Science.gov

Sample records for 4-dimethylamino-n-methyl-4-stilbazolium tosylate dast

  1. Real-time terahertz wave imaging by nonlinear optical frequency up-conversion in a 4-dimethylamino-N'-methyl-4'-stilbazolium tosylate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shuzhen; Qi, Feng; Notake, Takashi; Nawata, Kouji; Matsukawa, Takeshi; Takida, Yuma; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2014-03-01

    Real-time terahertz (THz) wave imaging has wide applications in areas such as security, industry, biology, medicine, pharmacy, and arts. In this letter, we report on real-time room-temperature THz imaging by nonlinear optical frequency up-conversion in organic 4-dimethylamino-N'-methyl-4'-stilbazolium tosylate crystal. The active projection-imaging system consisted of (1) THz wave generation, (2) THz-near-infrared hybrid optics, (3) THz wave up-conversion, and (4) an InGaAs camera working at 60 frames per second. The pumping laser system consisted of two optical parametric oscillators pumped by a nano-second frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. THz-wave images of handmade samples at 19.3 THz were taken, and videos of a sample moving and a ruler stuck with a black polyethylene film moving were supplied online to show real-time ability. Thanks to the high speed and high responsivity of this technology, real-time THz imaging with a higher signal-to-noise ratio than a commercially available THz micro-bolometer camera was proven to be feasible. By changing the phase-matching condition, i.e., by changing the wavelength of the pumping laser, we suggest THz imaging with a narrow THz frequency band of interest in a wide range from approximately 2 to 30 THz is possible.

  2. Bridging a few terahertz to tens of terahertz: Inspection on a cost-effective, room-temperature operated measurement system based on frequency conversion via 4-dimethylamino-N'-methyl-4'-stilbazolium tosylate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Feng; Nawata, Kouji; Hayashi, Shin'ichiro; Notake, Takashi; Matsukawa, Takeshi; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Based on experimental studies, we inspected the feasibility of a frequency conversion system, including both terahertz (THz) generation and detection, by using 4-dimethylamino-N'-methy-4'-stilbazolium tosylate crystal for wideband measurement. At 27 THz, more than five orders dynamic range in power have been obtained. Compared with typical pyroelectric detectors, it is four orders better in terms of sensitivity. Power calibration has been implemented and the minimum detectable pulse energy is 3 fJ, with a corresponding noise equivalent power of 22 pW/Hz1/2. For broadband operation, we have achieved good signal level downwards to 2.5 THz. Such a system can be an excellent complement to classical time-domain spectroscopy systems.

  3. Coherent terahertz-wave generation and detection over a wide frequency range using DAST crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamide, Hiroaki; Ito, Hiromasa

    2009-02-01

    Terahertz-frequency (THz) waves have shown potential for a wide range of applications. We have developed tunable THz-wave sources using nonlinear optical crystals, which have several advantages, including frequency agility, wide tunability, high output, and high coherency. We found that the organic nonlinear crystal of 4-dimethylamino-N-methyl-4-stilbazolium-tosylate (DAST) had particular potential for ultra-wide THz-wave generation from sub-THz to mid-infrared frequencies. Using DAST, we manufactured a coherent, tunable source (1-40 THz) with frequency agility. Moreover, we demonstrated THz-wave detection through up-conversion using DAST or MgO:LiNbO3 nonlinear optical crystals, which provided a fast response, high sensitivity, and room-temperature operation.

  4. 10 aJ-level sensing of nanosecond pulse below 10 THz by frequency upconversion detection via DAST crystal: more than a 4 K bolometer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Feng; Fan, Shuzhen; Notake, Takashi; Nawata, Koji; Matsukawa, Takeshi; Takida, Yuma; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2014-03-01

    By using frequency upconversion detection of terahertz (THz) waves via 4-dimethylamino-N-methyl-4-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) crystal with an optimized frequency conversion process, ultrahigh sensitivity has been achieved. Direct comparisons with a 4 K bolometer were implemented. By using a simple positive intrinsic negative (PIN) diode without either electrical amplification or optical amplification, frequency upconversion detection can compete with the commercial 4 K bolometer, while by replacing the PIN diode with an avalanche photo diode (APD), it performs more than three orders better than the 4 K bolometer. Based on power calibration, the minimum detectable THz pulse energy is in the order of 10 aJ (9-25 aJ) at 4.3 THz, with a pulse duration of 6 ns. Thus, the minimum number of THz photons that can be detected is down to the order of 10(3) at room temperature. The current THz detection system gives a noise equivalent power (NEP) in the order of 100  fW/Hz(1/2) (50-128  fW/Hz(1/2)). Moreover, by switching current optical detectors, the dynamic range is over six orders. PMID:24690730

  5. Room temperature terahertz wave imaging at 60 fps by frequency up-conversion in DAST crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shuzhen; Qi, Feng; Notake, Takashi; Nawata, Kouji; Matsukawa, Takeshi; Takida, Yuma; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2014-02-01

    Terahertz imaging has attracted a lot of interests for more than 10 years. But real time, high sensitive, low cost THz imaging in room temperature, which is widely needed by fields such as biology, biomedicine and homeland security, has not been fully developed yet. A lot of approaches have been reported on electro-optic (E-O) imaging and THz focal plane arrays with photoconductive antenna or micro-bolometer integrated. In this paper, we report high sensitive realtime THz image at 60 frames per second (fps) employing a commercial infrared camera, using nonlinear optical frequency up-conversion technology. In this system, a flash-lamp pumped nanosecond pulse green laser is used to pump two optical parametric oscillator systems with potassium titanyl phosphate crystals (KTP-OPO). One system with dual KTP crystals is used to generate infrared laser for the pumping of THz difference frequency generation (DFG) in a 4- Dimethylamino-N-Methyl-4-Stilbazolium Tosylate (DAST) crystal. The other one is for generation of pumping laser for THz frequency up-conversion in a second DAST crystal. The THz frequency can be tuned continuously from a few THz to less than 30 THz by controlling the angle of KTP crystals. The frequency up-converted image in infrared region is recorded by a commercial infrared camera working at 60 Hz. Images and videos are presented to show the feasibility of this technique and the real-time ability. Comparison with a general micro-bolometer THz camera shows the high sensitivity of this technique.

  6. Temperature Dependence of Crystal Structure and THz Absorption Spectra of Organic Nonlinear Optical Stilbazolium Material for High-Output THz-Wave Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukawa, Takeshi; Hoshina, Hiromichi; Hoshikawa, Akinori; Otani, Chiko; Ishigaki, Toru

    2016-06-01

    A stilbazolium material comprising 4-dimethylamino- N'-methyl-4'-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST), which has a large nonlinear optical susceptibility, was studied for application in terahertz (THz)-wave generation. The temperature-dependent structure of the DAST crystal was measured by using powder X-ray diffraction from -100 to 200 °C, indicating a volume expansion of 4.6 %. The lattice constants show anisotropic thermal expansion. Also, the temperature dependence of THz absorption spectra was measured by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in the temperature range varying from -80 to 88.1 °C. A strong absorption peak was found at around 1 THz, shifting slightly toward a lower frequency with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of the THz spectra was compared with that of X-ray diffraction. The shifting of THz-vibrational frequencies of the DAST crystal suggests that the change in its lattice structure is temperature dependent.

  7. Conversion of 4-N,N-dimethylamino-4'-N'-methyl-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) from a Simple Optical Material to a Versatile Optoelectronic Material.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangdong; Sun, Ziqiang; Fan, Kai; Jiang, Yadong; Huang, Rui; Wen, Yuejiang; He, Qiong; Ao, Tianhong

    2015-01-01

    4-N,N-dimethylamino-4'-N'-methyl-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) is an important optical material, but its poor conductivity limits applications in devices. To tackle this problem, we designed, prepared, and systematically investigated novel binary composite films that are composed of two-dimensional (2D) DAST and 2D graphene. Results indicate that both electrical and optical properties of DAST can be significantly improved by graphene addition. The negative steric effects of big DAST molecules that greatly trouble ex-situ synthesis can be efficiently overcome by in-situ synthesis, thus leading to better film quality and higher physical properties. Consequently, the in-situ composite film exhibits a low sheet resistance of 7.5 × 10(6) ohm and high temperature coefficient of resistance of -2.79% K(-1), close to the levels of the most important bolometric materials for uncooled infrared detectors. Particularly, a new low temperature reduction of graphene oxide induced by DAST, which is further enhanced by in-situ process, was discovered. This work presents valuable information about the DAST-graphene composite films, their chemical structures, mechanisms, physical properties, and comparison on in-situ and ex-situ syntheses of graphene-based composites, all of which will be helpful for not only theoretically studying the DAST and graphene materials and expanding their applications, but also for seeking new optoelectronic sensitive materials. PMID:26192068

  8. Conversion of 4-N,N-dimethylamino-4’-N’-methyl-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) from a Simple Optical Material to a Versatile Optoelectronic Material

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiangdong; Sun, Ziqiang; Fan, Kai; Jiang, Yadong; Huang, Rui; Wen, Yuejiang; He, Qiong; Ao, Tianhong

    2015-01-01

    4-N,N-dimethylamino-4’-N’-methyl-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) is an important optical material, but its poor conductivity limits applications in devices. To tackle this problem, we designed, prepared, and systematically investigated novel binary composite films that are composed of two-dimensional (2D) DAST and 2D graphene. Results indicate that both electrical and optical properties of DAST can be significantly improved by graphene addition. The negative steric effects of big DAST molecules that greatly trouble ex-situ synthesis can be efficiently overcome by in-situ synthesis, thus leading to better film quality and higher physical properties. Consequently, the in-situ composite film exhibits a low sheet resistance of 7.5 × 106 ohm and high temperature coefficient of resistance of −2.79% K−1, close to the levels of the most important bolometric materials for uncooled infrared detectors. Particularly, a new low temperature reduction of graphene oxide induced by DAST, which is further enhanced by in-situ process, was discovered. This work presents valuable information about the DAST–graphene composite films, their chemical structures, mechanisms, physical properties, and comparison on in-situ and ex-situ syntheses of graphene–based composites, all of which will be helpful for not only theoretically studying the DAST and graphene materials and expanding their applications, but also for seeking new optoelectronic sensitive materials. PMID:26192068

  9. DAST in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The modified BQM-34 Firebee II drone with Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-1), a supercritical airfoil, during a 1980 research flight. The remotely-piloted vehicle, which was air launched from NASA's NB-52B mothership, participated in the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program which ran from 1977 to 1983. The DAST 1 aircraft (Serial #72-1557), pictured, crashed on 12 June 1980 after its right wing ripped off during a test flight near Cuddeback Dry Lake, California. The crash occurred on the modified drone's third free flight. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of

  10. Evaluation of DAST and zinc telluride nonlinear crystals for efficient terahertz generation

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesh, M.; Chaudhary, A. K.; Rao, K. S.

    2015-07-31

    Terahertz (THz) signal is generated from 4-N, N-dimethylamino-4’-N’-methyl-stilbazolium tosylate (i.e. DAST Crystal) and Zinc telluride (ZnTe) nonlinear crystals by employing 140 fs laser pulses at 800 nm with 80 MHz repetition rate. The semi insulating gallium arsenide photoconductive stripline antennas (gap =5 µm, length = 20 µm) is used as a Terahertz detector. The detected temporal profile of Terahertz radiation generated from DAST crystal is high as compared to ZnTe crystal in terms of amplitude. THz effective bandwidths of these crystals are extended up to 1.1 THz range. The potential of THz generation of DAST and ZnTe crystals are evaluated with respect to incident laser power.

  11. Experiment Configurations for the DAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This image shows three vehicle configurations considered for the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program, conducted at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center between 1977 and 1983. The DAST project planned for three wing configurations. These were the Instrumented Standard Wing (ISW), the Aeroelastic Research Wing-1 (ARW-1), and the ARW-2. After the DAST-1 crash, project personnel fitted a second Firebee II with a rebuilt ARW-1 wing. Due to the project's ending, it never flew the ARW-2 wing. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of the structure, driven by aerodynamic

  12. Generation of 1.5-octave intense infrared pulses by nonlinear interactions in DAST crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicario, C.; Monoszlai, B.; Arisholm, G.; Hauri, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Infrared pulses with large spectral width extending from 1.2 to 3.4 μm are generated in the organic crystal DAST (4-N, N-dimethylamino-4‧-N‧-methylstilbazolium tosylate). The input pulse has a central wavelength of 1.5 μm and 65 fs duration. With 2.8 mJ input energy we obtained up to 700 μJ in the broadened spectrum. The output can be easily scaled up in energy by increasing the crystal size together with the energy and the beam size of the pump. The ultra-broad spectrum is ascribed to cascaded second order processes mediated by the exceptionally large effective χ 2 nonlinearity of DAST, but the shape of the spectrum indicates that a delayed χ 3 process may also be involved. Numerical simulations reproduce the experimental results qualitatively and provide an insight in the mechanisms underlying the asymmetric spectral broadening.

  13. DAST Being Calibrated for Flight in Hangar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    DAST-2, a modified BQM-34 Firebee II drone, undergoes calibration in a hangar at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. After the crash of the first DAST vehicle, project personnel fitted a second Firebee II (serial # 72-1558) with the rebuilt ARW-1 (ARW-1R) wing. The DAST-2 made a captive flight aboard the B-52 on October 29, 1982, followed by a free flight on November 3, 1982. During January and February of 1983, three launch attempts from the B-52 had to be aborted due to various problems. Following this, the project changed the launch aircraft to a DC-130A. Two captive flights occurred in May 1983. The first launch attempt from the DC-130 took place on June 1, 1983. The mothership released the DAST-2, but the recovery system immediately fired without being commanded. The parachute then disconnected from the vehicle, and the DAST-2 crashed into a farm field near Harper Dry Lake. Wags called this the 'Alfalfa Field Impact Test.' These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and

  14. DAST in Flight Showing Diverging Wingtip Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Two BQM-34 Firebee II drones were modified with supercritical airfoils, called the Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW), for the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program, which ran from 1977 to 1983. In this view of DAST-1 (Serial # 72-1557), taken on June 12, 1980, severe wingtip flutter is visible. Moments later, the right wing failed catastrophically and the vehicle crashed near Cuddeback Dry Lake. Before the drone was lost, it had made two captive and two free flights. Its first free flight, on October 2, 1979, was cut short by an uplink receiver failure. The drone was caught in midair by an HH-3 helicopter. The second free flight, on March 12, 1980, was successful, ending in a midair recovery. The third free flight, made on June 12, was to expand the flutter envelope. All of these missions launched from the NASA B-52. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than

  15. DAST Being Calibrated for Flight in Hangar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    DAST-2, a modified BQM-34 Firebee II drone, undergoes calibration in a hangar at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. After the crash of the first DAST vehicle, project personnel fitted a second Firebee II (serial # 72-1558) with the rebuilt ARW-1 (ARW-1R) wing. The DAST-2 made a captive flight aboard the B-52 on October 29, 1982, followed by a free flight on November 3, 1982. During January and February of 1983, three launch attempts from the B-52 had to be aborted due to various problems. Following this, the project changed the launch aircraft to a DC-130A. Two captive flights occurred in May 1983. The first launch attempt from the DC-130 took place on June 1, 1983. The mothership released the DAST-2, but the recovery system immediately fired without being commanded. The parachute then disconnected from the vehicle, and the DAST-2 crashed into a farm field near Harper Dry Lake. Wags called this the 'Alfalfa Field Impact Test.' These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and

  16. [Characterization of the organic crystal DAST as a THz emitter].

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Li, Chun; Hu, Zhang-gui; Wang, Li; Zhang, Jie

    2006-10-01

    Using THz time-domain spectroscopy, the home-grown organic crystal DAST and widely used high-efficient ZnTe were characterized as THz emitters. Bolometer was also used to measure the absolute energy of THz radiation from DAST and ZnTe. The refractive index and absorption coefficient of DAST were measured too. It is concluded that the home-grown DAST is a kind of high-efficiency THz material, and could become a good THz emitter and detector after the improvement in growing process. PMID:17205718

  17. Pump-beam-induced optical damage depended on repetition frequency and pulse width in 4-dimethylamino-N Prime -methyl-4 Prime -stilbazolium tosylate crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukawa, Takeshi; Nawata, Kouji; Notake, Takashi; Qi Feng; Kawamata, Hiroshi; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2013-07-08

    We investigated the dependence of optical damage to an organic nonlinear optical crystal of 4-dimethylamino-N Prime -methyl-4 Prime -stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) on the repetition frequency and pulse width of the pump beam used to cause the thermal damage. For a pump beam with a pulse width of 15 ns at a wavelength of 1064 nm, the highest damage threshold of 8.0 J/cm{sup 2} was measured for repetition frequencies in the range from 10 to 40 Hz. On the other hand, DAST crystals were easily damaged under the repetition rates from 50 to 100 Hz. For 600-ps pulses, a higher damage threshold that was a factor of 11 to 28 times higher in terms of peak intensity was obtained compared with that of 15-ns pulses. In both the cases of 15-ns pulse duration and 600-ps duration, we demonstrated that the thermal effects in DAST crystals dominated the optical damage, which depended on thermal accumulation and dissipation.

  18. DAST in Flight just after Structural Failure of Right Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Two BQM-34 Firebee II drones were modified with supercritical airfoils, called the Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW), for the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program, which ran from 1977 to 1983. This photo, taken 12 June 1980, shows the DAST-1 (Serial #72-1557) immediately after it lost its right wing after suffering severe wing flutter. The vehicle crashed near Cuddeback Dry Lake. The Firebee II was selected for the DAST program because its standard wing could be removed and replaced by a supercritical wing. The project's digital flutter suppression system was intended to allow lighter wing structures, which would translate into better fuel economy for airliners. Because the DAST vehicles were flown intentionally at speeds and altitudes that would cause flutter, the program anticipated that crashes might occur. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for

  19. DAST Mated to B-52 on Ramp - Close-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Technicians mount a BQM-43 Firebee II drone on the wing pylon of NASA's B-52B launch aircraft. The drone was test flown as part of the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program. Research flights of drones with modified wings for the DAST program were conducted from 1977 to 1983. After the initial flights of Firebee II 72-1564, it was fitted with the Instrumented Standard Wing (also called the 'Blue Streak' wing). The first free flight attempt on March 7, 1979, was aborted before launch due to mechanical problems with the HH-53 recovery helicopter. The next attempt, on March 9, 1979, was successful. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but

  20. Matsuda-Heck reaction with arenediazonium tosylates in water.

    PubMed

    Kutonova, Ksenia V; Trusova, Marina E; Stankevich, Andrey V; Postnikov, Pavel S; Filimonov, Victor D

    2015-01-01

    An environmentally friendly Matsuda-Heck reaction with arenediazonium tosylates has been developed for the first time. A range of alkenes was arylated in good to quantitative yields in water. The reaction is significantly accelerated when carried out under microwave heating. The arylation of haloalkylacrylates with diazonium salts has been implemented for the first time. PMID:25977709

  1. Cellulose carboxylate/tosylate mixed esters: Synthesis, properties and shaping into microspheres.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniela C; Bastos, Gustavo S; Pfeifer, Annett; Heinze, Thomas; El Seoud, Omar A

    2016-11-01

    Cellulose carboxylate/tosylate mixed esters (Cel-Carboxy/Ts) were synthesized with constant degree of tosylation, DSTs=0.98 and variable degree of acylation, DSCarboxy; acetate, butanoate, and hexanoate. The tosylate (Cel-Ts) was prepared by reacting cellulose with tosyl chloride in presence of trimethylamine. The mixed esters were obtained by reacting Cel-Ts with carboxylic acid anhydride. The dependence of the following on DSCarboxy was investigated: IR data, including νCO, νSO and peak area (CO); empirical polarity of the films, determined by an adsorbed perichromic dye. We employed these parameters to determine DSCarboxy. Relative to ester saponification, these spectroscopic methods are convenient, expedient, and require much less sample. Mixed esters prepared physically from cellulose tosylate and tosylate/acetate behave only qualitatively similar to (Cel-Carboxy/Ts). The mixed esters were dissolved in acetone and regenerated in water as homogeneous microspheres. PMID:27516252

  2. Palladium-catalyzed intramolecular C-H arylation of arenes using tosylates and mesylates as electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Nervig, Christine S; Waller, Peter J; Kalyani, Dipannita

    2012-09-21

    This paper describes a method for the palladium catalyzed intramolecular C-H arylation using tosylates and mesylates as electrophiles. The transformation is efficient for the synthesis of various heterocyclic motifs including furans, carbazoles, indoles, and lactams. Additionally, a protocol for the one-pot sequential tosylation/arylation of phenol derivatives is presented. PMID:22974229

  3. DAST Mated to B-52 in Flight - Close-up from Below

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This photo shows a BQM-34 Firebee II drone being carried aloft under the wing of NASA's B-52 mothership during a 1977 research flight. The Firebee/DAST research program ran from 1977 to 1983 at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. This is the original Firebee II wing. Firebee 72-1564 made three captive flights--on November 25, 1975; May 17, 1976; and June 22, 1977--in preparation for the DAST project with modified wings. These were for checkout of the Firebee's systems and the prelaunch procedures. The first two used a DC-130A aircraft as the launch vehicle, while the third used the B-52. A single free flight using this drone occurred on July 28, 1977. The remote (ground) pilot was NASA research pilot Bill Dana. The launch and flight were successful, and the drone was caught in midair by an HH-53 helicopter. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for

  4. Taming tosyl azide: the development of a scalable continuous diazo transfer process.

    PubMed

    Deadman, Benjamin J; O'Mahony, Rosella M; Lynch, Denis; Crowley, Daniel C; Collins, Stuart G; Maguire, Anita R

    2016-04-01

    Heat and shock sensitive tosyl azide was generated and used on demand in a telescoped diazo transfer process. Small quantities of tosyl azide were accessed in a 'one pot' batch procedure using shelf stable, readily available reagents. For large scale diazo transfer reactions tosyl azide was generated and used in a telescoped flow process, to mitigate the risks associated with handling potentially explosive reagents on scale. The in situ formed tosyl azide was used to rapidly perform diazo transfer to a range of acceptors, including β-ketoesters, β-ketoamides, malonate esters and β-ketosulfones. An effective in-line quench of sulfonyl azides was also developed, whereby a sacrificial acceptor molecule ensured complete consumption of any residual hazardous diazo transfer reagent. The telescoped diazo transfer process with in-line quenching was used to safely prepare over 21 g of an α-diazocarbonyl in >98% purity without any column chromatography. PMID:26959187

  5. Validation of the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10): A study on illicit drug use among Chinese pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Lap Po; Leung, Wing Cheong; Ip, Patrick; Chow, Chun Bong; Chan, Mei Fung; Ng, Judy Wai Ying; Sing, Chu; Lam, Ying Hoo; Mak, Wing Lai Tony; Chow, Kam Ming; Chin, Robert Kien Howe

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the Chinese version of the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10) for identifying illicit drug use during pregnancy among Chinese population. Chinese pregnant women attending their first antenatal visit or their first unbooked visit to the maternity ward were recruited during a 4-month study period in 2011. The participants completed self-administered questionnaires on demographic information, a single question on illicit drug use during pregnancy and the DAST-10. Urine samples screened positive by the urine Point-of-Care Test were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. DAST-10 performance was compared with three different gold standards: urinalysis, self-reported drug use, and evidence of drug use by urinalysis or self-report. 1214 Chinese pregnant women participated in the study and 1085 complete DAST-10 forms were collected. Women who had used illicit drugs had significantly different DAST-10 scores than those who had not. The sensitivity of DAST-10 for identify illicit drug use in pregnant women ranged from 79.2% to 33.3% and specificity ranged from 67.7% to 99.7% using cut-off scores from ≥1 to ≥3. The ~80% sensitivity of DAST-10 using a cut-off score of ≥1 should be sufficient for screening of illicit drug use in Chinese pregnant women, but validation tests for drug use are needed. PMID:26091290

  6. Validation of the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10): A study on illicit drug use among Chinese pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Lam, Lap Po; Leung, Wing Cheong; Ip, Patrick; Chow, Chun Bong; Chan, Mei Fung; Ng, Judy Wai Ying; Sing, Chu; Lam, Ying Hoo; Mak, Wing Lai Tony; Chow, Kam Ming; Chin, Robert Kien Howe

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the Chinese version of the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10) for identifying illicit drug use during pregnancy among Chinese population. Chinese pregnant women attending their first antenatal visit or their first unbooked visit to the maternity ward were recruited during a 4-month study period in 2011. The participants completed self-administered questionnaires on demographic information, a single question on illicit drug use during pregnancy and the DAST-10. Urine samples screened positive by the urine Point-of-Care Test were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. DAST-10 performance was compared with three different gold standards: urinalysis, self-reported drug use, and evidence of drug use by urinalysis or self-report. 1214 Chinese pregnant women participated in the study and 1085 complete DAST-10 forms were collected. Women who had used illicit drugs had significantly different DAST-10 scores than those who had not. The sensitivity of DAST-10 for identify illicit drug use in pregnant women ranged from 79.2% to 33.3% and specificity ranged from 67.7% to 99.7% using cut-off scores from ≥ 1 to ≥ 3. The ~ 80% sensitivity of DAST-10 using a cut-off score of ≥ 1 should be sufficient for screening of illicit drug use in Chinese pregnant women, but validation tests for drug use are needed. PMID:26091290

  7. Loads calibrations of strain gage bridges on the DAST project Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, C. V.

    1980-01-01

    The details of and results from the procedure used to calibrate strain gage bridges for measurement of wing structural loads for the DAST project ARW-1 wing are presented. Results are in the form of loads equations and comparison of computed loads vs. actual loads for two simulated flight loading conditions.

  8. Experience with bretylium tosylate by a hospital cardiac arrest team.

    PubMed

    Holder, D A; Sniderman, A D; Fraser, G; Fallen, E L

    1977-03-01

    The effect of bretylium tosylate (BT) was determined in 27 consecutive cases of resistant ventricular fibrillation (VF) encountered by a hospital cardiac arrest team. The VF was sustained and completely resistant to multiple injections of lidocaine, sequential DC shocks at 400 watt-sec and one or a combination of intravenous propranolol, diphenylhydantoin or procainamide. Following 30 min of sustained cardiac massage, BT (5 mg/kg i.v.) was administered. In 20 patients, VF was terminated within 9-12 min after DC shock. Eight of these patients failed to recover while 12 (44%) of all patients resuscitated survived to be discharged from hospital. Eleven out of 20 (55%) of all patients who had a cardiac arrest outside the CCU were survivors; only one out of seven in the CCU were successfully resuscitated. While receiving maintanance BT post-resuscitation (5 mg/kg i.m. q 8-12 hrs x 48 hrs), half the patients developed hypotension and three required vasopressors and/or fluid replacement. The data indicate that BT is a useful agent in patients with sustained VF refractory to repeated lidocaine injections, some other antiarrhythmic agents, and multiple DC shocks. PMID:837490

  9. Helquat Dyes: Helicene-like Push-Pull Systems with Large Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Responses.

    PubMed

    Coe, Benjamin J; Rusanova, Daniela; Joshi, Vishwas D; Sánchez, Sergio; Vávra, Jan; Khobragade, Dushant; Severa, Lukáš; Císařová, Ivana; Šaman, David; Pohl, Radek; Clays, Koen; Depotter, Griet; Brunschwig, Bruce S; Teplý, Filip

    2016-03-01

    Helquat dyes combine a cationic hemicyanine with a helicene-like motif to form a new blueprint for chiral systems with large and tunable nonlinear optical (NLO) properties. We report a series of such species with characterization, including determination of static first hyperpolarizabilities β0 via hyper-Rayleigh scattering and Stark spectroscopy. The measured β0 values are similar to or substantially larger than that of the commercial chromophore E-4'-(dimethylamino)-N-methyl-4-stilbazolium. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations on two of the new cations are used to probe their molecular electronic structures and optical properties. Related molecules are expected to show bulk second-order NLO effects in even nonpolar media, overcoming a key challenge in developing useful materials. PMID:26844587

  10. Homogeneous tosylation of agarose as an approach toward novel functional polysaccharide materials.

    PubMed

    Gericke, Martin; Heinze, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The homogeneous tosylation of agarose was studied with respect to the effects of reaction parameters, such as reaction medium, time, and molar ratio, on the reaction course, the degree of substitution (DS) with tosyl/chloro deoxy groups, and the molecular structure. Tosyl agaroses (TOSA) with DS tosyl ≤ 1 .81 could be obtained in completely homogeneous reactions by using N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA)/LiCl or 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI) as solvents. The products were characterized by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy and it was demonstrated that two types of substitution pattern can be achieved: (i) non-preferential substitution at position 6 of the 1 → 3-linked β-d-galactose unit (G-6) and position 2 of the 1 → 4-linked 3,6-anyhdro-α-L-galactose unit (LA-2) and (ii) regioselective tosylation at G-6, depending on whether the reaction is performed with or without LiCl. Finally, the nucleophilic displacement reaction of TOSA was studied using azide and ethylenediamine as representative nucleophiles. Novel deoxy-agarose derivatives were obtained that showed an interesting solubility behavior and will be used for creating functional polysaccharide materials. PMID:25965480

  11. N-tosyl-3-azacyclohexyne. Synthesis and chemistry of a strained cyclic ynamide.

    PubMed

    Tlais, Sami F; Danheiser, Rick L

    2014-11-01

    The first synthesis of a strained six-membered cyclic ynamide is described. N-Tosyl-3-azacyclohexyne is generated via fluoride-promoted 1,2 elimination under conditions that allow trapping of the strained heterocyclic alkyne in a variety of addition, insertion, and [2 + 2], [3 + 2], and [4 + 2] cycloaddition reactions. PMID:25328003

  12. The Synthesis and Methanolysis of Benzyl Tosylates: An Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garst, Michael E.; Gribble, Gordon W.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a series of experiments (requiring six hours/week for six to eight weeks) involving the synthesis and methanolysis of substituted benzyl tosylates. The experiments provide students with experiences in kinetic data manipulation and an introduction and firm basis for structure-activity relationships and solvent effects in organic…

  13. Effect of ring size on the direction of rearrangement in bicyclic 1-tosyl-5-ethoxy-1,2,3-triazolines

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, V.P.; Ogloblin, K.A.

    1987-09-20

    The authors determine that the title trazoline, formed in the reaction of tosyl azide with 1-epoxycyclohexene, is converted into ethyl N-tosylcyclopentencarbimidate, which is then converted into cyclopentanecarbohydrazide. The triazoline formed in the reaction of tosyl azide with 1-epoxycyclopentene is converted into N-(2-ethoxy-1-cyclopentenyl)toluenesulfonamide, the production of which indicates the intermediate formation of 2,3-trimethylene-1-tosyl-2-ethoxyaziridine. Consequently, the triazoline does not rearrange to ethyl N-tosylcyclobutanecarbimidate, in spite of the fact that it is substituted at the C-4 atom. Data on spin-spin coupling constants and chemical shift derived from the NMR spectra are analyzed.

  14. Ground vibration test results for Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST)/Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-1R) aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, T. H.; Gilyard, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    The drones for aerodynamic and structural testing (DAST) project was designed to control flutter actively at high subsonic speeds. Accurate knowledge of the structural model was critical for the successful design of the control system. A ground vibration test was conducted on the DAST vehicle to determine the structural model characteristics. This report presents and discusses the vibration and test equipment, the test setup and procedures, and the antisymmetric and symmetric mode shape results. The modal characteristics were subsequently used to update the structural model employed in the control law design process.

  15. High efficiency THz generation in DSTMS, DAST and OH1 pumped by Cr:forsterite laser.

    PubMed

    Vicario, C; Jazbinsek, M; Ovchinnikov, A V; Chefonov, O V; Ashitkov, S I; Agranat, M B; Hauri, C P

    2015-02-23

    We investigated Terahertz generation in organic crystals DSTMS, DAST and OH1 directly pumped by a Cr:forsterite laser at central wavelength of 1.25 μm. This pump laser technology provides a laser-to-THz energy conversion efficiency higher than 3 percent. Phase-matching is demonstrated over a broad 0.1-8 THz frequency range. In our simple setup we achieved hundred μJ pulses in tight focus resulting in electric and magnetic field larger than 10 MV/cm and 3 Tesla. PMID:25836494

  16. A tosyl-activated magnetic bead cellulose as solid support for sensitive protein detection.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junhong; Horák, Daniel; Lenfeld, Jiří; Hammond, Maria; Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood

    2013-09-10

    Magnetic bead cellulose (MBC) was prepared using sol-gel transition of viscose in the presence of maghemite (γ-Fe₂O₃) nanoparticles. The MBC particles were then activated with p-toluenesulfonyl chloride to yield tosyl-activated magnetic bead cellulose (MBC-Ts). The microspheres were characterized by light and electron microscopy, elemental analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy to determine morphology, size, polydispersity and content of iron and tosyl groups. The functionality of the MBC-Ts microspheres was demonstrated using proximity ligation assay (PLA) to detect vascular endothelial growth factor in femtomolar concentration range. The MBC-Ts microspheres performed equally well as commercially available microparticles that are routinely used as solid support in solid phase PLA. PMID:23811391

  17. Isomeric differentiation of chloroanilines by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in combination with tosylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Zhu, Guohua; Chen, Mengmeng; Liu, Jinsong; Jiang, Kezhi

    2016-01-01

    p-Chloroaniline is one of the banned aromatic amines in azo dyes, but it is very difficult to distinguish it from its isomers due to their identical retention time in chromatography and similar mass spectra. In this work, derivatization of the isomeric chloroanilines was carried out to yield the corresponding N-tosyl chloroanilines, which were completely separated by gas chromatography and also possessed clearly different electron ionization mass spectra. Thus, the three isomers could be differentiated and determined at the same time. Density functional theory calculation results indicated that the effect of the substituent pattern in electron ionization mass spectrometry is mainly due to the difference in the stability of the product ion (P2) at m/z 126, originating from the loss of tosyl radical from the precursor ion. PMID:27553734

  18. Gas-Phase Fragmentation of Protonated N,2-Diphenyl- N'-( p-Toluenesulfonyl)Ethanimidamides: Tosyl Cation Transfer Versus Proton Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanshan; Yu, Lian; Wu, Yanqing; Guo, Cheng; Zhang, Ningwen; Jiang, Kezhi

    2015-08-01

    The gas-phase dissociation chemistry of protonated N,2-diphenyl- N'-( p-toluenesulfonyl) ethanimidamides was investigated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in combination with density functional theory calculation. The protonated molecules underwent fragmentation via two main competing channels: (1) migration of the tosyl cation to the anilinic N atom and the subsequent loss of 2-phenylacetonitrile to afford protonated N-phenyl p-toluenesulfonamide ( m/z 248); and (2) transfer of the ionizing proton to the anilinic N atom to give an ion/neutral complex of [tosyl cation / 2-phenylacetonitrile] ( m/z 272) and the subsequent decomposition to yield tosyl cation ( m/z 155). To the best of our knowledge, the gas-phase tosyl cation transfer has not been reported previously. For the para-substituted sulfonamides, the presence of electron-donating groups on the anilinic ring inhibits the reaction channel of the tosyl cation migration, whereas the presence of electron-withdrawing groups favors this pathway.

  19. Gas-Phase Fragmentation of Protonated N,2-Diphenyl-N'-(p-Toluenesulfonyl)Ethanimidamides: Tosyl Cation Transfer Versus Proton Transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Yu, Lian; Wu, Yanqing; Guo, Cheng; Zhang, Ningwen; Jiang, Kezhi

    2015-08-01

    The gas-phase dissociation chemistry of protonated N,2-diphenyl-N'-(p-toluenesulfonyl) ethanimidamides was investigated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in combination with density functional theory calculation. The protonated molecules underwent fragmentation via two main competing channels: (1) migration of the tosyl cation to the anilinic N atom and the subsequent loss of 2-phenylacetonitrile to afford protonated N-phenyl p-toluenesulfonamide (m/z 248); and (2) transfer of the ionizing proton to the anilinic N atom to give an ion/neutral complex of [tosyl cation / 2-phenylacetonitrile] (m/z 272) and the subsequent decomposition to yield tosyl cation (m/z 155). To the best of our knowledge, the gas-phase tosyl cation transfer has not been reported previously. For the para-substituted sulfonamides, the presence of electron-donating groups on the anilinic ring inhibits the reaction channel of the tosyl cation migration, whereas the presence of electron-withdrawing groups favors this pathway. PMID:25962367

  20. The DAST-1 remotely piloted research vehicle development and initial flight testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotsabasis, A.

    1981-01-01

    The development and initial flight testing of the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing) remotely piloted research vehicle, fitted with the first aeroelastic research wing ARW-I are presented. The ARW-I is a swept supercritical wing, designed to exhibit flutter within the vehicle's flight envelope. An active flutter suppression system (FSS) designed to increase the ARW-I flutter boundary speed by 20 percent is described. The development of the FSS was based on prediction techniques of structural and unsteady aerodynamic characteristics. A description of the supporting ground facilities and aircraft systems involved in the remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV) flight test technique is given. The design, specification, and testing of the remotely augmented vehicle system are presented. A summary of the preflight and flight test procedures associated with the RPRV operation is given. An evaluation of the blue streak test flight and the first and second ARW-I test flights is presented.

  1. STILLE CROSS-COUPLING REACTIONS OF ARYL MESYLATES AND TOSYLATES USING A BIARYLPHOSPHINE BASED CATALYST SYSTEM‡

    PubMed Central

    Naber, John R.; Fors, Brett P.; Wu, Xiaoxing; Gunn, Jonathon

    2013-01-01

    A catalyst system for the Stille cross-coupling reactions of aryl mesylates and tosylates is reported. Using the combination of Pd(OAc)2, XPhos, and CsF in t-BuOH an array of aryl and heteroaryl sulfonates were successfully employed in these reactions. Morever, heteroarylstannanes, such as furyl, thiophenyl, and N-methylpyrrole, which are often prone to decomposition, were efficiently coupled under these conditions. Ortho-substitution on the stannane coupling partner was well tolerated; however, the presence of ortho substituents on the aryl sulfonates greatly reduced the proficiency of these reactions. PMID:23596345

  2. Direct Carboxylation of Aryl Tosylates by CO2 Catalyzed by In situ-Generated Ni(0).

    PubMed

    Rebih, Fatima; Andreini, Manuel; Moncomble, Aurélien; Harrison-Marchand, Anne; Maddaluno, Jacques; Durandetti, Muriel

    2016-03-01

    A novel Ni(0) -catalyzed carboxylation of aryl tosylates with carbon dioxide has been achieved under moderate temperatures and atmospheric pressure. In this procedure, the active Ni(0) species is generated in situ by simply mixing the Ni(0) precatalyst [NiBr2 (bipy)] with an excess of manganese metal. This approach requires neither a glove-box nor the tedious preparation of sophisticated intermediate organometallic derivatives. This mild, convenient, and user-friendly process is successfully applied to the valorization of carbon dioxide and the synthesis of versatile reactants with broad tolerance of substituents. PMID:26515879

  3. Design verification and fabrication of active control systems for the DAST ARW-2 high aspect ratio wing. Part 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    This is Part 2-Appendices of a study conducted under Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Program to accomplish the final design and hardware fabrication for four active control systems compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA Aeroelastic Research Wing No. 2 (ARW-2) and Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The wing structure was designed so that Active Control Systems (ACS) are required in the normal flight envelope by integrating control system design with aerodynamics and structure technologies. The DAST ARW-2 configuration uses flutter suppression, relaxed static stability, and gust and maneuver load alleviation ACS systems, and an automatic flight control system. Performance goals and criteria were applied to individual systems and the systems collectively to assure that vehicle stability margins, flutter margins, flying qualities, and load reductions were achieved.

  4. Design verification and fabrication of active control systems for the DAST ARW-2 high aspect ratio wing, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted under Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program to accomplish the final design and hardware fabrication for four active control systems compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA Aeroelastic Research Wing No. 2 (ARW-2) and Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The wing structure was designed so that Active Control Systems (ACS) are required in the normal flight envelope by integrating control system design with aerodynamics and structure technologies. The DAST ARW-2 configuration uses flutter suppression, relaxed static stability, and gust and maneuver load alleviation ACS systems, and an automatic flight control system. Performance goals and criteria were applied to individual systems and the systems collectively to assure that vehicle stability margins, flutter margins, flying qualities and load reductions are achieved.

  5. A Bulky Thiyl-Radical Catalyst for the [3+2] Cyclization of N-Tosyl Vinylaziridines and Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Takino, Kohei; Hato, Kazuki; Maruoka, Keiji

    2016-07-01

    Thiyl-radical-catalyzed cyclization reactions of N-tosyl vinylaziridines and alkenes were developed as a new synthetic method for the generation of substituted pyrrolidines. The key to making this process accessible to a broad range of substrates is the use of a sterically demanding thiyl radical, which prevents the undesired degradation of the catalyst. PMID:27169816

  6. The development of the DAST I remotely piloted research vehicle for flight testing an active flutter suppression control system. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grose, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The development of the DAST I (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing) remotely piloted research vehicle is described. The DAST I is a highly modified BQM-34E/F Firebee II Supersonic Aerial Target incorporating a swept supercritical wing designed to flutter within the vehicle's flight envelope. The predicted flutter and rigid body characteristics are presented. A description of the analysis and design of an active flutter suppression control system (FSS) designed to increase the flutter boundary of the DAST wing (ARW-1) by a factor of 20% is given. The design and development of the digital remotely augmented primary flight control system and on-board analog backup control system is presented. An evaluation of the near real-time flight flutter testing methods is made by comparing results of five flutter testing techniques on simulated DAST I flutter data. The development of the DAST ARW-1 state variable model used to generate time histories of simulated accelerometer responses is presented. This model uses control surface commands and a Dryden model gust as inputs. The feasibility of the concept of extracting open loop flutter characteristics from closed loop FSS responses was examined. It was shown that open loop characteristics can be determined very well from closed loop subcritical responses.

  7. Synthesis of azetidin-3-ones. Structure of n-tosyl-2-ethylazetidin-3-one

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, Z.G.; Atovmyan, L.O.; Sipyagin, A.M.; Kartsev, V.G.; Dobrokhotova, O.V.

    1987-10-01

    A one-step synthesis of azetidin-3-ones by intramolecular cyclization of 1-diazo-3-arenesulfamoylalkan-2-ones was developed. The yield of cyclic product increases to 70% in the presence of an alkyl or benzyl substituent in the hydrocarbon chain of the diazoketone. The structure of N-tosyl-2-ethylazetidin-3-one was studied by x-ray diffraction analysis and it was shown that the four-membered ring has 15/sup 0/ inflection. IR spectra were recorded with a Specord 75 IR instrument in mineral oil. PMR spectra were recorded with Bruker WH-360 (360 MHz) and Jeol HL-60 (60 MHz) instruments in CDCl/sub 3/ solution, with TMS internal standard. UV spectra were obtained with a Specord UV-VIS instrument in methanol.

  8. Crystal structures of (E)-3-(furan-2-yl)-2-phenyl-N-tosyl-acryl-amide and (E)-3-phenyl-2-(m-tol-yl)-N-tosyl-acryl-amide.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dong; Meng, Xiangzhen; Sheng, Zeyuan; Wang, Shuangming; Duan, Yuanyuan; Li, Ziqian

    2016-06-01

    In the title N-tosyl-acryl-amide compounds, C20H17NO4S, (I), and C23H21NO3S, (II), the conformation about the C=C bond is E. The acryl-amide groups, [-NH-C(=O)-C=C-], are almost planar, with the N-C-C=C torsion angle being -170.18 (14)° in (I) and -168.01 (17)° in (II). In (I), the furan, phenyl and 4-methyl-benzene rings are inclined to the acryl-amide mean plane by 26.47 (11), 69.01 (8) and 82.49 (9)°, respectively. In (II), the phenyl, 3-methyl-benzene and 4-methyl-benzene rings are inclined to the acryl-amide mean plane by 11.61 (10), 78.44 (10) and 78.24 (10)°, respectively. There is an intra-molecular C-H⋯π inter-action present in compound (II). In the crystals of both compounds, mol-ecules are linked by pairs of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers with an R 2 (2)(8) ring motif. In (I), the dimers are reinforced by C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and linked by C-H⋯π inter-actions, forming chains along [011]. In the crystal of (II), the dimers are linked via C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains along [100]. The chains are further linked by C-H⋯π inter-actions, forming layers parallel to (010). PMID:27308045

  9. An influence coefficient method for the application of the modal technique to wing flutter suppression of the DAST ARW-1 wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, S.

    1981-01-01

    The methods used to compute the mass, structural stiffness, and aerodynamic forces in the form of influence coefficient matrices as applied to a flutter analysis of the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Aeroelastic Research Wing. The DAST wing was chosen because wind tunnel flutter test data and zero speed vibration data of the modes and frequencies exist and are available for comparison. A derivation of the equations of motion that can be used to apply the modal method for flutter suppression is included. A comparison of the open loop flutter predictions with both wind tunnel data and other analytical methods is presented.

  10. Analytical procedures for flutter model development and checkout in preparation for wind tunnel testing of the DAST ARW-1 wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, S.

    1982-01-01

    A study to develop analytical procedures to be used in the checkout and calibration of a flutter wind tunnel model of the DAST ARW-1 wing equipped with a flutter suppression device is reported. The methods used to obtain a realistic simulation of the structural inertial and aerodynamic properties of the wing, the hydro-electro-servo actuator used for flutter suppression, a prediction of the open loop flutter speed at a fixed Mach number (.897), a procedure for checkout and calibration using the method frequency response of a wing mounted accelerometer, and an analytical representation of a reduced state approximation of the overall system are described.

  11. Synergistic Interactions of Eugenol-tosylate and Its Congeners with Fluconazole against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aijaz; Wani, Mohmmad Younus; Khan, Amber; Manzoor, Nikhat; Molepo, Julitha

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the antifungal properties of a monoterpene phenol "Eugenol" against different Candida strains and have observed that the addition of methyl group to eugenol drastically increased its antimicrobial potency. Based on the results and the importance of medicinal synthetic chemistry, we synthesized eugenol-tosylate and its congeners (E1-E6) and tested their antifungal activity against different clinical fluconazole (FLC)- susceptible and FLC- resistant C. albicans isolates alone and in combination with FLC by determining fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICIs) and isobolograms calculated from microdilution assays. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results confirmed that all the tested C. albicans strains were variably susceptible to the semi-synthetic derivatives E1-E6, with MIC values ranging from 1-62 μg/ml. The test compounds in combination with FLC exhibited either synergy (36%), additive (41%) or indifferent (23%) interactions, however, no antagonistic interactions were observed. The MICs of FLC decreased 2-9 fold when used in combination with the test compounds. Like their precursor eugenol, all the derivatives showed significant impairment of ergosterol biosynthesis in all C. albicans strains coupled with down regulation of the important ergosterol biosynthesis pathway gene-ERG11. The results were further validated by docking studies, which revealed that the inhibitors snugly fitting the active site of the target enzyme, mimicking fluconazole, may well explain their excellent inhibitory activity. Our results suggest that these compounds have a great potential as antifungals, which can be used as chemosensitizing agents with the known antifungal drugs. PMID:26694966

  12. Enhanced photodegradation of organic dyes adsorbed on a clay.

    PubMed

    Tani, Seiji; Yamaki, Hiroshi; Sumiyoshi, Azumi; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Hasegawa, Shinya; Yamazaki, Suzuko; Kawamata, Jun

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of three photoactive organic dyes, Rhodamine B, Rhodamine 6G and a stilbazolium derivative 4'-dimethylamino-N-methyl-4-stilbazolium with synthetic sodium-saponite has been examined by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. In all cases, bathochromic shifts and the reduction of peak absorbance for the dyes were observed in the absorption spectra at a low dye concentration (25% adsorption of the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the clay), although the shape and the width of their absorption bands were similar to those in aqueous solution. This absorption behavior indicates that the organic dye molecules adsorbed onto the surface of the negatively charged clay particles and the adsorbed molecules were well dispersed. The photodegradation of the organic dyes in aqueous solution and in the clay suspension has been also examined by the irradiation of a laser beam at a wavelength of 532 nm. We have found that the hybridization of the organic dyes with the exfoliated clay particles largely enhanced a photodegradation. The clay particles acted as a catalyst even at a high concentration such as approximately 300% of CEC. PMID:19441365

  13. Growth and characterization of novel organic 3-Hydroxy Benzaldehyde-N-methyl 4 Stilbazolium Tosylate crystals for NLO applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannathan, K.; Umarani, P.; Ratchagar, V.; Ramesh, V.; Kalainathan, S.

    2016-01-01

    The 3-Hydroxy Benzaldehyde-N-methyl 4-Stilbazolium Tosylate (3- HBST) is a new organic NLO crystal and it is a new derivative in stilbazolium tosylate family. In this work we have synthesized 3-HBST and the single crystal was grown by conventional slow cooling method. The structure and lattice parameters of the grown crystal were determined by the single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and it is exhibiting good crystalline nature which is observed from the powder XRD. In order to check the crystalline quality the rocking curve was recorded using multi crystal X-ray diffractometer. The functional groups were identified from both FTIR and NMR spectral analyses. The π-π* and n-π* optical transition energy levels were estimated from the absorption peaks. The NLO property was confirmed by measuring relative SHG efficiency by Kurtz powder test; it shows 24 times higher SHG efficiency than that of urea. In order to test the mechanical stability the Vickers and Knoop micro hardness measurement were carried out and found that the micro hardness number decreases with increasing load. The melting point was determined from Differential Scanning Colorimetry (DSC).

  14. Growth and characterization of novel organic 3-Hydroxy Benzaldehyde-N-methyl 4 Stilbazolium Tosylate crystals for NLO applications.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, K; Umarani, P; Ratchagar, V; Ramesh, V; Kalainathan, S

    2016-01-15

    The 3-Hydroxy Benzaldehyde-N-methyl 4-Stilbazolium Tosylate (3- HBST) is a new organic NLO crystal and it is a new derivative in stilbazolium tosylate family. In this work we have synthesized 3-HBST and the single crystal was grown by conventional slow cooling method. The structure and lattice parameters of the grown crystal were determined by the single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and it is exhibiting good crystalline nature which is observed from the powder XRD. In order to check the crystalline quality the rocking curve was recorded using multi crystal X-ray diffractometer. The functional groups were identified from both FTIR and NMR spectral analyses. The π-π* and n-π* optical transition energy levels were estimated from the absorption peaks. The NLO property was confirmed by measuring relative SHG efficiency by Kurtz powder test; it shows 24 times higher SHG efficiency than that of urea. In order to test the mechanical stability the Vickers and Knoop micro hardness measurement were carried out and found that the micro hardness number decreases with increasing load. The melting point was determined from Differential Scanning Colorimetry (DSC). PMID:26476071

  15. Nucleophile-dependent regio- and stereoselective ring opening of 1-azoniabicyclo[3.1.0]hexane tosylate.

    PubMed

    Ji, Mi-Kyung; Hertsen, Dietmar; Yoon, Doo-Ha; Eum, Heesung; Goossens, Hannelore; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; D'hooghe, Matthias; De Kimpe, Norbert; Ha, Hyun-Joon

    2014-04-01

    1-[(1R)-(1-Phenylethyl)]-1-azoniabicyclo[3.1.0]hexane tosylate was generated as a stable bicyclic aziridinium salt from the corresponding 2-(3-hydroxypropyl)aziridine upon reaction with p-toluenesulfonyl anhydride. This bicyclic aziridinium ion was then treated with various nucleophiles including halides, azide, acetate, and cyanide in CH3CN to afford either piperidines or pyrrolidines through regio- and stereoselective ring opening, mediated by the characteristics of the applied nucleophile. On the basis of DFT calculations, ring-opening reactions under thermodynamic control yield piperidines, whereas reactions under kinetic control can yield both piperidines and pyrrolidines depending on the activation energies for both pathways. PMID:24488926

  16. Selectively patterned highly conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-tosylate electrodes for high performance organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jung Ah; Park, Song Hee; Baek, Ji Hye; Ko, Young Dong; Lee, Hwa Sung; Cho, Kilwon; Lee, Jun Young; Lee, Dong Ryeol; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2009-12-01

    We have improved the performance of pentacene field-effect transistors by using highly conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-tosylate (PEDOT-Tos) source-drain electrodes (˜103 S/cm) formed by a simple solution-based process. A high field-effect mobility of 0.25 cm2/Vs and an ON/OFF current ratio of 107 were obtained in pentacene-based bottom contact organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), which constitutes an improvement over OFETs based on Au and PEDOT:PSS electrodes. Two-dimensional grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy results confirmed that the crystalline properties of the pentacene film and the hole injection from the PEDOT-Tos electrode to the pentacene layer are more efficient than those from Au and PEDOT:PSS electrodes.

  17. Application of optimization techniques to the design of a flutter suppression control law for the DAST ARW-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.; Tiffany, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    The design of a candidate flutter suppression (FS) control law for the symmetric degrees of freedom for the DAST ARW-2 aircraft is discussed. The results illustrate the application of several currently employed control law design techniques. Subsequent designs, obtained as the mathematical model of the ARW-2 is updated, are expected to employ similar methods and to provide a control law whose performance will be flight tested. This study represents one of the steps necessary to provide an assessment of the validity of applying current control law synthesis and analysis techniques in the design of actively controlled aircraft. Mathematical models employed in the control law design and evaluation phases are described. The control problem is specified by presenting the flutter boundary predicted for the uncontrolled aircraft and by defining objectives and constraints that the controller should satisfy. A full-order controller is obtained by using Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) techniques. The process of obtaining an implementable reduced-order controller is described. One example is also shown in which constrained optimization techniques are utilized to explicitly include robustness criteria within the design algorithm.

  18. Crystal structures of (E)-3-(furan-2-yl)-2-phenyl-N-tosyl­acryl­amide and (E)-3-phenyl-2-(m-tol­yl)-N-tosyl­acryl­amide

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dong; Meng, Xiangzhen; Sheng, Zeyuan; Wang, Shuangming; Duan, Yuanyuan; Li, Ziqian

    2016-01-01

    In the title N-tosyl­acryl­amide compounds, C20H17NO4S, (I), and C23H21NO3S, (II), the conformation about the C=C bond is E. The acryl­amide groups, [–NH—C(=O)—C=C–], are almost planar, with the N—C—C=C torsion angle being −170.18 (14)° in (I) and −168.01 (17)° in (II). In (I), the furan, phenyl and 4-methyl­benzene rings are inclined to the acryl­amide mean plane by 26.47 (11), 69.01 (8) and 82.49 (9)°, respectively. In (II), the phenyl, 3-methyl­benzene and 4-methyl­benzene rings are inclined to the acryl­amide mean plane by 11.61 (10), 78.44 (10) and 78.24 (10)°, respectively. There is an intra­molecular C—H⋯π inter­action present in compound (II). In the crystals of both compounds, mol­ecules are linked by pairs of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers with an R 2 2(8) ring motif. In (I), the dimers are reinforced by C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and linked by C—H⋯π inter­actions, forming chains along [011]. In the crystal of (II), the dimers are linked via C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains along [100]. The chains are further linked by C—H⋯π inter­actions, forming layers parallel to (010). PMID:27308045

  19. [Mn2+-cTMAB-sensitized fluorescent microscopic determination of tosufloxacin tosylate based on a self-ordered ring].

    PubMed

    Deng, Feng-Yu; Huang, Chun-Xiu; Liu, Ying

    2014-02-01

    With the development of antimicrobial drugs, drug residue in animal products has a serious potential hazards for the environment and public health, it is urgent to set up drug residue detection method with low detection limit and good selectivity. In our paper, with poly (vinyl alcohol)-124 (PVA-124) and NH3-NH4Cl (pH 10.50) as the medium, Mn2+ and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTMAB) as sensitizer, tosufloxacin tosylate (TSFX) formed a self-ordered ring (SOR) on a hydrophobic glass slide support. When the droplet volume is 0.20 microL, the TSFX can be detected in the range of 4.05 x 10(-14) approximately 4.28 x 10(-13) mol x ring(-1) (2.02 x 10(-7) approximately 2.14 x 10(-6) mol x L(-1)), and the limit of detection (LOD) can reach 4.1 x 10(-15) mol x ring(-1) (2.0 x 10(-8) mol x L(-1)). The established method had been applied satisfactorily to determine the content of TSFX in tablet, which close to the marked value of 0.15 g x piece(-1)) found value: 0.144 g x piece(-1)) and the results of TSFX concentrations in rabbit serum at different time after dosing with the recoveries of 90.0% - 105.0% and RSDs 1.9% - 3.3% were satisfactory. Xilinguole of Inner Mongolia is the national important livestock products ground, whose lamb is the main suppling source for Beijing-Tianjin-Tangshan region. It is very urgent to detect residue of antibacterial drug in its sheep tissue samples (meat, liver, kidney). In this paper, when acetonitrile was used as extraction agent in pretreatment of sheep tissue samples in six rangelands including Sonid Right Banner, Xiwuzhumuqin Banner, Xilinhot City, Duolun County, The white Flag Town and The Blue Flag Town, the extract can be directly determined with SOR technology without filtering process, the sample standard addition recovery of sheep tissues were 92.0%-101.0% and RSDs were less than 2.7%. The results indicated that the SOR technique can be successfully applied to pharmaceuticals and biological samples, which broaden the applied

  20. Acido-basic control of the thermoelectric properties of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)tosylate (PEDOT-Tos) thin films

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zia Ullah; Bubnova, Olga; Jafari, Mohammad Javad; Brooke, Robert; Liu, Xianjie; Gabrielsson, Roger; Ederth, Thomas; Evans, Drew R.; Andreasen, Jens W.; Fahlman, Mats

    2015-01-01

    PEDOT-Tos is one of the conducting polymers that displays the most promising thermoelectric properties. Until now, it has been utterly difficult to control all the synthesis parameters and the morphology governing the thermoelectric properties. To improve our understanding of this material, we study the variation in the thermoelectric properties by a simple acido-basic treatment. The emphasis of this study is to elucidate the chemical changes induced by acid (HCl) or base (NaOH) treatment in PEDOT-Tos thin films using various spectroscopic and structural techniques. We could identify changes in the nanoscale morphology due to anion exchange between tosylate and Cl– or OH–. But, we identified that changing the pH leads to a tuning of the oxidation level of the polymer, which can explain the changes in thermoelectric properties. Hence, a simple acid–base treatment allows finding the optimum for the power factor in PEDOT-Tos thin films. PMID:27019715

  1. Dipolar S=O...C=O and C-H...O interactions in the molecular organization of 4,6-di-O-acetyl-2-O-tosyl-myo-inositol 1,3,5-orthoesters.

    PubMed

    Manoj, K; Gonnade, R G; Bhadbhade, M M; Shashidhar, M S

    2009-07-01

    In the absence of conventional hydrogen bonding, the molecules of 4,6-di-O-acetyl-2-O-tosyl-myo-inositol 1,3,5-orthoformate, C(18)H(20)O(10)S, (I), and 4,6-di-O-acetyl-2-O-tosyl-myo-inositol 1,3,5-orthobenzoate, C(24)H(24)O(10)S, (II), are associated via C-H...O interactions. Molecules of (II) are additionally linked via dipolar S=O...C=O contacts. It is interesting to note that the sulfonyl O atom involved in the dipolar S=O...C=O contacts does not take part in any other interaction, indicating the competitive nature of this contact relative to the weak hydrogen-bonding interactions. PMID:19578267

  2. Radiosynthesis of the Tumor Hypoxia Marker [18F]TFMISO via O-[18F]Trifluoroethylation Reveals a Striking Difference Between Trifluoroethyl Tosylate and Iodide in Regiochemical Reactivity Toward Oxygen Nucleophiles

    PubMed Central

    Suehiro, Makiko; Yang, Guangbin; Torchon, Geralda; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Humm, John; Koutcher, Jason; Ouerfelli, Ouathek

    2014-01-01

    The MRI hypoxia marker trifluoro-misonidazole (TFMISO) [1-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-3-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)propan-2-ol] was successfully labeled with 18F to expand its role into a bimodal PET/MRI probe. 18F-Labeling was achieved via a 3-step procedure in which 2,2,2-[18F]trifluoroethyl p-toluenesulfonate prepared by 18F-19F exchange served as the [18F]trifluoroethylating agent. The O-[18F]trifluoroethylation reaction proceeded efficiently to give the intermediate 1,2-epoxy-3-(2,2,2-[18F]trifluoroethoxy)propane, with approximately 60% of 18F incorporated from the tosylate precursor, which was condensed with 2-nitroimidazole to yield [18F]TFMISO. Approximately 40% of the [18F]trifluoroethyl tosylate precursor was converted into the final product. In stark contrast, 2,2,2-[18F]trifluoroethyl iodide failed to produce [18F]TFMISO, giving instead 1,1-[18F]difluoro-2-iodoethoxy and 1-[18F]fluoro-2-iodovinyloxy analogs of [18F]TFMISO. Thus, this investigation has identified 2,2,2-[18F]trifluoroethyl tosylate as an excellent [18F]trifluoroethylating agent, which can convert efficiently an alcohol into the corresponding [18F]trifluoroethyl ether. PMID:21398131

  3. 1-O-Benzyl-2,3-O-iso­propyl­idene-6-O-tosyl-α-l-sorbo­furan­ose

    PubMed Central

    Reed, John H.; Turner, Peter; Kato, Atsushi; Houston, Todd A.; Simone, Michela I.

    2013-01-01

    In the title compound (systematic name: {(3aS,5S,6R,6aS)-3a-[(benz­yloxy)meth­yl]-6-hy­droxy-2,2-di­methyl­tetra­hydro­furo[2,3-d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl}methyl 4-methyl­benzene­sulfonate), C23H28O8S, the absolute structure and relative stereochemistry of the four chiral centres have been established by X-ray crystallography, with the absolute configuration inferred from the use of l-sorbose as the starting material. The central furan­ose ring adopts a slightly twisted envelope conformation (with the C atom bearing the methyl­benzene­sulfonate substituent as the flap) from which three substituents depart pseudo-axially (–CH2—O—benzyl, –OH and one acetonide O atom) and two substituents pseudo-equatorially (–CH2—O—tosyl and second acetonide O atom). The dioxalane ring is in a flattened envelope conformation with the fused CH C atom as the flap. In the crystal, mol­ecules pack in columns along [010] linked by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds involving the furan­ose hy­droxy group and furan­ose ether O atom. PMID:24046637

  4. Ligand-directed tosyl chemistry for in situ native protein labeling and engineering in living systems: from basic properties to applications.

    PubMed

    Tsukiji, Shinya; Hamachi, Itaru

    2014-08-01

    The ability to introduce any chemical probe to any endogenous target protein in its native environment, that is in cells and in vivo, is anticipated to provide various new exciting tools for biological and biomedical research. Although still at the prototype stage, the ligand-directed tosyl (LDT) chemistry is a novel type of affinity labeling technique that we developed for such a dream. This chemistry allows for modifying native proteins by various chemical probes with high specificity in various biological settings ranging from in vitro (in test tubes) to in living cells and in vivo. Since the first report, the list of proteins that are successfully labeled by the LDT chemistry has been increasing. A growing number of studies have demonstrated its utility to create semisynthetic proteins directly in cellular contexts. The in situ generated semisynthetic proteins are applicable for various types of analysis and imaging of intracellular biological processes. In this review, we summarize the basic properties of the LDT chemistry and its applications toward in situ engineering and analysis of native proteins in living systems. Current limitations and future challenges of this area are also described. PMID:25129055

  5. Enhanced antitumor activity of the photosensitizer meso-Tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate through encapsulation in antibody-targeted chitosan/alginate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Abdelghany, Sharif M; Schmid, Daniela; Deacon, Jill; Jaworski, Jakub; Fay, Francois; McLaughlin, Kirsty M; Gormley, Julie A; Burrows, James F; Longley, Daniel B; Donnelly, Ryan F; Scott, Christopher J

    2013-02-11

    meso-Tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP) is a photosensitizer that can be used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) to induce cell death through generation of reactive oxygen species in targeted tumor cells. However, TMP is highly hydrophilic, and therefore, its ability to accumulate intracellularly is limited. In this study, a strategy to improve TMP uptake into cells has been investigated by encapsulating the compound in a hydrogel-based chitosan/alginate nanoparticle formulation. Nanoparticles of 560 nm in diameter entrapping 9.1 μg of TMP per mg of formulation were produced and examined in cell-based assays. These particles were endocytosed into human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells and elicited a more potent photocytotoxic effect than free drug. Antibodies targeting death receptor 5 (DR5), a cell surface apoptosis-inducing receptor up-regulated in various types of cancer and found on HCT116 cells, were then conjugated onto the particles. The conjugated antibodies further enhanced uptake and cytotoxic potency of the nanoparticle. Taken together, these results show that antibody-conjugated chitosan/alginate nanoparticles significantly enhanced the therapeutic effectiveness of entrapped TMP. This novel approach provides a strategy for providing targeted site-specific delivery of TMP and other photosensitizer drugs to treat colorectal tumors using PDT. PMID:23327610

  6. (25R)-6α-Hy­droxy-5α-spiro­stan-3β-yl tosyl­ate

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Herrera, María A.; Sandoval-Ramírez, Jesús; Bernès, Sylvain; Rodríguez-Acosta, Maricela; Hernández Linares, María-Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    The title steroid, C34H50O6S, is an inter­mediate on the synthetic route between diosgenin and brassinosteroids, which possess the A ring modified with the 2α,3α-diol functionality. The polycyclic spiro­stan system has the expected conformation, with six-membered rings adopting chair forms and the five-membered rings envelope forms (flap atoms are the methine C atom in the C/D-ring junction and the spiro C atom connecting rings E and F). The 3β-tosyl­ate group is oriented in such a way that S=O bonds are engaged in inter­molecular hydrogen bonds with O—H and C—H donors. Chains of mol­ecules are formed along [100] via O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, and secondary weak C—H⋯O inter­actions connect two neighbouring chains in the [001] direction. PMID:23476236

  7. A Fully-automated One-pot Synthesis of [18F]Fluoromethylcholine with Reduced Dimethylaminoethanol Contamination via [18F]Fluoromethyl Tosylate

    PubMed Central

    Rodnick, Melissa E.; Brooks, Allen F.; Hockley, Brian G.; Henderson, Bradford D.; Scott, Peter J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A novel one-pot method for preparing [18F]fluoromethylcholine ([18F]FCH) via in situ generation of [18F]fluoromethyl tosylate ([18F]FCH2OTs), and subsequent [18F]fluoromethylation of dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE), has been developed. Methods [18F]FCH was prepared using a GE TRACERlab FXFN, although the method should be readily adaptable to any other fluorine-18 synthesis module. Initially ditosylmethane was fluorinated to generate [18F]FCH2OTs. DMAE was then added and the reaction was heated at 120°C for 10 min to generate [18F]FCH. After this time, reaction solvent was evaporated, and the crude reaction mixture was purified by solid-phase extraction using C18-Plus and CM-Light Sep-Pak cartridges to provide [18F]FCH formulated in USP saline. The formulated product was passed through a 0.22 μm filter into a sterile dose vial, and submitted for quality control testing. Total synthesis time was 1.25 hours from end-of-bombardment. Results Typical non-decay-corrected yields of [18F]FCH prepared using this method were 91 mCi (7% non-decay corrected based upon ~1.3 Ci [18F]fluoride), and doses passed all other quality control (QC) tests. Conclusion A one-pot liquid-phase synthesis of [18F]FCH has been developed. Doses contain extremely low levels of residual DMAE (31.6 μg / 10 mL dose or ~3 ppm) and passed all other requisite QC testing, confirming their suitability for use in clinical imaging studies. PMID:23665261

  8. Nα-Tosyl-l-phenylalanine Chloromethyl Ketone Induces Caspase-dependent Apoptosis in Transformed Human B Cell Lines with Transcriptional Down-regulation of Anti-apoptotic HS1-associated Protein X-1*

    PubMed Central

    Jitkaew, Siriporn; Trebinska, Alicja; Grzybowska, Ewa; Carlsson, Göran; Nordström, Anders; Lehtiö, Janne; Fröjmark, Anne-Sophie; Dahl, Niklas; Fadeel, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    Nα-Tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethylketone (TPCK) has been widely used to investigate signal transduction pathways that are involved in gene expression and cell survival/cell death. However, contradictory effects of TPCK on apoptosis have been reported, and the underlying signaling events leading to TPCK-induced promotion or prevention of apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we show that TPCK induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed human B cell lines with release of pro-apoptotic proteins from mitochondria. TPCK treatment also results in down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins, cIAP1, cIAP2, and HAX-1, and caspase-dependent cleavage of the anti-apoptotic proteins, Bcl-2 and XIAP. Quantitative PCR analysis confirmed that the TPCK-induced down-regulation of HAX-1 occurred at the transcriptional level, and experiments using the specific pharmacological inhibitor, Bay 11-7082, suggested that HAX-1 expression is subject to regulation by the transcription factor, NF-κB. B cell lines derived from patients with homozygous HAX1 mutations were more sensitive to TPCK-induced apoptosis when compared with normal donor cell lines. Furthermore, N-acetylcysteine effectively blocked TPCK-induced apoptosis in EBV-transformed B cell lines and prevented the down-regulation or cleavage of anti-apoptotic proteins. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that TPCK induces apoptosis in human B cell lines and exerts multiple effects on pro- and anti-apoptotic factors. PMID:19679660

  9. Crystal structure of (1S*,2R*)-7-benz­yloxy-2-methyl-3-tosyl-2,3,4,5-tetra­hydro-1H-3-benz­azepin-1-ol: elucidation of the relative configuration of potent allosteric GluN2B selective NMDA receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Tewes, Bastian; Frehland, Bastian; Fröhlich, Roland; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    In the title compound, C25H27NO4S, which crystallized as a racemate, the relative configuration of the adjacent OH and CH3 groups on the azepine ring is trans. The seven-membered azepin ring has a chair-like conformation. The planar aromatic rings of the benzyl and tosyl­ate moiety are inclined to the planar 3-benzazepine ring by 78.39 (15) and 77.03 (14)°, respectively, and to each another by 13.82 (15)°. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked via O—H⋯O and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming double-stranded chains along the a-axis direction. The chains are linked via C—H⋯π inter­actions, forming a three-dimensional architecture. PMID:27308018

  10. Drones for aerodynamic and structural testing /DAST/ - A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, H. N.; Eckstrom, C. V.

    1978-01-01

    A program for providing research data on aerodynamic loads and active control systems on wings with supercritical airfoils in the transonic speed range is described. Analytical development, wind tunnel tests, and flight tests are included. A Firebee II target drone vehicle has been modified for use as a flight test facility. The program currently includes flight experiments on two aeroelastic research wings. The primary purpose of the first flight experiment is to demonstrate an active control system for flutter suppression on a transport-type wing. Design and fabrication of the wing are complete and after installing research instrumentation and the flutter suppression system, flight testing is expected to begin in early 1979. The experiment on the second research wing - a fuel-conservative transport type - is to demonstrate multiple active control systems including flutter suppression, maneuver load alleviation, gust load alleviation, and reduce static stability. Of special importance for this second experiment is the development and validation of integrated design methods which include the benefits of active controls in the structural design.

  11. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Malignant Mesothelioma.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Epithelial Mesothelioma; Recurrent Malignant Mesothelioma; Sarcomatous Mesothelioma; Stage IA Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage IB Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage II Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage IV Malignant Mesothelioma

  12. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  13. Design of a candidate flutter suppression control law for DAST ARW-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.; Tiffany, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    A control law is developed to suppress symmetric flutter for a mathematical model of an aeroelastic research vehicle. An implementable control law is attained by including modified LQC (Linear Quadratic Gaussian) design techniques, controller order reduction, and gain scheduling. An alternate (complementary) design approach is illustrated for one flight condition wherein nongradient-based constrained optimization techniques are applied to maximize controller robustness.

  14. Loads calibrations of strain gage bridges on the DAST project Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, C. V.

    1986-01-01

    Results from and details of the procedure used to calibrate strain gage bridges for measurements of wing structural loads, shear (V), bending moment (M), and torque (T), at three semispan stations on both the left and right semispans of the ARW-2 wing are presented. The ARW-2 wing has a reference area of 35 square feet, a span of 19 feet, an aspect ratio of 10.3, a midchord line sweepback angle of 25 degrees, and a taper ratio of 0.4. The ARW-2 wing was fabricated using aluminum spars and ribs covered with a fiberglass/honeycomb sandwich skin material. All strain gage bridges are mounted along with an estimate of their accuracy by means of a comparison of computed loads versus actual loads for three simulated flight conditions.

  15. Methodology for determining elevon deflections to trim and maneuver the DAST vehicle with negative static margin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, B., III

    1982-01-01

    The relationships between elevon deflection and static margin using elements from static and dynamic stability and control and from classical control theory are emphasized. Expressions are derived and presented for calculating elevon deflections required to trim the vehicle in lg straight-and-level flight and to perform specified longitudinal and lateral maneuvers. Applications of this methodology are made at several flight conditions for the ARW-2 wing. On the basis of these applications, it appears possible to trim and maneuver the vehicle with the existing elevons at -15% static margin.

  16. Using the DAST-C to Explore Colombian and Bolivian Students' Images of Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina-Jerez, William; Middleton, Kyndra V.; Orihuela-Rabaza, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The way in which students view science and its practitioners, particularly during their late elementary and early secondary grade levels, has been at the core of numerous studies dating back to research by Mead & Metraux (Science 126:384-390, "1957"). In this study, we used the Draw-a-Scientist Test Checklist developed by Finson, Beaver & Cramond…

  17. Design of the flutter suppression system for DAST ARW-IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Pototzky, A. S.; Abel, I.

    1983-01-01

    The design of the flutter suppression system for a remotely-piloted research vehicle is described. The modeling of the aeroelastic system, the methodology used to synthesized the control law, the analytical results used to evaluate the control law performance, and ground testing of the flutter suppression system onboard the aircraft are discussed. The major emphasis is on the use of optimal control techniques employed during the synthesis of the control law.

  18. A conformational study of N-tosyl oxazolidines using molecular mechanics and crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belvisi, Laura; Carugo, Oliviero; Poli, Giovanni

    1994-03-01

    The conformational behavior of (4 S,5 R)-4-methyl-5-phenyl-3- p-toluenesulfonyl oxazolidines has been investigated. This was accomplished by combining a comparative analysis of nine crystal structures with a molecular mechanics conformational search. The required parametrization of the sulfonamide group was achieved by the appropriate combination of ab initio derived parameters with specific geometric features extracted from the crystal structures.

  19. Chinese Herbal Formulation PHY906 and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage B Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  20. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage III Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IV Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  1. Sorafenib Tosylate and Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (Megakaryoblastic) With t(1;22)(p13;q13); RBM15-MKL1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With a Variant RARA Translocation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(3)(q21q26.2) or t(3;3)(q21;q26.2); RPN1-EVI1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(6;9)(p23;q34); DEK-NUP214; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Variant MLL Translocations; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. 76 FR 78669 - Determination that Bretylium Tosylate Injection, 50 Milligrams/Milliliter, Was Not Withdrawn From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... Register of June 8, 2011 (76 FR 33310), FDA announced that it was withdrawing approval of NDA 019030... requirements are met. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Molly Flannery, Center for Drug Evaluation and...

  3. Generation of Widely Tunable Fourier-Transform Pulsed Terahertz Radiation Using Narrowband Near-Infrared Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinjun; Haase, Christa; Merkt, Frédéric

    2009-06-01

    Widely tunable, Fourier-transform-limited pulses of terahertz (THz) radiation have been generated by optical frequency deference using (i) crystals of the highly nonlinear organic salt 4-N,N-dimethylamino-4^'-N^'-methyl stilbazolium tosylate (DAST), (ii) zinc telluride (ZnTe) crystals, and (iii) gallium phosphide (GaP) crystals. Outputs from two narrowband (Δν<1 MHz, λ˜800 nm) cw titanium-doped sapphire (Ti:Sa) ring lasers with a well-controlled frequency difference were shaped into pulses using acousto-optic modulators, coupled into an optical fiber, pulse amplified in Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sa crystals and used as optical sources to pump the THz nonlinear crystals. The THz radiation was detected over a broad frequency range and its bandwidth was determined to be ˜10 MHz. Absorption spectra of gas phase molecules including HF and OCS using the THz source will be presented.

  4. High-power terahertz-wave generation using DAST crystal and detection using mid-infrared powermeter.

    PubMed

    Suizu, Koji; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Yamashita, Tomoyu; Ito, Hiromasa

    2007-10-01

    The exact power output of a table-top-sized terahertz (THz)-wave source using a nonlinear optical process has not been clarified because detectors for these experiments [Si bolometer, deuterated triglycine sulfate (DTGS), etc.] are not calibrated well. On the other hand, powermeters for the mid-infrared (mid-IR) region are well established and calibrated. We constructed a high-power dual-wavelength optical parametric oscillator with two KTP crystals as a light source for difference frequency generation. The obtained powers of dual waves were 21 mJ at ~1300 nm, ten times higher than that of the previous measurement. The device provides high-power THz-wave generation with ~100 times greater output power than that reported in previous works. A well-calibrated mid-IR powermeter at ~27 THz detected the generated THz wave; its measured energy was 2.4 microJ. Although the powermeter had no sensitivity in the lower-frequency range (below 20 THz), the pulse energy at such a low-frequency region was estimated in reference to the output spectrum obtained using a DTGS detector: the energy would be from about the submicrojoule level to a few microjoules in the THz-wave region. PMID:17909606

  5. Status and future plans of the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program. [Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, H. N.

    1981-01-01

    Results from flight tests of the ARW-1 research wing are presented. Preliminary loads data and experiences with the active control system for flutter suppression are included along with comparative results of test and prediction for the flutter boundary of the supercritical research wing and on performance of the flutter suppression system. The status of the ARW-2 research wing is given.

  6. Sorafenib Tosylate and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Unresectable, or Metastatic Gallbladder Cancer or Cholangiocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Extrahepatic Bile Duct Adenocarcinoma; Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma; Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma With Squamous Metaplasia; Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma

  7. Sorafenib Tosylate With or Without Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage D Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma

  8. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms Tumor, Liver Cancer, or Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-14

    Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  9. Copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative transformation of ketone-derived N-tosyl hydrazones: an entry to alkynes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianwei; Liu, Xiaohang; Chen, Huoji; Wu, Wanqing; Qi, Chaorong; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2014-12-22

    A novel strategy involving Cu-catalyzed oxidative transformation of ketone-derived hydrazone moiety to various synthetic valuable internal alkynes and diynes has been developed. This method features inexpensive metal catalyst, green oxidant, good functional group tolerance, high regioselectivity and readily available starting materials. Oxidative deprotonation reactions were carried out to form internal alkynes and symmetrical diynes. Cross-coupling reactions of hydrazones with halides and terminal alkynes were performed to afford functionalized alkynes and unsymmetrical conjugated diynes. A mechanism proceeding through a Cu-carbene intermediate is proposed for the CC triple bond formation. PMID:25424976

  10. Sorafenib Tosylate, Cisplatin, and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-27

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  11. Implementation of the DAST ARW II control laws using an 8086 microprocessor and an 8087 floating-point coprocessor. [drones for aeroelasticity research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, G. L.; Berthold, G.; Abbott, L.

    1982-01-01

    A 5 MHZ single-board microprocessor system which incorporates an 8086 CPU and an 8087 Numeric Data Processor is used to implement the control laws for the NASA Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing, Aeroelastic Research Wing II. The control laws program was executed in 7.02 msec, with initialization consuming 2.65 msec and the control law loop 4.38 msec. The software emulator execution times for these two tasks were 36.67 and 61.18, respectively, for a total of 97.68 msec. The space, weight and cost reductions achieved in the present, aircraft control application of this combination of a 16-bit microprocessor with an 80-bit floating point coprocessor may be obtainable in other real time control applications.

  12. Design of a candidate flutter suppression control law for DAST ARW-2. [Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing Aeroelastic Research Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.; Tiffany, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    A control law is developed to suppress symmetric flutter for a mathematical model of an aeroelastic research vehicle. An implementable control law is attained by including modified LQG (linear quadratic Gaussian) design techniques, controller order reduction, and gain scheduling. An alternate (complementary) design approach is illustrated for one flight condition wherein nongradient-based constrained optimization techniques are applied to maximize controller robustness.

  13. Screening for Disinhibited Disorder Cases in a College Population: Performance of the SMAST, DAST, SCID-II-Q, and PDQ-4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jeanette; James, Lisa M.; Bobadilla, Leonardo; Reeves, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders characterized by disinhibition--substance use disorders, antisocial personality disorder (PD), and borderline PD--represent a serious risk to the safety and health of college students. The ability of researchers and clinicians to identify students most at risk for disinhibited disorders associated with campus crime, violence,…

  14. Synthesis of cis-C-Iodo-N-Tosyl-Aziridines using Diiodomethyllithium: Reaction Optimization, Product Scope and Stability, and a Protocol for Selection of Stationary Phase for Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The preparation of C-iodo-N-Ts-aziridines with excellent cis-diastereoselectivity has been achieved in high yields by the addition of diiodomethyllithium to N-tosylimines and N-tosylimine–HSO2Tol adducts. This addition-cyclization protocol successfully provided a wide range of cis-iodoaziridines, including the first examples of alkyl-substituted iodoaziridines, with the reaction tolerating both aryl imines and alkyl imines. An ortho-chlorophenyl imine afforded a β-amino gem-diiodide under the optimized reaction conditions due to a postulated coordinated intermediate preventing cyclization. An effective protocol to assess the stability of the sensitive iodoaziridine functional group to chromatography was also developed. As a result of the judicious choice of stationary phase, the iodoaziridines could be purified by column chromatography; the use of deactivated basic alumina (activity IV) afforded high yield and purity. Rearrangements of electron-rich aryl-iodoaziridines have been promoted, selectively affording either novel α-iodo-N-Ts-imines or α-iodo-aldehydes in high yield. PMID:23738857

  15. Ion-pair single-drop microextraction versus phase-transfer catalytic extraction for the gas chromatographic determination of phenols as tosylated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Fiamegos, Yiannis C; Kefala, Ageliki-Panayota; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2008-05-01

    The environmental fate of phenols represents a diachronic scientific consideration mainly due to their high toxicity and diverse physicochemical properties rendering them difficult to be analyzed as unity. Ion-pair-assisted extraction and microextraction techniques in association with a dedicated derivatization reaction are possible to lead to enhanced selectivity and sensitivity in gas chromatography. Phase-transfer catalytic liquid-liquid extraction-derivatization and ion-pair-assisted single-drop microextraction with in-drop derivatization are successfully employed for the analysis of 15 phenolic compounds. The analytes that react at room temperature with p-toluenesulfonyl chloride into the bulk of the organic phase are subsequently determined by GC-MS in selective-ion monitoring mode. Aiming at maximizing the derivatization yields obtained from the 15 analytes in a reasonable time period, the optimum experimental parameters were established along with the figures of merit of the methods. The limits of detection ranged from 0.48 to 1.5 ng/ml and from 0.20 to 0.28 ng/ml respectively, while the limits of quantitation ranged from 1.4 to 4.5 ng/ml and from 0.59 to 0.84 ng/ml for the two methods with the techniques under study. The overall procedure presented satisfactory analytical features with the liquid-liquid extraction protocol being easier to carry out while the single-drop one, presented higher sensitivity and significant reduction of the organic solvent employed. By comparison with other methods for the analysis of phenols, the proposed methods exhibit adequately low detection limits, good precision, short derivatization time and low solvent, sample and reagent consumption. PMID:18378253

  16. Using the Draw-a-Scientist Test for Inquiry and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miele, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    The Draw-a-Scientist Test (DAST) is a tool to assess stereotypical imagery of scientists. This paper describes the use of the DAST as both a model for inquiry and as a method of assessing the affective domain. The DAST was administered in a science education methods course for undergraduate students of elementary education, a methods course for…

  17. A large-scale prospective registration study of the safety and efficacy of sorafenib tosylate in unresectable or metastatic renal cell carcinoma in Japan: results of over 3200 consecutive cases in post-marketing all-patient surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Akaza, Hideyuki; Oya, Mototsugu; Iijima, Masafumi; Hyodo, Ichinosuke; Gemma, Akihiko; Itoh, Hiroshi; Adachi, Masatoshi; Okayama, Yutaka; Sunaya, Toshiyuki; Inuyama, Lyo

    2015-01-01

    Objective Real-life safety and efficacy of sorafenib in advanced renal cell carcinoma in a nationwide patient population were evaluated by post-marketing all-patient surveillance. Methods All patients with unresectable or metastatic renal cell carcinoma in Japan who started sorafenib therapy from February 2008 to September 2009 were registered and followed for up to 12 months. Baseline characteristics, treatment status, tumor response, survival and safety data were recorded by the prescribing physicians. Results Safety and efficacy were evaluated in 3255 and 3171 patients, respectively. The initial daily dose was 800 mg in 78.2% of patients. Median duration of treatment was 6.7 months and the mean relative dose intensity was 68.4%. Overall, 2227 patients (68.4%) discontinued the treatment by 12 months, half of which (52.0% of discontinued patients) were due to adverse events. The most common adverse drug reactions were hand–foot skin reaction (59%), hypertension (36%), rash (25%) and increase in lipase/amylase (23%). The median progression-free survival was 7.3 months (95% confidence intervals: 6.7–8.1), and the overall survival rate at 1 year was 75.4% (73.5–77.1). Prognostic factors for overall survival were mostly consistent with those in previous clinical trials in the univariate analysis and largely similar to those for progression-free survival and duration of treatment in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Sorafenib for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma under the labeled dose was feasible in daily medical practice, for its acceptable toxicity profile and favorable clinical benefit that were consistent with those in clinical trials. PMID:26206897

  18. Children's Images of Scientists: Does Grade Level Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozel, Murat

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess children's images of scientists by using the Draw-A-Scientist Test (DAST) and to determine if differences in these images exist between grade levels. The DAST was administered to 243 children who were enrolled in kindergarten (aged 6) and grade 3 and 5 (aged 9 and 11). Findings obtained from the study…

  19. Scientists--Geeks and Nerds?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Thomas E., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates teachers' impressions of stereotypes of scientists and science. Uses the Draw a Scientist Test (DAST) for nonverbal assessment and makes recommendations for strategies to build more realistic and positive images. (Contains 12 references.) (YDS)

  20. Expression of the C-terminal ORF2 protein of duck astrovirus for application in a serological test.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yuzhou; Xie, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Dabing

    2011-01-01

    Duck astrovirus (DAstV) is an important pathogen causing duck viral hepatitis (DVH), a highly contagious and fatal disease in young ducklings. To provide an antigen for a diagnostic serum test, the C-terminus of DAstV ORF2 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. Four positive and 30 negative sera were used to validate the purified ORF2 protein by developing an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). No cross-reactions were found against other duck pathogens, including duck hepatitis A virus, duck plague herpesvirus, duck reovirus, Newcastle disease virus, and Riemerella anatipestifer 12/19 (63.2%) and 26/51 (51%) sera samples from two flocks of ducks that survived DAstV infections in commercial duck farms were positive for DAstV by this method, respectively. Interestingly, DAstV-specific antibodies were also detected in 12 (28.6%) of 42 sera samples from a different flock without DVH, indicating a wide distribution of subclinical infections caused by DAstV. PMID:20863856

  1. An Investigation of Media Influences on Elementary Students Representations of Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farland-Smith, Donna; Finson, Kevin; Boone, William J.; Yale, Melissa

    2014-04-01

    Even long before children are able to verbalize which careers may be interesting to them, they collect and store ideas about scientists. For these reasons, asking children to Draw-A-Scientist has become an accepted method to provide a glimpse into how children represent and identify with those in the science fields. Years later these representations may translate into student's career choice. Since 1995, children's illustrations of scientists have been assessed by the Draw-A-Scientist Checklist (DAST-C). The checklist was created from the common aspects or features found in illustrations from previous studies and were based initially on the scientists, broken down into "stereotypical" and "alternative" images shown in the drawings. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development, field test and reliability of the modified Draw-A-Scientist Test (DAST) and The Draw-A-Scientist Rubric designed as an improvement of the DAST-C to provide a more appropriate method of assessing students' drawings of scientists. The combination of the modified DAST and the DAST Rubric brings more refinement as it enables clarities to emerge and subsequently increased detail to what one could ascertain from students about their mental images of scientists.

  2. Aminodifluorosulfinium Salts: Selective Fluorination Reagents with Enhanced Thermal Stability and Ease of Handling†,‡

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Diethylaminodifluorosulfinium tetrafluoroborate (XtalFluor-E) and morpholinodifluorosulfinium tetrafluoroborate (XtalFluor-M) are crystalline fluorinating agents that are more easily handled and significantly more stable than Deoxo-Fluor, DAST, and their analogues. These reagents can be prepared in a safer and more cost-efficient manner by avoiding the laborious and hazardous distillation of dialkylaminosulfur trifluorides. Unlike DAST, Deoxo-Fluor, and Fluolead, XtalFluor reagents do not generate highly corrosive free-HF and therefore can be used in standard borosilicate vessels. When used in conjunction with promoters such as Et3N·3HF, Et3N·2HF, or DBU, XtalFluor reagents effectively convert alcohols to alkyl fluorides and carbonyls to gem-difluorides. These reagents are typically more selective than DAST and Deoxo-Fluor and exhibit superior performance by providing significantly less elimination side products. PMID:20405933

  3. Estimation of Modal Parameters Using a Wavelet-Based Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, Rick; Brenner, Marty; Haley, Sidney M.

    1997-01-01

    Modal stability parameters are extracted directly from aeroservoelastic flight test data by decomposition of accelerometer response signals into time-frequency atoms. Logarithmic sweeps and sinusoidal pulses are used to generate DAST closed loop excitation data. Novel wavelets constructed to extract modal damping and frequency explicitly from the data are introduced. The so-called Haley and Laplace wavelets are used to track time-varying modal damping and frequency in a matching pursuit algorithm. Estimation of the trend to aeroservoelastic instability is demonstrated successfully from analysis of the DAST data.

  4. Some experiences with active control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Abel, I.

    1981-01-01

    Flight and wind tunnel tests were conducted and multidiscipline computer programs were developed as part of investigations of active control technology conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. Unsteady aerodynamics approximation, optimal control theory, optimal controller design, and the Delta wing and DC-10 models are described. The drones for aerodynamics and structural testing (DAST program) for evaluating procedures for aerodynamic loads prediction and the design of active control systems on wings with significant aeroelastic effects is described as well as the DAST model used in the wind tunnel tests.

  5. Advanced aerodynamics and active controls. Selected NASA research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic and active control concepts for application to commercial transport aircraft are discussed. Selected topics include in flight direct strike lightning research, triply redundant digital fly by wire control systems, tail configurations, winglets, and the drones for aerodynamic and structural testing (DAST) program.

  6. Turkish Elementary and Secondary Students' Views about Science and Scientist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akcay, Behiye

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine elementary and secondary students' views concerning science and scientists. Data gathered from Draw-a-Scientist Test (DAST) and essays written by students were used to analyze their views. The study involved 359 students in grades 5 through 11. The results indicate that student's perceived scientists as to be…

  7. Investigating Gifted Middle School Students' Images about Scientists: A Cultural Similarity Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayri, N.; Koksal, M. S.; Ertekin, P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate gifted middle school students' images about scientists in terms of cultural similarity. Sample of the study is 64 gifted middle school students taking courses from a formal school for gifted students. The data were collected by using Draw-a-scientist (DAST) instrument and was analysed by two researchers…

  8. Putting a Human Face on Chemistry: A Project for Liberal Arts Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kriz, George; Popejoy, Kate

    A collaborative project in liberal arts chemistry, involving faculty in chemistry and science education, is described. The project includes various components: an introductory test (DAST) to examine students' perceptions of scientists, a group library research exercise, oral and written presentation of the results of the library research, a…

  9. A facile C-C bond cleavage in the epoxides and its use for the synthesis of oxygenated heterocycles by a ring expansion strategy.

    PubMed

    Lakshmipathi, Pandarinathan; Grée, Danielle; Grée, René

    2002-02-01

    The bicyclic epoxy alcohols when treated with DAST gave a new class of rearranged organofluorine compounds, by a ring expansion via C-C bond cleavage of the oxirane ring. The outcome of this reaction with respect to ring size and stereochemical relation between the functionalities is presented here. PMID:11820902

  10. Young Children's Conceptions of Science and Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Tiffany R.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores young children's images of science and scientists, their sources for scientific knowledge, and the nature of their science-related experiences. A cross-sectional design was used to study how students' ideas differ over the first three years of elementary school. A modified version of the Draw-a-Scientist Test (DAST) and a…

  11. Perception of the Image of Scientist by Israeli Student Teachers from Two Distinct Communities in Israel: Arabs and Jews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koren, Pazit; Bar, Varda

    2009-01-01

    This is a comparative study of the image of the scientist held by Israeli Jewish and Arabic student teachers from various backgrounds. The image of female scientists among these groups was also investigated. Five groups of female students (N = 500) from four colleges were studied. Traditional tools (DAST) were combined with more informative…

  12. Exploring High-Achieving Students' Images of Mathematicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Mario Sánchez; Rosas, Alejandro; Zavaleta, Juan Gabriel Molina; Romo-Vázquez, Avenilde

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the images that a group of high-achieving Mexican students hold of mathematicians. For this investigation, we used a research method based on the Draw-A-Scientist Test (DAST) with a sample of 63 Mexican high school students. The group of students' pictorial and written descriptions of mathematicians assisted us…

  13. Influence of Scientific Stories on Students Ideas about Science and Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erten, Sinan; Kiray, S. Ahmet; Sen-Gumus, Betul

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether a lesson, in which context-based learning approach and scientific stories were used, changed stereotypical images of students (aged 11-12) about science and scientists. Data was collected from two separate sources: Interviews conducted with six students and Draw a Scientist Test (DAST) document that…

  14. Turkish Primary Students' Perceptions about Scientist and What Factors Affecting the Image of the Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkmen, Hakan

    2008-01-01

    Students' views of science and scientists have been widely studied. The purpose of this study is to analyze image of scientist from drawn picture of scientists using The Draw-a-Scientist Test (DAST) by 5th grade students and to analyze where this image comes from students minds in changing Turkish educational perspective. Two hundred eighty seven…

  15. Effect of inhibitors of trypsin-like proteolytic enzymes Bacillus cereus T spore germination.

    PubMed Central

    Boschwitz, H; Milner, Y; Keynan, A; Halvorson, H O; Troll, W

    1983-01-01

    The germination of Bacillus cereus T spore suspensions is partially prevented by several inhibitors of trypsin-like enzymes. Leupeptin, antipain, and tosyl-lysine-chloromethyl ketone are effective inhibitors, whereas chymostatin, elastatinal, and pepstatin are inactive. A synthetic substrate of trypsin, tosyl-arginine-methyl ester, also inhibits germination. Its inhibitory effect decreases as a function of incubation time in the presence of spores and is abolished by previous hydrolysis with trypsin. Germinating, but not dormant, spore suspensions hydrolyze tosyl-arginine-methyl ester; its hydrolysis is insensitive to chloramphenicol, sulfhydryl reagents, and EDTA. A crude extract of germinated B. cereus spores contains a trypsin-like enzyme whose activity, as measured by hydrolysis of benzoyl-arginine p-nitroanilide, is sensitive to germination-inhibitory compounds such as leupeptin, tosyl-arginine-methyl ester, and tosyl-lysine-chloromethyl ketone. Spore suspensions exposed to the above inhibitors under germination conditions lose only part of their heat resistance and some 10 to 30% of their dipicolinic acid content. Part of the germinating spore population becomes "phase grey" under phase optics. Based on a study of the inhibition of germination by protease inhibitors and the activity of a protease in germination spores and spore extracts, it is suggested that the activity of a trypsin-like enzyme may be involved in the mechanism of the breaking of dormancy in spores of B. cereus T. PMID:6401704

  16. Investigation of the atypical glass transition and recrystallization behavior of amorphous prazosin salts.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokesh; Popat, Dharmesh; Bansal, Arvind K

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript studied the effect of counterion on the glass transition and recrystallization behavior of amorphous salts of prazosin. Three amorphous salts of prazosin, namely, prazosin hydrochloride, prazosin mesylate and prazosin tosylate were prepared by spray drying, and characterized by optical-polarized microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry was used to determine the glass transition and recrystallization temperature of amorphous salts. Glass transition of amorphous salts followed the order: prazosin mesylate > prazosin tosylate ~ prazosin hydrochloride. Amorphous prazosin mesylate and prazosin tosylate showed glass transition, followed by recrystallization. In contrast, amorphous prazosin hydrochloride showed glass transition and recrystallization simultaneously. Density Functional Theory, however, suggested the expected order of glass transition as prazosin hydrochloride > prazosin mesylate > prazosin tosylate. The counterintuitive observation of amorphous prazosin hydrochloride having lower glass transition was explained in terms of its lower activation energy (206.1 kJ/mol) for molecular mobility at Tg, compared to that for amorphous prazosin mesylate (448.5 kJ/mol) and prazosin tosylate (490.7 kJ/mol), and was further correlated to a difference in hydrogen bonding strength of the amorphous and the corresponding recrystallized salts. This study has implications in selection of an optimal amorphous salt form for pharmaceutical development. PMID:24310595

  17. Tos-Nos-Mos: Synthesis of different aryl sulfonate precursors for the radiosynthesis of the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor radioligand [(18)F]NS14490.

    PubMed

    Rötering, Sven; Scheunemann, Matthias; Günther, Robert; Löser, Reik; Hiller, Achim; Dan Peters; Brust, Peter; Fischer, Steffen; Steinbach, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    Radiopharmacological investigations of [(18)F]NS14490 have proven that this radiotracer could be a potential PET radiotracer for imaging of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor particularly with regard to vulnerable plaques of diseased vessels. For further optimisation of the previously automated one-pot radiosynthesis of [(18)F]NS14490 using a tosylate precursor, precursors with other leaving groups (nosylate and mosylate) were synthesized and compared with the tosylate with respect to their reactivities towards [(18)F]fluoride. The use of these different precursors resulted in comparable labelling yields of [(18)F]NS14490. A novel mosylate precursor was synthesized and evaluated, which has revealed a higher stability during a storage period of five months compared to the corresponding tosylate and nosylate. PMID:27183376

  18. Chiral Bicyclic Bridgehead Phosphoramidite (Briphos) Ligands for Asymmetric Rhodium-Catalyzed 1,2- and 1,4-Addition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ansoo; Kim, Hyunwoo

    2016-05-01

    A complementary solution for Rh-catalyzed enantioselective 1,2- and 1,4-arylation with two structurally related chiral ligands is reported. A chiral bicyclic bridgehead phosphoramidite (briphos) ligand derived from 1-aminoindane was efficient for the 1,2-arylation of N-sulfonyl imines, while that derived from 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-naphthylamine was efficient for 1,4-arylation of α,β-unsaturated cyclic ketones. For α,β-unsaturated N-tosyl ketimines, the briphos derived from 1-aminoindane was found to selectively provide γ,γ-diaryl N-tosyl enamines with high yields and stereoselectivities. PMID:27075859

  19. REVISITING CLASSICAL NUCLEOPHILIC SUBSTITUTIONS IN AQUEOUS MEDIUM: MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESIS OF ALKYL AZIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An efficient and clean synthesis of alkyl azides using microwave (MW) radiation is described in aqueous medium by reacting alkyl halides or tosylates with alkali azides. This general and expeditious MW-enhanced approach to nucleophilic substitution reactions is applicable to the ...

  20. Comparative Methylation of 1,8-Dihydroxy-9,10-Anthraquinone: Chemoselectivity in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sereda, Grigori A.

    2005-01-01

    A study has shown that methylation of 1,8-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (1) with methyl tosylate is highly dependent upon reaction conditions. When the reaction is carried out by a simple heating of the reaction mixture without solvent it yields dimethyl product in a nearly quantitative yield and refluxing the same mixture of reactants in…

  1. A cellulose-based bioassay for the colorimetric detection of pathogen DNA.

    PubMed

    Saikrishnan, Deepika; Goyal, Madhu; Rossiter, Sharon; Kukol, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Cellulose-paper-based colorimetric bioassays may be used at the point of sampling without sophisticated equipment. This study reports the development of a colorimetric bioassay based on cellulose that can detect pathogen DNA. The detection was based on covalently attached single-stranded DNA probes and visual analysis. A cellulose surface functionalized with tosyl groups was prepared by the N,N-dimethylacetamide-lithium chloride method. Tosylation of cellulose was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Sulfhydryl-modified oligonucleotide probes complementary to a segment of the DNA sequence IS6110 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were covalently immobilized on the tosylated cellulose. On hybridization of biotin-labelled DNA oligonucleotides with these probes, a colorimetric signal was obtained with streptavidin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase catalysing the oxidation of tetramethylbenzamidine by H2O2. The colour intensity was significantly reduced when the bioassay was subjected to DNA oligonucleotide of randomized base composition. Initial experiments have shown a sensitivity of 0.1 μM. A high probe immobilization efficiency (more than 90 %) was observed with a detection limit of 0.1 μM, corresponding to an absolute amount of 10 pmol. The detection of M. tuberculosis DNA was demonstrated using this technique coupled with PCR for biotinylation of the DNA. This work shows the potential use of tosylated cellulose as the basis for point-of-sampling bioassays. PMID:25354892

  2. Synthesis of Cyclic Guanidines via Silver-Catalyzed Intramolecular Alkene Hydroamination Reactions of N-Allylguanidines.

    PubMed

    Garlets, Zachary J; Silvi, Mattia; Wolfe, John P

    2016-05-20

    The silver-catalyzed hydroamination of tosyl-protected N-allylguanidines is described. These reactions provide substituted cyclic guanidines in high yields. The reactions are amenable to the construction of quaternary stereocenters as well as both monocyclic and bicyclic guanidine products. PMID:27181609

  3. A procedure for the preparation and isolation of nucleoside-5’-diphosphates

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Heidi J; Bolt, Hannah L

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tris[bis(triphenylphosphoranylidene)ammonium] pyrophosphate (PPN pyrophosphate) was used in the SN2 displacements of the tosylate ion from 5’-tosylnucleosides to afford nucleoside-5’-diphosphates. Selective precipitation permitted the direct isolation of nucleoside-5’-diphosphates from crude reaction mixtures. PMID:25977720

  4. Nickel-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Cross-Coupling of Perfluorobenzoates with Aryl Halides and Sulfonates

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A Ni-catalyzed method for the coupling of perfluorobenzoates with aryl halides and pseudohalides is described. Aryl iodides, bromides, chlorides, triflates, and tosylates participate in these transformations to afford the products in good yields. Penta-, tetra-, and trifluorinated biaryl compounds are obtained using these newly developed Ni-catalyzed decarboxylative cross-coupling reactions. PMID:25700128

  5. Base-mediated decomposition of amide-substituted furfuryl tosylhydrazones: synthesis and cytotoxic activities of enynyl-ketoamides.

    PubMed

    Ji, Fanghua; Peng, Hui; Zhang, Xiaoting; Lu, Wenhua; Liu, Shubin; Jiang, Huanfeng; Liu, Bo; Yin, Biaolin

    2015-02-20

    Base-mediated decomposition of amide-substituted furfuryl tosylhydrazones afforded practical access to novel multifunctionalized enynyl-ketoamides. In addition, furfuryl tosylhydrazones with stable furan rings underwent an interesting tosyl-group migration to form sulfones, which have potential synthetic applications. Some of the obtained enynyl-ketoamides demonstrated good cytotoxicities against human tumor cell lines. PMID:25635471

  6. Exploring the Effectiveness of Curriculum Provided Through Transmedia Books for Increasing Students' Knowledge and Interest in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponners, Pamela Jones

    Transmedia books are new and emerging technologies which are beginning to be used in current classrooms. Transmedia books are a traditional printed book that uses multiple media though the use of Quick Response (QR) codes and augmented reality (AR) triggers to access web-based technology. Using the transmedia book Skills That Engage Me students in kindergarten through second grade engage in curriculum designed to introduce science skills and careers. Using the modified Draw-a-Scientist Test (mDAST), observations and interviews, researchers analyzed pre and post data to describe changes students have about science and scientists. Future study may include the development and validation of a new instrument, Draw a Science Student, and examining the mDAST checklist with the intention of updating the parameters of what is considered positive and negative in relationship with work a scientist conducts.

  7. Control law design to meet constraints using SYNPAC-synthesis package for active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.; Tiffany, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Major features of SYNPAC (Synthesis Package for Active Controls) are described. SYNPAC employs constrained optimization techniques which allow explicit inclusion of design criteria (constraints) in the control law design process. Interrelationships are indicated between this constrained optimization approach, classical and linear quadratic Gaussian design techniques. Results are presented that were obtained by applying SYNPAC to the design of a combined stability augmentation/gust load alleviation control law for the DAST ARW-2.

  8. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Characteristics of the terahertz radiation from single crystals of N-substituted 2-methyl-4-nitroaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Takahashi, Hironori; Yamada, Takashi; Kuroyanagi, Kazuyoshi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2001-06-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation was generated via optical rectification from organic single crystals, i.e. N-substituted (N-benzyl, N-diphenylmethyl, and N-2-naphthylmethyl) derivatives of 2-methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA), and it was detected by means of the electro-optic sampling method. The intensity and the spectrum of the THz radiation were compared with those of ZnTe and DAST (N, N-dimethylamino-N'-methylstilbazolium p-toluenesulphonate) crystals. The integrated intensity of the THz radiation from the N-benzyl-MNA crystal was two thirds of that for the ZnTe crystal, the best-known practical THz emitter, and was as intense as that for the DAST crystal, the best organic THz emitter ever studied. The spectrum of the ZnTe crystal extended to 3 THz, while that of the N-benzyl MNA and DAST crystals dropped off around 2.5 THz. The THz radiation intensities from all of the organic crystals were compared quantitatively, on the basis of the consideration of molecular arrangements in the crystals. It was suggested that the absorption due to low-frequency phonon modes affected both the intensity and the spectral band shape of the THz radiation.

  9. Broadly tunable terahertz source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Peter E.; Kramb, Kevan; Haus, Joseph W.

    2010-02-01

    We present the results of a terahertz (THz) source based on difference frequency generation (DFG) that tunes seamlessly from 1.4 to 13.3 THz. The outputs from two seeded periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) optical parametric generators (OPGs) are mixed in a DAST crystal to generate the THz frequencies. The OPG's have ~1 nsec pulse duration and an output energy of approximately 200 μJ. The corresponding high peak intensities in the DAST crystal leads to appreciable conversion efficiency such that a room temperature pyro-electric detector is used to measure the THz signal. In one of the OPGs a continuously varying periodicity PPLN crystal is used to tune the output wavelength by translating the crystal. The crystal position and seed laser are computer-controlled and synchronized such that any wavelength within the seed laser's tuning range is randomly accessible, and hence any THz difference frequency between the two seed lasers is also randomly accessible. Phase matching in DAST requires the DFG inputs to have the same polarization. We demonstrate a scheme where the output of one of the OPGs is sent through the second OPG such that the two beams are collinear with the same polarization without using a beam splitter.

  10. Comparison of the prevalence of substance use and psychiatric disorders between government- and self-employed commercial drivers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Ku; Lee, Chao-Hui; Pan, Chun-Hung; Hu, Wei-Hern

    2003-08-01

    Five hundred and five city government-employed bus drivers (GED) and 506 self-employed drivers (SED) who were primarily taxi drivers attending annual health check-ups were studied. A two-step survey was applied. Data on basic demographics were collected, the 12-item Chinese Health Questionnaire (CHQ), Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST), Drug Abuse Screen Test (DAST) questionnaires were administered and urine drug screening for amphetamine and benzodiazepines was performed in all subjects. Subjects with MAST scores > or =3, DAST > or =5 from both groups and CHQ > or =4 for the GED group and CHQ > or =7 for the SED group were regarded as a high-risk group; and subjects with normal MAST, DAST and CHQ results serving as the comparison group were invited for further interview by psychiatric specialists using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The mean CHQ scores were 0.94 +/- 1.53 for the GED group and 2.08 +/- 2.42 for the SED group. The mean MAST scores for the GED and SED groups were 0.23 +/- 0.58 and 0.38 +/- 1.12; and the mean DAST scores were 1.03 +/- 0.85 and 1.41 +/- 1.89, respectively. The positive rate for benzodiazepines in urine screening by enzyme immunoassay was 8.3% for the GED group, and 8.5% for the SED group. After specification using liquid chromatography, this rate reduced to 4.6% and 3.7%, respectively. Only one subject in the SED group tested positive for urine amphetamine. The SED group had a higher rate of neurotic problems, psychiatric diagnosis and a higher frequency of substance use than the GED group. These findings suggest that different work style of commercial drivers may contribute to this phenomenon. The rate of psychiatric diagnosis was significantly higher in the high-risk subjects from both groups. Questionnaires such as CHQ, DAST and MAST are useful tools to screen out subjects at high risk of psychiatric disorders during routine health checks in labor workers. PMID:12839525

  11. Crystal structure of high-spin tetra­aqua­bis­(2-chloro­pyrazine-κN 4)iron(II) bis­(4-methyl­benzene­sulfonate)

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Bohdan O.; Shylin, Sergii I.; Dechert, Sebastian; Malysheva, Maria L.; Gural‘skiy, Il‘ya A.

    2015-01-01

    The title salt, [FeII(C4H3ClN2)2(H2O)4](C7H7O3S)2, contains a complex cation with point group symmetry 2/m. The high-spin FeII cation is hexa­coordinated by four symmetry-related water and two N-bound 2-chloro­pyrazine mol­ecules in a trans arrangement, forming a distorted FeN2O4 octa­hedron. The three-dimensional supra­molecular structure is supported by inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the complex cations and tosyl­ate anions, and additional π–π inter­actions between benzene and pyrazine rings. The methyl H atoms of the tosyl­ate anion are equally disordered over two positions. PMID:26279865

  12. Synthesis and Antiplasmodial Evaluation of Analogues Based on the Tricyclic Core of Thiaplakortones A–D

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Brett D.; Coster, Mark J.; Skinner-Adams, Tina S.; Andrews, Katherine T.; White, Jonathan M.; Davis, Rohan A.

    2015-01-01

    Six regioisomers associated with the tricyclic core of thiaplakortones A–D have been synthesized. Reaction of 1H-indole-4,7-dione and 1-tosyl-1H-indole-4,7-dione with 2-aminoethanesulfinic acid afforded a regioisomeric series, which was subsequently deprotected and oxidized to yield the tricyclic core scaffolds present in the thiaplakortones. All compounds were fully characterized using NMR and MS data. A single crystal X-ray structure was obtained on one of the N-tosyl derivatives. All compounds were screened for in vitro antiplasmodial activity against chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) and multidrug-resistant (Dd2) Plasmodium falciparum parasite lines. Several analogues displayed potent inhibition of P. falciparum growth (IC50 < 500 nM) but only moderate selectivity for P. falciparum versus human neonatal foreskin fibroblast cells. PMID:26389920

  13. A New Green Ionic Liquid-Based Corrosion Inhibitor for Steel in Acidic Environments.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; El-Mahdy, Gamal A; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Ezzat, Abdel Rahman O

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the use of new hydrophobic ionic liquid derivatives, namely octadecylammonium tosylate (ODA-TS) and oleylammonium tosylate (OA-TS) for corrosion protection of steel in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution. Their chemical structures were determined from NMR analyses. The surface activity characteristics of the prepared ODA-TS and OA-TS were evaluated from conductance, surface tension and contact angle measurements. The data indicate the presence of a double bond in the chemical structure of OA-TS modified its surface activity parameters. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements, scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) analysis and contact angle measurements were utilized to investigate the corrosion protection performance of ODA-TS and OA-TS on steel in acidic solution. The OA-TS and ODA-TS compounds showed good protection performance in acidic chloride solution due to formation of an inhibitive film on the steel surface. PMID:26091073

  14. Enhanced Therapeutic siRNA to Tumor Cells by a pH-Sensitive Agmatine-Chitosan Bioconjugate.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongmao; Yang, Jianhai; Xu, Bing; Gao, Fei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Wenguang

    2015-04-22

    Charge-conversional naturally occurring chitosan-agmatine bioconjugates are prepared by dimethylmaleic anhydride (DMA) modification and the nucleophilic reaction between tosyl of tosylated chitosan and primary amine of agmatine. These bioconjugates (CS-DM-Agm) are shown to condense siRNA into nanocomplexes, which are stable in the presence of serum at physical pH values. Furthermore, the surface charge of complexes can tune from negative to positive while pH is changed to weak acid tumor micromilieu, thus facilitating the target cancer cell internalization in resisting serum adsorption. More importantly, this smart biogenic system shows remarkable gene silencing efficiency and a high apoptotic rate of tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo, indicating its great potential for cancer therapy. PMID:25832629

  15. [A short path to synthesis of 4-deoxy-4-fluoroglucosaminides: methylumbelliferyl N-acetyl-4-deoxy-4-fluoro-beta-D-glucosaminide].

    PubMed

    Markina, N A; Voznyĭ, Ia V

    2008-01-01

    A convenient method of synthesis of 1,6-anhydro-4-deoxy-2-O-tosyl-4-fluoro-beta-D-glucopyranose by fusion of 1,6;3,4-dianhydro-2-O-tosyl-beta-D-galactopyranose with 2,4,6-trimethylpyridinium fluoride was found. By successive action of ammonia, methyl trifluoroacetate, and acetic anhydride, the resulting compound was transformed into 1,6-anhydro-3-O-acetyl-2,4-dideoxy-2-trifluoroacetamido-4-fluoro-beta-D-glucopyranose, which was converted into 3,6-di-O-acetyl-2,4-dideoxy-2-trifluoroacetamido-4-fluoro-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl fluoride by the reaction with HF/Py. The resulting fluoride was further used as a glycosyl donor in the synthesis of methylumbelliferyl N-acetyl-4-deoxy-4-fluoro-beta-D-glucosaminide. PMID:18695726

  16. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase-A activity in rat brain by synthetic hydrazines: structure-activity relationship (SAR).

    PubMed

    Dar, Ahsana; Khan, Khalid M; Ateeq, Humayun S; Khan, Shagufta; Rahat, Shagufta; Perveen, Shahnaz; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2005-06-01

    A series of hydrazine derivatives was synthesized in order to evaluate their monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) inhibitory effects. MAO-A inhibitory activity of 4-tosyl benzoic acid carbohydrazide was quite potent, similarly to that of the corresponding 4-benzyloxy-benzoic acid carbohydrazide and its N-cyanoethylated derivative. Structural variations of these compounds, such as the replacement of the 4-substitutent, of the aromatic ring on which the carbohydrazide moiety is grafted, as well as cyclization of the hydrazide moiety in five- or six-membered rings caused either significant decline or complete loss of MAO inhibitory properties. The most active compound (4-tosyl benzoic acid carbohydrazide) was also subjected to the forced swim test, an animal model of depression, eliciting a marked reduction in immobility time in rats, without affecting the locomotor activity, implying that it possesses anti-depressant properties due to inhibition of MAO type-A. PMID:16119198

  17. Accurate measurements of thermodynamic properties of solutes in ionic liquids using inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mutelet, Fabrice; Jaubert, Jean-Noël

    2006-01-13

    Activity coefficients at infinite dilution of 29 organic compounds in two room temperature ionic liquids were determined using inverse gas chromatography. The measurements were carried out at different temperatures between 323.15 and 343.15K. To establish the influence of concurrent retention mechanisms on the accuracy of activity coefficients at infinite dilution for 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium octyl sulfate and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tosylate, phase loading studies of the net retention volume per gram of packing as a function of the percent phase loading were used. It is shown that most of the solutes are retained largely by partition with a small contribution from adsorption on 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium octyl sulfate and that the n-alkanes are retained predominantly by interfacial adsorption on 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tosylate. PMID:16310203

  18. Growth and electrical properties on NLO crystal: 4-N,N-dimethylamino 4′-N′-methylstilbazolium iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M. Krishna Sudhahar, S. Kumar, R. Mohan

    2014-04-24

    4-N,N-Dimethylamino-4′-N′-methylstilbazolium tosylate single crystals were grown by solution crystal growth method. The cell parameters of grown crystal have been estimated using single crystal-X-ray diffraction analysis. The variation of real (´ε) and imaginary (´ε) part of dielectric constants and dielectric loss were observed for different frequencies and temperatures. The ac and dc electrical conductivities and activation energy were determined for DMSI crystal using dielectric studies.

  19. 1-Benzyl-2,5-diphenyl-3-tosylimidazol­idin-4-one

    PubMed Central

    Sakthimurugesan, K.; Ranjith, S.; SubbiahPandi, A.; Namitharan, K.; Pitchumani, K.

    2011-01-01

    In the title compound, C29H26N2O3S, the central imidazolidine ring adopts an envelope conformation with the N atom bearing the benzyl ring at the flap. The S atom has distorted tetra­hedral geometry. The benzyl and tosyl rings are oriented at a dihedral angle of 52.1 (1)°. The phenyl rings connected to the imidazolidine ring form a dihedral angle of 28.7 (1)°. PMID:22058970

  20. Crystalline form of a neutrophil elastase inhibitor, 6-methyl-5-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)-N-{[5-(methylsulfonyl)pyridin-2-yl]methyl}-2-oxo-1-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carboxamide p-toluene sulfonate - is it AZD-9668?: WO-2010094964.

    PubMed

    Norman, Peter

    2011-02-01

    This patent application claims a novel crystalline form (Form A) of a tosylate salt of a previously disclosed neutrophil elastase inhibitor. It also claims oral compositions of the salt and a process for the preparation of the crystalline form. The novel form is indicated to show improved physical properties relative to the free base. The claimed compound is evidently one of the elastase inhibitors currently being developed by AstraZeneca. PMID:21222548

  1. Effect of S-adenosylmethionine tablets on the reduction of age-related mental decline in dogs: a double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rème, C A; Dramard, V; Kern, L; Hofmans, J; Halsberghe, C; Mombiela, D Vida

    2008-01-01

    Oral S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) tosylate supplementation (Novifit tablets, Virbac) was evaluated as a dietary aid for the management of age-related mental impairment in dogs. Thirty-six dogs older than 8 years that had displayed signs of cognitive dysfunction for at least 1 month were selected for the study. The dogs were administered 18 mg/kg SAMe tosylate (n=17) or identical placebo tablets (n=19) for 2 months. Concurrent behavioral treatment was forbidden. A 14-item standardized questionnaire evaluated behavior and locomotion difficulties. Compared with the placebo group, SAMe-treated dogs showed greater improvement in activity (41.7% versus 2.6% after 4 weeks, P<.0003; 57.1% versus 9.0% after 8 weeks, P<.003) and awareness (33.3% versus 17.9% after 4 weeks, P<.05; 59.5% versus 21.4% after 8 weeks, P<.01). The aggregate mental impairment score was reduced by more than 50% in 41.2% and 15.8% of dogs treated with SAMe and placebo, respectively, at week 8. SAMe tosylate tablets proved safe and effective in improving signs of age-related mental decline in dogs. PMID:18597245

  2. Oxime derivatives with larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti L.

    PubMed

    Lima, Tamires Cardoso; Santos, Sandra Regina Lima; Uliana, Marciana P; Santos, Roseli La Corte; Brocksom, Timothy John; Cavalcanti, Sócrates Cabral de Holanda; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino

    2015-08-01

    Oximes containing secondary metabolites constitute an important group of bioactive compounds and have been described and frequently updated in the literature due to their pharmacological properties. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the larvicidal activity of a series of fourteen structurally related [1,4]-Benzoquinone mono-oximes on third-instar Aedes aegypti larvae and to investigate structure-activity relationships (SAR) of these compounds. Results of larvicidal assay revealed that all oximes were found to have larvicidal activity. Compound 2,6-dimethyl-[1,4]-benzoquinone oxime tosylate (11) was the most bioactive (LC50 = 9.858 ppm), followed by 2-methyl-[1,4]-benzoquinone oxime tosylate (9) (LC50 = 14.450 ppm). [1,4]-benzoquinone oxime (1) exhibited the lowest potency, with an LC50 = 121.181 ppm. The molecular characteristics which may help to understand the assayed compounds larvicidal activity were identified. SAR indicates that the addition of alkyl groups attached to the ring, number, position in the unsaturated cyclic structure, and size of these groups influence the larvicidal activity. Moreover, the lipophilicity seems to play an important role in increasing the larvicidal effect, because, in general, tosyl-containing products were more potent than products containing free OH. PMID:25956398

  3. Korean Elementary School Students' Perceptions of Earth Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Lee, H.; Oh, P.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the elementary school students' perceptions of earth-scientists while a number of previous studies focused on elementary school students’ perceptions of general scientists. A modified DAST and DAST-C were administered to 138 fourth graders (68 boys and 70 girls) from an elementary school in Northern Gyeonggi province, Korea. Four students were selected for each of four categories of the DAST-C items, and semi-structured interviews were conducted with a total of 16 students. Significant differences in the students’ perceptions of earth-scientists and general scientists were found concerning lab coats (.254), study symbols (.116), secret marks (.007), and indoor studies (.333). Moreover, while in previous studies only 9% of students indicated that scientists worked together, 29.7% of elementary school students believed that earth scientists worked in groups. The interviews with four students revealed details of their perceptions. First, the students thought that the objects of earth scientific research developed for a long time period and that the research was usually carried out outdoors because earth scientists studied strata and fossils. Second, the students considered ‘observing’ and ‘reporting’ (meaning describing) the main skills in earth science. Their perceptions of research questions in earth science were also limited to, for example, the formation and the types of fossils and strata. Third, the students believed that earth scientists were mostly young because they had to travel around the world to find something. Fourth and lastly, although the students viewed earth science as dangerous, they described earth scientists with incomplete safety equipment. It is concluded that Korean elementary school students have perceptions of earth scientists which reflect some aspects of the nature of earth science and that it is necessary in elementary school science to consider these perceptions.

  4. Analyzing prospective teachers' images of scientists using positive, negative and stereotypical images of scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan; Esprívalo Harrell, Pamela; Wojnowski, David

    2013-04-01

    Background and purpose : This study details the use of a conceptual framework to analyze prospective teachers' images of scientists to reveal their context-specific conceptions of scientists. The conceptual framework consists of context-specific conceptions related to positive, stereotypical and negative images of scientists as detailed in the literature on the images, role and work of scientists. Sample, design and method : One hundred and ninety-six drawings of scientists, generated by prospective teachers, were analyzed using the Draw-A-Scientist-Test Checklist (DAST-C), a binary linear regression and the conceptual framework. Results : The results of the binary linear regression analysis revealed a statistically significant difference for two DAST-C elements: ethnicity differences with regard to drawing a scientist who was Caucasian and gender differences for indications of danger. Analysis using the conceptual framework helped to categorize the same drawings into positive, stereotypical, negative and composite images of a scientist. Conclusions : The conceptual framework revealed that drawings were focused on the physical appearance of the scientist, and to a lesser extent on the equipment, location and science-related practices that provided the context of a scientist's role and work. Implications for teacher educators include the need to understand that there is a need to provide tools, like the conceptual framework used in this study, to help prospective teachers to confront and engage with their multidimensional perspectives of scientists in light of the current trends on perceiving and valuing scientists. In addition, teacher educators need to use the conceptual framework, which yields qualitative perspectives about drawings, together with the DAST-C, which yields quantitative measure for drawings, to help prospective teachers to gain a holistic outlook on their drawings of scientists.

  5. K-12 Students' Perceptions of Scientists: Finding a valid measurement and exploring whether exposure to scientists makes an impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Susan J.; Bloodsworth, Kylie H.; Tilburg, Charles E.; Zeeman, Stephan I.; List, Henrietta E.

    2014-10-01

    This study was launched from a National Science Foundation GK-12 grant in which graduate fellows in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) are placed in classrooms to engage K-12 students in STEM activities. The investigation explored whether the STEM Fellows' presence impacted the K-12 students' stereotypical image of a scientist. Since finding a valid instrument is critical, the study involved (1) determining the validity of the commonly administered Draw-A-Scientist Test (DAST) against a newly designed six-question survey and (2) using a combination of both instruments to determine what stereotypes are currently held by children. A pretest-posttest design was used on 485 students, grades 3-11, attending 6 different schools in suburban and rural Maine communities. A significant but low positive correlation was found between the DAST and the survey; therefore, it is imperative that the DAST not be used alone, but corroboration with interviews or survey questions should occur. Pretest results revealed that the children held common stereotypes of scientists, but these stereotypes were neither as extensive nor did they increase with the grade level as past research has indicated, suggesting that a shift has occurred with children having a broader concept of who a scientist can be. Finally, the presence of an STEM Fellow corresponded with decreased stereotypes in middle school and high school, but no change in elementary age children. More research is needed to determine whether this reflects resiliency in elementary children's perceptions or limitations in either drawing or in writing out their responses.

  6. Real-time flutter analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R.; Gupta, N.

    1984-01-01

    The important algorithm issues necessary to achieve a real time flutter monitoring system; namely, the guidelines for choosing appropriate model forms, reduction of the parameter convergence transient, handling multiple modes, the effect of over parameterization, and estimate accuracy predictions, both online and for experiment design are addressed. An approach for efficiently computing continuous-time flutter parameter Cramer-Rao estimate error bounds were developed. This enables a convincing comparison of theoretical and simulation results, as well as offline studies in preparation for a flight test. Theoretical predictions, simulation and flight test results from the NASA Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Test (DAST) Program are compared.

  7. Development of an ultra-widely tunable DFG-THz source with switching between organic nonlinear crystals pumped with a dual-wavelength BBO optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Notake, Takashi; Nawata, Kouji; Kawamata, Hiroshi; Matsukawa, Takeshi; Qi, Feng; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2012-11-01

    We developed a difference frequency generation (DFG) source with an organic nonlinear optical crystal of DAST or BNA selectively excited by a dual-wavelength β-BaB(2)O(4) optical parametric oscillator (BBO-OPO). The dual-wavelength BBO-OPO can independently oscillate two lights with different wavelengths from 800 to 1800 nm in a cavity. THz-wave generation by using each organic crystal covers ultrawide range from 1 to 30 THz with inherent intensity dips by crystal absorption modes. The reduced outputs can be improved by switching over the crystals with adequately tuned pump wavelengths of the BBO-OPO. PMID:23187402

  8. Synthesis of active controls for flutter suppression on a flight research wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Perry, B., III; Murrow, H. N.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes some activities associated with the preliminary design of an active control system for flutter suppression capable of demonstrating a 20% increase in flutter velocity. Results from two control system synthesis techniques are given. One technique uses classical control theory, and the other uses an 'aerodynamic energy method' where control surface rates or displacements are minimized. Analytical methods used to synthesize the control systems and evaluate their performance are described. Some aspects of a program for flight testing the active control system are also given. This program, called DAST (Drones for Aerodynamics and Structural Testing), employs modified drone-type vehicles for flight assessments and validation testing.

  9. Stress analyses of B-52 pylon hooks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.; Schuster, L. S.

    1985-01-01

    The NASTRAN finite element computer program was used in the two dimensional stress analysis of B-52 carrier aircraft pylon hooks: (1) old rear hook (which failed), (2) new rear hook (improved geometry), (3) new DAST rear hook (derated geometry), and (4) front hook. NASTRAN model meshes were generated by the aid of PATRAN-G computer program. Brittle limit loads for all the four hooks were established. The critical stress level calculated from NASTRAN agrees reasonably well with the values predicted from the fracture mechanics for the failed old rear hook.

  10. Application of a flight test and data analysis technique to flutter of a drone aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    Modal identification results presented were obtained from recent flight flutter tests of a drone vehicle with a research wing (DAST ARW-1 for Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing, Aeroelastic Research Wing-1). This vehicle is equipped with an active flutter suppression system (FSS). Frequency and damping of several modes are determined by a time domain modal analysis of the impulse response function obtained by Fourier transformations of data from fast swept sine wave excitation by the FSS control surface on the wing. Flutter points are determined for two different altitudes with the FSS off. Data are given for near the flutter boundary with the FSS on.

  11. Transonic calculations for a flexible supercritical wing and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, R. M.; Seidel, D. A.; Sandford, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    Pressure data measured on the flexible DAST ARW-2 wing are compared with results calculated using the transonic small perturbation code XTRAN3S. A brief description of the analysis is given and a recently-developed grid coordinate transformation is described. Calculations are presented for the rigid and flexible wing for Mach numbers from 0.60 to 0.90 and dynamic pressures from 0 to 1000 psf. Calculated and measured static pressures and wing deflections are compared, and calculated static aeroelastic trends are given. Attempts to calculate the transonic instability boundary of the wing are described.

  12. Racial identity development & perceptions of scientists of Black college students in science and non-science majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomillion, Crystall Sharee

    The focus of this research was to evaluate if differences exist in the racial identity profiles and perceptions of scientists held by 48 Black college students majoring in science (n = 17) and non-science (n = 31) fields. The study was conducted at a large, predominantly White university located in the south. All participants completed the Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) and Draw-a-Scientist Test (DAST); measures used to assess six subscales of individuals' racial identity development (RID) and 16 stereotypical conceptions of scientists respectively. Fourteen volunteers also completed one-on-one interviews with the researcher to discuss information that would elucidate their responses to survey instruments. Findings from the CRIS revealed that significant differences did not exist in the science majors' and non-science majors' racial identity profiles. Both groups expressed strongest agreement with views reflected in Internalization Multiculturalist Inclusive (IMCI) and Pre-Encounter Miseducation (PM) subscales. Conversely, the science majors and non-science majors exhibited least agreement with attitudes depicted in Immersion-Emersion Anti-White (IEAW) and Pre-Encounter Self-Hatred (PSH) subscales. Results from the DAST demonstrated that both groups illustrated similar perceptions of scientists as observed by an average of four of the 16 stereotypes expressed in their images.

  13. Khat (Catha edulis Forsk.) Dependence Potential and Pattern of Use in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Alsanosy, Rashad Mohammed; Rahim, Bahaa-eldin E. A.; Mohan, Syam; Taha, Sara; Mohamed Elhassan, Manal; El-Setouhy, Maged

    2015-01-01

    Background. Catha edulis Forsk. (Khat) is used for its psychoactive effects among people in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, although its utilization is illegal in some countries such as Saudi Arabia. This study examined the pattern of Khat use and assessed the applicability of the Drug Abuse Screening Test-10 (DAST-10) to measure Khat dependence. Methods. A pretested questionnaire was used to gather data from 603 respondents. Variables included demographic characteristics, pattern of use, reasons for Khat chewing, and DAST-10. Stepwise-logistic regression was used to explore predictors of Khat dependence. Results. The majority of the respondents were married, had a secondary school level of education, were employed, were younger than 35 years old, and were living in rural areas. Many chewers gave more than one reason for using Khat. It was mainly used to increase mental capacity, physical strength, and social entertainment, as well as enhance cheerfulness and orgasms. Statistical modeling of Khat dependence suggested that the most significant predictors were residence (OR = 1.67, P < 0.02), frequency of Khat chewing (OR = 4.8, P < 0.01), age of starting Khat chewing (OR = 1.15, P < 0.01), and time of Khat effect (OR = 1.15, P < 0.04). Conclusion. Our study provides important information on the pattern of Khat use and its potential to cause dependence. PMID:26380288

  14. Single crystal films and waveguides of organic materials: Preparation and nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Mrinal

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this program is to establish a generic method for the growth of thin single crystal films of important organic nonlinear optical materials and measurement of their nonlinear optical properties. Through the last year's effort we have successfully prepared single crystal films of three organic materials which are: (1) (N-(4-Nitrophenyl)-L-prolinol) abbreviated as NPP, (2) 2-cyclooctylamino- 5-nitropyridine, abbreviated as COANP, and (3) 4'-N, N-dimethylamino- 4-N-methylstilbazolium toluene-p-sulfonate, abbreviated as DAST. These materials have very large second order susceptibilities. Both NPP and COANP have an amphiphillic molecular structure, while DAST is an organic molecular salt. The single crystal films were prepared by a method called the shear method, with appropriate choice of the growth conditions. The shear method involves crystal growth at an interface and was originally applied to the growth of polydiacetylene films. Our results show that using the principles involved in the shear method, if the growth conditions are properly optimized for each compound, then molecules other than diacetylene are possible to organize as single crystal films. The only major condition that needs to be satisfied for this method to be applicable is that the molecule must be of an elongated shape with polar chemical groups at one or both ends.

  15. Solvent isotope effects on nucleophilic displacement reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, G.W.

    1981-01-01

    The kinetic solvent isotope effect, KSIE, (k/sub H/sub 2/O//k/sub D/sub 2/O/), at 25.0/sup 0/C and ionic strength, I, equal to 0.20 +- 0.02 M was measured for the nucleophilic displacement of iodine ion from iodomethane, iodoacetamide, and iodoacetate ion, thiophene from S-Methylthiophenium ion, and tosylate ion from methyl tosylate by bromide ion, chloride ion, acetate ion, hydroxide ion, water, ammonia, ethylenediamine, n-butylamine, piperazine, piperidine, quinuclidine, and 1,4-Diazabicyclo(2.2.2)octane (DABCO), and the monoprotonated cations of ethylenediamine, piperazine, and DABCO. By means of solvent partition measurements at 25.0/sup 0/C and I = 0.02 M between H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O and a common immiscible organic solvent, the ground state activity coefficients in D/sub 2/O, the solution in H/sub 2/O being chosen as the reference state, were determined for the nitrogen-containing nucleophiles (except ammonia) and the substrates methyl tosylate, iodoacetamide, and iodoacetic acid. The solubilities at 25.0/sup 0/C of the picrate and tetraphenylborate salts of the monoprotonated cationic forms of ethylenediamine, piperazine, and DABCO were measured to determine the activity coefficients in D/sub 2/O of these ions relative to an H/sub 2/O reference state. Applying the Eyring equation, the activity coefficients of the transition states in D/sub 2/O, reference state H/sub 2/O, were calculated.

  16. Chelating ionic liquids for reversible zinc electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kar, Mega; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn; Forsyth, Maria; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2013-05-21

    Advanced, high energy-density, metal-air rechargeable batteries, such as zinc-air, are of intense international interest due to their important role in energy storage applications such as electric and hybrid vehicles, and to their ability to deal with the intermittency of renewable energy sources such as solar and wind. Ionic liquids offer a number of ideal thermal and physical properties as potential electrolytes in such large-scale energy storage applications. We describe here the synthesis and characterisation of a family of novel "chelating" ILs designed to chelate and solubilize the zinc ions to create electrolytes for this type of battery. These are based on quaternary alkoxy alkyl ammonium cations of varying oligo-ether side chains and anions such as p-toluene sulfonate, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and dicyanoamides. This work shows that increasing the ether chain length in the cation from two to four oxygens can increase the ionic conductivity and reduce the melting point from 67 °C to 15 °C for the tosylate system. Changing the anion also plays a significant role in the nature of the zinc deposition electrochemistry. We show that zinc can be reversibly deposited from [N(222(20201))][NTf2] and [N(222(202020201))][NTf2] beginning at -1.4 V and -1.7 V vs. SHE, respectively, but not in the case of tosylate based ILs. This indicates that the [NTf2] is a weaker coordinating anion with the zinc cation, compared to the tosylate anion, allowing the coordination of the ether chain to dominate the behavior of the deposition and stripping of zinc ions. PMID:23558696

  17. The influence of substituents in 3-position on the activity of chroman-type potassium channel activators.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, R; Gericke, R

    1994-03-01

    Swern oxidation of chromanol 1 led to ketone 3 with concomitant chlorination of the adjacent 4-position. Using Leuckart conditions, chromanone 2 was converted to enamine 5.--4-Bromochromene-3-carbaldehyde 8, which was obtained by Vilsmeier-Arnold reaction from 7, turned out to be a suitable intermediate for the insertion of the pyridone residue. 3-Chloro derivatives 16 and 19 resulted on heating the mesylate or tosylate with LiCl in DMF. Bromination of chromene 20 led to 21.--All compounds were tested for oral antihypertensive activity in spontaneously hypertensive rats with a dose of 1 mg/kg. PMID:8179475

  18. A Pot-Economical Approach to the Total Synthesis of Sch-725674.

    PubMed

    Bodugam, Mahipal; Javed, Salim; Ganguly, Arghya; Torres, Jessica; Hanson, Paul R

    2016-02-01

    A pot-economical total synthesis of antifungal Sch-725674, 1, is reported. The approach takes advantage of a number of one-pot, sequential transformations, including a phosphate tether-mediated one-pot, sequential RCM/CM/chemoselective hydrogenation protocol, a one-pot tosylation/acrylation sequence, and a one-pot, sequential Finkelstein reaction/Boord olefination/acetonide deprotection procedure to streamline the synthesis route by reducing isolation and purification procedures, thus saving time. Overall, an asymmetric route has been developed that is efficiently accomplished in seven pots from phosphate (S,S)-triene and with minimal purification. PMID:26760683

  19. An Umpolung Strategy for the Synthesis of β-Aminoketones via Copper-Catalyzed Electrophilic Amination of Cyclopropanols.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhishi; Dai, Mingji

    2015-05-01

    A novel copper-catalyzed electrophilic amination of cyclopropanols with O-benzoyl-N,N-dialkylhydroxylamines to synthesize various β-aminoketones via a sequence that includes C-C bond cleavage and Csp(3)-N bond formation is reported. The reaction conditions are mild and tolerate a wide range of functional groups including benzoate, tosylate, expoxide, and α,β-unsaturated carbonyls, which are incompatible in the traditional amine nucleophilic conjugate addition and the Mannich reaction conditions. Preliminary mechanistic studies and a proposed catalytic cycle of this umpolung β-aminoketone synthesis process have been described as well. PMID:25885943

  20. Azidated Ether-Butadiene-Ether Block Copolymers as Binders for Solid Propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappello, Miriam; Lamia, Pietro; Mura, Claudio; Polacco, Giovanni; Filippi, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Polymeric binders for solid propellants are usually based on hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), which does not contribute to the overall energy output. Azidic polyethers represent an interesting alternative but may have poorer mechanical properties. Polybutadiene-polyether copolymers may combine the advantages of both. Four different ether-butadiene-ether triblock copolymers were prepared and azidated starting from halogenated and/or tosylated monomers using HTPB as initiator. The presence of the butadiene block complicates the azidation step and reduces the storage stability of the azidic polymer. Nevertheless, the procedure allows modifying the binder properties by varying the type and lengths of the energetic blocks.

  1. Visible-Light-Mediated Alkenylation, Allylation, and Cyanation of Potassium Alkyltrifluoroborates with Organic Photoredox Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Heitz, Drew R; Rizwan, Komal; Molander, Gary A

    2016-08-19

    Iridium- and ruthenium-free approaches to protected allylic amines and alkyl nitriles under photoredox conditions are reported. An inexpensive organic dye, eosin Y, catalyzes coupling of Boc-protected potassium α-aminomethyltrifluoroborates with a variety of substituted alkenyl sulfones through an α-aminomethyl radical addition-elimination pathway. Allylic and homoallylic amines were formed in moderate yields with high E/Z selectivity. The mechanistic approach was extended using tosyl cyanide as a radical trap, enabling the conversion of alkyltrifluoroborates to nitriles via a Fukuzumi acridinium-catalyzed process. PMID:27336284

  2. 4-Toluenesulfonyloxymethyl-(H)-phosphinate: A Reagent for the Introduction of O- and S-Methyl-(H)-phosphinate Moieties.

    PubMed

    Kostov, Ondřej; Páv, Ondřej; Buděšínský, Miloš; Liboska, Radek; Šimák, Ondřej; Petrová, Magdalena; Novák, Pavel; Rosenberg, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    The straightforward synthesis of sodium 4-toluenesulfonyloxymethyl-(H)-phosphinate and (H)-phosphinomethylisothiouronium tosylate as new reagents for the preparation of O- and S-methyl-(H)-phosphinic acid derivatives, respectively, is described. The reactivity of both reagents was demonstrated by the preparation of protected 2'-deoxyribonucleoside-O-methyl-(H)-phosphinates in the 5'- and 3'-series and 2',5'-dideoxyribonucleoside-5'-S-methyl-(H)-phosphinates. These compounds represent a new class of monomers compatible with the solid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides by H-phosphonate chemistry, as it was proved with the synthesis of a fully phosphonate heptamer. PMID:27177076

  3. Chromogenic assay for the prothrombin activator ecarin from the venom of the saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus).

    PubMed

    Stocker, K; Fischer, H; Brogli, M

    1986-01-01

    Ecarin, by limited proteolysis and subsequent autocatalytic reactions, causes the conversion of prothrombin into three products with amidolytic activity: meizothrombin, meizothrombin 1 and lpha-thrombin. Ecarin action may be abolished by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and the activity of alpha-thrombin can, with a high degree of selectivity, be inhibited by heparin. Thus, ecarin potency may be assayed by measuring the meizothrombin activity generated by ecarin action on human plasma in the presence of heparin. The chromogenic substrate Tosyl-glycyl-L-prolyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide (Chromozym TH) is used in this assay. PMID:3082039

  4. Synthesis and hSERT activity of homotryptamine analogs. Part 6: [3+2] dipolar cycloaddition of 3-vinylindoles.

    PubMed

    Marcin, Lawrence R; Mattson, Ronald J; Gao, Qi; Wu, Dedong; Molski, Thaddeus F; Mattson, Gail K; Lodge, Nicholas J

    2010-02-01

    Substituted 1-tosyl-3-vinylindoles undergo [3+2] dipolar cycloaddition with cyclic nitrones to afford substituted isoxazoles in good yield and high diastereoselectivity. The cycloadducts were readily converted in 4 steps into ring constrained homotryptamine analogs. These analogs exhibited excellent binding affinity for the human serotonin transporter (hSERT). Indoles bearing a 5-cyano group and a pendent ethyl(tetrahydroisoquinoline) moiety at the 3-position displayed the best potency for hSERT and high selectivity versus hDAT and hNET. PMID:20034793

  5. A Surface Plasmon Polariton Electro-Optic Switch Based on a Metal-Insulator-Metal Structure with a Strip Waveguide and Two Side-Coupled Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yun-Jin; Huang, Xu-Guang; Mei, Xian

    2012-06-01

    We propose and numerically simulate a nanoscale electro-optic (EO) switch based on a metal-insulator-metal structure composed of a strip waveguide and two side-coupled cavities filled with an EO material of 4-dimethyl-amino-N-methyl-4-stilbazolium tosylate, using the finite difference time domain method. It is found that the structure can be operated as an EO switch at a wavelength of 945 nm, with a modulation depth of 27 dB, a half-wave voltage of 5.3 V and a switching time of about 50 ps.

  6. One-pot, three-component approach to the synthesis of 3,4,5-trisubstituted pyrazoles.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ahmed; Sastry, K N Visweswara; Chandrasekhar, D; Mani, Geeta Sai; Adiyala, Praveen Reddy; Nanubolu, Jagadeesh Babu; Singarapu, Kiran Kumar; Maurya, Ram Awatar

    2015-05-01

    An operationally simple and high yielding protocol for the synthesis of polyfunctional pyrazoles has been developed through one-pot, three-component coupling of aldehydes, 1,3-dicarbonyls, and diazo compounds as well as tosyl hydrazones. The reaction proceeds through a tandem Knoevenagel condensation, 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition, and transition metal-free oxidative aromatization reaction sequence utilizing molecular oxygen as a green oxidant. The scope of the reaction was studied by varying the aldehyde, 1,3-dicarbonyl, and diazo component individually. PMID:25849582

  7. Synthesis of a Small Library of Imidazolidin-2-ones using Gold Catalysis on Solid Phase.

    PubMed

    La-Venia, Agustina; Medran, Noelia S; Krchňák, Viktor; Testero, Sebastián A

    2016-08-01

    An efficient and high-yielding solid phase synthesis of a small library of imidazolidin-2-ones and imidazol-2-ones was carried out employing a high chemo- and regioselective gold-catalyzed cycloisomerization as a key step. Polymer-supported amino acids derivatized with several alkyne functionalities combined with tosyl- and phenylureas have been subjected to gold-catalysis exhibiting exclusively C-N bond formation. The present work proves the potential of solid phase synthesis and homogeneous gold catalysis as an efficient and powerful synthetic tool for the generation of drug-like heterocycles. PMID:27337593

  8. Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities of Makaluvamine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Nadkarni, Dwayaja H.; Wu, Hui; Velu, Sadanandan E.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a key etiological agent in the formation of dental caries. The major virulence factor is its ability to form biofilms. Inhibition of S. mutans biofilms offers therapeutic prospects for the treatment and the prevention of dental caries. In this study, 14 analogs of makaluvamine, a marine alkaloid, were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against S. mutans and for their ability to inhibit S. mutans biofilm formation. All analogs contained the tricyclic pyrroloiminoquinone core of makaluvamines. The structural variations of the analogs are on the amino substituents at the 7-position of the ring and the inclusion of a tosyl group on the pyrrole ring N of the makaluvamine core. The makaluvamine analogs displayed biofilm inhibition with IC50 values ranging from 0.4 μM to 88 μM. Further, the observed bactericidal activity of the majority of the analogs was found to be consistent with the anti-biofilm activity, leading to the conclusion that the anti-biofilm activity of these analogs stems from their ability to kill S. mutans. However, three of the most potent N-tosyl analogs showed biofilm IC50 values at least an order of magnitude lower than that of bactericidal activity, indicating that the biofilm activity of these analogs is more selective and perhaps independent of bactericidal activity. PMID:25767719

  9. Trypsinlike enzymes from dormant and germinated spores of Bacillus cereus T and their possible involvement in germination.

    PubMed Central

    Boschwitz, H; Halvorson, H O; Keynan, A; Milner, Y

    1985-01-01

    Trypsin-like enzymes were studied in dormant, activated, and germinated spores of Bacillus cereus T. Dormant spores contained two heat-labile enzyme activities. One was extractable with 2 M KCl and hydrolyzed azo-albumin. The second, a trypsinlike activity, was not extractable with 2 M KCl and hydrolyzed benzoyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide. Because of their heat instability, these two enzyme activities are probably not involved in the germination of heat-activated spores. Upon germination of heat-treated spores, a trypsinlike protease which was not detected in intact dormant spores was activated or exposed. This enzyme, when measured in intact germinated spores, hydrolyzed benzoyl-DL-arginine-p-nitroanilide but not azo-albumin and was inhibited in situ by sulfhydryl-blocking reagents such as p-chloromercuribenzoic acid and Hg2+. There was a correlation between the inhibition of germination and enzymatic activity by sulfhydryl-blocking reagents. The enzyme was also inhibited by leupeptin, tosyl-L-lysine chromoethyl ketone, and tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester. Good correlation existed between the inhibition of germination and enzymatic activity by these agents. Electron micrographs showed that in the presence of trypsin inhibitors, the spores did not lose their cortex. The protein extracts of the inhibited spores formed a somewhat different electrophoretic pattern in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis than the protein extracts of dormant or germinated spores. Images PMID:3930468

  10. Antiproteases modulate bronchial epithelial cell responses to endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, S.; Rennard, S. I.; Claassen, L.; Robbins, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Escherichia coli endotoxin (0.1 to 1000 micrograms/ml) stimulated the release of neutrophil chemotactic activity (P < 0.001) and induced bronchial epithelial cell (BEC) cytotoxicity assessed by lactate dehydrogenase release (P < 0.001). Endotoxin (100 micrograms/ml) inhibited BEC accumulation (P < 0.001). In the present study, we investigated the role of proteolytic activity of BECs per se in response to endotoxin. Several structurally and functionally different antiproteases, alpha 1 protease inhibitor, soybean trypsin inhibitor, two chloromethyl ketone derivatives (N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone and methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val chloromethyl ketone), and L-658,758, a neutrophil elastase inhibitor, attenuated the release of neutrophil chemotactic activity and lactate dehydrogenase (P < 0.01). alpha 1-Protease inhibitor and N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone attenuated the inhibition of BEC accumulation by endotoxin (P < 0.001). The proteolytic enzyme activity measured by synthetic substrates revealed that endotoxin significantly augmented the serine proteolytic activity in the cell layers. Culture supernatant fluids and cell lysates of BECs in the presence of endotoxin solubilized 14C-labeled casein. These data suggest that responses of BECs to endotoxin may involve activation of cellular proteolytic activity. PMID:7747815

  11. Vibrational spectroscopic (FTIR and FT Raman) studies, first order hyperpolarizabilities and HOMO, LUMO analysis of p-toluenesulfonyl isocyanate using ab initio HF and DFT methods.

    PubMed

    Parimala, K; Balachandran, V

    2011-10-15

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and FT Raman spectra of p-toluenesulfonyl isocyanate (p-tosyl isocyanate) have been measured. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, Raman activities and atomic charges have been calculated by using ab initio HF and density functional theory calculation (B3LYP) with 6-311+G(d,p) basis set. Complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out using the observed FTIR and FT Raman data. The thermodynamic functions of the title compound were also performed with the aid of HF/6-311+G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) levels of theory. Simulated FTIR and FT Raman spectra for p-tosyl isocyanate showed good agreement with the observed spectra. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The dipole moment (μ), polarizability (α) and the hyperpolarizability (β) values of the investigated molecule have been computed using HF and B3LYP methods. PMID:21795105

  12. Vibrational spectroscopic (FTIR and FT Raman) studies, first order hyperpolarizabilities and HOMO, LUMO analysis of p-toluenesulfonyl isocyanate using ab initio HF and DFT methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimala, K.; Balachandran, V.

    2011-10-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and FT Raman spectra of p-toluenesulfonyl isocyanate (p-tosyl isocyanate) have been measured. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, Raman activities and atomic charges have been calculated by using ab initio HF and density functional theory calculation (B3LYP) with 6-311+G(d,p) basis set. Complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out using the observed FTIR and FT Raman data. The thermodynamic functions of the title compound were also performed with the aid of HF/6-311+G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) levels of theory. Simulated FTIR and FT Raman spectra for p-tosyl isocyanate showed good agreement with the observed spectra. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The dipole moment ( μ), polarizability ( α) and the hyperpolarizability ( β) values of the investigated molecule have been computed using HF and B3LYP methods.

  13. C-Glucopyranosyl-1,2,4-triazol-5-ones: synthesis and inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Bokor, Éva; Széles, Zsolt; Docsa, Tibor; Gergely, Pál; Somsák, László

    2016-06-24

    Various C-glucopyranosyl-1,2,4-triazolones were designed as potential inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase. Syntheses of these compounds were performed with O-perbenzoylated glucose derivatives as precursors. High temperature ring closure of N(1)-carbamoyl-C-β-D-glucopyranosyl formamidrazone gave 3-β-D-glucopyranosyl-1,2,4-triazol-5-one. Reaction of N(1)-tosyl-C-β-D-glucopyranosyl formamidrazone with ClCOOEt furnished 3-β-D-glucopyranosyl-1-tosyl-1,2,4-triazol-5-one. In situ prepared β-D-glucopyranosylcarbonyl isocyanate was transformed by PhNHNHBoc into 3-β-D-glucopyranosyl-1-phenyl-1,2,4-triazol-5-one, while the analogous 1-(2-naphthyl) derivative was obtained from the unsubstituted triazolone by naphthalene-2-boronic acid in a Cu(II) catalyzed N-arylation. Test compounds were prepared by Zemplén deacylation. The new glucose derivatives had weak or no inhibition of rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b: the best inhibitor was 3-β-D-glucopyranosyl-1-(2-naphthyl)-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (Ki = 80 µM). PMID:26818133

  14. Activation of Bt Protoxin Cry1Ac in Resistant and Susceptible Cotton Bollworm

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Gemei; Wang, Bingjie; Zhong, Feng; Chen, Lin; Khaing, Myint Myint; Zhang, Jie; Guo, Yuyuan; Wu, Kongming; Tabashnik, Bruce E.

    2016-01-01

    Crystalline (Cry) proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are used extensively for insect control in sprays and transgenic plants, but their efficacy is reduced by evolution of resistance in pests. Here we evaluated reduced activation of Cry1Ac protoxin as a potential mechanism of resistance in the invasive pest Helicoverpa armigera. Based on the concentration killing 50% of larvae (LC50) for a laboratory-selected resistant strain (LF120) divided by the LC50 for its susceptible parent strain (LF), the resistance ratio was 1600 for Cry1Ac protoxin and 1200 for trypsin-activated Cry1Ac toxin. The high level of resistance to activated toxin as well as to protoxin indicates reduced activation of protoxin is not a major mechanism of resistance to Cry1Ac in LF120. For both insect strains, treatment with either the trypsin inhibitor N-a-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) or the chymotrypsin inhibitor N-a-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) did not significantly affect the LC50 of Cry1Ac protoxin. Enzyme activity was higher for LF than LF120 for trypsin-like proteases, but did not differ between strains for chymotrypsin-like proteases. The results here are consistent with previous reports indicating that reduced activation of protoxin is generally not a major mechanism of resistance to Bt proteins. PMID:27257885

  15. Cytoplasmic Trafficking of Minute Virus of Mice: Low-pH Requirement, Routing to Late Endosomes, and Proteasome Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ros, Carlos; Burckhardt, Christoph J.; Kempf, Christoph

    2002-01-01

    The cytoplasmic trafficking of the prototype strain of minute virus of mice (MVMp) was investigated by analyzing and quantifying the effect of drugs that reduce or abolish specific cellular functions on the accumulation of viral macromolecules. With this strategy, it was found that a low endosomal pH is required for the infection, since bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine, two pH-interfering drugs, were similarly active against MVMp. Disruption of the endosomal network by brefeldin A interfered with MVMp infection, indicating that viral particles are routed farther than the early endocytic compartment. Pulse experiments with endosome-interfering drugs showed that the bulk of MVMp particles remained in the endosomal compartment for several hours before its release to the cytosol. Drugs that block the activity of the proteasome by different mechanisms, such as MG132, lactacystin, and epoxomicin, all strongly blocked MVMp infection. Pulse experiments with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 indicated that MVMp interacts with cellular proteasomes after endosomal escape. The chymotrypsin-like but not the trypsin-like activity of the proteasome is required for the infection, since the chymotrypsin inhibitors N-tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone and aclarubicin were both effective in blocking MVMp infection. However, the trypsin inhibitor Nα-p-tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone had no effect. These results suggest that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays an essential role in the MVMp life cycle, probably assisting at the stages of capsid disassembly and/or nuclear translocation. PMID:12438589

  16. Chemo-Enzymatic Synthesis of Chiral Epoxides Ethyl and Methyl (S)-3-(Oxiran-2-yl)propanoates from Renewable Levoglucosenone: An Access to Enantiopure (S)-Dairy Lactone.

    PubMed

    Peru, Aurélien A M; Flourat, Amandine L; Gunawan, Christian; Raverty, Warwick; Jevric, Martyn; Greatrex, Ben W; Allais, Florent

    2016-01-01

    Chiral epoxides-such as ethyl and methyl (S)-3-(oxiran-2-yl)propanoates ((S)-1a/1b)-are valuable precursors in many chemical syntheses. Until recently, these compounds were synthesized from glutamic acid in four steps (deamination, reduction, tosylation and epoxide formation) in low to moderate overall yield (20%-50%). Moreover, this procedure requires some harmful reagents such as sodium nitrite ((eco)toxic) and borane (carcinogen). Herein, starting from levoglucosenone (LGO), a biobased chiral compound obtained through the flash pyrolysis of acidified cellulose, we propose a safer and more sustainable chemo-enzymatic synthetic pathway involving lipase-mediated Baeyer-Villiger oxidation, palladium-catalyzed hydrogenation, tosylation and treatment with sodium ethoxide/methoxide as key steps. This route afforded ethyl and methyl (S)-3-(oxiran-2-yl)propanoates in 57% overall yield, respectively. To demonstrate the potentiality of this new synthetic pathway from LGO, the synthesis of high value-added (S)-dairy lactone was undertaken from these epoxides and provided the target in 37% overall yield from LGO. PMID:27483225

  17. Novel Ca2+-activated neutral protease from an aquatic fungus, Allomyces arbuscula.

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, M; Wallace, C J

    1988-01-01

    A Ca2+-activated neutral protease was purified to homogeneity from an aquatic Phycomycete fungus, Allomyces arbuscula. It requires millimolar concentrations of Ca2+ for activation (1.8 to 2 mM for 50% activation). Sr2+ can replace Ca2+ but at higher concentrations (4 mM for 50% activation). The enzyme is a dimer of 40-kilodalton subunits and contains six cysteine residues, three of which are revealed only after the addition of micromolar concentrations of Ca2+; the other three are free. Enzyme activity is strongly inhibited by SH-group inhibitors and some trypsin inhibitors (leupeptin and alpha-N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone). The enzyme lacks general trypsinlike specificity, since substrates containing tryptic cleavage sites are not cleaved nor is enzyme activity inhibited by other trypsin inhibitors. The enzyme has many functional similarities to the extensively characterized mammalian and avian Ca2+-activated neutral proteases but differs in its substrate specificity, inhibition by alpha-N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone, and subunit structure. It is, nevertheless, presumed that this enzyme has a similar high order of specificity and is involved in the regulation of a specific growth function. Images PMID:2830232

  18. [F-18]Fluorodihydrorotenone: Synthesis and evaluation of a mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complex I probe for PET

    SciTech Connect

    VanBrocklin, H.F.; Enas, J.D.; Hanrahan, S.M.

    1994-05-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) consists of five enzyme complexes (I-V) which participate in the transfer of electrons to oxygen and phosphorylation of ADP (oxidative phosphorylation). ETC dysfunction has been linked to several genetic neurological diseases as well as implicated in Parkinson`s (complex I) and Huntington`s (complex I) disease and normal aging processes. Dihydrorotenone (DHR) is a specific high affinity inhibitor of complex I. In order to develop a PET tracer for complex I, we have labeled DHR with fluorine-18. The tosylate precursor was produced in three steps from commercially available rotenone. Fluorine-18 was introduced by nucleophilic displacement of the tosylate using tetrabutyl-ammonium fluoride. Subsequent oxidation with MnO{sub 2} and HPLC purification gave the desired [{sup 18}F]fluoro-DHR. Initial biodistribution studies were carried out in {approximately}200 g male Sprague-Dawley rats. The tracer was taken up rapidly in the heart, an organ highly enriched with mitochondria, (5.5-6% injected dose (ID)/g at 30 minutes) and in the brain ({approximately}1.5% ID/g at 1 hour).

  19. Mechanistic insight into the Staudinger reaction catalyzed by N-heterocyclic carbenes.

    PubMed

    Hans, Morgan; Wouters, Johan; Demonceau, Albert; Delaude, Lionel

    2013-07-15

    Four zwitterions were prepared by treating 1,3-dimesitylimidazolin-2-ylidene (SIMes) or 1,3-dimesitylimidazol-2-ylidene (IMes) with either N-tosyl benzaldimine or diphenylketene. They were isolated in high yields and characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The molecular structures of three of them were determined by using X-ray crystallography and their thermal stability was monitored by using thermogravimetric analysis. The imidazol(in)ium-2-amides were rather labile white solids that did not show any tendency to tautomerize into the corresponding 1,2,2-triaminoethene derivatives. They displayed a mediocre catalytic activity in the Staudinger reaction of N-tosyl benzaldimine with diphenylketene. In contrast, the imidazol(in)ium-2-enolates were orange-red crystalline materials that remained stable over extended periods of time. Despite their greater stability, these zwitterions turned out to be efficient promoters for the model cycloaddition under scrutiny. As a matter of fact, their catalytic activity matched those recorded with the free carbenes. Altogether, these results provide strong experimental insight into the mechanism of the Staudinger reaction catalyzed by N-heterocyclic carbenes. They also highlight the superior catalytic activity of the imidazole-based carbene IMes compared with its saturated analogue SIMes in the reaction under consideration. PMID:23754585

  20. Steady pressure measurements on an Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Maynard C.; Seidel, David A.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.

    1994-01-01

    Transonic steady and unsteady pressure tests have been conducted in the Langley transonic dynamics tunnel on a large elastic wing known as the DAST ARW-2. The wing has a supercritical airfoil, an aspect ratio of 10.3, a leading-edge sweep back angle of 28.8 degrees, and two inboard and one outboard trailing-edge control surfaces. Only the outboard control surface was deflected to generate steady and unsteady flow over the wing during this study. Only the steady surface pressure, control-surface hinge moment, wing-tip deflection, and wing-root bending moment measurements are presented. The results from this elastic wing test are in tabulated form to assist in calibrating advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) algorithms.

  1. Design of control laws for flutter suppression based on the aerodynamic energy concept and comparisons with other design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1989-01-01

    The aerodynamic energy method is used in this paper to synthesize control laws for NASA's Drone for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing-Aerodynamic Research Wing 1 (DAST-ARW1) mathematical model. The performance of these control laws in terms of closed-loop flutter dynamic pressure, control surface activity, and robustness is compared against other control laws that appear in the literature and relate to the same model. A control law synthesis technique that makes use of the return difference singular values is developed in this paper. it is based on the aerodynamic energy approach and is shown to yield results superior to those given in the literature and based on optimal control theory. Nyquist plots are presented together with a short discussion regarding the relative merits of the minimum singular value as a measure of robustness, compared with the more traditional measure of robustness involving phase and gain margins.

  2. NASA DFRC Practices for Prototype Qualification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokos, William A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the practices that Dryden uses for qualification of the prototypes of aircraft. There are many views of aircraft that Dryden has worked with. Included is a discussion of basic considerations for strength, a listing of standards and references, a discussion of typical safety of flight approaches, a discussion of the prototype design, using the X-29A as an example, and requirements for new shapes (i.e., the DAST-ARW1 , F-8 Super Critical Wing, AFTI/F-111 MAW), new control laws (i.e., AAW F-18), new operating envelope (i.e., F-18 HARV), limited sope add-on or substitute structure (i.e., SR-71 LASRE, ECLIPSE, F-16XL SLFC), and extensively modified or replaced structure (i.e., SOFIA, B747SP). There is a listing of causes for the failure of the prototype.

  3. Criminality and Sexual Behaviours in Substance Dependents Seeking Treatment.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Alessandra; Pillon, Sandra Cristina; Dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Rassool, G Hussein; Laranjeira, Ronaldo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the link between violence, crime, and sexual behavior among patients with substance-related disorder admitted to a specialized inpatient care unit. This was a cross-sectional study using a questionnaire on socio-demographic characteristics, drug of choice (DOC), questions about sexual behavior, and instruments to evaluate the severity of dependence (SADD, DAST, FTND), level of impulsivity (BIS-11), and a screening sex addiction scale. The sample consisted of 587 adult subjects, of which 82.3% were men, 66.4% had used cocaine (sniffed and smoked) as their DOC, 24.4% had a history with the criminal justice system, 26.8% had committed crimes, 19.3% had engaged in violent behavior, and 12.2% had been involved in drug trafficking. In this sample, crime was strongly associated with various sexual behaviors and the severity of substance dependence. PMID:27163711

  4. Advanced solar dynamic space power systems perspectives, requirements and technology needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O.; Savino, J. M.; Lacy, D. E.; Migra, R. P.; Juhasz, A. J.; Coles, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    Projected NASA, Civil, Commercial, and Military missions will require space power systems of increased versatility and power levels. The Advanced Solar Dynamic (ASD) Power systems offer the potential for efficient, lightweight, survivable, relatively compact, long-lived space power systems applicable to a wide range of power levels (3 to 300 kWe), and a wide variety of orbits. The successful development of these systems could satisfy the power needs for a wide variety of these projected missions. Thus, the NASA Lewis Research Center has embarked upon an aggressive ASD reserach project under the direction of NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (DAST). The project is being implemented through a combination of in-house and contracted efforts. Key elements of this project are missions analysis to determine the power systems requirements, systems analysis to identify the most attractive ASD power systems to meet these requirements, and to guide the technology development efforts, and technology development of key components.

  5. iperf

    2014-01-10

    iperf is a tool for active measurements of the maximum achievable bandwidth on IP networks. It supports tuning of various parameters related to timing, protocols, and buffers. For each test it reports the bandwidth, loss, and other parameters. This version, sometimes referred to as iperf3, is a redesign of an original version developed at NLANR / DAST. iperf3 is a new implementation from scratch, with the goal of a smaller, simpler code base, and amore » library version of the functionality that can be used in other programs. iperf3 also incorporates a number of features found in other tools such as nuttcp and netperf, but were missing from the original iperf. These include, for example, a zero-copy mode and optional JSON output. Note that iperf3 is not backwards compatible with the original iperf.« less

  6. Design of control laws for flutter suppression based on the aerodynamic energy concept and comparisons with other design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, Eli

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamic energy method is used to synthesize control laws for NASA's drone for aerodynamic and structural testing-aerodynamic research wing 1 (DAST-ARW1) mathematical model. The performance of these control laws in terms of closed-loop flutter dynamic pressure, control surface activity, and robustness is compared with other control laws that relate to the same model. A control law synthesis technique that makes use of the return difference singular values is developed. It is based on the aerodynamic energy approach and is shown to yield results that are superior to those results given in the literature and are based on optimal control theory. Nyquist plots are presented, together with a short discussion regarding the relative merits of the minimum singular value as a measure of robustness as compared with the more traditional measure involving phase and gain margins.

  7. Final design and fabrication of an active control system for flutter suppression on a supercritical aeroelastic research wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, G. E.; Mcgehee, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    The final design and hardware fabrication was completed for an active control system capable of the required flutter suppression, compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA aeroelastic research wing number 1 (ARW-1) on Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The flutter suppression system uses vertical acceleration at win buttock line 1.930 (76), with fuselage vertical and roll accelerations subtracted out, to drive wing outboard aileron control surfaces through appropriate symmetric and antisymmetric shaping filters. The goal of providing an increase of 20 percent above the unaugmented vehicle flutter velocity but below the maximum operating condition at Mach 0.98 is exceeded by the final flutter suppression system. Results indicate that the flutter suppression system mechanical and electronic components are ready for installation on the DAST ARW-1 wing and BQM-34E/F drone fuselage.

  8. iperf

    SciTech Connect

    2014-01-10

    iperf is a tool for active measurements of the maximum achievable bandwidth on IP networks. It supports tuning of various parameters related to timing, protocols, and buffers. For each test it reports the bandwidth, loss, and other parameters. This version, sometimes referred to as iperf3, is a redesign of an original version developed at NLANR / DAST. iperf3 is a new implementation from scratch, with the goal of a smaller, simpler code base, and a library version of the functionality that can be used in other programs. iperf3 also incorporates a number of features found in other tools such as nuttcp and netperf, but were missing from the original iperf. These include, for example, a zero-copy mode and optional JSON output. Note that iperf3 is not backwards compatible with the original iperf.

  9. Synthesis and in vitro cytotoxicity of acetylated 3-fluoro, 4-fluoro and 3,4-difluoro analogs of D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine

    PubMed Central

    Horník, Štěpán; Červenková Šťastná, Lucie; Cuřínová, Petra; Sýkora, Jan; Káňová, Kateřina; Hrstka, Roman; Císařová, Ivana; Dračínský, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background: Derivatives of D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine represent an important family of the cell surface glycan components and their fluorinated analogs found use as metabolic inhibitors of complex glycan biosynthesis, or as probes for the study of protein–carbohydrate interactions. This work is focused on the synthesis of acetylated 3-deoxy-3-fluoro, 4-deoxy-4-fluoro and 3,4-dideoxy-3,4-difluoro analogs of D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine via 1,6-anhydrohexopyranose chemistry. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of the target compounds towards selected cancer cells is determined. Results: Introduction of fluorine at C-3 was achieved by the reaction of 1,6-anhydro-2-azido-2-deoxy-4-O-benzyl-β-D-glucopyranose or its 4-fluoro analog with DAST. The retention of configuration in this reaction is discussed. Fluorine at C-4 was installed by the reaction of 1,6:2,3-dianhydro-β-D-talopyranose with DAST, or by fluoridolysis of 1,6:3,4-dianhydro-2-azido-β-D-galactopyranose with KHF2. The amino group was introduced and masked as an azide in the synthesis. The 1-O-deacetylated 3-fluoro and 4-fluoro analogs of acetylated D-galactosamine inhibited proliferation of the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3 more than cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (IC50 28 ± 3 μM and 54 ± 5 μM, respectively). Conclusion: A complete series of acetylated 3-fluoro, 4-fluoro and 3,4-difluoro analogs of D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine is now accessible by 1,6-anhydrohexopyranose chemistry. Intermediate fluorinated 1,6-anhydro-2-azido-hexopyranoses have potential as synthons in oligosaccharide assembly. PMID:27340467

  10. Selectivity in the Addition Reactions of Organometallic Reagents to Aziridine-2-carboxaldehydes: The Effects of Protecting Groups and Substitution Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Aman; Schomaker, Jennifer M.; Holmes, Daniel; Staples, Richard J.; Jackson, James E.; Borhan, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Good to excellent stereo-selectivity has been found in the addition reactions of Grignard and organo-zinc reagents to N-protected aziridine-2-carboxaldehydes. Specifically, high syn selectivity was obtained with benzyl-protected cis, tert-butyloxycar-bonyl-protected trans, and tosyl-pro-tected 2,3-disubstituted aziridine-2-car-boxaldehydes. Furthermore, rate and selectivity effects of ring substituents, temperature, solvent, and Lewis acid and base modifiers were studied. The diastereomeric preference of addition is dominated by the substrate aziri-dines’ substitution pattern and especially the electronic character and conformational preferences of the nitrogen protecting groups. To help rationalize the observed stereochemical outcomes, conformational and electronic structural analyses of a series of model systems representing the various substitution patterns have been explored by density functional calculations at the B3LYP/6–31G* level of theory with the SM8 solvation model to account for solvent effects. PMID:21928447

  11. A Palladium-Catalyzed Method for the Synthesis of 2-(α-Styryl)-2,3-dihydroquinazolin-4-ones and 3-(α-Styryl)-3,4-dihydro-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-1,1-dioxide: Access to 2-(α-Styryl)quinazolin-4(3H)-ones and 3-(α-Styryl)-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-1,1-dioxides.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Priyanka; Mondal, Amrita; Chowdhury, Chinmay

    2016-08-01

    An efficient synthesis of 2-(α-styryl)-2,3-dihydroquinazolin-4-ones and 3-(α-styryl)-3,4-dihydro-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-1,1-dioxides has been achieved in 39-94% yield through palladium-catalyzed cyclocondensation of aryl/vinyl iodides with allenamides 13-15 and 22, respectively. Base treatment of the N-tosylated products provides an easy access to 2-(α-styryl)quinazolin-4(3H)-ones and 3-(α-styryl)-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-1,1-dioxides, hitherto unknown heterocycles. The method has been tested with phenyl substituted allenamides, applied for bis-heteroannulation, and used in the preparation of analogues of the natural product Luotonin F. PMID:27454621

  12. The convenient preparation of stable aryl-coated zerovalent iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Guselnikova, Olga A; Galanov, Andrey I; Gutakovskii, Anton K; Postnikov, Pavel S

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach for the in situ synthesis of zerovalent aryl-coated iron nanoparticles (NPs) based on diazonium salt chemistry is proposed. Surface-modified zerovalent iron NPs (ZVI NPs) were prepared by simple chemical reduction of iron(III) chloride aqueous solution followed by in situ modification using water soluble arenediazonium tosylate. The resulting NPs, with average iron core diameter of 21 nm, were coated with a 10 nm thick organic layer to provide long-term protection in air for the highly reactive zerovalent iron core up to 180 °C. The surface-modified iron NPs possess a high grafting density of the aryl group on the NPs surface of 1.23 mmol/g. FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, HRTEM, TGA/DTA, and elemental analysis were performed in order to characterize the resulting material. PMID:26171295

  13. Efficient Synthesis of 4-Amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose and Spacer-equipped 4-Amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinopyranosides by Transglycosylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Bernhard; Blaukopf, Markus; Hofinger, Andreas; Zamyatina, Alla; Brade, Helmut; Kosma, Paul

    2010-09-01

    Methyl 4-azido-4-deoxy-β-L-arabinopyranoside has been synthesized in five steps starting from methyl β-D-xylopyranoside in a multigram scale without chromatographic purification in 78% overall yield. The transformation relied on selective tosylation/nosylation at O-4 followed by acylation, S(N)2 displacement with sodium azide and subsequent deprotection. The methyl 4-azido-4-deoxy-arabinoside was then converted into allyl, propenyl, ω-bromohexyl and chlorethoxyethyl spacer glycosides by transglycosylation with the respective alcohols in good yields and fair anomeric selectivity. Reduction of the azido group and further transformations of the aglycon afforded ω-thiol-containing spacer derivatives. Coupling to maleimide-activated BSA provided a potent immunogen which was used to generate murine and rabbit polyclonal sera binding to LPS-core epitopes containing 4-amino-4-deoxy-arabinose residues. PMID:22187517

  14. Convenient Synthesis of 18F-Radiolabeled R-(−)-N-n-propyl-2-(3-fluoropropanoxy-11-hydroxynoraporphine

    PubMed Central

    Sromek, Anna W.; Zhang, Shaohui; Akurathi, Vamsidar; Packard, Alan B.; Li, Wei; Alagille, David; Morley, Thomas J.; Baldwin, Ronald; Tamagnan, Gilles; Neumeyer, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Aporphines are attractive candidates for imaging D2 receptor function because, as agonists rather than antagonists, they are selective for the receptor in the high affinity state. In contrast, D2 antagonists do not distinguish between the high and low affinity states, and in vitro data suggests that this distinction may be important in studying diseases characterized by D2 dysregulation, such as schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease. Accordingly, MCL-536 (R-(−)-N-n-propyl-2-(3-[18F]fluoropropanoxy-11-hydroxynoraporphine) was selected for labeling with 18F based on in vitro data obtained for the non-radioactive (19F) compound. Fluorine-18-labeled MCL-536 was synthesized in 70% radiochemical yield, >99% radiochemical purity and specific activity of 167 GBq/μmol (4.5 Ci/μmol) using p-toluenesulfonyl (tosyl) both as a novel protecting group for the phenol and a leaving group for the radiofluorination. PMID:25400260

  15. Convenient synthesis of 18F-radiolabeled R-(-)-N-n-propyl-2-(3-fluoropropanoxy-11-hydroxynoraporphine.

    PubMed

    Sromek, Anna W; Zhang, Shaohui; Akurathi, Vamsidhar; Packard, Alan B; Li, Wei; Alagille, David; Morley, Thomas J; Baldwin, Ronald; Tamagnan, Gilles; Neumeyer, John L

    2014-12-01

    Aporphines are attractive candidates for imaging D2 receptor function because, as agonists rather than antagonists, they are selective for the receptor in the high affinity state. In contrast, D2 antagonists do not distinguish between the high and low affinity states, and in vitro data suggests that this distinction may be important in studying diseases characterized by D2 dysregulation, such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. Accordingly, MCL-536 (R-(-)-N-n-propyl-2-(3-[(18)F]fluoropropanoxy-11-hydroxynoraporphine) was selected for labeling with (18)F based on in vitro data obtained for the non-radioactive ((19)F) compound. Fluorine-18-labeled MCL-536 was synthesized in 70% radiochemical yield, >99% radiochemical purity, and specific activity of 167 GBq/µmol (4.5 Ci/µmol) using p-toluenesulfonyl (tosyl) both as a novel protecting group for the phenol and a leaving group for the radiofluorination. PMID:25400260

  16. Interactions of Porphyromonas gingivalis with oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Smalley, John W; Birss, Andrew J; Withnall, Robert; Silver, Jack

    2002-02-15

    When grown on blood-containing solid media, the anaerobic periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis produces a haem pigment, the major component of which is the mu-oxo bishaem of iron protoporphyrin IX [Smalley, Silver, Marsh and Birss (1998) Biochem. J. 331, 681-685]. In this study, mu-oxo bishaem generation by P. gingivalis from oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin was examined. Bacterial cells were shown to convert oxyhaemoglobin into methaemoglobin, which was degraded progressively, generating a mixture of both monomeric and mu-oxo dimeric iron protoporphyrin IX. The rate of methaemoglobin formation was accelerated in the presence of bacterial cells, but was inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and tosyl-lysylchloromethylketone. Interaction of cells with deoxyhaemoglobin resulted in formation of an iron(III) haem species (Soret gamma(max), 393 nm), identified as pure mu-oxo bishaem. PMID:11829761

  17. Evaporation-driven self-assembly of colloidal silica dispersion: new insights on janus particles.

    PubMed

    Isenbügel, Kathrin; Gehrke, Yvonne; Ritter, Helmut

    2012-01-16

    The evaporation driven self-assembly of novel colloidal silica Janus particles was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy in comparison to unfunctionalized silica particles. The cyclodextrin- and azobenzene-modified compound was obtained utilizing Pickering emulsion approach, in which the particles were immobilized on solidified wax droplets and subsequently functionalized. Silica particles were modified with 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane and afterward reacted with tosyl-β-CD or phenylazo(benzoic acid), respectively. Mesoscopic structures of the colloidal dispersions, as dried films from aqueous solution, have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Interestingly, it has been observed that the Janus particles show a significantly different evaporation-induced assembly than the unmodified particles. PMID:22025482

  18. High-Dose Vitamin C Promotes Regression of Multiple Pulmonary Metastases Originating from Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Min-Seok; Kim, Ja-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of regression of multiple pulmonary metastases, which originated from hepatocellular carcinoma after treatment with intravenous administration of high-dose vitamin C. A 74-year-old woman presented to the clinic for her cancer-related symptoms such as general weakness and anorexia. After undergoing initial transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), local recurrence with multiple pulmonary metastases was found. She refused further conventional therapy, including sorafenib tosylate (Nexavar). She did receive high doses of vitamin C (70 g), which were administered into a peripheral vein twice a week for 10 months, and multiple pulmonary metastases were observed to have completely regressed. She then underwent subsequent TACE, resulting in remission of her primary hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26256994

  19. Targeted therapy for renal cell carcinoma: a new treatment paradigm

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Metastatic clear cell renal cell cancer has traditionally been treated with cytokines (interferon or interleukin-2). Improved understanding of biology has engendered novel targeted therapeutic agents that have altered the natural history of this disease. The vascular endothelial growth factor and its related receptor and the mTOR signal transduction pathway have particularly been exploited. Sunitinib malate, sorafenib tosylate, temsirolimus, and bevacizumab have improved clinical outcomes in randomized trials. Other multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (lapatinib, axitinib, pazopanib) and antiangiogenic agents (VEGF Trap, lenalidomide) have also demonstrated activity in early studies. Combinations of these agents are being evaluated. The future of the therapy of renal cancer appears promising owing to the efficacy of these novel agents. PMID:17637878

  20. Dynamic Covalent Organocatalysts Discovered from Catalytic Systems through Rapid Deconvolution Screening

    PubMed Central

    Schaufelberger, Fredrik; Ramström, Olof

    2015-01-01

    The first example of a bifunctional organocatalyst assembled through dynamic covalent chemistry (DCC) is described. The catalyst is based on reversible imine chemistry and can catalyze the Morita–Baylis–Hillman (MBH) reaction of enones with aldehydes or N-tosyl imines. Furthermore, these dynamic catalysts were shown to be optimizable through a systemic screening approach, in which large mixtures of catalyst structures were generated, and the optimal catalyst could be directly identified by using dynamic deconvolution. This strategy allowed one-pot synthesis and in situ evaluation of several potential catalysts without the need to separate, characterize, and purify each individual structure. The systems were furthermore shown to catalyze and re-equilibrate their own formation through a previously unknown thiourea-catalyzed transimination process. PMID:26174068

  1. Intermittency Route to Rheochaos in Wormlike Micelles with Flow-Concentration Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, Rajesh; Sood, A. K.

    2006-03-01

    We show experimentally that the route to chaos is via intermittency in a shear-thinning wormlike micellar system of cetyltrimethylammonium tosylate, where the strength of flow-concentration coupling is tuned by the addition of salt sodium chloride. A Poincaré first return map of the time series and the probability distribution of laminar lengths between burst events shows that our data is consistent with type-II intermittency. The coupling of flow to concentration fluctuations is evidenced by the “butterfly” intensity pattern in small angle light scattering (SALS) measurements performed simultaneously with the rheological measurements. The scattered depolarized intensity in SALS, sensitive to orientational order fluctuations, shows the same time dependence (like intermittency) as that of shear stress.

  2. Spatiotemporal nematodynamics in wormlike micelles en route to rheochaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, Rajesh; Majumdar, Sayantan; Sood, A. K.

    2008-08-01

    We show through polarized light scattering experiments the spatially inhomogeneous orientational dynamics for shear-thinning wormlike micellar gels (cetyltrimethylammonium tosylate+sodium chloride+H2O ) en route to rheochaos. For shear rates in the plateau of the flow curve, we see alternating bright and dark birefringent stripes stacked along the vorticity. The orientational order in adjacent bands is predominantly oriented at +45° and -45° to the flow (v) in the (v,∇v) plane, respectively. We have made an attempt to correlate the observed orientational ordering in terms of the two-dimensional Taylor-like velocity rolls in a gradient banding fluid. The bands show spatial motion along the vorticity, and the orientation dynamics of the interface delineating adjacent bands completely correlates with the temporal dynamics of the stress. Furthermore, the observed spatial dynamics of the interfaces of the rolls depends crucially on the gap width of the Couette cell.

  3. Spatiotemporal dynamics of shear induced bands en route to rheochaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, R.; Majumdar, S.; Sood, A. K.

    2008-08-01

    We show experimentally that the route to rheochaos in shear rate relaxation measurements is via Type-III intermittency and mixed mode oscillations in the shear-thinning wormlike micellar system of cetyltrimethylammonium tosylate in the presence of salt sodium chloride. Depolarised small angle light scattering measurements performed during flow show that scattered intensity temporally follows the shear rate/stress dynamics and portrays the crucial role played by nematic ordering. Direct visualization of the gap of the Couette cell, illuminated by an unpolarised laser sheet, in the (vorticity, velocity gradient) plane shows that the spatiotemporal dynamics of the shear induced structures is closely related to the temporal behaviour of shear rate/stress fluctuations.

  4. Superdiffusion of concentration in wormlike-micelle solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, R.; Sood, A. K.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2007-01-01

    Our dynamic light scattering studies of viscoelastic wormlike-micelle solutions of surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium tosylate (CTAT) show superdiffusive relaxation of concentration fluctuations: relaxation rate ~qz at wavenumber q, with z<2, at concentrations just past overlap. Linear rheology experiments show that the micellar recombination kinetics in this system is diffusion-controlled (micelles break and recombine with their original partners). Addition of 10 mM to 100 mM of sodium chloride (NaCl), takes the system from the diffusion-controlled (DC) regime to mean-field recombination kinetics regime where micellar ends combine with ends belonging to other micelles. In the mean-field regime, the concentration fluctuations decay in a purely diffusive manner. We suggest a qualitative explanation for the observed superdiffusive behaviour in the DC regime.

  5. Guided desaturation of unactivated aliphatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voica, Ana-Florina; Mendoza, Abraham; Gutekunst, Will R.; Fraga, Jorge Otero; Baran, Phil S.

    2012-08-01

    The excision of hydrogen from an aliphatic carbon chain to produce an isolated olefin (desaturation) without overoxidation is one of the most impressive and powerful biosynthetic transformations for which there are no simple and mild laboratory substitutes. The versatility of olefins and the range of reactions they undergo are unsurpassed in functional group space. Thus, the conversion of a relatively inert aliphatic system into its unsaturated counterpart could open new possibilities in retrosynthesis. In this article, the invention of a directing group to achieve such a transformation under mild, operationally simple, metal-free conditions is outlined. This ‘portable desaturase’ (TzoCl) is a bench-stable, commercial entity (Aldrich, catalogue number L510092) that is facile to install on alcohol and amine functionalities to ultimately effect remote desaturation, while leaving behind a synthetically useful tosyl group.

  6. Transetherification on Polyols by Intra- and Intermolecular Nucleophilic Substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Muraoka, Takahiro; Adachi, Kota; Chowdhury, Rainy; Kinbara, Kazushi

    2014-01-01

    Transetherification on polyols involving intra- and intermolecular nucleophilic substitutions is reported. Di- or trialkoxide formation of propane-1,3-diol or 2-(hydroxymethyl)propane-1,3-diol derivatives by NaH triggers the reaction via oxetanes formation, where the order to add NaH and a polyol significantly influences the yields of products. It was demonstrated that the protective group on the pentaerythritol skeleton is apparently transferred to the hydrophilic and hydrophobic chain molecules bearing a leaving group in one-step, and a protective group conversion from tosyl to benzyl was successful using a benzyl-appending triol to afford a desired product in 67% yield. PMID:24663293

  7. Oxydifluoromethylation of Alkenes by Photoredox Catalysis: Simple Synthesis of CF2H-Containing Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yusuke; Tomita, Ren; Ando, Gaku; Koike, Takashi; Akita, Munetaka

    2016-01-22

    We have developed a novel and simple protocol for the direct incorporation of a difluoromethyl (CF2 H) group into alkenes by visible-light-driven photoredox catalysis. The use of fac-[Ir(ppy)3] (ppy=2-pyridylphenyl) photocatalyst and shelf-stable Hu's reagent, N-tosyl-S-difluoromethyl-S-phenylsulfoximine, as a CF2 H source is the key to success. The well-designed photoredox system achieves synthesis of not only β-CF2 H-substituted alcohols but also ethers and an ester from alkenes through solvolytic processes. The present method allows a single-step and regioselective formation of C(sp(3))-CF2 H and C(sp(3))-O bonds from C=C moiety in alkenes, such as hydroxydifluoromethylation, regardless of terminal or internal alkenes. Moreover, this methodology tolerates a variety of functional groups. PMID:26639021

  8. Interactions of Porphyromonas gingivalis with oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Smalley, John W; Birss, Andrew J; Withnall, Robert; Silver, Jack

    2002-01-01

    When grown on blood-containing solid media, the anaerobic periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis produces a haem pigment, the major component of which is the mu-oxo bishaem of iron protoporphyrin IX [Smalley, Silver, Marsh and Birss (1998) Biochem. J. 331, 681-685]. In this study, mu-oxo bishaem generation by P. gingivalis from oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin was examined. Bacterial cells were shown to convert oxyhaemoglobin into methaemoglobin, which was degraded progressively, generating a mixture of both monomeric and mu-oxo dimeric iron protoporphyrin IX. The rate of methaemoglobin formation was accelerated in the presence of bacterial cells, but was inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and tosyl-lysylchloromethylketone. Interaction of cells with deoxyhaemoglobin resulted in formation of an iron(III) haem species (Soret gamma(max), 393 nm), identified as pure mu-oxo bishaem. PMID:11829761

  9. A Selective C-H Deprotonation Strategy to Access Functionalized Arynes by Using Hypervalent Iodine.

    PubMed

    Sundalam, Sunil K; Nilova, Aleksandra; Seidl, Thomas L; Stuart, David R

    2016-07-11

    Described here is an efficient method to access highly functionalized arynes from unsymmetrical aryl(mesityl)iodonium tosylate salts. The iodonium salts are prepared in a single pot from either commercially available aryl iodides or arylboronic acids. The aryne intermediates are generated by ortho-C-H deprotonation of aryl(mesityl)iodonium salt with a commercially available amide base and trapped in a cycloaddition reaction with furan in moderate to good yields. Coupling partners for the aryne intermediates beyond furan are also described, including benzyl azide and alicyclic amine nucleophiles. The regio- and chemoselectivity of this reaction is discussed and evidence for the spectator aryl ligand of the iodonium salt as a critical control element in selectivity is presented. PMID:27239971

  10. [18F]azadibenzocyclooctyne ([18F]ADIBO): a biocompatible radioactive labeling synthon for peptides using catalyst free [3+2] cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Selvanathan; Chin, Joshua; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Popik, Vladimir V; Kostikov, Alexey P

    2011-12-01

    N-Terminally azido-modified peptides were labeled with the novel prosthetic labeling synthon [(18)F]azadibenzocyclooctyne ([(18)F]ADIBO) using copper-free azide-alkyne [3+2]-dipolar cycloaddition in high radiochemical yields (RCYs). (18)F-Labeled [(18)F]ADIBO was prepared by nucleophilic substitution of the corresponding tosylate in 21% overall RCY (EOB) in a fully automated synthesis unit within 55 min. [(18)F]ADIBO was incubated with azide-containing peptides at room temperature in the absence of toxic metal catalysts and the formation of the triazole conjugate was confirmed. Finally, the azide-alkyne [3+2]-dipolar cycloaddition was shown to proceed with 95% radiochemical yield in ethanol within 30 min, allowing for a development of a kit-like peptide labeling approach with [(18)F]ADIBO. PMID:22024032

  11. Isolation and characteristics of trypsin from pyloric ceca of the starfish Asterina pectinifera.

    PubMed

    Kishimura, Hideki; Hayashi, Kenji

    2002-06-01

    Trypsin was purified from pyloric ceca of the starfish Asterina Pectinifera by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and cation-exchange chromatography. Final enzyme preparation was nearly homogeneous in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and its molecular weight was estimated as approximately 28000. Optimum pH and temperature of A. pectinifera trypsin for hydrolysis of N(alpha)-p-Tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride were approximately pH 8.0 and 55 degrees C, respectively. A. pectinifera trypsin was unstable at above 50 degrees C and below pH 5.0, and was not activated by adding Ca(2+). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of A. pectinifera trypsin, IVGGHEF, was found. PMID:12031475

  12. Modification of hydroxypropyl guar gum with ethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongchao; He, Jianping; Han, Xiaoxiao; Tian, Xiulin; Deng, Mingyu; Chen, Weiping; Jiang, Bo

    2012-10-01

    A new guar gum derivative containing amino group was synthesized through nucleophilic substitution of p-toluenesulfonate activated hydroxypropyl guar gum with ethanolamine. For the preparation of p-toluenesulfonate esters hydroxypropyl guar gum, the results showed that the reaction rate was optimal at 25 °C and the reaction could reach equilibrium state when it was carried out for 10h at 25 °C. For the nucleophilic substitution of tosyl group with ethanolamine, the reaction was completed after 10h reaction at 50 °C. The structures of products were characterized by NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. The results showed that the p-toluenesulfonate esters can be effectively substituted by ethanolamine to form the hydroxyethyl amino hydroxypropyl guar gum (EAHPG). The content of nitrogen of EAHPG was determined by acid-base titration and element analysis. PMID:22840030

  13. Pd-catalyzed cascade reactions between o-iodo-N-alkenylanilines and tosylhydrazones: novel approaches to the synthesis of polysubstituted indoles and 1,4-dihydroquinolines.

    PubMed

    Paraja, Miguel; Valdés, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Two different Pd-catalyzed cascade reactions between o-iodo-N-alkenylanilines and tosylhydrazones are described. The outcome of the cascade processes is determined by the substitution on the N-alkenyl fragment. The reactions with N-tosyl-N-ethylene-o-iodoanilines lead to indoles through a sequence that involves the sequential migratory insertions of a carbene ligand and a C-C double bond, featuring a 5-exo-trig cyclization. The reactions with N-alkyl-N-alkenyl-o-iodoanilines provide 1,4-dihydroquinolines through a cascade reaction that includes a formal 6-endo-trig cyclization. In both cases the benzofused heterocycles are built through the formation of two C-C bonds on the hydrazonic carbon atom. PMID:27087628

  14. Enantioselective Enzyme-Catalyzed Aziridination Enabled by Active-Site Evolution of a Cytochrome P450

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in protein design is creating new enzymes, something evolution does all the time, starting from existing ones. Borrowing from nature’s evolutionary strategy, we have engineered a bacterial cytochrome P450 to catalyze highly enantioselective intermolecular aziridination, a synthetically useful reaction that has no natural biological counterpart. The new enzyme is fully genetically encoded, functions in vitro or in whole cells, and can be optimized rapidly to exhibit high enantioselectivity (up to 99% ee) and productivity (up to 1,000 catalytic turnovers) for intermolecular aziridination, demonstrated here with tosyl azide and substituted styrenes. This new aziridination activity highlights the remarkable ability of a natural enzyme to adapt and take on new functions. Once discovered in an evolvable enzyme, this non-natural activity was improved and its selectivity tuned through an evolutionary process of accumulating beneficial mutations. PMID:26405689

  15. Synthesis of Pyrroloquinones via a CAN Mediated Oxidative Free Radical Reaction of 1,3-Dicarbonyl Compounds with Aminoquinones

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thao; Nadkarni, Dwayaja; Dutta, Shilpa; Xu, Su; Kim, Sanghun; Murugesan, Srinivasan; Velu, Sadanandan

    2015-01-01

    Pyrroloquinone ring systems are important structural units present in many biologically active molecules including a number of marine alkaloids. For example, they are found in a series of marine metabolites, such as tsitsikammamines, zyzzyanones, wakayin, and terreusinone. Several of these alkaloids have exhibited antimicrobial, antimalarial, antifungal, antitumor, and photoprotecting activities. Synthesis of pyrroloquinone unit is the key step in the synthesis of many of these important organic molecules. Here, we present a ceric (IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN) mediated oxidative free radical cyclization reaction of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds with aminoquinones as a facile methodology for making various substituted pyrroloquinones. 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds used in this study are ethyl acetoacetate, acetylacetone, benzoyl acetone, and N,N-dimethyl acetoacetamide. The aminoquinones used in this study are 2-(benzylamino)naphthalene-1,4-dione and 6-(benzylamino)-1-tosyl-1H-indole-4,7-dione. The yields of the synthesized pyrroloquinones ranged from 23–91%. PMID:25705550

  16. Thermophysical properties of phosphonium-based ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Arijit; Lopes-da-Silva, José A.; Freire, Mara G.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Carvalho, Pedro J.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental data for density, viscosity, refractive index and surface tension of four phosphonium-based ionic liquids were measured in the temperature range between (288.15 and 353.15) K and at atmospheric pressure. The ionic liquids considered include tri(isobutyl) methylphosphonium tosylate, [Pi(444)1][Tos], tri(butyl)methylphosphonium methylsulfate, [P4441][CH3SO4], tri(butyl)ethylphosphonium diethylphosphate, [P4442][(C2H5O)2PO2], and tetraoctylphosphonium bromide, [P8888][Br]. Additionally, derivative properties, such as the isobaric thermal expansion coefficient, the surface thermodynamic properties and the critical temperatures for the investigated ionic liquids were also estimated and are presented and discussed. Group contribution methods were evaluated and fitted to the density, viscosity and refractive index experimental data. PMID:26435574

  17. Dual Palladium(II)/Tertiary Amine Catalysis for Asymmetric Regioselective Rearrangements of Allylic Carbamates.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Johannes Moritz; Frey, Wolfgang; Peters, René

    2016-04-11

    The streamlined catalytic access to enantiopure allylic amines as valuable precursors towards chiral β- and γ-aminoalcohols as well as α- and β-aminoacids is desirable for industrial purposes. In this article an enantioselective method is described that transforms achiral allylic alcohols and N-tosylisocyanate in a single step into highly enantioenriched N-tosyl protected allylic amines via an allylic carbamate intermediate. The latter is likely to undergo a cyclisation-induced [3,3]-rearrangement catalysed by a planar chiral pentaphenylferrocene palladacycle in cooperation with a tertiary amine base. The otherwise often indispensable activation of palladacycle catalysts by a silver salt is not required in the present case and there is also no need for an inert gas atmosphere. To further improve the synthetic value, the rearrangement was used to form dimethylaminosulfonyl-protected allylic amines, which can be deprotected under non-reductive conditions. PMID:26990446

  18. Enantioselective Construction of Pyrrolidines by Palladium-Catalyzed Asymmetric [3+2] Cycloaddition of Trimethylenemethane with Imines

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Barry M.; Silverman, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    A protocol for the enantioselective [3+2] cycloaddition of trimethylenemethane (TMM) with imines has been developed. Central to this effort were the novel phosphoramidite ligands developed in our laboratories. The conditions developed to effect an asymmetric TMM reaction using 2-trimethylsilylmethyl allyl acetate were shown to be tolerant of a wide variety of imine acceptors to provide the corresponding pyrrolidine cycloadducts with excellent yields and selectivities. Use of a bis-2-naphthyl phosphoramidite allowed the successful cycloaddition of the parent TMM with N-Boc imines, and has further permitted the reaction of substituted donors with N-tosyl aldimines and ketimines in high regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselectivity. Use of a diphenylazetidine ligand allows the complimentary synthesis of the exocyclic nitrile product shown, and we demonstrate control of the regioselectivity of the product based on manipulation of the reaction parameters. PMID:22309214

  19. The convenient preparation of stable aryl-coated zerovalent iron nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Guselnikova, Olga A; Galanov, Andrey I; Gutakovskii, Anton K

    2015-01-01

    Summary A novel approach for the in situ synthesis of zerovalent aryl-coated iron nanoparticles (NPs) based on diazonium salt chemistry is proposed. Surface-modified zerovalent iron NPs (ZVI NPs) were prepared by simple chemical reduction of iron(III) chloride aqueous solution followed by in situ modification using water soluble arenediazonium tosylate. The resulting NPs, with average iron core diameter of 21 nm, were coated with a 10 nm thick organic layer to provide long-term protection in air for the highly reactive zerovalent iron core up to 180 °C. The surface-modified iron NPs possess a high grafting density of the aryl group on the NPs surface of 1.23 mmol/g. FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, HRTEM, TGA/DTA, and elemental analysis were performed in order to characterize the resulting material. PMID:26171295

  20. PMN-kinin and kinin metabolizing enzymes in normal and malignant leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, L M; Freer, R; Chang, J; Semente, G; Yamafuji, K

    1969-07-01

    1. Studies have been carried out on the kinin-forming and kinin destroying activity of rabbit macrophages obtained from the lung before and after BCG injection and from the peritoneal cavity following mineral oil injection. A similar study was carried out with L-1210 leukaemic cells obtained from the peritoneal cavity of mice.2. The macrophages and leukaemic cells contain enzymes that form kinins from purified kininogen substrates at acid pH. The kinin-forming activity is not limited to the lysosomal fraction of the cell since it is found in extralysosomal compartments. Delta-guanidovaleryl benzyl ester partially inhibits the kinin-forming activity. Trasylol does not inhibit the kinin-forming activity of these cells, but does inhibit the kininases of these cells. The lack of effectiveness of this agent as a general anti-inflammatory agent is thus explained.3. The kininases of the normal and malignant cells are also inhibited by chloromethyl ketones such as tosyl-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) and tosyl-phenylalanine-chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) as well as by copper salts. Hydroxyquinoline has no inhibitory action on these cells, indicating that they differ from the plasma kininases.4. Investigation of the kinins produced by enzymes in rabbit and human polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells has demonstrated the formation of a kinin that differs from bradykinin and other known mammalian kinins in its pharmacological properties, molecular weight, and amino-terminal end group. This peptide has been named PMN-kinin.5. Overall, the investigation has demonstrated the importance of white cells in contributing to the formation and destruction of "extra-plasma" sources of kinins by enzymes which differ from plasma enzymes. Anti-inflammatory agents may have different actions on these cell enzymes from those on plasma enzymes. PMID:5305988

  1. Digestive proteinase activity of the Khapra beetle, Trogoderma granarium Everts (Coleoptera: Dermestidae).

    PubMed

    Naveh, V Hosseini; Bandani, A R; Azmayeshfard, P; Hosseinkhani, S

    2005-01-01

    The khapra beetle, Trogoderma granarium, is one of the most important stored product pests worldwide. A study of digestive proteinases in T. granarium was performed to identify potential targets for proteinaceous biopesticides, such as proteinase inhibitors. The pH of guts was determined by addition of pH indicator solutions to broken open gut regions. The last instar larvae were dissected in cold distilled water and the whole guts were cleaned from adhering unwanted tissues. The pooled gut homogenates were centrifuged and the supernatants were used in the subsequent enzyme assay. Total proteinases activity of the gut homogenates was determined using the protein substrate azocasein. Optimal azocasein hydrolysis by luminal proteinases of the larvae of T. granarium was highly alkaline in pH 10-10.5, although the pH of luminal contents was slightly acidic (pH 6.5). The extract showed the highest activity at 55 degrees C (pH 6.5), 45 degrees C (pH 8) and 30 degrees C (pH 10). The proteolytic activity was strongly inhibited in the presence of phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride (82.33+/-4.37% inhibition). This inhibition was decreased with increasing of the pH of assay incubating medium. N-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (51.6+/-3.3% inhibition) and N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (27.23+/-4.37 % inhibition) showed inhibitory effect on proteolysis. Addition of thiol activators dithiothreitol and L-cysteine had not enhanced azocaseinolytic activity. The data suggest that protein digestion in the larvae of T. granarium is primarily dependent on serine proteinases; trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like proteinases. PMID:16628932

  2. Tosylphenylalanine chloromethyl ketone inhibits TNF-alpha mRNA synthesis in the presence of activated NF-kappa B in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, J Y; Kim, K U; Jue, D M

    1997-01-01

    Serine proteinase inhibitors such as N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) and N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) were shown to inhibit production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. The proteinase inhibitors were also reported to inhibit activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) by blocking the signalling pathway for stimuli-induced phosphorylation of the inhibitory subunit (I kappa B alpha) and thus preventing its degradation. In RAW 264.7 cells TPCK and TLCK significantly suppressed LPS-induced increase in TNF-alpha mRNA, induction of nuclear kappa B-binding activity and degradation of I kappa B alpha. TPCK and TLCK effectively blocked TNF-alpha mRNA synthesis even when they were added after LPS stimulation. In these cells, however, the inhibitory modes of the two inhibitors were found to be different: while addition of TLCK suppressed I kappa B alpha degradation and reduced NF-kappa B activity, a comparable decrease in the nuclear kappa B-binding activity or in I kappa B alpha degradation was not observed in cells treated with TPCK. Our results show that TPCK inhibits LPS-induced TNF-alpha mRNA synthesis in the presence of activated NF-kappa B and suggests that mechanisms other than NF-kappa B activation are involved in the transcriptional regulation of the TNF-alpha gene. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9415036

  3. A novel hatching enzyme from starfish Asterias amurensis: purification, characterization, and cleavage specificity.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi Jiang; Kim, Sang Moo

    2013-02-01

    Hatching enzyme (HE) is of importance to degrade egg membrane to let the larvae be free. HE was purified and characterized from starfish blastula. The specific activity and the purification ratio of the purified HE with 110.9 kDa of molecular weight were 449.62 U/mg and 7.42-fold, respectively. Its optimal pH and temperature for activity were pH 8.0 and 30 °C, respectively. This enzyme was relatively stable in the range of pH 4.0-6.0 and 30-40 °C. This enzyme was inhibited by ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid, and also done moderately by Leupeptin, tosyl-lysine chloromethyl ketone, tosyl-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone, and phenyl-methanesulfonyl fluoride. Zn(2+) ion activated HE activity strongly and recovered the EDTA-pretreated activity more than did Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Cu(2+). Based on the results above, the starfish HE was classified as a zinc metallo- and trypsin-like serine protease. The values of Km, Vmax, and Kcat of the starfish HE on dimethyl casein were 0.31 mg/ml, 0.17 U/ml, and 122.70 s(-1), respectively, whereas 1.09 mg/ml, 0.12 U/ml, and 771.98 s(-1) on type I collagen. Therefore, the starfish HE could be a potential cosmeceutical because of its strong cleavage specificity on type I collagen. PMID:23306897

  4. Synthesis of 4-(aminoalkyl) substituted 1,3-dioxanes as potent NMDA and σ receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Utech, Tina; Köhler, Jens; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2011-06-01

    Elongation of the distance between the oxygen heterocycle and the basic amino moiety or ring expansion of the oxygen heterocycle of the NMDA receptor antagonists dexoxadrol and etoxadrol led to compounds with promising NMDA receptor affinity. Herein the combination of both structural features, i.e. elongation of the O-heterocycle--amine distance with a 1,3-dioxane ring is envisaged. The synthesis of aminoethyl-1,3-dioxanes 13, 22, 23 and 29 was performed by transacetalization of various acetals with pentane-1,3,5-triol, activation of the remaining free OH moiety with tosyl chloride and subsequent nucleophilic substitution. The corresponding 3-aminopropyl derivatives 33-35 were prepared by substitution of the tosylates with KCN and LiAlH4 reduction. The highest NMDA receptor affinity was found for 1,3-dioxanes with a phenyl and an ethyl residue at the acetalic position (23) followed by diphenyl (22) and monophenyl derivatives (13). Generally the NMDA affinity of primary amines is higher than the NMDA affinity of secondary and tertiary amines. Altogether the primary amine 23a (Ki=24 nM) represents the most promising NMDA receptor antagonist of this series exceeding the NMDA affinity of the mono-homologues (2-aminoethyl)-1,3-dioxolanes (3,4) and (aminomethyl)-1,3-dioxanes (5,6). Whereas the primary amine 23a turned out to be selective against σ1 and σ2 receptors the benzylamine 13d was identified as potent (Ki=19 nM) and selective σ1 antagonist, which showed extraordinarily high antiallodynic activity in the capsaicin assay. PMID:21444132

  5. Separation and characterization of modified pregabalins in terms of cyclodextrin complexation, using capillary electrophoresis and nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Béni, Szabolcs; Sohajda, Tamás; Neumajer, Gábor; Iványi, Róbert; Szente, Lajos; Noszál, Béla

    2010-03-11

    The (S)-(+)-isomer of 3-isobutyl-GABA (pregabalin), the blockbuster drug in the treatment of neuropathic pain has been separated from its R isomer by cyclodextrin modified capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) using uncoated fused-silica capillary. Derivatization of the single isomer and the racemate with tosyl- and dansyl-chloride was carried out to introduce strong UV chromophores of different size. CE-pH titrations were performed to determine the dissociation constants for both derivatives. 30 cyclodextrin (CD) derivatives as chiral agents were used at four different pH values to study the enantioseparation of the differently protonated guest molecules. The separation was optimized as a function of CD concentration, buffer type and concentration, pH and applied voltage. For the tosylated derivate the best resolution (R(s)=2.76) was found with 6-monodeoxy-6-mono-(3-hydroxy)-propylamino-beta-cyclodextrin hydrochloride (PA-beta-CD) at pH 6.8, while with the same selector at pH 7.2 enantioseparation with an R(s) value of 4.32 could be achieved for the dansylated pregabalin. At pH 2.5 for the dansylated derivative trimethylated alpha- and beta-CD systems resulted the most significant separation (R(s)=7.38 and R(s)=7.74, respectively). Experiments with dual CD systems were carried out as well. The stoichiometry of the complexes was determined using the Job plot method and resulted in a 1:1 complex in both cases. The structures of the inclusion complexes were elucidated using 2D ROESY NMR experiments. PMID:19914021

  6. Isolation and characterization of trypsin from pyloric caeca of Monterey sardine Sardinops sagax caerulea.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Yáñez, Francisco Javier; Pacheco-Aguilar, Ramón; García-Carreño, Fernando Luis; Navarrete-Del Toro, María de Los Angeles

    2005-01-01

    Trypsin from pyloric caeca of Monterey sardine was purified by fractionation with ammonium sulfate, gel filtration, affinity and ionic exchange chromatography. Fraction 102, obtained from ionic exchange chromatography, generated one band in sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and isoelectric focusing. The molecular mass of the isolated trypsin was 25 kDa and showed esterase-specific activity on Nalpha-p-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME) that was 4.5 times greater than amidase-specific activity on N-benzoyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide. The purified enzyme was partially inhibited by the serine-protease phenyl-methyl-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) inhibitor and fully inhibited by the soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) and benzamidine, but was not inhibited by the metallo-protease inactivator EDTA or the chymotrypsin inhibitor tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl-ketone. The optimum pH for activity was 8.0 and maximum stability was observed between pH 7 and 8. A marked loss in stability was observed below pH 4 and above pH 11. Activity was optimum at 50 degrees C and lost activity at higher temperatures. The kinetic trypsin constants K(m) and k(cat) were 0.051 mM and 2.12 s(-1), respectively, while the catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) was 41 s(-1) mM(-1). General characteristics of the Monterey sardine trypsin resemble those of trypsins from other fish, especially trypsins from the anchovy Engraulis japonica and Engraulis encrasicholus and the sardine Sardinops melanostica. PMID:15621514

  7. Caldolase, a chelator-insensitive extracellular serine proteinase from a Thermus spp.

    PubMed

    Saravani, G A; Cowan, D A; Daniel, R M; Morgan, H W

    1989-09-01

    An extracellular alkaline serine proteinase from Thermus strain ToK3 was isolated and purified to homogeneity by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation followed by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and QAE-Sephadex, affinity chromatography on N alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-D-phenylalanyl-triethylenetetraminyl-Sepha rose 4B and gel-filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-75. The purified enzyme had a pI of 8.9 and an Mr determined by gel-permeation chromatography of 25,000. The specific activity was about 37,700 proteolytic units/mg with casein as substrate, and the pH optimum was 9.5. Proteolytic activity was inhibited by low concentrations of di-isopropyl phosphorofluoridate and phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride, but was unaffected by EDTA, EGTA, o-phenanthroline, N-ethyl-5-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulphonate, N alpha-p-tosyl-L-phenylalanylchloromethane, N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysylchloromethane, trypsin inhibitors and pepstatin A. The enzyme contained approx. 10% carbohydrate and four disulphide bonds. No Ca2+, Zn2+ or free thiol groups were detected. It hydrolysed several native and dye-linked proteins and synthetic chromogenic peptides and esters. The enzyme was very thermostable (half-life values were 840 min at 80 degrees C, 45 min at 90 degrees C and 5 min at 100 degrees C). The enzyme was unstable at low ionic strength: after 60 min at 75 degrees C in 0.1 M-Tris/acetate buffer, pH 8, only 20% activity remained, compared with no loss in 0.1 M-Tris/acetate buffer, pH 8, containing 0.4 M-NaCl. PMID:2803259

  8. Asymmetric Synthesis of Spirocyclic 2-Benzopyrans for Positron Emission Tomography of σ1 Receptors in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Holl, Katharina; Schepmann, Dirk; Fischer, Steffen; Ludwig, Friedrich-Alexander; Hiller, Achim; Donat, Cornelius K.; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Brust, Peter; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Sharpless asymmetric dihydroxylation of styrene derivative 6 afforded chiral triols (R)-7 and (S)-7, which were cyclized with tosyl chloride in the presence of Bu2SnO to provide 2-benzopyrans (R)-4 and (S)-4 with high regioselectivity. The additional hydroxy moiety in the 4-position was exploited for the introduction of various substituents. Williamson ether synthesis and replacement of the Boc protective group with a benzyl moiety led to potent σ1 ligands with high σ1/σ2-selectivity. With exception of the ethoxy derivative 16, the (R)-configured enantiomers represent eutomers with eudismic ratios of up to 29 for the ester (R)-18. The methyl ether (R)-15 represents the most potent σ1 ligand of this series of compounds, with a Ki value of 1.2 nM and an eudismic ratio of 7. Tosylate (R)-21 was used as precursor for the radiosynthesis of [18F]-(R)-20, which was available by nucleophilic substitution with K[18F]F K222 carbonate complex. The radiochemical yield of [18F]-(R)-20 was 18%–20%, the radiochemical purity greater than 97% and the specific radioactivity 175–300 GBq/µmol. Although radiometabolites were detected in plasma, urine and liver samples, radiometabolites were not found in brain samples. After 30 min, the uptake of the radiotracer in the brain was 3.4% of injected dose per gram of tissue and could be reduced by coadministration of the σ1 antagonist haloperidol. [18F]-(R)-20 was able to label those regions of the brain, which were reported to have high density of σ1 receptors. PMID:24451404

  9. Radionuclide-binding compound, a radionuclide delivery system, a method of making a radium complexing compound, a method of extracting a radionuclide, and a method of delivering a radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Darrell R.; Wai, Chien M.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2000-01-01

    The invention pertains to compounds which specifically bind radionuclides, and to methods of making radionuclide complexing compounds. In one aspect, the invention includes a radionuclide delivery system comprising: a) a calix[n]arene-crown-[m]-ether compound, wherein n is an integer greater than 3, and wherein m is an integer greater than 3, the calix[n]arene-crown-[m]-ether compound comprising at least two ionizable groups; and b) an antibody attached to the calix[n]arene-crown-[m]-ether compound. In another aspect, the invention includes a method of making a radium complexing compound, comprising: a) providing a calix[n]arene compound, wherein n is an integer greater than 3, the calix[n]arene compound comprising n phenolic hydroxyl groups; b) providing a crown ether precursor, the crown ether precursor comprising a pair of tosylated ends; c) reacting the pair of tosylated ends with a pair of the phenolic hydroxyl groups to convert said pair of phenolic hydroxyl groups to ether linkages, the ether linkages connecting the crown ether precursor to the calix[n]arene to form a calix[n]arene-crown-[m]-ether compound, wherein m is an integer greater than 3; d) converting remaining phenolic hydroxyl groups to esters; e) converting the esters to acids, the acids being proximate a crown-[m]-ether portion of the calix[n]arene-crown-[m]-ether compound; and f) providing a Ra.sup.2+ ion within the crown-[m]-ether portion of the calix[n]arene-crown-[m]-ether compound.

  10. Advances in the synthesis of functionalised pyrrolotetrathiafulvalenes

    PubMed Central

    O’Driscoll, Luke J; Andersen, Sissel S; Solano, Marta V; Bendixen, Dan; Jensen, Morten; Duedal, Troels; Lycoops, Jess; van der Pol, Cornelia; Sørensen, Rebecca E; Larsen, Karina R; Myntman, Kenneth; Henriksen, Christian; Hansen, Stinne W

    2015-01-01

    Summary The electron-donor and unique redox properties of the tetrathiafulvalene (TTF, 1) moiety have led to diverse applications in many areas of chemistry. Monopyrrolotetrathiafulvalenes (MPTTFs, 4) and bispyrrolotetrathiafulvalenes (BPTTFs, 5) are useful structural motifs and have found widespread use in fields such as supramolecular chemistry and molecular electronics. Protocols enabling the synthesis of functionalised MPTTFs and BPTTFs are therefore of broad interest. Herein, we present the synthesis of a range of functionalised MPTTF and BPTTF species. Firstly, the large-scale preparation of the precursor species N-tosyl-(1,3)-dithiolo[4,5-c]pyrrole-2-one (6) is described, as well as the synthesis of the analogue N-tosyl-4,6-dimethyl-(1,3)-dithiolo[4,5-c]pyrrole-2-one (7). Thereafter, we show how 6 and 7 can be used to prepare BPTTFs using homocoupling reactions and functionalised MPTTFs using cross-coupling reactions with a variety of 1,3-dithiole-2-thiones (19). Subsequently, the incorporation of more complex functionality is discussed. We show how the 2-cyanoethyl protecting group can be used to afford MPTTFs functionalised with thioethers, exemplified by a series of ethylene glycol derivatives. Additionally, the merits of 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU) as an alternative to the most common deprotecting agent, CsOH·H2O are discussed. Finally, we show how a copper-mediated Ullman-type reaction can be applied to the N-arylation of MPTTFs and BPTTFs using a variety of aryl halides. PMID:26199667

  11. Spectroscopic evidence of xanthine compounds fluorescence quenching effect on water-soluble porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2015-02-01

    The formation of π-stacked complexes between water-soluble porphyrins: 4,4‧,4″,4″‧-(21H,23H-porphine-5,10,15,20-tetrayl)tetrakis-(benzoic acid) (H2TCPP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)-21H,23H-porphine (H2TPPS4), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TTMePP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TMePyP), the Cu(II) complexes of H2TTMePP and H2TMePyP, as well as chlorophyll a with xanthine, theophylline (1,3-dimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine) has been studied analysing their absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra in aqueous (or acetone in case of chlorophyll a) solution. During titration by the compounds from xanthine group the bathochromic effect in the porphyrin absorption spectra as well as the hypochromicity of the porphyrin Soret maximum can be noticed. The fluorescence quenching effect observed during interactions in the systems examined suggests the process of static quenching. The association and fluorescence quenching constants are of the order of magnitude of 103 - 102 mol-1. The results obtained show that xanthine and its derivatives can quench the fluorescence of the porphyrins according to the number of methyl groups in the molecule of quencher.

  12. Hepatitis Virus Infections in Poultry.

    PubMed

    Yugo, Danielle M; Hauck, Ruediger; Shivaprasad, H L; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Viral hepatitis in poultry is a complex disease syndrome caused by several viruses belonging to different families including avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV-1, -2, -3), duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3, fowl adenoviruses (FAdV), and turkey hepatitis virus (THV). While these hepatitis viruses share the same target organ, the liver, they each possess unique clinical and biological features. In this article, we aim to review the common and unique features of major poultry hepatitis viruses in an effort to identify the knowledge gaps and aid the prevention and control of poultry viral hepatitis. Avian HEV is an Orthohepevirus B in the family Hepeviridae that naturally infects chickens and consists of three distinct genotypes worldwide. Avian HEV is associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome or big liver and spleen disease in chickens, although the majority of the infected birds are subclinical. Avihepadnaviruses in the family of Hepadnaviridae have been isolated from ducks, snow geese, white storks, grey herons, cranes, and parrots. DHBV evolved with the host as a noncytopathic form without clinical signs and rarely progressed to chronicity. The outcome for DHBV infection varies by the host's ability to elicit an immune response and is dose and age dependent in ducks, thus mimicking the pathogenesis of human hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and providing an excellent animal model for human HBV. DHAV is a picornavirus that causes a highly contagious virus infection in ducks with up to 100% flock mortality in ducklings under 6 wk of age, while older birds remain unaffected. The high morbidity and mortality has an economic impact on intensive duck production farming. Duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3 are astroviruses in the family of Astroviridae with similarity phylogenetically to turkey astroviruses, implicating the potential for cross-species infections between strains. Duck astrovirus (DAstV) causes

  13. Growth and nonlinear optical characterization of organic single crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ligui

    1997-12-01

    Organic single crystal films are important for various future applications in photonics and integrated optics. The conventional method for inorganic crystal growth is not suitable for organic materials, and the high temperature melting method is not good for most organic materials due to decomposition problems. We developed a new method-modified shear method-to grow large area organic single crystal thin films which have exceptional nonlinear optical properties and high quality surfaces. Several organic materials (NPP, PNP and DAST) were synthesized and purified before the thin film crystal growth. Organic single crystal thin films were grown from saturated organic solutions using modified shear method. The area of single crystal films were about 1.5 cm2 for PNP, 1 cm2 for NPP and 5 mm2 for DAST. The thickness of the thin films which could be controlled by the applied pressure ranged from 1μm to 10 μm. The single crystal thin films of organic materials were characterized by polarized microscopy, x-ray diffraction, polarized UV-Visible and polarized micro-FTIR spectroscopy. Polarized microscopy showed uniform birefringence and complete extinction with the rotation of the single crystal thin films under crossed- polarization, which indicated high quality single crystals with no scattering. The surface orientation of single crystal thin films was characterized by x-ray diffraction. The molecular orientation within the crystal was further studied by the polarized UV-Visible and Polarized micro-FTIR techniques combined with the x-ray and polarized microscopy results. A Nd:YAG laser with 35 picosecond pulses at 1064nm wavelength was employed to perform the nonlinear optical characterization of the organic single crystal thin films. Two measurement techniques were used to study the crystal films: second harmonic generation (SHG) and electro-optic (EO) effect. SHG results showed that the nonlinear optical coefficient of NPP was 18 times that of LiNbO3, a standard

  14. The images of scientists and science among Hebrew- and Arabic-speaking pre-service teachers in Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Edna; Cohen, Ariel

    2003-07-01

    This study investigated the image of scientists held by Israeli pre-service teachers, the majority of whom were female. The population consisted of students belonging to two cultures, Hebrew-speaking and Arabic-speaking. The DAST ('Draw-a-Scientist-Test') tool and other tools, some of which were developed specifically for this research, tested the image of the scientist as perceived by the participants. It was found that the image of the scientist is perceived as predominantly male, a physicist or a chemist, working in a laboratory typical of the eighteenth, nineteenth or the early-twentieth century. Students did not differentiate between scientists and inventors. Different images were held in the two cultures. Most of the Arabic-speaking students put Classical Islamic scientists near the top of their lists and thought of the scientist as an Arab male, while the Hebrew-speaking students' was as a typical Western male. Recommendations, resulting from the findings, for developing a new learning unit for the purpose of altering stereotypes are suggested.

  15. American and Greek Children's Visual Images of Scientists - Enduring or Fading Stereotypes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christidou, Vasilia; Bonoti, Fotini; Kontopoulou, Argiro

    2016-05-01

    This study explores American and Greek primary pupils' visual images of scientists by means of two nonverbal data collection tasks to identify possible convergences and divergences. Specifically, it aims to investigate whether their images of scientists vary according to the data collection instrument used and to gender. To this end, 91 third-grade American (N = 46) and Greek (N = 45) pupils were examined. Data collection was conducted through a drawing task based on Chambers (1983) `Draw-A-Scientist-Test' (DAST) and a picture selection task during which the children selected between 14 pairs of illustrations those that were most probable to represent scientists. Analysis focused on stereotype indicators related with scientists' appearance and work setting. Results showed that the two groups' performance varied significantly across the tasks used to explore their stereotypic perceptions, although the overall stereotypy was not differentiated according to participants' ethnic group. Moreover, boys were found to use more stereotypic indicators than girls, while the picture selection task elicited more stereotypic responses than the drawing task. In general, data collected by the two instruments revealed convergences and divergences concerning the stereotypic indicators preferred. Similarities and differences between national groups point to the influence of a globalized popular culture on the one hand and of the different sociocultural contexts underlying science curricula and their implementation on the other. Implications for science education are discussed.

  16. American and Greek Children's Visual Images of Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christidou, Vasilia; Bonoti, Fotini; Kontopoulou, Argiro

    2016-08-01

    This study explores American and Greek primary pupils' visual images of scientists by means of two nonverbal data collection tasks to identify possible convergences and divergences. Specifically, it aims to investigate whether their images of scientists vary according to the data collection instrument used and to gender. To this end, 91 third-grade American ( N = 46) and Greek ( N = 45) pupils were examined. Data collection was conducted through a drawing task based on Chambers (1983) `Draw-A-Scientist-Test' (DAST) and a picture selection task during which the children selected between 14 pairs of illustrations those that were most probable to represent scientists. Analysis focused on stereotype indicators related with scientists' appearance and work setting. Results showed that the two groups' performance varied significantly across the tasks used to explore their stereotypic perceptions, although the overall stereotypy was not differentiated according to participants' ethnic group. Moreover, boys were found to use more stereotypic indicators than girls, while the picture selection task elicited more stereotypic responses than the drawing task. In general, data collected by the two instruments revealed convergences and divergences concerning the stereotypic indicators preferred. Similarities and differences between national groups point to the influence of a globalized popular culture on the one hand and of the different sociocultural contexts underlying science curricula and their implementation on the other. Implications for science education are discussed.

  17. Measurements of prompt charm production cross-sections in pp collisions at sqrt{s}=13 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-03-01

    Production cross-sections of prompt charm mesons are measured with the first data from pp collisions at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.98 ± 0.19 pb-1 collected by the LHCb experiment. The production cross-sections of D 0, D +, D s + , and D *+ mesons are measured in bins of charm meson transverse momentum, p T, and rapidity, y, and cover the range 0 < p T < 15GeV/c and 2.0 < y < 4.5. The inclusive cross-sections for the four mesons, including charge conjugation, within the range of 1 < p T < 8 GeV/c are found to be begin{array}{l}σ left(ppto {D}^0Xright)=2460± 3± 130\\upmu b \\ {}σ left(ppto {D}+Xright)=1000± 3± 110\\upmu b \\ {}σ left(ppto {D}_s+Xright)=460± 13± 100\\upmu b \\ {}σ left(ppto {D}^{ast +}Xright)=880± 5± 140\\upmu b where the uncertainties are due to statistical and systematic uncertainties, respectively. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Alu repeats as markers for forensic DNA analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M.; Kass, D.H.

    1994-01-01

    The Human-Specific (HS) subfamily of Alu sequences is comprised of a group of 500 nearly identical members which are almost exclusively restricted to the human genome. Individual subfamily members share an average of 98.9% nucleotide identity with the HS subfamily consensus sequence, and have an average age of 2.8 million years. We have developed a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based assay using primers complementary to the 5 inch and 3 inch unique flanking DNA sequences from each HS Alu that allow the locus to be assayed for the presence or absence of the Alu repeat. The dimorphic HS Alu sequences probably inserted in the human genome after the radiation of modem humans (within the last 200,000-one million years) and represent a unique source of information for human population genetics and forensic DNA analyses. These sites can be developed into Dimorphic Alu Sequence Tagged Sites (DASTS) for the Human Genome Project. HS Alu family member insertions differ from other types of polymorphism (e.g. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat [VNTR] or Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism [RFLP]) in that polymorphisms due to Alu insertions arise as a result of a unique event which has occurred only one time in the human population and spread through the population from that point. Therefore, individuals that share HS Alu repeats inherited these elements from a common ancestor. Most VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms may arise multiple times in parallel within a population.

  19. Digital Quantification of DNA Replication and Chromosome Segregation Enables Determination of Antimicrobial Susceptibility after only 15 Minutes of Antibiotic Exposure.

    PubMed

    Schoepp, Nathan G; Khorosheva, Eugenia M; Schlappi, Travis S; Curtis, Matthew S; Humphries, Romney M; Hindler, Janet A; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-08-01

    Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) would decrease misuse and overuse of antibiotics. The "holy grail" of AST is a phenotype-based test that can be performed within a doctor visit. Such a test requires the ability to determine a pathogen's susceptibility after only a short antibiotic exposure. Herein, digital PCR (dPCR) was employed to test whether measuring DNA replication of the target pathogen through digital single-molecule counting would shorten the required time of antibiotic exposure. Partitioning bacterial chromosomal DNA into many small volumes during dPCR enabled AST results after short exposure times by 1) precise quantification and 2) a measurement of how antibiotics affect the states of macromolecular assembly of bacterial chromosomes. This digital AST (dAST) determined susceptibility of clinical isolates from urinary tract infections (UTIs) after 15 min of exposure for all four antibiotic classes relevant to UTIs. This work lays the foundation to develop a rapid, point-of-care AST and strengthen global antibiotic stewardship. PMID:27357747

  20. Sensitivity method for integrated structure/active control law design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    The development is described of an integrated structure/active control law design methodology for aeroelastic aircraft applications. A short motivating introduction to aeroservoelasticity is given along with the need for integrated structures/controls design algorithms. Three alternative approaches to development of an integrated design method are briefly discussed with regards to complexity, coordination and tradeoff strategies, and the nature of the resulting solutions. This leads to the formulation of the proposed approach which is based on the concepts of sensitivity of optimum solutions and multi-level decompositions. The concept of sensitivity of optimum is explained in more detail and compared with traditional sensitivity concepts of classical control theory. The analytical sensitivity expressions for the solution of the linear, quadratic cost, Gaussian (LQG) control problem are summarized in terms of the linear regulator solution and the Kalman Filter solution. Numerical results for a state space aeroelastic model of the DAST ARW-II vehicle are given, showing the changes in aircraft responses to variations of a structural parameter, in this case first wing bending natural frequency.

  1. Astronomy week: An investigation of the implementation and identity formation of participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewitt, Carl

    Our society has a great need for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) professionals and educational institutions are currently having difficulty keeping up with society's demand (Carnevale, 2011). Outreach efforts are a key strategy to encouraging young people to pursue STEM careers and evaluation methods need to be used to ensure that this outreach is efficient and effective in helping young students see themselves as a prospective STEM professionals (Moskal, 2011). The purpose of this dissertation study was to investigate the implementation of an Astronomy Week supported by the Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CMSE) and its impact on student identity formation. Three classrooms implemented the CMSE Astronomy Week curriculum and accepted a visit from the Starlab mobile planetarium. Data consisted of field notes from classroom observations, interviews with students and teachers, the Draw a Scientist Test (DAST), and surveys from both teachers and students. Results provide evidence that this outreach effort was a significant science event that helped change the stereotypical beliefs about scientists, especially in minority students. Drawings of scientists and written responses provided valuable insight into participants' identity formation and desires to pursue a career in science. Results also provide suggestions for improving the programmatic and curricular aspects of the outreach program. Teacher interviews and questionnaire responses were particularly valuable in the development of suggestions for improving the program.

  2. Validity and Reliability of the Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) in University Students.

    PubMed

    Tiburcio Sainz, Marcela; Rosete-Mohedano, Ma Guadalupe; Natera Rey, Guillermina; Martínez Vélez, Nora Angélica; Carreño García, Silvia; Pérez Cisneros, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST), developed by the World Health Organization (WHO), has been used successfully in many countries, but there are few studies of its validity and reliability for the Mexican population. The objective of this study was to determine the psychometric properties of the self-administered ASSIST test in university students in Mexico. This was an ex post facto non-experimental study with 1,176 undergraduate students, the majority women (70.1%) aged 18-23 years (89.5%) and single (87.5%). To estimate concurrent validity, factor analysis and tests of reliability and correlation were carried out between the subscale for alcohol and AUDIT, those for tobacco and the Fagerström Test, and those for marijuana and DAST-20. Adequate reliability coefficients were obtained for ASSIST subscales for tobacco (alpha = 0.83), alcohol (alpha = 0.76), and marijuana (alpha = 0.73). Significant correlations were found only with the AUDIT (r = 0.71) and the alcohol subscale. The best balance of sensitivity and specificity of the alcohol subscale (83.8% and 80%, respectively) and the largest area under the ROC curve (81.9%) was found with a cutoff score of 8. The self-administered version of ASSIST is a valid screening instrument to identify at-risk cases due to substance use in this population. PMID:26990386

  3. The effects of perceived quality on the behavioural economics of alcohol, amphetamine, cannabis, cocaine, and ecstasy purchases.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jon C; Goudie, Andrew J; Field, Matt; Loverseed, Anne-Claire; Charlton, Sarah; Sumnall, Harry R

    2008-04-01

    Previous research has indicated that non-dependent polydrug users are willing to pay more money to buy good quality drugs as their income increased. This study sought to examine whether altering the perceived quality of controlled drugs would affect drug purchases if the monetary price remained fixed. A random sample of 80 polydrug users were recruited. All participants were administered an anonymous questionnaire consisting of the Drug Abuse Screening Test for Adolescents (DAST-A), the Severity of Dependence Scale for cannabis (SDS), the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and questions about their drug use. Participants then completed a simulation of controlled drug purchases where the price of alcohol, amphetamine, cannabis, cocaine, and ecstasy remained the same but their perceived quality changed (i.e. unit price increased as the perceived quality decreased). The demand for alcohol was quality inelastic and alcohol quality had no effects on the purchase of any other controlled drug. Demand for cannabis was quality elastic and alcohol substituted for cannabis as its unit price increased. Demand for cocaine was quality elastic and alcohol, cannabis, and ecstasy substituted for cocaine as its unit price increased. Demand for ecstasy was quality elastic and alcohol and cocaine both substituted for ecstasy as its unit price increased. These results suggest that perceived quality influences the demand for controlled drugs and that monitoring the perceived quality of controlled drugs may provide a warning of potential public health problems in the near future. PMID:18201842

  4. Digital antimicrobial susceptibility testing using the MilliDrop technology.

    PubMed

    Jiang, L; Boitard, L; Broyer, P; Chareire, A-C; Bourne-Branchu, P; Mahé, P; Tournoud, M; Franceschi, C; Zambardi, G; Baudry, J; Bibette, J

    2016-03-01

    We present the MilliDrop Analyzer (MDA), a droplet-based millifluidic system for digital antimicrobial susceptibility testing (D-AST), which enables us to determine minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) precisely and accurately. The MilliDrop technology was validated by using resazurin for fluorescence readout, for comparison with standard methodology, and for conducting reproducibility studies. In this first assessment, the susceptibility of a reference Gram-negative strain Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 to gentamicin, chloramphenicol, and nalidixic acid were tested by the MDA, VITEK®2, and broth microdilution as a reference standard. We measured the susceptibility of clinically relevant Gram-positive strains of Staphylococcus aureus to vancomycin, including vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA), and vancomycin-susceptible S. aureus (VSSA) strains. The MDA provided results which were much more accurate than those of VITEK®2 and standard broth microdilution. The enhanced accuracy enabled us to reliably discriminate between VSSA and hVISA strains. PMID:26803821

  5. Screening of antibiotic susceptibility to β-lactam-induced elongation of Gram-negative bacteria based on dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cheng-Che; Cheng, I-Fang; Chen, Hung-Mo; Kan, Heng-Chuan; Yang, Wen-Horng; Chang, Hsien-Chang

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate a rapid antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) based on the changes in dielectrophoretic (DEP) behaviors related to the β-lactam-induced elongation of Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) on a quadruple electrode array (QEA). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) can be determined within 2 h by observing the changes in the positive-DEP frequency (pdf) and cell length of GNB under the cefazolin (CEZ) treatment. Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and the CEZ are used as the sample bacteria and antibiotic respectively. The bacteria became filamentous due to the inhibition of cell wall synthesis and cell division and cell lysis occurred for the higher antibiotic dose. According to the results, the pdfs of wild type bacteria decrease to hundreds of kHz and the cell length is more than 10 μm when the bacterial growth is inhibited by the CEZ treatment. In addition, the growth of wild type bacteria and drug resistant bacteria differ significantly. There is an obvious decrease in the number of wild type bacteria but not in the number of drug resistant bacteria. Thus, the drug resistance of GNB to β-lactam antibiotics can be rapidly assessed. Furthermore, the MIC determined using dielectrophoresis-based AST (d-AST) was consistent with the results of the broth dilution method. Utilizing this approach could reduce the time needed for bacteria growth from days to hours, help physicians to administer appropriate antibiotic dosages, and reduce the possibility of the occurrence of multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. PMID:22404714

  6. Sample Canister Capture Mechanism for Mars Sample Return: Functional and environmental test of the elegant breadboard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carta, R.; Filippetto, D.; Lavagna, M.; Mailland, F.; Falkner, P.; Larranaga, J.

    2015-12-01

    The paper provides recent updates about the ESA study: Sample Canister Capture Mechanism Design and Breadboard developed under the Mars Robotic Exploration Preparation (MREP) program. The study is part of a set of feasibility studies aimed at identifying, analysing and developing technology concepts enabling the future international Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission. The MSR is a challenging mission with the purpose of sending a Lander to Mars, acquire samples from its surface/subsurface and bring them back to Earth for further, more in depth, analyses. In particular, the technology object of the Study is relevant to the Capture Mechanism that, mounted on the Orbiter, is in charge of capturing and securing the Sample Canister, or Orbiting Sample, accommodating the Martian soil samples, previously delivered in Martian orbit by the Mars Ascent Vehicle. An elegant breadboard of such a device was implemented and qualified under an ESA contract primed by OHB-CGS S.p.A. and supported by Politecnico di Milano, Department of Aerospace Science and Technology: in particular, functional tests were conducted at PoliMi-DAST and thermal and mechanical test campaigns occurred at Serms s.r.l. facility. The effectiveness of the breadboard design was demonstrated and the obtained results, together with the design challenges, issues and adopted solutions are critically presented in the paper. The breadboard was also tested on a parabolic flight to raise its Technology Readiness Level to 6; the microgravity experiment design, adopted solutions and results are presented as well in the paper.

  7. Psychometric properties of the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) with substance abusers in outpatient and residential treatment.

    PubMed

    Voluse, Andrew C; Gioia, Christopher J; Sobell, Linda Carter; Dum, Mariam; Sobell, Mark B; Simco, Edward R

    2012-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT), an 11-item self-report questionnaire developed to screen individuals for drug problems, are evaluated. The measure, developed in Sweden and evaluated there with individuals with severe drug problems, has not been evaluated with less severe substance abusers or with clinical populations in the United States. Participants included 35 drug abusers in an outpatient substance abuse treatment program, 79 drug abusers in a residential substance abuse treatment program, and 39 alcohol abusers from both treatment settings who did not report a drug abuse problem. The DUDIT was found to be a psychometrically sound drug abuse screening measure with high convergent validity (r=.85) when compared with the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10), and to have a Cronbach's alpha of .94. In addition, a single component accounted for 64.91% of total variance, and the DUDIT had sensitivity and specificity scores of .90 and .85, respectively, when using the optimal cut-off score of 8. Additionally, the DUDIT showed good discriminant validity as it significantly differentiated drug from alcohol abusers. These findings support the DUDIT as a reliable and valid drug abuse screening instrument that measures a unidimensional construct. Further research is warranted with additional clinical populations. PMID:21937169

  8. Optimization of precursor synthesis, formulation and stability of 1′-[18 F] fluoroethyl-β-d-lactose ([18 F]FEL) for preclinical studies in detection of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paolillo, Vincenzo; De Palatis, Louis; Alauddin, Mian M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction 1′-[18 F]Fluoroethyl-β-d-lactose ([18 F]FEL) is a new PET imaging agent for early detection of pancreatic cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. We previously reported the syntheses of [18 F]FEL using a bromo- and a tosyl- precursor, followed by an improved method using a nosyl-precursor. However, some steps in the synthesis of the precursor appeared to be problematic producing low yields. Here, we report on an optimized method for synthesis of the precursor and production of [18 F]FEL; we also describe [18 F]FEL’s formulation and stability. Methods Acetylation of d-lactose 1 was performed following a literature procedure to obtain 1′,2′,3′,6′,2,3,4,6-d-lactose octa-acetate 2a/2b. Bromination of 2a/2b was performed using HBr/acetic acid to produce 1'-bromo-2′,3′,6′,2,3,4,6-hepta-O-acetyl-α-d-lactose 3. Coupling of 3 with ethylene glycol was performed in the presence of Ag-tosylate and an excess of ethylene glycol to produce 4a. Compound 4a was reacted with p-nitrophenylsulfonyl chloride to produce the nosyl derivative 5. Radiofluorination of 5 was performed using K[18 F]fluoride/kryptofix to obtain 6, which was purified by HPLC and hydrolyzed with Na-methoxide to produce 7. Results Compound 2 (2a/2b) was obtained in 83% yield as a mixture of two anomeric products. Compound 3 was obtained from the 2a/2b mixture in 80% yield as one product. Coupling of 3 with ethylene glycol produced 4a in 90% yield. Compound 5 was obtained in 64% yield, and radiofluorination of 5 produced 6 in 62.5% ± 7.5% yields (n = 8). Hydrolysis of 6 with Na-methoxide produced 7 in 42.0% ± 7.0% yield (n = 8) from the end of bombardment. Conclusions A simple 4-step synthesis of the precursor, compound 5, has been achieved with improved yields. A new formulation of [18 F]FEL has been developed that allows the product to remain stable at ambient temperature for use in animal studies. This improved synthesis of the precursor and stable formulation of [18 F]FEL should

  9. Gold-coated magnetic particles for solid-phase immunoassays: enhancing immobilized antibody binding efficiency and analytical performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hairong; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2006-01-15

    The preparation and characterization of gold-coated magnetic particles are described for use as more efficient solid-phase materials in immunoassay development. A thin gold coating on commercial tosylated magnetic polystyrene particles (4.5 microm) is achieved via an electroless plating method involving initial reaction of the particles with Sn(II), followed by redox deposition of Ag0, that serves as a catalytic site for the subsequent reduction of Na3Au(SO3)2 in the presence of formaldehyde to yield the adhered gold layer. Scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate the presence of the desired Au0 outer layer. To characterize the improved yield of antibody binding sites on such gold-coated phases, the modified particles are reacted with the free thiols of Fab' fragments of an anti-alkaline phosphatase (ALP) antibody to orient all the antigenic binding sites in a favorable direction. After equilibration with ALP, the amount of ALP bound to the surface of such particles is nearly 2.5-fold greater than on non-gold-coated particles possessing the same amount of immobilized anti-ALP Fab', but oriented randomly on the surface. The new gold-coated magnetic particles are further used as a solid phase for developing a sandwich-type enzyme immunoassay to detect C-reactive protein (CRP) using horseradish peroxidase as the enzyme label. The gold-coated magnetic particles with anti-CRP monoclonal Fab' reagents provide assays with enhanced assay slope (1.8-fold), lower nonspecific adsorption, and a detection limit improvement of nearly 10-fold (0.14 vs 1.9 ng/mL) compared to the same Fab' anti-CRP immobilized on the initial tosylated polystyrene magnetic particles. The improved assay performance is attributed to the more favorable binding orientation of the self-assembled monolayer of Fab' fragments on the gold-coated particles compared to the random orientation on the non-gold-coated surfaces. PMID:16408947

  10. Efficient photoinduced orthogonal energy and electron transfer reactions via phospholipid membrane-bound donors and acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Clapp, P.J.; Armitage, B.; Roosa, P.; O'Brien, D.F. )

    1994-10-05

    A three component, liposome-bound photochemical molecular device (PMD) consisting of energy and electron transfer reactions is described. Bilayer membrane surface-associated dyes, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)-phenyl]-21H,2 3H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate salt and N,N[prime]-bis[(3-trimethylammonio)propyl]thiadicarbocya nine tribromide, are the energy donor and acceptor, respectively, in a blue light stimulated energy transfer reaction along the vesicle surface. The electronically excited cyanine is quenched by electron transfer from the phospholipid membrane bound triphenylbenzyl borate anion, which is located in the lipid bilayer interior. The PMD exhibits sequential reactions following electronic excitation with the novel feature that the steps proceed with orthogonal orientation: energy transfer occurs parallel to the membrane surface, and electron transfer occurs perpendicular to the surface. Photobleaching and fluorescence quenching experiments verify the transfer reactions, and Stern-Volmer analysis was used to estimate the reaction rate constants. At the highest concentrations examined of energy and electron acceptor ca. 60% of the photoexcited porphyrins were quenched by energy transfer to the cyanine. 56 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Quantification of the electrophilic reactivities of aldehydes, imines, and enones.

    PubMed

    Appel, Roland; Mayr, Herbert

    2011-06-01

    The rates of the epoxidation reactions of aldehydes, of the aziridination reactions of aldimines, and of the cyclopropanation reactions of α,β-unsaturated ketones with aryl-stabilized dimethylsulfonium ylides have been determined photometrically in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). All of these sulfur ylide-mediated cyclization reactions as well as the addition reactions of stabilized carbanions to N-tosyl-activated aldimines have been shown to follow a second-order rate law, where the rate constants reflect the (initial) CC bond formation between nucleophile and electrophile. The derived second-order rate constants (log k(2)) have been combined with the known nucleophilicity parameters (N, s(N)) of the aryl-stabilized sulfur ylides 4a,b and of the acceptor-substituted carbanions 4c-h to calculate the electrophilicity parameters E of aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes (1a-i), N-acceptor-substituted aromatic aldimines (2a-e), and α,β-unsaturated ketones (3a-f) according to the linear free-energy relationship log k(2) = s(N)(N + E) as defined in J. Am. Chem. Soc.2001, 123, 9500-9512. The data reported in this work provide the first quantitative comparison of the electrophilic reactivities of aldehydes, imines, and simple Michael acceptors in DMSO with carbocations and cationic metal-π complexes within our comprehensive electrophilicity scale. PMID:21553901

  12. Purification and characterization of a new serine proteinase from Bacillus subtilis with specificity for amino acids at P1 and P2 positions.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, A; Yoshida, N; Noda, K; Ito, A

    1995-12-01

    A proteinase was purified 230-fold to apparent homogeneity from culture filtrates of Bacillus subtilis by a series of column chromatographies on DE52, DEAE-Toyopearl, Cellulofine GC200M, and Mono-Q, using Boc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ser-pNA as a substrate. The molecular weight of the proteinase was estimated to be 42,000 by SDS-PAGE in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. Studies on the substrate specificity with peptide p-nitroanilides and natural peptides revealed that this proteinase preferentially hydrolyzed the peptide bond on the carboxyl-terminal side of either serine or alanine residues at the P1 position and hydrophobic bulky amino acids at P2. It was most active at pH 9.5 for the hydrolysis of Boc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ser-pNA. The enzyme was inactivated by diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), but not by tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethylketone (TPCK) or by EDTA. Based on the reactivity toward substrates and inhibitors, this enzyme differs from elastase- or subtilisin-like proteinase, hence it is a new type of proteinase with specificity for amino acids at P1 and P2 positions. PMID:8519806

  13. Influence of pulse-height discrimination threshold for photon counting on the accuracy of singlet oxygen luminescence measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huiyun; Chen, Defu; Wang, Min; Lin, Juqiang; Li, Buhong; Xie, Shusen

    2011-12-01

    Direct measurement of near-infrared (NIR) luminescence around 1270 nm is the golden standard of singlet oxygen (1O2) identification. In this study, the influence of pulse-height discrimination threshold on measurement accuracy of the 1O2 luminescence that is generated from the photoirradiation of meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) morphine tetra-tosylate (TMPyP) in aqueous solution was investigated by using our custom-developed detection system. Our results indicate that the discrimination threshold has a significant influence on the absolute 1O2 luminescence counts, and the optimal threshold for our detection system is found to be about - 41.2 mV for signal discrimination. After optimization, the derived triplet-state and 1O2 lifetimes of TMPyP in aqueous solution are found to be 1.73 ± 0.03 and 3.70 ± 0.04 µs, respectively, and the accuracy of measurement was further independently demonstrated using the laser flash photolysis technique.

  14. The reaction of primary aromatic amines with alkylene carbonates for the selective synthesis of bis-N-(2-hydroxy)alkylanilines: the catalytic effect of phosphonium-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Selva, Maurizio; Fabris, Massimo; Lucchini, Vittorio; Perosa, Alvise; Noè, Marco

    2010-11-21

    At T≥ 140 °C, different primary aromatic amines (pX-C(6)H(4)NH(2); X = H, OCH(3), CH(3), Cl) react with both ethylene- and propylene-carbonates to yield a chemoselective N-alkylation process: bis-N-(2-hydroxyalkyl)anilines [pX-C(6)H(4)N(CH(2)CH(R)OH)(2); R = H, CH(3)] are the major products and the competitive formation of carbamates is substantially ruled out. At 140 °C, under solventless conditions, the model reaction of aniline with ethylene carbonate goes to completion by simply mixing stoichiometric amounts of the reagents. However, a class of phosphonium ionic liquids (PILs) such as tetraalkylphosphonium halides and tosylates turn out to be active organocatalysts for both aniline and other primary aromatic amines. A kinetic analysis monitored by (13)C NMR spectroscopy, shows that bromide exchanged PILs are the most efficient systems, able to impart a more than 8-fold acceleration to the reaction. The reactions of propylene carbonate take place at a higher temperature than those of ethylene carbonate, and only in the presence of PIL catalysts. A mechanism based on the Lewis acidity of tetraalkylphosphonium cations and the nucleophilicity of halide anions has been proposed to account for both the reaction chemoselectivity and the function of the catalysts. PMID:20844790

  15. An efficient synthesis of 3-fluoro-5-thio-xylofuranosyl nucleosides of thymine, uracil, and 5-fluorouracil as potential antitumor or/and antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Tsoukala, Evangelia; Agelis, George; Dolinsek, Jan; Botić, Tanja; Cencic, Avrelija; Komiotis, Dimitri

    2007-05-01

    1,2:5,6-Di-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-glucofuranose by the sequence of mild oxidation, reduction, fluorination, periodate oxidation, borohydride reduction, and sulfonylation gave 3-deoxy-3-fluoro-1,2-O-isopropylidene-5-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-alpha-D-xylofuranose (5). Tosylate 5 was converted to thioacetate derivative 6, which after acetolysis gave 1,2-di-O-acetyl-5-S-acetyl-3-deoxy-3-fluoro-5-thio-D-xylofuranose (7). Condensation of 7 with silylated thymine, uracil, and 5-fluorouracil afforded nucleosides 1-(5-S-acetyl-3-deoxy-3-fluoro-5-thio-beta-D-xylofuranosyl) thymine (8), 1-(5-S-acetyl-3-deoxy-3-fluoro-5-thio-beta-D-xylofuranosyl) uracil (9), and 1-(5-S-acetyl-3-deoxy-3-fluoro-5-thio-beta-D-xylofuranosyl) 5-fluorouracil (10). Compounds 8, 9, and 10 are biologically active against rotavirus infection and the growth of tumor cells. PMID:17337193

  16. Polyglycerol-functionalized nanodiamond as a platform for gene delivery: Derivatization, characterization, and hybridization with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Nakae, Yuki; Qin, Hongmei; Ito, Tadamasa; Kimura, Takahide; Kojima, Hideto; Chan, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Summary A gene vector consisting of nanodiamond, polyglycerol, and basic polypeptide (ND-PG-BPP) has been designed, synthesized, and characterized. The ND-PG-BPP was synthesized by PG functionalization of ND through ring-opening polymerization of glycidol on the ND surface, multistep organic transformations (–OH → –OTs (tosylate) → –N3) in the PG layer, and click conjugation of the basic polypeptides (Arg8, Lys8 or His8) terminated with propargyl glycine. The ND-PG-BPP exhibited good dispersibility in water (>1.0 mg/mL) and positive zeta potential ranging from +14.2 mV to +44.1 mV at neutral pH in Milli-Q water. It was confirmed by gel retardation assay that ND-PG-Arg8 and ND-PG-Lys8 with higher zeta potential hybridized with plasmid DNA (pDNA) through electrostatic attraction, making them promising as nonviral vectors for gene delivery. PMID:24778723

  17. Facile synthesis of mono-6-amino-6-deoxy-alpha-, beta-, gamma-cyclodextrin hydrochlorides for molecular recognition, chiral separation and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weihua; Ng, Siu-Choon

    2008-01-01

    We describe a protocol for the synthesis of mono-6-amino-6-deoxy-cyclodextrin hydrochloride (CD-NH3Cl), applicable to alpha-, beta- and gamma-cyclodextrin. These structurally simplest, highly water-soluble cationic cyclodextrins can be widely used in molecular recognition, chiral separation and drug delivery studies. Starting from commercially available chemicals, CD-NH3Cl is synthesized in four steps: (i) selective tosylation of cyclodextrin by the use of p-toluenesulfonyl chloride to afford mono-6-(p-toluenesulfonyl)-6-deoxy-cyclodextrin (Ts-CD); (ii) azide substitution of Ts-CD with sodium azide to afford mono-6-azido-6-deoxy-cyclodextrin (CD-N3); (iii) reduction of CD-N3 with triphenylphospine followed by hydrolysis to prepare mono-6-amino-6-deoxy-cyclodextrin (CD-NH2); and (iv) treatment of CD-NH2 with hydrochloric acid to afford the titled CD-NH3Cl with good yield. The overall protocol requires approximately 2 weeks. PMID:18388952

  18. A new synthesis of lysophosphatidylcholines and related derivatives. Use of p-toluenesulfonate for hydroxyl group protection.

    PubMed

    Rosseto, Renato; Bibak, Niloufar; DeOcampo, Rosemarie; Shah, Trishul; Gabrielian, Ara; Hajdu, Joseph

    2007-03-01

    A new stereoselective synthesis of lysophosphatidylcholines is reported. The synthesis is based upon (1) the use of 3-p-toluenesulfonyl-sn-glycerol to provide the stereocenter for construction of the optically active lysophospholipid molecule, (2) tetrahydropyranylation of the secondary alcohol function to achieve orthogonal protection of the sn-2- and sn-3-glycerol positions, and (3) elaboration of the phosphodiester headgroup using a 2-chloro-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane/trimethylamine sequence. In the course of developing the synthesis it has been discovered that methoxyacetate displacement of the sn-3-p-toluenesulfonate yields a reactive methoxyacetyl ester, which in turn can be selectively cleaved with methanol/tert-butylamine, while the ester group at the sn-1-position remains unaffected. The sequence has been shown to be suitable for preparation of spectroscopically labeled lysophosphatidylcholines. One of these compounds was readily converted to a double-labeled mixed-chain phosphatidylcholine applicable for real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay of lipolytic enzymes. In addition, the work led to new synthetic strategies based on chemoselective manipulation of the tosyl group in the presence of other base-labile groups such as FMOC derivatives that are often used for the protection of amino and hydroxyl groups in syntheses. PMID:17284078

  19. Efficient synthesis of pure monotosylated beta-cyclodextrin and its dimers.

    PubMed

    Tripodo, Giuseppe; Wischke, Christian; Neffe, Axel T; Lendlein, Andreas

    2013-11-15

    6-O-Monotosyl-β-cyclodextrin (mono-Ts-βCD) is one of the most important intermediates in the production of substituted βCD. So far, performing the monotosylation reaction and, in particular, the purification steps was challenging, relied on toxic solvents, and resulted in long and expensive procedures at, importantly, low yields. Here, the reaction of cyclodextrin with p-toluenesulfonyl chloride in aqueous environment is described to obtain a highly pure mono-Ts-βCD, for which a single-step purification with a cation exchange resin was applied. With this synthetic route and purification, yields could be increased from typically <10-15% to 35%, and organic solvents could be avoided. As characterized by FTIR, mass spectrometry, elemental analysis, and NMR, mono-Ts-βCD was obtained with a molar purity of >98mol%. From mono-Ts-βCD, β-cyclodextrin dimers linked by ethylenediamine (bis-Et-βCD) were successfully prepared (yield 93%, purity 96mol%) in a one-step approach using an anion exchange resin to trap leaving groups that typically interfere in the reaction. This synthesis procedure with a direct collection of side-products may be a general strategy applicable for nucleophilic substitution of tosylated cyclodextrins. PMID:24060538

  20. Synthesis of cationic single-isomer cyclodextrins for the chiral separation of amino acids and anionic pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weihua; Ng, Siu-Choon

    2007-01-01

    We describe a protocol for the synthesis of mono-6(A)-(1-butyl-3-imidazolium)-6(A)-deoxy-beta-cyclodextrin chloride (BIMCD), a cationic, water-soluble cyclodextrin used in the chiral separation of amino acids and anionic pharmaceuticals by capillary electrophoresis. Starting from commercially available chemicals, BIMCD is synthesized in five steps. The first step involves a nucleophilic substitution between p-toluenesulfonyl chloride and imidazole to afford 1-(p-toluenesulfonyl)imidazole (A). In the second step, a nucleophilic substitution between beta-cyclodextrin and A affords mono-6(A)-(p-toluenesulfonyl)-6(A)-deoxy-beta-cyclodextrin (B). In the third step, a nucleophilic substitution between 1-bromobutane and imidazole affords 1-butylimidazole (C). In the fourth step, a nucleophilic addition between A and C affords BIMCD tosylate. In the final step, anion exchange using an ion-exchange resin yields BIMCD as a highly water-soluble solid. Each step takes up to 2 d, including the time required for product purification. The overall protocol requires approximately 6 d. PMID:18079719

  1. The influence of the splanchnic nerves on the external secretion, blood flow and electrical conductance of the cat pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, T. E.; Greenwell, J. R.; Harper, A. A.; Scratcherd, T.

    1974-01-01

    1. Electrical stimulation of the cut peripheral end of the splanchnic nerves results in a biphasic change in electrical conductance measured across the tail of the pancreas. A phase of decreased conductance is followed by a more prolonged phase of increased conductance. 2. Simultaneous measurements of pancreatic blood flow indicate that the phase of decreased conductance occurs as a result of vasoconstriction, whilst the phase of increased conductance is due to vasodilatation. 3. The initial phase of decreased conductance and vasoconstriction is abolished by α-receptor blocking agents such as phenoxybenzamine and the phase of increased conductance blocked by β-receptor blocking agents such as pronethalol. 4. Short periods of electrical stimulation applied to the splanchnic nerves result in a secretion of amylase and a reduction in the volume rate of secretion. 5. When the vasoconstrictor response was abolished by phenoxybenzamine, nerve stimulation still reduced the rate of secretion, suggesting that the inhibitory effect is in part due to a direct action of the secretory cells. 6. After bretylium tosylate, splanchnic nerve stimulation no longer produced vasomotor changes in the pancreas and the inhibitory effect on the volume response was converted to one of augmentation, but the secretion of enzymes was unaffected. 7. The secretion of amylase on splanchnic stimulation was abolished by intravenous injection of atropine, suggesting that a cholinergic mechanism is involved. 8. Noradrenaline did not mobilize pancreatic enzymes. PMID:16992444

  2. Proteases from Canavalia ensiformis: Active and Thermostable Enzymes with Potential of Application in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Rayane Natshe; Gozzini Barbosa, Suellen Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Extracts of leaves, seeds, roots, and stem from a tropical legume, C. ensiformis, were prepared employing buffers and detergent in aqueous solution. Leaf extracts had the highest protein content and the most pronounced peptidase activity with optimal pH in the neutral to alkaline range. All extracts exhibited peaks of activity at various pH values, suggesting the presence of distinctive classes of proteases. N-α-Tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester hydrolysis was maximal at 30°C to 60°C and peptidase activity from all extracts presented very good thermal stability after 24 h incubation at 70°C. C. ensiformis proteases exhibited molecular masses of about 200–57, 40–37, and 20–15 kDa by SDS-PAGE analysis. These enzymes cleaved hemoglobin, bovine serum albumin, casein, and gelatin at different levels. Serine and metalloproteases are the major proteases in C. ensiformis extracts, modulated by divalent cations, stable at 1% of surfactant Triton X-100 and at different concentrations of the reducing agent β-mercaptoethanol. Thus, C. ensiformis expresses a particular set of proteases in distinctive organs with high activity and stability, making this legume an important source of proteases with biotechnological potential.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of cobalt-catalyzed hydrogen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Marinescu, Smaranda C.; Winkler, Jay R.; Gray, Harry B.

    2012-01-01

    Several cobalt complexes catalyze the evolution of hydrogen from acidic solutions, both homogeneously and at electrodes. The detailed molecular mechanisms of these transformations remain unresolved, largely owing to the fact that key reactive intermediates have eluded detection. One method of stabilizing reactive intermediates involves minimizing the overall reaction free-energy change. Here, we report a new cobalt(I) complex that reacts with tosylic acid to evolve hydrogen with a driving force of just 30 meV/Co. Protonation of CoI produces a transient CoIII-H complex that was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The CoIII-H intermediate decays by second-order kinetics with an inverse dependence on acid concentration. Analysis of the kinetics suggests that CoIII-H produces hydrogen by two competing pathways: a slower homolytic route involving two CoIII-H species and a dominant heterolytic channel in which a highly reactive CoII-H transient is generated by CoI reduction of CoIII-H. PMID:22949704

  4. The role of the anion in the toxicity of imidazolium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Biczak, Robert; Pawłowska, Barbara; Bałczewski, Piotr; Rychter, Piotr

    2014-06-15

    From the environmental protection point of view, the growing interest of ionic liquids in various industrial branches has raised concerns for the toxicity assessment of these compounds. The paper discusses the effect of salts containing the shared 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium [EMIM] cation as coupled with five different anions: bromide [Br], nitrate [NO3], p-toluenesulfonate (tosylate) [Ts], dimethylphosphate [dMP] and methanesulfonate [MS] on the growth and development of higher land plants - spring barley and common radish. The experiment was done according to the ISO Standard 11269-2:1995 and the OECD/OCDE Guide 208/2006. As the indications of phytotoxicity, the percentage of sprouts and the level of dry and fresh plant mass were used; in addition, the visual assessment of any signs of damage to the examined plant species, such as growth inhibition and chlorotic changes, was also made. Results of our study has proved the negative impact of ILs on the tested plants and the toxic effect of imidazolium salts was dependent primarily on the applied ionic liquids concentration. The common radish revealed the higher tolerance to the imidazolium as compared to spring barley. The anion type of ionic liquid was crucial for the toxicity against common radish. PMID:24793294

  5. Comparative study on aptamers as recognition elements for antibiotics in a label-free all-polymer biosensor.

    PubMed

    Daprà, Johannes; Lauridsen, Lasse Holm; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Rozlosnik, Noemi

    2013-05-15

    We present an all-polymer electrochemical microfluidic biosensor using Topas(®) as substrate and a conductive polymer bilayer as electrode material. The conductive bilayer consists of tosylate doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT:TsO) and the hydroxymethyl derivative PEDOT-OH:TsO, which was covalently functionalized with two aptamer probes with affinity to ampicillin or kanamycin A, respectively. Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) we were able to detect ampicillin in a concentration range from 100pM to 1μM and kanamycin A from 10nM to 1mM. The obtained EIS spectra were fitted with an equivalent circuit model successfully explaining the impedance signal. Real samples from regular ultra-high temperature treated low-fat milk spiked with ampicillin were successfully tested to assess the functionality of the sensor with real samples. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the applicability of the newly developed platform for real time, label-free and selective impedimetric detection of commonly used antibiotics. Additionally it was possible to detect ampicillin in a milk sample at a concentration below the allowed maximum residue limit (MRL) in the European Union. PMID:23353009

  6. A role for scavenger receptors in phagocytosis of protein-coated particles in rainbow trout head kidney macrophages.

    PubMed

    Frøystad, M K; Rode, M; Berg, T; Gjøen, T

    1998-01-01

    In macrophages of higher vertebrates, Fc receptors and receptors for complement and other serum factors, are generally known to enhance the phagocytic process. In lower vertebrates like salmonid fishes, none of these or other phagocytic receptors have been thoroughly characterized. The purpose of this study was to elucidate to what extent these and other receptors are involved in the process of phagocytosis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) head kidney macrophages. We used tosyl activated, paramagnetic dynabeads (2.8 microm in diameter), specifically coated with 125I labeled Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) IgM or bovine serum albumin (BSA) as phagocytic probes. The effect of complement opsonization was also investigated by incubating the beads in serum. Our results indicate that neither the Fc- nor the complement-receptor(s) were important for phagocytosis of these beads. Our data support the idea that scavenger receptors are involved in phagocytosis in rainbow trout head kidney macrophages, as the use of a competitive scavenger receptor ligand extensively decreased degradation of the labeled protein coat on the beads. PMID:9877435

  7. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of a potent and selective σ1 receptor antagonist with high antiallodynic activity.

    PubMed

    Utech, Tina; Köhler, Jens; Buschmann, Helmut; Holenz, Jörg; Vela, Jose Miguel; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2011-07-01

    Based on the pharmacophore model of Glennon the conformationally restricted σ(1) receptor ligand 2 with a 1,3-dioxane moiety has been designed and synthesized. The three step synthesis (transacetalization with pentane-1,3,5-triol, tosylation, and nucleophilic substitution with benzylamine) provided diastereoselectively the cis-configured 1,3-dioxane 2 in good yields. The 1,3-dioxane 2 represents a potent σ(1) receptor ligand (K(i) = 19 nM) with moderate selectivity over the σ(2) subtype (K(i) = 92 nM) and excellent selectivity against more than 60 other targets. Additionally the hERG K(+) channel is not affected by 2. In the capsaicin assay 2 showed extraordinarily high analgesic activity with more than 70% analgesia at the very low dose of 0.25 mg/kg body weight, which indicates σ(1) antagonistic activity. Since 2 does only interact with σ(1) receptors, the in-vivo antiallodynic activity of 2 must be attributed to the σ(1) antagonistic activity. PMID:21598296

  8. Design, synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled bradykinin B1 receptor-targeting small molecules for PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengxing; Kuo, Hsiou-Ting; Lau, Joseph; Jenni, Silvia; Zhang, Chengcheng; Zeisler, Jutta; Bénard, François; Lin, Kuo-Shyan

    2016-08-15

    Two fluorine-18 ((18)F) labeled bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R)-targeting small molecules, (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165, were synthesized and evaluated for imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). Z02035 and Z02165 were derived from potent antagonists, and showed high binding affinity (0.93±0.44 and 2.80±0.50nM, respectively) to B1R. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 were prepared by coupling 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl tosylate with their respective precursors, and were obtained in 10±5 (n=4) and 22±14% (n=3), respectively, decay-corrected radiochemical yield with >99% radiochemical purity. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 exhibited moderate lipophilicity (LogD7.4=1.10 and 0.59, respectively), and were stable in mouse plasma. PET imaging and biodistribution studies in mice showed that both tracers enabled visualization of the B1R-positive HEK293T::hB1R tumor xenografts with better contrast than control B1R-negative HEK293T tumors. Our data indicate that small molecule antagonists can be used as pharmacophores for the design of B1R-targeting PET tracers. PMID:27390067

  9. Order and chaos in soft condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, A. K.; Ganapathy, Rajesh

    2006-07-01

    Soft matter, like colloidal suspensions and surfactant gels, exhibit strong response to modest external perturbations. This paper reviews our recent experiments on the nonlinear flow behaviour of surfactant worm-like micellar gels. A rich dynamic behaviour exhibiting regular, quasi-periodic, intermittency and chaos is observed. In particular, we have shown experimentally that the route to chaos is via Type-II intermittency in shear thinning worm-like micellar solution of cetyltrimethylammonium tosylate where the strength of flow-concentration coupling is tuned by the addition of sodium chloride. A Poincaré first return map of the time series and the probability distribution of laminar length between burst events show that our data are consistent with Type-II intermittency. The existence of a `Butterfly' intensity pattern in small angle light scattering (SALS) measurements performed simultaneously with the rheological measurements confirms the coupling of flow to concentration fluctuations in the system under study. The scattered depolarised intensity in SALS, sensitive to orientational order fluctuations, shows the same time-dependence (like intermittency) as that of shear stress.

  10. Lipase-catalyzed resolution of (2R*,3S*)- and (2R*,3R*)-3-methyl-3-phenyl-2-aziridinemethanol at low temperatures and determination of the absolute configurations of the four stereoisomers.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takashi; Liu, Yu; Ohta, Hiroshi; Korenaga, Toshinobu; Ema, Tadashi

    2005-02-18

    [reaction: see text] Lipase-catalyzed resolution of (2R*,3S*)-3-methyl-3-phenyl-2-aziridinemethanol, (+/-)-2, at low temperatures gave synthetically useful (2R,3S)-2 and its acetate (2S,3R)-2a with (2S)-selectivity (E = 55 at -40 degrees C), while a similar reaction of (2R*,3R*)-3-methyl-3-phenyl-2-aziridinemethanol, (+/-)-3, gave (2S,3S)-3 and its acetate (2R,3R)-3a with (2R)-selectivity (E = 73 at -20 degrees C). Compound (+/-)-2 was prepared conveniently via diastereoselective addition of MeMgBr to tert-butyl 3-phenyl-2H-azirine-2-carboxylate, (+/-)-1a, which was successfully prepared by the Neber reaction of oxime tosylate of tert-butyl benzoyl acetate 7a. The tert-butyl ester was requisite to promote this reaction. For determination of the absolute configuration of (2S,3R)-2a, enantiopure (2S,3R)-2 was independently prepared in three steps involving diastereoselective methylation of 3-phenyl-2H-azirine-2-methanol, (S)-10, with MeMgBr. The absolute configuration of (2S,3S)-3 was determined by X-ray analysis of the corresponding N-(S)-2-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)propanoyl derivative (S,S,S)-13. PMID:15704972

  11. C[unk] inactivator inhibition by plasmin

    PubMed Central

    Harpel, Peter C.

    1970-01-01

    Plasmin incubated with partially purified C[unk] inactivator produced a decrease in inhibitory activity which was related to the time of incubation and to the concentration of plasmin. This effect of plasmin was not influenced by the purity of the inhibitor preparations. Soybean trypsin inhibitor and tosyl arginine methyl ester (TAMe), substances which block the active enzymic center of plasmin, prevented the plasmin-induced inactivation. Double diffusion analysis of the functionally deficient, plasmin-treated C[unk] inactivator using a specific antibody, showed a reaction of identity with the untreated inhibitor. Agarose and acrylamide gel immunoelectrophoresis of a plasmin, inhibitor mixture showed the appearance of an additional precipitin band with immunologic reactivity similar to that of the untreated inhibitor. These results demonstrate that plasmin alters both the functional and immunoelectrophoretic properties of C[unk] inactivator, and that the active proteolytic site of plasmin is necessary for this interaction. Since C[unk] inactivator has been shown to inhibit several different proteolytic enzymes including C[unk], kallikrein, PF/Dil, and plasmin, this investigation provides a theoretical relationship between the fibrinolytic, kallikrein, and complement systems which may have pathophysiologic relevance to various human disease states. Images PMID:4244455

  12. Modulation of human neutrophil polymorphonuclear leucocyte migration by human plasma alpha-globulin inhibitors and synthetic esterase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Goetzl, E J

    1975-01-01

    The exposure of isolated washed human neutrophils to purified human alpha1-antitrypsin resulted in a transient 2-fold enhancement of random migration and concomitant 70-90 per cent inhibition of chemotactic responsiveness to C5a or C3a, while treatment with alpha2-macroglobulin gave a less pronounced brief enhancement of random migration and prolonged 40-60 per cent suppression of chemotaxis. Peak effects occurred with concentrations of 1 mug/ml of alpha1-antitrypsin and 10 mug/ml of alpha2-macroglobulin. In contrast, the inhibitor of the activated first component of complement, at the highest concentration studied of 100/mug/ml, slightly enhanced chemotactic migration in response to C5a without influencing random migration. Preincubation of neutrophils with either L-1-tosylamide-2-phenylethyl-chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) or N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine-chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) at concentrations of 10-8-10-4M suppressed chemotaxis with concomitant inhibition of random migration by TPCK and enhancement of random migration by TLCK. All agents worked directly and irreversibly on the cells but caused only slight stimulation of the activity of the hexose monophosphate shunt of layers of adherent neutrophils. The results suggest that interaction of the plasma alpha-globulins or synthetic esterase inhibitors with surface receptors on neutrophils can influence both the random migration and responsiveness to chemotactic factors of these cells. PMID:49293

  13. Nasal challenge with ragweed pollen in hay fever patients. Effect of immunotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Creticos, P S; Adkinson, N F; Kagey-Sobotka, A; Proud, D; Meier, H L; Naclerio, R M; Lichtenstein, L M; Norman, P S

    1985-01-01

    Challenge of the nasal mucosa of allergic subjects with specific allergen induces not only the expected sneezing and rhinorrhea, but also the appearance in nasal secretions of mediators commonly associated with activation of mast cells or basophils: histamine, leukotrienes, prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), kinins, and TAME ([3H]-N-alpha-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester)-esterase. To determine whether specific immunotherapy alters mediator release in vivo, nasal pollen challenge was used to compare 27 untreated highly sensitive ragweed (RW)-allergic subjects with 12 similarly sensitive patients receiving long-term immunotherapy (3-5 yr) with RW extract (median dose, 6 micrograms RW antigen E). The two groups were equally sensitive based on skin tests and basophil histamine release. The immunized group had a diminished response as demonstrated by (a) the treated group required higher pollen doses to excite sneezing or mediator release; (b) significantly fewer subjects in the treated group released mediators at any dose (TAME-esterase [P = 0.005], PGD2 [P = 0.04]), and (c) the treated group released 3-5-fold less mediator (TAME-esterase [P = 0.01], and histamine [P = 0.02]). PMID:2416777

  14. Extended N-Arylsulfonylindoles as 5-HT₆ Receptor Antagonists: Design, Synthesis & Biological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Vera, Gonzalo; Lagos, Carlos F; Almendras, Sebastián; Hebel, Dan; Flores, Francisco; Valle-Corvalán, Gissella; Pessoa-Mahana, C David; Mella-Raipán, Jaime; Montecinos, Rodrigo; Recabarren-Gajardo, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Based on a known pharmacophore model for 5-HT₆ receptor antagonists, a series of novel extended derivatives of the N-arylsulfonyindole scaffold were designed and identified as a new class of 5-HT₆ receptor modulators. Eight of the compounds exhibited moderate to high binding affinities and displayed antagonist profile in 5-HT₆ receptor functional assays. Compounds 2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)-1-(1-tosyl-1H-indol-3-yl)ethanol (4b), 1-(1-(4-iodophenylsulfonyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)-2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)ethanol (4g) and 2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)-1-(1-(naphthalen-1-ylsulfonyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)ethanol (4j) showed the best binding affinity (4b pKi = 7.87; 4g pKi = 7.73; 4j pKi = 7.83). Additionally, compound 4j was identified as a highly potent antagonist (IC50 = 32 nM) in calcium mobilisation functional assay. PMID:27537868

  15. Purification and characterization of a novel extracellular alkaline protease from Cellulomonas bogoriensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Yang, Liyuan; Lv, Xue; Liu, Dongbo; Xia, Hongmei; Chen, Shan

    2016-05-01

    An extracellular alkaline protease produced by the alkali-tolerant Cellulomonas bogoriensis was purified by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and cation exchange chromatography. The purity of the protease was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and its molecular weight was confirmed to be 18.3 kDa. The enzyme showed optimum activity at 60 °C and pH 11. The stability of the protease was maintained at a wide temperature range of 4-60 °C and pH range of 3-12. Irreversible inhibition of the enzyme activity by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone demonstrated that the purified enzyme is a chymotrypsin of the serine protease family. The Km and Vmax of the protease activity on casein were 19.2 mg/mL and 25000 μg/min/mg, respectively. The broad substrate specificity and remarkable stability in the presence of organic solvents, salt, and commercial detergents, as well as its excellent stain removal and dehairing capability, make the purified alkaline protease a promising candidate for industrial applications. PMID:26849962

  16. Synthesis of a new bifunctional chelating agent for radioimmunotherapy: Cyclohexyl fused tetraazacyclodo-decanetetraacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, M.P.; Mease, R.C.; Lambert, C.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1996-05-01

    Preorganization of the coordinating groups within a chelating agent increases the stability of its metal-ligand complexes. For example, 1,2-diaminocyclo-hexanetetraacetic acid (CDTA) forms metal complexes with stability constants 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than the corresponding complexes of EDTA. Incorporation of a cyclohexyl group into a macrocyclic ligand produces a similar effect; stability constants of Cu complexes of tetrathiocyclotetradecanes are increased by 1.5 orders of magnitude by incorporating one cyclohexyl group into the macrocyclic ring and 3 orders of magnitude by incorporating two cyclohexyl moieties. In this study, we have synthesized cycohexyl DOTA (C-DOTA) in which the cyclohexyl group is fused to two carbons of the macrocyclic ring. Alkylation of disodium ethylene ditosylamide with trans-1,2-di(bromoacetamido)cyclohexane afforded the C{sub 8}N{sub 4} macrocycle. Reduction with lithium aluminum hydride not only reduced the amide moieties to amines but also removed the tosyl protecting groups affording the cyclohexylcyclen. Cyanomethylation followed by hydrolysis gave C-DOTA in an overall yield of 9.4%. C-DOTA is expected to offer improvements in the biodistribution of radiometal immunoconjugates for radioimmunotherapy, in particular with Sc-47, Y-90, and Sm-153 that have given encouraging results using the plain DOTA ligand.

  17. An economical and safe procedure to synthesize 2-hydroxy-4-pentynoic acid: A precursor towards 'clickable' biodegradable polylactide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanxuan; Ren, Hong; Baker, Gregory L

    2014-01-01

    2-Hydroxy-4-pentynoic acid (1) is a key intermediate towards 'clickable' polylactide which allows for efficient introduction of a broad range of pendant functional groups onto polymers from a single monomer via convenient 'click' chemistry with organic azides. The incorporation of various pendant functional groups could effectively tailor the physicochemical properties of polylactide. The reported synthesis of 1 started from propargyl bromide and ethyl glyoxylate. However, both of starting materials are expensive and unstable; especially, propargyl bromide is shock-sensitive and subjected to thermal explosive decomposition, which makes the preparation of 1 impractical with high cost and high risk of explosion. Herein, we report a simple, economical and safe synthetic route to prepare 1 using cheap and commercially available diethyl 2-acetamidomalonate (4) and propargyl alcohol. The desired product 1 was obtained via alkylation of malonate 4 with propargyl tosylate followed by a one-pot four-step sequence of hydrolysis, decarboxylation, diazotization and hydroxylation of propargylic malonate 5 without work-up of any intermediate. PMID:24991290

  18. UV-Induced [2+2] Grafting-To Reactions for Polymer Modification of Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Conradi, Matthias; Ramakers, Gijs; Junkers, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Benzaldehyde-functional cellulose paper sheets have been synthesized via tosylation of cellulose (Whatman No 5) followed by addition of p-hydroxy benzaldehyde. Via UV-induced Paterno-Büchi [2+2] cycloaddition reactions, these aldehyde functional surfaces are grafted with triallylcyanurate, trimethylolpropane allyl ether, and vinyl chloroacetate. In the following, allyl-functional polymers (poly(butyl acrylate), pBA, Mn = 6990 g mol(-1) , Đ = 1.12 and poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide), pNIPAAm, Mn = 9500 g mol(-1) , Đ = 1.16) synthesized via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization are conjugated to the celloluse surface in a UV-induced grafting-to approach. With pBA, hydrophobic cellulose sheets are obtained (water contact angle 116°), while grafting of pNIPAAm allows for generation of "smart" surfaces, which are hydrophilic at room temperature, but that become hydrophobic when heated above the characteristic lower critical solution temperature (93° contact angle). The Paterno-Büchi reaction has been shown to be a versatile synthetic tool that also performs well in grafting-to approaches whereby its overall performance seems to be close to that of radical thiol-ene reactions. PMID:26523942

  19. Universality and scaling behavior of injected power in elastic turbulence in wormlike micellar gel.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sayantan; Sood, A K

    2011-07-01

    We study the statistical properties of spatially averaged global injected power fluctuations for Taylor-Couette flow of a wormlike micellar gel formed by surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium tosylate. At sufficiently high Weissenberg numbers the shear rate, and hence the injected power p(t), at a constant applied stress shows large irregular fluctuations in time. The nature of the probability distribution function (PDF) of p(t) and the power-law decay of its power spectrum are very similar to that observed in recent studies of elastic turbulence for polymer solutions. Remarkably, these non-Gaussian PDFs can be well described by a universal, large deviation functional form given by the generalized Gumbel distribution observed in the context of spatially averaged global measures in diverse classes of highly correlated systems. We show by in situ rheology and polarized light scattering experiments that in the elastic turbulent regime the flow is spatially smooth but random in time, in agreement with a recent hypothesis for elastic turbulence. PMID:21867248

  20. Bacillus subtillis RTSBA6 6.00, a new strain isolated from gut of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) produces chymotrypsin-like proteases

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Ashok A.; Shaikh, Faiyaz K.; Padul, Manohar V.; Kachole, Manvendra S.

    2012-01-01

    Exploring bacterial communities with proteolytic activity from the gut of the Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) insect pests was the purpose of this study. As initial efforts to achieve this goal here we report the isolation of new Bacillus subtillis RTSBA6 6.00 strain from the gut of H. armigera and demonstrated as proteases producer. Zymographic analysis revealed 12 proteolytic bands with apparent molecular weights ranging from 20 to 185 kDa. Although some activity was detected at acidic pH, the major activity was observed at slight alkaline pH (7.8). The optimum temperature was found to be 35 °C with complete loss of activity at 70 °C. All proteases were completely inactivated by PMSF (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride) and TPCK (N-tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone), suggesting that proteases secreted by B. subtillis RTSBA6 6.00 belong to serine proteases class with chymotrypsin-like activity. The occurrence of protease producing bacterial community in the gut of the H. armigera advocates its probable assistance to insect in proteinaceous food digestion and adaptation to protease inhibitors of host plants. PMID:23961192

  1. Synthesis and Bio-Evaluation of New (18) F-Labeled Pyridaben Analogs with Improved Stability for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mou, Tiantian; Zhao, Zuoquan; Zhang, Pu; Fang, Wei; Peng, Cheng; Lu, Jie; Wang, Qian; Ma, Yunchuan; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2015-09-01

    To improve the stability of (18) F-labeled pyridaben analogs for myocardial perfusion imaging, three new analogs of pyridaben ([(18) F]FPTP2, [(18) F]FPTP-P2, and [(18) F]FPTP-P3) were synthesized with 'side chain' modifications. The radiolabeled tracers and corresponding non-radioactive compounds were obtained by substituting tosyl group with (18/19) F. The effect of structure modification on myocardial targeting and physicochemical properties of new tracers were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The total radiosynthesis time of these tracers was approximately 70-90 min with high decay-corrected radiochemical yields (36-65%) and good radiochemical purity (> 98%). These lipophilic tracers exhibited obvious improved stability in water. Studies of their biodistribution in normal Kunming mice demonstrated that [(18) F]FPTP2 exhibited very high initial heart uptake (39.70 ± 2.81 %ID/g at 2 min after injection) and low background in the liver, blood, and soft tissues. The heart-to-liver, heart-to-lung, and heart-to-blood ratios were 3.59, 19.34, and 67.34 at 15 min postinjection, respectively. Favorable myocardial targeting property and remarkable improvement of stability of [(18) F]FPTP2 suggest that the substitution of the phenyl 'sidechain' with other non-phenyl rings has no effect on the myocardial targeting property of (18) F-labeled pyridaben analogs. PMID:25529021

  2. A Metal-Free Protocol for Aminofunctionalization of Olefins Using TsNBr2.

    PubMed

    Rajbongshi, Kamal Krishna; Saikia, Indranirekha; Chanu, Loukrakpam Dineshwori; Roy, Subhasish; Phukan, Prodeep

    2016-07-01

    N,N-Dibromo-p-toluene sulfonamide (TsNBr2) has been found to be an effective reagent for various aminofunctionalization reactions. This reagent behaves both as an electrophilic bromine source as well as amine to react with olefins under different conditions to yield aminoether, imidazoline, diamine and amino bromine. The reaction proceeds rapidly under mild conditions with high regioselectivity. Olefins react with TsNBr2 in moist THF to form δ-amino ether at room temperature. Treatment of TsNBr2 with olefin in MeCN at room temperature produced imidazoline in high yield. Further modification of the reaction condition resulted in the development of a one-step procedure for the synthesis of N-acetyl,N'-tosyl diamine derivatives directly from olefin. When the olefin was treated with 2.4 mol equiv of TsNBr2 in the presence of K2CO3, N,N'-ditosyl diamine derivative was obtained in moderate yield. Instantaneous formation of aminobromine was observed when an olefin was treated with the reagent in dry CH2Cl2 at room temperature. PMID:27269517

  3. Morphology and structure of photosensitive dye J-aggregates adsorbed on AgBr microcrystals grown in gelatin.

    PubMed

    Saijo, H; Shiojiri, M

    1998-07-15

    Though the cyanine dye J-aggregates carry the role to sense the exposing light in the silver halide photographic system, little research on the morphology of the aggregates in adsorption has been made with modern surface analytical methods. In this paper, we describe the size, epitaxy, multi-layered array formation, nucleation and preferential adsorption, and irregular distribution of population between particles and the segregation on a particle, of J-aggregates adsorbed on AgBr grown in gelatin. We employed cathodoluminescence microscopy, low energy high resolution scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Dye molecules aggregate together near the surface of AgBr and adsorb on the surface. The growth of adsorbed aggregates is controlled by the diffusion of dye molecules from the surrounding solution. The population of J-aggregates adsorbed on an AgBr particle varies from almost none to full coverage. Each aggregate is about (20-30) x (30-50) nm in size and is 2.1 nm thick for thiacarbocyanine with sodium ion, 1.04 nm for thiacarbocyanine with tosyl ion, and 0.5 nm for an oxacarbocyanine. The aggregates connect their longer edges to each other to form arrays, and the arrays build up multi-layered stacks. The arrays align parallel and segregate to form terraces. The longer edges of J-aggregates align along [210] on AgBr (100) or [632] on AgBr (111). PMID:9728883

  4. Lysosomal destabilization in p53-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xi-Ming; Li, Wei; Dalen, Helge; Lotem, Joseph; Kama, Rachel; Sachs, Leo; Brunk, Ulf T.

    2002-01-01

    The tumor suppressor wild-type p53 can induce apoptosis. M1-t-p53 myeloid leukemic cells have a temperature-sensitive p53 protein that changes its conformation to wild-type p53 after transfer from 37°C to 32°C. We have now found that these cells showed an early lysosomal rupture after transfer to 32°C. Mitochondrial damage, including decreased membrane potential and release of cytochrome c, and the appearance of apoptotic cells occurred later. Lysosomal rupture, mitochondrial damage, and apoptosis were all inhibited by the cytokine IL-6. Some other compounds can also inhibit apoptosis induced by p53. The protease inhibitor N-tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone inhibited the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release, the Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin inhibited only cytochrome c release, and the antioxidant butylated hydroxyanisole inhibited only the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. In contrast to IL-6, these other compounds that inhibited some of the later occurring mitochondrial damage did not inhibit the earlier p53-induced lysosomal damage. The results indicate that apoptosis is induced by p53 through a lysosomal-mitochondrial pathway that is initiated by lysosomal destabilization, and that this pathway can be dissected by using different apoptosis inhibitors. These findings on the induction of p53-induced lysosomal destabilization can also help to formulate new therapies for diseases with apoptotic disorders. PMID:11959917

  5. Molecular recognition in the minor groove of the DNA helix. Studies on the synthesis of oligonucleotides and polynucleotides containing 3-deaza-2'-deoxyadenosine. Interaction of the oligonucleotides with the restriction endonuclease EcoRV.

    PubMed Central

    Cosstick, R; Li, X; Tuli, D K; Williams, D M; Connolly, B A; Newman, P C

    1990-01-01

    An improved procedure for the preparation of 3-deaza-2'-deoxyadenosine (d3CA) is described which is suitable for the synthesis of gram quantities of this analogue. Using phosphoramidite chemistry d3CA has been incorporated into the Eco RV restiction endonuclease recognition sequence (underlined) present in the self-complementary dodecamer d(GACGATATCGTC). The modified oligonucleotides have been thoroughly characterised by nucleoside composition analysis, circular dichroism and thermal melting studies. Studies with Eco RV show that incorporation of d3CA into either the central or outer dA-dT base-pair results in a substantial reduction in the rate of cleavage. The two-step conversion of d3CA to 3-deaza-2'-deoxyadenosine-5'-O-triphosphate (d3CATP) via the 5'-O-tosylate is also described. d3CATP is not a substrate in the poly[d(AT)].poly[d(AT)] primed polymerisation for either E. coli DNA polymerase I or Micrococcus luteus DNA polymerase. In a more detailed kinetic analysis d3CATP was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of E. coli DNA polymerase I with respect to dATP. PMID:2395641

  6. DNA sensor based on vapour polymerised pedot films functionalised with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Spain, Elaine; Keyes, Tia E; Forster, Robert J

    2013-03-15

    Poly-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene, PEDOT, films have been deposited on gold electrodes using polymerization from the vapor-phase in which the surface is first covered with a Fe (III) tosylate oxidant and then exposed to 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene, EDOT, vapor. Gold nanoparticles were then electrodeposited to give a nanocomposite material, PEDOT-AuNP. Thiolated capture strand DNA, that is complementary to the sequence associated with the pathogen S. aureus that causes mammary gland inflammation, was then immobilized onto the gold nanoparticles and the underlying gold electrode. The target oligo was then hybridized to the capture strand DNA. A probe strand, labeled with horse radish peroxidase, was then hybridized to the target. The concentration of the target was determined by measuring the current required to reduce hydroquinone oxidized during the regeneration of the HRP label. Semi-log plots of the pathogen DNA concentration vs. faradaic current are linear from 150 pM to 1 μM and pM concentrations can be detected without the need for molecular, e.g., PCR or NASBA, amplification. PMID:22960006

  7. "One-step production of biodiesel from Jatropha oil with high-acid value in ionic liquids" [Bioresour. Technol. 102 (11) (2011)].

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Fang, Zhen; Tian, Xiao-fei; Long, Yun-Duo; Jiang, Li-Qun

    2013-07-01

    Catalytic conversion of un-pretreated Jatropha oil with high-acid value (13.8 mg KOH/g) to biodiesel was studied in ionic liquids (ILs) with metal chlorides. Several commercial ILs were used to catalyze the esterification of oleic acid. It was found that 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tosylate {[BMIm][TS]} had high catalytic activity with 93% esterification rate for oleic acid at 140 °C but only 63.7% Jatropha biodiesel yield at 200 °C. When ZnCl2 was added to [BMIm][TS], a maximum Jatropha biodiesel yield of 92.5% was achieved at 180 °C. Addition of metal ions supplied Lewis acidic sites in ILs promoted both esterification and transestrification reactions. It was also found that the transition metal ions performed higher catalytic activity in transestrification than the ions of Group A. Mixture of [BMIm][TS] and ZnCl2 was easily separated from products for reuse to avoid producing pollutants. PMID:23908993

  8. One-step production of biodiesel from Jatropha oil with high-acid value in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Fang, Zhen; Tian, Xiao-Fei; Long, Yun-Duo; Jiang, Li-Qun

    2011-06-01

    Catalytic conversion of un-pretreated Jatropha oil with high-acid value (13.8 mg KOH/g) to biodiesel was studied in ionic liquids (ILs) with metal chlorides. Several commercial ILs were used to catalyze the esterification of oleic acid. It was found that 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tosylate ([BMIm][CH(3)SO(3)]; a Brønsted acidic IL) had the highest catalytic activity with 93% esterification rate for oleic acid at 140°C but only 12% biodiesel yield at 120°C. When FeCl(3) was added to [BMIm][CH(3)SO(3)], a maximum biodiesel yield of 99.7% was achieved at 120°C. Because metal ions in ILs supplied Lewis acidic sites, and more of the sites could be provided by trivalent metallic ions than those of bivalent ones. It was also found that the catalytic activity with bivalent metallic ions increased with atomic radius. Mixture of [BMIm][CH(3)SO(3)] and FeCl(3) was easily separated from products for reuse to avoid producing pollutants. PMID:21420854

  9. Synthesis of globular precursors.

    PubMed

    Teixidor, Francesc; Sillanpää, Reijo; Pepiol, Ariadna; Lupu, Marius; Viñas, Clara

    2015-09-01

    o-Carborane (C2 B10 H12 ) was adapted to perform as the core of globular macromolecules, dendrons or dendrimers. To meet this objective, precisely defined substitution patterns of terminal olefin groups on the carborane framework were subjected to Heck cross-coupling reactions or hydroboration leading to hydroxyl terminated arms. These led to new terminal groups (chloro, bromo, and tosyl leaving groups, organic acid, and azide) that permitted ester production, click chemistry, and oxonium ring opening to be performed as examples of reactions that demonstrate the wide possibilities of the globular icosahedral carboranes to produce new dendritic or dendrimer-like structures. Polyanionic species were obtained in high yield through the ring-opening reaction of cyclic oxonium compound [3,3'-Co(8-C4 H8 O2 -1,2-C2 B9 H10 )(1',2'-C2 B9 H11 )] by using terminal hydroxyl groups as nucleophiles. These new polyanionic compounds that contain multiple metallacarborane clusters at their periphery may prove useful as new classes of compounds for boron neutron capture therapy with enhanced water solubility and as cores to make a new class of high-boron globular macromolecules. PMID:26228947

  10. Control of Neural Stem Cell Survival by Electroactive Polymer Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Lundin, Vanessa; Herland, Anna; Berggren, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell function is regulated by intrinsic as well as microenvironmental factors, including chemical and mechanical signals. Conducting polymer-based cell culture substrates provide a powerful tool to control both chemical and physical stimuli sensed by stem cells. Here we show that polypyrrole (PPy), a commonly used conducting polymer, can be tailored to modulate survival and maintenance of rat fetal neural stem cells (NSCs). NSCs cultured on PPy substrates containing different counter ions, dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS), tosylate (TsO), perchlorate (ClO4) and chloride (Cl), showed a distinct correlation between PPy counter ion and cell viability. Specifically, NSC viability was high on PPy(DBS) but low on PPy containing TsO, ClO4 and Cl. On PPy(DBS), NSC proliferation and differentiation was comparable to standard NSC culture on tissue culture polystyrene. Electrical reduction of PPy(DBS) created a switch for neural stem cell viability, with widespread cell death upon polymer reduction. Coating the PPy(DBS) films with a gel layer composed of a basement membrane matrix efficiently prevented loss of cell viability upon polymer reduction. Here we have defined conditions for the biocompatibility of PPy substrates with NSC culture, critical for the development of devices based on conducting polymers interfacing with NSCs. PMID:21494605

  11. Fluorous Analogue of Chloramine-T: Preparation, X-ray Structure Determination, and Use as an Oxidant for Radioiodination and s-Tetrazine Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dzandzi, James P K; Beckford Vera, Denis R; Genady, Afaf R; Albu, Silvia A; Eltringham-Smith, Louise J; Capretta, Alfredo; Sheffield, William P; Valliant, John F

    2015-07-17

    A fluorous oxidant that can be used to introduce radioiodine into small molecules and proteins and generate iodinated tetrazines for bioorthogonal chemistry has been developed. The oxidant was prepared in 87% overall yield by combining a fluorous amine with tosyl chloride, followed by chlorination using aqueous sodium hypochlorite. A crystal structure of the oxidant, which is a fluorous analogue of chloramine-T, was obtained. The compound was shown to be stable for 7 days in EtOH and for longer than three months as a solid. The oxidant was effective at promoting the labeling of arylstannanes using [(125)I]NaI, where products were isolated in high specific activity in yields ranging from 46% to 86%. Similarly, iodinated biologically active proteins (e.g., thrombin) were successfully produced, as well as a radioiodinated tetrazine, through a concomitant oxidation-halodemetalation reaction. Because of its fluorous nature, unreacted oxidant and associated reaction byproducts can be removed quantitatively from reaction mixtures by passing solutions through fluorous solid phase extraction cartridges. This feature enables rapid and facile purification, which is critical when working with radionuclides and is similarly beneficial for general synthetic applications. PMID:26030355

  12. Ru Catalyzed Alkene-Alkyne Coupling. Total Synthesis of Amphidinolide P

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Barry M.; Papillon, Julien P. N.; Nussbaumer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A coordinatively unsaturated ruthenium complex catalyzed the formation of a carbon-carbon bond between two judiciously chosen alkene and alkyne partners in good yield, and in a chemo- and regioselective fashion, in spite of the significant degree of unsaturation of the substrates. The resulting 1,4-diene forms the backbone of the cytotoxic marine natural product amphidinolide P. The alkene partner was rapidly assembled from (R)-glycidyl tosylate, which served as a linchpin in a one-flask, sequential three-components coupling process using vinyllithium and a vinyl cyanocuprate. The synthesis of the alkyne partner made use of an unusual anti-selective addition under chelation control conditions of an allyltin reagent derived from tiglic acid. In addition, a remarkably E-selective E2 process using the azodicarboxylate-triphenylphosphine system is featured. Also featured is the first example of the use of a β-lactone as a thermodynamic spring to effect macrolactonization. The oxetanone ring was thus used as a productive protecting group that increased the overall efficiency of this total synthesis. This work was also an opportunity to further probe the scope of the ruthenium-catalyzed alkene-alkyne coupling, in particular using enynes, and studies using various functionalized substrates are described. PMID:16351124

  13. The Scope of Direct Alkylation of Gold Surface with Solutions of C1–C4n-Alkylstannanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of cleaned gold surfaces with dilute tetrahydrofuran or chloroform solutions of tetraalkylstannanes (alkyl = methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, n-butyl) or di-n-butylmethylstannyl tosylate under ambient conditions causes a self-limited growth of disordered monolayers consisting of alkyls and tin oxide. Extensive use of deuterium labeling showed that the alkyls originate from the stannane and not from ambient impurities, and that trialkylstannyl groups are absent in the monolayers, contrary to previous proposals. Methyl groups attached to the Sn atom are not transferred to the surface. Ethyl groups are transferred slowly, and propyl and butyl rapidly. In all cases, tin oxide is codeposited in submonolayer amounts. The monolayers were characterized by ellipsometry, contact angle goniometry, polarization modulated IR reflection absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy with ferrocyanide/ferricyanide, which revealed a very low charge-transfer resistance. The thermal stability of the monolayers and their resistance to solvents are comparable with those of an n-octadecanethiol monolayer. A preliminary examination of the kinetics of monolayer deposition from a THF solution of tetra-n-butylstannane revealed an approximately half-order dependence on the bulk solution concentration of the stannane, hinting that more than one alkyl can be transferred from a single stannane molecule. A detailed structure of the attachment of the alkyl groups is not known, and it is proposed that it involves direct single or multiple bonding of one or more C atoms to one or more Au atoms. PMID:26327466

  14. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of an (18)Fluorine-Labeled COX Inhibitor--[(18)F]Fluorooctyl Fenbufen Amide--For Imaging of Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Cheng; Chang, Yu-Chia; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Yu, Chung-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging of brain tumors remains a great challenge, despite the advances made in imaging technology. An anti-inflammatory compound may be a useful tool for this purpose because there is evidence of inflammatory processes in brain tumor micro-environments. Fluorooctylfenbufen amide (FOFA) was prepared from 8-chlorooctanol via treatment with potassium phthalimide, tosylation with Ts2O, fluorination with KF under phase transfer catalyzed conditions, deprotection using aqueous hydrazine, and coupling with fenbufen. The corresponding radiofluoro product [(18)F]FOFA, had a final radiochemical yield of 2.81 mCi and was prepared from activated [(18)F]F(-) (212 mCi) via HPLC purification and concentration. The radiochemical purity was determined to be 99%, and the specific activity was shown to exceed 22 GBq/μmol (EOS) based on decay-corrected calculations. Ex-vivo analysis of [(18)F]FOFA in plasma using HPLC showed that the agent had a half-life of 15 min. PET scanning showed significant accumulation of [(18)F]FOFA over tumor loci with reasonable contrast in C6-glioma bearing rats. These results suggest that this molecule is a promising agent for the visualization of brain tumors. Further investigations should focus on tumor micro-environments. PMID:27007363

  15. Mackerel Trypsin Purified from Defatted Viscera by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Byung-Soo; Kishimura, Hideki; Nalinanon, Sitthipong; Klomklao, Sappasith; Benjakul, Soottawat

    2011-01-01

    Viscera of mackerel (Scomber sp.) were defatted by supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO2) treatment. Trypsin (SC-T) was then extracted from the defatted powder and purified by a series of chromatographies including Sephacryl S-200 and Sephadex G-50. The purified SC-T was nearly homogeneous on SDS-PAGE, and its molecular weight was estimated as approximately 24,000 Da. N-terminal twenty amino acids sequence of SC-T was IVGGYECTAHSQPHQVSLNS. The specific trypsin inhibitors, soybean trypsin inhibitor and TLCK, strongly inhibited the activities of SC-T. The pH and temperature optimums of SC-T were at around pH 8.0 and 60°C, respectively, using Nα-p-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester as a substrate. The SC-T was unstable below pH 5.0 and above 40°C, and it was stabilized by calcium ion. These enzymatic characteristics of SC-T were the same as those of other fish trypsins, especially spotted mackerel (S. borealis) trypsin, purified from viscera defatted by acetone. Therefore, we concluded that the SCO2 defatting process is useful as a substitute for organic solvent defatting process. PMID:22312468

  16. A nonionic porphyrin as a noninterfering DNA antibacterial agent.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Sónia; Camacho, Fábio; Silva, Tito; Calado, Cecília R C; Serra, Arménio Coimbra; Gonsalves, António M d'A Rocha; Roxo-Rosa, Mónica

    2011-01-01

    The increasing interest in clinical bacterial photodynamic inactivation has led to the search for photosensitizers with higher bactericidal efficiency and less side effects on the surrounding tissues. We present a novel nonionic porphyrin, the 5,10,15-tris(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-20-[4-N-(6-amino-hexyl)sulfonamido)phenyl]-porphyrin (ACS769F4) with substantial improvements in the efficiency of nonionic sensitizers. This porphyrin causes eradication of both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by the photodynamic effect but in higher concentrations compared with 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-N,N,N-trimethylammoniumphenyl)-porphyrin p-tosylate (TTAP(4+)), a known bactericidal tetracationic porphyrin. More important, under such conditions, ACS769F4 proved to be harmless to two mammalian cells lines (human embryonic and baby hamster kidney), causing no reduction in their viability or negative impact on their cytoskeleton, despite its accumulation in cellular structures. On the contrary, TTAP(4+) is shown to accumulate in the nucleus of mammalian cells, in association to DNA, causing chromatin condensation after exposure to light. Furthermore, dark incubation with TTAP(4+) was shown to have a deleterious effect on the microtubule network. Based on its bactericidal efficiency, also observed without exposure to light, and on the low tendency to be harmful or genotoxic to mammalian cells, ACS769F4 should be looked at as an interesting photosensitizer to be evaluated for clinical purposes. PMID:21834867

  17. Reversed Electron Apportionment in Mesolytic Cleavage: The Reduction of Benzyl Halides by SmI2.

    PubMed

    Yitzhaki, Offir; Hoz, Shmaryahu

    2015-06-15

    The paradigm that the cleavage of the radical anion of benzyl halides occurs in such a way that the negative charge ends up on the departing halide leaving behind a benzyl radical is well rooted in chemistry. By studying the kinetics of the reaction of substituted benzylbromides and chlorides with SmI2 in THF it was found that substrates para-substituted with electron-withdrawing groups (CN and CO2 Me), which are capable of forming hydrogen bonds with a proton donor and coordinating to samarium cation, react in a reversed electron apportionment mode. Namely, the halide departs as a radical. This conclusion is based on the found convex Hammett plots, element effects, proton donor effects, and the effect of tosylate (OTs) as a leaving group. The latter does not tend to tolerate radical character on the oxygen atom. In the presence of a proton donor, the tolyl derivatives were the sole product, whereas in its absence, the coupling dimer was obtained by a SN 2 reaction of the benzyl anion on the neutral substrate. The data also suggest that for the para-CN and CO2 Me derivatives in the presence of a proton donor, the first electron transfer is coupled with the proton transfer. PMID:25965697

  18. Development of a New Radiofluorinated Quinoline Analog for PET Imaging of Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) in Brain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianrong; Wenzel, Barbara; Dukic-Stefanovic, Sladjana; Teodoro, Rodrigo; Ludwig, Friedrich-Alexander; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Schröder, Susann; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Moreau, Emmanuel; Brust, Peter; Maisonial-Besset, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are enzymes that play a major role in cell signalling by hydrolysing the secondary messengers cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and/or cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) throughout the body and brain. Altered cyclic nucleotide-mediated signalling has been associated with a wide array of disorders, including neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, PDE5 has been shown to be involved in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, but its precise role has not been elucidated yet. To visualize and quantify the expression of this enzyme in brain, we developed a radiotracer for specific PET imaging of PDE5. A quinoline-based lead compound has been structurally modified resulting in the fluoroethoxymethyl derivative ICF24027 with high inhibitory activity towards PDE5 (IC50 = 1.86 nM). Radiolabelling with fluorine-18 was performed by a one-step nucleophilic substitution reaction using a tosylate precursor (RCY(EOB) = 12.9% ± 1.8%; RCP > 99%; SA(EOS) = 70–126 GBq/μmol). In vitro autoradiographic studies of [18F]ICF24027 on different mouse tissue as well as on porcine brain slices demonstrated a moderate specific binding to PDE5. In vivo studies in mice revealed that [18F]ICF24027 was metabolized under formation of brain penetrable radiometabolites making the radiotracer unsuitable for PET imaging of PDE5 in brain. PMID:27110797

  19. Virulence characteristics of oral treponemes in a murine model.

    PubMed Central

    Kesavalu, L; Walker, S G; Holt, S C; Crawley, R R; Ebersole, J L

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the virulence characteristics of Treponema denticola, T. socranskii, T. pectinovorum, and T. vincentii following challenge infection of mice. These microorganisms induced well-demarcated, dose-dependent, raised subcutaneous (s.c.) abscesses which were similar in time of onset, lesion progression, and duration of healing. Only viable cells were capable of inducing these characteristic s.c. abscesses. Histological examination of the skin lesion 3 and 5 days postinfection revealed abscess formation in the s.c. tissues, and abundant spiral organisms were demonstrated to be present in the abscess. Host resistance modulation by dexamethasone (neutrophil alteration) and cyclophosphamide (neutrophil depletion) pretreatment had a minimal effect on the virulence expression by any of these treponemes. The T. denticola isolates demonstrated significant trypsin-like protease (TLPase) activity, while both T. socranskii and T. vincentii were devoid of this activity. Interestingly, T. pectinovorum strains were heterogeneous with respect to TLPase as high producers, low producers, and nonproducers. However, no differences in lesion formation were noted regardless of whether the species expressed this proteolytic activity or whether treatment with N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) and dithiothreitol was performed. These results showed that (i) a murine model may be used to evaluate virulence expression by oral treponemes; (ii) while TLPase activity varies among the oral treponemes, this protease does not appear to participate in abscess induction in the mouse model; and (iii) T. pectinovorum strains show variation in TLPase activity. PMID:9393801

  20. Amphiphilic behavior of two phosphonium based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Indrajyoti; Mukherjee, Suvasree; Naskar, Bappaditya; Ghosh, Soumen; Moulik, Satya P

    2013-04-01

    Solution and surface chemical behavior of two phosphonium based ionic liquids triisobutyl (methyl) phosphonium tosylate (IL-1) and trihexyl (tetradecyl) phosphonium bis 2,4,4-(trimethylpentyl)phosphinate (IL-2) have been studied. The polar IL-1 is surface active and water soluble, whereas the weakly polar IL-2 is more surface active with very low aqueous solubility. IL-1 does not form micelles but affects the micellization properties of ionic, nonionic, and zwitterionic surfactants more strongly than conventional electrolytes. IL-2 itself forms micelles and mixed micelles with Triton X-100 (TX-100) in aqueous solution. It also forms Langmuir monolayers of liquid expanded type, at the air/water interface. IL-1 can replace water in forming microemulsions with the oil isopropylmyristate (IPM), stabilized by IL-2 (surfactant)+isopropanol (IP as a co-surfactant) like the IL-1/IPM/(IL-2+IP) system. It produces a large monophasic zone in the pseudoternary phase diagram. The thermodynamics of formation of the microemulsions of IL-1 in oil (IPM) have been examined. The dimensions and the polydispersity of the dispersed nano-droplets in the microemulsions have been determined by DLS. The thermal stability of the microemulsion forming systems has also been studied. ILs studied against Sarcoma-180 cell lines have evidenced proficient anti-cancer activity of IL-1 and moderate activity of IL-2. PMID:23317771

  1. Preparation and biodistribution of F-18 labeled FQNPe

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, H.; Beets, K.; McPherson, D.W.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1996-05-01

    1-Azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl {alpha}-(1-fluoropentan-5-yl)-{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenylacetate (FQNPe) is an attractive candidate for the in vivo imaging of muscarinic receptors (mAChR) by PET. Initial studies with this new agent demonstrated a high binding affinity and ability to bind to regions of the brain containing mAChR. Fluorine-18 (F-18) labeling of racemic 1 was performed using X = tosyl, triflate, or mesylate group and a decay corrected radiolabeling yields of 2.6, 33, 75%, respectively, were obtained. F-18-3 in 11 % yield (decay corrected to beginning of synthesis). Initial biodistribution studies in rats (n=5) showed F-18-3 had high cerebral uptake of 0.72 ({plus_minus}0.26) and 0.83 ({plus_minus} 0.12) injected dose/gram at 15 and 30 minutes, respectively. The F-18 labeling and biodistribution study of the (-)-quinuclidinyl (-)-acetate and (-)-quinuclidinyl (+)-acetate isomers of FQNPe are currently being pursued.

  2. Screening and characterization of protease producing actinomycetes from marine saltern.

    PubMed

    Suthindhiran, Krish; Jayasri, Mangalam Achuthananda; Dipali, Dipa; Prasar, Apurva

    2014-10-01

    In the course of systematic screening program for bioactive actinomycetes, an alkaline protease producing halophilic strain Actinopolyspora sp. VITSDK2 was isolated from marine saltern, Southern India. The strain was identified as Actinopolyspora based on its phenotypic and phylogenetic characters. The protease was partially purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation and subsequently by DEAE cellulose column chromatography. The enzyme was further purified using HPLC and the molecular weight was found to be 22 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. The purified protease exhibited pH stability in a wide range of 4-12 with optimum at 10.0. The enzyme was found to be stable between 25 and 80 °C and displayed a maximum activity at 60 °C. The enzyme activity was increased marginally in presence of Mn(2+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) and decreased in presence of Cu(2+) . PMSF and DFP completely inhibited the activity suggesting it belongs to serine protease. Further, the proteolytic activity was abolished in presence of N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone suggesting this might be chymotrypsin-like serine protease. The protease was 96% active when kept for 10 days at room temperature. The results indicate that the enzyme belong to chymotrypsin-like serine protease exhibiting both pH and thermostability, which can be used for various applications in industries. PMID:24136565

  3. Aptamer-based organic-silica hybrid affinity monolith prepared via "thiol-ene" click reaction for extraction of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Jin-cheng; Lian, Hong-zhen; Chen, Hong-yuan

    2015-06-01

    A novel strategy for preparing aptamer-based organic-silica hybrid monolithic column was developed via "thiol-ene" click chemistry. Due to the large specific surface area of the hybrid matrix and the simplicity, rapidness and high efficiency of "thiol-ene" click reaction, the average coverage density of aptamer on the organic-silica hybrid monolith reached 420 pmol μL(-1). Human α-thrombin can be captured on the prepared affinity monolithic column with high specificity and eluted by NaClO4 solution. N-p-tosyl-Gly-Pro-Arg p-nitroanilide acetate was used as the sensitive chromogenic substrate of thrombin. The thrombin enriched by this affinity column was detected with a detection of limit of 0.01 μM by spectrophotometry. Furthermore, the extraction recovery of thrombin at 0.15 μM in human serum was 91.8% with a relative standard deviation of 4.0%. These results indicated that "thiol-ene" click chemistry provided a promising technique to immobilize aptamer on organic-inorganic hybrid monolith and the easily-assembled affinity monolithic material could be used to realize highly selective recognition of trace proteins. PMID:25863371

  4. 2'-O-Methyl- and 2'-O-propargyl-5-methylisocytidine: synthesis, properties and impact on the isoCd-dG and the isoCd-isoGd base pairing in nucleic acids with parallel and antiparallel strand orientation.

    PubMed

    Jana, Sunit K; Leonard, Peter; Ingale, Sachin A; Seela, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Oligonucleotides containing 2'-O-methylated 5-methylisocytidine (3) and 2'-O-propargyl-5-methylisocytidine (4) as well as the non-functionalized 5-methyl-2'-deoxyisocytidine (1b) were synthesized. MALDI-TOF mass spectra of oligonucleotides containing 1b are susceptible to a stepwise depyrimidination. In contrast, oligonucleotides incorporating 2'-O-alkylated nucleosides 3 and 4 are stable. This is supported by acid catalyzed hydrolysis experiments performed on nucleosides in solution. 2'-O-Alkylated nucleoside 3 was synthesized from 2'-O-5-dimethyluridine via tosylation, anhydro nucleoside formation and ring opening. The corresponding 4 was obtained by direct regioselective alkylation of 5-methylisocytidine (1d) with propargyl bromide under phase-transfer conditions. Both compounds were converted to phosphoramidites and employed in solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis. Hybridization experiments resulted in duplexes with antiparallel or parallel chains. In parallel duplexes, methylation or propargylation of the 2'-hydroxyl group of isocytidine leads to destabilization while in antiparallel DNA this effect is less pronounced. 2'-O-Propargylated 4 was used to cross-link nucleosides and oligonucleotides to homodimers by a stepwise click ligation with a bifunctional azide. PMID:27221215

  5. Phase equilibria and modeling of pyridinium-based ionic liquid solutions.

    PubMed

    Domańska, Urszula; Królikowski, Marek; Ramjugernath, Deresh; Letcher, Trevor M; Tumba, Kaniki

    2010-11-25

    The phase diagrams of the ionic liquid (IL) N-butyl-4-methylpyridinium bis{(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl}imide ([BM(4)Py][NTf(2)]) with water, an alcohol (1-butanol, 1-hexanol, 1-octanol, 1-decanol), an aromatic hydrocarbon (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, n-propylbenzene), an alkane (n-hexane, n-heptane, n-octane), or cyclohexane have been measured at atmospheric pressure using a dynamic method. This work includes the characterization of the synthesized compound by water content and also by differential scanning calorimetry. Phase diagrams for the binary systems of [BM(4)Py][NTf(2)] with all solvents reveal eutectic systems with regards to (solid-liquid) phase equilibria and show immiscibility in the liquid phase region with an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) in most of the mixtures. The phase equilibria (solid, or liquid-liquid) for the binary systems containing aliphatic hydrocarbons reported here exhibit the lowest solubility and the highest immiscibility gap, a trend which has been observed for all ILs. The reduction of experimental data has been carried out using the nonrandom two-liquid (NRTL) correlation equation. The phase diagrams reported here have been compared with analogous phase diagrams reported previously for systems containing the IL N-butyl-4-methylpyridinium tosylate and other pyridinium-based ILs. The influence of the anion of the IL on the phase behavior has been discussed. PMID:20964426

  6. Concerted mechanism for ethane hydroxylation by the particulate methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, B.; Priestly, N.D.; Floss, H.G.; Zhu, M.; Nguyen, H.H.T.; Chan, S.I.; Morimoto, Hiromi; Williams, P.G.

    1996-01-31

    The ethanol samples in the isolated alcohol/water mixtures were converted into their (2R)-2-acetoxy-2-phenylethanoate derivatives (2-34 mCi). Examination of the well-resolved {sup 3}H NMR spectra for these derivatives produced an exceptionally consistent set of stereochemical data. When corrected for the enantiomeric purity of the ethyl tosylate starting materials, the data clearly show that the reaction occurs with complete retention of configuration, i.e., with 100% stereoselection. Barring substantial slowing of the carbon-carbon bond rotation of the ethyl radical when bound to the enzyme, this result rules out mechanisms proceeding via alkyl radical (and/or cation) structures, even very short-lived ones, as such intermediates would have to have a lifetime of < 1 x 10{sup -14} s in order not to undergo any detectable C-C bond rotation, i.e., the capture reaction would have to be much faster than the decay of a transition state. The data instead point to a mechanism in which C-H bond cleavage is preceded by bond formation at the alkyl carbon, i.e., one proceeding through a pentacoordinated carbon species. 29 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Synthesis and phytotoxicity of new ionic liquids incorporating chiral cations and/or chiral anions.

    PubMed

    Bałczewski, Piotr; Bachowska, Barbara; Białas, Tomasz; Biczak, Robert; Wieczorek, Wanda M; Balińska, Agnieszka

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize chiral ionic liquids as chiral solvents for organic synthesis and to evaluate the phyto(eco)toxicity of the new products and starting N-alkylimidazoles and their potential environmental influence on soil and plants. Chiral ionic liquids containing anions such as Cl-, Br-, TsO-, PF6(-), NO3(-), CF3SO3(-), and (+)- and (-)-C6H5CH(OH)C(O)O- were synthesized using (-)-(1R)-6,6-dimethylbicyclo[3.1.1]hept-2-ene-2-ethyl [(-)-(1R)-nopyl] halides (X = Cl, Br) and tosylate in 62-100% yields. The chloride 7 and the nitrate 13 ionic liquids possessed a toxicity dependent on the applied concentration. The lowest concentration causing a distinct reduction in plant germination/growth was 100 mg/kg. Spring barley better tolerated the ionic liquids (200 mg/kg) than common radish (100 mg/kg). The nitrate liquid did not exhibit an inhibiting effect on the germination ability of seeds. The starting N-methylimidazole used in lower concentrations (1 and 10 mg/kg of soil dry weight) was not phytotoxic, in contrast to higher doses (>1000 mg/kg). PMID:17269786

  8. Supramolecular hydrogen-bonded structures between melamine and N-heterocycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, Sophia J.; Lacher, Monika; Lermer, Claudia; Schnick, Wolfgang

    2012-04-01

    Melamine (M) forms hydrogen bonded adducts with the N-heterocycles tris(2-pyridyl)-triazine (TPTZ) and tetrakis(4-N-methylpyridinumyl)porphyrin tetratosylate (TMPyP-Tos). The 4:3 adduct 4M·3TPTZ was obtained under solvent-free conditions and the 3:1 adduct 3M·TMPyP-Tos·9H2O in aqueous solution. In both adduct phases N-heterocycles are arranged in π-π stacks and melamine molecules are arranged perpendicular to these stacks. Whereas cohesion between the extended π-systems of N-heterocycles is mainly achieved by dispersive interactions no stacking interactions between melamine molecules occur. Melamine units are orientated in such a way to be located most suitable as donors and acceptors, respectively, for a dense hydrogen bonding network. In 4M·3TPTZ all molecules are involved in hydrogen bonding, whereas in 3M·TMPyP-Tos·9H2O hydrogen bridges are primarily formed between melamine, tosylate and water units and the macrocycle TMPyP is mainly bound by electrostatic interactions.

  9. Thermal Conductivity and ZT in Disordered Organic Thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, H. L.

    2013-03-01

    For decades, continuous attempts have been made to improve the figure of merit ( ZT) of thermoelectrics. The theory behind the Seebeck effect itself is well researched, but the problem with ZT is related to materials properties that offset one another. This work analyzed the link between the site energy distributions and thermal conductivity of oxidized poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene-tosylate) (PEDOT:Tos), which was reported to be a good organic thermoelectric. To understand how heat flow was affected by "disorder" in PEDOT:Tos and the associated electron-phonon interactions, we computed the values of the thermal conductivity κ and ZT using materials parameters extracted from the open literature. By varying the values of the parameters separately, we were able to identify their individual influence on κ and ZT. Our results suggest that ZT is most sensitive to changes in σ, the bandwidth of the density of states (DOS) of the transport sites, and less so to changes in n eff, the effective carrier density. Our simulations also suggested that ZT could become exceptionally large (approaching a value of ~20) if σ were lowered to 1 meV to 2 meV. This would be a tremendous approach to increase ZT in oxidized PEDOT:Tos.

  10. Stable Deep Doping of Vapor-Phase Polymerized Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/Ionic Liquid Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Christoffer; Nicholas, James; Evans, Drew; Forsyth, Maria; Strømme, Maria; Sjödin, Martin; Howlett, Patrick C; Pozo-Gonzalo, Cristina

    2016-08-23

    Liquid-solution polymerization and vapor-phase polymerization (VPP) have been used to manufacture a series of chloride- and tosylate-doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) carbon paper electrodes. The electrochemistry, specific capacitance, and specific charge were determined for single electrodes in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (emim dca) ionic liquid electrolyte. VPP-PEDOT exhibits outstanding properties with a specific capacitance higher than 300 F g(-1) , the highest value reported for a PEDOT-based conducting polymer, and doping levels as high as 0.7 charges per monomer were achieved. Furthermore, symmetric PEDOT supercapacitor cells with the emim dca electrolyte exhibited a high specific capacitance (76.4 F g(-1) ) and high specific energy (19.8 Wh kg(-1) ). A Ragone plot shows that the VPP-PEDOT cells combine the high specific power of conventional ("pure") capacitors with the high specific energy of batteries, a highly sought-after target for energy storage. PMID:27325487

  11. One-pot pseudomorphic crystallization of mesoporous porous silica to hierarchical porous zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Jun-Ling; Jiang, Shu-Hua; Pang, Jun-Ling; Yuan, En-Hui; Ma, Xiao-Jing; Lam, Koon-Fung; Xue, Qing-Song; Zhang, Kun

    2015-09-15

    Hierarchically porous silica with mesopore and zeolitic micropore was synthesized via pseudomorphic crystallization under high-temperature hydrothermal treatment in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium tosylate and tetrapropylammonium ions. A combined characterization using small-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TG), and elemental analysis showed that dual templates, CTA{sup +} and TPA{sup +} molecules, can work in a cooperative manner to synthesize mesoporous zeolite in a one-pot system by precisely tuning the reaction conditions, such as reaction time and temperature, and type and amount of heterometal atoms. It is found that the presence of Ti precursor is critical to the successful synthesis of such nanostructure. It not only retards the nucleation and growth of crystalline MFI domains, but also acts as nano-binder or nano-glue to favor the assembly of zeolite nanoblocks. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • A facile method to synthesize mesoporous zeolites with hierarchical porosity was presented. • It gives a new insight into keeping the balance between mesoscopic and molecular ordering in hierarchical porous materials. • A new understanding on the solid–solid transformation mechanism for the synthesis of titanosilicate zeolites was proposed.

  12. Investigation into the potential of sub-lethal photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) to reduce susceptibility of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Donnelly, R. F.; Tunney, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    In PACT, a combination of a sensitising drug and visible light cause the selective destruction of microbial cells via singlet oxygen production. As singlet oxygen is a non-specific oxidizing agent and is only present during illumination, development of resistance to this treatment is thought to be unlikely. However, in response to oxidative stress, bacteria can up-regulate oxidative stress genes and associated antibiotic resistance genes. The up-regulation of these genes and potential transfer of genetic material may result in a resistant bacterial population. This study determined whether treatment of clinically isolated meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains with sub-lethal doses of methylene blue (MB) and meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP)-PACT resulted in reduced susceptibility to antibiotics and previously lethal PACT. Exposure of strains to sub-lethal doses of photosensitizer in combination with light had no effect on susceptibility to previously lethal photosensitization. Furthermore, exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of both photosensitizers caused no significant changes in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for each strain tested. Any differences in susceptibility were not significant as they did not cross breakpoints between resistant and susceptible for any organism or antibiotic tested. Therefore, PACT remains an attractive alternative option for treatment of MRSA infections.

  13. Microwave-assisted stereospecific synthesis of novel tetrahydropyran adenine isonucleosides and crystal structures determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Fábio P. L.; Cirqueira, Marilia L.; Martins, Felipe T.; Vasconcellos, Mário L. A. A.

    2013-11-01

    We describe in this article stereospecific syntheses for new isonucleosides analogs of adenine 5-7 from tosyl derivatives 2-4 accessing by microwave irradiations (50-80%). The adenine reacts entirely at the N(9) position. Compounds 2-4 were prepared in two steps from the corresponding alcohols 1, 8 and 9 (81-92%). These tetrahydropyrans alcohols 1, 8 and 9 are achiral (Meso compounds) and were prepared in two steps with complete control of 2,4,6-cis relative configuration by Prins cyclization reaction (60-63%) preceded by the Barbier reaction between allyl bromide with benzaldehyde, 4-fluorobenzaldehyde and 2-naphthaldehyde respectively under Lewis acid conditions (96-98%). The configurations and preferential conformations of 5-7 were determined by crystal structure of 6. These novel isonucleosides 5-7 present in silico potentiality to act as GPCR ligand, kinase inhibitor and enzyme inhibitor, evaluated by Molinspiration program, consistent with the expected antiviral and anticancer bioactivities.

  14. Polyglycerol-functionalized nanodiamond as a platform for gene delivery: Derivatization, characterization, and hybridization with DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Nakae, Yuki; Qin, Hongmei; Ito, Tadamasa; Kimura, Takahide; Kojima, Hideto; Chan, Lawrence; Komatsu, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    A gene vector consisting of nanodiamond, polyglycerol, and basic polypeptide (ND-PG-BPP) has been designed, synthesized, and characterized. The ND-PG-BPP was synthesized by PG functionalization of ND through ring-opening polymerization of glycidol on the ND surface, multistep organic transformations (-OH → -OTs (tosylate) → -N3) in the PG layer, and click conjugation of the basic polypeptides (Arg8, Lys8 or His8) terminated with propargyl glycine. The ND-PG-BPP exhibited good dispersibility in water (>1.0 mg/mL) and positive zeta potential ranging from +14.2 mV to +44.1 mV at neutral pH in Milli-Q water. It was confirmed by gel retardation assay that ND-PG-Arg8 and ND-PG-Lys8 with higher zeta potential hybridized with plasmid DNA (pDNA) through electrostatic attraction, making them promising as nonviral vectors for gene delivery. PMID:24778723

  15. Sustained elevation of NF-κB activity sensitizes offspring of maternal inflammation to hypertension via impairing PGC-1α recovery.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Luo, Hongqin; Chen, Xianhua; Han, Qi; Wang, Fangjie; Huang, Pei; Lai, Wenjing; Guan, Xiao; Pan, Xiaodong; Ji, Yan; Guo, Wei; Che, Ling; Tang, Yuan; Gu, Liangqi; Yu, Jianhua; Namaka, Michael; Deng, Youcai; Li, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence has demonstrated that maternal detrimental factors, including inflammation, contribute to the development of hypertension in the offspring. The current study found that offspring subjected to prenatal exposure of inflammation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge during the second semester showed significantly increased systolic blood pressure. In addition, these offspring also displayed augmented vascular damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in thoracic aortas when challenged with deoxycorticosterone acetate and high-salt diet (DOCA-salt). Interestingly, the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine markedly reversed these changes. Mechanistically, prenatal LPS exposure led to pre-existing elevated peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor-γ co-activator (PGC)-1α, a critical master of ROS metabolism, which up-regulated the ROS defense capacity and maintained the balance of ROS generation and elimination under resting state. However, continued elevation of NF-κB activity significantly suppressed the rapid recovery of PGC-1α expression response to DOCA-salt challenge in offspring that underwent prenatal inflammatory stimulation. This was further confirmed by using a NF-κB inhibitor (N-p-Tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone) that restored PGC-1α recovery and prevented blood pressure elevation induced by DOCA-salt. Our results suggest that maternal inflammation programmed proneness to NF-κB over-activation which impaired PGC-1α-mediated anti-oxidant capacity resulting in the increased sensitivity of offspring to hypertensive damage. PMID:27616627

  16. A reinvestigation of a synthetic peptide (TrPepz) designed to mimic trypsin.

    PubMed Central

    Wells, J A; Fairbrother, W J; Otlewski, J; Laskowski, M; Burnier, J

    1994-01-01

    Recently, a 29-residue cyclic peptide was synthesized (TrPepz) that was reported to possess nearly the same catalytic activity and specificity as the pancreatic serine protease, trypsin, for hydrolysis of a small ester substrate, N-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME), and small and large peptides [Atassi, M. Z. & Manshouri, T. (1993) Proc. Natl. Acad Sci. USA 90, 8282-8286]. To study these results we have resynthesized TrPepz and a related cyclic peptide reported to possess some trypsin-like activity. The authenticity of each peptide was confirmed by mass spectrometry, peptide sequencing, compositional analysis, and 1H NMR spectroscopy. However, neither peptide exhibited any detectable esterase activity or amidase activity under a variety of conditions tested. Molecular modeling studies indicated it was possible for TrPepz to be nearly superimposed upon the active site of trypsin. However, NMR experiments showed the structure of the cyclic peptide to be disordered. Thus, we were unable to confirm the results of Atassi and Manshouri. Our results are consistent with the view that serine protease activity depends not only on the presence of catalytic groups but also on their precise and stable alignment. PMID:8183880

  17. Investigation into the susceptibility of Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates to photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Watters, A. L.; Donnelly, R. F.; Tunney, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    The main cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) sufferers is progressive pulmonary damage caused by recurrent and often unremitting respiratory tract infection. Causative organisms include Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Haemophilus influenzae, but in recent years the Burkholderia cepacia complex has come to the fore. This group of highly drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria are associated with a rapid decline in lung function and the often fatal cepacia syndrome, with treatment limited to patient segregation and marginally effective antibacterial regimens. Thus, development of an effective treatment is of the upmost importance. PACT, a non-target specific therapy, has proven successful in killing both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, planktonic cultures of six strains of the B. cepacia complex were irradiated (635 nm, 200 J cm-2,10 minutes irradiation) following 30 seconds incubation with methylene blue (MB) or meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP). Rates of kill of > 99 % were achieved with MB- and TMP-PACT. A MB concentration of 50 μg ml-1 and TMP concentration of 500 μg ml-1 were associated with highest percentage kills for each photosensitizer. PACT is an attractive option for treatment of B.cepacia complex infection. Further study, involving biofilm culture susceptibility, delivery of light to the target and in vivo testing will be necessary before it PACT becomes a viable treatment option for CF patients who are colonised or infected with B. cepacia complex.

  18. Use of 3-[18F]fluoropropanesulfonyl chloride as a prosthetic agent for the radiolabelling of amines: Investigation of precursor molecules, labelling conditions and enzymatic stability of the corresponding sulfonamides

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Steffen; Hiller, Achim; Köckerling, Martin; Funke, Uta; Maisonial, Aurélie; Brust, Peter; Steinbach, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Summary 3-[18F]Fluoropropanesulfonyl chloride, a recently proposed prosthetic agent for fluorine-18 labelling, was prepared in a two-step radiosynthesis via 3-[18F]fluoropropyl thiocyanate as an intermediate. Two benzenesulfonate-based radiolabelling precursors were prepared by various routes. Comparing the reactivities of 3-thiocyanatopropyl nosylate and the corresponding tosylate towards [18F]fluoride the former proved to be superior accounting for labelling yields of up to 85%. Conditions for a reliable transformation of 3-[18F]fluoropropyl thiocyanate to the corresponding sulfonyl chloride with the potential for automation have been identified. The reaction of 3-[18F]fluoropropanesulfonyl chloride with eight different aliphatic and aromatic amines was investigated and the identity of the resulting 18F-labelled sulfonamides was confirmed chromatographically by comparison with their nonradioactive counterparts. Even for weakly nucleophilic amines such as 4-nitroaniline the desired radiolabelled sulfonamides were accessible in satisfactory yields owing to systematic variation of the reaction conditions. With respect to the application of the 18F-fluoropropansulfonyl group to the labelling of compounds relevant as imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET), the stability of N-(4-fluorophenyl)-3-fluoropropanesulfonamide against degradation catalysed by carboxylesterase was investigated and compared to that of the analogous fluoroacetamide. PMID:23766817

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Atherosclerosis Using CD81-Targeted Microparticles of Iron Oxide in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fei; Yang, Wei; Li, Xiang; Liu, Hongmei; Nan, Xiang; Xie, Lisi; Zhou, Dongliang; Xie, Guoxi; Wu, Junru; Qiu, Bensheng; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using CD81- (Cluster of Differentiation 81 protein-) targeted microparticles of iron oxide (CD81-MPIO) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the murine atherosclerosis. CD81-MPIO and IgG- (Immunoglobulin G-) MPIO were prepared by covalently conjugating, respectively, with anti-CD81 monoclonal and IgG antibodies to the surface of the tosyl activated MPIO. The relevant binding capability of the MPIO was examined by incubating them with murine bEnd.3 cells stimulated with phenazine methosulfate (PMS) and its effect in shortening T2 relaxation time was also examined. MRI in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice was studied in vivo. Our results show that CD81-MPIO, but not IgG-MPIO, can bind to the PMS-stimulated bEnd.3 cells. The T2 relaxation time was significantly shortened for stimulated bEnd.3 cells when compared with IgG-MPIO. In vivo MRI in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice showed highly conspicuous areas of low signal after CD81-MPIO injection. Quantitative analysis of the area of CD81-MPIO contrast effects showed 8.96- and 6.98-fold increase in comparison with IgG-MPIO or plain MPIO, respectively (P < 0.01). Histological assay confirmed the expression of CD81 and CD81-MPIO binding onto atherosclerotic lesions. In conclusion, CD81-MPIO allows molecular assessment of murine atherosclerotic lesions by magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26266263

  20. Patterns of Substance Use among HIV-Positive Adults Over 50: Implications for Treatment and Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Starks, Tyrel J.; Millar, Brett M.; Boonrai, Kailip; Marcotte, David

    2014-01-01

    Background The population of older adults living with HIV is increasing in the United States. Despite an increased focus on the health of HIV-positive older adults, knowledge about their substance use, a primary risk factor for HIV medication non-adherence, and the association between use, problems associated with use, and adherence behavior, is limited. Methods Data were collected from 557 HIV-positive adults aged 50 and older in the New York City area via telephone interview. Participants reported the number of days in the past month on which they missed any doses of HIV medication as well as the number of days they used alcohol, marijuana, cocaine/crack, opiates, amyl nitrite (poppers), and other drugs. The severity of substance use associated problems was assessed using the DAST-10 and AUDIT-C. Results The sample included gay/bisexual (40.4%) and heterosexual (28.1%) men as well as lesbian/bisexual (4.9%) and heterosexual (26.7%) women. Latent class analyses identified four distinct patterns of substance use: Exclusive Alcohol Use; Alcohol and Marijuana; Alcohol and Cocaine/Crack; and Multiple-Substance Use. Variability in the number of missed HIV medication days and perceptions of substance use associated problems were observed across classes, with poorest adherence reported in the Alcohol and Cocaine/Crack class, followed by the Multiple-Substance Use class. These two classes also reported the greatest perceived impairment from substance use. Conclusions Patterns of recent substance use were associated with varying levels of HIV medication adherence and perceived substance use impairment, indicating that substance type matters when considering the health of older adults living with HIV, and that multiple-substance use needs to be addressed by interventions aimed at improving medication adherence. PMID:24745475

  1. Early recognition of chemical dependence.

    PubMed

    Maly, R C

    1993-03-01

    for drug dependence, although a 28-item instrument, the DAST (Drug Abuse Screening Test), has demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for drug abuse. PMID:8464947

  2. Chaetoglobosins from Chaetomium globosum, an endophytic fungus in Ginkgo biloba, and their phytotoxic and cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Xiao, Jian; Gao, Yu-Qi; Tang, Jiang Jiang; Zhang, An-Ling; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2014-04-30

    In preceding studies, cultivation of Chaetomium globosum, an endophytic fungus in Ginkgo biloba, produced five cytochalasan mycotoxins, chaetoglobosins A, G, V, Vb, and C (1-5), in three media. In the present work, five known chaetoglobosins, C, E, F, Fex, and 20-dihydrochaetoglobosin A (5-9), together with the four known compounds (11-14), were isolated from the MeOH extracts of the solid culture of the same endophyte. The structures of these metabolites were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. Treatment of chaetoglobosin F (7) with (diethylamino)sulfur trifluoride (DAST) in dichloromethane afforded an unexpected fluorinated chaetoglobosin, named chaetoglobosin Fa (10), containing an oxolane ring between C-20 and C-23. The phytotoxic effects of compounds 1, 3-8, and 10 were assayed on radish seedlings; some of these compounds (1, 3, and 6-8) significantly inhibited the growth of radish (Raphanus sativus) seedlings with inhibitory rates of >60% at a concentration of 50 ppm, which was comparable or superior to the positive control, glyphosate. In addition, the cytotoxic activities against HCT116 human colon cancer cells were also tested, and compounds 1 and 8-10 showed remarkable cytotoxicity with IC50 values ranging from 3.15 to 8.44 μM, in comparison to the positive drug etoposide (IC50 = 2.13 μM). The epoxide ring between C-6 and C-7 or the double bond at C-6(12) led to a drastically increased cytotoxicity, and chaetoglobosin Fa (10) displayed a markedly increased cytotoxicity but decreased phytotoxicity. PMID:24708412

  3. Biosynthesis of Fluorinated Analogs of Drugs Using Human Cytochrome P450 Enzymes Followed by Deoxyfluorination and Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Improve Metabolic Stability.

    PubMed

    Obach, R Scott; Walker, Gregory S; Brodney, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Replacement of hydrogen with fluorine is a useful drug design strategy when decreases in cytochrome P450 (P450) metabolic lability are needed. In this paper, a facile two-step method of inserting fluorine into metabolically labile sites of drug molecules is described that utilizes less than 1 mg of starting material and quantitative NMR spectroscopy to ascertain the structures and concentrations of products. In the first step, hydroxyl metabolites are biosynthesized using human P450 enzymes, and in the second step these metabolites are subjected to deoxyfluorination using diethylaminosulfur trifluoride (DAST). The method is demonstrated using midazolam, celecoxib, ramelteon, and risperidone as examples and CYP3A5, 2C9, 1A2, and 2D6 to catalyze the hydroxylations. The drugs and their fluoro analogs were tested for metabolic lability. 9-Fluororisperidone and 4'-fluorocelecoxib were 16 and 4 times more metabolically stable than risperidone and celecoxib, respectively, and 2-fluororamelteon and ramelteon were metabolized at the same rate. 1'-Fluoromidazolam was metabolized at the same rate as midazolam by CYP3A4 but was more stable in CYP3A5 incubations. The P450-catalyzed sites of metabolism of the fluorine-containing analogs were determined. Some of the metabolites arose via metabolism at the fluorine-substituted carbon, wherein the fluorine was lost to yield aldehydes. In summary, this method offers an approach whereby fluorine can be substituted in metabolically labile sites, and the products can be tested to determine whether an enhancement in metabolic stability was obtained. PMID:26921388

  4. Alu repeats as markers for human population genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M.; Bazan, H.

    1993-09-01

    The Human-Specific (HS) subfamily of Alu sequences is comprised of a group of 500 nearly identical members which are almost exclusively restricted to the human genome. Individual subfamily members share an average of 97.9% nucleotide identity with each other and an average of 98.9% nucleotide identity with the HS subfamily consensus sequence. HS Alu family members are thought to be derived from a single source ``master`` gene, and have an average age of 2.8 million years. We have developed a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based assay using primers complementary to the 5 in. and 3 in. unique flanking DNA sequences from each HS Alu that allows the locus to be assayed for the presence or absence of an Alu repeat. Individual HS Alu sequences were found to be either monomorphic or dimorphic for the presence or absence of each repeat. The monomorphic HS Alu family members inserted in the human genome after the human/great ape divergence (which is thought to have occurred 4--6 million years ago), but before the radiation of modem man. The dimorphic HS Alu sequences inserted in the human genome after the radiation of modem man (within the last 200,000-one million years) and represent a unique source of information for human population genetics and forensic DNA analyses. These sites can be developed into Dimorphic Alu Sequence Tagged Sites (DASTS) for the Human Genome Project as well. HS Alu family member insertion dimorphism differs from other types of polymorphism (e.g. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat [VNTR] or Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism [RFLP]) because individuals share HS Alu family member insertions based upon identity by descent from a common ancestor as a result of a single event which occurred one time within the human population. The VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms may arise multiple times within a population and are identical by state only.

  5. Representation of scientific methodology in secondary science textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, Ian C.

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the representation of scientific methodology in secondary science textbooks. More specifically, this study looked at how textbooks introduced scientific methodology and to what degree the examples from the rest of the textbook, the investigations, and the images were consistent with the text's description of scientific methodology, if at all. The sample included eight secondary science textbooks from two publishers, McGraw-Hill/Glencoe and Harcourt/Holt, Rinehart & Winston. Data consisted of all student text and teacher text that referred to scientific methodology. Second, all investigations in the textbooks were analyzed. Finally, any images that depicted scientists working were also collected and analyzed. The text analysis and activity analysis used the ethnographic content analysis approach developed by Altheide (1996). The rubrics used for the text analysis and activity analysis were initially guided by the Benchmarks (AAAS, 1993), the NSES (NRC, 1996), and the nature of science literature. Preliminary analyses helped to refine each of the rubrics and grounded them in the data. Image analysis used stereotypes identified in the DAST literature. Findings indicated that all eight textbooks presented mixed views of scientific methodology in their initial descriptions. Five textbooks placed more emphasis on the traditional view and three placed more emphasis on the broad view. Results also revealed that the initial descriptions, examples, investigations, and images all emphasized the broad view for Glencoe Biology and the traditional view for Chemistry: Matter and Change. The initial descriptions, examples, investigations, and images in the other six textbooks were not consistent. Overall, the textbook with the most appropriate depiction of scientific methodology was Glencoe Biology and the textbook with the least appropriate depiction of scientific methodology was Physics: Principles and Problems. These findings

  6. Intense terahertz radiation and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, H. A.; Chai, X.; Ibrahim, A.; Mondal, S.; Férachou, D.; Ropagnol, X.; Ozaki, T.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we will review both past and recent progresses in the generation, detection and application of intense terahertz (THz) radiation. We will restrict the review to laser based intense few-cycle THz sources, and thus will not include sources such as synchrotron-based or narrowband sources. We will first review the various methods used for generating intense THz radiation, including photoconductive antennas (PCAs), optical rectification sources (especially the tilted-pulse-front lithium niobate source and the DAST source, but also those using other crystals), air plasma THz sources and relativistic laser–plasma sources. Next, we will give a brief introduction on the common methods for coherent THz detection techniques (namely the PCA technique and the electro-optic sampling), and point out the limitations of these techniques for measuring intense THz radiation. We will then review three techniques that are highly suited for detecting intense THz radiation, namely the air breakdown coherent detection technique, various single-shot THz detection techniques, and the spectral-domain interferometry technique. Finally, we will give an overview of the various applications that have been made possible with such intense THz sources, including nonlinear THz spectroscopy of condensed matter (optical-pump/THz-probe, THz-pump/THz-probe, THz-pump/optical-probe), nonlinear THz optics, resonant and non-resonant control of material (such as switching of superconductivity, magnetic and polarization switching) and controlling the nonlinear response of metamaterials. We will also provide a short perspective on the future of intense THz sources and their applications.

  7. Investigation of oxygen functional groups in low rank coal

    SciTech Connect

    Hagaman, E.W.; Lee, S.K.

    1993-07-01

    The distribution of the organic oxygen content of coals among the principal oxygen containing functional groups typically is determined by a combination of chemical and spectroscopic methods (1,2) and results in a classification scheme such as % carboxyl, % hydroxyl, % carbonyl, and % ether. A notable subdivision in this classification scheme is the differentiation of phenols in a coal on the basis of their ortho-substitution pattern (3). Apart from this distinction, the further classification of oxygen into functional group subsets is virtually nonexistent. This paper presents initial experiments that indicate a fuller characterization of oxygen distribution in low rank coal is possible. The experimental approach couples selective chemical perturbation and solid state NMR analysis of the material, specifically, the fluorination of Argonne Premium Coal {number_sign}8, North Dakota lignite, and spectroscopic examination by high resolution solid state {sup 19}F NMR (4). The fluorination reagent is diethylaminosulfur trifluoride (DAST), (Et){sub 2}NSF{sub 3}, which promotes a rich slate of oxygen functional group interconversions that introduce fluorine into the coal matrix (5). The virtual absence of this element in coals make {sup 19}F an attractive NMR nuclei for this application (6). The present experiments use direct detection of the {sup 19}F nucleus under conditions of proton ({sup 1}H) heteronuclear dipolar decoupling and magic angle spinning (MAS). The ca 300 ppm range of {sup 19}F chemical shifts in common carbon-fluorine bonding configurations and high {sup 19}F nuclear sensitivity permit the identification of unique and chemically dilute functional groups in the coal milieu. The unique detection of aromatic and aliphatic carboxylic acids and primary and secondary alcohols provide examples of the exquisite functional group detail that is revealed by this combination of techniques.

  8. At the Beginning of the STEM Pipeline: A Case Study Exploring Preadolescent Female Students' Attitudes Toward Science, Perceptions of Scientists, and Developing Career Aspirations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heacock, Lucy Vogel

    The continuous underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), referred to as the leaky pipeline, has been examined from multiple perspectives internationally, while the attitudes and perceptions of preadolescent girls regarding STEM remain largely ignored. Employing a constructivist paradigm, this qualitative case study explored the perceptions and attitudes of 40 public elementary school female students across three grade levels regarding science, scientists, and career aspirations. Mixed-methods data collections included three survey instruments combined with semi-structured interviews. Self-efficacy, stereotype threat, and career choice theory provided the framework for the overarching research question: What are the attitudes and perceptions of female preadolescent students at the third, fourth, and fifth grade levels regarding science and scientists, and how might these dispositions affect their early development of STEM career aspirations and interests? The Three-Dimensions of Student Attitude Towards Science (TDSAS) instrument informed the exploration of self-efficacy; the modified Draw-A-Scientist Test (mDAST) and Rubric informed the exploration of stereotype threat; and the STEM-Career Interest Survey (CIS) informed the exploration of career aspirations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six participants. Results from this study indicated that the majority of the preadolescent girls thought science was an important topic to study and displayed an attitude of self-confident ability to learn science and be successful in science class. They highly enjoyed scientific experimentation and deeply valued problem solving. While they inferred they did not experience gender bias, the girls did engage in stereotyping scientists. Over half the girls expected to use science in their future careers, while a minority had already determined they wanted to be scientists when they grow up. The study concludes with

  9. Distributed data analysis in ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Paul; Atlas Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    Data analysis using grid resources is one of the fundamental challenges to be addressed before the start of LHC data taking. The ATLAS detector will produce petabytes of data per year, and roughly one thousand users will need to run physics analyses on this data. Appropriate user interfaces and helper applications have been made available to ensure that the grid resources can be used without requiring expertise in grid technology. These tools enlarge the number of grid users from a few production administrators to potentially all participating physicists. ATLAS makes use of three grid infrastructures for the distributed analysis: the EGEE sites, the Open Science Grid, and Nordu Grid. These grids are managed by the gLite workload management system, the PanDA workload management system, and ARC middleware; many sites can be accessed via both the gLite WMS and PanDA. Users can choose between two front-end tools to access the distributed resources. Ganga is a tool co-developed with LHCb to provide a common interface to the multitude of execution backends (local, batch, and grid). The PanDA workload management system provides a set of utilities called PanDA Client; with these tools users can easily submit Athena analysis jobs to the PanDA-managed resources. Distributed data is managed by Don Quixote 2, a system developed by ATLAS; DQ2 is used to replicate datasets according to the data distribution policies and maintains a central catalog of file locations. The operation of the grid resources is continually monitored by the Ganga Robot functional testing system, and infrequent site stress tests are performed using the Hammer Cloud system. In addition, the DAST shift team is a group of power users who take shifts to provide distributed analysis user support; this team has effectively relieved the burden of support from the developers.

  10. Impact of residential schooling and of child abuse on substance use problem in Indigenous Peoples.

    PubMed

    Ross, Amélie; Dion, Jacinthe; Cantinotti, Michael; Collin-Vézina, Delphine; Paquette, Linda

    2015-12-01

    Residential schools were the institutions, in operation from the 19th century to the late 20th century, which Indigenous children in Canada were forced to attend. The literature shows that many young people who attended these institutions were victims of neglect and abuse. Negative psychological effects resulting from child abuse have been amply documented. However, very few studies on this subject have been carried out among Canada's Indigenous Peoples. The objective of this study is to evaluate, for an Indigenous population in Quebec (Canada), the impact of residential schooling as well as self-reported experiences of sexual and physical abuse during childhood on the development of alcohol and drug use problems in adulthood. A total of 358 Indigenous participants were interviewed (164 men [45.8%] and 194 women [54.2%]). Alcoholism was evaluated using the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST). Drug abuse was assessed with the Drug Abuse Screening Test-20 (DAST). Child abuse and residential schooling were assessed with dichotomous questions (yes/no). Among the participants, 28.5% (n=102) had attended residential schools, 35.2% (n=121) reported having experienced sexual abuse, and 34.1% (n=117) reported having experienced physical abuse before adulthood. Results of the exact logistic regression analyses indicated that residential school attendance was linked to alcohol problems, while child abuse was related to drug use problems. The results of this study highlight the importance of considering the consequences of historical traumas related to residential schools to better understand the current situation of Indigenous Peoples in Canada. PMID:26280378

  11. Reticulation des fibres lignocellulosiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landrevy, Christel

    Pour faire face à la crise économique la conception de papier à valeur ajoutée est développée par les industries papetières. Le but de se projet est l'amélioration des techniques actuelles de réticulation des fibres lignocellulosiques de la pâte à papier visant à produire un papier plus résistant. En effet, lors des réactions de réticulation traditionnelles, de nombreuses liaisons intra-fibres se forment ce qui affecte négativement l'amélioration anticipée des propriétés physiques du papier ou du matériau produit. Pour éviter la formation de ces liaisons intra-fibres, un greffage sur les fibres de groupements ne pouvant pas réagir entre eux est nécessaire. La réticulation des fibres par une réaction de « click chemistry » appelée cycloaddition de Huisgen entre un azide et un alcyne vrai, catalysée par du cuivre (CuAAC) a été l'une des solutions trouvée pour remédier à ce problème. De plus, une adaptation de cette réaction en milieux aqueux pourrait favoriser son utilisation en milieu industriel. L'étude que nous désirons entreprendre lors de ce projet vise à optimiser la réaction de CuAAC et les réactions intermédiaires (propargylation, tosylation et azidation) sur la pâte kraft, en milieu aqueux. Pour cela, les réactions ont été adaptées en milieu aqueux sur la cellulose microcristalline afin de vérifier sa faisabilité, puis transférée à la pâte kraft et l'influence de différents paramètres comme le temps de réaction ou la quantité de réactifs utilisée a été étudiée. Dans un second temps, une étude des différentes propriétés conférées au papier par les réactions a été réalisée à partir d'une série de tests papetiers optiques et physiques. Mots Clés Click chemistry, Huisgen, CuAAC, propargylation, tosylation, azidation, cellulose, pâte kraft, milieu aqueux, papier.

  12. Thermoelectric properties of PEDOT nanowire/PEDOT hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Qiu, Jingjing; Wang, Shiren

    2016-04-01

    Freestanding poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanowires were synthesized by template-confined in situ polymerization, and then integrated into polystyrene sulfonate (PSS)-doped PEDOT and tosylate-doped PEDOT hosts, respectively. The hybrid morphologies were characterized by atomic force microscopy, indicating the homogeneous dispersion of PEDOT nanowires. The thermoelectric properties of the resultant hybrids were measured, and the power factor was found to be enhanced by 9-fold in comparison with PEDOT:PSS mixed with 5 vol% dimethyl sulfoxide while the low thermal conductivity was still maintained. Such a significant improvement could be attributed to the synergistic effects of interfacial energy filtering, component contributions, and changes of carrier concentrations in the host materials. Upon addition of 0.2 wt% PEDOT nanowires, the resultant composites demonstrated a power factor as high as 446.6 μW m-1 K-2 and the thermoelectric figure of merit could reach 0.44 at room temperature. The thermoelectric devices were investigated by using the PEDOT nanowire/PEDOT hybrid as a p-type leg and nitrogen-doped graphene as an n-type leg. The normalized power output was as high as ~0.5 mW m-2 for a temperature gradient of ΔT = 10.1 °C, indicating great potential for practical applications. These findings open up a new route towards high-performance organic thermoelectric materials and devices.Freestanding poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanowires were synthesized by template-confined in situ polymerization, and then integrated into polystyrene sulfonate (PSS)-doped PEDOT and tosylate-doped PEDOT hosts, respectively. The hybrid morphologies were characterized by atomic force microscopy, indicating the homogeneous dispersion of PEDOT nanowires. The thermoelectric properties of the resultant hybrids were measured, and the power factor was found to be enhanced by 9-fold in comparison with PEDOT:PSS mixed with 5 vol% dimethyl sulfoxide while the low

  13. Synthesis and Evaluation of 4-[18F]Fluoropropoxy-3-iodobenzylguanidine ([18F]FPOIBG): A Novel 18F-labeled Analogue of MIBG

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; McDougald, Darryl; Koumarianou, Eftychia; Choi, Jaeyeon; Hens, Marc; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Radioiodinated meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a norepinephrine transporter (NET) substrate, has been extensively used as an imaging agent to study the pathophysiology of the heart and for the diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. The goal of this study was to develop an 18F-labeled analogue of MIBG that like MIBG itself could be synthesized in a single radiochemical step. Towards this end, we designed 4-fluoropropoxy-3-iodobenzylguanidine (FPOIBG). Methods Standards of FPOIBG and 4-fluoropropoxy-3-bromobenzylguanidine (FPOBBG) as well as their tosylate precursors for labeling with 18F, and a tin precursor for the preparation of radioiodinated FPOIBG were synthesized. Radiolabeled derivatives were synthesized by nucleophilic substitution and electrophilic iododestannylation from the corresponding precursors. Labeled compounds were evaluated for NET transporter recognition in in vitro assays using three NET-expressing cell lines and in biodistribution experiments in normal mice, with all studies performed in a paired-label format. Competitive inhibition of [125I]MIBG uptake by unlabeled benzylguanidine compounds was performed in UVW-NAT cell line to determine IC50 values. Results [18F]FPOIBG was synthesized from the corresponding tosylate precursor in 5.2 ± 0.5% (n = 6) overall radiochemical yields starting with aqueous fluoride in about 105 min. In a paired-label in vitro assay, the uptake of [18F]FPOIBG at 2 h was 10.2 ± 1.5%, 39.6 ± 13.4%, and 13.3 ± 2.5%, in NET-expressing SK-N-SH, UVW-NAT, and SK-N-BE(2c) cells, respectively, while these values for [125I]MIBG were 57.3 ± 8.1%, 82.7 ± 8.9%, and 66.3 ± 3.6%. The specificity of uptake of both tracers was demonstrated by blocking with desipramine. The 125I-labeled congener of FPOIBG gave similar results. On the other hand, [18F]FPOBBG, a compound recently reported in the literature, demonstrated much higher uptake, albeit less than that of co-incubated [125I]MIBG. IC50 values for

  14. Hydrogel-forming and dissolving microneedles for enhanced delivery of photosensitisers and precursors

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Ryan F.; Morrow, Desmond I.J.; McCrudden, Maelíosa T.C.; Alkilani, Ahlam Zaid; Vicente-Pérez, Eva M.; O’Mahony, Conor; González-Vázquez, Patricia; McCarron, Paul A.; Woolfson, A. David

    2014-01-01

    We present novel dissolving and hydrogel-forming microneedle arrays that can be applied in a one-step fashion and are intended to enhance delivery of photosensitisers and photosensitiser precursors. Microneedles (280 μm in length) were prepared from aqueous blends of 20% w/w poly(methylvinylether/maelic acid) and either crosslinked with glycerol by esterification to form hydrogels upon skin insertion or allowed to dissolve rapidly when inserted into skin. Drug-loaded patches containing either 19 mg cm−2 of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) or mesotetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP) were attached to the MN during drug delivery experiments. Both MN types were mechanically robust, with even compression forces of 20.0 N only causing height reductions of around 14%. Application forces as low as 8.0 N per array allowed over 95% of the MN in each type of array to penetrate excised neonatal porcine skin and the MN penetrated to depths of approximately 280 μm, well beyond the stratum corneum barrier. MN significantly enhanced delivery of both ALA and TMP across dermatomed neonatal porcine skin in vitro, with the hydrogel-forming system comparable to the dissolving system for ALA delivery (approximately 3000 nmol cm−2 over 6 hours), but superior for delivery of the much larger TMP molecule (approximately 14 nmol cm−2 over 24 hours, compared to 0.15 nmol cm−2). This technology has the potential to improve convenience and efficacy of photodynamic therapy of neoplastic skin lesions. Consequently, we are currently planning animal studies, to be followed by preliminary human evaluations. Manufacturing scale-up is currently ongoing, with a view to patient benefit within 3-5 years. PMID:24215482

  15. Importance of dispersion forces for prediction of thermodynamic and transport properties of some common ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Izgorodina, Ekaterina I; Golze, Dorothea; Maganti, Radha; Armel, Vanessa; Taige, Maria; Schubert, Thomas J S; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2014-04-28

    An extensive study of interaction energies in ion pairs of pyrrolidinium and imidazolium ionic liquids is presented. The Cnmpyr and Cnmim cations with varying alkyl chains from Methyl, Ethyl, n-Propyl to n-Butyl were combined with a wide range of routinely used IL anions such as chloride, bromide, mesylate (CH3SO3 or Mes), tosylate (CH3PhSO3 or Tos), bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (NTf2), dicyanamide (N(CN)2 or dca), tetrafluoroborate (BF4) and hexafluorophosphate (PF6). A number of energetically favourable conformations were studied for each cation-anion combination. The interaction energy and its dispersion component of the single ion pairs were calculated using a sophisticated state-of-the-art approach: a second-order of Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory (SAPT). A comparison of energetics depending on the cation-anion type, as well as the mode of interaction was performed. Dispersion forces were confirmed to be of importance for the overall stabilisation of ionic liquids contributing from 28 kJ mol(-1) in pyrrolidinium ion pairs to 59 kJ mol(-1) in imidazolium ion pairs. The previously proposed ratio of total interaction energy to dispersion components and melting points was assessed for this set of ionic liquids and was found to correlate with their melting points for the anionic series, producing separate trends for the Cnmim and Cmpyr series of cations. Chlorides, bromides and tetrafluoroborates formed close-to-ideal correlations when both types of cations, Cnmim and Cnmpyr, were combined in the same trend. Correlation of the dispersion component of the interaction energy with transport properties such as conductivity and viscosity was also considered. For imidazolium-based ionic liquids strong linear correlations were obtained, whereas pyrrolidinium ionic liquids appeared to be insensitive to this correlation. PMID:24113510

  16. Novel consequences of voltage-dependence to G-protein-coupled P2Y1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, I S; Martinez-Pinna, J; Mahaut-Smith, M P

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Emerging evidence suggests that activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can be directly regulated by membrane voltage. However, the physiological and pharmacological relevance of this effect remains unclear. We have further examined this phenomenon for P2Y1 receptors in the non-excitable megakaryocyte using a range of agonists and antagonists. Experimental approach: Simultaneous whole-cell patch clamp and fura-2 fluorescence recordings of rat megakaryocytes, which lack voltage-gated Ca2+ influx, were used to examine the voltage-dependence of P2Y1 receptor-evoked IP3-dependent Ca2+ mobilization. Results: Depolarization transiently and repeatedly enhanced P2Y1 receptor-evoked Ca2+ mobilization across a wide concentration range of both weak, partial and full, potent agonists. Moreover, the amplitude of the depolarization-evoked [Ca2+]i increase displayed an inverse relationship with agonist concentration, such that the greatest potentiating effect of voltage was observed at near-threshold levels of agonist. Unexpectedly, depolarization also stimulated an [Ca2+]i increase in the absence of agonist during exposure to the competitive antagonists A3P5PS and MRS2179, or the allosteric enhancer 2,2′-pyridylisatogen tosylate. A further effect of some antagonists, particularly suramin, was to enhance the depolarization-evoked Ca2+ responses during co-application of an agonist. Of several P2Y1 receptor inhibitors, only SCH202676, which has a proposed allosteric mechanism of action, could block ADP-induced voltage-dependent Ca2+ release. Conclusions and implications: The ability of depolarization to potentiate GPCRs at near-threshold agonist concentrations represents a novel mechanism for coincidence detection. Furthermore, the induction and enhancement of voltage-dependent GPCR responses by antagonists has implications for the design of therapeutic compounds. PMID:18414379

  17. Plasma hyperosmolality elevates the internal temperature threshold for active thermoregulatory vasodilation during heat stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Aoki, Ken; Morimoto, Keiko; Johnson, John M; Takamata, Akira

    2009-12-01

    Plasma hyperosmolality delays the response in skin blood flow to heat stress by elevating the internal temperature threshold for cutaneous vasodilation. This elevation could be because of a delayed onset of cutaneous active vasodilation and/or to persistent cutaneous active vasoconstriction. Seven healthy men were infused with either hypertonic (3% NaCl) or isotonic (0.9% NaCl) saline and passively heated by immersing their lower legs in 42 degrees C water for 60 min (room temperature, 28 degrees C; relative humidity, 40%). Skin blood flow was monitored via laser-Doppler flowmetry at sites pretreated with bretylium tosylate (BT) to block sympathetic vasoconstriction selectively and at adjacent control sites. Plasma osmolality was increased by approximately 13 mosmol/kgH(2)O following hypertonic saline infusion and was unchanged following isotonic saline infusion. The esophageal temperature (T(es)) threshold for cutaneous vasodilation at untreated sites was significantly elevated in the hyperosmotic state (37.73 +/- 0.11 degrees C) relative to the isosmotic state (36.63 +/- 0.12 degrees C, P < 0.001). A similar elevation of the T(es) threshold for cutaneous vasodilation was observed between osmotic conditions at the BT-treated sites (37.74 +/- 0.18 vs. 36.67 +/- 0.07 degrees C, P < 0.001) as well as sweating. These results suggest that the hyperosmotically induced elevation of the internal temperature threshold for cutaneous vasodilation is due primarily to an elevation in the internal temperature threshold for the onset of active vasodilation, and not to an enhancement of vasoconstrictor activity. PMID:19812357

  18. The elongation factor Tu.kirromycin complex has two binding sites for tRNA molecules.

    PubMed Central

    van Noort, J M; Duisterwinkel, F J; Jonák, J; Sedlácek, J; Kraal, B; Bosch, L

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of the polypeptide chain elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) with the antibiotic kirromycin and tRNA has been studied by measuring the extent of protein modification with N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethylketone (TPCK) and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). Kirromycin protects both EF-Tu.GDP and EF-Tu.GTP against modification with TPCK. Binding of aminoacyl-tRNA added at increasing concentrations to a solution of 40 microM EF-Tu.GDP.kirromycin complex re-exposes the TPCK target site on the protein. However, when the aminoacyl-tRNA concentration is raised beyond 20 microM, TPCK labeling drops again and is blocked completely at approximately 300 microM aminoacyl-tRNA. By contrast, addition of uncharged tRNA or N- acetylaminoacyl -tRNA enhances TPCK labeling of the protein over the entire tRNA concentration range studied. These data strongly suggest that kirromycin induces in EF-Tu.GDP an additional tRNA binding site that can bind uncharged tRNA, aminoacyl-tRNA, and N- acetylaminoacyl -tRNA. Support for this assumption is provided by measuring the modification of EF-Tu.GDP with the sulfhydryl reagent NEM. Moreover, NEM modification also indicates an additional tRNA binding site on EF-Tu.GTP.kirromycin, which could not be detected with TPCK. Mapping of the tryptic peptides of EF-Tu.GDP labeled with [14C]TPCK revealed only one target site for this agent, i.e., cysteine-81. Modification occurred at the same site in the presence and in the absence of kirromycin and uncharged tRNA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6765192

  19. Identification and characterization of a surface protein-releasing activity in Streptococcus mutans and other pathogenic streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S F

    1992-01-01

    Surface proteins of Streptococcus mutans have been reported to be released into the culture filtrate at concentrations that vary with the growth conditions. The reason for this is not clear. The present study attempts to investigate the mechanism of the protein release. The results showed that whole cells and raffinose-stabilized protoplasts of S. mutans NG8, when incubated in buffers, were capable of releasing their surface proteins in a pH-dependent manner with optimal release at pH 5 to 6. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the released proteins were very complex. Two proteins, adhesin P1, which has been previously shown to interact with a human salivary agglutinin, and glucosyltransferase have been identified among the released proteins. The release of adhesin P1 and other proteins was found to be inhibited by heat, Cu2+,Zn2+, and thiol-blocking reagents. The inhibition by heat and Cu2+ was irreversible, whereas that by the thiol-blocking reagents was reversible. EDTA, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, and N-p-tosyl-L-lysyl-chloromethyl ketone had no effect on the release of P1, indicating that the release was probably not due to proteolytic activity. Adhesin P1 from Cu(2+)-inactivated S. mutans NG8 protoplasts could be released by mixing with fresh whole cells and protoplasts, but not the culture filtrate, of a P1-negative mutant of NG8, suggesting that the enzyme is located on the cell surface. This P1-releasing activity was also detected in two other strains of S. mutans and one strain each of S. gordonii, S. agalactiae, S. pneumoniae, and S. pyogenes. The biological role(s) of this enzyme activity remains to be determined. However, owing to its ability to release virulent surface proteins from the cell, it may play an important role in cell surface modulation among the pathogenic streptococci. Images PMID:1398915

  20. Synthesis, uptake mechanism characterization and biological evaluation of 18F labeled fluoroalkyl phenylalanine analogs as potential PET imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Qu, Wenchao; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Amino acids based tracers represent a promising class of tumor metabolic imaging agents with successful clinical applications. Two new phenylalanine derivatives, p-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-phenylalanine (FEP, [18F]2) and p-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)-L-phenylalanine (FPP, [18F]3) were synthesized and evaluated in comparison to clinically utilized O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET, [18F]1). Methods FEP ([18F]2) and FPP ([18F]3) were successfully synthesized by a rapid and efficient two-step nucleophilic fluorination of tosylate precursors and deprotection reaction. In vitro cell uptake studies were carried out in 9L glioma cells. In vivo studies, 9L tumor xenografts were implanted in Fisher 344 rats. Results FEP ([18F]2) and FPP ([18F]3) could be efficiently labeled within 90 min with good enantiomeric purity (>95%), good yield (11–37%) and high specific activity (21–69 GBq/μmol). Cell uptake studies showed FEP had higher uptake than FPP as well as reference ligand FET ([18F]1). Uptake mechanism studies suggested that FEP is a selective substrate for system L and prefers its subtype LAT1. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated FEP had specific accumulation in tumor cells and tumor to background ratio reached 1.45 at 60 min. Small animal PET imaging studies showed FEP was comparable to FET for imaging rats bearing 9L tumor model. FEP had high uptake in 9L tumor compared to surrounding tissue and was quickly excreted through urinary tract. Conclusion Biological evaluations indicate that FEP ([18F]2) is a potential useful tracer for tumor imaging with PET. PMID:21220129

  1. (4-(Bis(4-Fluorophenyl)Methyl)Piperazin-1-yl)(Cyclohexyl)Methanone Hydrochloride (LDK1229): A New Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Inverse Agonist from the Class of Benzhydryl Piperazine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Mariam M.; Olszewska, Teresa; Liu, Hui; Shore, Derek M.; Hurst, Dow P.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Lu, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Some inverse agonists of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) have been demonstrated to be anorectic antiobesity drug candidates. However, the first generation of CB1 inverse agonists, represented by rimonabant (SR141716A), otenabant, and taranabant, are centrally active, with a high level of psychiatric side effects. Hence, the discovery of CB1 inverse agonists with a chemical scaffold distinct from these holds promise for developing peripherally active CB1 inverse agonists with fewer side effects. We generated a new CB1 inverse agonist, (4-(bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl)(cyclohexyl)methanone hydrochloride (LDK1229), from the class of benzhydryl piperazine analogs. This compound binds to CB1 more selectively than cannabinoid receptor type 2, with a Ki value of 220 nM. Comparable CB1 binding was also observed by analogs 1-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]-4-cinnamylpiperazine dihydrochloride (LDK1203) and 1-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]-4-tosylpiperazine hydrochloride (LDK1222), which differed by the substitution on the piperazine ring where the piperazine of LDK1203 and LDK1222 are substituted by an alkyl group and a tosyl group, respectively. LDK1229 exhibits efficacy comparable with SR141716A in antagonizing the basal G protein coupling activity of CB1, as indicated by a reduction in guanosine 5′-O-(3-thio)triphosphate binding. Consistent with inverse agonist behavior, increased cell surface localization of CB1 upon treatment with LDK1229 was also observed. Although docking and mutational analysis showed that LDK1229 forms similar interactions with the receptor as SR141716A does, the benzhydryl piperazine scaffold is structurally distinct from the first-generation CB1 inverse agonists. It offers new opportunities for developing novel CB1 inverse agonists through the optimization of molecular properties, such as the polar surface area and hydrophilicity, to reduce the central activity observed with SR141716A. PMID:25411367

  2. BippyPhos: a single ligand with unprecedented scope in the Buchwald-Hartwig amination of (hetero)aryl chlorides.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Sarah M; Lavery, Christopher B; Stradiotto, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Over the past two decades, considerable attention has been given to the development of new ligands for the palladium-catalyzed arylation of amines and related NH-containing substrates (i.e., Buchwald-Hartwig amination). The generation of structurally diverse ligands, by research groups in both academia and industry, has facilitated the accommodation of sterically and electronically divergent substrates including ammonia, hydrazine, amines, amides, and NH heterocycles. Despite these achievements, problems with catalyst generality persist and access to multiple ligands is necessary to accommodate all of these NH-containing substrates. In our quest to address this significant limitation we identified the BippyPhos/[Pd(cinnamyl)Cl]2 catalyst system as being capable of catalyzing the amination of a variety of functionalized (hetero)aryl chlorides, as well as bromides and tosylates, at moderate to low catalyst loadings. The successful transformations described herein include primary and secondary amines, NH heterocycles, amides, ammonia and hydrazine, thus demonstrating the largest scope in the NH-containing coupling partner reported for a single Pd/ligand catalyst system. We also established BippyPhos/[Pd(cinnamyl)Cl]2 as exhibiting the broadest demonstrated substrate scope for metal-catalyzed cross-coupling of (hetero)aryl chlorides with NH indoles. Furthermore, the remarkable ability of BippyPhos/[Pd(cinnamyl)Cl]2 to catalyze both the selective monoarylation of ammonia and the N-arylation of indoles was exploited in the development of a new one-pot, two-step synthesis of N-aryl heterocycles from ammonia, ortho-alkynylhalo(hetero)arenes and (hetero) aryl halides through tandem N-arylation/hydroamination reactions. Although the scope in the NH-containing coupling partner is broad, BippyPhos/[Pd(cinnamyl)Cl]2 also displays a marked selectivity profile that was exploited in the chemoselective monoarylation of substrates featuring two chemically distinct NH

  3. Purification and characterization of trypsins from the digestive tract of Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Sakal, E; Applebaum, S W; Birk, Y

    1989-12-01

    Two trypsin-like enzymes were isolated from the digestive tract of the African migratory locust Locusta migratoria migratorioides. Primary purification was carried out on a DEAE-cellulose column, from which the two trypsins emerged in the anionic fraction. Further purification was achieved by affinity chromatography on a p-aminobenzamidine (PABA)-Sepharose column, which also separated the two trypsins (TLEAff.1. and TLEAff.2.), or by HPLC on an anion exchange column. The purity and homogeneity of the trypsins were demonstrated by electrophoresis of cellulose acetate strips and in polyacrylamide gels, with and without SDS. The molecular weights of TLEAff.1 and TLEAff.2, as determined by SDS-PAGE, were 17,000 and 24,000 respectively. The amino acid compositions of the locust trypsins were similar to those of trypsins from the digestive systems of other insects, which are characterized by the lack or low content of half cystines. The isoelectric points were 3.2 for TLEAff.1 and 3.5 fold for TLEAff.2. Since most of the locust trypsin comprised TLEAff.2, the latter served as the main object of this study. TLEAff.2 was unstable at low pH, differing in this respect from mammalian trypsins. The optimum activity was at pH 8.5-9.0. The Km and kcat, values were similar to those for bovine trypsin. Activation by substrate, a phenomenon in bovine trypsin, was also observed for TLEAff.2. The locust trypsin was full inhibited by the proteinaceous trypsin inhibitors Bowman-Birk (BBI) and Kunitz from soybeans, CI from chickpeas, chicken ovomucoid (COM), and turkey ovomucoid (TOM). It was inactivated by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK), indicating the involvement of serine and histidine in the active site. PMID:2635697

  4. Separation of Plasma Thromboplastin Antecedent from Kallikrein by the Plasma α2-Macroglobulin, Kallikrein Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Harpel, Peter C.

    1971-01-01

    Plasma thromboplastin antecedent (PTA, factor XI) is an important intermediate in the intrinsic coagulation system, and plasma kallikrein has been implicated as a mediator of the inflammatory process. Whereas their biologic activities are functionally distinct, their identity as separate entities in plasma has not been fully established, and the nature of their plasma inhibitors has not been completely characterized. A partially purified preparation containing the clotting, tosyl arginine methyl ester (TAMe) esterase and kinin-producing activities of these substances has been prepared by DEAE-cellulose chromatography of a Celite eluate obtained from acid-treated human plasma. These activities were not separable by acrylamide gel electrophoresis nor by isoelectric focusing, their pI being approximately 8.7. Human plasma α2-macroglobulin has been shown to inhibit the proteolytic activity of kallikrein and to inhibit partially its TAMe esterase activity. An α2-macroglobulin, PTA, kallikrein incubation mixture was separated by gel filtration chromatography. The α2-macroglobulin formed a high molecular weight complex with kallikrein and appeared in early chromatographic fractions. The PTA-clotting activity was not inhibited by the α2-macroglobulin; 64% of the initial PTA activity was isolated in later fractions free of kallikrein-induced kinin-like activity. In contrast, clotting, TAMe esterase, and kinin-forming activities were inhibited after gel filtration chromatography of an incubation mixture of these activities and partially purified C1̄ inactivator (C1 esterase inhibitor). Electrofocusing of an incubation mixture of an activated PTA, kallikrein preparation, and α2-macroglobulin resulted in the isolation of a PTA fraction free of kallikrein proteolytic activity, and with 4% of the original TAMe esterase activity. In this manner, activated PTA and plasma kallikrein have been shown to be distinct substances, and methods have been introduced for the further

  5. A novel plasminogen activator from Agkistrodon blomhoffii Ussurensis venom (ABUSV-PA): Purification and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Shuqing; Sun Mingzhong . E-mail: ming-zhong.sun@case.edu; Greenaway, Frederick T.

    2006-10-06

    A plasminogen activator with arginine ester hydrolysis activity (ABUSV-PA) has been identified and purified to homogeneity from Chinese Agkistrodon blomhoffii Ussurensis snake venom. ABUSV-PA, a monomeric protein with molecular mass of 27815.2 Da, was purified 180-fold with 0.02% recovery for protein and 3.6% recovery for esterase activity. ABUSV-PA reacts optimally with its substrate N {sub {alpha}}-tosyl-L-arginine-methyl ester (TAME) at {approx}pH 7.5 and at 51 {sup o}C. Measurement from inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) reveals that ABUSV-PA is a Zn{sup 2+}-containing protein with a stoichiometry of 1:1 [Zn{sup 2+}]:[ABUSV-PA]. Analyses of esterase hydrolysis and UV absorption and CD spectra indicate that Zn{sup 2+} plays an important role in maintaining the structural integrity rather than the esterase activity of ABUSV-PA. Divalent metal ions, including Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+}, increase the TAME hydrolysis activity of ABUSV-PA. A red-shift of the emission wavelengths of the synchronous fluorescence of ABUSV-PA, compared to those of free Tyr and Trp, indicates a conformation where the Tyr and Trp residues are in exposed hydrophilic environments. The presence of zinc increases the hydrophobicity of the conformational environments surrounding the Trp residues of ABUSV-PA and affects the secondary structure of ABUSV-PA, as proved by UV absorption and CD spectroscopy.

  6. Expression, purification and characterization of Gloydius shedaoensis venom gloshedobin as Hsp70 fusion protein in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Yang, Daping; Peng, Mingli; Yang, Hua; Yang, Qing; Xu, Jianqiang

    2009-08-01

    Gloshedobin, a thrombin-like enzyme from the venom of Gloydius shedaoensis was expressed as Hsp70 fusion protein from the construct pPIC9K/hsp70-TLE in the yeast Pichia pastoris. By fusing gloshedobin to the C-terminus of Hsp70, an expression level of 44.5mg Hsp70-gloshedobin per liter of culture was achieved by methanol induction. The fusion protein secreted in the culture medium was conveniently purified by two chromatographic steps: Q-Sepharose FF and Superdex 200. The purified enzyme had an apparent molecular mass of 98 kDa according to SDS-PAGE analysis, and exhibited fibrinogenolytic activity that preferentially degraded fibrinogen alpha-chain. The enzyme also degraded fibrinogen beta-chain to a lesser extent, while showing no degradation toward the gamma-chain. A fibrinogen clotting activity of 499.8 U/mg was achieved by the enzyme, which is within the range reported for other thrombin-like enzymes. Hsp70-gloshedobin had strong esterase activity toward the chromogenic substrate N alpha-p-tosyl-Gly-Pro-Arg-p-nitroanilide, and this activity was optimal at pH 7.5 and 50 degrees C, and was completely inhibited by PMSF, but not by EDTA. We concluded that Hsp70 has no effect on the physiochemical and biochemical properties of gloshedobin. Although applying a fusion partner with very big molecular weight is unusual, Hsp70 proved its advantage in soluble expression of gloshedobin without affecting its fibrinogenolytic activity. And this positive result may provide an alternative strategy for the expression of thrombin-like enzymes in microbial system. PMID:19286459

  7. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Lantz, M S; Allen, R D; Vail, T A; Switalski, L M; Hook, M

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains (M. S. Lantz, R. D. Allen, P. Bounelis, L. M. Switalski, and M. Hook, J. Bacteriol. 172:716-726, 1990). We now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37 degrees C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (Mr, 150,000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with 125I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4 degrees C but did occur at 22 and 37 degrees C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37 degrees C, two major fibrinogen fragments (Mr, 97,000 and 50,000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (Mr, 120,000 and 150,000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the Mr-120,000 and -150,000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate. Images PMID:1987144

  8. The contrasting catalytic efficiency and cancer cell antiproliferative activity of stereoselective organoruthenium transfer hydrogenation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Sanchez-Cano, Carlos; Soni, Rina; Romero-Canelon, Isolda; Hearn, Jessica M; Liu, Zhe; Wills, Martin; Sadler, Peter J

    2016-05-28

    The rapidly growing area of catalytic ruthenium chemistry has provided new complexes with potential as organometallic anticancer agents with novel mechanisms of action. Here we report the anticancer activity of four neutral organometallic Ru(II) arene N-tosyl-1,2-diphenylethane-1,2-diamine (TsDPEN) tethered transfer hydrogenation catalysts. The enantiomers (R,R)-[Ru(η(6)-C6H5(CH2)3-TsDPEN-N-Me)Cl] (8) and (S,S)-[Ru(η(6)-C6H5(CH2)3-TsDPEN-N-Me)Cl] (8a) exhibited higher potency than cisplatin against A2780 human ovarian cancer cells. When the N-methyl was replaced by N-H, i.e. to give (R,R)-[Ru(η(6)-Ph(CH2)3-TsDPEN-NH)Cl] (7) and (S,S)-[Ru(η(6)-Ph(CH2)3-TsDPEN-NH)Cl] (7a), respectively, anticancer activity decreased >5-fold. Their antiproliferative activity appears to be linked to their ability to accumulate in cells, and their mechanism of action might involve inhibition of tubulin polymerisation. This appears to be the first report of the potent anticancer activity of tethered Ru(II) arene complexes, and the structure-activity relationship suggests that the N-methyl substituents are important for potency. In the National Cancer Institute 60-cancer-cell-line screen, complexes 8 and 8a exhibited higher activity than cisplatin towards a broad range of cancer cell lines. Intriguingly, in contrast to their potent anticancer properties, complexes 8/8a are poor catalysts for asymmetric transfer hydrogenation, whereas complexes 7/7a are effective asymmetric hydrogenation catalysts. PMID:27109147

  9. Anisotropic thermal expansion in a metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Solveig Røgild; Lock, Nina; Overgaard, Jacob; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2014-06-01

    Ionothermal reaction between Mn(II)(acetate)2·4H2O and 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid (H3BTC) in either of the two ionic liquids 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (EMIMBr) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tosylate (EMIMOTs) resulted in the formation of the new metal-organic framework (MOF) EMIM[Mn(II)BTC] (BTC = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate). The compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbca with unit-cell parameters of a = 14.66658 (12), b = 12.39497 (9), c = 16.63509 (14) Å at 100 K. Multi-temperature single-crystal (15-340 K) and powder X-ray diffraction studies (100-400 K) reveal strongly anisotropic thermal expansion properties. The linear thermal expansion coefficients, αL(l), attain maximum values at 400 K along the a- and b-axis, with αL(a) = 115 × 10(-6) K(-1) and αL(b) = 75 × 10(-6) K(-1). At 400 K a negative thermal expansion coefficient of -40 × 10(-6) K(-1) is observed along the c-axis. The thermal expansion is coupled to a continuous deformation of the framework, which causes the structure to expand in two directions. Due to the rigidity of the linker, the expansion in the ab plane causes the network to contract along the c-axis. Hirshfeld surface analysis has been used to describe the interaction between the framework structure and the EMIM cation that resides within the channel. This reveals a number of rather weak interactions and one governing hydrogen-bonding interactions. PMID:24892606

  10. Effect on platelet FXIII and partial characterization of Lonomin V, a proteolytic enzyme from Lonomia achelous caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, B; Perales, J; Gil, A; Arocha-Piñango, C L

    1999-03-01

    Contact with Lonomia achelous caterpillars venom induces a severe bleeding syndrome in humans. A constant finding in all reported cases is a marked decrease of blood coagulation factor XIII (FXIII), which has been attributed to the presence of a proteolytic enzyme, isolated and named Lonomin V, in the hemolymph and hair secretion. In this study, the effect of Lonomin V on transglutaminase activity from human plasma, rabbit plasma, and platelet FXIII was analyzed. The decrease of activity was more pronounced in platelet (A2) when compared with rabbit plasma (AB) and human plasma FXIII (A2B2). This finding might be explained by the differences in FXIII molecular structure. In addition, platelet FXIII molecule was degraded by Lonomin to several fragments of low molecular mass. Lonomin V was stable over a wide range of pH (6-8.5) and temperatures of -70 degrees C, -20 degrees C and between 4 to 24 degrees C, with a progressive decrease at 37 degrees C and total inactivation at 60 degrees C after 2 hours incubation. Diisopropyl fluoro-phosphate, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone, and iodoacetamide abolished the effect of Lonomin V on FXIII; in contrast dithiothreitol and EDTA-Na enhance the activity. We concluded that Lonomin V is a serine proteinase with a free Cys essential for the enzymatic activity. Due to its proteolytic activity on FXIII, with concomitant impairment of fibrin cross-linking, Lonomin V might be useful in association with thrombolytic drugs for preventing rethrombosis. PMID:10074908

  11. 18F-Glutathione Conjugate as a PET Tracer for Imaging Tumors that Overexpress L-PGDS Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Yuan; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Lin, Kun-Ju; Yu, Chung-Shan

    2014-01-01

    Lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS) has been correlated with the progression of neurological disorders. The present study aimed at evaluating the imaging potency of a glutathione conjugate of fluorine-18-labeled fluorobutyl ethacrynic amide ([18F]FBuEA-GS) for brain tumors. Preparation of [18F]FBuEA-GS has been modified from the -4-tosylate derivative via radiofluorination in 5% radiochemical yield. The mixture of nonradioactive FBuEA-GS derived from a parallel preparation has be resolved to two isomers in a ratio of 9∶1 using analytic chiral reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The two fluorine-18-labeled isomers purified through nonchiral semipreparative RP-HPLC as a mixture were studied by assessing the binding affinity toward L-PGDS through a gel filtration HPLC, by analyzing radiotracer accumulation in C6 glioma cells, and by evaluating the imaging of radiotracer in a C6 glioma rat with positron emission tomography. The inhibition percentage of the production of PGD2 from PGH2 at the presence of 200 µM of FBuEA-GS and 4-Dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5-ylidene-1-[4-(2H-tetrazol-5-yl)butyl]piperidine (AT-56) were 74.1±4.8% and 97.6±16.0%, respectively. [18F]FBuEA-GS bound L-PGDS (16.3–21.7%) but not the isoform, microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1. No binding to GST-alpha and GST-pi was observed. The binding strength between [18F]FBuEA-GS and L-PGDS has been evaluated using analytic gel filtration HPLC at the presence of various concentrations of the cold competitor FBuEA-GS. The contrasted images indicated that the radiotracer accumulation in tumor lesions is probably related to the overexpression of L-PGDS. PMID:25111383

  12. Identification and characterization of a surface protein-releasing activity in Streptococcus mutans and other pathogenic streptococci.

    PubMed

    Lee, S F

    1992-10-01

    Surface proteins of Streptococcus mutans have been reported to be released into the culture filtrate at concentrations that vary with the growth conditions. The reason for this is not clear. The present study attempts to investigate the mechanism of the protein release. The results showed that whole cells and raffinose-stabilized protoplasts of S. mutans NG8, when incubated in buffers, were capable of releasing their surface proteins in a pH-dependent manner with optimal release at pH 5 to 6. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the released proteins were very complex. Two proteins, adhesin P1, which has been previously shown to interact with a human salivary agglutinin, and glucosyltransferase have been identified among the released proteins. The release of adhesin P1 and other proteins was found to be inhibited by heat, Cu2+,Zn2+, and thiol-blocking reagents. The inhibition by heat and Cu2+ was irreversible, whereas that by the thiol-blocking reagents was reversible. EDTA, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, and N-p-tosyl-L-lysyl-chloromethyl ketone had no effect on the release of P1, indicating that the release was probably not due to proteolytic activity. Adhesin P1 from Cu(2+)-inactivated S. mutans NG8 protoplasts could be released by mixing with fresh whole cells and protoplasts, but not the culture filtrate, of a P1-negative mutant of NG8, suggesting that the enzyme is located on the cell surface. This P1-releasing activity was also detected in two other strains of S. mutans and one strain each of S. gordonii, S. agalactiae, S. pneumoniae, and S. pyogenes. The biological role(s) of this enzyme activity remains to be determined. However, owing to its ability to release virulent surface proteins from the cell, it may play an important role in cell surface modulation among the pathogenic streptococci. PMID:1398915

  13. Facile synthesis of 1-alkoxy-1H-benzo- and 7-azabenzotriazoles from peptide coupling agents, mechanistic studies, and synthetic applications

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manish K; Kumar, Mukesh; Chamala, Raghu Ram; Yedulla, Vijayender R; Wagner, Domenick; Leung, Evan; Yang, Lijia; Matin, Asha; Ahmad, Sadia

    2014-01-01

    Summary (1H-Benzo[d][1,2,3]triazol-1-yloxy)tris(dimethylamino)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate (BOP), 1H-benzo[d][1,2,3]triazol-1-yl 4-methylbenzenesulfonate (Bt-OTs), and 3H-[1,2,3]triazolo[4,5-b]pyridine-3-yl 4-methylbenzenesulfonate (At-OTs) are classically utilized in peptide synthesis for amide-bond formation. However, a previously undescribed reaction of these compounds with alcohols in the presence of a base, leads to 1-alkoxy-1H-benzo- (Bt-OR) and 7-azabenzotriazoles (At-OR). Although BOP undergoes reactions with alcohols to furnish 1-alkoxy-1H-benzotriazoles, Bt-OTs proved to be superior. Both, primary and secondary alcohols undergo reaction under generally mild reaction conditions. Correspondingly, 1-alkoxy-1H-7-azabenzotriazoles were synthesized from At-OTs. Mechanistically, there are three pathways by which these peptide-coupling agents can react with alcohols. From 31P{1H}, [18O]-labeling, and other chemical experiments, phosphonium and tosylate derivatives of alcohols seem to be intermediates. These then react with BtO− and AtO− produced in situ. In order to demonstrate broader utility, this novel reaction has been used to prepare a series of acyclic nucleoside-like compounds. Because BtO− is a nucleofuge, several Bt-OCH2Ar substrates have been evaluated in nucleophilic substitution reactions. Finally, the possible formation of Pd π–allyl complexes by departure of BtO− has been queried. Thus, alpha-allylation of three cyclic ketones was evaluated with 1-(cinnamyloxy)-1H-benzo[d][1,2,3]triazole, via in situ formation of pyrrolidine enamines and Pd catalysis. PMID:25246951

  14. Pathogenesis of periodontitis: a major arginine-specific cysteine proteinase from Porphyromonas gingivalis induces vascular permeability enhancement through activation of the kallikrein/kinin pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, T; Pike, R N; Potempa, J; Travis, J

    1994-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of production of an inflammatory exudate, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), from periodontal pockets in periodontitis, we examined the vascular permeability enhancement (VPE) activity induced by an arginine-specific cysteine proteinase, Arg-gingipain-1 (RGP-1), produced by a major periopathogenic bacterium, Porphyromonas gingivalis. Intradermal injections into guinea pigs of RGP-1 (> 10(-8) M), or human plasma incubated with RGP-1 (> 10(-9) M), induced VPE in a dose- and activity-dependent manner but with different time courses for the two routes of production. VPE activity induced by RGP-1 was augmented by kininase inhibitors, inhibited by a kallikrein inhibitor and unaffected by an antihistamine drug. The VPE activity in human plasma incubated with RGP-1 also correlated closely with generation of bradykinin (BK). RGP-1 induced 30-40% less VPE activity in Hageman factor-deficient plasma and no VPE in plasma deficient in either prekallikrein (PK) or high molecular weight kininogen (HMWK). After incubation with RGP-1, plasma deficient in PK or HMWK, reconstituted with each missing protein, caused VPE, as did a mixture of purified PK and HMWK, but RGP-1 induced no VPE from HMWK. The VPE of extracts of clinically isolated P. gingivalis were reduced to about 10% by anti-RGP-1-IgG, leupeptin, or tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone, which paralleled effects observed with RGP-1. These results indicate that RGP-1 is the major VPE factor of P. gingivalis, inducing this activity through PK activation and subsequent BK release, resulting in GCF production at sites of periodontitis caused by infection with this organism. Images PMID:8040277

  15. Ruthenium Catalyzed Diastereo- and Enantioselective Coupling of Propargyl Ethers with Alcohols: Siloxy-Crotylation via Hydride Shift Enabled Conversion of Alkynes to π-Allyls.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tao; Zhang, Wandi; Chen, Te-Yu; Nguyen, Khoa D; Krische, Michael J

    2015-10-14

    The first enantioselective carbonyl crotylations through direct use of alkynes as chiral allylmetal equivalents are described. Chiral ruthenium(II) complexes modified by Josiphos (SL-J009-1) catalyze the C-C coupling of TIPS-protected propargyl ether 1a with primary alcohols 2a-2o to form products of carbonyl siloxy-crotylation 3a-3o, which upon silyl deprotection-reduction deliver 1,4-diols 5a-5o with excellent control of regio-, anti-diastereo-, and enantioselectivity. Structurally related propargyl ethers 1b and 1c bearing ethyl- and phenyl-substituents engage in diastereo- and enantioselective coupling, as illustrated in the formation of adducts 5p and 5q, respectively. Selective mono-tosylation of diols 5a, 5c, 5e, 5f, 5k, and 5m is accompanied by spontaneous cyclization to deliver the trans-2,3-disubstituted furans 6a, 6c, 6e, 6f, 6k, and 6m, respectively. Primary alcohols 2a, 2l, and 2p were converted to the siloxy-crotylation products 3a, 3l, and 3p, which upon silyl deprotection-lactol oxidation were transformed to the trans-4,5-disubstituted γ-butyrolactones 7a, 7l, and 7p. The formation of 7p represents a total synthesis of (+)-trans-whisky lactone. Unlike closely related ruthenium catalyzed alkyne-alcohol C-C couplings, deuterium labeling studies provide clear evidence of a novel 1,2-hydride shift mechanism that converts metal-bound alkynes to π-allyls in the absence of intervening allenes. PMID:26418572

  16. Cystalysin, a 46-kilodalton cysteine desulfhydrase from Treponema denticola, with hemolytic and hemoxidative activities.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, L; Ebersole, J L; Kurzban, G P; Holt, S C

    1997-01-01

    A 46-kDa hemolytic protein, referred to as cystalysin, from Treponema denticola ATCC 35404 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli LC-67. Both the native and recombinant 46-kDa proteins were purified to homogeneity. Both proteins expressed identical biological and functional characteristics. In addition to its biological function of lysing erythrocytes and hemoxidizing the hemoglobin to methemoglobin, cystalysin was also capable of removing the sulfhydryl and amino groups from selected S-containing compounds (e.g., cysteine) producing H2S, NH3, and pyruvate. This cysteine desulfhydrase resulted in the following Michaelis-Menten kinetics: Km = 3.6 mM and k(cat) = 12 s(-1). Cystathionine and S-aminoethyl-L-cysteine were also substrates for the protein. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the end products revealed NH3, pyruvate, homocysteine (from cystathionine), and cysteamine (from S-aminoethyl-L-cysteine). The enzyme was active over a broad pH range, with highest activity at pH 7.8 to 8.0. The enzymatic activity was increased by beta-mercaptoethanol. It was not inhibited by the proteinase inhibitor TLCK (N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone), pronase, or proteinase K, suggesting that the functional site was physically protected or located in a small fragment of the polypeptide. We hypothesize that cystalysin is a pyridoxal-5-phosphate-containing enzyme, with activity of an alphaC-N and betaC-S lyase (cystathionase) type. Since large amounts of H2S have been reported in deep periodontal pockets, cystalysin may also function in vivo as an important virulence molecule. PMID:9234780

  17. Selective corticotropin-releasing factor 1 receptor antagonist E2508 has potent antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like properties in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Ryota; Shikata, Kodo; Furuya, Yoshiaki; Ino, Mitsuhiro; Shin, Kogyoku; Shibata, Hisashi

    2016-10-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a hormone secreted by the hypothalamus in response to stress, and CRF antagonists may be effective for the treatment of stress-related disorders including major depressive and anxiety disorders. Here, we investigated the in vivo pharmacological profile of N-cyclopropylmethyl-7-(2,6-dimethoxy-4-methoxymethylphenyl)-2-ethyl-N-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-ylmethyl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridin-3-amine tosylate (E2508), a recently synthesized, orally active CRF1 receptor antagonist. Oral administration of a single dose of E2508 (3 or 10mg/kg), but not fluoxetine (30mg/kg), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), significantly shortened immobility time in rats in the forced swim test. E2508 (10, 30, or 100mg/kg) also showed an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swim test in mice, with no sedative or muscle relaxant effects for doses up to 100mg/kg. Moreover, E2508 (5 or 20mg/kg) significantly reduced anxiety-like behavior in the rat defensive burying test. Diazepam, a benzodiazepine anxiolytic agent, also showed an anxiolytic effect in the defensive burying test at the same dose that induced a muscle relaxant effect in mice. Administration of E2508 (30mg/kg) for 14 consecutive days did not affect sexual behavior. By contrast, fluoxetine (30mg/kg) administration for ≥7 consecutive days decreased sexual behavior. These results indicate that E2508 has both potent antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like effects in rodent models, and is well tolerated compared with a commonly prescribed therapeutic SSRI or benzodiazepine. PMID:27297028

  18. Inhibition of gingipains by their profragments as the mechanism protecting Porphyromonas gingivalis against premature activation of secreted proteases

    PubMed Central

    Veillard, Florian; Sztukowska, Maryta; Mizgalska, Danuta; Ksiazek, Mirosław; Houston, John; Potempa, Barbara; Enghild, Jan J.; Thogersen, Ida B.; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Potempa, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background Arginine-specific (RgpB and RgpA) and lysine-specific (Kgp) gingipains are secretory cysteine proteinases of Porphyromonas gingivalis that act as important virulence factors for the organism. They are translated as zymogens with both N- and C-terminal extensions, which are proteolytically cleaved during secretion. In this report, we describe and characterize inhibition of the gingipains by their N-terminal prodomains to maintain latency during their export through the cellular compartments. Methods Recombinant forms of various prodomains (PD) were analyzed for their interaction with mature gingipains. The kinetics of their inhibition of proteolytic activity along with the formation of stable inhibitory complexes with native gingipains was studied by gel filtration, native PAGE and substrate hydrolysis. Results PDRgpB and PDRgpA formed tight complexes with arginine-specific gingipains (Ki in the range from 6.2 nM to 0.85 nM). In contrast, PDKgp showed no inhibitory activity. A conserved Arg-102 residue in PDRgpB and PDRgpA was recognized as the P1 residue. Mutation of Arg-102 to Lys reduced inhibitory potency of PDRgpB by one order of magnitude while its substitutions with Ala, Gln or Gly totally abolished the PD inhibitory activity. Covalent modification of the catalytic cysteine with tosyl-L-Lys-chloromethylketone (TLCK) or H-D-Phe-Arg-chloromethylketone did not affect formation of the stable complex. Conclusion Latency of arginine-specific progingipains is efficiently exerted by N-terminal prodomains thus protecting the periplasm from potentially damaging effect of prematurely activated gingipains. General significance Blocking progingipain activation may offer an attractive strategy to attenuate P. gingivalis pathogenicity. PMID:23583629

  19. Co(III)-Carbene Radical Approach to Substituted 1H-Indenes.

    PubMed

    Das, Braja Gopal; Chirila, Andrei; Tromp, Moniek; Reek, Joost N H; Bruin, Bas de

    2016-07-20

    A new strategy for the catalytic synthesis of substituted 1H-indenes via metalloradical activation of o-cinnamyl N-tosyl hydrazones is presented, taking advantage of the intrinsic reactivity of a Co(III) carbene radical intermediate. The reaction uses readily available starting materials and is operationally simple, thus representing a practical method for the construction of functionalized 1H-indene derivatives. The cheap and easy to prepare low spin cobalt(II) complex [Co(II)(MeTAA)] (MeTAA = tetramethyltetraaza[14]annulene) proved to be the most active catalyst among those investigated, which demonstrates catalytic carbene radical reactivity for a nonporphyrin cobalt(II) complex, and for the first time catalytic activity of [Co(II)(MeTAA)] in general. The methodology has been successfully applied to a broad range of substrates, producing 1H-indenes in good to excellent yields. The metallo-radical catalyzed indene synthesis in this paper represents a unique example of a net (formal) intramolecular carbene insertion reaction into a vinylic C(sp(2))-H bond, made possible by a controlled radical ring-closure process of the carbene radical intermediate involved. The mechanism was investigated computationally, and the results were confirmed by a series of supporting experimental reactions. Density functional theory calculations reveal a stepwise process involving activation of the diazo compound leading to formation of a Co(III)-carbene radical, followed by radical ring-closure to produce an indanyl/benzyl radical intermediate. Subsequent indene product elimination involving a 1,2-hydrogen transfer step regenerates the catalyst. Trapping experiments using 2,2,6,6-tetra-methylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) radical or dibenzoylperoxide (DBPO) confirm the involvement of cobalt(III) carbene radical intermediates. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic spin-trapping experiments using phenyl N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) reveal the radical nature of the reaction. PMID

  20. Synthesis and properties of optically active nanostructured polymers bearing amino acid moieties by direct polycondensation of 4,4'-thiobis(2-tert-butyl-5-methylphenol) with chiral diacids.

    PubMed

    Mallakpour, Shadpour; Soltanian, Samaneh

    2012-06-01

    Four derivatives of N-trimellitylimido-L-amino acid (4a-4d) were prepared by the reaction of trimellitic anhydride (1) with the L-amino acids (2a-2d) in acetic acid as diacid monomers and were used with the aim to obtain a new family of amino acid based poly(ester-imide)s (PEI)s. The polymerization was performed by direct polycondensation of chiral diacids (4a-4d) with 4,4'-thiobis(2-tert-butyl-5-methylphenol) (5) in the presence of tosyl chloride (TsCl), pyridine and N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF). Step-growth polymerization was carried out by varying the time of heating and the molar ratio of TsCl/diacid and the optimum conditions were achieved. The synthesized polymers were characterized by means of specific rotation experiments, FT-IR, 1H-NMR, X-ray diffraction techniques and elemental analysis. The surface morphology of the obtained polymers was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The result showed nanostructure morphology of the resulting polymers. The obtained PEIs were soluble in polar aprotic solvents such as DMF, N,N-dimethyl acetamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone and protic solvents such as sulfuric acid. Thermal stability and the weight-loss behavior of the PEIs were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques. TGA showed that the 10% weight loss temperature in a nitrogen atmosphere was more than 402°C, therefore they had useful levels of thermal stability associated with excellent solubility. PMID:21691754

  1. Synthesis of fluorine-18 labeled rhodamine B: A potential PET myocardial perfusion imaging agent

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Tobias K.; Gottumukkala, Vijay; Snay, Erin; Dunning, Patricia; Fahey, Frederic H; Treves, S. Ted; Packard, Alan B.

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing an 18F-labeled PET myocardial perfusion agent. Rhodamine dyes share several properties with 99mTc-MIBI, the most commonly used single-photon myocardial perfusion agent, suggesting that an 18F-labeled rhodamine dye might prove useful for this application. In addition to being lipophilic cations, like 99mTc-MIBI, rhodamine dyes are known to accumulate in the myocardium and are substrates for Pgp, the protein implicated in MDR1 multidrug resistance. As the first step in determining whether 18F-labeled rhodamines might be useful as myocardial perfusion agents for PET, our objective was to develop synthetic methods for preparing the 18F-labeled compounds so that they could be evaluated in vivo. Rhodamine B was chosen as the prototype compound for development of the synthesis because the ethyl substituents on the amine moieties of rhodamine B protect them from side reactions, thus eliminating the need to include (and subsequently remove) protecting groups. The 2′-[18F]fluoroethyl ester of rhodamine B was synthesized by heating rhodamine B lactone with [18F]fluoroethyltosylate in acetonitrile at 165°C for 30 min.using [18F]fluoroethyl tosylate, which was prepared by the reaction of ethyleneglycol ditosylate with Kryptofix 2.2.2, K2CO3, and [18F]NaF in acetonitrile for 10 min. at 90°C. The product was purified by semi-preparative HPLC to produce the 2′-[18F]-fluoroethylester in >97% radiochemical purity with a specific activity of 1.3 GBq/μmol, an isolated decay corrected yield of 35%, and a total synthesis time of 90 min. PMID:19783150

  2. [Isolation and some properties of the proteinase atroxin from the venom of the snake Bothrops atrox].

    PubMed

    Pantigoso, C; Escobar, E; Málaga, O; Yarlequé, A

    1996-01-01

    A proteolytic enzyme from the venom of Bothrops atrox snake was isolated. It was designed as Atroxin, and three chromatography steps were used to purification: ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50 equilibrated with 0.05 M Tris HCl buffer, 1 mM CaCl2 pH 7.4, followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 and Sephadex G-100, respectively, using the same buffer. The enzyme was recovered with a 7.4 folds and 11% of yield. It had a high activity on casein being 7.4 optimus pH. A molecular weight was 19.9 Kd calculated by polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis, and head treatment showed that the enzyme preserves its activity in the range of 37-45 degrees C, while it was decrease when the temperature values were higher. On the other hand, 0.133 mumoles of Ca2+ and Mg2+, and Zn2+ ions (0.266 mumoles) were activators, while EDTA (0.20 mumoles) and sodium azide (0.053 mumoles) were inhibitors. The enzymatic activity was not affected by glicerol (1.33 mumoles) and phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride (PSMF) (0.16 mumoles). In addition, iodoacetic acid (0.08 mumoles) was slight inhibitor, but 0.16 mumoles of p-tosyl-1-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) was activator. Biological assays on mice showed that atroxin produced hemorrhagic and necrosis after 24 h of injection, which was increased by 5 mM calcium chloride. PMID:9334451

  3. Supramolecular design of biocompatible nanocontainers based on amphiphilic derivatives of a natural compound isosteviol.

    PubMed

    Gabdrakhmanov, Dinar R; Voronin, Mikhail A; Zakharova, Lucia Ya; Konovalov, Alexander I; Khaybullin, Ravil N; Strobykina, Irina Yu; Kataev, Vladimir E; Faizullin, Dzhigangir A; Gogoleva, Natalia E; Konnova, Tatiana A; Salnikov, Vadim V; Zuev, Yuriy F

    2013-10-21

    Two diterpenoid surfactants with ammonium head groups and bromide (S1) or tosylate (S2) counterions have been synthesized. Exploration of these biomimetic species made it possible to demonstrate that even minor structural changes beyond their chemical nature may dramatically affect their solution behavior. While their aggregation thresholds differ inconsiderably, morphological behavior and affinity to lipid bilayer are strongly dependent on the counterion nature. Compound S2 demonstrates properties of typical surfactants and forms small micelle-like aggregates above critical micelle concentration. For surfactant S1, two critical concentrations and two types of aggregates occur. Structural transitions have been observed between small micelles and aggregates with higher aggregation numbers and hydrodynamic diameter of ca. 150 nm. Unlike S2, surfactant S1 is shown to integrate with liposomes based on dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, resulting in a decrease of the temperature of the main phase transition. Both surfactants demonstrate an effective complexation capacity toward oligonucleotide (ONu), which is supported by recharging the surfactant-ONu complexes and the ethidium bromide exclusion at a low N/P ratio. Meanwhile, a very weak complexation of plasmid DNA with the surfactants has been revealed in the gel electrophoresis experiment. The DNA transfer to bacterial cells mediated by the surfactant S1 is shown to depend on the protocol used. In the case of the electroporation, the inhibition of the cell transformation occurs in the presence of the surfactant, while upon the chemical treatment no surfactant effect has been observed. The variability in the morphology, the biocompatibility, the nanoscale dimension and the high binding capacity toward the DNA decamer make it possible to nominate the designed surfactants as promising carriers for biosubstrates or as a helper surfactant for the mixed liposome-surfactant nanocontainers. PMID:23985972

  4. Synergistic Blockade of Mitotic Exit by Two Chemical Inhibitors of the APC/C

    PubMed Central

    Sackton, Katharine L.; Dimova, Nevena; Zeng, Xing; Tian, Wei; Zhang, Mengmeng; Sackton, Timothy B.; Meaders, Johnathan; Pfaff, Kathleen L.; Sigoillot, Frederic; Yu, Hongtao; Luo, Xuelian; King, Randall W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Protein machines are multi-subunit protein complexes that orchestrate highly regulated biochemical tasks. An example is the Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C), a thirteen-subunit ubiquitin ligase that initiates the metaphase-anaphase transition and mitotic exit by targeting proteins such as securin and cyclin B1 for ubiquitin-dependent destruction by the proteasome1,2. Because blocking mitotic exit is an effective approach for inducing tumor cell death3,4, the APC/C represents a potential novel target for cancer therapy. APC/C activation in mitosis requires binding of Cdc205, which forms a co-receptor with the APC/C to recognize substrates containing a Destruction box (D-box)6-14. Here we demonstrate that we can synergistically inhibit APC/C-dependent proteolysis and mitotic exit by simultaneously disrupting two protein-protein interactions within the APC/C-Cdc20-substrate ternary complex. We identified a small molecule, called apcin (APC inhibitor), which binds to Cdc20 and competitively inhibits the ubiquitylation of D-box-containing substrates. Analysis of the crystal structure of the apcin-Cdc20 complex suggests that apcin occupies the D-box-binding pocket on the side face of the WD40-domain. The ability of apcin to block mitotic exit is synergistically amplified by co-addition of tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME), a small molecule that blocks the APC/C-Cdc20 interaction15,16. This work suggests that simultaneous disruption of multiple, weak protein-protein interactions is an effective approach for inactivating a protein machine. PMID:25156254

  5. Enhanced toxicity and cellular uptake of methotrexate-conjugated nanoparticles in folate receptor-positive cancer cells by decorating with folic acid-conjugated d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate.

    PubMed

    Junyaprasert, Varaporn Buraphacheep; Dhanahiranpruk, Sirithip; Suksiriworapong, Jiraphong; Sripha, Kittisak; Moongkarndi, Primchanien

    2015-12-01

    Folic acid-conjugated d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS-FOL) decorated methotrexate (MTX)-conjugated nanoparticles were developed for targeted delivery of MTX to folate receptor-expressed tumor cells. The synthesis of TPGS-FOL followed 3-step process. Firstly, the terminal hydroxyl group of TPGS was converted to sulfonyl chloride using mesyl chloride in comparison with nosyl and tosyl chlorides. The highest conversion efficiency and yield were obtained by mesyl chloride due to the formation of higher reactive intermediate in a presence of triethylamine. Secondly, the substitution of sulfonyl group by sodium azide produced considerably high yield with conversion efficiency of over 90%. Lastly, the coupling reaction of azido-substituted TPGS and propargyl folamide by click reaction resulted in 96% conjugation efficiency without polymer degradation. To fabricate the folate receptor-targeted nanoparticles, 10 and 20%mol MTX-conjugated PEGylated poly(ϵ-caprolactone) nanoparticles were decorated with TPGS-FOL. The size and size distribution of MTX-conjugated nanoparticles relatively increased with %MTX. The MTX release from the nanoparticles was accelerated in acidic medium with an increase of %MTX but retarded in physiological pH medium. The decoration of TPGS-FOL onto the nanoparticles slightly enlarged the size and size distribution of the nanoparticles; however, it did not affect the surface charge. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of MCF-7 cells demonstrated that 10% MTX-conjugated nanoparticles and FOL-decorated nanoparticles possessed higher toxicity and uptake efficiency than 20% MTX-conjugated nanoparticles and undecorated nanoparticles, respectively. The results indicated that FOL-10% MTX-conjugated nanoparticles exhibited potential targeted delivery of MTX to folate receptor-expressed cancer cells. PMID:26433645

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled ATP competitive inhibitors of topoisomerase II as probes for imaging topoisomerase II expression

    PubMed Central

    Daumar, Pierre; Zeglis, Brian M.; Ramos, Nicholas; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntal Kumar; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Type II topoisomerase (Topo-II) is an ATP-dependent enzyme that is essential in the transcription, replication, and chromosome segregation processes and, as such, represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Numerous studies indicate that the response to treatment with Topo-II inhibitors is highly dependent on both the levels and the activity of the enzyme. Consequently, a non-invasive assay to measure tumoral Topo-II levels has the potential to differentiate responders from non-responders. With the ultimate goal of developing a radiofluorinated tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we have designed, synthesized, and evaluated a set of fluorinated compounds based on the structure of the ATP-competitive Topo-II inhibitor QAP1. Compounds 18 and 19b showed inhibition of Topo-II in in vitro assays and exhibited moderate, Topo-II level dependent cytotoxicity in SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. Based on these results, 18F-labeled analogs of these two compounds were synthesized and evaluated as PET probes for imaging Topo-II overexpression in mice bearing SK-BR-3 xenografts. [18F]-18 and [18F]-19b were synthesized from their corresponding protected tosylated derivatives by fluorination and subsequent deprotection. Small animal PET imaging studies indicated that both compounds do not accumulate in tumors and exhibit poor pharmacokinetics, clearing from the blood pool very rapidly and getting metabolized over. The insights gained from the current study will surely aid in the design and construction of future generations of PET agents for the non-invasive delineation of Topo-II expression. PMID:25240701

  7. Trypsin from the digestive system of carp Cirrhinus mrigala: purification, characterization and its potential application.

    PubMed

    Khangembam, Bronson Kumar; Chakrabarti, Rina

    2015-05-15

    Trypsin was purified 35.64-fold with 4.97% recovery from the viscera of carp Cirrhinus mrigala (mrigal) by ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange and affinity chromatography. The purified enzyme was active at a wide range of pH (7.0-9.2) and temperature (10-50°C). The purified enzyme exhibited high thermal stability up to 50°C for 1h. The enzyme activity was stabilized by Ca(+2) (2mM) up to 7h at 40°C. The Km and kcat values of purified enzyme were 0.0672 mM and 92.09/s/mM, respectively. Soybean trypsin inhibitor and phenylmethylsulphonylflouride completely inhibited the enzyme activity. The specific inhibitor of trypsin, N-α-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone inhibited 99.67% activity. Na(+), K(+) and Li(+) inhibited 20.99 ± 5.25%, 16.53 ± 4.80% and 18.99 ± 1.42% of enzyme activity, respectively. Divalent ions Mg(+2), Zn(+2), Co(+2), Hg(+2) and Cd(+2) inhibited 21.61 ± 2.22%, 31.62 ± 1.78%, 31.62 ± 1.96%, 85.68 ± 1.51% and 47.95 ± 2.13% enzyme activity, respectively. SDS-PAGE showed that the molecular mass of purified enzyme was 21.7 kDa. MALDI-TOF study showed a peptide sequence of AFCGGSLVNENKMHSAGHCYKSRIQV at the N-Terminal. This sequence recorded 76-84% identity with trypsin from Thunnus thynnus and other fish species. This confirmed that the purified protein was trypsin. The purified enzyme has potential applications in detergent and food industry because of its thermal stability and alkaline nature. PMID:25577096

  8. Thermoelectric Power and ZT in Conducting Organic Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, H. L.

    2012-03-01

    A recent report on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene-tosylate) (PEDOT.Tos) suggested that the thermoelectric figure of merit ( ZT) could be enhanced when the percentage oxidation was chemically altered. This invokes the question of whether the carrier density or the mobility was modified. In this work, we analyzed data reported by Bibnova et al. ( Nat. Mater. 10, 429, 2011) and extracted the transport parameters using three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) models. Our results indicate that the increase in the power factor ( S 2 σ) was due primarily to upward extension in the range of thermoelectric power. A changeover from lattice scattering to ionized impurity scattering in PEDOT.Tos allowed the equation governing the thermoelectric power to be valid at higher carrier densities, resulting in an increase in the power factor. ZT was also enhanced in PEDOT.Tos due to the low intrinsic thermal conductivity (~0.37 W/m K). The peak value of ZT (~0.3) was found close to the regime where the semiconductor turned "metallic," beyond which ZT would decrease. We are of the opinion that charge-to-charge scattering (which normally would lower the power factor in highly doped semiconductors) remain subdued in PEDOT.Tos due potentially to electronic screening and a lack of long-range order. We used the reported data to compute the carrier density and mobility assuming ionized impurity scattering and found the peak power factor to occur for carrier density of ~1 × 1026 m-3 and mobility of ~5 × 10-4 m2/V s.

  9. Characterization of an extracellular serine protease of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Silva-Lopez, R E; Coelho, M G Pinto; De Simone, S G

    2005-07-01

    A serine protease was purified 942-fold from culture supernatant of L. amazonensis promastigotes using (NH4)2SO4 precipitation followed by affinity chromatography on aprotinin-agarose and continuous elution electrophoresis by Prep Cell, yielding a total recovery of 61%. The molecular mass of the active enzyme estimated by SDS-PAGE under conditions of reduction was 56 kDa and 115 kDa under conditions of non-reduction, suggesting that the protease is a dimeric protein. Additionally, it was found to be a non-glycosylated enzyme, with a pI of 5.0. The optimal pH and temperature of the enzyme were 7.5 and 28 degrees C respectively, using alpha-N-rho-tosyl-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-TAME) as substrate. Assays of thermal stability indicated that 61% of the enzyme activity was preserved after 1 h of pre-treatment at 42 degrees C. Haemoglobin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), ovalbumin, fibrinogen, collagen, gelatin and peptide substrates containing arginine in an ester bond and amide substrates containing hydrophobic residues at the P1 site were hydrolysed by this extracellular protease. The insulin beta-chain was also hydrolysed by the enzyme and many peptidic bonds were susceptible to the protease action, and 4 of them (L11-V12, E3-A14, L15-Y16 and Y16-L17) were identified. Inhibition studies suggested that the enzyme belongs to the serine protease class inhibited by calcium and manganese and activated by zinc. These findings show that this enzyme of L. amazonensis is a novel serine protease, which differs from all known flagellate proteases characterized. PMID:16038400

  10. Evidence that the human cutaneous venoarteriolar response is not mediated by adrenergic mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Shibasaki, M.; Yen, T. C.

    2002-01-01

    The venoarteriolar response causes vasoconstriction to skin and muscle via local mechanisms secondary to venous congestion. The purpose of this project was to investigate whether this response occurs through alpha-adrenergic mechanisms. In supine individuals, forearm skin blood flow was monitored via laser-Doppler flowmetry over sites following local administration of terazosin (alpha(1)-antagonist), yohimbine (alpha(2)-antagonist), phentolamine (non-selective alpha-antagonist) and bretylium tosylate (inhibits neurotransmission of adrenergic nerves) via intradermal microdialysis or intradermal injection. In addition, skin blood flow was monitored over an area of forearm skin that was locally anaesthetized via application of EMLA (2.5 % lidocaine (lignocaine) and 2.5 % prilocaine) cream. Skin blood flow was also monitored over adjacent sites that received the vehicle for the specified drug. Each trial was performed on a minimum of seven subjects and on separate days. The venoarteriolar response was engaged by lowering the subject's arm from heart level such that the sites of skin blood flow measurement were 34 +/- 1 cm below the heart. The arm remained in this position for 2 min. Selective and non-selective alpha-adrenoceptor antagonism and presynaptic inhibition of adrenergic neurotransmission did not abolish the venoarteriolar response. However, local anaesthesia blocked the venoarteriolar response without altering alpha-adrenergic mediated vasoconstriction. These data suggest that the venoarteriolar response does not occur through adrenergic mechanisms as previously reported. Rather, the venoarteriolar response may due to myogenic mechanisms associated with changes in vascular pressure or is mediated by a non-adrenergic, but neurally mediated, local mechanism.

  11. Production and Evaluation of Antibodies and Phage Display-Derived Peptide Ligands for Immunomagnetic Separation of Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Linda D.; McNair, James; McCallan, Lyanne; Thompson, Suzan; Kulakov, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the development and optimization of an immunomagnetic separation (IMS) method to isolate Mycobacterium bovis cells from lymph node tissues. Gamma-irradiated whole M. bovis AF2122/97 cells and ethanol-extracted surface antigens of such cells were used to produce M. bovis-specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in rabbits and mice. They were also used to generate M. bovis-specific peptide ligands by phage display biopanning. The various antibodies and peptide ligands obtained were used to coat MyOne tosyl-activated Dynabeads (Life Technologies), singly or in combination, and evaluated for IMS. Initially, M. bovis capture from Middlebrook 7H9 broth suspensions (concentration range, 10 to 105 CFU/ml) was evaluated by IMS combined with an M. bovis-specific touchdown PCR. IMS-PCR results and, subsequently, IMS-culture results indicated that the beads with greatest immunocapture capability for M. bovis in broth were those coated simultaneously with a monoclonal antibody and a biotinylated 12-mer peptide. These dually coated beads exhibited minimal capture (mean of 0.36% recovery) of 12 other Mycobacterium spp. occasionally encountered in veterinary tuberculosis (TB) diagnostic laboratories. When the optimized IMS method was applied to various M. bovis-spiked lymph node matrices, it demonstrated excellent detection sensitivities (50% limits of detection of 3.16 and 57.7 CFU/ml of lymph node tissue homogenate for IMS-PCR and IMS-culture, respectively). The optimized IMS method therefore has the potential to improve isolation of M. bovis from lymph nodes and hence the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis. PMID:22322353

  12. Syntheses and biological activities of 13-substituted avermectin aglycons.

    PubMed

    Mrozik, H; Linn, B O; Eskola, P; Lusi, A; Matzuk, A; Preiser, F A; Ostlind, D A; Schaeffer, J M; Fisher, M H

    1989-02-01

    The reactions of sulfonate esters of the allylic/homoallylic 13-alcohol of 5-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-22,23-dihydroavermectin B1a aglycon (1a) were investigated. Nucleophilic substitution gave 13 beta-chloro and 13 beta-iodo derivatives, while solvolytic reaction conditions yielded 13 alpha-methoxy, 13 alpha-fluoro, and 13 alpha-chloro products. A mixture of 13 alpha- and 13 beta-fluorides was obtained upon reaction with DAST. The 13 beta-iodide gave, upon elimination with lutidine, the 8(9),10(11),12(13),14(15)-tetraene. The 13 beta-alcohol and the rearranged 15-ol 13(14)-ene and 15-amino 13(14)-ene derivatives were obtained by substitution via the allylic carbonium ion. MEM ethers 11 and 12 of the two epimeric 13-ols were prepared by alkylation with MEM chloride. In contrast, methylation of 1a with MeI and Ag2O in CH2Cl2 occurred exclusively at the tertiary 7-hydroxy group and not at the secondary 13 alpha-ol. Oxidation of the allylic alcohol 1a proceeded under Swern conditions but not with MnO2 to the 13-oxo aglycon, which was reduced by NaBH4 exclusively to the natural 13 alpha-ol, while reductive amination with NaCNBH3-NH4OAc gave the 13 alpha-amine. The methoxime derivative was obtained in the form of the two geometric isomers. Anthelmintic activities against the sheep nematode Trichostrongylus colubriformis, miticidal activities against the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae), and insecticidal activities against the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania) as well as the binding constants to a free living nematode (Caenorhabditis elegans) derived receptor assay were obtained and compared to avermectin B1a, 22,23-dihydroavermectin B1a, and the 13-deoxy-22,23-dihydroavermectin B1 aglycon related to the milbemycins. None of the newly prepared derivatives exceeded the potency of the three reference compounds. Lipophilic 13-substituents such as halogen, alkoxy, and methoxime retained high biological activities in all assays, while the more polar

  13. The effects of "Women Are Scientists, Too" program on middle school students' perceptions of scientists and their attitudes toward women in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailer, Jill

    Research has established the need for women in science and engineering fields. In response to the recommendations from noted researchers, the Women Are Scientists, Too (WAST) program was developed for implementation in middle school language arts classes. The program combines biographies of women scientists with questions that provide students practice in critical thinking skills and writing. A series of nine biographies were adapted from The Scientist Within You (1996) and were used over a nine-week period. The WAST Program integrates women scientist role models and career awareness into reading and writing activities that can be incorporated easily into a teachers' daily lessons. In addition, this program exposes both girls and boys to the idea that women are successful scientists. With its ease of use, teachers may be more likely to reuse the materials after the completion of the study. The study was quasi-experimental in design. A pretest-posttest control group design was used. Ten language arts teachers and their students (N = 500) participated in the study. Schools were chosen from a large urban school district in southeast Texas for its ethnic diversity. The effect of the WAST program on middle school students' perceptions of scientists was investigated. Students' perceptions of scientists were measured before and after the program by the Draw-A-Scientist Test. In addition students' attitudes toward women in science were investigated and measured with the Women in Science Scale. Data generated were analyzed using two stepwise multiple regression analyses. The study found that there was a statistically significant difference between students who had participated in the WAST program and those who had not participated in the program. The WAST program accounted for 2-3 percent of the variance of the scores on the DAST and the WiSS instruments (p <.001). In addition, it was found that there was a significantly linear relationship between gender and ethnicity and

  14. Pigtailed electro-optic probes for vectorial electric field mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warzecha, Adriana; Gaborit, Gwenaël; Ruaro, Mickael; Duvillaret, Lionel; Lassere, Jean-Louis

    2010-04-01

    Electro-optic measurement (EO) constitutes an efficient technique to characterize electrical (E) fields : indeed, the Pockel's effect properties (linear modification of refractive indices of some non-centrosymetric crystals induced by the E-field)1 leads to a vectorial measurement. Thus, it allows to map the E-field vector and its transient evolution, either in free space or inside guiding structures. Pigtailed EO sensors are naturally becoming a reliable and consistent mean of characterization for many applications, e.g. high power microwaves (HPM), electromagnetic interference (EMI), on chip diagnostic, bio-electromagnetism (e.g. influence of mobile phones on the human body). Even if these non-invasive sensors provide a greater temporal and spatial resolution (femtosecond and sub-millimeter, respectively) than commonly used sensors (antennas, bolometers), it remains temperature dependant and quite low sensitive. EO probes are based on the modification of a laser beam (either its polarization, phase or amplitude) crossing an EO crystal. We demonstrate here the last developments and improvements for EO probes as well as for whole EO setups, exploiting polarization state or amplitude modulation. The sensor is constituted by a polarization maintaining (PM) fiber carrying the beam to the crystal and taking it back once modulated, gradient index lense(s) managing the shape of the beam, half or quarter wave plate controlling the input and output polarizations and a crystal (either anisotropic: LiTaO3, LiNb03, DAST, KTP or isotropic : ZnTe, InP) converting the E-field into a modulation. Our probes are fully dielectric and cylindrically shaped (length ~ 1 cm and diameter ~ 2-3 mm). The setup is made of a 1.5 μm DFB laser, some photodiodes (low and high speed) added with a polarization state analyser arrangement in case of EO probes based on polarization state modulation scheme. The measurement bench is fully automated and compensate/measure the temperature deviation

  15. Synthesis and preclinical evaluation of a new C-6 alkylated pyrimidine derivative as a PET imaging agent for HSV1-tk gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Ursina; Ross, Tobias L; Ranadheera, Charlene; Slavik, Roger; Müller, Adrienne; Born, Mariana; Trauffer, Evelyn; Sephton, Selena Milicevic; Scapozza, Leonardo; Krämer, Stefanie D; Ametamey, Simon M

    2013-01-01

    [18F]FHOMP (6-((1-[18F]-fluoro-3-hydroxypropan-2-yloxy)methyl)-5-methylpyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione), a C-6 substituted pyrimidine derivative, has been synthesized and evaluated as a potential PET agent for imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene expression. [18F]FHOMP was prepared by the reaction of the tosylated precursor with tetrabutylammonium [18F]-fluoride followed by acidic cleavage of the protecting groups. In vitro cell accumulation of [18F]FHOMP and [18F]FHBG (reference) was studied with HSV1-tk transfected HEK293 (HEK293TK+) cells. Small animal PET and biodistribution studies were performed with HEK293TK+ xenograft-bearing nude mice. The role of equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) in the transport and uptake of [18F] FHOMP was also examined in nude mice after treatment with ENT1 inhibitor nitrobenzylmercaptopurine ribonucleoside phosphate (NBMPR-P). [18F]FHOMP was obtained in a radiochemical yield of ~25% (decay corrected) and the radiochemical purity was greater than 95%. The uptake of [18F]FHOMP in HSV1-TK containing HEK293TK+ cells was 52 times (at 30 min) and 244 times (at 180 min) higher than in control HEK293 cells. The uptake ratios between HEK293TK+ and HEK293 control cells for [18F]FHBG were significantly lower i.e. 5 (at 30 min) and 81 (240 min). In vivo, [18F]FHOMP accumulated to a similar extend in HEK293TK+ xenografts as [18F]FHBG but with a higher general background. Blocking of ENT1 reduced [18F]FHOMP uptake into brain from a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 0.10±0.01 to 0.06±0.02, but did not reduce the general background signal in PET. Although [18F]FHOMP does not outperform [18F]FHBG in its in vivo performance, this novel C-6 pyrimidine derivative may be a useful probe for monitoring HSV1-tk gene expression in vivo. PMID:23342302

  16. Characterization of proinsulin- and proglucagon-converting activities in isolated islet secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, D J; Quigley, J P; Bauer, G E; Noe, B D

    1981-08-01

    The conversion of proglucagon and proinsulin by secretory granules isolated from both prelabeled and unlabeled anglerfish islets was investigated. Either granules isolated from tissue labeled with [3H]tryptophan and [14C]isoleucine or [35S]cysteine, or lysed granules from unlabeled tissue to which exogenously labeled prohormones had been added were incubated under various conditions. Acetic acid extracts of these granule preparations were analyzed for prohormone and hormone content by gel filtration. Both prelabeled and lysed, unlabeled secretory granules converted radiolabeled precursor peptides (Mr 8,000-15,000) to labeled insulin and glucagon. The accuracy of the cleavage process was established by demonstrating comigration of products obtained from in vitro cleavage with insulin and glucagon extracted from intact islets using electrophoresis and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The pH optimum for granule-mediated conversion was found to be in the range of pH 4.5-5.5. Conversion of both proglucagon and proinsulin by secretory granules was significantly inhibited in the presence of antipain, leupeptin, p-chloromercuribenzoate (PCMB) or dithiodipyridine (DDP) but not chloroquine, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, EDTA, p-nitrophenyl guanidinobenzoate, soybean trypsin inhibitor, or N-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone HCl. The inhibitory action of PCMB and DDP was reversed in the presence of dithiothreitol. Both membranous and soluble components of the secretory granules possessed significant converting activity. HPLC and electrophoretic analysis of cleavage products demonstrated that the converting activities of the membranous and soluble components were indistinguishable. The amount of inhibition of proinsulin and proglucagon conversion caused by 600 micrograms/ml porcine proinsulin was significantly lower than that caused by the same concentration of unlabeled anglerfish precursor peptides. These results indicate that the proinsulin and proglucagon

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F labeled alanine derivatives as potential tumor imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Zha, Zhihao; Qu, Wenchao; Qiao, Hongwen; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This paper reports the synthesis and labeling of 18F alanine derivatives. We also investigate their biological characteristics as potential tumor imaging agents mediated by alanine-serine-cysteine preferring (ASC) transporter system. Methods Three new 18F alanine derivatives were prepared from corresponding tosylate-precursors through a two-step labelling reaction. In vitro uptake studies to evaluate and to compare these three analogs were carried out in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. Potential transport mechanisms, protein incorporation and stability of 3-(1-[18F]fluoromethyl)-L-alanine (L[18F]FMA) were investigated in 9L glioma cells. Its biodistribution was determined in a rat-bearing 9L tumor model. PET imaging studies were performed on rat bearing 9L glioma tumors and transgenic mouse carrying spontaneous generated M/tomND tumor (mammary gland adenocarcinoma). Results New 18F alanine derivatives were prepared with 7–34% uncorrected radiochemical yields, excellent enantiomeric purity (>99%) and good radiochemical purity (>99%). In vitro uptake of the L-[18F]FMA in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cells was higher than those observed for other two alanine derivatives and [18F]FDG in first 1 h. Inhibition of cell uptake studies suggested that L-[18F]FMA uptake in 9L glioma was predominantly via transport system ASC. After entering into cells, L-[18F]FMA remained stable and was not incorporated into protein within 2 h. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that L-[18F]FMA had relatively high uptake in liver and kidney. Tumor uptake was fast, reaching a maximum within 30 min. The tumor-to-muscle, tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-brain ratios at 60 min post injection were 2.2, 1.9 and 3.0, respectively. In PET imaging studies, tumors were visualized with L-[18F]FMA in both 9L rat and transgenic mouse. Conclusion L-[18F]FMA showed promising properties as a PET imaging agent for up-regulated ASC transporter associated with tumor

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F labeled FET prodrugs for tumor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Lieberman, Brian P.; Ploessl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET, [18F]1) is a useful amino-acid-based imaging agent for brain tumors. This paper reports the synthesis and evaluation of three FET prodrugs, O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosyl-L-glycine (FET-Gly, [18F]2), O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosyl-L-alanine (FET-Ala, [18F]3) and N-acetyl O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (AcFET, [18F]4), which could be readily hydrolyzed to FET in vivo for tumor imaging. We investigated their metabolism in the blood and imaging properties in comparison to FET ([18F]1). Methods Three new [18F]FET derivatives, 2 – 4, were prepared from their corresponding tosylate-precursors through nucleophilic fluorination and subsequent deprotection reactions. In vitro uptake studies were carried out in 9L glioma cancer cell lines. In vitro and in vivo hydrolysis studies were conducted to evaluate the hydrolysis of FET prodrugs in blood and in Fisher 344 rats. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were then performed in rats bearing 9L tumors. Results New FET prodrugs were prepared with 3 – 28 % decay corrected radiochemical yields, good enantiomeric purity (> 95 %) and high radiochemical purity (> 95 %). FET-Gly ([18F]2), FET-Ala ([18F]3), and AcFET ([18F]4) exhibited negligible uptake in comparison to the high uptake of FET ([18F]1) in 9L cells. Metabolism studies of FET-Gly ([18F]2), FET-Ala ([18F]3), and AcFET ([18F]4) in rat and human blood showed that FET-Ala ([18F]3) was hydrolyzed to FET ([18F]1) faster than FET-Gly ([18F]2) or AcFET ([18F]4). Most of the FET-Ala (79 %) was converted to FET ([18F]1) within 5 min in blood in vivo. Biodistribution studies demonstrated that FET-Ala ([18F]3) displayed the highest tumor uptake. The tumor-to-background ratios of FET-Ala ([18F]3) and FET ([18F]1) were comparable and appeared to be better than those of FET-Gly ([18F]2) and AcFET ([18F]4). PET imaging studies showed that both FET ([18F]1) and FET-Ala ([18F]3) could visualize tumors effectively, and that

  19. Imaging of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in brain and cerebral vasculature of juvenile pigs with [18F]NS14490

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is an important molecular target in neuropsychiatry and oncology. Development of applicable highly specific radiotracers has been challenging due to comparably low protein expression. To identify novel ligands as candidates for positron emission tomography (PET), a library of diazabicyclononane compounds was screened regarding affinity and specificity towards α7 nAChRs. From these, [18F]NS14490 has been shown to yield reliable results in organ distribution studies; however, the radiosynthesis of [18F]NS14490 required optimization and automation to obtain the radiotracer in quantities allowing dynamic PET studies in piglets. Methods Automated radiosynthesis of [18F]NS14490 has been performed by [18F]fluorination with the tosylate precursor in the TRACERlab™ FX F-N synthesis module (Waukesha, WI, USA). After optimization, the radiochemical yield of [18F]NS14490 was consistently approximately 35%, and the total synthesis time was about 90 min. The radiotracer was prepared with >92% radiochemical purity, and the specific activity at the end of the synthesis was 226 ± 68 GBq μmol−1. PET measurements were performed in young pigs to investigate the metabolic stability and cerebral binding of [18F]NS14490 without and with administration of the α7 nAChR partial agonist NS6740 in baseline and blocking conditions. Results The total distribution volume relative to the metabolite-corrected arterial input was 3.5 to 4.0 mL g−1 throughout the telencephalon and was reduced to 2.6 mL g−1 in animals treated with NS6740. Assuming complete blockade, this displacement indicated a binding potential (BPND) of approximately 0.5 in the brain of living pigs. In addition, evidence for specific binding in major brain arteries has been obtained. Conclusion [18F]NS14490 is not only comparable to other preclinically investigated PET radiotracers for imaging of α7 nAChR in brain but also could be a potential PET

  20. Interaction of thrombin des-ETW with antithrombin III, the Kunitz inhibitors, thrombomodulin and protein C. Structural link between the autolysis loop and the Tyr-Pro-Pro-Trp insertion of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Le Bonniec, B F; Guinto, E R; Esmon, C T

    1992-09-25

    X-ray diffraction studies of human thrombin revealed that compared with trypsin, two insertions (B and C) potentially limit access to the active site groove. When amino acids Glu146, Thr147, and Trp148, adjacent to the C-insertion (autolysis loop), are deleted the resulting thrombin (des-ETW) has dramatically altered interaction with serine protease inhibitors. Whereas des-ETW resists antithrombin III inactivation with a rate constant (Kon) approximately 350-fold slower than for thrombin, des-ETW is remarkably sensitive to the Kunitz inhibitors, with inhibition constants (Ki) decreased from 2.6 microM to 34 nM for the soybean trypsin inhibitor and from 52 microM to 1.8 microM for the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. The affinity for hirudin (Ki = 5.6 pM) is weakened at least 30-fold compared with recombinant thrombin. The mutation affects the charge stabilizing system and the primary binding pocket of thrombin as depicted by a decrease in Kon for diisopropylfluorophosphate (9.5-fold) and for N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine-chloromethyl ketone (51-fold) and a 39-fold increase in the Ki for benzamidine. With peptidyl p-nitroanilide substrates, the des-ETW deletion results in changes in the Michaelis (Km) and/or catalytic (kcat) constants, worsened as much as 85-fold (Km) or 100-fold (kcat). The specific clotting activity of des-ETW is less than 5% that of thrombin and the kcat/Km for protein C activation in the absence of cofactor less than 2%. Thrombomodulin binds to des-ETW with a dissociation constant of approximately 2.5 nM and partially restores its ability to activate protein C since, in the presence of the cofactor, kcat/Km rises to 6.5% that of thrombin. This study suggests that the ETW motif of thrombin prevents (directly or indirectly) its interaction with the two Kunitz inhibitors and is not essential for the thrombomodulin-mediated enhancement of protein C activation. PMID:1326550

  1. Conformational study of C8 diazocine turn mimics using {sup 3}J{sub CH} coupling constants with {sup 13}C in natural abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, J.W.; Briand, J.; Burgess, J.L.; Callahan, J.F.

    1994-12-01

    The conformations of two diazocine turn mimics, which were later incorporated into GPIIb/IIIa peptide antagonists, were investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The two compounds, methyl (2,5-dioxo-3-(S)-(3-{omega}-tosylguanidino-propyl)-4-methyl-octahydro-1,4-dazocin-1-yl)acetate (1) and methyl (2,5-dioxo-3-(S)-(3-{omega}-tosyl-guanidino-propyl)-octahydro-1,5-diazocin-1-yl)acetate (2), differ only in their substituent at the diazocine position 4 nitrogen, yet this substitution results in a marked difference in the affinity of the resulting analogs for the GPIIb/IIIa receptor. It was of interest to determine if the difference observed in the antagonistic potency between these analogs was related to constitutional or, perhaps, conformational differences. The backbone conformations of these two molecules can be determined by measuring vicinal coupling constants along the trimethylene portion of the C8 ring backbone and by measuring interproton NOE intensities between the diazocine methine proton and the protons of the trimethylene group. For compound 1, {sup 3}J{sub HH} values measured from a P.E.COSY spectrum and interproton distances calculated from ROESY buildup curves indicated the presence of a single C8 ring backbone conformation where the trimethylene bridge adopted a staggered conformation and the H{alpha}1 and H{gamma}1 protons of the trimethylene group were 2.2 A from the methine proton. For compound 2, however, partial overlap of the central H{beta}1 and H{beta}2 protons made it impossible to measure {sup 3}J{sub HH} values from the P.E.COSY spectrum. We therefore used a {sup 13}C-filtered TOCSY experiment to measure the {sup 3}J{sub CH} values in both compounds 1 and 2. These heteronuclear vicinal coupling constants measured with {sup 13}C in natural abundance in conjunction with measured interproton NOE intensities indicate that these compounds share a common C8 ring backbone conformation.

  2. 6-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)alkoxy]pyrimidines with antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Holý, Antonín; Votruba, Ivan; Masojídková, Milena; Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert; Naesens, Lieve; De Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan

    2002-04-25

    6-Hydroxypyrimidines substituted at positions 2 and 4 by hydrogen, methyl, amino, cyclopropylamino, dimethylamino, methylsulfanyl, or hydroxyl group afford by the reaction with diisopropyl 2-(chloroethoxy)methylphosphonate in the presence of NaH, Cs(2)CO(3), or DBU a mixture of N(1)- and O(6)-[2-(diisopropylphosphorylmethoxy)ethyl] isomers which were converted to the free phosphonic acids by treatment with bromotrimethylsilane followed by hydrolysis. Analogously, 2,4-diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine gave on reaction with [(R)- and (S)-2-(diisopropylphosphorylmethoxy)propyl] tosylate, followed by deprotection, the enantiomeric 6-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)propoxy]pyrimidines. 2,4-Diamino-6-sulfanylpyrimidine gave, on treatment with diisopropyl 2-(chloroethoxy)methylphosphonate in the presence of NaH and subsequent deprotection, 2,4-diamino-6-[[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]sulfanyl]pyrimidine. 2-Amino-4-hydroxy-6-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]pyrimidine was obtained from the appropriate 2-amino-4-chloropyrimidine derivative by alkaline hydrolysis and ester cleavage. Direct alkylation of 2-amino-4,6-dihydroxypyrimidine afforded a mixture of 2-amino-4,6-bis[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]- and 2-amino-1,4-bis[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]pyrimidine. None of the N(1)-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl] isomers exhibited any antiviral activity against DNA viruses or RNA viruses tested in vitro. On the contrary, the O(6)-isomers, namely the compounds derived from 2,4-diamino-, 2-amino-4-hydroxy-, or 2-amino-4-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethoxy]-6-hydroxypyrimidine, inhibited the replication of herpes viruses [herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), and cytomegalovirus (CMV)] and retroviruses [Moloney sarcoma virus (MSV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2)], their activity being most pronounced against the latter. The antiviral activity was lower if the oxygen at the position 6 was replaced by a sulfur atom, as in 2,4-diamino-6

  3. Identification and Partial Characterization of Midgut Proteases in the Lesser Mulberry Pyralid, Glyphodes pyloalis

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Atiyeh; Ghadamyari, Mohammad; Sajedi, Reza H.; Sharifi, Mahbobeh; Kouchaki, Behrooz

    2013-01-01

    Proteolytic activities in digestive system extracts from the larval midgut of the lesser mulberry pyralid, Glyphodes pyloalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), were analyzed using different specific peptide substrates and proteinase inhibitors. High proteolytic activities were found at pH 10.0 and a temperature of 50° C using azocasein as substrate. The trypsin was active in the pH range of 9.5– 12.0, with its maximum activity at pH 11.5. Ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid had the most inhibitory effect, and 44% inhibition was detected in the presence of this inhibitor. Phenyl methane sulfonyl floride and N-tosyl-L-phe chloromethyl ketone also showed considerable inhibition of larval azocaseinolytic activity, with 40.2 and 35.1% inhibition respectively. These data suggest that the midgut of larvae contains mainly metalloproteases and serine proteases, mainly chymotrypsin. The effect of several metal ions on the activity of proteases showed that NaCl, CaCl2, CoCl2 (5 and 10 mM), and MnCl2 (5mM) reduced the protease activity. The kinetic parameters of trypsin-like proteases using N-benzoyl-L-arg-p-nitroanilide as substrate indicated that the Km and Vmax values of trypsin in the alimentary canal were 50.5 ± 2.0 µM and 116.06 ± 1.96 nmol min-1 mg-1 protein, respectively. Inhibition assays showed only small amounts of cysteine proteases were present in the G. pyloalis digestive system. The midgut digestive protease system of G. pyloalis is as diverse as that of any of the other polyphagous lepidopteran insect species, and the midgut of larvae contains mainly metalloproteases. Moreover, serine proteases and chymotrypsin also play main roles in protein digestion. Characterization of the proteolytic properties of the digestive enzymes of G. pyloalis offers an opportunity for developing appropriate and effective pest management strategies via metalloproteases and chymotrypsin inhibitors. PMID:24228902

  4. Proteolytic inactivation of the leukocyte C5a receptor by proteinases derived from Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Jagels, M A; Travis, J; Potempa, J; Pike, R; Hugli, T E

    1996-01-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has been implicated as a primary causative agent in adult periodontitis. Several proteinases are produced by this bacterium, and it is suggested that they contribute to virulence and to local tissue injury resulting from infection by P. gingivalis. Cysteine proteinases with specificities to cleave either Arg-X or Lys-X peptide bonds (i.e., gingipains) have been characterized as predominant enzymes associated with vesicles shed from the surface of this bacterium. It has recently been demonstrated that these proteinases are capable of degrading the blood complement component C5, resulting in the generation of biologically active C5a. By using an affinity-purified rabbit antibody raised against residues 9 to 29 of the C5a receptor (C5aR; CD88), we demonstrate that noncysteinyl proteinases associated with vesicles obtained from P. gingivalis cleave the C5aR on human neutrophils. Proteolytic attack of the C5aR by enzymes from the P. gingivalis vesicles was inhibited by TPCK (tolylsullonyl phenylalanyl chloromethyl ketone), PMSF (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride), and dichloroisocoumarin, suggesting that serine proteinases are primarily responsible for this degradative activity. The purified vesicle proteinase Lys-gingipain but not Arg-gingipain also cleaved the N-terminal region of the C5aR on the human neutrophils. Lys-gingipain activity was essentially resistant to these inhibitors but was inhibited by TLCK (Nalpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone) and iodoacetamide. A synthetic peptide that mimics the N-terminal region of C5aR (residues 9 to 29; PDYGHY DDKDTLDLNTPVDKT) was readily cleaved by chymotrypsin but not by trypsin, despite the presence of two potential trypsin (i.e., lysyl-X) cleavage sites. The specific sites of cleavage in the C5aR 9-29 peptide were determined by mass spectroscopy for both chymotrypsin and Lys-gingipain digests. This analysis demonstrated that the C5aR peptide is susceptible to cleavage at

  5. Radiosynthesis of [131I]IAZGP via nucleophilic substitution and its biological evaluation as a hypoxia marker — is specific activity a factor influencing hypoxia-mapping ability of a hypoxia marker?

    PubMed Central

    Suehiro, Makiko; Burgman, Paul; Carlin, Sean; Burke, Sean; Yang, Guangbin; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Oehler-Janne, Christoph; O’Donoghue, Joseph; Ling, Clifton; Humm, John

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The hypoxia marker IAZGP, 1-(6-deoxy-6-iodo-β-D-galactopyranosyl)-2-nitroimidazole, has been labeled with 123I/124I/125I/131I via iodine–radioiodine exchange, which gives the radiotracer in a specific activity of 10–90 MBq/μmol. We synthesized the same radiotracer possessing several hundred to thousand times higher specific activity (high-SA IAZGP) via nucleophilic substitution and compared its biological behavior with that of conventionally produced IAZGP (low-SA IAZGP) to determine if specific activity is a factor influencing cell uptake kinetics, biodistribution and intratumor microregional localization of the radiotracer. Methods High-SA [131I]IAZGP was prepared by substitution of the tosyl functionality with [131I]iodide. In vitro uptake of high- and low-SA [131I]IAZGP by HCT8 and HT29 cells was assessed in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Biodistribution and intratumor localization of high- and low-SA [131I]IAZGP were determined by injection into HT29 tumor-bearing mice. Results The nucleophilic substitution reaction proceeded efficiently in acetonitrile at 150°C, giving the final product in an average yield of 42% and an average specific activity of 30 GBq/μmol. In vitro, high-SA [131I]IAZGP was incorporated into the tumor cells with similar kinetics and oxygen dependence to low-SA [131I]IAZGP. In HT29 tumor-bearing mice, biodistributions of high- and low-SA [131I]IAZGP were equivalent. Ex vivo autoradiography revealed heterogeneous intratumor localization of high-SA [131I]IAZGP corresponding closely to distributions of other exogenous and endogenous hypoxia markers. Comparable microregional distribution patterns were observed with low-SA [131I]IAZGP. Conclusions Radiolabeled IAZGP produced via nucleophilic substitution is validated as an exogenous hypoxia marker. Specific activity does not appear to influence the in vivo hypoxia-mapping ability of the radiotracer. PMID:19520288

  6. Leucoplast Pyruvate Kinase from Developing Castor Oil Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Plaxton, William C.

    1991-01-01

    Leucoplast pyruvate kinase (PKp; EC 2.7.1.40) from endosperm of developing castor oil seeds (Ricinus communis L. cv Baker 296) appears to be highly susceptible to limited degradation by a cysteine endopeptidase during the purification of the enzyme or incubation of clarified homogenates at 4°C. Purified castor seed PKp was previously reported to consist of immunologically related 57.5 and 44 kilodalton subunits (Plaxton WC, Dennis DT, Knowles VL [1990] Plant Physiol 94: 1528-1534). By contrast, immunoreactive polypeptides of about 63.5 and 54 kilodaltons were observed when a western blot of an extract prepared under denaturing conditions was probed with affinity purified rabbit anti-(castor seed PKp) immunoglobulin G. Proteolytic activity against PKp was estimated by the disappearance of the 63.5 and 54 kilodalton subunits and the concomitant appearance of lower molecular mass immunoreactive degradation products during the incubation of clarified homogenates at 4°C. The presence of 2 millimolar dithiothreitol accelerated the degradation of PKp. The conservation of the 63.5 and 54 kilodalton subunits was observed after extraction of the enzyme in the presence of 1 millimolar p-hydroxymecuribenzoate, or 1 millimolar Nα-p-tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone, or 10 millimolar iodoacetate. These results reveal that a cysteine endopeptidase was responsible for the in vitro proteolysis of PKp. This endopeptidase is present throughout all stages of endosperm development. Its PKp-degrading activity, however, appears to be most pronounced in preparations from older endosperm. When lysates of purified leucoplasts were incubated at 4°C for up to 21 hours, no degradation of PKp was observed; this indicated an extra-leucoplastic localization for the cysteine endopeptidase. Although the in vivo subunit structure of PKp remains uniform throughout all stages of endosperm development, the large decrease in PK activity that accompanies castor seed maturation coincides with a

  7. Enzymes produced by halotolerant spore-forming gram-positive bacterial strains isolated from a resting habitat (Restinga de Jurubatiba) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: focus on proteases.

    PubMed

    D Santos, Anderson Fragoso; Pacheco, Clarissa Almeida; Valle, Roberta D Santos; Seldin, Lucy; D Santos, André Luis Souza

    2014-12-01

    The screening for hydrolases-producing, halotolerant, and spore-forming gram-positive bacteria from the root, rhizosphere, and non-rhizosphere soil of Blutaparon portulacoides, a plant found in the Restinga de Jurubatiba located at the northern region of Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, resulted in the isolation of 22 strains. These strains were identified as Halobacillus blutaparonensis (n = 2), Oceanobacillus picturae (n = 5), and Oceanobacillus iheyensis (n = 15), and all showed the ability to produce different extracellular enzymes. A total of 20 isolates (90.9 %) showed activity for protease, 5 (22.7 %) for phytase, 3 (13.6 %) for cellulase, and 2 (9.1 %) for amylase. Some bacterial strains were capable of producing three (13.6 %) or two (9.1 %) distinct hydrolytic enzymes. However, no bacterial strain with ability to produce esterase and DNase was observed. The isolate designated M9, belonging to the species H. blutaparonensis, was the best producer of protease and also yielded amylase and phytase. This strain was chosen for further studies regarding its protease activity. The M9 strain produced similar amounts of protease when grown either without or with different NaCl concentrations (from 0.5 to 10 %). A simple inspection of the cell-free culture supernatant by gelatin-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) revealed the presence of three major alkaline proteases of 40, 50, and 70 kDa, which were fully inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) (two classical serine protease inhibitors). The secreted proteases were detected in a wide range of temperature (from 4 to 45 °C) and their hydrolytic activities were stimulated by NaCl (up to 10 %). The serine proteases produced by the M9 strain cleaved gelatin, casein, albumin, and hemoglobin, however, in different extensions. Collectively, these results suggest the potential use of the M9 strain in biotechnological

  8. Molecular mechanism of APC/C activation by mitotic phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suyang; Chang, Leifu; Alfieri, Claudio; Zhang, Ziguo; Yang, Jing; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, Mark; Barford, David

    2016-05-12

    In eukaryotes, the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C, also known as the cyclosome) regulates the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of specific cell-cycle proteins to coordinate chromosome segregation in mitosis and entry into the G1 phase. The catalytic activity of the APC/C and its ability to specify the destruction of particular proteins at different phases of the cell cycle are controlled by its interaction with two structurally related coactivator subunits, Cdc20 and Cdh1. Coactivators recognize substrate degrons, and enhance the affinity of the APC/C for its cognate E2 (refs 4-6). During mitosis, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) and polo-like kinase (Plk) control Cdc20- and Cdh1-mediated activation of the APC/C. Hyperphosphorylation of APC/C subunits, notably Apc1 and Apc3, is required for Cdc20 to activate the APC/C, whereas phosphorylation of Cdh1 prevents its association with the APC/C. Since both coactivators associate with the APC/C through their common C-box and Ile-Arg tail motifs, the mechanism underlying this differential regulation is unclear, as is the role of specific APC/C phosphorylation sites. Here, using cryo-electron microscopy and biochemical analysis, we define the molecular basis of how phosphorylation of human APC/C allows for its control by Cdc20. An auto-inhibitory segment of Apc1 acts as a molecular switch that in apo unphosphorylated APC/C interacts with the C-box binding site and obstructs engagement of Cdc20. Phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory segment displaces it from the C-box-binding site. Efficient phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory segment, and thus relief of auto-inhibition, requires the recruitment of Cdk-cyclin in complex with a Cdk regulatory subunit (Cks) to a hyperphosphorylated loop of Apc3. We also find that the small-molecule inhibitor, tosyl-l-arginine methyl ester, preferentially suppresses APC/C(Cdc20) rather than APC/C(Cdh1), and interacts with the binding sites of both the C-box and Ile-Arg tail motifs. Our

  9. Radiofluorinated 3-(2{prime}-fluoroethyl)-2-thienylspiperone (FETS): Synthesis, pharmacologic characterization, tissue distribution and primate imaging of a selective radioligand for mapping D2 receptor sites by PET

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M.M.; Shi, B.; Hoffman, J.

    1995-05-01

    Abnormally high dopaminergic neurotransmission has been implicated in schizophrenia. A number of radiolabeled analogs of spiperone, a potent antipyschotic with a high (nanomolar) affinity for dopamine D2 receptors, have been synthesized for quantifying D2 receptors in humans. An undesired property accompanying high striatal uptake of radiolabeled spiperone (SPIP) analogs is high affinity for serotonin 5-IIT2 receptors. A potent spiperone analog which selectively binds to D2 receptors would be valuable in studying regional dopaminergic aberrations in schizophrenia. We have synthesized new potent radioligands [F-18] labeled 3-(2{prime}-fluoroethyl)-2-thienylspiperone (FETS) and 3-(3{prime}-fluoropropyl)-2-thienylspiperone (FPTS) for quantifying D2 receptors by PET. In vitro binding studies for D2 receptors in rat striatal homogenates using [H-3]raclopride afforded Ki`s (nM) of 1.07 for SPIP, 2.02 for FETS, 3.45 for FES and 5.45 for FPTS. In vitro binding studies for 5-HT2 receptors in rat cortical homogenates using [H-3]ketanserin afforded Ki`s (nM) of 1.86 for SPIP, 6.03 for FES, 20 for FPTS and 67 for FETS. Thus, FETS was found to be a potent and the most selective (Ki 5-HT2/Ki D2=33.5) spiperone ligand for D2 receptors. [F-18]FETS was synthesized in 41% E.O.B. by NCA K[F-18]/K222 exchange for tosylate from 3-(2{sup {prime}}-tosylethyl)-2-thienylspiperone in CH3CN at 100{degrees}C. HPLC purification afforded [F-18]FETS with a specific activity of 8 Ci/{mu}mole in a total synthesis time of 90 min. Following femoral vein injection in rats [F-18]FETS showed good uptake and retention in striatal (S) tissue (0.91% dose/g at 60 min) with clearance from the cerebellum (C) (0.24% dose/g at 60 min) giving S/C = 3.6 at 60 min. [F-18]FETS (6.0 mCi) was also administered to a rhesus monkey and showed high uptake and retention in the basal ganglia with S/C = 6.0 and 10.0 at 1 h and 2 h post injection respectively.

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of two thermostable carboxyl esterases from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Ewis, Hosam E; Abdelal, Ahmed T; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2004-03-31

    Screening of the genomic libraries of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC12980 and ATCC7954 for esterase/lipase activity led to the isolation of two positive clones. The results of subclonings and sequence analyses identified two genes, est30 and est55, encoding two different carboxylesterases, and genetic rearrangement in the est55 locus was revealed from genomic comparison. The est30 gene encodes a polypeptide of 248 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 28338 Da, and the est55 gene encodes a polypeptide of 499 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 54867 Da. Both enzymes were purified to near homogeneity from recombinant strains of Escherichia coli. The results of enzyme characterization showed that while both enzymes possess optimal activities with short chain acyl derivatives, Est55 has a broader pH tolerance (pH 8-9) and optimal temperature range (30-60 degrees C) than Est30. The activation energy of Est55 (35.7 kJ/mol) was found to be significantly lower than that of Est30 (101.9 kJ/mol). Both enzymes were stable at 60 degrees C for more than 2 h; at 70 degrees C, the half-life for thermal inactivation was 40 and 180 min for Est55 and Est30, respectively. With p-nitrophenyl caproate as the substrate and assayed at 60 degrees C, Est55 had K(m) and k(cat) values of 0.5 microM and 39758 s(-1) while Est30 exhibited values of 2.16 microM and 38 s(-1). Inhibition studies indicated that both Est30 and Est55 were strongly inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, and tosyl-l-phenylalanine, consistent with the proposed presence of Ser-His-Glu catalytic triad of the alpha/beta hydrolase family. The enzymatic properties of Est30 and Est55 reported here warrant the potential applications of these enzymes in biotechnological industries. PMID:15033540

  11. Biocompatibility Implications of Polypyrrole Synthesis Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Fonner, John M.; Forciniti, Leandro; Nguyen, Hieu; Byrne, James; Kou, Yann-Fuu; Syeda-Nawaz, Jeja; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2008-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) is an inherently conducting polymer that has shown great promise for biomedical applications within the nervous system. However, to effectively use PPy as a biomaterial implant, it is important to understand and reproducibly control the electrical properties, physical topography, and surface chemistry of the polymer. Although there is much research published on the use of PPy in various applications, there is no systematic study linking the methodologies used for PPy synthesis to PPy’s basic polymeric properties (e.g., hydrophilicity, surface roughness), and to the biological effects these properties have on cells. Electrochemically synthesized PPy films differ greatly in their characteristics depending on synthesis parameters such as dopant, substrate, and thickness, among other parameters. In these studies, we have used three dopants (chloride (Cl), tosylate (ToS), polystyrene sulfonate (PSS)), two substrates (gold and indium tin oxide-coated glass), and a range of thicknesses, to measure and compare the biomedically-important characteristics of surface roughness, contact angle, conductivity, dopant stability, and cell adhesion (using PC-12 cells and Schwann cells). As predicted, we discovered large differences in roughness depending on the dopant used and the thickness of the film, while substrate choice had little effect. From contact angle measurements, PSS was found to yield the most hydrophilic material, most likely because of free charges from the long PSS chains exposed on the surface of the PPy. ToS-doped PPy films were tenfold more conductive than Cl- or PSS-doped films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies were used to evaluate dopant concentrations of PPy films stored in water and phosphate buffered saline over 14 days, and conductance studies over the same timeframe measured electrical stability. PSS proved to be the most stable dopant, though all films experienced significant decay in conductivity and dopant concentration

  12. Conformationally Strained trans-Cyclooctene (sTCO) Enables the Rapid Construction of 18F-PET Probes via Tetrazine Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mengzhe; Svatunek, Dennis; Rohlfing, Katarina; Liu, Yu; Wang, Hui; Giglio, Ben; Yuan, Hong; Wu, Zhanghong; Li, Zibo; Fox, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The bioorthogonal reaction between tetrazines and trans-cyclooctenes is a method for the rapid construction of F-18 probes for PET imaging. Described here is a second generation 18F-labeling system based on a conformationally strained trans-cyclooctene (sTCO)—a dienophile that is approximately 2 orders of magnitude more reactive than conventional TCO dienophiles. Starting from a readily prepared tosylate precursor, an 18F labeled sTCO derivative (18F-sTCO) could be synthesized in 29.3 +/- 5.1% isolated yield and with high specific activity. Tetrazine ligation was carried out with a cyclic RGD-conjugate of a diphenyl-s-tetrazine analogue (RGD-Tz) chosen from a diene class with an excellent combination of fast reactivity and stability both for the diene as well as the Diels-Alder adduct. For both the tetrazine and the sTCO, mini-PEG spacers were included to enhance solubility and improve the in vivo distribution profile of the resulting probe. Extremely fast reactivity (up to 2.86 x 105 M-1s-1 at 25 °C in water) has been observed in kinetic studies in the reaction of sTCO with diphenyl-s-tetrazine derivatives. A kinetic study on sTCO diastereomers in 55:45 MeOH:water showed that the syn-diastereomer displayed slightly faster reactivity than the anti-diastereomer. An 18F-sTCO conjugate with RGD-Tz demonstrated prominent and persistent tumor uptake in vivo with good tumor-to-background contrast. Unlike most radiolabeled RGD peptides, the tumor uptake of this PET agent increased from 5.3 +/- 0.2% ID/g at 1 h post injection (p.i.), to 8.9 +/- 0.5% ID/g at 4 h p.i., providing evidence for prolonged blood circulation. These findings suggest that tetrazine ligations employing 18F-sTCO should serve as a powerful and general platform for the rapid construction of peptide or protein derived PET agents. PMID:27162558

  13. Dissolved Zinc Measurements Using Shipboard FIA During the 2008 GEOTRACES Cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosnell, K. J.; Landing, W. M.; Milne, A.

    2008-12-01

    Zinc concentrations in the open ocean have been measured accurately by only a few investigators due to the extreme difficulties of collecting and processing seawater samples without introducing Zn contamination. Accurate measurements of dissolved Zn are important for understanding the biogeochemical behavior of this important biochemically required element in the open ocean. Historically, reliable samples for dissolved Zn were collected using Teflon-coated GO-FLO bottles individually hung on Kevlar line. To speed up sample collection, two "Trace Metal" rosette systems were tested during Leg 1 of the GEOTRACES 2008 intercalibration cruise: a large GEOTRACES 24-bottle rosette and the smaller Measures and Landing "CLIVAR" 12-bottle rosette. Both rosettes use 12-liter, Teflon-coated GO- FLO bottles equipped with Teflon spigots and modified air-relief fittings, allowing for pressure filtration. Contamination for dissolved Zn was eliminated in the 12-liter Teflon-lined GO-FLO bottles by repeated deployments ("flushing") on both rosette systems. A Flow Injection (FIA) technique for shipboard determination of total dissolved Zn was utilized to test rosette sampling methods for Zn contamination. Samples were acidified to 0.024M HCl (pH 2) for 16 hours. Samples were buffered to pH 5.5 using ammonium acetate buffer. Dissolved Zn was pre-concentrated using a small- volume column of 8-HQ cation exchange resin. After column rinsing, Zn was eluted into the flowing stream of organic reagent p-Tosyl-8-aminoquinoline (pTAQ), which forms fluorescent complexes with Zn. A flow- through fluorometer was used to record peak heights. Calibration was performed via standard additions. Accuracy of this method was established by measuring standard SAFe D2 and S1 samples, as well as multiple samples collected and analyzed throughout Leg 1 of the GEOTRACES 2008 cruise. Dissolved Cadmium (Cd) can additionally form fluorescent complexes with pTAQ. Thus, when necessary, a small, positive, Cd

  14. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A close-up of an experimental drag chute deploying in a cloud of dust behind NASA's B-52 research aircraft just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover

  15. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A rear view of NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploying an experimental drag chute just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid

  16. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An aerial view of NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploying an experimental drag chute just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid

  17. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An experimental drag chute deploys amidst a cloud of dust behind NASA's B-52 research aircraft just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space

  18. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploys an experimental drag chute just after landing the runway at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also

  19. Jay L. King, Joseph D. Huxman, and Orion D. Billeter Assist Pilot Milt Thompson into the M2-F2 Attac

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    NASA research pilot Milt Thompson is helped into the cockpit of the M2-F2 lifting body research aircraft at NASA's Flight Research Center (now the Dryden Flight Research Center). The M2-F2 is attached to a wing pylon under the wing of NASA's B-52 mothership. The flight was a captive flight with the pilot on-board. Milt Thompson flew in the lifting body throughout the flight, but it was never dropped from the mothership. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft

  20. Pegasus Mated to B-52 Mothership - Front View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    NASA's B-52 launch aircraft takes off with the second Pegasus vehicle under its wing from the Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air

  1. B-52B Cockpit Instrument Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This photo shows a close-up view of the instrument panel in the cockpit of NASA's B-52 research aircraft. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the HiMAT, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster

  2. X-38 - First Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In a scene reminiscent of the lifting body research flights conducted more than 30 years earlier, this photo shows a close-up view of NASA's B-52 mothership as it lifts off carrying a new generation of lifting body research vehicle--the X-38. The X-38 was designed to help develop an emergency crew return vehicle for the International Space Station. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the

  3. X-38 - First Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Reminiscent of the lifting body research flights conducted more than 30 years earlier, NASA's B-52 mothership lifts off carrying a new generation of lifting body research vehicle--the X-38. The X-38 was designed to help develop an emergency crew return vehicle for the International Space Station. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also

  4. B-52 Launch Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's venerable B-52 mothership is seen here photographed from a KC-135 Tanker aircraft. The X-43 adapter is visible attached to the right wing. The B-52, used for launching experimental aircraft and for other flight research projects, has been a familiar sight in the skies over Edwards for more than 40 years and is also both the oldest B-52 still flying and the aircraft with the lowest flight time of any B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported

  5. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable workhorse, the B-52 mothership, rolls out on the Edwards AFB runway after a test flight in 1996. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket

  6. X-38 Ship #2 Mated to B-52 Mothership in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This photo shows one of the X-38 lifting-body research vehicles mated to NASA's B-52 mothership in flight prior to launch. The B-52 has been a workhorse for the Dryden Flight Research Center for more than 40 years, carrying numerous research vehicles aloft and conducting a variety of other research flight experiments. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket

  7. X-38 Ship #2 in Free Flight after Release from B-52 Mothership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The X-38 research vehicle drops away from NASA's B-52 mothership immediately after being released from the B-52's wing pylon. More than 30 years earlier, this same B-52 launched the original lifting-body vehicles flight tested by NASA and the Air Force at what is now called the Dryden Flight Research Center and the Air Force Flight Test Center. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the

  8. Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The new pylon for the X-38 following a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in 1997. The fit-check was the first time the 1,200-pound steel pylon was mated to the B-52 following fabrication at Dryden by the Center's Experimental Fabrication Shop. The pylon was built as an 'adapter' to allow the X-38 research vehicle to be carried aloft and launched from the B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the

  9. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Dryden Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable B-52 mothership sits on the ramp in front of the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket

  10. X-38 Mounted on Pylon of B-52 Mothership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A close-up view of the X-38 research vehicle mounted under the wing of the B-52 mothership prior to a 1997 test flight. The X-38, which was designed to help develop technology for an emergency crew return vehicle (CRV) for the International Space Station, is one of many research vehicles the B-52 has carried aloft over the past 40 years. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space

  11. X-38 on B-52 Wing Pylon - View from Observation Window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A unique, close-up view of the X-38 under the wing of NASA's B-52 mothership prior to launch of the lifting-body research vehicle. The photo was taken from the observation window of the B-52 bomber as it banked in flight. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In

  12. B-52 Flight Mission Symbology - Close up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A close-up view of some of the mission markings that tell the story of the NASA B-52 mothership's colorful history. These particular markings denote some of the experiments the bomber conducted to develop parachute recovery systems for the solid rocket boosters used by the Space Shuttle. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported

  13. B-52 Flight Mission Symbology on Side of Craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A view of some of the mission markings, painted on the side of NASA's B-52 mothership, that tell the story of its colorful history. Just as combat aircraft would paint a bomb on the side of an aircraft for each bombing mission completed, NASA crew members painted a silhouette on the side of the B-52's fuselage to commemorate each drop of an X-15, lifting body, remotely piloted research vehicle, X-38 crew return vehicle, or other experimental vehicle or parachute system. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for

  14. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft in Flight over Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable B-52 mothership flies over the main building at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The B-52, used for launching experimental aircraft and for other flight research projects, has been a familiar sight in the skies over Edwards for more than 40 years and has also been both the oldest B-52 still flying and the aircraft with the lowest flight time of any B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of

  15. Spin Research Vehicle (SRV) in B-52 Captive Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This in-flight photo of NASA's B-52 mothership shows the bomber carrying a subscale model of an Air Force F-15, a remotely piloted vehicle that was used to conduct spin research. The F-15 Remotely Piloted Research Vehicles (RPRV) was air launched from the B-52 at approximately 45,000 feet and was controlled by a pilot in a ground cockpit complete with flight controls and a television screen. The F-15 model in this particular configuration was known as the Spin Research Vehicle (SRV). NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST

  16. Heterometallic modular metal-organic 3D frameworks assembled via new tris-β-diketonate metalloligands: nanoporous materials for anion exchange and scaffolding of selected anionic guests.

    PubMed

    Carlucci, Lucia; Ciani, Gianfranco; Maggini, Simona; Proserpio, Davide M; Visconti, Marco

    2010-11-01

    The modular engineering of heterometallic nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) based on novel tris-chelate metalloligands, prepared using the functionalised β-diketone 1,3-bis(4'-cyanophenyl)-1,3-propanedione (HL), is described. The complexes [M(III)L(3)] (M=Fe(3+), Co(3+)) and [M(II)L(3)](NEt(4)) (M=Mn(2+), Co(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+)) have been synthesised and characterised, all of which exhibit a distorted octahedral chiral structure. The presence of six exo-oriented cyano donor groups on each complex makes it a suitable building block for networking through interactions with external metal ions. We have prepared two families of MOFs by reacting the metalloligands [M(III)L(3)] and [M(II)L(3)](-) with many silver salts AgX (X=NO(3)(-), BF(4)(-), PF(6)(-), AsF(6)(-), SbF(6)(-), CF(3)SO(3)(-), tosylate), specifically the [M(III)L(3)Ag(3)]X(3)·Solv and [M(II)L(3)Ag(3)]X(2)·Solv network species. Very interestingly, all of these network species exhibit the same type of 3D structure and crystallise in the same trigonal space group with similar cell parameters, in spite of the different metal ions, ionic charges and X(-) counteranions of the silver salts. We have also succeeded in synthesising trimetallic species such as [Zn(x)Fe(y)L(3)Ag(3)](ClO(4))((2x+3y))·Solv and [Zn(x)Cd(y)L(3)Ag(3)](ClO(4))(2)·Solv (with x+y=1). All of the frameworks can be described as sixfold interpenetrated pcu nets, considering the Ag(+) ions as simple digonal spacers. Each individual net is homochiral, containing only Δ or Λ nodes; the whole array contains three nets of type Δ and three nets of type Λ. Otherwise, taking into account the presence of weak Ag-C σ bonds involving the central carbon atoms of the β-diketonate ligands of adjacent nets, the six interpenetrating pcu networks are joined into a unique non-interpenetrated six-connected frame with the rare acs topology. The networks contain large parallel channels of approximate hexagonal-shaped sections that represent 37

  17. Synthesis of group 4 complexes that contain the tridentate diamido/donor ligands [(ArylNCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 2}O]{sup 2{minus}} and zirconium complexes that contain [(ArylNCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 2}S]{sup 2{minus}} and an evaluation of their activity for the polymerization of 1-hexene

    SciTech Connect

    Aizenberg, M.; Turculet, L.; Davis, W.M.; Schattenmann, F.; Schrock, R.R.

    1998-10-26

    Compounds of the type (ArylNHCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 2}O (Aryl = 2,6-Me{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3} (H{sub 2}[1a])), 2,6-Et{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3} (H{sub 2}[1b]), 2,6-i-Pr{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3} (h{sub 2}[1c]) can be prepared by treating (TsOCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 2}O (TsO = tosylate) with the lithium anilides in THF. [1a,b]TiCl{sub 2}, [1a,b]TiMe{sub 2}, [1a]Ti(CH{sub 2}Ph){sub 2}, [1a-c]M(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} (M = Zr or Hf), [1a-c]MCl{sub 2}, and [1a-c]MR{sub 2} (R = Me, Et, i-Bu) were prepared. An X-ray study of [1a] Ti(CH{sub 2}Ph){sub 2} revealed the structure to be a distorted trigonal bipyramid (type B) in which the two amido nitrogens and one benzyl ligand occupy equatorial positions. An X-ray study of [1a]ZrMe{sub 2} showed it to be a distorted trigonal bipyramid that contains axial amido groups (type A), while an X-ray study of [1c]HfEt{sub 2} revealed it to have a structure halfway between type A and type B, i.e,, a distorted square pyramid with one alkyl in the apical position. Zr and Hf dimethyl complexes that contain an oxygen donor or a sulfur donor ligand can be activated with [Ph{sub 3}C][B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}] to yield efficient catalysts for polymerization of 1-hexene, although the molecular weight of the poly(1-hexene) chains is limited to {approximately}20,000-{approximately}25,000 under the conditions employed. Neither {l_brace}[1c]ZrMe(ether){r_brace}[B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}] nor {l_brace}[1c]HfMe(ether){r_brace}[B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}] will polymerize 1-hexene in C{sub 6}D{sub 5}Br at room temperature, and neither will polymerize ethylene readily at 1 atm and 25 C. It is proposed that a solvated five-coordinate cation must lose the solvent in order to react with an olefin and that {beta}-hydride elimination in the four-coordinate cation limits chain length.

  18. Screening and brief intervention for alcohol and other abuse.

    PubMed

    Harris, Sion Kim; Louis-Jacques, Jennifer; Knight, John R

    2014-04-01

    Substance use is the most common health risk behavior among adolescents and is one of the greatest threats to their current and future health. Universal screening of adolescents in general medical settings can be instrumental in identifying substance use early, before further problems develop and when BIs are more likely to be effective. Screening in and of itself may have some therapeutic effect. Brief screening tools feasible for use by busy medical offices to quickly and reliably assess adolescent risk for a substance use disorder now are available. A recent study found that a physician-conducted CRAFFT screen interview required an average of 74 seconds to complete, whereas a computer self-administered version took an average of 49 seconds. The CRAFFT and AUDIT tools currently have the most evidence for validity among adolescents, whereas the validity of other widely used tools such as DAST-10, NIDA-modified ASSIST (Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test), and ultra-brief screens (AUDIT-C, single-item screens) has yet to be established for adolescents. Studies are needed to identify effective strategies to promote universal adolescent screening and the use of valid screening tools in general medical settings. One statewide (Massachusetts) study found that although most (86%) primary care physicians seeing adolescents reported screening adolescents for substance use annually, only 1 in 3 reported using a validated tool (the CRAFFT). The remaining physicians reporting using informal screening procedures, their own questionnaire, or the CAGE. Computerization of screening and integration into the electronic health record appear to be promising strategies to promote universal screening and standardized use of valid screening tools. Increasing adolescent screening rates necessitates supporting physicians' ability to respond effectively to the screen results. To that end, recent evidence-informed practice guides from the AAP and NIAAA provide a

  19. Pegasus Mated to B-52 Mothership - First Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  20. Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    MAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  1. Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  2. Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Tom McMullen, Chief of Dryden's Experimental Fabrication Shop, makes adjustments to the new pylon for NASA's X-38 during a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in 1997. The fit-check was the first time the 1,200-pound steel pylon was mated to the B-52 following fabrication at Dryden by the Center's Experimental Fabrication Shop. The pylon was built as an 'adapter' to allow the X-38 to be attached to and launched from the B-52's wing. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST

  3. F-15 RPRV Attached Under the Wing of the B-52 Mothership in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This photograph shows one of NASA's 3/8th-scale F-15 remotely piloted research vehicles under the wing of the B-52 mothership in flight during 1973, the year that the research program began. The vehicle was used to make stall-spin studies of the F-15 shape before the actual F-15s began their flight tests. B-52 Project Description: NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle

  4. F-15 RPRV Attached Under the Wing of the B-52 Mothership in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This photograph shows one of NASA's 3/8th-scale F-15 remotely piloted research vehicles under the wing of the B-52 mothership in flight during 1973, the year that the research program began. The vehicle was used to make stall-spin studies of the F-15 shape before the actual F-15s began their flight tests. B-52 Project Description: NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle