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Lima, Eduardo A.; Fong, Luis E.; Baudenbacher, Franz J.

    2007-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopes are a new generation of instruments that map magnetic fields with unprecedented spatial resolution and moment sensitivity. Unlike standard rock magnetometers, SQUID microscopes map magnetic fields rather than measuring magnetic moments such that the sample magnetization pattern must be retrieved from source model fits to the measured field data. In this paper, we presented the first direct comparison between paleomagnetic analyses on natural samples using joint measurements from SQUID microscopy and moment magnetometry. We demonstrated that in combination with apriori geologic and petrographic data, SQUID microscopy can accurately characterize the magnetization of lunar glass spherules and Hawaiian basalt. The bulk moment magnitude and direction of these samples inferred from inversions of SQUID microscopy data match direct measurements on the same samples using moment magnetometry. In addition, these inversions provide unique constraints on the magnetization distribution within the sample. These measurements are among the most sensitive and highest resolution quantitative paleomagnetic studies of natural remanent magnetization to date. We expect that this technique will be able to extend many other standard paleomagnetic techniques to previously inaccessible microscale samples.

  11. 3D structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, William M.; Goodwin, Paul C.

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy achieves double the lateral and axial resolution of wide-field microscopy, using conventional fluorescent dyes, proteins and sample preparation techniques. A three-dimensional interference-fringe pattern excites the fluorescence, filling in the "missing cone" of the wide field optical transfer function, thereby enabling axial (z) discrimination. The pattern acts as a spatial carrier frequency that mixes with the higher spatial frequency components of the image, which usually succumb to the diffraction limit. The fluorescence image encodes the high frequency content as a down-mixed, moiré-like pattern. A series of images is required, wherein the 3D pattern is shifted and rotated, providing down-mixed data for a system of linear equations. Super-resolution is obtained by solving these equations. The speed with which the image series can be obtained can be a problem for the microscopy of living cells. Challenges include pattern-switching speeds, optical efficiency, wavefront quality and fringe contrast, fringe pitch optimization, and polarization issues. We will review some recent developments in 3D-SIM hardware with the goal of super-resolved z-stacks of motile cells.

  12. Electron Microscopy of Living Cells During in Situ Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liv, Nalan; van Oosten Slingeland, Daan S. B.; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Kruit, Pieter; Piston, David W.; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach toward dynamic nanoimaging: live fluorescence of cells encapsulated in a bionanoreactor is complemented with in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on an integrated microscope. This allows us to take SEM snapshots on-demand, that is, at a specific location in time, at a desired region of interest, guided by the dynamic fluorescence imaging. We show that this approach enables direct visualization, with EM resolution, of the distribution of bioconjugated quantum dots on cellular extensions during uptake and internalization. PMID:26580231

  13. Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy and Raman Microscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harootunian, Alec Tate

    1987-09-01

    Both a one dimensional near-field scanning optical microscope and Raman microprobe were constructed. In near -field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) a subwavelength aperture is scanned in the near-field of the object. Radiation transmitted through the aperture is collected to form an image as the aperture scans over the object. The resolution of an NSOM system is essentially wavelength independent and is limited by the diameter of the aperture used to scan the object. NSOM was developed in an effort to provide a nondestructive in situ high spatial resolution probe while still utilizing photons at optical wavelengths. The Raman microprobe constructed provided vibrational Raman information with spatial resolution equivalent that of a conventional diffraction limited microscope. Both transmission studies and near-field diffration studies of subwavelength apertures were performed. Diffraction theories for a small aperture in an infinitely thin conducting screen, a slit in a thick conducting screen, and an aperture in a black screen were examined. All three theories indicate collimation of radiation to the size to the size of the subwavelength aperture or slit in the near-field. Theoretical calculations and experimental results indicate that light transmitted through subwavelength apertures is readily detectable. Light of wavelength 4579 (ANGSTROM) was transmitted through apertures with diameters as small as 300 (ANGSTROM). These studies indicate the feasibility of constructing an NSOM system. One dimensional transmission and fluorescence NSOM systems were constructed. Apertures in the tips of metallized glass pipettes width inner diameters of less than 1000 (ANGSTROM) were used as a light source in the NSOM system. A tunneling current was used to maintain the aperture position in the near-field. Fluorescence NSOM was demonstrated for the first time. Microspectroscopic and Raman microscopic studies of turtle cone oil droplets were performed. Both the Raman vibrational

  14. Fluorescence-integrated transmission electron microscopy images: integrating fluorescence microscopy with transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sims, Paul A; Hardin, Jeff D

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes high-pressure freezing (HPF) techniques for correlative light and electron microscopy on the same sample. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) is exploited for its ability to collect fluorescent, as well as transmitted and back scattered light (BSL) images at the same time. Fluorescent information from a whole mount (preembedding) or from thin sections (post-embedding) can be displayed as a color overlay on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Fluorescence-integrated TEM (F-TEM) images provide a fluorescent perspective to TEM images. The pre-embedding method uses a thin two-part agarose pad to immobilize live Caenorhabditis elegans embryos for LSCM, HPF, and TEM. Pre-embedding F-TEM images display fluorescent information collected from a whole mount of live embryos onto all thin sections collected from that sample. In contrast, the postembedding method uses HPF and freeze substitution with 1% paraformaldehyde in 95% ethanol followed by low-temperature embedding in methacrylate resin. This procedure preserves the structure and function of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as determined by immunogold labeling of GFP, when compared with GFP expression, both demonstrated in the same thin section.

  15. Sustainable, Rapid Synthesis of Bright-Luminescent CuInS2-ZnS Alloyed Nanocrystals: Multistage Nano-xenotoxicity Assessment and Intravital Fluorescence Bioimaging in Zebrafish-Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Chetty, S. Shashank; Praneetha, S.; Basu, Sandeep; Sachidanandan, Chetana; Murugan, A. Vadivel

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) luminescent CuInS2-ZnS alloyed nanocrystals (CIZS-NCs) for highly fluorescence bioimaging have received considerable interest in recent years. Owing, they became a desirable alternative to heavy-metal based-NCs and organic dyes with unique optical properties and low-toxicity for bioimaging and optoelectronic applications. In the present study, bright and robust CIZS-NCs have been synthesized within 5 min, as-high-as 230 °C without requiring any inert-gas atmosphere via microwave-solvothermal (MW-ST) method. Subsequently, the in vitro and in vivo nano-xenotoxicity and cellular uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs were investigated in L929, Vero, MCF7 cell lines and zebrafish-embryos. We observed minimal toxicity and acute teratogenic consequences upto 62.5 μg/ml of the CIZS-NCs in zebrafish-embryos. We also observed spontaneous uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs by 3 dpf older zebrafish-embryos that are evident through bright red fluorescence-emission at a low concentration of 7.8 μg/mL. Hence, we propose that the rapid, low-cost, large-scale “sustainable” MW-ST synthesis of CIZS-NCs, is an ideal bio-nanoprobe with good temporal and spatial resolution for rapid labeling, long-term in vivo tracking and intravital-fluorescence-bioimaging (IVBI). PMID:27188464

  16. Magnetic resonance microscopy versus light microscopy in human embryology teaching.

    PubMed

    Puerta-Fonollá, J; Vázquez-Osorio, T; Ruiz-Cabello, J; Murillo-González, J; Peña-Melián, A

    2004-07-01

    A study was carried out on the application of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) in teaching prenatal human development. Human embryos measuring 8 mm, 15 mm, 18.5 mm, and 22 mm were fixed in a 4% paraformaldehyde solution and sections obtained with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were compared to those prepared for light microscopy (LM), using the same em