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Sample records for 4-form field strength

  1. Magnetic Field Strengths in Photodissociation Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balser, Dana S.; Anish Roshi, D.; Jeyakumar, S.; Bania, T. M.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Shitanishi, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    We measure carbon radio recombination line (RRL) emission at 5.3 {{GHz}} toward four H ii regions with the Green Bank Telescope to determine the magnetic field strength in the photodissociation region (PDR) that surrounds the ionized gas. Roshi suggests that the non-thermal line widths of carbon RRLs from PDRs are predominantly due to magneto-hydrodynamic waves, thus allowing the magnetic field strength to be derived. We model the PDR with a simple geometry and perform the non-LTE radiative transfer of the carbon RRL emission to solve for the PDR physical properties. Using the PDR mass density from these models and the carbon RRL non-thermal line width we estimate total magnetic field strengths of B∼ 100{--}300 μ {{G}} in W3 and NGC 6334A. Our results for W49 and NGC 6334D are less well constrained with total magnetic field strengths between B∼ 200{--}1000 μ {{G}}. H i and OH Zeeman measurements of the line of sight magnetic field strength ({B}{{los}}), taken from the literature, are between a factor of ∼ 0.5{--}1 of the lower bound of our carbon RRL magnetic field strength estimates. Since | {B}{{los}}| ≤slant B, our results are consistent with the magnetic origin of the non-thermal component of carbon RRL widths.

  2. Strength of field compacted clayey embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Lovell, C. W.

    1982-02-01

    The shearing behavior of a plastic Indiana clay (St. Croix) was studied for both laboratory and field compaction. This interim report deals with the field compacted phase. The strength tests were performed by unconsolidated undrained (UU) and saturated consolidated undrained (CIU) triaxials. These were run at various confining pressures to approximate the end of construction and long term conditions at several embankment depths.

  3. 47 CFR 24.236 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field strength limits. 24.236 Section 24.236... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.236 Field strength limits. The predicted or measured median field strength at... to a higher field strength....

  4. 47 CFR 24.236 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Field strength limits. 24.236 Section 24.236... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.236 Field strength limits. The predicted or measured median field strength at... to a higher field strength....

  5. 47 CFR 73.311 - Field strength contours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Field strength contours. 73.311 Section 73.311... Broadcast Stations § 73.311 Field strength contours. (a) Applications for FM broadcast authorizations must show the field strength contours required by FCC Form 301 or FCC Form 340, as appropriate. (b)...

  6. 47 CFR 73.311 - Field strength contours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Field strength contours. 73.311 Section 73.311... Broadcast Stations § 73.311 Field strength contours. (a) Applications for FM broadcast authorizations must show the field strength contours required by FCC Form 301 or FCC Form 340, as appropriate. (b)...

  7. 47 CFR 73.311 - Field strength contours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field strength contours. 73.311 Section 73.311... Broadcast Stations § 73.311 Field strength contours. (a) Applications for FM broadcast authorizations must show the field strength contours required by FCC Form 301 or FCC Form 340, as appropriate. (b)...

  8. 47 CFR 73.311 - Field strength contours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Field strength contours. 73.311 Section 73.311... Broadcast Stations § 73.311 Field strength contours. (a) Applications for FM broadcast authorizations must show the field strength contours required by FCC Form 301 or FCC Form 340, as appropriate. (b)...

  9. 47 CFR 73.311 - Field strength contours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Field strength contours. 73.311 Section 73.311... Broadcast Stations § 73.311 Field strength contours. (a) Applications for FM broadcast authorizations must show the field strength contours required by FCC Form 301 or FCC Form 340, as appropriate. (b)...

  10. 47 CFR 90.689 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field strength limits. 90.689 Section 90.689...-824/851-869 Mhz Band § 90.689 Field strength limits. (a) For purposes of implementing §§ 90.689... or measured field strength at any location on the border of the EA-based service area for...

  11. 47 CFR 90.689 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Field strength limits. 90.689 Section 90.689...-824/851-869 Mhz Band § 90.689 Field strength limits. (a) For purposes of implementing §§ 90.689... or measured field strength at any location on the border of the EA-based service area for...

  12. 47 CFR 73.683 - Field strength contours and presumptive determination of field strength at individual locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... definitions of satellite carrier, subscriber, and local market contained in 47 CFR 76.66(a) apply to this... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field strength contours and presumptive... Stations § 73.683 Field strength contours and presumptive determination of field strength at...

  13. 47 CFR 90.771 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field strength limits. 90.771 Section 90.771... Policies Governing the Licensing and Use of Phase II Ea, Regional and Nationwide Systems § 90.771 Field... transmit frequencies, of EA and Regional licensees may not exceed a predicted 38 dBu field strength...

  14. 47 CFR 90.771 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Field strength limits. 90.771 Section 90.771... Policies Governing the Licensing and Use of Phase II Ea, Regional and Nationwide Systems § 90.771 Field... transmit frequencies, of EA and Regional licensees may not exceed a predicted 38 dBu field strength...

  15. PERMANENT MAGNET DESIGNS WITH LARGE VARIATIONS IN FIELD STRENGTH.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA,R.

    2004-01-21

    The use of permanent magnets has been investigated as an option for electron cooling ring for the proposed luminosity upgrade of RHIC. Several methods have been developed that allow a large variation in field strength. These design concepts were verified with computer simulations using finite element codes. It will be shown that the field uniformity is maintained while the field strength is mechanically adjusted.

  16. 47 CFR 18.305 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Field strength limits. 18.305 Section 18.305 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical Standards § 18.305 Field strength limits. (a) ISM equipment operating on a frequency specified in §...

  17. 47 CFR 18.305 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Field strength limits. 18.305 Section 18.305 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical Standards § 18.305 Field strength limits. (a) ISM equipment operating on a frequency specified in §...

  18. Spontaneous Radiation Emission from Short, High Field Strength Insertion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2005-09-15

    Since the earliest papers on undulaters were published, it has been known how to calculate the spontaneous emission spectrum from ''short'' undulaters when the magnetic field strength parameter is small compared to unity, or in ''single'' frequency sinusoidal undulaters where the magnetic field strength parameter is comparable to or larger than unity, but where the magnetic field amplitude is constant throughout the undulater. Fewer general results have been obtained in the case where the insertion device is both short, i.e., the magnetic field strength parameter changes appreciably throughout the insertion device, and the magnetic field strength is high enough that ponderomotive effects, radiation retardation, and harmonic generation are important physical phenomena. In this paper a general method is presented for calculating the radiation spectrum for short, high-field insertion devices. It is used to calculate the emission from some insertion device designs of recent interest.

  19. Pulsar Emission Geometry and Accelerating Field Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCesar, Megan E.; Harding, Alice K.; Miller, M. Coleman; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Parent, Damien

    2012-01-01

    The high-quality Fermi LAT observations of gamma-ray pulsars have opened a new window to understanding the generation mechanisms of high-energy emission from these systems, The high statistics allow for careful modeling of the light curve features as well as for phase resolved spectral modeling. We modeled the LAT light curves of the Vela and CTA I pulsars with simulated high-energy light curves generated from geometrical representations of the outer gap and slot gap emission models. within the vacuum retarded dipole and force-free fields. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo maximum likelihood method was used to explore the phase space of the magnetic inclination angle, viewing angle. maximum emission radius, and gap width. We also used the measured spectral cutoff energies to estimate the accelerating parallel electric field dependence on radius. under the assumptions that the high-energy emission is dominated by curvature radiation and the geometry (radius of emission and minimum radius of curvature of the magnetic field lines) is determined by the best fitting light curves for each model. We find that light curves from the vacuum field more closely match the observed light curves and multiwavelength constraints, and that the calculated parallel electric field can place additional constraints on the emission geometry

  20. 47 CFR 73.184 - Groundwave field strength graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the CFR, nor will they be included in the Commission's automated rules system. For information on... versus distance used to plot Graphs 1 to 20 are available in tabular form. For information on obtaining... strength at 1 kilometer. This is accomplished by plotting the measured field strengths on transparent...

  1. 47 CFR 73.184 - Groundwave field strength graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the CFR, nor will they be included in the Commission's automated rules system. For information on... versus distance used to plot Graphs 1 to 20 are available in tabular form. For information on obtaining... strength at 1 kilometer. This is accomplished by plotting the measured field strengths on transparent...

  2. Physical processes at high field strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of the radiation produced by the high field interaction with the rare gases have revealed the presence of both copious harmonic production and fluorescence. The highest harmonic observed was the seventeenth (14.6 rm) in Ne, the shortest wavelength ever produced by that means. Strong fluorescence was seen in Ar, Kr, and Xe with the shortest wavelengths observed being below 10 nm. Furthermore, radiation from inner-shell excited configurations in Xe, specifically the 4d/sup 9/5s5p ..-->.. 4d/sup 10/5s manifold at approx. 17.7 nm, was detected. The behaviors of the rare gases with respect to multiquantum ionization, harmonic production, and fluorescence were found to be correlated so that the materials fell into two groups, He and Ne in one and Ar, Kr, and Xe in the other. These experimental findings, in alliance with other studies on inner-shell decay processes, give evidence for a role of atomic correlations in a direct nonlinear process of inner-shell excitation. It is expected that an understanding of these high-field processes will enable the generation of stimulated emission in the x-ray range. 59 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Electrostatic precipitator having apparatus for sensing electrostatic field strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Perryman, J.W.

    1984-03-27

    An electrostatic precipitator (10) of the type having a casing (12) defining a precipitation chamber (6) wherein a plurality of discharge electrode frames (32) are disposed alternately between a plurality of collecting electrode plates (20). Paired probe devices (50) are mounted on the collecting electrode plates for sensing the strength of the electrostatic field generated by at least one discharge electrode wire (36) at at least one location on each of the collecting electrode plates (20) disposed adjacent thereto. The electrostatic field strength sensed by the paired probe devices are compared with each other to provide an indication of the degree of imbalance, if any, existing between the sensed electrostatic fields experienced by the bounding electrode plates. The existence of an imbalance and the strength of the electrostatic fields on the bounding collecting electrode plates and the degree of any such imbalance provide an indication of whether or not the discharge electrode frame is properly positioned within the assembly of collecting electrode plates.

  4. Technique for Predicting the RF Field Strength Inside an Enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, M.; Reddell, J.

    1998-01-01

    This Memorandum presents a simple analytical technique for predicting the RF electric field strength inside an enclosed volume in which radio frequency radiation occurs. The technique was developed to predict the radio frequency (RF) field strength within a launch vehicle's fairing from payloads launched with their telemetry transmitters radiating and to the impact of the radiation on the vehicle and payload. The RF field strength is shown to be a function of the surface materials and surface areas. The method accounts for RF energy losses within exposed surfaces, through RF windows, and within multiple layers of dielectric materials which may cover the surfaces. This Memorandum includes the rigorous derivation of all equations and presents examples and data to support the validity of the technique.

  5. Estimate of Coronal Magnetic Field Strength Using Plasmoid Acceleration Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, G.; Lee, K.; Jang, M.

    2010-12-01

    A method of estimating the lower bound of coronal magnetic field strength in the neighborhood of an ejecting plasmoid is presented. Based on the assumption that the plasma ejecta is within a magnetic island, an analytical expression for the force acting on the ejecta is derived. A rather simple calculation shows that the vertical force acting on a cylinder-like volume, whose lateral surface is a flux surface and whose magnetic axis is parallel to the horizontal, is just the difference in total pressure (magnetic pressure plus plasma pressure) below and above the volume. The method is applied to a limb coronal mass ejection event, and a lower bound of the magnetic field strength just below the CME core is estimated. The method is expected to provide useful information on the strength of reconnecting magnetic field if applied to X-ray plasma ejecta.

  6. Measurements of magnetic field strength on T Tauri stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Eike W.; Lehmann, Holger; Emerson, James P.; Staude, Jürgen

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the magnetic field strength of one weak-line and four classical T Tauri stars. The magnetic field strength is derived from the differential change of the equivalent width of photospheric Fe I lines in the presence of a magnetic field, calculated using a full radiative transfer code. The method was successfully tested by applying it to a non-magnetic solar-type star, and to VY Ari which is believed to have a strong magnetic field. For two of the classical T Tauri stars, we find a product of magnetic field strength and filling factor B * f = (2.35+/- 0.15) kG for T Tau, and B * f = (1.1+/- 0.2) kG for LkCa 15. For the classical T Tauri star UX Tau A and the weak-line T Tauri star LkCa 16 the detection is only marginal, indicating magnetic field strengths of the order of 1 kG and possibly of more than 2 kG, respectively. No field could be detected for the classical T Tauri star GW Ori. For the two classical T Tauri stars for which we have detected a field, we find the filling factors to be larger than ~ 0.5, which indicates that the magnetic field covers most of the photosphere. We also show that ignoring a magnetic field can, depending on the lines used, result in errors in effective temperature and underestimates of veiling. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Royal Greenwich Observatory in the Spanish Observatorio de los Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias

  7. 47 CFR 90.671 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field strength limits. 90.671 Section 90.671 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND... coordinate their frequency usage with so-channel adjacent MTA licensees and all other affected parties....

  8. 47 CFR 90.671 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Field strength limits. 90.671 Section 90.671 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND... coordinate their frequency usage with so-channel adjacent MTA licensees and all other affected parties....

  9. Relationship between field strength and arousal response in mice exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, R.S.; Duffy, P.H.; Sacher, G.A.; Ehret, C.F.

    1983-01-01

    White-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus, were exposed to 60-Hz electric fields to study the relationship between field strength and three measures of the transient arousal response previously reported to occur with exposures at 100 kV/m. Five groups of 12 mice each were given a series of four 1-h exposures, separated by an hour, with each group exposed at one of the following field strengths: 75, 50, 35, 25, and 10 kV/m; 8 additional mice were sham-exposed with no voltage applied to the field generator. All mice were experimentally naive before the start of the experiment, and all exposures occurred during the inactive (lights-on) phase of the circadian cycle. The first exposure produced immediate increases in arousal measures, but subsequent exposures had no significant effect on any measure. These arousal responses were defined by significant increases of gross motor activity, carbon dioxide production, and oxygen consumption, and were frequently recorded with field strengths of 50 kV/m or higher. Significant arousal responses rarely occurred with exposures at lower field strengths. Responses of mice exposed at 75 and 50 kV/m were similar to previously described transient arousal responses in mice exposed to 100-kV/m electric fields. Less than half of the mice in each of the field strength groups below 50 kV/m showed arousal response based on Z (standard) scores, but the arousals of the mice that did respond were similar to those of mice exposed at higher field strengths. Polynomial regression was used to calculate the field strength producing the greatest increases for each of the arousal measures. The results show that the amplitude of the transient arousal response is related to the strength of the electric field, but different measures of arousal may have different relationships to field strength.

  10. 47 CFR 73.683 - Field strength contours and presumptive determination of field strength at individual locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... at distances beyond about 48.3 kilometers (30 miles). Theory would indicate that the field strengths..., 445 12th St., SW., Reference Information Center, Room CY-A257, Washington, DC, or at the FCC's Office..., subscriber, and local market contained in 47 CFR 76.66(a) apply to this paragraph (f)....

  11. 47 CFR 73.683 - Field strength contours and presumptive determination of field strength at individual locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... at distances beyond about 48.3 kilometers (30 miles). Theory would indicate that the field strengths..., 445 12th St., SW., Reference Information Center, Room CY-A257, Washington, DC, or at the FCC's Office..., subscriber, and local market contained in 47 CFR 76.66(a) apply to this paragraph (f)....

  12. Critical electric field strengths of onion tissues treated by pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Asavasanti, Suvaluk; Ersus, Seda; Ristenpart, William; Stroeve, Pieter; Barrett, Diane M

    2010-09-01

    The impact of pulsed electric fields (PEF) on cellular integrity and texture of Ranchero and Sabroso onions (Allium cepa L.) was investigated. Electrical properties, ion leakage rate, texture, and amount of enzymatically formed pyruvate were measured before and after PEF treatment for a range of applied field strengths and number of pulses. Critical electric field strengths or thresholds (E(c)) necessary to initiate membrane rupture were different because dissimilar properties were measured. Measurement of electrical characteristics was the most sensitive method and was used to detect the early stage of plasma membrane breakdown, while pyruvate formation by the enzyme alliinase was used to identify tonoplast membrane breakdown. Our results for 100-μs pulses indicate that breakdown of the plasma membrane occurs above E(c)= 67 V/cm for 10 pulses, but breakdown of the tonoplast membrane is above either E(c)= 200 V/cm for 10 pulses or 133 V/cm for 100 pulses. This disparity in field strength suggests there may be 2 critical electrical field strengths: a lower field strength for plasma membrane breakdown and a higher field strength for tonoplast membrane breakdown. Both critical electric field strengths depended on the number of pulses applied. Application of a single pulse at an electric field up to 333 V/cm had no observable effect on any measured properties, while significant differences were observed for n≥10. The minimum electric field strength required to cause a measurable property change decreased with the number of pulses. The results also suggest that PEF treatment may be more efficient if a higher electric field strength is applied for a fewer pulses.

  13. Controlling flow direction in nanochannels by electric field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Zhao, Tianshou; Li, Zhigang

    2015-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to study the flow behavior of CsF solutions in nanochannels under external electric fields E . It is found that the channel surface energy greatly affects the flow behavior. In channels of high surface energy, water molecules, on average, move in the same direction as that of the electric field regardless of the strength of E . In low surface energy channels, however, water transports in the opposite direction to the electric field at weak E and the flow direction is changed when E becomes sufficiently large. The direction change of water flow is attributed to the coupled effects of different water-ion interactions, inhomogeneous water viscosity, and ion distribution changes caused by the electric field. The flow direction change observed in this work may be employed for flow control in complex micro- or nanofluidic systems.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging: effects of magnetic field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, L.E.; Arakawa, M.; Hoenninger, J.; McCarten, B.; Watts, J.; Kaufman, L.

    1984-04-01

    Magnetic resonance images of the head, abdomen, and pelvis of normal adult men were obtained using varying magnetic field strength, and measurements of T1 and T2 relaxations and of signal-to-noise (SN) ratios were determined. For any one spin echo sequence, gray/white matter contrast decreases and muscle/fat contrast increases with field. SN levels rise rapidly up to 3.0 kgauss and then change more slowly, actually dropping for muscle. The optimum field for magnetic resonance imaging depends on tissue type, body part, and imaging sequence, so that it does not have a unique value. Magnetic resonance systems that operate in the 3.0-5.0 kgauss range achieve most or all of the gains that can be achieved by higher magnetic fields.

  15. Dielectronic recombination as a function of electric field strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisenfeld, Daniel B.

    1992-01-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) is the dominant recombination mechanism at coronal temperatures and densities. We present a procedure for calculating DR rate coefficients as a function of electric field strength and apply this method to carbon ions. We focus on the competing effects of enhancement by plasma microfields and rate decrease through collisional excitation and ionization. We find that, in the case of C(3+), a significant rate enhancement results, leading to a reinterpretation of C IV emission-line intensities in the sun and late-type stars. We further consider how macroscopic electric fields, in particular motional electric fields, can affect DR rate coefficients, demonstrating dramatic rate increases for a number of the carbon ions.

  16. 47 CFR 18.305 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Any 2515 300300 Ultrasonic Below 490 kHz Below 500500 or more 2,400/F(kHz)2,400/F(kHz)× SQRT(power/500) 300 3300 490 to 1,600 kHzAbove 1,600 kHz AnyAny 24,000/F(kHz)15 3030 Induction cooking ranges Below 90 kHzOn or above 90 kHz AnyAny 1,500300 430 430 1 Field strength may not exceed 10 μV/m at 1600...

  17. Paleomagnetic field strength over the last million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, L. B.; Johnson, C. L.; Constable, C. G.

    2012-04-01

    Absolute paleomagnetic intensity data derived from thermally magnetized lavas and archeological objects provide information about past geomagnetic field behavior, but the average field strength, its variability, and the expected statistical distribution of these observations remain uncertain despite growing data sets. We present statistical characterizations of the 0-1 Ma field strength, in terms of virtual axial dipole moment (VADM), using data from the PINT, MagIC, and Geomagia50 databases. Uneven temporal sampling and large age uncertainties in the available data produce biased estimates for the mean field and its statistical distribution. We describe and apply bootstrap resampling techniques to correct for these effects. The influence of material type is assessed using independent data compilations to compare Holocene data from lava flows, Submarine Basaltic Glass (SBG), and archeological objects. The comparison to SBG is inconclusive because of dating issues, but paleointensity estimates from lavas are on average about 10% higher than for archeological materials and show greater dispersion. A further interesting basis for comparison is provided by PADM2M, a continuous model of temporal variations in axial dipole moment principally derived from relative paleointensity time series, but calibrated by incorporating absolute measurements. On average, absolute VADMs are higher than the axial dipole moment estimated in PADM2M, with greater spread in the VADM distribution. Both VADM and PADM2M distribution estimates from lavas show more structure than might be expected: neither has a smooth, unimodal distribution despite the large numbers of data used in the estimation. Simulations from a stochastic model based on the geomagnetic field spectrum demonstrate that long period intensity variations can have a strong impact on the observed distributions and could plausibly explain apparent bimodality.

  18. Effect of static magnetic field on experimental dermal wound strength

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Yahya; Aydogan, Cem; Balcik, Cenk; Haberal, Nihan; Kirnap, Mahir; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Context: An animal model. Aim: We sought to evaluate the effect of static magnetic fields on cutaneous wound healing. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were used. Wounds were created on the backs of all rats. Forty of these animals (M group) had NeFeB magnets placed in contact with the incisions, either parallel (Pa) and perpendicular (Pr) to the incision. The other 40 animals (sham [S] group) had nonmagnetized NeFeB bars placed in the same directions as the implanted animals. Half of the animals in each group were killed and assessed for healing on postoperative day 7 and the other half on postoperative day 14. The following assessments were done: gross healing, mechanical strength, and histopathology. Statistical Analysis Used: Intergroup differences were compared by using the Mann-Whitney U or t test. Values for P less than 0.05 were accepted as significant. Results and Conclusions: There were no differences between the magnetic and sham animals with respect to gross healing parameters. The mechanical strength was different between groups. On postoperative day 14, the MPr14 had significantly higher scores than the other groups. When static, high-power, magnetic fields are placed perpendicular to the wound, increased wound healing occurs in the skin of the experimental model. PMID:23162219

  19. Spin resonance strength of a localized rf magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. Y.

    2006-07-01

    Spin-resonance strength produced by a localized rf field has been a focus of recent publications [V. S. Morozov , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 7, 024002 (2004).PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.7.024002; M. A. Leonova (to be published).; T. Roser, in Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering, edited by A. W. Chao and M. Tigner (World Scientific, Singapore, 1999), p. 151.; M. Bai, W. W. MacKay, and T. Roser, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 099001 (2005).PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.8.099001; V. S. Morozov , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 099002 (2005).PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.8.099002]. This paper discusses the debated factor of 2, and provides a formula to calculate the component enhanced by the induced betatron motion.

  20. Metamaterial magnetoinductive lens performance as a function of field strength.

    PubMed

    Algarín, José M; Freire, Manuel J; Breuer, Felix; Behr, Volker C

    2014-10-01

    Metamaterials are artificial composites that exhibit exotic electromagnetic properties, as the ability of metamaterial slabs to behave like lenses with sub-wavelength resolution for the electric or the magnetic field. In previous works, the authors investigated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications of metamaterial slabs that behave like lenses for the radiofrequency magnetic field. In particular, the authors investigated the ability of MRI metamaterial lenses to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of surface coils, and to localize the field of view (FOV) of the coils, which is of interest for parallel MRI (pMRI) applications. A metamaterial lens placed between a surface coil and the tissue enhances the sensitivity of the coil. Although the metamaterial lens introduces losses which add to the losses of the tissue, the enhancement of the sensitivity can compensate these additional losses and the SNR of the coil is increased. In a previous work, an optimization procedure was followed to find a metamaterial structure with minimum losses that will maximize the SNR. This structure was termed magnetoinductive (MI) lens by the authors. The properties of surface coils in the presence of MI lenses were investigated in previous works at the proton frequency of 1.5 T systems. The different frequency dependence of the losses in both the MI lenses and the tissue encouraged us to investigate the performance of MI lenses at different frequencies. Thus, in the present work, the SNR and the pMRI ability of MI lenses are investigated as a function of field strength. A numerical analysis is carried out with an algorithm developed by the authors to predict the SNR behavior of a surface coil loaded with a MI lens at the proton frequencies of 0.5 T, 1.5 T and 3 T systems. The results show that, at 0.5 T, there is a gain in the SNR for short distances, but the SNR is highly degraded at deeper distances. However, at 1.5 T and 3T, the MI lenses provide a gain in the SNR up to a

  1. Effects of magnetic field strength in the discharge channel on the performance of a multi-cusped field thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Peng; Liu, Hui; Gao, Yuanyuan; Yu, Daren

    2016-09-01

    The performance characteristics of a Multi-cusped Field Thruster depending on the magnetic field strength in the discharge channel were investigated. Four thrusters with different outer diameters of the magnet rings were designed to change the magnetic field strength in the discharge channel. It is found that increasing the magnetic field strength could restrain the radial cross-field electron current and decrease the radial width of main ionization region, which gives rise to the reduction of propellant utilization and thruster performance. The test results in different anode voltage conditions indicate that both the thrust and anode efficiency are higher for the weaker magnetic field in the discharge channel.

  2. 47 CFR 27.804 - Field strength limits at WMTS facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Field strength limits at WMTS facility. 27.804 Section 27.804 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.804 Field strength limits at WMTS facility....

  3. 47 CFR 27.804 - Field strength limits at WMTS facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Field strength limits at WMTS facility. 27.804 Section 27.804 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.804 Field strength limits at WMTS facility....

  4. 47 CFR 27.804 - Field strength limits at WMTS facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field strength limits at WMTS facility. 27.804 Section 27.804 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.804 Field strength limits at WMTS facility....

  5. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  6. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  7. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  8. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  9. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  10. 47 CFR 2.1053 - Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation. 2.1053 Section 2.1053 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL... Procedures Certification § 2.1053 Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation....

  11. 47 CFR 2.1053 - Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation. 2.1053 Section 2.1053 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL... Procedures Certification § 2.1053 Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation....

  12. 47 CFR 2.1053 - Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation. 2.1053 Section 2.1053 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL... Procedures Certification § 2.1053 Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation....

  13. 47 CFR 2.1053 - Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation. 2.1053 Section 2.1053 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL... Procedures Certification § 2.1053 Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation....

  14. 47 CFR 27.804 - Field strength limits at WMTS facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Field strength limits at WMTS facility. 27.804 Section 27.804 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.804 Field strength limits at WMTS facility....

  15. 47 CFR 27.804 - Field strength limits at WMTS facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Field strength limits at WMTS facility. 27.804 Section 27.804 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.804 Field strength limits at WMTS facility....

  16. Optical Field-Strength Polarization of Two-Mode Single-Photon States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linares, J.; Nistal, M. C.; Barral, D.; Moreno, V.

    2010-01-01

    We present a quantum analysis of two-mode single-photon states based on the probability distributions of the optical field strength (or position quadrature) in order to describe their quantum polarization characteristics, where polarization is understood as a significative confinement of the optical field-strength values on determined regions of…

  17. Yang-Mills field theory in an axial field-strength gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyburski, Lawrence

    1984-02-01

    We introduce what we call an axial field-strength gauge as an alternative to the conventional Coulomb gauge in the Yang-Mills field theory. This new gauge does not share the pathologies that were shown to exist in the Coulomb gauge by Gribov and Mandelstam. We apply this new gauge to the calculation, in two special cases, of the energy possessed by sources J1,20 interacting in the presence of a background field produced by a source J30, which is assumed to be of order g-1, in the limit g goes to zero, where g is the coupling constant. In the case in which the charge density J30 consists of two infinite uniform parallel plates bearing charge densities equal in magnitude but opposite in sign, we find that the potential energy possessed by two point particles bearing charge densities J1,20 grows linearly in proportion to the distance between them at large distances when the two particles are separated along a line parallel to the background field. This is a confining potential.

  18. Comparisons of 76Hz transverse and radial magnetic field strength components received in Connecticut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, P. R.

    1986-03-01

    Since June 1970, we have made extremely low frequency (ELF) measurements of the transverse horizontal magnetic field strength, H sub phi, received in Connecticut. Occasionally, we also have measured either the vertical electric field strength, E sub v, or the radial horizontal magnetic field strength, H sub rho. The AN/BSR-1 ELF receivers are located at the Naval Underwater Systems Center (NUSC), at New London, CT. The transmission source for these farfield (1.6-Mm range) measurements is the U.S. Navy's ELF Wisconsin Test Facility (WTF), located in the Chequamegon National Forest in north-central Wisconsin. The results of 136 days of radial magnetic field measurements taken from November 1977 through June 1984 are discussed in this report. The main result is that during disturbed propagation conditions, the radial and transverse magnetic field strength daily plots (versus GMT) are usually dissimilar (in both amplitude and relative phase).

  19. STRENGTH PROPERTIES OF POLED PZT SUBJECTED TO BIAXIAL FLEXURAL LOADING IN HIGH ELECTRIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Hua-Tay; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2010-01-01

    Failure of poled PZT has been experimentally studied using ball-on-ring (BoR) biaxial flexure strength tests with an electric field concurrently applied. The as-received and aged PZTs were tested in high electric fields of -3 to 4 times the coercive field. Both the sign and the magnitude of electric field had a significant effect on the strength of poled PZT. A surface flaw type with a depth of around 18 m was identified as the strength limiter and responsible for the failure of the tested PZT. With a value of 0.76 MPa m1/2 in the open circle condition, the fracture toughness of the poled PZT was affected by an applied electric field just as the strength was affected. These results and observations have the potential to serve probabilistic reliability analysis and design optimization of multilayer PZT piezo actuators.

  20. Dynamical mass generation in QED with magnetic fields: Arbitrary field strength and coupling constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Eduardo; Ayala, Alejandro; Bashir, Adnan; Raya, Alfredo

    2008-05-01

    We study the dynamical generation of masses for fundamental fermions in quenched quantum electrodynamics, in the presence of magnetics fields of arbitrary strength, by solving the Schwinger-Dyson equation for the fermion self-energy in the rainbow approximation. We employ the Ritus eigenfunction formalism which provides a neat solution to the technical problem of summing over all Landau levels. It is well known that magnetic fields catalyze the generation of fermion mass m for arbitrarily small values of electromagnetic coupling α. For intense fields it is also well known that m∝eB. Our approach allows us to span all regimes of parameters α and eB. We find that m∝eB provided α is small. However, when α increases beyond the critical value αc which marks the onslaught of dynamical fermion masses in vacuum, we find m∝Λ, the cutoff required to regularize the ultraviolet divergences. Our method permits us to verify the results available in literature for the limiting cases of eB and α. We also point out the relevance of our work for possible physical applications.

  1. Magnetic diode for measurement of magnetic-field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, S.I.; Zalkind, V.M.

    1988-02-01

    The accuracy of fabrication and assembly of the elements of the magnetic systems of thermonuclear installations of the stellarator type is checked by study of the topography of the confining magnetic field and is determined by the space resolution and accuracy of the measuring apparatus. A magnetometer with a galvanomagnetic sensor is described that is used to adjust the magnetic system of the Uragan-3 stellarator. The magnetometer measure magnetic-field induction in the range of 6 x 10/sup -7/-10/sup -2/ T with high space resolution.

  2. MF radio field strength measurements in desert terrain near Yuma, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckscher, J. L.; Kalakowsky, C. B.; Whidden, R. W.; Tichovolsky, E. J.

    1980-12-01

    The field strength of the commercial radio broadcast station KBLU was measured at several hundred locations in the desert southeast of Yuma, Arizona, to study MF ground-wave propagation over the desert valleys and mountain ridges. Field strengths below the surface of the desert floor were measured in specially drilled holes to observe the penetration of MF into the desert soil. Idealized propagation path models are shown to produce effects similar to the observations.

  3. PUTTING CORONAL SEISMOLOGY ESTIMATES OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH TO THE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    De Moortel, I.; Pascoe, D. J.

    2009-07-10

    The magnetic field strength inside a model coronal loop is 'estimated' using coronal seismology, to examine the reliability of magnetic field strengths derived from observed, transverse coronal loop oscillations. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the interaction of an external pressure pulse with a coronal loop (modeled as a three-dimensional density enhancement inside a two-dimensional magnetic arcade) are analyzed and the 'observed' properties of the excited transverse loop oscillations are used to derive the value of the local magnetic field strength, following the method of Nakariakov and Ofman. Due to the (unexpected) change in periodicity, the magnetic field derived from our 'observed' oscillation is substantially different from the actual (input) magnetic field value (approximately 50%). Coronal seismology can derive useful information about the local magnetic field, but the combined effect of the loop curvature, the density ratio, and aspect ratio of the loop appears to be more important than previously expected.

  4. Study on technology of high-frequency pulsed magnetic field strength measurement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Mei; Liu, Zhi-Peng; Yin, Tao

    2012-01-01

    High-frequency transient weak magnetic field is always involved in researches about biomedical engineering field while common magnetic-field sensors cannot work properly at frequencies as high as MHz. To measure the value of MHz-level weak pulsed magnetic-field strength accurately, this paper designs a measurement and calibration method for pulsed magnetic-field. In this paper, a device made of Nonferromagnetic material was independently designed and applied to pulsed magnetic field measurement. It held an accurately relative position between the magnetic field generating coil and the detecting coil. By applying a sinusoidal pulse to the generator, collecting the induced electromotive force of the detector, the final magnetic field strength was worked out through algorithms written in Matlab according to Faraday's Law. Experiments were carried out for measurement and calibration. Experiments showed that, under good stability and consistency, accurate measurement of magnetic-field strength of a sinepulse magnetic-field can be achieved, with frequency at 0.5, 1, 1.5 MHz and strength level at micro-Tesla. Calibration results carried out a measuring relative error about 2.5%.

  5. Tidal dissipation and the strength of the Earth's internal magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Buffett, Bruce A

    2010-12-16

    Magnetic fields at the Earth's surface represent only a fraction of the field inside the core. The strength and structure of the internal field are poorly known, yet the details are important for our understanding of the geodynamo. Here I obtain an indirect estimate for the field strength from measurements of tidal dissipation. Tidally driven flow in the Earth's liquid core develops internal shear layers, which distort the internal magnetic field and generate electric currents. Ohmic losses damp the tidal motions and produce detectable signatures in the Earth's nutations. Previously reported evidence of anomalous dissipation in nutations can be explained with a core-averaged field of 2.5 mT, eliminating the need for high fluid viscosity or a stronger magnetic field at the inner-core boundary. Estimates for the internal field constrain the power required for the geodynamo.

  6. EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH AND ORIENTATION ON MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Fabian; Hartmann, Lee W.; Stone, James M.

    2009-04-10

    We present a set of numerical simulations addressing the effects of magnetic field strength and orientation on the flow-driven formation of molecular clouds. Fields perpendicular to the flows sweeping up the cloud can efficiently prevent the formation of massive clouds but permit the buildup of cold, diffuse filaments. Fields aligned with the flows lead to substantial clouds, whose degree of fragmentation and turbulence strongly depends on the background field strength. Adding a random field component leads to a 'selection effect' for molecular cloud formation: high column densities are only reached at locations where the field component perpendicular to the flows is vanishing. Searching for signatures of colliding flows should focus on the diffuse, warm gas, since the cold gas phase making up the cloud will have lost the information about the original flow direction because the magnetic fields redistribute the kinetic energy of the inflows.

  7. 47 CFR 73.151 - Field strength measurements to establish performance of directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... coordinates determined with a Global Positioning System receiver. (iii) Clear photographs taken with the field... verified either by field strength measurement or by computer modeling and sampling system verification. (a... antenna systems (e.g., two towers) in the 1605-1705 kHz band, the measurements to support pattern...

  8. 47 CFR 73.151 - Field strength measurements to establish performance of directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... coordinates determined with a Global Positioning System receiver. (iii) Clear photographs taken with the field... verified either by field strength measurement or by computer modeling and sampling system verification. (a... antenna systems (e.g., two towers) in the 1605-1705 kHz band, the measurements to support pattern...

  9. 47 CFR 73.151 - Field strength measurements to establish performance of directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... coordinates determined with a Global Positioning System receiver. (iii) Clear photographs taken with the field... verified either by field strength measurement or by computer modeling and sampling system verification. (a... antenna systems (e.g., two towers) in the 1605-1705 kHz band, the measurements to support pattern...

  10. 47 CFR 73.151 - Field strength measurements to establish performance of directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... coordinates determined with a Global Positioning System receiver. (iii) Clear photographs taken with the field... verified either by field strength measurement or by computer modeling and sampling system verification. (a... antenna systems (e.g., two towers) in the 1605-1705 kHz band, the measurements to support pattern...

  11. Dependence of Brownian and Néel relaxation times on magnetic field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Deissler, Robert J. Wu, Yong; Martens, Michael A.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: In magnetic particle imaging (MPI) and magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) the relaxation time of the magnetization in response to externally applied magnetic fields is determined by the Brownian and Néel relaxation mechanisms. Here the authors investigate the dependence of the relaxation times on the magnetic field strength and the implications for MPI and MPS. Methods: The Fokker–Planck equation with Brownian relaxation and the Fokker–Planck equation with Néel relaxation are solved numerically for a time-varying externally applied magnetic field, including a step-function, a sinusoidally varying, and a linearly ramped magnetic field. For magnetic fields that are applied as a step function, an eigenvalue approach is used to directly calculate both the Brownian and Néel relaxation times for a range of magnetic field strengths. For Néel relaxation, the eigenvalue calculations are compared to Brown's high-barrier approximation formula. Results: The relaxation times due to the Brownian or Néel mechanisms depend on the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. In particular, the Néel relaxation time is sensitive to the magnetic field strength, and varies by many orders of magnitude for nanoparticle properties and magnetic field strengths relevant for MPI and MPS. Therefore, the well-known zero-field relaxation times underestimate the actual relaxation times and, in particular, can underestimate the Néel relaxation time by many orders of magnitude. When only Néel relaxation is present—if the particles are embedded in a solid for instance—the authors found that there can be a strong magnetization response to a sinusoidal driving field, even if the period is much less than the zero-field relaxation time. For a ferrofluid in which both Brownian and Néel relaxation are present, only one relaxation mechanism may dominate depending on the magnetic field strength, the driving frequency (or ramp time), and the phase of the magnetization relative to the

  12. Sunspot rotation. II. Effects of varying the field strength and twist of an emerging flux tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturrock, Z.; Hood, A. W.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Observations of flux emergence indicate that rotational velocities may develop within sunspots. However, the dependence of this rotation on sub-photospheric field strength and twist remains largely unknown. Aims: We investigate the effects of varying the initial field strength and twist of an emerging sub-photospheric magnetic flux tube on the rotation of the sunspots at the photosphere. Methods: We consider a simple model of a stratified domain with a sub-photospheric interior layer and three overlying atmospheric layers. A twisted arched flux tube is inserted in the interior and is allowed to rise into the atmosphere. To achieve this, the magnetohydrodynamic equations are solved using the Lagrangian-remap code, Lare3d. We perform a parameter study by independently varying the sub-photospheric magnetic field strength and twist. Results: Altering the initial magnetic field strength and twist of the flux tube significantly affects the tube's evolution and the rotational motions that develop at the photosphere. The rotation angle, vorticity, and current show a direct dependence on the initial field strength. We find that an increase in field strength increases the angle through which the fieldlines rotate, the length of the fieldlines extending into the atmosphere, and the magnetic energy transported to the atmosphere. This also affects the amount of residual twist in the interior. The length of the fieldlines is crucial as we predict the twist per unit length equilibrates to a lower value on longer fieldlines. No such direct dependence is found when we modify the twist of the magnetic field owing to the complex effect this has on the tension force acting on the tube. However, there is still a clear ordering in quantities such as the rotation angle, helicity, and free energy with higher initial twist cases being related to sunspots that rotate more rapidly, transporting more helicity and magnetic energy to the atmosphere.

  13. Magnetic-field-induced dose effects in MR-guided radiotherapy systems: dependence on the magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, A J E; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W

    2008-02-21

    Several institutes are currently working on the development of a radiotherapy treatment system with online MR imaging (MRI) modality. The main difference between their designs is the magnetic field strength of the MRI system. While we have chosen a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic field strength, the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton will be using a 0.2 T MRI scanner and the company Viewray aims to use 0.3 T. The magnetic field strength will affect the severity of magnetic field dose effects, such as the electron return effect (ERE): considerable dose increase at tissue air boundaries due to returning electrons. This paper has investigated how the ERE dose increase depends on the magnetic field strength. Therefore, four situations where the ERE occurs have been simulated: ERE at the distal side of the beam, the lateral ERE, ERE in cylindrical air cavities and ERE in the lungs. The magnetic field comparison values were 0.2, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 T. Results show that, in general, magnetic field dose effects are reduced at lower magnetic field strengths. At the distal side, the ERE dose increase is largest for B = 0.75 T and depends on the irradiation field size for B = 0.2 T. The lateral ERE is strongest for B = 3 T but shows no effect for B = 0.2 T. Around cylindrical air cavities, dose inhomogeneities disappear if the radius of the cavity becomes small relative to the in-air radius of the secondary electron trajectories. At larger cavities (r > 1 cm), dose inhomogeneities exist for all magnetic field strengths. In water-lung-water phantoms, the ERE dose increase takes place at the water-lung transition and the dose decreases at the lung-water transition, but these effects are minimal for B = 0.2 T. These results will contribute to evaluating the trade-off between magnetic field dose effects and image quality of MR-guided radiotherapy systems.

  14. Registration of weak ULF/ELF oscillations of the surface electric field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldyrev, A. I.; Vyazilov, A. E.; Ivanov, V. N.; Kemaev, R. V.; Korovin, V. Ya.; Melyashinskii, A. V.; Pamukhin, K. V.; Panov, V. N.; Shvyrev, Yu. N.

    2016-07-01

    Measurements of the atmospheric electric field strength made by an electrostatic fluxmeter with a unique threshold sensitivity for such devices (6 × 10-2-10-3 V m-1 Hz-1/2 in the 10-3-25 Hz frequency range) and wide dynamic (120 dB) and spectral (0-25 Hz) ranges, are presented. The device parameters make it possible to observe the electric component of global electromagnetic Schumann resonances and long-period fluctuations in the atmospheric electric field strength.

  15. Optical field-strength generalized polarization of non-stationary quantum states in waveguiding photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barral, David; Liñares, Jesús; Nistal, María C.

    2013-07-01

    A quantum analysis of the generalized polarization properties of multimode non-stationary states based on their optical field-strength probability distributions is presented. The quantum generalized polarization is understood as a significant confinement of the probability distribution along certain regions of a multidimensional optical field-strength space. The analysis is addressed to quantum states generated in multimode linear and nonlinear waveguiding (integrated) photonic devices, such as multimode waveguiding directional couplers and waveguiding parametric amplifiers, whose modes fulfill a spatial modal orthogonality. In particular, the generalized polarization degree of coherent, squeezed and Schrödinger's cat states is analyzed.

  16. Lower-extremity strength ratios of professional soccer players according to field position.

    PubMed

    Ruas, Cassio V; Minozzo, Felipe; Pinto, Matheus D; Brown, Lee E; Pinto, Ronei S

    2015-05-01

    Previous investigators have proposed that knee strength, hamstrings to quadriceps, and side-to-side asymmetries may vary according to soccer field positions. However, different results have been found in these variables, and a generalization of this topic could lead to data misinterpretation by coaches and soccer clubs. Thus, the aim of this study was to measure knee strength and asymmetry in soccer players across different field positions. One hundred and two male professional soccer players performed maximal concentric and eccentric isokinetic knee actions on the preferred and nonpreferred legs at a velocity of 60° · s. Players were divided into their field positions for analysis: goalkeepers, side backs, central backs, central defender midfielders, central attacking midfielders, and forwards. Results demonstrated that only goalkeepers (GK) differed from most other field positions on players' characteristics, and concentric peak torque across muscles. Although all players presented functional ratios of the preferred (0.79 ± 0.14) and nonpreferred (0.75 ± 0.13) legs below accepted normative values, there were no differences between positions for conventional or functional strength ratios or side-to-side asymmetry. The same comparisons were made only between field players, without inclusion of the GK, and no differences were found between positions. Therefore, the hamstrings to quadriceps and side-to-side asymmetries found here may reflect knee strength functional balance required for soccer skills performance and game demands across field positions. These results also suggest that isokinetic strength profiles should be considered differently in GK compared with other field positions due to their specific physiological and training characteristics.

  17. Perspectives and limitations of parallel MR imaging at high field strengths.

    PubMed

    Heidemann, Robin M; Seiberlich, Nicole; Griswold, Mark A; Wohlfarth, Katrin; Krueger, Gunnar; Jakob, Peter M

    2006-05-01

    In medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging, it is standard practice to use MR scanners with a field strength of 1.5 Tesla. Recently, an ongoing trend towards higher field strengths can be observed, with a new potential clinical standard of 3.0 Tesla. High-field MR imaging, with its intrinsic higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), can enable new applications for MRI in medical diagnosis, or can serve to improve existing methods. The use of high field MRI is not without its limitations, however. Besides SNR, other unwanted effects increase with a higher field strength. Without correction, these high field problems can cause a serious loss in image quality. An elegant way to address these problems is the use of parallel imaging. In many clinical applications, parallel MRI (pMRI) is part of the standard protocol, as pMRI can enhance virtually every MRI application without necessarily affecting the contrast behavior of the underlying imaging sequence. In addition to the speed advantages offered by pMRI, the capability of parallel imaging to reduce significant high field-specific problems, thereby improving image quality, will be of major importance.

  18. On the size, structure, and strength of the small-scale solar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, H. E.; Schoolman, S. A.; Title, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    High-resolution magnetograms place an upper limit of 0.33 arcsec on the smallest magnetic-field structures. These magnetograms show that the active-region field is organized into roughly cellular patterns 2-3 arcsec in diameter and that the field structures occur in the centers of 'abnormal' granules. Comparison of these data and other magnetograms with high signal-to-noise ratio indicates that there exists another component of the field that is diffuse on the scale of an arc second and has a maximum strength of less than 500 gauss.

  19. 47 CFR 73.151 - Field strength measurements to establish performance of directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... verified either by field strength measurement or by computer modeling and sampling system verification. (a... specifically identified by the Commission. (c) Computer modeling and sample system verification of modeled... element of the directional array shall be modeled by use of a method of moments computer program,...

  20. 47 CFR 5.87 - Frequencies for field strength surveys or equipment demonstrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies for field strength surveys or equipment demonstrations. 5.87 Section 5.87 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL RADIO SERVICE (OTHER THAN BROADCAST) Applications and Licenses § 5.87 Frequencies for...

  1. Strength of the Archean geomagnetic field and effectiveness of magnetic shielding from the young active Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarduno, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    The strength of Earth's early magnetic field is important for understanding the evolution of the core, surface environment, atmosphere and life. Paleointensity analyses of single silicate crystals indicate that the strength of the geomagnetic field 3.2 billion years ago was within 50% of the modern value (Tarduno et al., 2007), but for even earlier times it is unknown. Two ideas have been offered: (1) the geomagnetic field started shortly after core formation, and the subsequent field strength has been within a factor of 2-3 of the modern value since its initiation; (2) the field was at null values ~3.9 billion years ago and commenced thereafter. The latter scenario relies on a hypothesis to explain the amount and isotopic composition of nitrogen found in soils of the Moon; this lunar nitrogen may have been derived from Earth's atmosphere via the solar wind (Ozima et al., 2005) in the absence of geomagnetic field that would otherwise shield atmospheric erosion. The possibility of a delayed dynamo onset (Labrosse et al., 2007) will be discussed, as will our efforts to address the presence/absence of the geomagnetic field between 3.2 and 3.9 billion years ago using the terrestrial rock record. The available constraints on ancient magnetic shielding will be reviewed in light of the radiation and particle flux associated with the active young Sun. (References: Labrosse et al., A crystallizing dense magma ocean at the base of the Earth's mantle, Nature, 450, 866-868, 2007; Ozima, M., et al., Terrestrial nitrogen and noble gases in lunar soils, Nature, 436, 655-659, 2005; Tarduno, J.A. et al., Geomagnetic field strength 3.2 billion years ago recorded by single silicate crystals, Nature, 446, 657-660, 2007.)

  2. Friction behavior of magnetorheological fluids with different material types and magnetic field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Lee, Chul-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluid is a type of a smart material that can control its mechanical properties under a magnetic field. Iron particles in MR fluid form chain structures in the direction of an applied magnetic field, which is known as MR effect, resulting in variation of stiffness, shear modulus, damping and tribological characteristics of MR fluid. As MR effect depends on the density of particles in the fluid or the strength of a magnetic field, the experiments are conducted to evaluate the friction property under reciprocating motion by changing the types of MR fluid and the strength of a magnetic field. The material of aluminum, brass, and steel are chosen for specimen as they are the most common material in mechanical applications. The surfaces of specimen are also observed by optical microscope before and after experiments to compare the surfaces with test conditions. The comparing results show that the friction coefficient increases as the strength of a magnetic field increases in regardless of types of MR fluid or the material. Also the density of particle in MR fluid affects the friction characteristic. The results from this research can be used to improve the performance of mechanical applications using MR fluid.

  3. Constraints on magnetic field strength in the remnant SN 1006 from its non-thermal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruk, O.; Kuzyo, T.; Bocchino, F.

    2012-01-01

    Images of SN 1006 have a number of important properties. For instance, the bright limbs coincide spatially in various bands, they have different brightnesses, and the contrast of brightness varies from radio to gamma rays. The reasons for such properties and the role of the magnetic field strength are discussed. Simple, almost model-independent methods and analytical approximations for the derivation of the strength of the magnetic field from the comparison of radio, X-ray and TeV images of the supernova remnant are presented. The methods require the TeV image to be well resolved and accurate, at least to the level of the radio and X-ray maps, so that reasonable constraints can be placed on the magnetic field. If we apply the methods to the present HESS data, they limit the strength of the magnetic field in the limbs of SN 1006 to values lower than a few hundred micro-gauss. If applied to the Fermi-LAT band, the model predicts the same position and same ratio of the surface brightness for GeV photons as for the radio band. We conclude that future TeV and GeV high-resolution data may prove to be very informative about the magnetic field of SN 1006.

  4. Grout stability and strength requirements for field scale injection of fluidized bed combustion ash grout

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemkiewicz, P.F.; Black, C.; Gray, D.D.; Siriwardane, H.J.; Hamric, R.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a study involving a field scale injection of a grout made of Fluidized Bed Combustion Ash to control acid mine drainage and subsidence at an abandoned room and pillar coal mine. The grout mix was developed from results obtained from several laboratory scale experiments conducted to investigate flow characteristics and strength of the grout. Based on the rheological properties of the candidate grout mixes it was determined that admixtures were needed to stabilize the grout for optimum flow characteristics. Strength requirements for the grout were determined from site specific geologic information and expected stress levels. One thousand cubic yards of the candidate grout were pumped into an inactive panel of an active room and pillar coal mine to investigate the field performance of the grout. The field study showed that a grout made of Fluidized Bed Combustion ash can be successfully pumped to backfill the mine void.

  5. Effect of low transverse magnetic field on the confinement strength in a quasi-1D wire

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Thomas, K. J.; Smith, L. W.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Jones, G. A. C.; Griffiths, J.; Pepper, M.

    2013-12-04

    Transport measurements in a quasi-one dimensional (1D) quantum wire are reported in the presence of low transverse magnetic field. Differential conductance shows weak quantised plateaus when the 2D electrons are squeezed electrostatically. Application of a small transverse magnetic field (0.2T) enhances the overall degree of quantisation due to the formation of magneto-electric subbands. The results show the role of magnetic field to fine tune the confinement strength in low density wires when interaction gives rise to double row formation.

  6. A new estimate of average dipole field strength for the last five million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromwell, G.; Tauxe, L.; Halldorsson, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth's ancient magnetic field can be approximated by a geocentric axial dipole (GAD) where the average field intensity is twice as strong at the poles than at the equator. The present day geomagnetic field, and some global paleointensity datasets, support the GAD hypothesis with a virtual axial dipole moment (VADM) of about 80 ZAm2. Significant departures from GAD for 0-5 Ma are found in Antarctica and Iceland where paleointensity experiments on massive flows (Antarctica) (1) and volcanic glasses (Iceland) produce average VADM estimates of 41.4 ZAm2 and 59.5 ZAm2, respectively. These combined intensities are much closer to a lower estimate for long-term dipole field strength, 50 ZAm2 (2), and some other estimates of average VADM based on paleointensities strictly from volcanic glasses. Proposed explanations for the observed non-GAD behavior, from otherwise high-quality paleointensity results, include incomplete temporal sampling, effects from the tangent cylinder, and hemispheric asymmetry. Differences in estimates of average magnetic field strength likely arise from inconsistent selection protocols and experiment methodologies. We address these possible biases and estimate the average dipole field strength for the last five million years by compiling measurement level data of IZZI-modified paleointensity experiments from lava flows around the globe (including new results from Iceland and the HSDP-2 Hawaii drill core). We use the Thellier Gui paleointensity interpreter (3) in order to apply objective criteria to all specimens, ensuring consistency between sites. Specimen level selection criteria are determined from a recent paleointensity investigation of modern Hawaiian lava flows where the expected magnetic field strength was accurately recovered when following certain selection parameters. Our new estimate of average dipole field strength for the last five million years incorporates multiple paleointensity studies on lava flows with diverse global and

  7. Reproduction, growth, and development of rats during chronic exposure to multiple field strengths of 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rommereim, D.N.; Rommereim, R.L.; Sikov, M.R.; Buschbom, R.L.; Anderson, L.E. )

    1990-04-01

    A study with multiple exposure groups and large group sizes was performed to establish whether exposure to 60-Hz electric fields would result in reproductive and developmental toxicity. A response model was developed from previous results and tested in groups of rats exposed to electric fields at various field strengths. Female rats were mated, and sperm-positive animals randomly distributed among four groups: sham-exposed or exposed to 10, 65, or 130 kV/m, 60-Hz vertical electric fields. Animals were exposed for 19 hr/day throughout the experiment. During gestation, exposure to the higher field strengths resulted in slightly depressed weight gains of dams. Offspring were born in the field and remained with their dams through the suckling period. Numbers of pups per litter and pup mortality did not differ among the exposure groups. Dams exposed at 65 kV/m lost slightly more weight through the lactation period than the control group. Male pups exposed to higher field strengths gained slightly less weight from 4 to 21 days of age than did sham-exposed animals. At weaning, two F1 females per litter (randomly selected) continued on the same exposure regimen were mated at 11 weeks of age to unexposed males, and euthanized at 20 days of gestation. Uterine contents were evaluated, and all live fetuses were weighed and examined for external, visceral, and skeletal malformations. Fertility and gestational weight gain of F1 females were not affected by exposure, nor was prenatal viability or fetal body weight. No significant increase in the incidence of litters with malformations was observed. Although no developmental toxicity was detected, exposures produced physical changes in the dams, evidenced as a rust-colored deposit on the muzzle and ears (chromodacryorrhea) that increased in incidence and severity at 65 and 130 kV/m.

  8. Consistency restrictions on maximal electric-field strength in quantum field theory.

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, S P; Gitman, D M

    2008-09-26

    Quantum field theory with an external background can be considered as a consistent model only if backreaction is relatively small with respect to the background. To find the corresponding consistency restrictions on an external electric field and its duration in QED and QCD, we analyze the mean-energy density of quantized fields for an arbitrary constant electric field E, acting during a large but finite time T. Using the corresponding asymptotics with respect to the dimensionless parameter eET2, one can see that the leading contributions to the energy are due to the creation of particles by the electric field. Assuming that these contributions are small in comparison with the energy density of the electric background, we establish the above-mentioned restrictions, which determine, in fact, the time scales from above of depletion of an electric field due to the backreaction.

  9. Spatial offset of test field elements from surround elements affects the strength of motion aftereffects.

    PubMed

    Harris, John; Sullivan, Daniel; Oakley, Madeleine

    2008-01-01

    Static movement aftereffects (MAEs) were measured after adaptation to vertical square-wave luminance gratings drifting horizontally within a central window in a surrounding stationary vertical grating. The relationship between the stationary test grating and the surround was manipulated by varying the alignment of the stationary stripes in the window and those in the surround, and the type of outline separating the window and the surround [no outline, black outline (invisible on black stripes), and red outline (visible throughout its length)]. Offsetting the stripes in the window significantly increased both the duration and ratings of the strength of MAEs. Manipulating the outline had no significant effect on either measure of MAE strength. In a second experiment, in which the stationary test fields alone were presented, participants judged how segregated the test field appeared from its surround. In contrast to the MAE measures, outline as well as offset contributed to judged segregation. In a third experiment, in which test-stripe offset was systematically manipulated, segregation ratings rose with offset. However, MAE strength was greater at medium than at either small or large (180 degrees phase shift) offsets. The effects of these manipulations on the MAE are interpreted in terms of a spatial mechanism which integrates motion signals along collinear contours of the test field and surround, and so causes a reduction of motion contrast at the edges of the test field. PMID:18773724

  10. Using coronal seismology to estimate the magnetic field strength in a realistic coronal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Peter, H.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: Coronal seismology is used extensively to estimate properties of the corona, e.g. the coronal magnetic field strength is derived from oscillations observed in coronal loops. We present a three-dimensional coronal simulation, including a realistic energy balance in which we observe oscillations of a loop in synthesised coronal emission. We use these results to test the inversions based on coronal seismology. Methods: From the simulation of the corona above an active region, we synthesise extreme ultraviolet emission from the model corona. From this, we derive maps of line intensity and Doppler shift providing synthetic data in the same format as obtained from observations. We fit the (Doppler) oscillation of the loop in the same fashion as done for observations to derive the oscillation period and damping time. Results: The loop oscillation seen in our model is similar to imaging and spectroscopic observations of the Sun. The velocity disturbance of the kink oscillation shows an oscillation period of 52.5 s and a damping time of 125 s, which are both consistent with the ranges of periods and damping times found in observations. Using standard coronal seismology techniques, we find an average magnetic field strength of Bkink = 79 G for our loop in the simulation, while in the loop the field strength drops from roughly 300 G at the coronal base to 50 G at the apex. Using the data from our simulation, we can infer what the average magnetic field derived from coronal seismology actually means. It is close to the magnetic field strength in a constant cross-section flux tube, which would give the same wave travel time through the loop. Conclusions: Our model produced a realistic looking loop-dominated corona, and provides realistic information on the oscillation properties that can be used to calibrate and better understand the result from coronal seismology. A movie associated with Fig. 1 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Development and testing of passive tracking markers for different field strengths and tracking speeds.

    PubMed

    Peeters, J M; Seppenwoolde, J-H; Bartels, L W; Bakker, C J G

    2006-03-21

    Susceptibility markers for passive tracking need to be small in order to maintain the shape and mechanical properties of the endovascular device. Nevertheless, they also must have a high magnetic moment to induce an adequate artefact at a variety of scan techniques, tracking speeds and, preferably, field strengths. Paramagnetic markers do not satisfy all of these requirements. Ferro- and ferrimagnetic materials were therefore investigated with a vibrating sample magnetometer and compared with the strongly paramagnetic dysprosium oxide. Results indicated that the magnetic behaviour of stainless steel type AISI 410 corresponds the best with ideal marker properties. Markers with different magnetic moments were constructed and tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The appearance of the corresponding artefacts was field strength independent above magnetic saturation of 1.5 T. Generally, the contrast-to-noise ratio decreased at increasing tracking speed and decreasing magnetic moment. Device depiction was most consistent at a frame rate of 20 frames per second. PMID:16510948

  12. NOTE: Development and testing of passive tracking markers for different field strengths and tracking speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, J. M.; Seppenwoolde, J.-H.; Bartels, L. W.; Bakker, C. J. G.

    2006-03-01

    Susceptibility markers for passive tracking need to be small in order to maintain the shape and mechanical properties of the endovascular device. Nevertheless, they also must have a high magnetic moment to induce an adequate artefact at a variety of scan techniques, tracking speeds and, preferably, field strengths. Paramagnetic markers do not satisfy all of these requirements. Ferro- and ferrimagnetic materials were therefore investigated with a vibrating sample magnetometer and compared with the strongly paramagnetic dysprosium oxide. Results indicated that the magnetic behaviour of stainless steel type AISI 410 corresponds the best with ideal marker properties. Markers with different magnetic moments were constructed and tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The appearance of the corresponding artefacts was field strength independent above magnetic saturation of 1.5 T. Generally, the contrast-to-noise ratio decreased at increasing tracking speed and decreasing magnetic moment. Device depiction was most consistent at a frame rate of 20 frames per second.

  13. Field strength prediction for mobile radio with the aid of a topographic data bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. W.

    Okumura's classical study (1968) and numerous measurements in Germany are used to develop a field strength prediction method for mobile radio. A topographic data bank is developed that contains information on the altitude above sea level and the environmental clutter for areas of 100 x 150 sq m. The work is restricted to quasi-smooth terrain, and special attention is paid to the influence of environmental clutter and the range of field strength fluctuations. The prediction errors are indicated and values for the local probabilities are listed for two different kinds of built-up areas, forests and open terrain. Some discrepancies between measured values and the predicted values of the Okumura model are also explained.

  14. Electromagnetic field strength prediction in an urban environment: A useful tool for the planning of LMSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandooren, G. A. J.; Herben, M. H. A. J.; Brussaard, G.; Sforza, M.; Poiaresbaptista, J. P. V.

    1993-01-01

    A model for the prediction of the electromagnetic field strength in an urban environment is presented. The ray model, that is based on the Uniform Theory of Diffraction (UTD), includes effects of the non-perfect conductivity of the obstacles and their surface roughness. The urban environment is transformed into a list of standardized obstacles that have various shapes and material properties. The model is capable of accurately predicting the field strength in the urban environment by calculating different types of wave contributions such as reflected, edge and corner diffracted waves, and combinations thereof. Also, antenna weight functions are introduced to simulate the spatial filtering by the mobile antenna. Communication channel parameters such as signal fading, time delay profiles, Doppler shifts and delay-Doppler spectra can be derived from the ray-tracing procedure using post-processing routines. The model has been tested against results from scaled measurements at 50 GHz and proves to be accurate.

  15. Optical field-strength generalized polarization of multimode single photon states in integrated directional couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liñares, Jesús; Barral, David; Nistal, María C.; Moreno, Vicente

    2011-05-01

    A quantum analysis of the generalized polarization properties of multimode single photon states is presented. It is based on the optical field-strength probability distributions in such a way that generalized polarization is understood as a significant confinement of the probability distribution along certain regions of the multidimensional optical field-strength space. The analysis is addressed to multimode integrated waveguiding devices, such as N × N integrated directional couplers, whose modes fulfil a spatial modal orthogonality relationship. For that purpose a definition of the quantum generalized polarization degree in a N-dimensional space, based on the concept of distance to an unpolarized N-dimensional Gaussian distribution, is proposed. The generalized polarization degree of pure and mixture multimode single photon states and also of some multi-photon states such as coherent and chaotic ones, is evaluated and analyzed.

  16. EFFECTS OF ELECTRIC FIELD ON THE BIAXIAL STRENGTH OF POLED PZT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical integrity of piezoelectric ceramics plays a crucial role in the performance and design of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezo stack actuators especially as PZT actuators become physically larger and are sought to operate under harsher conditions. The reliable design of such systems demands additional consideration of a number of issues that include electro-mechanical coupling as well as strength-size scaling. This study addresses some of those issues through the use of ball-on-ring (BoR) equibiaxial flexure strength tests of two PZT piezo ceramics. The BoR biaxial flexure tests were conducted with two PZT materials under different electric fields. Fracture surfaces and failure initiations were analyzed using optical and scanning electronic microscopy. The effects of electric fields on the two-parameter Weibull distribution are discussed. These results will serve as input data for future probabilistic reliability analysis of multilayer PZT piezo actuators.

  17. H:Q Ratios and Bilateral Leg Strength in College Field and Court Sports Players

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Roy T.H.; Smith, Andrew W.; Wong, Del P.

    2012-01-01

    One of the key components in sports injury prevention is the identification of imbalances in leg muscle strength. However, different leg muscle characteristics may occur in large playing area (field) sports and small playing area (court) sports, which should be considered in regular injury prevention assessment. This study examined the isokinetic hamstrings-to-quadriceps (H:Q) ratio and bilateral leg strength balance in 40 male college (age: 23.4 ± 2.5 yrs) team sport players (field sport = 23, soccer players; court sport = 17, volleyball and basketball players). Five repetitions of maximal knee concentric flexion and concentric extension were performed on an isokinetic dynamometer at two speeds (slow: 60°·s−1 and fast: 300°·s−1) with 3 minutes rest between tests. Both legs were measured in counterbalanced order with the dominant leg being determined as the leg used to kick a ball. The highest concentric peak torque values (Nm) of the hamstrings and quadriceps of each leg were analyzed after body mass normalization (Nm·kg−1). Court sport players showed significantly weaker dominant leg hamstrings muscles at both contraction speeds (P < 0.05). The H:Q ratio was significantly larger in field players in their dominant leg at 60°·s−1 (P < 0.001), and their non-dominant leg at 300°·s−1 (P < 0.001) respectively. Sport-specific leg muscle strength was evident in college players from field and court sports. These results suggest the need for different muscle strength training and rehabilitation protocols for college players according to the musculature requirements in their respective sports. PMID:23487043

  18. H:q ratios and bilateral leg strength in college field and court sports players.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Roy T H; Smith, Andrew W; Wong, Del P

    2012-06-01

    One of the key components in sports injury prevention is the identification of imbalances in leg muscle strength. However, different leg muscle characteristics may occur in large playing area (field) sports and small playing area (court) sports, which should be considered in regular injury prevention assessment. This study examined the isokinetic hamstrings-to-quadriceps (H:Q) ratio and bilateral leg strength balance in 40 male college (age: 23.4 ± 2.5 yrs) team sport players (field sport = 23, soccer players; court sport = 17, volleyball and basketball players). Five repetitions of maximal knee concentric flexion and concentric extension were performed on an isokinetic dynamometer at two speeds (slow: 60°·s(-1) and fast: 300°·s(-1)) with 3 minutes rest between tests. Both legs were measured in counterbalanced order with the dominant leg being determined as the leg used to kick a ball. The highest concentric peak torque values (Nm) of the hamstrings and quadriceps of each leg were analyzed after body mass normalization (Nm·kg(-1)). Court sport players showed significantly weaker dominant leg hamstrings muscles at both contraction speeds (P < 0.05). The H:Q ratio was significantly larger in field players in their dominant leg at 60°·s(-1) (P < 0.001), and their non-dominant leg at 300°·s(-1) (P < 0.001) respectively. Sport-specific leg muscle strength was evident in college players from field and court sports. These results suggest the need for different muscle strength training and rehabilitation protocols for college players according to the musculature requirements in their respective sports. PMID:23487043

  19. Magnetic field strength influence on the reactive magnetron sputter deposition of Ta2O5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollerweger, R.; Holec, D.; Paulitsch, J.; Rachbauer, R.; Polcik, P.; Mayrhofer, P. H.

    2013-08-01

    Reactive magnetron sputtering enables the deposition of various thin films to be used for protective as well as optical and electronic applications. However, progressing target erosion during sputtering results in increased magnetic field strengths at the target surface. Consequently, the glow discharge, the target poisoning, and hence the morphology, crystal structure and stoichiometry of the prepared thin films are influenced. Therefore, these effects were investigated by varying the cathode current Im between 0.50 and 1.00 A, the magnetic field strength B between 45 and 90 mT, and the O2/(Ar + O2) flow rate ratio Γ between 0% and 100%. With increasing oxygen flow ratio a substoichiometric TaOx oxide forms at the metallic Ta target surface which further transfers to a non-conductive tantalum pentoxide Ta2O5, impeding a stable dc glow discharge. These two transition zones (from Ta to TaOx and from TaOx to Ta2O5) shift to higher oxygen flow rates for increasing target currents. In contrast, increasing the magnetic field strength (e.g., due to sputter erosion) mainly shifts the TaOx to Ta2O5 transition to lower oxygen flow rates while marginally influencing the Ta to TaOx transition. To allow for a stable dc glow discharge (and to suppress the formation of non-conductive Ta2O5 at the target) even at Γ = 100% either a high target current (Im ⩾ 1 A) or a low magnetic field strength (B ⩽ 60 mT) is necessary. These conditions are required to prepare stoichiometric and fully crystalline Ta2O5 films.

  20. H:q ratios and bilateral leg strength in college field and court sports players.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Roy T H; Smith, Andrew W; Wong, Del P

    2012-06-01

    One of the key components in sports injury prevention is the identification of imbalances in leg muscle strength. However, different leg muscle characteristics may occur in large playing area (field) sports and small playing area (court) sports, which should be considered in regular injury prevention assessment. This study examined the isokinetic hamstrings-to-quadriceps (H:Q) ratio and bilateral leg strength balance in 40 male college (age: 23.4 ± 2.5 yrs) team sport players (field sport = 23, soccer players; court sport = 17, volleyball and basketball players). Five repetitions of maximal knee concentric flexion and concentric extension were performed on an isokinetic dynamometer at two speeds (slow: 60°·s(-1) and fast: 300°·s(-1)) with 3 minutes rest between tests. Both legs were measured in counterbalanced order with the dominant leg being determined as the leg used to kick a ball. The highest concentric peak torque values (Nm) of the hamstrings and quadriceps of each leg were analyzed after body mass normalization (Nm·kg(-1)). Court sport players showed significantly weaker dominant leg hamstrings muscles at both contraction speeds (P < 0.05). The H:Q ratio was significantly larger in field players in their dominant leg at 60°·s(-1) (P < 0.001), and their non-dominant leg at 300°·s(-1) (P < 0.001) respectively. Sport-specific leg muscle strength was evident in college players from field and court sports. These results suggest the need for different muscle strength training and rehabilitation protocols for college players according to the musculature requirements in their respective sports.

  1. Carboxylated magnetic nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents: Relaxation measurements at different field strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlovszky-Hajdú, Angéla; Tombácz, Etelka; Bányai, István; Babos, Magor; Palkó, András

    2012-09-01

    At the moment the biomedical applications of magnetic fluids are the subject of intensive scientific interest. In the present work, magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized and stabilized in aqueous medium with different carboxylic compounds (citric acid (CA), polyacrylic acid (PAA), and sodium oleate (NaOA)), in order to prepare well stabilized magnetic fluids (MFs). The magnetic nanoparticles can be used in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as contrast agents. Magnetic resonance relaxation measurements of the above MFs were performed at different field strengths (i.e., 0.47, 1.5 and 9.4 T) to reveal the field strength dependence of their magnetic responses, and to compare them with that of ferucarbotran, a well-known superparamagnetic contrast agent. The measurements showed characteristic differences between the tested magnetic fluids stabilized by carboxylic compounds and ferucarbotran. It is worthy of note that our magnetic fluids have the highest r2 relaxivities at the field strength of 1.5 T, where the most of the MRI works in worldwide.

  2. Optical field-strength polarization of two-mode single-photon states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liñares, J.; Nistal, M. C.; Barral, D.; Moreno, V.

    2010-09-01

    We present a quantum analysis of two-mode single-photon states based on the probability distributions of the optical field strength (or position quadrature) in order to describe their quantum polarization characteristics, where polarization is understood as a significative confinement of the optical field-strength values on determined regions of the two-mode optical field-strength plane. We will show that the mentioned probability distributions along with the values of quantum Stokes parameters allow us to characterize the polarization of a two-mode single-photon state, in an analogous way to the classical case, and to distinguish conceptually between mixture and partially polarized quantum states; in this way, we propose a simple definition of the quantum polarization degree based on the recent concept of distance measure to an unpolarized distribution, which gives rise to a depolarization degree equivalent to an overlapping between the probability distribution of the quantum state and a non-polarized two-mode Gaussian distribution. The work is particularly intended to university physics teachers and graduate students as well as to physicists and specialists concerned with the issue of optical polarization.

  3. Resolution Improvements in in Vivo1H NMR Spectra with Increased Magnetic Field Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruetter, Rolf; Weisdorf, Sally A.; Rajanayagan, Vasantham; Terpstra, Melissa; Merkle, Hellmut; Truwit, Charles L.; Garwood, Michael; Nyberg, Scott L.; Ugurbil, Kâmil

    1998-11-01

    The measurement of cerebral metabolites using highly homologous localization techniques and similar shimming methods was performed in the human brain at 1.5 and 4 T as well as in the dog and rat brain at 9.4 T. In rat brain, improved resolution was achieved by shimming all first- and second-order shim coils using a fully adiabatic FASTMAP sequence. The spectra showed a clear improvement in spectral resolution for all metabolite resonances with increased field strength. Changes in cerebral glutamine content were clearly observed at 4 T compared to 1.5 T in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. At 9.4 T, glutamine H4 at 2.46 ppm was fully resolved from glutamate H4 at 2.37 ppm, as was the potential resonance from γ-amino-butyric acid at 2.30 ppm and N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate at 2.05 ppm. Singlet linewidths were found to be as low as 6 Hz (0.015 ppm) at 9.4 T, indicating a substantial decrease in ppm linewidth with field strength. Furthermore, the methylene peak of creatine was partially resolved from phosphocreatine, indicating a close to 1:1 relationship in gray matter. We conclude that increasing the magnetic field strength increases spectral resolution also for1H NMR, which can lead to more than linear sensitivity gains.

  4. Quantitative determination of electric field strengths within dynamically operated devices using EBIC analysis in the SEM.

    PubMed

    Pugatschow, Anton; Heiderhoff, Ralf; Balk, Ludwig J

    2008-01-01

    Although electron beam-induced current (EBIC) technique was invented in the seventies, it is still a powerful technique for failure analysis and reliability investigations of modern materials and devices. Time-resolved and stroboscopic microanalyses using sampling Fourier components decomposed by modulated charge carrier excitation are introduced. Quantitative determination of electric field strengths within dynamically operated devices in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) will be demonstrated. This technique allows investigations of diffusion and drift processes and of variations of electric field distributions inside active devices.

  5. Tailoring magnetostriction sign of ferromagnetic composite by increasing magnetic field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Junming; Liu, Xiaolian; Wu, Kaiyun; Wang, Yue; Hu, Shanshan; Zhao, Hui; Xiao, Andong; Ma, Tianyu; Yan, Mi

    2016-08-01

    The unitary deformation of single-phase ferromagnets by a magnetic field, i.e., either positive or negative linear magnetostriction, allows only monotonous control. Here we report a proof-of-principle ferromagnetic composite Fe73Ga27, for which the magnetostriction sign changes from positive to negative by increasing the magnetic field strength. Based on the transformation from body-centered-cubic (BCC) to face-centered-cubic (FCC) phases in this binary system, Fe73Ga27 composite is prepared by aging the BCC averaged precursor for 3 days at 803 K. Magnetic measurements indicate that the BCC phase exhibits smaller magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant than the FCC phase. The offset effect between BCC and FCC phases produces positive net magnetostriction at low magnetic fields but negative net magnetostriction at high magnetic fields. By tuning the field strength, such composites can mediate compressive and tensile strains to other functional materials, e.g., piezoelectric material or optic-fibers, which is beneficial to design multifunctional devices.

  6. CORRELATIONS OF PLASMA DENSITY AND MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH IN THE HELIOSHEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Gutynska, O.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Richardson, J. D.

    2010-10-20

    The crossing of the termination shock (TS) by Voyager 2 in 2007 at 84 AU allows a comparison of fluctuations in different heliosheath regions. The Letter concentrates on MHD waves that exhibit a significant correlation between the magnetic field strength and plasma density. The correlations between both quantities were computed on 2 hr time intervals in the frequency range of 1 x 10{sup -4} to 4 x 10{sup -3} Hz. We separate the data into two regions with different magnetic field behavior; the post-TS region with many crossings of the current sheet and the unipolar region where the magnetic field direction remains nearly constant. We find that typical correlation coefficients in these regions are about 0.55-0.65, larger than in Earth's magnetosheath. The largest correlations occur when the spectrum of magnetic field fluctuations is dominated by low frequencies.

  7. Effect of excitation field strength on magnetic Barkhausen noise profile in case carburized EN 36 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaow, M. M.; Shaw, B. A.

    2015-03-01

    The sensitivity of magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) profile to changes in the excitation field strength has been investigated in case carburized EN36 steel. In general, the 0.5 mm case depth EN 36 steel specimen induces a double peak profile indicative of inhomogeneity through the detected depth in the magnetized landscape. Various excitation field amplitudes have been applied to the electromagnet to generate various excitation fields on the specimen surface. Excitation field at the lowest level induced an MBN emission of two peaks of equivalent heights at low current value. The first peak occurs at lower field than the second peak in each half magnetization cycle. As the excitation field increases, the height of both peaks increased but the second peak, at higher field, increases in a higher rate than that of the first peak at lower field. Beyond certain magnetizing voltage, both peaks heights began to saturate and no further increase in the MBN intensity has been noticed. The results are discussed on the basis of the available theories on MBN.

  8. On the Collective Magnetic Field Strength and Vector Structure of Dark Umbral Cores Measured by the Hinode Spectropolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, T. A.

    2014-05-01

    We study 7530 sunspot umbrae and pores measured by the Hinode Spectropolarimeter (SP) between November 2006 and November 2012. We primarily seek confirmation of the long term secular decrease in the mean magnetic field strength of sunspot umbrae found by Penn and Livingston ( IAU Symp. 273, 126, 2011) between 1998 and 2011. The excellent SP photometric properties and full vector magnetic field determinations from full-Stokes Milne-Eddington inversions are used to address the interrelated properties of the magnetic field strength and brightness temperature for all umbral cores. We find non-linear relationships between magnetic field strength and umbral temperature (and continuum contrast), as well as between umbral radius and magnetic field strength. Using disambiguated vector data, we find that the azimuths measured in the umbral cores reflect an organization weakly influenced by Joy's law. The large selection of umbrae displays a log-normal size spectrum similar to earlier solar cycles. Influenced by the amplitude of the solar cycle and the non-linear relationship between umbral size and core magnetic field strength, the distribution of core magnetic field strengths, fit most effectively with a skew-normal distribution, shows a weak solar cycle dependence. Yet, the mean magnetic field strength does not show a significant long term trend.

  9. Prostate MR imaging at high-field strength: evolution or revolution?

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Hartman, Robert P; Lyonnet, Denis

    2006-02-01

    As 3 T MR scanners become more available, body imaging at high field strength is becoming the subject of intensive research. However, little has been published on prostate imaging at 3 T. Will high-field imaging dramatically increase our ability to depict and stage prostate cancer? This paper will address this question by reviewing the advantages and drawbacks of body imaging at 3 T and the current limitations of prostate imaging at 1.5 T, and by detailing the preliminary results of prostate 3 T MRI. Even if slight adjustments of imaging protocols are necessary for taking into account the changes in T1 and T2 relaxation times at 3 T, tissue contrast in T2-weighted (T2w) imaging seems similar at 1.5 T and 3 T. Therefore, significant improvement in cancer depiction in T2w imaging is not expected. However, increased spatial resolution due to increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) may improve the detection of minimal capsular invasion. Higher field strength should provide increased spectral and spatial resolution for spectroscopic imaging, but new pulse sequences will have to be designed for overcoming field inhomogeneities and citrate J-modulation issues. Finally, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is the method of imaging that is the most likely to benefit from the increased SNR, with a significantly better trade-off between temporal and spatial resolution.

  10. Influence of static magnetic field strength on the temperature resolution of a magnetic nanoparticle thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jing; Dieckhoff, Jan; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the influence of dc magnetic field strength on the resolution of a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) thermometer, which employs the fundamental f0 and 2f0 harmonics of the MNP magnetization induced by ac and superimposed dc magnetic fields. In ac and parallel dc magnetic fields, the strength of dc magnetic field modulates the harmonics of the MNP magnetization, which affects their temperature sensitivities and measurement signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). A temperature-adjustable fluxgate-based magnetic particle spectrometer was used to measure the spectra of the MNP magnetization at different temperatures. To determine the temperature, the amplitudes of the measured f0 and 2f0 harmonics were modeled based on the static Langevin function. AC susceptibility measurements on a MNP sample demonstrate the applicability of the static Langevin function for the description of the MNP magnetization spectra at a low frequency ac magnetic field without taking into account the MNP dynamics. Our simulations and experiments show that with increasing dc magnetic field from 0.2 mT to 2.0 mT, both the amplitude of the 2f0 harmonic and the temperature sensitivity of the amplitude ratio of the 2f0 to f0 harmonics increase by a factor of about 10 in an ac magnetic field with a frequency of 70 Hz and an amplitude of 1 mT. Concomitantly, the SNR of the 2f0 harmonic significantly increases by about 20 dB. Consequently, the temperature resolution of the MNP thermometer is improved from 1.97 K to 0.26 K.

  11. Field strength and dose dependence of contrast enhancement by gadolinium-based MR contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Rinck, P A; Muller, R N

    1999-01-01

    The relaxivities r1 and r2 of magnetic resonance contrast agents and the T1 relaxation time values of tissues are strongly field dependent. We present quantitative data and simulations of different gadolinium-based extracellular fluid contrast agents and the modulation of their contrast enhancement by the magnetic field to be able to answer the following questions: How are the dose and field dependences of their contrast enhancement? Is there an interrelationship between dose and field dependence? Should one increase or decrease doses at specific fields? Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion data were acquired for the following contrast agents: gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadoterate meglumine, gadodiamide injection, and gadoteridol injection, as well as for several normal and pathological human tissue samples. The magnetic field range stretched from 0.0002 to 4.7 T, including the entire clinical imaging range. The data acquired were then fitted with the appropriate theoretical models. The combination of the diamagnetic relaxation rates (R1 = 1/T1 and R2 = 1/T2) of tissues with the respective paramagnetic contributions of the contrast agents allowed the prediction of image contrast at any magnetic field. The results revealed a nearly identical field and dose-dependent increase of contrast enhancement induced by these contrast agents within a certain dose range. The target tissue concentration (TTC) was an important though nonlinear factor for enhancement. The currently recommended dose of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight seems to be a compromise close to the lower limits of diagnostically sufficient contrast enhancement for clinical imaging at all field strengths. At low field contrast enhancement might be insufficient. Adjustment of dose or concentration, or a new class of contrast agents with optimized relaxivity, would be a valuable contribution to a better diagnostic yield of contrast enhancement at all fields.

  12. Harmonic generation at high field strengths - Frequency shifts and saturation phenomena. [optical mixing technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stappaerts, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Optical harmonic generation and mixing in the gas phase has been proposed as a technique for the generation of coherent radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray spectral region. At the high field strengths required by these processes the interaction between atoms and the electromagnetic field shows intensity-dependent resonances. In this paper we modify harmonic generation theory to include the effect of these frequency shifts. Closed-form expressions for generated dipole moment, absorption probability, and coherence length are presented. The most important consequences of frequency shifts on resonantly enhanced processes are that the pump laser must be tuned away from the small-field resonance frequency, that the conversion efficiency may saturate, and that the dispersion of the medium may change sign. As an example, the generation of 198-A radiation by a five-photon mixing process in Li(+) is considered.

  13. Evaluating the strength of salt bridges: a comparison of current biomolecular force fields.

    PubMed

    Debiec, Karl T; Gronenborn, Angela M; Chong, Lillian T

    2014-06-19

    Recent advances in computer hardware and software have made rigorous evaluation of current biomolecular force fields using microsecond-scale simulations possible. Force fields differ in their treatment of electrostatic interactions, including the formation of salt bridges in proteins. Here we conducted an extensive evaluation of salt bridge interactions in the latest AMBER, CHARMM, and OPLS force fields, using microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations of amino acid analogues in explicit solvent. We focused on salt bridges between three different pairs of oppositely charged amino acids: Arg/Asp, Lys/Asp, and His(+)/Asp. Our results reveal considerable variability in the predicted KA values of the salt bridges for these force fields, as well as differences from experimental data: almost all of the force fields overestimate the strengths of the salt bridges. When amino acids are represented by side-chain analogues, the AMBER ff03 force field overestimates the KA values the least, while for complete amino acids, the AMBER ff13α force field yields the lowest KA value, most likely caused by an altered balance of side-chain/side-chain and side-chain/backbone contacts. These findings confirm the notion that the implicit incorporation of solvent polarization improves the accuracy of modeling salt bridge interactions.

  14. Geomagnetic field strength 3.2 billion years ago recorded by single silicate crystals.

    PubMed

    Tarduno, John A; Cottrell, Rory D; Watkeys, Michael K; Bauch, Dorothy

    2007-04-01

    The strength of the Earth's early geomagnetic field is of importance for understanding the evolution of the Earth's deep interior, surface environment and atmosphere. Palaeomagnetic and palaeointensity data from rocks formed near the boundary of the Proterozoic and Archaean eons, some 2.5 Gyr ago, show many hallmarks of the more recent geomagnetic field. Reversals are recorded, palaeosecular variation data indicate a dipole-dominated morphology and available palaeointensity values are similar to those from younger rocks. The picture before 2.8 Gyr ago is much less clear. Rocks of the Archaean Kaapvaal craton (South Africa) are among the best-preserved, but even they have experienced low-grade metamorphism. The variable acquisition of later magnetizations by these rocks is therefore expected, precluding use of conventional palaeointensity methods. Silicate crystals from igneous rocks, however, can contain minute magnetic inclusions capable of preserving Archaean-age magnetizations. Here we use a CO2 laser heating approach and direct-current SQUID magnetometer measurements to obtain palaeodirections and intensities from single silicate crystals that host magnetite inclusions. We find 3.2-Gyr-old field strengths that are within 50 per cent of the present-day value, indicating that a viable magnetosphere sheltered the early Earth's atmosphere from solar wind erosion. PMID:17410173

  15. Geomagnetic field strength 3.2 billion years ago recorded by single silicate crystals.

    PubMed

    Tarduno, John A; Cottrell, Rory D; Watkeys, Michael K; Bauch, Dorothy

    2007-04-01

    The strength of the Earth's early geomagnetic field is of importance for understanding the evolution of the Earth's deep interior, surface environment and atmosphere. Palaeomagnetic and palaeointensity data from rocks formed near the boundary of the Proterozoic and Archaean eons, some 2.5 Gyr ago, show many hallmarks of the more recent geomagnetic field. Reversals are recorded, palaeosecular variation data indicate a dipole-dominated morphology and available palaeointensity values are similar to those from younger rocks. The picture before 2.8 Gyr ago is much less clear. Rocks of the Archaean Kaapvaal craton (South Africa) are among the best-preserved, but even they have experienced low-grade metamorphism. The variable acquisition of later magnetizations by these rocks is therefore expected, precluding use of conventional palaeointensity methods. Silicate crystals from igneous rocks, however, can contain minute magnetic inclusions capable of preserving Archaean-age magnetizations. Here we use a CO2 laser heating approach and direct-current SQUID magnetometer measurements to obtain palaeodirections and intensities from single silicate crystals that host magnetite inclusions. We find 3.2-Gyr-old field strengths that are within 50 per cent of the present-day value, indicating that a viable magnetosphere sheltered the early Earth's atmosphere from solar wind erosion.

  16. Intracranial surgery with a compact, low-field-strength magnetic resonance imager.

    PubMed

    Schulder, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has been a reality for more than a decade. As technology has begun to mature, the focus on practicality and user-friendliness has sharpened. In addition, the need for well-designed and well-executed outcome studies remains so that expensive new instruments such as iMRI can be justified. We present our experience with the PoleStar system, a compact, low-field-strength iMRI designed to make intraoperative imaging a routine component of intracranial neurosurgery. The advantages and limitations of this approach are discussed in the context of different clinical applications. PMID:19148034

  17. Determining the neutron star surface magnetic field strength of two Z sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guoqiang; Huang, Chunping; Wang, Yanan

    2013-02-01

    From the extreme position of disk motion, we infer the neutron star (NS) surface magnetic field strength (B 0) of Z-source GX 17+2 and Cyg X-2. The inferred B 0 of GX 17+2 and Cyg X-2 are ~(1-5)×108 G and ~(1-3)×108 G, respectively, which are not inferior to that of millisecond X-ray pulsars or atoll sources. It is likely that the NS magnetic axis of Z sources is parallel to the axis of rotation, which could result in the lack of pulsations in these sources.

  18. Limits on the Strength of the Vestan Magnetic Field Using Dawn's GRaND Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, Michaela; Russell, Christopher; Prettyman, Tom; Yamashita, Naoyuki

    2015-04-01

    The well known HED meteorites have long been thought to have originated from Vesta and this interpretation was confirmed by Dawn's visit to Vesta in 2012. Fu et al. (2012) analyzed the HED meteorite Allan Hills ALHA81001 in particular and determined that the remanent magnetization of the meteorite likely formed in the presence of crustal fields about 12 microteslas. The Dawn spacecraft was not equipped with a magnetometer to confirm these results. However, the photomultiplier tube associated with the Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillator that is part of Dawn's Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) instrument is known to be sensitive to strong magnetic fields. The gain of the photomultiplier tube varies with both the magnitude and direction of the present magnetic field. Due to the arrangement of the photomultiplier tube, it is most sensitive along one axis. Fortunately, the defined axes of the photomultiplier tube are well aligned with the coordinate system defined for the spacecraft. Using position data, we can monitor how the output of the photomultiplier tube changes as the sensitive axis varies in position with respect to the surface. Here we attempt to use the variation of the gain of the photomultiplier tube as Dawn orbits Vesta as a proxy for any crustal fields that may be present. The photomultiplier tube is sensitive to field strengths greater than 0.5 mT, allowing us to put constraints on the Vestan crustal fields.

  19. Control over Janus micromotors by the strength of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraban, Larysa; Makarov, Denys; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Leiderer, Paul; Erbe, Artur

    2013-01-01

    For transportation of molecules or biological cells using artificial motors, the control over their motion, i.e. direction and speed of transfer, is important. Here, we demonstrate that modification of the velocity and orientation of a magnetic Janus particle can be efficiently controlled by tuning the strength of an applied homogeneous magnetic field. Interestingly, by keeping the same orientation of the magnetic field but changing its magnitude not only the velocity of capped particles can be altered but even their direction of motion can be reversed. We put forth a simple qualitative model, which allows us to explain this intriguing observation.For transportation of molecules or biological cells using artificial motors, the control over their motion, i.e. direction and speed of transfer, is important. Here, we demonstrate that modification of the velocity and orientation of a magnetic Janus particle can be efficiently controlled by tuning the strength of an applied homogeneous magnetic field. Interestingly, by keeping the same orientation of the magnetic field but changing its magnitude not only the velocity of capped particles can be altered but even their direction of motion can be reversed. We put forth a simple qualitative model, which allows us to explain this intriguing observation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Videos (1-3) describe the behavior of the magnetic Janus micromotors at different magnetic fields applied. The magnetic field is always applied along the positive direction of the y-axis. All the movies are recorded at the same frame rate of 21 images per second. Experiments were performed at 30 wt% of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution. Video 1 shows the motion of the Janus micromotors when a small magnetic field is applied (B = 0.2 mT). The particle is propelled in the direction ``opposite to the cap'' with a velocity of about 6 μm s-1. Video 2 displays the motion of the same Janus bead when an intermediately strong

  20. New Evidence For Proton Cyclotron Resonance In a Magnetar Strength Field From SGR 1806-20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parke, William; Ibrahim, Alaa I.; Swank, Jean H.

    2002-01-01

    A great deal of evidence has recently been gathered in favor of the picture that Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars are powered by ultra-strong magnetic fields (B greater than 10(exp 14) G; i.e. magnetars). Nevertheless, present determination of the magnetic field in such magnetar candidates has been indirect and model dependent. A key prediction concerning magnetars is the detection of ion cyclotron resonance features, which would offer a decisive diagnostic of the field strength. Here we present the detection of a 5 keV absorption feature in a variety of bursts from the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1806-20, confirming our initial discovery and establishing the presence of the feature in the source's burst spectra. The line feature is well explained as proton cyclotron resonance in an ultra-strong magnetic field, offering a direct measurement of SGR 1806-20's magnetic field (B approx. 10(exp 15) G) and a clear evidence of a magnetar. Together with the source's spin-down rate, the feature also provides the first measurement of the gravitational redshift, mass and radius of a magnetar.

  1. New paleointensity results from rapidly cooled Icelandic lavas: Implications for Arctic geomagnetic field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromwell, G.; Tauxe, L.; Halldórsson, S. A.

    2015-05-01

    The Earth's magnetic field is assumed to be a geocentric axial dipole (GAD) when averaged over sufficient time (105-106 years). Recent investigations of global paleosecular variation and time-averaged field behavior on million year timescales generally support a predominantly dipole field in the Northern Hemisphere, but unique field structures at high southern latitudes suggest the presence of a substantial ḡ20 quadrupolar component. Average paleointensity results from Antarctica are approximately half the value predicted by a GAD field; this behavior has not been sufficiently investigated because there is a paucity of absolute paleointensity data from the high latitudes of the Arctic and Antarctic, so no adequate comparisons have been made between the two regions. We collected glassy volcanic material from 129 subaerial and subglacial volcanic units in Iceland in order to provide a suitable intensity data set at high northern latitudes. Forty-four sites met our very strict specimen and site level selection criteria. Four Holocene sites have a median intensity value of 55.8 ± 15.6μT (virtual axial dipole moment = 78.1 ± 22.0 ZAm2), consistent with the present-day field. Thirty-seven sites are between 11 ka and 3.35 Ma with a median intensity of 33.1 ± 8.3 μT (47.0 ± 11.6 ZAm2). This median intensity is indistinguishable from some long-term global field strength estimates. Reevaluation of existing high-latitude data suggests a general agreement with our Iceland results, but there are still too few Antarctic sites to adequately compare Arctic and Antarctic field behaviors.

  2. CORONAL SEISMOLOGY USING EIT WAVES: ESTIMATION OF THE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    West, M. J.; Zhukov, A. N.; Dolla, L.; Rodriguez, L.

    2011-04-01

    Coronal EIT waves have been observed for many years. The nature of EIT waves is still contentious, however, there is strong evidence that some of them might be fast magnetosonic waves, or at least have a fast magnetosonic wave component. The fast magnetosonic wave speed is formed from two components; the Alfven speed (magnetic) and the sound speed (thermal). By making measurements of the wave speed, coronal density and temperature it is possible to calculate the quiet-Sun coronal magnetic field strength through coronal seismology. In this paper, we investigate an EIT wave observed on 2009 February 13 by the SECCHI/EUVI instruments on board the STEREO satellites. The wave epicenter was observed at disk center in the STEREO B (Behind) satellite. At this time, the STEREO satellites were separated by approximately 90 deg., and as a consequence the STEREO A (Ahead) satellite observed the wave on the solar limb. These observations allowed us to make accurate speed measurements of the wave. The background coronal density was derived through Hinode/Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations of the quiet Sun and the temperature was estimated through the narrow temperature response in the EUVI bandpasses. The density, temperature, and speed measurements allowed us to estimate the quiet-Sun coronal magnetic field strength to be approximately 0.7 {+-} 0.7 G.

  3. Variation of radio field strength and radio horizon distance over three stations in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adediji, A. T.; Ismail, Mahamod; Mandeep, J. S.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we present seasonal results of radio field strength and radio horizon distance derived from the computation of surface refractivity through in-situ measurement of temperature, relative humidity and pressure across three stations (Akure, Minna and Enugu) in Nigeria. The measurements of the tropospheric parameters were made using a Davis Wireless Weather Station (Integrated Sensor Suite, ISS) installed on the ground surface at each of the stations. The study utilized data for two years of measurement (January 2008-December 2009). Results show that the values of surface refractivity were low during the dry season months and high during the wet season months. The lowest values of 323, 313 and 281 N-units were observed in February for Akure, Enugu and Minna respectively, while maximum values of 372, 375 and 365 N-units were observed in September, October and August for the respective locations. Also, the average value of field strength variability was found to be 6.67, 5.62 and 7.48 for Akure, Enugu and Minna respectively.

  4. Field strength variations of LF radio waves prior to earthquakes in central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bella, F.; Biagi, P. F.; Caputo, M.; Cozzi, E.; Della Monica, G.; Ermini, A.; Plastino, W.; Sgrigna, V.

    The electric field strength of the LF radio broadcasting RMC (Principality of Monaco) which operates at 216 kHz has been recorded since January 1991 by two receivers in central Italy. During the monitoring period we observed two evident attenuations of the field strength in one receiver, with durations of 6-10 days. The geomagnetic and ionospheric observations carried out in the same time interval do not seem able to explain the attenuation of the radio signal. An analysis of the seismic activity occurring in the area between transmitter and receiver has revealed that some days after the attenuations the energy released by earthquakes reaches a maximum. The observed attenuation might therefore be precursors of earthquakes. We also checked meteorological conditions and found that advections of warm air occurred during both the two anomalous periods. It seems possible that these conditions can help the action of preseismic effects in generating irregularities in the vertical gradient of the tropospheric radio refractivity able to produce defocusing of LF radiobroadcast propagation.

  5. Examining the Magnetic Field Strength and the Horizontal and Vertical Motions in an Emerging Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Yu-Che

    2016-03-01

    Earlier observational studies have used the time evolution of emerging magnetic flux regions at the photosphere to infer their subsurface structures, assuming that the flux structure does not change significantly over the near-surface layer. In this study, we test the validity of this assumption by comparing the horizontal and vertical motions of an emerging active region. The two motions would be correlated if the emerging structure is rigid. The selected active region (AR) NOAA 11645 is not embedded in detectable preexisting magnetic field. The observed horizontal motion is quantified by the separation of the two AR polarities and the width of the region. The vertical motion is derived from the magnetic buoyancy theory. Our results show that the separation of the polarities is fastest at the beginning with a velocity of {≈ }4 Mm hr^{-1} and decreases to ≤ 1 Mm hr^{-1} after the main growing phase of flux emergence. The derived thick flux-tube buoyant velocity is between 1 and 3 Mm hr^{-1}, while the thin flux-tube approximation results in an unreasonably high buoyant velocity, consistent with the expectation that the approximation is inappropriate at the surface layer. The observed horizontal motion is not found to directly correlate with either the magnetic field strength or the derived buoyant velocities. However, the percentage of the horizontally oriented fields and the temporal derivatives of the field strength and the buoyant velocity show some positive correlations with the separation velocity. The results of this study imply that the assumption that the emerging active region is the cross section of a rising flux tube whose structure can be considered rigid as it rises through the near-surface layer should be taken with caution.

  6. Reproduction, growth, and development of rats during exposure to electric fields at multiple strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E. )

    1991-11-01

    A study with multiple exposure groups and large group sizes was performed to establish whether exposure to 60-Hz electric fields would result in reproductive and development toxicity. Female rats were mated, and sperm-positive animals randomly distributed among four groups: sham-exposed, or exposed to 10, 65, or 130 kV/m, 60-Hz vertical electric fields. During gestation, exposure to the higher field strengths resulted in slightly depressed weight gains of dams. Numbers ofpups per litter and pup mortality did not differ among the exposure groups. Dams exposed at 65 kV/m lost slightly more weight through the lactation period than the control group. Male pups exposed to high field strengths gained slightly less weight from 4 to 21 days of age than did sham exposed animals. At weaning, two F{sub 1} females per litter continued on the same exposure regimen, were mated at 11 weeks of age to unexposed males, and sacrificed at 20 days of gestation. Fertility and gestational weight gain of F{sub 1} females were not affected by exposure, nor was prenatal viability or fetal body weight. No significant increase in the incidence of litters with malformations was observed. Although no developmental toxicity was detected, exposures produced physical changes in the dams, evidenced as a rust-colored deposit on the muzzle and ears (chromodacryorrhea) that increased in incidence and severity at 65 and 130 kV/m. Incidence of chromodacryorrhea was not significantly different between sham-exposed rats and those exposed at 10 kV/m. 29 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. 14 CFR 385.4 - Form of staff action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) ORGANIZATION STAFF ASSIGNMENTS AND REVIEW OF ACTION UNDER ASSIGNMENTS General Provisions § 385.4 Form of staff action. Unless otherwise specified, staff action shall be by order or informal writing (letters, telegrams, decision marked on copy of application form, etc.). Such orders or informal writings...

  8. 12 CFR 966.4 - Form of consolidated obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Form of consolidated obligations. 966.4 Section 966.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK LIABILITIES CONSOLIDATED OBLIGATIONS § 966.4 Form of consolidated obligations. (a) All consolidated obligations shall be issued in...

  9. 12 CFR 966.4 - Form of consolidated obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Form of consolidated obligations. 966.4 Section 966.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK LIABILITIES CONSOLIDATED OBLIGATIONS § 966.4 Form of consolidated obligations. (a) All consolidated obligations shall be issued in...

  10. Monte Carlo characterization of skin doses in 6 MV transverse field MRI-linac systems: Effect of field size, surface orientation, magnetic field strength, and exit bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The main focus of this work is to continue investigations into the Monte Carlo predicted skin doses seen in MRI-guided radiotherapy. In particular, the authors aim to characterize the 70 {mu}m skin doses over a larger range of magnetic field strength and x-ray field size than in the current literature. The effect of surface orientation on both the entry and exit sides is also studied. Finally, the use of exit bolus is also investigated for minimizing the negative effects of the electron return effect (ERE) on the exit skin dose. Methods: High resolution GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian 2100C) have been performed. Transverse magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T have been applied to a 30x30x20 cm{sup 3} phantom. This phantom is also altered to have variable entry and exit surfaces with respect to the beam central axis and they range from -75 deg. to +75 deg. The exit bolus simulated is a 1 cm thick (water equivalent) slab located on the beam exit side. Results: On the entry side, significant skin doses at the beam central axis are reported for large positive surface angles and strong magnetic fields. However, over the entry surface angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg., the entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose, regardless of magnetic field strength and field size. On the exit side, moderate to high central axis skin dose increases are expected except at large positive surface angles. For exit bolus of 1 cm thickness, the central axis exit skin dose becomes an almost consistent value regardless of magnetic field strength or exit surface angle. This is due to the almost complete absorption of the ERE electrons by the bolus. Conclusions: There is an ideal entry angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg. where entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose. Other than this, the entry skin dose increases are significant, especially at

  11. Effect of various electric field strengths and current durations on stunning and spinal injuries of Atlantic herring.

    PubMed

    Nordgreen, Andreas Hoel; Slinde, Erik; Møller, Dag; Roth, Bjorn

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of electric field strength and current duration on wild-caught Atlantic herring Clupea harengus stunned with sinusoidal 50-Hz AC in seawater. The fish were exposed to electric field strengths ranging from 16 to 142 V/m and current durations from 1 to 12 s. We recorded the elapsed times between the point at which each fish became unconscious and the points at which it resumed normal behavioral functions. We also investigated injuries such as broken spinal columns and hematomas after the fish were filleted. The threshold electric field strength required to stun all of the fish to unconsciousness was 33 V/m for 1 s. The duration of the unconscious condition increased as both electric field strength and current duration increased. Of a total of 260 Atlantic herring, 60% had broken spinal columns. The proportion of fish with fractured spines was independent of field strength and duration, but the number of fractures per fish increased with field strength. We conclude that electrical stunning would promote the welfare of Atlantic herring that are landed alive but negatively affect fillet quality owing to hematomas associated with the fractures.

  12. Magnetic Field Strength in an Intermediate-velocity Ionized Filament in the First Galactic Quadrant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stil, J. M.; Hryhoriw, A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the magnetic field in an intermediate-velocity filament for which the Hα intensity in the WHAM survey correlates with excess Faraday rotation of extragalactic radio sources over the length of the filament from b ≈ 20° to b ≈ 55°. The density-weighted mean magnetic field is 2.8 +/- 0.8 μ {{G}}, derived from rotation measures and an empirical relation between Hα emission measure and dispersion measure from Berkhuijsen et al. In view of the uncertainties in the derived magnetic field strength, we propose an alternative use of the available data, rotation measure, and emission measure, to derive a lower limit to the Alfvén speed, weighted by electron density {n}e3/2. We find lower limits to the Alfvén speed that are comparable to or larger than the sound speed in a {10}4 {{K}} plasma, and conclude that the magnetic field is dynamically important. We discuss the role of intermediate-velocity gas as a locus of Faraday rotation in the interstellar medium, and propose that this lower limit to the Alfvén speed may also be applicable to Faraday rotation by galaxy clusters.

  13. Surface Magnetic Field Strengths: New Tests of Magnetoconvective Models of M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, James; Mullan, D. J.

    2014-05-01

    Precision modeling of M dwarfs has become worthwhile in recent years due to the increasingly precise values of masses and radii which can be obtained from eclipsing binary studies. In a recent paper, Torres has identified four prime M dwarf pairs with the most precise empirical determinations of masses and radii. The measured radii are consistently larger than standard stellar models predict by several percent. These four systems potentially provide the most challenging tests of precision evolutionary models of cool dwarfs at the present time. We have previously modeled M dwarfs in the context of a criterion due to Gough & Tayler in which magnetic fields inhibit the onset of convection according to a physics-based prescription. In the present paper, we apply our magnetoconvective approach to the four prime systems in the Torres list. Going a step beyond what we have already modeled in CM Dra (one of the four Torres systems), we note that new constraints on magnetoconvective models of M dwarfs are now available from empirical estimates of magnetic field strengths on the surfaces of these stars. In the present paper, we consider how well our magnetoconvective models succeed when confronted with this new test of surface magnetic field strengths. Among the systems listed by Torres, we find that plausible magnetic models work well for CM Dra, YY Gem, and CU Cnc. (The fourth system in Torres's list does not yet have enough information to warrant magnetic modeling.) Our magnetoconvection models of CM Dra, YY Gem, and CU Cnc yield predictions of the magnetic fluxes on the stellar surface which are consistent with the observed correlation between magnetic flux and X-ray luminosity.

  14. Surface magnetic field strengths: New tests of magnetoconvective models of M dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, James; Mullan, D. J. E-mail: mullan@udel.edu

    2014-05-20

    Precision modeling of M dwarfs has become worthwhile in recent years due to the increasingly precise values of masses and radii which can be obtained from eclipsing binary studies. In a recent paper, Torres has identified four prime M dwarf pairs with the most precise empirical determinations of masses and radii. The measured radii are consistently larger than standard stellar models predict by several percent. These four systems potentially provide the most challenging tests of precision evolutionary models of cool dwarfs at the present time. We have previously modeled M dwarfs in the context of a criterion due to Gough and Tayler in which magnetic fields inhibit the onset of convection according to a physics-based prescription. In the present paper, we apply our magnetoconvective approach to the four prime systems in the Torres list. Going a step beyond what we have already modeled in CM Dra (one of the four Torres systems), we note that new constraints on magnetoconvective models of M dwarfs are now available from empirical estimates of magnetic field strengths on the surfaces of these stars. In the present paper, we consider how well our magnetoconvective models succeed when confronted with this new test of surface magnetic field strengths. Among the systems listed by Torres, we find that plausible magnetic models work well for CM Dra, YY Gem, and CU Cnc. (The fourth system in Torres's list does not yet have enough information to warrant magnetic modeling.) Our magnetoconvection models of CM Dra, YY Gem, and CU Cnc yield predictions of the magnetic fluxes on the stellar surface which are consistent with the observed correlation between magnetic flux and X-ray luminosity.

  15. An investigation on the field strength and loading rate dependences of the hysteretic dynamics of magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Zhangwei; Wang, Linxiang

    2015-02-01

    This paper is an extended study on the model of the hysteretic dynamics of magnetorheological dampers based on a phenomenological phase transition theory (Wang and Kamath in Smart Mater. Struct. 15(6):1725-1733, 2006). It is demonstrated that, by appropriately choosing model parameters, the frequency dependence of the hysteretic dynamics can be captured very well by the model based on phase transition theory. Whilst by introducing an appropriate rescaling coefficient to account for the strength of the magnetized particle chains with various magnetic field strengths, the field strength dependence of the hysteretic dynamics can also be captured very well by the same differential equation with the same set of model parameters. There are in total eight model parameters introduced for capturing the hysteretic dynamics, including its dependence on the loading rate and field strength.

  16. Dynamical features and electric field strengths of double layers driven by currents. [in auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Thiemann, H.; Schunk, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, a number of papers have been concerned with 'ion-acoustic' double layers. In the present investigation, results from numerical simulations are presented to show that the shapes and forms of current-driven double layers evolve dynamically with the fluctuations in the current through the plasma. It is shown that double layers with a potential dip can form even without the excitation of ion-acoustic modes. Double layers in two-and one-half-dimensional simulations are discussed, taking into account the simulation technique, the spatial and temporal features of plasma, and the dynamical behavior of the parallel potential distribution. Attention is also given to double layers in one-dimensional simulations, and electrical field strengths predicted by two-and one-half-dimensional simulations.

  17. Sensitivity Reach of the Neutron EDM Experiment: The Electric Field Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Cooper, M.; Currie, S. A.; Makela, M. F.; Ramsey, J. C.; Tajima, S.; Womack, T. L.; Long, J. C.; Stanislaus, S.

    2010-08-04

    The search for an electric dipole moment of the neutron tests physics beyond the Standard Model such as new sources of CP-violation and Supersymmetry. The nEDM experiment aims to improve the sensitivity on the current limit of the electric dipole moment of the neutron to <10{sup -27} e{center_dot}cm. The experiment will use a flux of Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCNs) produced and stored in a bath of superfluid He-II. A change in precession frequency is expected for a non-zero EDM when an electric field is applied parallel and antiparallel to a magnetic field across the neutron storage cell. A dominant parameter in terms of reducing the statistical uncertainty of this measurement is the strength of the applied electric field. An experiment to measure if superfluid He-II can sustain up to 50 kV/cm for a volume and electrode spacings comparable to the nEDM experiment has been constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists in a large-area parallel plate capacitor immersed in a 200 liter central volume inside a suitable cryostat that in turn is connected to a dilution refrigerator unit. A description of test runs and the status of the experiment is presented.

  18. POSSIBLE CONSTRAINTS ON EXOPLANET MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTHS FROM PLANET-STAR INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, Caleb A.

    2010-10-20

    A small percentage of normal stars harbor giant planets that orbit within a few tenths of an astronomical unit. At such distances, the potential exists for significant tidal and magnetic field interaction resulting in energy dissipation that may manifest as changes within the stellar corona. We examine the X-ray emission of stars hosting planets and find a positive correlation between X-ray luminosity and the projected mass of the most closely orbiting exoplanets. We investigate possible systematics and observational biases that could mimic or confuse this correlation but find no strong evidence for any, especially for planets more massive than {approx}0.1 M{sub J} . Luminosities and upper limits are consistent with the interpretation that there is a lower floor to stellar X-ray emission dependent on close-in planetary mass. Under the hypothesis that this is a consequence of planet-star magnetic field interaction, and energy dissipation, we estimate a possible field strength increase of a factor of {approx}8 between planets of 1 and 10 M{sub J} . Intriguingly, this is consistent with recent geodynamo scaling law predictions. The high-energy photon emission of planet-star systems may therefore provide unique access to the detailed magnetic, and hence geodynamic, properties of exoplanets.

  19. A low-cost, high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging-compatible actuator.

    PubMed

    Secoli, Riccardo; Robinson, Matthew; Brugnoli, Michele; Rodriguez y Baena, Ferdinando

    2015-03-01

    To perform minimally invasive surgical interventions with the aid of robotic systems within a magnetic resonance imaging scanner offers significant advantages compared to conventional surgery. However, despite the numerous exciting potential applications of this technology, the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging-compatible robotics has been hampered by safety, reliability and cost concerns: the robots should not be attracted by the strong magnetic field of the scanner and should operate reliably in the field without causing distortion to the scan data. Development of non-conventional sensors and/or actuators is thus required to meet these strict operational and safety requirements. These demands commonly result in expensive actuators, which mean that cost effectiveness remains a major challenge for such robotic systems. This work presents a low-cost, high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging-compatible actuator: a pneumatic stepper motor which is controllable in open loop or closed loop, along with a rotary encoder, both fully manufactured in plastic, which are shown to perform reliably via a set of in vitro trials while generating negligible artifacts when imaged within a standard clinical scanner. PMID:25833997

  20. Volcanic sanidinites: an example for the mobilization of high field strength elements (HFSE) in magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aßbichler, Donjá; Heuss-Aßbichler, Soraya; Müller, Dirk; Kunzmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In earth science the mobility of high field strength elements (HFSE) is generally discussed in context of hydrothermal processes. Recent investigations mainly address processes in (late) magmatic-, metamorphic- and submarine hydrothermal systems. They have all in common that H2O is main solvent. The transport of HFSE is suggested to be favored by volatiles, like boron, fluorine, phosphate and sulfate (Jiang et al., 2005). In this study processes in magmatic system are investigated. Sanidinites are rare rocks of igneous origin and are found as volcanic ejecta of explosive volcanoes. They consist mainly of sanidine and minerals of the sodalite group. The very porous fabric of these rocks is an indication of their aggregation from a gaseous magmatic phase. The large sanidine crystals (up to several centimeters) are mostly interlocking, creating large cavities between some crystals. In these pores Zr crystallizes as oxide (baddeleyite, ZrO2) or silicate (zircon, ZrSiO4). The euhedral shape of these minerals is a further indication of their formation out of the gas phase. Furthermore, bubbles in glass observed in some samples are evidence for gas-rich reaction conditions during the formation of the sanidinites. The formation of sanidinites is suggested to be an example for solvothermal processes in natural systems. Solvothermal processes imply the solvation, transport and recrystallization of elements in a gas phase. Results obtained from whole rock analysis from sanidinites from Laacher See (Germany) show a positive correlation between LOI, sulfate, Cl, and Na with the HFSE like Zr. Na-rich conditions seem to ameliorate the solvothermal transport of Zr. All these features point to the formation of sanidinites in the upper part of a magma chamber, where fluid consisting of SO3 and Cl compounds in addition to H2O, CO2 and HFSE (high field strength elements) like Zr accumulate.

  1. FR II radio galaxies at low frequencies - I. Morphology, magnetic field strength and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwood, Jeremy J.; Croston, Judith H.; Intema, Huib T.; Stewart, Adam J.; Ineson, Judith; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Godfrey, Leith; Best, Philip; Brienza, Marisa; Heesen, Volker; Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Morganti, Raffaella; Murgia, Matteo; Orrú, Emanuela; Röttgering, Huub; Shulevski, Aleksandar; Wise, Michael W.

    2016-06-01

    Due to their steep spectra, low-frequency observations of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio galaxies potentially provide key insights in to the morphology, energetics and spectrum of these powerful radio sources. However, limitations imposed by the previous generation of radio interferometers at metre wavelengths have meant that this region of parameter space remains largely unexplored. In this paper, the first in a series examining FR IIs at low frequencies, we use LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) observations between 50 and 160 MHz, along with complementary archival radio and X-ray data, to explore the properties of two FR II sources, 3C 452 and 3C 223. We find that the morphology of 3C 452 is that of a standard FR II rather than of a double-double radio galaxy as had previously been suggested, with no remnant emission being observed beyond the active lobes. We find that the low-frequency integrated spectra of both sources are much steeper than expected based on traditional assumptions and, using synchrotron/inverse-Compton model fitting, show that the total energy content of the lobes is greater than previous estimates by a factor of around 5 for 3C 452 and 2 for 3C 223. We go on to discuss possible causes of these steeper-than-expected spectra and provide revised estimates of the internal pressures and magnetic field strengths for the intrinsically steep case. We find that the ratio between the equipartition magnetic field strengths and those derived through synchrotron/inverse-Compton model fitting remains consistent with previous findings and show that the observed departure from equipartition may in some cases provide a solution to the spectral versus dynamical age disparity.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Field Strength Effects on Diffusion Measures and Brain Connectivity Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Liang; Mueller, Bryon A.; Jahanshad, Neda; Jin, Yan; Lenglet, Christophe; Yacoub, Essa; Sapiro, Guillermo; Ugurbil, Kamil; Harel, Noam; Toga, Arthur W.; Lim, Kelvin O.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The quest to map brain connectivity is being pursued worldwide using diffusion imaging, among other techniques. Even so, we know little about how brain connectivity measures depend on the magnetic field strength of the scanner. To investigate this, we scanned 10 healthy subjects at 7 and 3 tesla—using 128-gradient high-angular resolution diffusion imaging. For each subject and scan, whole-brain tractography was used to estimate connectivity between 113 cortical and subcortical regions. We examined how scanner field strength affects (i) the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the non-diffusion-sensitized reference images (b0); (ii) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-derived fractional anisotropy (FA), mean, radial, and axial diffusivity (MD/RD/AD), in atlas-defined regions; (iii) whole-brain tractography; (iv) the 113×113 brain connectivity maps; and (v) five commonly used network topology measures. We also assessed effects of the multi-channel reconstruction methods (sum-of-squares, SOS, at 7T; adaptive recombine, AC, at 3T). At 7T with SOS, the b0 images had 18.3% higher SNR than with 3T-AC. FA was similar for most regions of interest (ROIs) derived from an online DTI atlas (ICBM81), but higher at 7T in the cerebral peduncle and internal capsule. MD, AD, and RD were lower at 7T for most ROIs. The apparent fiber density between some subcortical regions was greater at 7T-SOS than 3T-AC, with a consistent connection pattern overall. Suggesting the need for caution, the recovered brain network was apparently more efficient at 7T, which cannot be biologically true as the same subjects were assessed. Care is needed when comparing network measures across studies, and when interpreting apparently discrepant findings. PMID:23205551

  3. Relationships between field-based measures of strength and power and golf club head speed.

    PubMed

    Read, Paul J; Lloyd, Rhodri S; De Ste Croix, Mark; Oliver, Jon L

    2013-10-01

    Increased golf club head speed (CHS) has been shown to result in greater driving distances and is also correlated with golf handicap. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between field-based measures of strength and power and golf CHS with a secondary aim to determine the reliability of the selected tests. A correlation design was used to assess the following variables: anthropometrics, squat jump (SJ) height and squat jump peak power (SJPP), unilateral countermovement jump (CMJ) heights (right leg countermovement jump and left leg countermovement jump [LLCMJ]), bilateral CMJ heights, countermovement jump peak power (CMJPP), and medicine ball seated throw (MBST) and medicine ball rotational throw (MBRT). Fouty-eight male subjects participated in the study (age: 20.1 ± 3.2 years, height: 1.76 ± 0.07 m, mass: 72.8 ± 7.8 kg, handicap: 5.8 ± 2.2). Moderate significant correlations were reported between CHS and MBRT (r = 0.67; p < 0.01), MBST (r = 0.63; p < 0.01), CMJPP (r = 0.54; p < 0.01), and SJPP (r = 0.53; p < 0.01). Weak significant correlations (r = 0.3-0.5) were identified between CHS and the other remaining variables excluding LLCMJ. Stepwise multiple regression analysis identified that the MBST and SJ were the greatest predictors of CHS, explaining 49% of the variance. Additionally the intraclass correlation coefficients reported for tests of CHS and all performance variables were deemed acceptable (r = 0.7-0.9). The results of this study suggest that the strength and conditioning coach can accurately assess and monitor the physical abilities of golf athletes using the proposed battery of field tests. Additionally, movements that are more concentrically dominant in nature may display stronger relationships with CHS due to MBST and SJ displaying the highest explained variance after a stepwise linear regression.

  4. The issues and tentative solutions for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field strength.

    PubMed

    Fries, Peter; Morelli, John N; Lux, Francois; Tillement, Olivier; Schneider, Günther; Buecker, Arno

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed at ultra-high field strengths beyond 3 Tesla (T) has become increasingly prevalent in research and preclinical applications. As such, the inevitable clinical implementation of such systems lies on the horizon. The major benefit of ultra-high field MRI is the markedly increased signal-to-noise ratios achievable, enabling acquisition of MR images with simultaneously greater spatial and temporal resolution. However, at field strengths higher than 3 T, the efficacy of Gd(III)-based contrast agents is diminished due to decreased r1 relaxivity, somewhat limiting imaging of the vasculature and contrast-enhanced imaging of tumors. There have been extensive efforts to design new contrast agents with high r1 relaxivities based on macromolecular compounds or nanoparticles; however, the efficacy of these agents at ultra-high field strengths has not yet been proven. The aim of this review article is to provide an overview of the basic principles of MR contrast enhancement processes and to highlight the main factors influencing relaxivity. In addition, challenges and opportunities for contrast-enhanced MRI at ultra-high field strengths will be explored. Various approaches for the development of effective contrast agent molecules that are suitable for a broad spectrum of applied field strengths will be discussed in the context of the current literature.

  5. Further constraints for the Plio-Pleistocene geomagnetic field strength: New results from the Los Tuxtlas volcanic field (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Goguitchaichvili, A.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2001-09-01

    A rock-magnetic, paleomagnetic and paleointensity study was carried out on 13 Plio-Pleistocene volcanic flows from the Los Tuxtlas volcanic field (Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt) in order to obtain some decisive constraints for the geomagnetic field strength during the Plio-Pleistocene time. The age of the volcanic units, which yielded reliable paleointensity estimates, lies between 2.2 and 0.8 Ma according to the available K/Ar radiometric data. Thermomagnetic investigations reveal that remanence is carried in most cases by Ti-poor titanomagnetite, resulting from oxy-exsolution that probably occurred during the initial flow cooling. Unblocking temperature spectra and relatively high coercivity point to 'small' pseudo-single domain magnetic grains for these (titano)magnetites. Single-component, linear demagnetization plots were observed in most cases. Six flows yield reverse polarity magnetization, five flows are normally magnetized, and one flow shows intermediate polarity magnetization. Evidence of a strong lightning-produced magnetization overprint was detected for one site. The mean pole position obtained in this study is Plat = 83.7°, Plong = 178.1°, K = 36, A95 = 8.1°, N =10 and the corresponding mean paleodirection is I = 31.3°, D = 352°, k = 37, a95 = 8.2°, which is not significantly different from the expected direction estimated from the North American apparent polar wander path. Thirty-nine samples were pre-selected for Thellier palaeointensity experiments because of their stable remanent magnetization and relatively weak-within-site dispersion. Only 21 samples, coming from four individual basaltic lava flows, yielded reliable paleointensity estimates with the flow-mean virtual dipole moments (VDM) ranging from 6.4 to 9.1 × 1022 Am2. Combining the coeval Mexican data with the available comparable quality Pliocene paleointensity results yield a mean VDM of 6.4 × 1022 Am2, which is almost 80% of the present geomagnetic axial dipole. Reliable

  6. Radial transport of large-scale magnetic fields in accretion disks. I. Steady solutions and an upper limit on the vertical field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Taku; Muto, Takayuki

    2014-04-20

    Large-scale magnetic fields are key ingredients of magnetically driven disk accretion. We study how large-scale poloidal fields evolve in accretion disks, with the primary aim of quantifying the viability of magnetic accretion mechanisms in protoplanetary disks. We employ a kinematic mean-field model for poloidal field transport and focus on steady states where inward advection of a field balances with outward diffusion due to effective resistivities. We analytically derive the steady-state radial distribution of poloidal fields in highly conducting accretion disks. The analytic solution reveals an upper limit on the strength of large-scale vertical fields attainable in steady states. Any excess poloidal field will diffuse away within a finite time, and we demonstrate this with time-dependent numerical calculations of the mean-field equations. We apply this upper limit to large-scale vertical fields threading protoplanetary disks. We find that the maximum attainable strength is about 0.1 G at 1 AU, and about 1 mG at 10 AU from the central star. When combined with recent magnetic accretion models, the maximum field strength translates into the maximum steady-state accretion rate of ∼10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, in agreement with observations. We also find that the maximum field strength is ∼1 kG at the surface of the central star provided that the disk extends down to the stellar surface. This implies that any excess stellar poloidal field of strength ≳ kG can be transported to the surrounding disk. This might in part resolve the magnetic flux problem in star formation.

  7. Interaction of radio-frequency, high-strength electric fields with harmful insects.

    PubMed

    Ponomaryova, Iryna A; Niño de Rivera y Oyarzabal, Luis; Ruíz Sánchez, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the research reported here is to investigate the influence of radio-frequency electric fields of high strength on insect mortality. The experiments were accomplished at the frequencies 47.5, 900 and 2,450 MHz for the pulse modulated radiation treatment and the continuous wave RF radiation. Two types of systems, which are the coaxial irradiation chamber and the irradiation chamber with plane capacitor are presented in this work. The experiments in the coaxial type radiation chamber on granary weevil (Sitophilus granarius L.) at voltages U = 5.5-10.5 kV frequency 47.5 MHz, electric field intensity 180-350 kV/m and exposures 5-60 seconds give 40-90% of insect mortality that mainly depends on voltage increase. The experiments in the irradiation chamber with plane capacitor are presented for the pulse modulated regime at a frequency of 47.5 MHz and field intensities 350-2000 kV/m. 100% of insect mortality is reached at the exposures of 1-30 seconds, at field intensity of 2000 kV/m. The RF radiation of granary weevil (Sitophilus granarius L.) in the coaxial irradiation chamber in stationary mode reaches 100% insect mortality at major exposure times for the frequencies 900 and 2,450 MHz. Stationary generator mode also permits 21-97% fungi (Cladosporium cladosporioides, Aspergillus candidus) control at voltage U = 10.5 kV frequencies 900 and 2,450 MHz and exposures of 120-180 seconds. Further investigation is needed for microscopic fungi control to understand the fungi reproduction mechanism during the RF-radiation treatment for Aspergillus fumigatus.

  8. MCZ: Striations in CZ silicon crystals grown under various axial magnetic field strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, G. K. M.

    1985-01-01

    Suppression of fluid flow instabilities in the melt by the axial magnetic field in Czochralski silicon crystal growth (AMCZ) is investigated precisely by a high-sensitivity striation etching in conjunction with temperature measurements. The magnetic strength (B) was varied up to 4.0 kG, incremented in 0.5 kG/5 cm crystal length. The convection flow was substantially suppressed at B 1.0 kG. A low oxygen level of 2-3 ppma and a high resistivity of 400 ohm-cm is achieved in the AMCZ silicon crystals at B 1.0 kG. Details of the striation formation as a function of B are presented. Computer simulation of the magnetohydrodynamics of the AMCZ silicon crystal growth are discussed briefly with regard to the solute, especially oxygen segregation at B=0, 1.0, and 2.0 kG. Earlier studies in the inverted Bridgman growth of InSb and Ge, which have established the cause and effect relationship between the convection in the melt and the striation formation as well as the suppression of the convections in the melt by transverse magnetic field are reviewed.

  9. Influence of magnetic field strength on potential well in the ionization stage of a double stage Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Daren; Song Maojiang; Liu Hui; Zhang Xu; Li Hong

    2012-07-15

    Similar to a single stage Hall thruster, the magnetic field, which controls electron trajectory and electric field distribution, is the most important factor determining the performance of a double stage Hall thruster. Especially, a potential well, which is helpful to reduce the ion loss on the thruster walls, is shaped in the ionization stage due to the existence of an annular magnetic field topology there. In this paper, the influence of magnetic field strength in the ionization stage on the potential well is researched with both experiments and particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that the depth of potential well increases with the magnetic field strength as a result of enhanced magnetic confinement and lowered electron conductivity. Consequently, the plasma density as well as the ion current entering the acceleration stage increases. However, an excessive magnetic field strength leads to an excess of ion loss on the walls of the acceleration stage. Therefore, there is an appropriate magnetic field strength in the ionization stage that results in a proper potential well and consequently an optimal performance of a double stage Hall thruster.

  10. Levels of electric field strength within the immediate vicinity of FM radio stations in Accra, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Azah, C K; Amoako, J K; Fletcher, J J

    2013-10-01

    Heightened awareness of the ever-expanding use of radiofrequency (RF) techniques and technology has led to mounting concerns from the general public and the scientific community regarding the possible health effects that may arise as a consequence of exposure to RF radiations and has drawn the attention of many researchers the world over. A survey of the RF electromagnetic radiation at public access points in the vicinity of 20 frequency-modulated (FM) radio stations has been made in Accra, Ghana. The fundamental object was to determine the levels of RF fields from FM broadcast antennae within 10-200 m radius about the foot of the FM base station and at a height of 1.5 m above the ground at selected locations. A spectrum analyser and a bi-conical antenna element sensitive and effective within the frequency band of 30-300 MHz were used. Results obtained indicated that the levels of electric field strength ranged from 5.4E-04 V m(-1) at FM station 'O' to 7.4E-08 V m(-1) at FM station 'D'. At a transmission frequency range of 88-108 MHz, the variation of power densities is from 2.5E-10 to 1.5E-17 Wm(-2). These values are very low and are far below the reference level set by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and therefore do not pose any known hazard to the inhabitants of Accra, Ghana. The electric field levels presented in this work are comparable with those reported from epidemiological studies conducted elsewhere. PMID:23567196

  11. Levels of electric field strength within the immediate vicinity of FM radio stations in Accra, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Azah, C K; Amoako, J K; Fletcher, J J

    2013-10-01

    Heightened awareness of the ever-expanding use of radiofrequency (RF) techniques and technology has led to mounting concerns from the general public and the scientific community regarding the possible health effects that may arise as a consequence of exposure to RF radiations and has drawn the attention of many researchers the world over. A survey of the RF electromagnetic radiation at public access points in the vicinity of 20 frequency-modulated (FM) radio stations has been made in Accra, Ghana. The fundamental object was to determine the levels of RF fields from FM broadcast antennae within 10-200 m radius about the foot of the FM base station and at a height of 1.5 m above the ground at selected locations. A spectrum analyser and a bi-conical antenna element sensitive and effective within the frequency band of 30-300 MHz were used. Results obtained indicated that the levels of electric field strength ranged from 5.4E-04 V m(-1) at FM station 'O' to 7.4E-08 V m(-1) at FM station 'D'. At a transmission frequency range of 88-108 MHz, the variation of power densities is from 2.5E-10 to 1.5E-17 Wm(-2). These values are very low and are far below the reference level set by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and therefore do not pose any known hazard to the inhabitants of Accra, Ghana. The electric field levels presented in this work are comparable with those reported from epidemiological studies conducted elsewhere.

  12. Reprint of: Coulomb field strength measurement by electro-optic spectral decoding system at the CALIFES beam line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, R.; Jamison, S. P.; Lefevre, T.; Gillespie, W. A.

    2016-09-01

    Electro-optic (EO) techniques are increasingly used for longitudinal bunch profile measurements. A bunch profile monitor, based on electro-optic spectral decoding (EOSD), has been developed and demonstrated on the CALIFES beam line at CERN. The EO response is analysed using a frequency domain description, and two methods for extraction of absolute Coulomb field strengths from the electron bunch are demonstrated. Measurements at field strengths up to 1.3 MV/m agree with the expectation based on independent charge measurements.

  13. High field strength (4.7T) magnetic resonance imaging of hydrocephalus in an African Grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus).

    PubMed

    Fleming, Gregory J; Lester, Nola V; Stevenson, Rhoda; Silver, Xeve S

    2003-01-01

    Hydrocephalus was diagnosed in a juvenile African Grey parrot by high-field strength (4.7-Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Excellent anatomic detail was achieved, and there was severe dilation of all ventricles. Relative obstruction was localized to the level of or beyond the outflow of the fourth ventricle. There have been several reports of hydrocephalus diagnosed postmortem in psittacines (i.e., hook-billed parrots), however, this is the first report of an antemortem diagnosis in a psittacine using high-field strength MRI.

  14. Electrochemical properties of columns in capillary electrochromatography. I. Ohm's law, resistivity and field strength.

    PubMed

    Henry, Michael P; Ratnayake, Chitra K

    2005-06-24

    The most commonly used type of column in capillary electrochromatography (CEC) consists of a packed segment and an open (but buffer-filled) segment. The two segments differ importantly in two respects: firstly, their electrical resistivity; and secondly, their zeta potentials at a multitude of solid-liquid interfaces. Determination of the magnitude of these properties for each segment cannot be made using only results from the column as a whole. Instead, measurements of resistivity and zeta potentials of an entirely open, unpacked column can be used in conjunction with those of the CEC column to determine the electrochemical nature of both segments. This review of basic electrochemical properties will describe simple procedures that can be used to determine resistance, resistivity, conductivity, conductance, and field strength in each segment. In addition, it will be shown how the properties of each segment add together to give the same properties of the CEC column as a whole. The equations so derived will be applied to data from the literature and conclusions drawn from the results.

  15. Towards a Consensus View of the Heliospheric Magnetic Field Strength Since 1900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Svalgaard, L.

    2008-12-01

    McCracken (2007) inverted the galactic cosmic ray record for the interval 1428-2005 to estimate annual averages of the heliomagnetic field (HMF) near Earth during this interval. Quoting from his abstract, "There is good agreement with the results obtained by others using two independent methodologies based upon the sunspot [Solanki et al., 2002] and geomagnetic [Lockwood et al., 1999] records There is disagreement with another method based on the geomagnetic record [Svalgaard and Cliver, 2005] that needs to be resolved." We address the reported disagreement of our long-term reconstruction of the HMF strength with that obtained in the other three studies. We show that a recent reconstruction of the HMF by Rouillard, Lockwood, and Finch [2007] agrees much more closely with that of Svalgaard and Cliver than that of Lockwood et al. to the point where a consensus seems to be reached. We suggest that the discrepancy between McCracken's cosmic-ray-based HMF reconstruction and those based on geomagnetic data originates in the Forbush and Neher ionization chamber data (1933-1957) used to bridge the time gap between the 10Be time series (1428-1930) and the Climax neutron monitor record (1951-present).

  16. Dependence of streamer density on electric field strength on positive electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koki, Nakamura; Takahumi, Okuyama; Wang, Douyan; Takao, N.; Hidenori, Akiyama; Kumamoto University Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Pulsed streamer discharge plasma, a type of non-thermal plasma, is known as generation method of reactive radicals and ozone and treatment of exhausted gas. From our previous research, the distance between electrodes has been considered a very important parameter for applications using pulsed streamer discharge. However, how the distance between electrodes affects the pulsed discharge hasn't been clarified. In this research, the propagation process of pulsed streamer discharge in a wire-plate electrode was observed using an ICCD camera for 4 electrodes having different distance between electrodes. The distance between electrodes was changeable at 45 mm, 40 mm, 35 mm, and 30 mm. The results show that, when the distance between electrodes was shortened, applied voltage with a pulse duration of 100 ns decreased from 80 to 60.3 kV. Conversely, discharge current increased from 149 to 190 A. Streamer head velocity became faster. On the other hand, Streamer head density at onset time of streamer head propagation didn't change. This is considered due to the electric field strength of streamer head at that time, in result, it was about 14 kV/mm under each distance between electrodes.

  17. Corneal temperature changes induced by high-field-strength MR imaging with a head coil.

    PubMed

    Shellock, F G; Crues, J V

    1988-06-01

    High-field-strength/high-frequency magnetic resonance (MR) imaging systems can cause tissue heating. Since the eye is particularly susceptible to temperature elevations because of its relatively poor blood supply, the authors measured corneal temperatures in 33 patients immediately before and after MR imaging performed with a 1.5-T (64-MHz) imager and a transmit/receive head coil at estimated peak specific absorption rates (SAR) ranging from 2.54 to 3.05 W/kg. There was a statistically (P less than .001) significant increase in the average corneal temperature (32.7 degrees C +/- 0.7 before imaging, 33.2 degrees C +/- 0.5 after). The changes in corneal temperature ranged from 0.0 degrees C to 1.8 degrees C (mean, 0.5 degrees C), and the highest corneal temperature measured after imaging was 34.4 degrees C. In animal models, the eye temperature threshold for radio frequency-induced cataractogenesis is between 41 degrees C and 55 degrees C. The authors conclude that clinical MR imaging with use of a head coil at the SARs studied causes relatively minor increases in corneal temperature that do not appear to pose any thermal hazard to ocular tissue. PMID:3363146

  18. The 1983-84 Connecticut 45-Hz-band field-strength measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, P. R.

    1986-03-01

    Extremely low frequency (ELF) measurements are made of the transverse horizontal magnetic field strength received in Connecticut. The AN/BSR-1 receiver consists of an AN/UYK-20 minicomputer, a signal timing and interface unit (STIU), a rubidium frequency time standard, two magnetic tape recorders, and a preamplifier. The transmission source of these farfield (1.6-Mm range) measurements is the U.S. Navy's ELF Wisconsin Test Facility (WTF), located in the Chequamegon National Forest in north central Wisconsin, about 8 km south of the village of Clam Lake. The WTF consists of two 22.5-km antennas; one of which is situated approximately in the north-south (NS) direction and the other approximately in the east-west (EW) direction. Each antenna is grounded at both ends. The electrical axis of the WTF EW antenna is 11 deg east of north at 45 Hz and 14 deg east of north at 75Hz. The electrical axis of the WTF NS antenna is 11 deg east of north at 45 Hz and 14 deg east of north at 75 Hz. The WTF array can be steered electrically. Its radiated power is approximately 0.5 W at 45 Hz and 1 W at 75 Hz. This report will compare results of 45 Hz band data taken during 1983 to 1984 with previous 45 Hz band measurements.

  19. Semiclassical circular strings in AdS{sub 5} and 'long' gauge field strength operators

    SciTech Connect

    Park, I.Y.; Tirziu, A.; Tseytlin, A.A.

    2005-06-15

    We consider circular strings rotating with equal spins S{sub 1}=S{sub 2}=S in two orthogonal planes in AdS{sub 5} and suggest that they may be dual to long gauge-theory operators built out of self-dual components of gauge field strength. As was found in hep-th/0404187, the one-loop anomalous dimensions of the such gauge-theory operators are described by an antiferromagnetic XXX{sub 1} spin chain and scale linearly with length L>>1. We find that in the case of rigid rotating string both the classical energy E{sub 0} and the 1-loop string correction E{sub 1} depend linearly on the spin S (within the stability region of the solution). This supports the identification of the rigid rotating string with the gauge-theory operator corresponding to the maximal-spin (ferromagnetic) state of the XXX{sub 1} spin chain. The energy of more general rotating and pulsating strings also happens to scale linearly with both the spin and the oscillation number. Such solutions should be dual to other lower-spin states of the spin chain, with the antiferromagnetic ground state presumably corresponding to the string pulsating in two planes with no rotation.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and diffusion in the presence of internal gradients: the effect of magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C; Johns, M L; Gladden, L F; Fordham, E J

    2010-02-01

    It is known that internal magnetic field gradients in porous materials, caused by susceptibility differences at the solid-fluid interfaces, alter the observed effective Nuclear Magnetic Resonance transverse relaxation times T2,eff. The internal gradients scale with the strength of the static background magnetic field B0. Here, we acquire data at various magnitudes of B0 to observe the influence of internal gradients on T2-T2 exchange measurements; the theory discussed and observations made are applicable to any T2-T2 analysis of heterogeneous materials. At high magnetic field strengths, it is possible to observe diffusive exchange between regions of local internal gradient extrema within individual pores. Therefore, the observed exchange pathways are not associated with pore-to-pore exchange. Understanding the significance of internal gradients in transverse relaxation measurements is critical to interpreting these results. We present the example of water in porous sandstone rock and offer a guideline to determine whether an observed T2,eff relaxation time distribution reflects the pore size distribution for a given susceptibility contrast (magnetic field strength) and spin echo separation. More generally, we confirm that for porous materials T1 provides a better indication of the pore size distribution than T2,eff at high magnetic field strengths (B0>1 T), and demonstrate the data analysis necessary to validate pore size interpretations of T2,eff measurements.

  1. Survey of Processing Methods for High Strength High Conductivity Wires for High Field Magnet Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Han, K.; Embury, J.D.

    1998-10-01

    This paper will deal with the basic concepts of attaining combination of high strength and high conductivity in pure materials, in-situ composites and macrocomposites. It will survey current attainments, and outline where some future developments may lie in developing wire products that are close to the theoretical strength of future magnet applications.

  2. A fast parallel code for calculating energies and oscillator strengths of many-electron atoms at neutron star magnetic field strengths in adiabatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, D.; Klews, M.; Wunner, G.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a new method for the fast computation of wavelengths and oscillator strengths for medium-Z atoms and ions, up to iron, at neutron star magnetic field strengths. The method is a parallelized Hartree-Fock approach in adiabatic approximation based on finite-element and B-spline techniques. It turns out that typically 15-20 finite elements are sufficient to calculate energies to within a relative accuracy of 10-5 in 4 or 5 iteration steps using B-splines of 6th order, with parallelization speed-ups of 20 on a 26-processor machine. Results have been obtained for the energies of the ground states and excited levels and for the transition strengths of astrophysically relevant atoms and ions in the range Z=2…26 in different ionization stages. Catalogue identifier: AECC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3845 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 989 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MPI/Fortran 95 and Python Computer: Cluster of 1-26 HP Compaq dc5750 Operating system: Fedora 7 Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: 1 GByte Classification: 2.1 External routines: MPI/GFortran, LAPACK, PyLab/Matplotlib Nature of problem: Calculations of synthetic spectra [1] of strongly magnetized neutron stars are bedevilled by the lack of data for atoms in intense magnetic fields. While the behaviour of hydrogen and helium has been investigated in detail (see, e.g., [2]), complete and reliable data for heavier elements, in particular iron, are still missing. Since neutron stars are formed by the collapse of the iron cores of massive stars, it may be assumed that their atmospheres contain an iron plasma. Our objective is to fill the gap

  3. Magnetic Field Strength Fluctuations in the Heliosheath: Voyager 1 Observations during 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the "microscale fluctuations" of the magnetic field strength Beta on a scale of several hours observed by Voyager I (VI) in the heliosheath during 2009. The microscale fluctuations of Beta range from coherent to stochastic structures. The amplitude of microscale fluctuations of Beta during 1 day is measured by the standard deviation (SD) of 48 s averages of B. The distribution of the daily values of SD is lognormal. SD(t) from day of year (DOY) I to 331, 2009, is very intermittent. SD(t) has a 1/f or "pink noise" spectrum on scales from I to 100 days, and it has a broad multi fractal spectrum f(alpha) with 0.57 much < alpha much < 1.39. The time series of increments SD(t + r) - SD(t) has a pink noise spectrum with alpha' = 0.88 +/- 0.14 on scales from 1 to 100 days. The increments have a Tsallis (q-Gaussian) distribution on scales from 1 to 165 days, with an average q = 1.75 +/- 0.12. The skewness S and kurtosis K have Gaussian and lognormal distributions, respectively. The largest spikes in K(t) and Set) are often associated with a change in Beta across a data gap and with identifiable physical structures. The "turbulence" observed by VI during 2009 was weakly compressible on average but still very intermittent, highly variable, and highly compressible at times. The turbulence observed just behind the termination shock by Voyager 2 was twice as strong. These observations place strong constraints on any model of "turbulence" in the heliosheath.

  4. Magnetic Field Strength Fluctuations in the Heliosheath: Voyager 1 Observations During 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brulaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the microscale fluctuations of the magnetic field strength B on a scale of several hours observed by Voyager1 (V1) in the heliosheath during 2009. The microscale fluctuations of B range from coherent to stochastic structures. The amplitude of microscale fluctuations of B during 1 day is measured by the standard deviation (SD) of 48 s averages of B. The distribution of the daily values of SD is lognormal. SD(t) from day of year (DOY) 1 to 331, 2009, is very intermittent. SD(t) has a 1/f or "pink noise" spectrum on scales from 1 to 100 days, and it has a broad multifractal spectrum f(alpha) with 0.57 less than or equal to alpha less than or equal to 1.39. The time series of increments SD(t + tau) -- SD(t) has a pink noise spectrum with alpha(1) = 0.88 plus or minus 0.14 on scales from 1 to 100 days. The increments have a Tsallis (q-Gaussian) distribution on scales from 1 to 165 days, with an average q = 1.75 plus or minus 0.12. The skewness S and kurtosis K have Gaussian and lognormal distributions, respectively. The largest spikes in K(t) and S(t) are often associated with a change in B across a data gap and with identifiable physical structures. The "turbulence" observed by V1 during 2009 was weakly compressible on average but still very intermittent, highly variable, and highly compressible at times. The turbulence observed just behind the termination shock by Voyager 2 was twice as strong. These observations place strong constraints on any model of turbulence in the heliosheath.

  5. MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH FLUCTUATIONS IN THE HELIOSHEATH: VOYAGER 1 OBSERVATIONS DURING 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F. E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the ''microscale fluctuations'' of the magnetic field strength B on a scale of several hours observed by Voyager1 (V1) in the heliosheath during 2009. The microscale fluctuations of B range from coherent to stochastic structures. The amplitude of microscale fluctuations of B during 1 day is measured by the standard deviation (SD) of 48 s averages of B. The distribution of the daily values of SD is lognormal. SD(t) from day of year (DOY) 1 to 331, 2009, is very intermittent. SD(t) has a 1/f or 'pink noise' spectrum on scales from 1 to 100 days, and it has a broad multifractal spectrum f({alpha}) with 0.57 {<=} {alpha} {<=} 1.39. The time series of increments SD(t + {tau}) - SD(t) has a pink noise spectrum with {alpha}' = 0.88 {+-} 0.14 on scales from 1 to 100 days. The increments have a Tsallis (q-Gaussian) distribution on scales from 1 to 165 days, with an average q = 1.75 {+-} 0.12. The skewness S and kurtosis K have Gaussian and lognormal distributions, respectively. The largest spikes in K(t) and S(t) are often associated with a change in B across a data gap and with identifiable physical structures. The 'turbulence' observed by V1 during 2009 was weakly compressible on average but still very intermittent, highly variable, and highly compressible at times. The turbulence observed just behind the termination shock by Voyager 2 was twice as strong. These observations place strong constraints on any model of 'turbulence' in the heliosheath.

  6. The effect of electrical field strength on activation and development of cloned caprine embryos.

    PubMed

    Shen, P C; Lee, S N; Wu, J S; Huang, J C; Chu, F H; Chang, C C; Kung, J C; Lin, H H; Chen, L R; Shiau, J W; Yen, N T; Cheng, W T K

    2006-05-01

    The activation procedure used in nuclear transfer (NT) is one of the critical factors affecting the efficiency of animal cloning. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of two electrical field strengths (EFS) for activation on the developmental competence of caprine NT embryos reconstructed from ear skin fibroblasts of adult Alpine does. The NT embryos were obtained by transfer of the quiescent fibroblasts at the fourth passage into the enucleated metaphase II (M II) oocytes. Four to five hours after electrical fusion, the NT-embryos were activated by EFS either at 1.67 or at 2.33 kV/cm and immediately incubated in 6-DMAP (2 mM) for 4 h. The cleavage rate of the NT-embryos activated with 2.33 kV/cm was greater than that activated with 1.67 kV/cm after in vitro culture for 18 h (65.6% versus 19.6%, p < 0.001). No pregnancy was found in 14 recipient does after transferring 51 NT embryos at 1-2 cell stages activated with 1.67 kV/cm. In contrast, two of the seven recipients were pregnant and gave birth to three kids after transferring 61 NT embryos at 1-2 cell stages activated by 2.33 kV/cm. The birth weights of three cloned kids were within the normal range of Alpine goats. However, one kid died 1h after birth while the remaining two are still healthy. DNA analysis by polymerase chain reaction (single-strand conformation polymorphism, SSCP) confirmed that the three kids were genetically identical to the nuclear donor.

  7. BIPOLAR JETS LAUNCHED FROM MAGNETICALLY DIFFUSIVE ACCRETION DISKS. I. EJECTION EFFICIENCY VERSUS FIELD STRENGTH AND DIFFUSIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikhnezami, Somayeh; Fendt, Christian; Porth, Oliver; Vaidya, Bhargav; Ghanbari, Jamshid E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2012-09-20

    We investigate the launching of jets and outflows from magnetically diffusive accretion disks. Using the PLUTO code, we solve the time-dependent resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations taking into account the disk and jet evolution simultaneously. The main question we address is which kind of disks launch jets and which kind of disks do not? In particular, we study how the magnitude and distribution of the (turbulent) magnetic diffusivity affect mass loading and jet acceleration. We apply a turbulent magnetic diffusivity based on {alpha}-prescription, but also investigate examples where the scale height of diffusivity is larger than that of the disk gas pressure. We further investigate how the ejection efficiency is governed by the magnetic field strength. Our simulations last for up to 5000 dynamical timescales corresponding to 900 orbital periods of the inner disk. As a general result, we observe a continuous and robust outflow launched from the inner part of the disk, expanding into a collimated jet of superfast-magnetosonic speed. For long timescales, the disk's internal dynamics change, as due to outflow ejection and disk accretion the disk mass decreases. For magnetocentrifugally driven jets, we find that for (1) less diffusive disks, (2) a stronger magnetic field, (3) a low poloidal diffusivity, or (4) a lower numerical diffusivity (resolution), the mass loading of the outflow is increased-resulting in more powerful jets with high-mass flux. For weak magnetization, the (weak) outflow is driven by the magnetic pressure gradient. We consider in detail the advection and diffusion of magnetic flux within the disk and we find that the disk and outflow magnetization may substantially change in time. This may have severe impact on the launching and formation process-an initially highly magnetized disk may evolve into a disk of weak magnetization which cannot drive strong outflows. We further investigate the jet asymptotic velocity and the jet rotational velocity in

  8. On the nature of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in astrophysical plasma: the case of uniform magnetic field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, Andrew S.

    2016-10-01

    The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability has been shown to play a key role in many astrophysical systems. The equation for the growth rate of this instability in the incompressible limit, and the most-unstable mode that can be derived from it, are often used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field that is associated with the observed dynamics. However, there are some issues with the interpretations given. Here, we show that the class of most unstable modes ku for a given θ, the class of modes often used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field from observations, for the system leads to the instability growing as σ2 = 1/2Agku, a growth rate which is independent of the strength of the magnetic field and which highlights that small scales are preferred by the system, but not does not give the fastest growing mode for that given k. We also highlight that outside of the interchange (k ṡ B = 0) and undular (k parallel to B) modes, all the other modes have a perturbation pair of the same wavenumber and growth rate that when excited in the linear regime can result in an interference pattern that gives field aligned filamentary structure often seen in 3D simulations. The analysis was extended to a sheared magnetic field, where it was found that it was possible to extend the results for a non-sheared field to this case. We suggest that without magnetic shear it is too simplistic to be used to infer magnetic field strengths in astrophysical systems.

  9. Absolute stability window and upper bound on the magnetic field strength in a strongly magnetized strange quark star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isayev, A. A.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetized strange quark stars, composed of strange quark matter (SQM) and self-bound by strong interactions, can be formed if the energy per baryon of magnetized SQM is less than that of the most stable 56Fe nucleus under the zero external pressure and temperature. Utilizing the MIT bag model description of magnetized SQM under charge neutrality and beta equilibrium conditions, the corresponding absolute stability window in the parameter space of the theory is determined. It is shown that there exists the maximum magnetic field strength allowed by the condition of absolute stability of magnetized SQM. The value of this field, H 3 × 1018G, represents the upper bound on the magnetic field strength which can be reached in a strongly magnetized strange quark star.

  10. A fast parallel code for calculating energies and oscillator strengths of many-electron atoms at neutron star magnetic field strengths in adiabatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, D.; Klews, M.; Wunner, G.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a new method for the fast computation of wavelengths and oscillator strengths for medium-Z atoms and ions, up to iron, at neutron star magnetic field strengths. The method is a parallelized Hartree-Fock approach in adiabatic approximation based on finite-element and B-spline techniques. It turns out that typically 15-20 finite elements are sufficient to calculate energies to within a relative accuracy of 10-5 in 4 or 5 iteration steps using B-splines of 6th order, with parallelization speed-ups of 20 on a 26-processor machine. Results have been obtained for the energies of the ground states and excited levels and for the transition strengths of astrophysically relevant atoms and ions in the range Z=2…26 in different ionization stages. Catalogue identifier: AECC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3845 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 989 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MPI/Fortran 95 and Python Computer: Cluster of 1-26 HP Compaq dc5750 Operating system: Fedora 7 Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: 1 GByte Classification: 2.1 External routines: MPI/GFortran, LAPACK, PyLab/Matplotlib Nature of problem: Calculations of synthetic spectra [1] of strongly magnetized neutron stars are bedevilled by the lack of data for atoms in intense magnetic fields. While the behaviour of hydrogen and helium has been investigated in detail (see, e.g., [2]), complete and reliable data for heavier elements, in particular iron, are still missing. Since neutron stars are formed by the collapse of the iron cores of massive stars, it may be assumed that their atmospheres contain an iron plasma. Our objective is to fill the gap

  11. Electric-field strength and doping level controlled spin-valley transport in a silicene np junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Tao; Zhai, Xuechao; Yang, Zhihong; Wang, Shendong; Li, Bin

    2016-10-01

    The performance of np junction, as the basic unit of electronic devices, often determines the prospect of a material. We here investigate the spin- and valley-polarized transport in a silicene np junction, where a ferromagnetic field and a perpendicular electric field are applied in the p-doped region. It is found that pure spin current with valley polarization can be obtained under the control of electric-field strength and doping level, arising from the specific dispersion with spin- and valley-polarizations. By tuning the electric field properly, one can even realize a controllable state that supports 100% spin- and valley-polarized transport. At fixed electric field, we also demonstrate that the ferromagnetic field can greatly affect the ratios of spin- and valley-polarizations. These findings suggest that silicene is a promising material for application in future spintronics and valleytronics devices.

  12. Atomic-level Pseudo-degeneracy of Atomic Levels Giving Transitions Induced by Magnetic Fields, of Importance for Determining the Field Strengths in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenxian; Yang, Yang; Tu, Bingsheng; Xiao, Jun; Grumer, Jon; Brage, Tomas; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Hutton, Roger; Zou, Yaming

    2016-08-01

    We present a measured value for the degree of pseudo-degeneracy between two fine-structure levels in Fe9+ from line intensity ratios involving a transition induced by an external magnetic field. The extracted fine-structure energy difference between the 3{p}43d{}4{D}5/2 and {}4{D}7/2 levels, where the latter is the upper state for the magnetic-field induced line, is needed in our recently proposed method to measure magnetic-field strengths in the solar corona. The intensity of the 3{p}43d{}4{D}7/2\\to 3{p}5{}2{P}3/2 line at 257.262 Å is sensitive to the magnetic field external to the ion. This sensitivity is in turn strongly dependent on the energy separation in the pseudo-degeneracy through the mixing induced by the external magnetic field. Our measurement, which uses an Electron Beam Ion Trap with a known magnetic-field strength, indicates that this energy difference is 3.5 cm‑1. The high abundance of Fe9+ and the sensitivity of the line’s transition probability to field strengths below 0.1 T opens up the possibility of diagnosing coronal magnetic fields. We propose a new method to measure the magnetic field in the solar corona, from similar intensity ratios in Fe9+. In addition, the proposed method to use the line ratio of the blended line 3{p}43d{}4{D}7/{2,5/2}\\to 3{p}5{}2{P}3/2 with another line from Fe x as the density diagnostic should evaluate the effect of the magnetic-field-induced transition line.

  13. Atomic-level Pseudo-degeneracy of Atomic Levels Giving Transitions Induced by Magnetic Fields, of Importance for Determining the Field Strengths in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenxian; Yang, Yang; Tu, Bingsheng; Xiao, Jun; Grumer, Jon; Brage, Tomas; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Hutton, Roger; Zou, Yaming

    2016-08-01

    We present a measured value for the degree of pseudo-degeneracy between two fine-structure levels in Fe9+ from line intensity ratios involving a transition induced by an external magnetic field. The extracted fine-structure energy difference between the 3{p}43d{}4{D}5/2 and {}4{D}7/2 levels, where the latter is the upper state for the magnetic-field induced line, is needed in our recently proposed method to measure magnetic-field strengths in the solar corona. The intensity of the 3{p}43d{}4{D}7/2\\to 3{p}5{}2{P}3/2 line at 257.262 Å is sensitive to the magnetic field external to the ion. This sensitivity is in turn strongly dependent on the energy separation in the pseudo-degeneracy through the mixing induced by the external magnetic field. Our measurement, which uses an Electron Beam Ion Trap with a known magnetic-field strength, indicates that this energy difference is 3.5 cm-1. The high abundance of Fe9+ and the sensitivity of the line’s transition probability to field strengths below 0.1 T opens up the possibility of diagnosing coronal magnetic fields. We propose a new method to measure the magnetic field in the solar corona, from similar intensity ratios in Fe9+. In addition, the proposed method to use the line ratio of the blended line 3{p}43d{}4{D}7/{2,5/2}\\to 3{p}5{}2{P}3/2 with another line from Fe x as the density diagnostic should evaluate the effect of the magnetic-field-induced transition line.

  14. The high field strength element budget of atmospheric aerosols (puy de Dôme, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlastelic, Ivan; Suchorski, Krzysztof; Sellegri, Karine; Colomb, Aurélie; Nauret, François; Bouvier, Laetitia; Piro, Jean-Luc

    2015-10-01

    High field strength elements (HFSE), including Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta and Ti have low solubility in aqueous fluids and partition into dense and resistant minerals. HFSE proved useful in studying terrestrial weathering and sediment transport, but little is known about their behavior during atmospheric processes, which play an important role in global sedimentary cycles. The atmospheric budget of HFSE is evaluated from the sequential dissolution of aerosol samples collected between 2011 and 2014 at puy de Dôme (1465 m elevation, French Massif Central). Aerosols were sampled during nighttime, while the site is generally located above the planetary boundary layer. Systematic, partial recovery of HFSE during gentle dissolution of aerosols indicates that resistant minerals are ubiquitous in air samples. Total dissolution of aerosols in pressure vessels reveals that Zr and Hf occur on average in sub-crustal abundance, which is consistent with the sampling site being dominantly influenced by oceanic air masses depleted in zircons. Conversely, zircon excess occasionally occurs in continental air masses, in particular those originating from northern Africa. Overall, the Hf/Nd ratio, a proxy for zircon fractionation, varies from 0.26 to 3.94 times the Upper Continental Crust (UCC) value, encompassing the range of worldwide loess. This wide compositional range is consistent with (1) the occurrence of coarse zircons (10-30 μm) in dust source, with possible local enrichments relative to bulk UCC in residual wind-winnowed soils, and (2) gravitational settling of coarse zircons during long-distance (>ca. 1000 km) transport. Niobium and Ta are systematically more abundant (by a mean factor of ∼3) in puy de Dôme aerosols than expected from average crustal or soil concentrations. The volume-weighted average Nb/Ta ratio of 15.5 ± 2.6 (1σ) is also higher than in bulk UCC (11.4-13.3). The positive Nb-Ta anomaly of free troposphere aerosols unlikely reflects a net Nb-Ta enrichment but

  15. ROLE OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH AND NUMERICAL RESOLUTION IN SIMULATIONS OF THE HEAT-FLUX-DRIVEN BUOYANCY INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Avara, Mark J.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Bogdanovic, Tamara E-mail: chris@astro.umd.edu

    2013-08-20

    The role played by magnetic fields in the intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters is complex. The weakly collisional nature of the ICM leads to thermal conduction that is channeled along field lines. This anisotropic heat conduction profoundly changes the instabilities of the ICM atmosphere, with convective stabilities being driven by temperature gradients of either sign. Here, we employ the Athena magnetohydrodynamic code to investigate the local non-linear behavior of the heat-flux-driven buoyancy instability (HBI) relevant in the cores of cooling-core clusters where the temperature increases with radius. We study a grid of two-dimensional simulations that span a large range of initial magnetic field strengths and numerical resolutions. For very weak initial fields, we recover the previously known result that the HBI wraps the field in the horizontal direction, thereby shutting off the heat flux. However, we find that simulations that begin with intermediate initial field strengths have a qualitatively different behavior, forming HBI-stable filaments that resist field-line wrapping and enable sustained vertical conductive heat flux at a level of 10%-25% of the Spitzer value. While astrophysical conclusions regarding the role of conduction in cooling cores require detailed global models, our local study proves that systems dominated by the HBI do not necessarily quench the conductive heat flux.

  16. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2–5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20–40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110–120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99–164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (<250 Oe). This may extend MNP hyperthermia therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue. PMID:25825545

  17. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, Fridon; Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2-5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20-40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110-120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99-164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (<250 Oe). This may extend MNP hyperthermia therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue.

  18. Mineralogic reservoirs for high-field strength elements in deeply subducted continental sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, R. P.; Shimizu, N.; Irifune, T.; Nishiyama, N.

    2013-12-01

    For more than 40 years now, mantle geochemists have interpreted the isotopic signature of ocean-island basalts (OIB) in terms of deeply recycled crustal lithologies, including terrigeneous sediments, being transported via subduction into the source region for mantle plumes, which reside in the transition zone (MTZ) and/or lower mantle. As such, continent-derived sediments in particular represent domains of extreme isotopic and trace-element heterogeneity relative to the deep primitive mantle (PM). In an effort to understand the extent to which the original geochemical signature of deeply subducted continental material is preserved, and to determine which mineral phases act as reservoirs for transporting key trace-elements (e.g., large-ion lithophile elements, LILE; high-field strength elements, HFSE) into the deep mantle, we have conducted a series of phase-equilibria multi-anvil experiments on natural terrigeneous sediments at pressures appropriate to the base of the MTZ and uppermost lower mantle. The starting materials for these experiments contain modest amounts of water, and a small carbonate component, and their major- and trace-element composition are a close approximation to that of average 'global subducting sediment' (i.e., GLOSS; Plank and Langmuir, 1998). Experiments were conducted over the pressure range ~15-23 GPa, and temperatures between ~1200-1800°C. Below ~22 GPa, the high-pressure phase assemblage consists of K-hollandite, majoritic garnet, stishovite, and depending on temperature, either a hydrous alumino-silicate (e.g., phase-EGG or δ-AlOOH), or kyanite or corundum. Stable accessory minerals at these conditions include rutile, and zircon, where much of the whole-rock complement of HFSE resides, and occasionally monazite. At higher pressure (>23 GPa), the breakdown of garnet produces a Fe-Al-Mg perovskite phase, which is exceptionally rich in TiO2 (up to 9 wt%), and the aforementioned accessory phases are no longer stable. The full phase

  19. Long-term Trends in Interplanetary Magnetic Field Strength and Solar Wind Structure during the 20th Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cliver, E. W.; Cane, H. V.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Lockwood et al have recently reported an approximately 40% increase in the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at Earth between 1964 and 1996. We argue that this increase does not constitute a secular trend but is largely the consequence of lower than average fields during solar cycle 20 (1964-1976) in comparison with surrounding cycles. For times after 1976 the average IMF strength has actually decreased slightly. Examination of the cosmic ray intensity, an indirect measure of the IMF strength, over the last five solar cycles (19-23) also indicates that cycle averages of the IMF strength have been relatively constant since approximately 1954. We also consider the origin of the well-documented increase in the geomagnetic alphaalpha index that occurred primarily during the first half of the twentieth century. We surmise that the coronal mass ejection (CME) rate for recent solar cycles was approximately twice as high as that for solar cycles 100 years ago. However, this change in the CME rate and the accompanying increase in 27-day recurrent storm activity reported by others are unable to account completely for the increase in alphaalpha. Rather, the CMEs and recurrent high-speed streams at the beginning of the twentieth century must have been embedded in a background of slow solar wind that was less geoeffective (having, for example, lower IMF strength and/or flow speed) than its modern counterpart.

  20. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Model Potential Calculations of Oscillator Strength Spectra of Rydberg Li Atoms in External Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui-Yan; Shi, Ting-Yun

    2009-08-01

    By combining the B-spline basis set with model potential (B-spline + MP), we present oscillator strength spectra of Rydberg Li atoms in external fields. The photoabsorption spectra are analyzed. Over the narrow energy ranges considered in this paper, the structure of the spectra can be independent of the initial state chosen for a given atom. Our results are in good agreement with previous high-precision experimental data and theoretical calculations, where the R-matrix approach together with multichannel quantum defect theory (R-matrix+MQDT) was used. It is suggested that the present methods can be applied to deal with the oscillator strength spectra of Rydberg atoms in crossed electric and magnetic fields.

  1. A robust method to estimate the intracranial volume across MRI field strengths (1.5T and 3T).

    PubMed

    Keihaninejad, Shiva; Heckemann, Rolf A; Fagiolo, Gianlorenzo; Symms, Mark R; Hajnal, Joseph V; Hammers, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    As population-based studies may obtain images from scanners with different field strengths, a method to normalize regional brain volumes according to intracranial volume (ICV) independent of field strength is needed. We found systematic differences in ICV estimation, tested in a cohort of healthy subjects (n=5) that had been imaged using 1.5T and 3T scanners, and confirmed in two independent cohorts. This was related to systematic differences in the intensity of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), with higher intensities for CSF located in the ventricles compared with CSF in the cisterns, at 3T versus 1.5T, which could not be removed with three different applied bias correction algorithms. We developed a method based on tissue probability maps in MNI (Montreal Neurological Institute) space and reverse normalization (reverse brain mask, RBM) and validated it against manual ICV measurements. We also compared it with alternative automated ICV estimation methods based on Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM5) and Brain Extraction Tool (FSL). The proposed RBM method was equivalent to manual ICV normalization with a high intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC=0.99) and reliable across different field strengths. RBM achieved the best combination of precision and reliability in a group of healthy subjects, a group of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and can be used as a common normalization framework.

  2. Relationship of magnetic field strength and brightness of fine-structure elements in the solar temperature minimum region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. W.; Ewing, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A quantitative relationship was determined between magnetic field strength (or magnetic flux) from photospheric magnetograph observations and the brightness temperature of solar fine-structure elements observed at 1600 A, where the predominant flux source is continuum emission from the solar temperature minimum region. A Kitt Peak magnetogram and spectroheliograph observations at 1600 A taken during a sounding rocket flight of the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph from December 11, 1987 were used. The statistical distributions of brightness temperature in the quiet sun at 1600 A, and absolute value of magnetic field strength in the same area were determined from these observations. Using a technique which obtains the best-fit relationship of a given functional form between these two histogram distributions, a quantitative relationship was determined between absolute value of magnetic field strength B and brightness temperature which is essentially linear from 10 to 150 G. An interpretation is suggested, in which a basal heating occurs generally, while brighter elements are produced in magnetic regions with temperature enhancements proportional to B.

  3. Effect of magnetic field strength on the alignment of α''-Fe16N2 nanoparticle films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartikowati, Christina W.; Suhendi, Asep; Zulhijah, Rizka; Ogi, Takashi; Iwaki, Toru; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2016-01-01

    Aligning the magnetic orientation is one strategy to improve the magnetic performance of magnetic materials. In this study, well-dispersed single-domain core-shell α''-Fe16N2/Al2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) were aligned by vertically applying magnetic fields with various strengths to a Si wafer substrate followed by fixation with resin. X-ray diffraction indicated that the alignment of the easy c-axis of the α''-Fe16N2 crystal and the magnetic orientation of the NPs depended upon the applied magnetic field. Magnetic analysis demonstrated that increasing the magnetic field strength resulted in hysteresis loops approaching a rectangular form, implying a higher magnetic coercivity, remanence, and maximum energy product. The same tendency was also observed when a horizontal magnetic field was applied. The fixation of the easy c-axis alignment of each nanoparticle caused by Brownian rotation under the magnetic field, instead of Néel rotation, was the reason for the enhancement in the magnetic performance. These results on the alignment of the magnetic orientation of α''-Fe16N2 NPs suggest the practical application of high-performance permanent bulk magnets from well-dispersed single-domain α''-Fe16N2/Al2O3 NPs.

  4. Effect of magnetic field strength on the alignment of α''-Fe16N2 nanoparticle films.

    PubMed

    Kartikowati, Christina W; Suhendi, Asep; Zulhijah, Rizka; Ogi, Takashi; Iwaki, Toru; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2016-02-01

    Aligning the magnetic orientation is one strategy to improve the magnetic performance of magnetic materials. In this study, well-dispersed single-domain core-shell α''-Fe16N2/Al2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) were aligned by vertically applying magnetic fields with various strengths to a Si wafer substrate followed by fixation with resin. X-ray diffraction indicated that the alignment of the easy c-axis of the α''-Fe16N2 crystal and the magnetic orientation of the NPs depended upon the applied magnetic field. Magnetic analysis demonstrated that increasing the magnetic field strength resulted in hysteresis loops approaching a rectangular form, implying a higher magnetic coercivity, remanence, and maximum energy product. The same tendency was also observed when a horizontal magnetic field was applied. The fixation of the easy c-axis alignment of each nanoparticle caused by Brownian rotation under the magnetic field, instead of Néel rotation, was the reason for the enhancement in the magnetic performance. These results on the alignment of the magnetic orientation of α''-Fe16N2 NPs suggest the practical application of high-performance permanent bulk magnets from well-dispersed single-domain α''-Fe16N2/Al2O3 NPs.

  5. On the importance of body posture and skin modelling with respect to in situ electric field strengths in magnetic field exposure scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Gernot; Hirtl, Rene

    2016-06-01

    The reference levels and maximum permissible exposure values for magnetic fields that are currently used have been derived from basic restrictions under the assumption of upright standing body models in a standard posture, i.e. with arms laterally down and without contact with metallic objects. Moreover, if anatomical modelling of the body was used at all, the skin was represented as a single homogeneous tissue layer. In the present paper we addressed the possible impacts of posture and skin modelling in scenarios of exposure to a 50 Hz uniform magnetic field on the in situ electric field strength in peripheral tissues, which must be limited in order to avoid peripheral nerve stimulation. We considered different body postures including situations where body parts form large induction loops (e.g. clasped hands) with skin-to-skin and skin-to-metal contact spots and compared the results obtained with a homogeneous single-layer skin model to results obtained with a more realistic two-layer skin representation consisting of a low-conductivity stratum corneum layer on top of a combined layer for the cellular epidermis and dermis. Our results clearly indicated that postures with loops formed of body parts may lead to substantially higher maximum values of induced in situ electric field strengths than in the case of standard postures due to a highly concentrated current density and in situ electric field strength in the skin-to-skin and skin-to-metal contact regions. With a homogeneous single-layer skin, as is used for even the most recent anatomical body models in exposure assessment, the in situ electric field strength may exceed the basic restrictions in such situations, even when the reference levels and maximum permissible exposure values are not exceeded. However, when using the more realistic two-layer skin model the obtained in situ electric field strengths were substantially lower and no violations of the basic restrictions occurred, which can be explained by the

  6. Influence of applied magnetic field strength and frequency response of pick-up coil on the magnetic barkhausen noise profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashista, M.; Moorthy, V.

    2013-11-01

    The influence of applied magnetic field strength and frequency response of the pick-up coil on the shape of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) profile have been studied. The low frequency MBN measurements have been carried out using 5 different MBN pick-up coils at two different ranges of applied magnetic field strengths on quenched and tempered (QT) and case-carburised and tempered (CT) 18CrNiMo7 steel bar samples. The MBN pick-up coils have been designed to obtain different frequency response such that the peak frequency response varies from ˜4 kHz to ˜32 kHz and the amplitude of low frequency signals decreases gradually. At lower applied magnetic field strength of ±14,000 A/m, all the pick-up coils produced a single peak MBN profile for both QT and CT sample. However, at higher applied magnetic field strength of ±22,000 A/m, the MBN profile showed two peaks for both QT and CT samples for pick-up coils with peak frequency response up to ˜17 kHz. Also, there is systematic reduction in peak 2 for QT sample and asymmetric reduction in the heights of peak 1 and peak 2 for CT sample with increase in peak frequency response of the pick-up coils. The decreasing sensitivity of pick-up coils with increasing peak frequency response to MBN signal generation is indicated by the gradual reduction in width of MBN profile and height of peak 2 in the QT sample. The drastic reduction in peak 1 as compared to peak 2 in the CT sample shows the effect of decreasing low frequency response of the pick-up coils on lowering skin-depth of MBN signal detection. This study clearly suggests that it is essential to optimise both maximum applied magnetic field strength and frequency response of the MBN pick-up coil for maximising the shape of the MBN profile for appropriate correlation with the magnetisation process and hence the material properties.

  7. Upper bound on the magnetic field strength in the quark core of a strongly-magnetized compact star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isayev, Alexander; Yang, Jongmann

    2014-09-01

    Two types of strongly-magnetized compact stars, represented by magnetized strange quark stars and magnetized hybrid stars, are considered. In each case, there exists an upper bound H max on the magnetic field strength in the interior of a compact star. For a magnetized strange quark star, H max is determined by the magnetic field at which the upper bound on the bag pressure from the absolute stability window of magnetized strange quark matter (SQM) vanishes, assuming the Massachusetts Institute of Technology bag model description of SQM. For a hybrid star, H max is represented by the critical magnetic field for the occurrence of a longitudinal (along the magnetic field) instability in the quark core, at which the longitudinal pressure in magnetized SQM vanishes.

  8. The effects of different speed training protocols on sprint acceleration kinematics and muscle strength and power in field sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Robert G; Murphy, Aron J; Schultz, Adrian B; Knight, Timothy J; Janse de Jonge, Xanne A K

    2012-06-01

    A variety of resistance training interventions are used to improve field sport acceleration (e.g., free sprinting, weights, plyometrics, resisted sprinting). The effects these protocols have on acceleration performance and components of sprint technique have not been clearly defined in the literature. This study assessed 4 common protocols (free sprint training [FST], weight training [WT], plyometric training [PT], and resisted sprint training [RST]) for changes in acceleration kinematics, power, and strength in field sport athletes. Thirty-five men were divided into 4 groups (FST: n = 9; WT: n = 8; PT: n = 9; RST: n = 9) matched for 10-m velocity. Training involved two 60-minute sessions per week for 6 weeks. After the interventions, paired-sample t-tests identified significant (p ≤ 0.05) within-group changes. All the groups increased the 0- to 5-m and 0- to 10-m velocity by 9-10%. The WT and PT groups increased the 5- to 10-m velocity by approximately 10%. All the groups increased step length for all distance intervals. The FST group decreased 0- to 5-m flight time and step frequency in all intervals and increased 0- to 5-m and 0- to 10-m contact time. Power and strength adaptations were protocol specific. The FST group improved horizontal power as measured by a 5-bound test. The FST, PT, and RST groups all improved reactive strength index derived from a 40-cm drop jump, indicating enhanced muscle stretch-shortening capacity during rebound from impacts. The WT group increased absolute and relative strength measured by a 3-repetition maximum squat by approximately 15%. Step length was the major limiting sprint performance factor for the athletes in this study. Correctly administered, each training protocol can be effective in improving acceleration. To increase step length and improve acceleration, field sport athletes should develop specific horizontal and reactive power. PMID:21912294

  9. The effects of different speed training protocols on sprint acceleration kinematics and muscle strength and power in field sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Robert G; Murphy, Aron J; Schultz, Adrian B; Knight, Timothy J; Janse de Jonge, Xanne A K

    2012-06-01

    A variety of resistance training interventions are used to improve field sport acceleration (e.g., free sprinting, weights, plyometrics, resisted sprinting). The effects these protocols have on acceleration performance and components of sprint technique have not been clearly defined in the literature. This study assessed 4 common protocols (free sprint training [FST], weight training [WT], plyometric training [PT], and resisted sprint training [RST]) for changes in acceleration kinematics, power, and strength in field sport athletes. Thirty-five men were divided into 4 groups (FST: n = 9; WT: n = 8; PT: n = 9; RST: n = 9) matched for 10-m velocity. Training involved two 60-minute sessions per week for 6 weeks. After the interventions, paired-sample t-tests identified significant (p ≤ 0.05) within-group changes. All the groups increased the 0- to 5-m and 0- to 10-m velocity by 9-10%. The WT and PT groups increased the 5- to 10-m velocity by approximately 10%. All the groups increased step length for all distance intervals. The FST group decreased 0- to 5-m flight time and step frequency in all intervals and increased 0- to 5-m and 0- to 10-m contact time. Power and strength adaptations were protocol specific. The FST group improved horizontal power as measured by a 5-bound test. The FST, PT, and RST groups all improved reactive strength index derived from a 40-cm drop jump, indicating enhanced muscle stretch-shortening capacity during rebound from impacts. The WT group increased absolute and relative strength measured by a 3-repetition maximum squat by approximately 15%. Step length was the major limiting sprint performance factor for the athletes in this study. Correctly administered, each training protocol can be effective in improving acceleration. To increase step length and improve acceleration, field sport athletes should develop specific horizontal and reactive power.

  10. In situ rock strength and far field stress in the Nankai accretionary complex: Integration of downhole data from multiple wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, K. A.; Saffer, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Knowing the magnitude of tectonic stress and rock strength at seismically active margins is important towards understanding fault strength and failure mechanics, yet both are difficult to measure in situ. Recent work at subduction margins, including Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Nankai Trough Subduction Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) drillsites, uses the width of compressional wellbore breakouts (BO), which depends on far field stress conditions, rock strength, and borehole annular pressure (APRS), to estimate the magnitude of horizontal principal stresses (SHmax and Shmin); estimates are problematic due to uncertainty in rock strength (unconfined compressive strength/UCS- for which direct measurements are scarce) and rheology that govern stress distribution at the wellbore. We conduct a novel case study at IODP Site C0002, where a hole was drilled twice with different boundary conditions, providing an opportunity to define in situ stress and strength from field data. Site C0002 is the main deep riser borehole for NanTroSEIZE, located near the seaward edge of the Kumano Basin above the seismogenic plate boundary, ~30 km from the trench. Several boreholes were drilled at the site. During IODP Expedition 314 in 2007, Hole C0002A was drilled with a suite of logging while drilling (LWD) tools to 1401 mbsf in a riserless mode. Hole C0002F, ~70 m away, was drilled to 862 mbsf in riserless mode during Exp. 326 in 2010 and deepened to 2005 mbsf in a riser mode during Expedition 338 in 2012-2013. Increased APRS achieved by riser drilling stabilizes the borehole and suppresses BO, consistent with resistivity imaging data from Exp. 314 that document well-developed, continuous BO throughout the borehole, and data from Expedition 338 indicating few BO. We use a semi-Newtonian approach to solve for stress and UCS consistent with the observed BO width and measured APRS in the two holes over the interval from 862-2005 mbsf. Effective SHmax ranges from ~10-30 MPa and

  11. Multi-scale Anti-correlation Between Electron Density and Magnetic Field Strength in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuo; He, J.-S.; Marsch, E.; Tu, C.-Y.; Pedersen, A.; Rème, H.; Trotignon, J. G.

    2011-02-01

    This work focuses on the relation between the electron density and the magnetic field strength in the solar wind, and aims to reveal its compressive nature and to determine the level of compressibility. For this purpose, we choose a period of quiet solar wind data obtained at 1 AU by the Cluster C1 satellite. The electron density is derived with a sampling time as high as 0.2 s from the spacecraft-potential measurements made by the Electric Field and Waves instrument. We use the wavelet cross-coherence method to analyze the correlation between the electron density and the magnetic field strength on various scales. We find a dominant anti-correlation between them at different timescales ranging from 1000 s down to 10 s, a result which has never been reported before. This may indicate the existence of pressure-balanced structures (PBSs) with different sizes in the solar wind. The small (mini) PBSs appear to be embedded in the large PBSs, without affecting the pressure balance between the large structures. Thus, a nesting of these possible multi-scale PBSs is found. Moreover, we find for the first time that the relative fluctuation spectra of both the electron number density and the magnetic field strength look almost the same in the range from 0.01 Hz to 2.5 Hz, implying a similar cascading for these two types of fluctuations. Probable formation mechanisms for the multi-scale possible PBSs are discussed. The results of our work are believed to be helpful for understanding the compressive nature of solar wind turbulence as well as the connections between the solar wind streams and their coronal sources.

  12. Rieger-type Periodicity during Solar Cycles 14–24: Estimation of Dynamo Magnetic Field Strength in the Solar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurgenashvili, Eka; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Kukhianidze, Vasil; Oliver, Ramon; Ballester, Jose Luis; Ramishvili, Giorgi; Shergelashvili, Bidzina; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Poedts, Stefaan

    2016-07-01

    Solar activity undergoes a variation over timescales of several months known as Rieger-type periodicity, which usually occurs near maxima of sunspot cycles. An early analysis showed that the periodicity appears only in some cycles and is absent in other cycles. But the appearance/absence during different cycles has not been explained. We performed a wavelet analysis of sunspot data from the Greenwich Royal Observatory and the Royal Observatory of Belgium during cycles 14–24. We found that the Rieger-type periods occur in all cycles, but they are cycle dependent: shorter periods occur during stronger cycles. Our analysis revealed a periodicity of 185–195 days during the weak cycles 14–15 and 24 and a periodicity of 155–165 days during the stronger cycles 16–23. We derived the dispersion relation of the spherical harmonics of the magnetic Rossby waves in the presence of differential rotation and a toroidal magnetic field in the dynamo layer near the base of the convection zone. This showed that the harmonics of fast Rossby waves with m = 1 and n = 4, where m (n) indicates the toroidal (poloidal) wavenumbers, perfectly fit with the observed periodicity. The variation of the toroidal field strength from weaker to stronger cycles may lead to the different periods found in those cycles, which explains the observed enigmatic feature of the Rieger-type periodicity. Finally, we used the observed periodicity to estimate the dynamo field strength during cycles 14–24. Our estimations suggest a field strength of ˜40 kG for the stronger cycles and ˜20 kG for the weaker cycles.

  13. The dependence of potential well formation on the magnetic field strength and electron injection current in a polywell device

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, S. Gummersall, D.; Carr, M.; Khachan, J.

    2014-09-15

    A capacitive probe has been used to measure the plasma potential in a polywell device in order to observe the dependence of potential well formation on magnetic field strength, electron injection current, and polywell voltage bias. The effectiveness of the capacitive probe in a high energy electron plasma was determined by measuring the plasma potential of a planar diode with an axial magnetic field. The capacitive probe was translated along the axis of one of the field coils of the polywell, and the spatial profile of the potential well was measured. The confinement time of electrons in the polywell was estimated with a simple analytical model which used the experimentally observed potential well depths, as well as a simulation of the electron trajectories using particle orbit theory.

  14. Feasibility of normal tissue dose reduction in radiotherapy using low strength magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Youngseob; Jung, In-Hye; Kwak, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Toxicity of mucosa is one of the major concerns of radiotherapy (RT), when a target tumor is located near a mucosal lined organ. Energy of photon RT is transferred primarily by secondary electrons. If these secondary electrons could be removed in an internal cavity of mucosal lined organ, the mucosa will be spared without compromising the target tumor dose. The purpose of this study was to present a RT dose reduction in near target inner-surface (NTIS) of internal cavity, using Lorentz force of magnetic field. Materials and Methods Tissue equivalent phantoms, composed with a cylinder shaped internal cavity, and adjacent a target tumor part, were developed. The phantoms were irradiated using 6 MV photon beam, with or without 0.3 T of perpendicular magnetic field. Two experimental models were developed: single beam model (SBM) to analyze central axis dose distributions and multiple beam model (MBM) to simulate a clinical case of prostate cancer with rectum. RT dose of NTIS of internal cavity and target tumor area (TTA) were measured. Results With magnetic field applied, bending effect of dose distribution was visualized. The depth dose distribution of SBM showed 28.1% dose reduction of NTIS and little difference in dose of TTA with magnetic field. In MBM, cross-sectional dose of NTIS was reduced by 33.1% with magnetic field, while TTA dose were the same, irrespective of magnetic field. Conclusion RT dose of mucosal lined organ, located near treatment target, could be modulated by perpendicular magnetic field. PMID:26484306

  15. An experimental study on the effects of temperature and magnetic field strength on the magnetorheological fluid stability and MR effect.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Yahya; Ashtiani, Mahshid; Hashemabadi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-06-14

    In this study, the stability and rheological properties of a suspension of carbonyl iron microparticles (CIMs) in silicone oil were investigated within a temperature range of 10 to 85 °C. The effect of adding two hydrophobic (stearic and palmitic) acids on the stability and magnetorheological effect of a suspension of CIMs in silicone oil was studied. According to the results, for preparing a stable and efficient magnetorheological (MR) fluid, additives should be utilized. Therefore, 3 wt% of stearic acid was added to the MR fluid which led to an enhancement of the fluid stability over 92% at 25 °C. By investigating shear stress variation due to the changes in the shear rate for acid-based MR fluids, the maximum yield stress was obtained by fitting the Bingham plastic rheological model at high shear rates. Based on the existing correlations of yield stress and either temperature or magnetic field strength, a new model was fitted to the experimental data to monitor the simultaneous effect of magnetic field strength and temperature on the maximum yield stress. The results demonstrated that as the magnetic field intensified or the temperature decreased, the maximum yield stress increased dramatically. In addition, when the MR fluid reached its magnetic saturation, the viscosity of fluid depended only on the shear rate. PMID:25940850

  16. An experimental study on the effects of temperature and magnetic field strength on the magnetorheological fluid stability and MR effect.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Yahya; Ashtiani, Mahshid; Hashemabadi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-06-14

    In this study, the stability and rheological properties of a suspension of carbonyl iron microparticles (CIMs) in silicone oil were investigated within a temperature range of 10 to 85 °C. The effect of adding two hydrophobic (stearic and palmitic) acids on the stability and magnetorheological effect of a suspension of CIMs in silicone oil was studied. According to the results, for preparing a stable and efficient magnetorheological (MR) fluid, additives should be utilized. Therefore, 3 wt% of stearic acid was added to the MR fluid which led to an enhancement of the fluid stability over 92% at 25 °C. By investigating shear stress variation due to the changes in the shear rate for acid-based MR fluids, the maximum yield stress was obtained by fitting the Bingham plastic rheological model at high shear rates. Based on the existing correlations of yield stress and either temperature or magnetic field strength, a new model was fitted to the experimental data to monitor the simultaneous effect of magnetic field strength and temperature on the maximum yield stress. The results demonstrated that as the magnetic field intensified or the temperature decreased, the maximum yield stress increased dramatically. In addition, when the MR fluid reached its magnetic saturation, the viscosity of fluid depended only on the shear rate.

  17. Determination of the electric field strength of filamentary DBDs by CARS-based four-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, P.; Kettlitz, M.; Brandenburg, R.; Höft, H.; Czarnetzki, U.

    2016-10-01

    It is demonstrated that a four-wave mixing technique based on coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) can determine the electric field strength of a pulsed-driven filamentary dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) of 1 mm gap, using hydrogen as a tracer medium in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. The measurements are presented for a hydrogen admixture of 10%, but even 5% H2 admixture delivers sufficient infrared signals. The lasers do not affect the discharge by photoionization or by other radiation-induced processes. The absolute values of the electric field strength can be determined by the calibration of the CARS setup with high voltage amplitudes below the ignition threshold of the arrangement. This procedure also enables the determination of the applied breakdown voltage. The alteration of the electric field is observed during the internal polarity reversal and the breakdown process. One advantage of the CARS technique over emission-based methods is that it can be used independently of emission, e.g. in the pre-phase and in between two consecutive discharges, where no emission occurs at all.

  18. On the strength of oceanic fracture zones and their influence on the intraplate stress field

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, E.A.; Solomon, S.C. )

    1992-10-01

    We use the locations and source mechanisms of oceanic intraplate earthquakes to test the hypothesis that the strength of oceanic fracture zones is less than that of normal oceanic lithosphere. The 77 earthquakes selected for the study have well-determined focal mechanisms and epicenters in regions where fracture zones are well mapped. We have search for dependence of faulting style, fault orientation, or principal stress direction on the distance from the nearest fracture zone. If fracture zones were generally weaker than the surrounding lithosphere, one of the principal horizontal stresses would be oriented nearly perpendicular to the fracture zone; we find no evidence that principal stresses near fracture zones are oriented preferentially in this manner. There is a slight tendency for earthquakes to occur near fracture zones, and patterns of fault orientation and sense of slip support the view that differential cooling and horizontal contraction on fracture zones may contribute seismogenic stress. 56 refs.

  19. Can Images Obtained With High Field Strength Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reduce Contouring Variability of the Prostate?

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, Nawaid; Sloboda, Ron; Kamal, Wafa; Ghosh, Sunita; Pervez, Nadeem; Pedersen, John; Yee, Don; Danielson, Brita; Murtha, Albert; Amanie, John; Monajemi, Tara

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to determine whether there is less contouring variability of the prostate using higher-strength magnetic resonance images (MRI) compared with standard MRI and computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Forty patients treated with prostate brachytherapy were accrued to a prospective study that included the acquisition of 1.5-T MR and CT images at specified time points. A subset of 10 patients had additional 3.0-T MR images acquired at the same time as their 1.5-T MR scans. Images from each of these patients were contoured by 5 radiation oncologists, with a random subset of patients repeated to quantify intraobserver contouring variability. To minimize bias in contouring the prostate, the image sets were placed in folders in a random order with all identifiers removed from the images. Results: Although there was less interobserver contouring variability in the overall prostate volumes in 1.5-T MRI compared with 3.0-T MRI (p < 0.01), there was no significant differences in contouring variability in the different regions of the prostate between 1.5-T MRI and 3.0-T MRI. MRI demonstrated significantly less interobserver contouring variability in both 1.5-T and 3.0-T compared with CT in overall prostate volumes (p < 0.01, p = 0.01), with the greatest benefits being appreciated in the base of the prostate. Overall, there was less intraobserver contouring variability than interobserver contouring variability for all of the measurements analyzed. Conclusions: Use of 3.0-T MRI does not demonstrate a significant improvement in contouring variability compared with 1.5-T MRI, although both magnetic strengths demonstrated less contouring variability compared with CT.

  20. WE-G-18C-05: Characterization of Cross-Vendor, Cross-Field Strength MR Image Intensity Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, E; Prah, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Variations in MR image intensity and image intensity nonuniformity (IINU) can challenge the accuracy of intensity-based image segmentation and registration algorithms commonly applied in radiotherapy. The goal of this work was to characterize MR image intensity variations across scanner vendors and field strengths commonly used in radiotherapy. Methods: ACR-MRI phantom images were acquired at 1.5T and 3.0T on GE (450w and 750, 23.1), Siemens (Espree and Verio, VB17B), and Philips (Ingenia, 4.1.3) scanners using commercial spin-echo sequences with matched parameters (TE/TR: 20/500 ms, rBW: 62.5 kHz, TH/skip: 5/5mm). Two radiofrequency (RF) coil combinations were used for each scanner: body coil alone, and combined body and phased-array head coils. Vendorspecific B1- corrections (PURE/Pre-Scan Normalize/CLEAR) were applied in all head coil cases. Images were transferred offline, corrected for IINU using the MNI N3 algorithm, and normalized. Coefficients of variation (CV=σ/μ) and peak image uniformity (PIU = 1−(Smax−Smin)/(Smax+Smin)) estimates were calculated for one homogeneous phantom slice. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon matched-pairs tests compared mean MR signal intensities and differences between original and N3 image CV and PIU. Results: Wide variations in both MR image intensity and IINU were observed across scanner vendors, field strengths, and RF coil configurations. Applying the MNI N3 correction for IINU resulted in significant improvements in both CV and PIU (p=0.0115, p=0.0235). However, wide variations in overall image intensity persisted, requiring image normalization to improve consistency across vendors, field strengths, and RF coils. These results indicate that B1- correction routines alone may be insufficient in compensating for IINU and image scaling, warranting additional corrections prior to use of MR images in radiotherapy. Conclusions: MR image intensities and IINU vary as a function of scanner vendor, field strength, and RF coil

  1. Disorder Strength and Field-Driven Ground State Domain Formation in Artificial Spin Ice: Experiment, Simulation, and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budrikis, Zoe; Morgan, J. P.; Akerman, J.; Stein, A.; Politi, Paolo; Langridge, S.; Marrows, C. H.; Stamps, R. L.

    2012-07-01

    Quenched disorder affects how nonequilibrium systems respond to driving. In the context of artificial spin ice, an athermal system comprised of geometrically frustrated classical Ising spins with a twofold degenerate ground state, we give experimental and numerical evidence of how such disorder washes out edge effects and provide an estimate of disorder strength in the experimental system. We prove analytically that a sequence of applied fields with fixed amplitude is unable to drive the system to its ground state from a saturated state. These results should be relevant for other systems where disorder does not change the nature of the ground state.

  2. An estimate of the magnetic field strength associated with a solar coronal mass ejection from low frequency radio observations

    SciTech Connect

    Sasikumar Raja, K.; Ramesh, R.; Hariharan, K.; Kathiravan, C.; Wang, T. J.

    2014-11-20

    We report ground based, low frequency heliograph (80 MHz), spectral (85-35 MHz), and polarimeter (80 and 40 MHz) observations of drifting, non-thermal radio continuum associated with the 'halo' coronal mass ejection that occurred in the solar atmosphere on 2013 March 15. The magnetic field strengths (B) near the radio source were estimated to be B ≈ 2.2 ± 0.4 G at 80 MHz and B ≈ 1.4 ± 0.2 G at 40 MHz. The corresponding radial distances (r) are r ≈ 1.9 R {sub ☉} (80 MHz) and r ≈ 2.2 R {sub ☉} (40 MHz).

  3. How the Strength and Thickness of Field-aligned Currents Depend on Solar Wind and Ionospheric Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J.; Wing, S.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, Wing et al. [2011] examined the dependence of field-aligned currents, peak electron energy, and electron energy flux on solar wind parameters. We provide an analytical analysis of how velocity shear layers couple to the ionosphere via field-aligned currents. In the model, we use the Knight relation to express the field-aligned current in terms of the potential drop between the magnetosphere and ionosphere and solve for the ionospheric potential using current continuity. We obtain an analytic expression for the dependence of the current, the current maximum, and the current thickness on the magnetosheath velocity, magnetopause shear layer thickness, magnetospheric density and temperature, and ionospheric conductivity. We compare the analytical results for the current profiles using the magnetic field instruments on board the DMSP satellites. Estimates for FAC strength and thickness allow us to constrain the model to estimate the thickness of the magnetopause velocity shear layer, which is consistent with in situ observations and kinetic simulations. Finally, we discuss how the presence of waves could affect the field-aligned currents. Wing, S., S. Ohtani, J. R. Johnson, M. Echim, P. T. Newell, T. Higuchi, G. Ueno, and G. R. Wilson (2011), Solar wind driving of dayside field-aligned currents, J. Geophys. Res., 116, A08208, doi:10.1029/2011JA016579.

  4. VLF Radio Field Strength Measurement of power line carrier system in San Diego, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertel, H. K.

    1981-01-01

    The radio frequency interference (RFI) potential was evaluated for a Powerline Carriet (PLC) installed in San Diego which monitors the performance of an electrical power system. The PLC system generated 30 amperes at 5.79 kHz. The RF radiations were measured to be (typically) 120 dBuV/m at the beginning of the 12 kV powerline and 60 dBuV/m at the end of the powerline. The RF fields varied inversely as the distance squared. Measurements were also performed with a 45 kHz PLC system. The RF fields were of similar amplitude.

  5. Smaller Forbush Decreases in Solar Cycle 24: Effect of the Weak CME Field Strength?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, N.

    2015-12-01

    A Forbush decrease (FD) is a sudden depression in the intensity of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) background, followed by a gradual recovery. One of the major causes of FDs is the presence of magnetic structures such as magnetic clouds (MCs) or corotating interaction regions (CIRs) that have enhanced magnetic field, which can scatter particles away reducing the observed GCR intensity. Recent work (Gopalswamy et al. 2014, GRL 41, 2673) suggests that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are expanding anomalously in solar cycle 24 due to the reduced total pressure in the ambient medium. One of the consequences of the anomalous expansion is the reduced magnetic content of MCs, so we expect subdued FDs in cycle 24. In this paper, we present preliminary results from a survey of FDs during MC events in cycle 24 in comparison with those in cycle 23. We find that only ~17% FDs in cycle 24 had an amplitude >3%, as compared to ~31% in cycle 23. This result is consistent with the difference in the maximum magnetic field intensities (Bmax) of MCs in the two cycles: only ~ 10% of MCs in cycle 24 have Bmax>20nT, compared to 22% in cycle 23, confirming that MCs of cycle 24 have weaker magnetic field content. Therefore, we suggest that weaker magnetic field intensity in the magnetic clouds of cycle 24 has led to FDs with smaller amplitudes.

  6. 47 CFR 2.1053 - Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Equipment Authorization... the measuring instrument antenna located in the far-field at all test frequencies. In the event it is... the transmitter, assuming all emissions are radiated from halfwave dipole antennas. (b)...

  7. Local Electric Field Strength in a Hollow Cathode Determined by Stark Splitting of the 2S Level of Hydrogen Isotopes by Optogalvanic Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, C.; Rosa, M. I. de la; Gruetzmacher, K.; Fuentes, L. M.; Gonzalo, A. B.

    2008-10-22

    In this work we present Doppler-free two-photon optogalvanic spectroscopy as a tool to measure the electric field strength in the cathode fall region of a hollow cathode discharge via the Stark splitting of the 2S level of atomic deuterium. The strong electric field strength present in the hollow cathode is determined for various discharge conditions which allows studying the corresponding variations of the cathode fall, and its changes with discharge operation time.

  8. Microparticles in a Collisional Rf Plasma Sheath under Hypergravity Conditions as Probes for the Electric Field Strength and the Particle Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Beckers, J.; Stoffels, W. W.; Dijk, J. van; Kroesen, G. M. W.; Ockenga, T.; Wolter, M.; Kersten, H.

    2011-03-18

    We used microparticles under hypergravity conditions, induced by a centrifuge, in order to measure nonintrusively and spatially resolved the electric field strength as well as the particle charge in the collisional rf plasma sheath. The measured electric field strengths demonstrate good agreement with the literature, while the particle charge shows decreasing values towards the electrode. We demonstrate that it is indeed possible to measure these important quantities without changing or disturbing the plasma.

  9. Fiber-Optic Magnetic-Field-Strength Measurement System for Lightning Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurecki, Jay; Scully, Robert; Davis, Allen; Kirkendall, Clay; Bucholtz, Frank

    2011-01-01

    A fiber-optic sensor system is designed to measure magnetic fields associated with a lightning stroke. Field vector magnitudes are detected and processed for multiple locations. Since physical limitations prevent the sensor elements from being located in close proximity to highly conductive materials such as aluminum, the copper wire sensor elements (3) are located inside a 4-cubic-in. (.66-cubic-cm) plastic housing sensor head and connected to a fiber-optic conversion module by shielded cabling, which is limited to the shortest length feasible. The signal path between the conversion module and the avionics unit which processes the signals are fiber optic, providing enhanced immunity from electromagnetic radiation incident in the vicinity of the measurements. The sensors are passive, lightweight, and much smaller than commercial B-dot sensors in the configuration which measures a three-dimensional magnetic field. The system is expandable, and provides a standard-format output signal for downstream processing. Inside of the sensor head, three small search coils, each having a few turns on a circular form, are mounted orthogonally inside the non-metallic housing. The fiber-optic conversion module comprises three interferometers, one for each search coil. Each interferometer has a high bandwidth optical phase modulator that impresses the signal received from its search coil onto its output. The output of each interferometer travels by fiber optic cable to the avionics unit, and the search coil signal is recovered by an optical phase demodulator. The output of each demodulator is fed to an analog-to-digital converter, whose sampling rate is determined by the maximum expected rate of rise and peak signal magnitude. The output of the digital processor is a faithful reproduction of the coil response to the incident magnetic field. This information is provided in a standard output format on a 50-ohm port that can be connected to any number of data collection and processing

  10. High strength kiloampere Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox cables for high-field magnet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tengming; Li, Pei; Jiang, Jianyi; Cooley, Lance; Tompkins, John; McRae, Dustin; Walsh, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Multifilamentary Ag-sheathed Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (Bi-2212) wire can carry sufficient critical current density Jc for the development of powerful superconducting magnets. However, the range of its applications is limited by the low mechanical strength of the Ag/Bi-2212 strand. A potential solution is to cable Ag/Bi-2212 wire with high-strength materials that are compatible with the Bi-2212 heat treatment in an oxygen atmosphere. Past attempts have not always been successful, because the high-strength materials reacted with Bi-2212 wires, significantly reducing their Jc. We examined the nature of reactions occurring when Ag/Bi-2212 wires are heat-treated in direct contact with several commonly used high-strength alloys and a new Fe-Cr-Al alloy. INCONEL X750 and INCONEL 600 resulted in significant Jc loss, whereas Ni80-Cr caused little or no Jc loss; however, all of them formed chromium oxide that subsequently reacted with silver, creating cracks in the silver sheath. We found that Fe-Cr-Al did not show significant reactions with Ag/Bi-2212 strands. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDS) examinations revealed that the Fe-Cr-Al alloy benefits from the formation of a uniform, crack-free, continuous alumina layer on its surface that does not react with Ag and that helps minimize the Cu loss found with INCONEL X750 and INCONEL 600. We fabricated prototype 6-around-1 cables with six Bi-2212 strands twisted and transposed around an Fe-Cr-Al alloy core coated with TiO2. After standard 1 bar melt processing, the cable retained 100% of the total current-carrying capability of its strands, and, after a 10 bar overpressure processing, the cable reached a total current of 1025 A at 4.2 K and 10 T. Tensile tests showed that Fe-Cr-Al becomes brittle after being cooled to 4.2 K, whereas INCONEL X750 remains ductile and retains a modulus of 183 GPa. We proposed new cable designs that take advantage of the chemical compatibility of Fe-Cr-Al and high strength of

  11. Internal field strength measurements in chick forebrains at 50, 147, and 450 MHz.

    PubMed

    Weil, C M; Spiegel, R J; Joines, W T

    1984-01-01

    This report describes some experimental measurements of the internal field levels induced within isolated chick-forebrains irradiated at 50, 147, and 450 MHz, under essentially the same conditions as those used in the in vitro calcium-ion efflux experiments. Ratios of incident power at 50/147 MHz and 147/450 MHz that are needed to establish the same probe output are given and comparisons made with values predicted by different spherical models. Data predicted by the layered-sphere model were found to be in close agreement with measured values for the 50/147-MHz ratio. Agreement for the 147/450-MHz ratio was poorer.

  12. A NEW DIAGNOSTIC OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTHS IN RADIATIVELY COOLED SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartigan, P.; Wright, A.

    2015-09-20

    We show that it is possible to measure Alfvénic Mach numbers, defined as the shock velocity in the flow divided by the Alfvén velocity, for low-velocity (V{sub shock} ≲ 100 km s{sup −1}) radiative shocks. The method combines observations of bright forbidden lines with a measure of the size of the cooling zone, the latter typically obtained from spatial separation between the Balmer emission lines and the forbidden lines. Because magnetic fields become compressed as gas in the postshock region cools, even relatively weak preshock magnetic fields can be detected with this method. We derive analytical formulae that explain how the spatial separations relate to emission-line ratios, and compute a large grid of radiatively cooled shock models to develop diagnostic diagrams that can be used to derive Alfvénic Mach numbers in flows. Applying the method to existing data for a bright knot in the HH 111 jet, we obtain a relatively low Alfvénic Mach number of ∼2, indicative of a magnetized jet that has super-magnetosonic velocity perturbations within it.

  13. Is the general conclusion justified that higher applicable field strength results in shorter analysis time with organic solvents in CE?

    PubMed

    Téllez, Adolfo; Kenndler, Ernst

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, a widespread opinion in CE with organic solvents for the background electrolyte is critically questioned, namely that in general a shorter analysis time can be achieved due to the higher field strength applicable compared with aqueous electrolyte systems. This view, common in the literature, is based on the supposition that the conductance in organic solvents is lower than in water. Indeed in many organic solvents with higher viscosity than water lower ion mobility is observed, and higher fields can be applied in these cases. However, in this paper the problem is sharper defined and treated two-fold: (i) in all solvents conditions are such that either the same electric power is generated, or (ii) the same temperature increase is taken into account. It was shown that for the same electric power the field strength in the organic solvent can be changed to a less extent than the ionic mobility changes. As a result, the migration velocity of the analytes is lower and the analysis time is longer in most organic solvents compared with water; acetonitrile (MeCN) is an exception (in this solvent the mobilities are higher than in water). The more stringent treatment of the problem takes an equal temperature increase due to Joule heating into account rather than equal electric power. The temperature increase in the capillary depends on the thermal conductivity of the solvent, which is only about one-third of that of water for organic liquids. The consequence is that in none of the organic solvent systems a shorter analysis time can be achieved compared with water (given that the experimental conditions are comparable, e.g. zero EOF). The theoretical predictions were confirmed by measurements with water, methanol, propylenecarbonate, and MeCN as solvents.

  14. Study of the behavioral and biological effects of high-strength 60-Hz electric fields. Quarterly technical progress report number 10, 18 December 1982-18 March 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-20

    The objective of this contract is to use the baboon as a surrogate for the human in studies of the possible deleterious effects of exposure to high strength, 60 Hz electric fields. The specific aims of this contract are to (1) design and construct an exposure facility in which baboons can be exposed to an electric field up to 60 kV/m in intensity for experiments and (2) to develop computer models relating the fields and currents produced in both baboons and humans by exposure to high strength, 60 Hz electric fields.

  15. Microhardness, strength and strain field characterization of self-reacting friction stir and plug welds of dissimilar aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Karla Renee

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process with potential advantages for aerospace and automotive industries dealing with light alloys. Self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW) is one variation of the FSW process being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for use in the fabrication of propellant tanks. Friction plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential SR-FSW. This work reports on material properties and strain patterns developed in a SR-FSW with a friction plug weld. Specifically, this study examines the behavior of a SR-FSW formed between an AA2014-T6 plate on the advancing side and an AA2219-T87 plate on the retreating side and a SR-FSW (AA2014-T6 to AA2219-T87) with a 2219-T87 plug weld. This study presents the results of a characterization of the micro-hardness, joint strength, and strain field characterization of SR-FSW and FPW joints tested at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. The initial weld microstructure analysis showed a nugget region with fine grains and a displaced weld seam from the advancing side past the thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) into the nugget region. The displaced material shared the same hardness as the parent material. Dynamic recrystallization was observed in the SR-FSW zone and the displaced weld seam region. The welds revealed a fine grain structure in the SR-FSW zone with a sharp demarcation seen on the advancing side and fairly diffuse flow observed on the retreating side. The parent material hardness is 145 HV700g with a drop in hardness starting at the HAZ to 130 HV700g. The hardness further drops in the TMAZ to118 HV700g with an increase representing a dispersed interface of AA2014-T6 material to 135 HV700g. The hardness then drops significantly within the nugget region to 85 HV700g followed by an increase through the retreating side TMAZ into the HAZ to 135 HV 700g. There was a sharp increase in the hardness value within

  16. Linearly polarized radiation from astrophysical masers due to magnetic fields of intermediate strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Watson, William D.

    1990-01-01

    Previous solutions for polarization of astrophysical maser radiation due to closed-shell molecules in a magnetic field have potentially serious limitations. These solutions are mostly based on the approximation that the Zeeman frequency g-Omega is much greater than the rate for stimulated emission R and the rate for decay Gamma of the molecular state. Others are asymptotic solutions obtained for an angular momentum J = 1-0 transition. It has been unclear whether the polarizations due to plausible Zeeman splittings are adequately represented by the solutions obtained for g-Omega/Gamma much greater than 1 and g-Omega/R much greater than 1. Actual masing transitions tend to involve molecular states with angular momenta that are higher than J = 1 and 0. Numerical solutions for the linear polarization are presented here which do not have the foregoing restrictions on the g-Omega and which are not limited to a J = 1-0 transition.

  17. Signal Amplification in Field Effect-Based Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosensing by Tuned Buffer Concentration with Ionic Strength Adjuster.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satyendra; Kumar, Narendra; Panda, Siddhartha

    2016-04-01

    Miniaturization of the sandwich enzyme-based immunosensor has several advantages but could result in lower signal strength due to lower enzyme loading. Hence, technologies for amplification of the signal are needed. Signal amplification in a field effect-based electrochemical immunosensor utilizing chip-based ELISA is presented in this work. First, the molarities of phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and concentrations of KCl as ionic strength adjuster were optimized to maximize the GOx glucose-based enzymatic reactions in a beaker for signal amplification measured by change in the voltage shift with an EIS device (using 20 μl of solution) and validated with a commercial pH meter (using 3 ml of solution). The PBS molarity of 100 μM with 25 mM KCl provided the maximum voltage shift. These optimized buffer conditions were further verified for GOx immobilized on silicon chips, and similar trends with decreased PBS molarity were obtained; however, the voltage shift values obtained on chip reaction were lower as compared to the reactions occurring in the beaker. The decreased voltage shift with immobilized enzyme on chip could be attributed to the increased Km (Michaelis-Menten constant) values in the immobilized GOx. Finally, a more than sixfold signal enhancement (from 8 to 47 mV) for the chip-based sandwich immunoassay was obtained by altering the PBS molarity from 10 to 100 μM with 25 mM KCl.

  18. Crystal Field Splitting is Limiting the Stability and Strength of Ultra-incompressible Orthorhombic Transition Metal Tetraborides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, R. F.; Wen, X. D.; Legut, D.; Fu, Z. H.; Veprek, S.; Zurek, E.; Mao, H. K.

    2016-01-01

    The lattice stability and mechanical strengths of the supposedly superhard transition metal tetraborides (TmB4, Tm = Cr, Mn and Fe) evoked recently much attention from the scientific community due to the potential applications of these materials, as well as because of general scientific interests. In the present study, we show that the surprising stabilization of these compounds from a high symmetry to a low symmetry structure is accomplished by an in-plane rotation of the boron network, which maximizes the in-plane hybridization by crystal field splitting between d orbitals of Tm and p orbitals of B. Studies of mechanical and electronic properties of TmB4 suggest that these tetraborides cannot be intrinsically superhard. The mechanical instability is facilitated by a unique in-plane or out-of-plane weakening of the three-dimensional covalent bond network of boron along different shear deformation paths. These results shed a novel view on the origin of the stability and strength of orthorhombic TmB4, highlighting the importance of combinational analysis of a variety of parameters related to plastic deformation of the crystalline materials when attempting to design new ultra-incompressible, and potentially strong and hard solids. PMID:26976479

  19. Relationship between hamstring strains and leg muscle strength. A follow-up study of collegiate track and field athletes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship between hamstring strains and leg muscle strength. The bilateral isometric extensions and flexion maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of knee and hip were measured among 64 collegiate track and field athletes (128 legs). The values of MVC per body-weight, flexion to extension ratio and bilateral legs imbalance index were calculated as the parameters for the investigation. The follow-up research was performed within the following two years. Among the 64 subjects (128 legs): 26 subjects (31 legs), 24.2 percent had suffered from hamstring strains. Then, the subjects were divided into injured (31 legs) and uninjured (97 legs) groups respectively. The parameters of the lower extremities measured at the beginning were compared for the two groups. The different rates of the hip flexion and knee extension of bilateral legs of the injured group were significantly higher than those of the uninjured group (p < 0.05). In the injured group, the value of MVC per body-weight of the knee flexor and the flexion-extension ratio were significantly lower than in the uninjured group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the imbalance of the bilateral legs, the hamstring strength and the ratio of the flexor to extensor were shown to be parameters related to the occurrence of hamstring strains.

  20. Electrical Characterization of Molecular Beam Epitaxy Grown Mercury-Cadmium Alloy Under Low Magnetic Field Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.

    HgCdTe alloy is currently the most important semiconductor material for IR detection technology. Different growth techniques are used to produce HgCdTe, but achieving a high-quality material is still a major objective in the field. Among the growth techniques for HgCdTe, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is one of the most promising, mainly because of its versatility. Furthermore, the growth by MBE is carried out at a low temperature which limits interdiffusion processes. The focus of this research is the understanding of the electrical properties of HgCdTe layers grown by MBE technique. Using a model based on a single discrete acceptor level near the valence band and a corresponding fully ionized donor level, a good fit to the observed Hall data on p-type epilayers was obtained. In some samples, another acceptor level was needed. Also, analysis of R _{h} data and low temperature mobilities indicated that the p-type MBE growth layers were highly compensated. This was also confirmed by mercury saturated annealing experiments. Annealing of (111)B epilayers with Hg pressure leads us to believe that Hg vacancies are responsible for the p-type character. The findings reveal that the electrical properties differ drastically between different growth orientations, with (111)B having the highest residual doping levels for a particular Cd composition. It is concluded that MBE growth for HgCdTe is essentially a Te rich growth and our understanding is that this extra Te is responsible for the n-type character in the epilayers. A comparison between HgCdTe twinned layers and twin-free layers has shown that electrically active acceptors and high hole mobilities are associated with the presence of twins. Incorporation of several foreign elements also tried and all were found to substitute the metal sites during growth. With magnetic field studies on R_ {h}, resistivity and conductivity tensor analysis, the band structure of the HgCdTe alloy is also investigated. Junction depth and the

  1. The Dependence of the Strength and Thickness of Field-Aligned Currents on Solar Wind and Ionospheric Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay R.; Wing, Simon

    2014-08-01

    Sheared plasma flows at the low-latitude boundary layer correlate well with early afternoon auroral arcs and eld-aligned currents [Sonnerup, 1980; Lundin and Evans, 1985]. We present a simple analytic model that relates solar wind and ionospheric parameters to the strength and thickness of field-aligned currents in a region of sheared velocity, such as the low latitude boundary layer. We compare the predictions of the model with DMSP observations and nd remarkably good scaling of the currents with solar wind and ionospheric parameters. The sheared boundary layer thickness is inferred to be around 3000km consistent with observational studies. The analytic model provides a simple way to organize data and to infer boundary layer structures from ionospheric data.

  2. Traceable calibration of a horizontally polarised reference antenna with omnidirectional pattern at VHF frequencies for ILS field strength validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, T.; Kleine-Ostmann, T.; Bredemeyer, J.

    2013-07-01

    We present a traceable calibration of a specially designed horizontally polarised reference antenna with an omnidirectional pattern in the E-plane for the frequency range between 105 MHz and 120 MHz. This antenna is used as a validation tool for absolute field strength measurements at the localizer transmitter of an instrument landing system (ILS) at airports and is carried by a helicopter. We investigate whether we can treat it as a dipole-like antenna in the calibration setup despite its disk-shape body. We also investigate the suitability of an anechoic chamber for antenna calibration though it was not designed for that purpose. The measurements are based on scattering parameters (S-parameters) which we apply in the 3-antenna-method (TAM or 3-AM) to obtain the antenna gain and the antenna factor, respectively. An uncertainty budget for the antenna gain calibration is derived. We also report on the first practical application of the calibrated reference antenna.

  3. Bi-Component T2* Analysis of Bound and Pore Bone Water Fractions Fails at High Field Strengths

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Alan C.; Wehrli, Suzanne L.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis involves degradation of bone’s trabecular architecture, cortical thinning, and enlargement of cortical pores. Increased cortical porosity is a major cause of the decreased strength of osteoporotic bone. The majority of cortical pores, however, are below the resolution limit of MRI. Recent work has shown that porosity can be evaluated by MRI-based quantification of bone water. Bi-exponential T2* fitting and adiabatic inversion preparation are the two most common methods purported to distinguish bound and pore water in order to quantify matrix density and porosity. To assess the viability of T2* bi-component analysis as a method for quantifying bound and pore water fractions, we have applied this method to human cortical bone at 1.5T, 3T, 7T, and 9.4T, and validated the resulting pool fractions against μCT-derived porosity and gravimetrically-determined bone densities. We also investigated alternative methods: 2D T1–T2* bi-component fitting by incorporating saturation-recovery, 1D and 2D fitting of CPMG echo amplitudes, and deuterium inversion recovery. Short-T2* pool fraction was moderately correlated with porosity (R2 = 0.70) and matrix density (R2 = 0.63) at 1.5T, but the strengths of these associations were found to diminish rapidly as field strength increases, falling below R2 = 0.5 at 3T. Addition of the T1 dimension to bi-component analysis only slightly improved the strengths of these correlations. T2*-based bi-component analysis should therefore be used with caution. Performance of deuterium inversion-recovery at 9.4T was also poor (R2 = 0.50 versus porosity and R2 = 0.46 versus matrix density). CPMG-derived short-T2 fraction at 9.4T, however, is highly correlated with porosity (R2 = 0.87) and matrix density (R2 = 0.88), confirming the utility of this method for independent validation of bone water pools. PMID:25981785

  4. Orion’s Veil: Magnetic Field Strengths and Other Properties of a PDR in Front of the Trapezium Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troland, T. H.; Goss, W. M.; Brogan, C. L.; Crutcher, R. M.; Roberts, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    We present an analysis of physical conditions in the Orion Veil, an atomic photon-dominated region (PDR) that lies just in front (≈2 pc) of the Trapezium stars of Orion. This region offers an unusual opportunity to study the properties of PDRs, including the magnetic field. We have obtained 21 cm H i and 18 cm (1665 and 1667 MHz) OH Zeeman effect data that yield images of the line-of-sight magnetic field strength B los in atomic and molecular regions of the Veil. We find B los ≈ ‑50 to ‑75 μG in the atomic gas across much of the Veil (25″ resolution) and B los ≈ ‑350 μG at one position in the molecular gas (40″ resolution). The Veil has two principal H i velocity components. Magnetic and kinematical data suggest a close connection between these components. They may represent gas on either side of a shock wave preceding a weak-D ionization front. Magnetic fields in the Veil H i components are 3–5 times stronger than they are elsewhere in the interstellar medium where N(H) and n(H) are comparable. The H i components are magnetically subcritical (magnetically dominated), like the cold neutral medium, although they are about 1 dex denser. Comparatively strong fields in the Veil H i components may have resulted from low-turbulence conditions in the diffuse gas that gave rise to OMC-1. Strong fields may also be related to magnetostatic equilibrium that has developed in the Veil since star formation. We also consider the location of the Orion-S molecular core, proposing a location behind the main Orion H+ region.

  5. Impact of field strength and iron oxide nanoparticle concentration on the linearity and diagnostic accuracy of off-resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Christian T; Dai, Guangping; Novikov, Mikhail; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Weissleder, Ralph; Rosen, Bruce R; Sosnovik, David E

    2008-06-01

    Off-resonance imaging (ORI) techniques are being increasingly used to image iron oxide imaging agents such as monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles (MION). However, the diagnostic accuracy, linearity, and field dependence of ORI have not been fully characterized. In this study, the sensitivity, specificity, and linearity of ORI were thus examined as a function of both MION concentration and magnetic field strength (4.7 and 14 T). MION phantoms with and without an air interface as well as MION uptake in a mouse model of healing myocardial infarction were imaged. MION-induced resonance shifts were shown to increase linearly with MION concentration. In contrast, the ORI signal/sensitivity was highly non-linear, initially increasing with MION concentration until T2 became comparable to the TE and decreasing thereafter. The specificity of ORI to distinguish MION-induced resonance shifts from on-resonance water was found to decrease with increasing field because of the increased on-resonance water linewidths (15 Hz at 4.7 T versus 45 Hz at 14 T). Large resonance shifts ( approximately 300 Hz) were observed at air interfaces at 4.7 T, both in vitro and in vivo, and led to poor ORI specificity for MION concentrations less than 150 microg Fe/mL. The in vivo ORI sensitivity was sufficient to detect the accumulation of MION in macrophages infiltrating healing myocardial infarcts, but the specificity was limited by non-specific areas of positive contrast at the air/tissue interfaces of the thoracic wall and the descending aorta. Improved specificity and linearity can, however, be expected at lower fields where decreased on-resonance water linewidths, reduced air-induced resonance shifts, and longer T2 relaxation times are observed. The optimal performance of ORI will thus likely be seen at low fields, with moderate MION concentrations and with sequences containing very short TEs.

  6. Orion’s Veil: Magnetic Field Strengths and Other Properties of a PDR in Front of the Trapezium Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troland, T. H.; Goss, W. M.; Brogan, C. L.; Crutcher, R. M.; Roberts, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    We present an analysis of physical conditions in the Orion Veil, an atomic photon-dominated region (PDR) that lies just in front (≈2 pc) of the Trapezium stars of Orion. This region offers an unusual opportunity to study the properties of PDRs, including the magnetic field. We have obtained 21 cm H i and 18 cm (1665 and 1667 MHz) OH Zeeman effect data that yield images of the line-of-sight magnetic field strength B los in atomic and molecular regions of the Veil. We find B los ≈ -50 to -75 μG in the atomic gas across much of the Veil (25″ resolution) and B los ≈ -350 μG at one position in the molecular gas (40″ resolution). The Veil has two principal H i velocity components. Magnetic and kinematical data suggest a close connection between these components. They may represent gas on either side of a shock wave preceding a weak-D ionization front. Magnetic fields in the Veil H i components are 3-5 times stronger than they are elsewhere in the interstellar medium where N(H) and n(H) are comparable. The H i components are magnetically subcritical (magnetically dominated), like the cold neutral medium, although they are about 1 dex denser. Comparatively strong fields in the Veil H i components may have resulted from low-turbulence conditions in the diffuse gas that gave rise to OMC-1. Strong fields may also be related to magnetostatic equilibrium that has developed in the Veil since star formation. We also consider the location of the Orion-S molecular core, proposing a location behind the main Orion H+ region.

  7. 31P NMR relaxation of cortical bone mineral at multiple magnetic field strengths and levels of demineralization.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Alan C; Wright, Alexander C; Wehrli, Suzanne L; Ong, Henry H; Li, Cheng; Wehrli, Felix W

    2013-09-01

    Recent work has shown that solid-state (1) H and (31) P MRI can provide detailed insight into bone matrix and mineral properties, thereby potentially enabling differentiation of osteoporosis from osteomalacia. However, (31) P MRI of bone mineral is hampered by unfavorable relaxation properties. Hence, accurate knowledge of these properties is critical to optimizing MRI of bone phosphorus. In this work, (31) P MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was predicted on the basis of T1 and T2 * (effective transverse relaxation time) measured in lamb bone at six field strengths (1.5-11.7 T) and subsequently verified by 3D ultra-short echo-time and zero echo-time imaging. Further, T1 was measured in deuterium-exchanged bone and partially demineralized bone. (31) P T2 * was found to decrease from 220.3 ± 4.3 µs to 98.0 ± 1.4 µs from 1.5 to 11.7 T, and T1 to increase from 12.8 ± 0.5 s to 97.3 ± 6.4 s. Deuteron substitution of exchangeable water showed that 76% of the (31) P longitudinal relaxation rate is due to (1) H-(31) P dipolar interactions. Lastly, hypomineralization was found to decrease T1, which may have implications for (31) P MRI based mineralization density quantification. Despite the steep decrease in the T2 */T1 ratio, SNR should increase with field strength as B0 (0.4) for sample-dominated noise and as B0 (1.1) for coil-dominated noise. This was confirmed by imaging experiments. PMID:23505120

  8. Seed orientation and magnetic field strength have more influence on tomato seed performance than relative humidity and duration of exposure to non-uniform static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Poinapen, Danny; Brown, Daniel C W; Beeharry, Girish K

    2013-09-15

    Different factors (e.g., light, humidity, and temperature) including exposure to static magnetic fields (SMFs), referred here as critical factors, can significantly affect horticultural seed performance. However, the link between magnetic field parameters and other interdependent factors affecting seed viability is unclear. The importance of these critical factors affecting tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) var. MST/32 seed performance was assessed after performing several treatments based on a L9 (3(4)) (four factors at three levels) orthogonal array (OA) design. The variable factors in the design were magnetic flux density (R1=332.1±37.8mT; R2=108.7±26.9mT; and R3=50.6±10.5mT), exposure time (1, 2, and 24h), seed orientation (North polarity, South polarity, and control - no magnetic field), and relative humidity (RH) (7.0, 25.5, and 75.5%). After seed moisture content stabilisation at the different chosen RH, seeds were exposed in dark under laboratory conditions to several treatments based on the OA design before performance evaluation. Treatments not employing magnetic field exposure were used as controls. Results indicate that electrolyte leakage rate was reduced by a factor of 1.62 times during seed imbibition when non-uniform SMFs were employed. Higher germination (∼11.0%) was observed in magnetically-exposed seeds than in non-exposed ones, although seedlings emerging from SMF treatments did not show a consistent increase in biomass accumulation. The respective influence of the four critical factors tested on seed performance was ranked (in decreasing order) as seed orientation to external magnetic fields, magnetic field strength, RH, and exposure time. This study suggests a significant effect of non-uniform SMFs on seed performance with respect to RH, and more pronounced effects are observed during seed imbibition rather than during later developmental stages. PMID:23759543

  9. Magnetic field strength at the innermost circular orbit in accretion disk of supermassive black hole in active galactic nuclei: comparison with the equipartition value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrovich, M. Y.; Buliga, S. D.; Gnedin, Y. N.; Natsvlishvili, T. M.; Silant'ev, N. A.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present the results of the determination of the magnetic field strength at the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) of an active galactic nuclei (AGN) derived from the polarimetric data for radiation emerging from broad line regions (BLR). These results are obtained by the radiative transfer method that takes into account the effect of Faraday rotation depolarization. The observed polarization degree allows to estimate the value of the magnetic field in the BLR and then to derive the ISCO magnetic field strength using the standard accretion disk model (Shakura and Sunyaev in Astron. Astrophys. 24:337, 1973). We used the polarimetric data obtained by Smith et al. (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 335:773, 2002) to calculate the values of relativistic jet kinetic power of AGN from the derived values of the magnetic field strength at the ISCO radius.

  10. Microchip capillary gel electrophoresis using programmed field strength gradients for the ultra-fast analysis of genetically modified organisms in soybeans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Jeong; Chae, Joon-Seok; Chang, Jun Keun; Kang, Seong Ho

    2005-08-12

    We have developed a novel method for the ultra-fast analysis of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in soybeans by microchip capillary gel electrophoresis (MCGE) using programmed field strength gradients (PFSG) in a conventional glass double-T microchip. Under the programmed electric field strength and 0.3% poly(ethylene oxide) sieving matrix, the GMO in soybeans was analyzed within only 11 s of the microchip. The MCGE-PFSG method was a program that changes the electric field strength during GMO analysis, and was also applied to the ultra-fast analysis of PCR products. Compared to MCGE using a conventional and constantly applied electric field, the MCGE-PFSG analysis generated faster results without the loss of resolving power and reproducibility for specific DNA fragments (100- and 250-bp DNA) of GM-soybeans. The MCGE-PFSG technique may prove to be a new tool in the GMO analysis due to its speed, simplicity, and high efficiency.

  11. The Effect of Dissipation Mechanism and Guide Field Strength on X-line Spreading in 3D Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Lucas; Cassak, P.; Drake, J.; Gosling, J.; Phan, T.; Shay, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    In two-ribbon flares, the fact that the ribbons separate in time is considered evidence of magnetic reconnection. However, in addition to the ribbons separating, they can also elongate (as seen in animations of, for example, the Bastille Day flare). The elongation is undoubtedly related to the reconnection spreading in the out-of-plane direction. Indeed, naturally occurring magnetic reconnection generally begins in a spatially localized region and spreads in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane as time progresses. For example, it was suggested that X-line spreading is necessary to explain the observation of X-lines extending more than 390 Earth radii (Phan et al., Nature, 404, 848, 2006), and has been seen in reconnection experiments. A sizeable out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field is present at flare sites and in the solar wind. Here, we study the effect of dissipation mechanism and the strength of the guide field has on X-line spreading. We present results from three-dimensional numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection, comparing spreading with the Hall term to spreading with anomalous resistivity. Applications to solar flares and magnetic reconnection in the solar wind will be discussed.

  12. MRS thermometry calibration at 3 T: effects of protein, ionic concentration and magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Babourina-Brooks, Ben; Simpson, Robert; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Machin, Graham; Peet, Andrew C; Davies, Nigel P

    2015-07-01

    MRS thermometry has been utilized to measure temperature changes in the brain, which may aid in the diagnosis of brain trauma and tumours. However, the temperature calibration of the technique has been shown to be sensitive to non-temperature-based factors, which may provide unique information on the tissue microenvironment if the mechanisms can be further understood. The focus of this study was to investigate the effects of varied protein content on the calibration of MRS thermometry at 3 T, which has not been thoroughly explored in the literature. The effects of ionic concentration and magnetic field strength were also considered. Temperature reference materials were controlled by water circulation and freezing organic fixed-point compounds (diphenyl ether and ethylene carbonate) stable to within 0.2 °C. The temperature was measured throughout the scan time with a fluoro-optic probe, with an uncertainty of 0.16 °C. The probe was calibrated at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) with traceability to the International Temperature Scale 1990 (ITS-90). MRS thermometry measures were based on single-voxel spectroscopy chemical shift differences between water and N-acetylaspartate (NAA), Δ(H20-NAA), using a Philips Achieva 3 T scanner. Six different phantom solutions with varying protein or ionic concentration, simulating potential tissue differences, were investigated within a temperature range of 21-42 °C. Results were compared with a similar study performed at 1.5 T to observe the effect of field strengths. Temperature calibration curves were plotted to convert Δ(H20-NAA) to apparent temperature. The apparent temperature changed by -0.2 °C/% of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and a trend of 0.5 °C/50 mM ionic concentration was observed. Differences in the calibration coefficients for the 10% BSA solution were seen in this study at 3 T compared with a study at 1.5 T. MRS thermometry may be utilized to measure temperature and the tissue

  13. MRS thermometry calibration at 3 T: effects of protein, ionic concentration and magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Babourina-Brooks, Ben; Simpson, Robert; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Machin, Graham; Peet, Andrew C; Davies, Nigel P

    2015-07-01

    MRS thermometry has been utilized to measure temperature changes in the brain, which may aid in the diagnosis of brain trauma and tumours. However, the temperature calibration of the technique has been shown to be sensitive to non-temperature-based factors, which may provide unique information on the tissue microenvironment if the mechanisms can be further understood. The focus of this study was to investigate the effects of varied protein content on the calibration of MRS thermometry at 3 T, which has not been thoroughly explored in the literature. The effects of ionic concentration and magnetic field strength were also considered. Temperature reference materials were controlled by water circulation and freezing organic fixed-point compounds (diphenyl ether and ethylene carbonate) stable to within 0.2 °C. The temperature was measured throughout the scan time with a fluoro-optic probe, with an uncertainty of 0.16 °C. The probe was calibrated at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) with traceability to the International Temperature Scale 1990 (ITS-90). MRS thermometry measures were based on single-voxel spectroscopy chemical shift differences between water and N-acetylaspartate (NAA), Δ(H20-NAA), using a Philips Achieva 3 T scanner. Six different phantom solutions with varying protein or ionic concentration, simulating potential tissue differences, were investigated within a temperature range of 21-42 °C. Results were compared with a similar study performed at 1.5 T to observe the effect of field strengths. Temperature calibration curves were plotted to convert Δ(H20-NAA) to apparent temperature. The apparent temperature changed by -0.2 °C/% of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and a trend of 0.5 °C/50 mM ionic concentration was observed. Differences in the calibration coefficients for the 10% BSA solution were seen in this study at 3 T compared with a study at 1.5 T. MRS thermometry may be utilized to measure temperature and the tissue

  14. Long-term variation of statistical properties of sunspot field strengths and their relation to the characteristics of solar cycles in 1917-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlatova, Kseniya; Pevtsov, Alexei; Tlatov, Andrey; Vasilieva, Valeria; Kalevi Mursula

    We use the digitized sunspot daily drawings from the Mount Wilson Observatory (MWO) from 1917—2013 to study the long-term variations in sunspot magnetic fields. Tabulated data include the heliographic coordinates, area and magnetic field strength of all sunspots on solar disk. Sunspot field strengths exhibit several trends, which can be of instrumental or truly solar in its nature. For example, in depth analysis of the sunspot field strength and the sunspot areas indicates long-term changes in the observing system at the MWO, when systematically larger number of measurements in sub-features (e.g., multiple umbrae) was made beginning mid-20th century. The final data set is used to study several properties of active regions including difference (in field strength and area) between leading and following sunspots, the orientation of magnetic field in sunspots and pores relative to vertical direction, and the Hale (polarity) and Joy (tilt) laws over the period of about ten solar cycles.

  15. Sectors and Large-Scale Magnetic Field Strength Fluctuations in the Heliosheath Near 110 AU: Voyager 1,2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes observations of daily averages of the magnetic field strength B and the magnetic polarity measured by Voyager 1 (V1) in the heliosheath during 2009 between 108.5 and 112.1 AU and at heliographic latitude 34. . 4. A negative magnetic polarity sector was observed during 2009 DOY 43.255. A positive polarity sector was observed during 2009 DOY 256.365. We offer the hypothesis that the existence of the two sectors is the result of the displacement of the wavy heliospheric current sheet to the position of V1 as a result of northward flow in the heliosheath. The large size of the sectors is caused by the slow radial motion of the flow observed by V1 in the heliosheath. The distribution of B during 2009 was lognormal, in contrast to the Gaussian distributions observed by V1 in the heliosheath prior to 2009. The large-scale fluctuations of B, described by the distribution of increments of daily averages of B, have a Tsallis distribution with q = 1.6. The large-scale fluctuations of B observed by V1 during 2009 have a multifractal spectrum with the same parameters that V1 observed during 2005 close to the termination shock at 94 AU. These results suggest that the large-scale magnetic fluctuations of B are in a metastable equilibrium state in the heliosheath between 94 AU and 112.1 AU.

  16. SECTORS AND LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH FLUCTUATIONS IN THE HELIOSHEATH NEAR 110 AU: VOYAGER 1, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F. E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.co

    2010-12-10

    This paper describes observations of daily averages of the magnetic field strength B and the magnetic polarity measured by Voyager 1 (V1) in the heliosheath during 2009 between 108.5 and 112.1 AU and at heliographic latitude 34.{sup 0}4. A negative magnetic polarity sector was observed during 2009 DOY 43-255. A positive polarity sector was observed during 2009 DOY 256-365. We offer the hypothesis that the existence of the two sectors is the result of the displacement of the wavy heliospheric current sheet to the position of V1 as a result of northward flow in the heliosheath. The large size of the sectors is caused by the slow radial motion of the flow observed by V1 in the heliosheath. The distribution of B during 2009 was lognormal, in contrast to the Gaussian distributions observed by V1 in the heliosheath prior to 2009. The large-scale fluctuations of B, described by the distribution of increments of daily averages of B, have a Tsallis distribution with q = 1.6. The large-scale fluctuations of B observed by V1 during 2009 have a multifractal spectrum with the same parameters that V1 observed during 2005 close to the termination shock at 94 AU. These results suggest that the large-scale magnetic fluctuations of B are in a metastable equilibrium state in the heliosheath between 94 AU and 112.1 AU.

  17. Effect of electrical field strength applied by PEF processing and storage temperature on the outgrowth of yeasts and moulds naturally present in a fresh fruit smoothie.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, R A H; Nederhoff, A L; Nierop Groot, M N; van Boekel, M A J S; Mastwijk, H C

    2016-08-01

    Pulsed electrical field (PEF) technology offers an alternative to thermal pasteurisation of high-acid fruit juices, by extending the shelf life of food products, while retaining its fresh taste and nutritional value. Substantial research has been performed on the effect of electrical field strength on the inactivation kinetics of spoilage and pathogenic micro-organisms and on the outgrowth of spoilage micro-organisms during shelf life. However, studies on the effect of electrical field strength on the inactivation and outgrowth of surviving populations during shelf life are missing. In this study, we assessed the influence of electrical field strength applied by PEF processing and storage temperature on the outgrowth of surviving yeast and mould populations naturally present in fresh fruit smoothie in time. Therefore, an apple-strawberry-banana smoothie was treated in a continuous-flow PEF system (130L/h), using similar inlet and outlet conditions (preheating temperature 41°C, maximum temperature 58°C) to assure that the amount of energy across the different conditions was kept constant. Smoothies treated with variable electrical field strengths (13.5, 17.0, 20.0 and 24.0kV/cm) were compared to smoothies without treatment for outgrowth of yeasts and moulds. Outgrowth of yeasts and moulds stored at 4°C and 7°C was analysed by plating and visual observation and yeast growth was modelled using the modified logistic growth model (Zwietering model). Results showed that the intensity of the electrical field strength had an influence on the degree of inactivation of yeast cells, resulting in a faster outgrowth over time at lower electrical field strength. Outgrowth of moulds over time was not affected by the intensity of the electrical field strength used. Application of PEF introduces a trade-off between type of spoilage: in untreated smoothie yeasts lead to spoilage after 8days when stored at 4 or 7°C, whereas in PEF treated smoothie yeasts were (partly

  18. The Strength and Radial Profile of the Coronal Magnetic Field from the Standoff Distance of a Coronal Mass Ejection-driven Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji

    2011-07-01

    We determine the coronal magnetic field strength in the heliocentric distance range 6-23 solar radii (Rs) by measuring the shock standoff distance and the radius of curvature of the flux rope during the 2008 March 25 coronal mass ejection imaged by white-light coronagraphs. Assuming the adiabatic index, we determine the Alfvén Mach number, and hence the Alfvén speed in the ambient medium using the measured shock speed. By measuring the upstream plasma density using polarization brightness images, we finally get the magnetic field strength upstream of the shock. The estimated magnetic field decreases from ~48 mG around 6 Rs to 8 mG at 23 Rs. The radial profile of the magnetic field can be described by a power law in agreement with other estimates at similar heliocentric distances.

  19. The Strength and Radial Profile of the Coronal Magnetic Field from the Standoff Distance of a Coronal Mass Ejection-Driven Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    We determine the coronal magnetic field strength in the heliocentric distance range 6-23 solar radii (Rs) by measuring the shock standoff distance and the radius of curvature of the flux rope during the 2008 March 25 coronal mass ejection imaged by white-light coronagraphs. Assuming the adiabatic index, we determine the Alfven Mach number, and hence the Alfven speed in the ambient medium using the measured shock speed. By measuring the upstream plasma density using polarization brightness images, we finally get the magnetic field strength upstream of the shock. The estimated magnetic field decreases from approximately 48 mG around 6 Rs to 8 mG at 23 Rs. The radial profile of the magnetic field can be described by a power law in agreement with other estimates at similar heliocentric distances.

  20. Using a Combination of Experimental and Computational Methods to Explore the Impact of Metal Identity and Ligand Field Strength on the Electronic Structure of Metal Ions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pernicone, Naomi C.; Geri, Jacob B.; York, John T.

    2011-01-01

    In this exercise, students apply a combination of techniques to investigate the impact of metal identity and ligand field strength on the spin states of three d[superscript 5] transition-metal complexes: Fe(acac)[subscript 3], K[subscript 3][Fe(CN)[subscript 6

  1. Electric field strength of membrane lipids from vertebrate species: membrane lipid composition and Na+-K+-ATPase molecular activity.

    PubMed

    Starke-Peterkovic, Thomas; Turner, Nigel; Else, Paul L; Clarke, Ronald J

    2005-03-01

    Intramembrane electric field strength is a very likely determinant of the activity of ion-transporting membrane proteins in living cells. In the absence of any transmembrane electrical potential or surface potential, its magnitude is determined by the dipole potential of the membrane's lipid components and their associated water of hydration. Here we have used a fluorometric method to quantify the dipole potential of vesicles formed from lipids extracted from kidney and brain of 11 different animal species from four different vertebrate classes. The dipole potential was compared with the fatty acid composition and with the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase molecular activity of each preparation. The magnitude of the dipole potential was found to be relatively constant across all animal species, i.e., 236-334 mV for vesicles prepared from the total membrane lipids and 223-256 mV for phospholipids alone. The significantly lower value for phospholipids alone is potentially related to the removal of cholesterol and/or other common soluble lipid molecules from the membrane. Surprisingly, no significant dependence of the dipole potential on fatty acid composition was found. This may, however, be due to concomitant compensatory variations in lipid head group composition. The molecular activity of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase was found to increase with increasing dipole potential. The fact that the dipole potential is maintained at a relatively constant value over a wide range of animal species suggests that it may play a fundamental role in ensuring correct ion pump conformation and function within the membrane.

  2. Ligand Field Strength Mediates Electron Delocalization in Octahedral [((H)L)2Fe6(L')m](n+) Clusters.

    PubMed

    Hernández Sánchez, Raúl; Zheng, Shao-Liang; Betley, Theodore A

    2015-09-01

    To assess the impact of terminal ligand binding on a variety of cluster properties (redox delocalization, ground-state stabilization, and breadth of redox state accessibility), we prepared three electron-transfer series based on the hexanuclear iron cluster [((H)L)2Fe6(L')m](n+) in which the terminal ligand field strength was modulated from weak to strong (L' = DMF, MeCN, CN). The extent of intracore M-M interactions is gauged by M-M distances, spin ground state persistence, and preference for mixed-valence states as determined by electrochemical comproportionation constants. Coordination of DMF to the [((H)L)2Fe6] core leads to weaker Fe-Fe interactions, as manifested by the observation of ground states populated only at lower temperatures (<100 K) and by the greater evidence of valence trapping within the mixed-valence states. Comproportionation constants determined electrochemically (Kc = 10(4)-10(8)) indicate that the redox series exhibits electronic delocalization (class II-III), yet no intervalence charge transfer (IVCT) bands are observable in the near-IR spectra. Ligation of the stronger σ donor acetonitrile results in stabilization of spin ground states to higher temperatures (∼300 K) and a high degree of valence delocalization (Kc = 10(2)-10(8)) with observable IVCT bands. Finally, the anionic cyanide-bound series reveals the highest degree of valence delocalization with the most intense IVCT bands (Kc = 10(12)-10(20)) and spin ground state population beyond room temperature. Across the series, at a given formal oxidation level, the capping ligand on the hexairon cluster dictates the overall properties of the aggregate, modulating the redox delocalization and the persistence of the intracore coupling of the metal sites.

  3. Effects of magnetic field strength and b value on the sensitivity and specificity of quantitative breast diffusion-weighted MRI

    PubMed Central

    Eghtedari, Mohammad; Fox, Patricia; Guvenc, Inanc; Yang, Wei T.; Dogan, Basak E.

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of b value or the magnetic field strength (B0) on the sensitivity and specificity of quantitative breast diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Methods A total of 126 patients underwent clinical breast MRI that included pre-contrast DWI imaging using b values of both 1,000 and 1,500 s/mm2 at either 1.5 T (n=86) or 3.0 T (n=40). Quantitative apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were measured and compared for 18 benign, 33 malignant lesions, and 126 normal breast tissues. Optimal ADCmean threshold for differentiating benign and malignant lesions was estimated and the effect of b values and B0 were examined using a generalized estimating equations (GEE) model. Results The optimal ADCmean threshold was 1.235×10–3 mm2/s for b value of 1,000 and 0.934×10–3 mm2/s for b value of 1,500. Using these thresholds, the sensitivities and specificities were 96% and 89% (b value =1,000, B0 =1.5 T), 89% and 98% (b value =1,000, B0 =3.0 T), 88% and 96% (b value =1,500, B0 =1.5 T), and 67% and 100% (b value =1,500, B0 =3.0 T). No significant difference was found between different B0 (P=0.26) or b values (P=0.28). Conclusions Better sensitivity is achieved with DWI of b value =1,000 than with b value =1,500. However, b value and B0 do not significantly impact diagnostic performance of DWI when using appropriate thresholds. PMID:27709073

  4. Comparison of Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Parameters across MR Imagers and Field Strengths: Evaluation in Upper Abdominal Organs.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Sebastiano; Donati, Olivio F; Froehlich, Johannes M; Thoeny, Harriet C

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To determine the reproducibility of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) parameters measured in upper abdominal organs with magnetic resonance (MR) imagers from different vendors and with different field strengths. Materials and Methods This prospective study was approved by the independent ethics committees of Kanton Bern and Kanton Zurich, and signed informed consent was obtained from all participants. Abdominal diffusion-weighted images in 10 healthy men (mean age, 37 years ± 8 [standard deviation]) were acquired by using 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imagers from three different vendors. Two readers independently delineated regions of interest that were used to measure IVIM parameters (diffusion coefficient [Dt], perfusion fraction [Fp], and pseudodiffusion coefficient [Dp]) in the left and right lobes of the liver, and in the pancreas, spleen, renal cortex, and renal medulla. Measurement reproducibility between readers was assessed with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Variability across MR imagers was analyzed by using between- and within-subject coefficients of variation (CVs) and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results Between-reader reproducibility was high for Dt (ICC, 94.6%), intermediate for Fp (ICC, 81.7%), and low for Dp (ICC, 69.5%). Between- and within-subject CVs of Dt were relatively high (>20%) in the left lobe of the liver and relatively low (<10%) in the renal cortex and renal medulla. CVs generally exceeded 15% for Fp values and 20% for Dp. ANOVA indicated significant differences (P < .05) between MR imagers. Conclusion IVIM parameters in the upper abdomen may differ substantially across MR imagers. (©) RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26678455

  5. Image Charge and Electric Field Effects on Hydrogen-like Impurity-bound Polaron Energies and Oscillator Strengths in a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, L. A.; Vartanian, A. L.; Asatryan, A. L.; Kirakosyan, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    By using Landau-Pekar variational method, the ground and the first excited state energies and the transition frequencies between the ground and the first excited states of a hydrogen-like impurity-bound polaron in a spherical quantum dot (QD) have been studied by taking into account the image charge effect (ICE). We employ the dielectric continuum model to describe the phonon confinement effects. The oscillator strengths (OSs) of transitions from the 1 s-like state to excited states of 2 s, 2 p x , and 2 p z symmetries are calculated as functions of the applied electric field and strength of the confinement potential. We have shown that with and without image charge effect, the increase of the strength of the parabolic confinement potential leads to the increase of the oscillator strengths of 1 s - 2 p x and 1 s - 2 p z transitions. This indicates that the energy differences between 1 s- and 2 p x - as well as 1 s- and 2 p z -like states have a dominant role determining the oscillator strength. Although there is almost no difference in the oscillator strengths for transitions 1 s - 2 p x and 1 s -2 p z when the image charge effect is not taken into account, it becomes significant with the image charge effect.

  6. Dependences of Q-branch integrated intensity of linear-molecule pendular spectra on electric-field strength and rotational temperature and its potential applications

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Min; Wang, Hailing; Wang, Qin; Yin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the pendular-state spectra of cold linear molecules, and investigated the dependences of “Q-branch” integrated intensity of pendular spectra on both electric-field strength and molecular rotation-temperature. A new multi-peak structure in the “Q-branch” spectrum is appearing when the Stark interaction strength ω = μE/B equal to or larger than the critical value. Our study shows that the above results can be used not only to measure the electric-field vector and its spatial distribution in some electrostatic devices, such as the Stark decelerator, Stark velocity filter and electrostatic trap and so on, but also to survey the orientation degree of cold linear molecules in a strong electrostatic field. PMID:27231057

  7. Accuracy of Prediction Method of Cryogenic Tensile Strength for Austenitic Stainless Steels in ITER Toroidal Field Coil Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Takeru; Icuchi, Masahide; Nakahira, Masatake; Saito, Toru; Morimoto, Masaaki; Inagaki, Takashi; Hong, Yunseok; Matsui, Kunihiro; Hemmi, Tsutomu; Kajitani, Hideki; Koizumi, Norikiyo

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has developed the prediction method for yield stress and ultimate tensile strength at liquid helium temperature (4 K) using the quadratic curve as a function of the content of carbon and nitrogen. Prediction method was formulated based on the tensile strength data of materials with shape of rectangle. In this study, tensile strength of the forged materials with round bar and complex shape were obtained so as to compare with the predicted value. The accuracy of the prediction method was 10.2% of Yield Strength (YS), 2.5% of Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) when the prediction method was applied to round bar forged materials. By contrast, the accuracy about prediction method was 1.8% of YS, -0.8% of UTS when prediction method was applied to complex shape forged materials. It can be presumed the tendency of tensile strength other than materials with shape of rectangle. However, it was found accuracy of round bar is larger than other materials because of difference in the forging method."The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the ITER Organization"

  8. Relative strength of lithospheric mantle compared to granulite lower crust in orogenic roots: insight from field laboratory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusbach, V.; Ulrich, S.; Schulmann, K.

    2009-04-01

    The continental lithosphere is composed by strong lithospheric mantle and weak lower crust for average and hot geotherms. However, some experiments and seismic studies show that the strength contrast between mantle and crust can vary in order of several magnitudes. The internal zone of the European Variscan orogen (Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic) contains large complexes of Ky - K-feldspar granulites with incorporated spinel and garnet peridotites that can respond to question of mantle-lower crust strength contrast from the field perspective. The studied spinel-garnet harzburgite body (the Mohelno peridotite) represents probably a fragment of strongly depleted oceanic lithosphere showing peak conditions of 22,4-27,6 kbar and 1120-1275°C. The peridotite forms large folded sheet with steep hinge and vertical axial plane. It exhibits presence of spinel along the outer arc and the internal part of the fold and garnet along inner arc, both related to coarse-grained orthopyroxene - olivine microstructure. This coarse microstructure is dynamically recrystallized forming fine-grained matrix (~10 - 20 microns) and the EBSD measurements show presence of axial [100] LPO olivine pattern dominantly along the outer arc of the fold and in spinel harzburgite, while the inner arc of the fold and partly also garnet harzburgite reveals presence of axial [010] LPO pattern. Steep foliation and sub-horizontal to moderately plunging lineation determined from olivine EBSD data defines the shape of the megafold. Host rocks exhibit transposed mylonitic fabric S1-2 revealing peak conditions of 18 kbar, 800°C and heterogeneous D3 retrogression at about 10 - 7 kbar, 650°C. The foliation S2-3 is fully concordant with limbs of peridotite megafold, but close to the outer arc it is affected by asymmetrical folds with axial planar leucosomes coherent with the shape of the megafold hinge zone. In contrast, the S2 in the internal part of the megafold is affected by sinistral and dextral melt

  9. Pulsed electromagnetic fields partially preserve bone mass, microarchitecture, and strength by promoting bone formation in hindlimb-suspended rats.

    PubMed

    Jing, Da; Cai, Jing; Wu, Yan; Shen, Guanghao; Li, Feijiang; Xu, Qiaoling; Xie, Kangning; Tang, Chi; Liu, Juan; Guo, Wei; Wu, Xiaoming; Jiang, Maogang; Luo, Erping

    2014-10-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF), as a safe and noninvasive method, could promote in vivo and in vitro osteogenesis. Thus far, the effects and underlying mechanisms of PEMF on disuse osteopenia and/or osteoporosis remain poorly understood. Herein, the efficiency of PEMF on osteoporotic bone microarchitecture, bone strength, and bone metabolism, together with its associated signaling pathway mechanism, was systematically investigated in hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rats. Thirty young mature (3-month-old), male Sprague-Dawley rats were equally assigned to control, HU, and HU + PEMF groups. The HU + PEMF group was subjected to daily 2-hour PEMF exposure at 15 Hz, 2.4 mT. After 4 weeks, micro-computed tomography (µCT) results showed that PEMF ameliorated the deterioration of trabecular and cortical bone microarchitecture. Three-point bending test showed that PEMF mitigated HU-induced reduction in femoral mechanical properties, including maximum load, stiffness, and elastic modulus. Moreover, PEMF increased serum bone formation markers, including osteocalcin (OC) and N-terminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen (P1NP); nevertheless, PEMF exerted minor inhibitory effects on bone resorption markers, including C-terminal crosslinked telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX-I) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAcP5b). Bone histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that PEMF increased mineral apposition rate, bone formation rate, and osteoblast numbers in cancellous bone, but PEMF caused no obvious changes on osteoclast numbers. Real-time PCR showed that PEMF promoted tibial gene expressions of Wnt1, LRP5, β-catenin, OPG, and OC, but did not alter RANKL, RANK, or Sost mRNA levels. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of PEMF on disuse-induced osteopenia were further confirmed in 8-month-old mature adult HU rats. Together, these results demonstrate that PEMF alleviated disuse-induced bone loss by promoting skeletal anabolic activities

  10. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: High-Field-Strength MR Microscopy in the Human Substantia Nigra and Globus Pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Foroutan, Parastou; Murray, Melissa E.; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Schweitzer, Katherine J.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize changes in the magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation properties of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and tissue from neurologically normal brains by using high-resolution (21.1-T, 900-MHz) MR microscopy of postmortem human midbrain and basal ganglia. Materials and Methods: This HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board at the Mayo Clinic and informed consent was obtained. Postmortem tissue from age-matched PSP (n = 6) and control (n = 3) brains was imaged by using three-dimensional fast low-angle shot MR imaging with isotropic resolution of 50 μm. Relaxation times and parametric relaxation maps were generated from spin-echo and gradient-recalled-echo sequences. MR findings were correlated with histologic features by evaluating the presence of iron by using Prussian blue and ferritin and microglia burden as determined by a custom-designed color deconvolution algorithm. T2 and T2*, signal intensities, percent pixels (that could not be fitted in a pixel-by-pixel regression analysis due to severe hypointensity), and histologic data (total iron, ferritin, and microglia burden) were statistically analyzed by using independent sample t tests (P < .05). Results: PSP specimens showed higher iron burden in the cerebral peduncles and substantia nigra than did controls. However, only the putamen was significantly different, and it correlated with a decrease of T2* compared with controls (−48%; P = .043). Similarly, substantia nigra showed a significant decrease of T2* signal in PSP compared with controls (−57%; P = .028). Compared with controls, cerebral peduncles showed increased T2 (38%; P = .026) and T2* (34%; P = .014), as well as higher T2 signal intensity (57%; P = .049). Ferritin immunoreactivity was the opposite from iron burden and was significantly lower compared with controls in the putamen (−74%; P = .025), red nucleus (−61%; P = .018), and entire basal ganglia section (−63%; P = .016). Conclusion: High-field-strength

  11. Multi-site study of diffusion metric variability: effects of site, vendor, field strength, and echo time on regions-of-interest and histogram-bin analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmer, K. G.; Chou, M.-C.; Preciado, R. I.; Gimi, B.; Rollins, N. K.; Song, A.; Turner, J.; Mori, S.

    2016-03-01

    It is now common for magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) based multi-site trials to include diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) as part of the protocol. It is also common for these sites to possess MR scanners of different manufacturers, different software and hardware, and different software licenses. These differences mean that scanners may not be able to acquire data with the same number of gradient amplitude values and number of available gradient directions. Variability can also occur in achievable b-values and minimum echo times. The challenge of a multi-site study then, is to create a common protocol by understanding and then minimizing the effects of scanner variability and identifying reliable and accurate diffusion metrics. This study describes the effect of site, scanner vendor, field strength, and TE on two diffusion metrics: the first moment of the diffusion tensor field (mean diffusivity, MD), and the fractional anisotropy (FA) using two common analyses (region-of-interest and mean-bin value of whole brain histograms). The goal of the study was to identify sources of variability in diffusion-sensitized imaging and their influence on commonly reported metrics. The results demonstrate that the site, vendor, field strength, and echo time all contribute to variability in FA and MD, though to different extent. We conclude that characterization of the variability of DTI metrics due to site, vendor, field strength, and echo time is a worthwhile step in the construction of multi-center trials.

  12. Comparing Simulations of Rising Flux Tubes Through the Solar Convection Zone with Observations of Solar Active Regions: Constraining the Dynamo Field Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M. A.; Fan, Y.; Miesch, M. S.

    2013-10-01

    We study how active-region-scale flux tubes rise buoyantly from the base of the convection zone to near the solar surface by embedding a thin flux tube model in a rotating spherical shell of solar-like turbulent convection. These toroidal flux tubes that we simulate range in magnetic field strength from 15 kG to 100 kG at initial latitudes of 1∘ to 40∘ in both hemispheres. This article expands upon Weber, Fan, and Miesch ( Astrophys. J. 741, 11, 2011) (Article 1) with the inclusion of tubes with magnetic flux of 1020 Mx and 1021 Mx, and more simulations of the previously investigated case of 1022 Mx, sampling more convective flows than the previous article, greatly improving statistics. Observed properties of active regions are compared to properties of the simulated emerging flux tubes, including: the tilt of active regions in accordance with Joy's Law as in Article 1, and in addition the scatter of tilt angles about the Joy's Law trend, the most commonly occurring tilt angle, the rotation rate of the emerging loops with respect to the surrounding plasma, and the nature of the magnetic field at the flux tube apex. We discuss how these diagnostic properties constrain the initial field strength of the active-region flux tubes at the bottom of the solar convection zone, and suggest that flux tubes of initial magnetic field strengths of ≥ 40 kG are good candidates for the progenitors of large (1021 Mx to 1022 Mx) solar active regions, which agrees with the results from Article 1 for flux tubes of 1022 Mx. With the addition of more magnetic flux values and more simulations, we find that for all magnetic field strengths, the emerging tubes show a positive Joy's Law trend, and that this trend does not show a statistically significant dependence on the magnetic flux.

  13. 41 CFR 60-30.4 - Form, filing, service of pleadings and papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... pleadings and papers. 60-30.4 Section 60-30.4 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 General Provisions § 60-30.4 Form, filing, service of pleadings and papers. (a) Form. The original of all pleadings and papers in a proceeding conducted under the regulations in this...

  14. 41 CFR 60-30.4 - Form, filing, service of pleadings and papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... pleadings and papers. 60-30.4 Section 60-30.4 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 General Provisions § 60-30.4 Form, filing, service of pleadings and papers. (a) Form. The original of all pleadings and papers in a proceeding conducted under the regulations in this...

  15. Enhanced capture of magnetic microbeads using combination of reduced magnetic field strength and sequentially switched electroosmotic flow--a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Das, Debarun; Al-Rjoub, Marwan F; Banerjee, Rupak K

    2015-05-01

    Magnetophoretic immunoassay is a widely used technique in lab-on-chip systems for detection and isolation of target cells, pathogens, and biomolecules. In this method, target pathogens (antigens) bind to specific antibodies coated on magnetic microbeads (mMBs) which are then separated using an external magnetic field for further analysis. Better capture of mMB is important for improving the sensitivity and performance of magnetophoretic assay. The objective of this study was to develop a numerical model of magnetophoretic separation in electroosmotic flow (EOF) using magnetic field generated by a miniaturized magnet and to evaluate the capture efficiency (CE) of the mMBs. A finite-volume solver was used to compute the trajectory of mMBs under the coupled effects of EOF and external magnetic field. The effect of steady and time varying (switching) electric fields (150-450 V/cm) on the CE was studied under reduced magnetic field strength. During switching, the electric potential at the inlet and outlet of the microchannel was reversed or switched, causing reversal in flow direction. The CE was a function of the momentum of the mMB in EOF and the applied magnetic field strength. By switching the electric field, CE increased from 75% (for steady electric field) to 95% for lower electric fields (150-200 V/cm) and from 35% to 47.5% for higher electric fields (400-450 V/cm). The CE was lower at higher EOF electric fields because the momentum of the mMB overcame the external magnetic force. Switching allowed improved CE due to the reversal and decrease in EOF velocity and increase in mMB residence time under the reduced magnetic field strength. These improvements in CE, particularly at higher electric fields, made sequential switching of EOF an efficient separation technique of mMBs for use in high throughput magnetophoretic immunoassay devices. The reduced size of the magnet, along with the efficient mMB separation technique of switching can lead to the development

  16. Kerr electro-optic field mapping study of the effect of charge injection on the impulse breakdown strength of transformer oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Zahn, M.

    2013-10-01

    The smart use of charge injection to improve breakdown strength in transformer oil is demonstrated in this paper. Hypothetically, bipolar homo-charge injection with reduced electric field at both electrodes may allow higher voltage operation without insulation failure, since electrical breakdown usually initiates at the electrode-dielectric interfaces. To find experimental evidence, the applicability and limitation of the hypothesis is first analyzed. Impulse breakdown tests and Kerr electro-optic field mapping measurements are then conducted with different combinations of parallel-plate aluminum and brass electrodes stressed by millisecond duration impulse. It is found that the breakdown voltage of brass anode and aluminum cathode is ˜50% higher than that of aluminum anode and brass cathode. This can be explained by charge injection patterns from Kerr measurements under a lower voltage, where aluminum and brass electrodes inject negative and positive charges, respectively. This work provides a feasible approach to investigating the effect of electrode material on breakdown strength.

  17. Scaling submillimeter single-cycle transients toward megavolts per centimeter field strength via optical rectification in the organic crystal OH1.

    PubMed

    Ruchert, Clemens; Vicario, Carlo; Hauri, Christoph P

    2012-03-01

    We present the generation of high-power single-cycle terahertz (THz) pulses in the organic salt crystal 2-[3-(4-hydroxystyryl)-5.5-dimethylcyclohex-2-enylidene]malononitrile or OH1. Broadband THz radiation with a central frequency of 1.5 THz (λ(c)=200 μm) and high electric field strength of 440 kV/cm is produced by optical rectification driven by the signal of a powerful femtosecond optical parametric amplifier. A 1.5% pump to THz energy conversion efficiency is reported, and pulse energy stability better than 1% RMS is achieved. An approach toward the realization of higher field strength is discussed.

  18. Development of high-strength and high-conductivity conductor materials for pulsed high-field magnets at Dresden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünberger, W.; Heilmaier, M.; Schultz, L.

    2001-01-01

    The work at the IFW Dresden is focused on the development of microcomposite Cu-Ag alloys and steel-copper macrocomposites with high-nitrogen steel and pearlitic steel jackets, respectively. In Cu-Ag alloys the investigation of continuously cast rods with different starting diameters suggests that the cooling rate during solidification determining the dendrite arm spacing has a minor influence on the development of the strength compared to the cooling velocity after solidification which determines the extent of the Ag-supersaturation in the Cu solid solution. Maximum strength at minimum drawing strain demands (i) a sufficient volume fraction of eutectic in order to suppress discontinuous precipitation (absence of grain boundaries) and (ii) a sufficiently rapid cooling after solidification in order to prevent pre-precipitation. With a continuously cast starting rod of 12 mm diameter a maximum tensile strength of 1.3 GPa was obtained after a drawing strain of only η=4.3. Steel-copper macrocomposites were fabricated by the ‘rod-in-tube’ technology. The experiments with austenitic high-nitrogen steels were performed with two alloys. With the commercial alloy Nicrofer 3033 a strength level of 1.2 GPa has been achieved with a 52 vol% Cu composite at a drawing strain of η=2.3. A composite with pearlitic C60-steel (0.6 wt% C) and 56 vol% Cu showed a tensile strength of 1.53 GPa after a final patenting at a diameter of 14.7 mm and a drawing strain of η=4.

  19. Whole-body vibration combined with extra-load training for enhancing the strength and speed of track and field athletes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiang-Hsin; Chen, Wei-Han; Liu, Chiang; Yang, Wen-Wen; Huang, Mao-Ying; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether whole-body vibration (WBV) combined with extra-load training can enhance the strength and speed of trained athletes compared with isolated WBV training or loaded training (LT) only. Twenty-one elite male track and field athletes were randomly assigned to a loaded vibration (LV) training group (n = 7), an unloaded vibration (ULV) training group (n = 7), and a LT group (n = 7). During 4 weeks of training, the LV group received the vibration stimulus (30 Hz and 4 mm) accompanied by a load comprising 75% of the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), the ULV group received the same vibration stimulus without any load, and the LT group received only a load of 75% MVC without any vibration stimulus. The knee extensor isometric strength, and the concentric and eccentric strength were measured using an isokinetic dynamometer at 300°·s at a 30-m sprint speed before and after the training period. A 2-way mixed analysis of variance (time × group) was used to analyze the differences. Significant time × group interactions were observed for all the dependent variables (p ≤ 0.05). Regarding the post hoc analysis results, the LV group exhibited significant improvements for all the dependent variables after training (p ≤ 0.05), whereas the ULV group exhibited significantly reduced sprint speeds (p ≤ 0.05). The LV group demonstrated significantly superior eccentric strength compared with the ULV and LT groups after training (p ≤ 0.05), and the LV group also produced significantly superior sprint speeds compared with the ULV group after training (p ≤ 0.05). Vibration combined with extra-load training for 4 weeks significantly increased the muscle strength and speed of the elite male track and field athletes.

  20. Control of the binding energy by tuning the single dopant position, magnetic field strength and shell thickness in ZnS/CdSe core/shell quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbi, A.; Feddi, E.; Zouitine, A.; Haouari, M. El; Zazoui, M.; Oukerroum, A.; Dujardin, F.; Assaid, E.; Addou, M.

    2016-10-01

    Recently, the new tunable optoelectronic devices associated to the inclusion of the single dopant are in continuous emergence. Combined to other effects such as magnetic field, geometrical confinement and dielectric discontinuity, it can constitute an approach to adjusting new transitions. In this paper, we present a theoretical investigation of magnetic field, donor position and quantum confinement effects on the ground state binding energy of single dopant confined in ZnS/CdSe core/shell quantum dot. Within the framework of the effective mass approximation, the Schrödinger equation was numerically been solved by using the Ritz variational method under the finite potential barrier. The results show that the binding energy is very affected by the core/shell sizes and by the external magnetic field. It has been shown that the single dopant energy transitions can be controlled by tuning the dopant position and/or the field strength.

  1. Kinetic parameters, collision rates, energy exchanges and transport coefficients of non-thermal electrons in premixed flames at sub-breakdown electric field strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; El Morsli, Mbark

    2014-01-01

    The effects of an electric field on the collision rates, energy exchanges and transport properties of electrons in premixed flames are investigated via solutions to the Boltzmann kinetic equation. The case of high electric field strength, which results in high-energy, non-thermal electrons, is analysed in detail at sub-breakdown conditions. The rates of inelastic collisions and the energy exchange between electrons and neutrals in the reaction zone of the flame are characterised quantitatively. The analysis includes attachment, ionisation, impact dissociation, and vibrational and electronic excitation processes. Our results suggest that Townsend breakdown occurs for E/N = 140 Td. Vibrational excitation is the dominant process up to breakdown, despite important rates of electronic excitation of CO, CO2 and N2 as well as impact dissociation of O2 being apparent from 50 Td onwards. Ohmic heating in the reaction zone is found to be negligible (less than 2% of peak heat release rate) up to breakdown field strengths for realistic electron densities equal to 1010 cm-3. The observed trends are largely independent of equivalence ratio. In the non-thermal regime, electron transport coefficients are insensitive to mixture composition and approximately constant across the flame, but are highly dependent on the electric field strength. In the thermal limit, kinetic parameters and transport coefficients vary substantially across the flame due to the spatially inhomogeneous concentration of water vapour. A practical approach for identifying the plasma regime (thermal versus non-thermal) in studies of electric field effects on flames is proposed.

  2. Virgo cluster and field dwarf ellipticals in 3D - I. On the variety of stellar kinematic and line-strength properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryś, Agnieszka; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; van de Ven, Glenn

    2013-02-01

    We present the first large-scale stellar kinematic and line-strength maps for dwarf elliptical galaxies (nine in the Virgo cluster and three in the field environment) obtained with the SAURON (Spectrographic Areal Unit for Research on Optical Nebulae) integral-field unit. No two galaxies in our sample are alike: we see that the level of rotation is not tied to flattening (we have, e.g., round rotators and flattened non-rotators); we observe kinematic twists in one Virgo and one field object; we discover large-scale kinematically decoupled components in two field galaxies; we see varying gradients in line-strength maps, from nearly flat to strongly peaked in the centre. The great variety of morphological, kinematic and stellar population parameters seen in our data points to a formation scenario in which properties are shaped stochastically. A combined effect of ram-pressure stripping and galaxy harassment is the most probable explanation. We show the need for a comprehensive analysis of kinematic, dynamical and stellar population properties which will enable us to place dwarf ellipticals and processes that govern their evolution in the wider context of galaxy formation.

  3. Macroscopic orientation effects in broadline NMR-spectra of model membranes at high magnetic field strength: A method preventing such effects.

    PubMed

    Brumm, T; Möps, A; Dolainsky, C; Brückner, S; Bayerl, T M

    1992-04-01

    The partial orientation of multilamellar vesicles (MLV) in high magnetic fields has been studied and a method to prevent such effects is herewith proposed. The orientation effect was measured with (2)H-, (31)P-NMR and electron microscopy on MLVs of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine with 30 mol% cholesterol. We present the first freeze-etch electron microscopy data obtained from MLV samples that were frozen directly in the NMR magnet at a field strength of 9.4 Tesla. These experiments clearly show that the MLVs adopt an ellipsoidal (but not a cylindrical) shape in the magnetic field. Best fit (31)P-NMR lineshape calculations assuming an ellipsoidal distribution of molecular director axes to the experimentally obtained spectra provide a quantitative measure of the average semiaxis ratio of the ellipsoidal MLVs and its change with temperature. The application of so-called spherical supported vesicles (SSV) is found to prevent any partial orientation effects so that undistorted NMR powder pattern of the bilayer can be measured independently of magnetic field strength and temperature.The usefulness of SSVs is further demonstrated by a direct comparison of spectral data such as (31)P-and (2)H-NMR lineshapes and relaxation times as well as (2)H-NMR dePaked spectra obtained for both model systems. These experiments show that spectral data obtained from partially oriented MLVs are not unambiguous to interpret, in particular, if an external parameter such as temperature is varied.

  4. How accurately can subject-specific finite element models predict strains and strength of human femora? Investigation using full-field measurements.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Lorenzo; Väänänen, Sami P; Ristinmaa, Matti; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Isaksson, Hanna

    2016-03-21

    Subject-specific finite element models have been proposed as a tool to improve fracture risk assessment in individuals. A thorough laboratory validation against experimental data is required before introducing such models in clinical practice. Results from digital image correlation can provide full-field strain distribution over the specimen surface during in vitro test, instead of at a few pre-defined locations as with strain gauges. The aim of this study was to validate finite element models of human femora against experimental data from three cadaver femora, both in terms of femoral strength and of the full-field strain distribution collected with digital image correlation. The results showed a high accuracy between predicted and measured principal strains (R(2)=0.93, RMSE=10%, 1600 validated data points per specimen). Femoral strength was predicted using a rate dependent material model with specific strain limit values for yield and failure. This provided an accurate prediction (<2% error) for two out of three specimens. In the third specimen, an accidental change in the boundary conditions occurred during the experiment, which compromised the femoral strength validation. The achieved strain accuracy was comparable to that obtained in state-of-the-art studies which validated their prediction accuracy against 10-16 strain gauge measurements. Fracture force was accurately predicted, with the predicted failure location being very close to the experimental fracture rim. Despite the low sample size and the single loading condition tested, the present combined numerical-experimental method showed that finite element models can predict femoral strength by providing a thorough description of the local bone mechanical response. PMID:26944687

  5. A highly optimized code for calculating atomic data at neutron star magnetic field strengths using a doubly self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimeczek, C.; Engel, D.; Wunner, G.

    2012-07-01

    Our previously published code for calculating energies and bound-bound transitions of medium-Z elements at neutron star magnetic field strengths [D. Engel, M. Klews, G. Wunner, Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 302-311] was based on the adiabatic approximation. It assumes a complete decoupling of the (fast) gyration of the electrons under the action of the magnetic field and the (slow) bound motion along the field under the action of the Coulomb forces. For the single-particle orbitals this implied that each is a product of a Landau state and an (unknown) longitudinal wave function whose B-spline coefficients were determined self-consistently by solving the Hartree-Fock equations for the many-electron problem on a finite-element grid. In the present code we go beyond the adiabatic approximation, by allowing the transverse part of each orbital to be a superposition of Landau states, while assuming that the longitudinal part can be approximated by the same wave function in each Landau level. Inserting this ansatz into the energy variational principle leads to a system of coupled equations in which the B-spline coefficients depend on the weights of the individual Landau states, and vice versa, and which therefore has to be solved in a doubly self-consistent manner. The extended ansatz takes into account the back-reaction of the Coulomb motion of the electrons along the field direction on their motion in the plane perpendicular to the field, an effect which cannot be captured by the adiabatic approximation. The new code allows for the inclusion of up to 8 Landau levels. This reduces the relative error of energy values as compared to the adiabatic approximation results by typically a factor of three (1/3 of the original error), and yields accurate results also in regions of lower neutron star magnetic field strengths where the adiabatic approximation fails. Further improvements in the code are a more sophisticated choice of the initial wave functions, which takes into

  6. Multi-site study of diffusion metric variability: characterizing the effects of site, vendor, field strength, and echo time using the histogram distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmer, K. G.; Chou, M.-C.; Preciado, R. I.; Gimi, B.; Rollins, N. K.; Song, A.; Turner, J.; Mori, S.

    2016-03-01

    MRI-based multi-site trials now routinely include some form of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in their protocol. These studies can include data originating from scanners built by different vendors, each with their own set of unique protocol restrictions, including restrictions on the number of available gradient directions, whether an externally generated list of gradient directions can be used, and restrictions on the echo time (TE). One challenge of multi-site studies is to create a common imaging protocol that will result in a reliable and accurate set of diffusion metrics. The present study describes the effect of site, scanner vendor, field strength, and TE on two common metrics: the first moment of the diffusion tensor field (mean diffusivity, MD), and the fractional anisotropy (FA). We have shown in earlier work that ROI metrics and the mean of MD and FA histograms are not sufficiently sensitive for use in site characterization. Here we use the distance between whole brain histograms of FA and MD to investigate within- and between-site effects. We concluded that the variability of DTI metrics due to site, vendor, field strength, and echo time could influence the results in multi-center trials and that histogram distance is sensitive metrics for each of these variables.

  7. Effect of magnetic field strength on deposition rate and energy flux in a dc magnetron sputtering system

    SciTech Connect

    Ekpe, Samuel D.; Jimenez, Francisco J.; Field, David J.; Davis, Martin J.; Dew, Steven K.

    2009-11-15

    Variations in the magnetic field strongly affect the plasma parameters in a magnetron sputtering system. This in turn affects the throughput as well as the energy flux to the substrate. The variation in the magnetic field in this study, for a dc magnetron process, is achieved by shifting the magnet assembly slightly away from the target. Measurements of the plasma parameters show that while the electron density at the substrate increases with decrease in magnetic field, the electron temperature decreases. The cooling of the electron temperature is consistent with results reported elsewhere. The deposition rate per input magnetron power is found to increase slightly with the decrease in magnetic field for the process conditions considered in this study. Results suggest that the energy flux to the substrate tends to show a general decrease with the shift in the magnet assembly.

  8. ION KINETIC ENERGY CONSERVATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH CONSTANCY IN MULTI-FLUID SOLAR WIND ALFVÉNIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Matteini, L.; Horbury, T. S.; Schwartz, S. J.; Pantellini, F.; Velli, M.

    2015-03-20

    We investigate the properties of plasma fluid motion in the large-amplitude, low-frequency fluctuations of highly Alfvénic fast solar wind. We show that protons locally conserve total kinetic energy when observed from an effective frame of reference comoving with the fluctuations. For typical properties of the fast wind, this frame can be reasonably identified by alpha particles which, due to their drift with respect to protons at about the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, do not partake in the fluid low-frequency fluctuations. Using their velocity to transform the proton velocity into the frame of Alfvénic turbulence, we demonstrate that the resulting plasma motion is characterized by a constant absolute value of the velocity, zero electric fields, and aligned velocity and magnetic field vectors as expected for unidirectional Alfvénic fluctuations in equilibrium. We propose that this constraint, via the correlation between velocity and magnetic field in Alfvénic turbulence, is the origin of the observed constancy of the magnetic field; while the constant velocity corresponding to constant energy can only be observed in the frame of the fluctuations, the corresponding constant total magnetic field, invariant for Galilean transformations, remains the observational signature in the spacecraft frame of the constant total energy in the Alfvén turbulence frame.

  9. A Robust Method to Predict the Near-Sun and Interplanetary Magnetic Field Strength of Coronal Mass Ejections: Parametric and Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, Spiros; Georgoulis, Manolis K.

    2016-07-01

    Predicting the near-Sun, and particularly the Interplanetary (IP), magnetic field structure of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and interplanetary counterparts (ICMEs) is a topic of intense research activity. This is because Earth-directed CMEs with strong southward magnetic fields are responsible for the most powerful geomagnetic storms. We have recently developed a simple two-tier method to predict the magnetic field strength of CMEs in the outer corona and in the IP medium, using as input the magnetic-helicity budget of the source solar active region and stereoscopic coronagraphic observations. Near-Sun CME magnetic fields are obtained by utilizing the principle of magnetic helicity conservation of flux-rope CMEs for coronagraphic observations. Interplanetary propagation of the inferred values is achieved by employing power-law prescriptions of the radial evolution of the CME-ICME magnetic fields. We hereby present a parametric study of our method, based on the observed statistics of input parameters, to infer the anticipated range of values for the near-Sun and interplanetary CME-ICME magnetic fields. This analysis is complemented by application of our method to several well-observed major CME-ICME events.

  10. Fast quantifying collision strength index of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer coverings on the fields based on near infrared hyperspectral imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y. M.; Lin, P.; He, Y.; He, J. Q.; Zhang, J.; Li, X. L.

    2016-01-01

    A novel strategy based on the near infrared hyperspectral imaging techniques and chemometrics were explored for fast quantifying the collision strength index of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVAC) coverings on the fields. The reflectance spectral data of EVAC coverings was obtained by using the near infrared hyperspectral meter. The collision analysis equipment was employed to measure the collision intensity of EVAC materials. The preprocessing algorithms were firstly performed before the calibration. The algorithms of random frog and successive projection (SP) were applied to extracting the fingerprint wavebands. A correlation model between the significant spectral curves which reflected the cross-linking attributions of the inner organic molecules and the degree of collision strength was set up by taking advantage of the support vector machine regression (SVMR) approach. The SP-SVMR model attained the residual predictive deviation of 3.074, the square of percentage of correlation coefficient of 93.48% and 93.05% and the root mean square error of 1.963 and 2.091 for the calibration and validation sets, respectively, which exhibited the best forecast performance. The results indicated that the approaches of integrating the near infrared hyperspectral imaging techniques with the chemometrics could be utilized to rapidly determine the degree of collision strength of EVAC. PMID:26875544

  11. Fast quantifying collision strength index of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer coverings on the fields based on near infrared hyperspectral imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. M.; Lin, P.; He, Y.; He, J. Q.; Zhang, J.; Li, X. L.

    2016-02-01

    A novel strategy based on the near infrared hyperspectral imaging techniques and chemometrics were explored for fast quantifying the collision strength index of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVAC) coverings on the fields. The reflectance spectral data of EVAC coverings was obtained by using the near infrared hyperspectral meter. The collision analysis equipment was employed to measure the collision intensity of EVAC materials. The preprocessing algorithms were firstly performed before the calibration. The algorithms of random frog and successive projection (SP) were applied to extracting the fingerprint wavebands. A correlation model between the significant spectral curves which reflected the cross-linking attributions of the inner organic molecules and the degree of collision strength was set up by taking advantage of the support vector machine regression (SVMR) approach. The SP-SVMR model attained the residual predictive deviation of 3.074, the square of percentage of correlation coefficient of 93.48% and 93.05% and the root mean square error of 1.963 and 2.091 for the calibration and validation sets, respectively, which exhibited the best forecast performance. The results indicated that the approaches of integrating the near infrared hyperspectral imaging techniques with the chemometrics could be utilized to rapidly determine the degree of collision strength of EVAC.

  12. SV40 late protein VP4 forms toroidal pores to disrupt membranes for viral release.

    PubMed

    Raghava, Smita; Giorda, Kristina M; Romano, Fabian B; Heuck, Alejandro P; Hebert, Daniel N

    2013-06-01

    Nonenveloped viruses are generally released from the cell by the timely lysis of host cell membranes. SV40 has been used as a model virus for the study of the lytic nonenveloped virus life cycle. The expression of SV40 VP4 at later times during infection is concomitant with cell lysis. To investigate the role of VP4 in viral release and its mechanism of action, VP4 was expressed and purified from bacteria as a fusion protein for use in membrane disruption assays. Purified VP4 perforated membranes as demonstrated by the release of fluorescent markers encapsulated within large unilamellar vesicles or liposomes. Dynamic light scattering results revealed that VP4 treatment did not cause membrane lysis or change the size of the liposomes. Liposomes encapsulated with 4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-3-indacene-labeled streptavidin were used to show that VP4 formed stable pores in membranes. These VP4 pores had an inner diameter of 1-5 nm. Asymmetrical liposomes containing pyrene-labeled lipids in the outer monolayer were employed to monitor transbilayer lipid diffusion. Consistent with VP4 forming toroidal pore structures in membranes, VP4 induced transbilayer lipid diffusion or lipid flip-flop. Altogether, these studies support a central role for VP4 acting as a viroporin in the disruption of cellular membranes to trigger SV40 viral release by forming toroidal pores that unite the outer and inner leaflets of membrane bilayers. PMID:23651212

  13. The Correlation Between Electron Density and Temperature in Low and High Strength Crustal Magnetic Field Regions at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamandy, T.; Andersson, L.; Fowler, C. M.; Ergun, R.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Brain, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Langmuir Probe and Waves Instrument (LPW) onboard the MAVEN spacecraft is the first Langmuir probe to map out the upper atmosphere of Mars. The instrument provides measurements (amongst other variables) of electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te). The overarching scientific goal of MAVEN is to determining how Mars lost its atmosphere and to understand the physical processes governing this escape and the above quantities play a crucial role in understanding this. Ne and Te information is critical for determining the efficiency of the different photochemical reaction rates and thereby in understanding the upper atmospheric composition. Understanding the upper atmosphere allows the MAVEN mission to calculate escape rates. Photochemical reactions and collisions dominate below the exobase region (~150-~180 km). Above the exobase, particles with energies greater than the Mars gravity well can escape. On the dayside solar EUV heats the atmosphere at lower altitudes and produces the ionosphere. It is of great interest to understand the how the electron density and temperature correlate. The presented study therefore shows the correlation between Ne and Te. This study investigates how different solar zenith angles affect these quantities and evaluates if closed magnetic field lines (as expected to occur over crustal magnetic fields) change the correlation between the two. Many previous studies have shown that crustal fields affect the plasma at high altitudes. In this study we present how the magnetic field influences the photochemical and the plasma processes close to the exobase via analyzing Ne and Te.

  14. The Effect of Shock Stress and Field Strength on Shock-Induced Depoling of Normally Poled PZT 95/5

    SciTech Connect

    CHHABILDAS,LALIT C.; FURNISH,MICHAEL D.; MONTGOMERY,STEPHEN T.; SETCHELL,ROBERT E.

    1999-09-01

    Shock-induced depoling of the ferroelectric ceramic PZT 95/5 is utilized in a number of pulsed power devices. Several experimental and theoretical efforts are in progress in order to improve numerical simulations of these devices. In this study we have examined the shock response of normally poled PZT 95/5 under uniaxial strain conditions. On each experiment the current produced in an external circuit and the transmitted waveform at a window interface were recorded. The peak electrical field generated within the PZT sample was varied through the choice of external circuit resistance. Shock pressures were varied from 0.6 to 4.6 GPa, and peak electrical fields were varied from 0.2 to 37 kV/cm. For a 2.4 GPa shock and the lowest peak field, a nearly constant current governed simply by the remanent polarization and the shock velocity was recorded. Both decreasing the shock pressure and increasing the electrical field resulted in reduced current generation, indicating a retardation of the depoling kinetics.

  15. 47 CFR 1.544 - Application for broadcast station to conduct field strength measurements and for experimental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application for broadcast station to conduct... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Broadcast Applications and Proceedings General Filing Requirements § 1.544 Application for broadcast station to conduct field...

  16. Measuring the Magnetic Field Strength of the Transiting Extra-solar Planet TrES-2b Using Near-UV Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Ian; Turner, J.; Pearson, K.

    2013-06-01

    By measuring the magnetic field of an extra-solar planet we can learn about properties such as its internal structure, rotation period, and atmospheric retention. It is also theorized that magnetic fields can contribute to the habitability of a planet (Grieβmeier et al. 2005). By observing the asymmetries in the near-UV and optical light curve of a transiting extra-solar planet it is possible to detect a magnetic field (Vidotto et al. 2011). We observed the primary transit of TrES-2b using a near-UV filter with the Steward Observatory 61" Kuiper Telescope, and compared it with available optical data in an attempt to detect this asymmetry. Analysis of the data does not show any asymmetries. Furthermore, we found that the upper limit of the magnetic field strength ranges from 0.022 to 0.46 Gauss. Future observations of the planet's radio emissions generated by electron-cyclotron maser interactions are encouraged to confirm this low magnetic field.

  17. Free-solution electrophoretic separations of DNA-drag-tag conjugates on glass microchips with no polymer network and no loss of resolution at increased electric field strength.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Jennifer Coyne; Kerby, Matthew B; Niedringhaus, Thomas P; Lin, Jennifer S; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Barron, Annelise E

    2011-05-01

    Here, we demonstrate the potential for high-resolution electrophoretic separations of ssDNA-protein conjugates in borosilicate glass microfluidic chips, with no sieving media and excellent repeatability. Using polynucleotides of two different lengths conjugated to moderately cationic protein polymer drag-tags, we measured separation efficiency as a function of applied electric field. In excellent agreement with prior theoretical predictions of Slater et al., resolution is found to remain constant as applied field is increased up to 700 V/cm, the highest field we were able to apply. This remarkable result illustrates the fundamentally different physical limitations of free-solution conjugate electrophoresis (FSCE)-based DNA separations relative to matrix-based DNA electrophoresis. ssDNA separations in "gels" have always shown rapidly declining resolution as the field strength is increased; this is especially true for ssDNA > 400 bases in length. FSCE's ability to decouple DNA peak resolution from applied electric field suggests the future possibility of ultra-rapid FSCE sequencing on chips. We investigated sources of peak broadening for FSCE separations on borosilicate glass microchips, using six different protein polymer drag-tags. For drag-tags with four or more positive charges, electrostatic and adsorptive interactions with poly(N-hydroxyethylacrylamide)-coated microchannel walls led to appreciable band-broadening, while much sharper peaks were seen for bioconjugates with nearly charge-neutral protein drag-tags.

  18. Microplasma mode transition and corresponding propagation characteristics controlled by manipulating electric field strength in a microchannel-cavity hybrid structure device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Ni, J. H.; Zhong, S.; Zhang, X.; Liang, Z.; Liu, C.; Park, S.-J.; Eden, J. G.

    2016-10-01

    Plasma redistribution in a symmetric microchannel-cavity hybrid structure device has been investigated by modulating the applied electric field strength. The device array has been operated in 200 Torr of argon, driven by a 20 kHz bipolar waveform. With the existence of the intervening microchannel between microcavities, several stable modes of operation of the microplasma have been observed, including cavity mode, hybrid mode and channel mode. Transition between the modes occurs with modulation of the applied voltage from 800 to 1100 V. The characteristics of microplasma propagation in different modes are investigated and the propagation speed along diagonal direction of the device in cavity mode, hybrid and channel mode are calculated to be ~48, ~29 and ~32 km s-1, respectively. Nonhomogeneous electric field strength distribution and plasma interaction have been discussed to explain these experimental results. Emission intensity and propagation speed differences in the cavity mode between the polarities of the applied voltage are interpreted through spatially resolved measurements of the emission profile in a partial channel-cavity array.

  19. Quantum wells on 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunctions. Calculation of spontaneous polarization and electric field strength in experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sbruev, I. S.; Sbruev, S. B.

    2010-10-15

    The results of experiments with quantum wells on 3C-SiC/4H-SiC and 3C-SiC/6H-SiC heterojunctions obtained by various methods are reconsidered. Spontaneous polarizations, field strengths, and energies of local levels in quantum wells on 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunctions were calculated within a unified model. The values obtained are in agreement with the results of all considered experiments. Heterojunction types are determined. Approximations for valence band offsets on heterojunctions between silicon carbide polytypes and the expression for calculating local levels in quantum wells on the 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunction are presented. The spontaneous polarizations and field strengths induced by spontaneous polarization on 3C-SiC/4H-SiC and 3C-SiC/6H-SiC heterojunctions were calculated as 0.71 and 0.47 C/m{sup 2} and 0.825 and 0.55 MV/cm, respectively.

  20. In-situ investigation of the influence of the long-term shear strength of faults on the regional stress field in a granite rock mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Bruno; Cornet, Francois; Lamas, Luís; Muralha, José

    2016-04-01

    A case study is presented to show how stress field measurements may be used to assess the long-term rheological behaviour of an equivalent geo-material. The example concerns a granitic rock mass at the km3 scale, where an underground hydropower scheme including a new 10 km long power conduit and a powerhouse complex will be constructed. For design of the underground cavern and hydraulic pressure tunnel, several in situ stress measurements were carried out, using hydraulic borehole testing, overcoring and flat jack techniques. A first continuum mechanics model, with a homogenous material, was developed to integrate the several in situ test results and to assess the regional stress field. This model is based on elasticity and relaxation of the elastic properties measured through laboratory tests conducted on cores. Results of integration show that the long-term behavior of this granite rock mass differs markedly from the short-term behaviour as defined by laboratory tests. This suggests that the in-situ stress field depends mostly on the softer material that fills up the faults and hence results from the shear stress relaxation over a large number of pre-existing fractures and faults. A second continuum mechanics model, with consideration of two fault planes located nearby the hydraulic tests, was studied. This model is based on elasticity for the overall rock mass, with the elastic properties extracted from laboratory measurements, and visco-elasticity with small long-term shear strength for the two fault planes. Results show that the overall granite rock mass may be viewed as a combination of stiff elastic blocks separated by soft low strength material, leading to a fairly large scale homogeneous axisymmetrical stress field with vertical axis. Advantages and limitations of the two modelling approaches are discussed.

  1. Instability of thermoremanence and the problem of estimating the ancient geomagnetic field strength from non-single-domain recorders

    PubMed Central

    Shaar, Ron; Tauxe, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Data on the past intensity of Earth’s magnetic field (paleointensity) are essential for understanding Earth’s deep interior, climatic modeling, and geochronology applications, among other items. Here we demonstrate the possibility that much of available paleointensity data could be biased by instability of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) associated with non-single-domain (SD) particles. Paleointensity data are derived from experiments in which an ancient TRM, acquired in an unknown field, is replaced by a laboratory-controlled TRM. This procedure is built on the assumption that the process of ancient TRM acquisition is entirely reproducible in the laboratory. Here we show experimental results violating this assumption in a manner not expected from standard theory. We show that the demagnetization−remagnetization relationship of non-SD specimens that were kept in a controlled field for only 2 y show a small but systematic bias relative to sister specimens that were given a fresh TRM. This effect, likely caused by irreversible changes in micromagnetic structures, leads to a bias in paleointensity estimates. PMID:26305946

  2. Electric field strength and focality in electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: A finite element simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first computational study comparing the electric field induced by various electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) paradigms. Four ECT electrode configurations (bilateral, bifrontal, right unilateral, and focal electrically administered seizure therapy) and three MST coil configurations (circular, cap, and double cone) were modeled. The model incorporated a modality-specific neural activation threshold. ECT (0.3 ms pulse width) and MST induced maximum electric field in the brain of 2.1–2.5 V/cm and 1.1–2.2 V/cm, corresponding to 6.2–7.2 times and 1.2–2.3 times the neural activation threshold, respectively. The MST electric field is more confined to the superficial cortex compared to ECT. The brain volume stimulated was much higher with ECT (up to 100%) than MST (up to 8.2%). MST with the double cone coil was the most focal and bilateral ECT was the least focal. Our results suggest a possible biophysical explanation of the reduced side effects of MST compared to ECT. Our results also indicate that the conventional ECT pulse amplitude (800–900 mA) is much higher than necessary for seizure induction. Reducing the ECT pulse amplitude should be explored as a potential means of diminishing side effects. PMID:21248385

  3. Electric field strength and focality in electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: a finite element simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2011-02-01

    We present the first computational study comparing the electric field induced by various electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) paradigms. Four ECT electrode configurations (bilateral, bifrontal, right unilateral, and focal electrically administered seizure therapy) and three MST coil configurations (circular, cap, and double cone) were modeled. The model incorporated a modality-specific neural activation threshold. ECT (0.3 ms pulse width) and MST induced the maximum electric field of 2.1-2.5 V cm-1 and 1.1-2.2 V cm-1 in the brain, corresponding to 6.2-7.2 times and 1.2-2.3 times the neural activation threshold, respectively. The MST electric field is more confined to the superficial cortex compared to ECT. The brain volume stimulated was much larger with ECT (up to 100%) than with MST (up to 8.2%). MST with the double-cone coil was the most focal, and bilateral ECT was the least focal. Our results suggest a possible biophysical explanation of the reduced side effects of MST compared to ECT. Our results also indicate that the conventional ECT pulse amplitude (800-900 mA) is much higher than necessary for seizure induction. Reducing the ECT pulse amplitude should be explored as a potential means of diminishing side effects.

  4. Instability of thermoremanence and the problem of estimating the ancient geomagnetic field strength from non-single-domain recorders.

    PubMed

    Shaar, Ron; Tauxe, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    Data on the past intensity of Earth's magnetic field (paleointensity) are essential for understanding Earth's deep interior, climatic modeling, and geochronology applications, among other items. Here we demonstrate the possibility that much of available paleointensity data could be biased by instability of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) associated with non-single-domain (SD) particles. Paleointensity data are derived from experiments in which an ancient TRM, acquired in an unknown field, is replaced by a laboratory-controlled TRM. This procedure is built on the assumption that the process of ancient TRM acquisition is entirely reproducible in the laboratory. Here we show experimental results violating this assumption in a manner not expected from standard theory. We show that the demagnetization-remagnetization relationship of non-SD specimens that were kept in a controlled field for only 2 y show a small but systematic bias relative to sister specimens that were given a fresh TRM. This effect, likely caused by irreversible changes in micromagnetic structures, leads to a bias in paleointensity estimates. PMID:26305946

  5. Systematic study of low-lying E1 strength using the time-dependent mean field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ebata, S.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Inakura, T.

    2012-11-12

    We carry out systematic investigation of electric dipole (E1) mode from light to heavy nuclei, using a new time-dependent mean field theory: the Canonical-basis Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (Cb-TDHFB) theory. The Cb-TDHFB in the three-dimensional coordinate space representation can deal with pairing correlation and any kind of deformation in the timedependent framework. We report the neutron-number dependence of the low-energy E1 mode for light (A > 40) and heavy isotopes (A < 100) around N= 82.

  6. Effect of stationary magnetic field strengths of 150 and 200 mT on reactive oxygen species production in soybean.

    PubMed

    Shine, M B; Guruprasad, K N; Anand, Anjali

    2012-07-01

    Our previous investigation reported the beneficial effect of pre-sowing magnetic treatment for improving germination parameters and biomass accumulation in soybean. In this study, soybean seeds treated with static magnetic fields of 150 and 200 mT for 1 h were evaluated for reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activity of antioxidant enzymes. Superoxide and hydroxyl radicals were measured in embryos and hypocotyls of germinating seeds by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and kinetics of superoxide production; hydrogen peroxide and antioxidant activities were estimated spectrophotometrically. Magnetic field treatment resulted in enhanced production of ROS mediated by cell wall peroxidase while ascorbic acid content, superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase activity decreased in the hypocotyl of germinating seeds. An increase in the cytosolic peroxidase activity indicated that this antioxidant enzyme had a vital role in scavenging the increased H(2)O(2) produced in seedlings from the magnetically treated seeds. Hence, these studies contribute to our first report on the biochemical basis of enhanced germination and seedling growth in magnetically treated seeds of soybean in relation to increased production of ROS. PMID:22253132

  7. A highly optimized code for calculating atomic data at neutron star magnetic field strengths using a doubly self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimeczek, C.; Engel, D.; Wunner, G.

    2014-05-01

    Our previously published code for calculating energies and bound-bound transitions of medium-Z elements at neutron star magnetic field strengths [D. Engel, M. Klews, G. Wunner, Comp. Phys. Comm. 180, 3-2-311 (2009)] was based on the adiabatic approximation. It assumes a complete decoupling of the (fast) gyration of the electrons under the action of the magnetic field and the (slow) bound motion along the field under the action of the Coulomb forces. For the single-particle orbitals this implied that each is a product of a Landau state and an (unknown) longitudinal wave function whose B-spline coefficients were determined self-consistently by solving the Hartree-Fock equations for the many-electron problem on a finite-element grid. In the present code we go beyond the adiabatic approximation, by allowing the transverse part of each orbital to be a superposition of Landau states, while assuming that the longitudinal part can be approximated by the same wave function in each Landau level. Inserting this ansatz into the energy variational principle leads to a system of coupled equations in which the B-spline coefficients depend on the weights of the individual Landau states, and vice versa, and which therefore has to be solved in a doubly self-consistent manner. The extended ansatz takes into account the back-reaction of the Coulomb motion of the electrons along the field direction on their motion in the plane perpendicular to the field, an effect which cannot be captured by the adiabatic approximation. The new code allows for the inclusion of up to 8 Landau levels. This reduces the relative error of energy values as compared to the adiabatic approximation results by typically a factor of three (1/3 of the original error) and yields accurate results also in regions of lower neutron star magnetic field strengths where the adiabatic approximation fails. Further improvements in the code are a more sophisticated choice of the initial wave functions, which takes into

  8. Strength Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.

    1981-01-01

    Postural deviations resulting from strength and flexibility imbalances include swayback, scoliosis, and rounded shoulders. Screening tests are one method for identifying strength problems. Tests for the evaluation of postural problems are described, and exercises are presented for the strengthening of muscles. (JN)

  9. Fast high-throughput screening of angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism by variable programmed electric field strength-based microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yucheng; Kim, Su-Kang; Zhang, Peng; Woo, Nain; Kang, Seong Ho

    2016-08-15

    An insertion (I)/deletion (D) polymorphism in angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been associated with susceptibility to various diseases in numerous studies. Traditionally, slab gel electrophoresis (SGE) after polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been used to genotype this ACE I/D polymorphism. In this study, single- and multi-channel microchip electrophoresis (ME) methods based on variable programmed electric field strength (PEFS) (i.e., low constant, high constant, (+)/(-) staircase, and random electric field strengths) were developed for fast high-throughput screening of this specific polymorphism. The optimum PEFS conditions were set as 470V/cm for 0-9s, 129V/cm for 9-13s, 470V/cm for 13-13.9s, 294V/cm for 13.9-16s, and 470V/cm for 16-20s for single-channel ME, and 615V/cm for 0-22.5s, 231V/cm for 22.5-28.5s, and 615V/cm for 28.5-40s for multi-channel ME, respectively. In the multi-channel PEFS-ME, target ACE I/D polymorphism DNA fragments (D=190bp and I=490bp) were identified within 25s without loss of resolving power, which was ∼300 times faster than conventional SGE. In addition, PCR products of the ACE gene from human blood samples were detected after only 10 cycles by multi-channel PEFS-ME, but not by SGE. This parallel detection multichannel-based PEFS-ME method offers a powerful tool for fast high-throughput ACE I/D polymorphism screening with high sensitivity. PMID:27322633

  10. Fast high-throughput screening of angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism by variable programmed electric field strength-based microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yucheng; Kim, Su-Kang; Zhang, Peng; Woo, Nain; Kang, Seong Ho

    2016-08-15

    An insertion (I)/deletion (D) polymorphism in angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been associated with susceptibility to various diseases in numerous studies. Traditionally, slab gel electrophoresis (SGE) after polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been used to genotype this ACE I/D polymorphism. In this study, single- and multi-channel microchip electrophoresis (ME) methods based on variable programmed electric field strength (PEFS) (i.e., low constant, high constant, (+)/(-) staircase, and random electric field strengths) were developed for fast high-throughput screening of this specific polymorphism. The optimum PEFS conditions were set as 470V/cm for 0-9s, 129V/cm for 9-13s, 470V/cm for 13-13.9s, 294V/cm for 13.9-16s, and 470V/cm for 16-20s for single-channel ME, and 615V/cm for 0-22.5s, 231V/cm for 22.5-28.5s, and 615V/cm for 28.5-40s for multi-channel ME, respectively. In the multi-channel PEFS-ME, target ACE I/D polymorphism DNA fragments (D=190bp and I=490bp) were identified within 25s without loss of resolving power, which was ∼300 times faster than conventional SGE. In addition, PCR products of the ACE gene from human blood samples were detected after only 10 cycles by multi-channel PEFS-ME, but not by SGE. This parallel detection multichannel-based PEFS-ME method offers a powerful tool for fast high-throughput ACE I/D polymorphism screening with high sensitivity.

  11. Linear mode conversion of Langmuir/z-mode waves to radiation in plasmas with various magnetic field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2013-12-15

    Linear mode conversion of Langmuir/z waves to electromagnetic radiation near the plasma and upper hybrid frequency in the presence of density gradients is potentially relevant to type II and III solar radio bursts, ionospheric radar experiments, pulsars, and continuum radiation for planetary magnetospheres. Here, we study mode conversion in warm, magnetized plasmas using a numerical electron fluid simulation code when the density gradient has a wide range of angle, δ, to the ambient magnetic field, B{sub 0}, for a range of incident Langmuir/z wavevectors. Our results include: (1) Left-handed polarized ordinary (oL) and right-handed polarized extraordinary (xR) mode waves are produced in various ranges of δ for Ω{sub 0} = (ωL/c){sup 1/3}(ω{sub ce}/ω) < 1.5, where ω{sub ce} is the (angular) electron cyclotron frequency, ω is the angular wave frequency, L is the length scale of the (linear) density gradient, and c is the speed of light; (2) the xR mode is produced most strongly in the range, 40° < δ < 60°, for intermediately magnetized plasmas with Ω{sub 0} = 1.0 and 1.5, while it is produced over a wider range, 0° ≤ δ ≤ 90°, for weakly magnetized plasmas with Ω{sub 0} = 0.1 and 0.7; (3) the maximum total conversion efficiencies for wave power from the Langmuir/z mode to radiation are of order 50%–99% and the corresponding energy conversion efficiencies are 5%–14% (depending on the adiabatic index γ and β = T{sub e}/m{sub e}c{sup 2}, where T{sub e} is the electron temperature and m{sub e} is the electron) for various Ω{sub 0}; (4) the mode conversion window becomes wider as Ω{sub 0} and δ increase. Hence, the results in this paper confirm that linear mode conversion under these conditions can explain the weak total circular polarization of interplanetary type II and III solar radio bursts because a strong xR mode can be generated via linear mode conversion near δ ∼ 45°.

  12. SU-E-T-590: Optimizing Magnetic Field Strengths with Matlab for An Ion-Optic System in Particle Therapy Consisting of Two Quadrupole Magnets for Subsequent Simulations with the Monte-Carlo Code FLUKA

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, K; Weber, U; Simeonov, Y; Zink, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Aim of this study was to optimize the magnetic field strengths of two quadrupole magnets in a particle therapy facility in order to obtain a beam quality suitable for spot beam scanning. Methods: The particle transport through an ion-optic system of a particle therapy facility consisting of the beam tube, two quadrupole magnets and a beam monitor system was calculated with the help of Matlab by using matrices that solve the equation of motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field and field-free region, respectively. The magnetic field strengths were optimized in order to obtain a circular and thin beam spot at the iso-center of the therapy facility. These optimized field strengths were subsequently transferred to the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA and the transport of 80 MeV/u C12-ions through this ion-optic system was calculated by using a user-routine to implement magnetic fields. The fluence along the beam-axis and at the iso-center was evaluated. Results: The magnetic field strengths could be optimized by using Matlab and transferred to the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA. The implementation via a user-routine was successful. Analyzing the fluence-pattern along the beam-axis the characteristic focusing and de-focusing effects of the quadrupole magnets could be reproduced. Furthermore the beam spot at the iso-center was circular and significantly thinner compared to an unfocused beam. Conclusion: In this study a Matlab tool was developed to optimize magnetic field strengths for an ion-optic system consisting of two quadrupole magnets as part of a particle therapy facility. These magnetic field strengths could subsequently be transferred to and implemented in the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA to simulate the particle transport through this optimized ion-optic system.

  13. Strength nutrition.

    PubMed

    Volek, Jeff S

    2003-08-01

    Muscle strength is determined by muscle size and factors related to neural recruitment. Resistance training is a potent stimulus for increasing muscle size and strength. These increases are, to a large extent, influenced and mediated by changes in hormones that regulate important events during the recovery process following exercise. Provision of nutrients in the appropriate amounts and at the appropriate times is necessary to optimize the recovery process. This review discusses the results of research that has examined the potential for nutrition and dietary supplements to impact the acute response to resistance exercise and chronic adaptations to resistance training. To date, the most promising strategies to augment gains in muscle size and strength appear to be consumption of protein-carbohydrate calories before and after resistance exercise, and creatine supplementation.

  14. Fracture strength and principal stress fields during crush testing of the SiC layer in TRISO-coated fuel particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Brian C.; Ward, Logan; Butt, Darryl P.; Fillery, Brent; Reimanis, Ivar

    2016-08-01

    Diametrical compression testing is an important technique to evaluate fracture properties of the SiC layer in TRISO-coated nuclear fuel particles. This study was conducted to expand the understanding and improve the methodology of the test. An analytic solution and multiple FEA models are used to determine the development of the principal stress fields in the SiC shell during a crush test. An ideal fracture condition where the diametrical compression test best mimics in-service internal pressurization conditions was discovered. For a small set of empirical data points, results from different analysis methodologies were input to an iterative Weibull equation set to determine characteristic strength (332.9 MPa) and Weibull modulus (3.80). These results correlate well with published research. It is shown that SiC shell asphericity is currently the limiting factor of greatest concern to obtaining repeatable results. Improvements to the FEA are the only apparent method for incorporating asphericity and improving accuracy.

  15. ON THE NATURE OF THE FIRST TRANSIENT Z SOURCE XTE J1701-462: ITS ACCRETION DISK STRUCTURE, NEUTRON STAR MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH, AND HARD TAIL

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, G. Q.; Wang, N.; Yan, S. P.; Zhang, S. N.; Qu, J. L. E-mail: dinggq@gmail.com

    2011-08-15

    Using data from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer, we investigate the spectral evolution along a 'Z' track and a '{nu}' track on the hardness-intensity diagrams of the first transient Z source XTE J1701-462. The spectral analyses suggest that the inner disk radius depends on the mass accretion rate, in agreement with the model prediction, R{sub in}{proportional_to}M-dot{sup 2/7}{sub disk}, for a radiation-pressure-dominated accretion disk interacting with the magnetosphere of a neutron star (NS). The changes in the disk mass accretion rate M-dot{sub disk} are responsible for the evolution of the 'Z' or '{nu}' track. Radiation pressure thickens the disk considerably and also produces significant outflows. The NS surface magnetic field strength, derived from the interaction between the magnetosphere and the radiation-pressure-dominated accretion disk, is {approx}(1-3) x 10{sup 9} G, which is possibly between normal atoll and Z sources. A significant hard tail is detected in the horizontal branches and we discuss several possible origins of the hard tail.

  16. Relaxation time measurements of bone marrow protons in the calcaneus using a compact MRI system at 0.2 Tesla field strength.

    PubMed

    Tomiha, Sadanori; Iita, Nachiko; Okada, Fumi; Handa, Shinya; Kose, Katsumi

    2008-08-01

    Relaxation times (T(1) and T(2)) of the bone marrow protons and trabecular bone volume fraction (TBVF) in the calcaneus were measured for 100 female volunteers using a compact MRI system at 0.2 T field strength. The speed of sound (SOS) through the calcaneus was measured also for the same subjects using a quantitative ultrasound system. Both relaxation times were found to have positive correlations with age (R = 0.40; P < 0.0001 and R = 0.31; P < 0.002, respectively) and negative correlations with SOS (R = -0.38; P < 0.0001 and R = -0.38; P < 0.0001, respectively). Although TBVF had a fairly high positive correlation with the SOS (R = 0.67), neither T(1) nor T(2) were correlated with TBVF (R = -0.062 and -0.024, respectively). These results suggest that the age dependence of both T(1) and T(2) is caused by the microdynamic properties of the lipid molecules in bone marrow observed using acoustic or elastic modalities. PMID:18666107

  17. Determining Earth's magnetic field strength during magnetically quiet and stormy times and predict the location of dancing Auroras using THEMIS Mission Educators ground based magnetometer data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, N.; Peticolas, L.; Trautman, V.

    2006-12-01

    The Education and Public Outreach program of the THEMIS Mission has deployed 10 ground-based observatories with science-grade magnetometers in schools in the Northern U.S. This network of schools, called Geomagnetic Event Observation Network by Students (GEONS), monitors local magnetic disturbances. The magnetometers are receiving local data; data are archived and available at the THEMIS E/PO Website. The E/PO program conducts teacher professional development workshops for the teachers of these schools. During the third year of the project, teachers from Alaska and Wisconsin started their classroom research using magnetometers that are installed in their classrooms. We will describe how with highly committed and enthusiastic teachers a research project developed to determine the strength of the local magnetic field in locations such as AK and WI and to compare these results with "companion schools" at lower latitudes. The GEONS teachers not only learned science and research tools, but they also conducted workshops in their own states, influenced the science curricula in their districts, and also started student research in their classrooms. We will discuss the challenges, give the results of their research, and encourage other teachers who wish to use real data in their classrooms to participate in this exciting project.

  18. WE-G-17A-08: Electron Gun Operation for in Line MRI-Linac Configurations: An Assessment of Beam Fidelity and Recovery Techniques for Different SIDs and Magnetic Field Strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, B; Keall, P; Constantin, D; Holloway, L; Kolling, S; Oborn, B; Fahrig, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To test the functionality of medical electron guns within the fringe field of a purpose built superconducting MRI magnet, and to test different recovery techniques for a variety of imaging field strengths and SIDs. Methods: Three different electron guns were simulated using Finite Element Modelling; a standard diode gun, a standard triode gun, and a novel diode gun designed to operate within parallel magnetic fields. The approximate working regime of each gun was established by assessing exit current in constant magnetic fields of varying strength and defining ‘working’ as less than 10% change in injection current. Next, the 1.0T MRI magnet was simulated within Comsol Multiphysics. The coil currents in this model were also scaled to produce field strengths of .5, 1, 1.5 and 3T. Various magnetic shield configurations were simulated, varying the SID from 800 to 1300mm. The average magnetic field within the gun region was assessed together with the distortion in the imaging volume - greater than 150uT distortion was considered unacceptable. Results: The conventional guns functioned in fields of less than 7.5mT. Conversely, the redesigned diode required fields greater than .1T to function correctly. Magnetic shielding was feasible for SIDS of greater than 1000mm for field strengths of .5T and 1T, and 1100mm for 1.5 and 3.0T. Beyond these limits shielding resulted in unacceptable MRI distortion. In contrast, the redesigned diode could perform acceptably for SIDs of less than 812, 896, 931, and 974mm for imaging strengths of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 3.0T. Conclusions: For in-line MRIlinac configurations where the electron gun is operating in low field regions, shielding is a straight forward option. However, as magnetic field strength increases and the SID is reduced, shielding results in too great a distortion in the MRI and redesigning the electron optics is the preferable solution. The authors would like to acknowledge funding from the National Health and Research

  19. The alteration of metamict zircon and its role in the remobilization of high-field strength elements in the Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.J.; Wirth, R.; Thomas, R.

    2008-10-02

    The structure and composition of metamict zircon from the Georgeville epizonal A-type granite in the Antigonish Highlands, Nova Scotia, were determined using EMPA, SXRF, LA-ICP-MS, Raman microspectroscopy and TEM data. Individual crystals of zircon are variably altered and consist of four domains distinguished on the basis of texture and composition. Domain A consists of zircon and zirconium oxide nanocrystals in an amorphous matrix and is trace-element-enriched. Replacement of domain A in proximity to microfractures produced a porous and relatively trace-element-poor zircon (domain B) with disseminated Th-U- and Y-enriched inclusions (domain C). Domain D consists of amorphous zirconium silicate that is depleted in trace elements but enriched in Hf. It is found in fractures, together with minor amounts of thorite and thorianite. It Domain D is anhydrous and free of inclusions and pore spaces and has a composition similar to highly crystalline zircon. Micro- and nanoscale element-distribution maps indicate that high-field-strength trace elements in metamict zircon were redistributed during alteration by diffusion and by dissolution-and-reprecipitation processes near microfractures and other fluid channelways. The anomalous chondrite-normalized rare-earth-element patterns and Nd isotopic signature of the granite is attributed largely to the preferential transport and deposition of rare-earth elements during subsolidus re-equilibration of metamict zircon. Hydrothermally deposited zirconium silicate (domain D) has a composition similar to that of highly crystalline Hf-rich zircon but is completely amorphous. This observation emphasizes the need to verify the structural integrity and aqueous durability of hydrothermally deposited zircon before it is used to reconstruct hydrothermal processes.

  20. On the Relationship of the Energy Spectrum Indexes of the 11-Year Variation of Galactic Cosmic Rays and the Interplanetary Magnetic Field Strength Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alania, M. V.; Iskra, K.; Modzelewska, R.; Siluszyk, M.

    2003-07-01

    Data of neutron super monitors and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) have been used to find a relationship between the temporal changes of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) isotropic intensity variations energy spectrum index γ (δ D/D(R) ∝ R-γ , where R is the rigidity of GCR particles) and the exponent ( of the power spectral density (PSD) of the IMF's strength fluctuations (PSD ∝ f-ν , where f is the frequency). INTRODUCTION. The 11-year variation of GCR is generally related with the similar variation of solar activity (SA) [1-5]. Up to present it is not well established which of parameters or group of parameters of SA and of the solar wind are responsible for the 11-year variation of GCR. To answer to this question it is necessary to estimate the separate contributions of each processes — convection, diffusion, drift and energy changes of GCR due to the interaction with the solar wind. However, all above mentioned processes are interconnected and an estimation of the roles of each separate processes contains some uncertainties. Regarding contributions of all above mentioned processes in the formation of the 11-year variation of GCR the special role is ascrib ed to the varying character of the diffusion from the minima to the maxima epochs of SA. It was noted [6-8] that the exponent γ of GCR isotropic intensity variations (δ D(R)/D (R) = AR-γ , where R is the GCR particle's rigidity and A is he power) could be considered as one of the important indices for the explanation of the 11-year variation of GCR for the energy more than 1 GeV.

  1. Changes in the effective gravitational field strength affect the state of phosphorylation of stress-related proteins in callus cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Barjaktarović, Žarko; Schütz, Wolfgang; Madlung, Johannes; Fladerer, Claudia; Nordheim, Alfred; Hampp, Rüdiger

    2009-01-01

    In a recent study it was shown that callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana respond to changes in gravitational field strengths by changes in protein expression. Using ESI-MS/MS for proteins with differential abundance after separation by 2D-PAGE, 28 spots which changed reproducibly and significantly in amount (P <0.05) after 2 h of hypergravity (18 up-regulated, 10 down-regulated) could be identified. The corresponding proteins were largely involved in stress responses, including the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present study, these investigations are extended to phosphorylated proteins. For this purpose, callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed to hypergravity (8 g) and simulated weightlessness (random positioning; RP) for up to 30 min, a period of time which yielded the most reliable data. The first changes, however, were visible as early as 10 min after the start of treatment. In comparison to 1 g controls, exposure to hypergravity resulted in 18 protein spots, and random positioning in 25, respectively, with increased/decreased signal intensity by at least 2-fold (P <0.05). Only one spot (alanine aminotransferase) responded the same way under both treatments. After 30 min of RP, four spots appeared, which could not be detected in control samples. Among the protein spots altered in phosphorylation, it was possible to identify 24 from those responding to random positioning and 12 which responded to 8 g. These 12 proteins (8 g) are partly (5 out of 12) the same as those changed in expression after exposure to 2 h of hypergravity. The respective proteins are involved in scavenging and detoxification of ROS (32%), primary metabolism (20.5%), general signalling (14.7%), protein translation and proteolysis (14.7%), and ion homeostasis (8.8%). Together with our recent data on protein expression, it is assumed that changes in gravitational fields induce the production of ROS. Our data further indicate that responses

  2. Oxidative mobilization of cerium and uranium and enhanced release of "immobile" high field strength elements from igneous rocks in the presence of the biogenic siderophore desferrioxamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Dennis; Kopf, Sebastian; Bau, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Polyvalent trace elements such as the high field strength elements (HFSE) are commonly considered rather immobile during low-temperature water-rock interaction. Hence, they have become diagnostic tools that are widely applied in geochemical studies. We present results of batch leaching experiments focused on the mobilization of certain HFSE (Y, Zr, Hf, Th, U and rare earth elements) from mafic, intermediate and felsic igneous rocks in the presence and absence, respectively, of the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB). Our data show that DFOB strongly enhances the mobility of these trace elements during low-temperature water-rock interaction. The presence of DFOB produces two distinct features in the Rare Earths and Yttrium (REY) patterns of leaching solutions, regardless of the mineralogical and chemical composition or the texture of the rock type studied. Bulk rock-normalized REY patterns of leaching solutions with DFOB show (i) a very distinct positive Ce anomaly and (ii) depletion of La and other light REY relative to the middle REY, with a concave downward pattern between La and Sm. These features are not observed in experiments with hydrochloric acid, acetic acid or deionized water. In DFOB-bearing leaching solutions Ce and U are decoupled from and selectively enriched relative to light REY and Th, respectively, due to oxidation to Ce(IV) and U(VI). Oxidation of Ce3+ and U4+ is promoted by the significantly higher stability of the Ce(IV) and U(VI) DFOB complexes as compared to the Ce(III) and U(IV) DFOB complexes. This is similar to the relationship between the Ce(IV)- and Ce(III)-pentacarbonate complexes that cause positive Ce anomalies in alkaline lakes. However, while formation of Ce(IV) carbonate complexes is confined to alkaline environments, Ce(IV) DFOB complexes may produce positive Ce anomalies even in mildly acidic and near-neutral natural waters. Siderophore-promoted dissolution processes also significantly enhance mobility of other 'immobile' HFSE

  3. Mechanical loading with or without weight-bearing activity: influence on bone strength index in elite female adolescent athletes engaged in water polo, gymnastics, and track-and-field.

    PubMed

    Greene, David A; Naughton, Geraldine A; Bradshaw, Elizabeth; Moresi, Mark; Ducher, Gaele

    2012-09-01

    Bone health is considered not to benefit from water-based sports because of their weight-supported nature, but available evidence primarily relies on DXA technology. Our purpose was to investigate musculoskeletal health in the upper and lower body in well-trained adolescent female athletes using pQCT and compare these athletes with less-active, age- and sex-matched peers. Bone mineral content, volumetric cortical and trabecular BMD, total and cortical area, and bone strength index were assessed at the distal and proximal tibia and radius in four groups of adolescent females (mean age, 14.9 years) including water polo players (n = 30), gymnasts (n = 25), track-and-field athletes (n = 34), and nonactive controls (n = 28). Water polo players did not show any benefit in bone strength index or muscle size in the lower leg when compared with controls. In contrast, gymnasts showed 60.1 % and 53.4 % greater bone strength index at the distal and proximal tibia, respectively, than nonactive females (p < 0.05). Similarly, track-and-field athletes displayed 33.9 % and 14.7 % greater bone strength index at the distal and proximal tibia, respectively, compared with controls (p < 0.05). In the upper body, water polo players had 31.9 % greater bone strength index at the distal radius, but not the radial shaft, and 15.2 % larger forearm muscle cross-sectional area than controls (p < 0.05). The greatest musculoskeletal benefits in the upper body were found in gymnasts. In conclusion, despite training at an elite level, female water polo players did not show any benefits in musculoskeletal health in the lower leg and only limited benefits in the upper body when compared with nonactive girls. PMID:22614913

  4. Mechanical loading with or without weight-bearing activity: influence on bone strength index in elite female adolescent athletes engaged in water polo, gymnastics, and track-and-field.

    PubMed

    Greene, David A; Naughton, Geraldine A; Bradshaw, Elizabeth; Moresi, Mark; Ducher, Gaele

    2012-09-01

    Bone health is considered not to benefit from water-based sports because of their weight-supported nature, but available evidence primarily relies on DXA technology. Our purpose was to investigate musculoskeletal health in the upper and lower body in well-trained adolescent female athletes using pQCT and compare these athletes with less-active, age- and sex-matched peers. Bone mineral content, volumetric cortical and trabecular BMD, total and cortical area, and bone strength index were assessed at the distal and proximal tibia and radius in four groups of adolescent females (mean age, 14.9 years) including water polo players (n = 30), gymnasts (n = 25), track-and-field athletes (n = 34), and nonactive controls (n = 28). Water polo players did not show any benefit in bone strength index or muscle size in the lower leg when compared with controls. In contrast, gymnasts showed 60.1 % and 53.4 % greater bone strength index at the distal and proximal tibia, respectively, than nonactive females (p < 0.05). Similarly, track-and-field athletes displayed 33.9 % and 14.7 % greater bone strength index at the distal and proximal tibia, respectively, compared with controls (p < 0.05). In the upper body, water polo players had 31.9 % greater bone strength index at the distal radius, but not the radial shaft, and 15.2 % larger forearm muscle cross-sectional area than controls (p < 0.05). The greatest musculoskeletal benefits in the upper body were found in gymnasts. In conclusion, despite training at an elite level, female water polo players did not show any benefits in musculoskeletal health in the lower leg and only limited benefits in the upper body when compared with nonactive girls.

  5. Study of the behavioral and biological effects of high-strength 60-Hz electric fields. Quarterly progress report, 11 October 1981-10 January 1982. [Research plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    The primary objective of this research is to study the effects of high intensity, 60 Hz electric fields on baboon behavior to obtain information which will assist in the determination of the degree of risk of deleterious consequences for humans exposed to such fields. The generalization of results obtained with the baboon to predictions concerning humans will be aided by the development of computer models relating the surface electric field intensities and internal current densities produced in baboons and humans by exposure to high intensity, 60 Hz electric fields. Research plans are described.

  6. Application of Strength Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Robert U.; Dugan, Eric

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the various strength qualities (maximum strength, high- and low-load speed strength, reactive strength, rate of force development, and skill performance), noting why a training program design based on strength diagnosis can lead to greater efficacy and better performance gains for the athlete. Examples of tests used to assess strength…

  7. Study of the behavioral and biological effects of high strength 60 HZ electric fields. Quarterly technical progress report No. 15, 12 May 1984-3 August 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-15

    Progress is reported in the construction of a test facility for studying the effects of high intensity, 60 Hz electric fields on baboons. Effects to be studied include operant out social behaviors. (ACR)

  8. Apparatus and procedure to characterize the surface quality of conductors by measuring the rate of cathode emission as a function of surface electric field strength

    DOEpatents

    Mestayer, Mac; Christo, Steve; Taylor, Mark

    2014-10-21

    A device and method for characterizing quality of a conducting surface. The device including a gaseous ionizing chamber having centrally located inside the chamber a conducting sample to be tested to which a negative potential is applied, a plurality of anode or "sense" wires spaced regularly about the central test wire, a plurality of "field wires" at a negative potential are spaced regularly around the sense, and a plurality of "guard wires" at a positive potential are spaced regularly around the field wires in the chamber. The method utilizing the device to measure emission currents from the conductor.

  9. Reliability and Validity of Field-Based Tests to Assess Upper-Body Muscular Strength in Children Aged 6-12 Years.

    PubMed

    Fernandez Santos, Jorge R; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Gonzalez-Montesinos, Jose Luis; Castro-Piñero, Jose

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the reliability and the validity of the handgrip, basketball throw and pushups tests in children aged 6-12 years. One hundred and eighty healthy children (82 girls) agreed to participate in this study. All the upper body muscular fitness tests were performed twice (7 days apart) whereas the 1 repetition maximum (1RM) bench press test was performed 2 days after the first session of testing. All the tests showed a high reproducibility (ICC > 0.9) except the push-ups test (intertrial difference = 0.77 ± 2.38, p < .001 and the percentage error = 9%). The handgrip test showed the highest association with 1RM bench press test (r = .79, p < .01; R2 = .621). In conclusion the handgrip and basketball throw tests are shown as reliable and valid tests to assess upper body muscular strength in children. More studies are needed to assess the validity and the reliability of the upper body muscular endurance tests in children.

  10. Spin-orbit and orbit-orbit strengths for the radioactive neutron-rich doubly magic nucleus {sup 132}Sn in relativistic mean-field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Haozhao; Zhao Pengwei; Li Lulu; Meng Jie

    2011-01-15

    Relativistic mean-field (RMF) theory is applied to investigate the properties of the radioactive neutron-rich doubly magic nucleus {sup 132}Sn and the corresponding isotopes and isotones. The two-neutron and two-proton separation energies are well reproduced by the RMF theory. In particular, the RMF results agree with the experimental single-particle spectrum in {sup 132}Sn as well as the Nilsson spin-orbit parameter C and orbit-orbit parameter D thus extracted, but remarkably differ from the traditional Nilsson parameters. Furthermore, the present results provide a guideline for the isospin dependence of the Nilsson parameters.

  11. Molecular deformation and free-solution electrophoresis of DNA-uncharged polymer conjugates at high field strengths: theoretical predictions Part 2: Stretching.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Laurette C; Slater, Gary W

    2007-11-01

    DNA sequencing by electrophoresis can be dramatically sped up by overcoming the need for the sieving medium. Normally it is possible to separate DNA based on size in free solution; however, not end-labeled free-solution electrophoresis (ELFSE) uses a neutral drag-tag molecule to make it possible. In experiments to date, the drag-tag and DNA together form a random coil conformation; while with future generation drag-tags and high fields, deformation of this conformation may occur. In the first paper in this series we investigated the conditions under which the DNA and label become hydrodynamically distinct (or segregated), based on a theoretical approach developed for the electrophoresis of polyampholytes. In this paper we study further deformation wherein either the DNA and/or a polymeric label stretch. We show that deformation may dramatically improve the capabilities of ELFSE, especially when both the DNA and a polymeric drag-tag fully stretch; however, reaching these regimes will require extremely high field intensities, something that only microchip technologies may be able to achieve.

  12. A general model to calculate the spin-lattice (T1) relaxation time of blood, accounting for haematocrit, oxygen saturation and magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Hales, Patrick W; Kirkham, Fenella J; Clark, Christopher A

    2016-02-01

    Many MRI techniques require prior knowledge of the T1-relaxation time of blood (T1bl). An assumed/fixed value is often used; however, T1bl is sensitive to magnetic field (B0), haematocrit (Hct), and oxygen saturation (Y). We aimed to combine data from previous in vitro measurements into a mathematical model, to estimate T1bl as a function of B0, Hct, and Y. The model was shown to predict T1bl from in vivo studies with a good accuracy (± 87 ms). This model allows for improved estimation of T1bl between 1.5-7.0 T while accounting for variations in Hct and Y, leading to improved accuracy of MRI-derived perfusion measurements.

  13. Computational prediction and analysis of the (27)Al solid-state NMR spectrum of methylaluminoxane (MAO) at variable temperatures and field strengths.

    PubMed

    Falls, Zackary; Zurek, Eva; Autschbach, Jochen

    2016-09-14

    Calculations of NMR shielding tensors and nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) tensors at the Kohn-Sham density functional level are used to simulate (27)Al magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra of the important olefin polymerization co-catalyst methylaluminoxane (MAO) at 77, 298, 398, and 498 K and spectrometer magnetic field inductions B ranging from 14.1 to 23.5 T. The calculations utilize the temperature (T) dependent distribution of species present in MAO determined recently by Zurek and coworkers from first-principles theory [Macromolecules, 2014, 47, 8556]. The NMR calculations suggest that variable-T and variable-B NMR measurements are able to quantify the ratio of free versus bound trimethyl-aluminum (TMA) in MAO via characteristic spectral features assigned to 3-coordinate and 4-coordinate Al sites in MAO as well as spectral features arising from free TMA or its dimer. The T-dependent distribution of species causes other characteristic features in the NMR spectra to appear/disappear that can be associated with different aluminum environments such as square vs. hexagonal faces in cage and tubular structures. The simulated spectra at 298 K and 19.6 T are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectra obtained previously for MAO gel. The promise and limitations of solid-state NMR to unravel the enigma surrounding the structure(s) of MAO are discussed. PMID:27526292

  14. Flexibility and Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell

    1988-01-01

    This definition of flexibility and muscular strength also explores their roles in overall physical fitness and focuses on how increased flexibility and muscular strength can help decrease or eliminate lower back pain. (CB)

  15. Magnetic field sensor based on selectively magnetic fluid infiltrated dual-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, Rahul Kumar; Bhardwaj, Vanita; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2016-02-01

    We reported the modeling result of selectively magnetic fluid infiltrated dual-core photonic crystal fiber based magnetic field sensor. Inside the cross-section of the designed photonic crystal fiber, the two fiber cores filled with magnetic fluid (Fe3O4) form two independent waveguides with mode coupling. The mode coupling under different magnetic field strengths is investigated theoretically. The sensitivity of the sensor as a function of the structural parameters of the photonic crystal fiber is calculated. The result shows that the proposed sensing device with 1 cm photonic crystal fiber length has a large sensitivity of 305.8 pm/Oe.

  16. What Is a Strength?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolin, Sybil

    2003-01-01

    As the strength-based perspective gains recognition, it is important to describe what constitutes strengths and to develop a specific vocabulary to name them. This article draws on resilience research to help identify specific competencies and areas of strengths in youth. (Contains 1 table.)

  17. Strength Training for Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connaughton, Daniel; Connaughton, Angela; Poor, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Strength training can be fun, safe, and appropriate for young girls and women and is an important component of any fitness program when combined with appropriate cardiovascular and flexibility activities. Concerns and misconceptions regarding girls' strength training are discussed, presenting general principles of strength training for children…

  18. Strength Modeling Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.; Lee, P.; Wong, S.

    1985-01-01

    Strength modeling is a complex and multi-dimensional issue. There are numerous parameters to the problem of characterizing human strength, most notably: (1) position and orientation of body joints; (2) isometric versus dynamic strength; (3) effector force versus joint torque; (4) instantaneous versus steady force; (5) active force versus reactive force; (6) presence or absence of gravity; (7) body somatotype and composition; (8) body (segment) masses; (9) muscle group envolvement; (10) muscle size; (11) fatigue; and (12) practice (training) or familiarity. In surveying the available literature on strength measurement and modeling an attempt was made to examine as many of these parameters as possible. The conclusions reached at this point toward the feasibility of implementing computationally reasonable human strength models. The assessment of accuracy of any model against a specific individual, however, will probably not be possible on any realistic scale. Taken statistically, strength modeling may be an effective tool for general questions of task feasibility and strength requirements.

  19. Electronic properties of quasi one-dimensional quantum wire models under equal coupling strength superpositions of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, E.; Micu, C.; Racolta, D.

    2013-11-13

    In this paper one deals with the theoretical derivation of energy bands and of related wavefunctions characterizing quasi 1D semiconductor heterostructures, such as InAs quantum wire models. Such models get characterized this time by equal coupling strength superpositions of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions of dimensionless magnitude a under the influence of in-plane magnetic fields of magnitude B. We found that the orientations of the field can be selected by virtue of symmetry requirements. For this purpose one resorts to spin conservations, but alternative conditions providing sensible simplifications of the energy-band formula can be reasonably accounted for. Besides the wavenumber k relying on the 1D electron, one deals with the spin-like s=±1 factors in the front of the square root term of the energy. Having obtained the spinorial wavefunction, opens the way to the derivation of spin precession effects. For this purpose one resorts to the projections of the wavenumber operator on complementary spin states. Such projections are responsible for related displacements proceeding along the Ox-axis. This results in a 2D rotation matrix providing both the precession angle as well as the precession axis.

  20. Vibrating diaphragm measures high electrostatic field strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Meter with flexible conductive diaphragm measures electrostatic charge density on a conducting surface in a vacuum. The diaphragm is supported from an insulated conductive support ring rigidly attached to the conductive surface whose electrostatic charge density is to be measured.

  1. Test of QED at critical field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Bula, C.

    1997-01-01

    In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collisions with terawatt pulses of 1054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{epsilon}/m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

  2. Alumina fiber strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. T.; Nelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effective fiber strength of alumina fibers in an aluminum composite was increased to 173,000 psi. A high temperature heat treatment, combined with a glassy carbon surface coating, was used to prevent degradation and improve fiber tensile strength. Attempts to achieve chemical strengthening of the alumina fiber by chromium oxide and boron oxide coatings proved unsuccessful. A major problem encountered on the program was the low and inconsistent strength of the Dupont Fiber FP used for the investigation.

  3. Strength Training and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Strength Training and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Strength Training ... help prevent injuries and speed up recovery. About Strength Training Strength training is the practice of using free ...

  4. Building on Our Strengths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Comments on the feeling that the American family is disintegrating, and that many criticisms traditionally made about Black families are now made about White families. Suggests that people need to stress family strengths. As an example, five major strengths of Black families are described: flexibility, work and achievement ethics, religiosity, and…

  5. Strengths of Remarried Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knaub, Patricia Kain; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on remarried families' (N=80) perceptions of family strengths, marital satisfaction, and adjustment to the remarried situation. Results indicated that although most would like to make some changes, scores on the measurements used were high. A supportive environment was the most important predictor of family strength and success. (JAC)

  6. Vocational Psychology: Using One of Counseling Psychology's Strengths to Foster Human Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robitschek, Christine; Woodson, Shelley Janiczek

    2006-01-01

    At several points in the history of their field, counseling psychologists have emphasized that fostering human strengths is part of their mission. Vocational psychology is an area of counseling psychology that has focused consistently on human strengths. In keeping with the Major Contribution's theme, this article examines the following: (a)…

  7. Influence of chemical bond length changes on the crystal field strength and “ligand metal” charge transfer transitions in Cs2GeF6 doped with Mn4+ and Os4+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brik, M. G.

    2007-07-01

    Detailed study of dependence of the crystal field strength 10Dq and lowest charge transfer (CT) energies for different interionic distances in Cs2GeF6:Mn4+ and Cs2GeF6:Os4+crystals is presented. The calculations were performed using the first-principles discrete-variational Dirac Slater (DV-DS) method. As a result, the functional dependencies of 10Dq and lowest CT energy on the metal ligand distance R were obtained without any fitting or semiempirical parameters. It was shown that 10Dq depends on R as 1/Rn, with n=4.0612 and 4.3874 for Cs2GeF6:Mn4+ and Cs2GeF6:Os4+, respectively. Two approximations (linear and quadratic) are obtained for the dependence of the lowest CT energy on R; CT energy decreases when R increases with dE(CT)/dR=-638 and -1080 cm-1/pm for Cs2GeF6:Mn4+ and Cs2GeF6:Os4+, respectively, if the linear approximation is used. These values can be used for estimations of the lowest CT energies for Mn4+ and Os4+ ions in other hosts with fluorine ligands. Estimations of the electron-vibrational interaction (EVI) constants, Huang Rhys parameters, and Stokes shifts for all the above-mentioned crystals were performed using the obtained 10Dq and E(CT) functions.

  8. 47 CFR 27.55 - Power strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Power strength limits. 27.55 Section 27.55 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.55 Power strength limits. (a) Field strength limits. For...

  9. 47 CFR 27.55 - Power strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power strength limits. 27.55 Section 27.55 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.55 Power strength limits. (a) Field strength limits. For...

  10. 47 CFR 27.55 - Power strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power strength limits. 27.55 Section 27.55 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.55 Power strength limits. (a) Field strength limits. For...

  11. Variation of the Earth's magnetic field strength in South America during the last two millennia: New results from historical buildings of Buenos Aires and re-evaluation of regional data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguitchaichvili, Avto; Morales, Juan; Schavelzon, Daniel; Vásquez, Carlos; Gogorza, Claudia S. G.; Loponte, Daniel; Rapalini, Augusto

    2015-08-01

    The causes of the systematic decay of the Earth's Magnetic Field strength since eighteen century have been a matter of debate during the last decade. It is also well known that such variations may have completely different expressions under an area characterized with strong magnetic anomalies, such as the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly. To fully understand these atypical phenomena, it is crucial to retrieve the past evolution of Earth's magnetic field beyond the observatory records. We report on detailed rock-magnetic and archeointensity investigations from some well-studied historical buildings of Buenos Aires city, located at the heart of the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly. Samples consist of bricks, tiles, fireplaces and pottery, which are considered as highly suitable materials for archaeointensity studies. The dating is ascertained by historical documents complemented by archeological constraints. Eighteen out of 26 analyzed samples yield reliable absolute intensity determinations. The site-mean archaeointensity values obtained in this study range from 28.5 to 43.5 μT, with corresponding virtual axial dipole moments (VADMs) ranging from 5.3 to 8.04 × 1022 Am2. Most determinations obtained in the present study are in remarkable agreement with the values predicted by the time varying field model CALS10k.1b (Korte et al., 2011). For the older periods the recently available SHA.DIF.14 model (Pavon-Carrasco et al., 2014) seems to have greater resolution. South American archaeointensity database now includes absolute intensities from 400 to 1930 AD based on 63 selected archaeointensity determinations. The data set reveals several distinct periods of quite large fluctuations of intensity. However, most data are concentrated into a relatively narrow interval from AD 1250 to AD 1450. At the beginning of the record, values between 400 AD and 830 AD match well with ARCH3k.1 model. Some general features may be detected: the time intervals from about AD 400 to 950 and

  12. Crew Strength Training

    NASA Video Gallery

    Train to develop your upper and lower body strength in your muscles and bones by performing body-weight squats and push-ups.The Train Like an Astronaut project uses the excitement of exploration to...

  13. Developing Strengths in Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Ted

    1976-01-01

    There are few descriptions of growth experiences for total families. This paper describes one such model. It expresses the conviction that families need opportunities to come together with other families to identify strengths, sharpen communication skills, and establish goals. (Author)

  14. The Annual Cosmic-Radiation Intensities 1391 - 2014; The Annual Heliospheric Magnetic Field Strengths 1391 - 1983, and Identification of Solar Cosmic-Ray Events in the Cosmogenic Record 1800 - 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, K. G.; Beer, J.

    2015-10-01

    The annual cosmogenic ^{10}Be ice-core data from Dye 3 and the North Greenland Ice-core Project (NGRIP), and neutron-monitor data, 1951 - 2014, are combined to yield a record of the annual cosmic-ray intensity, 1391 - 2014. These data were then used to estimate the intensity of the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF), 1391 - 1983. All of these annual data are provided in the Electronic Supplementary Material. Analysis of these annual data shows that there were significant impulsive increases in ^{10}Be production in the year following the very large solar cosmic-ray events of 1942, 1949, and 1956. There was an additional enhancement that we attribute to six high-altitude nuclear explosions in 1962. All of these enhancements result in underestimates of the strength of the HMF. An identification process is defined, resulting in a total of seven impulsive ^{10}Be events in the interval 1800 - 1942 prior to the first detection of a solar cosmic-ray event using ionization chambers. Excision of the ^{10}Be impulsive enhancements yields a new estimate of the HMF, designated B(PCR-2). Five of the seven ^{10}Be enhancements prior to 1941 are well correlated with the occurrence of very great geomagnetic storms. It is shown that a solar cosmic-ray event similar to that of 25 July 1946, and occurring in the middle of the second or third year of the solar cycle, may merge with the initial decreasing phase of the 11-year cycle in cosmic-ray intensity and be unlikely to be detected in the ^{10}Be data. It is concluded that the occurrence rate for solar energetic-particle (SEP) events such as that on 23 February 1956 is about seven per century, and that there is an upper limit to the size of solar cosmic-ray events.

  15. Apple Strength Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C

    2009-12-22

    Strength of the apple parts has been noticed to decrease, especially those installed by the new induction heating system since the LEP campaign started. Fig. 1 shows the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), and elongation of the installed or installation-simulated apples on various systems. One can clearly see the mean values of UTS and YS of the post-LEP parts decreased by about 8 ksi and 6 ksi respectively from those of the pre-LEP parts. The slight increase in elongation seen in Fig.1 can be understood from the weak inverse relationship between the strength and elongation in metals. Fig.2 shows the weak correlation between the YS and elongation of the parts listed in Fig. 1. Strength data listed in Figure 1 were re-plotted as histograms in Figs. 3 and 4. Figs. 3a and 4a show histograms of all UTS and YS data. Figs. 3b and 4b shows histograms of pre-LEP data and Figs. 3c and 4c of post-LEP data. Data on statistical scatter of tensile strengths have been rarely published by material suppliers. Instead, only the minimum 'guaranteed' strength data are typically presented. An example of strength distribution of aluminum 7075-T6 sheet material, listed in Fig. 5, show that its scatter width of both UTS and YS for a single sheet can be about 6 ksi and for multi-lot scatter can be as large as 11 ksi even though the sheets have been produced through well-controlled manufacturing process. By approximating the histograms shown in Figs. 3 and 4 by a Gaussian or similar type of distribution curves, one can plausibly see the strength reductions in the later or more recent apples. The pre-LEP data in Figs. 3b and 4b show wider scatter than the post-LEP data in Figs. 3c and 4c and seem to follow the binomial distribution of strength indicating that the apples might have been made from two different lots of material, either from two different vendors or from two different melts of perhaps slightly different chemical composition by a single vendor. The post

  16. Dielectric strength of parylene HT

    SciTech Connect

    Diaham, S. Bechara, M.; Locatelli, M.-L.; Khazaka, R.; Tenailleau, C.

    2014-02-07

    The dielectric strength of parylene HT (PA-HT) films was studied at room temperature in a wide thickness range from 500 nm to 50 μm and was correlated with nano- and microstructure analyses. X-ray diffraction and polarized optical microscopy have revealed an enhancement of crystallization and spherulites development, respectively, with increasing the material thickness (d). Moreover, a critical thickness d{sub C} (between 5 and 10 μm) is identified corresponding to the beginning of spherulite developments in the films. Two distinct behaviors of the dielectric strength (F{sub B}) appear in the thickness range. For d ≥ d{sub C}, PA-HT films exhibit a decrease in the breakdown field following a negative slope (F{sub B} ∼ d{sup −0.4}), while for d < d{sub C}, it increases with increasing the thickness (F{sub B} ∼ d{sup 0.3}). An optimal thickness d{sub optim} ∼ 5 μm corresponding to a maximum dielectric strength (F{sub B} ∼ 10 MV/cm) is obtained. A model of spherulite development in PA-HT films with increasing the thickness is proposed. The decrease in F{sub B} above d{sub C} is explained by the spherulites development, whereas its increase below d{sub C} is induced by the crystallites growth. An annealing of the material shows both an enhancement of F{sub B} and an increase of the crystallites and spherulites dimensions, whatever the thickness. The breakdown field becomes thickness-independent below d{sub C} showing a strong influence of the nano-scale structural parameters. On the contrary, both nano- and micro-scale structural parameters appear as influent on F{sub B} for d ≥ d{sub C}.

  17. Performance of An Adjustable Strength Permanent Magnet Quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, S.C.; DeHart, T.E.; Kangas, K.W.; Spencer, C.M.; Volk, J.T.; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    An adjustable strength permanent magnet quadrupole suitable for use in Next Linear Collider has been built and tested. The pole length is 42cm, aperture diameter 13mm, peak pole tip strength 1.03Tesla and peak integrated gradient * length (GL) is 68.7 Tesla. This paper describes measurements of strength, magnetic CL and field quality made using an air bearing rotating coil system. The magnetic CL stability during -20% strength adjustment proposed for beam based alignment was < 0.2 microns. Strength hysteresis was negligible. Thermal expansion of quadrupole and measurement parts caused a repeatable and easily compensated change in the vertical magnetic CL. Calibration procedures as well as CL measurements made over a wider tuning range of 100% to 20% in strength useful for a wide range of applications will be described. The impact of eddy currents in the steel poles on the magnetic field during strength adjustments will be reported.

  18. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  19. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  20. Spin resonance strength calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Courant,E.D.

    2008-10-06

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  1. The Density and Compressibility of BaCO3-SrCO3-CaCO3-K2CO3-Na2CO3-Li2CO3 Liquids: New Measurements and a Systematic Trend with Cation Field Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurt, S. M.; Lange, R. A.; Ai, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The volumetric properties of multi-component carbonate liquids are required to extend thermodynamic models that describe partial melting of the deep mantle (e.g. pMELTS; Ghiorso et al., 2003) to carbonate-bearing lithologies. Carbonate in the mantle is an important reservoir of carbon, which is released to the atmosphere as CO2 through volcanism, and thus contributes to the carbon cycle. Although MgCO3 is the most important carbonate component in the mantle, it is not possible to directly measure the 1-bar density and compressibility of MgCO3 liquid because, like other alkaline-earth carbonates, it decomposes at a temperature lower than its melting temperature. Despite this challenge, Liu and Lange (2003) and O'Leary et al. (2015) showed that the one bar molar volume, thermal expansion and compressibility of the CaCO3 liquid component could be obtained by measuring the density and sound speeds of stable liquids in the CaCO3-Li2CO3-Na2CO3-K2CO3 quaternary system at one bar. In this study, this same strategy is employed on SrCO3- and BaCO3-bearing alkali carbonate liquids. The density and sound speed of seven liquids in the SrCO3-Li2CO3-Na2CO3-K2CO3 quaternary and three liquids in the BaCO3-Li2CO3-Na2CO3-K2CO3 quaternary were measured from 739-1367K, with SrCO3 and BaCO3 concentrations ranging from 10-50 mol%. The density measurements were made using the double-bob Archimedean method and sound speeds were obtained with a frequency-sweep acoustic interferometer. The molar volume and sound speed measurements were used to calculate the isothermal compressibility of each liquid, and the results show the volumetric properties mix ideally with composition. The partial molar volume and compressibility of the SrCO3 and BaCO3 components are compared to those obtained for the CaCO3 component as a function of cation field strength. The results reveal a systematic trend that allows the partial molar volume and compressibility of the MgCO3 liquid component to be estimated.

  2. Notch strength of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The notch strength of composites is discussed. The point stress and average stress criteria relate the notched strength of a laminate to the average strength of a relatively long tensile coupon. Tests of notched specimens in which microstrain gages have been placed at or near the edges of the holes have measured strains much larger that those measured in an unnotched tensile coupon. Orthotropic stress concentration analyses of failed notched laminates have also indicated that failure occurred at strains much larger than those experienced on tensile coupons with normal gage lengths. This suggests that the high strains at the edge of a hole can be related to the very short length of fiber subjected to these strains. Lockheed has attempted to correlate a series of tests of several laminates with holes ranging from 0.19 to 0.50 in. Although the average stress criterion correlated well with test results for hole sizes equal to or greater than 0.50 in., it over-estimated the laminate strength in the range of hole sizes from 0.19 to 0.38 in. It thus appears that a theory is needed that is based on the mechanics of failure and is more generally applicable to the range of hole sizes and the varieties of laminates found in aircraft construction.

  3. High strength composites evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, S.M.

    1992-02-01

    A high-strength, thick-section, graphite/epoxy composite was identified. The purpose of this development effort was to evaluate candidate materials and provide LANL with engineering properties. Eight candidate materials (Samples 1000, 1100, 1200, 1300, 1400, 1500, 1600, and 1700) were chosen for evaluation. The Sample 1700 thermoplastic material was the strongest overall.

  4. Gender Differences in Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyward, Vivian H.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This investigation examined gender differences of 103 physically active men and women in upper and lower body strength as a function of lean body weight and the distribution of muscle and subcutaneous fat in the upper and lower limbs. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  5. An overview of strength training injuries: acute and chronic.

    PubMed

    Lavallee, Mark E; Balam, Tucker

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces the history of strength training, explains the many different styles of strength training, and discusses common injuries specific to each style. Strength training is broken down into five disciplines: basic strength or resistance training, bodybuilding, power lifting, style-dependant strength sports (e.g., strongman competitions, Highland games, field events such as shot put, discus, hammer throw, and javelin), and Olympic-style weightlifting. Each style has its own principal injuries, both acute and chronic, related to the individual technique. Acute injuries should be further categorized as emergent or nonemergent. Specific age-related populations (i.e., the very young and the aging athlete) carry additional considerations.

  6. Corium crust strength measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Lomperski, S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-11-01

    Corium strength is of interest in the context of a severe reactor accident in which molten core material melts through the reactor vessel and collects on the containment basemat. Some accident management strategies involve pouring water over the melt to solidify it and halt corium/concrete interactions. The effectiveness of this method could be influenced by the strength of the corium crust at the interface between the melt and coolant. A strong, coherent crust anchored to the containment walls could allow the yet-molten corium to fall away from the crust as it erodes the basemat, thereby thermally decoupling the melt from the coolant and sharply reducing the cooling rate. This paper presents a diverse collection of measurements of the mechanical strength of corium. The data is based on load tests of corium samples in three different contexts: (1) small blocks cut from the debris of the large-scale MACE experiments, (2) 30 cm-diameter, 75 kg ingots produced by SSWICS quench tests, and (3) high temperature crusts loaded during large-scale corium/concrete interaction (CCI) tests. In every case the corium consisted of varying proportions of UO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and the constituents of concrete to represent a LWR melt at different stages of a molten core/concrete interaction. The collection of data was used to assess the strength and stability of an anchored, plant-scale crust. The results indicate that such a crust is likely to be too weak to support itself above the melt. It is therefore improbable that an anchored crust configuration could persist and the melt become thermally decoupled from the water layer to restrict cooling and prolong an attack of the reactor cavity concrete.

  7. Strength calculations on airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, A

    1925-01-01

    Every strength calculation, including those on airplanes, must be preceded by a determination of the forces to be taken into account. In the following discussion, it will be assumed that the magnitudes of these forces are known and that it is only a question of how, on the basis of these known forces, to meet the prescribed conditions on the one hand and the practical requirements on the other.

  8. (Finite) statistical size effects on compressive strength

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jérôme; Girard, Lucas; Gimbert, Florent; Amitrano, David; Vandembroucq, Damien

    2014-01-01

    The larger structures are, the lower their mechanical strength. Already discussed by Leonardo da Vinci and Edmé Mariotte several centuries ago, size effects on strength remain of crucial importance in modern engineering for the elaboration of safety regulations in structural design or the extrapolation of laboratory results to geophysical field scales. Under tensile loading, statistical size effects are traditionally modeled with a weakest-link approach. One of its prominent results is a prediction of vanishing strength at large scales that can be quantified in the framework of extreme value statistics. Despite a frequent use outside its range of validity, this approach remains the dominant tool in the field of statistical size effects. Here we focus on compressive failure, which concerns a wide range of geophysical and geotechnical situations. We show on historical and recent experimental data that weakest-link predictions are not obeyed. In particular, the mechanical strength saturates at a nonzero value toward large scales. Accounting explicitly for the elastic interactions between defects during the damage process, we build a formal analogy of compressive failure with the depinning transition of an elastic manifold. This critical transition interpretation naturally entails finite-size scaling laws for the mean strength and its associated variability. Theoretical predictions are in remarkable agreement with measurements reported for various materials such as rocks, ice, coal, or concrete. This formalism, which can also be extended to the flowing instability of granular media under multiaxial compression, has important practical consequences for future design rules. PMID:24733930

  9. The strength anisotropia of sea ice

    SciTech Connect

    Evdokimov, G.N.; Rogachko, S.I.

    1994-12-31

    The hydraulic-engineering structure calculations of sea ice formation force require the sea ice strength data. The strength characteristics values and the types of sea ice formations in view of water depth define the type and the design of future structures in each particular region of supposed construction. The most objective information on the sea ice physical and technical properties can be obtained by field investigations ad the existing methods of their calculations refer to a great number of errors. The accumulated bank of data on studying the sea ice formation strength properties show one that ice as a natural material is of great crystalline structure variety. The level ice fields have a number of particularities. The crystal sizes increase in ice thickness. The crystals consist of fresh-water thin plates 0.5--0.6 mm in thickness oriented by pickle-water interlayers. Difference in thickness of the sea ice cover structure is one of the main causes of the changes strength characteristics layer. Besides that the sea ice strength depends upon the destroying force direction in reference to crystal orientation which characterizes the sea ice anisotropia as a material.

  10. Spin resonance strength calculation through single particle tracking for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Dutheil, Y.; Huang, H.; Meot, F.; Ranjbar, V.

    2015-05-03

    The strengths of spin resonances for the polarized-proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are currently calculated with the code DEPOL, which numerically integrates through the ring based on an analytical approximate formula. In this article, we test a new way to calculate the spin resonance strengths by performing Fourier transformation to the actual transverse magnetic fields seen by a single particle traveling through the ring. Comparison of calculated spin resonance strengths is made between this method and DEPOL.

  11. In-situ rock strength determination for blasting purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, D.K.; Jain, A.

    1994-12-31

    Compressive strength of rocks is often required by mining engineers and quarrying authorities for blasting operations. Uniaxial compressive strength of rocks can be predicted with reasonable accuracy with the help of point load strength tests which can be easily conducted at site by the field staff, simultaneously as the cores are recovered from drilling operations. A number of diametral point load tests and uniaxial compressive strength tests have been conducted on the specimens of different rock types under air dried, and saturated condition as well to study the effect of ground water saturation on strength. It has been observed that due to saturation uniaxial compressive strength and point load strength get reduced to a maximum of 32 and 29 percent respectively. It has also been observed that uniaxial strength is sixteen times the point load strength in air dried as well as saturated condition. However, this factor used for calculating uniaxial compressive strength may be reduced to a lower value for the safety of miners in field blasting operations.

  12. Dynamic Strength of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabildas, Lalit

    2011-06-01

    Historically when shock loading techniques became accessible in the early fifties it was assumed that materials behave like fluids implying that materials cannot support any shear stresses. Early and careful investigation in the sixties by G. R. Fowles in aluminum indicated otherwise. When he compared his Hugoniot compression measurements to hydrostatic pressure compression measurements in the pressure volume plane he noticed that the shock data lay above the hydrostatic compression curve - which laid the ground work for what is the basis for elastic-plastic theories that exist today. In this talk, a brief historical perspective on strength measurements in materials will be discussed including how time-resolved techniques have played a role in allowing estimates of the strength of materials at over Mbar stress. This is crucial especially at high stresses since we are determining values that are small compared to the loading stress. Even though we have made considerable progress in our understanding of materials, there are still many anomalies and unanswered questions. Some of these anomalies are fertile grounds for further and future research and will be mentioned.

  13. Oscillator strengths and collision strengths for S III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. K.; Henry, R. J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The present calculation, in a close-coupled approximation for the energy range up to 1,000,000 K, yields collision strengths for the electron impact excitation of S III from the ground 3p2 3P state to the excited states 3s3p3 3D0, 3P0, 3S0, 3d 3D0, 3P0, and 4s 3P0. Also obtained are those transitions' oscillator strengths, and strengths for others involving 3p2 1D and 1S. Configuration-interaction target wave functions yielding oscillator strengths that are accurate to 20 percent are used in collision strength calculations.

  14. Strength Training and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the potential health benefits of strength training for children, discussing the role of strength training in preventing sports-related injuries and highlighting design considerations for such programs. The focus is on musculoskeletal adaptations to strength training that are observable in healthy children. Guidelines for…

  15. Strength Development for Young Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry W.; Jackson, Allen; Gaudet, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Participation in strength training is important for older children or young adolescences who wish to improve fitness or participate in sports. When designing strength training programs for our youth this age group is immature anatomically, physiologically, and psychologically. For the younger or inexperienced group the strength training activities…

  16. The fracture strength and frictional strength of Weber Sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    The fracture strength and frictional strength of Weber Sandstone have been measured as a function of confining pressure and pore pressure. Both the fracture strength and the frictional strength obey the law of effective stress, that is, the strength is determined not by the confining pressure alone but by the difference between the confining pressure and the pore pressure. The fracture strength of the rock varies by as much as 20 per cent depending on the cement between the grains, but the frictional strength is independent of lithology. Over the range 0 2 kb, ??=0??5 + 0??6??n. This relationship also holds for other rocks such as gabbro, dunite, serpentinite, granite and limestone. ?? 1975.

  17. Claudin-4 forms a paracellular barrier, revealing the interdependence of claudin expression in the loose epithelial cell culture model opossum kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Borovac, Jelena; Barker, Reid S; Rievaj, Juraj; Rasmussen, Andrew; Pan, Wanling; Wevrick, Rachel; Alexander, R Todd

    2012-12-15

    The effect of claudins on paracellular fluxes has been predominantly studied in either Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) or LLCPK cells. Neither model system has a very low transepithelial resistance (TER) as observed in leaky epithelia. Moreover, results from one model system are not always consistent with another. Opossum kidney (OK) cells form tight junctions yet have a very low TER. We therefore set out to characterize the paracellular transport properties of this cell culture model. Ussing chamber dilution potential measurements revealed that OK cells exhibit a very low TER (11.7 ± 1.4 Ω·cm(2)), slight cation selectivity (P(Na)/P(Cl) = 1.10 ± 0.01), and the Eisenman permeability sequence IV; the permeability of monovalent cations ranking K(+) > Cs(+) > Rb(+) > Na(+) > Li(+). Quantitative real-time PCR studies found that OK cells endogenously express claudin-4 > -1 > -6 > -20 > -9 > -12 > -11 > -15. Overexpression of claudin-4 significantly increased TER, decreased Na(+) and Cl(-) permeability, and increased levels of claudin-1, -6, and -9 mRNA. Knockdown of claudin-4 in the overexpressing cells significantly decreased TER without altering claudin expression; thus claudin-4 forms a barrier in OK cells. Knockdown of endogenous claudin-4 decreased claudin-1, -9, and -12 expression without altering TER. Claudin-2 overexpression decreased TER, significantly increased Na(+) and Cl(-) permeability, and decreased claudin-12 and -6 expression. Together these results demonstrate that claudin expression is tightly coupled in OK cells.

  18. Failure strength of icy lithospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Banerdt, W. B.

    1987-01-01

    Lithospheric strengths derived from friction on pre-existing fractures and ductile flow laws show that the tensile strength of intact ice under applicable conditions is actually an order of magnitude stronger than widely assumed. It is demonstrated that this strength is everywhere greater than that required to initiate frictional sliding on pre-existing fractures and faults. Because the tensile strength of intact ice increases markedly with confining pressure, it actually exceeds the frictional strength at all depths. Thus, icy lithospheres will fail by frictional slip along pre-existing fractures at yeild stresses greater than previously assumed rather than opening tensile cracks in intact ice.

  19. QM02 Strength Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2010-11-24

    In late April, Paul Emma reported that his orbit fitting program could find a reasonably good fit only if the strength of QM02 was changed from design value of -5.83 kG to -6.25 kG - a strength change of 7.3%. In late May, we made a focal length measurement of QM02 by turning off all focusing optics between YC07 and BPMS1 (in the spectrometer line) except for QM02 and adjusted the strength of QM02 so that vertical kicks by YC07 did not produce any displacements at BPMS1 (see Figure 1). The result was quoted in the LCLS elog was that QM02 appeared to 6% too weak, and approximately agreed with Paul's observation. The analysis used for the entry in the log book was based on the thin lens approximation and used the following numbers: Distance YC07 to QM02 - 5.128 m; Distance QM02 to BPMS1 - 1.778 m; and Energy - 135 MeV. These distances were computed from the X,Z coordinates given the on the large plot of the Injector on the wall of the control room. On review of the MAD output file coordinates, it seems that the distance used for QM02 to BPMS1 is not 1.778 m. The correct value is Distance, center of QM02 to BPMS1 - 1.845 m. There may be a typo on the wall chart values for the coordinates of BPMS1, or perhaps there was a misinterpretation of edge versus center of QM02. In any case, the effect of this change is that the thin lens estimate changes from 6% too weak to 9% too weak. At John Galayda's suggestion, we looked into the thin lens versus thick lens approximation. A Mathematica program was written to solve for the K value of the QM02, in the thick lens approximation, that provides point to point focusing from YC07 to BPMS1, and to compare this number with the value obtained using the thin lens approximation. The length of QM02 used in the thick lens calculation is the effective length determined by magnetic measurements of 0.108 m. The result of the Mathematica calculation is that the thin lens approximation predicts less magnet strength is required to produce the

  20. Gaussian discriminating strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigovacca, L.; Farace, A.; De Pasquale, A.; Giovannetti, V.

    2015-10-01

    We present a quantifier of nonclassical correlations for bipartite, multimode Gaussian states. It is derived from the Discriminating Strength measure, introduced for finite dimensional systems in Farace et al., [New J. Phys. 16, 073010 (2014), 10.1088/1367-2630/16/7/073010]. As the latter the new measure exploits the quantum Chernoff bound to gauge the susceptibility of the composite system with respect to local perturbations induced by unitary gates extracted from a suitable set of allowed transformations (the latter being identified by posing some general requirements). Closed expressions are provided for the case of two-mode Gaussian states obtained by squeezing or by linearly mixing via a beam splitter a factorized two-mode thermal state. For these density matrices, we study how nonclassical correlations are related with the entanglement present in the system and with its total photon number.

  1. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  2. Permanent-magnet multipole with adjustable strength

    DOEpatents

    Halbach, K.

    1982-09-20

    Two or more magnetically soft pole pieces are symmetrically positioned along a longitudinal axis to provide a magnetic field within a space defined by the pole pieces. Two or more permanent magnets are mounted to an external magnetically-soft cylindrical sleeve which rotates to bring the permanent magnets into closer coupling with the pole pieces and thereby adjustably control the field strength of the magnetic field produced in the space defined by the pole pieces. The permanent magnets are preferably formed of rare earth cobalt (REC) material which has a high remanent magnetic field and a strong coercive force. The pole pieces and the permanent magnets have corresponding cylindrical surfaces which are positionable with respect to each other to vary the coupling there between. Auxiliary permanent magnets are provided between the pole pieces to provide additional magnetic flux to the magnetic field without saturating the pole pieces.

  3. Permanent magnet multipole with adjustable strength

    DOEpatents

    Halbach, Klaus

    1985-01-01

    Two or more magnetically soft pole pieces are symmetrically positioned along a longitudinal axis to provide a magnetic field within a space defined by the pole pieces. Two or more permanent magnets are mounted to an external magnetically-soft cylindrical sleeve which rotates to bring the permanent magnets into closer coupling with the pole pieces and thereby adjustably control the field strength of the magnetic field produced in the space defined by the pole pieces. The permanent magnets are preferably formed of rare earth cobalt (REC) material which has a high remanent magnetic field and a strong coercive force. The pole pieces and the permanent magnets have corresponding cylindrical surfaces which are positionable with respect to each other to vary the coupling therebetween. Auxiliary permanent magnets are provided between the pole pieces to provide additional magnetic flux to the magnetic field without saturating the pole pieces.

  4. High strength and high toughness steel

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Earl R.; Zackay, Victor F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural steel which possess both high strength and high toughness and has particular application of cryogenic uses. The steel is produced by the utilization of thermally induced phase transformation following heating in a three-phase field in iron-rich alloys of the Fe-Ni-Ti system, with a preferred composition of 12% nickel, 0.5% titanium, the remainder being iron.

  5. Strength of Chemical Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Jerry D.

    1973-01-01

    Students are not generally made aware of the extraordinary magnitude of the strengths of chemical bonds in terms of the forces required to pull them apart. Molecular bonds are usually considered in terms of the energies required to break them, and we are not astonished at the values encountered. For example, the Cl2 bond energy, 57.00 kcal/mole, amounts to only 9.46 x 10(sup -20) cal/molecule, a very small amount of energy, indeed, and impossible to measure directly. However, the forces involved in realizing the energy when breaking the bond operate over a very small distance, only 2.94 A, and, thus, f(sub ave) approx. equals De/(r - r(sub e)) must be very large. The forces involved in dissociating the molecule are discussed in the following. In consideration of average forces, the molecule shall be assumed arbitrarily to be dissociated when the atoms are far enough separated so that the potential, relative to that of the infinitely separated atoms, is reduced by 99.5% from the potential of the molecule at the equilibrium bond length (r(sub e)) for Cl2 of 1.988 A this occurs at 4.928 A.

  6. Polymer-solid interfaces: Structure and strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Liezhong

    1999-12-01

    This thesis explored the influence of sticker group concentration (φ), interaction parameter between sticker groups and the solid substrate (chi), and bonding time on the structure and strength of polymer-solid interfaces. Carboxylated polybutadienes (cPBD's) with different COOH concentrations (φ) were synthesized through hydrocarboxylation of high molecular weight polybutadienes. The COOH groups were randomly distributed along the polymer chains and selectively introduced to the pendant double bonds. The influence of φ and chi on the peel strength (GIC) of two interfaces, cPBD-Al and cPBD-AlS (amine terminated silane modified Al), was investigated using the T-peel test. Counter-intuitively, with increasing φ, GIC of both interfaces increased first and then decreased after passing through a maximum strength. At a constant φ, GIC increased with chi. Additionally, the bonding dynamics was strongly dependent on φ and chi and the time scale was several orders of Magnitude longer than the characteristic relaxation time of polybutadiene. The adhesion dynamics was controlled by the slow frustrated surface reorganization process. Most of the experimental observations could be attributed to the variation in chain physical connectivity within the interfaces, which was explored by a self-consistent field lattice model (SCFLM). Sticker groups were found to segregate to the solid surface and chain physical connectivity was modified at the polymer-solid interface. We demonstrated that the segregation of sticker groups and the variation in chain physical connectivity led to the formation of a weak boundary interphase. It is this weak interphase that controls the strength and bonding dynamics of the interface. The presence of this weak interphase was experimentally verified through angle resolved XPS analysis. Finally, an entanglement percolation model was developed to correlate the interface strength with the chain connectivity. The results obtained in this study contribute

  7. Investigation of Vacuum Insulator Surface Dielectric Strength with Nanosecond Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Nunnally, W C; Krogh, M; Williams, C; Trimble, D; Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G

    2003-06-03

    The maximum vacuum insulator surface dielectric strength determines the acceleration electric field gradient possible in a short pulse accelerator. Previous work has indicated that higher electric field strengths along the insulator-vacuum interface might be obtained as the pulse duration is decreased. In this work, a 250 kV, single ns wide impulse source was applied to small diameter, segmented insulators samples in a vacuum to evaluate the multi-layer surface dielectric strength of the sample construction. Resonances in the low inductance test geometry were used to obtain unipolar, pulsed electric fields in excess of 100 MV/m on the insulator surface. The sample construction, experimental arrangement and experimental results are presented for the initial data in this work. Modeling of the multi-layer structure is discussed and methods of improving insulator surface dielectric strength in a vacuum are proposed.

  8. Tensile strength of restorative resins.

    PubMed

    Zidan, O; Asmussen, E; Jørgensen, K D

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of the present work was to measure the tensile strength of restorative resins and to study the effect of the method of measurement on the recorded results. A direct pull method using dumb-bell shaped specimens was used. The tensile strength of the resins was also tested using the diametral compression method suggested by the A.D.A. It was found that the method of testing affects the results. Although the diametral compression method is a simple method, it cannot be considered reliable for all types of material. The tensile strength of the conventional composites was significantly higher than the tensile strength of the microfilled composites.

  9. Physiological Effects of Strength Training and Various Strength Training Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmore, Jack H.

    Current knowledge in the area of muscle physiology is a basis for a discussion on strength training programs. It is now recognized that the expression of strength is related to, but not dependent upon, the size of the muscle and is probably more related to the ability to recruit more muscle fibers in the contraction, or to better synchronize their…

  10. Strength Training for Young Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraemer, William J.; Fleck, Steven J.

    This guide is designed to serve as a resource for developing strength training programs for children. Chapter 1 uses research findings to explain why strength training is appropriate for children. Chapter 2 explains some of the important physiological concepts involved in children's growth and development as they apply to developing strength…

  11. Strength properties of fly ash based controlled low strength materials.

    PubMed

    Türkel, S

    2007-08-25

    Controlled low strength material (CLSM) is a flowable mixture that can be used as a backfill material in place of compacted soils. Flowable fill requires no tamping or compaction to achieve its strength and typically has a load carrying capacity much higher than compacted soils, but it can still be excavated easily. The selection of CLSM type should be based on technical and economical considerations for specific applications. In this study, a mixture of high volume fly ash (FA), crushed limestone powder (filler) and a low percentage of pozzolana cement have been tried in different compositions. The amount of pozzolana cement was kept constant for all mixes as, 5% of fly ash weight. The amount of mixing water was chosen in order to provide optimum pumpability by determining the spreading ratio of CLSM mixtures using flow table method. The shear strength of the material is a measure of the materials ability to support imposed stresses on the material. The shear strength properties of CLSM mixtures have been investigated by a series of laboratory tests. The direct shear test procedure was applied for determining the strength parameters Phi (angle of shearing resistance) and C(h) (cohesion intercept) of the material. The test results indicated that CLSM mixtures have superior shear strength properties compared to compacted soils. Shear strength, cohesion intercept and angle of shearing resistance values of CLSM mixtures exceeded conventional soil materials' similar properties at 7 days. These parameters proved that CLSM mixtures are suitable materials for backfill applications.

  12. Oscillator strengths and collision strengths for S v

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Wyngaarden, W. L.; Henry, R. J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of the optical extreme-ultraviolet spectrum of the Jupiter planetary system during the Voyager space mission revealed bright emission lines of some sulfur ions. The spectra of the torus at the orbit of Io are likely to contain S V lines. The described investigation provides oscillator strengths and collision strengths for the first four UV lines. The collision strengths from the ground state to four other excited states are also obtained. Use is made of a two-state calculation which is checked for convergence for some transitions by employing a three-state or a four-state approximation. Target wave functions for S V are calculated so that the oscillator strengths calculated in dipole length and dipole velocity approximations agree within 5%.

  13. Strength Matters: Resisting Erosion Across Upland Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimsath, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Soil-covered upland landscapes comprise a critical part of the habitable world and our understanding of their evolution as a function of different climatic, tectonic, and geologic regimes is important across a wide range of disciplines. Erosion laws, which help direct our study and drive our models of Earth surface processes are based on little field data. Soil production and transport play essential roles in controlling the spatial variation of soil depth and therefore hillslope hydrological processes, vegetation, and soil biological activity. Field-based confirmation of the hypothesized relationship between soil thickness and soil production is recent, however, and here we quantify the first direct physical explanation of variable soil production across landscapes. We report clear empirical linkages between the mechanical strength of the parent material (erodability), soil production rates determined from the same material, and the routing of water on hillslopes. Specifically, soil production rates determined from in situ produced 10Be and 26Al decrease exponentially with increasing shear strength of parent material across three very different field sites, all underlain by granitic bedrock: The Point Reyes Peninsular and The San Gabriel Mountains in California and the Nunnock River, Australia field site used for extensive previous work. At the same field sites, we use fallout radionuclide profiles to show how the flux of water across the soil-saprolite boundary changes significantly along the hillslope profile. Specifically, we quantify the transition from creep dominated bioturbation on the upper parts of the hillslopes to overland flow dominated surficial erosion towards the axis of the unchannelled swales. Our field-based data, collected across a full range of erosion and soil production rates and topographic settings, help explain more clearly the linkages between biota, weathering, hillslope hydrology, and the evolution of the Earth's surface.

  14. Compressive strength of carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Prandy, J.M. ); Hahn, H.T. )

    1991-01-01

    Most composites are weaker in compression than in tension, which is due to the poor compressive strength of the load bearing fibers. The present paper discusses the compressive strengths and failure modes of 11 different carbon fibers: PAN-AS1, AS4, IM6, IM7, T700, T300, GY-30, pitch-75, ultra high modulus (UHM), high modulus (HM), and high strength (HS). The compressive strength was determined by embedding a fiber bundle in a transparent epoxy matrix and testing in compression. The resin allows for the containment and observation of failure during and after testing while also providing lateral support to the fibers. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determine the global failure modes of the fibers.

  15. Systematics of photon strength functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, Richard

    2015-10-01

    The photon strength of high energy E1 transitions is well described by Brink-Axel theory based on the contribution of the Giant Dipole Resonance. No adequate theory is available for M1 and E2 transitions which do not generally compete strongly with high energy E1 transitions. Measurements with the 57Fe(3He,3He') reaction at the Oslo cyclotron have revealed that the photon strength below 2 MeV greatly exceeds BA predictions. Similar results have been found for numerous other nuclides. In this paper I will discuss my analysis of the 56Fe(n,γ)57Fe reaction which we investigated with both cold neutrons from the Budapest Reactor and thermal neutrons from the Rez Reactor (Prague). A >99% complete 57Fe capture γ-ray decay scheme containing 449 γ-rays deexciting 100 levels has been constructed on the basis of γ-ray singles and γγ -coincidence data. The photon strengths for 90 primary γ-rays with energies ranging from 92-7646 keV were calculated and compared with the predictions of Brink-Axel (BA) theory. Excellent agreement has been attained for the high energy transitions while the strength below 2 MeV exceeds BA predictions confirming the earlier Oslo (3He,3He' γ) results. Photon strengths for another 95 secondary M1, E1, and E2 γ-rays were also determined to also exceed BA predictions for transitions below 4 MeV. The dependence of photon strength on level energy and the statistical distribution of photon strengths will also be discussed in this talk.

  16. Crystal strength by direct computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatov, Vasily

    2007-03-01

    The art of making materials stronger goes back to medieval and even ancient times. Swords forged from Damascus steels more than 10 centuries ago possessed a unique combination of hardness and flexibility, two qualities that are difficult to attain simultaneously. The skills of metalworking were based on empirical knowledge and were passed from the master smith to his pupils. The science of physical metallurgy came about only in the XX century bringing with it new methods for finding out why some materials are strong while others are not. Soon it was realized that, when it comes to metal strength, it is all about crystal defects -- impurities, dislocations, grain boundaries, etc. - and how they are organized into crystal microstructure. This understanding has since resulted in new effective methods of material processing aiming to modify crystal microstructure in order to affect material's properties, e.g. strength and/or hardness. Remarkably and disappointingly, general understanding that microstructure defines material's response to external loads has not yet resulted in a workable physical theory of metal strength accounting for the realistic complexity of material microstructure. In this presentation I would like to discuss a few tidbits from computational and experimental research in our group at LLNL on crystal defects and their contributions to material strength. My selection of the examples aims to illustrate the major premise of our work that the mechanisms by which the microstructure affects crystal strength are multiple and complex but that there is hope to bring some order to this complexity.

  17. Lifting strength in two-person teamwork.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of lifting range, hand-to-toe distance, and lifting direction on single-person lifting strengths and two-person teamwork lifting strengths. Six healthy males and seven healthy females participated in this study. Two-person teamwork lifting strengths were examined in both strength-matched and strength-unmatched groups. Our results showed that lifting strength significantly decreased with increasing lifting range or hand-to-toe distance. However, lifting strengths were not affected by lifting direction. Teamwork lifting strength did not conform to the law of additivity for both strength-matched and strength-unmatched groups. In general, teamwork lifting strength was dictated by the weaker of the two members, implying that weaker members might be exposed to a higher potential danger in teamwork exertions. To avoid such overexertion in teamwork, members with significantly different strength ability should not be assigned to the same team.

  18. Strength measurements of The Geysers reservoir rock

    SciTech Connect

    Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1980-09-01

    Rock samples taken from two outcrops and cores from well bores at the Geysers geothermal field were tested at temperatures and pressures similar to those found in the field. Both intact cylinders and cylinders containing 30/sup 0/ sawcuts were deformed at confining pressures of 200 to 1000 bars, pore pressure of 30 bars, and temperatures of 150 to 250/sup 0/C. Constant strain rate tests gave a coefficient of friction of 0.68. Friction was independent of rock type, temperature and strain rate. Most cores taken from the producing zone were highly fractured. For this reason, intact samples were rarely 50% stronger than the frictional strength. At 500 bars confining pressure, P wave velocity of 6.2 km/sec was measured for a sample taken from an outcrop. Porosities and permeabilities were also measured.

  19. The torsional strength of wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, C P

    1930-01-01

    This report describes a simple method for calculating the position of the elastic axis of a wing structure having any number of spars. It is shown that strong drag bracing near the top and bottom of a wing greatly increases the torsional strength. An analytical procedure for finding the contribution of the drag bracing to the torsional strength and stiffness is described, based upon the principle of least work, and involving only one unknown quantity. A coefficient for comparing the torsional rigidity of different wings is derived in this report.

  20. An interlaminar tension strength specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tension strength, sigma(sub 3c) of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 degrees, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism which was held by the grips of a tensile testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the loading arm length had no effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality. Width was found to affect the value of sigma(sub 3c) only slightly. The wider specimens generally had a slightly lower strength since more material was under high stress, and hence, had a larger probability of containing a significant flaw.

  1. Prepubescent Strength Training Gains Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duda, Marty

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies have stimulated greater support for prepubescent weight training. There seems to be general agreement that strength and weight training, when practiced under properly controlled conditions, is safe and efficacious for prepubescents. Weight lifting is not supported. Recommendations for weight training are made, and reservations are…

  2. Building Strengths through Adventure Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughmiller, Grover C.

    2007-01-01

    Campbell Loughmiller (1906-1993) is widely recognized as a leader in therapeutic work with troubled youngsters in outdoor settings. Rejecting punitive or institutional models of intervention, Loughmiller set out to demonstrate that every young person has strengths, desires to make positive changes, can grow in responsibility, and contribute to…

  3. A NEW CLINICAL MUSCLE FUNCTION TEST FOR ASSESSMENT OF HIP EXTERNAL ROTATION STRENGTH: AUGUSTSSON STRENGTH TEST

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    external rotation strength in patients, non–athletes and athletes. The test is practical and easy to perform in any setting and could therefore provide additional information to the common clinical hip examination, in the rehabilitation or research setting, as well as when conducting on–the–field testing in sports. Level of evidence 3 PMID:27525176

  4. The Strength-Based Counseling Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elsie J.

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes a strength-based model for counseling at-risk youth. The author presents the assumptions, basic concepts, and values of the strength perspective in counseling and offers strength categories as a conceptual model for viewing clients' behavior. Propositions leading toward a theory of strength-based counseling and stages of this…

  5. 47 CFR 90.671 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 806-824, 851-869, 896... coordinate their frequency usage with so-channel adjacent MTA licensees and all other affected parties. To the extent that a single entity obtains licenses for adjacent MTAs on the same channel block, it...

  6. The Earth's Magnetic Field: A Simple Measurement of Its Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, William G., III

    1978-01-01

    This laboratory exercise for junior or senior high school students forms a basis for expansion of concepts, offers opportunities for analytical thinking, and presents possibilities for independent thinking. (BB)

  7. 47 CFR 73.184 - Groundwave field strength graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the CFR, nor will they be included in the Commission's automated rules system. For information on... a dielectric constant of the ground (referred to air as unity) equal to 15 for land and 80 for sea..., Washington, DC 20554, (202) 632-7000. (c) Provided the value of the dielectric constant is near 15,...

  8. 47 CFR 73.184 - Groundwave field strength graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the CFR, nor will they be included in the Commission's automated rules system. For information on... a dielectric constant of the ground (referred to air as unity) equal to 15 for land and 80 for sea..., Washington, DC 20554, (202) 632-7000. (c) Provided the value of the dielectric constant is near 15,...

  9. 47 CFR 73.184 - Groundwave field strength graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the CFR, nor will they be included in the Commission's automated rules system. For information on... a dielectric constant of the ground (referred to air as unity) equal to 15 for land and 80 for sea..., Washington, DC 20554, (202) 632-7000. (c) Provided the value of the dielectric constant is near 15,...

  10. 47 CFR 18.305 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) 300 3300 490 to 1,600 kHzAbove 1,600 kHz AnyAny 24,000/F(kHz)15 3030 Induction cooking ranges Below 90... otherwise permitted here for over 500 watts. 4 Induction cooking ranges manufactured prior to February...

  11. 47 CFR 73.686 - Field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., rated and actual power output of transmitter, measured transmission line loss, antenna power gain... power should be computed, and horizontal and vertical plane patterns of the transmitting antenna should... measuring point, reduced to dBu for the actual effective radiated power of the station. Weather, date,...

  12. 47 CFR 73.686 - Field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., rated and actual power output of transmitter, measured transmission line loss, antenna power gain... power should be computed, and horizontal and vertical plane patterns of the transmitting antenna should... measuring point, reduced to dBu for the actual effective radiated power of the station. Weather, date,...

  13. 47 CFR 73.314 - Field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... sector of its response pattern over which maximum gain is realized is in the direction of the transmitter..., such as topography, height and types of vegetation, buildings, obstacles, weather, and other local... and vertical plane patterns of the transmitting antenna should be submitted. (iv) A list of...

  14. 47 CFR 73.314 - Field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... sector of its response pattern over which maximum gain is realized is in the direction of the transmitter..., such as topography, height and types of vegetation, buildings, obstacles, weather, and other local... and vertical plane patterns of the transmitting antenna should be submitted. (iv) A list of...

  15. 47 CFR 73.686 - Field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... response pattern over which maximum gain is realized is in the direction of the transmitter. (v) A mobile..., such as topography, height and types of vegetation, buildings, obstacles, weather, and other local... power should be computed, and horizontal and vertical plane patterns of the transmitting antenna...

  16. 47 CFR 73.314 - Field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... sector of its response pattern over which maximum gain is realized is in the direction of the transmitter..., such as topography, height and types of vegetation, buildings, obstacles, weather, and other local... and vertical plane patterns of the transmitting antenna should be submitted. (iv) A list of...

  17. 47 CFR 73.314 - Field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... sector of its response pattern over which maximum gain is realized is in the direction of the transmitter..., such as topography, height and types of vegetation, buildings, obstacles, weather, and other local... and vertical plane patterns of the transmitting antenna should be submitted. (iv) A list of...

  18. 47 CFR 73.314 - Field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... sector of its response pattern over which maximum gain is realized is in the direction of the transmitter..., such as topography, height and types of vegetation, buildings, obstacles, weather, and other local... and vertical plane patterns of the transmitting antenna should be submitted. (iv) A list of...

  19. 47 CFR 73.686 - Field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... response pattern over which maximum gain is realized is in the direction of the transmitter. (v) A mobile..., such as topography, height and types of vegetation, buildings, obstacles, weather, and other local... power should be computed, and horizontal and vertical plane patterns of the transmitting antenna...

  20. 47 CFR 73.686 - Field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... response pattern over which maximum gain is realized is in the direction of the transmitter. (v) A mobile..., such as topography, height and types of vegetation, buildings, obstacles, weather, and other local... power should be computed, and horizontal and vertical plane patterns of the transmitting antenna...

  1. 47 CFR 18.305 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) 300 3300 490 to 1,600 kHzAbove 1,600 kHz AnyAny 24,000/F(kHz)15 3030 Induction cooking ranges Below 90... otherwise permitted here for over 500 watts. 4 Induction cooking ranges manufactured prior to February...

  2. Determining the Strength of an Electromagnet through Damped Oscillations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Michael; Leung, Chi Fan

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a project designed to extend sixth-form pupils looking to further their knowledge and skill base in physics. This project involves a quantitative analysis of the decaying amplitude of a metal plate oscillating in a strong magnetic field; the decay of the amplitude is used to make estimates of the strength of the magnetic…

  3. 47 CFR 27.55 - Power strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of a licensee's service area shall not exceed the value specified unless the adjacent affected service area licensee(s) agree(s) to a different field strength. This value applies to both the initially... service area shall not exceed the value specified unless the adjacent affected service area...

  4. Geomagnetic Dipole Strength and Reversal Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J.; Meynadier, L.; Guyodo, Y.

    2004-12-01

    We present a first 2 million years long composite curve obtained after stacking records of relative paleointensity from a selection of sedimentary sequences. The composite Sint-2000 record was calibrated using the virtual dipole moments (VDMs) of the 2004 updated volcanic database of absolute paleointensity over 0.1 Myr long intervals. The value of the time-averaged VDM (7.46+/-1.16 x 1022 Am2) for the past 0.8Myr was used for calibration and the mean values of the successive 0.1 Myr intervals were found in very good agreement with the relative paleointensity for the same periods. A striking characteristic of this Sint-2000 curve is the succession of periods with different mean values of paleointensity. During the Brunhes chron the dipole oscillated around a value of 7.51+/-1.66 x 1022 Am2, which was significantly larger than during the previous 400 kyrs (5.3 +/- 1.5 x 1022 Am2). To provide a more quantitative picture of field strength as a function of reversal frequency, we calculated successive running averages of the field intensity over 100 kyrs long intervals and found that the time-averaged field was higher during periods without reversals. We also observe that the amplitude of the short-term oscillations remained the same. As a consequence, less intervals of very low intensity are expected during periods associated with a strong average dipole moment, whereas more excursions or other instabilities are produced during periods of weak field intensity. The relation between the mean dipole strength and the frequency of reversals suggests also the existence of a large field during long periods without reversals, under the assumption that they would be governed by the same processes. Prior to reversals, the axial dipole decays during 60 to 80 kyrs, but rebuilds itself in the opposite direction much more rapidly, in a few thousand years at most. These time constants suggest that the decay phase is caused by diffusion while advection would dominate the dipole

  5. Determination of functional strength imbalance of the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Newton, Robert U; Gerber, Aimee; Nimphius, Sophia; Shim, Jae K; Doan, Brandon K; Robertson, Mike; Pearson, David R; Craig, Bruce W; Häkkinen, Keijo; Kraemer, William J

    2006-11-01

    The purposes of this study were (a) to determine whether a significant strength imbalance existed between the left and right or dominant (D) and nondominant (ND) legs and (b) to investigate possible correlations among various unilateral and bilateral closed kinetic chain tests, including a field test, and traditional isokinetic dynamometry used to determine strength imbalance. Fourteen Division I collegiate women softball players (20.2 +/- 1.4 years) volunteered to undergo measures of average peak torque for isokinetic flexion and extension at 60 degrees .s(-1) and 240 degrees .s(-1); in addition, measures of peak and average force of each leg during parallel back squat, 2-legged vertical jump, and single-leg vertical jump and performance in a 5-hop test were examined. Significant differences of between 4.2% and 16.0% were evident for all measures except for average force during single-leg vertical jump between the D and ND limbs, thus revealing a significant strength imbalance. The 5-hop test revealed a significant difference between D and ND limbs and showed a moderate correlation with more sophisticated laboratory tests, suggesting a potential use as a field test for the identification of strength imbalance. The results of this study indicate that a significant strength imbalance can exist even in collegiate level athletes, and future research should be conducted to determine how detrimental these imbalances could be in terms of peak performance for athletes, as well as the implications for injury risk.

  6. Strength Scaling in Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Morton, John

    1990-01-01

    A research program was initiated to study and isolate the factors responsible for scale effects in the tensile strength of graphite/epoxy composite laminates. Four layups were chosen with appropriate stacking sequences so as to highlight individual and interacting failure modes. Four scale sizes were selected for investigation including full scale size, 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4, with n = to 4, 3, 2, and 1, respectively. The full scale specimen sizes was 32 piles thick as compared to 24, 16, and 8 piles for the 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4 specimen sizes respectively. Results were obtained in the form of tensile strength, stress-strain curves and damage development. Problems associated with strength degradation with increasing specimen sizes are isolated and discussed. Inconsistencies associated with strain measurements were also identified. Enhanced x ray radiography was employed for damage evaluation, following step loading. It was shown that fiber dominated layups were less sensitive to scaling effects compared to the matrix dominated layups.

  7. An Interlaminar Tensile Strength Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Jackson, Wade C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tensile strength, sigma(sub 3c), of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 deg, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism that was held by the grips of a tension testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the specimen width and loading arm length had little effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality.

  8. Modeling of Nanoparticle-Mediated Electric Field Enhancement Inside Biological Cells Exposed to AC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Pawan K.; Kang, Sung Kil; Kim, Gon Jun; Choi, Jun; Mohamed, A.-A. H.; Lee, Jae Koo

    2009-08-01

    We present in this article the effect of alternating electric field at kilohertz (kHz) and megahertz (MHz) frequencies on the biological cells in presence and absence of nanoparticles. The induced electric field strength distribution in the region around cell membrane and nucleus envelope display different behavior at kHz and MHz frequencies. The attachment of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), especially gold nanowires around the surface of nucleus induce enhanced electric field strengths. The induced field strengths are dependent on the length of nanowire and create varying field regions when the length of nanowire is increased from 2 to 4 µm. The varying nanowire length increased the induced field strengths inside nucleoplasm and region adjacent to the nucleus in the cytoplasm. We investigated a process of electrostatic disruption of nucleus membrane when the induced electric field strength across the nucleus exceeds its tensile strength.

  9. Li2WO4 form II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villars, P.; Cenzual, K.; Daams, J.; Gladyshevskii, R.; Shcherban, O.; Dubenskyy, V.; Kuprysyuk, V.; Savysyuk, I.

    This document is part of Subvolume A9 `Structure Types. Part 9: Space Groups (148) R-3 - (141) I41' of Volume 43 `Crystal Structures of Inorganic Compounds' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III `Condensed Matter'.

  10. 47 CFR 73.683 - Field strength contours and presumptive determination of field strength at individual locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., subscriber, and local market contained in 47 CFR 76.66(a) apply to this paragraph (f). ... specified as Grade A and Grade B and indicate the approximate extent of coverage over average terrain in the... vary greatly from these estimates because the terrain over any specific path is expected to...

  11. 47 CFR 73.683 - Field strength contours and presumptive determination of field strength at individual locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., subscriber, and local market contained in 47 CFR 76.66(a) apply to this paragraph (f). ... specified as Grade A and Grade B and indicate the approximate extent of coverage over average terrain in the... vary greatly from these estimates because the terrain over any specific path is expected to...

  12. Enhancement of octupole strength in near spherical nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robledo, L. M.

    2016-09-01

    The validity of the rotational formula used to compute E1 and E3 transition strengths in even-even nuclei is analyzed within the Generator Coordinate Method framework based on mean field wave functions. It turns out that those nuclei with spherical or near spherical shapes the E1 and E3 strengths computed with this formula are strongly underestimated and a sound evaluation of them requires angular-momentum projected wave functions. Results for several isotopic chains with proton number equal to or near magic numbers are analyzed and compared with experimental data. The use of angular-momentum projected wave functions greatly improves the agreement with the scarce experimental data.

  13. Inert strength of pristine silica glass fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.L.; Michalske, T.A.

    1993-11-01

    Silica glass fibers have been produced and tested under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions to investigate the inert strength of pristine fibers in absence of reactive agents. Analysis of the coefficient of variation in diameter ({upsilon}{sub d}) vs the coefficient of variation of breaking strength ({upsilon}{sub {sigma}}) does not adequately explain the variation of breaking stress. Distribution of fiber tensile strength data suggests that the inert strength of such fibers is not single valued and that the intrinsic strength is controlled by defects in the glass. Furthermore, comparison of room temperature UHV data with LN{sub 2} data indicates that these intrinsic strengths are not temperature dependent.

  14. Enhanced long-term strength and durability of shotcrete with high-strength C{sub 12}A{sub 7} mineral-based accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Won, Jong-Pil Hwang, Un-Jong; Lee, Su-Jin

    2015-10-15

    This study evaluated the performance of shotcrete using high strength C{sub 12}A{sub 7} mineral-based accelerator that has been developed to improve the durability and long-term strength. Rebound, compressive strength and flexural strength were tested in the field. Test result showed that existing C{sub 12}A{sub 7} mineral-based accelerator exhibits better early strength than the high-strength C{sub 12}A{sub 7} mineral-based accelerator until the early age, but high-strength C{sub 12}A{sub 7} mineral-based accelerator shows about 29% higher at the long-term age of 28 days. Microstructural analysis such as scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption method was evaluated to analyze long-term strength development mechanism of high strength C{sub 12}A{sub 7} mineral-based accelerator. As analysis result, it had more dense structure due to the reaction product by adding material that used to enhanced strength. It had better resistance performance in chloride ion penetration, freezing–thawing and carbonation than shotcrete that used existing C{sub 12}A{sub 7} mineral-based accelerator.

  15. Strength Training and Shoulder Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Salles, José Inácio; Velasques, Bruna; Cossich, Victor; Nicoliche, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Pedro; Amaral, Marcus Vinicius; Motta, Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    Context: Proprioception is essential to motor control and joint stability during daily and sport activities. Recent studies demonstrated that athletes have better joint position sense (JPS) when compared with controls matched for age, suggesting that physical training could have an effect on proprioception. Objective: To evaluate the result of an 8-week strength-training program on shoulder JPS and to verify whether using training intensities that are the same or divergent for the shoulder's dynamic-stabilizer muscles promote different effects on JPS. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: We evaluated JPS in a research laboratory and conducted training in a gymnasium. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 90 men, right handed and asymptomatic, with no history of any type of injury or shoulder instability. Intervention(s): For 8 weeks, the participants performed the strength-training program 3 sessions per week. We used 4 exercises (bench press, lat pull down, shoulder press, and seated row), with 2 sets each. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured shoulder JPS acuity by calculating the absolute error. Results: We found an interaction between group and time. To examine the interaction, we conducted two 1-way analyses of variance comparing groups at each time. The groups did not differ at pretraining; however, a difference among groups was noted posttraining. Conclusions: Strength training using exercises at the same intensity produced an improvement in JPS compared with exercises of varying intensity, suggesting that the former resulted in improvements in the sensitivity of muscle spindles and, hence, better neuromuscular control in the shoulder. PMID:25594912

  16. High strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  17. Bats respond to very weak magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lan-Xiang; Pan, Yong-Xin; Metzner, Walter; Zhang, Jin-Shuo; Zhang, Bing-Fang

    2015-01-01

    How animals, including mammals, can respond to and utilize the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field for orientation and navigation is contentious. In this study, we experimentally tested whether the Chinese Noctule, Nyctalus plancyi (Vespertilionidae) can sense magnetic field strengths that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Such field strengths occurred during geomagnetic excursions or polarity reversals and thus may have played an important role in the evolution of a magnetic sense. We found that in a present-day local geomagnetic field, the bats showed a clear preference for positioning themselves at the magnetic north. As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (i.e., 10 μT; the lowest field strength tested here), the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. When the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 μT), despite the fact that the artificial field orientation was opposite to the natural geomagnetic field (P<0.05). Hence, N. plancyi is able to detect the direction of a magnetic field even at 1/5th of the present-day field strength. This high sensitivity to magnetic fields may explain how magnetic orientation could have evolved in bats even as the Earth's magnetic field strength varied and the polarity reversed tens of times over the past fifty million years.

  18. Predicting The Compression Strength Of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James; Jackson, Wade; Schaff, Jeffery

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a technique for predicting the residual compression strength of sandwich panels containing impact damage in one facesheet. The technique was tailored to predict the strength of specimens that exhibit a failure mode involving the formation of kink bands at locations of peak strain in the region of impact damage. Under continued compression loading, the kink bands propagate in a stable manner perpendicular to the applied load. When a critical kink-band length is reached, growth becomes unstable corresponding to panel failure. The analysis follows in two sections. The first section calculates the far-field stress required for stable kink-band growth and the second calculates that required for unstable growth. The residual strength prediction is made when the stress for stable growth becomes equal to that for unstable kink-band growth. Initial comparisons between analysis and experiment show good agreement.

  19. The strength of Miranda's lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, Robert; Greeley, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    In attempting to understand the endogenic processes which have shaped the surface of an icy satellite, it is desirable to quantify the failure strength of the satellite's lithosphere. In a crust that is fractured on a large scale, frictional sliding along pre-existing fractures occurs in response to lower differential stresses than required to initiate fracture of pristine rock, thus governing failure of a brittle lithosphere. Failure is predicted along favorably oriented fracture planes; if fractures of all orientations are assumed to be present in the crust (as is expected of a heavily cratered lithosphere), frictional failure relations are directly applicable. The Coulomb criterion predicts that the shear stress (sigma sub t) and normal stress (sigma sub n) components on a fracture plane at failure are related as sigma sub t = mu-sigma sub n + S sub o, where S sub o is the cohesion and mu is the coefficient of friction. At moderate to high pressures, the frictional sliding strength of most materials is found to be sigma sub t = 0.85 sigma sub n.

  20. Strength evaluation of socket joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, Larry C.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the development of a set of equations that can be used to provide a relatively simple solution for identifying the strength of socket joints and for most cases avoid the need of more lengthy analyses. The analytical approach was verified by comparison of the contact load distributions to results obtained from a finite element analysis. The contacting surfaces for the specific joint in this analysis are in the shape of frustrums of a cone and are representative of the tapered surfaces in the socket-type joints used to join segments of model support systems for wind tunnels. The results are in the form of equations that can be used to determine the contact loads and stresses in the joint from the given geometry and externally applied loads. Equations were determined to define the bending moments and stresses along the length of the joints based on strength and materials principles. The results have also been programmed for a personal computer and a copy of the program is included.

  1. Asteroid airburst altitude vs. strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Darrel; Wheeler, Lorien; Mathias, Donovan

    2016-10-01

    Small NEO asteroids (<Ø140m) may not be a threat on a national or global level but can still cause a significant amount of local damage as demonstrated by the Chelyabinsk event where there was over $33 million worth of damage (1 billion roubles) and 1500 were injured, mostly due to broken glass. The ground damage from a small asteroid depends strongly on the altitude at which they "burst" where most of the energy is deposited in the atmosphere. The ability to accurately predict ground damage is useful in determining appropriate evacuation or shelter plans and emergency management.Strong asteroids, such as a monolithic boulder, fail and create peak energy deposition close to the altitude at which ram dynamic pressure exceeds the material cohesive strength. Weaker asteroids, such as a rubble pile, structurally fail at higher altitude, but it requires the increased aerodynamic pressure at lower altitude to disrupt and disperse the rubble. Consequently the resulting airbursts have a peak energy deposition at similar altitudes.In this study hydrocode simulations of the entry and break-up of small asteroids were performed to examine the effect of strength, size, composition, entry angle, and speed on the resulting airburst. This presentation will show movies of the simulations, the results of peak burst height, and the comparison to semi-analytical models.

  2. Strength of Shocked Aluminum Oxynitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Feng, R.; Dandekar, D. P.

    2009-06-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (AlON) is a polycrystalline and transparent ceramic. An accurate characterization of its shock response is critically important for its applications as transparent armor. Shock wave profiles measured in a series of plate impact experiments on AlON [Thornhill, et al., SCCM-2005, 143-146 (2006)] have been reanalyzed using finite element wave propagation simulations and considering an effective strength behavior that is pressure- and time-dependent. The results show a stiffer shock response than that calculated previously using the jump conditions. The material has a Hugoniot elastic limit of 10.37 GPa and sustains a maximum shear stress of 4.38 GPa for shock compressions up to a shock stress of 96 GPa. The mean stress response determined from the simulations displays no sign of phase transformation and corresponds to a linear shock speed-particle velocity relation with a slope of 0.857. These results have been successfully summarized into an AlON material model consisting of compression-dependent nonlinear elasticity, pressure-dependent equilibrium strength, and over-stress relaxation. The wave profiles simulated with the model show very good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  3. Strength distribution in commercial silicon carbide materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Sunil

    1988-01-01

    Four-point flexural strength testing has been conducted in order to establish the baseline strength and reliability of four different commercial SiC types, in conjunction with reliable Weibull modulus values. Average strength of the samples ranged from 380 to 482 MPa at room temperature and 307 to 470 MPa at 1370 C. The strength scatter reflects the effect of flaw variability, which must be minimized to improve reliability in sintered SiC.

  4. Bonded joint strength - Static versus fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mall, S.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesives are commonly characterized only by their static strength even though they are used in structural joints that are subjected to fatigue loads. This paper reviews the relationship between static and fatigue strength for four different specimen types: single-lap-shear, edge-delamination, double cantilever beam, and cracked-lap-shear. It was found that the ratio of static strength to fatigue strength varied from 2.3 to 4.7, depending on the adhesive and specimen configuration.

  5. Strengths and Satisfaction across the Adult Lifespan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacowitz, Derek M.; Vaillant, George E.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2003-01-01

    Positive psychology has recently developed a classification of human strengths (Peterson & Seligman, in press). We aimed to evaluate these strengths by investigating the strengths and life satisfaction in three adult samples recruited from the community (young adult, middle-aged, and older adult), as well as in the surviving men of the Grant study…

  6. Improving the toughness of ultrahigh strength steel

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Koji

    2002-08-15

    The ideal structural steel combines high strength with high fracture toughness. This dissertation discusses the toughening mechanism of the Fe/Co/Ni/Cr/Mo/C steel, AerMet 100, which has the highest toughness/strength combination among all commercial ultrahigh strength steels. The possibility of improving the toughness of this steel was examined by considering several relevant factors.

  7. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  8. Functional organization of excitatory synaptic strength in primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Dylan R.; Houlton, Rachael; Sader, Elie N.; Ko, Ho; Hofer, Sonja B.; Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    The strength of synaptic connections fundamentally determines how neurons influence each other’s firing. Excitatory connection amplitudes between pairs of cortical neurons vary over two orders of magnitude, comprising only very few strong connections among many weaker ones1–9. Although this highly skewed distribution of connection strengths is observed in diverse cortical areas1–9, its functional significance remains unknown: it is not clear how connection strength relates to neuronal response properties, nor how strong and weak inputs contribute to information processing in local microcircuits. Here we reveal that the strength of connections between layer 2/3 (L2/3) pyramidal neurons in mouse primary visual cortex (V1) obeys a simple rule—the few strong connections occur between neurons with most correlated responses, while only weak connections link neurons with uncorrelated responses. Moreover, we show that strong and reciprocal connections occur between cells with similar spatial receptive field structure. Although weak connections far outnumber strong connections, each neuron receives the majority of its local excitation from a small number of strong inputs provided by the few neurons with similar responses to visual features. By dominating recurrent excitation, these infrequent yet powerful inputs disproportionately contribute to feature preference and selectivity. Therefore, our results show that the apparently complex organization of excitatory connection strength reflects the similarity of neuronal responses, and suggest that rare, strong connections mediate stimulus-specific response amplification in cortical microcircuits. PMID:25652823

  9. STRENGTH OF A C-SPHERE FLEXURE SPECIMEN

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Wang, Wei; Jadaan, Osama M.; Lance, Michael J; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2007-01-01

    A 'C-Sphere' flexure strength specimen geometry was conceived and developed to measure a relevant strength of bearing-grade Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls and to relate that to surface-located strength-limiting flaws and to ultimately link those flaw populations to rolling contact fatigue performance. A slot was machined into the balls to a set depth to produce the C-sphere geometry. C-sphere specimens were then diametrally compressed to produce a monotonically increasing flexure or hoop tensile stress at their surface that caused their fracture. The strength was determined using the combination of failure load, C-sphere geometry, and FEA, and the stress field was used to determine C-sphere effective areas and effective volumes as a function of Weibull modulus. A description of the specimen and the aforementioned analysis are provided and a comparison of C-sphere flexure strength distributions of two bearing grade Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials (NBD200 and SN101C) is given.

  10. Densification, microstructure and strength evolution in sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoping

    2000-10-01

    Powder metallurgy has the ability to fabricate high quality, complex components to close tolerances in an economical manner. In many applications, a high sintered density is desirable for an improved performance. However, sintering to a high density demands a large shrinkage, often resulting in difficulties with dimensional control. Recent studies indicate the occurrence of a sufficient densification requires a low in situ strength at high sintering temperatures. On the other hand, the low in situ strength often leads to component's distortion in response to the external forces, such as gravity. Unfortunately, lack of knowledge on strength evolution in sintering has been a major challenge to achieve an optimized combination of densification and shape retention. Therefore, the present study investigates strength evolution in sintering and the effects of processing factors. Experiments are performed on prealloyed bronze and elemental mixture of Fe-2Ni powders. For the bronze, a loose casting method is used to fabricate transverse rupture bars, while bars are injection molded for the Fe-2Ni. The in situ transverse rupture strength is measured using the Penn State Flaming Tensile Tester. Experimental results indicate a dependence of densification and strength on sintering temperature. High temperatures enhance densification and interparticle bonding, resulting in strong sintered structures. However, a low in situ strength at high test temperatures indicates the dominance of thermal softening. A strength model combining sintering theories and microstructural parameters is developed to predict both the in situ strength and the post-sintering strength. The model demonstrates the strength of the sintered materials depends on the inherent material strength, the square of neck size ratio, sintered density, and thermal softening. The model is verified by comparison of model predictions with experimental data of the bronze and Fe-2Ni. Compared to prior strength models, this

  11. Conditioned Reinforcement and Response Strength

    PubMed Central

    Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-01-01

    Stimuli associated with primary reinforcers appear themselves to acquire the capacity to strengthen behavior. This paper reviews research on the strengthening effects of conditioned reinforcers within the context of contemporary quantitative choice theories and behavioral momentum theory. Based partially on the finding that variations in parameters of conditioned reinforcement appear not to affect response strength as measured by resistance to change, long-standing assertions that conditioned reinforcers do not strengthen behavior in a reinforcement-like fashion are considered. A signposts or means-to-an-end account is explored and appears to provide a plausible alternative interpretation of the effects of stimuli associated with primary reinforcers. Related suggestions that primary reinforcers also might not have their effects via a strengthening process are explored and found to be worthy of serious consideration. PMID:20885815

  12. Cobalt: for strength and color

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, Maeve A.; Kropschot, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cobalt is a shiny, gray, brittle metal that is best known for creating an intense blue color in glass and paints. It is frequently used in the manufacture of rechargeable batteries and to create alloys that maintain their strength at high temperatures. It is also one of the essential trace elements (or "micronutrients") that humans and many other living creatures require for good health. Cobalt is an important component in many aerospace, defense, and medical applications and is a key element in many clean energy technologies. The name cobalt comes from the German word kobold, meaning goblin. It was given this name by medieval miners who believed that troublesome goblins replaced the valuable metals in their ore with a substance that emitted poisonous fumes when smelted. The Swedish chemist Georg Brandt isolated metallic cobalt-the first new metal to be discovered since ancient times-in about 1735 and identified some of its valuable properties.

  13. Conditioned reinforcement and response strength.

    PubMed

    Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-03-01

    Stimuli associated with primary reinforcers appear themselves to acquire the capacity to strengthen behavior. This paper reviews research on the strengthening effects of conditioned reinforcers within the context of contemporary quantitative choice theories and behavioral momentum theory. Based partially on the finding that variations in parameters of conditioned reinforcement appear not to affect response strength as measured by resistance to change, long-standing assertions that conditioned reinforcers do not strengthen behavior in a reinforcement-like fashion are considered. A signposts or means-to-an-end account is explored and appears to provide a plausible alternative interpretation of the effects of stimuli associated with primary reinforcers. Related suggestions that primary reinforcers also might not have their effects via a strengthening process are explored and found to be worthy of serious consideration.

  14. An indentation fatigue strength law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Baoxing; Yonezu, Akio; Chen, Xi

    2010-05-01

    Indentation fatigue, where a cyclic load is applied on the sample via an indenter, emerges as an alternative approach for measuring the fatigue properties of materials. We have carried out indentation fatigue tests on a poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) bulk material, as well as on TiN and NiP films/coatings deposited on SUS304 steel substrates, and demonstrate that a simple power-law relationship can be established between the indentation load amplitude and number of cycles to failure. Such a law is very similar to the conventional fatigue strength law obtained from uniaxial tests. The agreement between the fatigue stress exponents obtained by uniaxial and indentation fatigue tests suggests the potential applicability of the indentation fatigue technique for extracting the fatigue properties of materials.

  15. Conditioned reinforcement and response strength.

    PubMed

    Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-03-01

    Stimuli associated with primary reinforcers appear themselves to acquire the capacity to strengthen behavior. This paper reviews research on the strengthening effects of conditioned reinforcers within the context of contemporary quantitative choice theories and behavioral momentum theory. Based partially on the finding that variations in parameters of conditioned reinforcement appear not to affect response strength as measured by resistance to change, long-standing assertions that conditioned reinforcers do not strengthen behavior in a reinforcement-like fashion are considered. A signposts or means-to-an-end account is explored and appears to provide a plausible alternative interpretation of the effects of stimuli associated with primary reinforcers. Related suggestions that primary reinforcers also might not have their effects via a strengthening process are explored and found to be worthy of serious consideration. PMID:20885815

  16. Magnetic Fields in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields, their strength and structure in intergalactic space, their first occurrence in young galaxies, and their dynamical importance for galaxy evolution remain widely unknown. Radio synchrotron emission, its polarization and its Faraday rotation are powerful tools to study the strength and structure of magnetic fields in galaxies. Unpolarized radio synchrotron emission traces isotropic turbulent fields which are strongest in spiral arms and bars (20-30 μG) and in central starburst regions (50-100 μG). Such fields are dynamically important; they can affect gas flows and drive gas inflows in central regions. Polarized radio emission traces ordered fields which can be regular or anisotropic turbulent, generated from isotropic turbulent fields by compression or shear. The strongest ordered fields of 10-15 μG strength are generally found in interarm regions and follow the orientation of adjacent gas spiral arms. In galaxies with strong density waves, ordered (anisotropic turbulent) fields are also observed at the inner edges of the spiral arms. Ordered fields with spiral patterns exist in grand-design, barred and flocculent galaxies, and in central regions of starburst galaxies. Ordered fields in interacting galaxies have asymmetric distributions and are an excellent tracer of past interactions between galaxies or with the intergalactic medium. Irregular galaxies host isotropic turbulent fields often of similar strength as in spiral galaxies, but only weak ordered fields. Faraday rotation measures (RM) of the diffuse polarized radio emission from the disks of several galaxies reveal large-scale spiral patterns that can be described by the superposition of azimuthal modes; these are signatures of regular fields generated by a mean-field α -Ω dynamo. So far no indications were found in external galaxies of large-scale field reversals, like the one in the Milky Way. Ordered magnetic fields are also observed in radio halos

  17. The Distribution of Subjective Memory Strength: List Strength and Response Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criss, Amy H.

    2009-01-01

    Models of recognition memory assume that memory decisions are based partially on the subjective strength of the test item. Models agree that the subjective strength of targets increases with additional time for encoding however the origin of the subjective strength of foils remains disputed. Under the fixed strength assumption the distribution of…

  18. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics of strength-mismatching

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, D.M.; Ganti, S.; McClintock, F.A.

    1996-12-31

    Approximate solutions to stress-fields are provided for a strength-mismatched interface crack in small-scale yielding (SSY) for non-hardening and low hardening materials. Variations of local deformation intensities, characterized by a J-type contour integral, are proposed. The softer material experiences a higher deformation intensity level, J{sub S}, while the harder material sees a much lower deformation intensity level, J{sub H}, compared to that obtained from the applied J near the respective homogeneous crack-tips. For a low hardening material, the stress fields are obtained by scaling from an elastic/perfectly-plastic problem, based on an effective mismatch, M{sub eff}, which is a function of mismatch, M, and the hardening exponent, n. Triaxial stress build-up is discussed quantitatively in terms of M. The influence of strength-mismatch on cleavage fracture is discussed using Weibull statistics.

  19. Photospheric magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.

    1972-01-01

    Knowledge on the nature of magnetic fields on the solar surface is reviewed. At least a large part of the magnetic flux in the solar surface is confined to small bundles of lines of force within which the field strength is of the order of 500 gauss. Magnetic fields are closely associated with all types of solar activity. Magnetic flux appears at the surface at the clearly defined birth or regeneration of activity of an active region. As the region ages, the magnetic flux migrates to form large-scale patterns and the polar fields. Some manifestations of the large-scale distribution are discussed.

  20. Magnetic and Magnetostrictive Characterization and Modeling of High Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgy, Christopher Donald

    High strength steels exhibit small amounts of magnetostriction, which is a useful property for non-destructive testing amongst other things. This property cannot currently be fully utilized due to a lack of adequate measurements and models. This thesis reports measurements of these material parameters, and derives a model using these parameters to predict magnetization changes due to the application of compressive stresses and magnetic fields. The resulting Preisach model, coupled with COMSOL MultiphysicsRTM finite element modeling, accurately predicts the magnetization change seen in a separate high strength steel sample previously measured by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Three sets of measurements on low-carbon, low-alloy high strength steel are introduced in this research. The first experiment measured magnetostriction in steel rods under uniaxial compressive stresses and magnetic fields. The second experiment consisted of magnetostriction and magnetization measurements of the same steel rods under the influence of bi-axially applied magnetic fields. The final experiment quantified the small effect that temperature has on magnetization of steels. The experiments demonstrated that the widely used approximation of stress as an "effective field" is inadequate, and that temperatures between -50 and 100 °C cause minimal changes in magnetization. Preisach model parameters for the prediction of the magnetomechanical effect were derived from the experiments. The resulting model accurately predicts experimentally derived major and minor loops for a high strength steel sample, including the bulging and coincident points attributed to compressive stresses. A framework is presented which couples the uniaxial magnetomechanical model with a finite element package, and was used successfully to predict experimentally measured magnetization changes on a complex sample. These results show that a 1-D magnetomechanical model can be applied to predict 3-D

  1. Converging finite-strength shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axford, R. A.; Holm, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The converging shock problem was first solved by Guderley and later by Landau and Stanyukovich for infinitely strong shocks in an ideal gas with spherical and cylindrical symmetry. This problem is solved herein for finite-strength shocks and a non-ideal-gas equation of state with an adiabatic bulk modulus of the type Bs= {- v∂ p}/{∂ v| s} = ( p +B) f( v) , where B is a constant with the dimensions of pressure, and f(v) is an arbitrary function of the specific volume. Self-similar profiles of the particle velocity and thermodynamic variables are studied explicitly for two cases with constant specific heat at constant volume; the Tait-Kirkwood-Murnaghan equation, f(v) = constant, and the Walsh equation, f(v) = v/A, where A = constant. The first case reduces to the ideal gas when B = 0. In both cases the flow behind the shock front exhibits an unbalanced buoyant force instability at a critical Mach number which depends upon equation-of-state parameters.

  2. INTEGRATION OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING PRINCIPLES INTO A REHABILITATION PROGRAM

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Daniel S.

    2011-01-01

    . Conclusion: Despite abundance of information on the implementation of training principles in the strength and conditioning field, investigation regarding the use of these principles in a properly designed rehabilitation program is lacking. PMID:21904701

  3. Bond strength of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) grouted anchors

    SciTech Connect

    Bellavance, E.; Xu, H.; Benmokrane, B.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes the results of laboratory and field pull-out tests on cement grouted glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) anchors. As an alternative for grouted steel anchors, GFRP bars have many advantages over steel tendons, and can avoid corrosion and some difficulties in transportation, handling, and installation. Three types of 36 GFRP anchors and 20 steel anchors installed in three types of host media: steel pipe, concrete block, and rock mass were tested in the laboratory as well as in the field. The bond strength, load carrying capacity, load-displacement behavior, and critical bond length of cement grouted GFRP anchors were examined in comparison with conventional steel anchors.

  4. Dynamic Strength Ceramic Nanocomposites Under Pulse Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.; Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Vaganova, Irina K.; Skripnyak, Vladimir A.

    2015-06-01

    Multi-scale computer simulation approach has been applied to research of strength of nanocomposites under dynamic loading. The influence of mesoscopic substructures on the dynamic strength of ceramic and hybrid nanocomposites, which can be formed using additive manufacturing were numerically investigated. At weak shock wave loadings the shear strength and the spall strength of ceramic and hybrid nanocomposites depends not only phase concentration and porosity, but size parameters of skeleton substructures. The influence of skeleton parameter on the shear strength and the spall strength of ceramic nanocomposites with the same concentration of phases decreases with increasing amplitude of the shock pulse of microsecond duration above the double amplitude of the Hugoniot elastic limit of nanocomposites. This research carried out in 2014 -2015 was supported by grant from The Tomsk State University Academic D.I. Mendeleev Fund Program and also Ministry of Sciences and Education of Russian Federation (State task 2014/223, project 1943, Agreement 14.132.

  5. Fracture toughness and strength of 96% alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.B.; Chinn, R.E.; McNerney, K.R.; Brog, T.K.; Kim, C.Y.; Krutyholowa, M.W.; Chen, N.W.; Haun, M.J.

    1997-05-01

    There exists a need to understand the controlling factors that simultaneously impact strength and toughness in 96% alumina. The enhancement of both strength and toughness enables designers to extend the use limits and reliability for structural ceramics. This article presents mechanical property results from a group study examining the use of different alkaline-earth aluminosilicate intergranular compositions containing magnesium, calcium and strontium oxides (RO) in 96% alumina. Principal results address trends in indentation strength toughness and modulus of rupture. Trends in the data are presented relative to existing theories of thermal expansion mismatch toughening, grain-bridging crack-wake effect and crack deflection mechanisms. Strength is addressed in terms of strength after indentation, crack growth of indentation flaws and Weibull characterization for the strength distribution.

  6. Fracture strength of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1979-01-01

    A test program was developed to determine the nature and source of the flaw controlling the fracture of silicon solar cells and to provide information regarding the mechanical strength of cells. Significant changes in fracture strengths were found in seven selected in-process wafer-to-cell products from a manufacturer's production line. The fracture strength data were statistically analyzed and interpreted in light of the exterior flaw distribution of the samples.

  7. Electrostatic precipitator having high strength discharge electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Bakke, E.; Willett, H.P.

    1983-06-21

    There is disclosed an electrostatic precipitator with a discharge electrode having dimensional and configuration characteristics which provide high field strength and high current density particularly in a wet electrostatic precipitator. The round cylindrical collector tube of length (L) and with an inner diameter (D) has a coaxially positioned discharge electrode having an electrode supporting mast of a diameter from 0.25 to 40 D with an electrically conducting closed screw fli secured to the mast. The screw flight has an overall diameter (D) of from 0.33 to 0.67 D with a pitch of from d-d/2 to d-d and an overall length of from one screw revolution to l-(D-d), preferably one-half L or less and most preferably one to two revolutions. The short screw flight is economical and readily adjusted. The screw flight has a thickness of from about 0.05 to 15 inch and has a symmetrically curved outer edge. Collector tube is flared at its lower end to direct water away from the electrode mast as the water is discharged from the tube. The discharge electrode is supported from above and centered by means of adjustable tie rods at its lower end.

  8. Mechanical strength and stability of lithium aluminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimhall, J. L.

    1992-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) investigated the strength and resistance to thermal shock of lithium aluminate annular pellets. The room temperature, axial compressive fracture strength of pellets made at Westinghouse Advanced Energy Systems (WAES) varied from 80 to 133 ksi. The strength at 430 C (806 F) was to 30 to 40 percent lower. The strength at 900 C (1652 F) showed a wide variation with one measurement near 90 ksi. These strength values are consistent with other data and predictions made in the literature when the grain size and porosity of the microstructure are taken into account. In diametral compression tests, the fracture strengths were much lower due to the existence of tensile stresses in some pellet regions from this type of loading. However, the fracture stresses were still generally higher than those reported in the literature; this fracture resistance probably reflects the better quality of the pellets tested in this study. Measurements on pellets made at PNL indicated lower strengths compared to the WAES material. This strength difference could be accounted for by different processing technologies: material made at PNL was cold-pressed and sintered with high porosity whereas the WAES material was isostatically hot-pressed with high density. Thermal shocking of the material by ramping to 900 C in two minutes did not have an observable effect on the microstructure or the strength of any of the pellets.

  9. Accelerated Strength Testing of Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.; Allen, D. H.; Bradley, W. L.

    1998-01-01

    Constant ramp strength tests on unidirectional thermoplastic composite specimens oriented in the 90 deg. direction were conducted at constant temperatures ranging from 149 C to 232 C. Ramp rates spanning 5 orders of magnitude were tested so that failures occurred in the range from 0.5 sec. to 24 hrs. (0.5 to 100,000 MPa/sec). Below 204 C, time-temperature superposition held allowing strength at longer times to be estimated from strength tests at shorter times but higher temperatures. The data indicated that a 50% drop in strength might be expected for this material when the test time is increased by 9 orders of magnitude. The shift factors derived from compliance data applied well to the strength results. To explain the link between compliance and strength, a viscoelastic fracture model was investigated. The model, which used compliance as input, was found to fit the strength data only if the critical fracture energy was allowed to vary with temperature reduced stress rate. This variation in the critical parameter severely limits its use in developing a robust time-dependent strength model. The significance of this research is therefore seen as providing both the indication that a more versatile acceleration method for strength can be developed and the evidence that such a method is needed.

  10. Pitch strength of normal and dysphonic voices

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastav, Rahul; Eddins, David A.; Anand, Supraja

    2012-01-01

    Two sounds with the same pitch may vary from each other based on saliency of their pitch sensation. This perceptual attribute is called “pitch strength.” The study of voice pitch strength may be important in quantifying of normal and pathological qualities. The present study investigated how pitch strength varies across normal and dysphonic voices. A set of voices (vowel /a/) selected from the Kay Elemetrics Disordered Voice Database served as the stimuli. These stimuli demonstrated a wide range of voice quality. Ten listeners judged the pitch strength of these stimuli in an anchored magnitude estimation task. On a given trial, listeners heard three different stimuli. The first stimulus represented very low pitch strength (wide-band noise), the second stimulus consisted of the target voice and the third stimulus represented very high pitch strength (pure tone). Listeners estimated pitch strength of the target voice by positioning a continuous slider labeled with values between 0 and 1, reflecting the two anchor stimuli. Results revealed that listeners can judge pitch strength reliably in dysphonic voices. Moderate to high correlations with perceptual judgments of voice quality suggest that pitch strength may contribute to voice quality judgments. PMID:22423721

  11. Muscular strength after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Winther, Siri B; Husby, Vigdis S; Foss, Olav A; Wik, Tina S; Svenningsen, Svein; Engdal, Monika; Haugan, Kristin; Husby, Otto S

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Minimizing the decrease in muscular strength after total hip arthroplasty (THA) might allow patients to recover faster. We evaluated muscular strength in patients who were operated on using 3 surgical approaches. Patients and methods In a prospective cohort study, 60 patients scheduled for primary THA were allocated to the direct lateral, posterior, or anterior approach. Leg press and abduction strength were evaluated 2 weeks or less preoperatively, 2 and 8 days postoperatively, and at 6-week and 3-month follow-up. Results Differences in maximal strength change were greatest after 2 and 8 days. The posterior and anterior approaches produced less decrease in muscular strength than the direct lateral approach. 6 weeks postoperatively, the posterior approach produced greater increase in muscular strength than the direct lateral approach, and resulted in a greater increase in abduction strength than the anterior approach. At 3-month follow-up, no statistically significant differences between the groups were found. The operated legs were 18% weaker in leg press and 15% weaker in abduction than the unoperated legs, and the results were similar between groups. Interpretation The posterior and anterior approaches appeared to have the least negative effect on abduction and leg press muscular strength in the first postoperative week; the posterior approach had the least negative effect, even up to 6 weeks postoperatively. THA patients have reduced muscle strength in the operated leg (compared to the unoperated leg) 3 months after surgery. PMID:26141371

  12. Correlated Strength in the Nuclear Spectral Function

    SciTech Connect

    D. Rohe; C. S. Armstrong; R. Asaturyan; O. K. Baker; S. Bueltmann; C. Carasco; D. Day; R. Ent; H. C. Fenker; K. Garrow; A. Gasparian; P. Gueye; M. Hauger; A. Honegger; J. Jourdan; C. E. Keppel; G. Kubon; R. Lindgren; A. Lung; D. J. Mack; J. H. Mitchell; H. Mkrtchyan; D. Mocelj; K. Normand; T. Petitjean; O. Rondon; E. Segbefia; I. Sick; S. Stepanyan; L. Tang; F. Tiefenbacher; W. F. Vulcan; G. Warren; S. A. Wood; L. Yuan; M. Zeier; H. Zhu; B. Zihlmann

    2004-10-01

    We have carried out an (e,ep) experiment at high momentum transfer and in parallel kinematics to measure the strength of the nuclear spectral function S(k,E) at high nucleon momenta k and large removal energies E. This strength is related to the presence of short-range and tensor correlations, and was known hitherto only indirectly and with considerable uncertainty from the lack of strength in the independent-particle region. This experiment locates by direct measurement the correlated strength predicted by theory.

  13. Discoveries, financial strength lift Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, A.D.

    1996-07-15

    Colombia plans to play a growing role in international oil markets while expanding and privatizing its domestic gas and electricity industries. Officials intend to curb the government`s spending on energy development while increasing its energy revenues. Their plans imply growing participation in energy projects by private companies. Also certain to help attract investment capital is the country`s new standing as a world-class oil and gas province. Discovery of Cusiana oil field in 1989 and of Cupiagua oil field in 1992 added 2 billion bbl of oil and 3 tcf of gas reserves, effectively doubling Colombia`s totals. Exploration near the giant Cusiana-Cupiagua complex, in the eastern foothills of the Andes about 100 miles northeast of Bogota, has turned up an estimated 10 tcf of gas and 1 billion bbl of oil in Volcanera field and two discoveries overlying it, Florena and Pauto Sur. Colombia`s critics say that, despite its laudable economic stability and improving oil and gas prospectivity, political impediments could interfere with progress toward its lofty energy goals. The paper discusses the heightened political risks, unequal pace of reform, gas pipeline construction, gas regulations, tying gas to power, reform in the oil sector, achieving sustainable change, and the appeal to investors.

  14. 47 CFR 73.186 - Establishment of effective field at one kilometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... coordinate paper, plot field strengths as ordinate and distance as abscissa. (ii) Using semi-log coordinate paper, plot field strength times distance as ordinate on the log scale and distance as abscissa on...

  15. 47 CFR 73.186 - Establishment of effective field at one kilometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... coordinate paper, plot field strengths as ordinate and distance as abscissa. (ii) Using semi-log coordinate paper, plot field strength times distance as ordinate on the log scale and distance as abscissa on...

  16. Lung models: strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Martonen, T B; Musante, C J; Segal, R A; Schroeter, J D; Hwang, D; Dolovich, M A; Burton, R; Spencer, R M; Fleming, J S

    2000-06-01

    The most widely used particle dosimetry models are those proposed by the National Council on Radiation Protection, International Commission for Radiological Protection, and the Netherlands National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (the RIVM model). Those models have inherent problems that may be regarded as serious drawbacks: for example, they are not physiologically realistic. They ignore the presence and commensurate effects of naturally occurring structural elements of lungs (eg, cartilaginous rings, carinal ridges), which have been demonstrated to affect the motion of inhaled air. Most importantly, the surface structures have been shown to influence the trajectories of inhaled particles transported by air streams. Thus, the model presented herein by Martonen et al may be perhaps the most appropriate for human lung dosimetry. In its present form, the model's major "strengths" are that it could be used for diverse purposes in medical research and practice, including: to target the delivery of drugs for diseases of the respiratory tract (eg, cystic fibrosis, asthma, bronchogenic carcinoma); to selectively deposit drugs for systemic distribution (eg, insulin); to design clinical studies; to interpret scintigraphy data from human subject exposures; to determine laboratory conditions for animal testing (ie, extrapolation modeling); and to aid in aerosolized drug delivery to children (pediatric medicine). Based on our research, we have found very good agreement between the predictions of our model and the experimental data of Heyder et al, and therefore advocate its use in the clinical arena. In closing, we would note that for the simulations reported herein the data entered into our computer program were the actual conditions of the Heyder et al experiments. However, the deposition model is more versatile and can simulate many aerosol therapy scenarios. For example, the core model has many computer subroutines that can be enlisted to simulate the

  17. It`s material strength, not a negative Grueneisen gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Sinz, K.H.P.H.; Moss, W.C.

    1993-02-01

    Hydrocode simulations of CORRTEX data (shock position as a function of time) require a model for the material properties of the medium in which the explosion occurs. Prior to the BULLION underground nuclear test, Furnish performed gun experiments on core samples that were taken from a satellite hole near the working point. The authors have analyzed some of these data and constructed a constitutive model that is consistent with the gun data. The model consists of a Mie-Grueneisen equation of state that is parameterized using the Hugoniot, a Grueneisen gamma that is only volume dependent, and a pressure dependent strength model. Previous analyses of these particular experiments have ignored material strength, because of its lack of influence on numerical simulations of the CORRTEX data. However, if strength is excluded, negative gammas are required to fit Furnish`s data, but these negative gammas give an extremely poor fit to the CORRTEX field data. The simple model, which includes strength, has a positive volume dependent gamma. The model fits Furnish`s laboratory data and the measured experimental CORRTEX data. What is remarkable about the model is that all of the parameters in it can be obtained from the gun data, indicating that laboratory experiments of this type (and perhaps others) on core samples are potentially more useful than believed previously.

  18. Hand Grip Strength Vs. Sprint Effectiveness in Amputee Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, Marta; Wiliński, Wojciech; Struzik, Artur; Rokita, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Amputee soccer is one of the types of soccer designed for the disabled, especially those who have undergone amputations, as well as those with extremity dysfunction. The objective of the study was to find the relationship between hand grip strength and sprint time in amputee soccer players. Thirteen field amputee soccer players participated in the study. A SAEHAN hydraulic hand dynamometer manufactured by Jamar was used for hand grip strength measurements. The sprint running test was conducted over a distance of 30 m. The Fusion Smart Speed System was employed for running time measurements. No statistically significant relationships were found between hand grip strength of the left or right hand, and sprint times over 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 m. Analysis of the running velocity curve of the subjects showed an interesting profile characterized by a 15 meter-long acceleration phase and a significant velocity increase over a distance of 20 – 25 m. The study suggests that there is no relationship between hand grip strength and sprint effectiveness in amputee soccer players. The specificity of locomotion with the use of elbow crutches among elite Polish amputee soccer players probably accounts for the profile of the sprint velocity curve. Extension of the acceleration phase in the sprint run and a velocity increase in the subsequent part of the run were observed. PMID:26834881

  19. Functionalization enhancement on interfacial shear strength between graphene and polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yikuang; Duan, Fangli; Mu, Xiaojing

    2016-11-01

    Pull-out processes were simulated to investigate the interfacial mechanical properties between the functionalized graphene sheet (FGS) and polyethylene (PE) matrix by using molecular dynamics simulation with ReaxFF reactive force field. The interfacial structure of polymer and the interfacial interaction in the equilibrium FGS/PE systems were also analyzed to reveal the enhancement mechanism of interfacial shear strength. We observed the insertion of functional groups into polymer layer in the equilibrium FGS/PE systems. During the pull-out process, some interfacial chains were attached on the FGS and pulled out from the polymer matrix. The behavior of these pulled out chains was further analyzed to clarify the different traction action of functional groups applied on them. The results show that the traction effect of functional groups on the pulled-out chains is agreement with their enhancement influence on the interfacial shear strength of the FGS/PE systems. They both are basically dominated by the size of functional groups, suggesting the enhancement mechanism of mechanical interlocking. However, interfacial binding strength also exhibits an obvious influence on the interfacial shear properties of the hybrid system. Our simulation show that geometric constrains at the interface is the principal contributor to the enhancement of interfacial shear strength in the FGS/PE systems, which could be further strengthened by the wrinkled morphology of graphene in experiments.

  20. Hand Grip Strength Vs. Sprint Effectiveness in Amputee Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Marta; Wiliński, Wojciech; Struzik, Artur; Rokita, Andrzej

    2015-11-22

    Amputee soccer is one of the types of soccer designed for the disabled, especially those who have undergone amputations, as well as those with extremity dysfunction. The objective of the study was to find the relationship between hand grip strength and sprint time in amputee soccer players. Thirteen field amputee soccer players participated in the study. A SAEHAN hydraulic hand dynamometer manufactured by Jamar was used for hand grip strength measurements. The sprint running test was conducted over a distance of 30 m. The Fusion Smart Speed System was employed for running time measurements. No statistically significant relationships were found between hand grip strength of the left or right hand, and sprint times over 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 m. Analysis of the running velocity curve of the subjects showed an interesting profile characterized by a 15 meter-long acceleration phase and a significant velocity increase over a distance of 20 - 25 m. The study suggests that there is no relationship between hand grip strength and sprint effectiveness in amputee soccer players. The specificity of locomotion with the use of elbow crutches among elite Polish amputee soccer players probably accounts for the profile of the sprint velocity curve. Extension of the acceleration phase in the sprint run and a velocity increase in the subsequent part of the run were observed.

  1. Hand Grip Strength Vs. Sprint Effectiveness in Amputee Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Marta; Wiliński, Wojciech; Struzik, Artur; Rokita, Andrzej

    2015-11-22

    Amputee soccer is one of the types of soccer designed for the disabled, especially those who have undergone amputations, as well as those with extremity dysfunction. The objective of the study was to find the relationship between hand grip strength and sprint time in amputee soccer players. Thirteen field amputee soccer players participated in the study. A SAEHAN hydraulic hand dynamometer manufactured by Jamar was used for hand grip strength measurements. The sprint running test was conducted over a distance of 30 m. The Fusion Smart Speed System was employed for running time measurements. No statistically significant relationships were found between hand grip strength of the left or right hand, and sprint times over 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 m. Analysis of the running velocity curve of the subjects showed an interesting profile characterized by a 15 meter-long acceleration phase and a significant velocity increase over a distance of 20 - 25 m. The study suggests that there is no relationship between hand grip strength and sprint effectiveness in amputee soccer players. The specificity of locomotion with the use of elbow crutches among elite Polish amputee soccer players probably accounts for the profile of the sprint velocity curve. Extension of the acceleration phase in the sprint run and a velocity increase in the subsequent part of the run were observed. PMID:26834881

  2. Probabilistic Modeling of Ceramic Matrix Composite Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shan, Ashwin R.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mital, Subodh K.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1998-01-01

    Uncertainties associated with the primitive random variables such as manufacturing process (processing temperature, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio), constituent properties (fiber, matrix and interface), and geometric parameters (ply thickness, interphase thickness) have been simulated to quantify the scatter in the first matrix cracking strength (FMCS) and the ultimate tensile strength of SCS-6/RBSN (SiC fiber (SCS-6) reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride composite) ceramic matrix composite laminate at room temperature. Cumulative probability distribution function for the FMCS and ultimate tensile strength at room temperature (RT) of (0)(sub 8), (0(sub 2)/90(sub 2), and (+/-45(sub 2))(sub S) laminates have been simulated and the sensitivity of primitive variables to the respective strengths have been quantified. Computationally predicted scatter of the strengths for a uniaxial laminate have been compared with those from limited experimental data. Also the experimental procedure used in the tests has been described briefly. Results show a very good agreement between the computational simulation and the experimental data. Dominating failure modes in (0)(sub 8), (0/90)(sub s) and (+/-45)(sub S) laminates have been identified. Results indicate that the first matrix cracking strength for the (0)(sub S), and (0/90)(sub S) laminates is sensitive to the thermal properties, modulus and strengths of both the fiber and matrix whereas the ultimate tensile strength is sensitive to the fiber strength and the fiber volume ratio. In the case of a (+/-45)(sub S), laminate, both the FMCS and the ultimate tensile strengths have a small scatter range and are sensitive to the fiber tensile strength as well as the fiber volume ratio.

  3. A review of floc strength and breakage.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, P; Jefferson, B; Gregory, J; Parsons, S A

    2005-09-01

    The main focus of the paper is to review current understanding of floc structure and strength. This has been done by reviewing current theoretical understanding of floc growth and breakage and an analysis of different techniques used for measuring floc strength. An overview has also been made of the general trends seen in floc strength analysis. The rate of floc formation is a balance between breakage and aggregation with flocs eventually reaching a steady-state size for a given shear rate. The steady-state floc size for a particular shear rate can, therefore, be a good indicator of floc strength. This has resulted in the development of a range of techniques to measure floc size at different applied shear levels using a combination of one or more of the following tools: light scattering and transmission; microscopy; photography; video and image analysis software. Floc strength may be simply quantified using the initial floc size for a given shear rate and the floc strength factor. More complex techniques have used theoretical modelling to determine whether flocs break by large-scale fragmentation or smaller-scale surface erosion effects, although this interpretation is open to debate. Impeller-based mixing, ultrasound and vibrating columns have all been used to provide a uniform, accurate and controllable dissipation of energy onto a floc suspension to determine floc strength. Other more recent techniques have used sensitive micromanipulators to measure the force required to break or compress individual flocs, although these techniques have been limited to the measurement of only a few hundred flocs. General trends emerge showing that smaller flocs tend to have greater strength than larger flocs, whilst the use of polymer seems to give increased strength to only some types of floc. Finally, a comparison of the strength of different types of floc (activated sludge flocs, organic matter flocs, sweep flocs and charge neutralised flocs) has been made highlighting

  4. Inferring the spatial variation of the wedge strength based on a modified critical taper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C.; Liu, H.; Hsieh, Y.; Dong, J.

    2013-12-01

    Critical taper wedge theory has been widely applied to evaluate the strength of the detachment fault and the wedge by measuring taper angle. Traditional taper model, which incorporated constant cohesion and friction angle, fails to explain the lateral variation of the taper angle. A modified critical taper model adopting nonlinear Hoek-Brown failure criterion is proposed accordingly. The fold-and-thrust belt of central Taiwan was studied. Based on the field works and laboratory tests, the geological strength index (GSI) and the uniaxial compressive strength were obtained and the wedge strength can be estimated accordingly. The GSI values from investigation are decreased from the west to the east along the cross section due to the wedge strength heterogeneity. The uniaxial compressive strength of intact rock varies from the age of formation and lithology. The estimated wedge strength exhibits a strong spatial variation. The strength of the detachment fault was derived from rotary shear tests using fault gouge materials under different velocities and normal stresses. General speaking, the steady-state friction coefficient are about 0.29-0.46 when the shear velocity less than 0.1 m/s. The friction coefficient is not sensitive to the normal stress. Consequently, the lateral variation of the taper angle, which calculated by modified critical taper model, is mainly dominated by the wedge strength heterogeneity and the thickening of the wedge from the west to the east.

  5. Maximal Strength Testing in Healthy Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Milliken, Laurie A.; Westcott, Wayne L.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluated the safety and efficacy of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) strength testing in healthy children age 6-12 years. Data were collected on 96 children who performed a 1RM test on one upper body and one lower body exercise using child-sized weight machines. Findings indicated that children could safely perform 1RM strength tests provided…

  6. Oxide driven strength evolution of silicon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Zehnder, Alan T.; Milosevic, Erik; Boyce, Brad L.

    2015-11-21

    Previous experiments have shown a link between oxidation and strength changes in single crystal silicon nanostructures but provided no clues as to the mechanisms leading to this relationship. Using atomic force microscope-based fracture strength experiments, molecular dynamics modeling, and measurement of oxide development with angle resolved x-ray spectroscopy we study the evolution of strength of silicon (111) surfaces as they oxidize and with fully developed oxide layers. We find that strength drops with partial oxidation but recovers when a fully developed oxide is formed and that surfaces intentionally oxidized from the start maintain their high initial strengths. MD simulations show that strength decreases with the height of atomic layer steps on the surface. These results are corroborated by a completely separate line of testing using micro-scale, polysilicon devices, and the slack chain method in which strength recovers over a long period of exposure to the atmosphere. Combining our results with insights from prior experiments we conclude that previously described strength decrease is a result of oxidation induced roughening of an initially flat silicon (1 1 1) surface and that this effect is transient, a result consistent with the observation that surfaces flatten upon full oxidation.

  7. The Strengths Perspective: Fortigenesis in Adult Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strumpfer, D. J. W.

    2006-01-01

    "Fortigenesis" (L. fortis=strong) refers to a process of developing strengths at a variety of endpoints. Assumptions are: (i) there exist 2 continua, of mental illness and mental health, along which waxing and waning in the process of fortigenesis moves individuals in the directions of more or less strength; (ii) challenge, struggling and…

  8. Static Material Strength Determined Using a DAC

    SciTech Connect

    Cynn, H; Evans, W; Klepeis, J P; Lipp, M; Liermann, P; Yang, W

    2009-06-04

    By measuring sample thickness and pressure gradient using x-ray absorption and x-ray diffraction, respectively, the accurate static yield strengths of Ta and Fe were determined at high pressure. This improved method has several advantages over other similar methods to quantitatively determine static material strength.

  9. 46 CFR 127.420 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Strength. 127.420 Section 127.420 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Construction of Windows, Visibility, and Operability of Coverings § 127.420 Strength. Each window or...

  10. 46 CFR 177.1020 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Strength. 177.1020 Section 177.1020 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Window Construction and Visibility § 177.1020 Strength. Each window, port hole, and its means...

  11. 46 CFR 177.1020 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Strength. 177.1020 Section 177.1020 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Window Construction and Visibility § 177.1020 Strength. Each window, port hole, and its means...

  12. 46 CFR 127.420 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Strength. 127.420 Section 127.420 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Construction of Windows, Visibility, and Operability of Coverings § 127.420 Strength. Each window or...

  13. 46 CFR 177.1020 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Strength. 177.1020 Section 177.1020 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Window Construction and Visibility § 177.1020 Strength. Each window, port hole, and its means...

  14. 46 CFR 127.420 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Strength. 127.420 Section 127.420 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Construction of Windows, Visibility, and Operability of Coverings § 127.420 Strength. Each window or...

  15. 46 CFR 127.420 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Strength. 127.420 Section 127.420 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Construction of Windows, Visibility, and Operability of Coverings § 127.420 Strength. Each window or...

  16. 46 CFR 177.1020 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Strength. 177.1020 Section 177.1020 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Window Construction and Visibility § 177.1020 Strength. Each window, port hole, and its means...

  17. 46 CFR 116.1020 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Strength. 116.1020 Section 116.1020 Shipping COAST GUARD... OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Window Construction and Visibility § 116.1020 Strength. Each window, port hole, and its means of attachment to the hull or deck...

  18. 46 CFR 116.1020 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Strength. 116.1020 Section 116.1020 Shipping COAST GUARD... OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Window Construction and Visibility § 116.1020 Strength. Each window, port hole, and its means of attachment to the hull or deck...

  19. 46 CFR 116.1020 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Strength. 116.1020 Section 116.1020 Shipping COAST GUARD... OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Window Construction and Visibility § 116.1020 Strength. Each window, port hole, and its means of attachment to the hull or deck...

  20. 46 CFR 127.420 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Strength. 127.420 Section 127.420 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Construction of Windows, Visibility, and Operability of Coverings § 127.420 Strength. Each window or...

  1. 46 CFR 177.1020 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Strength. 177.1020 Section 177.1020 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Window Construction and Visibility § 177.1020 Strength. Each window, port hole, and its means...

  2. Strength Development and Motor-Sports Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1974-01-01

    This document examines the effects of strength-development programs on the improvement of motor skills and sports competencies. Part one defines various terms used throughout the development studies. Part two discusses the mixed results of experiments involving speed of movement as the motor item indicative of strength development. Part three…

  3. 7 CFR 29.6040 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.6040 Section 29.6040 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6040 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco...

  4. 7 CFR 29.6040 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.6040 Section 29.6040 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6040 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco...

  5. The Strengths Revolution: A Positive Psychology Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Christopher Peterson received the Circle of Courage Award and made the following address in a symposium on "The Strength-Based Revolution" at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan (Peterson & Brendtro, 2008). Dr. Peterson shared personal reflections on the strengths movement, which is transforming youth development. His presentation shows…

  6. Strength Training, Not Only for the Young.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munnings, Frances

    1993-01-01

    Research indicates that increased strength leads to improved balance and functional mobility and that nearly every senior patient can benefit from basic resistance training. The article provides guidelines for physicians on prescribing resistance training and for patients on increasing strength. (SM)

  7. Asymmetry of Muscle Strength in Elite Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drid, Patrik; Drapsin, Miodrag; Trivic, Tatjana; Lukac, Damir; Obadov, Slavko; Milosevic, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    "Study aim": To determine muscle strength variables in elite judoists and wrestlers since thigh muscle strength and bilaterally balanced flexor-to-extensor ratio minimise injury risk and are desirable for achieving sport successes. "Material and methods": Judoists, wrestlers and untrained subjects, 10 each, were subjected to isokinetic strength…

  8. 46 CFR 160.017-17 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Strength. 160.017-17 Section 160.017-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Chain Ladder § 160.017-17 Strength. (a) Each chain ladder...

  9. 46 CFR 160.017-17 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Strength. 160.017-17 Section 160.017-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Chain Ladder § 160.017-17 Strength. (a) Each chain ladder...

  10. 46 CFR 163.003-17 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Strength. 163.003-17 Section 163.003-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL CONSTRUCTION Pilot Ladder § 163.003-17 Strength. (a) Each pilot ladder must...

  11. 46 CFR 160.017-17 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Strength. 160.017-17 Section 160.017-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Chain Ladder § 160.017-17 Strength. (a) Each chain ladder...

  12. 46 CFR 160.017-17 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Strength. 160.017-17 Section 160.017-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Chain Ladder § 160.017-17 Strength. (a) Each chain ladder...

  13. 46 CFR 163.003-17 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Strength. 163.003-17 Section 163.003-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL CONSTRUCTION Pilot Ladder § 163.003-17 Strength. (a) Each pilot ladder must...

  14. 46 CFR 163.003-17 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Strength. 163.003-17 Section 163.003-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL CONSTRUCTION Pilot Ladder § 163.003-17 Strength. (a) Each pilot ladder must...

  15. 46 CFR 163.003-17 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Strength. 163.003-17 Section 163.003-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL CONSTRUCTION Pilot Ladder § 163.003-17 Strength. (a) Each pilot ladder must...

  16. 46 CFR 163.003-17 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Strength. 163.003-17 Section 163.003-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL CONSTRUCTION Pilot Ladder § 163.003-17 Strength. (a) Each pilot ladder must...

  17. 46 CFR 160.017-17 - Strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Strength. 160.017-17 Section 160.017-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Chain Ladder § 160.017-17 Strength. (a) Each chain ladder...

  18. The genetic architecture of maize stalk strength

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stalk strength is an important trait in maize (Zea mays L.). Strong stalks reduce lodging and maximize harvestable yield. Studies show rind penetrometer resistance (RPR), or the force required to pierce a stalk rind with a spike, is a valid approximation of strength. We measured RPR across 4,892 rec...

  19. Effects of Directional Exercise on Lingual Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heather M.; O'Brien, Katy; Calleja, Aimee; Corrie, Sarah Newcomb

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the application of known muscle training principles to tongue strengthening exercises and to answer the following research questions: (a) Did lingual strength increase following 9 weeks of training? (b) Did training conducted using an exercise moving the tongue in one direction result in strength changes for tongue movements in…

  20. Magnetic fields and coronal heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.; Maxson, C.; Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.; Serio, S.

    1980-01-01

    General considerations concerning the scaling properties of magnetic-field-related coronal heating mechanisms are used to build a two-parameter model for the heating of closed coronal regions. The model predicts the way in which coronal temperature and electron density are related to photospheric magnetic field strength and the size of the region, using the additional constraint provided by the scaling law of Rosner, Tucker, and Vaiana. The model duplicates the observed scaling of total thermal energy content with total longitudinal flux; it also predicts a relation between the coronal energy density (or pressure) and the longitudinal field strength modified by the region scale size.