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Sample records for 4-dimethylamino-n-methyl-4-stilbazolium tosylate dast

  1. Growth and characterization of 4-dimethylamino-N-methyl 4-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) single crystals grown by nucleation reduction method

    SciTech Connect

    Jagannathan, K.; Kalainathan, S.

    2007-11-06

    Good quality single crystal 4-dimethylamino-N-methyl 4-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) has been grown by novel nucleation reduction method instead of regular slope nucleation technique (SNT). The grown crystal was subjected to high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) studies, the perfection of the crystal was found to be better than the crystal grown by slope nucleation technique and slow cooling method. The UV-vis-NIR spectrum was recorded for the grown crystal and relative second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was investigated to explore the nonlinear optical (NLO) property. The dielectric and thermal behaviour of the crystal were also studied. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies also performed for the identification of different modes present in the compound. The photoluminescence and mechanical were carried out and the results were discussed in detail.

  2. Real-time terahertz wave imaging by nonlinear optical frequency up-conversion in a 4-dimethylamino-N'-methyl-4'-stilbazolium tosylate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shuzhen; Qi, Feng; Notake, Takashi; Nawata, Kouji; Matsukawa, Takeshi; Takida, Yuma; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2014-03-01

    Real-time terahertz (THz) wave imaging has wide applications in areas such as security, industry, biology, medicine, pharmacy, and arts. In this letter, we report on real-time room-temperature THz imaging by nonlinear optical frequency up-conversion in organic 4-dimethylamino-N'-methyl-4'-stilbazolium tosylate crystal. The active projection-imaging system consisted of (1) THz wave generation, (2) THz-near-infrared hybrid optics, (3) THz wave up-conversion, and (4) an InGaAs camera working at 60 frames per second. The pumping laser system consisted of two optical parametric oscillators pumped by a nano-second frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. THz-wave images of handmade samples at 19.3 THz were taken, and videos of a sample moving and a ruler stuck with a black polyethylene film moving were supplied online to show real-time ability. Thanks to the high speed and high responsivity of this technology, real-time THz imaging with a higher signal-to-noise ratio than a commercially available THz micro-bolometer camera was proven to be feasible. By changing the phase-matching condition, i.e., by changing the wavelength of the pumping laser, we suggest THz imaging with a narrow THz frequency band of interest in a wide range from approximately 2 to 30 THz is possible.

  3. Mechanical and surface analysis of stilbazolium tosylate derivative crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalainathan, S.; Jagannathan, K.

    2008-04-01

    The highly efficient nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals, 4-dimethylamino- N-methyl 4 stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) crystals, have been grown by the slope nucleation technique (SNT) and the new derivative in the same family, 4-ethoxy benzaldehyde- N-methyl 4 stilbazolium tosylate (EBST) crystals by slow evaporation technique. In this present work the mechanical, dielectric studies and surface analysis of EBST and DAST were compared. The Meyer's index number ( n), fracture toughness and brittle index were calculated using Vicker's microhardness number. Young's modulus was calculated using the Knoop hardness value. The surfaces of the grown crystals were analyzed with etching. The etching was done using methanol as solvent. The dc conductivity was calculated from the dielectric study by the cole-cole plot method. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss were found to decreased when the frequency increased.

  4. 10 aJ-level sensing of nanosecond pulse below 10 THz by frequency upconversion detection via DAST crystal: more than a 4 K bolometer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Feng; Fan, Shuzhen; Notake, Takashi; Nawata, Koji; Matsukawa, Takeshi; Takida, Yuma; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2014-03-01

    By using frequency upconversion detection of terahertz (THz) waves via 4-dimethylamino-N-methyl-4-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) crystal with an optimized frequency conversion process, ultrahigh sensitivity has been achieved. Direct comparisons with a 4 K bolometer were implemented. By using a simple positive intrinsic negative (PIN) diode without either electrical amplification or optical amplification, frequency upconversion detection can compete with the commercial 4 K bolometer, while by replacing the PIN diode with an avalanche photo diode (APD), it performs more than three orders better than the 4 K bolometer. Based on power calibration, the minimum detectable THz pulse energy is in the order of 10 aJ (9-25 aJ) at 4.3 THz, with a pulse duration of 6 ns. Thus, the minimum number of THz photons that can be detected is down to the order of 10(3) at room temperature. The current THz detection system gives a noise equivalent power (NEP) in the order of 100  fW/Hz(1/2) (50-128  fW/Hz(1/2)). Moreover, by switching current optical detectors, the dynamic range is over six orders. PMID:24690730

  5. Room temperature terahertz wave imaging at 60 fps by frequency up-conversion in DAST crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shuzhen; Qi, Feng; Notake, Takashi; Nawata, Kouji; Matsukawa, Takeshi; Takida, Yuma; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2014-02-01

    Terahertz imaging has attracted a lot of interests for more than 10 years. But real time, high sensitive, low cost THz imaging in room temperature, which is widely needed by fields such as biology, biomedicine and homeland security, has not been fully developed yet. A lot of approaches have been reported on electro-optic (E-O) imaging and THz focal plane arrays with photoconductive antenna or micro-bolometer integrated. In this paper, we report high sensitive realtime THz image at 60 frames per second (fps) employing a commercial infrared camera, using nonlinear optical frequency up-conversion technology. In this system, a flash-lamp pumped nanosecond pulse green laser is used to pump two optical parametric oscillator systems with potassium titanyl phosphate crystals (KTP-OPO). One system with dual KTP crystals is used to generate infrared laser for the pumping of THz difference frequency generation (DFG) in a 4- Dimethylamino-N-Methyl-4-Stilbazolium Tosylate (DAST) crystal. The other one is for generation of pumping laser for THz frequency up-conversion in a second DAST crystal. The THz frequency can be tuned continuously from a few THz to less than 30 THz by controlling the angle of KTP crystals. The frequency up-converted image in infrared region is recorded by a commercial infrared camera working at 60 Hz. Images and videos are presented to show the feasibility of this technique and the real-time ability. Comparison with a general micro-bolometer THz camera shows the high sensitivity of this technique.

  6. Conversion of 4-N,N-dimethylamino-4’-N’-methyl-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) from a Simple Optical Material to a Versatile Optoelectronic Material

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiangdong; Sun, Ziqiang; Fan, Kai; Jiang, Yadong; Huang, Rui; Wen, Yuejiang; He, Qiong; Ao, Tianhong

    2015-01-01

    4-N,N-dimethylamino-4’-N’-methyl-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) is an important optical material, but its poor conductivity limits applications in devices. To tackle this problem, we designed, prepared, and systematically investigated novel binary composite films that are composed of two-dimensional (2D) DAST and 2D graphene. Results indicate that both electrical and optical properties of DAST can be significantly improved by graphene addition. The negative steric effects of big DAST molecules that greatly trouble ex-situ synthesis can be efficiently overcome by in-situ synthesis, thus leading to better film quality and higher physical properties. Consequently, the in-situ composite film exhibits a low sheet resistance of 7.5 × 106 ohm and high temperature coefficient of resistance of −2.79% K−1, close to the levels of the most important bolometric materials for uncooled infrared detectors. Particularly, a new low temperature reduction of graphene oxide induced by DAST, which is further enhanced by in-situ process, was discovered. This work presents valuable information about the DAST–graphene composite films, their chemical structures, mechanisms, physical properties, and comparison on in-situ and ex-situ syntheses of graphene–based composites, all of which will be helpful for not only theoretically studying the DAST and graphene materials and expanding their applications, but also for seeking new optoelectronic sensitive materials. PMID:26192068

  7. DAST in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The modified BQM-34 Firebee II drone with Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-1), a supercritical airfoil, during a 1980 research flight. The remotely-piloted vehicle, which was air launched from NASA's NB-52B mothership, participated in the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program which ran from 1977 to 1983. The DAST 1 aircraft (Serial #72-1557), pictured, crashed on 12 June 1980 after its right wing ripped off during a test flight near Cuddeback Dry Lake, California. The crash occurred on the modified drone's third free flight. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of

  8. Evaluation of DAST and zinc telluride nonlinear crystals for efficient terahertz generation

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesh, M.; Chaudhary, A. K.; Rao, K. S.

    2015-07-31

    Terahertz (THz) signal is generated from 4-N, N-dimethylamino-4’-N’-methyl-stilbazolium tosylate (i.e. DAST Crystal) and Zinc telluride (ZnTe) nonlinear crystals by employing 140 fs laser pulses at 800 nm with 80 MHz repetition rate. The semi insulating gallium arsenide photoconductive stripline antennas (gap =5 µm, length = 20 µm) is used as a Terahertz detector. The detected temporal profile of Terahertz radiation generated from DAST crystal is high as compared to ZnTe crystal in terms of amplitude. THz effective bandwidths of these crystals are extended up to 1.1 THz range. The potential of THz generation of DAST and ZnTe crystals are evaluated with respect to incident laser power.

  9. Experiment Configurations for the DAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This image shows three vehicle configurations considered for the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program, conducted at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center between 1977 and 1983. The DAST project planned for three wing configurations. These were the Instrumented Standard Wing (ISW), the Aeroelastic Research Wing-1 (ARW-1), and the ARW-2. After the DAST-1 crash, project personnel fitted a second Firebee II with a rebuilt ARW-1 wing. Due to the project's ending, it never flew the ARW-2 wing. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of the structure, driven by aerodynamic

  10. Growth and characterization of DAST crystal with large-thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lifeng; Teng, Bing; Zhong, Degao; Hao, Lun; Sun, Qing

    2016-10-01

    Highly nonlinear optical 4-N, N-dimethylamino-4-N-methyl stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) crystals with large surface and thickness was grown by the slope nucleation technology with slow-cooling in a high concentration solution. The structure and composition of the crystal were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface morphology of the crystal was characterized by optical microscope. Growth layers were observed on the (001) surface and several isolated "island layers" were also found. The mechanism of crystal growth was analyzed. Etching behavior of the (001) and (00 1 bar) faces of the crystal was studied with methanol, respectively. Optical properties of the crystal were also characterized by UV-vis-NIR spectrometer. The dielectric constants and the dielectric loss were tested by impedance analyzer.

  11. Electrical and Nonlinear Optical Studies of Specific Organic Molecular and Nonconjugated Conductive Polymeric Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Ananthakrishnan

    In this research, structural, electrical and nonlinear optical characteristics of: (a) single crystal films involving a noncentrosymmetric molecule DAST and a laser dye IR125 and (b) specific nonconjugated conducting polymers including poly(beta-pinene) and polynorbornene have been studied. 4'-dimethylamino-N-methyl-4-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) is a well known second order nonlinear optical material. This material has exceptionally high electro-optic coefficients, high thermal stability and ultrafast response time. In this work single crystal films involving a combination of DAST and IR125 have been prepared using modified shear method and the films have been characterized using polarized optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, polarization dependent optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The electro-optic coefficient of these films measured at 633nm was found to be 300pm/V. Since IR-125 has a strong absorption band from 500nm to 800nm, these films are promising for various applications in nonlinear optics at longer wavelength and for light emission. Nonconjugated conducting polymers are a class of polymers that have at least one double bond in their repeat units. 1,4-cis polyisoprene, polyalloocimene, styrene butadiene rubber, poly(ethylenepyrrolediyl) derivatives, and poly(beta-pinene) are some of the well known examples of nonconjugated conducting polymers. In this work, polynorborne, a new addition to the class of nonconjugated conducting polymers is discussed. Like other polymers in this class, polynorbornene exhibits increase in electrical conductivity by many orders of magnitude upon doping with iodine. The maximum electrical conductivity of this material is 0.01 S/cm. As shown by using FTIR microscopy, the C=C bonds are transformed into cation radicals when polynorborne is doped. This is due to the charge-transfer from the double bond to the dopant (iodine). These materials like other nonconjugated conducting polymers have significant

  12. DAST Being Calibrated for Flight in Hangar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    DAST-2, a modified BQM-34 Firebee II drone, undergoes calibration in a hangar at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. After the crash of the first DAST vehicle, project personnel fitted a second Firebee II (serial # 72-1558) with the rebuilt ARW-1 (ARW-1R) wing. The DAST-2 made a captive flight aboard the B-52 on October 29, 1982, followed by a free flight on November 3, 1982. During January and February of 1983, three launch attempts from the B-52 had to be aborted due to various problems. Following this, the project changed the launch aircraft to a DC-130A. Two captive flights occurred in May 1983. The first launch attempt from the DC-130 took place on June 1, 1983. The mothership released the DAST-2, but the recovery system immediately fired without being commanded. The parachute then disconnected from the vehicle, and the DAST-2 crashed into a farm field near Harper Dry Lake. Wags called this the 'Alfalfa Field Impact Test.' These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and

  13. DAST in Flight Showing Diverging Wingtip Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Two BQM-34 Firebee II drones were modified with supercritical airfoils, called the Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW), for the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program, which ran from 1977 to 1983. In this view of DAST-1 (Serial # 72-1557), taken on June 12, 1980, severe wingtip flutter is visible. Moments later, the right wing failed catastrophically and the vehicle crashed near Cuddeback Dry Lake. Before the drone was lost, it had made two captive and two free flights. Its first free flight, on October 2, 1979, was cut short by an uplink receiver failure. The drone was caught in midair by an HH-3 helicopter. The second free flight, on March 12, 1980, was successful, ending in a midair recovery. The third free flight, made on June 12, was to expand the flutter envelope. All of these missions launched from the NASA B-52. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than

  14. Prism-coupled Cherenkov phase-matched terahertz wave generation using a DAST crystal.

    PubMed

    Suizu, Koji; Shibuya, Takayuki; Uchida, Hirohisa; Kawase, Kodo

    2010-02-15

    Terahertz (THz) wave generation based on nonlinear frequency conversion is a promising method for realizing a tunable monochromatic high-power THz-wave source. Unfortunately, many nonlinear crystals have strong absorption in the THz frequency region. This limits efficient and widely tunable THz-wave generation. The Cherenkov phase-matching method is one of the most promising techniques for overcoming these problems. Here, we propose a prism-coupled Cherenkov phase-matching (PCC-PM) method, in which a prism with a suitable refractive index at THz frequencies is coupled to a nonlinear crystal. This has the following advantages. Many crystals can be used as THz-wave emitters; the phase-matching condition inside the crystal does not have to be observed; the absorption of the crystal does not prevent efficient generation of radiation; and pump sources with arbitrary wavelengths can be employed. Here we demonstrate PCC-PM THz-wave generation using the organic crystal 4-dimethylamino-N-metyl-4-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) and a Si prism coupler. We obtain THz-wave radiation with tunability of approximately 0.1 to 10 THz and with no deep absorption features resulting from the absorption spectrum of the crystal. The obtained spectra did not depend on the pump wavelength in the range 1300 to 1450 nm. This simple technique shows promise for generating THz radiation using a wide variety of nonlinear crystals.

  15. DAST in Flight just after Structural Failure of Right Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Two BQM-34 Firebee II drones were modified with supercritical airfoils, called the Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW), for the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program, which ran from 1977 to 1983. This photo, taken 12 June 1980, shows the DAST-1 (Serial #72-1557) immediately after it lost its right wing after suffering severe wing flutter. The vehicle crashed near Cuddeback Dry Lake. The Firebee II was selected for the DAST program because its standard wing could be removed and replaced by a supercritical wing. The project's digital flutter suppression system was intended to allow lighter wing structures, which would translate into better fuel economy for airliners. Because the DAST vehicles were flown intentionally at speeds and altitudes that would cause flutter, the program anticipated that crashes might occur. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for

  16. DAST Mated to B-52 on Ramp - Close-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Technicians mount a BQM-43 Firebee II drone on the wing pylon of NASA's B-52B launch aircraft. The drone was test flown as part of the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program. Research flights of drones with modified wings for the DAST program were conducted from 1977 to 1983. After the initial flights of Firebee II 72-1564, it was fitted with the Instrumented Standard Wing (also called the 'Blue Streak' wing). The first free flight attempt on March 7, 1979, was aborted before launch due to mechanical problems with the HH-53 recovery helicopter. The next attempt, on March 9, 1979, was successful. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but

  17. Betulin 3,28-di-O-tosyl-ate.

    PubMed

    Peipiņš, Uldis; Freimanis, Niks; Stepanovs, Dmitrijs; Mishnev, Anatoly; Turks, Māris

    2014-08-01

    The title compound, C44H62O6S2 {systematic name: (1R,3aS,5aR,5bR,7aR,9S,11aR,11bR,13aR,13bR)-5a,5b,8,8,11a-penta-methyl-1-(prop-1-en-2-yl)-3a-[(tos-yloxy)meth-yl]icosa-hydro-1H-cyclo-penta-[a]chrysen-9-yl 4-methyl-benzene-sulfonate}, was obtained by tosyl-ation of naturally occurring betulin. All the cyclo-hexane rings adopt chair conformations and the cyclo-pentane ring adopts a twisted envelope conformation, with the C atom bearing the tosyl-methyl substituent forming the flap. In the crystal, mol-ecules form a three-dimensional network through multiple weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds.

  18. Cellulose carboxylate/tosylate mixed esters: Synthesis, properties and shaping into microspheres.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniela C; Bastos, Gustavo S; Pfeifer, Annett; Heinze, Thomas; El Seoud, Omar A

    2016-11-01

    Cellulose carboxylate/tosylate mixed esters (Cel-Carboxy/Ts) were synthesized with constant degree of tosylation, DSTs=0.98 and variable degree of acylation, DSCarboxy; acetate, butanoate, and hexanoate. The tosylate (Cel-Ts) was prepared by reacting cellulose with tosyl chloride in presence of trimethylamine. The mixed esters were obtained by reacting Cel-Ts with carboxylic acid anhydride. The dependence of the following on DSCarboxy was investigated: IR data, including νCO, νSO and peak area (CO); empirical polarity of the films, determined by an adsorbed perichromic dye. We employed these parameters to determine DSCarboxy. Relative to ester saponification, these spectroscopic methods are convenient, expedient, and require much less sample. Mixed esters prepared physically from cellulose tosylate and tosylate/acetate behave only qualitatively similar to (Cel-Carboxy/Ts). The mixed esters were dissolved in acetone and regenerated in water as homogeneous microspheres. PMID:27516252

  19. DAST Mated to B-52 in Flight - Close-up from Below

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This photo shows a BQM-34 Firebee II drone being carried aloft under the wing of NASA's B-52 mothership during a 1977 research flight. The Firebee/DAST research program ran from 1977 to 1983 at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. This is the original Firebee II wing. Firebee 72-1564 made three captive flights--on November 25, 1975; May 17, 1976; and June 22, 1977--in preparation for the DAST project with modified wings. These were for checkout of the Firebee's systems and the prelaunch procedures. The first two used a DC-130A aircraft as the launch vehicle, while the third used the B-52. A single free flight using this drone occurred on July 28, 1977. The remote (ground) pilot was NASA research pilot Bill Dana. The launch and flight were successful, and the drone was caught in midair by an HH-53 helicopter. These are the image contact sheets for each image resolution of the NASA Dryden Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Photo Gallery. From 1977 to 1983, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, (under two different names) conducted the DAST Program as a high-risk flight experiment using a ground-controlled, pilotless aircraft. Described by NASA engineers as a 'wind tunnel in the sky,' the DAST was a specially modified Teledyne-Ryan BQM-34E/F Firebee II supersonic target drone that was flown to validate theoretical predictions under actual flight conditions in a joint project with the Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. The DAST Program merged advances in electronic remote control systems with advances in airplane design. Drones (remotely controlled, missile-like vehicles initially developed to serve as gunnery targets) had been deployed successfully during the Vietnamese conflict as reconnaissance aircraft. After the war, the energy crisis of the 1970s led NASA to seek new ways to cut fuel use and improve airplane efficiency. The DAST Program's drones provided an economical, fuel-conscious method for

  20. Validation of the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10): A study on illicit drug use among Chinese pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Lap Po; Leung, Wing Cheong; Ip, Patrick; Chow, Chun Bong; Chan, Mei Fung; Ng, Judy Wai Ying; Sing, Chu; Lam, Ying Hoo; Mak, Wing Lai Tony; Chow, Kam Ming; Chin, Robert Kien Howe

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the Chinese version of the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10) for identifying illicit drug use during pregnancy among Chinese population. Chinese pregnant women attending their first antenatal visit or their first unbooked visit to the maternity ward were recruited during a 4-month study period in 2011. The participants completed self-administered questionnaires on demographic information, a single question on illicit drug use during pregnancy and the DAST-10. Urine samples screened positive by the urine Point-of-Care Test were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. DAST-10 performance was compared with three different gold standards: urinalysis, self-reported drug use, and evidence of drug use by urinalysis or self-report. 1214 Chinese pregnant women participated in the study and 1085 complete DAST-10 forms were collected. Women who had used illicit drugs had significantly different DAST-10 scores than those who had not. The sensitivity of DAST-10 for identify illicit drug use in pregnant women ranged from 79.2% to 33.3% and specificity ranged from 67.7% to 99.7% using cut-off scores from ≥1 to ≥3. The ~80% sensitivity of DAST-10 using a cut-off score of ≥1 should be sufficient for screening of illicit drug use in Chinese pregnant women, but validation tests for drug use are needed. PMID:26091290

  1. Validation of the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10): A study on illicit drug use among Chinese pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Lam, Lap Po; Leung, Wing Cheong; Ip, Patrick; Chow, Chun Bong; Chan, Mei Fung; Ng, Judy Wai Ying; Sing, Chu; Lam, Ying Hoo; Mak, Wing Lai Tony; Chow, Kam Ming; Chin, Robert Kien Howe

    2015-06-19

    We assessed the Chinese version of the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10) for identifying illicit drug use during pregnancy among Chinese population. Chinese pregnant women attending their first antenatal visit or their first unbooked visit to the maternity ward were recruited during a 4-month study period in 2011. The participants completed self-administered questionnaires on demographic information, a single question on illicit drug use during pregnancy and the DAST-10. Urine samples screened positive by the urine Point-of-Care Test were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. DAST-10 performance was compared with three different gold standards: urinalysis, self-reported drug use, and evidence of drug use by urinalysis or self-report. 1214 Chinese pregnant women participated in the study and 1085 complete DAST-10 forms were collected. Women who had used illicit drugs had significantly different DAST-10 scores than those who had not. The sensitivity of DAST-10 for identify illicit drug use in pregnant women ranged from 79.2% to 33.3% and specificity ranged from 67.7% to 99.7% using cut-off scores from ≥ 1 to ≥ 3. The ~ 80% sensitivity of DAST-10 using a cut-off score of ≥ 1 should be sufficient for screening of illicit drug use in Chinese pregnant women, but validation tests for drug use are needed.

  2. Validation of the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10): A study on illicit drug use among Chinese pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Lam, Lap Po; Leung, Wing Cheong; Ip, Patrick; Chow, Chun Bong; Chan, Mei Fung; Ng, Judy Wai Ying; Sing, Chu; Lam, Ying Hoo; Mak, Wing Lai Tony; Chow, Kam Ming; Chin, Robert Kien Howe

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the Chinese version of the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10) for identifying illicit drug use during pregnancy among Chinese population. Chinese pregnant women attending their first antenatal visit or their first unbooked visit to the maternity ward were recruited during a 4-month study period in 2011. The participants completed self-administered questionnaires on demographic information, a single question on illicit drug use during pregnancy and the DAST-10. Urine samples screened positive by the urine Point-of-Care Test were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. DAST-10 performance was compared with three different gold standards: urinalysis, self-reported drug use, and evidence of drug use by urinalysis or self-report. 1214 Chinese pregnant women participated in the study and 1085 complete DAST-10 forms were collected. Women who had used illicit drugs had significantly different DAST-10 scores than those who had not. The sensitivity of DAST-10 for identify illicit drug use in pregnant women ranged from 79.2% to 33.3% and specificity ranged from 67.7% to 99.7% using cut-off scores from ≥ 1 to ≥ 3. The ~ 80% sensitivity of DAST-10 using a cut-off score of ≥ 1 should be sufficient for screening of illicit drug use in Chinese pregnant women, but validation tests for drug use are needed. PMID:26091290

  3. Loads calibrations of strain gage bridges on the DAST project Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, C. V.

    1980-01-01

    The details of and results from the procedure used to calibrate strain gage bridges for measurement of wing structural loads for the DAST project ARW-1 wing are presented. Results are in the form of loads equations and comparison of computed loads vs. actual loads for two simulated flight loading conditions.

  4. Experience with bretylium tosylate by a hospital cardiac arrest team.

    PubMed

    Holder, D A; Sniderman, A D; Fraser, G; Fallen, E L

    1977-03-01

    The effect of bretylium tosylate (BT) was determined in 27 consecutive cases of resistant ventricular fibrillation (VF) encountered by a hospital cardiac arrest team. The VF was sustained and completely resistant to multiple injections of lidocaine, sequential DC shocks at 400 watt-sec and one or a combination of intravenous propranolol, diphenylhydantoin or procainamide. Following 30 min of sustained cardiac massage, BT (5 mg/kg i.v.) was administered. In 20 patients, VF was terminated within 9-12 min after DC shock. Eight of these patients failed to recover while 12 (44%) of all patients resuscitated survived to be discharged from hospital. Eleven out of 20 (55%) of all patients who had a cardiac arrest outside the CCU were survivors; only one out of seven in the CCU were successfully resuscitated. While receiving maintanance BT post-resuscitation (5 mg/kg i.m. q 8-12 hrs x 48 hrs), half the patients developed hypotension and three required vasopressors and/or fluid replacement. The data indicate that BT is a useful agent in patients with sustained VF refractory to repeated lidocaine injections, some other antiarrhythmic agents, and multiple DC shocks. PMID:837490

  5. Helquat Dyes: Helicene-like Push-Pull Systems with Large Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Responses.

    PubMed

    Coe, Benjamin J; Rusanova, Daniela; Joshi, Vishwas D; Sánchez, Sergio; Vávra, Jan; Khobragade, Dushant; Severa, Lukáš; Císařová, Ivana; Šaman, David; Pohl, Radek; Clays, Koen; Depotter, Griet; Brunschwig, Bruce S; Teplý, Filip

    2016-03-01

    Helquat dyes combine a cationic hemicyanine with a helicene-like motif to form a new blueprint for chiral systems with large and tunable nonlinear optical (NLO) properties. We report a series of such species with characterization, including determination of static first hyperpolarizabilities β0 via hyper-Rayleigh scattering and Stark spectroscopy. The measured β0 values are similar to or substantially larger than that of the commercial chromophore E-4'-(dimethylamino)-N-methyl-4-stilbazolium. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations on two of the new cations are used to probe their molecular electronic structures and optical properties. Related molecules are expected to show bulk second-order NLO effects in even nonpolar media, overcoming a key challenge in developing useful materials. PMID:26844587

  6. Homogeneous tosylation of agarose as an approach toward novel functional polysaccharide materials.

    PubMed

    Gericke, Martin; Heinze, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The homogeneous tosylation of agarose was studied with respect to the effects of reaction parameters, such as reaction medium, time, and molar ratio, on the reaction course, the degree of substitution (DS) with tosyl/chloro deoxy groups, and the molecular structure. Tosyl agaroses (TOSA) with DS tosyl ≤ 1 .81 could be obtained in completely homogeneous reactions by using N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA)/LiCl or 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI) as solvents. The products were characterized by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy and it was demonstrated that two types of substitution pattern can be achieved: (i) non-preferential substitution at position 6 of the 1 → 3-linked β-d-galactose unit (G-6) and position 2 of the 1 → 4-linked 3,6-anyhdro-α-L-galactose unit (LA-2) and (ii) regioselective tosylation at G-6, depending on whether the reaction is performed with or without LiCl. Finally, the nucleophilic displacement reaction of TOSA was studied using azide and ethylenediamine as representative nucleophiles. Novel deoxy-agarose derivatives were obtained that showed an interesting solubility behavior and will be used for creating functional polysaccharide materials.

  7. Homogeneous tosylation of agarose as an approach toward novel functional polysaccharide materials.

    PubMed

    Gericke, Martin; Heinze, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The homogeneous tosylation of agarose was studied with respect to the effects of reaction parameters, such as reaction medium, time, and molar ratio, on the reaction course, the degree of substitution (DS) with tosyl/chloro deoxy groups, and the molecular structure. Tosyl agaroses (TOSA) with DS tosyl ≤ 1 .81 could be obtained in completely homogeneous reactions by using N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA)/LiCl or 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI) as solvents. The products were characterized by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy and it was demonstrated that two types of substitution pattern can be achieved: (i) non-preferential substitution at position 6 of the 1 → 3-linked β-d-galactose unit (G-6) and position 2 of the 1 → 4-linked 3,6-anyhdro-α-L-galactose unit (LA-2) and (ii) regioselective tosylation at G-6, depending on whether the reaction is performed with or without LiCl. Finally, the nucleophilic displacement reaction of TOSA was studied using azide and ethylenediamine as representative nucleophiles. Novel deoxy-agarose derivatives were obtained that showed an interesting solubility behavior and will be used for creating functional polysaccharide materials. PMID:25965480

  8. The Synthesis and Methanolysis of Benzyl Tosylates: An Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garst, Michael E.; Gribble, Gordon W.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a series of experiments (requiring six hours/week for six to eight weeks) involving the synthesis and methanolysis of substituted benzyl tosylates. The experiments provide students with experiences in kinetic data manipulation and an introduction and firm basis for structure-activity relationships and solvent effects in organic…

  9. Studies on the tosylation of cellulose in mixtures of ionic liquids and a co-solvent.

    PubMed

    Gericke, Martin; Schaller, Jens; Liebert, Tim; Fardim, Pedro; Meister, Frank; Heinze, Thomas

    2012-06-20

    The tosylation of cellulose in ionic liquids (ILs) was studied. Due to the beneficial effect of different co-solvents, the reaction could be performed at 25°C without the need of heating (in order to reduce viscosity) or cooling (in order to prevent side reactions). The effects of reaction parameters, such as time, molar ratio, and type of base, on the degree of substitution (DS) with tosyl- and chloro-deoxy groups as well as on the molecular weight were evaluated. Products with a DStosyl≤1.14 and DSCl≤0.16 were obtained and characterized by means of NMR- and FT-IR spectroscopy in order to evaluate their purity and distribution of functional groups within the modified anhydroglucose unit (AGU). Tosylation of cellulose in mixtures of IL and a co-solvent was found to result in predominant substitution at the primary hydroxyl group. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) revealed only a moderate degradation of the polymer backbone at a reaction time of 4-8h. Finally, the nucleophilic displacement (SN) of tosyl- and chloro-deoxy groups by azide as well as recycling of the ILs was studied. PMID:24750754

  10. Ground vibration test results for Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST)/Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-1R) aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, T. H.; Gilyard, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    The drones for aerodynamic and structural testing (DAST) project was designed to control flutter actively at high subsonic speeds. Accurate knowledge of the structural model was critical for the successful design of the control system. A ground vibration test was conducted on the DAST vehicle to determine the structural model characteristics. This report presents and discusses the vibration and test equipment, the test setup and procedures, and the antisymmetric and symmetric mode shape results. The modal characteristics were subsequently used to update the structural model employed in the control law design process.

  11. Psychometric properties of the Turkish versions of the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) and the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10) in the prison setting.

    PubMed

    Evren, Cuneyt; Ogel, Kultegin; Evren, Bilge; Bozkurt, Muge

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate psychometric properties of the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) and the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10) in prisoners with (n = 124) or without (n = 78) drug use disorder. Participants were evaluated with the DUDIT, the DAST-10, and the Addiction Profile Index-Short (API-S). The DUDIT and the DAST-10 were found to be psychometrically sound drug abuse screening measures with high convergent validity when compared with each other (r = 0.86), and API-S (r = 0.88 and r = 0.84, respectively), and to have a Cronbach's α of 0.93 and 0.87, respectively. In addition, a single component accounted for 58.28% of total variance for DUDIT, whereas this was 47.10% for DAST-10. The DUDIT had sensitivity and specificity scores of 0.95 and 0.79, respectively, when using the optimal cut-off score of 10, whereas these scores were 0.88 and 0.74 for the DAST-10 when using the optimal cut-off score of 4. Additionally, both the DUDIT and the DAST-10 showed good discriminant validity as they differentiated prisoners with drug use disorder from those without. Findings support the Turkish versions of both the DUDIT and the DAST-10 as reliable and valid drug abuse screening instruments that measure unidimensional constructs.

  12. Isomeric differentiation of chloroanilines by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in combination with tosylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Zhu, Guohua; Chen, Mengmeng; Liu, Jinsong; Jiang, Kezhi

    2016-01-01

    p-Chloroaniline is one of the banned aromatic amines in azo dyes, but it is very difficult to distinguish it from its isomers due to their identical retention time in chromatography and similar mass spectra. In this work, derivatization of the isomeric chloroanilines was carried out to yield the corresponding N-tosyl chloroanilines, which were completely separated by gas chromatography and also possessed clearly different electron ionization mass spectra. Thus, the three isomers could be differentiated and determined at the same time. Density functional theory calculation results indicated that the effect of the substituent pattern in electron ionization mass spectrometry is mainly due to the difference in the stability of the product ion (P2) at m/z 126, originating from the loss of tosyl radical from the precursor ion. PMID:27553734

  13. The DAST-1 remotely piloted research vehicle development and initial flight testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotsabasis, A.

    1981-01-01

    The development and initial flight testing of the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing) remotely piloted research vehicle, fitted with the first aeroelastic research wing ARW-I are presented. The ARW-I is a swept supercritical wing, designed to exhibit flutter within the vehicle's flight envelope. An active flutter suppression system (FSS) designed to increase the ARW-I flutter boundary speed by 20 percent is described. The development of the FSS was based on prediction techniques of structural and unsteady aerodynamic characteristics. A description of the supporting ground facilities and aircraft systems involved in the remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV) flight test technique is given. The design, specification, and testing of the remotely augmented vehicle system are presented. A summary of the preflight and flight test procedures associated with the RPRV operation is given. An evaluation of the blue streak test flight and the first and second ARW-I test flights is presented.

  14. Gas-Phase Fragmentation of Protonated N,2-Diphenyl- N'-( p-Toluenesulfonyl)Ethanimidamides: Tosyl Cation Transfer Versus Proton Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanshan; Yu, Lian; Wu, Yanqing; Guo, Cheng; Zhang, Ningwen; Jiang, Kezhi

    2015-08-01

    The gas-phase dissociation chemistry of protonated N,2-diphenyl- N'-( p-toluenesulfonyl) ethanimidamides was investigated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in combination with density functional theory calculation. The protonated molecules underwent fragmentation via two main competing channels: (1) migration of the tosyl cation to the anilinic N atom and the subsequent loss of 2-phenylacetonitrile to afford protonated N-phenyl p-toluenesulfonamide ( m/z 248); and (2) transfer of the ionizing proton to the anilinic N atom to give an ion/neutral complex of [tosyl cation / 2-phenylacetonitrile] ( m/z 272) and the subsequent decomposition to yield tosyl cation ( m/z 155). To the best of our knowledge, the gas-phase tosyl cation transfer has not been reported previously. For the para-substituted sulfonamides, the presence of electron-donating groups on the anilinic ring inhibits the reaction channel of the tosyl cation migration, whereas the presence of electron-withdrawing groups favors this pathway.

  15. Design verification and fabrication of active control systems for the DAST ARW-2 high aspect ratio wing, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted under Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program to accomplish the final design and hardware fabrication for four active control systems compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA Aeroelastic Research Wing No. 2 (ARW-2) and Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The wing structure was designed so that Active Control Systems (ACS) are required in the normal flight envelope by integrating control system design with aerodynamics and structure technologies. The DAST ARW-2 configuration uses flutter suppression, relaxed static stability, and gust and maneuver load alleviation ACS systems, and an automatic flight control system. Performance goals and criteria were applied to individual systems and the systems collectively to assure that vehicle stability margins, flutter margins, flying qualities and load reductions are achieved.

  16. Design verification and fabrication of active control systems for the DAST ARW-2 high aspect ratio wing. Part 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    This is Part 2-Appendices of a study conducted under Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) Program to accomplish the final design and hardware fabrication for four active control systems compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA Aeroelastic Research Wing No. 2 (ARW-2) and Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The wing structure was designed so that Active Control Systems (ACS) are required in the normal flight envelope by integrating control system design with aerodynamics and structure technologies. The DAST ARW-2 configuration uses flutter suppression, relaxed static stability, and gust and maneuver load alleviation ACS systems, and an automatic flight control system. Performance goals and criteria were applied to individual systems and the systems collectively to assure that vehicle stability margins, flutter margins, flying qualities, and load reductions were achieved.

  17. Iron-catalyzed coupling of aryl sulfamates and aryl/vinyl tosylates with aryl Grignards.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Toolika; Cook, Silas P

    2014-10-01

    The iron-catalyzed coupling of aryl sulfamates and tosylates with aryl Grignard reagents is reported for the first time. The methodology employs air-stable, low-cost FeF3·3H2O and the N-heterocyclic carbene ligand IPr·HCl as the preligand to form a long-lived catalyst upon treatment with aryl Grignards. The reaction provides a range of cross-coupled products in good-to-excellent yields. In contrast to previous reports with aryl chlorides, these reactions proceed with low levels of Grignard homocoupling regardless of the iron source. PMID:25230097

  18. The development of the DAST I remotely piloted research vehicle for flight testing an active flutter suppression control system. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grose, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The development of the DAST I (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing) remotely piloted research vehicle is described. The DAST I is a highly modified BQM-34E/F Firebee II Supersonic Aerial Target incorporating a swept supercritical wing designed to flutter within the vehicle's flight envelope. The predicted flutter and rigid body characteristics are presented. A description of the analysis and design of an active flutter suppression control system (FSS) designed to increase the flutter boundary of the DAST wing (ARW-1) by a factor of 20% is given. The design and development of the digital remotely augmented primary flight control system and on-board analog backup control system is presented. An evaluation of the near real-time flight flutter testing methods is made by comparing results of five flutter testing techniques on simulated DAST I flutter data. The development of the DAST ARW-1 state variable model used to generate time histories of simulated accelerometer responses is presented. This model uses control surface commands and a Dryden model gust as inputs. The feasibility of the concept of extracting open loop flutter characteristics from closed loop FSS responses was examined. It was shown that open loop characteristics can be determined very well from closed loop subcritical responses.

  19. Titania-catalyzed radiofluorination of tosylated precursors in highly aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Sergeev, Maxim E; Morgia, Federica; Lazari, Mark; Wang, Christopher; van Dam, R Michael

    2015-05-01

    Nucleophilic radiofluorination is an efficient synthetic route to many positron-emission tomography (PET) probes, but removal of water to activate the cyclotron-produced [(18)F]fluoride has to be performed prior to reaction, which significantly increases overall radiolabeling time and causes radioactivity loss. In this report, we demonstrate the possibility of (18)F-radiofluorination in highly aqueous medium. The method utilizes titania nanoparticles, 1:1 (v/v) acetonitrile-thexyl alcohol solvent mixture, and tetra-n-butylammonium bicarbonate as a phase-transfer agent. Efficient radiolabeling is directly performed with aqueous [(18)F]fluoride without the need for a drying/azeotroping step to significantly reduce radiosynthesis time. High radiochemical purity of the target compound is also achieved. The substrate scope of the synthetic strategy is demonstrated with a range of aromatic, aliphatic, and cycloaliphatic tosylated precursors.

  20. Positron annihilation and conductivity measurements on poly(pyrrole tosylate) and poly(pyrrole fluoride)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. C.; Krishnamoorthy, S.; Naidu, S. V.; Eom, C. I.; Krichene, S.; Reynolds, J. R.

    1990-03-01

    Positron lifetimes, Doppler broadening of the annihilation γ energy, and electrical conductivities have been measured for two conducting polymers, poly(pyrrole tosylate) and poly(pyrrole fluoride), as functions of temperature in the range 10-295 K. The positron-lifetime spectra have been resolved into two exponentials. Positrons are localized in shallow traps, and the lifetime data suggest thermally induced detrapping of positrons at low temperatures. The temperature dependence of the conductivity has been analyzed following the variable-range-hopping model which provides results for the density of states at the Fermi energy [N(EF)] and bipolaron localization length α-1. Whereas the temperature dependence of the conductivity qualitatively follows this model, it provides incorrect results for N(EF) and α-1. .AE

  1. Analytical procedures for flutter model development and checkout in preparation for wind tunnel testing of the DAST ARW-1 wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, S.

    1982-01-01

    A study to develop analytical procedures to be used in the checkout and calibration of a flutter wind tunnel model of the DAST ARW-1 wing equipped with a flutter suppression device is reported. The methods used to obtain a realistic simulation of the structural inertial and aerodynamic properties of the wing, the hydro-electro-servo actuator used for flutter suppression, a prediction of the open loop flutter speed at a fixed Mach number (.897), a procedure for checkout and calibration using the method frequency response of a wing mounted accelerometer, and an analytical representation of a reduced state approximation of the overall system are described.

  2. Crystal structures of (E)-3-(furan-2-yl)-2-phenyl-N-tosyl-acryl-amide and (E)-3-phenyl-2-(m-tol-yl)-N-tosyl-acryl-amide.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dong; Meng, Xiangzhen; Sheng, Zeyuan; Wang, Shuangming; Duan, Yuanyuan; Li, Ziqian

    2016-06-01

    In the title N-tosyl-acryl-amide compounds, C20H17NO4S, (I), and C23H21NO3S, (II), the conformation about the C=C bond is E. The acryl-amide groups, [-NH-C(=O)-C=C-], are almost planar, with the N-C-C=C torsion angle being -170.18 (14)° in (I) and -168.01 (17)° in (II). In (I), the furan, phenyl and 4-methyl-benzene rings are inclined to the acryl-amide mean plane by 26.47 (11), 69.01 (8) and 82.49 (9)°, respectively. In (II), the phenyl, 3-methyl-benzene and 4-methyl-benzene rings are inclined to the acryl-amide mean plane by 11.61 (10), 78.44 (10) and 78.24 (10)°, respectively. There is an intra-molecular C-H⋯π inter-action present in compound (II). In the crystals of both compounds, mol-ecules are linked by pairs of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers with an R 2 (2)(8) ring motif. In (I), the dimers are reinforced by C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and linked by C-H⋯π inter-actions, forming chains along [011]. In the crystal of (II), the dimers are linked via C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains along [100]. The chains are further linked by C-H⋯π inter-actions, forming layers parallel to (010).

  3. Crystal structures of (E)-3-(furan-2-yl)-2-phenyl-N-tosyl-acryl-amide and (E)-3-phenyl-2-(m-tol-yl)-N-tosyl-acryl-amide.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dong; Meng, Xiangzhen; Sheng, Zeyuan; Wang, Shuangming; Duan, Yuanyuan; Li, Ziqian

    2016-06-01

    In the title N-tosyl-acryl-amide compounds, C20H17NO4S, (I), and C23H21NO3S, (II), the conformation about the C=C bond is E. The acryl-amide groups, [-NH-C(=O)-C=C-], are almost planar, with the N-C-C=C torsion angle being -170.18 (14)° in (I) and -168.01 (17)° in (II). In (I), the furan, phenyl and 4-methyl-benzene rings are inclined to the acryl-amide mean plane by 26.47 (11), 69.01 (8) and 82.49 (9)°, respectively. In (II), the phenyl, 3-methyl-benzene and 4-methyl-benzene rings are inclined to the acryl-amide mean plane by 11.61 (10), 78.44 (10) and 78.24 (10)°, respectively. There is an intra-molecular C-H⋯π inter-action present in compound (II). In the crystals of both compounds, mol-ecules are linked by pairs of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers with an R 2 (2)(8) ring motif. In (I), the dimers are reinforced by C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and linked by C-H⋯π inter-actions, forming chains along [011]. In the crystal of (II), the dimers are linked via C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains along [100]. The chains are further linked by C-H⋯π inter-actions, forming layers parallel to (010). PMID:27308045

  4. Copper-catalyzed reductive cross-coupling of nonactivated alkyl tosylates and mesylates with alkyl and aryl bromides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Hui; Yang, Chu-Ting; Lu, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Zhen-Qi; Xu, Ling; Cui, Mian; Lu, Xi; Xiao, Bin; Fu, Yao; Liu, Lei

    2014-11-17

    A copper-catalyzed reductive cross-coupling reaction of nonactivated alkyl tosylates and mesylates with alkyl and aryl bromides was developed. It provides a practical method for efficient and cost-effective construction of aryl-alkyl and alkyl-alkyl CC bonds with stereocontrol from readily available substrates. When used in an intramolecular fashion, the reaction enables convenient access to various substituted carbo- or heterocycles, such as 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran and benzochromene derivatives.

  5. Pd(Quinox)-Catalyzed Allylic Relay Suzuki Reactions of Secondary Homostyrenyl Tosylates via Alkene-Assisted Oxidative Addition.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Benjamin J; Bischoff, Amanda J; Sigman, Matthew S

    2014-06-01

    Pd-catalyzed allylic relay Suzuki cross-coupling reactions of secondary alkyl tosylates, featuring a sterically-hindered oxidative addition and precise control of β-hydride elimination, are reported. The identification of a linear free energy relationship between the relative rates of substrate consumption and the electronic nature of the substrate alkene suggests that the oxidative addition requires direct alkene involvement. A study of the effect of chain length on the reaction outcome supports a chelation-controlled oxidative addition.

  6. Enantiomeric separation of glycidyl tosylate by CE: application to the study of catalytic asymmetric epoxidation of allyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Morante-Zarcero, Sonia; Crego, Antonio L; del Hierro, Isabel; Sierra, Isabel; Marina, Maria Luisa

    2008-11-01

    A CE method using CDs as chiral selectors was developed and validated to achieve the separation of glycidyl tosylate enantiomers originated by in situ derivatization of glycidol enantiomers obtained in asymmetric epoxidation of allyl alcohol with chiral titanium-tartrate complexes as catalysts. The effects of the nature, pH and concentration of the buffer, the nature and concentration of chiral selector, the addition of SDS, methanol, ethanol or 2-propanol, the capillary temperature, the effective capillary length and the applied voltage on the chiral resolution of glycidyl tosylate enantiomers were investigated. The best separation conditions were achieved using a Tris-borate buffer mixture (50 and 25 mM, respectively) at pH=9.3 with a dual CD system consisting of 2.5% succinyl-beta-CD and 1.0% beta-CD w/v at 15 degrees C. A baseline separation (resolution approximately 2.0) of the glycidyl tosylate enantiomers was obtained in a relatively short time (less than 12 min). Satisfactory results were obtained in terms of linearity (r>0.99) and intermediate precision (RSD below 8.5%). The LOD and LOQ were 3.0 and 10.0 mg/L, respectively, and the recoveries ranged from 99.8 to 108.8%. Finally, the method was applied to the determination of the enantiomeric excess and the yield obtained in the asymmetric epoxidation of allyl alcohol employing chiral titanium-tartrate complexes as catalysts after an in situ derivatization of glycidol enantiomers to glycidyl tosylate.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of tosyl-activated magnetic and nonmagnetic monodisperse microspheres for use in microfluic-based ferritin immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Frédéric; Vollet, Christine; Plichta, Zdeněk; Horák, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the preparation of tosyl-activated nonmagnetic poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate) [P(HEMA-GMA)] microspheres by dispersion polymerization and tosyl-activated magnetic poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) [P(HEMA-EDMA)] microspheres by multistep swelling polymerization method and precipitation of iron oxide inside the pores. These new approaches show that monodisperse microspheres, 2.3 µm, respectively 4.1 µm, in diameter can be produced in high yields avoiding aggregation and with the advantage of being free of aromatic moieties. To demonstrate their potential for diagnostic applications, both types of microparticles have been coated with capture and detection antibodies (DAs), respectively. Immunoassay protocols have then been developed for the dosage of ferritin using an automated affinity platform combining microchannel chips and electrochemical detection. The assay performance using the above magnetic microspheres has been compared with that obtained with commercial tosyl-activated beads. Finally, the possibility to combine functionalized magnetic and nonmagnetic microspheres has been evaluated in view of amplifying the number of enzymatic labels in the immuno-complex. At a ferritin concentration of 119.6 ng/mL, a signal-to-noise ratio of 150.5 is obtained using 0.2 mg/mL of anti-ferritin-coated P(HEMA-GMA)-DA microspheres against a value of 158.8 using free DA in solution.

  8. Synergistic Interactions of Eugenol-tosylate and Its Congeners with Fluconazole against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aijaz; Wani, Mohmmad Younus; Khan, Amber; Manzoor, Nikhat; Molepo, Julitha

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the antifungal properties of a monoterpene phenol "Eugenol" against different Candida strains and have observed that the addition of methyl group to eugenol drastically increased its antimicrobial potency. Based on the results and the importance of medicinal synthetic chemistry, we synthesized eugenol-tosylate and its congeners (E1-E6) and tested their antifungal activity against different clinical fluconazole (FLC)- susceptible and FLC- resistant C. albicans isolates alone and in combination with FLC by determining fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICIs) and isobolograms calculated from microdilution assays. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results confirmed that all the tested C. albicans strains were variably susceptible to the semi-synthetic derivatives E1-E6, with MIC values ranging from 1-62 μg/ml. The test compounds in combination with FLC exhibited either synergy (36%), additive (41%) or indifferent (23%) interactions, however, no antagonistic interactions were observed. The MICs of FLC decreased 2-9 fold when used in combination with the test compounds. Like their precursor eugenol, all the derivatives showed significant impairment of ergosterol biosynthesis in all C. albicans strains coupled with down regulation of the important ergosterol biosynthesis pathway gene-ERG11. The results were further validated by docking studies, which revealed that the inhibitors snugly fitting the active site of the target enzyme, mimicking fluconazole, may well explain their excellent inhibitory activity. Our results suggest that these compounds have a great potential as antifungals, which can be used as chemosensitizing agents with the known antifungal drugs.

  9. Radiofluorination of diaryliodonium tosylates under aqueous-organic and cryptand-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Chun, Joong-Hyun; Telu, Sanjay; Lu, Shuiyu; Pike, Victor W

    2013-08-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has growing importance as a molecular imaging technique in clinical research and drug development. Methods for producing PET radiotracers utilizing cyclotron-produced [(18)F]fluoride ion (t1/2 = 109.7 min) without the need for complete removal of irradiated target [(18)O]water and addition of cryptand are keenly sought for practical convenience and efficiency. Several structurally diverse diaryliodonium tosylates, XArI(+)Ar'Y TsO(-) (X = H or p-MeO), were investigated in a microfluidic apparatus for their reactivity towards radiofluorination with high specific activity (no-carrier-added) [(18)F]fluoride ion in mixtures of DMF and irradiated target [(18)O]water in the absence of cryptand. Salts bearing a para or ortho electron-withdrawing group Y (e.g., Y = p-CN) reacted rapidly (∼3 min) to give the expected major [(18)F]fluoroarene product, [(18)F]FArY, in useful moderate radiochemical yields even when the solvent had an [(18)O]water content up to 28%. Salts bearing electron-withdrawing groups in meta position (e.g., Y = m-NO2), or an electron-donating substituent (Y = p-OMe), gave low radiochemical yields under the same conditions.

  10. Synergistic Interactions of Eugenol-tosylate and Its Congeners with Fluconazole against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Amber; Manzoor, Nikhat; Molepo, Julitha

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the antifungal properties of a monoterpene phenol “Eugenol” against different Candida strains and have observed that the addition of methyl group to eugenol drastically increased its antimicrobial potency. Based on the results and the importance of medicinal synthetic chemistry, we synthesized eugenol-tosylate and its congeners (E1-E6) and tested their antifungal activity against different clinical fluconazole (FLC)- susceptible and FLC- resistant C. albicans isolates alone and in combination with FLC by determining fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICIs) and isobolograms calculated from microdilution assays. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results confirmed that all the tested C. albicans strains were variably susceptible to the semi-synthetic derivatives E1-E6, with MIC values ranging from 1–62 μg/ml. The test compounds in combination with FLC exhibited either synergy (36%), additive (41%) or indifferent (23%) interactions, however, no antagonistic interactions were observed. The MICs of FLC decreased 2–9 fold when used in combination with the test compounds. Like their precursor eugenol, all the derivatives showed significant impairment of ergosterol biosynthesis in all C. albicans strains coupled with down regulation of the important ergosterol biosynthesis pathway gene-ERG11. The results were further validated by docking studies, which revealed that the inhibitors snugly fitting the active site of the target enzyme, mimicking fluconazole, may well explain their excellent inhibitory activity. Our results suggest that these compounds have a great potential as antifungals, which can be used as chemosensitizing agents with the known antifungal drugs. PMID:26694966

  11. Metal-Free Cross-Coupling of Arylboronic Acids and Derivatives with DAST-Type Reagents for Direct Access to Diverse Aromatic Sulfinamides and Sulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Tang, Xiang-Ying; Shi, Min

    2016-08-26

    We have developed a simple and convenient method for the cross-coupling of arylboronic acids and their derivatives with DAST-type reagents under mild and metal-free conditions to directly afford sulfinamides in moderate to good yields. Moreover, sulfonamides were obtained after a simple oxidation reaction. The reaction mechanism was investigated by (18) O-labeling experiments, and the synthetic utility was demonstrated by the sulfoxidation of natural products.

  12. Growth and characterization of novel organic 3-Hydroxy Benzaldehyde-N-methyl 4 Stilbazolium Tosylate crystals for NLO applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannathan, K.; Umarani, P.; Ratchagar, V.; Ramesh, V.; Kalainathan, S.

    2016-01-01

    The 3-Hydroxy Benzaldehyde-N-methyl 4-Stilbazolium Tosylate (3- HBST) is a new organic NLO crystal and it is a new derivative in stilbazolium tosylate family. In this work we have synthesized 3-HBST and the single crystal was grown by conventional slow cooling method. The structure and lattice parameters of the grown crystal were determined by the single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and it is exhibiting good crystalline nature which is observed from the powder XRD. In order to check the crystalline quality the rocking curve was recorded using multi crystal X-ray diffractometer. The functional groups were identified from both FTIR and NMR spectral analyses. The π-π* and n-π* optical transition energy levels were estimated from the absorption peaks. The NLO property was confirmed by measuring relative SHG efficiency by Kurtz powder test; it shows 24 times higher SHG efficiency than that of urea. In order to test the mechanical stability the Vickers and Knoop micro hardness measurement were carried out and found that the micro hardness number decreases with increasing load. The melting point was determined from Differential Scanning Colorimetry (DSC).

  13. Growth and characterization of novel organic 3-Hydroxy Benzaldehyde-N-methyl 4 Stilbazolium Tosylate crystals for NLO applications.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, K; Umarani, P; Ratchagar, V; Ramesh, V; Kalainathan, S

    2016-01-15

    The 3-Hydroxy Benzaldehyde-N-methyl 4-Stilbazolium Tosylate (3- HBST) is a new organic NLO crystal and it is a new derivative in stilbazolium tosylate family. In this work we have synthesized 3-HBST and the single crystal was grown by conventional slow cooling method. The structure and lattice parameters of the grown crystal were determined by the single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and it is exhibiting good crystalline nature which is observed from the powder XRD. In order to check the crystalline quality the rocking curve was recorded using multi crystal X-ray diffractometer. The functional groups were identified from both FTIR and NMR spectral analyses. The π-π* and n-π* optical transition energy levels were estimated from the absorption peaks. The NLO property was confirmed by measuring relative SHG efficiency by Kurtz powder test; it shows 24 times higher SHG efficiency than that of urea. In order to test the mechanical stability the Vickers and Knoop micro hardness measurement were carried out and found that the micro hardness number decreases with increasing load. The melting point was determined from Differential Scanning Colorimetry (DSC).

  14. Cationic Pd(II)-Catalyzed Cyclization of N-Tosyl-aniline Tethered Allenyl Aldehydes with Arylboronic Acids: Diastereo- and Enantioselective Synthesis of Tetrahydroquinoline Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojuan; Han, Xiuling; Lu, Xiyan

    2015-08-01

    An efficient cyclization of N-tosyl-aniline tethered allenyl aldehydes and arylboronic acids catalyzed by cationic palladium complex is developed. This annulation reaction provides a convenient process for the synthesis of 3,4-cis-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline derivatives in high yields with excellent diastereoselectivity and enantioselectivity.

  15. Crystal growth, spectral, structural and optical studies of π-conjugated stilbazolium crystal: 4-bromobenzaldehyde-4'-N'-methylstilbazolium tosylate.

    PubMed

    Krishna Kumar, M; Sudhahar, S; Bhagavannarayana, G; Mohan Kumar, R

    2014-05-01

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) organic compound, 4-bromobenzaldehyde-4'-N'-methylstilbazolium tosylate was synthesized by reflux method. The formation of molecular complex was confirmed from (1)H NMR, FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral analyses. The single crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth method and the crystal structure and atomic packing of grown crystal was identified. The morphology and growth axis of grown crystal were determined. The crystal perfection was analyzed using high resolution X-ray diffraction study on (001) plane. Thermal stability, decomposition stages and melting point of the grown crystal were analyzed. The optical absorption coefficient (α) and energy band gap (E(g)) of the crystal were determined using UV-visible absorption studies. Second harmonic generation efficiency of the grown crystal was examined by Kurtz powder method with different particle size using 1064 nm laser. Laser induced damage threshold study was carried out for the grown crystal using Nd:YAG laser. PMID:24531108

  16. Tosylated and azidated inulins as key substrates for further chemical modifications to access inulin-based advanced materials: an inulin-based glycocluster.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Kazumi; Hasegawa, Teruaki

    2012-01-15

    We successfully synthesized inulin tosylates by treating commercially available inulin with tosyl chloride and triethylamine in N,N-dimethylacetoamide at the ambient temperature for 24h. The subsequent S(N)2 reactions using sodium azide afford inulin azides that can act as useful substrates for the following Huisgen cycloaddition with alkyne-terminated β-lactoside. The resultant inulin derivative having multiple β-lactosides has excellent affinity towards a β-lactoside binding lectin (RCA(120)). This synthetic strategy has various advantages, such as non-fragmentation of the inulin mainchain and wide applications for various alkyne-terminated functional units. Our strategy can be, therefore, used to develop various inulin derivatives that are applicable for food and medicinal industries.

  17. Effects of electrolyte concentration and counterion valence on the microstructural flow regimes in dilute cetyltrimethylammonium tosylate micellar solutions.

    PubMed

    Tepale, N; Macías, E R; Bautista, F; Puig, J E; Manero, O; Gradzielski, M; Escalante, J I

    2011-11-15

    The shear thickening behavior and the transition to shear thinning are examined in dilute cetyltrimethylammonium tosylate (CTAT) micellar solutions as a function of surfactant concentration and ionic strength using electrolytes with different counterion valence. Newtonian behavior at low shear rates, followed by shear thickening and shear thinning at higher shear rates, are observed at low and intermediate surfactant and electrolyte concentrations. Shear thickening diminishes with increasing surfactant concentration and ionic strength. At higher surfactant or electrolyte concentration, only a Newtonian region followed by shear thinning is detected. A generalized flow diagram indicates two controlling regimes: one in which electrostatic screening dominates and induces micellar growth, and another, at higher electrolyte and surfactant concentrations, where chemical equilibrium among electrolyte and surfactant counterions controls the rheological behavior by modifying micellar breaking and reforming. Analysis of the shear thickening behavior reveals that not only a critical shear rate is required for shear thickening, but also a critical deformation, which appears to be unique for all systems examined, within experimental error. Moreover, a superposition of the critical shear rate for shear thickening with surfactant and electrolyte concentration is reported.

  18. Tosyl esters of cinchonidine and cinchonine alkaloids: the structure-reactivity relationship in the hydrolysis to 9-epibases.

    PubMed

    Karczmarzyk, Zbigniew; Lipińska, Teodozja M; Wysocki, Waldemar; Denisiuk, Monika; Piechocka, Katarzyna

    2011-09-01

    In the crystal structures of the diastereoisomers of O-tosylcinchonidine [(9R)-cinchon-9-yl 4-methylbenzenesulfonate], (I), and O-tosylcinchonine [(9S)-cinchon-9-yl 4-methylbenzenesulfonate], (II), both C(26)H(28)N(2)O(3)S, both molecules are in an anti-closed conformation and, in each case, the position of the aryl ring of the tosylate system is influenced by an intramolecular C-H···O hydrogen bond. The molecular packing in (I) is influenced by weak intermolecular C-H···O and C-H···π interactions. The crystal structure of (II) features C-H···π interactions and van der Waals forces only. The computational investigations using RHF/6-31G** ab initio and AM1 semi-empirical methods performed for (I) and (II) and their protonated species show that the conformational and energetic parameters of the molecules are correlated with differences in their reactivity in hydrolysis to the corresponding 9-epibases.

  19. Influence of alkoxy groups on rates of acetal hydrolysis and tosylate solvolysis: electrostatic stabilization of developing oxocarbenium ion intermediates and neighboring-group participation to form oxonium ions.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Angie; Otte, Douglas A L; Salamant, Walter A; Sanzone, Jillian R; Woerpel, K A

    2015-05-01

    The hydrolysis of 4-alkoxy-substituted acetals was accelerated by about 20-fold compared to that of sterically comparable substrates that do not have an alkoxy group. Rate accelerations are largest when the two functional groups are linked by a flexible cyclic tether. When controlled for the inductive destabilization, an alkoxy group can accelerate acetal hydrolysis by up to 200-fold. The difference in rates of acetal hydrolysis between a substrate where the alkoxy group was tethered to the acetal group by a five-membered ring compared to one where it was tethered by an eight-membered ring was less than 100-fold, suggesting that fused-ring intermediates were not formed. By comparison, the difference in rates of solvolysis of structurally related tosylates were nearly 10(6)-fold between the five- and eight-membered ring series. This observation implicates neighboring-group participation in the solvolysis of tosylates but not in the hydrolysis of acetals. The acceleration of acetal hydrolysis by an alkoxy group is better explained by electrostatic stabilization of intermediates that accumulate positive charge at the acetal carbon atom.

  20. Influence of alkoxy groups on rates of acetal hydrolysis and tosylate solvolysis: electrostatic stabilization of developing oxocarbenium ion intermediates and neighboring-group participation to form oxonium ions.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Angie; Otte, Douglas A L; Salamant, Walter A; Sanzone, Jillian R; Woerpel, K A

    2015-05-01

    The hydrolysis of 4-alkoxy-substituted acetals was accelerated by about 20-fold compared to that of sterically comparable substrates that do not have an alkoxy group. Rate accelerations are largest when the two functional groups are linked by a flexible cyclic tether. When controlled for the inductive destabilization, an alkoxy group can accelerate acetal hydrolysis by up to 200-fold. The difference in rates of acetal hydrolysis between a substrate where the alkoxy group was tethered to the acetal group by a five-membered ring compared to one where it was tethered by an eight-membered ring was less than 100-fold, suggesting that fused-ring intermediates were not formed. By comparison, the difference in rates of solvolysis of structurally related tosylates were nearly 10(6)-fold between the five- and eight-membered ring series. This observation implicates neighboring-group participation in the solvolysis of tosylates but not in the hydrolysis of acetals. The acceleration of acetal hydrolysis by an alkoxy group is better explained by electrostatic stabilization of intermediates that accumulate positive charge at the acetal carbon atom. PMID:25806832

  1. Compact High-Repetition-Rate Monochromatic Terahertz Source Based on Difference Frequency Generation from a Dual-Wavelength Nd:YAG Laser and DAST Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Kai; Mei, Jialin; Wang, Maorong; Liu, Pengxiang; Xu, Degang; Wang, Yuye; Shi, Wei; Yao, Jianquan; Teng, Bing; Xiao, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Although high-repetition-rate dual-wavelength Nd:YAG lasers at 1319 and 1338 nm have been realized for quite a long time, we have employed it in generating monochromatic terahertz (THz) wave in this paper for the first time. The dual-wavelength laser was LD-end-pumped and acousto-optically (AO) Q-switched with the output power of watt level operating at different repetition rates from 5.5 to 30 kHz. Using a 0.6-mm-thick organic nonlinear crystal DAST for difference frequency generation (DFG), a compact terahertz source was achieved at 3.28 THz. The maximum average output power was about 0.58 μW obtained at a repetition rate of 5.5 kHz, corresponding to the conversion efficiency of about 6.4 × 10-7. The output power scaling is still feasible with higher pump power and a longer nonlinear DFG crystal. Owing to the compactness of the dual-wavelength laser and the nonlinear crystal, a palm-top terahertz source is expected for portable applications such as imaging and so on.

  2. Acido-basic control of the thermoelectric properties of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)tosylate (PEDOT-Tos) thin films

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zia Ullah; Bubnova, Olga; Jafari, Mohammad Javad; Brooke, Robert; Liu, Xianjie; Gabrielsson, Roger; Ederth, Thomas; Evans, Drew R.; Andreasen, Jens W.; Fahlman, Mats

    2015-01-01

    PEDOT-Tos is one of the conducting polymers that displays the most promising thermoelectric properties. Until now, it has been utterly difficult to control all the synthesis parameters and the morphology governing the thermoelectric properties. To improve our understanding of this material, we study the variation in the thermoelectric properties by a simple acido-basic treatment. The emphasis of this study is to elucidate the chemical changes induced by acid (HCl) or base (NaOH) treatment in PEDOT-Tos thin films using various spectroscopic and structural techniques. We could identify changes in the nanoscale morphology due to anion exchange between tosylate and Cl– or OH–. But, we identified that changing the pH leads to a tuning of the oxidation level of the polymer, which can explain the changes in thermoelectric properties. Hence, a simple acid–base treatment allows finding the optimum for the power factor in PEDOT-Tos thin films. PMID:27019715

  3. Radiosynthesis of the Tumor Hypoxia Marker [18F]TFMISO via O-[18F]Trifluoroethylation Reveals a Striking Difference Between Trifluoroethyl Tosylate and Iodide in Regiochemical Reactivity Toward Oxygen Nucleophiles

    PubMed Central

    Suehiro, Makiko; Yang, Guangbin; Torchon, Geralda; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Humm, John; Koutcher, Jason; Ouerfelli, Ouathek

    2014-01-01

    The MRI hypoxia marker trifluoro-misonidazole (TFMISO) [1-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-3-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)propan-2-ol] was successfully labeled with 18F to expand its role into a bimodal PET/MRI probe. 18F-Labeling was achieved via a 3-step procedure in which 2,2,2-[18F]trifluoroethyl p-toluenesulfonate prepared by 18F-19F exchange served as the [18F]trifluoroethylating agent. The O-[18F]trifluoroethylation reaction proceeded efficiently to give the intermediate 1,2-epoxy-3-(2,2,2-[18F]trifluoroethoxy)propane, with approximately 60% of 18F incorporated from the tosylate precursor, which was condensed with 2-nitroimidazole to yield [18F]TFMISO. Approximately 40% of the [18F]trifluoroethyl tosylate precursor was converted into the final product. In stark contrast, 2,2,2-[18F]trifluoroethyl iodide failed to produce [18F]TFMISO, giving instead 1,1-[18F]difluoro-2-iodoethoxy and 1-[18F]fluoro-2-iodovinyloxy analogs of [18F]TFMISO. Thus, this investigation has identified 2,2,2-[18F]trifluoroethyl tosylate as an excellent [18F]trifluoroethylating agent, which can convert efficiently an alcohol into the corresponding [18F]trifluoroethyl ether. PMID:21398131

  4. (25R)-6α-Hy­droxy-5α-spiro­stan-3β-yl tosyl­ate

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Herrera, María A.; Sandoval-Ramírez, Jesús; Bernès, Sylvain; Rodríguez-Acosta, Maricela; Hernández Linares, María-Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    The title steroid, C34H50O6S, is an inter­mediate on the synthetic route between diosgenin and brassinosteroids, which possess the A ring modified with the 2α,3α-diol functionality. The polycyclic spiro­stan system has the expected conformation, with six-membered rings adopting chair forms and the five-membered rings envelope forms (flap atoms are the methine C atom in the C/D-ring junction and the spiro C atom connecting rings E and F). The 3β-tosyl­ate group is oriented in such a way that S=O bonds are engaged in inter­molecular hydrogen bonds with O—H and C—H donors. Chains of mol­ecules are formed along [100] via O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, and secondary weak C—H⋯O inter­actions connect two neighbouring chains in the [001] direction. PMID:23476236

  5. A Fully-automated One-pot Synthesis of [18F]Fluoromethylcholine with Reduced Dimethylaminoethanol Contamination via [18F]Fluoromethyl Tosylate

    PubMed Central

    Rodnick, Melissa E.; Brooks, Allen F.; Hockley, Brian G.; Henderson, Bradford D.; Scott, Peter J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A novel one-pot method for preparing [18F]fluoromethylcholine ([18F]FCH) via in situ generation of [18F]fluoromethyl tosylate ([18F]FCH2OTs), and subsequent [18F]fluoromethylation of dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE), has been developed. Methods [18F]FCH was prepared using a GE TRACERlab FXFN, although the method should be readily adaptable to any other fluorine-18 synthesis module. Initially ditosylmethane was fluorinated to generate [18F]FCH2OTs. DMAE was then added and the reaction was heated at 120°C for 10 min to generate [18F]FCH. After this time, reaction solvent was evaporated, and the crude reaction mixture was purified by solid-phase extraction using C18-Plus and CM-Light Sep-Pak cartridges to provide [18F]FCH formulated in USP saline. The formulated product was passed through a 0.22 μm filter into a sterile dose vial, and submitted for quality control testing. Total synthesis time was 1.25 hours from end-of-bombardment. Results Typical non-decay-corrected yields of [18F]FCH prepared using this method were 91 mCi (7% non-decay corrected based upon ~1.3 Ci [18F]fluoride), and doses passed all other quality control (QC) tests. Conclusion A one-pot liquid-phase synthesis of [18F]FCH has been developed. Doses contain extremely low levels of residual DMAE (31.6 μg / 10 mL dose or ~3 ppm) and passed all other requisite QC testing, confirming their suitability for use in clinical imaging studies. PMID:23665261

  6. Delivery of Methylene Blue and meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate from cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels: a potential means of photodynamic therapy of infected wounds.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Ryan F; Cassidy, Corona M; Loughlin, Ryan G; Brown, Anthony; Tunney, Michael M; Jenkins, Mark G; McCarron, Paul A

    2009-09-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol)-borate complexes were evaluated as a potentially novel drug delivery platform suitable for in vivo use in photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) of wound infections. An optimised formulation (8.0%w/w PVA, 2.0%w/w borax) was loaded with 1.0 mg ml(-1) of the photosensitisers Methylene Blue (MB) and meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP). Both drugs were released to yield receiver compartment concentrations (>5.0 microg ml(-1)) found to be phototoxic to both planktonic and biofilm-grown methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a common cause of wound infections in hospitals. Newborn calf serum, used to simulate the conditions prevalent in an exuding wound, did not adversely affect the properties of the hydrogels and had no significant effect on the rate of TMP-mediated photodynamic kill of MRSA, despite appreciably reducing the fluence rate of incident light. However, MB-mediated photodynamic kill of MRSA was significantly reduced in the presence of calf serum and when the clinical isolate was grown in a biofilm. Results support the contention that delivery of MB or TMP using gel-type vehicles as part of PACT could make a contribution to the photodynamic eradication of MRSA from infected wounds.

  7. Drones for aerodynamic and structural testing /DAST/ - A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, H. N.; Eckstrom, C. V.

    1978-01-01

    A program for providing research data on aerodynamic loads and active control systems on wings with supercritical airfoils in the transonic speed range is described. Analytical development, wind tunnel tests, and flight tests are included. A Firebee II target drone vehicle has been modified for use as a flight test facility. The program currently includes flight experiments on two aeroelastic research wings. The primary purpose of the first flight experiment is to demonstrate an active control system for flutter suppression on a transport-type wing. Design and fabrication of the wing are complete and after installing research instrumentation and the flutter suppression system, flight testing is expected to begin in early 1979. The experiment on the second research wing - a fuel-conservative transport type - is to demonstrate multiple active control systems including flutter suppression, maneuver load alleviation, gust load alleviation, and reduce static stability. Of special importance for this second experiment is the development and validation of integrated design methods which include the benefits of active controls in the structural design.

  8. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  9. Loads calibrations of strain gage bridges on the DAST project Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, C. V.

    1986-01-01

    Results from and details of the procedure used to calibrate strain gage bridges for measurements of wing structural loads, shear (V), bending moment (M), and torque (T), at three semispan stations on both the left and right semispans of the ARW-2 wing are presented. The ARW-2 wing has a reference area of 35 square feet, a span of 19 feet, an aspect ratio of 10.3, a midchord line sweepback angle of 25 degrees, and a taper ratio of 0.4. The ARW-2 wing was fabricated using aluminum spars and ribs covered with a fiberglass/honeycomb sandwich skin material. All strain gage bridges are mounted along with an estimate of their accuracy by means of a comparison of computed loads versus actual loads for three simulated flight conditions.

  10. Using the DAST-C to Explore Colombian and Bolivian Students' Images of Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina-Jerez, William; Middleton, Kyndra V.; Orihuela-Rabaza, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The way in which students view science and its practitioners, particularly during their late elementary and early secondary grade levels, has been at the core of numerous studies dating back to research by Mead & Metraux (Science 126:384-390, "1957"). In this study, we used the Draw-a-Scientist Test Checklist developed by Finson, Beaver & Cramond…

  11. Design of the flutter suppression system for DAST ARW-IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Pototzky, A. S.; Abel, I.

    1983-01-01

    The design of the flutter suppression system for a remotely-piloted research vehicle is described. The modeling of the aeroelastic system, the methodology used to synthesized the control law, the analytical results used to evaluate the control law performance, and ground testing of the flutter suppression system onboard the aircraft are discussed. The major emphasis is on the use of optimal control techniques employed during the synthesis of the control law.

  12. Sorafenib Tosylate and Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (Megakaryoblastic) With t(1;22)(p13;q13); RBM15-MKL1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With a Variant RARA Translocation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(3)(q21q26.2) or t(3;3)(q21;q26.2); RPN1-EVI1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(6;9)(p23;q34); DEK-NUP214; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Variant MLL Translocations; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-15

    Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  14. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Liver Cancer Who Have Undergone a Liver Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-25

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer

  15. Chinese Herbal Formulation PHY906 and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage B Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  16. 76 FR 78669 - Determination that Bretylium Tosylate Injection, 50 Milligrams/Milliliter, Was Not Withdrawn From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... Register of June 8, 2011 (76 FR 33310), FDA announced that it was withdrawing approval of NDA 019030...- threatening ventricular arrhythmias, such as ventricular tachycardia, that have failed to respond to...

  17. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-05

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  18. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-02

    Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage III Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IV Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  19. Generation of Widely Tunable Fourier-Transform Pulsed Terahertz Radiation Using Narrowband Near-Infrared Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinjun; Haase, Christa; Merkt, Frédéric

    2009-06-01

    Widely tunable, Fourier-transform-limited pulses of terahertz (THz) radiation have been generated by optical frequency deference using (i) crystals of the highly nonlinear organic salt 4-N,N-dimethylamino-4^'-N^'-methyl stilbazolium tosylate (DAST), (ii) zinc telluride (ZnTe) crystals, and (iii) gallium phosphide (GaP) crystals. Outputs from two narrowband (Δν<1 MHz, λ˜800 nm) cw titanium-doped sapphire (Ti:Sa) ring lasers with a well-controlled frequency difference were shaped into pulses using acousto-optic modulators, coupled into an optical fiber, pulse amplified in Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sa crystals and used as optical sources to pump the THz nonlinear crystals. The THz radiation was detected over a broad frequency range and its bandwidth was determined to be ˜10 MHz. Absorption spectra of gas phase molecules including HF and OCS using the THz source will be presented.

  20. Narrowband continuous-wave terahertz generation and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolasinski, Brian; Powers, Peter

    2014-03-01

    The output of seeded, dual periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) optical parametric generators (OPG) are combined in the nonlinear crystal 4-dimthylamino-N-methyl-4-stilbazolium-tosylate (DAST) to produce a widely tunable narrowband THz source via difference frequency generation (DFG). We have demonstrated that by employing this type of configuration we are able to tune our system seamlessly, without mode-hops, from 1.5 THz to 21THz with a minimum bandwidth of 3.1 GHz. The bandwidth of the source was measured by using the THz transmission spectrum of water vapor lines over a 3-meter path length. By selecting of the DFG pump wavelength to be at 1380 nm and the signal wavelength to tune over a range from 1380 nm to 1570 nm, we produced several maxima in the output THz spectrum that was dependent on the phase matching ability of the DAST crystal and the efficiency of our pyro-electric detector. Due to the effects of dispersive phase matching, filter absorption of the THz waves, and two-photon absorption multiple band gaps in the overall spectrum occur and are discussed. Employing the dual generator scheme, we have obtained THz images at several locations in the spectrum using an infrared camera that runs at a rate of 35 frames per second. We have demonstrated the ability to image 13 THz to 20 THz under static conditions. We will present images of carbon fibers illuminated at different THz frequencies.

  1. Status and future plans of the Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing (DAST) program. [Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, H. N.

    1981-01-01

    Results from flight tests of the ARW-1 research wing are presented. Preliminary loads data and experiences with the active control system for flutter suppression are included along with comparative results of test and prediction for the flutter boundary of the supercritical research wing and on performance of the flutter suppression system. The status of the ARW-2 research wing is given.

  2. High-power terahertz-wave generation using DAST crystal and detection using mid-infrared powermeter.

    PubMed

    Suizu, Koji; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Yamashita, Tomoyu; Ito, Hiromasa

    2007-10-01

    The exact power output of a table-top-sized terahertz (THz)-wave source using a nonlinear optical process has not been clarified because detectors for these experiments [Si bolometer, deuterated triglycine sulfate (DTGS), etc.] are not calibrated well. On the other hand, powermeters for the mid-infrared (mid-IR) region are well established and calibrated. We constructed a high-power dual-wavelength optical parametric oscillator with two KTP crystals as a light source for difference frequency generation. The obtained powers of dual waves were 21 mJ at ~1300 nm, ten times higher than that of the previous measurement. The device provides high-power THz-wave generation with ~100 times greater output power than that reported in previous works. A well-calibrated mid-IR powermeter at ~27 THz detected the generated THz wave; its measured energy was 2.4 microJ. Although the powermeter had no sensitivity in the lower-frequency range (below 20 THz), the pulse energy at such a low-frequency region was estimated in reference to the output spectrum obtained using a DTGS detector: the energy would be from about the submicrojoule level to a few microjoules in the THz-wave region.

  3. Sorafenib Tosylate, Cisplatin, and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-27

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  4. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms Tumor, Liver Cancer, or Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-14

    Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  5. Sorafenib Tosylate With or Without Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage D Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma

  6. Sorafenib Tosylate and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Unresectable, or Metastatic Gallbladder Cancer or Cholangiocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Extrahepatic Bile Duct Adenocarcinoma; Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma; Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma With Squamous Metaplasia; Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma

  7. Copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative transformation of ketone-derived N-tosyl hydrazones: an entry to alkynes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianwei; Liu, Xiaohang; Chen, Huoji; Wu, Wanqing; Qi, Chaorong; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2014-12-22

    A novel strategy involving Cu-catalyzed oxidative transformation of ketone-derived hydrazone moiety to various synthetic valuable internal alkynes and diynes has been developed. This method features inexpensive metal catalyst, green oxidant, good functional group tolerance, high regioselectivity and readily available starting materials. Oxidative deprotonation reactions were carried out to form internal alkynes and symmetrical diynes. Cross-coupling reactions of hydrazones with halides and terminal alkynes were performed to afford functionalized alkynes and unsymmetrical conjugated diynes. A mechanism proceeding through a Cu-carbene intermediate is proposed for the CC triple bond formation. PMID:25424976

  8. Entinostat and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-18

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  9. Implementation of the DAST ARW II control laws using an 8086 microprocessor and an 8087 floating-point coprocessor. [drones for aeroelasticity research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, G. L.; Berthold, G.; Abbott, L.

    1982-01-01

    A 5 MHZ single-board microprocessor system which incorporates an 8086 CPU and an 8087 Numeric Data Processor is used to implement the control laws for the NASA Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing, Aeroelastic Research Wing II. The control laws program was executed in 7.02 msec, with initialization consuming 2.65 msec and the control law loop 4.38 msec. The software emulator execution times for these two tasks were 36.67 and 61.18, respectively, for a total of 97.68 msec. The space, weight and cost reductions achieved in the present, aircraft control application of this combination of a 16-bit microprocessor with an 80-bit floating point coprocessor may be obtainable in other real time control applications.

  10. Design of a candidate flutter suppression control law for DAST ARW-2. [Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing Aeroelastic Research Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.; Tiffany, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    A control law is developed to suppress symmetric flutter for a mathematical model of an aeroelastic research vehicle. An implementable control law is attained by including modified LQG (linear quadratic Gaussian) design techniques, controller order reduction, and gain scheduling. An alternate (complementary) design approach is illustrated for one flight condition wherein nongradient-based constrained optimization techniques are applied to maximize controller robustness.

  11. Screening for Disinhibited Disorder Cases in a College Population: Performance of the SMAST, DAST, SCID-II-Q, and PDQ-4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jeanette; James, Lisa M.; Bobadilla, Leonardo; Reeves, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders characterized by disinhibition--substance use disorders, antisocial personality disorder (PD), and borderline PD--represent a serious risk to the safety and health of college students. The ability of researchers and clinicians to identify students most at risk for disinhibited disorders associated with campus crime, violence,…

  12. Practical asymmetric synthesis of a potent PDE4 inhibitor via stereoselective enolate alkylation of a chiral aryl-heteroaryl secondary tosylate.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Paul D; Chen, Cheng-yi; Chen, Weirong; Dagneau, Philippe; Frey, Lisa F; Grabowski, Edward J J; Marcantonio, Karen M; Reamer, Robert A; Tan, Lushi; Tillyer, Richard D; Roy, Amélie; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Dalian

    2005-04-15

    A practical, chromatography-free catalytic asymmetric synthesis of a potent and selective PDE4 inhibitor (L-869,298, 1) is described. Catalytic asymmetric hydrogenation of thiazole ketone 5a afforded the corresponding alcohol 3b in excellent enantioselectivity (up to 99.4% ee). Activation of alcohol 3b via formation of the corresponding p-toluenesulfonate followed by an unprecedented displacement with the lithium enolate of ethyl 3-pyridylacetate N-oxide 4a generated the required chiral trisubstituted methane. The displacement reaction proceeded with inversion of configuration and without loss of optical purity. Conversion of esters 2b to 1 was accomplished via a one-pot deprotection, saponification, and decarboxylation sequence in excellent overall yield.

  13. Methyl 2-(2,2,4-trimethyl-6-tosyl­perhydro-1,3-dioxino[5,4-c]pyridin-5-yl)acetate

    PubMed Central

    Selvanayagam, S.; Sridhar, B.; Ravikumar, K.; Kathiravan, S.; Raghunathan, R.

    2009-01-01

    The title compound, C20H29NO6S, crystallizes with two mol­ecules in the asymmetric unit, with similar conformations. The dioxane and pyridine rings adopt twist conformations in both mol­ecules. The packing is stabilized by inter­molecular C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. PMID:21583906

  14. Using the Draw-a-Scientist Test for Inquiry and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miele, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    The Draw-a-Scientist Test (DAST) is a tool to assess stereotypical imagery of scientists. This paper describes the use of the DAST as both a model for inquiry and as a method of assessing the affective domain. The DAST was administered in a science education methods course for undergraduate students of elementary education, a methods course for…

  15. Genetic characterization of a novel astrovirus in Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qinfeng; Liu, Ning; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Fumin; Zhang, Dabing

    2015-06-01

    Three divergent groups of duck astroviruses (DAstVs), namely DAstV-1, DAstV-2 (formerly duck hepatitis virus type 3) and DAstV-3 (isolate CPH), and other avastroviruses are known to infect domestic ducks. To provide more data regarding the molecular epidemiology of astroviruses in domestic ducks, we examined the prevalence of astroviruses in 136 domestic duck samples collected from four different provinces of China. Nineteen goose samples were also included. Using an astrovirus-specific reverse transcription-PCR assay, two groups of astroviruses were detected from our samples. A group of astroviruses detected from Pekin ducks, Shaoxing ducks and Landes geese were highly similar to the newly discovered DAstV-3. More interestingly, a novel group of avastroviruses, which we named DAstV-4, was detected in Pekin ducks. Following full-length sequencing and sequence analysis, the variation between DAstV-4 and other avastroviruses in terms of lengths of genome and internal component was highlighted. Sequence identity and phylogenetic analyses based on the amino acid sequences of the three open reading frames (ORFs) clearly demonstrated that DAstV-4 was highly divergent from all other avastroviruses. Further analyses showed that DAstV-4 shared low levels of genome identities (50-58%) and high levels of mean amino acid genetic distances in the ORF2 sequences (0.520-0.801) with other avastroviruses, suggesting DAstV-4 may represent an additional avastrovirus species although the taxonomic relationship of DAstV-4 to DAstV-3 remains to be resolved. The present works contribute to the understanding of epidemiology, ecology and taxonomy of astroviruses in ducks.

  16. Children's Images of Scientists: Does Grade Level Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozel, Murat

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess children's images of scientists by using the Draw-A-Scientist Test (DAST) and to determine if differences in these images exist between grade levels. The DAST was administered to 243 children who were enrolled in kindergarten (aged 6) and grade 3 and 5 (aged 9 and 11). Findings obtained from the study…

  17. Scientists--Geeks and Nerds?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Thomas E., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates teachers' impressions of stereotypes of scientists and science. Uses the Draw a Scientist Test (DAST) for nonverbal assessment and makes recommendations for strategies to build more realistic and positive images. (Contains 12 references.) (YDS)

  18. 2-Iodoxybenzoic acid organosulfonates: preparation, X-ray structure and reactivity of new, powerful hypervalent iodine(V) oxidants.

    PubMed

    Yusubov, Mekhman S; Svitich, Dmitrii Yu; Yoshimura, Akira; Nemykin, Victor N; Zhdankin, Viktor V

    2013-12-14

    New powerful hypervalent iodine(V) oxidants, tosylate and mesylate derivatives of 2-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX), were prepared by the reaction of IBX with the corresponding sulfonic acids. Single crystal X-ray crystallography of the diacetate derivative of IBX-tosylate revealed an unusual heptacoordinated iodine geometry without any significant intermolecular secondary interactions.

  19. Preparation and structure of drug-carrying biodegradable microspheres designed for transarterial chemoembolization therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujing; Benzina, Abderazak; Molin, Daniel G M; Akker, Nynke van den; Gagliardi, Mick; Koole, Leo H

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable poly(D,L-lactic acid) drug-eluting microspheres containing anti-tumor drugs, cisplatin, and sorafenib tosylate have been prepared by the emulsion solvent evaporation method with diameter between 200 and 400 μm. Scanning electron microscopy showed that cisplatin microspheres had smooth surfaces, while sorafenib tosylate microspheres and cisplatin + sorafenib tosylate microspheres were porous at the surface and the pits of the latter were larger than those of the former. Notably, cisplatin + sorafenib tosylate microspheres had a fast drug release rate compared with microspheres containing one drug alone. In vitro cytotoxicity experiments and classical matrigel endothelial tube assay certificated the maintaining bioactivity of cisplatin and sorafenib tosylate released from the microspheres, respectively. This work provides a useful approach for the fabrication of drug-eluting beads used in transarterial chemoembolization.

  20. 77 FR 10535 - Final Guidances for Industry Describing Product-Specific Bioequivalence Recommendations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... FR 33311), FDA announced the availability of a guidance for industry, ``Bioequivalence... Meprobamate Methotrexate Sodium (multiple RLDs) Methylprednisolone Acetate Metoclopramide HCl N Nadolol... Tosylate T Tamoxifen Citrate Telbivudine Temazepam Terbinafine HCl Toremifene Citrate V Voriconazole...

  1. Estimation of Modal Parameters Using a Wavelet-Based Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, Rick; Brenner, Marty; Haley, Sidney M.

    1997-01-01

    Modal stability parameters are extracted directly from aeroservoelastic flight test data by decomposition of accelerometer response signals into time-frequency atoms. Logarithmic sweeps and sinusoidal pulses are used to generate DAST closed loop excitation data. Novel wavelets constructed to extract modal damping and frequency explicitly from the data are introduced. The so-called Haley and Laplace wavelets are used to track time-varying modal damping and frequency in a matching pursuit algorithm. Estimation of the trend to aeroservoelastic instability is demonstrated successfully from analysis of the DAST data.

  2. Some experiences with active control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Abel, I.

    1981-01-01

    Flight and wind tunnel tests were conducted and multidiscipline computer programs were developed as part of investigations of active control technology conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. Unsteady aerodynamics approximation, optimal control theory, optimal controller design, and the Delta wing and DC-10 models are described. The drones for aerodynamics and structural testing (DAST program) for evaluating procedures for aerodynamic loads prediction and the design of active control systems on wings with significant aeroelastic effects is described as well as the DAST model used in the wind tunnel tests.

  3. Advanced aerodynamics and active controls. Selected NASA research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic and active control concepts for application to commercial transport aircraft are discussed. Selected topics include in flight direct strike lightning research, triply redundant digital fly by wire control systems, tail configurations, winglets, and the drones for aerodynamic and structural testing (DAST) program.

  4. Turkish Primary Students' Perceptions about Scientist and What Factors Affecting the Image of the Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkmen, Hakan

    2008-01-01

    Students' views of science and scientists have been widely studied. The purpose of this study is to analyze image of scientist from drawn picture of scientists using The Draw-a-Scientist Test (DAST) by 5th grade students and to analyze where this image comes from students minds in changing Turkish educational perspective. Two hundred eighty seven…

  5. Perception of the Image of Scientist by Israeli Student Teachers from Two Distinct Communities in Israel: Arabs and Jews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koren, Pazit; Bar, Varda

    2009-01-01

    This is a comparative study of the image of the scientist held by Israeli Jewish and Arabic student teachers from various backgrounds. The image of female scientists among these groups was also investigated. Five groups of female students (N = 500) from four colleges were studied. Traditional tools (DAST) were combined with more informative…

  6. Putting a Human Face on Chemistry: A Project for Liberal Arts Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kriz, George; Popejoy, Kate

    A collaborative project in liberal arts chemistry, involving faculty in chemistry and science education, is described. The project includes various components: an introductory test (DAST) to examine students' perceptions of scientists, a group library research exercise, oral and written presentation of the results of the library research, a…

  7. Scientist-Image Stereotypes: The Relationships among Their Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaçam, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine primary school students' scientist-image stereotypes by considering the relationships among indicators. A total of 877 students attending Grades 6 and 7 in Düzce, Turkey participated in this study. The Draw-A-Scientist Test (DAST) was implemented during the 2013-2014 academic year to determine students' images…

  8. Exploring High-Achieving Students' Images of Mathematicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Mario Sánchez; Rosas, Alejandro; Zavaleta, Juan Gabriel Molina; Romo-Vázquez, Avenilde

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the images that a group of high-achieving Mexican students hold of mathematicians. For this investigation, we used a research method based on the Draw-A-Scientist Test (DAST) with a sample of 63 Mexican high school students. The group of students' pictorial and written descriptions of mathematicians assisted us…

  9. Influence of Scientific Stories on Students Ideas about Science and Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erten, Sinan; Kiray, S. Ahmet; Sen-Gumus, Betul

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether a lesson, in which context-based learning approach and scientific stories were used, changed stereotypical images of students (aged 11-12) about science and scientists. Data was collected from two separate sources: Interviews conducted with six students and Draw a Scientist Test (DAST) document that…

  10. Towards a Clearer Understanding of Students' Ideas about Science and Technology: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Doug; Wheeler, Alan

    1991-01-01

    An alternative procedure to the draw-a-scientist test (DAST) was used to uncover students ideas about science, scientists, and technology. A series of illustrations (based on the interview-about-instances (IAI) procedure) concerned with appearance, gender, work place, and employment were developed. Through interviews, students (n=121) responded to…

  11. Investigating Gifted Middle School Students' Images about Scientists: A Cultural Similarity Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayri, N.; Koksal, M. S.; Ertekin, P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate gifted middle school students' images about scientists in terms of cultural similarity. Sample of the study is 64 gifted middle school students taking courses from a formal school for gifted students. The data were collected by using Draw-a-scientist (DAST) instrument and was analysed by two researchers…

  12. Young Children's Conceptions of Science and Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Tiffany R.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores young children's images of science and scientists, their sources for scientific knowledge, and the nature of their science-related experiences. A cross-sectional design was used to study how students' ideas differ over the first three years of elementary school. A modified version of the Draw-a-Scientist Test (DAST) and a…

  13. Turkish Elementary and Secondary Students' Views about Science and Scientist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akcay, Behiye

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine elementary and secondary students' views concerning science and scientists. Data gathered from Draw-a-Scientist Test (DAST) and essays written by students were used to analyze their views. The study involved 359 students in grades 5 through 11. The results indicate that student's perceived scientists as to be…

  14. Synthesis of GAP and PAMMO Homopolymers from Mesylate Polymeric Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mura, Claudio; Fruci, Stefania; Lamia, Pietro; Cappello, Miriam; Filippi, Sara; Polacco, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    In azidic binders for solid propellants, the N3 functionality is introduced by substitution of a halogen or tosyl group, but recently the mesyl group has been suggested as an alternative. The mesylate group has two advantages, mainly related to its small dimensions and low cost. Poly(glycidyl azide) and poly 3-azidomethyl-3-methyl oxetane were prepared by using both tosylate and mesylate precursors. The azidation kinetics were studied at three different temperatures while keeping all other operating parameters the same. The results confirmed the good potential of the mesylate precursors for the production of azidic binders.

  15. Exploring the Effectiveness of Curriculum Provided Through Transmedia Books for Increasing Students' Knowledge and Interest in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponners, Pamela Jones

    Transmedia books are new and emerging technologies which are beginning to be used in current classrooms. Transmedia books are a traditional printed book that uses multiple media though the use of Quick Response (QR) codes and augmented reality (AR) triggers to access web-based technology. Using the transmedia book Skills That Engage Me students in kindergarten through second grade engage in curriculum designed to introduce science skills and careers. Using the modified Draw-a-Scientist Test (mDAST), observations and interviews, researchers analyzed pre and post data to describe changes students have about science and scientists. Future study may include the development and validation of a new instrument, Draw a Science Student, and examining the mDAST checklist with the intention of updating the parameters of what is considered positive and negative in relationship with work a scientist conducts.

  16. Control law design to meet constraints using SYNPAC-synthesis package for active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.; Tiffany, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Major features of SYNPAC (Synthesis Package for Active Controls) are described. SYNPAC employs constrained optimization techniques which allow explicit inclusion of design criteria (constraints) in the control law design process. Interrelationships are indicated between this constrained optimization approach, classical and linear quadratic Gaussian design techniques. Results are presented that were obtained by applying SYNPAC to the design of a combined stability augmentation/gust load alleviation control law for the DAST ARW-2.

  17. Comparative Methylation of 1,8-Dihydroxy-9,10-Anthraquinone: Chemoselectivity in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sereda, Grigori A.

    2005-01-01

    A study has shown that methylation of 1,8-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (1) with methyl tosylate is highly dependent upon reaction conditions. When the reaction is carried out by a simple heating of the reaction mixture without solvent it yields dimethyl product in a nearly quantitative yield and refluxing the same mixture of reactants in…

  18. Facile synthesis of pyrazole- and benzotriazole-containing selenoethers.

    PubMed

    Potapov, Andrei S; Chernova, Nina P; Ogorodnikov, Vladimir D; Petrenko, Tatiana V; Khlebnikov, Andrei I

    2014-01-01

    Azole-containing selenoethers, 1,5-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-3-selena pentane and 1,3-bis(1,2,3-benzotriazol-1-yl)-2-selena propane were prepared by the reaction of corresponding tosylate or chloride with sodium selenide generated in situ from elemental selenium and sodium formaldehydesulfoxylate (rongalite).

  19. A procedure for the preparation and isolation of nucleoside-5’-diphosphates

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Heidi J; Bolt, Hannah L

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tris[bis(triphenylphosphoranylidene)ammonium] pyrophosphate (PPN pyrophosphate) was used in the SN2 displacements of the tosylate ion from 5’-tosylnucleosides to afford nucleoside-5’-diphosphates. Selective precipitation permitted the direct isolation of nucleoside-5’-diphosphates from crude reaction mixtures. PMID:25977720

  20. Heteroaromatic sulfonates and phosphates as electrophiles in iron-catalyzed cross-couplings.

    PubMed

    Gøgsig, Thomas M; Lindhardt, Anders T; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2009-11-01

    Employment of heteroaromatic tosylates and phosphates as suitable electrophiles in iron-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions with alkyl Grignard reagents is reported. These reactions are performed at low temperature allowing good functional group tolerance and full conversion is achieved within minutes. In addition, an aryl-aryl cross-coupling utilizing a heteroaryl sulfamate electrophile is reported.

  1. The benzyne Fischer-indole reaction.

    PubMed

    McAusland, Donald; Seo, Sangwon; Pintori, Didier G; Finlayson, Jonathan; Greaney, Michael F

    2011-07-15

    A new approach to the Fischer-indole synthesis is reported that uses the reactive intermediate benzyne. The addition of N-tosyl hydrazones to arynes, generated through fluoride activation of 2-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl triflate precursors, leads to efficient N-arylation. Addition of a Lewis acid to the same reaction pot then affords N-tosylindole products via Fischer cyclization.

  2. Traceless labeling of glycoproteins and its application to the study of glycoprotein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yung-Lin; Lee, Yen-Pin; Yang, Yen-Ling; Lin, Po-Chiao

    2014-02-21

    A new chemical method for the traceless labeling of glycoproteins with synthetic boronic acid (BA)-tosyl probes was successfully developed. The BA moiety acts as an affinity head to direct the formation of a cyclic boronate diester with the diol groups of glycans. Following this step, the electrophilic tosyl group is displaced by an SN2 reaction with a nucleophilic residue of the boronated glycoprotein, and finally, a reporter group is tagged onto the glycoprotein via an ether linkage. In the presence of polyols, a competition reaction recovers the native glycan of the tagged glycoprotein, conserving its biological significance. The BA-tosyl probes were used successfully for the specific labeling of glycosylated fetuins in a mixed protein pool and from crude Escherichia coli (E. coli) lysate. Further, a BA-tosyl-functionalized glass slide was used to fabricate glycoprotein microarrays with highly conserved glycans. By interacting with various lectins (carbohydrate-binding proteins), such as Concanavalin A (Con A) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), the types of carbohydrates and specific linkages of glycoproteins (α or β) could be systematically monitored. It is believed that the newly developed method will greatly accelerate the understanding of glycoproteins.

  3. Nickel-catalyzed decarboxylative cross-coupling of perfluorobenzoates with aryl halides and sulfonates.

    PubMed

    Sardzinski, Logan W; Wertjes, William C; Schnaith, Abigail M; Kalyani, Dipannita

    2015-03-01

    A Ni-catalyzed method for the coupling of perfluorobenzoates with aryl halides and pseudohalides is described. Aryl iodides, bromides, chlorides, triflates, and tosylates participate in these transformations to afford the products in good yields. Penta-, tetra-, and trifluorinated biaryl compounds are obtained using these newly developed Ni-catalyzed decarboxylative cross-coupling reactions.

  4. REVISITING CLASSICAL NUCLEOPHILIC SUBSTITUTIONS IN AQUEOUS MEDIUM: MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESIS OF ALKYL AZIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An efficient and clean synthesis of alkyl azides using microwave (MW) radiation is described in aqueous medium by reacting alkyl halides or tosylates with alkali azides. This general and expeditious MW-enhanced approach to nucleophilic substitution reactions is applicable to the ...

  5. An efficient, selective, and reducing agent-free copper catalyst for the atom-transfer radical addition of halo compounds to activated olefins.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Molina, José María; Belderraín, Tomás R; Pérez, Pedro J

    2010-01-18

    Efficient and selective ATRA reactions of CCl(4), CBr(4), TsCl (Ts = tosyl), or Cl(3)CCO(2)Et with activated olefins (styrene, methyl methacrylate, n-butyl methacrylate, tert-butyl methacrylate) using the Tp(tBu)Cu(NCMe) complex as a catalyst have been achieved in the absence of any reductant and with low catalyst loadings.

  6. Selective synthesis of eight-membered cyclic ureas by the [6 + 2] cycloaddition reaction of 2-vinylazetidines and electron-deficient isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Koya, Shunsuke; Yamanoi, Kenichi; Yamasaki, Ryu; Azumaya, Isao; Masu, Hyuma; Saito, Shinichi

    2009-12-01

    The [6 + 2] cycloaddition reaction of 2-vinylazetidines with electron-deficient isocyanates such as tosyl isocyanate proceeded smoothly in the absence of the catalyst at room temperature, and various cyclic ureas were isolated in good to high yields. Electron-deficient allenes also reacted with the 2-vinylazetidine, and the corresponding azocine derivatives were isolated.

  7. Synthesis and Antiplasmodial Evaluation of Analogues Based on the Tricyclic Core of Thiaplakortones A–D

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Brett D.; Coster, Mark J.; Skinner-Adams, Tina S.; Andrews, Katherine T.; White, Jonathan M.; Davis, Rohan A.

    2015-01-01

    Six regioisomers associated with the tricyclic core of thiaplakortones A–D have been synthesized. Reaction of 1H-indole-4,7-dione and 1-tosyl-1H-indole-4,7-dione with 2-aminoethanesulfinic acid afforded a regioisomeric series, which was subsequently deprotected and oxidized to yield the tricyclic core scaffolds present in the thiaplakortones. All compounds were fully characterized using NMR and MS data. A single crystal X-ray structure was obtained on one of the N-tosyl derivatives. All compounds were screened for in vitro antiplasmodial activity against chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) and multidrug-resistant (Dd2) Plasmodium falciparum parasite lines. Several analogues displayed potent inhibition of P. falciparum growth (IC50 < 500 nM) but only moderate selectivity for P. falciparum versus human neonatal foreskin fibroblast cells. PMID:26389920

  8. Macrocyclic lactones: A versatile source for omega radiohalogenated fatty acid analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Dougan, A.H.; Lyster, D.M.; Robertson, K.A.; Vincent, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    For each omega halogenated fatty acid there exists a potential omega hydroxy fatty acid and the corresponding macrocyclic lactone. The authors have utilized such lactones as starting materials for omega /sup 123/I fatty acid analogs intended for myocardial imaging. Macrocyclic musk lactones are industrially available; 120 analogs are described in the literature. The preparation requires saponification, tosylation, and radio-iodide substitution. Iodo-fatty acids are readily separated from tosylate fatty acids on TLC. While providing a secure source of 16-iodo-hexadecanoic acid and 17-iodo-heptadecanoic acid, the scheme allows ready access to a large number of untried fatty acid analogs. Examples presented are 16-iodo-hexadecanoic acid, 16-iodo-7-hexadecanoic acid, 16-iodo-12-oxa-hexadecanoic acid, 15-iodo-pentadecanoic acid, and 15-iodo-12-keto-pentadecanoic acid. Metabolic studies are in progress in mice and dogs to assess the utility of these analogs for myocardial imaging.

  9. Synthesis and Antiplasmodial Evaluation of Analogues Based on the Tricyclic Core of Thiaplakortones A-D.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Brett D; Coster, Mark J; Skinner-Adams, Tina S; Andrews, Katherine T; White, Jonathan M; Davis, Rohan A

    2015-09-01

    Six regioisomers associated with the tricyclic core of thiaplakortones A-D have been synthesized. Reaction of 1H-indole-4,7-dione and 1-tosyl-1H-indole-4,7-dione with 2-aminoethanesulfinic acid afforded a regioisomeric series, which was subsequently deprotected and oxidized to yield the tricyclic core scaffolds present in the thiaplakortones. All compounds were fully characterized using NMR and MS data. A single crystal X-ray structure was obtained on one of the N-tosyl derivatives. All compounds were screened for in vitro antiplasmodial activity against chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) and multidrug-resistant (Dd2) Plasmodium falciparum parasite lines. Several analogues displayed potent inhibition of P. falciparum growth (IC50 < 500 nM) but only moderate selectivity for P. falciparum versus human neonatal foreskin fibroblast cells. PMID:26389920

  10. Crystal structure of high-spin tetra­aqua­bis­(2-chloro­pyrazine-κN 4)iron(II) bis­(4-methyl­benzene­sulfonate)

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Bohdan O.; Shylin, Sergii I.; Dechert, Sebastian; Malysheva, Maria L.; Gural‘skiy, Il‘ya A.

    2015-01-01

    The title salt, [FeII(C4H3ClN2)2(H2O)4](C7H7O3S)2, contains a complex cation with point group symmetry 2/m. The high-spin FeII cation is hexa­coordinated by four symmetry-related water and two N-bound 2-chloro­pyrazine mol­ecules in a trans arrangement, forming a distorted FeN2O4 octa­hedron. The three-dimensional supra­molecular structure is supported by inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the complex cations and tosyl­ate anions, and additional π–π inter­actions between benzene and pyrazine rings. The methyl H atoms of the tosyl­ate anion are equally disordered over two positions. PMID:26279865

  11. Chick-Erythrocyte Nucleus Reactivation in Heterokaryons: Suppression by Inhibitors of Proteolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Chelmicka-Szorc, Ewa; Arnason, Barry G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Reactivation of chick-erythrocyte nuclei in heterokaryons (obtained by Sendai virus-induced fusion of chick erythrocytes with HeLa cells) is suppressed by specific inhibitors of trypsin and trypsin-like enzymes. N-α-tosyl-L-lysyl-chloromethane and N-α-tosyl-L-arginine methylester inhibit erythrocyte nuclear enlargement and suppress RNA and DNA synthesis in nuclei of erythrocytes and HeLa cells in heterokaryons at concentrations that only minimally influence individual HeLa cells or HeLa homokaryons. Although other unknown mechanisms of action cannot be formally excluded, the data are interpreted as fitting best with an intracellular site of action of the protease inhibitors studied, and as suggesting a role for cellular proteases in reactivation of chick-erythrocyte nuclei in heterokaryons. PMID:4522779

  12. Synthesis of sulfonate analogs of bile acids.

    PubMed

    Kihira, K; Mikami, T; Ikawa, S; Okamoto, A; Yoshii, M; Miki, S; Mosbach, E H; Hoshita, T

    1992-04-01

    Sulfonate analogs of C23 and C24 bile acids were synthesized from norcholic, norchenodeoxycholic, norursodeoxycholic, nordeoxycholic, norhyodeoxycholic, cholic, deoxycholic, hyodeoxycholic, and lithocholic acids. The principal reactions used were (1) reduction of the bile acids with NaBH4 to the corresponding bile alcohols, (2) selective tosylation of the terminal hydroxyl group, (3) iodination of the tosyl esters with NaI, and (4) treatment of the iodides with Na2SO3 to form the sulfonate analogs of the bile acids. The sulfonate analogs showed polarity similar to that of taurine-conjugated bile acids on thin-layer chromatography. The carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectral data for the sulfonate analogs were tabulated.

  13. A New Green Ionic Liquid-Based Corrosion Inhibitor for Steel in Acidic Environments.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; El-Mahdy, Gamal A; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Ezzat, Abdel Rahman O

    2015-06-17

    This work examines the use of new hydrophobic ionic liquid derivatives, namely octadecylammonium tosylate (ODA-TS) and oleylammonium tosylate (OA-TS) for corrosion protection of steel in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution. Their chemical structures were determined from NMR analyses. The surface activity characteristics of the prepared ODA-TS and OA-TS were evaluated from conductance, surface tension and contact angle measurements. The data indicate the presence of a double bond in the chemical structure of OA-TS modified its surface activity parameters. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements, scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) analysis and contact angle measurements were utilized to investigate the corrosion protection performance of ODA-TS and OA-TS on steel in acidic solution. The OA-TS and ODA-TS compounds showed good protection performance in acidic chloride solution due to formation of an inhibitive film on the steel surface.

  14. Selective Inhibition of the Synthesis of Sindbis Virion Proteins by an Inhibitor of Chymotrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferkorn, E. R.; Boyle, Mary K.

    1972-01-01

    Treatment of chick embryo fibroblasts infected with Sindbis virus with TPCK, the choloromethyl ketone derivative of tosyl-phenylalanine and an inhibitor of chymotrypsin, resulted in reduced synthesis of viral structural proteins and the accumulation of a high-molecular-weight polypeptide, thought to be a precursor. The analogous inhibitor of trypsin, TLCK, the chloromethyl ketone derivative of tosyllysine, had no such effect. PMID:5061988

  15. Growth and electrical properties on NLO crystal: 4-N,N-dimethylamino 4′-N′-methylstilbazolium iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M. Krishna Sudhahar, S. Kumar, R. Mohan

    2014-04-24

    4-N,N-Dimethylamino-4′-N′-methylstilbazolium tosylate single crystals were grown by solution crystal growth method. The cell parameters of grown crystal have been estimated using single crystal-X-ray diffraction analysis. The variation of real (´ε) and imaginary (´ε) part of dielectric constants and dielectric loss were observed for different frequencies and temperatures. The ac and dc electrical conductivities and activation energy were determined for DMSI crystal using dielectric studies.

  16. 1-Benzyl-2,5-diphenyl-3-tosylimidazol­idin-4-one

    PubMed Central

    Sakthimurugesan, K.; Ranjith, S.; SubbiahPandi, A.; Namitharan, K.; Pitchumani, K.

    2011-01-01

    In the title compound, C29H26N2O3S, the central imidazolidine ring adopts an envelope conformation with the N atom bearing the benzyl ring at the flap. The S atom has distorted tetra­hedral geometry. The benzyl and tosyl rings are oriented at a dihedral angle of 52.1 (1)°. The phenyl rings connected to the imidazolidine ring form a dihedral angle of 28.7 (1)°. PMID:22058970

  17. Phenol Derivatives as Coupling Partners with Alkylsilicates in Photoredox/Nickel Dual Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Niki R; Molander, Gary A

    2016-08-19

    Photoredox/nickel dual catalysis via single electron transmetalation allows coupling of Csp(3)-Csp(2) hybridized centers under mild conditions. A procedure for the coupling of electron-deficient aryl triflates, -tosylates, and -mesylates with alkylbis(catecholato)silicates is presented. This method represents the first example of the use of phenol derivatives as electrophilic coupling partners in photoredox/nickel dual catalysis. PMID:27258090

  18. Analyzing prospective teachers' images of scientists using positive, negative and stereotypical images of scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan; Esprívalo Harrell, Pamela; Wojnowski, David

    2013-04-01

    Background and purpose : This study details the use of a conceptual framework to analyze prospective teachers' images of scientists to reveal their context-specific conceptions of scientists. The conceptual framework consists of context-specific conceptions related to positive, stereotypical and negative images of scientists as detailed in the literature on the images, role and work of scientists. Sample, design and method : One hundred and ninety-six drawings of scientists, generated by prospective teachers, were analyzed using the Draw-A-Scientist-Test Checklist (DAST-C), a binary linear regression and the conceptual framework. Results : The results of the binary linear regression analysis revealed a statistically significant difference for two DAST-C elements: ethnicity differences with regard to drawing a scientist who was Caucasian and gender differences for indications of danger. Analysis using the conceptual framework helped to categorize the same drawings into positive, stereotypical, negative and composite images of a scientist. Conclusions : The conceptual framework revealed that drawings were focused on the physical appearance of the scientist, and to a lesser extent on the equipment, location and science-related practices that provided the context of a scientist's role and work. Implications for teacher educators include the need to understand that there is a need to provide tools, like the conceptual framework used in this study, to help prospective teachers to confront and engage with their multidimensional perspectives of scientists in light of the current trends on perceiving and valuing scientists. In addition, teacher educators need to use the conceptual framework, which yields qualitative perspectives about drawings, together with the DAST-C, which yields quantitative measure for drawings, to help prospective teachers to gain a holistic outlook on their drawings of scientists.

  19. Korean Elementary School Students' Perceptions of Earth Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Lee, H.; Oh, P.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the elementary school students' perceptions of earth-scientists while a number of previous studies focused on elementary school students’ perceptions of general scientists. A modified DAST and DAST-C were administered to 138 fourth graders (68 boys and 70 girls) from an elementary school in Northern Gyeonggi province, Korea. Four students were selected for each of four categories of the DAST-C items, and semi-structured interviews were conducted with a total of 16 students. Significant differences in the students’ perceptions of earth-scientists and general scientists were found concerning lab coats (.254), study symbols (.116), secret marks (.007), and indoor studies (.333). Moreover, while in previous studies only 9% of students indicated that scientists worked together, 29.7% of elementary school students believed that earth scientists worked in groups. The interviews with four students revealed details of their perceptions. First, the students thought that the objects of earth scientific research developed for a long time period and that the research was usually carried out outdoors because earth scientists studied strata and fossils. Second, the students considered ‘observing’ and ‘reporting’ (meaning describing) the main skills in earth science. Their perceptions of research questions in earth science were also limited to, for example, the formation and the types of fossils and strata. Third, the students believed that earth scientists were mostly young because they had to travel around the world to find something. Fourth and lastly, although the students viewed earth science as dangerous, they described earth scientists with incomplete safety equipment. It is concluded that Korean elementary school students have perceptions of earth scientists which reflect some aspects of the nature of earth science and that it is necessary in elementary school science to consider these perceptions.

  20. K-12 Students' Perceptions of Scientists: Finding a valid measurement and exploring whether exposure to scientists makes an impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Susan J.; Bloodsworth, Kylie H.; Tilburg, Charles E.; Zeeman, Stephan I.; List, Henrietta E.

    2014-10-01

    This study was launched from a National Science Foundation GK-12 grant in which graduate fellows in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) are placed in classrooms to engage K-12 students in STEM activities. The investigation explored whether the STEM Fellows' presence impacted the K-12 students' stereotypical image of a scientist. Since finding a valid instrument is critical, the study involved (1) determining the validity of the commonly administered Draw-A-Scientist Test (DAST) against a newly designed six-question survey and (2) using a combination of both instruments to determine what stereotypes are currently held by children. A pretest-posttest design was used on 485 students, grades 3-11, attending 6 different schools in suburban and rural Maine communities. A significant but low positive correlation was found between the DAST and the survey; therefore, it is imperative that the DAST not be used alone, but corroboration with interviews or survey questions should occur. Pretest results revealed that the children held common stereotypes of scientists, but these stereotypes were neither as extensive nor did they increase with the grade level as past research has indicated, suggesting that a shift has occurred with children having a broader concept of who a scientist can be. Finally, the presence of an STEM Fellow corresponded with decreased stereotypes in middle school and high school, but no change in elementary age children. More research is needed to determine whether this reflects resiliency in elementary children's perceptions or limitations in either drawing or in writing out their responses.

  1. Oxime derivatives with larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti L.

    PubMed

    Lima, Tamires Cardoso; Santos, Sandra Regina Lima; Uliana, Marciana P; Santos, Roseli La Corte; Brocksom, Timothy John; Cavalcanti, Sócrates Cabral de Holanda; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino

    2015-08-01

    Oximes containing secondary metabolites constitute an important group of bioactive compounds and have been described and frequently updated in the literature due to their pharmacological properties. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the larvicidal activity of a series of fourteen structurally related [1,4]-Benzoquinone mono-oximes on third-instar Aedes aegypti larvae and to investigate structure-activity relationships (SAR) of these compounds. Results of larvicidal assay revealed that all oximes were found to have larvicidal activity. Compound 2,6-dimethyl-[1,4]-benzoquinone oxime tosylate (11) was the most bioactive (LC50 = 9.858 ppm), followed by 2-methyl-[1,4]-benzoquinone oxime tosylate (9) (LC50 = 14.450 ppm). [1,4]-benzoquinone oxime (1) exhibited the lowest potency, with an LC50 = 121.181 ppm. The molecular characteristics which may help to understand the assayed compounds larvicidal activity were identified. SAR indicates that the addition of alkyl groups attached to the ring, number, position in the unsaturated cyclic structure, and size of these groups influence the larvicidal activity. Moreover, the lipophilicity seems to play an important role in increasing the larvicidal effect, because, in general, tosyl-containing products were more potent than products containing free OH. PMID:25956398

  2. Oxime derivatives with larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti L.

    PubMed

    Lima, Tamires Cardoso; Santos, Sandra Regina Lima; Uliana, Marciana P; Santos, Roseli La Corte; Brocksom, Timothy John; Cavalcanti, Sócrates Cabral de Holanda; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino

    2015-08-01

    Oximes containing secondary metabolites constitute an important group of bioactive compounds and have been described and frequently updated in the literature due to their pharmacological properties. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the larvicidal activity of a series of fourteen structurally related [1,4]-Benzoquinone mono-oximes on third-instar Aedes aegypti larvae and to investigate structure-activity relationships (SAR) of these compounds. Results of larvicidal assay revealed that all oximes were found to have larvicidal activity. Compound 2,6-dimethyl-[1,4]-benzoquinone oxime tosylate (11) was the most bioactive (LC50 = 9.858 ppm), followed by 2-methyl-[1,4]-benzoquinone oxime tosylate (9) (LC50 = 14.450 ppm). [1,4]-benzoquinone oxime (1) exhibited the lowest potency, with an LC50 = 121.181 ppm. The molecular characteristics which may help to understand the assayed compounds larvicidal activity were identified. SAR indicates that the addition of alkyl groups attached to the ring, number, position in the unsaturated cyclic structure, and size of these groups influence the larvicidal activity. Moreover, the lipophilicity seems to play an important role in increasing the larvicidal effect, because, in general, tosyl-containing products were more potent than products containing free OH.

  3. Application of a flight test and data analysis technique to flutter of a drone aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    Modal identification results presented were obtained from recent flight flutter tests of a drone vehicle with a research wing (DAST ARW-1 for Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing, Aeroelastic Research Wing-1). This vehicle is equipped with an active flutter suppression system (FSS). Frequency and damping of several modes are determined by a time domain modal analysis of the impulse response function obtained by Fourier transformations of data from fast swept sine wave excitation by the FSS control surface on the wing. Flutter points are determined for two different altitudes with the FSS off. Data are given for near the flutter boundary with the FSS on.

  4. Real-time flutter analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R.; Gupta, N.

    1984-01-01

    The important algorithm issues necessary to achieve a real time flutter monitoring system; namely, the guidelines for choosing appropriate model forms, reduction of the parameter convergence transient, handling multiple modes, the effect of over parameterization, and estimate accuracy predictions, both online and for experiment design are addressed. An approach for efficiently computing continuous-time flutter parameter Cramer-Rao estimate error bounds were developed. This enables a convincing comparison of theoretical and simulation results, as well as offline studies in preparation for a flight test. Theoretical predictions, simulation and flight test results from the NASA Drones for Aerodynamic and Structural Test (DAST) Program are compared.

  5. Revisiting the one leptoquark solution to the R( D (∗)) anomalies and its phenomenological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Qiang; Yang, Ya-Dong; Zhang, Xin

    2016-08-01

    It has been shown recently that the anomalies observed in overline{B}to {D}^{(*)}τ {overline{ν}}_{τ } and overline{B}to overline{K}{ℓ}+{ℓ}- decays could be resolved with just one scalar leptoquark. Fitting to the current data on R( D(∗)) along with acceptable q 2 distributions in overline{B}to {D}^{(ast )}τ {overline{ν}}_{τ } decays, four best-fit solutions for the operator coefficients have been found. In this paper, we explore the possibilities of how to discriminate these four solutions. Firstly, we find that two of them are already excluded by the decay {B}_c-to {τ}-{overline{ν}}_{τ } , because the predicted decay widths have already overshot the total width Γ Bc . It is then found that the remaining two solutions result in two effective Hamiltonians governing bto cτ {overline{ν}}_{τ } transition, which differ by a sign and enhance the absolute value of the coefficient of {overline{c}}_L{γ}_{μ }{b}_L{overline{τ}}_L{γ}^{μ }{ν}_{τ L} operator by about 12%. However, they give nearly the same predictions as in the SM for the D ∗ and τ longitudinal polarizations as well as the lepton forward-backward asymmetries in overline{B}to {D}^{(ast )}τ {overline{ν}}_{τ } decays. For the other observables like {B}({B}_c-to {τ}-{overline{ν}}_{τ}),{B}({B}_c-to γ {τ}-{overline{ν}}_{τ}),{R}_{D(ast )}({q}^2), d{B}(overline{B}to {D}^{(ast )}τ {overline{ν}}_{τ})/d{q}^2 and {B}({B}_c-to {X}_3τ {overline{ν}}_{τ}) , on the other hand, the two solutions give sizable enhancements relative to the SM predictions. With measurement of {B}_c-to {τ}-{overline{ν}}_{τ } at LHCb and refined measurements of observables in overline{B}to {D}^{(ast )}τ {overline{ν}}_{τ } at both LHCb and Belle-II, such a specific NP scenario could be further deciphered.

  6. Development of an ultra-widely tunable DFG-THz source with switching between organic nonlinear crystals pumped with a dual-wavelength BBO optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Notake, Takashi; Nawata, Kouji; Kawamata, Hiroshi; Matsukawa, Takeshi; Qi, Feng; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2012-11-01

    We developed a difference frequency generation (DFG) source with an organic nonlinear optical crystal of DAST or BNA selectively excited by a dual-wavelength β-BaB(2)O(4) optical parametric oscillator (BBO-OPO). The dual-wavelength BBO-OPO can independently oscillate two lights with different wavelengths from 800 to 1800 nm in a cavity. THz-wave generation by using each organic crystal covers ultrawide range from 1 to 30 THz with inherent intensity dips by crystal absorption modes. The reduced outputs can be improved by switching over the crystals with adequately tuned pump wavelengths of the BBO-OPO.

  7. Synthesis of active controls for flutter suppression on a flight research wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Perry, B., III; Murrow, H. N.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes some activities associated with the preliminary design of an active control system for flutter suppression capable of demonstrating a 20% increase in flutter velocity. Results from two control system synthesis techniques are given. One technique uses classical control theory, and the other uses an 'aerodynamic energy method' where control surface rates or displacements are minimized. Analytical methods used to synthesize the control systems and evaluate their performance are described. Some aspects of a program for flight testing the active control system are also given. This program, called DAST (Drones for Aerodynamics and Structural Testing), employs modified drone-type vehicles for flight assessments and validation testing.

  8. Khat (Catha edulis Forsk.) Dependence Potential and Pattern of Use in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Alsanosy, Rashad Mohammed; Rahim, Bahaa-eldin E. A.; Mohan, Syam; Taha, Sara; Mohamed Elhassan, Manal; El-Setouhy, Maged

    2015-01-01

    Background. Catha edulis Forsk. (Khat) is used for its psychoactive effects among people in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, although its utilization is illegal in some countries such as Saudi Arabia. This study examined the pattern of Khat use and assessed the applicability of the Drug Abuse Screening Test-10 (DAST-10) to measure Khat dependence. Methods. A pretested questionnaire was used to gather data from 603 respondents. Variables included demographic characteristics, pattern of use, reasons for Khat chewing, and DAST-10. Stepwise-logistic regression was used to explore predictors of Khat dependence. Results. The majority of the respondents were married, had a secondary school level of education, were employed, were younger than 35 years old, and were living in rural areas. Many chewers gave more than one reason for using Khat. It was mainly used to increase mental capacity, physical strength, and social entertainment, as well as enhance cheerfulness and orgasms. Statistical modeling of Khat dependence suggested that the most significant predictors were residence (OR = 1.67, P < 0.02), frequency of Khat chewing (OR = 4.8, P < 0.01), age of starting Khat chewing (OR = 1.15, P < 0.01), and time of Khat effect (OR = 1.15, P < 0.04). Conclusion. Our study provides important information on the pattern of Khat use and its potential to cause dependence. PMID:26380288

  9. Synthesis, structure, and biological applications of α-fluorinated β-amino acids and derivatives.

    PubMed

    March, Taryn L; Johnston, Martin R; Duggan, Peter J; Gardiner, James

    2012-11-01

    This review gives a broad overview of the state of play with respect to the synthesis, conformational properties, and biological activity of α-fluorinated β-amino acids and derivatives. General methods are described for the preparation of monosubstituted α-fluoro-β-amino acids (Scheme 1). Nucleophilic methods for the introduction of fluorine predominantly involve the reaction of DAST with alcohols derived from α-amino acids, whereas electrophilic sources of fluorine such as NFSI have been used in conjunction with Arndt-Eistert homologation, conjugate addition or organocatalyzed Mannich reactions. α,α-Difluoro-β-amino acids have also been prepared using DAST; however, this area of synthesis is largely dominated by the use of difluorinated Reformatsky reagents to introduce the difluoro ester functionality (Scheme 9). α-Fluoro-β-amino acids and derivatives analyzed by X-ray crystal and NMR solution techniques are found to adopt preferred conformations which are thought to result from stereoelectronic effects associated with F located close to amines, amides, and esters (Figs. 2-6). α-Fluoro amide and β-fluoro ethylamide/amine effects can influence the secondary structure of α-fluoro-β-amino acid-containing derivatives including peptides and peptidomimetics (Figs. 7-9). α-Fluoro-β-amino acids are also components of a diverse range of bioactive anticancer (e.g., 5-fluorouracil), antifungal, and antiinsomnia agents as well as protease inhibitors where such fluorinated analogs have shown increased potency and spectrum of activity.

  10. Racial identity development & perceptions of scientists of Black college students in science and non-science majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomillion, Crystall Sharee

    The focus of this research was to evaluate if differences exist in the racial identity profiles and perceptions of scientists held by 48 Black college students majoring in science (n = 17) and non-science (n = 31) fields. The study was conducted at a large, predominantly White university located in the south. All participants completed the Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) and Draw-a-Scientist Test (DAST); measures used to assess six subscales of individuals' racial identity development (RID) and 16 stereotypical conceptions of scientists respectively. Fourteen volunteers also completed one-on-one interviews with the researcher to discuss information that would elucidate their responses to survey instruments. Findings from the CRIS revealed that significant differences did not exist in the science majors' and non-science majors' racial identity profiles. Both groups expressed strongest agreement with views reflected in Internalization Multiculturalist Inclusive (IMCI) and Pre-Encounter Miseducation (PM) subscales. Conversely, the science majors and non-science majors exhibited least agreement with attitudes depicted in Immersion-Emersion Anti-White (IEAW) and Pre-Encounter Self-Hatred (PSH) subscales. Results from the DAST demonstrated that both groups illustrated similar perceptions of scientists as observed by an average of four of the 16 stereotypes expressed in their images.

  11. Chelating ionic liquids for reversible zinc electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kar, Mega; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn; Forsyth, Maria; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2013-05-21

    Advanced, high energy-density, metal-air rechargeable batteries, such as zinc-air, are of intense international interest due to their important role in energy storage applications such as electric and hybrid vehicles, and to their ability to deal with the intermittency of renewable energy sources such as solar and wind. Ionic liquids offer a number of ideal thermal and physical properties as potential electrolytes in such large-scale energy storage applications. We describe here the synthesis and characterisation of a family of novel "chelating" ILs designed to chelate and solubilize the zinc ions to create electrolytes for this type of battery. These are based on quaternary alkoxy alkyl ammonium cations of varying oligo-ether side chains and anions such as p-toluene sulfonate, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and dicyanoamides. This work shows that increasing the ether chain length in the cation from two to four oxygens can increase the ionic conductivity and reduce the melting point from 67 °C to 15 °C for the tosylate system. Changing the anion also plays a significant role in the nature of the zinc deposition electrochemistry. We show that zinc can be reversibly deposited from [N(222(20201))][NTf2] and [N(222(202020201))][NTf2] beginning at -1.4 V and -1.7 V vs. SHE, respectively, but not in the case of tosylate based ILs. This indicates that the [NTf2] is a weaker coordinating anion with the zinc cation, compared to the tosylate anion, allowing the coordination of the ether chain to dominate the behavior of the deposition and stripping of zinc ions. PMID:23558696

  12. Transition-metal-catalyzed direct arylation of (hetero)arenes by C-H bond cleavage.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Lutz; Vicente, Rubén; Kapdi, Anant R

    2009-01-01

    The area of transition-metal-catalyzed direct arylation through cleavage of C-H bonds has undergone rapid development in recent years, and is becoming an increasingly viable alternative to traditional cross-coupling reactions with organometallic reagents. In particular, palladium and ruthenium catalysts have been described that enable the direct arylation of (hetero)arenes with challenging coupling partners--including electrophilic aryl chlorides and tosylates as well as simple arenes in cross-dehydrogenative arylations. Furthermore, less expensive copper, iron, and nickel complexes were recently shown to be effective for economically attractive direct arylations.

  13. Silver-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Radical Azidation of Aliphatic Carboxylic Acids in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Xiaoqing; Li, Zhaodong; Cui, Lei; Li, Chaozhong

    2015-08-12

    We report herein an efficient and general method for the decarboxylative azidation of aliphatic carboxylic acids. Thus, with AgNO3 as the catalyst and K2S2O8 as the oxidant, the reactions of various aliphatic carboxylic acids with tosyl azide or pyridine-3-sulfonyl azide in aqueous CH3CN solution afforded the corresponding alkyl azides under mild conditions. A broad substrate scope and wide functional group compatibility were observed. A radical mechanism is proposed for this site-specific azidation.

  14. An Umpolung Strategy for the Synthesis of β-Aminoketones via Copper-Catalyzed Electrophilic Amination of Cyclopropanols.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhishi; Dai, Mingji

    2015-05-01

    A novel copper-catalyzed electrophilic amination of cyclopropanols with O-benzoyl-N,N-dialkylhydroxylamines to synthesize various β-aminoketones via a sequence that includes C-C bond cleavage and Csp(3)-N bond formation is reported. The reaction conditions are mild and tolerate a wide range of functional groups including benzoate, tosylate, expoxide, and α,β-unsaturated carbonyls, which are incompatible in the traditional amine nucleophilic conjugate addition and the Mannich reaction conditions. Preliminary mechanistic studies and a proposed catalytic cycle of this umpolung β-aminoketone synthesis process have been described as well. PMID:25885943

  15. Azidated Ether-Butadiene-Ether Block Copolymers as Binders for Solid Propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappello, Miriam; Lamia, Pietro; Mura, Claudio; Polacco, Giovanni; Filippi, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Polymeric binders for solid propellants are usually based on hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), which does not contribute to the overall energy output. Azidic polyethers represent an interesting alternative but may have poorer mechanical properties. Polybutadiene-polyether copolymers may combine the advantages of both. Four different ether-butadiene-ether triblock copolymers were prepared and azidated starting from halogenated and/or tosylated monomers using HTPB as initiator. The presence of the butadiene block complicates the azidation step and reduces the storage stability of the azidic polymer. Nevertheless, the procedure allows modifying the binder properties by varying the type and lengths of the energetic blocks.

  16. One-pot, three-component approach to the synthesis of 3,4,5-trisubstituted pyrazoles.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ahmed; Sastry, K N Visweswara; Chandrasekhar, D; Mani, Geeta Sai; Adiyala, Praveen Reddy; Nanubolu, Jagadeesh Babu; Singarapu, Kiran Kumar; Maurya, Ram Awatar

    2015-05-01

    An operationally simple and high yielding protocol for the synthesis of polyfunctional pyrazoles has been developed through one-pot, three-component coupling of aldehydes, 1,3-dicarbonyls, and diazo compounds as well as tosyl hydrazones. The reaction proceeds through a tandem Knoevenagel condensation, 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition, and transition metal-free oxidative aromatization reaction sequence utilizing molecular oxygen as a green oxidant. The scope of the reaction was studied by varying the aldehyde, 1,3-dicarbonyl, and diazo component individually. PMID:25849582

  17. An Umpolung Strategy for the Synthesis of β-Aminoketones via Copper-Catalyzed Electrophilic Amination of Cyclopropanols.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhishi; Dai, Mingji

    2015-05-01

    A novel copper-catalyzed electrophilic amination of cyclopropanols with O-benzoyl-N,N-dialkylhydroxylamines to synthesize various β-aminoketones via a sequence that includes C-C bond cleavage and Csp(3)-N bond formation is reported. The reaction conditions are mild and tolerate a wide range of functional groups including benzoate, tosylate, expoxide, and α,β-unsaturated carbonyls, which are incompatible in the traditional amine nucleophilic conjugate addition and the Mannich reaction conditions. Preliminary mechanistic studies and a proposed catalytic cycle of this umpolung β-aminoketone synthesis process have been described as well.

  18. Iron-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling of Alkenyl Acetates.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Dominik; Stein, André Luiz; Grupe, Sabine; Arp, Johannes; Jacobi von Wangelin, Axel

    2015-09-01

    Stable C-O linkages are generally unreactive in cross-coupling reactions which mostly employ more electrophilic halides or activated esters (triflates, tosylates). Acetates are cheap and easily accessible electrophiles but have not been used in cross-couplings because the strong C-O bond and high propensity to engage in unwanted acetylation and deprotonation. Reported herein is a selective iron-catalyzed cross-coupling of diverse alkenyl acetates, and it operates under mild reaction conditions (0 °C, 2 h) with a ligand-free catalyst (1-2 mol%). PMID:26184455

  19. One-pot, three-component approach to the synthesis of 3,4,5-trisubstituted pyrazoles.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ahmed; Sastry, K N Visweswara; Chandrasekhar, D; Mani, Geeta Sai; Adiyala, Praveen Reddy; Nanubolu, Jagadeesh Babu; Singarapu, Kiran Kumar; Maurya, Ram Awatar

    2015-05-01

    An operationally simple and high yielding protocol for the synthesis of polyfunctional pyrazoles has been developed through one-pot, three-component coupling of aldehydes, 1,3-dicarbonyls, and diazo compounds as well as tosyl hydrazones. The reaction proceeds through a tandem Knoevenagel condensation, 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition, and transition metal-free oxidative aromatization reaction sequence utilizing molecular oxygen as a green oxidant. The scope of the reaction was studied by varying the aldehyde, 1,3-dicarbonyl, and diazo component individually.

  20. Palladium-Catalyzed Alkene Carboamination Reactions of Electron-Poor Nitrogen Nucleophiles

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Luke J.

    2015-01-01

    Modified reaction conditions that facilitate Pd-catalyzed alkene carboamination reactions of electron-deficient nitrogen nucleophiles are reported. Pent-4-enylamine derivatives bearing N-tosyl or N-trifluoroacetyl groups are coupled with aryl triflates to afford substituted pyrrolidines in good yield. These reactions proceed via a mechanism involving anti-aminopalladation of the alkene, which differs from previously reported analogous reactions of N-aryl and N-boc pentenylamines. The application of these conditions to a formal synthesis of (±)-aphanorphine is also described. PMID:26622222

  1. Chromogenic assay for the prothrombin activator ecarin from the venom of the saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus).

    PubMed

    Stocker, K; Fischer, H; Brogli, M

    1986-01-01

    Ecarin, by limited proteolysis and subsequent autocatalytic reactions, causes the conversion of prothrombin into three products with amidolytic activity: meizothrombin, meizothrombin 1 and lpha-thrombin. Ecarin action may be abolished by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and the activity of alpha-thrombin can, with a high degree of selectivity, be inhibited by heparin. Thus, ecarin potency may be assayed by measuring the meizothrombin activity generated by ecarin action on human plasma in the presence of heparin. The chromogenic substrate Tosyl-glycyl-L-prolyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide (Chromozym TH) is used in this assay. PMID:3082039

  2. Soluplus-coated colloidal silica nanomatrix system for enhanced supersaturation and oral absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Soo

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a Soluplus-coated colloidal silica nanomatrix (SCCSN) formulation for the entrapment of poorly water-soluble drugs was devised. The maximum supersaturation of the drug-loaded nanomatrix was higher than that of a physical mixture as indicated by the results of in vitro kinetic solubility studies. For atorvastatin calcium, dutasteride, and sorafenib tosylate, there were 2.8-, 326-, and 46.4-fold increases in solubility, respectively. For dutasteride, a promising 4.7-fold increase for in vivo oral drug absorption in the entrapped nanomatrix was observed as compared to the free physical mixture, supported by statistical significance testing of pharmacokinetic parameters.

  3. A Pot-Economical Approach to the Total Synthesis of Sch-725674.

    PubMed

    Bodugam, Mahipal; Javed, Salim; Ganguly, Arghya; Torres, Jessica; Hanson, Paul R

    2016-02-01

    A pot-economical total synthesis of antifungal Sch-725674, 1, is reported. The approach takes advantage of a number of one-pot, sequential transformations, including a phosphate tether-mediated one-pot, sequential RCM/CM/chemoselective hydrogenation protocol, a one-pot tosylation/acrylation sequence, and a one-pot, sequential Finkelstein reaction/Boord olefination/acetonide deprotection procedure to streamline the synthesis route by reducing isolation and purification procedures, thus saving time. Overall, an asymmetric route has been developed that is efficiently accomplished in seven pots from phosphate (S,S)-triene and with minimal purification. PMID:26760683

  4. A Pot-Economical Approach to the Total Synthesis of Sch-725674.

    PubMed

    Bodugam, Mahipal; Javed, Salim; Ganguly, Arghya; Torres, Jessica; Hanson, Paul R

    2016-02-01

    A pot-economical total synthesis of antifungal Sch-725674, 1, is reported. The approach takes advantage of a number of one-pot, sequential transformations, including a phosphate tether-mediated one-pot, sequential RCM/CM/chemoselective hydrogenation protocol, a one-pot tosylation/acrylation sequence, and a one-pot, sequential Finkelstein reaction/Boord olefination/acetonide deprotection procedure to streamline the synthesis route by reducing isolation and purification procedures, thus saving time. Overall, an asymmetric route has been developed that is efficiently accomplished in seven pots from phosphate (S,S)-triene and with minimal purification.

  5. Chiral Resolution and Serendipitous Fluorination Reaction for the Selective Dopamine D3 Receptor Antagonist BAK2-66

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The improved chiral synthesis of the selective dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) antagonist (R)-N-(4-(4-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)-3-hydroxybutyl)1H-indole-2-carboxamide ((R)-PG648) is described. The same chiral secondary alcohol intermediate was used to prepare the enantiomers of a 3-F-benzofuranyl analogue, BAK 2-66. The absolute configurations of the 3-F enantiomers were assigned from their X-ray crystal structures that confirmed retention of configuration during fluorination with N,N-diethylaminosulfur trifluoride (DAST). (R)-BAK2-66 showed higher D3R affinity and selectivity than its (S)-enantiomer; however, it had lower D3R affinity and enantioselectivity than (R)-PG648. Further, importance of the 4-atom linker length between the aryl amide and 4-phenylpiperazine was demonstrated with the 4-fluorobutyl-product (8). PMID:24944737

  6. Final design and fabrication of an active control system for flutter suppression on a supercritical aeroelastic research wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, G. E.; Mcgehee, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    The final design and hardware fabrication was completed for an active control system capable of the required flutter suppression, compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA aeroelastic research wing number 1 (ARW-1) on Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The flutter suppression system uses vertical acceleration at win buttock line 1.930 (76), with fuselage vertical and roll accelerations subtracted out, to drive wing outboard aileron control surfaces through appropriate symmetric and antisymmetric shaping filters. The goal of providing an increase of 20 percent above the unaugmented vehicle flutter velocity but below the maximum operating condition at Mach 0.98 is exceeded by the final flutter suppression system. Results indicate that the flutter suppression system mechanical and electronic components are ready for installation on the DAST ARW-1 wing and BQM-34E/F drone fuselage.

  7. Design of control laws for flutter suppression based on the aerodynamic energy concept and comparisons with other design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, Eli

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamic energy method is used to synthesize control laws for NASA's drone for aerodynamic and structural testing-aerodynamic research wing 1 (DAST-ARW1) mathematical model. The performance of these control laws in terms of closed-loop flutter dynamic pressure, control surface activity, and robustness is compared with other control laws that relate to the same model. A control law synthesis technique that makes use of the return difference singular values is developed. It is based on the aerodynamic energy approach and is shown to yield results that are superior to those results given in the literature and are based on optimal control theory. Nyquist plots are presented, together with a short discussion regarding the relative merits of the minimum singular value as a measure of robustness as compared with the more traditional measure involving phase and gain margins.

  8. iperf

    SciTech Connect

    2014-01-10

    iperf is a tool for active measurements of the maximum achievable bandwidth on IP networks. It supports tuning of various parameters related to timing, protocols, and buffers. For each test it reports the bandwidth, loss, and other parameters. This version, sometimes referred to as iperf3, is a redesign of an original version developed at NLANR / DAST. iperf3 is a new implementation from scratch, with the goal of a smaller, simpler code base, and a library version of the functionality that can be used in other programs. iperf3 also incorporates a number of features found in other tools such as nuttcp and netperf, but were missing from the original iperf. These include, for example, a zero-copy mode and optional JSON output. Note that iperf3 is not backwards compatible with the original iperf.

  9. NASA DFRC Practices for Prototype Qualification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokos, William A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the practices that Dryden uses for qualification of the prototypes of aircraft. There are many views of aircraft that Dryden has worked with. Included is a discussion of basic considerations for strength, a listing of standards and references, a discussion of typical safety of flight approaches, a discussion of the prototype design, using the X-29A as an example, and requirements for new shapes (i.e., the DAST-ARW1 , F-8 Super Critical Wing, AFTI/F-111 MAW), new control laws (i.e., AAW F-18), new operating envelope (i.e., F-18 HARV), limited sope add-on or substitute structure (i.e., SR-71 LASRE, ECLIPSE, F-16XL SLFC), and extensively modified or replaced structure (i.e., SOFIA, B747SP). There is a listing of causes for the failure of the prototype.

  10. Criminality and Sexual Behaviours in Substance Dependents Seeking Treatment.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Alessandra; Pillon, Sandra Cristina; Dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Rassool, G Hussein; Laranjeira, Ronaldo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the link between violence, crime, and sexual behavior among patients with substance-related disorder admitted to a specialized inpatient care unit. This was a cross-sectional study using a questionnaire on socio-demographic characteristics, drug of choice (DOC), questions about sexual behavior, and instruments to evaluate the severity of dependence (SADD, DAST, FTND), level of impulsivity (BIS-11), and a screening sex addiction scale. The sample consisted of 587 adult subjects, of which 82.3% were men, 66.4% had used cocaine (sniffed and smoked) as their DOC, 24.4% had a history with the criminal justice system, 26.8% had committed crimes, 19.3% had engaged in violent behavior, and 12.2% had been involved in drug trafficking. In this sample, crime was strongly associated with various sexual behaviors and the severity of substance dependence. PMID:27163711

  11. Changes in Elementary Student Perceptions of Science, Scientists and Science Careers after Participating in a Curricular Module on Health and Veterinary Science

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soo Yeon; Parker, Loran Carleton; Adedokun, Omolola; Mennonno, Ann; Wackerly, Amy; SanMiguel, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    This study examined to what extent a curriculum module that uses animal and human health scientists and science concepts to portray science and scientists in a relevant and authentic manner could enhance elementary students’ aspiration for science careers, attitudes to science, positive perceptions of scientists, and perceived relevance of science. The curriculum was developed by a research-based university program and has been put into practice in two early elementary classrooms in an urban school in the Midwest. An attitudinal rating survey and the Draw-A-Scientist Test (DAST) were used to assess pre to post changes in student attitudes toward science, perceptions of scientists, perceived relevance of science, and aspiration for science careers. Findings indicated that the implementation of this curriculum contributed positively to student attitudes toward science, decreased students’ stereotypical images of scientists, and increased student aspirations to become a scientist. PMID:26726271

  12. iperf

    2014-01-10

    iperf is a tool for active measurements of the maximum achievable bandwidth on IP networks. It supports tuning of various parameters related to timing, protocols, and buffers. For each test it reports the bandwidth, loss, and other parameters. This version, sometimes referred to as iperf3, is a redesign of an original version developed at NLANR / DAST. iperf3 is a new implementation from scratch, with the goal of a smaller, simpler code base, and amore » library version of the functionality that can be used in other programs. iperf3 also incorporates a number of features found in other tools such as nuttcp and netperf, but were missing from the original iperf. These include, for example, a zero-copy mode and optional JSON output. Note that iperf3 is not backwards compatible with the original iperf.« less

  13. Steady pressure measurements on an Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Maynard C.; Seidel, David A.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.

    1994-01-01

    Transonic steady and unsteady pressure tests have been conducted in the Langley transonic dynamics tunnel on a large elastic wing known as the DAST ARW-2. The wing has a supercritical airfoil, an aspect ratio of 10.3, a leading-edge sweep back angle of 28.8 degrees, and two inboard and one outboard trailing-edge control surfaces. Only the outboard control surface was deflected to generate steady and unsteady flow over the wing during this study. Only the steady surface pressure, control-surface hinge moment, wing-tip deflection, and wing-root bending moment measurements are presented. The results from this elastic wing test are in tabulated form to assist in calibrating advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) algorithms.

  14. Advanced solar dynamic space power systems perspectives, requirements and technology needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O.; Savino, J. M.; Lacy, D. E.; Migra, R. P.; Juhasz, A. J.; Coles, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    Projected NASA, Civil, Commercial, and Military missions will require space power systems of increased versatility and power levels. The Advanced Solar Dynamic (ASD) Power systems offer the potential for efficient, lightweight, survivable, relatively compact, long-lived space power systems applicable to a wide range of power levels (3 to 300 kWe), and a wide variety of orbits. The successful development of these systems could satisfy the power needs for a wide variety of these projected missions. Thus, the NASA Lewis Research Center has embarked upon an aggressive ASD reserach project under the direction of NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (DAST). The project is being implemented through a combination of in-house and contracted efforts. Key elements of this project are missions analysis to determine the power systems requirements, systems analysis to identify the most attractive ASD power systems to meet these requirements, and to guide the technology development efforts, and technology development of key components.

  15. Synthesis and in vitro cytotoxicity of acetylated 3-fluoro, 4-fluoro and 3,4-difluoro analogs of D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine

    PubMed Central

    Horník, Štěpán; Červenková Šťastná, Lucie; Cuřínová, Petra; Sýkora, Jan; Káňová, Kateřina; Hrstka, Roman; Císařová, Ivana; Dračínský, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background: Derivatives of D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine represent an important family of the cell surface glycan components and their fluorinated analogs found use as metabolic inhibitors of complex glycan biosynthesis, or as probes for the study of protein–carbohydrate interactions. This work is focused on the synthesis of acetylated 3-deoxy-3-fluoro, 4-deoxy-4-fluoro and 3,4-dideoxy-3,4-difluoro analogs of D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine via 1,6-anhydrohexopyranose chemistry. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of the target compounds towards selected cancer cells is determined. Results: Introduction of fluorine at C-3 was achieved by the reaction of 1,6-anhydro-2-azido-2-deoxy-4-O-benzyl-β-D-glucopyranose or its 4-fluoro analog with DAST. The retention of configuration in this reaction is discussed. Fluorine at C-4 was installed by the reaction of 1,6:2,3-dianhydro-β-D-talopyranose with DAST, or by fluoridolysis of 1,6:3,4-dianhydro-2-azido-β-D-galactopyranose with KHF2. The amino group was introduced and masked as an azide in the synthesis. The 1-O-deacetylated 3-fluoro and 4-fluoro analogs of acetylated D-galactosamine inhibited proliferation of the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3 more than cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (IC50 28 ± 3 μM and 54 ± 5 μM, respectively). Conclusion: A complete series of acetylated 3-fluoro, 4-fluoro and 3,4-difluoro analogs of D-glucosamine and D-galactosamine is now accessible by 1,6-anhydrohexopyranose chemistry. Intermediate fluorinated 1,6-anhydro-2-azido-hexopyranoses have potential as synthons in oligosaccharide assembly. PMID:27340467

  16. Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities of Makaluvamine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Nadkarni, Dwayaja H.; Wu, Hui; Velu, Sadanandan E.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a key etiological agent in the formation of dental caries. The major virulence factor is its ability to form biofilms. Inhibition of S. mutans biofilms offers therapeutic prospects for the treatment and the prevention of dental caries. In this study, 14 analogs of makaluvamine, a marine alkaloid, were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against S. mutans and for their ability to inhibit S. mutans biofilm formation. All analogs contained the tricyclic pyrroloiminoquinone core of makaluvamines. The structural variations of the analogs are on the amino substituents at the 7-position of the ring and the inclusion of a tosyl group on the pyrrole ring N of the makaluvamine core. The makaluvamine analogs displayed biofilm inhibition with IC50 values ranging from 0.4 μM to 88 μM. Further, the observed bactericidal activity of the majority of the analogs was found to be consistent with the anti-biofilm activity, leading to the conclusion that the anti-biofilm activity of these analogs stems from their ability to kill S. mutans. However, three of the most potent N-tosyl analogs showed biofilm IC50 values at least an order of magnitude lower than that of bactericidal activity, indicating that the biofilm activity of these analogs is more selective and perhaps independent of bactericidal activity. PMID:25767719

  17. Role of serotonin in the discriminative stimulus properties of mescaline.

    PubMed

    Browne, R G; Ho, B T

    1975-01-01

    Rats were trained to discriminate intraperitoneally administered mescaline from saline in a two-lever operant chamber for food reinforcement. Reward was contingent upon responses made greater than 15 sec apart (DRL-15) on the appropriate lever paired with either drug or saline administration. Following the establishment of discriminative response control by mescaline, the animals were tested for stimulus generalization produced by mescaline after: (a) blockade of periphreral and central serotonin (5-HT) receptors with cinanserin, methysergide, or cyproheptadine; (b) blockade of peripheral 5-HT receptors with xylamidine tosylate; and (c) depletion of brain 5-HT with the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA). The results show that all three central 5-HT antagonists greatly reduced the discriminability of mescaline while the peripheral antagonist, xylamidine tosylate, was without effect. Furthermore, these agents at the doses employed did not effect the discriminability of saline. Depletion of 5-HT with PCPA potentiated the effects of a sub-threshold dose of mescaline and slightly reduced the discriminability of saline. The results indicate that mescaline produces its discriminative stimulus properties by directly stimulating central serotonergic receptors.

  18. Cellular redox status influences both cytotoxic and NF-kappa B activation in natural killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Valle Blázquez, M; Luque, I; Collantes, E; Aranda, E; Solana, R; Peña, J; Muñoz, E

    1997-01-01

    The role of cellular redox status in both cytotoxic activity and NF-kappa B activation in natural killer (NK) cells was investigated. The results indicate that stimulation of NK cells, either freshly isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) or long-term cultured NK clones, with specific cell targets results in an increased binding activity of NF-kappa B and AP-1 transcription factors measured by gel retardation. Pretreatment of NK cells with the antioxidant pyrrolidine dithiocarbarmate (PDTC) leads to the inhibition of NF-kappa B activation but the AP-1 binding to DNA was superinduced. The inhibition of NF-kappa B by PDTC paralleled with an inhibition of spontaneous cytotoxicity mediated by NK cells. Moreover, the inhibitors of serine proteases, N-alpha-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone and N-alpha-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone, also blocked the cytolytic activity of NK cells against the sensitive target K562. In contrast, NK activity was not affected by pretreatment of the effector cells with the proteasome inhibitor N-acetyl-leu-leu-norleucinal which selectively inhibits NF-kappa B activation. Altogether, these results support the hypothesis that the activation of NK cells involved transcriptional and post-transcriptional events, and that reactive intermediates may play an important role in the molecular processes related with the generation of a cytotoxic response by NK cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9155655

  19. [F-18]Fluorodihydrorotenone: Synthesis and evaluation of a mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complex I probe for PET

    SciTech Connect

    VanBrocklin, H.F.; Enas, J.D.; Hanrahan, S.M.

    1994-05-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) consists of five enzyme complexes (I-V) which participate in the transfer of electrons to oxygen and phosphorylation of ADP (oxidative phosphorylation). ETC dysfunction has been linked to several genetic neurological diseases as well as implicated in Parkinson`s (complex I) and Huntington`s (complex I) disease and normal aging processes. Dihydrorotenone (DHR) is a specific high affinity inhibitor of complex I. In order to develop a PET tracer for complex I, we have labeled DHR with fluorine-18. The tosylate precursor was produced in three steps from commercially available rotenone. Fluorine-18 was introduced by nucleophilic displacement of the tosylate using tetrabutyl-ammonium fluoride. Subsequent oxidation with MnO{sub 2} and HPLC purification gave the desired [{sup 18}F]fluoro-DHR. Initial biodistribution studies were carried out in {approximately}200 g male Sprague-Dawley rats. The tracer was taken up rapidly in the heart, an organ highly enriched with mitochondria, (5.5-6% injected dose (ID)/g at 30 minutes) and in the brain ({approximately}1.5% ID/g at 1 hour).

  20. N-H-Type Excited-State Proton Transfer in Compounds Possessing a Seven-Membered-Ring Intramolecular Hydrogen Bond.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-An; Meng, Fan-Yi; Hsu, Yen-Hao; Hung, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Chi-Lin; Chung, Kun-You; Tang, Wei-Feng; Hung, Wen-Yi; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2016-10-01

    A series of compounds containing 5-(2-aminobenzylidene)-2,3-dimethyl-3,5-dihydro-4H-imidazol-4-one (o-ABDI) as the core chromophore with a seven-membered-ring N-H-type intramolecular hydrogen bond have been synthesized and characterized. The acidity of the N-H proton and thus the hydrogen-bond strength can be fine-tuned by replacing one of the amino hydrogen atoms by a substituent R, the acidity increasing with increasing electron-withdrawing strength of R, that is, in the order HTosyltosyl and trifluoroacetyl derivatives undergo ultrafast, irreversible excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) that results in proton-transfer emission solely in the red region. Reversible ESIPT, and hence dual emission, involving the normal and proton-transfer tautomers was resolved for the acetyl- and benzyl-substituted counterparts. For o-ABDI, which has the weakest acidity, ESIPT is prohibited due to its highly endergonic reaction. The results clearly demonstrate the harnessing of ESIPT by modifying the proton acidity and hydrogen-bonding strength in a seven-membered-ring intramolecular hydrogen-bonding system. For all the compounds studied, the emission quantum yields are weak (ca. 10(-3) ) in dichloromethane, but strong in the solid form, ranging from 3.2 to 47.4 %. PMID:27539818

  1. Stimulated mast cells promote maturation of myocardial microvascular endothelial cell neovessels by modulating the angiopoietin-Tie-2 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.H.; Zhu, W.; Tao, J.P.; Zhang, Q.Y.; Wei, M.

    2013-01-01

    Angiopoietin (Ang)-1 and Ang-2 interact in angiogenesis to activate the Tie-2 receptor, which may be involved in new vessel maturation and regression. Mast cells (MCs) are also involved in formation of new blood vessels and angiogenesis. The present study was designed to test whether MCs can mediate angiogenesis in myocardial microvascular endothelial cells (MMVECs). Using a rat MMVEC and MC co-culture system, we observed that Ang-1 protein levels were very low even though its mRNA levels were increased by MCs. Interestingly, MCs were able to enhance migration, proliferation, and capillary-like tube formation, which were associated with suppressed Ang-2 protein expression, but not Tie-2 expression levels. These MCs induced effects that could be reversed by either tryptase inhibitor [N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK)] or chymase inhibitor (N-tosyl-L-phenylalanyl chloromethyl ketone), with TLCK showing greater effects. In conclusion, our data indicated that MCs can interrupt neovessel maturation via suppression of the Ang-2/Tie-2 signaling pathway. PMID:24270910

  2. Crystal structure of bis­{μ-4-methyl-N′-[3-(oxido­imino)­butan-2-yl­idene]benzene­sulfono­hydrazidato}bis­[(dimethyl sulfoxide-κO)copper(II)

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Diego Pereira; Siqueira, Maria Carolina Bulhosa; Gervini, Vanessa Carratu; Bresolin, Leandro; de Oliveira, Adriano Bof

    2014-01-01

    In the title compound, [Cu2(C11H13N3O3S)2(C2H6OS)2], the CuII cation is N,N′,O-chelated by a deprotonated hy­droxy­imino-tosyl­hydrazone ligand and coordinated by a dimethyl sulfoxide mol­ecule. One O atom from the adjacent hy­droxy­imino-tosyl­hydrazone ligand bridges the CuII cation, forming the centrosymmetric dimeric complex. The cation is in an overall distorted N2O3 square-pyramidal coordination environment. The methyl­benzene ring is twisted with respect to the hydrazine fragment, with a dihedral angle of 89.54 (9)° between the planes. An intra­molecular C—H⋯O hydrogen bond occurs. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by weak C—H⋯O and C—H⋯S inter­actions. Weak π–π stacking is also observed between parallel benzene rings of adjacent mol­ecules, the centroid–centroid distance being 3.9592 (17) Å. PMID:25309178

  3. Activation of Bt Protoxin Cry1Ac in Resistant and Susceptible Cotton Bollworm

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Gemei; Wang, Bingjie; Zhong, Feng; Chen, Lin; Khaing, Myint Myint; Zhang, Jie; Guo, Yuyuan; Wu, Kongming; Tabashnik, Bruce E.

    2016-01-01

    Crystalline (Cry) proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are used extensively for insect control in sprays and transgenic plants, but their efficacy is reduced by evolution of resistance in pests. Here we evaluated reduced activation of Cry1Ac protoxin as a potential mechanism of resistance in the invasive pest Helicoverpa armigera. Based on the concentration killing 50% of larvae (LC50) for a laboratory-selected resistant strain (LF120) divided by the LC50 for its susceptible parent strain (LF), the resistance ratio was 1600 for Cry1Ac protoxin and 1200 for trypsin-activated Cry1Ac toxin. The high level of resistance to activated toxin as well as to protoxin indicates reduced activation of protoxin is not a major mechanism of resistance to Cry1Ac in LF120. For both insect strains, treatment with either the trypsin inhibitor N-a-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) or the chymotrypsin inhibitor N-a-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) did not significantly affect the LC50 of Cry1Ac protoxin. Enzyme activity was higher for LF than LF120 for trypsin-like proteases, but did not differ between strains for chymotrypsin-like proteases. The results here are consistent with previous reports indicating that reduced activation of protoxin is generally not a major mechanism of resistance to Bt proteins. PMID:27257885

  4. A fibrinolytic protease AfeE from Streptomyces sp. CC5, with potent thrombolytic activity in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhibin; Liu, Pingping; Cheng, Guangyan; Zhang, Biying; Dong, Weiliang; Su, Xingli; Huang, Yan; Cui, Zhongli; Kong, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Fibrinolytic proteases have potential applications in cardiovascular disease therapy. A novel fibrinolytic protease, AfeE, with strong thrombolytic activity was purified from Streptomyces sp. CC5. AfeE displayed maximum activity at 40°C in the pH range of 7.0-12.0. It was strongly inhibited by serine protease inhibitor phenylmethanesulfonylfluoride, soybean trypsin inhibitor, tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone and tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone. The activity of the enzyme was partially inhibited by Cu(2+), Co(2+) and Zn(2+). AfeE exhibited higher substrate specificity for fibrin than fibrinogen, which has rarely been reported in fibrinolytic enzymes. AfeE also showed high thrombolytic activity in a carrageenan-induced mouse tail thrombosis model. AfeE prolonged prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and thrombin time in rat blood. A bleeding time assay revealed that AfeE did not prolong bleeding time in mice at a dose of 1mg/kg. No acute cytotoxicity was observed for AfeE at 320μg/well in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The afeE gene was cloned from the genome of Streptomyces sp. CC5. Full-length AFE-CC5E contained 434 amino acids and was processed into a mature form consisting 284 amino acids by posttranslational modification, as revealed by high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis. These results indicate that AfeE is a prospective candidate for antithrombotic drug development. PMID:26721382

  5. Stereoselective rhodium-catalysed [2+2+2] cycloaddition of linear allene-ene/yne-allene substrates: reactivity and theoretical mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Haraburda, Ewelina; Torres, Óscar; Parella, Teodor; Solà, Miquel; Pla-Quintana, Anna

    2014-04-22

    Allene-ene-allene (2 and 5) and allene-yne-allene (3 and 7) N-tosyl and O-linked substrates were satisfactorily synthesised. The [2+2+2] cycloaddition reaction catalysed by the Wilkinson catalyst [RhCl(PPh3 )3 ] was evaluated. Substrates 2 and 5, which bear a double bond in the central position, gave a tricyclic structure in a reaction in which four contiguous stereogenic centres were formed as a single diastereomer. The reaction of substrates 3 and 7, which bear a triple bond in the central position, gave a tricyclic structure with a cyclohexenic ring core, again in a diastereoselective manner. All cycloadducts were formed by a regioselective reaction of the inner allene double bond and, therefore, feature an exocyclic diene motif. A Diels-Alder reaction on N-tosyl linked cycloadducts 8 and 10 allowed pentacyclic scaffolds to be diastereoselectively constructed. The reactivity of the allenes on [2+2+2] cycloaddition reactions was studied for the first time by density functional theory calculations. This mechanistic study rationalizes the order in which the unsaturations take part in the catalytic cycle, the reactivity of the two double bonds of the allene towards the [2+2+2] cycloaddition reaction, and the diastereoselectivity of the reaction.

  6. Cytotoxic effects of methionine alkyl esters and amides in normal and neoplastic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Clement, M A; Chapman, J M; Roberts, J

    1989-06-01

    Homologous series of L-methionine alkyl ester hydrochlorides and tosylates were synthesized and evaluated for in vitro growth inhibitory activity in Meth A sarcoma. Cytotoxicity, as determined by [3H]thymidine incorporation, was found to be directly proportional to alkyl chain length and surface tension lowering activity. L-Methionine decyl and dodecyl ester hydrochlorides possessed optimum cytotoxic activity (IC50 = 29, 28 microM) which was not reversible by the addition of L-methionine. Surface tension of a 50 microM solution of the decyl and dodecyl ester hydrochlorides were 35.4 and 32.7 dyn/cm, respectively. The corresponding decyl and dodecyl ester tosylates and amide hydrochlorides were less active. The N-t-butoxycarbonyl analogues were essentially inactive, demonstrating the necessity of an unsubstituted and/or potentially cationic amino group. Methionine dependence characteristics and cytotoxicity were also determined for three human (IMR-90, LX-1, MCF7) and four additional murine (L1210, L5178Y, 3T3, SV-T2) cell lines. The human cell lines Meth A, LX-1, and SV-T2 were found to be methionine independent. The LX-1 tumor cell line and the SV-T2 transformed line exhibited two to four times more sensitivity to the cytotoxic and cytolytic properties of the decyl and dodecyl ester hydrochlorides than their normal counterparts. The dodecyl amide hydrochloride derivative demonstrated enhanced cytotoxic activity in vivo relative to the corresponding ester, possibly due to decreased metabolic hydrolysis.

  7. Synthesis, characterization, and metabolism studies of fluspidine enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Holl, Katharina; Falck, Evamaria; Köhler, Jens; Schepmann, Dirk; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Brust, Peter; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    The enantiomers of the potent σ1 ligand fluspidine (1) were prepared by using chiral preparative HPLC. Synthesis of racemic tosylate 2 and subsequent separation of enantiomers yielded (R)-2 and (S)-2 in excellent enantiomeric purities. The fluspidine enantiomers (R)-1 and (S)-1 were synthesized from (R)-2 and (S)-2 by nucleophilic substitution with tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride, affording (R)-1 with 99.6 % ee and (S)-1 with 96.4 % ee. Tosylates (R)-2 and (S)-2 can also serve as precursors for the radiosynthesis of enantiomerically pure radiotracers [(18) F](R)-1 and [(18) F](S)-1. The absolute configuration of the pure enantiomers was elucidated by comparison of their CD spectra with a calculated CD spectrum of a simplified model compound. In receptor binding studies, both enantiomers displayed very high σ1 receptor affinity and selectivity against the σ2 receptor. (R)-Fluspidine ((R)-1) is the eutomer, with a Ki value of 0.57 nM and a eudysmic ratio of 4. Incubation of (R)-1 and (S)-1 with rat liver microsomes led to the identification of seven and eight metabolites, respectively. Although the S-configured enantiomer formed additional metabolite (S)-1-3, it is metabolically more stable than (R)-1.

  8. Activation of Bt Protoxin Cry1Ac in Resistant and Susceptible Cotton Bollworm.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jizhen; Liang, Gemei; Wang, Bingjie; Zhong, Feng; Chen, Lin; Khaing, Myint Myint; Zhang, Jie; Guo, Yuyuan; Wu, Kongming; Tabashnik, Bruce E

    2016-01-01

    Crystalline (Cry) proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are used extensively for insect control in sprays and transgenic plants, but their efficacy is reduced by evolution of resistance in pests. Here we evaluated reduced activation of Cry1Ac protoxin as a potential mechanism of resistance in the invasive pest Helicoverpa armigera. Based on the concentration killing 50% of larvae (LC50) for a laboratory-selected resistant strain (LF120) divided by the LC50 for its susceptible parent strain (LF), the resistance ratio was 1600 for Cry1Ac protoxin and 1200 for trypsin-activated Cry1Ac toxin. The high level of resistance to activated toxin as well as to protoxin indicates reduced activation of protoxin is not a major mechanism of resistance to Cry1Ac in LF120. For both insect strains, treatment with either the trypsin inhibitor N-a-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) or the chymotrypsin inhibitor N-a-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) did not significantly affect the LC50 of Cry1Ac protoxin. Enzyme activity was higher for LF than LF120 for trypsin-like proteases, but did not differ between strains for chymotrypsin-like proteases. The results here are consistent with previous reports indicating that reduced activation of protoxin is generally not a major mechanism of resistance to Bt proteins. PMID:27257885

  9. Effects of the reaction cavity on metastable optical excitation in ruthenium-sulfur dioxide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Anthony E.; D'Almeida, Thierry; Low, Kian Sing; Cole, Jacqueline M.

    2010-10-15

    We report photoexcited-state crystal structures for two new members of the [Ru(SO{sub 2})(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}X]Y family: 1:X=H{sub 2}O, Y=({+-})-camphorsulfonate{sub 2}; 2:X=isonicotinamide, Y=tosylate{sub 2}. The excited states are metastable at 100 K, with a photoconversion fraction of 11.1(7)% achieved in 1, and 22.1(10)% and 26.9(10)% at the two distinct sites in 2. We further show using solid-state density-functional-theory calculations that the excited-state geometries achieved are strongly influenced by the local crystal environment. This result is relevant to attempts to rationally design related photoexcitation systems for optical data-storage applications.

  10. Synthesis of 3-fluoropyrrolidines and 4-fluoropyrrolidin-2-ones from allylic fluorides.

    PubMed

    Combettes, Lorraine E; Schuler, Marie; Patel, Rakesh; Bonillo, Baltasar; Odell, Barbara; Thompson, Amber L; Claridge, Tim D W; Gouverneur, Véronique

    2012-10-01

    Various 3-fluoropyrrolidines and 4-fluoropyrrolidin-2-ones were prepared by 5-exo-trig iodocyclisation from allylic fluorides bearing a pending nitrogen nucleophile. These bench-stable precursors were made accessible upon electrophilic fluorination of the corresponding allylsilanes. The presence of the allylic fluorine substituent induces syn-stereocontrol upon iodocyclisation with diastereomeric ratios ranging from 10:1 to > 20:1 for all N-tosyl-3-fluoropent-4-en-1-amines and amides. The sense and level of stereocontrol is strikingly similar to the corresponding iodocyclisation of structurally related allylic fluorides bearing pending oxygen nucleophiles. These results suggest that the syn selectivity observed upon ring closure involves I(2)-π complexes with the fluorine positioned inside.

  11. Inulin-based glycopolymer: its preparation, lectin-affinity and gellation property.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Kazumi; Akiyama, Kento; Abe, Haruka; Togashi, Yosuke; Hasegawa, Teruaki

    2013-06-01

    The glycopolymer composed of an inulin scaffold and pendent β-lactosides was developed from commercially available inulin through sequential chemical modification processes composed of tosylation, azidation, and the subsequent Huisgen cyclocoupling with an alkyne-terminated β-lactoside. The resultant inulin-based glycopolymer has unique dual affinity towards β-galactoside and α-glucoside specific lectins which is attributable to its pendent β-lactosides and terminal α-glucoside. Its gellation property was also accessed to find that the inulin-based glycopolymer forms hydrogels whose critical gellation concentration (CGC) was lower than that required for hydrogels made from native inulin. Drug release properties of the inulin-based glycopolymer were also discussed in this paper.

  12. Targeted therapy for renal cell carcinoma: a new treatment paradigm

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Metastatic clear cell renal cell cancer has traditionally been treated with cytokines (interferon or interleukin-2). Improved understanding of biology has engendered novel targeted therapeutic agents that have altered the natural history of this disease. The vascular endothelial growth factor and its related receptor and the mTOR signal transduction pathway have particularly been exploited. Sunitinib malate, sorafenib tosylate, temsirolimus, and bevacizumab have improved clinical outcomes in randomized trials. Other multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (lapatinib, axitinib, pazopanib) and antiangiogenic agents (VEGF Trap, lenalidomide) have also demonstrated activity in early studies. Combinations of these agents are being evaluated. The future of the therapy of renal cancer appears promising owing to the efficacy of these novel agents. PMID:17637878

  13. Lignin Modification for Biopolymer/Conjugated Polymer Hybrids as Renewable Energy Storage Materials.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Ting Yang; Wagner, Michal; Inganäs, Olle

    2015-12-01

    Lignin derivatives, which arise as waste products from the pulp and paper industry and are mainly used for heating, can be used as charge storage materials. The charge storage function is a result of the quinone groups formed in the lignin derivative. Herein, we modified lignins to enhance the density of such quinone groups by covalently linking monolignols and quinones through phenolation. The extra guaiacyl, syringyl, and hydroquinone groups introduced by phenolation of kraft lignin derivatives were monitored by (31) P nuclear magnetic resonance and size exclusion chromatography. Electropolymerization in ethylene glycol/tetraethylammonium tosylate electrolyte was used to synthesize the kraft lignin/polypyrrole hybrid films. These modifications changed the phenolic content of the kraft lignin with attachment of hydroquinone units yielding the highest specific capacity (around 70 mA h g(-1) ). The modification of softwood and hardwood lignin derivatives yielded 50 % and 23 % higher charge capacity than the original lignin, respectively.

  14. Guided desaturation of unactivated aliphatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voica, Ana-Florina; Mendoza, Abraham; Gutekunst, Will R.; Fraga, Jorge Otero; Baran, Phil S.

    2012-08-01

    The excision of hydrogen from an aliphatic carbon chain to produce an isolated olefin (desaturation) without overoxidation is one of the most impressive and powerful biosynthetic transformations for which there are no simple and mild laboratory substitutes. The versatility of olefins and the range of reactions they undergo are unsurpassed in functional group space. Thus, the conversion of a relatively inert aliphatic system into its unsaturated counterpart could open new possibilities in retrosynthesis. In this article, the invention of a directing group to achieve such a transformation under mild, operationally simple, metal-free conditions is outlined. This ‘portable desaturase’ (TzoCl) is a bench-stable, commercial entity (Aldrich, catalogue number L510092) that is facile to install on alcohol and amine functionalities to ultimately effect remote desaturation, while leaving behind a synthetically useful tosyl group.

  15. Lipophilisation of Caffeic Acid through Esterification with Propanol Using Water-tolerable Acidic Ionic Liquid as Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Han, Liya

    2015-01-01

    Propyl caffeate was synthesized to produce lipophilic antioxidant, which used caffeic acid and propanol as starting materials, acidic ionic liquid as catalyst. The highest yield of propyl caffeate (98.7±0.8%) have been achieved under the optimum as follows: 1-butylsulfonic-3-methylimidazolium tosylate showed the best catalytic performance, molar ratio of caffeic acid to propanol was 1:20, reaction temperature was 90°C and the amount of acidic ionic liquid was 40%. The relationship between temperature and the forward rate constant gave the activation energy of 33.6 kJ mol(-1), which indicated that acidic ionic liquid possesses high catalytic activity in the synthesis of PC. And the activity of acidic ionic liquid was not inhibited by the water produced during the esterification process. More importantly, this reaction system can even proceed smoothly when initial water content was 5%.

  16. Enantioselective Construction of Pyrrolidines by Palladium-Catalyzed Asymmetric [3+2] Cycloaddition of Trimethylenemethane with Imines

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Barry M.; Silverman, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    A protocol for the enantioselective [3+2] cycloaddition of trimethylenemethane (TMM) with imines has been developed. Central to this effort were the novel phosphoramidite ligands developed in our laboratories. The conditions developed to effect an asymmetric TMM reaction using 2-trimethylsilylmethyl allyl acetate were shown to be tolerant of a wide variety of imine acceptors to provide the corresponding pyrrolidine cycloadducts with excellent yields and selectivities. Use of a bis-2-naphthyl phosphoramidite allowed the successful cycloaddition of the parent TMM with N-Boc imines, and has further permitted the reaction of substituted donors with N-tosyl aldimines and ketimines in high regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselectivity. Use of a diphenylazetidine ligand allows the complimentary synthesis of the exocyclic nitrile product shown, and we demonstrate control of the regioselectivity of the product based on manipulation of the reaction parameters. PMID:22309214

  17. Convenient Synthesis of 18F-Radiolabeled R-(−)-N-n-propyl-2-(3-fluoropropanoxy-11-hydroxynoraporphine

    PubMed Central

    Sromek, Anna W.; Zhang, Shaohui; Akurathi, Vamsidar; Packard, Alan B.; Li, Wei; Alagille, David; Morley, Thomas J.; Baldwin, Ronald; Tamagnan, Gilles; Neumeyer, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Aporphines are attractive candidates for imaging D2 receptor function because, as agonists rather than antagonists, they are selective for the receptor in the high affinity state. In contrast, D2 antagonists do not distinguish between the high and low affinity states, and in vitro data suggests that this distinction may be important in studying diseases characterized by D2 dysregulation, such as schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease. Accordingly, MCL-536 (R-(−)-N-n-propyl-2-(3-[18F]fluoropropanoxy-11-hydroxynoraporphine) was selected for labeling with 18F based on in vitro data obtained for the non-radioactive (19F) compound. Fluorine-18-labeled MCL-536 was synthesized in 70% radiochemical yield, >99% radiochemical purity and specific activity of 167 GBq/μmol (4.5 Ci/μmol) using p-toluenesulfonyl (tosyl) both as a novel protecting group for the phenol and a leaving group for the radiofluorination. PMID:25400260

  18. High-Dose Vitamin C Promotes Regression of Multiple Pulmonary Metastases Originating from Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Min-Seok; Kim, Ja-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of regression of multiple pulmonary metastases, which originated from hepatocellular carcinoma after treatment with intravenous administration of high-dose vitamin C. A 74-year-old woman presented to the clinic for her cancer-related symptoms such as general weakness and anorexia. After undergoing initial transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), local recurrence with multiple pulmonary metastases was found. She refused further conventional therapy, including sorafenib tosylate (Nexavar). She did receive high doses of vitamin C (70 g), which were administered into a peripheral vein twice a week for 10 months, and multiple pulmonary metastases were observed to have completely regressed. She then underwent subsequent TACE, resulting in remission of her primary hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26256994

  19. Optical resolution by preferential crystallization of (RS)-2-benzoylamino-2-benzyl-3-hydroxypropanoic acid and its use in synthesizing optically active 2-amino-2-methyl-3-phenylpropanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Tadashi; Suzuki, Masahiro; Sakai, Yoshio; Nagasawa, Hisashi; Takatani, Kazuhiro; Noshi, Daisuke; Yamanashi, Kenji

    2002-10-01

    To synthesize optically active 2-amino-2-methyl-3-phenylpropanoic acid (1), (RS)-2-benzoylamino-2-benzyl-3-hydroxypropanoic acid [(RS)-2] was first optically resolved using cinchonidine as a resolving agent to yield optically pure (S)- and (R)-2 in yields of about 70%, based on half of the starting amount of (RS)-2. Next, the racemic structure of (RS)-2 was examined based on melting point, solubility, IR spectrum, and binary and ternary phase diagrams, with the aim of optical resolution by preferential crystallization of (RS)-2. Results indicated that the (RS)-2 exists as a conglomerate at room temperature, although it forms a racemic compound at the melting point. The optical resolution by preferential crystallization yielded (S)- and (R)-2 with optical purities of about 90%, which were fully purified by recrystallization. After O-tosylation of (S)- and (R)-2, reduction by zinc powder and sodium iodide gave (R)- and (S)-1, respectively.

  20. Thermophysical properties of phosphonium-based ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Arijit; Lopes-da-Silva, José A.; Freire, Mara G.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Carvalho, Pedro J.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental data for density, viscosity, refractive index and surface tension of four phosphonium-based ionic liquids were measured in the temperature range between (288.15 and 353.15) K and at atmospheric pressure. The ionic liquids considered include tri(isobutyl) methylphosphonium tosylate, [Pi(444)1][Tos], tri(butyl)methylphosphonium methylsulfate, [P4441][CH3SO4], tri(butyl)ethylphosphonium diethylphosphate, [P4442][(C2H5O)2PO2], and tetraoctylphosphonium bromide, [P8888][Br]. Additionally, derivative properties, such as the isobaric thermal expansion coefficient, the surface thermodynamic properties and the critical temperatures for the investigated ionic liquids were also estimated and are presented and discussed. Group contribution methods were evaluated and fitted to the density, viscosity and refractive index experimental data. PMID:26435574

  1. A Selective C-H Deprotonation Strategy to Access Functionalized Arynes by Using Hypervalent Iodine.

    PubMed

    Sundalam, Sunil K; Nilova, Aleksandra; Seidl, Thomas L; Stuart, David R

    2016-07-11

    Described here is an efficient method to access highly functionalized arynes from unsymmetrical aryl(mesityl)iodonium tosylate salts. The iodonium salts are prepared in a single pot from either commercially available aryl iodides or arylboronic acids. The aryne intermediates are generated by ortho-C-H deprotonation of aryl(mesityl)iodonium salt with a commercially available amide base and trapped in a cycloaddition reaction with furan in moderate to good yields. Coupling partners for the aryne intermediates beyond furan are also described, including benzyl azide and alicyclic amine nucleophiles. The regio- and chemoselectivity of this reaction is discussed and evidence for the spectator aryl ligand of the iodonium salt as a critical control element in selectivity is presented. PMID:27239971

  2. Degenerate four-wave mixing in noncentrosymmetric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biaggio, Ivan

    2001-12-01

    This work treats degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) in noncentrosymmetric materials, taking into full account the fact that the DFWM signal arises from third-order nonlinear optical effects as well as from two distinct combinations of second-order effects: second-harmonic generation plus difference frequency generation and optical rectification plus Pockels effect. Because of these second order ``cascaded'' contributions, the DFWM signal becomes dependent on details of the experimental setup that do not normally matter for centrosymmetric materials, such as the wave vectors of the interacting beams and the pulse duration. The origin, consequences, and possible applications of these effects are discussed for both the ``forward'' and the ``phase-conjugation'' DFWM configurations. All second-order contributions are described quantitatively by introducing effective third-order susceptibilities, and their value is discussed using the example of two materials: ferroelectric KNbO3 and the organic salt 4-N,N-dimethylamino-4'-N'-methyl-stilbazolium tosylate.

  3. Development of variously functionalized nitrile oxides.

    PubMed

    Asahara, Haruyasu; Arikiyo, Keita; Nishiwaki, Nagatoshi

    2015-01-01

    N-Methylated amides (N,4-dimethylbenzamide and N-methylcyclohexanecarboxamide) were systematically subjected to chemical transformations, namely, N-tosylation followed by nucleophilic substitution. The amide function was converted to the corresponding carboxylic acid, esters, amides, aldehyde, and ketone upon treatment with hydroxide, alkoxide, amine, diisobutylaluminium hydride and Grignard reagent, respectively. In these transformations, N-methyl-N-tosylcarboxamides behave like a Weinreb amide. Similarly, N-methyl-5-phenylisoxazole-3-carboxamide was converted into 3-functionalized isoxazole derivatives. Since the amide was prepared by the cycloaddition reaction of ethynylbenzene and N-methylcarbamoylnitrile oxide, the nitrile oxide served as the equivalent of the nitrile oxides bearing a variety of functional groups such as carboxy, alkoxycarbonyl, carbamoyl, acyl and formyl moieties. PMID:26425182

  4. Nitrogen fixation revisited on iron(0) dinitrogen phosphine complexes.

    PubMed

    Field, Leslie D; Hazari, Nilay; Li, Hsiu L

    2015-05-18

    A reinvestigation of the treatment of [Fe(N2)(PP)2] (PP = depe, dmpe) with acid revealed no ammonium formation. Instead, rapid protonation at the metal center to give hydride complexes was observed. Treatment of [Fe(N2)(dmpe)2] with methylating agents such as methyl triflate or methyl tosylate resulted in methylation of the metal center to afford [FeMe(N2)(dmpe)2](+). Treatment of [Fe(N2)(dmpe)2] with trimethylsilyl triflate, however, resulted in reaction at dinitrogen affording NH4(+) on subsequent treatment with acid. The side-on bound hydrazine complex [Fe(N2H4)(dmpe)2](2+) and bis(ammonia) complex [Fe(NH3)2(dmpe)2](2+) were identified by (15)N NMR spectroscopy as other species formed in the reaction mixture.

  5. Development of variously functionalized nitrile oxides

    PubMed Central

    Arikiyo, Keita

    2015-01-01

    Summary N-Methylated amides (N,4-dimethylbenzamide and N-methylcyclohexanecarboxamide) were systematically subjected to chemical transformations, namely, N-tosylation followed by nucleophilic substitution. The amide function was converted to the corresponding carboxylic acid, esters, amides, aldehyde, and ketone upon treatment with hydroxide, alkoxide, amine, diisobutylaluminium hydride and Grignard reagent, respectively. In these transformations, N-methyl-N-tosylcarboxamides behave like a Weinreb amide. Similarly, N-methyl-5-phenylisoxazole-3-carboxamide was converted into 3-functionalized isoxazole derivatives. Since the amide was prepared by the cycloaddition reaction of ethynylbenzene and N-methylcarbamoylnitrile oxide, the nitrile oxide served as the equivalent of the nitrile oxides bearing a variety of functional groups such as carboxy, alkoxycarbonyl, carbamoyl, acyl and formyl moieties. PMID:26425182

  6. Nickel-Catalyzed Alkyl–Alkyl Cross-Couplings of Fluorinated Secondary Electrophiles: A General Approach to the Synthesis of Compounds that Bear a Perfluoroalkyl Substituent**

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yufan

    2015-01-01

    Fluorinated organic molecules are of interest in fields ranging from medicinal chemistry to polymer science. Herein, we describe a mild, convenient, and versatile method for the synthesis of compounds that bear a perfluoroalkyl group attached to a tertiary carbon, via an alkyl–alkyl cross-coupling. Thus, a nickel catalyst derived from commercially available components (NiCl2·glyme and a pybox ligand) achieves the coupling of a wide range of fluorinated alkyl halides with alkylzinc reagents at room temperature. A broad array of functional groups (e.g., alkyne, aryl iodide, carbamate, furan, ketone, nitrile, phosphonate, primary alkyl bromide, and primary alkyl tosylate) are compatible with the reaction conditions, and highly selective couplings can be achieved on the basis of differing levels of fluorination. A mechanistic investigation has established that the presence of TEMPO inhibits cross-coupling under these conditions and that a TEMPO–electrophile adduct can be isolated. PMID:26073669

  7. Synthesis and characterization of conductive core-shell polyacrylonitrile-polypyrrole nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Jun, Tae-Sun; Nguyen, Tuan-Anh; Jung, Yongju; Kim, Yong Shin

    2012-07-01

    Nonwoven polyacrylonitrile-polypyrrole (PAN-PPy) core-shell nanofiber mats were prepared through the growth of PPy layers on electrospun PAN nanofibers via a two-step vapor-phase polymerization, i.e., the wet-coating of ferric tosylate (FeTos) oxidants on PAN nanofibers followed by exposure to pyrrole monomers in the gas phase. Under the conditions ([FeTos] = 10 wt%, reaction time = 15 min, temperature = 15 degrees C), the PPy polymerization procedure led to both a uniform coating over the PAN surface with an average thickness of 18 nm and cross-linkages among the nanofibers without a noticeable change in the highly porous nanofibrous structures. The oxidant concentration and polymerization time were found to be key parameters for achieving a good nanostructured core-shell fiber mat. FT-IR, XPS, XRD and conductivity measurements confirmed the synthesis of Tos-doped PPy with some degree of crystallinity and a high conductivity. PMID:22966690

  8. Guided Desaturation of Unactivated Aliphatics

    PubMed Central

    Voica, Ana-Florina; Mendoza, Abraham; Gutekunst, Will R.; Fraga, Jorge Otero; Baran, Phil S.

    2012-01-01

    The excision of hydrogen from an aliphatic carbon chain to produce an isolated olefin (desaturation) without over-oxidation is one of the most impressive and powerful biosynthetic transformations for which there are no simple and mild laboratory substitutes. The versatility of olefins and the range of reactions they undergo is unsurpassed in functional group space. Thus, the conversion of a relatively inert aliphatic system to its unsaturated counterpart can open new possibilities in retrosynthesis. In this article, the invention of a directing group to achieve such a transformation under mild, operationally simple, metal-free conditions is outlined. This “portable desaturase” (TzoCl) is a bench-stable, commercial entity (Aldrich, cat # L510092) that is facile to install on alcohol and amine functionalities to ultimately effect remote desaturation, while leaving behind a synthetically useful tosyl group. PMID:22824894

  9. Transetherification on Polyols by Intra- and Intermolecular Nucleophilic Substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Muraoka, Takahiro; Adachi, Kota; Chowdhury, Rainy; Kinbara, Kazushi

    2014-01-01

    Transetherification on polyols involving intra- and intermolecular nucleophilic substitutions is reported. Di- or trialkoxide formation of propane-1,3-diol or 2-(hydroxymethyl)propane-1,3-diol derivatives by NaH triggers the reaction via oxetanes formation, where the order to add NaH and a polyol significantly influences the yields of products. It was demonstrated that the protective group on the pentaerythritol skeleton is apparently transferred to the hydrophilic and hydrophobic chain molecules bearing a leaving group in one-step, and a protective group conversion from tosyl to benzyl was successful using a benzyl-appending triol to afford a desired product in 67% yield. PMID:24663293

  10. From elusive thio- and selenosilanoic acids to copper(I) complexes with intermolecular Si=E → Cu-O-Si coordination modes (E = S, Se).

    PubMed

    Tan, Gengwen; Xiong, Yun; Inoue, Shigeyoshi; Enthaler, Stephan; Blom, Burgert; Epping, Jan D; Driess, Matthias

    2013-06-21

    The facile synthesis of the first stable selenosilanoic acid-base adduct LSi(=Se)OH(dmap) 3 (L = CH[C(Me)NAr]2, Ar = 2,6-iPr2C6H3, dmap = 4-dimethylaminopyridine), the heavier analogue of the thiosilanoic acid adduct LSi(=S)OH(dmap) 1, is reported. Both adducts 1 and 3 react readily with MesCu (Mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl) to form the novel dimeric Cu(I) complexes [LSi(=E)OCu]2 (4: E = S; 5: E = Se) with unprecedented intermolecular Si=E → Cu-O-Si coordination modes. The latter are efficient pre-catalysts for the Cu(I)-mediated aziridination of styrene with PhI=N(Ts) (Ts = tosyl).

  11. [18F]azadibenzocyclooctyne ([18F]ADIBO): a biocompatible radioactive labeling synthon for peptides using catalyst free [3+2] cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Selvanathan; Chin, Joshua; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Popik, Vladimir V; Kostikov, Alexey P

    2011-12-01

    N-Terminally azido-modified peptides were labeled with the novel prosthetic labeling synthon [(18)F]azadibenzocyclooctyne ([(18)F]ADIBO) using copper-free azide-alkyne [3+2]-dipolar cycloaddition in high radiochemical yields (RCYs). (18)F-Labeled [(18)F]ADIBO was prepared by nucleophilic substitution of the corresponding tosylate in 21% overall RCY (EOB) in a fully automated synthesis unit within 55 min. [(18)F]ADIBO was incubated with azide-containing peptides at room temperature in the absence of toxic metal catalysts and the formation of the triazole conjugate was confirmed. Finally, the azide-alkyne [3+2]-dipolar cycloaddition was shown to proceed with 95% radiochemical yield in ethanol within 30 min, allowing for a development of a kit-like peptide labeling approach with [(18)F]ADIBO. PMID:22024032

  12. Isolation and characteristics of trypsin from pyloric ceca of the starfish Asterina pectinifera.

    PubMed

    Kishimura, Hideki; Hayashi, Kenji

    2002-06-01

    Trypsin was purified from pyloric ceca of the starfish Asterina Pectinifera by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and cation-exchange chromatography. Final enzyme preparation was nearly homogeneous in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and its molecular weight was estimated as approximately 28000. Optimum pH and temperature of A. pectinifera trypsin for hydrolysis of N(alpha)-p-Tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride were approximately pH 8.0 and 55 degrees C, respectively. A. pectinifera trypsin was unstable at above 50 degrees C and below pH 5.0, and was not activated by adding Ca(2+). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of A. pectinifera trypsin, IVGGHEF, was found. PMID:12031475

  13. Aspartame and aspartame derivatives effect human thrombin catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Julie E; Berliner, Lawrence J

    2004-12-20

    The study of small Asp-Phe analogs was undertaken since this dipeptide sequence is critical in fibrinogen recognition and catalysis. The inhibition of clotting activity by Asp-Phe-methyl ester (aspartame), formyl-Asp-Phe-methyl ester and acetyl-Asp-Phe was biphasic in all cases, indicating the presence of at least two binding sites. The N-terminally blocked derivatives are stronger inhibitors than aspartame. In contrast, tosyl-Gly-Pro-Arg-p'-nitroanilide hydrolysis was inhibited minimally by Asp-Phe-methyl, ester [Ki(app)=98 mM]. Acetyl-Asp-Phe inhibition of thrombin amidase activity was biphasic, tenfold stronger and appeared to be strongly cooperative. These results are discussed with respect to the inhibition of alpha-thrombin by ATP.

  14. XPS Study of Counterion Incorporation into Poly(vinylferrocene).

    PubMed

    Zeng, X; Moon, S; Bruckenstein, S; Hillman, A R

    1998-07-01

    XPS provides answers to two significant issues that arise in studying electroactive polymers. First, what fraction of possible charge centers participates in the redox process? Second, what are the relative partition coefficients of two counterions that compete as charge-compensating counterions? To answer both these questions, we emersed (or immersed) poly(vinylferrocene) films from (or into) supporting electrolytes while maintaining potential control to govern the electrochemical history of the electroactive film. We found that all ferrocene units in the surface of a poly(vinylferrocene) film deposited on gold can be oxidized when the counterion is perchlorate, tetrafluoroborate, hexafluorophosphate, tosylate, or 1,5-naphthalenedisulfonate. In answering the second question, no internal standard was needed:  the concentration ratios of the two competing ions in both water and polymer phases were used as the experimental variables. For the completely oxidized ferricinium film, we found that the partition coefficient of perchlorate ions is 67% of that of fluoroborate ions.

  15. Hepatitis Virus Infections in Poultry.

    PubMed

    Yugo, Danielle M; Hauck, Ruediger; Shivaprasad, H L; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Viral hepatitis in poultry is a complex disease syndrome caused by several viruses belonging to different families including avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV-1, -2, -3), duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3, fowl adenoviruses (FAdV), and turkey hepatitis virus (THV). While these hepatitis viruses share the same target organ, the liver, they each possess unique clinical and biological features. In this article, we aim to review the common and unique features of major poultry hepatitis viruses in an effort to identify the knowledge gaps and aid the prevention and control of poultry viral hepatitis. Avian HEV is an Orthohepevirus B in the family Hepeviridae that naturally infects chickens and consists of three distinct genotypes worldwide. Avian HEV is associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome or big liver and spleen disease in chickens, although the majority of the infected birds are subclinical. Avihepadnaviruses in the family of Hepadnaviridae have been isolated from ducks, snow geese, white storks, grey herons, cranes, and parrots. DHBV evolved with the host as a noncytopathic form without clinical signs and rarely progressed to chronicity. The outcome for DHBV infection varies by the host's ability to elicit an immune response and is dose and age dependent in ducks, thus mimicking the pathogenesis of human hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and providing an excellent animal model for human HBV. DHAV is a picornavirus that causes a highly contagious virus infection in ducks with up to 100% flock mortality in ducklings under 6 wk of age, while older birds remain unaffected. The high morbidity and mortality has an economic impact on intensive duck production farming. Duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3 are astroviruses in the family of Astroviridae with similarity phylogenetically to turkey astroviruses, implicating the potential for cross-species infections between strains. Duck astrovirus (DAstV) causes

  16. Hepatitis Virus Infections in Poultry.

    PubMed

    Yugo, Danielle M; Hauck, Ruediger; Shivaprasad, H L; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Viral hepatitis in poultry is a complex disease syndrome caused by several viruses belonging to different families including avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV-1, -2, -3), duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3, fowl adenoviruses (FAdV), and turkey hepatitis virus (THV). While these hepatitis viruses share the same target organ, the liver, they each possess unique clinical and biological features. In this article, we aim to review the common and unique features of major poultry hepatitis viruses in an effort to identify the knowledge gaps and aid the prevention and control of poultry viral hepatitis. Avian HEV is an Orthohepevirus B in the family Hepeviridae that naturally infects chickens and consists of three distinct genotypes worldwide. Avian HEV is associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome or big liver and spleen disease in chickens, although the majority of the infected birds are subclinical. Avihepadnaviruses in the family of Hepadnaviridae have been isolated from ducks, snow geese, white storks, grey herons, cranes, and parrots. DHBV evolved with the host as a noncytopathic form without clinical signs and rarely progressed to chronicity. The outcome for DHBV infection varies by the host's ability to elicit an immune response and is dose and age dependent in ducks, thus mimicking the pathogenesis of human hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and providing an excellent animal model for human HBV. DHAV is a picornavirus that causes a highly contagious virus infection in ducks with up to 100% flock mortality in ducklings under 6 wk of age, while older birds remain unaffected. The high morbidity and mortality has an economic impact on intensive duck production farming. Duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3 are astroviruses in the family of Astroviridae with similarity phylogenetically to turkey astroviruses, implicating the potential for cross-species infections between strains. Duck astrovirus (DAstV) causes

  17. Radionuclide-binding compound, a radionuclide delivery system, a method of making a radium complexing compound, a method of extracting a radionuclide, and a method of delivering a radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Darrell R.; Wai, Chien M.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2000-01-01

    The invention pertains to compounds which specifically bind radionuclides, and to methods of making radionuclide complexing compounds. In one aspect, the invention includes a radionuclide delivery system comprising: a) a calix[n]arene-crown-[m]-ether compound, wherein n is an integer greater than 3, and wherein m is an integer greater than 3, the calix[n]arene-crown-[m]-ether compound comprising at least two ionizable groups; and b) an antibody attached to the calix[n]arene-crown-[m]-ether compound. In another aspect, the invention includes a method of making a radium complexing compound, comprising: a) providing a calix[n]arene compound, wherein n is an integer greater than 3, the calix[n]arene compound comprising n phenolic hydroxyl groups; b) providing a crown ether precursor, the crown ether precursor comprising a pair of tosylated ends; c) reacting the pair of tosylated ends with a pair of the phenolic hydroxyl groups to convert said pair of phenolic hydroxyl groups to ether linkages, the ether linkages connecting the crown ether precursor to the calix[n]arene to form a calix[n]arene-crown-[m]-ether compound, wherein m is an integer greater than 3; d) converting remaining phenolic hydroxyl groups to esters; e) converting the esters to acids, the acids being proximate a crown-[m]-ether portion of the calix[n]arene-crown-[m]-ether compound; and f) providing a Ra.sup.2+ ion within the crown-[m]-ether portion of the calix[n]arene-crown-[m]-ether compound.

  18. Synthesis of 4-(aminoalkyl) substituted 1,3-dioxanes as potent NMDA and σ receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Utech, Tina; Köhler, Jens; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2011-06-01

    Elongation of the distance between the oxygen heterocycle and the basic amino moiety or ring expansion of the oxygen heterocycle of the NMDA receptor antagonists dexoxadrol and etoxadrol led to compounds with promising NMDA receptor affinity. Herein the combination of both structural features, i.e. elongation of the O-heterocycle--amine distance with a 1,3-dioxane ring is envisaged. The synthesis of aminoethyl-1,3-dioxanes 13, 22, 23 and 29 was performed by transacetalization of various acetals with pentane-1,3,5-triol, activation of the remaining free OH moiety with tosyl chloride and subsequent nucleophilic substitution. The corresponding 3-aminopropyl derivatives 33-35 were prepared by substitution of the tosylates with KCN and LiAlH4 reduction. The highest NMDA receptor affinity was found for 1,3-dioxanes with a phenyl and an ethyl residue at the acetalic position (23) followed by diphenyl (22) and monophenyl derivatives (13). Generally the NMDA affinity of primary amines is higher than the NMDA affinity of secondary and tertiary amines. Altogether the primary amine 23a (Ki=24 nM) represents the most promising NMDA receptor antagonist of this series exceeding the NMDA affinity of the mono-homologues (2-aminoethyl)-1,3-dioxolanes (3,4) and (aminomethyl)-1,3-dioxanes (5,6). Whereas the primary amine 23a turned out to be selective against σ1 and σ2 receptors the benzylamine 13d was identified as potent (Ki=19 nM) and selective σ1 antagonist, which showed extraordinarily high antiallodynic activity in the capsaicin assay. PMID:21444132

  19. Identification and characterisation of the excreted/secreted serine proteases of larvae of the old world screwworm fly, Chrysomya bezziana.

    PubMed

    Muharsini, S; Sukarsih; Riding, G; Partoutomo, S; Hamilton, S; Willadsen, P; Wijffels, G

    2000-05-01

    Serine proteases are the major proteolytic activity excreted or secreted from Chrysomya bezziana larvae as demonstrated by gelatin gel analyses and the use of specific substrates, benzoyl-Arg-p-nitroanilide and succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide. Serine proteases were identified through their inhibition by 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzene sulphonyl fluoride and classified as trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like on the basis of inhibition by tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone and tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone, respectively. Like most insect serine proteases, the C. bezziana enzymes were active over broad pH range from mildly acidic to alkaline. The excreted or secreted serine proteases were purified by affinity chromatography using soybean trypsin inhibitor. A different subset of the serine proteases was isolated by salt elution from washed larval peritrophic matrices. Amino-terminal sequencing identified both trypsin and chymotrypsin-like sequences in the excreted or secreted pool with the latter being the dominant protease, whereas trypsin was the dominant species in the peritrophic matrix eluant. These results suggest that trypsin was possibly preferably adsorbed by the peritrophic matrix and may act as a final proteolytic processing stage as partially digested and ingested polypeptides pass through the peritrophic matrix. Immunoblot analysis on dissected gut tissues indicated that the anterior and posterior midguts were the main source of the serine proteases, although a novel species of 32 kDa was predominantly associated with the peritrophic matrix. Proteases are a target for a partially protective immune response and understanding the complexity of the secreted and digestive proteases is a necessary part of understanding the mechanism of the host's immunological defence against the parasite.

  20. Thrombin stimulates tumor-platelet adhesion in vitro and metastasis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Nierodzik, M L; Plotkin, A; Kajumo, F; Karpatkin, S

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed a role for platelets and the platelet-adhesive proteins, fibronectin and von Willebrand factor (vWF) in platelet-tumor cell interaction in vitro and metastasis in vivo. The present report documents the effect of thrombin treatment of platelets on this interaction in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, thrombin at 100-1,000 mU/ml maximally stimulated the adhesion of six different tumor cell lines from three different species two- to fivefold. As little as 1-10 mU/ml was effective. The effect of thrombin was specific (inhibitable by hirudin, dansyl-arginine N-(3-ethyl-1,5 pentanediyl) amide and unreactive with the inactive thrombin analogue N-P-tosyl-L-phenylchloromethylketone-thrombin and D-phenylalanyl-L-propyl-L-arginine chloromethylketone-thrombin (PPACK-thrombin), and required high-affinity thrombin receptors (competition with PPACK-thrombin but not with N-P-tosyl-L-lysine-chloromethyl-ketone-thrombin). Functionally active thrombin was required on the platelet surface. Binding of tumor cells to thrombin-activated platelets was inhibitable by agents known to interfere with the platelet GPIIb-GPIIIa integrin: monoclonal antibody 10E5, tetrapeptide RGDS and gamma chain fibrinogen decapeptide LGGAKQAGDV, as well as polyclonal antibodies against the platelet adhesive ligands, fibronectin and vWF. In vivo, thrombin at 250-500 mU per animal increased murine pulmonary metastases fourfold with CT26 colon carcinoma cells and 68-413-fold with B16 amelanotic melanoma cells. Thus, thrombin amplifies tumor-platelet adhesion in vitro two- to fivefold via occupancy of high-affinity platelet thrombin receptors, and modulation of GPIIb-GPIIIa adhesion via an RGD-dependent mechanism. In vivo, thrombin enhances tumor metastases 4-413-fold with two different tumor cell lines. PMID:1845869

  1. A chymotrypsin-like proteinase from the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae.

    PubMed

    Elpidina, E N; Tsybina, T A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Belozersky, M A; Zhuzhikov, D P; Oppert, B

    2005-08-01

    A chymotrypsin-like proteinase was isolated from the posterior midgut of larvae of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, by ion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The enzyme, TmC1, was purified to homogeneity as determined by SDS-PAGE and postelectrophoretic activity detection. TmC1 had a molecular mass of 23.0 kDa, pI of 8.4, a pH optimum of 9.5, and the optimal temperature for activity was 51 degrees C. The proteinase displayed high stability at temperatures below 43 degrees C and in the pH range 6.5-11.2, which is inclusive of the pH of the posterior and middle midgut. The enzyme hydrolyzed long chymotrypsin peptide substrates SucAAPFpNA, SucAAPLpNA and GlpAALpNA and did not hydrolyze short chymotrypsin substrates. Kinetic parameters of the enzymatic reaction demonstrated that the best substrate was SucAAPFpNA, with k(cat app) 36.5 s(-1) and K(m) 1.59 mM. However, the enzyme had a lower K(m) for SucAAPLpNA, 0.5 mM. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) was an effective inhibitor of TmC1, and the proteinase was not inhibited by either tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) or N(alpha)-tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK). However, the activity of TmC1 was reduced with sulfhydryl reagents. Several plant and insect proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors were active against the purified enzyme, the most effective being Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI). The N-terminal sequence of the enzyme was IISGSAASKGQFPWQ, which was up to 67% similar to other insect chymotrypsin-like proteinases and 47% similar to mammalian chymotrypsin A. The amino acid composition of TmC1 differed significantly from previously isolated T. molitor enzymes.

  2. Studies on activity, distribution, and zymogram of protease, α-amylase, and lipase in the paddlefish Polyodon spathula.

    PubMed

    Ji, H; Sun, H T; Xiong, D M

    2012-06-01

    A series of biochemical determination and electrophoretic observations have been conducted to analyze the activities and characteristics of protease, α-amylase, and lipase of paddlefish Polyodon spathula. The results obtained have been compared with those of bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis) and hybrid sturgeon (Huso dauricus ♀ × Acipenser schrenki Brandt ♂), in order to increase available knowledge of the physiological characteristics of this sturgeon species and to gain information with regard to its nutrition. Further, a comparative study of enzymatic activity, distribution, and characterization between commercial feed-reared paddlefish (CG) and natural live food-reared (NG) paddlefish was conducted. Results showed that higher proteolytic activity was observed in the pH range 2.5-3.0 and at a pH of 7.0 for paddlefish. Levels of acid protease activity of paddlefish were similar to that of hybrid sturgeon, and significantly higher than that of bighead carp. The inhibition assay of paddlefish showed that the rate of inhibition of tosyl-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone was approximately 2.6-fold that of tosyl-lysine chloromethyl ketone. There was no significant difference observed for acid protease activity between PG and CG groups, whereas the activity of alkaline protease, α-amylase, and lipase in the PG group were significantly lower than those in the CG group. The substrate sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis further showed that there were certain types of enzymes, especially α-amylase, with similar molecular mass in the paddlefish and hybrid sturgeon. It can be inferred that acid digestion was main mechanism for protein hydrolysis in paddlefish, as reported for other fishes with a stomach. This indicates that the paddlefish requires higher alkaline protease, α-amylase, and lipase activity to digest natural live food. PMID:21894570

  3. Advances in the synthesis of functionalised pyrrolotetrathiafulvalenes

    PubMed Central

    O’Driscoll, Luke J; Andersen, Sissel S; Solano, Marta V; Bendixen, Dan; Jensen, Morten; Duedal, Troels; Lycoops, Jess; van der Pol, Cornelia; Sørensen, Rebecca E; Larsen, Karina R; Myntman, Kenneth; Henriksen, Christian; Hansen, Stinne W

    2015-01-01

    Summary The electron-donor and unique redox properties of the tetrathiafulvalene (TTF, 1) moiety have led to diverse applications in many areas of chemistry. Monopyrrolotetrathiafulvalenes (MPTTFs, 4) and bispyrrolotetrathiafulvalenes (BPTTFs, 5) are useful structural motifs and have found widespread use in fields such as supramolecular chemistry and molecular electronics. Protocols enabling the synthesis of functionalised MPTTFs and BPTTFs are therefore of broad interest. Herein, we present the synthesis of a range of functionalised MPTTF and BPTTF species. Firstly, the large-scale preparation of the precursor species N-tosyl-(1,3)-dithiolo[4,5-c]pyrrole-2-one (6) is described, as well as the synthesis of the analogue N-tosyl-4,6-dimethyl-(1,3)-dithiolo[4,5-c]pyrrole-2-one (7). Thereafter, we show how 6 and 7 can be used to prepare BPTTFs using homocoupling reactions and functionalised MPTTFs using cross-coupling reactions with a variety of 1,3-dithiole-2-thiones (19). Subsequently, the incorporation of more complex functionality is discussed. We show how the 2-cyanoethyl protecting group can be used to afford MPTTFs functionalised with thioethers, exemplified by a series of ethylene glycol derivatives. Additionally, the merits of 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU) as an alternative to the most common deprotecting agent, CsOH·H2O are discussed. Finally, we show how a copper-mediated Ullman-type reaction can be applied to the N-arylation of MPTTFs and BPTTFs using a variety of aryl halides. PMID:26199667

  4. Spectroscopic evidence of xanthine compounds fluorescence quenching effect on water-soluble porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2015-02-01

    The formation of π-stacked complexes between water-soluble porphyrins: 4,4‧,4″,4″‧-(21H,23H-porphine-5,10,15,20-tetrayl)tetrakis-(benzoic acid) (H2TCPP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)-21H,23H-porphine (H2TPPS4), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TTMePP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TMePyP), the Cu(II) complexes of H2TTMePP and H2TMePyP, as well as chlorophyll a with xanthine, theophylline (1,3-dimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine) has been studied analysing their absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra in aqueous (or acetone in case of chlorophyll a) solution. During titration by the compounds from xanthine group the bathochromic effect in the porphyrin absorption spectra as well as the hypochromicity of the porphyrin Soret maximum can be noticed. The fluorescence quenching effect observed during interactions in the systems examined suggests the process of static quenching. The association and fluorescence quenching constants are of the order of magnitude of 103 - 102 mol-1. The results obtained show that xanthine and its derivatives can quench the fluorescence of the porphyrins according to the number of methyl groups in the molecule of quencher.

  5. Luminescence, structural, and bonding trends upon varying the halogen in isostructural aurophilic dimers.

    PubMed

    Elbjeirami, Oussama; Gonser, M W Alexander; Stewart, Barbara N; Bruce, Alice E; Bruce, Mitchell R M; Cundari, Thomas R; Omary, Mohammad A

    2009-03-01

    The preparation of three isonitrile complexes (p-tosyl)CH(2)NCAu(I)X (X = Cl, Br, and I) along with their structural, spectral, and computational characterization are reported. X-Ray crystallography reveals that these complexes all crystallize in the same space group, C2/c, and have closely related supramolecular structures. The three complexes exhibit crossed-dimer structures with short Au...Au aurophilic distances of 3.0634(4) A, 3.1044(7) A, and 3.1083(5) A, for X = Cl, Br, and I, respectively. These distances are among the shortest ligand-unassisted Au...Au interactions reported. While RNCAuX complexes that we reported earlier associate as anti-parallel, one-dimensional aurophilic polymers with long Au...Au distances (approximately 3.6 A) and exhibit orange-red phosphorescence, the analogous aurophilic dimers herein show seemingly counter-intuitive blue-green emissions despite having much shorter Au...Au distances. DFT computations are used to augment experiment and study the T(1) phosphorescent excited state of [RNCAuX](n) in parallel, anti-parallel, and staggered conformations. Excimeric bonding and large Stokes shifts are predicted for all models, the extent of which is sensitive to both "n" and conformation with trends commensurate with experimental luminescence data. Calculations for the three [MeNCAuX](2) dimeric complexes reveal blue-green phosphorescence with a red shift as a function of increasing halide softness, consistent with experimental data for (p-tosyl)CH(2)NCAu(I)X (Cl > Br > I). The overall experimental and theoretical work signifies the central role of ground-state aurophilic bonding and excited-state excimeric bonding on the electronic structure, hence facilitating development of structure-luminescence relations that may assist in the rational design of novel optoelectronic devices.

  6. Astronomy week: An investigation of the implementation and identity formation of participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewitt, Carl

    Our society has a great need for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) professionals and educational institutions are currently having difficulty keeping up with society's demand (Carnevale, 2011). Outreach efforts are a key strategy to encouraging young people to pursue STEM careers and evaluation methods need to be used to ensure that this outreach is efficient and effective in helping young students see themselves as a prospective STEM professionals (Moskal, 2011). The purpose of this dissertation study was to investigate the implementation of an Astronomy Week supported by the Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CMSE) and its impact on student identity formation. Three classrooms implemented the CMSE Astronomy Week curriculum and accepted a visit from the Starlab mobile planetarium. Data consisted of field notes from classroom observations, interviews with students and teachers, the Draw a Scientist Test (DAST), and surveys from both teachers and students. Results provide evidence that this outreach effort was a significant science event that helped change the stereotypical beliefs about scientists, especially in minority students. Drawings of scientists and written responses provided valuable insight into participants' identity formation and desires to pursue a career in science. Results also provide suggestions for improving the programmatic and curricular aspects of the outreach program. Teacher interviews and questionnaire responses were particularly valuable in the development of suggestions for improving the program.

  7. Measurements of prompt charm production cross-sections in pp collisions at sqrt{s}=13 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-03-01

    Production cross-sections of prompt charm mesons are measured with the first data from pp collisions at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.98 ± 0.19 pb-1 collected by the LHCb experiment. The production cross-sections of D 0, D +, D s + , and D *+ mesons are measured in bins of charm meson transverse momentum, p T, and rapidity, y, and cover the range 0 < p T < 15GeV/c and 2.0 < y < 4.5. The inclusive cross-sections for the four mesons, including charge conjugation, within the range of 1 < p T < 8 GeV/c are found to be begin{array}{l}σ left(ppto {D}^0Xright)=2460± 3± 130\\upmu b \\ {}σ left(ppto {D}+Xright)=1000± 3± 110\\upmu b \\ {}σ left(ppto {D}_s+Xright)=460± 13± 100\\upmu b \\ {}σ left(ppto {D}^{ast +}Xright)=880± 5± 140\\upmu b where the uncertainties are due to statistical and systematic uncertainties, respectively. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Health Information Technology: An Expanded Care Coordination in Rural Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Wodarski, John S; Green, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    The Expanded Care Coordination through the Use of Health Information Technology in Rural Tennessee was a 3-year initiative implemented by The University of Tennessee Children's Mental Health Services Research Center and the Helen Ross McNabb Center Regional Mental Health System. The program targeted rural adults in the East Tennessee area. This intervention utilized the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT), Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST), and AC-COD screening tools. After the initial screening, the appropriate level of intervention was assessed. Clients completed modules on the program's website and met with a clinician for a minimum for four face-to-face meetings. Alcohol use and drug use declined significantly over the course of the program. Alcohol use and outpatient treatment for alcohol and substance abuse declined significantly over the course of the program. There were also significant decreases in days of probations, depression, physical complaints, and violent behaviors. Health information technology is becoming more common in mental health treatment facilities. However, more testing needs to be done with larger samples to assess the efficacy of the program.

  9. Validity and Reliability of the Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) in University Students.

    PubMed

    Tiburcio Sainz, Marcela; Rosete-Mohedano, Ma Guadalupe; Natera Rey, Guillermina; Martínez Vélez, Nora Angélica; Carreño García, Silvia; Pérez Cisneros, Daniel

    2016-03-02

    The Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST), developed by the World Health Organization (WHO), has been used successfully in many countries, but there are few studies of its validity and reliability for the Mexican population. The objective of this study was to determine the psychometric properties of the self-administered ASSIST test in university students in Mexico. This was an ex post facto non-experimental study with 1,176 undergraduate students, the majority women (70.1%) aged 18-23 years (89.5%) and single (87.5%). To estimate concurrent validity, factor analysis and tests of reliability and correlation were carried out between the subscale for alcohol and AUDIT, those for tobacco and the Fagerström Test, and those for marijuana and DAST-20. Adequate reliability coefficients were obtained for ASSIST subscales for tobacco (alpha = 0.83), alcohol (alpha = 0.76), and marijuana (alpha = 0.73). Significant correlations were found only with the AUDIT (r = 0.71) and the alcohol subscale. The best balance of sensitivity and specificity of the alcohol subscale (83.8% and 80%, respectively) and the largest area under the ROC curve (81.9%) was found with a cutoff score of 8. The self-administered version of ASSIST is a valid screening instrument to identify at-risk cases due to substance use in this population.

  10. Psychometric properties of the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) with substance abusers in outpatient and residential treatment.

    PubMed

    Voluse, Andrew C; Gioia, Christopher J; Sobell, Linda Carter; Dum, Mariam; Sobell, Mark B; Simco, Edward R

    2012-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT), an 11-item self-report questionnaire developed to screen individuals for drug problems, are evaluated. The measure, developed in Sweden and evaluated there with individuals with severe drug problems, has not been evaluated with less severe substance abusers or with clinical populations in the United States. Participants included 35 drug abusers in an outpatient substance abuse treatment program, 79 drug abusers in a residential substance abuse treatment program, and 39 alcohol abusers from both treatment settings who did not report a drug abuse problem. The DUDIT was found to be a psychometrically sound drug abuse screening measure with high convergent validity (r=.85) when compared with the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10), and to have a Cronbach's alpha of .94. In addition, a single component accounted for 64.91% of total variance, and the DUDIT had sensitivity and specificity scores of .90 and .85, respectively, when using the optimal cut-off score of 8. Additionally, the DUDIT showed good discriminant validity as it significantly differentiated drug from alcohol abusers. These findings support the DUDIT as a reliable and valid drug abuse screening instrument that measures a unidimensional construct. Further research is warranted with additional clinical populations. PMID:21937169

  11. Digital Quantification of DNA Replication and Chromosome Segregation Enables Determination of Antimicrobial Susceptibility after only 15 Minutes of Antibiotic Exposure.

    PubMed

    Schoepp, Nathan G; Khorosheva, Eugenia M; Schlappi, Travis S; Curtis, Matthew S; Humphries, Romney M; Hindler, Janet A; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-08-01

    Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) would decrease misuse and overuse of antibiotics. The "holy grail" of AST is a phenotype-based test that can be performed within a doctor visit. Such a test requires the ability to determine a pathogen's susceptibility after only a short antibiotic exposure. Herein, digital PCR (dPCR) was employed to test whether measuring DNA replication of the target pathogen through digital single-molecule counting would shorten the required time of antibiotic exposure. Partitioning bacterial chromosomal DNA into many small volumes during dPCR enabled AST results after short exposure times by 1) precise quantification and 2) a measurement of how antibiotics affect the states of macromolecular assembly of bacterial chromosomes. This digital AST (dAST) determined susceptibility of clinical isolates from urinary tract infections (UTIs) after 15 min of exposure for all four antibiotic classes relevant to UTIs. This work lays the foundation to develop a rapid, point-of-care AST and strengthen global antibiotic stewardship.

  12. Alu repeats as markers for forensic DNA analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M.; Kass, D.H.

    1994-01-01

    The Human-Specific (HS) subfamily of Alu sequences is comprised of a group of 500 nearly identical members which are almost exclusively restricted to the human genome. Individual subfamily members share an average of 98.9% nucleotide identity with the HS subfamily consensus sequence, and have an average age of 2.8 million years. We have developed a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based assay using primers complementary to the 5 inch and 3 inch unique flanking DNA sequences from each HS Alu that allow the locus to be assayed for the presence or absence of the Alu repeat. The dimorphic HS Alu sequences probably inserted in the human genome after the radiation of modem humans (within the last 200,000-one million years) and represent a unique source of information for human population genetics and forensic DNA analyses. These sites can be developed into Dimorphic Alu Sequence Tagged Sites (DASTS) for the Human Genome Project. HS Alu family member insertions differ from other types of polymorphism (e.g. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat [VNTR] or Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism [RFLP]) in that polymorphisms due to Alu insertions arise as a result of a unique event which has occurred only one time in the human population and spread through the population from that point. Therefore, individuals that share HS Alu repeats inherited these elements from a common ancestor. Most VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms may arise multiple times in parallel within a population.

  13. Synthesis and NMDA receptor affinity of fluorinated dioxadrol analogues.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Ashutosh; Schepmann, Dirk; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2010-06-01

    A series of dioxadrol analogues with fluorine substituents in position 4 of the piperidine ring has been synthesized and pharmacologically evaluated. The key step in the synthesis was the fluorination of diastereomeric piperidones 6a and 6c as well as diastereomeric alcohols 9a and 9c with DAST. The reaction of the alcohols 9a and 9c took place with inversion of configuration. After removal of the Cbz-protective group, the NMDA receptor affinities of the resulting secondary amines 8a, 8c, 12b, and 12d were investigated in receptor binding studies. It was shown that the like-configuration of the ring junction was crucial for high NMDA receptor affinity. An axially oriented fluorine atom in position 4 led to 2-(2,2-diphenyl-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl)-4-fluoropiperidine (12d, WMS-2517) with a K(i)-value of 27nM. The NMDA receptor affinity of 8c (WMS-2513) with an additional fluorine atom in equatorial 4-position was slightly reduced (K(i)=81 nM). Both fluorinated dioxadrol derivatives 8c and 12d showed high selectivity against sigma(1) and sigma(2) receptors as well as the polyamine binding site of NR2B receptors.

  14. Sample Canister Capture Mechanism for Mars Sample Return: Functional and environmental test of the elegant breadboard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carta, R.; Filippetto, D.; Lavagna, M.; Mailland, F.; Falkner, P.; Larranaga, J.

    2015-12-01

    The paper provides recent updates about the ESA study: Sample Canister Capture Mechanism Design and Breadboard developed under the Mars Robotic Exploration Preparation (MREP) program. The study is part of a set of feasibility studies aimed at identifying, analysing and developing technology concepts enabling the future international Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission. The MSR is a challenging mission with the purpose of sending a Lander to Mars, acquire samples from its surface/subsurface and bring them back to Earth for further, more in depth, analyses. In particular, the technology object of the Study is relevant to the Capture Mechanism that, mounted on the Orbiter, is in charge of capturing and securing the Sample Canister, or Orbiting Sample, accommodating the Martian soil samples, previously delivered in Martian orbit by the Mars Ascent Vehicle. An elegant breadboard of such a device was implemented and qualified under an ESA contract primed by OHB-CGS S.p.A. and supported by Politecnico di Milano, Department of Aerospace Science and Technology: in particular, functional tests were conducted at PoliMi-DAST and thermal and mechanical test campaigns occurred at Serms s.r.l. facility. The effectiveness of the breadboard design was demonstrated and the obtained results, together with the design challenges, issues and adopted solutions are critically presented in the paper. The breadboard was also tested on a parabolic flight to raise its Technology Readiness Level to 6; the microgravity experiment design, adopted solutions and results are presented as well in the paper.

  15. Validity and Reliability of the Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) in University Students.

    PubMed

    Tiburcio Sainz, Marcela; Rosete-Mohedano, Ma Guadalupe; Natera Rey, Guillermina; Martínez Vélez, Nora Angélica; Carreño García, Silvia; Pérez Cisneros, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST), developed by the World Health Organization (WHO), has been used successfully in many countries, but there are few studies of its validity and reliability for the Mexican population. The objective of this study was to determine the psychometric properties of the self-administered ASSIST test in university students in Mexico. This was an ex post facto non-experimental study with 1,176 undergraduate students, the majority women (70.1%) aged 18-23 years (89.5%) and single (87.5%). To estimate concurrent validity, factor analysis and tests of reliability and correlation were carried out between the subscale for alcohol and AUDIT, those for tobacco and the Fagerström Test, and those for marijuana and DAST-20. Adequate reliability coefficients were obtained for ASSIST subscales for tobacco (alpha = 0.83), alcohol (alpha = 0.76), and marijuana (alpha = 0.73). Significant correlations were found only with the AUDIT (r = 0.71) and the alcohol subscale. The best balance of sensitivity and specificity of the alcohol subscale (83.8% and 80%, respectively) and the largest area under the ROC curve (81.9%) was found with a cutoff score of 8. The self-administered version of ASSIST is a valid screening instrument to identify at-risk cases due to substance use in this population. PMID:26990386

  16. American and Greek Children's Visual Images of Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christidou, Vasilia; Bonoti, Fotini; Kontopoulou, Argiro

    2016-08-01

    This study explores American and Greek primary pupils' visual images of scientists by means of two nonverbal data collection tasks to identify possible convergences and divergences. Specifically, it aims to investigate whether their images of scientists vary according to the data collection instrument used and to gender. To this end, 91 third-grade American ( N = 46) and Greek ( N = 45) pupils were examined. Data collection was conducted through a drawing task based on Chambers (1983) `Draw-A-Scientist-Test' (DAST) and a picture selection task during which the children selected between 14 pairs of illustrations those that were most probable to represent scientists. Analysis focused on stereotype indicators related with scientists' appearance and work setting. Results showed that the two groups' performance varied significantly across the tasks used to explore their stereotypic perceptions, although the overall stereotypy was not differentiated according to participants' ethnic group. Moreover, boys were found to use more stereotypic indicators than girls, while the picture selection task elicited more stereotypic responses than the drawing task. In general, data collected by the two instruments revealed convergences and divergences concerning the stereotypic indicators preferred. Similarities and differences between national groups point to the influence of a globalized popular culture on the one hand and of the different sociocultural contexts underlying science curricula and their implementation on the other. Implications for science education are discussed.

  17. Sensitivity method for integrated structure/active control law design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    The development is described of an integrated structure/active control law design methodology for aeroelastic aircraft applications. A short motivating introduction to aeroservoelasticity is given along with the need for integrated structures/controls design algorithms. Three alternative approaches to development of an integrated design method are briefly discussed with regards to complexity, coordination and tradeoff strategies, and the nature of the resulting solutions. This leads to the formulation of the proposed approach which is based on the concepts of sensitivity of optimum solutions and multi-level decompositions. The concept of sensitivity of optimum is explained in more detail and compared with traditional sensitivity concepts of classical control theory. The analytical sensitivity expressions for the solution of the linear, quadratic cost, Gaussian (LQG) control problem are summarized in terms of the linear regulator solution and the Kalman Filter solution. Numerical results for a state space aeroelastic model of the DAST ARW-II vehicle are given, showing the changes in aircraft responses to variations of a structural parameter, in this case first wing bending natural frequency.

  18. Intense terahertz radiation and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, H. A.; Chai, X.; Ibrahim, A.; Mondal, S.; Férachou, D.; Ropagnol, X.; Ozaki, T.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we will review both past and recent progresses in the generation, detection and application of intense terahertz (THz) radiation. We will restrict the review to laser based intense few-cycle THz sources, and thus will not include sources such as synchrotron-based or narrowband sources. We will first review the various methods used for generating intense THz radiation, including photoconductive antennas (PCAs), optical rectification sources (especially the tilted-pulse-front lithium niobate source and the DAST source, but also those using other crystals), air plasma THz sources and relativistic laser–plasma sources. Next, we will give a brief introduction on the common methods for coherent THz detection techniques (namely the PCA technique and the electro-optic sampling), and point out the limitations of these techniques for measuring intense THz radiation. We will then review three techniques that are highly suited for detecting intense THz radiation, namely the air breakdown coherent detection technique, various single-shot THz detection techniques, and the spectral-domain interferometry technique. Finally, we will give an overview of the various applications that have been made possible with such intense THz sources, including nonlinear THz spectroscopy of condensed matter (optical-pump/THz-probe, THz-pump/THz-probe, THz-pump/optical-probe), nonlinear THz optics, resonant and non-resonant control of material (such as switching of superconductivity, magnetic and polarization switching) and controlling the nonlinear response of metamaterials. We will also provide a short perspective on the future of intense THz sources and their applications.

  19. Intense terahertz radiation and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, H. A.; Chai, X.; Ibrahim, A.; Mondal, S.; Férachou, D.; Ropagnol, X.; Ozaki, T.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we will review both past and recent progresses in the generation, detection and application of intense terahertz (THz) radiation. We will restrict the review to laser based intense few-cycle THz sources, and thus will not include sources such as synchrotron-based or narrowband sources. We will first review the various methods used for generating intense THz radiation, including photoconductive antennas (PCAs), optical rectification sources (especially the tilted-pulse-front lithium niobate source and the DAST source, but also those using other crystals), air plasma THz sources and relativistic laser-plasma sources. Next, we will give a brief introduction on the common methods for coherent THz detection techniques (namely the PCA technique and the electro-optic sampling), and point out the limitations of these techniques for measuring intense THz radiation. We will then review three techniques that are highly suited for detecting intense THz radiation, namely the air breakdown coherent detection technique, various single-shot THz detection techniques, and the spectral-domain interferometry technique. Finally, we will give an overview of the various applications that have been made possible with such intense THz sources, including nonlinear THz spectroscopy of condensed matter (optical-pump/THz-probe, THz-pump/THz-probe, THz-pump/optical-probe), nonlinear THz optics, resonant and non-resonant control of material (such as switching of superconductivity, magnetic and polarization switching) and controlling the nonlinear response of metamaterials. We will also provide a short perspective on the future of intense THz sources and their applications.

  20. Patterns of Substance Use among HIV-Positive Adults Over 50: Implications for Treatment and Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Starks, Tyrel J.; Millar, Brett M.; Boonrai, Kailip; Marcotte, David

    2014-01-01

    Background The population of older adults living with HIV is increasing in the United States. Despite an increased focus on the health of HIV-positive older adults, knowledge about their substance use, a primary risk factor for HIV medication non-adherence, and the association between use, problems associated with use, and adherence behavior, is limited. Methods Data were collected from 557 HIV-positive adults aged 50 and older in the New York City area via telephone interview. Participants reported the number of days in the past month on which they missed any doses of HIV medication as well as the number of days they used alcohol, marijuana, cocaine/crack, opiates, amyl nitrite (poppers), and other drugs. The severity of substance use associated problems was assessed using the DAST-10 and AUDIT-C. Results The sample included gay/bisexual (40.4%) and heterosexual (28.1%) men as well as lesbian/bisexual (4.9%) and heterosexual (26.7%) women. Latent class analyses identified four distinct patterns of substance use: Exclusive Alcohol Use; Alcohol and Marijuana; Alcohol and Cocaine/Crack; and Multiple-Substance Use. Variability in the number of missed HIV medication days and perceptions of substance use associated problems were observed across classes, with poorest adherence reported in the Alcohol and Cocaine/Crack class, followed by the Multiple-Substance Use class. These two classes also reported the greatest perceived impairment from substance use. Conclusions Patterns of recent substance use were associated with varying levels of HIV medication adherence and perceived substance use impairment, indicating that substance type matters when considering the health of older adults living with HIV, and that multiple-substance use needs to be addressed by interventions aimed at improving medication adherence. PMID:24745475

  1. Alu repeats as markers for human population genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M.; Bazan, H.

    1993-09-01

    The Human-Specific (HS) subfamily of Alu sequences is comprised of a group of 500 nearly identical members which are almost exclusively restricted to the human genome. Individual subfamily members share an average of 97.9% nucleotide identity with each other and an average of 98.9% nucleotide identity with the HS subfamily consensus sequence. HS Alu family members are thought to be derived from a single source ``master`` gene, and have an average age of 2.8 million years. We have developed a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based assay using primers complementary to the 5 in. and 3 in. unique flanking DNA sequences from each HS Alu that allows the locus to be assayed for the presence or absence of an Alu repeat. Individual HS Alu sequences were found to be either monomorphic or dimorphic for the presence or absence of each repeat. The monomorphic HS Alu family members inserted in the human genome after the human/great ape divergence (which is thought to have occurred 4--6 million years ago), but before the radiation of modem man. The dimorphic HS Alu sequences inserted in the human genome after the radiation of modem man (within the last 200,000-one million years) and represent a unique source of information for human population genetics and forensic DNA analyses. These sites can be developed into Dimorphic Alu Sequence Tagged Sites (DASTS) for the Human Genome Project as well. HS Alu family member insertion dimorphism differs from other types of polymorphism (e.g. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat [VNTR] or Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism [RFLP]) because individuals share HS Alu family member insertions based upon identity by descent from a common ancestor as a result of a single event which occurred one time within the human population. The VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms may arise multiple times within a population and are identical by state only.

  2. At the Beginning of the STEM Pipeline: A Case Study Exploring Preadolescent Female Students' Attitudes Toward Science, Perceptions of Scientists, and Developing Career Aspirations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heacock, Lucy Vogel

    The continuous underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), referred to as the leaky pipeline, has been examined from multiple perspectives internationally, while the attitudes and perceptions of preadolescent girls regarding STEM remain largely ignored. Employing a constructivist paradigm, this qualitative case study explored the perceptions and attitudes of 40 public elementary school female students across three grade levels regarding science, scientists, and career aspirations. Mixed-methods data collections included three survey instruments combined with semi-structured interviews. Self-efficacy, stereotype threat, and career choice theory provided the framework for the overarching research question: What are the attitudes and perceptions of female preadolescent students at the third, fourth, and fifth grade levels regarding science and scientists, and how might these dispositions affect their early development of STEM career aspirations and interests? The Three-Dimensions of Student Attitude Towards Science (TDSAS) instrument informed the exploration of self-efficacy; the modified Draw-A-Scientist Test (mDAST) and Rubric informed the exploration of stereotype threat; and the STEM-Career Interest Survey (CIS) informed the exploration of career aspirations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six participants. Results from this study indicated that the majority of the preadolescent girls thought science was an important topic to study and displayed an attitude of self-confident ability to learn science and be successful in science class. They highly enjoyed scientific experimentation and deeply valued problem solving. While they inferred they did not experience gender bias, the girls did engage in stereotyping scientists. Over half the girls expected to use science in their future careers, while a minority had already determined they wanted to be scientists when they grow up. The study concludes with

  3. Impact of residential schooling and of child abuse on substance use problem in Indigenous Peoples.

    PubMed

    Ross, Amélie; Dion, Jacinthe; Cantinotti, Michael; Collin-Vézina, Delphine; Paquette, Linda

    2015-12-01

    Residential schools were the institutions, in operation from the 19th century to the late 20th century, which Indigenous children in Canada were forced to attend. The literature shows that many young people who attended these institutions were victims of neglect and abuse. Negative psychological effects resulting from child abuse have been amply documented. However, very few studies on this subject have been carried out among Canada's Indigenous Peoples. The objective of this study is to evaluate, for an Indigenous population in Quebec (Canada), the impact of residential schooling as well as self-reported experiences of sexual and physical abuse during childhood on the development of alcohol and drug use problems in adulthood. A total of 358 Indigenous participants were interviewed (164 men [45.8%] and 194 women [54.2%]). Alcoholism was evaluated using the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST). Drug abuse was assessed with the Drug Abuse Screening Test-20 (DAST). Child abuse and residential schooling were assessed with dichotomous questions (yes/no). Among the participants, 28.5% (n=102) had attended residential schools, 35.2% (n=121) reported having experienced sexual abuse, and 34.1% (n=117) reported having experienced physical abuse before adulthood. Results of the exact logistic regression analyses indicated that residential school attendance was linked to alcohol problems, while child abuse was related to drug use problems. The results of this study highlight the importance of considering the consequences of historical traumas related to residential schools to better understand the current situation of Indigenous Peoples in Canada. PMID:26280378

  4. Representation of scientific methodology in secondary science textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, Ian C.

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the representation of scientific methodology in secondary science textbooks. More specifically, this study looked at how textbooks introduced scientific methodology and to what degree the examples from the rest of the textbook, the investigations, and the images were consistent with the text's description of scientific methodology, if at all. The sample included eight secondary science textbooks from two publishers, McGraw-Hill/Glencoe and Harcourt/Holt, Rinehart & Winston. Data consisted of all student text and teacher text that referred to scientific methodology. Second, all investigations in the textbooks were analyzed. Finally, any images that depicted scientists working were also collected and analyzed. The text analysis and activity analysis used the ethnographic content analysis approach developed by Altheide (1996). The rubrics used for the text analysis and activity analysis were initially guided by the Benchmarks (AAAS, 1993), the NSES (NRC, 1996), and the nature of science literature. Preliminary analyses helped to refine each of the rubrics and grounded them in the data. Image analysis used stereotypes identified in the DAST literature. Findings indicated that all eight textbooks presented mixed views of scientific methodology in their initial descriptions. Five textbooks placed more emphasis on the traditional view and three placed more emphasis on the broad view. Results also revealed that the initial descriptions, examples, investigations, and images all emphasized the broad view for Glencoe Biology and the traditional view for Chemistry: Matter and Change. The initial descriptions, examples, investigations, and images in the other six textbooks were not consistent. Overall, the textbook with the most appropriate depiction of scientific methodology was Glencoe Biology and the textbook with the least appropriate depiction of scientific methodology was Physics: Principles and Problems. These findings

  5. The relationship between forgiveness, spirituality, traumatic guilt and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among people with addiction.

    PubMed

    Langman, Louise; Chung, Man Cheung

    2013-03-01

    Spirituality and forgiveness have been shown to be associated with psychological well-being, while guilt has been associated with poor health. Little is known, however, about the relationship between forgiveness, spirituality, guilt, posttraumatic stress (PTSD) and psychological co-morbidity among people in recovery from addiction. Eighty-one people (F = 36, M = 45) in recovery from drug and alcohol addiction were recruited from two residential units and two drop-in centres in a city in the United Kingdom. They completed the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale (PDS), the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28), the Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale (SIBS), the Heartland Forgiveness Scale (HFS), the Traumatic Guilt Inventory (TGI), the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST-22) and the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-20). The control group comprised of 83 (F = 34, M = 49) individuals who confirmed that they did not have addiction and completed the PDS & GHQ-28. 54 % of the addiction group met the criteria for full PTSD and reported anxiety, somatic problems and depression. They described themselves as spiritual, had strong feelings of guilt associated with their addiction, and had difficulty in forgiving themselves. Controlling for demographics, number of events and medication management, regression analyses showed that spirituality predicted psychological co-morbidity, whilst feelings of guilt predicted PTSD symptoms and psychological co-morbidity. Unexpectedly, forgiveness did not predict outcomes. This study supports existing literature, which shows that people with drug and alcohol addiction tend to have experienced significant past trauma and PTSD symptoms. Their posttraumatic stress reactions and associated psychological difficulties can be better understood in the light of guilt and spirituality. Meanwhile, their ability to forgive themselves or others did not seem to influence health outcomes.

  6. Impact of residential schooling and of child abuse on substance use problem in Indigenous Peoples.

    PubMed

    Ross, Amélie; Dion, Jacinthe; Cantinotti, Michael; Collin-Vézina, Delphine; Paquette, Linda

    2015-12-01

    Residential schools were the institutions, in operation from the 19th century to the late 20th century, which Indigenous children in Canada were forced to attend. The literature shows that many young people who attended these institutions were victims of neglect and abuse. Negative psychological effects resulting from child abuse have been amply documented. However, very few studies on this subject have been carried out among Canada's Indigenous Peoples. The objective of this study is to evaluate, for an Indigenous population in Quebec (Canada), the impact of residential schooling as well as self-reported experiences of sexual and physical abuse during childhood on the development of alcohol and drug use problems in adulthood. A total of 358 Indigenous participants were interviewed (164 men [45.8%] and 194 women [54.2%]). Alcoholism was evaluated using the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST). Drug abuse was assessed with the Drug Abuse Screening Test-20 (DAST). Child abuse and residential schooling were assessed with dichotomous questions (yes/no). Among the participants, 28.5% (n=102) had attended residential schools, 35.2% (n=121) reported having experienced sexual abuse, and 34.1% (n=117) reported having experienced physical abuse before adulthood. Results of the exact logistic regression analyses indicated that residential school attendance was linked to alcohol problems, while child abuse was related to drug use problems. The results of this study highlight the importance of considering the consequences of historical traumas related to residential schools to better understand the current situation of Indigenous Peoples in Canada.

  7. Associations among types of impulsivity, substance use problems and Neurexin-3 polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Stoltenberg, Scott F.; Lehmann, Melissa K.; Christ, Christa C.; Hersrud, Samantha L.; Davies, Gareth E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Some of the genetic vulnerability for addiction may be mediated by impulsivity. This study investigated relationships among impulsivity, substance use problems and six neurexin-3 (NRXN3) polymorphisms. Neurexins (NRXNs) are presynaptic transmembrane proteins that play a role in the development and function of synapses. Methods Impulsivity was assessed with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale Version 11 (BIS-11), the Boredom Proneness Scale (BPS) and the TIME paradigm; alcohol problems with the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST); drug problems with the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-20); and regular tobacco use with a single question. Participants (N = 439 Caucasians, 64.7% female) donated buccal cells for genotyping. Six NRXN3 polymorphisms were genotyped: rs983795, rs11624704, rs917906, rs1004212, rs10146997 and rs8019381. A dual luciferase assay was conducted to determine whether allelic variation at rs917906 regulated gene expression. Results In general, impulsivity was significantly higher in those who regularly used tobacco and/or had alcohol or drug problems. In men, there were modest associations between rs11624704 and attentional impulsivity (p = .005) and between rs1004212 and alcohol problems (p = .009). In women, there were weak associations between rs10146997 and TIME estimation (p = .03); and between rs1004212 and drug problems (p = .03). The dual luciferase assay indicated that C and T alleles of rs917906 did not differentially regulate gene expression in vitro. Conclusions Associations between impulsivity, substance use problems and polymorphisms in NRXN3 may be gender specific. Impulsivity is associated with substance use problems and may provide a useful intermediate phenotype for addiction. PMID:21676558

  8. Polyglycerol-functionalized nanodiamond as a platform for gene delivery: Derivatization, characterization, and hybridization with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Nakae, Yuki; Qin, Hongmei; Ito, Tadamasa; Kimura, Takahide; Kojima, Hideto; Chan, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Summary A gene vector consisting of nanodiamond, polyglycerol, and basic polypeptide (ND-PG-BPP) has been designed, synthesized, and characterized. The ND-PG-BPP was synthesized by PG functionalization of ND through ring-opening polymerization of glycidol on the ND surface, multistep organic transformations (–OH → –OTs (tosylate) → –N3) in the PG layer, and click conjugation of the basic polypeptides (Arg8, Lys8 or His8) terminated with propargyl glycine. The ND-PG-BPP exhibited good dispersibility in water (>1.0 mg/mL) and positive zeta potential ranging from +14.2 mV to +44.1 mV at neutral pH in Milli-Q water. It was confirmed by gel retardation assay that ND-PG-Arg8 and ND-PG-Lys8 with higher zeta potential hybridized with plasmid DNA (pDNA) through electrostatic attraction, making them promising as nonviral vectors for gene delivery. PMID:24778723

  9. Sustained elevation of NF-κB activity sensitizes offspring of maternal inflammation to hypertension via impairing PGC-1α recovery.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Luo, Hongqin; Chen, Xianhua; Han, Qi; Wang, Fangjie; Huang, Pei; Lai, Wenjing; Guan, Xiao; Pan, Xiaodong; Ji, Yan; Guo, Wei; Che, Ling; Tang, Yuan; Gu, Liangqi; Yu, Jianhua; Namaka, Michael; Deng, Youcai; Li, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence has demonstrated that maternal detrimental factors, including inflammation, contribute to the development of hypertension in the offspring. The current study found that offspring subjected to prenatal exposure of inflammation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge during the second semester showed significantly increased systolic blood pressure. In addition, these offspring also displayed augmented vascular damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in thoracic aortas when challenged with deoxycorticosterone acetate and high-salt diet (DOCA-salt). Interestingly, the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine markedly reversed these changes. Mechanistically, prenatal LPS exposure led to pre-existing elevated peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor-γ co-activator (PGC)-1α, a critical master of ROS metabolism, which up-regulated the ROS defense capacity and maintained the balance of ROS generation and elimination under resting state. However, continued elevation of NF-κB activity significantly suppressed the rapid recovery of PGC-1α expression response to DOCA-salt challenge in offspring that underwent prenatal inflammatory stimulation. This was further confirmed by using a NF-κB inhibitor (N-p-Tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone) that restored PGC-1α recovery and prevented blood pressure elevation induced by DOCA-salt. Our results suggest that maternal inflammation programmed proneness to NF-κB over-activation which impaired PGC-1α-mediated anti-oxidant capacity resulting in the increased sensitivity of offspring to hypertensive damage. PMID:27616627

  10. Lewis acid trapping of an elusive copper-tosylnitrene intermediate using scandium triflate.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Subrata; Miceli, Enrico; Farquhar, Erik; Pfaff, Florian Felix; Kuhlmann, Uwe; Hildebrandt, Peter; Braun, Beatrice; Greco, Claudio; Ray, Kallol

    2012-09-12

    High-valent copper-nitrene intermediates have long been proposed to play a role in copper-catalyzed aziridination and amination reactions. However, such intermediates have eluded detection for decades, preventing the unambiguous assignments of mechanisms. Moreover, the electronic structure of the proposed copper-nitrene intermediates has also been controversially discussed in the literature. These mechanistic questions and controversy have provided tremendous motivation to probe the accessibility and reactivity of Cu(III)-NR/Cu(II)N(•)R species. In this paper, we report a breakthrough in this field that was achieved by trapping a transient copper-tosylnitrene species, 3-Sc, in the presence of scandium triflate. The sufficient stability of 3-Sc at -90 °C enabled its characterization with optical, resonance Raman, NMR, and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopies, which helped to establish its electronic structure as Cu(II)N(•)Ts (Ts = tosyl group) and not Cu(III)NTs. 3-Sc can initiate tosylamination of cyclohexane, thereby suggesting Cu(II)N(•)Ts cores as viable reactants in oxidation catalysis.

  11. One-pot pseudomorphic crystallization of mesoporous porous silica to hierarchical porous zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Jun-Ling; Jiang, Shu-Hua; Pang, Jun-Ling; Yuan, En-Hui; Ma, Xiao-Jing; Lam, Koon-Fung; Xue, Qing-Song; Zhang, Kun

    2015-09-15

    Hierarchically porous silica with mesopore and zeolitic micropore was synthesized via pseudomorphic crystallization under high-temperature hydrothermal treatment in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium tosylate and tetrapropylammonium ions. A combined characterization using small-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TG), and elemental analysis showed that dual templates, CTA{sup +} and TPA{sup +} molecules, can work in a cooperative manner to synthesize mesoporous zeolite in a one-pot system by precisely tuning the reaction conditions, such as reaction time and temperature, and type and amount of heterometal atoms. It is found that the presence of Ti precursor is critical to the successful synthesis of such nanostructure. It not only retards the nucleation and growth of crystalline MFI domains, but also acts as nano-binder or nano-glue to favor the assembly of zeolite nanoblocks. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • A facile method to synthesize mesoporous zeolites with hierarchical porosity was presented. • It gives a new insight into keeping the balance between mesoscopic and molecular ordering in hierarchical porous materials. • A new understanding on the solid–solid transformation mechanism for the synthesis of titanosilicate zeolites was proposed.

  12. Proteases from Canavalia ensiformis: Active and Thermostable Enzymes with Potential of Application in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Rayane Natshe; Gozzini Barbosa, Suellen Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Extracts of leaves, seeds, roots, and stem from a tropical legume, C. ensiformis, were prepared employing buffers and detergent in aqueous solution. Leaf extracts had the highest protein content and the most pronounced peptidase activity with optimal pH in the neutral to alkaline range. All extracts exhibited peaks of activity at various pH values, suggesting the presence of distinctive classes of proteases. N-α-Tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester hydrolysis was maximal at 30°C to 60°C and peptidase activity from all extracts presented very good thermal stability after 24 h incubation at 70°C. C. ensiformis proteases exhibited molecular masses of about 200–57, 40–37, and 20–15 kDa by SDS-PAGE analysis. These enzymes cleaved hemoglobin, bovine serum albumin, casein, and gelatin at different levels. Serine and metalloproteases are the major proteases in C. ensiformis extracts, modulated by divalent cations, stable at 1% of surfactant Triton X-100 and at different concentrations of the reducing agent β-mercaptoethanol. Thus, C. ensiformis expresses a particular set of proteases in distinctive organs with high activity and stability, making this legume an important source of proteases with biotechnological potential.

  13. Magneto immunosensor for gliadin detection in gluten-free foodstuff: towards food safety for celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Laube, T; Kergaravat, S V; Fabiano, S N; Hernández, S R; Alegret, S; Pividori, M I

    2011-09-15

    Gliadin is a constituent of the cereal protein gluten, responsible for the intolerance generated in celiac disease. Its detection is of high interest for food safety of celiac patients, since the only treatment known until now is a lifelong avoidance of this protein in the diet. Therefore, it is essential to have an easy and reliable method of analysis to control the contents in gluten-free foods. An electrochemical magneto immunosensor for the quantification of gliadin or small gliadin fragments in natural or pretreated food samples is described for the first time and compared to a novel magneto-ELISA system based on optical detection. The immunological reaction was performed on magnetic beads as solid support by the oriented covalent immobilization, of the protein gliadin on tosyl-activated beads. Direct, as well as indirect competitive immunoassays were optimized, achieving the best analytical performance with the direct competitive format. Excellent detection limits (in the order of μg L(-1)) were achieved, according to the legislation for gluten-free products. The matrix effect, as well as the performance of the assays was successfully evaluated using spiked gluten-free foodstuffs (skimmed milk and beer), obtaining excellent recovery values in the results.

  14. Quantification of the electrophilic reactivities of aldehydes, imines, and enones.

    PubMed

    Appel, Roland; Mayr, Herbert

    2011-06-01

    The rates of the epoxidation reactions of aldehydes, of the aziridination reactions of aldimines, and of the cyclopropanation reactions of α,β-unsaturated ketones with aryl-stabilized dimethylsulfonium ylides have been determined photometrically in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). All of these sulfur ylide-mediated cyclization reactions as well as the addition reactions of stabilized carbanions to N-tosyl-activated aldimines have been shown to follow a second-order rate law, where the rate constants reflect the (initial) CC bond formation between nucleophile and electrophile. The derived second-order rate constants (log k(2)) have been combined with the known nucleophilicity parameters (N, s(N)) of the aryl-stabilized sulfur ylides 4a,b and of the acceptor-substituted carbanions 4c-h to calculate the electrophilicity parameters E of aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes (1a-i), N-acceptor-substituted aromatic aldimines (2a-e), and α,β-unsaturated ketones (3a-f) according to the linear free-energy relationship log k(2) = s(N)(N + E) as defined in J. Am. Chem. Soc.2001, 123, 9500-9512. The data reported in this work provide the first quantitative comparison of the electrophilic reactivities of aldehydes, imines, and simple Michael acceptors in DMSO with carbocations and cationic metal-π complexes within our comprehensive electrophilicity scale. PMID:21553901

  15. Purification and characterization of a new serine proteinase from Bacillus subtilis with specificity for amino acids at P1 and P2 positions.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, A; Yoshida, N; Noda, K; Ito, A

    1995-12-01

    A proteinase was purified 230-fold to apparent homogeneity from culture filtrates of Bacillus subtilis by a series of column chromatographies on DE52, DEAE-Toyopearl, Cellulofine GC200M, and Mono-Q, using Boc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ser-pNA as a substrate. The molecular weight of the proteinase was estimated to be 42,000 by SDS-PAGE in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. Studies on the substrate specificity with peptide p-nitroanilides and natural peptides revealed that this proteinase preferentially hydrolyzed the peptide bond on the carboxyl-terminal side of either serine or alanine residues at the P1 position and hydrophobic bulky amino acids at P2. It was most active at pH 9.5 for the hydrolysis of Boc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ser-pNA. The enzyme was inactivated by diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), but not by tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethylketone (TPCK) or by EDTA. Based on the reactivity toward substrates and inhibitors, this enzyme differs from elastase- or subtilisin-like proteinase, hence it is a new type of proteinase with specificity for amino acids at P1 and P2 positions. PMID:8519806

  16. Preparation of Nucleosides Derived from 2-Nitroimidazole and d-Arabinose, d-Ribose, and d-Galactose by the Vorbrüggen Method and Their Conversion to Potential Precursors for Tracers To Image Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    2-Nitroimidazole was silylated using hexaethyldisilazane and then reacted with 1-O-acetyl derivatives of d-arabinose, d-ribose, and d-galactose in acetonitrile at mild temperatures (−20 °C to rt), catalyzed by triethylsilyl triflate (Vorbrüggen conditions). The α-anomer was formed in the former case and the β-anomers in the latter two cases (highly) selectively. When d-arabinose and d-ribose were silylated with tert-butyldiphenylsilyl chloride in pyridine at the hydroxyl groups at C-5 and acetylated at the other ones in a one-pot reaction, mixtures of anomeric 1-O-acetyl derivatives were obtained. These were coupled by the Vorbrüggen method and then deblocked at C-5 and tosylated to give precursors for tracers to image hypoxia in four steps without using Hg(CN)2 necessary for other methods. The Vorbrüggen conditions enable a shorter route to azomycin nucleoside analogues than the previous coupling procedures. PMID:21905640

  17. Purification and characterization of a novel extracellular alkaline protease from Cellulomonas bogoriensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Yang, Liyuan; Lv, Xue; Liu, Dongbo; Xia, Hongmei; Chen, Shan

    2016-05-01

    An extracellular alkaline protease produced by the alkali-tolerant Cellulomonas bogoriensis was purified by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and cation exchange chromatography. The purity of the protease was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and its molecular weight was confirmed to be 18.3 kDa. The enzyme showed optimum activity at 60 °C and pH 11. The stability of the protease was maintained at a wide temperature range of 4-60 °C and pH range of 3-12. Irreversible inhibition of the enzyme activity by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone demonstrated that the purified enzyme is a chymotrypsin of the serine protease family. The Km and Vmax of the protease activity on casein were 19.2 mg/mL and 25000 μg/min/mg, respectively. The broad substrate specificity and remarkable stability in the presence of organic solvents, salt, and commercial detergents, as well as its excellent stain removal and dehairing capability, make the purified alkaline protease a promising candidate for industrial applications.

  18. Auto-ubiquitination of ubiquitin-activating enzymes from chicken breast muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, J E; Gevers, W

    1990-01-01

    A soluble ubiquitin-depleted fraction from chicken skeletal muscle (fraction II), when incubated at neutral pH for several hours with 125I-ubiquitin and ATP, formed small amounts of a ubiquitin derivative (Mr 115,000) of the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 as well as certain similarly modified E2 species (Mr 37,000, 34,000 and 24,000). Treatment of such mixtures with NaOH during the incubations, even at early times, greatly enhanced the appearance of these entities; up to two-thirds of the thiolesters of ubiquitin bound to these proteins before alkali treatment were thus converted. The bonds involved had properties compatible with their being peptidic in nature, suggesting that auto-ubiquitination had occurred in each case. The protease inhibitor and alkylating agent tosyl-lysylchloromethane ('TLCK'), when preincubated at 50 microM with fraction II for 2 h at 37 degrees C before the addition of 125I-ubiquitin and ATP, promoted the subsequent auto-ubiquitination of E1 and inhibited its adenylate-forming and thiolester-transferring activities. The findings have a bearing on the physiological substrate- and site-specificity of ubiquitin-conjugating reactions. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:2160236

  19. Cleavage of human fibronectin and other basement membrane-associated proteins by a Cryptococcus neoformans serine proteinase.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marcio L; dos Reis, Flavia C G; Puccia, Rosana; Travassos, Luiz R; Alviano, Celuta S

    2003-02-01

    The interaction between the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans and human fibronectin (HFN) was examined in this study. Polypeptides from cryptococcal whole homogenates and cell wall with molecular masses of 25 and 35 kDa, respectively reacted with HFN. The relevance of the occurrence of these proteins in intact cells was uncertain, since yeast cells from different strains and serotypes of C. neoformans did not significantly adhere to soluble or solid-phased HFN. In contrast, an exocellular proteolytic activity that cleaves HFN was suggested. Degradation of HFN by culture supernatant fluids was demonstrated by Western blotting using a monoclonal anti-HFN antibody. Several fragments of lower molecular weights were observed which reacted with the antibody. Proteolysis was mediated by a serine protease activity, since HFN cleavage was completely inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), aprotinin, and N-tosyl-L-phenylalanyl chloromethylketone (TPCK), but not by inhibitors of metalo, cysteine, or aspartyl proteases. Similar results were obtained when the fluorogenic peptide carbobenzoxy-phenylalanyl-arginyl-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin (CBZ-Phe-Arg-NHmet-C) was used as substrate. The cryptococcal supernatant also cleaved laminin and type IV collagen, as demonstrated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with co-polymerized proteins. The hydrolysis of these proteins was mediated by a single cryptococcal protease with a molecular mass of 75 kDa. The cleavage of key host components of the basement membrane and extracellular matrix by C. neoformans may be a relevant factor in the process of fungal invasion.

  20. Investigation into the potential of sub-lethal photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) to reduce susceptibility of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Donnelly, R. F.; Tunney, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    In PACT, a combination of a sensitising drug and visible light cause the selective destruction of microbial cells via singlet oxygen production. As singlet oxygen is a non-specific oxidizing agent and is only present during illumination, development of resistance to this treatment is thought to be unlikely. However, in response to oxidative stress, bacteria can up-regulate oxidative stress genes and associated antibiotic resistance genes. The up-regulation of these genes and potential transfer of genetic material may result in a resistant bacterial population. This study determined whether treatment of clinically isolated meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains with sub-lethal doses of methylene blue (MB) and meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP)-PACT resulted in reduced susceptibility to antibiotics and previously lethal PACT. Exposure of strains to sub-lethal doses of photosensitizer in combination with light had no effect on susceptibility to previously lethal photosensitization. Furthermore, exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of both photosensitizers caused no significant changes in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for each strain tested. Any differences in susceptibility were not significant as they did not cross breakpoints between resistant and susceptible for any organism or antibiotic tested. Therefore, PACT remains an attractive alternative option for treatment of MRSA infections.

  1. A role for scavenger receptors in phagocytosis of protein-coated particles in rainbow trout head kidney macrophages.

    PubMed

    Frøystad, M K; Rode, M; Berg, T; Gjøen, T

    1998-01-01

    In macrophages of higher vertebrates, Fc receptors and receptors for complement and other serum factors, are generally known to enhance the phagocytic process. In lower vertebrates like salmonid fishes, none of these or other phagocytic receptors have been thoroughly characterized. The purpose of this study was to elucidate to what extent these and other receptors are involved in the process of phagocytosis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) head kidney macrophages. We used tosyl activated, paramagnetic dynabeads (2.8 microm in diameter), specifically coated with 125I labeled Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) IgM or bovine serum albumin (BSA) as phagocytic probes. The effect of complement opsonization was also investigated by incubating the beads in serum. Our results indicate that neither the Fc- nor the complement-receptor(s) were important for phagocytosis of these beads. Our data support the idea that scavenger receptors are involved in phagocytosis in rainbow trout head kidney macrophages, as the use of a competitive scavenger receptor ligand extensively decreased degradation of the labeled protein coat on the beads. PMID:9877435

  2. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of a potent and selective σ1 receptor antagonist with high antiallodynic activity.

    PubMed

    Utech, Tina; Köhler, Jens; Buschmann, Helmut; Holenz, Jörg; Vela, Jose Miguel; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2011-07-01

    Based on the pharmacophore model of Glennon the conformationally restricted σ(1) receptor ligand 2 with a 1,3-dioxane moiety has been designed and synthesized. The three step synthesis (transacetalization with pentane-1,3,5-triol, tosylation, and nucleophilic substitution with benzylamine) provided diastereoselectively the cis-configured 1,3-dioxane 2 in good yields. The 1,3-dioxane 2 represents a potent σ(1) receptor ligand (K(i) = 19 nM) with moderate selectivity over the σ(2) subtype (K(i) = 92 nM) and excellent selectivity against more than 60 other targets. Additionally the hERG K(+) channel is not affected by 2. In the capsaicin assay 2 showed extraordinarily high analgesic activity with more than 70% analgesia at the very low dose of 0.25 mg/kg body weight, which indicates σ(1) antagonistic activity. Since 2 does only interact with σ(1) receptors, the in-vivo antiallodynic activity of 2 must be attributed to the σ(1) antagonistic activity. PMID:21598296

  3. 2'-O-Methyl- and 2'-O-propargyl-5-methylisocytidine: synthesis, properties and impact on the isoCd-dG and the isoCd-isoGd base pairing in nucleic acids with parallel and antiparallel strand orientation.

    PubMed

    Jana, Sunit K; Leonard, Peter; Ingale, Sachin A; Seela, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Oligonucleotides containing 2'-O-methylated 5-methylisocytidine (3) and 2'-O-propargyl-5-methylisocytidine (4) as well as the non-functionalized 5-methyl-2'-deoxyisocytidine (1b) were synthesized. MALDI-TOF mass spectra of oligonucleotides containing 1b are susceptible to a stepwise depyrimidination. In contrast, oligonucleotides incorporating 2'-O-alkylated nucleosides 3 and 4 are stable. This is supported by acid catalyzed hydrolysis experiments performed on nucleosides in solution. 2'-O-Alkylated nucleoside 3 was synthesized from 2'-O-5-dimethyluridine via tosylation, anhydro nucleoside formation and ring opening. The corresponding 4 was obtained by direct regioselective alkylation of 5-methylisocytidine (1d) with propargyl bromide under phase-transfer conditions. Both compounds were converted to phosphoramidites and employed in solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis. Hybridization experiments resulted in duplexes with antiparallel or parallel chains. In parallel duplexes, methylation or propargylation of the 2'-hydroxyl group of isocytidine leads to destabilization while in antiparallel DNA this effect is less pronounced. 2'-O-Propargylated 4 was used to cross-link nucleosides and oligonucleotides to homodimers by a stepwise click ligation with a bifunctional azide. PMID:27221215

  4. A master dynamic flow diagram for the shear thickening transition in micellar solutions.

    PubMed

    Bautista, F; Tepale, N; Fernández, V V A; Landázuri, G; Hernández, E; Macías, E R; Soltero, J F A; Escalante, J I; Manero, O; Puig, J E

    2016-01-01

    The shear thickening behavior of dilute micellar solutions of hexadecyltrimethylammonium-type surfactants with different counterions (tosylate, 3- and 4-fluorobenzoate, vinylbenzoate and salicylate) and of n-alkyltetradecylammonium bromide (CnTAB), with n = 14, 16 and 18, is examined here. These solutions undergo a shear thickening transition due to the formation of shear-induced structures (SISs) in the shear range studied. Here we report a relationship between the shear thickening intensity and the differences in the hydrophobicity of counterions according to the Hofmeister-like anion series, which leads to a master flow diagram. This master flow diagram is produced by plotting a normalized shear thickening intensity (Iη - 1)/(Imax - 1) versus CD/CD,max, where Iη is the shear-thickening intensity, defined as the largest viscosity obtained in the shear-thickening transition (STT) at a given surfactant concentration CD divided by the Newtonian viscosity η0, and Imax is the largest intensity value obtained in the STT at a surfactant concentration CD,max. The master flow diagram is built using several cetyltrimethylammonium-type surfactants with different counterions, according to a Hofmeister-like series, and by n-alkyltetradecylammonium bromide surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths.

  5. Purification and characteristics of trypsin from masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou) cultured in fresh-water.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Gaku; Yamaguchi, Takahito; Kishimura, Hideki; Yamaha, Etsurou; Saeki, Hiroki

    2010-09-01

    Trypsin from the pyloric ceca of masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou) cultured in fresh water was purified by a series of chromatographies including Sephacryl S-200, Sephadex G-50 and diethylaminoethyl cellulose to obtain a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and native PAGE. The molecular mass of the purified trypsin was estimated to be approximately 24,000 Da by SDS-PAGE. The enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, soybean trypsin inhibitor, and N ( alpha )-p-tosyl-L: -lysine chloromethyl ketone. Masu salmon trypsin was stabilized by calcium ion. The optimum pH of the masu salmon trypsin was around pH 8.5, and the trypsin was unstable below pH 5.0. The optimum temperature of the masu salmon trypsin was around 60 degrees C, and the trypsin was stable below 50 degrees C, like temperate-zone and tropical-zone fish trypsins. The N-terminal 20 amino acid sequence of the masu salmon trypsin was IVGGYECKAYSQPHQVSLNS, and its charged amino acid content was lower than those of trypsins from frigid-zone fish and similar to those of trypsins from temperate-zone and tropical-zone fish. In the phylogenetic tree, the masu salmon trypsin was classified into the group of the temperate-zone fish trypsin.

  6. Atomic resolution structure of a lysine-specific endoproteinase from Lysobacter enzymogenes suggests a hydroxyl group bound to the oxyanion hole.

    PubMed

    Asztalos, Peter; Müller, Astrid; Hölke, Werner; Sobek, Harald; Rudolph, Markus G

    2014-07-01

    Lysobacter enzymogenes lysyl endoproteinase (LysC) is a trypsin-type serine protease with a high pH optimum that hydrolyses all Lys-Xaa peptide bonds. The high specificity of LysC renders it useful for biotechnological purposes. The K30R variant of a related lysyl endoproteinase from Achromobacter lyticus has favourable enzymatic properties that might be transferrable to LysC. To visualize structural differences in the substrate-binding sites, the crystal structures of wild-type and the K30R variant of LysC were determined. The mutation is located at a distance of 12 Å from the catalytic triad and subtly changes the surface properties of the substrate-binding site. The high pH optimum of LysC can be attributed to electrostatic effects of an aromatic Tyr/His stack on the catalytic aspartate and is a general feature of this enzyme subfamily. LysC crystals in complex with the covalent inhibitor N(α)-p-tosyl-lysyl chloromethylketone yielded data to 1.1 and 0.9 Å resolution, resulting in unprecedented precision of the active and substrate-binding sites for this enzyme subfamily. Error estimates on bond lengths and difference electron density indicate that instead of the expected oxyanion a hydroxyl group binds to the partially solvent-exposed oxyanion hole. Protonation of the alkoxide catalytic intermediate might be a recurring feature during serine protease catalysis.

  7. Development of a cell death-based method for the screening of nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Puneet; Bajpai, Malini; Dastidar, Sunanda G; Ray, Abhijit

    2008-06-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) plays a significant role in immunity and inflammation and represents a first choice as pharmacological target for anti-inflammatory therapy. However, research in this field has been hampered by the fact that no convenient assay suitable for large-scale screening procedures is available. The present study provides a cell death-based assay method for screening of nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitors. In this study, we observed that four distinct pharmacologic inhibitors of NF-kappaB, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), N-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone (TPCK), genistein and BAY11-7082, resulted in the cell death of murine macrophages, J774A.1. DNA-binding experiments showed that lethal doses were consistent with those required for NF-kappaB inhibition. DNA fragmentation analysis showed that cell death is apoptotic in nature. Further studies suggested that NF-kappaB inhibitors induced apoptosis is independent of the involvement of other markers of cell death such as caspases and p38 MAP (Mitogen activated protein) kinase. From this study, we conclude that NF-kappaB activation may represent an important survival mechanism in macrophages. This study also provides a new cell-based screening method, as any compound that will inhibit NF-kappaB activity will result in the death of macrophages.

  8. Copper-catalyzed alkyl-alkyl cross-coupling reactions using hydrocarbon additives: efficiency of catalyst and roles of additives.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Takanori; Imanishi, Reiko; Shimizu, Ryohei; Kuniyasu, Hitoshi; Terao, Jun; Kambe, Nobuaki

    2014-09-19

    Cross-coupling of alkyl halides with alkyl Grignard reagents proceeds with extremely high TONs of up to 1230000 using a Cu/unsaturated hydrocarbon catalytic system. Alkyl fluorides, chlorides, bromides, and tosylates are all suitable electrophiles, and a TOF as high as 31200 h(-1) was attained using an alkyl iodide. Side reactions of this catalytic system, i.e., reduction, dehydrohalogenation (elimination), and the homocoupling of alkyl halides, occur in the absence of additives. It appears that the reaction involves the β-hydrogen elimination of alkylcopper intermediates, giving rise to olefins and Cu-H species, and that this process triggers both side reactions and the degradation of the Cu catalyst. The formed Cu-H promotes the reduction of alkyl halides to give alkanes and Cu-X or the generation of Cu(0), probably by disproportionation, which can oxidatively add to alkyl halides to yield olefins and, in some cases, homocoupling products. Unsaturated hydrocarbon additives such as 1,3-butadiene and phenylpropyne play important roles in achieving highly efficient cross-coupling by suppressing β-hydrogen elimination, which inhibits both the degradation of the Cu catalyst and undesirable side reactions.

  9. Capture of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Using Immunomagnetic Beads of Different Size and Antibody Conjugating Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Shu-I; Reed, Sue; Gehring, Andrew; He, Yiping; Paoli, George

    2009-01-01

    Immunomagnetic beads (IMB) were synthesized using anti-Escherichia coli O157 antibodies and magnetic beads of two different sizes (1 μm and 2.6 to 2.8 μm) that contained a streptavidin coating, activated carboxyl groups or tosylated surfaces. The synthesized IMB, together with a commercially available IMB, were used to capture different strains of E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli O157:NM. The E. coli capture was measured by the time resolved fluorescence (TRF) intensity using a sandwich assay which we have previously demonstrated of having a sensitivity of 1 CFU/g after 4.5 hour enrichment [1]. The analyses of measured TRF intensity and determined antibody surface concentration indicated that larger beads provided higher response signals than smaller beads and were more effective in capturing the target of interest in pure culture and ground beef. In addition, while each type of IMB showed different favorable capture of E. coli O157:H7, streptavidin-coated IMB elicited the highest response, on average. Streptavidin-coated IMB also provided an economic benefit, costing less than $0.50 per assay. The results could be used to guide the proper choice of IMB for applications in developing detection processes for E. coli O157:H7. PMID:22399935

  10. Diphlorethohydroxycarmalol Inhibits Interleukin-6 Production by Regulating NF-κB, STAT5 and SOCS1 in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Na-Jin; Han, Sang-Chul; Kang, Gyeoung-Jin; Koo, Dong-Hwan; Koh, Young-Sang; Hyun, Jin-Won; Lee, Nam-Ho; Ko, Mi-Hee; Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Yoo, Eun-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Diphlorethohydroxycarmalol (DPHC) is a phlorotannin compound isolated from Ishige okamuarae, a brown alga. This study was conducted to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect and action mechanism of DPHC in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. We found that DPHC strongly reduces the production of interleukin 6 (IL-6), but not that of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) induced by LPS. DPHC (12.5 and 100 μM) suppressed the phosphorylation and the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB (NF-κB), a central signaling molecule in the inflammation process induced by LPS. The suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) is a negative feedback regulator of Janus kinase (Jak)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling. In this study, DPHC inhibited STAT5 expression and upregulated that of SOCS1 at a concentration of 100 μM. Furthermore, N-tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) (a specific NF-κB inhibitor) and JI (a specific Jak2 inhibitor) reduced the production of IL-6, but not that of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. These findings demonstrate that DPHC inhibits IL-6 production via the downregulation of NF-κB and Jak2-STAT5 pathway and upregulation of SOCS1. PMID:25871292

  11. Preparation and biodistribution of F-18 labeled FQNPe

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, H.; Beets, K.; McPherson, D.W.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1996-05-01

    1-Azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl {alpha}-(1-fluoropentan-5-yl)-{alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenylacetate (FQNPe) is an attractive candidate for the in vivo imaging of muscarinic receptors (mAChR) by PET. Initial studies with this new agent demonstrated a high binding affinity and ability to bind to regions of the brain containing mAChR. Fluorine-18 (F-18) labeling of racemic 1 was performed using X = tosyl, triflate, or mesylate group and a decay corrected radiolabeling yields of 2.6, 33, 75%, respectively, were obtained. F-18-3 in 11 % yield (decay corrected to beginning of synthesis). Initial biodistribution studies in rats (n=5) showed F-18-3 had high cerebral uptake of 0.72 ({plus_minus}0.26) and 0.83 ({plus_minus} 0.12) injected dose/gram at 15 and 30 minutes, respectively. The F-18 labeling and biodistribution study of the (-)-quinuclidinyl (-)-acetate and (-)-quinuclidinyl (+)-acetate isomers of FQNPe are currently being pursued.

  12. Extended N-Arylsulfonylindoles as 5-HT₆ Receptor Antagonists: Design, Synthesis & Biological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Vera, Gonzalo; Lagos, Carlos F; Almendras, Sebastián; Hebel, Dan; Flores, Francisco; Valle-Corvalán, Gissella; Pessoa-Mahana, C David; Mella-Raipán, Jaime; Montecinos, Rodrigo; Recabarren-Gajardo, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Based on a known pharmacophore model for 5-HT₆ receptor antagonists, a series of novel extended derivatives of the N-arylsulfonyindole scaffold were designed and identified as a new class of 5-HT₆ receptor modulators. Eight of the compounds exhibited moderate to high binding affinities and displayed antagonist profile in 5-HT₆ receptor functional assays. Compounds 2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)-1-(1-tosyl-1H-indol-3-yl)ethanol (4b), 1-(1-(4-iodophenylsulfonyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)-2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)ethanol (4g) and 2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)-1-(1-(naphthalen-1-ylsulfonyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)ethanol (4j) showed the best binding affinity (4b pKi = 7.87; 4g pKi = 7.73; 4j pKi = 7.83). Additionally, compound 4j was identified as a highly potent antagonist (IC50 = 32 nM) in calcium mobilisation functional assay. PMID:27537868

  13. A Metal-Free Protocol for Aminofunctionalization of Olefins Using TsNBr2.

    PubMed

    Rajbongshi, Kamal Krishna; Saikia, Indranirekha; Chanu, Loukrakpam Dineshwori; Roy, Subhasish; Phukan, Prodeep

    2016-07-01

    N,N-Dibromo-p-toluene sulfonamide (TsNBr2) has been found to be an effective reagent for various aminofunctionalization reactions. This reagent behaves both as an electrophilic bromine source as well as amine to react with olefins under different conditions to yield aminoether, imidazoline, diamine and amino bromine. The reaction proceeds rapidly under mild conditions with high regioselectivity. Olefins react with TsNBr2 in moist THF to form δ-amino ether at room temperature. Treatment of TsNBr2 with olefin in MeCN at room temperature produced imidazoline in high yield. Further modification of the reaction condition resulted in the development of a one-step procedure for the synthesis of N-acetyl,N'-tosyl diamine derivatives directly from olefin. When the olefin was treated with 2.4 mol equiv of TsNBr2 in the presence of K2CO3, N,N'-ditosyl diamine derivative was obtained in moderate yield. Instantaneous formation of aminobromine was observed when an olefin was treated with the reagent in dry CH2Cl2 at room temperature. PMID:27269517

  14. Morphology and structure of photosensitive dye J-aggregates adsorbed on AgBr microcrystals grown in gelatin.

    PubMed

    Saijo, H; Shiojiri, M

    1998-07-15

    Though the cyanine dye J-aggregates carry the role to sense the exposing light in the silver halide photographic system, little research on the morphology of the aggregates in adsorption has been made with modern surface analytical methods. In this paper, we describe the size, epitaxy, multi-layered array formation, nucleation and preferential adsorption, and irregular distribution of population between particles and the segregation on a particle, of J-aggregates adsorbed on AgBr grown in gelatin. We employed cathodoluminescence microscopy, low energy high resolution scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Dye molecules aggregate together near the surface of AgBr and adsorb on the surface. The growth of adsorbed aggregates is controlled by the diffusion of dye molecules from the surrounding solution. The population of J-aggregates adsorbed on an AgBr particle varies from almost none to full coverage. Each aggregate is about (20-30) x (30-50) nm in size and is 2.1 nm thick for thiacarbocyanine with sodium ion, 1.04 nm for thiacarbocyanine with tosyl ion, and 0.5 nm for an oxacarbocyanine. The aggregates connect their longer edges to each other to form arrays, and the arrays build up multi-layered stacks. The arrays align parallel and segregate to form terraces. The longer edges of J-aggregates align along [210] on AgBr (100) or [632] on AgBr (111). PMID:9728883

  15. Lysosomal destabilization in p53-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xi-Ming; Li, Wei; Dalen, Helge; Lotem, Joseph; Kama, Rachel; Sachs, Leo; Brunk, Ulf T.

    2002-01-01

    The tumor suppressor wild-type p53 can induce apoptosis. M1-t-p53 myeloid leukemic cells have a temperature-sensitive p53 protein that changes its conformation to wild-type p53 after transfer from 37°C to 32°C. We have now found that these cells showed an early lysosomal rupture after transfer to 32°C. Mitochondrial damage, including decreased membrane potential and release of cytochrome c, and the appearance of apoptotic cells occurred later. Lysosomal rupture, mitochondrial damage, and apoptosis were all inhibited by the cytokine IL-6. Some other compounds can also inhibit apoptosis induced by p53. The protease inhibitor N-tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone inhibited the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release, the Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin inhibited only cytochrome c release, and the antioxidant butylated hydroxyanisole inhibited only the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. In contrast to IL-6, these other compounds that inhibited some of the later occurring mitochondrial damage did not inhibit the earlier p53-induced lysosomal damage. The results indicate that apoptosis is induced by p53 through a lysosomal-mitochondrial pathway that is initiated by lysosomal destabilization, and that this pathway can be dissected by using different apoptosis inhibitors. These findings on the induction of p53-induced lysosomal destabilization can also help to formulate new therapies for diseases with apoptotic disorders. PMID:11959917

  16. An APC/C inhibitor stabilizes cyclin B1 by prematurely terminating ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xing; King, Randall W.

    2012-01-01

    The Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC) is a ubiquitin ligase required for exit from mitosis. We previously showed that Tosyl Arginine Methyl Ester (TAME) inhibits APC-dependent proteolysis by competing with the C-terminal IR-tail of the APC activator Cdc20 for APC binding. Here we show that in the absence of APC substrates, TAME ejects Cdc20 from the APC by promoting Cdc20 auto-ubiquitination in its N-terminal region. Cyclin B1 antagonizes TAME's effect by promoting binding of free Cdc20 to the APC and suppressing Cdc20 auto-ubiquitination. Nevertheless, TAME stabilizes cyclin B1 in Xenopus extract by two mechanisms. First, it reduces the kcat of the APCCdc20/cyclin B1 complex without affecting the Km, slowing the initial ubiquitination of unmodified cyclin B1. Second, as cyclin B1 becomes ubiquitinated, it loses its ability to promote Cdc20 binding to the APC in the presence of TAME. As a result, cyclin B1 ubiquitination terminates before reaching the threshold necessary for proteolysis. PMID:22366722

  17. "One-step production of biodiesel from Jatropha oil with high-acid value in ionic liquids" [Bioresour. Technol. 102 (11) (2011)].

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Fang, Zhen; Tian, Xiao-fei; Long, Yun-Duo; Jiang, Li-Qun

    2013-07-01

    Catalytic conversion of un-pretreated Jatropha oil with high-acid value (13.8 mg KOH/g) to biodiesel was studied in ionic liquids (ILs) with metal chlorides. Several commercial ILs were used to catalyze the esterification of oleic acid. It was found that 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tosylate {[BMIm][TS]} had high catalytic activity with 93% esterification rate for oleic acid at 140 °C but only 63.7% Jatropha biodiesel yield at 200 °C. When ZnCl2 was added to [BMIm][TS], a maximum Jatropha biodiesel yield of 92.5% was achieved at 180 °C. Addition of metal ions supplied Lewis acidic sites in ILs promoted both esterification and transestrification reactions. It was also found that the transition metal ions performed higher catalytic activity in transestrification than the ions of Group A. Mixture of [BMIm][TS] and ZnCl2 was easily separated from products for reuse to avoid producing pollutants. PMID:23908993

  18. One-step production of biodiesel from Jatropha oil with high-acid value in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Fang, Zhen; Tian, Xiao-Fei; Long, Yun-Duo; Jiang, Li-Qun

    2011-06-01

    Catalytic conversion of un-pretreated Jatropha oil with high-acid value (13.8 mg KOH/g) to biodiesel was studied in ionic liquids (ILs) with metal chlorides. Several commercial ILs were used to catalyze the esterification of oleic acid. It was found that 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tosylate ([BMIm][CH(3)SO(3)]; a Brønsted acidic IL) had the highest catalytic activity with 93% esterification rate for oleic acid at 140°C but only 12% biodiesel yield at 120°C. When FeCl(3) was added to [BMIm][CH(3)SO(3)], a maximum biodiesel yield of 99.7% was achieved at 120°C. Because metal ions in ILs supplied Lewis acidic sites, and more of the sites could be provided by trivalent metallic ions than those of bivalent ones. It was also found that the catalytic activity with bivalent metallic ions increased with atomic radius. Mixture of [BMIm][CH(3)SO(3)] and FeCl(3) was easily separated from products for reuse to avoid producing pollutants. PMID:21420854

  19. The role of the anion in the toxicity of imidazolium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Biczak, Robert; Pawłowska, Barbara; Bałczewski, Piotr; Rychter, Piotr

    2014-06-15

    From the environmental protection point of view, the growing interest of ionic liquids in various industrial branches has raised concerns for the toxicity assessment of these compounds. The paper discusses the effect of salts containing the shared 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium [EMIM] cation as coupled with five different anions: bromide [Br], nitrate [NO3], p-toluenesulfonate (tosylate) [Ts], dimethylphosphate [dMP] and methanesulfonate [MS] on the growth and development of higher land plants - spring barley and common radish. The experiment was done according to the ISO Standard 11269-2:1995 and the OECD/OCDE Guide 208/2006. As the indications of phytotoxicity, the percentage of sprouts and the level of dry and fresh plant mass were used; in addition, the visual assessment of any signs of damage to the examined plant species, such as growth inhibition and chlorotic changes, was also made. Results of our study has proved the negative impact of ILs on the tested plants and the toxic effect of imidazolium salts was dependent primarily on the applied ionic liquids concentration. The common radish revealed the higher tolerance to the imidazolium as compared to spring barley. The anion type of ionic liquid was crucial for the toxicity against common radish.

  20. Synthesis and Evaluation of (18)F-labeled Pyridaben Analogues for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Mice, Rats and Chinese mini-swine.

    PubMed

    Mou, Tiantian; Zhao, Zuoquan; You, Linyi; Li, Yesen; Wang, Qian; Fang, Wei; Lu, Jie; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2016-01-01

    This study reports three novel (18)F-labeled pyridaben analogues for potential myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Three precursors and the corresponding nonradioactive compounds were synthesized and characterized. The radiolabeled tracers were obtained by substituting tosyl with (18)F. The total radiosynthesis time of these tracers was 70-90 min. Typical decay-corrected radiochemical yields were 47-58%, with high radiochemical purities (>98%). Tracers were evaluated as MPI agents in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. In the mouse biodistribution study, all three radiotracers showed high initial heart uptake (34-54% ID/g at 2 min after injection) and fast liver clearance. In the microPET imaging study, [(18)F]Fmpp2 produced heart images with good quality in both mice and rats. In the whole-body PET/CT images of mini-swine, [(18)F]Fmpp2 showed excellent initial heart standardized uptake value (SUV) (7.12 at 5 min p.i.) and good retention (5.75 at 120 min p.i.). The heart/liver SUV ratios were 4.12, 5.42 and 5.99 at 30, 60 and 120 min after injection, respectively. The favorable biological properties of [(18)F]Fmpp2 suggest that it is worth further investigation as a potential MPI agent. PMID:27646847

  1. Synthetic, enzyme kinetic, and protein crystallographic studies of C-β-d-glucopyranosyl pyrroles and imidazoles reveal and explain low nanomolar inhibition of human liver glycogen phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kantsadi, Anastassia L; Bokor, Éva; Kun, Sándor; Stravodimos, George A; Chatzileontiadou, Demetra S M; Leonidas, Demetres D; Juhász-Tóth, Éva; Szakács, Andrea; Batta, Gyula; Docsa, Tibor; Gergely, Pál; Somsák, László

    2016-11-10

    C-β-d-Glucopyranosyl pyrrole derivatives were prepared in the reactions of pyrrole, 2-, and 3-aryl-pyrroles with O-peracetylated β-d-glucopyranosyl trichloroacetimidate, while 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyl) indole was obtained by a cross coupling of O-perbenzylated β-d-glucopyranosyl acetylene with N-tosyl-2-iodoaniline followed by spontaneous ring closure. An improved synthesis of O-perbenzoylated 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyl) imidazoles was achieved by reacting C-glucopyranosyl formimidates with α-aminoketones. The deprotected compounds were assayed with isoforms of glycogen phosphorylase (GP) to show no activity of the pyrroles against rabbit muscle GPb. The imidazoles proved to be the best known glucose derived inhibitors of not only the muscle enzymes (both a and b) but also of the pharmacologically relevant human liver GPa (Ki = 156 and 26 nM for the 4(5)-phenyl and -(2-naphthyl) derivatives, respectively). An X-ray crystallographic study of the rmGPb-imidazole complexes revealed structural features of the strong binding, and also allowed to explain the absence of inhibition for the pyrrole derivatives. PMID:27522507

  2. Virulence characteristics of oral treponemes in a murine model.

    PubMed Central

    Kesavalu, L; Walker, S G; Holt, S C; Crawley, R R; Ebersole, J L

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the virulence characteristics of Treponema denticola, T. socranskii, T. pectinovorum, and T. vincentii following challenge infection of mice. These microorganisms induced well-demarcated, dose-dependent, raised subcutaneous (s.c.) abscesses which were similar in time of onset, lesion progression, and duration of healing. Only viable cells were capable of inducing these characteristic s.c. abscesses. Histological examination of the skin lesion 3 and 5 days postinfection revealed abscess formation in the s.c. tissues, and abundant spiral organisms were demonstrated to be present in the abscess. Host resistance modulation by dexamethasone (neutrophil alteration) and cyclophosphamide (neutrophil depletion) pretreatment had a minimal effect on the virulence expression by any of these treponemes. The T. denticola isolates demonstrated significant trypsin-like protease (TLPase) activity, while both T. socranskii and T. vincentii were devoid of this activity. Interestingly, T. pectinovorum strains were heterogeneous with respect to TLPase as high producers, low producers, and nonproducers. However, no differences in lesion formation were noted regardless of whether the species expressed this proteolytic activity or whether treatment with N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) and dithiothreitol was performed. These results showed that (i) a murine model may be used to evaluate virulence expression by oral treponemes; (ii) while TLPase activity varies among the oral treponemes, this protease does not appear to participate in abscess induction in the mouse model; and (iii) T. pectinovorum strains show variation in TLPase activity. PMID:9393801

  3. Biological investigation using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor: small "click generated" DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Zerrouki, Chouki; Fourati, Najla; Lucas, Romain; Vergnaud, Julien; Fougnion, Jean-Marie; Zerrouki, Rachida; Pernelle, Christine

    2010-12-15

    We have used a 104 MHz lithium tantalate (LiTaO(3)) surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor to investigate DNA probes grafting and their further hybridization with natural and click generated (Cg-DNA) oligonucleotides. Natural DNA targets of different strand lengths, tosyl-di(tri, tetra) thymidine and azido-di(tri, tetra) thymidine oligonucleotides were tested. In our case, and besides the follow-up of a 34mer DNA hybridization, we detected complementarity between natural DNA probes and azido-tetra-thymidine for the first time, whereas previous hybridization studies reported a minimal of 10-mer oligonucleotides recognition length. We also demonstrated that contrarily to natural DNA, the synthesized oligonucleotides present stable bonds with complementary DNA strands. Frequency responses of both grafting and hybridization have shown the same shape: an exponential decay with different time constants, (187±1)s and (68±19) s for grafting and hybridization respectively. We have also shown that recognition between DNA strands and tetranucleotide analogues is comparable to natural 34mer DNA bases and presents the same time constant within uncertainties.

  4. Purification and characterization of chymotrypsin from viscera of vermiculated sailfin catfish, Pterygoplichthys disjunctivus, Weber, 1991.

    PubMed

    Villalba-Villalba, Ana Gloria; Ramírez-Suárez, Juan Carlos; Pacheco-Aguilar, Ramón; Valenzuela-Soto, Elisa Miriam; Lugo-Sánchez, María Elena; Figueroa-Soto, Ciria Guadalupe

    2013-04-01

    Pterygoplichthys disjunctivus viscera chymotrypsin was purified by fractionation with ammonium sulfate (30-70 % saturation), gel filtration, affinity, and ion exchange chromatography. Chymotrypsin molecular weight was approximately 29 kDa according to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), shown a single band in zymogram. Electrofocusing study suggested being an anionic enzyme (pI ≈ 3.9), exhibiting maximal activity at pH 9 and 50 °C, using Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide (SAAPNA) as substrate. Enzyme was effectively inhibited by phenyl methyl sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) (99 %), and N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) (94 %). Enzyme activity was affected by the following ions in decreasing order: Hg(2+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Li(1+), Mg(2+), K(1+), Mn(2+), while Ca(2+) had no effect. Chymotrypsin activity decreased continuously as NaCl concentration increased (from 0 to 30 %). K m and V max values were 0.72 ± 1.4 mM and 1.15 ± 0.06 μmol/min/mg of protein, respectively (SAAPNA as substrate). Results suggest the enzyme has a potential application where low processing temperatures are needed, such as in fish sauce production.

  5. Investigation into the susceptibility of Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates to photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Watters, A. L.; Donnelly, R. F.; Tunney, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    The main cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) sufferers is progressive pulmonary damage caused by recurrent and often unremitting respiratory tract infection. Causative organisms include Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Haemophilus influenzae, but in recent years the Burkholderia cepacia complex has come to the fore. This group of highly drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria are associated with a rapid decline in lung function and the often fatal cepacia syndrome, with treatment limited to patient segregation and marginally effective antibacterial regimens. Thus, development of an effective treatment is of the upmost importance. PACT, a non-target specific therapy, has proven successful in killing both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, planktonic cultures of six strains of the B. cepacia complex were irradiated (635 nm, 200 J cm-2,10 minutes irradiation) following 30 seconds incubation with methylene blue (MB) or meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP). Rates of kill of > 99 % were achieved with MB- and TMP-PACT. A MB concentration of 50 μg ml-1 and TMP concentration of 500 μg ml-1 were associated with highest percentage kills for each photosensitizer. PACT is an attractive option for treatment of B.cepacia complex infection. Further study, involving biofilm culture susceptibility, delivery of light to the target and in vivo testing will be necessary before it PACT becomes a viable treatment option for CF patients who are colonised or infected with B. cepacia complex.

  6. N,N,N-Trimethyl-N-(methyl 5-de­oxy-2,3-O-iso­propyl­idene-β-d-ribo­furan­osid-5-yl)ammonium 4-methyl­benzene­sulfonate sesquihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Dmochowska, Barbara; Sikora, Karol; Chojnacki, Jaroslaw; Wojnowski, Wieslaw; Wiśniewski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The structure of the title compound, [C12H24NO4][C7H7O3S]·1.5H2O, contains alternating layers parallel to (001) of hydro­phobic and polar character, stabilized by C—H⋯O hydrogen bonding. The furan ring adopts an envelope conformation with the C(OMe) atom as the flap, and the dioxolane ring is twisted about one of the O—C(methine) bonds. A comparison to related compounds is presented. The tosyl­ate-O atoms were disordered over two positions with the major component having a site occupancy factor = 0.566 (12). The structure was refined as a rotary twin with regard to rotation about the c axis with the contribution of the second component being 0.0048 (6). Solvate water mol­ecules are highly disordered and were removed using the SQUEEZE procedure; the unit cell characteristics take into account the presence of the disordered solvent. High-resolution 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic data are also presented. PMID:24046601

  7. The Scope of Direct Alkylation of Gold Surface with Solutions of C1–C4n-Alkylstannanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of cleaned gold surfaces with dilute tetrahydrofuran or chloroform solutions of tetraalkylstannanes (alkyl = methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, n-butyl) or di-n-butylmethylstannyl tosylate under ambient conditions causes a self-limited growth of disordered monolayers consisting of alkyls and tin oxide. Extensive use of deuterium labeling showed that the alkyls originate from the stannane and not from ambient impurities, and that trialkylstannyl groups are absent in the monolayers, contrary to previous proposals. Methyl groups attached to the Sn atom are not transferred to the surface. Ethyl groups are transferred slowly, and propyl and butyl rapidly. In all cases, tin oxide is codeposited in submonolayer amounts. The monolayers were characterized by ellipsometry, contact angle goniometry, polarization modulated IR reflection absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy with ferrocyanide/ferricyanide, which revealed a very low charge-transfer resistance. The thermal stability of the monolayers and their resistance to solvents are comparable with those of an n-octadecanethiol monolayer. A preliminary examination of the kinetics of monolayer deposition from a THF solution of tetra-n-butylstannane revealed an approximately half-order dependence on the bulk solution concentration of the stannane, hinting that more than one alkyl can be transferred from a single stannane molecule. A detailed structure of the attachment of the alkyl groups is not known, and it is proposed that it involves direct single or multiple bonding of one or more C atoms to one or more Au atoms. PMID:26327466

  8. Exogenous and endogenous protease inhibitors in the gut of the fall armyworm larvae, Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Lwalaba, Digali; Weidlich, Sandy; Hoffmann, Klaus H; Woodring, Joseph

    2010-06-01

    A dose-dependent inhibition of endogenous trypsin and aminopeptidase occurs in the lumen of Spodoptera frugiperda after feeding L6 larvae exogenous inhibitors soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI), tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone-HCl (TLCK), or bestatin, respectively, for 3 days. TLCK inhibits trypsin in tissue extracts and in secretions more strongly than SBTI. The aminopeptidase released into the lumen (containing the peritrophic membrane) is strongly inhibited by bestatin, but the membrane-bound enzyme is not. A bound enzyme may be more resistant to an inhibitor than unbound. A cross-class elevation of aminopeptidase activity occurs in response to ingested trypsin inhibitor, but there was no cross-class effect of aminopeptidase inhibitor (bestatin) on trypsin activity. An endogenous trypsin and aminopeptidase inhibitor is present in the lumen and ventricular cells. The strength of the endogenous trypsin inhibition seems to be in the same range as that resulting from ingestion of the exogenous inhibitor SBTI. In some insect species, considerable trypsin secretion occurs in unfed as well as in fed animals, and endogenous protease inhibitors might function to protect the ventricular epithelium by inactivation of trypsin when less food is available. PMID:20513059

  9. Control of Neural Stem Cell Survival by Electroactive Polymer Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Lundin, Vanessa; Herland, Anna; Berggren, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell function is regulated by intrinsic as well as microenvironmental factors, including chemical and mechanical signals. Conducting polymer-based cell culture substrates provide a powerful tool to control both chemical and physical stimuli sensed by stem cells. Here we show that polypyrrole (PPy), a commonly used conducting polymer, can be tailored to modulate survival and maintenance of rat fetal neural stem cells (NSCs). NSCs cultured on PPy substrates containing different counter ions, dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS), tosylate (TsO), perchlorate (ClO4) and chloride (Cl), showed a distinct correlation between PPy counter ion and cell viability. Specifically, NSC viability was high on PPy(DBS) but low on PPy containing TsO, ClO4 and Cl. On PPy(DBS), NSC proliferation and differentiation was comparable to standard NSC culture on tissue culture polystyrene. Electrical reduction of PPy(DBS) created a switch for neural stem cell viability, with widespread cell death upon polymer reduction. Coating the PPy(DBS) films with a gel layer composed of a basement membrane matrix efficiently prevented loss of cell viability upon polymer reduction. Here we have defined conditions for the biocompatibility of PPy substrates with NSC culture, critical for the development of devices based on conducting polymers interfacing with NSCs. PMID:21494605

  10. Conducting polymer nanofibers for high sensitivity detection of chemical analytes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Nagarajan, Subhalakshmi; Nagarajan, Ramaswamy; Kumar, Jayant

    2008-03-01

    Possessing large surface area materials is vital for high sensitivity detection of analyte. We report a novel, inexpensive and simple technique to make high surface area sensing interfaces using electrospinning. Conducting polymers (CP) nanotubes were made by electrospinning a solution of a catalyst (ferric tosylate) along with poly (lactic acid), which is an environment friendly biodegradable polymer. Further vapor deposition polymerization of the monomer ethylenedioxy thiophene (EDOT) on the nanofiber surface yielded poly (EDOT) covered fibers. X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS) study reveals the presence of PEDOT predominantly on the surface of nanofibers. Conducting nanotubes had been received by dissolving the polymer in the fiber core. By a similar technique we had covalently incorporated fluorescent dyes on the nanofiber surface. The materials obtained show promise as efficient sensing elements. UV-Vis characterization confirms the formation of PEDOT nanotubes and incorporation of chromophores on the fiber surface. The morphological characterization was carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  11. Proteases from Canavalia ensiformis: Active and Thermostable Enzymes with Potential of Application in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Rayane Natshe; Gozzini Barbosa, Suellen Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Extracts of leaves, seeds, roots, and stem from a tropical legume, C. ensiformis, were prepared employing buffers and detergent in aqueous solution. Leaf extracts had the highest protein content and the most pronounced peptidase activity with optimal pH in the neutral to alkaline range. All extracts exhibited peaks of activity at various pH values, suggesting the presence of distinctive classes of proteases. N-α-Tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester hydrolysis was maximal at 30°C to 60°C and peptidase activity from all extracts presented very good thermal stability after 24 h incubation at 70°C. C. ensiformis proteases exhibited molecular masses of about 200–57, 40–37, and 20–15 kDa by SDS-PAGE analysis. These enzymes cleaved hemoglobin, bovine serum albumin, casein, and gelatin at different levels. Serine and metalloproteases are the major proteases in C. ensiformis extracts, modulated by divalent cations, stable at 1% of surfactant Triton X-100 and at different concentrations of the reducing agent β-mercaptoethanol. Thus, C. ensiformis expresses a particular set of proteases in distinctive organs with high activity and stability, making this legume an important source of proteases with biotechnological potential. PMID:27630776

  12. Synthesis of biodegradable chiral poly(ester-imide)s derived from valine-, leucine- and tyrosine-containing monomers.

    PubMed

    Mallakpour, Shadpour; Asadi, Parvin; Sabzalian, Mohammad R

    2011-11-01

    The present demand for a drastic reduction in environmental pollution is extended to qualitative change in the approach to development of biodegradable polymers. The aim of this article is to focus on the synthesis of biodegradable optically active poly(ester-imide)s (PEI)s, which compose of different amino acids in the main chain as well as in the side chain. These polymers were synthesized by polycondensation of diacid monomers such as 5-(2-phthalimidyl-3-methyl butanoylamino) isophthalic acid (1), 5-(4-methyl-2-phthalimidyl pentanoylamino)isophthalic acid (2) with N,N'-(pyromellitoyl)-bis-L: -tyrosine dimethyl ester (3) as a phenolic diol. The direct polycondensation reaction was carried out in a system of tosyl chloride, pyridine and N,N-dimethylformamide as a condensing agent under conventional heating conditions. The optically active PEIs were obtained in good yield and moderate inherent viscosity. The synthesized polymers were characterized by means of FT-IR, (1)H-NMR, elemental and thermo gravimetric analysis techniques. In addition, in vitro toxicity and soil burial test were employed for assessing the sensitivity of these compounds to microbial degradation. To this purpose, biodegradability behavior of the monomers and polymers were investigated in culture media and soil condition. The results of this study revealed that synthesized monomers and their derived polymers are biologically active and probably microbiologically biodegradable.

  13. Influence of pulse-height discrimination threshold for photon counting on the accuracy of singlet oxygen luminescence measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huiyun; Chen, Defu; Wang, Min; Lin, Juqiang; Li, Buhong; Xie, Shusen

    2011-12-01

    Direct measurement of near-infrared (NIR) luminescence around 1270 nm is the golden standard of singlet oxygen (1O2) identification. In this study, the influence of pulse-height discrimination threshold on measurement accuracy of the 1O2 luminescence that is generated from the photoirradiation of meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) morphine tetra-tosylate (TMPyP) in aqueous solution was investigated by using our custom-developed detection system. Our results indicate that the discrimination threshold has a significant influence on the absolute 1O2 luminescence counts, and the optimal threshold for our detection system is found to be about - 41.2 mV for signal discrimination. After optimization, the derived triplet-state and 1O2 lifetimes of TMPyP in aqueous solution are found to be 1.73 ± 0.03 and 3.70 ± 0.04 µs, respectively, and the accuracy of measurement was further independently demonstrated using the laser flash photolysis technique.

  14. Importance of counterion reactivity on the deactivation of Co-salen catalysts in the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of epichlorohydrin.

    PubMed

    Jain, Surbhi; Zheng, Xiaolai; Jones, Christopher W; Weck, Marcus; Davis, Robert J

    2007-10-15

    Possible modes of deactivation of Jacobsen's Co-salen catalyst during the hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of epichlorohydrin were explored by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, combined with recycling studies. Although an active Co(III)-salen catalyst deactivated substantially after multiple cycles without regeneration, the catalyst maintained its +3 oxidation state throughout the runs. Thus, deactivation of Co-salen during HKR was not the result of Co reduction. The mass spectrum of a deactivated material showed that catalyst dimerization does not account for the loss of activity. Results from various catalyst pretreatment tests, as well as from catalysts containing various counterions (acetate, tosylate, chloride, iodide) indicated that the rate of addition of the Co-salen counterions to epoxide forming Co-OH during the reaction correlated with deactivation. The extent of counterion addition to epoxide was influenced by the exposure time and the nucleophilicity of the counterion. An oligo(cyclooctene)-supported Co-OAc salen catalyst, which was 25 times more active than the standard Co-salen catalyst, was recycled multiple times with negligible deactivation. PMID:17850142

  15. Copper-catalyzed alkyl-alkyl cross-coupling reactions using hydrocarbon additives: efficiency of catalyst and roles of additives.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Takanori; Imanishi, Reiko; Shimizu, Ryohei; Kuniyasu, Hitoshi; Terao, Jun; Kambe, Nobuaki

    2014-09-19

    Cross-coupling of alkyl halides with alkyl Grignard reagents proceeds with extremely high TONs of up to 1230000 using a Cu/unsaturated hydrocarbon catalytic system. Alkyl fluorides, chlorides, bromides, and tosylates are all suitable electrophiles, and a TOF as high as 31200 h(-1) was attained using an alkyl iodide. Side reactions of this catalytic system, i.e., reduction, dehydrohalogenation (elimination), and the homocoupling of alkyl halides, occur in the absence of additives. It appears that the reaction involves the β-hydrogen elimination of alkylcopper intermediates, giving rise to olefins and Cu-H species, and that this process triggers both side reactions and the degradation of the Cu catalyst. The formed Cu-H promotes the reduction of alkyl halides to give alkanes and Cu-X or the generation of Cu(0), probably by disproportionation, which can oxidatively add to alkyl halides to yield olefins and, in some cases, homocoupling products. Unsaturated hydrocarbon additives such as 1,3-butadiene and phenylpropyne play important roles in achieving highly efficient cross-coupling by suppressing β-hydrogen elimination, which inhibits both the degradation of the Cu catalyst and undesirable side reactions. PMID:25010426

  16. Aptamer-based organic-silica hybrid affinity monolith prepared via "thiol-ene" click reaction for extraction of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Jin-cheng; Lian, Hong-zhen; Chen, Hong-yuan

    2015-06-01

    A novel strategy for preparing aptamer-based organic-silica hybrid monolithic column was developed via "thiol-ene" click chemistry. Due to the large specific surface area of the hybrid matrix and the simplicity, rapidness and high efficiency of "thiol-ene" click reaction, the average coverage density of aptamer on the organic-silica hybrid monolith reached 420 pmol μL(-1). Human α-thrombin can be captured on the prepared affinity monolithic column with high specificity and eluted by NaClO4 solution. N-p-tosyl-Gly-Pro-Arg p-nitroanilide acetate was used as the sensitive chromogenic substrate of thrombin. The thrombin enriched by this affinity column was detected with a detection of limit of 0.01 μM by spectrophotometry. Furthermore, the extraction recovery of thrombin at 0.15 μM in human serum was 91.8% with a relative standard deviation of 4.0%. These results indicated that "thiol-ene" click chemistry provided a promising technique to immobilize aptamer on organic-inorganic hybrid monolith and the easily-assembled affinity monolithic material could be used to realize highly selective recognition of trace proteins.

  17. Sustained elevation of NF-κB activity sensitizes offspring of maternal inflammation to hypertension via impairing PGC-1α recovery

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Luo, Hongqin; Chen, Xianhua; Han, Qi; Wang, Fangjie; Huang, Pei; Lai, Wenjing; Guan, Xiao; Pan, Xiaodong; Ji, Yan; Guo, Wei; Che, Ling; Tang, Yuan; Gu, Liangqi; Yu, Jianhua; Namaka, Michael; Deng, Youcai; Li, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence has demonstrated that maternal detrimental factors, including inflammation, contribute to the development of hypertension in the offspring. The current study found that offspring subjected to prenatal exposure of inflammation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge during the second semester showed significantly increased systolic blood pressure. In addition, these offspring also displayed augmented vascular damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in thoracic aortas when challenged with deoxycorticosterone acetate and high-salt diet (DOCA-salt). Interestingly, the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine markedly reversed these changes. Mechanistically, prenatal LPS exposure led to pre-existing elevated peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor-γ co-activator (PGC)-1α, a critical master of ROS metabolism, which up-regulated the ROS defense capacity and maintained the balance of ROS generation and elimination under resting state. However, continued elevation of NF-κB activity significantly suppressed the rapid recovery of PGC-1α expression response to DOCA-salt challenge in offspring that underwent prenatal inflammatory stimulation. This was further confirmed by using a NF-κB inhibitor (N-p-Tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone) that restored PGC-1α recovery and prevented blood pressure elevation induced by DOCA-salt. Our results suggest that maternal inflammation programmed proneness to NF-κB over-activation which impaired PGC-1α-mediated anti-oxidant capacity resulting in the increased sensitivity of offspring to hypertensive damage. PMID:27616627

  18. Development of a New Radiofluorinated Quinoline Analog for PET Imaging of Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) in Brain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianrong; Wenzel, Barbara; Dukic-Stefanovic, Sladjana; Teodoro, Rodrigo; Ludwig, Friedrich-Alexander; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Schröder, Susann; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Moreau, Emmanuel; Brust, Peter; Maisonial-Besset, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are enzymes that play a major role in cell signalling by hydrolysing the secondary messengers cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and/or cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) throughout the body and brain. Altered cyclic nucleotide-mediated signalling has been associated with a wide array of disorders, including neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, PDE5 has been shown to be involved in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, but its precise role has not been elucidated yet. To visualize and quantify the expression of this enzyme in brain, we developed a radiotracer for specific PET imaging of PDE5. A quinoline-based lead compound has been structurally modified resulting in the fluoroethoxymethyl derivative ICF24027 with high inhibitory activity towards PDE5 (IC50 = 1.86 nM). Radiolabelling with fluorine-18 was performed by a one-step nucleophilic substitution reaction using a tosylate precursor (RCY(EOB) = 12.9% ± 1.8%; RCP > 99%; SA(EOS) = 70–126 GBq/μmol). In vitro autoradiographic studies of [18F]ICF24027 on different mouse tissue as well as on porcine brain slices demonstrated a moderate specific binding to PDE5. In vivo studies in mice revealed that [18F]ICF24027 was metabolized under formation of brain penetrable radiometabolites making the radiotracer unsuitable for PET imaging of PDE5 in brain. PMID:27110797

  19. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of an (18)Fluorine-Labeled COX Inhibitor--[(18)F]Fluorooctyl Fenbufen Amide--For Imaging of Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Cheng; Chang, Yu-Chia; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Yu, Chung-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging of brain tumors remains a great challenge, despite the advances made in imaging technology. An anti-inflammatory compound may be a useful tool for this purpose because there is evidence of inflammatory processes in brain tumor micro-environments. Fluorooctylfenbufen amide (FOFA) was prepared from 8-chlorooctanol via treatment with potassium phthalimide, tosylation with Ts2O, fluorination with KF under phase transfer catalyzed conditions, deprotection using aqueous hydrazine, and coupling with fenbufen. The corresponding radiofluoro product [(18)F]FOFA, had a final radiochemical yield of 2.81 mCi and was prepared from activated [(18)F]F(-) (212 mCi) via HPLC purification and concentration. The radiochemical purity was determined to be 99%, and the specific activity was shown to exceed 22 GBq/μmol (EOS) based on decay-corrected calculations. Ex-vivo analysis of [(18)F]FOFA in plasma using HPLC showed that the agent had a half-life of 15 min. PET scanning showed significant accumulation of [(18)F]FOFA over tumor loci with reasonable contrast in C6-glioma bearing rats. These results suggest that this molecule is a promising agent for the visualization of brain tumors. Further investigations should focus on tumor micro-environments. PMID:27007363

  20. p-Aminobenzamidine-sensitive acrosomal protease(s) other than acrosin serve the sperm penetration of the egg zona pellucida in mouse.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, K; Murayama, K; Kohno, N; Kashiwabara, S; Baba, T

    1998-11-01

    It has been reported that a significant delay in protein dispersal from the acrosomal matrix is observed in wild-type sperm by adding p-aminobenzamidine, a trypsin/acrosin inhibitor, to the incubation medium. The pattern of this delayed release was similar to that of the acrosin-deficient mutant mouse sperm (Yamagata et al., J. Biol. Chem., 273, 10470-4, 1998). In the present study, no further delay in protein dispersal was found when the acrosin-deficient sperm were treated with p-aminobenzamidine, indicating that among the p-aminobenzamidine-sensitive protease(s) only acrosin may function to accelerate this process. Although the acrosin-deficient sperm penetrated the zona pellucida (Baba et al., J. Biol. Chem., 269, 31845-9, 1994), the addition of p-aminobenzamidine to the fertilisation medium caused a significant inhibition of fertilisation in vitro. This indicates that there is a p-aminobenzamidine-sensitive protease(s) other than acrosin participating in the zona penetration step. Indeed, we demonstrated that a non-acrosin protease with a size of 42 kDa was present in the supernatant of the acrosome-reacted sperm suspension. The enzyme was inhibited by p-aminobenzamidine, diisopropyl fluorophosphate and N alpha-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone, and was apparently activated by acrosin. PMID:9921641

  1. DNA sensor based on vapour polymerised pedot films functionalised with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Spain, Elaine; Keyes, Tia E; Forster, Robert J

    2013-03-15

    Poly-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene, PEDOT, films have been deposited on gold electrodes using polymerization from the vapor-phase in which the surface is first covered with a Fe (III) tosylate oxidant and then exposed to 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene, EDOT, vapor. Gold nanoparticles were then electrodeposited to give a nanocomposite material, PEDOT-AuNP. Thiolated capture strand DNA, that is complementary to the sequence associated with the pathogen S. aureus that causes mammary gland inflammation, was then immobilized onto the gold nanoparticles and the underlying gold electrode. The target oligo was then hybridized to the capture strand DNA. A probe strand, labeled with horse radish peroxidase, was then hybridized to the target. The concentration of the target was determined by measuring the current required to reduce hydroquinone oxidized during the regeneration of the HRP label. Semi-log plots of the pathogen DNA concentration vs. faradaic current are linear from 150 pM to 1 μM and pM concentrations can be detected without the need for molecular, e.g., PCR or NASBA, amplification. PMID:22960006

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Atherosclerosis Using CD81-Targeted Microparticles of Iron Oxide in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fei; Yang, Wei; Li, Xiang; Liu, Hongmei; Nan, Xiang; Xie, Lisi; Zhou, Dongliang; Xie, Guoxi; Wu, Junru; Qiu, Bensheng; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using CD81- (Cluster of Differentiation 81 protein-) targeted microparticles of iron oxide (CD81-MPIO) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the murine atherosclerosis. CD81-MPIO and IgG- (Immunoglobulin G-) MPIO were prepared by covalently conjugating, respectively, with anti-CD81 monoclonal and IgG antibodies to the surface of the tosyl activated MPIO. The relevant binding capability of the MPIO was examined by incubating them with murine bEnd.3 cells stimulated with phenazine methosulfate (PMS) and its effect in shortening T2 relaxation time was also examined. MRI in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice was studied in vivo. Our results show that CD81-MPIO, but not IgG-MPIO, can bind to the PMS-stimulated bEnd.3 cells. The T2 relaxation time was significantly shortened for stimulated bEnd.3 cells when compared with IgG-MPIO. In vivo MRI in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice showed highly conspicuous areas of low signal after CD81-MPIO injection. Quantitative analysis of the area of CD81-MPIO contrast effects showed 8.96- and 6.98-fold increase in comparison with IgG-MPIO or plain MPIO, respectively (P < 0.01). Histological assay confirmed the expression of CD81 and CD81-MPIO binding onto atherosclerotic lesions. In conclusion, CD81-MPIO allows molecular assessment of murine atherosclerotic lesions by magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26266263

  3. Clinical and Immunological Analysis of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis before and after Different Treatments

    PubMed Central

    O'Daly, José A.; Spinetti, Humberto M.; Gleason, Joe; Rodríguez, María B.

    2013-01-01

    Amastigotes from L. (L.)amazonensis (La), L. (L.)venezuelensis (Lv), L. (V.)brasiliensis (Lb), and L. (L.)chagasi (Lch) were cultured in a free cells liquid culture medium. Patients (n = 87) from a cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) hyperendemic region receiving different treatments were followed up from January 1994 to August 2000. Time for remission of lesions were spontaneous remission (SR) 7 weeks; Glucantime (Glu) chemotherapy 9 weeks; immunotherapy with La, Lv, Lb, and Lch amastigotes Tosyl-Lysil Chloromethyl-ketone (TLCK) treated and Nonidet P-40(NP-40) extracted (VT) 7 weeks. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response with leishmanine intradermic reaction (IDR) was higher in CL patients than healthy controls (P < 0.05) and increased in active secondary versus primary infection (P < 0.001) with diagnostic value 1.74 for active infection and 1.81 postclinical remission. Antibodies to amastigotes characterized by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) decreased in sera postclinical remission versus active infections (P < 0.001), with a diagnostic value from 1.50 to 1.84. Immunoblottings antigenic bands frequency as well as Integral Optical Density (IOD) Area Densitometry decreased with sera from SR, after Glu or VT treatments in CL volunteers. Intracellular parasitism is due to normal antibodies recognizing parasite antigens after inoculation by vector. VT vaccine induced mainly cellular immunity, for remission of lesions and protection from CL infection. PMID:23844278

  4. Stable Deep Doping of Vapor-Phase Polymerized Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/Ionic Liquid Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Christoffer; Nicholas, James; Evans, Drew; Forsyth, Maria; Strømme, Maria; Sjödin, Martin; Howlett, Patrick C; Pozo-Gonzalo, Cristina

    2016-08-23

    Liquid-solution polymerization and vapor-phase polymerization (VPP) have been used to manufacture a series of chloride- and tosylate-doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) carbon paper electrodes. The electrochemistry, specific capacitance, and specific charge were determined for single electrodes in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (emim dca) ionic liquid electrolyte. VPP-PEDOT exhibits outstanding properties with a specific capacitance higher than 300 F g(-1) , the highest value reported for a PEDOT-based conducting polymer, and doping levels as high as 0.7 charges per monomer were achieved. Furthermore, symmetric PEDOT supercapacitor cells with the emim dca electrolyte exhibited a high specific capacitance (76.4 F g(-1) ) and high specific energy (19.8 Wh kg(-1) ). A Ragone plot shows that the VPP-PEDOT cells combine the high specific power of conventional ("pure") capacitors with the high specific energy of batteries, a highly sought-after target for energy storage. PMID:27325487

  5. Syntheses of mGluR5 PET Radioligands through the Radiofluorination of Diaryliodonium Tosylates†

    PubMed Central

    Telu, Sanjay; Chun, Joong-Hyun; Siméon, Fabrice G.; Lu, Shuiyu; Pike, Victor W.

    2011-01-01

    3-Fluoro-1-((thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl)benzenes constitute an important class of high-affinity metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptor (mGluR5) ligands, some of which have been labeled with fluorine-18 (t1/2 = 109.7 min), to provide radioligands for molecular imaging of brain mGluR5 in living animal and human subjects with positron emission tomography (PET). Labeling in the 3-fluoro position of such ligands can be achieved through aromatic nucleophilic substitution of a halide leaving group with [18F]fluoride ion when a weakly activating m-nitrile group is present, but is generally very low yielding (< 8%). Here we used a microfluidic reaction platform to show that greatly enhanced (up to 6-fold) radiochemical yields can be achieved from suitably synthesized diaryliodonium tosylate precursors. The presence of a m-nitrile or other activating group is not required. Similar conditions were adopted in a more conventional automated radiochemistry platform having a single-pot reactor, to produce mGluR5 radioligands in useful radioactivities for PET imaging. PMID:21845279

  6. Microwave-assisted stereospecific synthesis of novel tetrahydropyran adenine isonucleosides and crystal structures determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Fábio P. L.; Cirqueira, Marilia L.; Martins, Felipe T.; Vasconcellos, Mário L. A. A.

    2013-11-01

    We describe in this article stereospecific syntheses for new isonucleosides analogs of adenine 5-7 from tosyl derivatives 2-4 accessing by microwave irradiations (50-80%). The adenine reacts entirely at the N(9) position. Compounds 2-4 were prepared in two steps from the corresponding alcohols 1, 8 and 9 (81-92%). These tetrahydropyrans alcohols 1, 8 and 9 are achiral (Meso compounds) and were prepared in two steps with complete control of 2,4,6-cis relative configuration by Prins cyclization reaction (60-63%) preceded by the Barbier reaction between allyl bromide with benzaldehyde, 4-fluorobenzaldehyde and 2-naphthaldehyde respectively under Lewis acid conditions (96-98%). The configurations and preferential conformations of 5-7 were determined by crystal structure of 6. These novel isonucleosides 5-7 present in silico potentiality to act as GPCR ligand, kinase inhibitor and enzyme inhibitor, evaluated by Molinspiration program, consistent with the expected antiviral and anticancer bioactivities.

  7. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Triazolyl 13α-Estrone-Nucleoside Bioconjugates.

    PubMed

    Bodnár, Brigitta; Mernyák, Erzsébet; Wölfling, János; Schneider, Gyula; Herman, Bianka Edina; Szécsi, Mihály; Sinka, Izabella; Zupkó, István; Kupihár, Zoltán; Kovács, Lajos

    2016-01-01

    2'-Deoxynucleoside conjugates of 13α-estrone were synthesized by applying the copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide click reaction (CuAAC). For the introduction of the azido group the 5'-position of the nucleosides and a propargyl ether functional group on the 3-hydroxy group of 13α-estrone were chosen. The best yields were realized in our hands when the 3'-hydroxy groups of the nucleosides were protected by acetyl groups and the 5'-hydroxy groups were modified by the tosyl-azide exchange method. The commonly used conditions for click reaction between the protected-5'-azidonucleosides and the steroid alkyne was slightly modified by using 1.5 equivalent of Cu(I) catalyst. All the prepared conjugates were evaluated in vitro by means of MTT assays for antiproliferative activity against a panel of human adherent cell lines (HeLa, MCF-7 and A2780) and the potential inhibitory activity of the new conjugates on human 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (17β-HSD1) was investigated via in vitro radiosubstrate incubation. Some protected conjugates displayed moderate antiproliferative properties against a panel of human adherent cancer cell lines (the protected cytidine conjugate proved to be the most potent with IC50 value of 9 μM). The thymidine conjugate displayed considerable 17β-HSD1 inhibitory activity (IC50 = 19 μM). PMID:27626395

  8. Regulation of autophagy by α1-antitrypsin: "a foe of a foe is a friend".

    PubMed

    Shapira, Michal G; Khalfin, Boris; Lewis, Eli C; Parola, Abraham H; Nathan, Ilana

    2014-10-27

    Autophagy is involved in both the cell protective and the cell death process but its mechanism is largely unknown. The present work unravels a novel intracellular mechanism by which the serpin α1-antitrypsin (AAT) acts as a novel negative regulator of autophagic cell death. For the first time, the role of intracellularly synthesized AAT, other than in liver cells, is demonstrated. Autophagic cell death was induced by N-α-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) and tamoxifen. By utilizing a fluorescently tagged TPCK analog, AAT was "fished out" (pulled out) as a TPCK intracellular protein target. The interaction was further verified by competition binding experiments. Both inducers caused downregulation of AAT expression associated with activation of trypsin-like proteases. Furthermore, silencing AAT by siRNA induced autophagic cell death. Moreover, AAT administration to cultured cells prevented autophagic cell death. This new mechanism could have implications in the treatment of diseases by the regulation of AAT levels in which autophagy has a detrimental function. Furthermore, the results imply that the high synthesis of endogenous AAT by cancer cells could provide a novel resistance mechanism of cancer against autophagic cell death.

  9. Synthesis of 1,4-, 2,4-, and 3,4-dimethylphenanthrenes: A novel deoxygenation of arene 1,4-endoxides with trimethylsilyl iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Keeyong; Koreeda, Masato )

    1989-11-24

    A mild, efficient synthesis of the carcinogen 1,4-dimethylphenanthrene (2) and its bay-region methyl-bearing regioisomers 2,4-dimethyl- and 3,4-dimethylphenanthrenes (3 and 4) is described. The synthesis involves a generally applicable strategy that features a furan/dimethyl-1-naphthyne cycloaddition reaction followed by a convenient direct deoxygenation of the resulting enooxide with excess trimethylsilyl iodide generated in situ. The Friedel-Crafts cyclization of p-xylene with {gamma}-butyrolactone/AlCl{sub 3} or {gamma}-(2,5-dimethylphenyl)butyric acid via its trifluoromethanesulfonic anhydride derivative results in the formation of a mixture of 5,8-, 6,8-, and 5,7-dimethyl-1-tetralones (17, 20, and 21, respectively) through migration of aromatic methyl groups. The precursor to 6,8-dimethyl-1-naphthyne (10) was prepared from tetralone 20, isolable only as a 5:1 inseparable mixture with 17 from the direct Friedel-Crafts cyclization of p-xylene with {gamma}-butyrolactone, by {alpha}-dibromination with CuBr{sub 2}, dehydrobromination, and tosylation. The precursors to 5,8-dimethyl-1-naphthyne (9) and 7,8-dimethyl-1-naphthyne (11) were synthesized from the corresponding 1-naphthols 15 and 31, respectively. The synthesis of these naphthols involved cycloaddition between the corresponding dimethylated benzyne and furan followed by acid-catalyzed isomerization.

  10. Design, synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled bradykinin B1 receptor-targeting small molecules for PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengxing; Kuo, Hsiou-Ting; Lau, Joseph; Jenni, Silvia; Zhang, Chengcheng; Zeisler, Jutta; Bénard, François; Lin, Kuo-Shyan

    2016-08-15

    Two fluorine-18 ((18)F) labeled bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R)-targeting small molecules, (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165, were synthesized and evaluated for imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). Z02035 and Z02165 were derived from potent antagonists, and showed high binding affinity (0.93±0.44 and 2.80±0.50nM, respectively) to B1R. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 were prepared by coupling 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl tosylate with their respective precursors, and were obtained in 10±5 (n=4) and 22±14% (n=3), respectively, decay-corrected radiochemical yield with >99% radiochemical purity. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 exhibited moderate lipophilicity (LogD7.4=1.10 and 0.59, respectively), and were stable in mouse plasma. PET imaging and biodistribution studies in mice showed that both tracers enabled visualization of the B1R-positive HEK293T::hB1R tumor xenografts with better contrast than control B1R-negative HEK293T tumors. Our data indicate that small molecule antagonists can be used as pharmacophores for the design of B1R-targeting PET tracers. PMID:27390067

  11. Catalyst-Directed Diastereoselective Isomerization of Allylic Alcohols for the Stereoselective Construction of C(20) in Steroid Side Chains: Scope and Topological Diversification.

    PubMed

    Li, Houhua; Mazet, Clément

    2015-08-26

    The stereoselective construction of C20 in steroidal derivatives by a highly diastereoselective Ir-catalyzed isomerization of primary allylic alcohols is reported. A key aspect of this strategy is a straightforward access to geometrically pure steroidal enol tosylate and enol triflate intermediates for subsequent high yielding stereoretentive Negishi cross-coupling reactions to allow structural diversity to be introduced. A range of allylic alcohols participates in the diastereoselective isomerization under the optimized reaction conditions. Electron-rich and electron-poor aryl or heteroaryl substituents are particularly well-tolerated, and the stereospecific nature of the reaction provides indifferently access to the natural C20-(R) and unnatural C20-(S) configurations. Alkyl containing substrates are more challenging as they affect regioselectivity of iridium-hydride insertion. A rationale for the high diastereoselectivities observed is proposed for aryl containing precursors. The scope of our method is further highlighted through topological diversification in the side chain and within the polycyclic domain of advanced and complex steroidal architectures. These findings have the potential to greatly simplify access to epimeric structural analogues of important steroid scaffolds for applications in biological, pharmaceutical, and medical sciences.

  12. Synthesis and Evaluation of 18F-labeled Pyridaben Analogues for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Mice, Rats and Chinese mini-swine

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Tiantian; Zhao, Zuoquan; You, Linyi; Li, Yesen; Wang, Qian; Fang, Wei; Lu, Jie; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2016-01-01

    This study reports three novel 18F-labeled pyridaben analogues for potential myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Three precursors and the corresponding nonradioactive compounds were synthesized and characterized. The radiolabeled tracers were obtained by substituting tosyl with 18F. The total radiosynthesis time of these tracers was 70–90 min. Typical decay-corrected radiochemical yields were 47–58%, with high radiochemical purities (>98%). Tracers were evaluated as MPI agents in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. In the mouse biodistribution study, all three radiotracers showed high initial heart uptake (34–54% ID/g at 2 min after injection) and fast liver clearance. In the microPET imaging study, [18F]Fmpp2 produced heart images with good quality in both mice and rats. In the whole-body PET/CT images of mini-swine, [18F]Fmpp2 showed excellent initial heart standardized uptake value (SUV) (7.12 at 5 min p.i.) and good retention (5.75 at 120 min p.i.). The heart/liver SUV ratios were 4.12, 5.42 and 5.99 at 30, 60 and 120 min after injection, respectively. The favorable biological properties of [18F]Fmpp2 suggest that it is worth further investigation as a potential MPI agent. PMID:27646847

  13. Amphiphilic behavior of two phosphonium based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Indrajyoti; Mukherjee, Suvasree; Naskar, Bappaditya; Ghosh, Soumen; Moulik, Satya P

    2013-04-01

    Solution and surface chemical behavior of two phosphonium based ionic liquids triisobutyl (methyl) phosphonium tosylate (IL-1) and trihexyl (tetradecyl) phosphonium bis 2,4,4-(trimethylpentyl)phosphinate (IL-2) have been studied. The polar IL-1 is surface active and water soluble, whereas the weakly polar IL-2 is more surface active with very low aqueous solubility. IL-1 does not form micelles but affects the micellization properties of ionic, nonionic, and zwitterionic surfactants more strongly than conventional electrolytes. IL-2 itself forms micelles and mixed micelles with Triton X-100 (TX-100) in aqueous solution. It also forms Langmuir monolayers of liquid expanded type, at the air/water interface. IL-1 can replace water in forming microemulsions with the oil isopropylmyristate (IPM), stabilized by IL-2 (surfactant)+isopropanol (IP as a co-surfactant) like the IL-1/IPM/(IL-2+IP) system. It produces a large monophasic zone in the pseudoternary phase diagram. The thermodynamics of formation of the microemulsions of IL-1 in oil (IPM) have been examined. The dimensions and the polydispersity of the dispersed nano-droplets in the microemulsions have been determined by DLS. The thermal stability of the microemulsion forming systems has also been studied. ILs studied against Sarcoma-180 cell lines have evidenced proficient anti-cancer activity of IL-1 and moderate activity of IL-2. PMID:23317771

  14. Design, synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled bradykinin B1 receptor-targeting small molecules for PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengxing; Kuo, Hsiou-Ting; Lau, Joseph; Jenni, Silvia; Zhang, Chengcheng; Zeisler, Jutta; Bénard, François; Lin, Kuo-Shyan

    2016-08-15

    Two fluorine-18 ((18)F) labeled bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R)-targeting small molecules, (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165, were synthesized and evaluated for imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). Z02035 and Z02165 were derived from potent antagonists, and showed high binding affinity (0.93±0.44 and 2.80±0.50nM, respectively) to B1R. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 were prepared by coupling 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl tosylate with their respective precursors, and were obtained in 10±5 (n=4) and 22±14% (n=3), respectively, decay-corrected radiochemical yield with >99% radiochemical purity. (18)F-Z02035 and (18)F-Z02165 exhibited moderate lipophilicity (LogD7.4=1.10 and 0.59, respectively), and were stable in mouse plasma. PET imaging and biodistribution studies in mice showed that both tracers enabled visualization of the B1R-positive HEK293T::hB1R tumor xenografts with better contrast than control B1R-negative HEK293T tumors. Our data indicate that small molecule antagonists can be used as pharmacophores for the design of B1R-targeting PET tracers.

  15. Importance of Counterion Reactivity on the Deactivation of Co-Salen Catalysts in the Hydrolytic Kinetic Resolution of Epichlorohydrin

    SciTech Connect

    Jain,S.; Zheng, X.; Jones, C.; Weck, M.; Davis, R.

    2007-01-01

    Possible modes of deactivation of Jacobsen's Co-salen catalyst during the hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of epichlorohydrin were explored by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, combined with recycling studies. Although an active Co(III)-salen catalyst deactivated substantially after multiple cycles without regeneration, the catalyst maintained its +3 oxidation state throughout the runs. Thus, deactivation of Co-salen during HKR was not the result of Co reduction. The mass spectrum of a deactivated material showed that catalyst dimerization does not account for the loss of activity. Results from various catalyst pretreatment tests, as well as from catalysts containing various counterions (acetate, tosylate, chloride, iodide) indicated that the rate of addition of the Co-salen counterions to epoxide forming Co-OH during the reaction correlated with deactivation. The extent of counterion addition to epoxide was influenced by the exposure time and the nucleophilicity of the counterion. An oligo(cyclooctene)-supported Co-OAc salen catalyst, which was 25 times more active than the standard Co-salen catalyst, was recycled multiple times with negligible deactivation.

  16. Sensitization to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human neuroblastoma SK-N-AS cells by NF-κB inhibitors is dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS).

    PubMed

    Gatsinzi, Tom; Iverfeldt, Kerstin

    2011-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been shown to induce apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell lines with almost no toxicity toward normal cells. However, many neuroblastoma cells acquire resistance to TRAIL by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to investigate involvement of the transcription factor NF-κB in the resistance of human neuroblastoma SK-N-AS cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. We used five compounds previously reported to inhibit NF-κB activity. SN50, curcumin, oridonin, and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) all sensitized cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In contrast, N-alpha-tosyl-L: -phenylalanyl chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) did not affect sensitivity to TRAIL, although reporter gene assay clearly showed inhibition of NF-κB activity. In addition, neither curcumin nor oridonin had any inhibitory effect on NF-κB activity at concentrations at which sensitization to TRAIL was observed. Instead, the free radical scavenger N-acetyl-L: -cysteine (NAC) completely blocked the effect on TRAIL-induced apoptosis caused by curcumin, oridonin, and PDTC. Furthermore, exposure of SK-N-AS cells to H(2)O(2) could mimic the TRAIL-sensitizing effect of other agents. In conclusion, our results suggest that sensitization of neuroblastoma SK-N-AS cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis is correlated with induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) rather than inhibition of NF-κB.

  17. Stable Deep Doping of Vapor-Phase Polymerized Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/Ionic Liquid Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Christoffer; Nicholas, James; Evans, Drew; Forsyth, Maria; Strømme, Maria; Sjödin, Martin; Howlett, Patrick C; Pozo-Gonzalo, Cristina

    2016-08-23

    Liquid-solution polymerization and vapor-phase polymerization (VPP) have been used to manufacture a series of chloride- and tosylate-doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) carbon paper electrodes. The electrochemistry, specific capacitance, and specific charge were determined for single electrodes in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (emim dca) ionic liquid electrolyte. VPP-PEDOT exhibits outstanding properties with a specific capacitance higher than 300 F g(-1) , the highest value reported for a PEDOT-based conducting polymer, and doping levels as high as 0.7 charges per monomer were achieved. Furthermore, symmetric PEDOT supercapacitor cells with the emim dca electrolyte exhibited a high specific capacitance (76.4 F g(-1) ) and high specific energy (19.8 Wh kg(-1) ). A Ragone plot shows that the VPP-PEDOT cells combine the high specific power of conventional ("pure") capacitors with the high specific energy of batteries, a highly sought-after target for energy storage.

  18. Proteases from Canavalia ensiformis: Active and Thermostable Enzymes with Potential of Application in Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Rayane Natshe; Gozzini Barbosa, Suellen Duarte; da Silva-López, Raquel Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Extracts of leaves, seeds, roots, and stem from a tropical legume, C. ensiformis, were prepared employing buffers and detergent in aqueous solution. Leaf extracts had the highest protein content and the most pronounced peptidase activity with optimal pH in the neutral to alkaline range. All extracts exhibited peaks of activity at various pH values, suggesting the presence of distinctive classes of proteases. N-α-Tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester hydrolysis was maximal at 30°C to 60°C and peptidase activity from all extracts presented very good thermal stability after 24 h incubation at 70°C. C. ensiformis proteases exhibited molecular masses of about 200-57, 40-37, and 20-15 kDa by SDS-PAGE analysis. These enzymes cleaved hemoglobin, bovine serum albumin, casein, and gelatin at different levels. Serine and metalloproteases are the major proteases in C. ensiformis extracts, modulated by divalent cations, stable at 1% of surfactant Triton X-100 and at different concentrations of the reducing agent β-mercaptoethanol. Thus, C. ensiformis expresses a particular set of proteases in distinctive organs with high activity and stability, making this legume an important source of proteases with biotechnological potential. PMID:27630776

  19. Click azide-nitrile cycloaddition as a new ligation tool for the synthesis of tetrazole-tethered C-glycosyl alpha-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Aldhoun, Mohammad; Massi, Alessandro; Dondoni, Alessandro

    2008-12-19

    Glycoproteins play a key role in a multitude of biological events in living organisms. Hence, neoglycopeptides obtained from unnatural C-glycosyl alpha-amino acids can be used as synthetic probes in studies aiming at clarifying the role of the carbohydrate domain in glycoprotein biological activity. A new class of C-glycosyl alpha-amino acids featuring a nitrogenated heterocycle ring holding the carbohydrate and glycinyl moiety was designed in our laboratory. Having previously prepared isoxazole-, 1,2,3-triazole-, and pyridine-tethered compounds, the family has now been enlarged by a group of newcomers represented by tetrazole derivatives. Two sets of compounds have been prepared, one being constituted of C-galactosyl and C-ribosyl O-tetrazolyl serines while the other contains S-tetrazolyl cysteine derivatives. In both cases, the synthetic scheme involved a two-step route, the first one being the thermal cycloaddition of a sugar azide with p-toluensulfonyl cyanide (TsCN) to give a 1-substituted 5-sulfonyl tetrazole and the second the replacement of the tosyl group with a serine or cysteine residue. For the high efficiency and operational simplicity, the azide-TsCN cycloaddition appears to be a true click process. Finally, one of the amino acids prepared was incorporated into a tripeptide.

  20. Phenidone and hydroxyurea reduce sulfur mustard-increased proteolysis in hairless guinea pig skin

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, F.M.; Bongiovanni, R.; Broomfield, C.A.; Schulz, S.M.; Smith, W.J.

    1995-12-31

    Increased proteolytic activity at the dermal-epidermal junction is postulated as being involved in sulfur-mustard-induced cutaneous injury. Homogenates of skin punch biopsy specimens from the skin of hairless guinea pig at 6, 9, 12, and 24 h after a 7 min vapor cup exposure to sulfur mustard (HD) demonstrated enhanced proteolytic activity. Homogenates from the biopsy specimens of exposed animals produced from 3 to 10 times the hydrolysis of the chromogenic peptide substrate Chromzym TH (tosyl-gly-pro-arg-p-nitrani-lide) and human elastase substrate N-methoxysuccinyl-ala- ala-pro-val-p-nitranilide than did the homogenates from control samples. In this study HD-increased proteolysis of the TH substrate by extracts of hairless guinea pig skin biopsies was nearly eliminated by systemic treatment with hydroxyurea and greatly reduced by topical application of the anti-inflammatory compound phenidone. Compounds that reduce HD-increased proteolytic activity, such as phenidone and hydroxyurea, can serve as probes to examine the role of proteolysis in HD-induced pathology. HD-increased proteolysis provides a biochemical correlate for investigating cutaneous exposure to HD. Increased proteolysis may therefore serve as a biomarker for HD-induced pathology that might be used as an index of efficacy for potential treatment compounds.

  1. The reaction of primary aromatic amines with alkylene carbonates for the selective synthesis of bis-N-(2-hydroxy)alkylanilines: the catalytic effect of phosphonium-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Selva, Maurizio; Fabris, Massimo; Lucchini, Vittorio; Perosa, Alvise; Noè, Marco

    2010-11-21

    At T≥ 140 °C, different primary aromatic amines (pX-C(6)H(4)NH(2); X = H, OCH(3), CH(3), Cl) react with both ethylene- and propylene-carbonates to yield a chemoselective N-alkylation process: bis-N-(2-hydroxyalkyl)anilines [pX-C(6)H(4)N(CH(2)CH(R)OH)(2); R = H, CH(3)] are the major products and the competitive formation of carbamates is substantially ruled out. At 140 °C, under solventless conditions, the model reaction of aniline with ethylene carbonate goes to completion by simply mixing stoichiometric amounts of the reagents. However, a class of phosphonium ionic liquids (PILs) such as tetraalkylphosphonium halides and tosylates turn out to be active organocatalysts for both aniline and other primary aromatic amines. A kinetic analysis monitored by (13)C NMR spectroscopy, shows that bromide exchanged PILs are the most efficient systems, able to impart a more than 8-fold acceleration to the reaction. The reactions of propylene carbonate take place at a higher temperature than those of ethylene carbonate, and only in the presence of PIL catalysts. A mechanism based on the Lewis acidity of tetraalkylphosphonium cations and the nucleophilicity of halide anions has been proposed to account for both the reaction chemoselectivity and the function of the catalysts.

  2. The Ruthenostannylene Complex [Cp*(IXy)H2 Ru-Sn-Trip]: Providing Access to Unusual Ru-Sn Bonded Stanna-imine, Stannene, and Ketenylstannyl Complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsueh-Ju; Ziegler, Micah S; Tilley, T Don

    2015-05-26

    Reactivity studies of the thermally stable ruthenostannylene complex [Cp*(IXy)(H)2 Ru-Sn-Trip] (1; IXy=1,3-bis(2,6-dimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene; Cp*=η(5) -C5 Me5 ; Trip=2,4,6-iPr3 C6 H2 ) with a variety of organic substrates are described. Complex 1 reacts with benzoin and an α,β-unsaturated ketone to undergo [1+4] cycloaddition reactions and afford [Cp*(IXy)(H)2 RuSn(κ(2) -O,O-OCPhCPhO)Trip] (2) and [Cp*(IXy)(H)2 RuSn(κ(2) -O,C-OCPhCHCHPh)Trip] (3), respectively. The reaction of 1 with ethyl diazoacetate resulted in a tin-substituted ketene complex [Cp*(IXy)(H)2 RuSn(OC2 H5 )(CHCO)Trip] (4), which is most likely a decomposition product from the putative ruthenium-substituted stannene complex. The isolation of a ruthenium-substituted stannene [Cp*(IXy)(H)2 RuSn(=Flu)Trip] (5) and stanna-imine [Cp*(IXy)(H)2 RuSn(κ(2) -N,O-NSO2 C6 H4 Me)Trip] (6) complexes was achieved by treatment of 1 with 9-diazofluorene and tosyl azide, respectively.

  3. Nasal challenge with ragweed pollen in hay fever patients. Effect of immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Creticos, P S; Adkinson, N F; Kagey-Sobotka, A; Proud, D; Meier, H L; Naclerio, R M; Lichtenstein, L M; Norman, P S

    1985-12-01

    Challenge of the nasal mucosa of allergic subjects with specific allergen induces not only the expected sneezing and rhinorrhea, but also the appearance in nasal secretions of mediators commonly associated with activation of mast cells or basophils: histamine, leukotrienes, prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), kinins, and TAME ([3H]-N-alpha-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester)-esterase. To determine whether specific immunotherapy alters mediator release in vivo, nasal pollen challenge was used to compare 27 untreated highly sensitive ragweed (RW)-allergic subjects with 12 similarly sensitive patients receiving long-term immunotherapy (3-5 yr) with RW extract (median dose, 6 micrograms RW antigen E). The two groups were equally sensitive based on skin tests and basophil histamine release. The immunized group had a diminished response as demonstrated by (a) the treated group required higher pollen doses to excite sneezing or mediator release; (b) significantly fewer subjects in the treated group released mediators at any dose (TAME-esterase [P = 0.005], PGD2 [P = 0.04]), and (c) the treated group released 3-5-fold less mediator (TAME-esterase [P = 0.01], and histamine [P = 0.02]).

  4. Reticulation des fibres lignocellulosiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landrevy, Christel

    Pour faire face à la crise économique la conception de papier à valeur ajoutée est développée par les industries papetières. Le but de se projet est l'amélioration des techniques actuelles de réticulation des fibres lignocellulosiques de la pâte à papier visant à produire un papier plus résistant. En effet, lors des réactions de réticulation traditionnelles, de nombreuses liaisons intra-fibres se forment ce qui affecte négativement l'amélioration anticipée des propriétés physiques du papier ou du matériau produit. Pour éviter la formation de ces liaisons intra-fibres, un greffage sur les fibres de groupements ne pouvant pas réagir entre eux est nécessaire. La réticulation des fibres par une réaction de « click chemistry » appelée cycloaddition de Huisgen entre un azide et un alcyne vrai, catalysée par du cuivre (CuAAC) a été l'une des solutions trouvée pour remédier à ce problème. De plus, une adaptation de cette réaction en milieux aqueux pourrait favoriser son utilisation en milieu industriel. L'étude que nous désirons entreprendre lors de ce projet vise à optimiser la réaction de CuAAC et les réactions intermédiaires (propargylation, tosylation et azidation) sur la pâte kraft, en milieu aqueux. Pour cela, les réactions ont été adaptées en milieu aqueux sur la cellulose microcristalline afin de vérifier sa faisabilité, puis transférée à la pâte kraft et l'influence de différents paramètres comme le temps de réaction ou la quantité de réactifs utilisée a été étudiée. Dans un second temps, une étude des différentes propriétés conférées au papier par les réactions a été réalisée à partir d'une série de tests papetiers optiques et physiques. Mots Clés Click chemistry, Huisgen, CuAAC, propargylation, tosylation, azidation, cellulose, pâte kraft, milieu aqueux, papier.

  5. Thermoelectric properties of PEDOT nanowire/PEDOT hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Qiu, Jingjing; Wang, Shiren

    2016-04-01

    Freestanding poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanowires were synthesized by template-confined in situ polymerization, and then integrated into polystyrene sulfonate (PSS)-doped PEDOT and tosylate-doped PEDOT hosts, respectively. The hybrid morphologies were characterized by atomic force microscopy, indicating the homogeneous dispersion of PEDOT nanowires. The thermoelectric properties of the resultant hybrids were measured, and the power factor was found to be enhanced by 9-fold in comparison with PEDOT:PSS mixed with 5 vol% dimethyl sulfoxide while the low thermal conductivity was still maintained. Such a significant improvement could be attributed to the synergistic effects of interfacial energy filtering, component contributions, and changes of carrier concentrations in the host materials. Upon addition of 0.2 wt% PEDOT nanowires, the resultant composites demonstrated a power factor as high as 446.6 μW m-1 K-2 and the thermoelectric figure of merit could reach 0.44 at room temperature. The thermoelectric devices were investigated by using the PEDOT nanowire/PEDOT hybrid as a p-type leg and nitrogen-doped graphene as an n-type leg. The normalized power output was as high as ~0.5 mW m-2 for a temperature gradient of ΔT = 10.1 °C, indicating great potential for practical applications. These findings open up a new route towards high-performance organic thermoelectric materials and devices.Freestanding poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanowires were synthesized by template-confined in situ polymerization, and then integrated into polystyrene sulfonate (PSS)-doped PEDOT and tosylate-doped PEDOT hosts, respectively. The hybrid morphologies were characterized by atomic force microscopy, indicating the homogeneous dispersion of PEDOT nanowires. The thermoelectric properties of the resultant hybrids were measured, and the power factor was found to be enhanced by 9-fold in comparison with PEDOT:PSS mixed with 5 vol% dimethyl sulfoxide while the low

  6. Synthesis and Evaluation of 4-[18F]Fluoropropoxy-3-iodobenzylguanidine ([18F]FPOIBG): A Novel 18F-labeled Analogue of MIBG

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; McDougald, Darryl; Koumarianou, Eftychia; Choi, Jaeyeon; Hens, Marc; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Radioiodinated meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a norepinephrine transporter (NET) substrate, has been extensively used as an imaging agent to study the pathophysiology of the heart and for the diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. The goal of this study was to develop an 18F-labeled analogue of MIBG that like MIBG itself could be synthesized in a single radiochemical step. Towards this end, we designed 4-fluoropropoxy-3-iodobenzylguanidine (FPOIBG). Methods Standards of FPOIBG and 4-fluoropropoxy-3-bromobenzylguanidine (FPOBBG) as well as their tosylate precursors for labeling with 18F, and a tin precursor for the preparation of radioiodinated FPOIBG were synthesized. Radiolabeled derivatives were synthesized by nucleophilic substitution and electrophilic iododestannylation from the corresponding precursors. Labeled compounds were evaluated for NET transporter recognition in in vitro assays using three NET-expressing cell lines and in biodistribution experiments in normal mice, with all studies performed in a paired-label format. Competitive inhibition of [125I]MIBG uptake by unlabeled benzylguanidine compounds was performed in UVW-NAT cell line to determine IC50 values. Results [18F]FPOIBG was synthesized from the corresponding tosylate precursor in 5.2 ± 0.5% (n = 6) overall radiochemical yields starting with aqueous fluoride in about 105 min. In a paired-label in vitro assay, the uptake of [18F]FPOIBG at 2 h was 10.2 ± 1.5%, 39.6 ± 13.4%, and 13.3 ± 2.5%, in NET-expressing SK-N-SH, UVW-NAT, and SK-N-BE(2c) cells, respectively, while these values for [125I]MIBG were 57.3 ± 8.1%, 82.7 ± 8.9%, and 66.3 ± 3.6%. The specificity of uptake of both tracers was demonstrated by blocking with desipramine. The 125I-labeled congener of FPOIBG gave similar results. On the other hand, [18F]FPOBBG, a compound recently reported in the literature, demonstrated much higher uptake, albeit less than that of co-incubated [125I]MIBG. IC50 values for

  7. Structural Properties of the Acidification Products of Scandium Hydroxy Chloride Hydrate.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Timothy J; Sears, Jeremiah M; Neville, Michael L; Alam, Todd M; Young, Victor G

    2015-12-21

    The structural properties of a series of scandium inorganic acid derivatives were determined. The reaction of Sc(0) with concentrated aqueous hydrochloric acid led to the isolation of [(H2O)5Sc(μ-OH)]24Cl·2H2O (1). Compound 1 was modified with a series of inorganic acids (i.e., HNO3, H3PO4, and H2SO4) at room temperature and found to form {[(H2O)4Sc(κ(2)-NO3)(μ-OH)]NO3}2 (2a), [(H2O)4Sc(κ(2)-NO3)2]NO3·H2O (2b) (at reflux temperatures), {6[H][Sc(μ-PO4)(PO4)]6}n (3), and [H][Sc(μ3-SO4)2]·2H2O (4a). Additional organosulfonic acid derivatives were investigated, including tosylic acid (H-OTs) to yield {[(H2O)4Sc(OTs)2]OTs}·2H2O (4b) in H2O and [(DMSO)3Sc(OTs)3] (4c) in dimethyl sulfoxide and triflic acid (H-OTf) to form [Sc(H2O)8]OTf3 (4d). Other organic acid modifications of 1 were also investigated, and the final structures were determined to be {([(H2O)2Sc(μ-OAc)2]Cl)6}n (5) from acetic acid (H-OAc) and [Sc(μ-TFA)3Sc(μ-TFA)3]n (6) from trifluoroacetic acid (H-TFA). In addition to single-crystal X-ray structures, the compounds were identified by solid-state and solution-state (45)Sc nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies.

  8. PET radiotracer [18F]-P6 selectively targeting COX-1 as a novel biomarker in ovarian cancer: Preliminary investigation

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Jashim; Vitale, Paola; Panella, Andrea; Crews, Brenda C.; Daniel, Cristina K.; Ghebreselasie, Kebreab; Nickels, Mike; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Manning, H. Charles; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Scilimati, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), but not COX-2, is expressed at high levels in the early stages of human epithelial ovarian cancer where it seems to play a key role in cancer onset and progression. As a consequence, COX-1 is an ideal biomarker for early ovarian cancer detection. A series of novel fluorinated COX-1-targeted imaging agents derived from P6 was developed by using a highly selective COX-1 inhibitor as a lead compound. Among these new compounds, designed by structural modification of P6, 3-(5-chlorofuran-2-yl)-5-(fluoromethyl)-4-phenylisoxazole ([18/19F]-P6) is the most promising derivative [IC50 = 2.0 μM (purified oCOX-1) and 1.37 μM (hOVCAR-3 cell COX-1)]. Its tosylate precursor was also prepared and, a method for radio[18F]chemistry was developed and optimized. The radiochemistry was carried out using a carrier-free K18F/Kryptofix 2.2.2 complex, that afforded [18F]-P6 in good radio-chemical yield (18%) and high purity (>95%). In vivo PET/CT imaging data showed that the radiotracer [18F]-P6 was selectively taken up by COX-1-expressing ovarian carcinoma (OVCAR 3) tumor xenografts as compared with the normal leg muscle. Our results suggest that [18F]-P6 might be an useful radiotracer in preclinical and clinical settings for in vivo PET-CT imaging of tissues that express elevated levels of COX-1. PMID:24832612

  9. Hydrogel-forming and dissolving microneedles for enhanced delivery of photosensitisers and precursors

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Ryan F.; Morrow, Desmond I.J.; McCrudden, Maelíosa T.C.; Alkilani, Ahlam Zaid; Vicente-Pérez, Eva M.; O’Mahony, Conor; González-Vázquez, Patricia; McCarron, Paul A.; Woolfson, A. David

    2014-01-01

    We present novel dissolving and hydrogel-forming microneedle arrays that can be applied in a one-step fashion and are intended to enhance delivery of photosensitisers and photosensitiser precursors. Microneedles (280 μm in length) were prepared from aqueous blends of 20% w/w poly(methylvinylether/maelic acid) and either crosslinked with glycerol by esterification to form hydrogels upon skin insertion or allowed to dissolve rapidly when inserted into skin. Drug-loaded patches containing either 19 mg cm−2 of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) or mesotetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP) were attached to the MN during drug delivery experiments. Both MN types were mechanically robust, with even compression forces of 20.0 N only causing height reductions of around 14%. Application forces as low as 8.0 N per array allowed over 95% of the MN in each type of array to penetrate excised neonatal porcine skin and the MN penetrated to depths of approximately 280 μm, well beyond the stratum corneum barrier. MN significantly enhanced delivery of both ALA and TMP across dermatomed neonatal porcine skin in vitro, with the hydrogel-forming system comparable to the dissolving system for ALA delivery (approximately 3000 nmol cm−2 over 6 hours), but superior for delivery of the much larger TMP molecule (approximately 14 nmol cm−2 over 24 hours, compared to 0.15 nmol cm−2). This technology has the potential to improve convenience and efficacy of photodynamic therapy of neoplastic skin lesions. Consequently, we are currently planning animal studies, to be followed by preliminary human evaluations. Manufacturing scale-up is currently ongoing, with a view to patient benefit within 3-5 years. PMID:24215482

  10. Structural Properties of the Acidification Products of Scandium Hydroxy Chloride Hydrate.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Timothy J; Sears, Jeremiah M; Neville, Michael L; Alam, Todd M; Young, Victor G

    2015-12-21

    The structural properties of a series of scandium inorganic acid derivatives were determined. The reaction of Sc(0) with concentrated aqueous hydrochloric acid led to the isolation of [(H2O)5Sc(μ-OH)]24Cl·2H2O (1). Compound 1 was modified with a series of inorganic acids (i.e., HNO3, H3PO4, and H2SO4) at room temperature and found to form {[(H2O)4Sc(κ(2)-NO3)(μ-OH)]NO3}2 (2a), [(H2O)4Sc(κ(2)-NO3)2]NO3·H2O (2b) (at reflux temperatures), {6[H][Sc(μ-PO4)(PO4)]6}n (3), and [H][Sc(μ3-SO4)2]·2H2O (4a). Additional organosulfonic acid derivatives were investigated, including tosylic acid (H-OTs) to yield {[(H2O)4Sc(OTs)2]OTs}·2H2O (4b) in H2O and [(DMSO)3Sc(OTs)3] (4c) in dimethyl sulfoxide and triflic acid (H-OTf) to form [Sc(H2O)8]OTf3 (4d). Other organic acid modifications of 1 were also investigated, and the final structures were determined to be {([(H2O)2Sc(μ-OAc)2]Cl)6}n (5) from acetic acid (H-OAc) and [Sc(μ-TFA)3Sc(μ-TFA)3]n (6) from trifluoroacetic acid (H-TFA). In addition to single-crystal X-ray structures, the compounds were identified by solid-state and solution-state (45)Sc nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies. PMID:26641309

  11. Co(III)-Carbene Radical Approach to Substituted 1H-Indenes.

    PubMed

    Das, Braja Gopal; Chirila, Andrei; Tromp, Moniek; Reek, Joost N H; Bruin, Bas de

    2016-07-20

    A new strategy for the catalytic synthesis of substituted 1H-indenes via metalloradical activation of o-cinnamyl N-tosyl hydrazones is presented, taking advantage of the intrinsic reactivity of a Co(III) carbene radical intermediate. The reaction uses readily available starting materials and is operationally simple, thus representing a practical method for the construction of functionalized 1H-indene derivatives. The cheap and easy to prepare low spin cobalt(II) complex [Co(II)(MeTAA)] (MeTAA = tetramethyltetraaza[14]annulene) proved to be the most active catalyst among those investigated, which demonstrates catalytic carbene radical reactivity for a nonporphyrin cobalt(II) complex, and for the first time catalytic activity of [Co(II)(MeTAA)] in general. The methodology has been successfully applied to a broad range of substrates, producing 1H-indenes in good to excellent yields. The metallo-radical catalyzed indene synthesis in this paper represents a unique example of a net (formal) intramolecular carbene insertion reaction into a vinylic C(sp(2))-H bond, made possible by a controlled radical ring-closure process of the carbene radical intermediate involved. The mechanism was investigated computationally, and the results were confirmed by a series of supporting experimental reactions. Density functional theory calculations reveal a stepwise process involving activation of the diazo compound leading to formation of a Co(III)-carbene radical, followed by radical ring-closure to produce an indanyl/benzyl radical intermediate. Subsequent indene product elimination involving a 1,2-hydrogen transfer step regenerates the catalyst. Trapping experiments using 2,2,6,6-tetra-methylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) radical or dibenzoylperoxide (DBPO) confirm the involvement of cobalt(III) carbene radical intermediates. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic spin-trapping experiments using phenyl N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) reveal the radical nature of the reaction. PMID

  12. [Isolation and some properties of the proteinase atroxin from the venom of the snake Bothrops atrox].

    PubMed

    Pantigoso, C; Escobar, E; Málaga, O; Yarlequé, A

    1996-01-01

    A proteolytic enzyme from the venom of Bothrops atrox snake was isolated. It was designed as Atroxin, and three chromatography steps were used to purification: ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50 equilibrated with 0.05 M Tris HCl buffer, 1 mM CaCl2 pH 7.4, followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 and Sephadex G-100, respectively, using the same buffer. The enzyme was recovered with a 7.4 folds and 11% of yield. It had a high activity on casein being 7.4 optimus pH. A molecular weight was 19.9 Kd calculated by polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis, and head treatment showed that the enzyme preserves its activity in the range of 37-45 degrees C, while it was decrease when the temperature values were higher. On the other hand, 0.133 mumoles of Ca2+ and Mg2+, and Zn2+ ions (0.266 mumoles) were activators, while EDTA (0.20 mumoles) and sodium azide (0.053 mumoles) were inhibitors. The enzymatic activity was not affected by glicerol (1.33 mumoles) and phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride (PSMF) (0.16 mumoles). In addition, iodoacetic acid (0.08 mumoles) was slight inhibitor, but 0.16 mumoles of p-tosyl-1-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) was activator. Biological assays on mice showed that atroxin produced hemorrhagic and necrosis after 24 h of injection, which was increased by 5 mM calcium chloride. PMID:9334451

  13. High glucose induced nuclear factor kappa B mediated inhibition of endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hamuro, Masao; Polan, Jodie; Natarajan, Mohan; Mohan, Sumathy

    2002-06-01

    Delayed wound healing and accelerated atherosclerosis are common vascular complications of diabetes mellitus. Although elevated blood glucose level is the major contributing factor, mechanisms that mediate these complications are not clearly understood. In the present study, we have demonstrated that elevated glucose inhibits endothelial cell migration, thereby delaying wound healing. Our results clearly indicated that high glucose (10 or 30 mM) induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) inhibited endothelial cell migration (P<0.05). High glucose induced NF-kappaB DNA binding activity may mediate this inhibition of migration by regulating intracellular nitric oxide. In vitro wound healing model in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were used to evaluate cell migration under the influence of high glucose. The migration inhibited by high glucose was restored by NF-kappaB inhibitors (including E3-4-methylphenyl sulfonyl-2-propenenitrile, N-tosyl-Lys-chloromethylketone (TLCK), or over-expression of inhibitor subunit of kappaB) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (N-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA); and Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)). Furthermore, NF-kappaB inhibitors attenuated high glucose induced eNOS expression and intracellular nitric oxide (NO) production. Cytoskeletal immunofluorescence staining confirmed differences in actin distribution in HAEC incubated in high glucose in the presence or absence of NF-kappaB and NO inhibitors, explaining the differences observed in migration. In summary, our results for the first time suggest therapeutic strategies involving inhibition of NF-kappaB activation induced by high glucose, which may improve wound healing and help avoid some of the vascular complications of diabetes.

  14. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, M.S.; Allen, R.D.; Vail, T.A.; Switalski, L.M.; Hook, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains. The authors now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37{degree}C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (M{sub r}, 150 000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with {sup 125}I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4{degree}C but did occur at 22 and 37{degree}C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37{degree}C, two major fibrinogen fragments (M{sub r}, 97 000 and 50 000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (M{sub r}, 120 000 and 150 000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the M{sub r}-120 000 and -150 000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-{alpha}-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate.

  15. Supramolecular design of biocompatible nanocontainers based on amphiphilic derivatives of a natural compound isosteviol.

    PubMed

    Gabdrakhmanov, Dinar R; Voronin, Mikhail A; Zakharova, Lucia Ya; Konovalov, Alexander I; Khaybullin, Ravil N; Strobykina, Irina Yu; Kataev, Vladimir E; Faizullin, Dzhigangir A; Gogoleva, Natalia E; Konnova, Tatiana A; Salnikov, Vadim V; Zuev, Yuriy F

    2013-10-21

    Two diterpenoid surfactants with ammonium head groups and bromide (S1) or tosylate (S2) counterions have been synthesized. Exploration of these biomimetic species made it possible to demonstrate that even minor structural changes beyond their chemical nature may dramatically affect their solution behavior. While their aggregation thresholds differ inconsiderably, morphological behavior and affinity to lipid bilayer are strongly dependent on the counterion nature. Compound S2 demonstrates properties of typical surfactants and forms small micelle-like aggregates above critical micelle concentration. For surfactant S1, two critical concentrations and two types of aggregates occur. Structural transitions have been observed between small micelles and aggregates with higher aggregation numbers and hydrodynamic diameter of ca. 150 nm. Unlike S2, surfactant S1 is shown to integrate with liposomes based on dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, resulting in a decrease of the temperature of the main phase transition. Both surfactants demonstrate an effective complexation capacity toward oligonucleotide (ONu), which is supported by recharging the surfactant-ONu complexes and the ethidium bromide exclusion at a low N/P ratio. Meanwhile, a very weak complexation of plasmid DNA with the surfactants has been revealed in the gel electrophoresis experiment. The DNA transfer to bacterial cells mediated by the surfactant S1 is shown to depend on the protocol used. In the case of the electroporation, the inhibition of the cell transformation occurs in the presence of the surfactant, while upon the chemical treatment no surfactant effect has been observed. The variability in the morphology, the biocompatibility, the nanoscale dimension and the high binding capacity toward the DNA decamer make it possible to nominate the designed surfactants as promising carriers for biosubstrates or as a helper surfactant for the mixed liposome-surfactant nanocontainers.

  16. SARS coronavirus spike protein-induced innate immune response occurs via activation of the NF-kappaB pathway in human monocyte macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dosch, Susan F; Mahajan, Supriya D; Collins, Arlene R

    2009-06-01

    A purified recombinant spike (S) protein was studied for its effect on stimulating human peripheral blood monocyte macrophages (PBMC). We examined inflammatory gene mRNA abundances found in S protein-treated PBMC using gene arrays. We identified differential mRNA abundances of genes with functional properties associated with antiviral (CXCL10) and inflammatory (IL-6 and IL-8) responses. We confirmed cytokine mRNA increases by real-time quantitative(q) RT-PCR or ELISA. We further analyzed the sensitivity and specificity of the prominent IL-8 response. By real-time qRT-PCR, S protein was shown to stimulate IL-8 mRNA accumulation in a dose dependent manner while treatment with E protein did not. Also, titration of S protein-specific production and secretion of IL-8 by ELISA showed that the dose of 5.6nM of S produced a significant increase in IL-8 (p=0.003) compared to mock-treated controls. The increase in IL-8 stimulated by a concentration of 5.6nM of S was comparable to concentrations seen for S protein binding to ACE2 or to neutralizing monoclonal antibody suggesting a physiological relevance. An NF-kappaB inhibitor, TPCK (N-Tosyl-L-Phenylalanine Chloromethyl Ketone) could suppress IL-8 production and secretion in response to S protein in PBMC and THP-1 cells and in HCoV-229E virus-infected PBMC. Activation and translocation of NF-kappaB was shown to occur rapidly following exposure of PBMC or THP-1 cells to S protein using a highly sensitive assay for active nuclear NF-kappaB p65 transcription factor. The results further suggested that released or secreted S protein could activate blood monocytes through recognition by toll-like receptor (TLR)2 ligand.

  17. (4-(Bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl)(cyclohexyl)methanone hydrochloride (LDK1229): a new cannabinoid CB1 receptor inverse agonist from the class of benzhydryl piperazine analogs.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mariam M; Olszewska, Teresa; Liu, Hui; Shore, Derek M; Hurst, Dow P; Reggio, Patricia H; Lu, Dai; Kendall, Debra A

    2015-02-01

    Some inverse agonists of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) have been demonstrated to be anorectic antiobesity drug candidates. However, the first generation of CB1 inverse agonists, represented by rimonabant (SR141716A), otenabant, and taranabant, are centrally active, with a high level of psychiatric side effects. Hence, the discovery of CB1 inverse agonists with a chemical scaffold distinct from these holds promise for developing peripherally active CB1 inverse agonists with fewer side effects. We generated a new CB1 inverse agonist, (4-(bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl)(cyclohexyl)methanone hydrochloride (LDK1229), from the class of benzhydryl piperazine analogs. This compound binds to CB1 more selectively than cannabinoid receptor type 2, with a Ki value of 220 nM. Comparable CB1 binding was also observed by analogs 1-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]-4-cinnamylpiperazine dihydrochloride (LDK1203) and 1-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]-4-tosylpiperazine hydrochloride (LDK1222), which differed by the substitution on the piperazine ring where the piperazine of LDK1203 and LDK1222 are substituted by an alkyl group and a tosyl group, respectively. LDK1229 exhibits efficacy comparable with SR141716A in antagonizing the basal G protein coupling activity of CB1, as indicated by a reduction in guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate binding. Consistent with inverse agonist behavior, increased cell surface localization of CB1 upon treatment with LDK1229 was also observed. Although docking and mutational analysis showed that LDK1229 forms similar interactions with the receptor as SR141716A does, the benzhydryl piperazine scaffold is structurally distinct from the first-generation CB1 inverse agonists. It offers new opportunities for developing novel CB1 inverse agonists through the optimization of molecular properties, such as the polar surface area and hydrophilicity, to reduce the central activity observed with SR141716A.

  18. Synthesis, uptake mechanism characterization and biological evaluation of 18F labeled fluoroalkyl phenylalanine analogs as potential PET imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Qu, Wenchao; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Amino acids based tracers represent a promising class of tumor metabolic imaging agents with successful clinical applications. Two new phenylalanine derivatives, p-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-phenylalanine (FEP, [18F]2) and p-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)-L-phenylalanine (FPP, [18F]3) were synthesized and evaluated in comparison to clinically utilized O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET, [18F]1). Methods FEP ([18F]2) and FPP ([18F]3) were successfully synthesized by a rapid and efficient two-step nucleophilic fluorination of tosylate precursors and deprotection reaction. In vitro cell uptake studies were carried out in 9L glioma cells. In vivo studies, 9L tumor xenografts were implanted in Fisher 344 rats. Results FEP ([18F]2) and FPP ([18F]3) could be efficiently labeled within 90 min with good enantiomeric purity (>95%), good yield (11–37%) and high specific activity (21–69 GBq/μmol). Cell uptake studies showed FEP had higher uptake than FPP as well as reference ligand FET ([18F]1). Uptake mechanism studies suggested that FEP is a selective substrate for system L and prefers its subtype LAT1. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated FEP had specific accumulation in tumor cells and tumor to background ratio reached 1.45 at 60 min. Small animal PET imaging studies showed FEP was comparable to FET for imaging rats bearing 9L tumor model. FEP had high uptake in 9L tumor compared to surrounding tissue and was quickly excreted through urinary tract. Conclusion Biological evaluations indicate that FEP ([18F]2) is a potential useful tracer for tumor imaging with PET. PMID:21220129

  19. Involvement of serine proteases in the excystation and metacystic development of Entamoeba invadens.

    PubMed

    Makioka, Asao; Kumagai, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Seiki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2009-10-01

    Although the functions of cysteine proteases involved in the pathogenicity and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica have been demonstrated, little is known about the functions of serine proteases. We examined the involvement of serine proteases in amoebic excystation and metacystic development using inhibitors specific for serine proteases. Entamoeba invadens IP-1 strain was used as the model of excystation and metacystic development of E. histolytica. Four serine protease inhibitors, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), 4-(2-aminoethyl) bezensulfonylfluoride hydrochloride, 3, 4-dichloroisocoumarin, and N-tosyl-phe-chloromethylketone, decreased the number of metacystic amoebae in a dose-dependent manner, without showing cytotoxicity to cysts. PMSF inhibited not only the increase but also the development of metacystic amoebae as determined by the change of nucleus number from four- to one-nucleate amoebae. The protease activity in cyst lysates was also inhibited by PMSF and the band of protease on gelatin sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was weaker than controls when treated with PMSF. Three serine protease families, S28 (three types), S9 (two), and S26 (one) were retrieved from the database of E. invadens. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that amebic enzymes from the serine protease families formed different clades from those from other organisms. The expression levels of these serine proteases in cysts 5 h after the induction of excystation as assessed by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were higher than those observed prior to induction assayed by real-time RT-PCR; the increase in one type of S9 (named S9-3) expression was the highest. The expression of S9 enzymes also increased from cysts to trophozoites higher than the other family serine proteases. Thus, the results show that Entamoeba uses their serine proteases in the excystation and metacystic development, which leads to successful infection.

  20. Anisotropic thermal expansion in a metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Solveig Røgild; Lock, Nina; Overgaard, Jacob; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2014-06-01

    Ionothermal reaction between Mn(II)(acetate)2·4H2O and 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid (H3BTC) in either of the two ionic liquids 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (EMIMBr) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tosylate (EMIMOTs) resulted in the formation of the new metal-organic framework (MOF) EMIM[Mn(II)BTC] (BTC = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate). The compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbca with unit-cell parameters of a = 14.66658 (12), b = 12.39497 (9), c = 16.63509 (14) Å at 100 K. Multi-temperature single-crystal (15-340 K) and powder X-ray diffraction studies (100-400 K) reveal strongly anisotropic thermal expansion properties. The linear thermal expansion coefficients, αL(l), attain maximum values at 400 K along the a- and b-axis, with αL(a) = 115 × 10(-6) K(-1) and αL(b) = 75 × 10(-6) K(-1). At 400 K a negative thermal expansion coefficient of -40 × 10(-6) K(-1) is observed along the c-axis. The thermal expansion is coupled to a continuous deformation of the framework, which causes the structure to expand in two directions. Due to the rigidity of the linker, the expansion in the ab plane causes the network to contract along the c-axis. Hirshfeld surface analysis has been used to describe the interaction between the framework structure and the EMIM cation that resides within the channel. This reveals a number of rather weak interactions and one governing hydrogen-bonding interactions. PMID:24892606

  1. Purification and characterization of an extracellular trypsin-like protease of Fusarium oxysporum var. lini.

    PubMed

    Barata, Ricardo Andrade; Andrade, Milton Hercules Guerra; Rodrigues, Roberta Dias; Castro, Ieso Miranda

    2002-01-01

    An alkaline serineprotease, capable of hydrolyzing Nalpha-benzoyl- dl arginine p-nitroanilide, was secreted by Fusarium oxysporum var. lini grown in the presence of gelatin as the sole nitrogen and carbon source. The protease was purified 65-fold to electrophoretic homogenity from the culture supernatant in a three-step procedure comprising QSepharose chromatography, affinity chromatography, and FPLC on a MonoQ column. SDS-PAGE analysis of the purified protein indicated an estimated molecular mass of 41 kDa. The protease had optimum activity at a reaction temperature of 45 degrees C and showed a rapid decrease of activity at 48 degrees C. The optimum pH was around 8.0. Characterization of the protease showed that Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations increased the activity, which was not inhibited by EDTA or 1,10-phenanthroline. The enzyme activity on Nalpha-benzoyl-DL arginine p-nitroanilide was inhibited by 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride, p-aminobenzamidine dihydrochloride, aprotinin, 3-4 dichloroisocoumarin, and N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone. The enzyme is also inhibited by substrate concentrations higher than 2.5 x 10(-4)M. The protease had a Michaelis-Menten constant of 0.16 mM and a V(max) of 0.60 mumol released product.min(-1).mg(-1) enzyme when assayed in a non-inhibiting substrate concentration. The activity on Nalpha-benzoyl- dl arginine p-nitroanilide was competitively inhibited by p-aminobenzamidine dihydrochoride. A K(i) value of 0.04 mM was obtained.

  2. Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor immobilized onto sepharose as a new strategy to purify a thermostable alkaline peptidase from cobia (Rachycentron canadum) processing waste.

    PubMed

    França, Renata Cristina da Penha; Assis, Caio Rodrigo Dias; Santos, Juliana Ferreira; Torquato, Ricardo José Soares; Tanaka, Aparecida Sadae; Hirata, Izaura Yoshico; Assis, Diego Magno; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Cavalli, Ronaldo Olivera; Carvalho, Luiz Bezerra de; Bezerra, Ranilson Souza

    2016-10-15

    A thermostable alkaline peptidase was purified from the processing waste of cobia (Rachycentron canadum) using bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) immobilized onto Sepharose. The purified enzyme had an apparent molecular mass of 24kDa by both sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and mass spectrometry. Its optimal temperature and pH were 50°C and 8.5, respectively. The enzyme was thermostable until 55°C and its activity was strongly inhibited by the classic trypsin inhibitors N-ρ-tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) and benzamidine. BPTI column allowed at least 15 assays without loss of efficacy. The purified enzyme was identified as a trypsin and the N-terminal amino acid sequence of this trypsin was IVGGYECTPHSQAHQVSLNSGYHFC, which was highly homologous to trypsin from cold water fish species. Using Nα-benzoyl-dl-arginine ρ-nitroanilide hydrochloride (BApNA) as substrate, the apparent km value of the purified trypsin was 0.38mM, kcat value was 3.14s(-1), and kcat/km was 8.26s(-1)mM(-1). The catalytic proficiency of the purified enzyme was 2.75×10(12)M(-1) showing higher affinity for the substrate at the transition state than other fish trypsin. The activation energy (AE) of the BApNA hydrolysis catalyzed by this enzyme was estimated to be 11.93kcalmol(-1) while the resulting rate enhancement of this reaction was found to be approximately in a range from 10(9) to 10(10)-fold evidencing its efficiency in comparison to other trypsin. This new purification strategy showed to be appropriate to obtain an alkaline peptidase from cobia processing waste with high purification degree. According with N-terminal homology and kinetic parameters, R. canadum trypsin may gathers desirable properties of psychrophilic and thermostable enzymes.

  3. Topical vasoconstrictor (oxymetazoline) does not affect histamine-induced mucosal exudation of plasma in human nasal airways.

    PubMed

    Svensson, C; Pipkorn, U; Alkner, U; Baumgarten, C R; Persson, C G

    1992-03-01

    Mucosal exudation of almost unfiltered plasma proteins, plasma-derived mediators and fluid has recently been advanced as a major respiratory defence mechanism. Oxymetazoline chloride is a commonly used decongestant agent. By reducing blood flow it may reduce mucosal exudation and thus compromise the mucosal defence capacity. This study examines the effect of topically applied oxymetazoline on histamine-induced plasma exudation into human nasal airways. Twelve normal volunteers participated in a double-blind, randomized, cross-over and placebo-controlled study with pretreatment with a single dose oxymetazoline chloride (5 micrograms or 50 micrograms; a dose previously known to reduce nasal mucosal blood flow by almost 50%) prior to the histamine challenge sequence. Nasal lavages were performed every 10 min for 140 min, and three histamine challenges were performed at 30-min intervals during this period. The concentrations of two exudative indices, N-alpha-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME)-esterase activity and albumin, were measured in the nasal lavage fluids. Nasal symptoms (sneezing, nasal secretion and blockage) were assessed by a scoring technique. Histamine induced all three symptoms with correlatively raised levels of the biochemical markers for plasma exudation. Oxymetazoline chloride caused a significant decrease in nasal stuffiness, but did not influence the other nasal symptoms or the histamine-induced plasma exudation. It is concluded that histamine-induced plasma exudation is not influenced by topical oxymetazoline. Thus, an important airway defence reaction such as plasma exudation may be little affected by topical alpha-adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Expression, purification and characterization of Gloydius shedaoensis venom gloshedobin as Hsp70 fusion protein in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Yang, Daping; Peng, Mingli; Yang, Hua; Yang, Qing; Xu, Jianqiang

    2009-08-01

    Gloshedobin, a thrombin-like enzyme from the venom of Gloydius shedaoensis was expressed as Hsp70 fusion protein from the construct pPIC9K/hsp70-TLE in the yeast Pichia pastoris. By fusing gloshedobin to the C-terminus of Hsp70, an expression level of 44.5mg Hsp70-gloshedobin per liter of culture was achieved by methanol induction. The fusion protein secreted in the culture medium was conveniently purified by two chromatographic steps: Q-Sepharose FF and Superdex 200. The purified enzyme had an apparent molecular mass of 98 kDa according to SDS-PAGE analysis, and exhibited fibrinogenolytic activity that preferentially degraded fibrinogen alpha-chain. The enzyme also degraded fibrinogen beta-chain to a lesser extent, while showing no degradation toward the gamma-chain. A fibrinogen clotting activity of 499.8 U/mg was achieved by the enzyme, which is within the range reported for other thrombin-like enzymes. Hsp70-gloshedobin had strong esterase activity toward the chromogenic substrate N alpha-p-tosyl-Gly-Pro-Arg-p-nitroanilide, and this activity was optimal at pH 7.5 and 50 degrees C, and was completely inhibited by PMSF, but not by EDTA. We concluded that Hsp70 has no effect on the physiochemical and biochemical properties of gloshedobin. Although applying a fusion partner with very big molecular weight is unusual, Hsp70 proved its advantage in soluble expression of gloshedobin without affecting its fibrinogenolytic activity. And this positive result may provide an alternative strategy for the expression of thrombin-like enzymes in microbial system. PMID:19286459

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled ATP competitive inhibitors of topoisomerase II as probes for imaging topoisomerase II expression.

    PubMed

    Daumar, Pierre; Zeglis, Brian M; Ramos, Nicholas; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntal Kumar; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Lewis, Jason S

    2014-10-30

    Type II topoisomerase (Topo-II) is an ATP-dependent enzyme that is essential in the transcription, replication, and chromosome segregation processes and, as such, represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Numerous studies indicate that the response to treatment with Topo-II inhibitors is highly dependent on both the levels and the activity of the enzyme. Consequently, a non-invasive assay to measure tumoral Topo-II levels has the potential to differentiate responders from non-responders. With the ultimate goal of developing a radiofluorinated tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we have designed, synthesized, and evaluated a set of fluorinated compounds based on the structure of the ATP-competitive Topo-II inhibitor QAP1. Compounds 18 and 19b showed inhibition of Topo-II in in vitro assays and exhibited moderate, Topo-II level dependent cytotoxicity in SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. Based on these results, (18)F-labeled analogs of these two compounds were synthesized and evaluated as PET probes for imaging Topo-II overexpression in mice bearing SK-BR-3 xenografts. [(18)F]-18 and [(18)F]-19b were synthesized from their corresponding protected tosylated derivatives by fluorination and subsequent deprotection. Small animal PET imaging studies indicated that both compounds do not accumulate in tumors and exhibit poor pharmacokinetics, clearing from the blood pool very rapidly and getting metabolized over. The insights gained from the current study will surely aid in the design and construction of future generations of PET agents for the non-invasive delineation of Topo-II expression.

  6. Induction of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 cleavage by antitumor triptycene bisquinones in wild-type and daunorubicin-resistant HL-60 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Perchellet, Elisabeth M; Tamura, Masafumi; Hua, Duy H; Perchellet, Jean Pierre

    2002-12-15

    In contrast to their inactive parent compound triptycene (code name TT0), new synthetic analogs (TT code number) mimic the antitumor effects of the anthracycline quinone antibiotic daunorubicin (DAU) in the nM range in vitro but have the additional advantage of also blocking nucleoside transport and retaining their efficacy in multidrug-resistant (MDR) tumor cells. Since TT bisquinones may induce DNA fragmentation at 24 h by an active mechanism that requires RNA and protein syntheses and protease activities, the most cytotoxic of them, TT24, was tested for its ability to induce poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) cleavage, an early marker of apoptosis. PARP-1 cleavage starts at 2-3 h and is maximally induced at 6 h by 1.6 microM concentrations of TT24 and DAU in wild-type drug-sensitive HL-60-S cells. However, in MDR HL-60-RV cells, PARP-1 cleavage is still induced by 4 microM TT24 but not by 4-10 microM DAU. The magnitude of PARP-1 cleavage may increase with the number of quinoid rings in the triptych structure and, in contrast to TT0, all lead antitumor TT bisquinones share the ability to fully induce PARP-1 cleavage in HL-60-S cells. A 1 h pulse treatment is sufficient for TT24 and DAU to induce PARP-1 cleavage at 6 h. Since the abilities of TT24 and DAU to induce PARP-1 cleavage are inhibited by benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone but not by N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone, caspase-mediated apoptosis may be involved in the mechanism by which these quinone antitumor drugs induce the proteolytic cleavage of PARP-1 at 6 h and the internucleosomal fragmentation of DNA at 24 h in the HL-60 tumor cell system. PMID:12406551

  7. Effect on platelet FXIII and partial characterization of Lonomin V, a proteolytic enzyme from Lonomia achelous caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, B; Perales, J; Gil, A; Arocha-Piñango, C L

    1999-03-01

    Contact with Lonomia achelous caterpillars venom induces a severe bleeding syndrome in humans. A constant finding in all reported cases is a marked decrease of blood coagulation factor XIII (FXIII), which has been attributed to the presence of a proteolytic enzyme, isolated and named Lonomin V, in the hemolymph and hair secretion. In this study, the effect of Lonomin V on transglutaminase activity from human plasma, rabbit plasma, and platelet FXIII was analyzed. The decrease of activity was more pronounced in platelet (A2) when compared with rabbit plasma (AB) and human plasma FXIII (A2B2). This finding might be explained by the differences in FXIII molecular structure. In addition, platelet FXIII molecule was degraded by Lonomin to several fragments of low molecular mass. Lonomin V was stable over a wide range of pH (6-8.5) and temperatures of -70 degrees C, -20 degrees C and between 4 to 24 degrees C, with a progressive decrease at 37 degrees C and total inactivation at 60 degrees C after 2 hours incubation. Diisopropyl fluoro-phosphate, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone, and iodoacetamide abolished the effect of Lonomin V on FXIII; in contrast dithiothreitol and EDTA-Na enhance the activity. We concluded that Lonomin V is a serine proteinase with a free Cys essential for the enzymatic activity. Due to its proteolytic activity on FXIII, with concomitant impairment of fibrin cross-linking, Lonomin V might be useful in association with thrombolytic drugs for preventing rethrombosis. PMID:10074908

  8. Evidence that the human cutaneous venoarteriolar response is not mediated by adrenergic mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Shibasaki, M.; Yen, T. C.

    2002-01-01

    The venoarteriolar response causes vasoconstriction to skin and muscle via local mechanisms secondary to venous congestion. The purpose of this project was to investigate whether this response occurs through alpha-adrenergic mechanisms. In supine individuals, forearm skin blood flow was monitored via laser-Doppler flowmetry over sites following local administration of terazosin (alpha(1)-antagonist), yohimbine (alpha(2)-antagonist), phentolamine (non-selective alpha-antagonist) and bretylium tosylate (inhibits neurotransmission of adrenergic nerves) via intradermal microdialysis or intradermal injection. In addition, skin blood flow was monitored over an area of forearm skin that was locally anaesthetized via application of EMLA (2.5 % lidocaine (lignocaine) and 2.5 % prilocaine) cream. Skin blood flow was also monitored over adjacent sites that received the vehicle for the specified drug. Each trial was performed on a minimum of seven subjects and on separate days. The venoarteriolar response was engaged by lowering the subject's arm from heart level such that the sites of skin blood flow measurement were 34 +/- 1 cm below the heart. The arm remained in this position for 2 min. Selective and non-selective alpha-adrenoceptor antagonism and presynaptic inhibition of adrenergic neurotransmission did not abolish the venoarteriolar response. However, local anaesthesia blocked the venoarteriolar response without altering alpha-adrenergic mediated vasoconstriction. These data suggest that the venoarteriolar response does not occur through adrenergic mechanisms as previously reported. Rather, the venoarteriolar response may due to myogenic mechanisms associated with changes in vascular pressure or is mediated by a non-adrenergic, but neurally mediated, local mechanism.

  9. Gingipains from Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 induce cell adhesion molecule cleavage and apoptosis in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Shaun M; Potempa, Jan; Travis, James; Casiano, Carlos A; Fletcher, Hansel M

    2005-03-01

    The presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the periodontal pocket and the high levels of gingipain activity detected in gingival crevicular fluid could implicate a role for gingipains in the destruction of the highly vascular periodontal tissue. To explore the effects of these proteases on endothelial cells, we exposed bovine coronary artery endothelial cells and human microvascular endothelial cells to gingipain-active extracellular protein preparations and/or purified gingipains from P. gingivalis. Treated cells exhibited a rapid loss of cell adhesion properties that was followed by apoptotic cell death. Cleavage of N- and VE-cadherin and integrin beta1 was observed in immunoblots of cell lysates. There was a direct correlation between the kinetics of cleavage of N- and VE-cadherin and loss of cell adhesion properties. Loss of cell adhesion, as well as N- and VE-cadherin and integrin beta1 cleavage, could be inhibited or significantly delayed by preincubation of P. gingivalis W83 gingipain-active extracellular extracts with the cysteine protease inhibitor Nalpha-p-tosyl-l-lysine chloromethylketone. Furthermore, purified gingipains also induced endothelial cell detachment and apoptosis. Apoptosis-associated events, including annexin V positivity, caspase-3 activation, and cleavage of the caspase substrates poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and topoisomerase I (Topo I), were observed in endothelial cells after detachment. All of the effects observed were correlated with the different levels of cysteine-dependent proteolytic activity of the extracts tested. Taken together, these results indicate that gingipains from P. gingivalis can alter cell adhesion molecules and induce endothelial cell death, which could have implications for the pathogenicity of this organism. PMID:15731052

  10. A Trypanosoma cruzi-secreted 80 kDa proteinase with specificity for human collagen types I and IV.

    PubMed Central

    Santana, J M; Grellier, P; Schrével, J; Teixeira, A R

    1997-01-01

    Specific interactions between parasites and extracellular matrix components are an important mechanism in the dissemination of Chagas' disease. Binding of the extracellular matrix proteins to Trypanosoma cruzi receptors has been described as a significant step in this phenomenon. In this study, a specific proteinase activity was identified in cell-free extracts of amastigote, trypomastigote and epimastigote forms of T. cruzi using the collagenase fluorogenic substrate N-Suc-Gly-Pro-Leu-Gly-Pro-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin. Isolation of this activity was achieved by a four-step FPLC procedure. Optimal enzyme activity was found to occur at pH 8.0 and was associated with a single T. cruzi 80 kDa protein (Tc 80 proteinase) on SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions. An internal peptide sequence of Tc 80 proteinase was obtained (AGDNYTPPE), and no similarity was found to previously described proteinases of T. cruzi. This enzyme activity is strongly inhibited by HgCl2, tosyl-lysylchloromethane ('TLCK') p-chloromercuribenzoate and benzyloxycarbonyl-Phe-Ala-diazomethane. The purified enzyme was able to hydrolyse purified human [14C]collagen types I and IV at neutral pH, but not 14C-labelled BSA, rat laminin, rabbit IgG or small proteins such as insulin or cytochrome c. In addition, Tc 80 proteinase activity was found to be secreted by T. cruzi forms infective to mammalian cells. Furthermore we demonstrated that purified Tc 80 proteinase mediates native collagen type I hydrolysis in rat mesentery. This feature is compared with that of Clostridium histolyticum collagenase. These findings suggest that Tc 80 proteinase may facilitate T. cruzi host-cell infection by degrading the collagens of the extracellular matrix and could represent a good target for Chagas' disease chemotherapy. PMID:9224638

  11. Trichomonas vaginalis surface proteinase activity is necessary for parasite adherence to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, R; Alderete, J F

    1989-01-01

    The role of cysteine proteinases in adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis NYH 286 to HeLa and human vaginal epithelial cells was evaluated. Only pretreatment of trichomonads, but not epithelial cells, with N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK), an inhibitor of trichomonad cysteine proteinases, greatly diminished the ability of T. vaginalis to recognize and bind to epithelial cells. Leupeptin and L-1-tosylamide-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, other cysteine proteinase inhibitors, also decreased T. vaginalis cytadherence. Parasites incubated with TLCK and washed extensively still did not adhere to cells at levels equal to those seen for control trichomonads treated with phosphate-buffered saline or culture medium alone. Exposure of TLCK-treated organisms with other cysteine proteinases restored cytadherence levels, indicating that proteinase action on the parasite surface is prerequisite for host cell attachment. Concentrations of TLCK which inhibited cytadherence did not alter the metabolism of T. vaginalis, as determined by metabolic labeling of trichomonad proteins; the protein patterns of T. vaginalis in the presence and absence of TLCK were identical. Kinetics of TLCK-mediated inhibition of cytadherence of other T. vaginalis isolates with different levels of epithelial-cell parasitism were similar to the concentration-dependent inhibition seen for isolate NYH 286. Incubation of TLCK-treated, washed organisms in growth medium resulted in regeneration of adherence. Finally, treatment of T. vaginalis organisms with proteinase inhibitors for abrogation of cytadherence effectively rendered the trichomonads unable to kill host cells, which is consistent with the contact-dependent nature of host cytotoxicity. These data show for the first time the involvement of T. vaginalis cysteine proteinases in parasite attachment to human epithelial cells. These results have implications for future pharmacologic intervention at a key step in infection. PMID:2789190

  12. Nitric oxide and noradrenaline contribute to the temperature threshold of the axon reflex response to gradual local heating in human skin.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Belinda L; Meendering, Jessica R; Wong, Brett J; Minson, Christopher T

    2006-05-01

    The initial skin blood flow response to rapid local heating is an axon reflex, which may be mediated by calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P released from C-fibres. We investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) and noradrenaline on the temperature threshold for the axon reflex during gradual local heating. 36 subjects participated in two studies. Using microdialysis, we examined the following interventions: NO synthase inhibition (10 mM N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, L-NAME); low-dose NO infusion (1.0 microM sodium nitroprusside, SNP); adrenergic blockade (10 mM bretylium tosylate); and low-dose (0.1 microM) noradrenaline infusion. Laser-Doppler flowmetry was used to measure red blood cell flux. Skin was heated at a rate of 0.1 degrees C min(-1) from 33 degrees C to 40 degrees C. Compared to control skin sites, the axon reflex response was shifted to a higher temperature in 4 subjects in the L-NAME sites (control, 37.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C, n = 16; L-NAME, 39.8 +/- 0.1 degrees C, n = 4; P < 0.001) and absent in 12 subjects. The response was also absent in L-NAME plus low-dose SNP sites and not altered by low-dose SNP infusion alone. Adrenergic blockade, with and without low-dose noradrenaline infusion, also abolished the axon reflex response in all subjects. Low-dose noradrenaline infusion alone shifted the axon reflex to a significantly lower temperature threshold compared to control sites (control, 38.2 +/- 0.5 degrees C; noradrenaline, 37.7 +/- 0.4 degrees C, P < 0.05, n = 5). These results suggest that endogenous NO and noradrenaline contribute to the temperature threshold of the axon reflex response during gradual local heating of the skin.

  13. Plasma hyperosmolality elevates the internal temperature threshold for active thermoregulatory vasodilation during heat stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Aoki, Ken; Morimoto, Keiko; Johnson, John M; Takamata, Akira

    2009-12-01

    Plasma hyperosmolality delays the response in skin blood flow to heat stress by elevating the internal temperature threshold for cutaneous vasodilation. This elevation could be because of a delayed onset of cutaneous active vasodilation and/or to persistent cutaneous active vasoconstriction. Seven healthy men were infused with either hypertonic (3% NaCl) or isotonic (0.9% NaCl) saline and passively heated by immersing their lower legs in 42 degrees C water for 60 min (room temperature, 28 degrees C; relative humidity, 40%). Skin blood flow was monitored via laser-Doppler flowmetry at sites pretreated with bretylium tosylate (BT) to block sympathetic vasoconstriction selectively and at adjacent control sites. Plasma osmolality was increased by approximately 13 mosmol/kgH(2)O following hypertonic saline infusion and was unchanged following isotonic saline infusion. The esophageal temperature (T(es)) threshold for cutaneous vasodilation at untreated sites was significantly elevated in the hyperosmotic state (37.73 +/- 0.11 degrees C) relative to the isosmotic state (36.63 +/- 0.12 degrees C, P < 0.001). A similar elevation of the T(es) threshold for cutaneous vasodilation was observed between osmotic conditions at the BT-treated sites (37.74 +/- 0.18 vs. 36.67 +/- 0.07 degrees C, P < 0.001) as well as sweating. These results suggest that the hyperosmotically induced elevation of the internal temperature threshold for cutaneous vasodilation is due primarily to an elevation in the internal temperature threshold for the onset of active vasodilation, and not to an enhancement of vasoconstrictor activity.

  14. Pathogenesis of periodontitis: a major arginine-specific cysteine proteinase from Porphyromonas gingivalis induces vascular permeability enhancement through activation of the kallikrein/kinin pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, T; Pike, R N; Potempa, J; Travis, J

    1994-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of production of an inflammatory exudate, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), from periodontal pockets in periodontitis, we examined the vascular permeability enhancement (VPE) activity induced by an arginine-specific cysteine proteinase, Arg-gingipain-1 (RGP-1), produced by a major periopathogenic bacterium, Porphyromonas gingivalis. Intradermal injections into guinea pigs of RGP-1 (> 10(-8) M), or human plasma incubated with RGP-1 (> 10(-9) M), induced VPE in a dose- and activity-dependent manner but with different time courses for the two routes of production. VPE activity induced by RGP-1 was augmented by kininase inhibitors, inhibited by a kallikrein inhibitor and unaffected by an antihistamine drug. The VPE activity in human plasma incubated with RGP-1 also correlated closely with generation of bradykinin (BK). RGP-1 induced 30-40% less VPE activity in Hageman factor-deficient plasma and no VPE in plasma deficient in either prekallikrein (PK) or high molecular weight kininogen (HMWK). After incubation with RGP-1, plasma deficient in PK or HMWK, reconstituted with each missing protein, caused VPE, as did a mixture of purified PK and HMWK, but RGP-1 induced no VPE from HMWK. The VPE of extracts of clinically isolated P. gingivalis were reduced to about 10% by anti-RGP-1-IgG, leupeptin, or tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone, which paralleled effects observed with RGP-1. These results indicate that RGP-1 is the major VPE factor of P. gingivalis, inducing this activity through PK activation and subsequent BK release, resulting in GCF production at sites of periodontitis caused by infection with this organism. Images PMID:8040277

  15. Electrically-responsive anti-adherent hydrogels for photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fallows, Steven J; Garland, Martin J; Cassidy, Corona M; Tunney, Michael M; Singh, Thakur Raghu Raj; Donnelly, Ryan F

    2012-09-01

    The loading of the photosensitisers meso-Tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP), methylene blue (MB) and TMP with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) into and release from hydrogels composed of the polyelectrolyte poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic acid) crosslinked in a 2:1 ratio with PEG 10,000 were investigated as a potential rapid photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) treatment for infected wounds using iontophoresis as a novel delivery method. Photosensitiser uptake was very high; (% TMP uptake; 95.53-96.72%) (% MB uptake; 90.58-93.26%) and was PMVE/MA concentration independent, whilst SDS severely limited TMP uptake (5.93-8.75%). Hydrogel hardness, compressibility and adhesiveness on the dermal surface of neonate porcine skin increased with PMVE/MA concentration and were significantly increased with SDS. The ionic conductivities of the hydrogels increased with PMVE/MA concentration. Drug release was PMVE/MA concentration independent, except for drug release under iontophoteric conditions for MB and TMP (without SDS). In just 15 min, the mean% drug concentrations released of TMP, TMP (with SDS) and MB using an electric current ranged from 22.30 to 64.72 μg ml(-1), 6.37-4.59 μg ml(-1) and 11.73-36.57 μg ml(-1) respectively. These concentrations were in excess of those required to induce complete kill of clinical strains of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Burkholderia cepacia. Thus these results support our contention that the iontophoteric delivery of TMP and MB using anti-adherent, electrically-responsive, PEG-crosslinked PMVE/MA hydrogels are a potential option in the rapid PACT treatment of infected wounds.

  16. Purification and characterization of an extracellular trypsin-like protease of Fusarium oxysporum var. lini.

    PubMed

    Barata, Ricardo Andrade; Andrade, Milton Hercules Guerra; Rodrigues, Roberta Dias; Castro, Ieso Miranda

    2002-01-01

    An alkaline serineprotease, capable of hydrolyzing Nalpha-benzoyl- dl arginine p-nitroanilide, was secreted by Fusarium oxysporum var. lini grown in the presence of gelatin as the sole nitrogen and carbon source. The protease was purified 65-fold to electrophoretic homogenity from the culture supernatant in a three-step procedure comprising QSepharose chromatography, affinity chromatography, and FPLC on a MonoQ column. SDS-PAGE analysis of the purified protein indicated an estimated molecular mass of 41 kDa. The protease had optimum activity at a reaction temperature of 45 degrees C and showed a rapid decrease of activity at 48 degrees C. The optimum pH was around 8.0. Characterization of the protease showed that Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations increased the activity, which was not inhibited by EDTA or 1,10-phenanthroline. The enzyme activity on Nalpha-benzoyl-DL arginine p-nitroanilide was inhibited by 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride, p-aminobenzamidine dihydrochloride, aprotinin, 3-4 dichloroisocoumarin, and N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone. The enzyme is also inhibited by substrate concentrations higher than 2.5 x 10(-4)M. The protease had a Michaelis-Menten constant of 0.16 mM and a V(max) of 0.60 mumol released product.min(-1).mg(-1) enzyme when assayed in a non-inhibiting substrate concentration. The activity on Nalpha-benzoyl- dl arginine p-nitroanilide was competitively inhibited by p-aminobenzamidine dihydrochoride. A K(i) value of 0.04 mM was obtained. PMID:16233307

  17. Synergistic Blockade of Mitotic Exit by Two Chemical Inhibitors of the APC/C

    PubMed Central

    Sackton, Katharine L.; Dimova, Nevena; Zeng, Xing; Tian, Wei; Zhang, Mengmeng; Sackton, Timothy B.; Meaders, Johnathan; Pfaff, Kathleen L.; Sigoillot, Frederic; Yu, Hongtao; Luo, Xuelian; King, Randall W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Protein machines are multi-subunit protein complexes that orchestrate highly regulated biochemical tasks. An example is the Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C), a thirteen-subunit ubiquitin ligase that initiates the metaphase-anaphase transition and mitotic exit by targeting proteins such as securin and cyclin B1 for ubiquitin-dependent destruction by the proteasome1,2. Because blocking mitotic exit is an effective approach for inducing tumor cell death3,4, the APC/C represents a potential novel target for cancer therapy. APC/C activation in mitosis requires binding of Cdc205, which forms a co-receptor with the APC/C to recognize substrates containing a Destruction box (D-box)6-14. Here we demonstrate that we can synergistically inhibit APC/C-dependent proteolysis and mitotic exit by simultaneously disrupting two protein-protein interactions within the APC/C-Cdc20-substrate ternary complex. We identified a small molecule, called apcin (APC inhibitor), which binds to Cdc20 and competitively inhibits the ubiquitylation of D-box-containing substrates. Analysis of the crystal structure of the apcin-Cdc20 complex suggests that apcin occupies the D-box-binding pocket on the side face of the WD40-domain. The ability of apcin to block mitotic exit is synergistically amplified by co-addition of tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME), a small molecule that blocks the APC/C-Cdc20 interaction15,16. This work suggests that simultaneous disruption of multiple, weak protein-protein interactions is an effective approach for inactivating a protein machine. PMID:25156254

  18. Diminution of mouse epidermal superoxide dismutase and catalase activities by tumor promotors

    SciTech Connect

    Solanki, V.; Rana, R.S.; Slaga, T.J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of phorbol ester tumor promoters and related compounds on superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase were examined. The treatment of adult mouse skin with 2 ..mu..g 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) resulted in a sustained decrease in the basal levels of both SOD and catalase activities in the epidermis. A decline in SOD activity occurred within 2 h after application and the maximum effect was seen at 16-17 h. The decrease in SOD activity was always accompanied by a similar decline in the epidermal catalase activity. The alterations in both enzymes occurred against a high background of enhanced protein synthesis which indicates that the effect of TPA is selective for SOD and catalase. Other tumor promoters such as phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate and the non-phorbol tumor promoter anthraline also lowered the activities of both the enzymes. Mezerein, a resiniferonol derivative with weak promoting activity but a potent stage-II promoter, appeared to be more potent than TPA in lowering the basal levels. These results indicate that damage which favors neoplastic progression would occur in TPA-treated mouse skin due to the accumulation of free radicals resulting from low levels of SOD and catalase activity. In addition, the TPA-caused decrease in the levels of SOD and catalase was not prevented by either retinoic acid, fluocinolone acetonide, tosyl amino-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, or butylated hydroxytoluene, suggesting that inhibition of tumor promotion by these agents is not mediated through alterations in the levels of enzymatic activities which decrease free radical concentrations.

  19. A Membrane-Bound NAC Transcription Factor, ANAC017, Mediates Mitochondrial Retrograde Signaling in Arabidopsis[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Sophia; Ivanova, Aneta; Duncan, Owen; Law, Simon R.; Van Aken, Olivier; De Clercq, Inge; Wang, Yan; Carrie, Chris; Xu, Lin; Kmiec, Beata; Walker, Hayden; Van Breusegem, Frank; Whelan, James; Giraud, Estelle

    2013-01-01

    Plants require daily coordinated regulation of energy metabolism for optimal growth and survival and therefore need to integrate cellular responses with both mitochondrial and plastid retrograde signaling. Using a forward genetic screen to characterize regulators of alternative oxidase1a (rao) mutants, we identified RAO2/Arabidopsis NAC domain-containing protein17 (ANAC017) as a direct positive regulator of AOX1a. RAO2/ANAC017 is targeted to connections and junctions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and F-actin via a C-terminal transmembrane (TM) domain. A consensus rhomboid protease cleavage site is present in ANAC017 just prior to the predicted TM domain. Furthermore, addition of the rhomboid protease inhibitor N-p-Tosyl-l-Phe chloromethyl abolishes the induction of AOX1a upon antimycin A treatment. Simultaneous fluorescent tagging of ANAC017 with N-terminal red fluorescent protein (RFP) and C-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP) revealed that the N-terminal RFP domain migrated into the nucleus, while the C-terminal GFP tag remained in the ER. Genome-wide analysis of the transcriptional network regulated by RAO2/ANAC017 under stress treatment revealed that RAO2/ANAC017 function was necessary for >85% of the changes observed as a primary response to cytosolic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), but only ∼33% of transcriptional changes observed in response to antimycin A treatment. Plants with mutated rao2/anac017 were more stress sensitive, whereas a gain-of-function mutation resulted in plants that had lower cellular levels of H2O2 under untreated conditions. PMID:24045017

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled ATP competitive inhibitors of topoisomerase II as probes for imaging topoisomerase II expression

    PubMed Central

    Daumar, Pierre; Zeglis, Brian M.; Ramos, Nicholas; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntal Kumar; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Type II topoisomerase (Topo-II) is an ATP-dependent enzyme that is essential in the transcription, replication, and chromosome segregation processes and, as such, represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Numerous studies indicate that the response to treatment with Topo-II inhibitors is highly dependent on both the levels and the activity of the enzyme. Consequently, a non-invasive assay to measure tumoral Topo-II levels has the potential to differentiate responders from non-responders. With the ultimate goal of developing a radiofluorinated tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we have designed, synthesized, and evaluated a set of fluorinated compounds based on the structure of the ATP-competitive Topo-II inhibitor QAP1. Compounds 18 and 19b showed inhibition of Topo-II in in vitro assays and exhibited moderate, Topo-II level dependent cytotoxicity in SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. Based on these results, 18F-labeled analogs of these two compounds were synthesized and evaluated as PET probes for imaging Topo-II overexpression in mice bearing SK-BR-3 xenografts. [18F]-18 and [18F]-19b were synthesized from their corresponding protected tosylated derivatives by fluorination and subsequent deprotection. Small animal PET imaging studies indicated that both compounds do not accumulate in tumors and exhibit poor pharmacokinetics, clearing from the blood pool very rapidly and getting metabolized over. The insights gained from the current study will surely aid in the design and construction of future generations of PET agents for the non-invasive delineation of Topo-II expression. PMID:25240701

  1. (4-(Bis(4-Fluorophenyl)Methyl)Piperazin-1-yl)(Cyclohexyl)Methanone Hydrochloride (LDK1229): A New Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Inverse Agonist from the Class of Benzhydryl Piperazine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Mariam M.; Olszewska, Teresa; Liu, Hui; Shore, Derek M.; Hurst, Dow P.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Lu, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Some inverse agonists of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) have been demonstrated to be anorectic antiobesity drug candidates. However, the first generation of CB1 inverse agonists, represented by rimonabant (SR141716A), otenabant, and taranabant, are centrally active, with a high level of psychiatric side effects. Hence, the discovery of CB1 inverse agonists with a chemical scaffold distinct from these holds promise for developing peripherally active CB1 inverse agonists with fewer side effects. We generated a new CB1 inverse agonist, (4-(bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl)(cyclohexyl)methanone hydrochloride (LDK1229), from the class of benzhydryl piperazine analogs. This compound binds to CB1 more selectively than cannabinoid receptor type 2, with a Ki value of 220 nM. Comparable CB1 binding was also observed by analogs 1-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]-4-cinnamylpiperazine dihydrochloride (LDK1203) and 1-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]-4-tosylpiperazine hydrochloride (LDK1222), which differed by the substitution on the piperazine ring where the piperazine of LDK1203 and LDK1222 are substituted by an alkyl group and a tosyl group, respectively. LDK1229 exhibits efficacy comparable with SR141716A in antagonizing the basal G protein coupling activity of CB1, as indicated by a reduction in guanosine 5′-O-(3-thio)triphosphate binding. Consistent with inverse agonist behavior, increased cell surface localization of CB1 upon treatment with LDK1229 was also observed. Although docking and mutational analysis showed that LDK1229 forms similar interactions with the receptor as SR141716A does, the benzhydryl piperazine scaffold is structurally distinct from the first-generation CB1 inverse agonists. It offers new opportunities for developing novel CB1 inverse agonists through the optimization of molecular properties, such as the polar surface area and hydrophilicity, to reduce the central activity observed with SR141716A. PMID:25411367

  2. Studies on prekallikrein of bovine plasma. II. Activation of prekallikrein with proteinases and properties of kallikrein activated by bovine Hageman factor.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Nagasawa, S; Suzuki, T

    1980-01-01

    Activation of bovine plasma prekallikrein was investigated with several proteinases. Highly purified bovine plasma prekallikrein was rapidly activated to kallikrein [EC 3.4.21.8] by bovine activated Hageman factor, trypsin [EC 3.4.21.4] and Pronase P (proteinases from Streptomyces griseus) and more gradually by papain [EC 3.4.22.2] and ficin [EC 3.4.22.3]. Activation of prekallikrein was also observed with bovine plasmin [EC 3.4.21.7], but not with bovine clotting factors Xa (Stuart factor) [EC 3.4.21.6] and IXa (Christmas factor) or thrombin [EC 3.4.21.5]. Urokinase [EC 3.4.99.26], Reptilase, collagenase [EC 3.4.24.3], elastase [EC 3.4.21.11], alpha-chymotrypsin [EC 3.4.21.1], Nagarse [EC 3.4.21.14], and stem bromelain [EC 3.4.22 4] did not convert prekallikrein to kallikrein. Plasma kallikrein activated to Hageman factor released kinin rapidly from bovine high molecular weight (HMW) kininogen. However, from bovine low molecular weight (LMW) kininogen, liberation of kinin was extremely slow. The kallikrein activity was inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI), Trasylol, diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), and N-alpha-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethylketone (TLCK), but not by egg-white trypsin inhibitor (EWTI), lima bean trypsin inhibitor (LBTI), heparin or hexadimethrine bromide (Polybrene). The kallikrein formed an enzyme-inhibitor complex with SBTI and Trasylol, but not with LBTI. Prekallikrein did not react with SBTI. Prekallikrein consists of a single polypeptide chain of molecular weight about 90,000, as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Activation of prekallikrein by Hageman factor was found to involve cleavage of the single peptide bond on the disulfide-bridged polypeptide chain, and no change of molecular weight was observed during the activation. The peptide bond cleaved in prekallikrein by the activation was an Arg-X peptide bond on a disulfide-bridged polypeptide chain.

  3. Cystalysin, a 46-kilodalton cysteine desulfhydrase from Treponema denticola, with hemolytic and hemoxidative activities.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, L; Ebersole, J L; Kurzban, G P; Holt, S C

    1997-01-01

    A 46-kDa hemolytic protein, referred to as cystalysin, from Treponema denticola ATCC 35404 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli LC-67. Both the native and recombinant 46-kDa proteins were purified to homogeneity. Both proteins expressed identical biological and functional characteristics. In addition to its biological function of lysing erythrocytes and hemoxidizing the hemoglobin to methemoglobin, cystalysin was also capable of removing the sulfhydryl and amino groups from selected S-containing compounds (e.g., cysteine) producing H2S, NH3, and pyruvate. This cysteine desulfhydrase resulted in the following Michaelis-Menten kinetics: Km = 3.6 mM and k(cat) = 12 s(-1). Cystathionine and S-aminoethyl-L-cysteine were also substrates for the protein. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the end products revealed NH3, pyruvate, homocysteine (from cystathionine), and cysteamine (from S-aminoethyl-L-cysteine). The enzyme was active over a broad pH range, with highest activity at pH 7.8 to 8.0. The enzymatic activity was increased by beta-mercaptoethanol. It was not inhibited by the proteinase inhibitor TLCK (N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone), pronase, or proteinase K, suggesting that the functional site was physically protected or located in a small fragment of the polypeptide. We hypothesize that cystalysin is a pyridoxal-5-phosphate-containing enzyme, with activity of an alphaC-N and betaC-S lyase (cystathionase) type. Since large amounts of H2S have been reported in deep periodontal pockets, cystalysin may also function in vivo as an important virulence molecule. PMID:9234780

  4. Enhanced toxicity and cellular uptake of methotrexate-conjugated nanoparticles in folate receptor-positive cancer cells by decorating with folic acid-conjugated d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate.

    PubMed

    Junyaprasert, Varaporn Buraphacheep; Dhanahiranpruk, Sirithip; Suksiriworapong, Jiraphong; Sripha, Kittisak; Moongkarndi, Primchanien

    2015-12-01

    Folic acid-conjugated d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS-FOL) decorated methotrexate (MTX)-conjugated nanoparticles were developed for targeted delivery of MTX to folate receptor-expressed tumor cells. The synthesis of TPGS-FOL followed 3-step process. Firstly, the terminal hydroxyl group of TPGS was converted to sulfonyl chloride using mesyl chloride in comparison with nosyl and tosyl chlorides. The highest conversion efficiency and yield were obtained by mesyl chloride due to the formation of higher reactive intermediate in a presence of triethylamine. Secondly, the substitution of sulfonyl group by sodium azide produced considerably high yield with conversion efficiency of over 90%. Lastly, the coupling reaction of azido-substituted TPGS and propargyl folamide by click reaction resulted in 96% conjugation efficiency without polymer degradation. To fabricate the folate receptor-targeted nanoparticles, 10 and 20%mol MTX-conjugated PEGylated poly(ϵ-caprolactone) nanoparticles were decorated with TPGS-FOL. The size and size distribution of MTX-conjugated nanoparticles relatively increased with %MTX. The MTX release from the nanoparticles was accelerated in acidic medium with an increase of %MTX but retarded in physiological pH medium. The decoration of TPGS-FOL onto the nanoparticles slightly enlarged the size and size distribution of the nanoparticles; however, it did not affect the surface charge. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of MCF-7 cells demonstrated that 10% MTX-conjugated nanoparticles and FOL-decorated nanoparticles possessed higher toxicity and uptake efficiency than 20% MTX-conjugated nanoparticles and undecorated nanoparticles, respectively. The results indicated that FOL-10% MTX-conjugated nanoparticles exhibited potential targeted delivery of MTX to folate receptor-expressed cancer cells.

  5. Sensory and sympathetic nerve contributions to the cutaneous vasodilator response from a noxious heat stimulus.

    PubMed

    Carter, Stephen J; Hodges, Gary J

    2011-11-01

    We investigated the roles of sensory and noradrenergic sympathetic nerves on the cutaneous vasodilator response to a localized noxious heating stimulus. In two separate studies, four forearm skin sites were instrumented with microdialysis fibres, local heaters and laser-Doppler probes. Skin sites were locally heated from 33 to 42 °C or rapidly to 44 °C (noxious). In the first study, we tested sensory nerve involvement using EMLA cream. Treatments were as follows: (1) control 42 °C; (2) EMLA 42 °C; (3) control 44°C; and (4) EMLA 44 °C. At the EMLA-treated sites, the axon reflex was reduced compared with the control sites during heating to 42 °C (P < 0.05). There were no differences during the plateau phase (P > 0.05). At both the sites heated to 44 °C, the initial peak and nadir became indistinguishable, and the EMLA-treated sites were lower compared with the control sites during the plateau phase (P < 0.05). In the second study, we tested the involvement of noradrenergic sympathetic nerves in response to the noxious heating using bretylium tosylate (BT). Treatments were as follows: (1) control 42 °C; (2) BT 42 °C; (3) control 44 °C; and (4) BT 44 °C. Treatment with BT at the 42 °C sites resulted in a marked reduction in both the axon reflex and the secondary plateau (P < 0.05). At the 44 °C sites, there was no apparent initial peak or nadir, but the plateau phase was reduced at the BT-treated sites (P < 0.05). These data suggest that both sympathetic nerves and sensory nerves are involved during the vasodilator response to a noxious heat stimulus.

  6. Role of sensory nerves in the cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to local cooling in humans.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Gary J; Traeger, J Andrew; Tang, Tri; Kosiba, Wojciech A; Zhao, Kun; Johnson, John M

    2007-07-01

    Local cooling (LC) causes a cutaneous vasoconstriction (VC). In this study, we tested whether there is a mechanism that links LC to VC nerve function via sensory nerves. Six subjects participated. Local skin and body temperatures were controlled with Peltier probe holders and water-perfused suits, respectively. Skin blood flow at four forearm sites was monitored by laser-Doppler flowmetry with the following treatments: untreated control, pretreatment with local anesthesia (LA) blocking sensory nerve function, pretreatment with bretylium tosylate (BT) blocking VC nerve function, and pretreatment with both LA and BT. Local skin temperature was slowly reduced from 34 to 29 degrees C at all four sites. Both sites treated with LA produced an increase in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) early in the LC process (64 +/- 55%, LA only; 42 +/- 14% LA plus BT; P < 0.05), which was absent at the control and BT-only sites (5 +/- 8 and 6 +/- 8%, respectively; P > 0.05). As cooling continued, there were significant reductions in CVC at all sites (P < 0.05). At control and LA-only sites, CVC decreased by 39 +/- 4 and 46 +/- 8% of the original baseline values, which were significantly (P < 0.05) more than the reductions in CVC at the sites treated with BT and BT plus LA (-26 +/- 8 and -22 +/- 6%). Because LA affected only the short-term response to LC, either alone or in the presence of BT, we conclude that sensory nerves are involved early in the VC response to LC, but not for either adrenergic or nonadrenergic VC with longer term LC.

  7. Sympathetic, sensory, and nonneuronal contributions to the cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to local cooling.

    PubMed

    Johnson, John M; Yen, Tony C; Zhao, Kun; Kosiba, Wojciech A

    2005-04-01

    Previous work indicates that sympathetic nerves participate in the vascular responses to direct cooling of the skin in humans. We evaluated this hypothesis further in a four-part series by measuring changes in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) from forearm skin locally cooled from 34 to 29 degrees C for 30 min. In part 1, bretylium tosylate reversed the initial vasoconstriction (-14 +/- 6.6% control CVC, first 5 min) to one of vasodilation (+19.7 +/- 7.7%) but did not affect the response at 30 min (-30.6 +/- 9% control, -38.9 +/- 6.9% bretylium; both P < 0.05, P > 0.05 between treatments). In part 2, yohimbine and propranolol (YP) also reversed the initial vasoconstriction (-14.3 +/- 4.2% control) to vasodilation (+26.3 +/- 12.1% YP), without a significant effect on the 30-min response (-26.7 +/- 6.1% YP, -43.2 +/- 6.5% control; both P < 0.05, P > 0.05 between sites). In part 3, the NPY Y1 receptor antagonist BIBP 3226 had no significant effect on either phase of vasoconstriction (P > 0.05 between sites both times). In part 4, sensory nerve blockade by anesthetic cream (Emla) also reversed the initial vasoconstriction (-20.1 +/- 6.4% control) to one of vasodilation (+213.4 +/- 87.0% Emla), whereas the final levels did not differ significantly (-37.7 +/- 10.1% control, -37.2 +/- 8.7% Emla; both P < 0.05, P > 0.05 between treatments). These results indicate that local cooling causes cold-sensitive afferents to activate sympathetic nerves to release norepinephrine, leading to a local cutaneous vasoconstriction that masks a nonneurogenic vasodilation. Later, a vasoconstriction develops with or without functional sensory or sympathetic nerves.

  8. Ruthenium Catalyzed Diastereo- and Enantioselective Coupling of Propargyl Ethers with Alcohols: Siloxy-Crotylation via Hydride Shift Enabled Conversion of Alkynes to π-Allyls

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Tao; Zhang, Wandi; Chen, Te-Yu; Nguyen, Khoa D.; Krische, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The first enantioselective carbonyl crotylations through direct use of alkynes as chiral allylmetal equivalents are described. Chiral ruthenium(II) complexes modified by Josiphos (SL-J009-1) catalyze the C-C coupling of TIPS-protected propargyl ether 1a with primary alcohols 2a-2o to form products of carbonyl siloxy-crotylation 3a-3o, which upon silyl deprotection-reduction deliver 1,4-diols 5a-5o with excellent control of regio-, anti-diastereo- and enantioselectivity. Structurally related propargyl ethers 1b and 1c bearing ethyl- and phenyl-substituents engage in diastereo- and enantioselective coupling, as illustrated in the formation of adducts 5p and 5q, respectively. Selective mono-tosylation of diols 5a, 5c, 5e, 5f, 5k and 5m is accompanied by spontaneous cyclization to deliver the trans-2,3-disubstituted furans 6a, 6c, 6e, 6f, 6k and 6m, respectively. Primary alcohols 2a, 2l and 2p were converted to the siloxy-crotylation products 3a, 3l and 3p, which upon silyl deprotection-lactol oxidation were transformed to the trans-4,5-disubstituted γ-butyrolactones 7a, 7l and 7p. The formation of 7p represents a total synthesis of (+)-trans-whisky lactone. Unlike closely related ruthenium catalyzed alkyne-alcohol C-C couplings, deuterium labeling studies provide clear evidence of a novel 1,2-hydride shift mechanism that converts metal-bound alkynes to π-allyls in the absence of intervening allenes. PMID:26418572

  9. Selective corticotropin-releasing factor 1 receptor antagonist E2508 has potent antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like properties in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Ryota; Shikata, Kodo; Furuya, Yoshiaki; Ino, Mitsuhiro; Shin, Kogyoku; Shibata, Hisashi

    2016-10-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a hormone secreted by the hypothalamus in response to stress, and CRF antagonists may be effective for the treatment of stress-related disorders including major depressive and anxiety disorders. Here, we investigated the in vivo pharmacological profile of N-cyclopropylmethyl-7-(2,6-dimethoxy-4-methoxymethylphenyl)-2-ethyl-N-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-ylmethyl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridin-3-amine tosylate (E2508), a recently synthesized, orally active CRF1 receptor antagonist. Oral administration of a single dose of E2508 (3 or 10mg/kg), but not fluoxetine (30mg/kg), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), significantly shortened immobility time in rats in the forced swim test. E2508 (10, 30, or 100mg/kg) also showed an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swim test in mice, with no sedative or muscle relaxant effects for doses up to 100mg/kg. Moreover, E2508 (5 or 20mg/kg) significantly reduced anxiety-like behavior in the rat defensive burying test. Diazepam, a benzodiazepine anxiolytic agent, also showed an anxiolytic effect in the defensive burying test at the same dose that induced a muscle relaxant effect in mice. Administration of E2508 (30mg/kg) for 14 consecutive days did not affect sexual behavior. By contrast, fluoxetine (30mg/kg) administration for ≥7 consecutive days decreased sexual behavior. These results indicate that E2508 has both potent antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like effects in rodent models, and is well tolerated compared with a commonly prescribed therapeutic SSRI or benzodiazepine. PMID:27297028

  10. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Lantz, M S; Allen, R D; Vail, T A; Switalski, L M; Hook, M

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains (M. S. Lantz, R. D. Allen, P. Bounelis, L. M. Switalski, and M. Hook, J. Bacteriol. 172:716-726, 1990). We now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37 degrees C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (Mr, 150,000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with 125I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4 degrees C but did occur at 22 and 37 degrees C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37 degrees C, two major fibrinogen fragments (Mr, 97,000 and 50,000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (Mr, 120,000 and 150,000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the Mr-120,000 and -150,000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate. Images PMID:1987144

  11. Asymmetric synthesis and effect of absolute stereochemistry of YCZ-2013, a brassinosteroid biosynthesis inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Oh, Keimei; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Yoshizawa, Yuko

    2013-12-15

    The four stereoisomers of 2RS,4RS-1-[[2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-(2-(2-propenyloxy)phenoxymethyl)-1,3-dioxolan-2-yl]methyl]-1H-1,2,4-triazole (YCZ-2013), a novel brassinosteroid biosynthesis inhibitor, were prepared. The diastereomers of 2RS,4R-5 and 2RS,4S-5 were prepared by using the corresponding optically pure R and S toluene-4-sulfonic acid 2,3-dihydroxypropyl ester (R-4,S-4). The enatiomerically and diastereomerically pure acetonide (5) was obtained by a method involving diastereoselective crystallisation of the tosylate salt, followed by re-equilibration with the mother liquor and chromatography. The optical purity of four target compounds (YCZ-2013) was confirmed by chiral high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and NMR. The effects of these stereoisomers on Arabidopsis stem elongation indicated that the cis isomers of 2S,4R-YCZ-2013 and 2R,4S-YCZ-2013 exhibited potent inhibitory activity with IC50 values of approximately 24 ± 3 and 24 ± 2 nM, respectively. The IC50 values of the trans isomers of 2S,4S-YCZ-2013 and 2R,4R-YCZ-2013 are approximately 1510 ± 50 and 3900 ± 332 nM, respectively. Co-application of brassinolide (10nM), the most potent BR, and GA3 (1 μM) to Arabidopsis seedlings grown in the dark with 2R,4S-YCZ-2013 and 2S,4R-YCZ-2013 revealed that brassinolide recovered the induced dwarfism of Arabidopsis seedlings, whereas GA3 showed no effect. PMID:24269478

  12. The contrasting catalytic efficiency and cancer cell antiproliferative activity of stereoselective organoruthenium transfer hydrogenation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Sanchez-Cano, Carlos; Soni, Rina; Romero-Canelon, Isolda; Hearn, Jessica M; Liu, Zhe; Wills, Martin; Sadler, Peter J

    2016-05-28

    The rapidly growing area of catalytic ruthenium chemistry has provided new complexes with potential as organometallic anticancer agents with novel mechanisms of action. Here we report the anticancer activity of four neutral organometallic Ru(II) arene N-tosyl-1,2-diphenylethane-1,2-diamine (TsDPEN) tethered transfer hydrogenation catalysts. The enantiomers (R,R)-[Ru(η(6)-C6H5(CH2)3-TsDPEN-N-Me)Cl] (8) and (S,S)-[Ru(η(6)-C6H5(CH2)3-TsDPEN-N-Me)Cl] (8a) exhibited higher potency than cisplatin against A2780 human ovarian cancer cells. When the N-methyl was replaced by N-H, i.e. to give (R,R)-[Ru(η(6)-Ph(CH2)3-TsDPEN-NH)Cl] (7) and (S,S)-[Ru(η(6)-Ph(CH2)3-TsDPEN-NH)Cl] (7a), respectively, anticancer activity decreased >5-fold. Their antiproliferative activity appears to be linked to their ability to accumulate in cells, and their mechanism of action might involve inhibition of tubulin polymerisation. This appears to be the first report of the potent anticancer activity of tethered Ru(II) arene complexes, and the structure-activity relationship suggests that the N-methyl substituents are important for potency. In the National Cancer Institute 60-cancer-cell-line screen, complexes 8 and 8a exhibited higher activity than cisplatin towards a broad range of cancer cell lines. Intriguingly, in contrast to their potent anticancer properties, complexes 8/8a are poor catalysts for asymmetric transfer hydrogenation, whereas complexes 7/7a are effective asymmetric hydrogenation catalysts. PMID:27109147

  13. Substituent Effects on the Formation and Nucleophile Selectivity of Ring-Substituted Phenonium Ions in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yutaka; Ogawa, Shin; Richard, John P

    2013-12-01

    The reaction of 2-(4-methyphenyl)ethyl tosylate (Me-1-OTs) in 50/50 (v/v) trifluoroethanol/water at 25 °C is first-order in the concentration of azide anion nucleophile. A carbon-13 NMR analysis of the products of the reactions of Me-1-[α-(13)C]OTs in 50/50 (v/v) trifluoroethanol/water at 25 °C shows the formation of Me-1-[β-(13)C]OH, Me-1-[β-(13)C]OCH2CF3 and Me-1-[β-(13)C]N3 from the trapping of a symmetrical 4-methylphenonium ion reaction intermediate Me-2 (+). The formation of Me-1-[α-(13)C]N3 by concerted bimolecular displacement of azide ion at Me-1-[α-(13)C]OTs (k N = 3.8 × 10(-6) M(-1) s(-1)) and of Me-1-[α-(13)C]OH and Me-1-[α-(13)C]OCH2CF3 by concerted bimolecular displacement of solvent (k solv = 1.8 × 10(-8) s(-1)) is also observed. An analysis of the rate and product data provides a value of k az/k s = 32 M(-1) for partitioning of Me-2 (+) between addition of azide ion and solvent that is nearly 3-fold smaller than k az/k s = 83 M(-1) reported in an earlier study on the partitioning of MeO-2 (+) [J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 9568]. This change is attributed to a decrease in nucleophile selectivity with increasing electrophile reactivity for the activation-limited addition of solvent and azide anion to X-2 (+). These data set a limit of 1/k s ≥ 10(-7) s for the lifetime of Me-2 (+) in aqueous solution.

  14. Reversibility and reproducibility of histamine induced plasma leakage in nasal airways.

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, C; Baumgarten, C R; Pipkorn, U; Alkner, U; Persson, C G

    1989-01-01

    Plasma exudation is one cardinal factor in airways defence and inflammation. In inflammatory airway diseases such as rhinitis and asthma, however, plasma leakage may also have a pathogenetic role. Experimental data from animals indicate that highly sensitive, active, and reversible processes regulate the vascular and mucosal permeability to macromolecules. With the use of a nasal lavage model for the recovery of liquids on the mucosal surface the effect of histamine on the macromolecular permeability of the airway endothelial-epithelial barriers was studied in normal subjects. The concentrations of albumin, kinins, and N-alpha-beta-tosyl-L-arginine-methyl esterase (TAME) in nasal lavage fluid were measured and nasal symptoms assessed by a scoring technique. The reproducibility of three repeated challenges with 30 minute intervals on the same day was studied in 12 subjects and compared with the same procedure (three challenges) on a different day. Sneezing decreased significantly (p less than 0.05) after the first histamine challenge but was maintained thereafter. Otherwise, the mean values for symptoms and for markers of vascular leakage were very similar both for the three challenges in the same session and for the two challenge sessions on a different day. Sneezing, blockage, and secretions were associated with increased concentrations of TAME esterase (maximum 9000 cpm/ml), kinins (1.4 ng/ml), and albumin (0.3 g/l) in lavage fluid. Both the symptoms and the measures of plasma exudation were reversible and reproducible in the three repeat histamine challenges and at two challenge sessions on different days. These findings support the view that non-injurious, active processes regulate the inflammatory flow of macromolecules across airways endothelial-epithelial barriers. The present experimental approach would be suitable for studies of the modulatory effects of inflammatory stimulus induced plasma leakage and symptoms in human airways. PMID:2648641

  15. Isozyme-specific enzyme inhibitors. 14. 5'(R)-C-[(L-homocystein-S-yl)methyl]adenosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imidotriphosphate), a potent inhibitor of rat methionine adenosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Kappler, F; Vrudhula, V M; Hampton, A

    1987-09-01

    The title compound is a covalent adduct of L-methionine (Met) and beta,gamma-imido-ATP. In its synthesis the N-Boc derivative of 5'(R)-C-(aminomethyl)-N6-benzoyl-5'-O-tosyl-2',3'-O- isopropylidenadenosine was converted by the successive actions of CF3CO2H and HNO2 into the corresponding 5'(R)-C-hydroxymethyl derivative. Treatment of this with disodium L-homocysteinate led to attack of sulfur at C6', apparently via a 5',6'-epoxide, and to total stereoselective inversion at C5' to furnish, after debenzoylation, 5'(R)-C-(L-homocystein-S-ylmethyl)-2',3'-O-isopropylidene ade nosine. The 5' configuration was established by conversion of this into the known 5'(S)-C-methyl-2',3'-O-isopropylidene adenosine with Raney nickel. The alpha-amino acid residue was protected as an N-Boc methyl ester, after which the 5'-hydroxyl was phosphorylated with benzyl phosphate and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. The phosphoanhydride bond with inorganic imidodiphosphate was then created by established methods. Finally, blocking groups were removed under conditions that gave the desired adduct with no racemization of its L-methionine residue. It was a potent inhibitor [KM(ATP)/Ki = 1080; KM(Met)/Ki = 7.7] of the M-2 (normal tissue) form of rat methionine adenosyltransferase and of the M-T (hepatoma tissue) form [KM(ATP)/Ki = 670; KM(Met)/Ki = 22]. Inhibitions were competitive with respect to ATP or to L-methionine, indicating a dual substrate site mode of binding to the enzyme forms.

  16. Synthesis of fluorine-18 labeled rhodamine B: A potential PET myocardial perfusion imaging agent

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Tobias K.; Gottumukkala, Vijay; Snay, Erin; Dunning, Patricia; Fahey, Frederic H; Treves, S. Ted; Packard, Alan B.

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing an 18F-labeled PET myocardial perfusion agent. Rhodamine dyes share several properties with 99mTc-MIBI, the most commonly used single-photon myocardial perfusion agent, suggesting that an 18F-labeled rhodamine dye might prove useful for this application. In addition to being lipophilic cations, like 99mTc-MIBI, rhodamine dyes are known to accumulate in the myocardium and are substrates for Pgp, the protein implicated in MDR1 multidrug resistance. As the first step in determining whether 18F-labeled rhodamines might be useful as myocardial perfusion agents for PET, our objective was to develop synthetic methods for preparing the 18F-labeled compounds so that they could be evaluated in vivo. Rhodamine B was chosen as the prototype compound for development of the synthesis because the ethyl substituents on the amine moieties of rhodamine B protect them from side reactions, thus eliminating the need to include (and subsequently remove) protecting groups. The 2′-[18F]fluoroethyl ester of rhodamine B was synthesized by heating rhodamine B lactone with [18F]fluoroethyltosylate in acetonitrile at 165°C for 30 min.using [18F]fluoroethyl tosylate, which was prepared by the reaction of ethyleneglycol ditosylate with Kryptofix 2.2.2, K2CO3, and [18F]NaF in acetonitrile for 10 min. at 90°C. The product was purified by semi-preparative HPLC to produce the 2′-[18F]-fluoroethylester in >97% radiochemical purity with a specific activity of 1.3 GBq/μmol, an isolated decay corrected yield of 35%, and a total synthesis time of 90 min. PMID:19783150

  17. Polynorbornene as a low loss matrix material for IR metamaterial applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, Christian Lew; Sinclair, Michael B.; Ginn, James Cleveland, III; Lee, Yun-Ju; Sanchez, Andrea E.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Hines, Paul; Dirk, Shawn M.; Rasberry, Roger D.

    2010-11-01

    Novel low loss photopatternable matrix materials for IR metamaterial applications were synthesized using the ring opening metathesis polymerization reaction (ROMP) of norbornene followed by a partial hydrogenation to remove most of the IR absorbing olefin groups which absorb in the 8-12 {micro}m range. Photopatterning was achieved via crosslinking of the remaining olefin groups with alpha, omega-dithiols via the thiol-ene coupling reaction. Since ROMP is a living polymerization the molecular weight of the polymer can be controlled simply by varying the ratio of catalyst to monomer. In order to determine the optimum photopattenable IR matrix material we varied the amount of olefin remaining after the partial hydrogenation. Hydrogenation was accomplished using tosyl hydrazide. The degree of hydrogenation can be controlled by altering the reaction time or reaction stoichiometry and the by-products can be easily removed during workup by precipitation into ethanol. Several polymers have been prepared using this reduction scheme including two polymers which had 54% and 68% olefin remaining. Free standing films (approx. 12 {micro}m) were prepared from the 68% olefin material using draw-down technique and subsequently irradiated with a UV lamp (365 nm) for thirty minutes to induce crosslinking via thiol-ene reaction. After crosslinking, the olefin IR-absorption band disappeared and the Tg of the matrix material increased; both desirable properties for IR metamaterial applications. The polymer system has inherent photopatternable behavior primarily because of solubility differences between the pre-polymer and cross-linked matrix. Photopatterned structures using the 54% as well as the 68% olefin material were easily obtained. The synthesis, processing, and IR absorption data and the ramifications to dielectric metamaterials will be discussed.

  18. Pigtailed electro-optic probes for vectorial electric field mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warzecha, Adriana; Gaborit, Gwenaël; Ruaro, Mickael; Duvillaret, Lionel; Lassere, Jean-Louis

    2010-04-01

    Electro-optic measurement (EO) constitutes an efficient technique to characterize electrical (E) fields : indeed, the Pockel's effect properties (linear modification of refractive indices of some non-centrosymetric crystals induced by the E-field)1 leads to a vectorial measurement. Thus, it allows to map the E-field vector and its transient evolution, either in free space or inside guiding structures. Pigtailed EO sensors are naturally becoming a reliable and consistent mean of characterization for many applications, e.g. high power microwaves (HPM), electromagnetic interference (EMI), on chip diagnostic, bio-electromagnetism (e.g. influence of mobile phones on the human body). Even if these non-invasive sensors provide a greater temporal and spatial resolution (femtosecond and sub-millimeter, respectively) than commonly used sensors (antennas, bolometers), it remains temperature dependant and quite low sensitive. EO probes are based on the modification of a laser beam (either its polarization, phase or amplitude) crossing an EO crystal. We demonstrate here the last developments and improvements for EO probes as well as for whole EO setups, exploiting polarization state or amplitude modulation. The sensor is constituted by a polarization maintaining (PM) fiber carrying the beam to the crystal and taking it back once modulated, gradient index lense(s) managing the shape of the beam, half or quarter wave plate controlling the input and output polarizations and a crystal (either anisotropic: LiTaO3, LiNb03, DAST, KTP or isotropic : ZnTe, InP) converting the E-field into a modulation. Our probes are fully dielectric and cylindrically shaped (length ~ 1 cm and diameter ~ 2-3 mm). The setup is made of a 1.5 μm DFB laser, some photodiodes (low and high speed) added with a polarization state analyser arrangement in case of EO probes based on polarization state modulation scheme. The measurement bench is fully automated and compensate/measure the temperature deviation

  19. Fading of artificial hair color and its prevention by photofilters.

    PubMed

    Locke, B; Jachowicz, J

    2005-01-01

    data were in reasonable agreement with the theoretical predictions. The data are also presented for color protection with treatments containing two photo-absorbers: benzophenone-3-ZnO; benzophenone-4-ZnO; octyl methoxy cinnamate-ZnO; and dimethylpabaimidopropyl laurdimonium tosylate-benzophenone-3.

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of a midgut chymotrypsin-like enzyme from the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y C; Baker, J E

    2000-04-01

    A cDNA encoding a chymotrypsinogen-like protein in midguts of the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) was cloned and sequenced. The 901 bp cDNA contains an 816-nucleotide open reading frame encoding 272-amino acids. The predicted molecular mass and pI of the mature enzyme are 23.7 kDa and 4.64, respectively. The encoded protein includes amino acid sequence motifs that are conserved with 5 homologous chymotrypsinogen proteins from other insects. Features of the putative chymotrypsin-like protein from R. dominica include the serine proteinase active site (His(90), Asp(133), Ser(226)), conserved cysteine residues for disulfide bridges, the residues (Gly(220), Gly(243), Asp(252)) that determine chymotrypsin specificity, and both zymogen activation and signal peptides. A TPCK-sensitive caseinolytic protein (P6) with an estimated molecular mass of 24 kDa is present in midgut extracts of R. dominica and can be resolved by electrophoresis on 4-16% polyacrylamide gels. The molecular mass of this caseinolytic enzyme is similar to that of the chymotrypsin deduced from cDNA. Midgut extracts of R. dominica readily hydrolyzed azocasein and N-succinyl-alanine-alanine-proline-phenylalanine-p- nitroanilide (SAAPFpNA), a chymotrypsin-specific substrate. Properties of the enzymes responsible for these activities were partially characterized with respect to distribution in the gut, optimum pH, and sensitivity toward selected proteinase inhibitors. Optimal activity against both azocasein and SAAPFpNA occurs in a broad pH range from about 7 to 10. Both azocasein and SAAPFpNA activities, located primarily in the anterior midgut region, are inhibited by aprotinin, phenylmethyl sulphonylfluoride (PMSF), and soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI). TPCK (N-alpha-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone) and chymostatin inhibited more than 60% of SAAPFpNA but only about 10-20% of azocasein activity. These results provide additional evidence for the presence of

  1. Characterization of proinsulin- and proglucagon-converting activities in isolated islet secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, D J; Quigley, J P; Bauer, G E; Noe, B D

    1981-08-01

    The conversion of proglucagon and proinsulin by secretory granules isolated from both prelabeled and unlabeled anglerfish islets was investigated. Either granules isolated from tissue labeled with [3H]tryptophan and [14C]isoleucine or [35S]cysteine, or lysed granules from unlabeled tissue to which exogenously labeled prohormones had been added were incubated under various conditions. Acetic acid extracts of these granule preparations were analyzed for prohormone and hormone content by gel filtration. Both prelabeled and lysed, unlabeled secretory granules converted radiolabeled precursor peptides (Mr 8,000-15,000) to labeled insulin and glucagon. The accuracy of the cleavage process was established by demonstrating comigration of products obtained from in vitro cleavage with insulin and glucagon extracted from intact islets using electrophoresis and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The pH optimum for granule-mediated conversion was found to be in the range of pH 4.5-5.5. Conversion of both proglucagon and proinsulin by secretory granules was significantly inhibited in the presence of antipain, leupeptin, p-chloromercuribenzoate (PCMB) or dithiodipyridine (DDP) but not chloroquine, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, EDTA, p-nitrophenyl guanidinobenzoate, soybean trypsin inhibitor, or N-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone HCl. The inhibitory action of PCMB and DDP was reversed in the presence of dithiothreitol. Both membranous and soluble components of the secretory granules possessed significant converting activity. HPLC and electrophoretic analysis of cleavage products demonstrated that the converting activities of the membranous and soluble components were indistinguishable. The amount of inhibition of proinsulin and proglucagon conversion caused by 600 micrograms/ml porcine proinsulin was significantly lower than that caused by the same concentration of unlabeled anglerfish precursor peptides. These results indicate that the proinsulin and proglucagon

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F labeled alanine derivatives as potential tumor imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Zha, Zhihao; Qu, Wenchao; Qiao, Hongwen; Lieberman, Brian P.; Plössl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This paper reports the synthesis and labeling of 18F alanine derivatives. We also investigate their biological characteristics as potential tumor imaging agents mediated by alanine-serine-cysteine preferring (ASC) transporter system. Methods Three new 18F alanine derivatives were prepared from corresponding tosylate-precursors through a two-step labelling reaction. In vitro uptake studies to evaluate and to compare these three analogs were carried out in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. Potential transport mechanisms, protein incorporation and stability of 3-(1-[18F]fluoromethyl)-L-alanine (L[18F]FMA) were investigated in 9L glioma cells. Its biodistribution was determined in a rat-bearing 9L tumor model. PET imaging studies were performed on rat bearing 9L glioma tumors and transgenic mouse carrying spontaneous generated M/tomND tumor (mammary gland adenocarcinoma). Results New 18F alanine derivatives were prepared with 7–34% uncorrected radiochemical yields, excellent enantiomeric purity (>99%) and good radiochemical purity (>99%). In vitro uptake of the L-[18F]FMA in 9L glioma and PC-3 prostate cancer cells was higher than those observed for other two alanine derivatives and [18F]FDG in first 1 h. Inhibition of cell uptake studies suggested that L-[18F]FMA uptake in 9L glioma was predominantly via transport system ASC. After entering into cells, L-[18F]FMA remained stable and was not incorporated into protein within 2 h. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that L-[18F]FMA had relatively high uptake in liver and kidney. Tumor uptake was fast, reaching a maximum within 30 min. The tumor-to-muscle, tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-brain ratios at 60 min post injection were 2.2, 1.9 and 3.0, respectively. In PET imaging studies, tumors were visualized with L-[18F]FMA in both 9L rat and transgenic mouse. Conclusion L-[18F]FMA showed promising properties as a PET imaging agent for up-regulated ASC transporter associated with tumor

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F labeled FET prodrugs for tumor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Lieberman, Brian P.; Ploessl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET, [18F]1) is a useful amino-acid-based imaging agent for brain tumors. This paper reports the synthesis and evaluation of three FET prodrugs, O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosyl-L-glycine (FET-Gly, [18F]2), O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosyl-L-alanine (FET-Ala, [18F]3) and N-acetyl O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (AcFET, [18F]4), which could be readily hydrolyzed to FET in vivo for tumor imaging. We investigated their metabolism in the blood and imaging properties in comparison to FET ([18F]1). Methods Three new [18F]FET derivatives, 2 – 4, were prepared from their corresponding tosylate-precursors through nucleophilic fluorination and subsequent deprotection reactions. In vitro uptake studies were carried out in 9L glioma cancer cell lines. In vitro and in vivo hydrolysis studies were conducted to evaluate the hydrolysis of FET prodrugs in blood and in Fisher 344 rats. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were then performed in rats bearing 9L tumors. Results New FET prodrugs were prepared with 3 – 28 % decay corrected radiochemical yields, good enantiomeric purity (> 95 %) and high radiochemical purity (> 95 %). FET-Gly ([18F]2), FET-Ala ([18F]3), and AcFET ([18F]4) exhibited negligible uptake in comparison to the high uptake of FET ([18F]1) in 9L cells. Metabolism studies of FET-Gly ([18F]2), FET-Ala ([18F]3), and AcFET ([18F]4) in rat and human blood showed that FET-Ala ([18F]3) was hydrolyzed to FET ([18F]1) faster than FET-Gly ([18F]2) or AcFET ([18F]4). Most of the FET-Ala (79 %) was converted to FET ([18F]1) within 5 min in blood in vivo. Biodistribution studies demonstrated that FET-Ala ([18F]3) displayed the highest tumor uptake. The tumor-to-background ratios of FET-Ala ([18F]3) and FET ([18F]1) were comparable and appeared to be better than those of FET-Gly ([18F]2) and AcFET ([18F]4). PET imaging studies showed that both FET ([18F]1) and FET-Ala ([18F]3) could visualize tumors effectively, and that

  4. Radiofluorinated 3-(2{prime}-fluoroethyl)-2-thienylspiperone (FETS): Synthesis, pharmacologic characterization, tissue distribution and primate imaging of a selective radioligand for mapping D2 receptor sites by PET

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M.M.; Shi, B.; Hoffman, J.

    1995-05-01

    Abnormally high dopaminergic neurotransmission has been implicated in schizophrenia. A number of radiolabeled analogs of spiperone, a potent antipyschotic with a high (nanomolar) affinity for dopamine D2 receptors, have been synthesized for quantifying D2 receptors in humans. An undesired property accompanying high striatal uptake of radiolabeled spiperone (SPIP) analogs is high affinity for serotonin 5-IIT2 receptors. A potent spiperone analog which selectively binds to D2 receptors would be valuable in studying regional dopaminergic aberrations in schizophrenia. We have synthesized new potent radioligands [F-18] labeled 3-(2{prime}-fluoroethyl)-2-thienylspiperone (FETS) and 3-(3{prime}-fluoropropyl)-2-thienylspiperone (FPTS) for quantifying D2 receptors by PET. In vitro binding studies for D2 receptors in rat striatal homogenates using [H-3]raclopride afforded Ki`s (nM) of 1.07 for SPIP, 2.02 for FETS, 3.45 for FES and 5.45 for FPTS. In vitro binding studies for 5-HT2 receptors in rat cortical homogenates using [H-3]ketanserin afforded Ki`s (nM) of 1.86 for SPIP, 6.03 for FES, 20 for FPTS and 67 for FETS. Thus, FETS was found to be a potent and the most selective (Ki 5-HT2/Ki D2=33.5) spiperone ligand for D2 receptors. [F-18]FETS was synthesized in 41% E.O.B. by NCA K[F-18]/K222 exchange for tosylate from 3-(2{sup {prime}}-tosylethyl)-2-thienylspiperone in CH3CN at 100{degrees}C. HPLC purification afforded [F-18]FETS with a specific activity of 8 Ci/{mu}mole in a total synthesis time of 90 min. Following femoral vein injection in rats [F-18]FETS showed good uptake and retention in striatal (S) tissue (0.91% dose/g at 60 min) with clearance from the cerebellum (C) (0.24% dose/g at 60 min) giving S/C = 3.6 at 60 min. [F-18]FETS (6.0 mCi) was also administered to a rhesus monkey and showed high uptake and retention in the basal ganglia with S/C = 6.0 and 10.0 at 1 h and 2 h post injection respectively.

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of two thermostable carboxyl esterases from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Ewis, Hosam E; Abdelal, Ahmed T; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2004-03-31

    Screening of the genomic libraries of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC12980 and ATCC7954 for esterase/lipase activity led to the isolation of two positive clones. The results of subclonings and sequence analyses identified two genes, est30 and est55, encoding two different carboxylesterases, and genetic rearrangement in the est55 locus was revealed from genomic comparison. The est30 gene encodes a polypeptide of 248 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 28338 Da, and the est55 gene encodes a polypeptide of 499 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 54867 Da. Both enzymes were purified to near homogeneity from recombinant strains of Escherichia coli. The results of enzyme characterization showed that while both enzymes possess optimal activities with short chain acyl derivatives, Est55 has a broader pH tolerance (pH 8-9) and optimal temperature range (30-60 degrees C) than Est30. The activation energy of Est55 (35.7 kJ/mol) was found to be significantly lower than that of Est30 (101.9 kJ/mol). Both enzymes were stable at 60 degrees C for more than 2 h; at 70 degrees C, the half-life for thermal inactivation was 40 and 180 min for Est55 and Est30, respectively. With p-nitrophenyl caproate as the substrate and assayed at 60 degrees C, Est55 had K(m) and k(cat) values of 0.5 microM and 39758 s(-1) while Est30 exhibited values of 2.16 microM and 38 s(-1). Inhibition studies indicated that both Est30 and Est55 were strongly inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, and tosyl-l-phenylalanine, consistent with the proposed presence of Ser-His-Glu catalytic triad of the alpha/beta hydrolase family. The enzymatic properties of Est30 and Est55 reported here warrant the potential applications of these enzymes in biotechnological industries. PMID:15033540

  6. Trypsin-like serine peptidase profiles in the egg, larval, and pupal stages of Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aedes albopictus, a ubiquitous mosquito, is one of the main vectors of dengue and yellow fever, representing an important threat to public health worldwide. Peptidases play key roles in processes such as digestion, oogenesis, and metamorphosis of insects. However, most of the information on the proteolytic enzymes of mosquitoes is derived from insects in the adult stages and is often directed towards the understanding of blood digestion. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of active peptidases from the preimaginal stages of Ae. albopictus. Methods Ae. albopictus eggs, larvae, and pupae were analyzed using zymography with susbtrate-SDS-PAGE. The pH, temperature and peptidase inhibitor sensitivity was evaluated. In addition, the proteolytic activities of larval instars were assayed using the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC. Results The proteolytic profile of the larval stage was composed of 8 bands ranging from 17 to 130 kDa. These enzymes displayed activity in a broad range of pH values, from 5.5 to 10.0. The enzymatic profile of the eggs was similar to that of the larvae, although the proteolytic bands of the eggs showed lower intensities. The pupal stage showed a complex proteolytic pattern, with at least 6 bands with apparent molecular masses ranging from 30 to 150 kDa and optimal activity at pH 7.5. Peptidases from larval instars were active from 10°C to 60°C, with optimal activity at temperatures between 37°C and 50°C. The proteolytic profile of both the larval and pupal stages was inhibited by phenyl-methyl sulfonyl-fluoride (PMSF) and Nα-Tosyl L-lysine chloromethyl ketone hydrochloride (TLCK), indicating that the main peptidases expressed during these developmental stages are trypsin-like serine peptidases. Conclusion The preimaginal stages of Ae. albopictus exhibited a complex profile of trypsin-like serine peptidase activities. A comparative analysis of the active peptidase profiles revealed differential expression

  7. Among substituted 9,10-dihydro-9,10-[1,2]benzenoanthracene-1,4,5,8-tetraones, the lead antitumor triptycene bisquinone TT24 blocks nucleoside transport, induces apoptotic DNA fragmentation and decreases the viability of L1210 leukemic cells in the nanomolar range of daunorubicin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Perchellet, Elisabeth M; Sperfslage, Bonnie J; Wang, Yang; Huang, Xiaodong; Tamura, Masafumi; Hua, Duy H; Perchellet, Jean-Pierre

    2002-07-01

    In contrast to their inactive parent compound triptycene (code name TT0), several new synthetic analogs (TT code number) have antileukemic activities and remain effective in daunorubicin (DAU)-resistant tumor sublines in vitro. Among variously substituted 9,10-dihydro-9,10-[1,2]benzenoanthracene-1,4,5,8-tetraones, a total of six lead antitumor compounds have been identified, and their code names are TT2, TT13, TT16, TT19, TT21 and TT24. These active antitumor triptych structures have bisquinone functionality, and various bromo, methoxy, methylamino and/or dimethylamino substitutions with or without longer alkyl chains on the amino function. Like the anthracycline quinone antibiotic DAU, these triptycene (TT) bisquinones also inhibit DNA synthesis and induce DNA cleavage in relation with their cytotoxic activities, but have the additional advantage of blocking the cellular transport of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, an effect which DAU cannot do. As demonstrated by intact chromatin precipitation and agarose gel electrophoresis, the ability of TT bisquinones and DAU to induce DNA fragmentation is biphasic with a peak that shifts to lower concentrations with increasing times of drug exposure. The most effective lead antitumor compound, TT24, induces DNA cleavage in the same concentration-dependent manner as DAU at 24 h (similar peak in response to 1.6 microM) and is nearly equipotent to DAU against L1210 tumor cell viability at day 4 (IC50 values of TT24 and DAU: 48 and 25 nM, respectively). The mechanism by which TT24 induces DNA fragmentation is inhibited by actinomycin D, cycloheximide, benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone, benzyloxycarbonyl-Ile-Glu-Thr-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone, N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone and ZnSO4, suggesting that TT bisquinones trigger apoptosis by caspase and endonuclease activation. Since TT24 is cytotoxic in the nanomolar range of DAU, but might have a more versatile mechanism of action than DAU in wild

  8. BJ-48, a novel thrombin-like enzyme from the Bothrops jararacussu venom with high selectivity for Arg over Lys in P1: Role of N-glycosylation in thermostability and active site accessibility.

    PubMed

    Silva-Junior, Floriano P; Guedes, Herbert L M; Garvey, Laura C; Aguiar, Aniesse S; Bourguignon, Saulo C; Di Cera, Enrico; Giovanni-De-Simone, Salvatore

    2007-07-01

    BJ-48, a serine protease from the venom of Bothrops jararacussu, was purified to homogeneity using affinity chromatography on p-aminobenzamidine-agarose followed by HPLC gel filtration. BJ-48 presented 52kDa by SDS-PAGE analysis and 48,036Da by electron spray mass spectrometry. The enzyme was shown to be highly glycosylated with 42% of N-linked carbohydrates composed of Fuc(1):GalN(4):GlcN(5):Gal(1):Man(2) and a high content of sialic acid residues (8-12%). BJ-48 had optimal esterase activity at pH 7.5 and displayed maximum catalytic rate at 50 degrees C. Its hydrolytic activity was strongly inhibited by aprotinin and dithiothreitol while N-tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone, 6-aminocaproic acid, E-64 and soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) were ineffective. The kinetics of BJ-48 with chromogenic substrates revealed an unprecedented selectivity (10(4)-fold) for Arg over Lys in P1. BJ-48 proved to be a thrombin-like enzyme (TLE) with a specific fibrinogen-clotting activity of 73.4NIH units/mg. The TLE rapidly digested human fibrinogen Bbeta chain, but the Aalpha chain was cleaved specifically to release fibrinopeptide A with k(cat)/K(m)=2.1 microM(-1)s(-1). The TLE showed no activity toward other thrombin substrates like protein C, protease-activated receptor-1 or inhibitors such as hirudin and antithrombin. A non-denaturing procedure using PNGase F and neuraminidase followed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography was employed to obtain active BJ-48 forms with variable carbohydrate content. Compared to the native enzyme, total or partially deglycosylated BJ-48 forms presented up to 2-fold reduction in their specific activities upon heating at 55/65 degrees C or treatment with SBTI. These results point out a role for BJ-48 glycosylation in thermostability and controlling the access of some canonical protein inhibitors to the active site. PMID:17433397

  9. Novel Hydrogels from Telechelic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taribagil, Rajiv R.

    The last two decades have seen telechelic polymers support an increasing number of applications as stabilizers and flow modifiers in fields as varied as pharmaceutics, paints and oil recovery. Mainly consisting of a long hydrophilic block end-capped with hydrophobic blocks, these polymers form gels at modest concentrations, comprising hydrophobic junctions with hydrophilic blocks bridging these junctions. This thesis examines two different types of telechelic polymer hydrogels: concentrated dispersions of telechelic triblock copolymers and dilute solutions of wormlike micelles cross-linked by hydrophobically end-capped polymers. Aqueous gels of telechelic poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-based triblock polymers, with homo and hetero combinations of 1,2-polybutadiene (PB) and poly(perfluoropropylene oxide) (PFPO) as hydrophobic end-blocks, were investigated using a combination of cryogenic scanning electron microscopy and small-angle neutron scattering. The PB-b-PEO-b-PB copolymers formed networks of spherical micelles at all concentrations as expected, albeit with significant spatial heterogeneity that diminished with increasing concentration. The PFPO-b-PEO-b-PFPO copolymers also formed networks by aggregation of the end-blocks, but the PFPO blocks tended to adopt disk-like or even sheet-like structures. This is attributed to the extremely high interfacial tension of PFPO with water and is consistent with the "super-strong" segregation regime behavior. The heterotelechelic PB-b-PEO- b-PFPO terpolymers adopted a quite different structure, namely an intricate bicontinuous open-cell foam, with cells on the order of 500 nm in size and cell walls composed of PFPO disks embedded in PB sheets. These various network structures illustrate the potential of using end-block chemistry to manipulate both the morphology and the physical properties of polymer gels. Dilute aqueous solutions containing 1 wt% cetyltrimethylammonium tosylate, a surfactant well recognized to form wormlike

  10. Complexation equilibria involving salts in non-aqueous solvents: ion pairing and activity considerations.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Harry W; Jones, Jason W; Zakharov, Lev N; Rheingold, Arnold L; Slebodnick, Carla

    2011-03-01

    Complexation of anions, cations and even ion pairs is now an active area of investigation in supramolecular chemistry; unfortunately it is an area fraught with complications when these processes are examined in low polarity organic media. Using a pseudorotaxane complex as an example, apparent K(a2) values (=[complex]/{[salt](o)-[complex]}{[host](o)-[complex]}) for pseudorotaxane formation from dibenzylammonium salts (2-X) and dibenzo-[24]crown-8 (1, DB24C8) in CDCl(3)/CD(3)CN 3:2 vary with concentration. This is attributable to the fact that the salt is ion paired, but the complex is not. We report an equilibrium model that explicitly includes ion pair dissociation and is based upon activities rather than molar concentrations for study of such processes in non-aqueous media. Proper analysis requires both a dissociation constant, K(ipd), for the salt and a binding constant for interaction of the free cation 2(+) with the host, K(a5); K(a5) for pseudorotaxane complexation is independent of the counterion (500 M(-1)), a result of the complex existing in solution as a free cation, but K(ipd) values for the salts vary by nearly two orders of magnitude from trifluoroacetate to tosylate to tetrafluoroborate to hexafluorophosphate anions. The activity coefficients depend on the nature of the predominant ions present, whether the pseudorotaxane or the ions from the salt, and also strongly on the molar concentrations; activity coefficients as low as 0.2 are observed, emphasizing the magnitude of their effect. Based on this type of analysis, a method for precise determination of relative binding constants, K(a5), for multiple hosts with a given guest is described. However, while the incorporation of activity coefficients is clearly necessary, it removes the ability to predict from the equilibrium constants the effects of concentration on the extent of binding, which can only be determined experimentally. This has serious implications for study of all such complexation

  11. Generation of a high-valent iron imido corrolazine complex and NR group transfer reactivity.

    PubMed

    Leeladee, Pannee; Jameson, Guy N L; Siegler, Maxime A; Kumar, Devesh; de Visser, Sam P; Goldberg, David P

    2013-04-15

    The generation of a new high-valent iron terminal imido complex prepared with a corrolazine macrocycle is reported. The reaction of [Fe(III)(TBP8Cz)] (TBP8Cz = octakis(4-tert-butylphenyl)corrolazinato) with the commercially available chloramine-T (Na(+)TsNCl(-)) leads to oxidative N-tosyl transfer to afford [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz(+•))(NTs)] in dichloromethane/acetonitrile at room temperature. This complex was characterized by UV-vis, Mössbauer (δ = -0.05 mm s(-1), ΔE(Q) = 2.94 mm s(-1)), and EPR (X-band (15 K), g = 2.10, 2.00) spectroscopies, and together with reactivity patterns and DFT calculations has been established as an iron(IV) species antiferromagnetically coupled with a Cz-π-cation-radical (S(total) = 1/2 ground state). Reactivity studies with triphenylphosphine as substrate show that [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz(+•))(NTs)] is an efficient NTs transfer agent, affording the phospharane product Ph3P═NTs under both stoichiometric and catalytic conditions. Kinetic analysis of this reaction supports a bimolecular NTs transfer mechanism with rate constant of 70(15) M(-1) s(-1). These data indicate that [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz(+•))(NTs)] reacts about 100 times faster than analogous Mn terminal arylimido corrole analogues. It was found that two products crystallize from the same reaction mixture of Fe(III)(TBP8Cz) + chloramine-T + PPh3, [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz)(NPPh3)] and [Fe(III)(TBP8Cz)(OPPh3)], which were definitively characterized by X-ray crystallography. The sequential production of Ph3P═NTs, Ph3P═NH, and Ph3P═O was observed by (31)P NMR spectroscopy and led to a proposed mechanism that accounts for all of the observed products. The latter Fe(III) complex was then rationally synthesized and structurally characterized from Fe(III)(TBP8Cz) and OPPh3, providing an important benchmark compound for spectroscopic studies. A combination of Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopies led to the characterization of both intermediate spin (S = 3/2 and low spin (S = 1/2) Fe(III) corrolazines, as

  12. Conformationally Strained trans-Cyclooctene (sTCO) Enables the Rapid Construction of (18)F-PET Probes via Tetrazine Ligation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengzhe; Svatunek, Dennis; Rohlfing, Katarina; Liu, Yu; Wang, Hui; Giglio, Ben; Yuan, Hong; Wu, Zhanghong; Li, Zibo; Fox, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The bioorthogonal reaction between tetrazines and trans-cyclooctenes is a method for the rapid construction of F-18 probes for PET imaging. Described here is a second generation (18)F-labeling system based on a conformationally strained trans-cyclooctene (sTCO)-a dienophile that is approximately 2 orders of magnitude more reactive than conventional TCO dienophiles. Starting from a readily prepared tosylate precursor, an (18)F labeled sTCO derivative ((18)F-sTCO) could be synthesized in 29.3 +/- 5.1% isolated yield and with high specific activity. Tetrazine ligation was carried out with a cyclic RGD-conjugate of a diphenyl-s-tetrazine analogue (RGD-Tz) chosen from a diene class with an excellent combination of fast reactivity and stability both for the diene as well as the Diels-Alder adduct. For both the tetrazine and the sTCO, mini-PEG spacers were included to enhance solubility and improve the in vivo distribution profile of the resulting probe. Extremely fast reactivity (up to 2.86 x 10(5) M(-1)s(-1) at 25 °C in water) has been observed in kinetic studies in the reaction of sTCO with diphenyl-s-tetrazine derivatives. A kinetic study on sTCO diastereomers in 55:45 MeOH:water showed that the syn-diastereomer displayed slightly faster reactivity than the anti-diastereomer. An (18)F-sTCO conjugate with RGD-Tz demonstrated prominent and persistent tumor uptake in vivo with good tumor-to-background contrast. Unlike most radiolabeled RGD peptides, the tumor uptake of this PET agent increased from 5.3 +/- 0.2% ID/g at 1 h post injection (p.i.), to 8.9 +/- 0.5% ID/g at 4 h p.i., providing evidence for prolonged blood circulation. These findings suggest that tetrazine ligations employing (18)F-sTCO should serve as a powerful and general platform for the rapid construction of peptide or protein derived PET agents.

  13. Conformationally Strained trans-Cyclooctene (sTCO) Enables the Rapid Construction of 18F-PET Probes via Tetrazine Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mengzhe; Svatunek, Dennis; Rohlfing, Katarina; Liu, Yu; Wang, Hui; Giglio, Ben; Yuan, Hong; Wu, Zhanghong; Li, Zibo; Fox, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The bioorthogonal reaction between tetrazines and trans-cyclooctenes is a method for the rapid construction of F-18 probes for PET imaging. Described here is a second generation 18F-labeling system based on a conformationally strained trans-cyclooctene (sTCO)—a dienophile that is approximately 2 orders of magnitude more reactive than conventional TCO dienophiles. Starting from a readily prepared tosylate precursor, an 18F labeled sTCO derivative (18F-sTCO) could be synthesized in 29.3 +/- 5.1% isolated yield and with high specific activity. Tetrazine ligation was carried out with a cyclic RGD-conjugate of a diphenyl-s-tetrazine analogue (RGD-Tz) chosen from a diene class with an excellent combination of fast reactivity and stability both for the diene as well as the Diels-Alder adduct. For both the tetrazine and the sTCO, mini-PEG spacers were included to enhance solubility and improve the in vivo distribution profile of the resulting probe. Extremely fast reactivity (up to 2.86 x 105 M-1s-1 at 25 °C in water) has been observed in kinetic studies in the reaction of sTCO with diphenyl-s-tetrazine derivatives. A kinetic study on sTCO diastereomers in 55:45 MeOH:water showed that the syn-diastereomer displayed slightly faster reactivity than the anti-diastereomer. An 18F-sTCO conjugate with RGD-Tz demonstrated prominent and persistent tumor uptake in vivo with good tumor-to-background contrast. Unlike most radiolabeled RGD peptides, the tumor uptake of this PET agent increased from 5.3 +/- 0.2% ID/g at 1 h post injection (p.i.), to 8.9 +/- 0.5% ID/g at 4 h p.i., providing evidence for prolonged blood circulation. These findings suggest that tetrazine ligations employing 18F-sTCO should serve as a powerful and general platform for the rapid construction of peptide or protein derived PET agents. PMID:27162558

  14. Conformational study of C8 diazocine turn mimics using {sup 3}J{sub CH} coupling constants with {sup 13}C in natural abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, J.W.; Briand, J.; Burgess, J.L.; Callahan, J.F.

    1994-12-01

    The conformations of two diazocine turn mimics, which were later incorporated into GPIIb/IIIa peptide antagonists, were investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The two compounds, methyl (2,5-dioxo-3-(S)-(3-{omega}-tosylguanidino-propyl)-4-methyl-octahydro-1,4-dazocin-1-yl)acetate (1) and methyl (2,5-dioxo-3-(S)-(3-{omega}-tosyl-guanidino-propyl)-octahydro-1,5-diazocin-1-yl)acetate (2), differ only in their substituent at the diazocine position 4 nitrogen, yet this substitution results in a marked difference in the affinity of the resulting analogs for the GPIIb/IIIa receptor. It was of interest to determine if the difference observed in the antagonistic potency between these analogs was related to constitutional or, perhaps, conformational differences. The backbone conformations of these two molecules can be determined by measuring vicinal coupling constants along the trimethylene portion of the C8 ring backbone and by measuring interproton NOE intensities between the diazocine methine proton and the protons of the trimethylene group. For compound 1, {sup 3}J{sub HH} values measured from a P.E.COSY spectrum and interproton distances calculated from ROESY buildup curves indicated the presence of a single C8 ring backbone conformation where the trimethylene bridge adopted a staggered conformation and the H{alpha}1 and H{gamma}1 protons of the trimethylene group were 2.2 A from the methine proton. For compound 2, however, partial overlap of the central H{beta}1 and H{beta}2 protons made it impossible to measure {sup 3}J{sub HH} values from the P.E.COSY spectrum. We therefore used a {sup 13}C-filtered TOCSY experiment to measure the {sup 3}J{sub CH} values in both compounds 1 and 2. These heteronuclear vicinal coupling constants measured with {sup 13}C in natural abundance in conjunction with measured interproton NOE intensities indicate that these compounds share a common C8 ring backbone conformation.

  15. Human lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells: III. Effect of L-phenylalanine methyl ester on LAK cell activation from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: possible protease involvement of monocytes, natural killer cells and LAK cells.

    PubMed

    Leung, K H

    1991-01-01

    We have shown that depletion of monocytes from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by L-phenylalanine methyl ester (PheOMe) enhanced lymphokine-activated killer cell (LAK) generation by recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) at high cell density. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of action of PheOMe on LAK activation by using trypsin, chymotrypsin, tosylphenylalaninechloromethanol (TPCK, a chymotrypsin inhibitor), tosyl-L-lysinechloromethane (TLCK, a trypsin inhibitor), phenylalaninol (PheOH), and benzamidine. PBMC were treated with 1-5 mM PheOMe for 40 min at room temperature in combination with the various agents, washed and assessed for their effects on natural killer (NK) activity against K562 cells and monocyte depletion. The treated cells were then cultured with or without rIL-2 for 3 days. LAK cytotoxicity was assayed against 51Cr-labeled K562 and Raji tumor target cells. TPCK at 10 micrograms/ml partially inhibited depletion of monocytes by PheOMe. TLCK did not prevent depletion of monocytes nor inhibition of NK activity induced by PheOMe. TPCK and TLCK inhibited NK activity by themselves. TPCK but not TLCK inhibited rIL-2 induction of LAK cells. On the other hand, PheOH and benzamidine (analogs of PheOMe) lacked any effect on monocyte depletion but abrogated the inhibitory effect of PheOMe on NK activity. They had no effect on rIL-2 activation of LAK activity enhanced by PheOMe. Trypsin potentiated the inhibitory effect of PheOMe on NK activity and monocyte depletion. Trypsin partially inhibited IL-2 activation of LAK activity enhanced by PheOMe. Chymotrypsin had little effect on NK activity but prevented the inhibitory effect of PheOMe on NK activity. It had little effect on monocyte depletion induced by PheOMe. PheOMe was hydrolysed by monocytes and chymotrypsin to Phe and methanol as determined by HPLC. TPCK inhibited hydrolysis of PheOMe by monocytes. Our data suggest that the effects of PheOMe on monocytes, NK cells and LAK

  16. Molecular mechanism of APC/C activation by mitotic phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suyang; Chang, Leifu; Alfieri, Claudio; Zhang, Ziguo; Yang, Jing; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, Mark; Barford, David

    2016-04-27

    In eukaryotes, the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C, also known as the cyclosome) regulates the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of specific cell-cycle proteins to coordinate chromosome segregation in mitosis and entry into the G1 phase. The catalytic activity of the APC/C and its ability to specify the destruction of particular proteins at different phases of the cell cycle are controlled by its interaction with two structurally related coactivator subunits, Cdc20 and Cdh1. Coactivators recognize substrate degrons, and enhance the affinity of the APC/C for its cognate E2 (refs 4-6). During mitosis, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) and polo-like kinase (Plk) control Cdc20- and Cdh1-mediated activation of the APC/C. Hyperphosphorylation of APC/C subunits, notably Apc1 and Apc3, is required for Cdc20 to activate the APC/C, whereas phosphorylation of Cdh1 prevents its association with the APC/C. Since both coactivators associate with the APC/C through their common C-box and Ile-Arg tail motifs, the mechanism underlying this differential regulation is unclear, as is the role of specific APC/C phosphorylation sites. Here, using cryo-electron microscopy and biochemical analysis, we define the molecular basis of how phosphorylation of human APC/C allows for its control by Cdc20. An auto-inhibitory segment of Apc1 acts as a molecular switch that in apo unphosphorylated APC/C interacts with the C-box binding site and obstructs engagement of Cdc20. Phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory segment displaces it from the C-box-binding site. Efficient phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory segment, and thus relief of auto-inhibition, requires the recruitment of Cdk-cyclin in complex with a Cdk regulatory subunit (Cks) to a hyperphosphorylated loop of Apc3. We also find that the small-molecule inhibitor, tosyl-l-arginine methyl ester, preferentially suppresses APC/C(Cdc20) rather than APC/C(Cdh1), and interacts with the binding sites of both the C-box and Ile-Arg tail motifs. Our

  17. Generation of a high-valent iron imido corrolazine complex and NR group transfer reactivity.

    PubMed

    Leeladee, Pannee; Jameson, Guy N L; Siegler, Maxime A; Kumar, Devesh; de Visser, Sam P; Goldberg, David P

    2013-04-15

    The generation of a new high-valent iron terminal imido complex prepared with a corrolazine macrocycle is reported. The reaction of [Fe(III)(TBP8Cz)] (TBP8Cz = octakis(4-tert-butylphenyl)corrolazinato) with the commercially available chloramine-T (Na(+)TsNCl(-)) leads to oxidative N-tosyl transfer to afford [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz(+•))(NTs)] in dichloromethane/acetonitrile at room temperature. This complex was characterized by UV-vis, Mössbauer (δ = -0.05 mm s(-1), ΔE(Q) = 2.94 mm s(-1)), and EPR (X-band (15 K), g = 2.10, 2.00) spectroscopies, and together with reactivity patterns and DFT calculations has been established as an iron(IV) species antiferromagnetically coupled with a Cz-π-cation-radical (S(total) = 1/2 ground state). Reactivity studies with triphenylphosphine as substrate show that [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz(+•))(NTs)] is an efficient NTs transfer agent, affording the phospharane product Ph3P═NTs under both stoichiometric and catalytic conditions. Kinetic analysis of this reaction supports a bimolecular NTs transfer mechanism with rate constant of 70(15) M(-1) s(-1). These data indicate that [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz(+•))(NTs)] reacts about 100 times faster than analogous Mn terminal arylimido corrole analogues. It was found that two products crystallize from the same reaction mixture of Fe(III)(TBP8Cz) + chloramine-T + PPh3, [Fe(IV)(TBP8Cz)(NPPh3)] and [Fe(III)(TBP8Cz)(OPPh3)], which were definitively characterized by X-ray crystallography. The sequential production of Ph3P═NTs, Ph3P═NH, and Ph3P═O was observed by (31)P NMR spectroscopy and led to a proposed mechanism that accounts for all of the observed products. The latter Fe(III) complex was then rationally synthesized and structurally characterized from Fe(III)(TBP8Cz) and OPPh3, providing an important benchmark compound for spectroscopic studies. A combination of Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopies led to the characterization of both intermediate spin (S = 3/2 and low spin (S = 1/2) Fe(III) corrolazines, as

  18. B-52 Flight Mission Symbology on Side of Craft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A view of some of the mission markings, painted on the side of NASA's B-52 mothership, that tell the story of its colorful history. Just as combat aircraft would paint a bomb on the side of an aircraft for each bombing mission completed, NASA crew members painted a silhouette on the side of the B-52's fuselage to commemorate each drop of an X-15, lifting body, remotely piloted research vehicle, X-38 crew return vehicle, or other experimental vehicle or parachute system. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for

  19. Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The new pylon for the X-38 following a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in 1997. The fit-check was the first time the 1,200-pound steel pylon was mated to the B-52 following fabrication at Dryden by the Center's Experimental Fabrication Shop. The pylon was built as an 'adapter' to allow the X-38 research vehicle to be carried aloft and launched from the B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the

  20. X-38 - First Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Reminiscent of the lifting body research flights conducted more than 30 years earlier, NASA's B-52 mothership lifts off carrying a new generation of lifting body research vehicle--the X-38. The X-38 was designed to help develop an emergency crew return vehicle for the International Space Station. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also

  1. B-52 Flight Mission Symbology - Close up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A close-up view of some of the mission markings that tell the story of the NASA B-52 mothership's colorful history. These particular markings denote some of the experiments the bomber conducted to develop parachute recovery systems for the solid rocket boosters used by the Space Shuttle. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported

  2. X-38 - First Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In a scene reminiscent of the lifting body research flights conducted more than 30 years earlier, this photo shows a close-up view of NASA's B-52 mothership as it lifts off carrying a new generation of lifting body research vehicle--the X-38. The X-38 was designed to help develop an emergency crew return vehicle for the International Space Station. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the

  3. B-52B Cockpit Instrument Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This photo shows a close-up view of the instrument panel in the cockpit of NASA's B-52 research aircraft. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the HiMAT, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster

  4. B-52 Launch Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's venerable B-52 mothership is seen here photographed from a KC-135 Tanker aircraft. The X-43 adapter is visible attached to the right wing. The B-52, used for launching experimental aircraft and for other flight research projects, has been a familiar sight in the skies over Edwards for more than 40 years and is also both the oldest B-52 still flying and the aircraft with the lowest flight time of any B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported

  5. X-38 Ship #2 in Free Flight after Release from B-52 Mothership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The X-38 research vehicle drops away from NASA's B-52 mothership immediately after being released from the B-52's wing pylon. More than 30 years earlier, this same B-52 launched the original lifting-body vehicles flight tested by NASA and the Air Force at what is now called the Dryden Flight Research Center and the Air Force Flight Test Center. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the

  6. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft in Flight over Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable B-52 mothership flies over the main building at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The B-52, used for launching experimental aircraft and for other flight research projects, has been a familiar sight in the skies over Edwards for more than 40 years and has also been both the oldest B-52 still flying and the aircraft with the lowest flight time of any B-52. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of

  7. X-38 Ship #2 Mated to B-52 Mothership in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This photo shows one of the X-38 lifting-body research vehicles mated to NASA's B-52 mothership in flight prior to launch. The B-52 has been a workhorse for the Dryden Flight Research Center for more than 40 years, carrying numerous research vehicles aloft and conducting a variety of other research flight experiments. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket

  8. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable workhorse, the B-52 mothership, rolls out on the Edwards AFB runway after a test flight in 1996. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket

  9. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Dryden Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable B-52 mothership sits on the ramp in front of the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket

  10. X-38 Mounted on Pylon of B-52 Mothership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A close-up view of the X-38 research vehicle mounted under the wing of the B-52 mothership prior to a 1997 test flight. The X-38, which was designed to help develop technology for an emergency crew return vehicle (CRV) for the International Space Station, is one of many research vehicles the B-52 has carried aloft over the past 40 years. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space

  11. X-38 on B-52 Wing Pylon - View from Observation Window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A unique, close-up view of the X-38 under the wing of NASA's B-52 mothership prior to launch of the lifting-body research vehicle. The photo was taken from the observation window of the B-52 bomber as it banked in flight. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In

  12. Synthesis and characterization of borate based and AgGaS2 materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanasekaran, R.

    2009-07-01

    In recent years, there has been tremendous development in the fabrication of suitable materials for optoelectronic, laser, photovoltaic devices, acousto-optic, sonar and infrared detectors applications. Mastering in synthesis, growth and characterization is an essential requirement for fully realizing the potential applications of the materials technology for the construction of novel devices for Laser, microwave, optoelectronic and other applications. The anisotropy in the crystals gives them enhanced properties as required in the field of non-linear optics. With the advent of laser sources, a nonlinear optical phenomenon has got tremendous interest and nonlinear optical (NLO) materials play a key role in the development of laser technology. Because of the variety and complexity of the material systems involved, several approaches towards synthesis, growth and characterization have been developed during the past decades. Laser materials can be classified into Inorganic, Organic and Semi organic categories. Urea, DAST, mNA, POM, NPP, MAP are examples of organic family crystals where as L-Arginine phosphate (LAP), Zinc tris thiourea sulphate (ZTS), BTCC, ZCTC belongs to semi organic class. Inorganic NLO crystals are Potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP), GdYCOB, KAB, Beta Barium Borate (BBO), LBO, KDP and LiNbO3. Synthesis and characterization of technologically important Borate based materials for NLO applications will be reviewed. The raising demand for UV lasers has led to the development of various NLO materials. A series of borate materials - Rare earth calcium oxy borate (RECOB) with the general chemical formula RECa4O(BO3)3 with RE=Y,Gd, Nd, Sm, etc. are reported to be synthesized from their repective melts. The RECOB crystals are excellent NLO materials and when doped with `laser-active' ions (Nd3+, Yb3+), they become efficient laser-host crystals. The single crystals of YCOB were grown by flux technique using boron-tri-oxide as a flux. This technique enables to

  13. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A close-up of an experimental drag chute deploying in a cloud of dust behind NASA's B-52 research aircraft just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover

  14. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A rear view of NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploying an experimental drag chute just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid

  15. Pegasus Mated to B-52 Mothership - Front View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    NASA's B-52 launch aircraft takes off with the second Pegasus vehicle under its wing from the Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air

  16. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An experimental drag chute deploys amidst a cloud of dust behind NASA's B-52 research aircraft just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space

  17. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploys an experimental drag chute just after landing the runway at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also

  18. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An aerial view of NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploying an experimental drag chute just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid

  19. B-52 Testing F-111 Parachute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A mock-up of an F-111 cockpit section drops out of the bomb bay of NASA's B-52 mothership on a test flight of a new parachute system for the F-111 'Aardvark' bomber. The F-111's ejection system separated the entire cockpit from the rest of the aircraft, and a large parachute was then deployed to lower the cockpit section to the ground. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space

  20. B-52 Testing F-111 Parachute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The main parachute begins to deploy on the mock-up of an F-111 'Aardvark' bomber cockpit section after being dropped from NASA's B-52 mothership during 1988 flight tests on improved parachute systems for the Air Force bomber. The F-111's ejection system separated the entire cockpit from the rest of the aircraft, and a large parachute was then deployed to lower the cockpit section to the ground. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of

  1. Development of a Gaussia Luciferase-Based Human Norovirus Protease Reporter System: Cell Type-Specific Profile of Norwalk Virus Protease Precursors and Evaluation of Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Lin; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Atmar, Robert L.; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Norwalk virus (NV) is the prototype strain of human noroviruses (HuNoVs), a group of positive-strand RNA viruses in the Caliciviridae family and the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide. Investigation of HuNoV replication and development of antiviral therapeutics in cell culture remain challenging tasks. Here, we present NoroGLuc, a HuNoV protease reporter system based on a fusion of NV p41 protein with a naturally secreted Gaussia luciferase (GLuc), linked by the p41/p22 cleavage site for NV protease (Pro). trans cleavage of NoroGLuc by NV Pro or Pro precursors results in release and secretion of an active GLuc. Using this system, we observed a cell type-specific activity profile of NV Pro and Pro precursors, suggesting that the activity of NV Pro is modulated by other viral proteins in the precursor forms and strongly influenced by cellular factors. NoroGLuc was also cleaved by Pro and Pro precursors generated from replication of NV stool RNA in transfected cells, resulting in a measurable increase of secreted GLuc. Truncation analysis revealed that the N-terminal membrane association domain of NV p41 is critical for NoroGLuc activity. Although designed for NV, a genogroup GI.1 norovirus, NoroGLuc also efficiently detects Pro activities from GII.3 and GII.4 noroviruses. At noncytotoxic concentrations, protease inhibitors ZnCl2 and Nα-p-tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) exhibited dose-dependent inhibitory effects on a GII.4 Pro by NoroGLuc assay. These results establish NoroGLuc as a pan-genogroup HuNoV protease reporter system that can be used for the study of HuNoV proteases and precursors, monitoring of viral RNA replication, and evaluation of antiviral agents. IMPORTANCE Human noroviruses are the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide. Currently, there are no vaccines or antiviral drugs available to counter these highly contagious viruses. These viruses are currently noncultivatable in cell culture. Here, we report

  2. Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    MAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  3. Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In addition, the B-52 served as the air launch platform for the first six Pegasus space boosters. During its many years of service, the B-52 has undergone several modifications. The first major modification was made by North American Aviation (now part of Boeing) in support of the X-15 program. This involved creating a launch-panel-operator station for monitoring the status of the test vehicle being carried, cutting a large notch in the right inboard wing flap to accommodate the vertical tail of the X-15 aircraft, and installing a wing pylon that enables the B-52 to carry research vehicles and test articles to be air-launched/dropped. Located on the right wing, between the inboard engine pylon and the fuselage, this wing pylon was subjected to extensive testing prior to its use. For each test vehicle the B-52 carried, minor changes were made to the launch-panel operator's station. Built originally by the Boeing Company, the NASA B-52 is powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-19 turbojet engines, each of which produce 12,000 pounds of thrust. The aircraft's normal launch speed has been Mach 0.8 (about 530 miles per hour) and its normal drop altitude has been 40,000 to 45,000 feet. It is 156 feet long and has a wing span of 185 feet. The heaviest load it has carried was the No. 2 X-15 aircraft at 53,100 pounds. Project manager for the aircraft is Roy Bryant.

  4. Close-up of Wing Fit Check of Pylon to Carry the X-38 on B-52 Launch Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Tom McMullen, Chief of Dryden's Experimental Fabrication Shop, makes adjustments to the new pylon for NASA's X-38 during a fit-check on NASA's B-52 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in 1997. The fit-check was the first time the 1,200-pound steel pylon was mated to the B-52 following fabrication at Dryden by the Center's Experimental Fabrication Shop. The pylon was built as an 'adapter' to allow the X-38 to be attached to and launched from the B-52's wing. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST

  5. Screening and brief intervention for alcohol and other abuse.

    PubMed

    Harris, Sion Kim; Louis-Jacques, Jennifer; Knight, John R

    2014-04-01

    Substance use is the most common health risk behavior among adolescents and is one of the greatest threats to their current and future health. Universal screening of adolescents in general medical settings can be instrumental in identifying substance use early, before further problems develop and when BIs are more likely to be effective. Screening in and of itself may have some therapeutic effect. Brief screening tools feasible for use by busy medical offices to quickly and reliably assess adolescent risk for a substance use disorder now are available. A recent study found that a physician-conducted CRAFFT screen interview required an average of 74 seconds to complete, whereas a computer self-administered version took an average of 49 seconds. The CRAFFT and AUDIT tools currently have the most evidence for validity among adolescents, whereas the validity of other widely used tools such as DAST-10, NIDA-modified ASSIST (Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test), and ultra-brief screens (AUDIT-C, single-item screens) has yet to be established for adolescents. Studies are needed to identify effective strategies to promote universal adolescent screening and the use of valid screening tools in general medical settings. One statewide (Massachusetts) study found that although most (86%) primary care physicians seeing adolescents reported screening adolescents for substance use annually, only 1 in 3 reported using a validated tool (the CRAFFT). The remaining physicians reporting using informal screening procedures, their own questionnaire, or the CAGE. Computerization of screening and integration into the electronic health record appear to be promising strategies to promote universal screening and standardized use of valid screening tools. Increasing adolescent screening rates necessitates supporting physicians' ability to respond effectively to the screen results. To that end, recent evidence-informed practice guides from the AAP and NIAAA provide a

  6. Screening and brief intervention for alcohol and other abuse.

    PubMed

    Harris, Sion Kim; Louis-Jacques, Jennifer; Knight, John R

    2014-04-01

    Substance use is the most common health risk behavior among adolescents and is one of the greatest threats to their current and future health. Universal screening of adolescents in general medical settings can be instrumental in identifying substance use early, before further problems develop and when BIs are more likely to be effective. Screening in and of itself may have some therapeutic effect. Brief screening tools feasible for use by busy medical offices to quickly and reliably assess adolescent risk for a substance use disorder now are available. A recent study found that a physician-conducted CRAFFT screen interview required an average of 74 seconds to complete, whereas a computer self-administered version took an average of 49 seconds. The CRAFFT and AUDIT tools currently have the most evidence for validity among adolescents, whereas the validity of other widely used tools such as DAST-10, NIDA-modified ASSIST (Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test), and ultra-brief screens (AUDIT-C, single-item screens) has yet to be established for adolescents. Studies are needed to identify effective strategies to promote universal adolescent screening and the use of valid screening tools in general medical settings. One statewide (Massachusetts) study found that although most (86%) primary care physicians seeing adolescents reported screening adolescents for substance use annually, only 1 in 3 reported using a validated tool (the CRAFFT). The remaining physicians reporting using informal screening procedures, their own questionnaire, or the CAGE. Computerization of screening and integration into the electronic health record appear to be promising strategies to promote universal screening and standardized use of valid screening tools. Increasing adolescent screening rates necessitates supporting physicians' ability to respond effectively to the screen results. To that end, recent evidence-informed practice guides from the AAP and NIAAA provide a

  7. Oxidation Reactions of Dithiocarbamate Complexes of Ruthenium(II).

    PubMed

    Leung, Wa-Hung; Chim, Joyce L. C.; Hou, Hongwei; Hun, Tom S. M.; Williams, Ian D.; Wong, Wing-Tak

    1997-09-24

    interaction between the Ru(III) and Ru(II) centers. Oxidation of Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)L(2) (L = PPh(3), t-BuNC) by I(2) gave the respective [Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)L(2)](+) cations. The reaction of cis-Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(PPh(3))(2) with excess tosyl azide gave the diamagnetic Ru(IV) tetrazene complex Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(Ts(2)N(4)), 7. Complex 7 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P&onemacr; with a = 10.380(1) Å, b = 11.322(1) Å, c = 15.310(1) Å, alpha = 106.84(2) degrees, beta = 106.87(2) degrees, and gamma = 92.63(2) degrees for Z = 2. The Ru-S and Ru-N(alpha) distances in 7 are 2.385 and 1.98 Å, respectively. The formal potentials of the Ru dithiocarbamate complexes were determined by cyclic voltammetry.

  8. F-15 RPRV Attached Under the Wing of the B-52 Mothership in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This photograph shows one of NASA's 3/8th-scale F-15 remotely piloted research vehicles under the wing of the B-52 mothership in flight during 1973, the year that the research program began. The vehicle was used to make stall-spin studies of the F-15 shape before the actual F-15s began their flight tests. B-52 Project Description: NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle