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Sample records for 4-hour cocaine infusion

  1. Tolerance to cocaine in brain stimulation reward following continuous cocaine infusions.

    PubMed

    Pudiak, Cindy M; KuoLee, Rhonda; Bozarth, Michael A

    2014-07-01

    This study examined tolerance to cocaine's threshold-lowering effect in brain stimulation reward (BSR) following continuous cocaine infusions and secondly, used the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) to determine NO's involvement in the development of cocaine tolerance. Animals were continuously infused with saline or cocaine (30 mg/kg per day) via osmotic minipump for 14 days and injected daily with saline or L-NAME (30 mg/kg, i.p.) following BSR testing. Saline-treated animals continuously infused with saline showed stable BSR thresholds across the 14-day infusion period. Saline-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine showed markedly lowered BSR thresholds on Day 1 followed by a progressive increase in BSR thresholds across the infusion period - indicating the development of tolerance. L-NAME-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine showed stimulation thresholds that were not significantly different from saline-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine. A cocaine challenge injection (10 mg/kg, i.p.) administered 3 and again at 10 days following minipump removal revealed that saline-treated animals continuously infused with saline showed lowered BSR thresholds. Saline-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine displayed lowered BSR thresholds that were not significantly different from saline-infused animals. L-NAME treated animals continuously infused with cocaine showed higher BSR thresholds to a challenge 3 days following pump removal. However, stimulation thresholds for this group failed to reach statistical significance on both days (i.e., Days 3 and 10) following pump removal. Results showed that animals continuously infused with cocaine develop robust tolerance to cocaine's threshold-lowering effect during the 14-day infusion period. Tolerance to cocaine's threshold-lowering effect was short-lived and dissipated soon after minipump removal. L-NAME treatment failed to significantly

  2. Lethal toxicity from equimolar infusions of cocaine and cocaine metabolites in conscious and anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Mets, B; Virag, L

    1995-11-01

    We compared the lethal toxicity of cocaine with that of three of its metabolites to determine the contribution of these metabolites to the lethal potential from cocaine infusion. Equimolar quantities of cocaine, norcocaine, benzoylecgonine, and ecgonine methyl ester were infused in conscious rats to determine onset of convulsions and respiratory arrest. In addition, the convulsive and respiratory toxicity for cocaine and norcocaine were evaluated in anesthetized rats and their circulatory toxicity in anesthetized and ventilated rats. Norcocaine infusion resulted in earlier onset of convulsions and respiratory arrest in conscious rats than cocaine and earlier onset of circulatory arrest. Plasma concentrations of norcocaine and cocaine were not different at these times. Benzoylecgonine and ecgonine methyl ester were less potent convulsants and respiratory depressants than norcocaine and cocaine, with ecgonine methyl ester more respiratory depressant than benzoylecgonine. Pentobarbital anesthesia enhanced the respiratory depression and suppressed or delayed the onset of convulsions from norcocaine and cocaine infusion. Prolonged infusion of cocaine to circulatory arrest resulted in benzoylecgonine concentrations approximately 60%, and norcocaine concentrations approximately 5%, of the cocaine concentration, but no detectable ecgonine methyl ester formation. We conclude that although norcocaine, ecgonine methyl ester, and benzoylecgonine administered separately have lethal potential in massive dosages, death from cocaine overdose primarily results from the parent compound and not from metabolite formation.

  3. Effects of 4 hours magnesium sulfate infusion on fetal heart rate variability and reactivity in a goat model.

    PubMed

    Sameshima, H; Ikenoue, T; Kamitomo, M; Sakamoto, H

    1998-01-01

    Effects of magnesium sulfate were investigated on fetal heart rate (FHR) baseline, variability, and reactivity in goats. Six chronically catheterized fetuses of Japanese Saanen goat at 125 to 130 days' gestation (term = 147 days) were used. Magnesium sulfate was directly infused to the fetuses. Short-term variability and long-term variability were obtained according to Huey et al. The baseline, reactivity, short-term variability and long-term variability of the FHR were compared between those receiving magnesium sulfate infusions and those receiving vehicle infusions without magnesium sulfate for 4 hr. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's multiple range test was applied for statistical significance. Four hours magnesium sulfate infusion significantly increased fetal plasma concentration of magnesium from 2.4-6.6 mg/dL, without significant changes in fetal respiratory gases and pH values. The baseline FHR was significantly decreased by magnesium infusion compared with that receiving vehicle infusion. The incidence of acceleration, short-term variability, and long-term variability during the fourth hour of magnesium infusion was also significantly decreased compared to a controlled infusion. The time spent by high amplitude phase of short-term variability and that of long-term variability were also significantly reduced. Significant correlation was obtained between the magnesium concentration and incidence of acceleration at fourth hour of magnesium infusion. Four hours infusion of magnesium sulfate significantly decreases baseline FHR, short-term variability, long-term variability, and reactivity in fetal goats at 0.85 gestation.

  4. A Single Intra-PFC Infusion of BDNF Prevents Cocaine-Induced Alterations in Extracellular Glutamate within the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Berglind, William J.; Whitfield, Timothy W.; LaLumiere, Ryan T.; Kalivas, Peter W.; McGinty, Jacqueline F.

    2009-01-01

    The glutamatergic pathway arising in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) and projecting to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core is a critical component of the reward circuitry that underlies reinstatement to cocaine-seeking behavior. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is expressed by and modulates PFC-NAc neurons. BDNF infusion into the dmPFC attenuates reinstatement to cocaine-seeking behavior as well as some cocaine-induced molecular adaptations within the NAc. In the present study, it is demonstrated that a single intra-dmPFC infusion of BDNF prevents cocaine self administration-induced reduction in basal extracelluar glutamate, as well as cocaine prime-induced increases in extracellular glutamate levels within the NAc. These data suggest that intra-PFC BDNF attenuates reinstatement to cocaine-seeking behavior by normalizing cocaine-induced neuroadaptations that alter glutamate neurotransmission within the NAc. PMID:19321768

  5. Addition of n-3 fatty acids to a 4-hour lipid infusion does not affect insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, or markers of oxidative stress in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mostad, Ingrid L; Bjerve, Kristian S; Basu, Samar; Sutton, Pauline; Frayn, Keith N; Grill, Valdemar

    2009-12-01

    Fatty acids (FA) can impair glucose metabolism to a varying degree depending on time of exposure and also of type of FA. Here we tested for acute effects of marine n-3 FA on insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, energy metabolism, and oxidative stress. This was a randomized, double-blind, crossover study in 11 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A 4-hour lipid infusion (Intralipid [Fresenius Kabi, Halden, Norway], total of 384 mL) was compared with a similar lipid infusion partly replaced by Omegaven (Fresenius Kabi) that contributed a median of 0.1 g fish oil per kilogram body weight, amounting to 0.04 g/kg of marine n-3 FA. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by isoglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps; insulin secretion (measured after the clamps), by C-peptide glucagon tests; and energy metabolism, by indirect calorimetry. Infusion of Omegaven increased the proportion of n-3 FA in plasma nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) compared with Intralipid alone (20:5n-3: median, 1.5% [interquartile range, 0.6%] vs -0.2% [0.2%], P = .001; 22:6n-3: 0.8% [0.4%] vs -0.7% [0.2%], P = .001). However, glucose utilization was not affected; neither was insulin secretion or total energy production (P = .966, .210, and .423, respectively, for the differences between the lipid clamps). Omegaven tended to lower oxidation of fat (P = .062) compared with Intralipid only, correlating with the rise in individual n-3 NEFA (r = 0.627, P = .039). The effects of clamping on phospholipid FA composition, leptin, adiponectin, or F(2)-isoprostane concentrations were not affected by Omegaven. Enrichment of NEFA with n-3 FA during a 4-hour infusion of Intralipid failed to affect insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, or markers of oxidative stress in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  6. Cocaine but not natural reward self-administration nor passive cocaine infusion produces persistent LTP in the VTA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Billy T.; Bowers, M. Scott; Martin, Miquel; Hopf, F. Woodward; Gilroy, Anitra M.; Carelli, Regina M.; Chou, Jonathan K.; Bonci, Antonello

    2008-01-01

    Summary Persistent drug-seeking behavior is hypothesized to co-opt the brain's natural reward-motivational system. Although ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons represent a crucial component of this system, the synaptic adaptations underlying natural rewards and drug-related motivation have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that self-administration of cocaine, but not passive cocaine infusions, produced a persistent potentiation of VTA excitatory synapses, which was still present after 3 months abstinence. Further, enhanced synaptic function in VTA was evident even after 3 weeks of extinction training. Food or sucrose self-administration induced only a transient potentiation of VTA glutamatergic signaling. Our data show that synaptic function in VTA DA neurons is readily but reversibly enhanced by natural reward-seeking behavior, while voluntary cocaine self-administration induced a persistent synaptic enhancement that is resistant to behavioral extinction. Such persistent synaptic potentiation in VTA DA neurons may represent a fundamental cellular phenomenon driving pathological drug-seeking behavior. PMID:18667156

  7. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cocaine KidsHealth > For Teens > Cocaine Print A A A ... How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Cocaine What Is Cocaine? Cocaine is a powerful and highly addictive drug ...

  8. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... DEA Press Room » Multi-Media Library » Image Gallery » Cocaine COCAINE To Save Images: First click on the thumbnail ... your Save in directory and then click Save. Cocaine Crack Cocaine RESOURCE CENTER Controlled Substances Act DEA ...

  9. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Share Print Home » Drugs of Abuse » Cocaine Cocaine Email Facebook Twitter Brief Description Cocaine is a ... NIDA for Teens: Stimulants NIDA Therapy Manuals for Cocaine Addiction (Archives): Manual 1: A Cognitive-Behavioral Approach: ...

  10. Cocaine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piazza, Nick J.; Yeager, Rebecca D.

    Cocaine was first used by Europeans in the nineteenth century when extract from the coca leaf was combined with various beverages. Cocaine comes as a white crystalline powder. However, a product called crack cocaine may come as an opaque crystal similar in size and shape to rock salt. A third form of cocaine is known as coca paste, which is an…

  11. A Single Amphetamine Infusion Reverses Deficits in Dopamine Nerve-Terminal Function Caused by a History of Cocaine Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Mark J; Calipari, Erin S; Rose, Jamie H; Siciliano, Cody A; Sun, Haiguo; Chen, Rong; Jones, Sara R

    2015-01-01

    There are ∼1.6 million people who meet the criteria for cocaine addiction in the United States, and there are currently no FDA-approved pharmacotherapies. Amphetamine-based dopamine-releasing drugs have shown efficacy in reducing the motivation to self-administer cocaine and reducing intake in animals and humans. It is hypothesized that amphetamine acts as a replacement therapy for cocaine through elevation of extracellular dopamine levels. Using voltammetry in brain slices, we tested the ability of a single amphetamine infusion in vivo to modulate dopamine release, uptake kinetics, and cocaine potency in cocaine-naive animals and after a history of cocaine self-administration (1.5 mg/kg/infusion, fixed-ratio 1, 40 injections/day × 5 days). Dopamine kinetics were measured 1 and 24 h after amphetamine infusion (0.56 mg/kg, i.v.). Following cocaine self-administration, dopamine release, maximal rate of uptake (Vmax), and membrane-associated dopamine transporter (DAT) levels were reduced, and the DAT was less sensitive to cocaine. A single amphetamine infusion reduced Vmax and membrane DAT levels in cocaine-naive animals, but fully restored all aspects of dopamine terminal function in cocaine self-administering animals. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate pharmacologically induced, immediate rescue of deficits in dopamine nerve-terminal function in animals with a history of high-dose cocaine self-administration. This observation supports the notion that the DAT expression and function can be modulated on a rapid timescale and also suggests that the pharmacotherapeutic actions of amphetamine for cocaine addiction go beyond that of replacement therapy. PMID:25689882

  12. A Single Amphetamine Infusion Reverses Deficits in Dopamine Nerve-Terminal Function Caused by a History of Cocaine Self-Administration.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Mark J; Calipari, Erin S; Rose, Jamie H; Siciliano, Cody A; Sun, Haiguo; Chen, Rong; Jones, Sara R

    2015-07-01

    There are ∼ 1.6 million people who meet the criteria for cocaine addiction in the United States, and there are currently no FDA-approved pharmacotherapies. Amphetamine-based dopamine-releasing drugs have shown efficacy in reducing the motivation to self-administer cocaine and reducing intake in animals and humans. It is hypothesized that amphetamine acts as a replacement therapy for cocaine through elevation of extracellular dopamine levels. Using voltammetry in brain slices, we tested the ability of a single amphetamine infusion in vivo to modulate dopamine release, uptake kinetics, and cocaine potency in cocaine-naive animals and after a history of cocaine self-administration (1.5 mg/kg/infusion, fixed-ratio 1, 40 injections/day × 5 days). Dopamine kinetics were measured 1 and 24 h after amphetamine infusion (0.56 mg/kg, i.v.). Following cocaine self-administration, dopamine release, maximal rate of uptake (Vmax), and membrane-associated dopamine transporter (DAT) levels were reduced, and the DAT was less sensitive to cocaine. A single amphetamine infusion reduced Vmax and membrane DAT levels in cocaine-naive animals, but fully restored all aspects of dopamine terminal function in cocaine self-administering animals. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate pharmacologically induced, immediate rescue of deficits in dopamine nerve-terminal function in animals with a history of high-dose cocaine self-administration. This observation supports the notion that the DAT expression and function can be modulated on a rapid timescale and also suggests that the pharmacotherapeutic actions of amphetamine for cocaine addiction go beyond that of replacement therapy. PMID:25689882

  13. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    Cocaine is a white powder. It can be snorted up the nose or mixed with water and injected with a needle. Cocaine can also be made into small white rocks, ... Crack is smoked in a small glass pipe. Cocaine speeds up your whole body. You may feel ...

  14. Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ravindra; Wagner, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine abuse is commonly associated with myocardial ischemia, mesenteric ischemia, and cerebrovascular accidents. Renal infarction is an uncommon complication of cocaine abuse. Various mechanisms have been postulated for this cocaine-related injury. There are only 15 cases reported on cocaine-induced renal infarction. Among the cases with available data, very few cases had left kidney involvement. We report a case of a 65-year-old African American man with history of cocaine abuse who presented with left flank pain and had left renal infarction. PMID:26425633

  15. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... the neurotransmitter in the brain. It is this flood of dopamine that causes cocaine’s high. The drug ... Articles: Stimulants Research Report Series: Cocaine Statistics and Trends NIDA: DrugFacts: High School and Youth Trends Centers ...

  16. Short-term abstinence from cocaine self-administration, but not passive cocaine infusion, elevates αCaMKII autophosphorylation in the rat nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Caffino, Lucia; Cassina, Chiara; Giannotti, Giuseppe; Orrù, Alessandro; Moro, Federico; Di Clemente, Angelo; Racagni, Giorgio; Fumagalli, Fabio; Cervo, Luigi

    2014-02-01

    Increases in alpha calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II (αCaMKII) activity in the nucleus accumbens shell has been proposed as a core component in the motivation to self-administer cocaine and in priming-induced drug-seeking. Since cocaine withdrawal promotes drug-seeking, we hypothesized that abstinence from cocaine self-administration should enhance αCaMKII as well. We found that short-term abstinence from contingent, but not non-contingent, cocaine i.v. self-administration (2 h/d for 14 d; 0.25 mg/0.1 ml, 6 s infusion) elevates αCaMKII autophosphorylation, but not the kinase expression, in a dynamic, time- and brain region-dependent manner. Increased αCaMKII autophosphorylation in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), but not dorsolateral striatum (dlS), was found 24 h, but not immediately, after the last cocaine self-administration session. Notably, in the mPFC, but not NAc and dlS, αCaMKII autophosphorylation was still enhanced 7 d later. The persistent enhancement in the mPFC of abstinent rats may represent a previously unappreciated contribution to initial incubation of cocaine-seeking. PMID:23953174

  17. Short-term abstinence from cocaine self-administration, but not passive cocaine infusion, elevates αCaMKII autophosphorylation in the rat nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Caffino, Lucia; Cassina, Chiara; Giannotti, Giuseppe; Orrù, Alessandro; Moro, Federico; Di Clemente, Angelo; Racagni, Giorgio; Fumagalli, Fabio; Cervo, Luigi

    2014-02-01

    Increases in alpha calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II (αCaMKII) activity in the nucleus accumbens shell has been proposed as a core component in the motivation to self-administer cocaine and in priming-induced drug-seeking. Since cocaine withdrawal promotes drug-seeking, we hypothesized that abstinence from cocaine self-administration should enhance αCaMKII as well. We found that short-term abstinence from contingent, but not non-contingent, cocaine i.v. self-administration (2 h/d for 14 d; 0.25 mg/0.1 ml, 6 s infusion) elevates αCaMKII autophosphorylation, but not the kinase expression, in a dynamic, time- and brain region-dependent manner. Increased αCaMKII autophosphorylation in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), but not dorsolateral striatum (dlS), was found 24 h, but not immediately, after the last cocaine self-administration session. Notably, in the mPFC, but not NAc and dlS, αCaMKII autophosphorylation was still enhanced 7 d later. The persistent enhancement in the mPFC of abstinent rats may represent a previously unappreciated contribution to initial incubation of cocaine-seeking.

  18. A Single Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Infusion into the Dorsomedial Prefrontal Cortex Attenuates Cocaine Self-Administration-Induced Phosphorylation of Synapsin in the Nucleus Accumbens during Early Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei-Lun; Eisenstein, Sarah A.; Zelek-Molik, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysregulation in the prefrontal cortex-nucleus accumbens pathway has been implicated in cocaine addiction. We have previously demonstrated that one intra-dorsomedial prefrontal cortex brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) infusion immediately following the last cocaine self-administration session caused a long-lasting inhibition of cocaine-seeking and normalized the cocaine-induced disturbance of glutamate transmission in the nucleus accumbens after extinction and a cocaine prime. However, the molecular mechanism mediating the brain-derived neurotrophic factor effect on cocaine-induced alterations in extracellular glutamate levels is unknown. Methods: In the present study, we determined the effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on cocaine-induced changes in the phosphorylation of synapsin (p-synapsin), a family of presynaptic proteins that mediate synaptic vesicle mobilization, in the nucleus accumbens during early withdrawal. Results: Two hours after cocaine self-administration, p-synapsin Ser9 and p-synapsin Ser62/67, but not p-synapsin Ser603, were increased in the nucleus accumbens. At 22 hours, only p-synapsin Ser9 was still elevated. Elevations at both time points were attenuated by an intra-dorsomedial prefrontal cortex brain-derived neurotrophic factor infusion immediately after the end of cocaine self-administration. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor also reduced cocaine self-administration withdrawal-induced phosphorylation of the protein phosphatase 2A C-subunit, suggesting that brain-derived neurotrophic factor disinhibits protein phosphatase 2A C-subunit, consistent with p-synapsin Ser9 dephosphorylation. Further, co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2A C-subunit and synapsin are associated in a protein-protein complex that was reduced after 2 hours of withdrawal from cocaine self-administration and reversed by brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Conclusions: Taken together, these findings demonstrate that

  19. Differential antagonism of cocaine self-administration and cocaine-induced disruptions of learning by haloperidol in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Winsauer, Peter J; Moerschbaecher, Joseph M; Roussell, Alison M

    2008-03-01

    Six rhesus monkeys responding under a three-component multiple schedule were administered haloperidol to determine its effects on cocaine self-administration and on cocaine's disruptive effects on the repeated acquisition and performance of response chains. In the absence of haloperidol, 0.0032-0.032 mg/kg/infusion of cocaine increased response rate and the number of infusions in the self-administration component when compared to saline administration, whereas 0.1-0.32 mg/kg/infusion decreased response rate and the number of infusions. When compared to saline administration, the two lowest infusion doses of cocaine had little or no effect on responding in the acquisition and performance components; however, higher infusion doses of cocaine dose-dependently decreased response rate in these components. In addition, the higher doses of cocaine also increased the percentage of errors in the acquisition and performance components. Pretreatment with haloperidol (0.0032 or 0.01 mg/kg, i.m.) antagonized the effects of low doses of cocaine on the number of infusions in the self-administration component, whereas only the 0.01-mg/kg dose antagonized the effects of high doses of cocaine on the number of infusions. Neither dose of haloperidol antagonized the rate-decreasing effects of cocaine on responding in the acquisition and performance components significantly; the highest dose of haloperidol alone decreased rates of responding in each component. Antagonism of cocaine's error-increasing effects by haloperidol was only evident at one dose of cocaine (0.032 mg/kg/infusion), and was more complete in the performance components than in the acquisition components. Together, these data show the limited suitability of haloperidol for selectively antagonizing cocaine self-administration in the context of a multiple schedule involving transition behavior, and show the lack of uniform antagonism across operant behaviors. PMID:18422020

  20. Differential Antagonism of Cocaine Self-Administration and Cocaine-Induced Disruptions of Learning by Haloperidol in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Winsauer, Peter J; Moerschbaecher, Joseph M; Roussell, Alison M

    2008-01-01

    Six rhesus monkeys responding under a three-component multiple schedule were administered haloperidol to determine its effects on cocaine self-administration and on cocaine's disruptive effects on the repeated acquisition and performance of response chains. In the absence of haloperidol, 0.0032–0.032 mg/kg/infusion of cocaine increased response rate and the number of infusions in the self-administration component when compared to saline administration, whereas 0.1–0.32 mg/kg/infusion decreased response rate and the number of infusions. When compared to saline administration, the two lowest infusion doses of cocaine had little or no effect on responding in the acquisition and performance components; however, higher infusion doses of cocaine dose-dependently decreased response rate in these components. In addition, the higher doses of cocaine also increased the percentage of errors in the acquisition and performance components. Pretreatment with haloperidol (0.0032 or 0.01 mg/kg, i.m.) antagonized the effects of low doses of cocaine on the number of infusions in the self-administration component, whereas only the 0.01-mg/kg dose antagonized the effects of high doses of cocaine on the number of infusions. Neither dose of haloperidol antagonized the rate-decreasing effects of cocaine on responding in the acquisition and performance components significantly; the highest dose of haloperidol alone decreased rates of responding in each component. Antagonism of cocaine's error-increasing effects by haloperidol was only evident at one dose of cocaine (0.032 mg/kg/infusion), and was more complete in the performance components than in the acquisition components. Together, these data show the limited suitability of haloperidol for selectively antagonizing cocaine self-administration in the context of a multiple schedule involving transition behavior, and show the lack of uniform antagonism across operant behaviors. PMID:18422020

  1. Cocaine psychosis.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, F. M.

    1989-01-01

    A 28-year-old divorced black male intranasal cocaine abuser presented three times in seven days to the psychiatric emergency service of a general hospital with complaints of psychotic symptoms in the context of a cocaine binge. His repeated visits provided the opportunity to correlate his clinical picture with serum cocaine levels. This article describes that correlation and reviews the current literature on cocaine abuse and the cocaine abstinence syndrome. PMID:2674466

  2. Differential Antagonism of Cocaine Self-Administration and Cocaine-Induced Disruptions of Learning by Haloperidol in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winsauer, Peter J.; Moerschbaecher, Joseph M.; Roussell, Alison M.

    2008-01-01

    Six rhesus monkeys responding under a three-component multiple schedule were administered haloperidol to determine its effects on cocaine self-administration and on cocaine's disruptive effects on the repeated acquisition and performance of response chains. In the absence of haloperidol, 0.0032 - 0.032 mg/kg/infusion of cocaine increased response…

  3. The local anesthetic potency of norcocaine, a metabolite of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Just, W W; Hoyer, J

    1977-01-15

    The local anesthetic effects of cocaine and one of its main metabolites norcocaine, were investigated comparatively on isolated ganglion cells of the marine gastropod, Aplysia californica. During a 4-hour-period, different action potential parameters such as amplitude, duration, maximum rate of rise were observed, which demonstrated that norcocaine exhibits a higher local anesthetic potency than cocaine.

  4. Cocaine withdrawal

    MedlinePlus

    ... is stopped or when a binge ends, a crash follows almost immediately. The cocaine user has a strong craving for more cocaine during a crash. Other symptoms include fatigue, lack of pleasure, anxiety, ...

  5. Sensitization enhances acquisition of cocaine self-administration in female rats: Estradiol further enhances cocaine intake after acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Becker, Jill B.

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine self-administration in rodents has been used widely as a preclinical model of cocaine use in humans. In laboratory animals, estradiol enhances behavioral sensitization to cocaine and the acquisition of cocaine self-administration in female rats. The rewarding effect of cocaine has been shown to be enhanced following behavioral sensitization in male rats. This experiment examined whether behavioral sensitization to cocaine would promote cocaine-taking behavior in female rats, and whether estradiol could further modulate cocaine-taking behavior in cocaine-sensitized rats. Ovariectomized female rats were pretreated with either cocaine or saline for 4 days per week for 3 weeks. Self-administration sessions started 2 weeks after the last dose of drug. Female Sprague–Dawley rats received either estradiol or oil 30 min prior to the start of each session and self-administration was carried out 5 days per week for 4 weeks. The dose of cocaine self-administered each week was as follows (in mg/kg/infusion): week 1, 0.1; week 2, 0.1; week 3, 0.15; and week 4, 0.4. The rats that received cocaine pretreatment took fewer days to acquire cocaine self-administration and took more cocaine than rats that received saline pretreatment. Estradiol enhanced cocaine intake during the last six self-administration sessions after acquisition but did not affect acquisition of self-administration at the lowest doses of cocaine used. In conclusion, cocaine sensitization promotes the acquisition of cocaine self-administration in female rats. Furthermore, prior cocaine experience is more powerful than estradiol at enhancing acquisition, while estradiol enhances intake of cocaine after acquisition of self-administration. PMID:19769978

  6. IT infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Infusing IT technology is a perennial challenge. The Technology Infusion and Maturity Assessment approach of Cornford & Hicks is shown applied to an example of IT infusion: moedl-based V&V of spacecraft software.

  7. Effects of mazindol on behavior maintained or occasioned by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Mansbach, R S; Balster, R L

    1993-01-01

    The effects of mazindol, cocaine and D-amphetamine were studied in rhesus monkeys trained to self-administer cocaine, and in rats and squirrel monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline. Non-contingent intravenous drug injections were administered to monkeys responding under a session consisting of a 5-min period during which lever-pressing produced food reinforcement and a 60-min session in which responding produced i.v. cocaine infusions (10 or 33 micrograms/kg per infusion). Acute i.v. injections of cocaine (0.1-1.7 mg/kg), D-amphetamine (0.1-1 mg/kg) and the dopamine re-uptake inhibitor mazindol (0.03-0.56 mg/kg) given 5 min before the session decreased self-administration of cocaine, but also decreased rates of behavior maintained by the presentation of food. In both rats and squirrel monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline in a two-lever, food-maintained procedure, mazindol, cocaine and D-amphetamine substituted for cocaine in a dose-related manner. Despite a lack of selectivity to decrease cocaine self-administration as compared to behavior maintained by food, the present data provide some rationale for further consideration of mazindol as a potential pharmacotherapy for stimulant abuse, due to its relatively low abuse liability and cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects. PMID:8436063

  8. Lack of effect of ethanol on cocaine prime-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine self-administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Czoty, Paul W

    2016-10-01

    Cocaine and alcohol are commonly co-abused for reasons that are incompletely understood. Laboratory animal studies have suggested that, although the reinforcing effects of low cocaine doses are increased following chronic ethanol (EtOH) consumption, acute EtOH administration does not consistently alter cocaine self-administration. The present study examined whether EtOH influences another abuse-related effect of cocaine: reinstatement of extinguished responding. Rhesus monkeys that had previously consumed EtOH for 8 weeks (2.0 g/kg over 1 h, 5 days/week) self-administered up to 10 injections per day of 0.1 mg/kg cocaine under a fixed-interval 300-s schedule. After responding had been extinguished by substituting saline for cocaine, a pre-session infusion of saline or EtOH (0.5 or 1.0 g/kg, intravenously over 10 min) was followed by a 'priming' injection of saline or cocaine (intravenously). Responding was increased significantly by priming injections of cocaine, but not saline. EtOH infusions neither reinstated behavior when administered before a saline prime nor altered the priming effect of cocaine. The inability of EtOH to alter the response-reinstating ability of cocaine provides further evidence for a lack of acute behavioral interactions between cocaine and EtOH. PMID:27509315

  9. Intravenous self-administration of cocaine and norcocaine by dogs.

    PubMed

    Risner, M E; Jones, B E

    1980-01-01

    The potency of cocaine, relative to d-amphetamine, to initiate and maintain intravenous self-administration behavior by dogs (n = 5) was determined. Response-contingent infusions of cocaine (at unit doses of 0.15, 0.30 and 0.60 mg/kg/infusion) and d-amphetamine (at unit doses of 0.05 and 0.10 mg/kg/infusion) were available during daily 4-h sessions on a FR1 reinforcement schedule. By comparing the dose-response curves of the two drugs, it was found that 1 mg of amphetamine is equivalent to 5.3 mg of cocaine (95% confidence limits = 3.8--9.1 mg). In a second experiment, pretreatment with the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phenoxybenzamine (in doses ranging from 0.125--2.0 mg/kg, IV) did not produce any appreciable changes in responding for cocaine (0.2 mg/kg/infusion) by dogs (n = 9). In contrast, when the same animals were pretreated with the dopaminergic antagonist pimozide (in doses ranging from 5--40 mg/kg, IV), subsequent responding for cocaine was increased in a dose-dependent manner. In a third experiment it was determined that norcocaine, the N-demethylated metabolite of cocaine, would maintain self-administration behavior by dogs (n = 4) when it was substituted for cocaine. As expected, when saline was substituted for cocaine, responding was not maintained.

  10. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  11. Infusion Extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  12. [Sucrose reward promotes rats' motivation for cocaine].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Qing; LE, Qiu-Min; Yu, Xiang-Chen; Ma, Lan; Wang, Fei-Fei

    2016-06-25

    Caloric diet, such as fat and sugar intake, has rewarding effects, and has been indicated to affect the responses to addictive substances in animal experiments. However, the possible association between sucrose reward and the motivation for addictive drugs remains to be elucidated. Thus, we carried out behavioral tests after sucrose self-administration training to determine the effects of sucrose experience on rats' motivation for cocaine, locomotor sensitivity to cocaine, basal locomotor activity, anxiety level, and associative learning ability. The sucrose-experienced (sucrose) group exhibited higher lever press, cocaine infusion and break point, as well as upshift of cocaine dose-response curve in cocaine self-administration test, as compared with the control (chow) group. Additionally, despite similar locomotor activity in open field test and comparable score in cocaine-induced conditioned place preference, the sucrose group showed higher cocaine-induced locomotor sensitivity as compared with the chow group. The anxiety level and the performance in vocal-cue induced fear memory were similar between these two groups in elevated plus maze and fear conditioning tests, respectively. Taken together, our work indicates that sucrose experience promotes the rats' motivation for cocaine. PMID:27350195

  13. Development of translational preclinical models in substance abuse: Effects of cocaine administration on cocaine choice in humans and non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Foltin, Richard W; Haney, Margaret; Rubin, Eric; Reed, Stephanie C; Vadhan, Nehal; Balter, Rebecca; Evans, Suzette M

    2015-07-01

    Human drug use involves repeated choices to take drugs or to engage in alternative behaviors. The purpose of this study was to examine how response cost for cocaine and the value of an alternative reinforcer (opportunity to play a game of chance) and how 'free' doses (with minimal response cost) affected cocaine choice. Two laboratory studies of cocaine self-administration were conducted in a group of humans who were habitual cocaine smokers and in a group of rhesus monkeys that intravenously self-administered cocaine. Nine human cocaine smokers who were not seeking treatment for their cocaine were repeatedly presented with the choice to smoke 25mg cocaine base or play a game of chance for a monetary bonus paid at study completion. The response cost for choosing cocaine varied (up to 4000 responses/dose) and the number of game plays varied (up to 8). In this sample of humans, increasing either the response cost for cocaine or increasing the value of the alternative reinforcer did not significantly affect cocaine choice, while increasing both simultaneously slightly decreased cocaine choice and increased choice of the alternative. In monkeys, the dose-response function for cocaine self-administration (10 choices of 0.0125-0.1mg/kg/infusion vs. candy coated chocolate) was steep and we failed to achieve a 50/50 cocaine/candy choice even after substantially manipulating cost and number of candies available. Providing a large 'free' self-administered cocaine dose to humans did not significantly affect cocaine choice, whereas in monkeys, a large free dose of cocaine decreased cocaine choice when higher doses of cocaine were available for self-administration. The present results demonstrate that in the laboratory, it is difficult to modify on-going cocaine self-administration behavior in both humans and non-human primates.

  14. Development of translational preclinical models in substance abuse: Effects of cocaine administration on cocaine choice in humans and non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Foltin, Richard W; Haney, Margaret; Rubin, Eric; Reed, Stephanie C; Vadhan, Nehal; Balter, Rebecca; Evans, Suzette M

    2015-07-01

    Human drug use involves repeated choices to take drugs or to engage in alternative behaviors. The purpose of this study was to examine how response cost for cocaine and the value of an alternative reinforcer (opportunity to play a game of chance) and how 'free' doses (with minimal response cost) affected cocaine choice. Two laboratory studies of cocaine self-administration were conducted in a group of humans who were habitual cocaine smokers and in a group of rhesus monkeys that intravenously self-administered cocaine. Nine human cocaine smokers who were not seeking treatment for their cocaine were repeatedly presented with the choice to smoke 25mg cocaine base or play a game of chance for a monetary bonus paid at study completion. The response cost for choosing cocaine varied (up to 4000 responses/dose) and the number of game plays varied (up to 8). In this sample of humans, increasing either the response cost for cocaine or increasing the value of the alternative reinforcer did not significantly affect cocaine choice, while increasing both simultaneously slightly decreased cocaine choice and increased choice of the alternative. In monkeys, the dose-response function for cocaine self-administration (10 choices of 0.0125-0.1mg/kg/infusion vs. candy coated chocolate) was steep and we failed to achieve a 50/50 cocaine/candy choice even after substantially manipulating cost and number of candies available. Providing a large 'free' self-administered cocaine dose to humans did not significantly affect cocaine choice, whereas in monkeys, a large free dose of cocaine decreased cocaine choice when higher doses of cocaine were available for self-administration. The present results demonstrate that in the laboratory, it is difficult to modify on-going cocaine self-administration behavior in both humans and non-human primates. PMID:25933796

  15. Functional Consequences of Cocaine Re-exposure after Discontinuation of Cocaine Availability

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Thomas J.R.; Smith, Hilary R.; Nader, Susan H.; Nader, Michael A.; Porrino, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine users exhibit a wide range of behavioral impairments accompanied by brain structural, neurochemical and functional abnormalities. Metabolic mapping studies in cocaine users and animal models have shown extensive functional alterations throughout the striatum, limbic system, and cortex. Few studies, however, have evaluated the persistence of these effects following cessation of cocaine availability. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to assess the functional effects of re-exposure to cocaine in nonhuman primates after the discontinuation of cocaine self-administration for 30 or 90 days, using the quantitative autoradiographic 2-[14C]deoxyglucose (2DG) method. Rhesus monkeys self-administered cocaine (fixed interval 3-min schedule, 30 infusions per session, 0.3 mg/kg/infusion) for 100 sessions followed by 30 (n=4) or 90 days (n=3) during which experimental sessions were not conducted. Food-reinforced control animals (n=5) underwent identical schedules of reinforcement. Animals were then re-exposed to cocaine or food for one final session and the 2DG method applied immediately after session completion. Compared to controls, re-exposure to cocaine after 30 or 90 day drug-free periods resulted in lower rates of glucose utilization in ventral and dorsal striatum, prefrontal and temporal cortex, limbic system, thalamus, and midbrain. These data demonstrate that vulnerability to the effects of cocaine persists for as long as 90 days after cessation of drug use. While there was some evidence for recovery (fewer brain areas were affected by cocaine re-exposure at 90 days as compared to 30 days), this was not uniform across regions, thus suggesting that recovery occurs at different rates in different brain systems. PMID:24953829

  16. Functional consequences of cocaine re-exposure after discontinuation of cocaine availability.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Thomas J R; Smith, Hilary R; Nader, Susan H; Nader, Michael A; Porrino, Linda J

    2014-10-01

    Cocaine users exhibit a wide range of behavioral impairments accompanied by brain structural, neurochemical and functional abnormalities. Metabolic mapping studies in cocaine users and animal models have shown extensive functional alterations throughout the striatum, limbic system, and cortex. Few studies, however, have evaluated the persistence of these effects following cessation of cocaine availability. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to assess the functional effects of re-exposure to cocaine in nonhuman primates after the discontinuation of cocaine self-administration for 30 or 90 days, using the quantitative autoradiographic 2-[14C]deoxyglucose (2DG) method. Rhesus monkeys self-administered cocaine (fixed interval 3-min schedule, 30 infusions per session, 0.3 mg/kg/infusion) for 100 sessions followed by 30 (n=4) or 90 days (n=3) during which experimental sessions were not conducted. Food-reinforced control animals (n=5) underwent identical schedules of reinforcement. Animals were then re-exposed to cocaine or food for one final session and the 2DG method applied immediately after session completion. Compared to controls, re-exposure to cocaine after 30 or 90 day drug-free periods resulted in lower rates of glucose utilization in ventral and dorsal striatum, prefrontal and temporal cortex, limbic system, thalamus, and midbrain. These data demonstrate that vulnerability to the effects of cocaine persists for as long as 90 days after cessation of drug use. While there was some evidence for recovery (fewer brain areas were affected by cocaine re-exposure at 90 days as compared to 30 days), this was not uniform across regions, thus suggesting that recovery occurs at different rates in different brain systems. PMID:24953829

  17. Cocaine. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    This compilation of journal articles on cocaine includes a report describing cocaine as the recreational drug of the middle class, statistics from the United States Department of Health on health consequences of cocaine use, an article on "speedballing" (use of cocaine and heroin in combination), and a discussion of the various ways cocaine is…

  18. Infusion extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction. A piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber. The method is applicable to operation in low or micro-gravity environments.

  19. Safety of Atomoxetine in Combination with Intravenous Cocaine in Cocaine- Experienced Participants

    PubMed Central

    Cantilena, Louis; Kahn, Roberta; Duncan, Connie C.; Li, Shou-Hua; Anderson, Ann; Elkashef, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Atomoxetine has been considered as an agonist replacement therapy for cocaine. We investigated the safety of the interaction of atomoxetine with cocaine, and also whether cognitive function was affected by atomoxetine during short-term administration. Methods In a double-blind placebo-controlled inpatient study of 20 cocaine-dependent volunteers, participants received atomoxetine 80 mg daily followed by 100 mg daily for 5 days each. On the fourth and fifth day at each dose, cocaine (20 mg and 40 mg) was infused intravenously in sequential daily sessions. Results Pre-infusion mean systolic pressures showed a small but statistically significant difference between placebo and both doses of atomoxetine. Pre-infusion mean diastolic pressures were significant between placebo and atomoxetine 80 mg only. The diastolic pressure response to 40 mg cocaine was statistically significant only between the 80 mg and 100 mg atomoxetine doses. All ECG parameters were unchanged. VAS scores for “bad effect” in the atomoxetine group were significantly higher at baseline, then declined, and for “likely to use” declined with atomoxetine treatment. On the ARCI the atomoxetine group scored significantly lower on amphetamine, euphoria and energy subscales (p<0.0001). Other VAS descriptors, BSCS, POMS, and BPRS showed no differences. Atomoxetine did not affect cocaine pharmacokinetics. In tests of working memory, sustained attention, cognitive flexibility, and decision-making, atomoxetine improved performance on the visual n-back task. There were no differences in any pharmacokinetic parameters for cocaine with atomoxetine. Conclusions Atomoxetine was tolerated safely by all participants. Certain cognitive improvements and a dampening effect on VAS scores after cocaine were observed, but should be weighed against small but significant differences in hemodynamic responses after atomoxetine. PMID:22987022

  20. The selective dopamine uptake inhibitor, D-84, suppresses cocaine self-administration, but does not occasion cocaine-like levels of generalization.

    PubMed

    Batman, Angela M; Dutta, Aloke K; Reith, Maarten E A; Beardsley, Patrick M

    2010-12-01

    A successful replacement pharmacotherapy for treating cocaine dependency would likely reduce cocaine's abuse, support a low abuse liability, overlap cocaine's subjective effects, and have a long duration of action. Inhibitors with varying selectivity at the dopamine transporter (DAT) have approximated these properties. The objective of the present study was to characterize the behavioural effects of an extremely selective DAT inhibitor, (+) trans-4-(2-Benzhydryloxyethyl)-1-(4-fluorobenzyl) piperadin-3-ol (D-84), a 3-hydroxy substituted piperidine derivative of GBR-12935, for its cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects, its effects on cocaine self-administration, and for its own self-administration. During cocaine discrimination tests, cocaine occasioned the 10 mg/kg cocaine training stimulus with an ED(50) value of 3.13 (1.54-6.34) mg/kg, and reduced response rates with an ED(50) value of 20.39 (7.24-57.44) mg/kg. D-84 incompletely generalized to the cocaine stimulus occasioning a maximal 76% cocaine-lever responding, while reducing response rates with lower potency than cocaine (ED(50)=30.94 (12.34-77.60) mg/kg). Pretreatment with D-84 (9.6-30.4 mg/kg) significantly (P<0.05) reduced cocaine intake at 17.1 mg/kg D-84 when cocaine was self-administered at 0.5 mg/kg/infusion, and at 30.4 mg/kg D-84 when cocaine was self-administered at 0.1, 0.5 .and 1.0 mg/kg/infusion. During self-administration tests with D-84 (0.1-1 mg/kg/infusion), numbers of infusions significantly exceeded vehicle levels at 0.3 mg/kg/infusion. These results show that D-84 pretreatment can decrease cocaine intake especially when high doses of cocaine are being self-administered. This observation, combined with its incomplete generalization to the cocaine discriminative stimulus and its reported long duration of action, provides a profile consistent with a potential replacement therapy for treating cocaine-abusing patients.

  1. Repeated stress exposure causes strain-dependent shifts in the behavioral economics of cocaine in rats.

    PubMed

    Groblewski, Peter A; Zietz, Chad; Willuhn, Ingo; Phillips, Paul E M; Chavkin, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Cocaine-experienced Wistar and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats received four daily repeated forced swim stress sessions (R-FSS), each of which preceded 4-hour cocaine self-administration sessions. Twenty-four hours after the last swim stress, cocaine valuation was assessed during a single-session threshold procedure. Prior exposure to R-FSS significantly altered cocaine responding in Wistar, but not WKY, rats. Behavioral economic analysis of responding revealed that the Wistar rats that had received R-FSS exhibited an increase in the maximum price that they were willing to pay for cocaine (Pmax ). Pre-treatment with the long-lasting kappa opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist norbinaltorphimine prevented the stress-induced increase in Pmax . Thus, R-FSS exposure had strain-dependent effects on cocaine responding during the threshold procedure, and the stress effects on cocaine valuation exhibited by Wistar, but not WKY, required intact KOR signaling.

  2. Mind Over Matter: Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Term(s): Teachers / NIDA Teaching Guide / Mind Over Matter Teaching Guide and Series / Cocaine Print Mind Over Matter: Cocaine Order Free Publication in: English Spanish Download PDF 806.08 KB Cocaine is made ...

  3. Agency in Action: How Teachers Interpret and Implement Arizona's 4-Hour Structured English Immersion Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomer, Sarah N.; Collier, Lizabeth C.

    2015-01-01

    Sharing the findings from two qualitative case studies, analyzed together, this article examines various ways educators, both elementary teachers and teacher educators, exercise agency in their interpretation and implementation of Arizona's model of Structured English Immersion (SEI), a 4-hour English Language Development (ELD) block, which…

  4. Examination of cocaine dose in a preclinical model of natural reward devaluation by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Green, Jennifer L; Dykstra, Linda A; Carelli, Regina M

    2015-06-01

    In a preclinical model of natural reward devaluation by cocaine, taste cues elicit aversive taste reactivity when they predict impending but delayed cocaine self-administration. Here, we investigated this negative affective state as a function of cocaine dose. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats were given 45 brief intraoral infusions of a 0.15% saccharin solution before 2 h cocaine self-administration for 14 days. Rats were video recorded; taste reactivity and patterns of self-administration were quantified on the first and last days. On day 14, a significant decrease in appetitive taste reactivity and increase in aversive taste reactivity was observed (compared with day 1) that did not vary as a function of cocaine dose. In contrast, patterns of cocaine self-administration (i.e. the total number of lever presses and load-up behavior) varied as a function of dose across days. Further, load-up behavior was positively correlated with aversive taste reactivity (i.e. gapes) on day 14 across all doses tested. Collectively, these findings indicate that the emergence of negative affect in this preclinical model is not dependent on cocaine dose. PMID:25738759

  5. Adolescent-onset of cocaine use is associated with heightened stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wai Chong; Marinelli, Michela

    2016-05-01

    Adolescent rats take cocaine more readily than adults, are more sensitive to lower doses of the drug and work harder for it. It remains unknown if adolescent-onset of cocaine use has long-term consequences on adult relapse liability. Therefore, we tested if self-administering cocaine during adolescence impacts subsequent stress-induced reinstatement to cocaine seeking and taking, after a prolonged drug-free period. Adolescent (~P42) or adult (P88) rats self-administered cocaine (0.6 or 1.2 mg/kg/infusion) for 7 or 10 days. Then, they underwent a prolonged drug-free period (21-40 days), after which they were tested for reinstatement of cocaine-seeking (i.e. responding in the absence of cocaine) induced by the stress hormone corticosterone, the pharmacological stressor yohimbine or electric footshock. Studies employed either single extinction session (within-session extinction/reinstatement) or repeated extinction prior to reinstatement (between-session extinction/reinstatement). Finally, in a separate set of experiments, rats underwent a prolonged drug-free period (~40 days) and were then allowed to self-administer cocaine again, using progressive-ratio procedures that appraise the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine. Rats with adolescent-onset of cocaine use showed greater stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking than rats with adult-onset of cocaine use. This was observed across conditions, providing external validity to these results. Groups did not differ on drug taking in progressive-ratio tests. Our studies indicate that experiencing cocaine during adolescence renders subjects particularly responsive to the subsequent effects of stress on drug seeking. This heightened propensity for reinstatement puts adolescent-onset drug users at heightened risk for relapse.

  6. Adolescent-onset of cocaine use is associated with heightened stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wai Chong; Marinelli, Michela

    2016-05-01

    Adolescent rats take cocaine more readily than adults, are more sensitive to lower doses of the drug and work harder for it. It remains unknown if adolescent-onset of cocaine use has long-term consequences on adult relapse liability. Therefore, we tested if self-administering cocaine during adolescence impacts subsequent stress-induced reinstatement to cocaine seeking and taking, after a prolonged drug-free period. Adolescent (~P42) or adult (P88) rats self-administered cocaine (0.6 or 1.2 mg/kg/infusion) for 7 or 10 days. Then, they underwent a prolonged drug-free period (21-40 days), after which they were tested for reinstatement of cocaine-seeking (i.e. responding in the absence of cocaine) induced by the stress hormone corticosterone, the pharmacological stressor yohimbine or electric footshock. Studies employed either single extinction session (within-session extinction/reinstatement) or repeated extinction prior to reinstatement (between-session extinction/reinstatement). Finally, in a separate set of experiments, rats underwent a prolonged drug-free period (~40 days) and were then allowed to self-administer cocaine again, using progressive-ratio procedures that appraise the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine. Rats with adolescent-onset of cocaine use showed greater stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking than rats with adult-onset of cocaine use. This was observed across conditions, providing external validity to these results. Groups did not differ on drug taking in progressive-ratio tests. Our studies indicate that experiencing cocaine during adolescence renders subjects particularly responsive to the subsequent effects of stress on drug seeking. This heightened propensity for reinstatement puts adolescent-onset drug users at heightened risk for relapse. PMID:26202521

  7. fMRI of cocaine self-administration in macaques reveals functional inhibition of basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Mandeville, Joseph B; Choi, Ji-Kyung; Jarraya, Bechir; Rosen, Bruce R; Jenkins, Bruce G; Vanduffel, Wim

    2011-05-01

    Disparities in cocaine-induced neurochemical and metabolic responses between human beings and rodents motivate the use of non-human primates (NHP) to model consequences of repeated cocaine exposure in human subjects. To characterize the functional response to cocaine infusion in NHP brain, we employed contrast-enhanced fMRI during both non-contingent injection of drug and self-administration of cocaine in the magnet. Cocaine robustly decreased cerebral blood volume (CBV) throughout basal ganglia and motor/pre-motor cortex and produced subtle functional inhibition of prefrontal cortex. No brain regions exhibited significant elevation of CBV in response to cocaine challenge. Theses effects in NHP brain are opposite in sign to the cocaine-induced fMRI response in rats, but consistent with previous measurements in NHP based on glucose metabolism. Because the striatal ratio of D2 to D1 receptors is larger in human beings and NHP than rats, we hypothesize that the inhibitory effects of D2 receptor binding dominate the functional response in primates, whereas excitatory D1 receptor stimulation predominates in the rat. If the NHP accurately models the human response to cocaine, downregulation of D2 receptors in human cocaine-abusing populations can be expected to blunt cocaine-induced functional responses, contributing to the weak and variable fMRI responses reported in human basal ganglia following cocaine infusion. PMID:21307843

  8. Acquisition of Cocaine Self-Administration with Unsignaled Delayed Reinforcement in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galuska, Chad M.; Woods, James H.

    2005-01-01

    Six experimentally naive rhesus monkeys produced 0.01 mg/kg/infusion cocaine by lever pressing under a tandem fixed-ratio 1 differential-reinforcement-of-other- behavior schedule. One lever press initiated an unsignaled 15- or 30-s delay culminating in cocaine delivery. Each press made during the delay reset the delay interval. With two…

  9. Self administration of cocaine in monkeys receiving LAAM acutely or chronically.

    PubMed

    Gerak, Lisa R; Galici, Ruggero; France, Charles P

    2008-01-28

    Polydrug abuse remains a common problem among opioid abusers as well as patients in opioid maintenance programs. Although cocaine abuse has been reported in patients receiving methadone, the incidence of cocaine use in patients receiving l-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM) has not been well established. The goal of this study was to determine whether acute or chronic administration of LAAM modified the reinforcing effects of cocaine using a self-administration procedure in rhesus monkeys. Four monkeys responded under a fixed ratio (FR) 30 schedule to receive i.v. infusions of cocaine (0.0032-0.32 mg/kg/infusion) in the absence of other treatment, after acute LAAM administration (0.1-1.0 mg/kg, s.c.), and during daily administration of 1.0 mg/kg of LAAM. Cocaine maintained self-administration responding that exceeded responding maintained by saline; acutely administered LAAM had small and variable effects on self administration of cocaine. Daily LAAM administration increased the number of infusions received of at least one dose of cocaine. These studies indicated that LAAM administration did not attenuate the reinforcing effects of cocaine, suggesting that LAAM would not likely alter cocaine abuse in patients undergoing treatment for opioid abuse. PMID:17764707

  10. Lesions and reversible inactivation of the dorsolateral caudate-putamen impair cocaine-primed reinstatement to cocaine-seeking in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gabriele, Amanda; See, Ronald E.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that cocaine addiction may involve progressive drug-induced neuroplasticity of the dorsal striatum. Here, we examined the effects of a) dorsolateral caudate putamen (dlCPu) lesions on cocaine self-administration, extinction of responding, and subsequent reinstatement to cocaine-seeking, and b) reversible inactivation of the dlCPu with GABA receptor agonists (baclofen and muscimol) immediately prior to reinstatement testing. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered cocaine (0.2 mg/50 μl infusion, i.v.) along an FR1 schedule in daily 2 hr sessions for 10 days, whereby lever presses resulted in cocaine infusions and presentation of a paired light-tone stimulus complex. After 14 days of abstinence, animals were returned to the self-administration chamber and lever responding was recorded, but had no programmed consequences (relapse test). Animals then underwent daily extinction, followed by reinstatement tests in the presence of the conditioned cues, after a cocaine priming injection (10 mg/kg), or cues + cocaine prime. Lesions of the dlCPu failed to affect responding during self-administration, extinction, relapse, or cued-induced reinstatement. However, lesioned animals showed reduced cocaine-seeking during cocaine-primed reinstatement as compared to sham controls. Furthermore, reversible inactivation of the dlCPu significantly impaired both cocaine-primed and cocaine-primed + cue-induced reinstatement. These results demonstrate the critical involvement of the dlCPu in cocaine-primed reinstatement, perhaps via chronic drug-induced changes in the interoceptive effects of cocaine that impact drug-seeking. PMID:21890120

  11. Cocaine Versus Food Choice Procedure in Rats: Environmental Manipulations and Effects of Amphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Morgane; Barrett, Andrew C.; Negus, S. Stevens; Caine, S. Barak

    2014-01-01

    We have adapted a nonhuman primate model of cocaine versus food choice to the rat species. To evaluate the procedure, we tested cocaine versus food choice under a variety of environmental manipulations as well as pharmacological pretreatments. Complete cocaine-choice dose-effect curves (0–1.0 mg/kg/infusion) were obtained for each condition under concurrent fixed ratio schedules of reinforcement. Percentage of responding emitted on the cocaine-reinforced lever was not affected significantly by removal of cocaine-associated visual or auditory cues, but it was decreased after removal of response-contingent or response-independent cocaine infusions. Cocaine choice was sensitive to the magnitude and fixed ratio requirement of both the cocaine and food reinforcers. We also tested the effects of acute (0.32, 0.56, 1.0, 1.8 mg/kg) and chronic (0.1, 0.32 mg/kg/hr) d-amphetamine treatment on cocaine choice. Acute and chronic d-amphetamine had opposite effects, with acute increasing and chronic decreasing cocaine choice, similar to observations in humans and in nonhuman primates. The results suggest feasibility and utility of the choice procedure in rats and support its comparability to similar procedures used in humans and monkeys. PMID:23319458

  12. Low- and high-cocaine locomotor responding rats differ in reinstatement of cocaine seeking and striatal mGluR5 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Diana L; Mandt, Bruce H; Ng, Christopher M C; Richards, Toni L; Yamamoto, Dorothy J; Zahniser, Nancy R; Allen, Richard M

    2013-12-01

    Behavioral responsiveness to initial cocaine use varies among individuals and may contribute to differential vulnerability to cocaine addiction. Rats also exhibit individual differences in cocaine's effects and can be classified as low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs, respectively), based on their initial cocaine-induced locomotor activity (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Here, we used the extinction/reinstatement model to address whether or not LCRs and HCRs differ in (i) extinction/reinstatement of cocaine self-administration behavior and (ii) levels of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) following these behaviors. During the earliest acquisition sessions, LCRs exhibited significantly greater cocaine intake (0.8 mg/kg/infusion) and cocaine-paired lever responding than HCRs, but intake and lever responding converged by the end of the cocaine self-administration portion of the study. LCRs and HCRs did not differ in cocaine seeking during the first extinction session and extinguished cocaine seeking similarly. HCRs exhibited greater reinstatement than LCRs to lower (2.5 and 5 mg/kg), but not higher (10 mg/kg), i.p. priming doses of cocaine. The effect of drug-paired cues on reinstatement following extinction was complex, with HCRs and LCRs showing the greater effect of cue depending on the order in which cue- and drug-primed tests were given. Western blot analysis revealed that mGluR5 heteromers were significantly higher in the dorsal striatum of HCRs than LCRs following reinstatement testing. Although our previous findings with the LCR/HCR model have uniformly supported the idea that lower initial cocaine-induced activation predicts more ready development of cocaine addiction-like behaviors, here, we show a more complex relationship with cocaine reinstatement.

  13. Dehydroepiandrosterone Attenuates Cocaine-Seeking Behaviour Independently of Corticosterone Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Maayan, R; Hirsh, L; Yadid, G; Weizman, A

    2015-11-01

    The neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is involved in the pathophysiology of several psychiatric disorders, including cocaine addiction. We have previously shown that DHEA attenuates cocaine-seeking behaviour, and also that DHEA decreases corticosterone (CORT) levels in plasma and the prefrontal cortex. Previous studies have found that rats demonstrate cocaine-seeking behaviour only when the level of CORT reaches a minimum threshold. In the present study, we investigated whether the attenuating effect of DHEA on cocaine seeking is a result of it reducing CORT levels rather than a result of any unique neurosteroid properties. Rats received either daily DHEA injections (2 mg/kg, i.p.) alone, daily DHEA (2 mg/kg, i.p.) with CORT infusion (to maintain stable basal levels of CORT; 15 mg/kg, s.c.) or vehicle (i.p.) as control, throughout self-administration training and extinction sessions. We found that both DHEA-treated and DHEA + CORT-treated groups showed a significantly lower number of active lever presses compared to controls throughout training and extinction sessions, as well as at cocaine-primed reinstatement. DHEA-treated rats showed lower CORT levels throughout the experimental phases compared to DHEA + CORT-treated and control rats. Additionally, we show that DHEA administered to cocaine-trained rats throughout extinction sessions, or immediately before reinstatement, attenuated cocaine seeking. These findings indicate that DHEA attenuates cocaine-seeking behaviour independently of fluctuations in CORT levels.

  14. Cocaine and Cardiovascular Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, John D.; Rose, Fred D.

    1986-01-01

    The case of a 21-year-old man who suffered a myocardial infarction after using cocaine and amphetamines is reported. A brief literature review provides evidence of cocaine's potential cardiovascular effects. (Author/MT)

  15. Reinforcer interactions under concurrent schedules of food, water, and intravenous cocaine.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, S.I.; Mirkis, S.; Smith, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Rats housed in three-lever, operant-conditioning chambers were trained under a concurrent, chained fixed-ratio 1, fixed-ratio 9 schedule (conc chain FR1 FR9) of food and water deliveries. After stable patterns of food and water intake were observed, the rats were prepared with intravenous catheters and a drug self-administration option was added to the schedule. Cocaine infusions (0.33 mg/infusion) were available for only 6 h (09.00 h-15.00 h), while access to food and water was available for 24 h. Addition of the cocaine option produced a minimal decrease in food and water intake and a considerable disruption ruption of food and water intake patterns. Changes in the cocaine dose (0.08-0.84 mg/infusion) did not alter responding on the levers resulting in either food or water deliveries. Cocaine self-administration, however, showed an inverted "U" shaped function as the dose of cocaine was increased. Drug extinction probes resulted in a significant increase in responding on the levers resulting in food and water deliveries and substantial decreases on the lever previously resulting in cocaine infusions. Twenty-four hour food extinction probes decreased responding on the levers resulting in food and water deliveries and produced a modest decrease in the self-administration of cocaine.

  16. Intraosseous infusion.

    PubMed

    LaRocco, Brian G; Wang, Henry E

    2003-01-01

    Establishing vascular access is vital in the resuscitation of critically-ill children and adults. Intraosseous infusion (IOI) is a viable route for providing vascular access when traditional intravenous methods cannot be accomplished. IOI is relatively easy to perform and is a standard recommended intervention for the resuscitation of both adults and children. The authors review the history, anatomy, technique, and clinical application of IOI. They also highlight the use of IOI in the prehospital setting. PMID:12710793

  17. Effects of menstrual cycle phase on cocaine self-administration in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ziva D; Foltin, Richard W; Evans, Suzette M

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological findings suggest that men and women vary in their pattern of cocaine use resulting in differences in cocaine dependence and relapse rates. Preclinical laboratory studies have demonstrated that female rodents are indeed more sensitive to cocaine's reinforcing effects than males, with estrous cycle stage as a key determinant of this effect. The current study sought to extend these findings to normally cycling female rhesus macaques, a species that shares a nearly identical menstrual cycle to humans. Dose-dependent intravenous cocaine self-administration (0.0125, 0.0250, and 0.0500 mg/kg/infusion) using a progressive-ratio schedule of reinforcement was determined across the menstrual cycle. The menstrual cycle was divided into 5 discrete phases - menses, follicular, periovulatory, luteal, and late luteal phases - verified by the onset of menses and plasma levels of estradiol and progesterone. Dependent variables including number of infusions self-administered per session, progressive ratio breakpoint, and cocaine intake were analyzed according to cocaine dose and menstrual cycle phase. Analysis of plasma hormone levels verified phase-dependent fluctuations of estradiol and progesterone, with estrogen levels peaking during the periovulatory phase, and progesterone peaking during the luteal phase. Progressive ratio breakpoint, infusions self-administered, and cocaine intake did not consistently vary based on menstrual cycle phase. These findings demonstrate that under the current experimental parameters, the reinforcing effects of cocaine did not vary across the menstrual cycle in a systematic fashion in normally cycling rhesus macaques. PMID:23098805

  18. Bidirectional modulation of cocaine-expectancy by phasic glutamate fluctuations in the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Suto, Nobuyoshi; Elmer, Greg I.; Wang, Bin; You, Zhi-Bing; Wise, Roy A.

    2013-01-01

    While glutamate in the nucleus accumbens (NAS) contributes to the promotion of drug-seeking by drug-predictive cues, it also appears to play a role in the inhibition of drug-seeking following extinction procedures. Thus we measured extracellular fluctuations of NAS glutamate in response to discriminative stimuli that signaled either cocaine availability or cocaine omission. We trained rats to self-administer intravenous cocaine and then to recognize discriminative odor cues that predicted either sessions where cocaine was available or alternating sessions where it was not (saline substituted for cocaine). Whereas responding in cocaine availability sessions remained stable, responding in cocaine omission sessions progressively declined to chance levels. We then determined the effects of each odor cue on extracellular glutamate in the core and shell subregions of NAS preceding and accompanying lever-pressing under an extinction condition. Glutamate levels were elevated in both core and shell by the availability odor and depressed in the core but not the shell by the omission odor. Infusion of kynurenic acid (an antagonist for ionotropic glutamate receptors) into core but not shell suppressed responding associated with the availability odor, but had no effect on the suppression associated with the omission odor. Thus cocaine-predictive cues appear to promote cocaine-seeking in part by elevating glutamatergic neurotransmission in the core of NAS, whereas cocaine-omission cues appear to suppress cocaine-seeking in part by depressing glutamatergic receptor activation in the same region. PMID:23699516

  19. Inhibition of Cdk5 in the nucleus accumbens enhances the locomotor-activating and incentive-motivational effects of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jane R; Lynch, Wendy J; Sanchez, Hayde; Olausson, Peter; Nestler, Eric J; Bibb, James A

    2007-03-01

    Neuronal adaptations in striatal dopamine signaling have been implicated in enhanced responses to addictive drugs. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) regulates striatal dopamine signaling and is a downstream target gene of the transcription factor DeltaFosB, which accumulates in striatal neurons after chronic cocaine exposure. Here we investigated the role of Cdk5 activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) on cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, responding for reward-associated stimuli (conditioned reinforcement), and cocaine self-administration under a progressive ratio schedule. Repeated infusions of the Cdk5 inhibitor roscovitine into the NAc before cocaine injections augmented both the development and expression of cocaine sensitization without having any intrinsic stimulant actions of its own. Additionally, repeated intra-NAc infusions of roscovitine to saline-injected rats enhanced locomotor responses to a subsequent cocaine challenge. Similar effects were found after infusions of another Cdk5 inhibitor, olomoucine, but not its inactive congener, iso-olomoucine. Repeated inhibition of Cdk5 within the NAc also robustly enhanced the incentive-motivational effects of cocaine, similar to the effect of prior repeated cocaine exposure. The enhanced responding with conditioned reinforcement induced by cocaine persisted at least 2 weeks after the final roscovitine infusion. NAc infusions of olomoucine also produced acute and enduring increases in "breakpoints" achieved on a progressive ratio schedule for cocaine reinforcement. These results demonstrate profound and persistent effects of NAc Cdk5 inhibition on locomotor sensitization and incentive-motivational processes and provide direct evidence for a role for striatal Cdk5-induced alterations in the brain's long-term adaptations to cocaine.

  20. Cocaine self-administration punished by intravenous histamine in adolescent and adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Holtz, Nathan A.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a transitional phase marked by a heightened vulnerability to substances of abuse. It has been hypothesized that both increased sensitivity to reward and decreased sensitivity to aversive events may drive drug-use liability during this phase. To investigate possible age-related differences in sensitivity to the aversive consequences of drug use, adolescent and adult rats were compared on self-administration of cocaine before, during, and after a 10-day period in which an aversive agent, histamine, was added to the cocaine solution. Adult and adolescent female rats were trained to self-administer intravenous cocaine (0.4 mg/kg/infusion) over 10 sessions (2 h/session; 2 sessions/day). Histamine (4 mg/kg/infusion) was then added directly into the cocaine solution for the next 10 sessions. Finally, the cocaine/histamine solution was replaced with a cocaine-only solution, and rats continued to self-administer cocaine (0.4 mg/kg) for 20 sessions. Compared with adolescent rats, adult rats showed a greater decrease in cocaine self-administration when it was punished with intravenous histamine compared with their baseline cocaine self-administration rates. These results suggest that differences in the sensitivity to negative consequences of drug use may partially explain developmental differences in drug use vulnerability. PMID:25769092

  1. Cocaine self-administration punished by intravenous histamine in adolescent and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Nathan A; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2015-06-01

    Adolescence is a transitional phase marked by a heightened vulnerability to substances of abuse. It has been hypothesized that both increased sensitivity to reward and decreased sensitivity to aversive events may drive drug-use liability during this phase. To investigate possible age-related differences in sensitivity to the aversive consequences of drug use, adolescent and adult rats were compared on self-administration of cocaine before, during, and after a 10-day period in which an aversive agent, histamine, was added to the cocaine solution. Adult and adolescent female rats were trained to self-administer intravenous cocaine (0.4 mg/kg/infusion) over 10 sessions (2 h/session; 2 sessions/day). Histamine (4 mg/kg/infusion) was then added directly into the cocaine solution for the next 10 sessions. Finally, the cocaine/histamine solution was replaced with a cocaine-only solution, and rats continued to self-administer cocaine (0.4 mg/kg) for 20 sessions. Compared with adolescent rats, adult rats showed a greater decrease in cocaine self-administration when it was punished with intravenous histamine compared with their baseline cocaine self-administration rates. These results suggest that differences in the sensitivity to negative consequences of drug use may partially explain developmental differences in drug use vulnerability.

  2. Role of Mu and Delta Opioid Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens in Cocaine-Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Diana; Self, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that opioid receptors in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), but not the nucleus accumbens (NAc), play a role in relapse to drug-seeking behavior. However, environmental stimuli that elicit relapse also release the endogenous opioid β-endorphin in the NAc. Using a within–session extinction/reinstatement paradigm in rats that self-administer cocaine, we found that NAc infusions of the mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO moderately reinstated responding on the cocaine-paired lever at low doses (1.0–3.0 ng/side), whereas the delta opioid receptor (DOR) agonist DPDPE induced greater responding at higher doses (300–3000 ng/side) that also enhanced inactive lever responding. Using doses of either agonist that induced responding on only the cocaine-paired lever, we found that DAMGO-induced responding was blocked selectively by pretreatment with the MOR antagonist CTAP, while DPDPE-induced responding was selectively blocked by the DOR antagonist naltrindole. Cocaine-primed reinstatement was blocked by intra-NAc CTAP but not naltrindole, indicating a role for endogenous MOR-acting peptides in cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. In this regard, intra-NAc infusions of β-endorphin (100–1000 ng/side) induced marked cocaine-seeking behavior, an effect blocked by intra-NAc pretreatment with the MOR but not DOR antagonist. Conversely, cocaine seeking elicited by the enkephalinase inhibitor thiorphan (1–10 μg/side) was blocked by naltrindole but not CTAP. MOR stimulation in more dorsal caudate-putamen sites was ineffective, while DPDPE infusions induced cocaine seeking. Together, these findings establish distinct roles for MOR and DOR in cocaine relapse, and suggest that NAc MOR could be an important therapeutic target to neutralize the effects of endogenous β-endorphin release on cocaine relapse. PMID:19279569

  3. Assessment of Safety, Cardiovascular and Subjective Effects After Intravenous Cocaine and Lofexidine

    PubMed Central

    De La Garza, R.; Galloway, G. P.; Newton, T.F.; Mendelson, J.; Haile, C.N.; Dib, E.; Hawkins, R. Y.; Chen, C-Y A.; Mahoney, J.J.; Mojsiak, J.; Lao, G.; Anderson, A.; Kahn, R.

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the safety of lofexidine, an α2 receptor agonist, alone and concurrent with cocaine in non-treatment seeking cocaine-dependent or cocaine-abusing participants. After screening, eligible participants received double-blind, randomized infusions of saline and 20 mg of cocaine on Day 1, and saline and 40 mg of cocaine on Day 2. Subjects were randomized and started receiving daily administration of placebo (N=4) or lofexidine on Day 3 and continued on this schedule until Day 7. Two dosing regimens for lofexedine were investigated: 0.8 QID (N=3) and 0.2 mg QID (N=11). On Days 6 and 7, subjects received double-blind infusions of saline and 20 mg of cocaine on Day 6, and saline and 40 mg of cocaine on Day 7. The data reveal a notable incidence of hemodynamic-related AEs over the course of the study. Two of the three participants at the 0.8 mg dose level discontinued, and five of 11 participants at the 0.2 mg dose level were withdrawn (or voluntarily discontinued) after hemodynamic AEs. Subjective effects and cardiovascular data were derived from all participants who were eligible to receive infusions (i.e., did not meet stopping criteria) on Days 6 and 7 (6 received lofexidine 0.2 mg, QID and 4 received placebo, QID). As expected, cocaine significantly increased heart rate and blood pressure, as well as several positive subjective effects. There was a trend for lofexidine to decrease cocaine-induced cardiovascular changes and cocaine-induced ratings for "Any Drug Effect", "Good Effects", and “Desire Cocaine”, but sample size issues limit the conclusions that can be drawn. Despite the trends to reduce cocaine-induced subjective effects, cardiovascular AEs may limit future utility of lofexidine as a treatment for this population. PMID:24316175

  4. Behavioral and electrophysiological indices of negative affect predict cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Robert A; Twining, Robert C; Jones, Joshua L; Slater, Jennifer M; Grigson, Patricia S; Carelli, Regina M

    2008-03-13

    The motivation to seek cocaine comes in part from a dysregulation of reward processing manifested in dysphoria, or affective withdrawal. Learning is a critical aspect of drug abuse; however, it remains unclear whether drug-associated cues can elicit the emotional withdrawal symptoms that promote cocaine use. Here we report that a cocaine-associated taste cue elicited a conditioned aversive state that was behaviorally and neurophysiologically quantifiable and predicted subsequent cocaine self-administration behavior. Specifically, brief intraoral infusions of a cocaine-predictive flavored saccharin solution elicited aversive orofacial responses that predicted early-session cocaine taking in rats. The expression of aversive taste reactivity also was associated with a shift in the predominant pattern of electrophysiological activity of nucleus accumbens (NAc) neurons from inhibitory to excitatory. The dynamic nature of this conditioned switch in affect and the neural code reveals a mechanism by which cues may exert control over drug self-administration. PMID:18341996

  5. Conditioned Contribution of Peripheral Cocaine Actions to Cocaine Reward and Cocaine-Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; You, Zhi-Bing; Oleson, Erik B; Cheer, Joseph F; Myal, Stephanie; Wise, Roy A

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine has actions in the peripheral nervous system that reliably precede—and thus predict—its soon-to-follow central rewarding effects. In cocaine-experienced animals, the peripheral cocaine signal is relayed to the central nervous system, triggering excitatory input to the ventral tegmental origin of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system, the system that mediates the rewarding effects of the drug. We used cocaine methiodide, a cocaine analog that does not cross the blood–brain barrier, to isolate the peripheral actions of cocaine and determine their central and behavioral effects in animals first trained to lever-press for cocaine hydrochloride (the centrally acting and abused form of the drug). We first confirmed with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry that cocaine methiodide causes rapid dopamine release from dopamine terminals in cocaine hydrochloride-trained rats. We then compared the ability of cocaine hydrochloride and cocaine methiodide to establish conditioned place preferences in rats with self-administration experience. While cocaine hydrochloride established stronger place preferences, cocaine methiodide was also effective and its effectiveness increased (incubated) over weeks of cocaine abstinence. Cocaine self-administration was extinguished when cocaine methiodide or saline was substituted for cocaine hydrochloride in the intravenous self-administration paradigm, but cocaine hydrochloride and cocaine methiodide each reinstated non-rewarded lever-pressing after extinction. Rats extinguished by cocaine methiodide substitution showed weaker cocaine-induced reinstatement than rats extinguished by saline substitution. These findings suggest that the conditioned peripheral effects of cocaine can contribute significantly to cocaine-induced (but not stress-induced) cocaine craving, and also suggest the cocaine cue as an important target for cue-exposure therapies for cocaine addiction. PMID:23535778

  6. The Impact of Disulfiram Treatment on the Reinforcing Effects of Cocaine: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Haile, Colin N.; De La Garza, Richard; Mahoney, James J.; Nielsen, David A.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Newton, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical trials indicate that disulfiram (250 mg/d) reduces cocaine use, though one study found that treatment with lower doses of disulfiram (62.5 and 125 mg/d) increased cocaine use. We conducted the present study to better understand how disulfiram alters the reinforcing effects of cocaine in cocaine users. Methods Seventeen non-treatment seeking, cocaine-dependent volunteers participated in this double-blind, placebo-controlled, laboratory-based study. A cross-over design was utilized in which participants received placebo in one phase and disulfiram (250 mg/d) in the other. Following three days of study medication participants completed two choice sessions. In one they made 10 choices between receiving an intravenous infusion of saline or money that increased in value (US$ 0.05–16) and in the other cocaine (20 mg) or money. Results Participants chose cocaine more than saline under both disulfiram and placebo conditions (p<0.05). Unexpectedly, disulfiram increased both the number of cocaine and saline infusion choices (p<0.05). We next examined the relationship between disulfiram dose and cocaine choices. Disulfiram dose (mg/kg bodyweight) was negatively correlated with number of choices for cocaine (p<0.05). Disulfiram also enhanced cocaine-induced increases in cardiovascular measures (p's<0.05–0.01). Conclusions Disulfiram's impact on the reinforcing effects of cocaine depends on dose relative to body weight. Our results suggest that the use of weight-based medication doses would produce more reliable effects, consistent with weight-based dosing used in pediatrics and in preclinical research. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00729300 PMID:23144826

  7. Sex Differences in Selecting Between Food and Cocaine Reinforcement are Mediated by Estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Kerstetter, Kerry A; Ballis, Maya A; Duffin-Lutgen, Stevie; Carr, Amanda E; Behrens, Alexandra M; Kippin, Tod E

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine-dependent women, relative to their male counterparts, report shorter cocaine-free periods and report transiting faster from first use to entering treatment for addiction. Similarly, preclinical studies indicate that female rats, particularly those in the estrus phase of their reproductive cycle, show increased operant responding for cocaine under a wide variety of schedules. Making maladaptive choices is a component of drug dependence, and concurrent reinforcement schedules that examine cocaine choice offers an animal model of the conditions of human drug use; therefore, the examination of sex differences in decision-making may be critical to understanding why women display a more severe profile of cocaine addiction than men. Accordingly, we assessed sex and estrous cycle differences in choice between food (45 mg grain pellets) and intravenous cocaine (0.4 or 1.0 mg/kg per infusion) reinforcement in male, female (freely cycling), and ovariectomized (OVX) females treated with either estrogen benzoate (EB; 5 μg per day) or vehicle. At both cocaine doses, intact female rats choose cocaine over food significantly more than male rats. However, the estrous cycle did not impact the level of cocaine choice in intact females. Nevertheless, OVX females treated with vehicle exhibited a substantially lower cocaine choice compared with those receiving daily EB or to intact females. These results demonstrate that intact females have a greater preference for cocaine over food compared with males. Furthermore, this higher preference is estrogen-dependent, but does not vary across the female reproductive cycle, suggesting that ovarian hormones regulate cocaine choice. The present findings indicate that there is a biological predisposition for females to forgo food reinforcement to obtain cocaine reinforcement, which may substantially contribute to women experiencing a more severe profile of cocaine addiction than men. PMID:22871910

  8. Cocaine-related deaths.

    PubMed

    Lora-Tamayo, C; Tena, T; Rodriguez, A

    1994-07-15

    Cocaine availability has been increasing in Spain in the past few years. A review of all the toxicological analyses carried out at the Madrid Department of the Instituto Nacional de Toxicología, with subjects who had died of drugs from 1990 to 1992, found 533 persons who had cocaine in their blood and/or tissues; 450 (84%) deaths involved cocaine and heroin together whereas 83 (16%) deaths involved cocaine with an absence of heroin. This paper reports the circumstances, cocaine and benzoylecgonine concentrations in the blood and other toxicological findings for the two major groups of deaths where cocaine was found with an absence of heroin, i.e., possible overdose cases (35 cases) and traffic accidents (23 cases).

  9. β-endorphin via the delta opioid receptor is a major factor in the incubation of cocaine craving.

    PubMed

    Dikshtein, Yahav; Barnea, Royi; Kronfeld, Noam; Lax, Elad; Roth-Deri, Ilana; Friedman, Alexander; Gispan, Iris; Elharrar, Einat; Levy, Sarit; Ben-Tzion, Moshe; Yadid, Gal

    2013-11-01

    Cue-induced cocaine craving intensifies, or 'incubates', during the first few weeks of abstinence and persists over extended periods of time. One important factor implicated in cocaine addiction is the endogenous opioid β-endorphin. In the present study, we examined the possible involvement of β-endorphin in the incubation of cocaine craving. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.75 mg/kg, 10 days, 6 h/day), followed by either a 1-day or a 30-day period of forced abstinence. Subsequent testing for cue-induced cocaine-seeking behavior (without cocaine reinforcement) was performed. Rats exposed to the drug-associated cue on day 1 of forced abstinence demonstrated minimal cue-induced cocaine-seeking behavior concurrently with a significant increase in β-endorphin release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Conversely, exposure to the cue on day 30 increased cocaine seeking, while β-endorphin levels remained unchanged. Intra-NAc infusion of an anti-β-endorphin antibody (4 μg) on day 1 increased cue-induced cocaine seeking, whereas infusion of a synthetic β-endorphin peptide (100 ng) on day 30 significantly decreased cue response. Both intra-NAc infusions of the δ opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole (1 μg) on day 1 and naltrindole together with β-endorphin on day 30 increased cue-induced cocaine-seeking behavior. Intra-NAc infusion of the μ opioid receptor antagonist CTAP (30 ng and 3 μg) had no behavioral effect. Altogether, these results demonstrate a novel role for β-endorphin and the δ opioid receptor in the development of the incubation of cocaine craving. PMID:23800967

  10. Medical consequences of cocaine.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Cocaine use among middle-class North Americans increased dramatically during the 1980s. Medical complications involve almost every organ system and are produced by intense vasoconstriction. Managing cocaine-induced disease requires careful identification and the use of alpha-adrenergic blocking agents, in addition to standard therapy and referral to specialists to manage cocaine withdrawal. Images p1976-a p1980-a PMID:8106032

  11. Cocaine withdrawal in Planaria.

    PubMed

    Raffa, R B; Valdez, J M

    2001-10-26

    Cocaine-exposed planarians displayed abstinence-induced withdrawal behavior when placed into cocaine-free, but not cocaine-containing, water. The effect, manifested and quantified using a new spontaneous locomotor velocity metric, was dose-dependently related to cocaine exposure (8x10(-9) to 8x10(-5) M). Ultraviolet light (254 nm=7.83x10(-19) J), which was previously shown to interfere with drug-receptor interactions in Planaria, enhanced the abstinence-induced decreased locomotor velocity.

  12. Action of cocaine and chronic sympathetic denervation on vagal escape

    PubMed Central

    Campos, H. A.; Urquilla, P. R.

    1969-01-01

    1. The effect of cocaine has been studied on vagal escape and on the tachycardia due to vagal stimulation in the atropinized dog. All the dogs were submitted to acute cervical section of the spinal cord and acute or chronic sympathetic denervation. 2. Cocaine, 5 mg/kg or 40 μg/kg/min, I.V., induces a significant enhancement of the ventricular escape. The effects of a continuous infusion of cocaine are more reproducible than those of a single injection of the drug. 3. Cocaine, 40 μg/kg/min, I.V., potentiates the tachycardia due to vagal stimulation in the atropinized dog. 4. Chronic thoracic sympathectomy markedly retards the recovery of the ventricular rate from the inhibitory action of the vagus. Under this condition, the infusion of cocaine does not significantly enhance the ventricular escape. 5. These findings suggest that an adrenergic mechanism located at the sympathetic nerves supplying the heart is substantially involved in the phenomenon of vagal escape. PMID:5249864

  13. Long-term reduction of cocaine self-administration in rats treated with adenoviral vector-delivered cocaine hydrolase: evidence for enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Zlebnik, Natalie E; Brimijoin, Stephen; Gao, Yang; Saykao, Amy T; Parks, Robin J; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2014-05-01

    A new pharmacokinetic approach treating cocaine addiction involves rapidly metabolizing cocaine before it reaches brain reward centers using mutated human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) or cocaine hydrolase (CocH). Recent work has shown that helper-dependent adenoviral (hdAD) vector-mediated plasma CocH reduced the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine and prevented reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior up to 6 months in rats. The present study investigated whether hdAD-CocH could decrease ongoing intravenous cocaine (0.4 mg/kg) self-administration. The hdAD-CocH vector was injected into self-administering rats, and after accumulation of plasma CocH, there was a dramatic reduction in cocaine infusions earned under a fixed ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement that lasted for the length of the study (>2 months). Pretreatment with the selective BChE and CocH inhibitor iso-OMPA (1.5 mg/kg) restored cocaine intake; therefore, the decline in self-administration was likely due to rapid CocH-mediated cocaine metabolism. Direct measurements of cocaine levels in plasma and brain samples taken after the conclusion of behavioral studies provided strong support for this conclusion. Further, rats injected with hdAD-CocH did not experience a deficit in operant responding for drug reinforcement and self-administered methamphetamine (0.05 mg/kg) at control levels. Overall, these outcomes suggest that viral gene transfer can yield plasma CocH levels that effectively diminish long-term cocaine intake and may have potential treatment implications for cocaine-dependent individuals seeking to become and remain abstinent. PMID:24407266

  14. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  15. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  16. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  17. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  18. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  19. Deficits in ventromedial prefrontal cortex group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor function mediate resistance to extinction during protracted withdrawal from an extensive history of cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shahar, Osnat; Sacramento, Arianne D; Miller, Bailey W; Webb, Sierra M; Wroten, Melissa G; Silva, Hannah E; Caruana, Amanda L; Gordon, Evan J; Ploense, Kyle L; Ditzhazy, Jennifer; Kippin, Tod E; Szumlinski, Karen K

    2013-01-01

    Anomalies in prefrontal cortex (PFC) function are posited to underpin difficulties in learning to suppress drug-seeking behavior during abstinence. Because group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) regulate drug-related learning, we assayed the consequences of extended access to intravenous cocaine (6 h/d; 0.25 mg/infusion for 10 d) on the PFC expression of group 1 mGluRs and the relevance of observed changes for cocaine seeking. After protracted withdrawal, cocaine-experienced animals exhibited a time-dependent intensification of cue-induced cocaine-seeking behavior and an impaired extinction of this behavior. These behavioral phenomena were associated with a time-dependent reduction in mGluR1/5 expression within ventromedial PFC (vmPFC) of cocaine-experienced animals exposed to extinction testing but not in untested ones. Interestingly, pharmacological manipulations of vmPFC mGluR1/5 produced no immediate effects on cue-induced cocaine-seeking behavior but produced residual effects on a subsequent test for cocaine seeking. At 3 d withdrawal, cocaine-experienced rats infused intra-vmPFC with mGluR1/5 antagonists, either before or after an initial test for cocaine seeking, persisted in their cocaine seeking akin to cocaine-experienced rats in protracted withdrawal. Conversely, cocaine-experienced rats infused with an mGluR1/5 agonist before the initial test for cocaine-seeking at 30 d withdrawal exhibited a facilitation of extinction learning. These data indicate that cue-elicited deficits in vmPFC group 1 mGluR function mediate resistance to extinction during protracted withdrawal from a history of extensive cocaine self-administration and pose pharmacological stimulation of these receptors as a potential approach to facilitate learned suppression of drug-seeking behavior that may aid drug abstinence.

  20. Cocaine induced hippocampi infarction

    PubMed Central

    Morales Vidal, Sarkis Gibran; Hornik, Alejandro; Morgan, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    A middle age man presented with disorientation and memory impairment due to bilateral hippocampal strokes secondary to cocaine use. This is the second report of cocaine induced hippocampi ischaemic strokes. In contrast to the previous report, this middle age man did not have cardiac arrest. PMID:22761214

  1. Enduring effects of tacrine on cocaine-reinforced behavior: Analysis by conditioned-place preference, temporal separation from drug reward, and reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Grasing, Kenneth; Yang, Yungao; He, Shuangteng

    2015-07-01

    Previous work by our laboratory has shown that tacrine can produce long-lasting reductions in cocaine-reinforced behavior, when administered to rats as daily intravenous infusions over four days. Tacrine causes dose-related liver toxicity in different species, and its manufacture for human use was recently discontinued. This study was conducted to further characterize its actions on cocaine reward. Cocaine-experienced animals that had no contact with drug over one week resumed self-administration at levels similar to their initial baseline. When tacrine was administered over four days which were preceded and followed by washout periods to allow elimination of cocaine and tacrine respectively, subsequent cocaine self-administration was attenuated by more than one-half. Tacrine administered at 10 mg/kg-day as a chronic infusion by osmotic pump did not modify cocaine-induced increases in locomotor activity or conditioned-place preference. In rats that exhibited persistent attenuation of cocaine-self-administration after receiving tacrine, cocaine-induced reinstatement was also attenuated. No changes in plasma measures of renal or hepatic function were observed in rats receiving tacrine. In conclusion, pretreatment with tacrine can decrease cocaine-motivated behavior measured by self-administration or reinstatement, but not conditioned-place preference. Reductions in cocaine self-administration following pretreatment with tacrine do not require direct interaction with cocaine and are not secondary to either liver or kidney toxicity.

  2. Enduring effects of tacrine on cocaine-reinforced behavior: Analysis by conditioned-place preference, temporal separation from drug reward, and reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Grasing, Kenneth; Yang, Yungao; He, Shuangteng

    2015-07-01

    Previous work by our laboratory has shown that tacrine can produce long-lasting reductions in cocaine-reinforced behavior, when administered to rats as daily intravenous infusions over four days. Tacrine causes dose-related liver toxicity in different species, and its manufacture for human use was recently discontinued. This study was conducted to further characterize its actions on cocaine reward. Cocaine-experienced animals that had no contact with drug over one week resumed self-administration at levels similar to their initial baseline. When tacrine was administered over four days which were preceded and followed by washout periods to allow elimination of cocaine and tacrine respectively, subsequent cocaine self-administration was attenuated by more than one-half. Tacrine administered at 10 mg/kg-day as a chronic infusion by osmotic pump did not modify cocaine-induced increases in locomotor activity or conditioned-place preference. In rats that exhibited persistent attenuation of cocaine-self-administration after receiving tacrine, cocaine-induced reinstatement was also attenuated. No changes in plasma measures of renal or hepatic function were observed in rats receiving tacrine. In conclusion, pretreatment with tacrine can decrease cocaine-motivated behavior measured by self-administration or reinstatement, but not conditioned-place preference. Reductions in cocaine self-administration following pretreatment with tacrine do not require direct interaction with cocaine and are not secondary to either liver or kidney toxicity. PMID:25890194

  3. A comparison of cocaine and its metabolite norcocaine: effects on locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Elliott, P J; Rosen, G M; Nemeroff, C B

    1987-03-01

    Intraventricular and intraperitoneal administration of cocaine and its metabolite norcocaine were studied in adult male rats. Norcocaine (10-100 micrograms) had no behavioral activity following central infusion but proved to be toxic at high doses (50-100 mg/kg) when given peripherally. Cocaine at high doses (100 micrograms), produced possible hypoactivity after central injections but produced significant hyperactivity after peripheral administration (20 mg/kg).

  4. [Cocaine - Characteristics and addiction].

    PubMed

    Girczys-Połedniok, Katarzyna; Pudlo, Robert; Jarząb, Magdalena; Szymlak, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine use leads to health, social and legal problems. The aim of this paper is to discuss cocaine action, addicts characteristics, use patterns and consequences, as well as addiction treatment methods. A literature review was based on the Medline, PubMed, Polish Medical Bibliography databases and the Silesian Library resources. The Police and Central Statistical Office statistics, as well as the World Health Organization, the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction and the National Office for Combating Drug Addiction reports were used. Cocaine leads to mood improvement, appetite decrease, physical and intellectual activity enhancement, euphoria, inflated self-esteem, social networking ease and increased sexual desire. Cocaine hydrochloride is mainly used intranasaly, but also as intravenous and subcutaneous injections. Cocaine use and first addiction treatment fall in later age compared to other psychoactive substances. There is a high men to women ratio among addicts. There is a relationship between cocaine addiction, the presence of other disorders and genetic predisposition to addiction development. Polish reports indicate higher popularity of cocaine among people with a high economic and social status. Although Poland is a country with the low percentage of cocaine use, its popularity is growing. The consequences of cocaine use concern somatic and mental health problems, socioeconomic and legal conditions. The drug plays a role in crimes and traffic accidents. Because of the risks associated with cocaine use, it has been listed in a register of drugs attached to the Act on Counteracting Drug Addiction. Addiction treatment includes psychological, pharmacological and harm reduction strategies. Med Pr 2016;67(4):537-544. PMID:27623834

  5. [Cocaine - Characteristics and addiction].

    PubMed

    Girczys-Połedniok, Katarzyna; Pudlo, Robert; Jarząb, Magdalena; Szymlak, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine use leads to health, social and legal problems. The aim of this paper is to discuss cocaine action, addicts characteristics, use patterns and consequences, as well as addiction treatment methods. A literature review was based on the Medline, PubMed, Polish Medical Bibliography databases and the Silesian Library resources. The Police and Central Statistical Office statistics, as well as the World Health Organization, the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction and the National Office for Combating Drug Addiction reports were used. Cocaine leads to mood improvement, appetite decrease, physical and intellectual activity enhancement, euphoria, inflated self-esteem, social networking ease and increased sexual desire. Cocaine hydrochloride is mainly used intranasaly, but also as intravenous and subcutaneous injections. Cocaine use and first addiction treatment fall in later age compared to other psychoactive substances. There is a high men to women ratio among addicts. There is a relationship between cocaine addiction, the presence of other disorders and genetic predisposition to addiction development. Polish reports indicate higher popularity of cocaine among people with a high economic and social status. Although Poland is a country with the low percentage of cocaine use, its popularity is growing. The consequences of cocaine use concern somatic and mental health problems, socioeconomic and legal conditions. The drug plays a role in crimes and traffic accidents. Because of the risks associated with cocaine use, it has been listed in a register of drugs attached to the Act on Counteracting Drug Addiction. Addiction treatment includes psychological, pharmacological and harm reduction strategies. Med Pr 2016;67(4):537-544.

  6. The rate of intravenous cocaine or amphetamine delivery: influence on drug-taking and drug-seeking behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Crombag, Hans S.; Ferrario, Carrie R.; Robinson, Terry E.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the influence of rate of intravenous infusion of cocaine or amphetamine on drug-taking and seeking behavior. First, drug-naive rats were tested for acquisition of self-administration of increasing doses of amphetamine or cocaine infused over 5 or 100s. Second, self-administration of cocaine or amphetamine infused over 5–100 sec was assessed on fixed or progressive-ratio (PR) reinforcement schedules. Finally, the ability of a single 5 or 100 sec amphetamine or cocaine infusion to reinstate extinguished drug seeking was assessed. Although slower infusion rates produced a small effect on drug taking under continuous-reinforcement conditions, infusion rate did not alter drug taking on intermittent or PR reinforcement schedules, or the ability of cocaine or amphetamine to reinstate drug seeking. Taken together, our results suggest that variation in drug delivery rate over a range that we previously found alters the induction of behavioral sensitization, gene-expression and striatal dopamine activity, does not markedly alter drug-taking or seeking behavior. PMID:18586051

  7. Cocaine Seeking and Taking: Role of Hippocampal Dopamine D1-like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaohu; Wells, Audrey M.; Fuchs, Rita A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-documented involvement of dopamine D1-like receptor stimulation in cocaine-induced goal-directed behaviors, little is known about the specific contribution of D1-like receptor populations in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) to drug context-induced cocaine-seeking or drug-reinforced instrumental behaviors. To investigate this question, rats were trained to lever press for un-signaled cocaine infusions in a distinct context followed by extinction training in a different context. Cocaine-seeking behavior (non-reinforced lever responding) was then assessed in the previously cocaine-paired and extinction contexts. SCH23390-induced D1-like receptor antagonism in the DH, but not the overlying trunk region of the somatosensory cortex, dose-dependently inhibited drug context-induced cocaine-seeking behavior, without altering cocaine-reinforced instrumental responding, cocaine intake, food-reinforced instrumental responding, or general motor activity, relative to vehicle treatment. These findings suggest that D1-like receptor stimulation in the DH is critical for the incentive motivational effects and/or memory of cocaine-paired contextual stimuli that contribute to drug-seeking behavior. PMID:24655895

  8. Cocaine seeking and taking: role of hippocampal dopamine D1-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaohu; Wells, Audrey M; Fuchs, Rita A

    2014-09-01

    Despite the well-documented involvement of dopamine D1-like receptor stimulation in cocaine-induced goal-directed behaviours, little is known about the specific contribution of D1-like receptor populations in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) to drug context-induced cocaine-seeking or drug-reinforced instrumental behaviours. To investigate this question, rats were trained to lever press for un-signalled cocaine infusions in a distinct context followed by extinction training in a different context. Cocaine-seeking behaviour (non-reinforced lever responding) was then assessed in the previously cocaine-paired and extinction contexts. SCH23390-induced D1-like receptor antagonism in the DH, but not the overlying trunk region of the somatosensory cortex, dose-dependently inhibited drug context-induced cocaine-seeking behaviour, without altering cocaine-reinforced instrumental responding, cocaine intake, food-reinforced instrumental responding, or general motor activity, relative to vehicle treatment. These findings suggest that D1-like receptor stimulation in the DH is critical for the incentive motivational effects and/or memory of cocaine-paired contextual stimuli that contribute to drug-seeking behaviour.

  9. Administration of Extended Infusion Piperacillin-TazobactamWith the Use of Smart Pump Technology

    PubMed Central

    DeBoer, Erica C.; Hammerquist, Rhonda J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: For beta-lactams, the parameter that best predicts bacterial killing is the length of time the antibiotic concentration exceeds the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Studies have demonstrated improved outcomes with extended infusion (4-hour) piperacillin-tazobactam (P-TZ) compared with traditional immediate infusions. Objectives: To describe how one institution made the conversion from immediate infusion of P-TZ to a 4-hour extended infusion utilizing an approved automatic therapeutic substitution, staff education, and smart pump technology, and to examine the impact of this conversion on patient length of stay and pharmacy costs. Methods: With approval from the Pharmacy and Therapeutics (P&T), Antimicrobial Stewardship, and Medical Executive Committees, the decision was made to automatically convert all P-TZ orders to a standardized 4-hour infusion given every 8 to 12 hours depending on renal function. The medical records of all adult patients receiving P-TZ during 12 months pre implementation and 24 months post implementation of a 4-hour extended infusion of P-TZ were retrospectively analyzed for length of stay and mortality. The cost of P-TZ was also assessed during these time periods. Results: With the help of smart pump technology, our institution successfully completed a conversion to 4-hour extended infusion P-TZ. Through this conversion, pharmacy expenditure of P-TZ was reduced by 38%; the total cost savings was $387,980.62 for the 24-month postintervention phase. Extended infusion P-TZ reduced hospital length of stay by 0.6 days (P < .05), resulting in an additional cost savings of $1,689,480 for the 24-month postintervention phase. A conservative estimate of total cost savings to the hospital in the first 24 months, including the reduction in P-TZ expenditures, was $2,077,460. PMID:24958956

  10. Double Dissociation of the Dorsomedial and Dorsolateral Striatal Control Over the Acquisition and Performance of Cocaine Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Jennifer E; Belin, David; Everitt, Barry J

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the involvement of dopamine-dependent mechanisms in the anterior dorsolateral (aDLS) and posterior dorsomedial (pDMS) striatum during the early- and late-stage performance of cocaine-seeking behavior. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine under continuous reinforcement (fixed-ratio 1, FR1) with a 20-s light conditioned stimulus (CS) presented contingently upon each infusion. After a week, rats were challenged by a change in contingency to seek cocaine during a 15-min period uninfluenced by cocaine during which each response was reinforced by a 1-s CS presentation. Dopamine transmission blockade by intracranial infusions of α-flupenthixol only in the pDMS, but not in the aDLS, dose dependently reduced performance of cue-controlled cocaine seeking at the early stage of self-administration. One cohort of rats was then trained with increasing response requirements until completing 15 sessions under a second-order schedule [FI15(FR10:S)] so that cocaine-seeking performance became well established. At this stage, intra-aDLS, but not pDMS, α-flupenthixol infusions dose dependently reduced active lever presses. The second cohort of rats continued to self-administer cocaine under the FR1 schedule such that their drug intake was matched to the late-stage performance group. α-Flupenthixol in the pDMS, but not in the aDLS, again prevented the performance of cocaine seeking. These results show that dopamine transmission in the pDMS is required for initial performance of goal-directed cocaine seeking, and that its role is ultimately subverted and devolves instead to the aDLS only following training with high rates of cocaine-seeking behavior, supporting the theory of dynamic shifts in the striatal control over cocaine seeking between goal-directed and habitual performance. PMID:22739470

  11. Double dissociation of the dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatal control over the acquisition and performance of cocaine seeking.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jennifer E; Belin, David; Everitt, Barry J

    2012-10-01

    The present study investigated the involvement of dopamine-dependent mechanisms in the anterior dorsolateral (aDLS) and posterior dorsomedial (pDMS) striatum during the early- and late-stage performance of cocaine-seeking behavior. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine under continuous reinforcement (fixed-ratio 1, FR1) with a 20-s light conditioned stimulus (CS) presented contingently upon each infusion. After a week, rats were challenged by a change in contingency to seek cocaine during a 15-min period uninfluenced by cocaine during which each response was reinforced by a 1-s CS presentation. Dopamine transmission blockade by intracranial infusions of α-flupenthixol only in the pDMS, but not in the aDLS, dose dependently reduced performance of cue-controlled cocaine seeking at the early stage of self-administration. One cohort of rats was then trained with increasing response requirements until completing 15 sessions under a second-order schedule [FI15(FR10:S)] so that cocaine-seeking performance became well established. At this stage, intra-aDLS, but not pDMS, α-flupenthixol infusions dose dependently reduced active lever presses. The second cohort of rats continued to self-administer cocaine under the FR1 schedule such that their drug intake was matched to the late-stage performance group. α-Flupenthixol in the pDMS, but not in the aDLS, again prevented the performance of cocaine seeking. These results show that dopamine transmission in the pDMS is required for initial performance of goal-directed cocaine seeking, and that its role is ultimately subverted and devolves instead to the aDLS only following training with high rates of cocaine-seeking behavior, supporting the theory of dynamic shifts in the striatal control over cocaine seeking between goal-directed and habitual performance.

  12. Double dissociation of the dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatal control over the acquisition and performance of cocaine seeking.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jennifer E; Belin, David; Everitt, Barry J

    2012-10-01

    The present study investigated the involvement of dopamine-dependent mechanisms in the anterior dorsolateral (aDLS) and posterior dorsomedial (pDMS) striatum during the early- and late-stage performance of cocaine-seeking behavior. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine under continuous reinforcement (fixed-ratio 1, FR1) with a 20-s light conditioned stimulus (CS) presented contingently upon each infusion. After a week, rats were challenged by a change in contingency to seek cocaine during a 15-min period uninfluenced by cocaine during which each response was reinforced by a 1-s CS presentation. Dopamine transmission blockade by intracranial infusions of α-flupenthixol only in the pDMS, but not in the aDLS, dose dependently reduced performance of cue-controlled cocaine seeking at the early stage of self-administration. One cohort of rats was then trained with increasing response requirements until completing 15 sessions under a second-order schedule [FI15(FR10:S)] so that cocaine-seeking performance became well established. At this stage, intra-aDLS, but not pDMS, α-flupenthixol infusions dose dependently reduced active lever presses. The second cohort of rats continued to self-administer cocaine under the FR1 schedule such that their drug intake was matched to the late-stage performance group. α-Flupenthixol in the pDMS, but not in the aDLS, again prevented the performance of cocaine seeking. These results show that dopamine transmission in the pDMS is required for initial performance of goal-directed cocaine seeking, and that its role is ultimately subverted and devolves instead to the aDLS only following training with high rates of cocaine-seeking behavior, supporting the theory of dynamic shifts in the striatal control over cocaine seeking between goal-directed and habitual performance. PMID:22739470

  13. Selective activation of the trace amine-associated receptor 1 decreases cocaine's reinforcing efficacy and prevents cocaine-induced changes in brain reward thresholds.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yue; Mortas, Patrick; Hoener, Marius C; Canales, Juan J

    2015-12-01

    The newly discovered trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) has emerged as a promising target for medication development in stimulant addiction due to its ability to regulate dopamine (DA) function and modulate stimulants' effects. Recent findings indicate that TAAR1 activation blocks some of the abuse-related physiological and behavioral effects of cocaine. However, findings from existing self-administration studies are inconclusive due to the very limited range of cocaine unit doses tested. Here, in order to shed light on the influence of TAAR1 on cocaine's reward and reinforcement, we studied the effects of partial and full activation of TAAR1on (1) the dose-response curve for cocaine self-administration and (2) cocaine-induced changes in intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). In the first experiment, we examined the effects of the selective full and partial TAAR1 agonists, RO5256390 and RO5203648, on self-administration of five unit-injection doses of cocaine (0.03, 0.1, 0.2, 0.45, and 1mg/kg/infusion). Both agonists induced dose-dependent downward shifts in the cocaine dose-response curve, indicating that both partial and full TAAR1 activation decrease cocaine, reinforcing efficacy. In the second experiment, RO5256390 and the partial agonist, RO5263397, dose-dependently prevented cocaine-induced lowering of ICSS thresholds. Taken together, these data demonstrated that TAAR1 stimulation effectively suppresses the rewarding and reinforcing effects of cocaine in self-administration and ICSS models, supporting the candidacy of TAAR1 as a drug discovery target for cocaine addiction.

  14. Selective activation of the trace amine-associated receptor 1 decreases cocaine's reinforcing efficacy and prevents cocaine-induced changes in brain reward thresholds.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yue; Mortas, Patrick; Hoener, Marius C; Canales, Juan J

    2015-12-01

    The newly discovered trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) has emerged as a promising target for medication development in stimulant addiction due to its ability to regulate dopamine (DA) function and modulate stimulants' effects. Recent findings indicate that TAAR1 activation blocks some of the abuse-related physiological and behavioral effects of cocaine. However, findings from existing self-administration studies are inconclusive due to the very limited range of cocaine unit doses tested. Here, in order to shed light on the influence of TAAR1 on cocaine's reward and reinforcement, we studied the effects of partial and full activation of TAAR1on (1) the dose-response curve for cocaine self-administration and (2) cocaine-induced changes in intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). In the first experiment, we examined the effects of the selective full and partial TAAR1 agonists, RO5256390 and RO5203648, on self-administration of five unit-injection doses of cocaine (0.03, 0.1, 0.2, 0.45, and 1mg/kg/infusion). Both agonists induced dose-dependent downward shifts in the cocaine dose-response curve, indicating that both partial and full TAAR1 activation decrease cocaine, reinforcing efficacy. In the second experiment, RO5256390 and the partial agonist, RO5263397, dose-dependently prevented cocaine-induced lowering of ICSS thresholds. Taken together, these data demonstrated that TAAR1 stimulation effectively suppresses the rewarding and reinforcing effects of cocaine in self-administration and ICSS models, supporting the candidacy of TAAR1 as a drug discovery target for cocaine addiction. PMID:26048337

  15. Prior extended daily access to cocaine elevates the reward threshold in a conditioned place preference test.

    PubMed

    Su, Zu-In; Wenzel, Jennifer; Ettenberg, Aaron; Ben-Shahar, Osnat

    2014-09-01

    We have previously shown that extended-access subjects exhibit heightened motivation for cocaine in the runway model, as reflected by reduced number of retreats. This heightened motivation could reflect either an increase in cocaine-induced reward or a decrease in cocaine-induced aversion. The current experiment was therefore devised to assess the cocaine-induced reward and aversion in extended-access rats using a place conditioning test. Rats trained to lever press for intravenous (IV) cocaine (0.25 mg/infusion) were provided 6-hour daily access to the drug over 10 days. Lever pressing in control subjects produced IV infusions of saline. Following drug self-administration, subjects underwent place conditioning for the immediate or delayed effects of cocaine (1.0 or 2.5 mg/kg, IV). In control subjects, the immediate effects of the low dose of cocaine produced conditioned places preferences (CPPs), while the delayed effects produced conditioned place aversions (CPAs). In contrast, the animals receiving low cocaine dose for 6 hours, exhibited place aversions but not preferences; an effect that was reversed when the dose of cocaine was increased. Additionally, in the 6-hour group, delayed conditioning was associated with a reduction in zif268 immunoreactivity in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens shell while immediate conditioning was associated with an increase in zif268-positive cells in the central nucleus of the amygdala. Collectively, these data suggest that extended daily access to cocaine produces a shift in the subject's perceived reward threshold that is paralleled by alterations in the activity of both the reward and stress pathways.

  16. Prior extended daily access to cocaine elevates the reward threshold in a conditioned place preference test.

    PubMed

    Su, Zu-In; Wenzel, Jennifer; Ettenberg, Aaron; Ben-Shahar, Osnat

    2014-09-01

    We have previously shown that extended-access subjects exhibit heightened motivation for cocaine in the runway model, as reflected by reduced number of retreats. This heightened motivation could reflect either an increase in cocaine-induced reward or a decrease in cocaine-induced aversion. The current experiment was therefore devised to assess the cocaine-induced reward and aversion in extended-access rats using a place conditioning test. Rats trained to lever press for intravenous (IV) cocaine (0.25 mg/infusion) were provided 6-hour daily access to the drug over 10 days. Lever pressing in control subjects produced IV infusions of saline. Following drug self-administration, subjects underwent place conditioning for the immediate or delayed effects of cocaine (1.0 or 2.5 mg/kg, IV). In control subjects, the immediate effects of the low dose of cocaine produced conditioned places preferences (CPPs), while the delayed effects produced conditioned place aversions (CPAs). In contrast, the animals receiving low cocaine dose for 6 hours, exhibited place aversions but not preferences; an effect that was reversed when the dose of cocaine was increased. Additionally, in the 6-hour group, delayed conditioning was associated with a reduction in zif268 immunoreactivity in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens shell while immediate conditioning was associated with an increase in zif268-positive cells in the central nucleus of the amygdala. Collectively, these data suggest that extended daily access to cocaine produces a shift in the subject's perceived reward threshold that is paralleled by alterations in the activity of both the reward and stress pathways. PMID:23634951

  17. Cocaine use and stroke

    PubMed Central

    Treadwell, Sean D; Robinson, Tom G

    2007-01-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in developed countries. In England and Wales, 1000 people under the age of 30 have a stroke each year. Cocaine is the most commonly used class A drug, and the first report of cocaine‐induced stroke was in 1977. Since the development of alkaloidal “crack” cocaine in the 1980s, there has been a significant rise in the number of case reports describing both ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke associated with cocaine use. Cocaine is a potent central nervous system stimulant, and acts by binding to specific receptors at pre‐synaptic sites preventing the reuptake of neurotransmitters. The exact mechanism of cocaine‐induced stroke remains unclear and there are likely to be a number of factors involved including vasospasm, cerebral vasculitis, enhanced platelet aggregation, cardioembolism, and hypertensive surges associated with altered cerebral autoregulation. The evidence surrounding each of these factors will be considered here. PMID:17551070

  18. Cocaine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the semen and may reduce the number of sperm, and increase the number of abnormal sperm. This can result in fertility problems. Cocaine can attach to sperm. This has led to the suggestion that sperm ...

  19. Phenytoin Toxicity from Cocaine Adulteration

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Carlos J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of phenytoin (PHT) as a cocaine adulterant was reported decades ago; that practice is still current. Ironically PHT has also been used for the treatment of cocaine dependence. A drug smuggler developed PHT toxicity after swallowing several rocks of crack. We investigated the current trends of PHT as a cocaine adulterant and its toxicological implications. We also reviewed the clinical use of PTH in relation to cocaine. The use of PHT as cocaine cut is a current practice. This may affect the clinical manifestations and the management of the cocaine-related visits to the emergency department. PMID:24672596

  20. Increased Impulsivity Retards the Transition to Dorsolateral Striatal Dopamine Control of Cocaine Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Jennifer E.; Dilleen, Ruth; Pelloux, Yann; Economidou, Daina; Dalley, Jeffrey W.; Belin, David; Everitt, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of maladaptive drug-seeking habits occurs in conjunction with a ventral-to-dorsal striatal shift in dopaminergic control over behavior. Although these habits readily develop as drug use continues, high impulsivity predicts loss of control over drug seeking and taking. However, whether impulsivity facilitates the transition to dorsolateral striatum (DLS) dopamine-dependent cocaine-seeking habits or whether impulsivity and cocaine-induced intrastriatal shifts are additive processes is unknown. Methods High- and low-impulsive rats identified in the five-choice serial reaction-time task were trained to self-administer cocaine (.25 mg/infusion) with infusions occurring in the presence of a cue-light conditioned stimulus. Dopamine transmission was blocked in the DLS after three stages of training: early, transition, and late-stage, by bilateral intracranial infusions of α-flupenthixol (0, 5, 10, or 15 μg/side) during 15-min cocaine-seeking test sessions in which each response was reinforced by a cocaine-associated conditioned stimulus presentation. Results In early-stage tests, neither group was affected by DLS dopamine receptor blockade. In transition-stage tests, low-impulsive rats showed a significant dose-dependent reduction in cocaine seeking, whereas high-impulsive rats were still unaffected by α-flupenthixol infusions. In the final, late-stage seeking test, both groups showed dose-dependent sensitivity to dopamine receptor blockade. Conclusions The results demonstrate that high impulsivity is associated with a delayed transition to DLS-dopamine-dependent control over cocaine seeking. This suggests that, if impulsivity confers an increased propensity to addiction, it is not simply through a more rapid development of habits but instead through interacting corticostriatal and striato-striatal processes that result ultimately in maladaptive drug-seeking habits. PMID:24157338

  1. Method of infusion extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  2. Lorcaserin Reduces the Discriminative Stimulus and Reinforcing Effects of Cocaine in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gregory T; Gerak, Lisa R; Javors, Martin A; France, Charles P

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine abuse and obesity are serious public health problems, and studies suggest that both dopamine and serotonin systems are involved in regulating the consumption of drugs and food. Lorcaserin has serotonin (5-HT)2C receptor agonist actions, is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating obesity, and might be effective for treating cocaine abuse. These studies characterized the pharmacokinetic and behavioral profiles of lorcaserin (intragastric administration) and determined the effectiveness of lorcaserin to alter discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects of cocaine (intravenous administration) in rhesus monkeys. Administered acutely, lorcaserin dose-dependently increased the occurrence of yawning while decreasing spontaneous activity and operant responding for food. These effects appeared within 30-60 minutes of administration and began to dissipate by 240 minutes, a time course closely matching plasma concentrations of lorcaserin. In monkeys discriminating cocaine from saline, lorcaserin alone did not occasion cocaine-appropriate responding but shifted the cocaine dose-response curve to the right and down in two of three monkeys. When administered acutely, lorcaserin dose-dependently decreased the rate at which monkeys responded for infusions of cocaine. When administered chronically, 3.2 mg/kg lorcaserin reduced the rate of cocaine-maintained responding by 50% for the duration of a 14-day treatment period. Together, these results show that lorcaserin attenuates the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine after acute administration and the reinforcing effects of cocaine after acute and repeated administration, consistent with the view that it might have utility in treating cocaine abuse.

  3. Lorcaserin Reduces the Discriminative Stimulus and Reinforcing Effects of Cocaine in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gregory T; Gerak, Lisa R; Javors, Martin A; France, Charles P

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine abuse and obesity are serious public health problems, and studies suggest that both dopamine and serotonin systems are involved in regulating the consumption of drugs and food. Lorcaserin has serotonin (5-HT)2C receptor agonist actions, is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating obesity, and might be effective for treating cocaine abuse. These studies characterized the pharmacokinetic and behavioral profiles of lorcaserin (intragastric administration) and determined the effectiveness of lorcaserin to alter discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects of cocaine (intravenous administration) in rhesus monkeys. Administered acutely, lorcaserin dose-dependently increased the occurrence of yawning while decreasing spontaneous activity and operant responding for food. These effects appeared within 30-60 minutes of administration and began to dissipate by 240 minutes, a time course closely matching plasma concentrations of lorcaserin. In monkeys discriminating cocaine from saline, lorcaserin alone did not occasion cocaine-appropriate responding but shifted the cocaine dose-response curve to the right and down in two of three monkeys. When administered acutely, lorcaserin dose-dependently decreased the rate at which monkeys responded for infusions of cocaine. When administered chronically, 3.2 mg/kg lorcaserin reduced the rate of cocaine-maintained responding by 50% for the duration of a 14-day treatment period. Together, these results show that lorcaserin attenuates the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine after acute administration and the reinforcing effects of cocaine after acute and repeated administration, consistent with the view that it might have utility in treating cocaine abuse. PMID:26534942

  4. Reinforcement-related regulation of AMPA glutamate receptor subunits in the ventral tegmental area enhances motivation for cocaine.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang Ho; Edwards, Scott; Graham, Danielle L; Larson, Erin B; Whisler, Kimberly N; Simmons, Diana; Friedman, Allyson K; Walsh, Jessica J; Rahman, Zia; Monteggia, Lisa M; Eisch, Amelia J; Neve, Rachael L; Nestler, Eric J; Han, Ming-Hu; Self, David W

    2011-05-25

    Chronic cocaine use produces numerous biological changes in brain, but relatively few are functionally associated with cocaine reinforcement. Here we show that daily intravenous cocaine self-administration, but not passive cocaine administration, induces dynamic upregulation of the AMPA glutamate receptor subunits GluR1 and GluR2 in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of rats. Increases in GluR1 protein and GluR1(S845) phosphorylation are associated with increased GluR1 mRNA in self-administering animals, whereas increased GluR2 protein levels occurred despite substantial decreases in GluR2 mRNA. We investigated the functional significance of GluR1 upregulation in the VTA on cocaine self-administration using localized viral-mediated gene transfer. Overexpression of GluR1(WT) in rat VTA primarily infected dopamine neurons (75%) and increased AMPA receptor-mediated membrane rectification in these neurons with AMPA application. Similar GluR1(WT) overexpression potentiated locomotor responses to intra-VTA AMPA, but not NMDA, infusions. In cocaine self-administering animals, overexpression of GluR1(WT) in the VTA markedly increased the motivation for cocaine injections on a progressive ratio schedule of cocaine reinforcement. In contrast, overexpression of protein kinase A-resistant GluR1(S845A) in the VTA reduced peak rates of cocaine self-administration on a fixed ratio reinforcement schedule. Neither viral vector altered sucrose self-administration, and overexpression of GluR1(WT) or GluR1(S845A) in the adjacent substantia nigra had no effect on cocaine self-administration. Together, these results suggest that dynamic regulation of AMPA receptors in the VTA during cocaine self-administration contributes to cocaine addiction by acting to facilitate subsequent cocaine use.

  5. Cocaine abuse during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cressman, Alex M; Natekar, Aniket; Kim, Eunji; Koren, Gideon; Bozzo, Pina

    2014-07-01

    Cocaine abuse during pregnancy is a significant public health problem but is infrequently discussed between physicians and patients. The impact of in utero cocaine exposure on pregnancy and the baby has received significant media attention in preceding decades because of fears of teratogenicity, long-term health consequences, and poor cognitive and neurodevelopmental outcomes. We sought to review the medical literature examining these phenomena. We identified risks to the pregnancy and baby in women abusing cocaine during pregnancy. These include preterm birth, placenta-associated syndromes (e.g., placental abruption, preeclampsia, and placental infarction), and impaired fetal growth. Long-term neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits include (but are not limited to) poorer language development, learning and perceptual reasoning, behavioural problems, and adverse effects on memory and executive function. However, these results should be interpreted cautiously because cocaine abuse may be accompanied by many other maternal and sociodemographic risk factors, so it is difficult to ascertain the effect of cocaine alone. Therefore, it is critical to counsel patients about potential risk, and perhaps more importantly, to treat addiction and to better understand, and advocate for improvements to, these patients' high-risk environment.

  6. Upregulation of Arc mRNA Expression in the Prefrontal Cortex Following Cue-Induced Reinstatement of Extinguished Cocaine-Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    ZAVALA, ARTURO R.; OSREDKAR, TRACY; JOYCE, JEFFREY N.; NEISEWANDER, JANET L.

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine-associated cues acquire incentive motivational effects that manifest as cue-elicited craving in humans and cocaine-seeking behavior in rats. Here we examine the hypothesis that neuronal processes associated with incentive motivational effects of cocaine cues involve increased expression of the plasticity-associated gene, Arc. Rats trained to self-administer cocaine subsequently underwent extinction training, during which cocaine-seeking behavior (i.e., responses without cocaine reinforcement) progressively decreased. Rats were then tested for cocaine-seeking behavior either with or without response-contingent presentations of light/tone cues that had been previously paired with cocaine infusions during self-administration training. Cues elicited reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior and were accompanied by increased Arc mRNA levels in the orbitofrontal, prelimbic, and anterior cingulate cortices, suggesting Arc involvement in conditioned plasticity associated with incentive motivational effects of cocaine cues. Additionally, rats with a history of cocaine self-administration and extinction exhibited upregulation of Arc expression in several limbic and cortical regions relative to saline-yoked controls regardless of cue exposure condition, suggesting persistent neuroadaptations involving Arc within these regions. PMID:18361437

  7. When a good taste turns bad: Neural mechanisms underlying the emergence of negative affect and associated natural reward devaluation by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Carelli, Regina M; West, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    An important feature of cocaine addiction in humans is the emergence of negative affect (e.g., dysphoria, irritability, anhedonia), postulated to play a key role in craving and relapse. Indeed, the DSM-IV recognizes that social, occupational and/or recreational activities become reduced as a consequence of repeated drug use where previously rewarding experiences (e.g., food, job, family) become devalued as the addict continues to seek and use drug despite serious negative consequences. Here, research in the Carelli laboratory is reviewed that examined neurobiological mechanisms that may underlie these processes using a novel animal model. Oromotor responses (taste reactivity) were examined as rats learned that intraoral infusion of a sweet (e.g., saccharin) predicts impending but delayed access to cocaine self-administration. We showed that rats exhibit aversive taste reactivity (i.e., gapes/rejection responses) during infusion of the sweet paired with impending cocaine, similar to aversive responses observed during infusion of quinine, a bitter tastant. Critically, the expression of this pronounced aversion to the sweet predicted the subsequent motivation to self-administer cocaine. Electrophysiology studies show that this shift in palatability corresponds to an alteration in nucleus accumbens (NAc) cell firing; neurons that previously responded with inhibition during infusion of the palatable sweet shifted to excitatory activity during infusion of the cocaine-devalued tastant. This excitatory response profile is typically observed during infusion of quinine, indicating that the once palatable sweet becomes aversive following its association with impending but delayed cocaine, and NAc neurons encode this aversive state. We also review electrochemical studies showing a shift (from increase to decrease) in rapid NAc dopamine release during infusion of the cocaine-paired tastant as the aversive state developed, again, resulting in responses similar to quinine

  8. Fluorescence Immunoassay for Cocaine Detection.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjjou, Noriko; Shigetoh, Nobuyuki; Ito, Yuji

    2016-04-01

    A fluorescence immunoassay (FIA) has been developed for the detection of cocaine using norcocaine labeled with merocyanine dye and a monoclonal antibody specific to cocaine. Using this FIA, the detection range for cocaine was between 20.0 and 1700 μg/L with a limit of detection of 20.0 μg/L. Other cocaine derivatives did not interfere significantly with the detection when using this immunoassay technique with cross-reactivity values of less than 20%. Thus this FIA could be considered a useful tool for the detection of cocaine.

  9. Fluorescence Immunoassay for Cocaine Detection.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjjou, Noriko; Shigetoh, Nobuyuki; Ito, Yuji

    2016-04-01

    A fluorescence immunoassay (FIA) has been developed for the detection of cocaine using norcocaine labeled with merocyanine dye and a monoclonal antibody specific to cocaine. Using this FIA, the detection range for cocaine was between 20.0 and 1700 μg/L with a limit of detection of 20.0 μg/L. Other cocaine derivatives did not interfere significantly with the detection when using this immunoassay technique with cross-reactivity values of less than 20%. Thus this FIA could be considered a useful tool for the detection of cocaine. PMID:26977890

  10. Cocaine detection using piezoresistive microcantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srijanto, Bernadeta; Cheney, Christine P.; Hedden, David L.; Gehl, Anthony; Ferrell, Thomas L.

    2008-03-01

    Sensitive and inexpensive sensors play a significant role in the analysis of drugs and drug metabolites. Specifically, reliable in vivo detection of cocaine and cocaine metabolites serves as a useful tool in research of the body's reaction to the drug and in the treatment of the drug addiction. We present here a promising cocaine biosensor to be used in the human body. The sensor's active element consists of piezoresistive microcantilevers coated with an oligonucleotide-based aptamer as the cocaine binder. In vitro cocaine detection was carried out by flowing a cocaine solution over the microcantilevers. Advantages of this device are its low power consumption, its high sensitivity, and its potential for miniaturization into an implantable capsule. The limit of detection for cocaine in distilled water was found to be 1 ng/ml.

  11. Safety and Preliminary Efficacy of the Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor Huperzine A as a Treatment for Cocaine Use Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Verrico, Christopher D.; Newton, Thomas F.; Mahoney, James J.; Thompson-Lake, Daisy G. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cholinergic transmission is altered by drugs of abuse and contributes to psychostimulant reinforcement. In particular, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, like huperzine A, may be effective as treatments for cocaine use disorder. Methods: The current report describes results from a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in which participants (n=14–17/group) were randomized to huperzine A (0.4 or 0.8mg) or placebo. Participants received randomized infusions of cocaine (0 and 40mg, IV) on days 1 and 9. On day 10, participants received noncontingent, randomized infusions of cocaine (0 and 20mg, IV) before making 5 choices to receive additional infusions. Results: Huperzine A was safe and well-tolerated and compared with placebo, treatment with huperzine A did not cause significant changes in any cocaine pharmacokinetic parameters (all P>.05). Time-course and peak effects analyses show that treatment with 0.4mg of huperzine A significantly attenuated cocaine-induced increases of “Any Drug Effect,” “High,” “Stimulated,” “Willing to Pay,” and “Bad Effects” (all P>.05). Conclusions: The current study represents a significant contribution to the addiction field since it serves as the first published report on the safety and potential efficacy of huperzine A as a treatment for cocaine use disorder. PMID:26364275

  12. Therapeutic infusions of ketamine: Do the psychoactive effects matter?

    PubMed Central

    Dakwar, E.; Anerella, C.; Hart, C.L.; Levin, F.R.; Mathew, S.J.; Nunes, E.V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sub-anesthetic ketamine infusions may benefit a variety of psychiatric disorders, including addiction. Though ketamine engenders transient alterations in consciousness, it is not known whether these alterations influence efficacy. This analysis evaluates the mystical-type effects of ketamine, which may have therapeutic potential according to prior research, and assesses whether these effects mediate improvements in dependence-related deficits, 24 h postinfusion. Methods Eight cocaine dependent individuals completed this double-blind, randomized, inpatient study. Three counter-balanced infusions separated by 48 h were received: lorazepam (2 mg) and two doses of ketamine (0.41 mg/kg and 0.71 mg/kg, with the former dose always preceding the latter). Infusions were followed within 15 min by measures of dissociation (Clinician Administered Dissociative Symptoms Scale: CADSS) and mystical-type effects (adapted from Hood's Mysticism Scale: HMS). At baseline and 24 h postinfusion, participants underwent assessments of motivation to stop cocaine (University of Rhode Island Change Assessment) and cue-induced craving (by visual analogue scale for cocaine craving during cue exposure). Results Ketamine led to significantly greater acute mystical-type effects (by HMS) relative to the active control lorazepam; ketamine 0.71 mg/kg was associated with significantly higher HMS scores than was the 0.41 mg/kg dose. HMS score, but not CADSS score, was found to mediate the effect of ketamine on motivation to quit cocaine 24 h postinfusion. Conclusions These findings suggest that psychological mechanisms may be involved in some of the anti-addiction benefits resulting from ketamine. Future research can evaluate whether the psychoactive effects of ketamine influence improvements in larger samples. PMID:24480515

  13. Environmental enrichment counters cocaine abstinence-induced stress and brain reactivity to cocaine cues but fails to prevent the incubation effect

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Kenneth J.; Painter, Michael R.; Pentkowski, Nathan S.; Mitroi, Danut; Crawford, Cynthia A.; Neisewander, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) during a period of forced abstinence attenuates incentive motivational effects of cocaine-paired stimuli. Here we examined whether EE during forced abstinence from cocaine self-administration would prevent time-dependent increases in cue-elicited cocaine-seeking behavior (i.e., the incubation effect). Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine, which was paired with light/tone cues, for 15 days while living in isolated conditions (IC). Controls received yoked saline infusions. Subsequently, rats were assigned to live in either continued IC or EE for either 1 or 21 days of forced abstinence prior to a test for cocaine-seeking behavior. During testing, responding resulted only in presentation of the light/tone cues. Contrary to our prediction, cocaine-seeking behavior increased over time regardless of living condition during abstinence; however, EE attenuated cocaine-seeking behavior relative to IC regardless of length of abstinence. Brains were harvested and trunk blood was collected immediately after the 60-min test and later assayed. Results indicated that short-term EE elevated hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor and reduced plasma corticosterone compared to IC. Furthermore, 21 days of EE during forced abstinence prevented increases in the cue-elicited amygdala phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase expression that was observed in IC rats. These findings suggest that EE attenuates incentive motivational effects of cocaine cues through a mechanism other than preventing the incubation effect, perhaps involving reduction of stress and neural activity in response to cocaine-paired cues during acute withdrawal. PMID:21812872

  14. Hapten Optimization for Cocaine Vaccine with Improved Cocaine Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Muthu; Kinsey, Berma M.; Singh, Rana A.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Orson, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of any effective pharmacotherapy for cocaine addiction, immunotherapy is being actively pursued as a therapeutic intervention. While several different cocaine haptens have been explored to develop anti-cocaine antibodies, none of the hapten was successfully designed which had a protonated tropane nitrogen as is found in native cocaine under physiological conditions, including the succinyl norcocaine (SNC) hapten that has been tested in phase II clinical trials. Herein, we discuss three different cocaine haptens: hexyl-norcocaine (HNC), bromoacetamido butyl- norcocaine (BNC), and succinyl-butyl- norcocaine (SBNC), each with a tertiary nitrogen structure mimicking that of native cocaine which could optimize the specificity of anti-cocaine antibodies for better cocaine recognition. Mice immunized with these haptens conjugated to immunogenic proteins produced high titer anti-cocaine antibodies. However, during chemical conjugation of HNC and BNC haptens to carrier proteins, the 2β methyl ester group is hydrolyzed and immunizing mice with these conjugate vaccines in mice produced antibodies that bound both cocaine and the inactive benzoylecgonine metabolite. While in the case of the SBNC conjugate vaccine hydrolysis of the methyl ester did not appear to occur, leading to antibodies with high specificity to cocaine over BE. Though we observed similar specificity with a SNC hapten, the striking difference is that SBNC carries a positive charge on the tropane nitrogen atom, and therefore it is expected to have better binding of cocaine. The 50% cocaine inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for SBNC antibodies (2.8 μM) was significantly better than the SNC antibodies (9.4 μM) when respective hapten-BSA was used as a substrate. In addition, antibodies from both sera had no inhibitory effect from BE. In contrast to BNC and HNC, the SBNC conjugate was also found to be highly stable without any noticeable hydrolysis for several months at 4°C and 2-3 days in p

  15. Cocaine withdrawal symptoms identify "Type B" cocaine-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Kampman, Kyle; Dackis, Charles; Sparkman, Thorne; Pettinati, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies of substance dependence typologies briefly show that multivariate systems originally developed for identifying subtypes of alcoholics, such as Babor's Type A and B system, may also be valid in abusers of other substances, such as cocaine. Type B patients are characterized by an earlier onset of addiction and more severe symptoms of their addiction, psychopathology, and impulsivity. The Type B classification has also been associated with deficits in serotonergic function. We have found that patients who exhibit more severe cocaine withdrawal symptoms, as measured by scores on the Cocaine Selective Severity Assessment (CSSA), have poor treatment outcome and share many characteristics with "Type B" patients. In this paper, we review baseline characteristics of cocaine-dependent patients from several recently completed outpatient cocaine dependence treatment trials to assess the association of cocaine withdrawal symptom severity and the Type B profile. Identifying subtypes of cocaine-dependent patients may improve our ability to treat cocaine dependence by targeting treatments for specific subtypes of patients. We examined the ability of the CSSA scores to capture Type B characteristics in cocaine dependence by analyzing a series of cocaine medication trials that included 255 cocaine-dependent subjects. High CSSA scores at baseline were associated with a history of violent behavior, a family history of substance abuse, antisocial personality disorder, higher addiction severity, and co-morbid psychiatric diseases. Patients with high CSSA scores are also more likely to meet criteria for Type B (Type II) cocaine dependence. Identifying Type B cocaine-dependent patients may help to develop targeted psychosocial or pharmacological treatments for these difficult-to-treat patients.

  16. Responding during signaled availability and nonavailability of iv cocaine and food in rats: age and sex differences

    PubMed Central

    Zlebnik, Natalie E.; Navin, Sean F.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Research suggests that age and sex are vulnerability factors for drug abuse. However, few studies have systematically examined their interaction. Objective The purpose of the present study was to examine male and female, adult and adolescent rats under a procedure that measures responding during periods of signaled availability and nonavailability of iv cocaine and food reinforcers. Methods Adolescent and adult rats lever pressed for iv infusions of cocaine or food pellets under a procedure with three components of signaled availability of the reinforcer alternating with two components of signaled nonavailability. Adolescent rats were removed and then later retested under the same conditions as adults, and a group of adult rats was also removed and retested after a similar number of days. A subset of rats earning cocaine infusions under the initial test was later retested with food pellets under the same behavioral task to assess the influence of prior cocaine exposure on subsequent responding for a nondrug reinforcer. Results Adolescents (vs. adults) made more responses during periods of signaled iv cocaine availability and nonavailabiltiy, and adult females responded more than adult males during these periods. Responding during periods of signaled nonavailability of iv cocaine and food did not differ between the initial and subsequent retest conditions in adult rats. Further, adult males and females exposed to cocaine during adolescence responded more during periods of food availability compared to cocaine-naïve adults. Conclusion These results indicate that sex and age are vulnerability factors in cocaine abuse, and cocaine exposure during critical developmental stages can have long-lasting effects. PMID:21301816

  17. Nucleus accumbens shell and core involvement in drug context-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking in rats

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Rita A.; Ramirez, Donna R.; Bell, Guinevere H.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale The nucleus accumbens (NAC) is a functionally heterogeneous brain region with respect to its involvement in cocaine-seeking behavior triggered by drug-associated explicit conditioned stimuli, foot shock stress, or cocaine itself in the reinstatement animal model of drug relapse. However, it is not known whether the NAC or its subregions are critical for reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior produced by re-exposure to a previously cocaine-paired environmental context. Objectives The present study was designed to evaluate potentially unique contributions of the NAC core and shell to this behavior. Materials and methods Rats were trained to lever press for unsignaled cocaine infusions (0.15 mg/infusion, intravenous) in a distinct environmental context. Lever responding was then extinguished in a distinctly different environmental context (extinction context) during a minimum of seven daily training sessions. Subsequently, using a counterbalanced testing design, rats were re-exposed to the cocaine-paired context or the extinction context while cocaine seeking (i.e., responding on the previously cocaine-reinforced lever) was assessed. Before each test session, neural activity was inhibited selectively in the NAC core or shell using bilateral microinfusions of the γ-aminobutyric acid agonists, baclofen and muscimol (0/0 or 1.0/0.1 mM; 0.3 μl per hemisphere). Results Neural inactivation of the NAC shell or core attenuated responding in the cocaine context and, interestingly, increased responding in the extinction context. Control experiments indicated no effects on general activity or food-reinforced instrumental behavior. Conclusions These findings suggest that both subregions of the NAC may promote context-induced reinstatement by facilitating drug context-induced motivation for cocaine and context discrimination. PMID:18597075

  18. Combined Cocaine Hydrolase Gene Transfer and Anti-Cocaine Vaccine Synergistically Block Cocaine-Induced Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Marilyn E.; Zlebnik, Natalie E.; Anker, Justin J.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Orson, Frank M.; Shen, Xiaoyun; Kinsey, Berma; Parks, Robin J.; Gao, Yang; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Mice and rats were tested for reduced sensitivity to cocaine-induced hyper-locomotion after pretreatment with anti-cocaine antibody or cocaine hydrolase (CocH) derived from human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). In Balb/c mice, direct i.p. injection of CocH protein (1 mg/kg) had no effect on spontaneous locomotion, but it suppressed responses to i.p. cocaine up to 80 mg/kg. When CocH was injected i.p. along with a murine cocaine antiserum that also did not affect spontaneous locomotion, there was no response to any cocaine dose. This suppression of locomotor activity required active enzyme, as it was lost after pretreatment with iso-OMPA, a selective BChE inhibitor. Comparable results were obtained in rats that developed high levels of CocH by gene transfer with helper-dependent adenoviral vector, and/or high levels of anti-cocaine antibody by vaccination with norcocaine hapten conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). After these treatments, rats were subjected to a locomotor sensitization paradigm involving a “training phase" with an initial i.p. saline injection on day 1 followed by 8 days of repeated cocaine injections (10 mg/kg, i.p.). A 15-day rest period then ensued, followed by a final “challenge" cocaine injection. As in mice, the individual treatment interventions reduced cocaine-stimulated hyperactivity to a modest extent, while combined treatment produced a greater reduction during all phases of testing compared to control rats (with only saline pretreatment). Overall, the present results strongly support the view that anti-cocaine vaccine and cocaine hydrolase vector treatments together provide enhanced protection against the stimulatory actions of cocaine in rodents. A similar combination therapy in human cocaine users might provide a robust therapy to help maintain abstinence. PMID:22912888

  19. The interaction of cocaine with serotonin dorsal raphe neurons. Single-unit extracellular recording studies.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, K A; Lakoski, J M

    1990-02-01

    Cocaine potently inhibits the spontaneous activity of dorsal raphe serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT] neurons which possess impulse-modulating receptors of the 5-HT1A subtype. In an investigation of the neuropharmacologic mechanisms underlying this electrophysiologic effect, we have compared cocaine with structurally and functionally similar compounds, attempted to reverse cocaine-induced suppression of 5-HT dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) neuronal activity, and assessed the effects of 5-HT depletion on the response to cocaine. Extracellular recordings in chloral hydrate-anesthetized rats were obtained using single-unit recording techniques; drugs were infused intravenously IV) in a cumulative dose manner. The active isomer (-)-cocaine (ID50 = 0.5 +/- 0.15 mg/kg) and the phenyltropane analogue WIN 35428 (ID50 = 0.17 +/- 0.03 mg/kg) that share the ability of cocaine to block monoamine uptake also inhibit impulse activity in 5-HT neurons. In contrast, the inactive isomers (+)-cocaine, (+)-pseudococaine and the metabolite benzoylecgonine do not exhibit the same range of potency (maximal 20% to 30% inhibition at a cumulative dose of 8 to 16 mg/kg). A selective inhibitor of uptake for 5-HT (fluoxetine; ID50 = 1.8 +/- 0.5 mg/kg), but not norepinephrine (desipramine) or dopamine (GBR 12909), mimicked cocaine, as did the monoamine releaser amphetamine (ID50 = 2.86 +/- 0.46 mg/kg). The putative 5-HT1A autoreceptor antagonist spiperone reversed the cocaine-induced depression of firing rate in 64% of 5-HT neurons tested whereas receptor antagonists for dopamine D2 (haloperidol), 5-HT2 (ketanserin), gamma-aminobutyric acid (picrotoxin) and 5-HT1/beta-adrenergic (propranolol) were ineffective. Following treatment with the 5-HT synthesis inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (100 mg/kg/day of the base for 3 days), impulse depression induced by cocaine was significantly attenuated as compared to control, which suggests that the effects of cocaine may be dependent on endogenous 5-HT

  20. Emotion recognition during cocaine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, K P C; Steenbergen, L; Theunissen, E L; Toennes, S W; Ramaekers, J G

    2015-11-01

    Chronic or repeated cocaine use has been linked to impairments in social skills. It is not clear whether cocaine is responsible for this impairment or whether other factors, like polydrug use, distort the observed relation. We aimed to investigate this relation by means of a placebo-controlled experimental study. Additionally, associations between stressor-related activity (cortisol, cardiovascular parameters) induced by the biological stressor cocaine, and potential cocaine effects on emotion recognition were studied. Twenty-four healthy recreational cocaine users participated in this placebo-controlled within-subject study. Participants were tested between 1 and 2 h after treatment with oral cocaine (300 mg) or placebo. Emotion recognition of low and high intensity expressions of basic emotions (fear, anger, disgust, sadness, and happiness) was tested. Findings show that cocaine impaired recognition of negative emotions; this was mediated by the intensity of the presented emotions. When high intensity expressions of Anger and Disgust were shown, performance under influence of cocaine 'normalized' to placebo-like levels while it made identification of Sadness more difficult. The normalization of performance was most notable for participants with the largest cortisol responses in the cocaine condition compared to placebo. It was demonstrated that cocaine impairs recognition of negative emotions, depending on the intensity of emotion expression and cortisol response. PMID:26328908

  1. Emotion recognition during cocaine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, K P C; Steenbergen, L; Theunissen, E L; Toennes, S W; Ramaekers, J G

    2015-11-01

    Chronic or repeated cocaine use has been linked to impairments in social skills. It is not clear whether cocaine is responsible for this impairment or whether other factors, like polydrug use, distort the observed relation. We aimed to investigate this relation by means of a placebo-controlled experimental study. Additionally, associations between stressor-related activity (cortisol, cardiovascular parameters) induced by the biological stressor cocaine, and potential cocaine effects on emotion recognition were studied. Twenty-four healthy recreational cocaine users participated in this placebo-controlled within-subject study. Participants were tested between 1 and 2 h after treatment with oral cocaine (300 mg) or placebo. Emotion recognition of low and high intensity expressions of basic emotions (fear, anger, disgust, sadness, and happiness) was tested. Findings show that cocaine impaired recognition of negative emotions; this was mediated by the intensity of the presented emotions. When high intensity expressions of Anger and Disgust were shown, performance under influence of cocaine 'normalized' to placebo-like levels while it made identification of Sadness more difficult. The normalization of performance was most notable for participants with the largest cortisol responses in the cocaine condition compared to placebo. It was demonstrated that cocaine impairs recognition of negative emotions, depending on the intensity of emotion expression and cortisol response.

  2. The cocaine-abused heart.

    PubMed

    Keller, Kathryn Buchanan; Lemberg, Louis

    2003-11-01

    Recreational use of cocaine dates back to the Incas in South America 5000 years ago. Cocaine is derived from the leaves of Erythroxylon coca, a shrub native to South America. In the late 1800s, Sigmund Freud popularized the drug in Europe. He used cocaine to treat depression, asthma, cachexia, and for overcoming morphine addiction. Also in this period cocaine rapidly gained acceptance in surgical procedures as a local anesthetic and vasoconstrictor. Cocaine reached the United States in the early 1900s, and its popularity led President Taft to declare it public enemy number one in 1910. Cocaine became popular again in the 1980s. Currently cocaine use is responsible for more ED visits then any of the other illicit drugs. Because most cocaine users are young, they are at a lower risk for coronary artery atherosclerotic disease. An estimated 25 million people between the ages of 26 and 34 years have used cocaine at least once, 20% were women and 30% men. Habitual users of cocaine are estimated to number 1.5 million. Most cocaine-induced chest pains do not progress to MI, and in fact many originate in the chest wall. The chest pains due to cocaine, however, are induced by myocardial ischemia, a result of vasospasm and not a thrombotic occlusion of a coronary artery that has a ruptured atheromatous plaque. ECG findings can be misleading in the diagnosis because the early repolarization syndrome, a normal variant, is a frequent finding in young African American men. Measurement of cardiac troponin levels is the most reliable diagnostic test. Percutaneous coronary intervention and angioplasty, rather than thrombolysis, is the treatment of choice because intense coronary vasospasm is the primary pathophysiology in cocaine-induced MI.

  3. Signs of Cocaine Abuse and Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Signs of Cocaine Use and Addiction Signs of Cocaine Use and Addiction Listen After the "high" of ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  4. Programmable physiological infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. H.; Young, D. R.; Adachi, R. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A programmable physiological infusion device and method are provided wherein a program source, such as a paper tape, is used to actuate an infusion pump in accordance with a desired program. The system is particularly applicable for dispensing calcium in a variety of waveforms.

  5. Enhanced Choice for Viewing Cocaine Pictures in Cocaine Addiction

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, S.J.; Goldstein, R.; Moeller, S.J.; Maloney, T. Parvaz, M.A.; Dunning, J.P.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik, P.A.; Hajcak, G.; Telang, F.; Wang, G.-J.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2009-02-01

    Individuals with cocaine use disorder (CUD) chose cocaine over nondrug rewards. In two newly designed laboratory tasks with pictures, we document this modified choice outside of a cocaine administration paradigm. Choice for viewing cocaine, pleasant, unpleasant, or neutral pictures-under explicit contingencies (choice made between two fully visible side-by-side images) and under more implicit contingencies (selections made between pictures hidden under flipped-over cards)-was examined in 20 CUD and 20 matched healthy control subjects. Subjects also provided self-reported ratings of each picture's pleasantness and arousal. Under both contingencies, CUD subjects chose to view more cocaine pictures than control subjects, group differences that were not fully explained by the self-reported picture ratings. Furthermore, whereas CUD subjects choice for viewing cocaine pictures exceeded choice for viewing unpleasant pictures (but did not exceed choice for viewing pleasant pictures, in contrast to their self-reported ratings), healthy control subjects avoided viewing cocaine pictures as frequently as, or even more than, unpleasant pictures. Finally, CUD subjects with the most cocaine viewing selections, even when directly compared with selections of the pleasant pictures, also reported the most frequent recent cocaine use. Enhanced drug-related choice in cocaine addiction can be demonstrated even for nonpharmacologic (pictorial) stimuli. This choice, which is modulated by alternative stimuli, partly transcends self-reports (possibly indicative of a disconnect in cocaine addiction between self-reports and objective behavior) to provide an objective marker of addiction severity. Neuroimaging studies are needed to establish the neural underpinnings of such enhanced cocaine-related choice.

  6. Stimulus control of cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Stanley J; Kearns, David N; Cohn, Scott I; Schindler, Charles W; Panlilio, Leigh V

    2003-01-01

    Environmental stimuli that set the occasion wherein drugs are acquired can "trigger" drug-related behavior. Investigating the stimulus control of drug self-administration in laboratory animals should help us better understand this aspect of human drug abuse. Stimulus control of cocaine self-administration was generated here for the first time using multiple and chained schedules with short, frequently-alternating components--like those typically used to study food-maintained responding. The procedures and results are presented along with case histories to illustrate the strategies used to produce this stimulus control. All these multicomponent schedules contained variable-interval (VI) components as well as differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior (DRO) or extinction components. Schedule parameters and unit dose were adjusted for each rat to produce stable, moderate rates in VI components, with minimal postreinforcement (infusion) pausing, and response cessation in extinction and DRO components. Whole-body drug levels on terminal baselines calculated retrospectively revealed that all rats maintained fairly stable drug levels (mean, 2.3 to 3.4 mg/kg) and molar rates of intake (approximately 6.0 mg/kg/hr). Within this range, no relation between local VI response rates and drug level was found. The stimulus control revealed in cumulative records was indistinguishable from that achieved with food under these schedules, suggesting that common mechanisms may underlie the control of cocaine- and food-maintained behavior.

  7. Stimulus control of cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Stanley J; Kearns, David N; Cohn, Scott I; Schindler, Charles W; Panlilio, Leigh V

    2003-01-01

    Environmental stimuli that set the occasion wherein drugs are acquired can "trigger" drug-related behavior. Investigating the stimulus control of drug self-administration in laboratory animals should help us better understand this aspect of human drug abuse. Stimulus control of cocaine self-administration was generated here for the first time using multiple and chained schedules with short, frequently-alternating components--like those typically used to study food-maintained responding. The procedures and results are presented along with case histories to illustrate the strategies used to produce this stimulus control. All these multicomponent schedules contained variable-interval (VI) components as well as differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior (DRO) or extinction components. Schedule parameters and unit dose were adjusted for each rat to produce stable, moderate rates in VI components, with minimal postreinforcement (infusion) pausing, and response cessation in extinction and DRO components. Whole-body drug levels on terminal baselines calculated retrospectively revealed that all rats maintained fairly stable drug levels (mean, 2.3 to 3.4 mg/kg) and molar rates of intake (approximately 6.0 mg/kg/hr). Within this range, no relation between local VI response rates and drug level was found. The stimulus control revealed in cumulative records was indistinguishable from that achieved with food under these schedules, suggesting that common mechanisms may underlie the control of cocaine- and food-maintained behavior. PMID:12696744

  8. Prenatal and postnatal cocaine exposure predict teen cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Delaney-Black, Virginia; Chiodo, Lisa M; Hannigan, John H; Greenwald, Mark K; Janisse, James; Patterson, Grace; Huestis, Marilyn A; Partridge, Robert T; Ager, Joel; Sokol, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Preclinical studies have identified alterations in cocaine and alcohol self-administration and behavioral responses to pharmacological challenges in adolescent offspring following prenatal exposure. To date, no published human studies have evaluated the relation between prenatal cocaine exposure and postnatal adolescent cocaine use. Human studies of prenatal cocaine-exposed children have also noted an increase in behaviors previously associated with substance use/abuse in teens and young adults, specifically childhood and teen externalizing behaviors, impulsivity, and attention problems. Despite these findings, human research has not addressed prior prenatal exposure as a potential predictor of teen drug use behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relations between prenatal cocaine exposure and teen cocaine use in a prospective longitudinal cohort (n=316) that permitted extensive control for child, parent and community risk factors. Logistic regression analyses and Structural Equation Modeling revealed that both prenatal exposure and postnatal parent/caregiver cocaine use were uniquely related to teen use of cocaine at age 14 years. Teen cocaine use was also directly predicted by teen community violence exposure and caregiver negativity, and was indirectly related to teen community drug exposure. These data provide further evidence of the importance of prenatal exposure, family and community factors in the intergenerational transmission of teen/young adult substance abuse/use.

  9. Prenatal and postnatal cocaine exposure predict teen cocaine use

    PubMed Central

    Delaney-Black, Virginia; Chiodo, Lisa M.; Hannigan, John H.; Greenwald, Mark K.; Janisse, James; Patterson, Grace; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Partridge, Robert T.; Ager, Joel; Sokol, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies have identified alterations in cocaine and alcohol self-administration and behavioral responses to pharmacological challenges in adolescent offspring following prenatal exposure. To date, no published human studies have evaluated the relation between prenatal cocaine exposure and postnatal adolescent cocaine use. Human studies of prenatal cocaine-exposed children have also noted an increase in behaviors previously associated with substance use/abuse in teens and young adults, specifically childhood and teen externalizing behaviors, impulsivity, and attention problems. Despite these findings, human research has not addressed prior prenatal exposure as a potential predictor of teen drug use behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relations between prenatal cocaine exposure and teen cocaine use in a prospective longitudinal cohort (n = 316) that permitted extensive control for child, parent and community risk factors. Logistic regression analyses and Structural Equation Modeling revealed that both prenatal exposure and postnatal parent/caregiver cocaine use were uniquely related to teen use of cocaine at age 14 years. Teen cocaine use was also directly predicted by teen community violence exposure and caregiver negativity, and was indirectly related to teen community drug exposure. These data provide further evidence of the importance of prenatal exposure, family and community factors in the intergenerational transmission of teen/young adult substance abuse/use. PMID:20609384

  10. Cardiac Depression Induced by Cocaine or Cocaethylene are Alleviated by Lipid Emulsion More Effectively Than by Sulfobutylether β-Cyclodextrin

    PubMed Central

    Fettiplace, Michael R.; Pichurko, Adrian; Ripper, Richard; Lin, Bocheng; Kowal, Katarzyna; Lis, Kinga; Schwartz, David; Feinstein, Douglas L.; Rubinstein, Israel; Weinberg, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cocaine intoxication leads to over 500,000 emergency department visits annually in the USA and ethanol co-intoxication occurs in 34% of those cases. Cardiotoxicity is an ominous complication of cocaine and cocaethylene overdose for which no specific antidote exists. Because infusion of lipid emulsion (Intralipid) can treat lipophilic local anesthetic toxicity and cocaine is an amphipathic local anesthetic, the authors tested whether lipid emulsion could attenuate cocaine cardiotoxicity in vivo. The effects of lipid emulsion were compared with the metabolically inert sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (Captisol) in an isolated heart model of cocaine and cocaethylene toxicity to determine if capture alone could exert similar benefit as lipid emulsion which exhibits multi-modal effects. The authors then tested if cocaine and cocaethylene, like bupivacaine, inhibit lipid-based metabolism in isolated cardiac mitochondria. Methods For whole animal experiments, Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, instrumented, and pretreated with lipid emulsion followed by a continuous infusion of cocaine to assess time of onset of cocaine toxicity. For ex vivo experiments, rat hearts were placed onto a non-recirculating Langendorff system perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution. Heart rate, left ventricle maximum developed pressure (LVdevP), left ventricle diastolic pressure (LVDP), maximum rate of contraction (+dP/dtmax), maximum rate of relaxation (−dP/dtmax), rate-pressure product (RPP = heart rate*LVdevP), and line pressure were monitored continuously during the experiment. A dose-response to cocaine (10, 30, 50, and 100 μM) and cocaethylene (10, 30, 50 μM) was generated in the absence or presence of either 0.25% lipid emulsion, or sulfobutyl-β-cyclodextrin. Substrate-specific rates of oxygen consumption were measured in interfibrillar cardiac mitochondria in the presence of cocaine, cocaethylene, ecgonine, and benzoylecgonine. Results Treatment with lipid emulsion

  11. Effects of chronic binge-like ethanol consumption on cocaine self-administration in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Czoty, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Most cocaine abusers also abuse alcohol, but little is known about interactions that promote co-abuse. These experiments in rhesus monkeys determined the effects of >8 weeks of ethanol (EtOH) consumption on cocaine self-administration (n=6), effects of dopamine (DA) receptor antagonists on cocaine reinforcement (n=3–4 per drug) and the ability of the D2-like DA receptor agonist quinpirole to elicit yawning (n=3). Methods Monkeys self-administered cocaine (0.0–1.0 mg/kg/injection, i.v.) under a 300-second fixed-interval schedule and the above-listed variables were measured before EtOH exposure. Next, monkeys consumed a sweetened, 4% EtOH solution in the home cage under binge-like conditions: one hour, 5 days/week with daily intake equaling 2.0 g/kg EtOH. After approximately 8 weeks, measures were re-determined, then EtOH drinking was discontinued. Finally, acute effects of EtOH on cocaine self-administration were determined by infusing EtOH (0.0–1.0 g/kg. i.v.) prior to cocaine self-administration sessions (n=4). Results In 5 of 6 monkeys, EtOH drinking increased self-administration of low cocaine doses but did not alter reinforcing effects of higher doses. Self-administration returned to baseline after EtOH access was terminated (n=3). Effects of DA receptor antagonists on cocaine self-administration were not consistently altered after EtOH consumption, but the ability of quinpirole to induce yawning was enhanced in 2 of 3 monkeys. Acute EtOH infusions only decreased self-administration of lower cocaine doses. Conclusions Taken together, the data suggest that long-term EtOH exposure can increase sensitivity to cocaine, possibly by increasing D3 receptor sensitivity. Data do not support a role for acute pharmacological interactions in promoting cocaine/EtOH co-abuse. PMID:26048636

  12. Anisomycin in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Reduces Reconsolidation of Cocaine-associated Memories in the Rat Self-administration Model

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Barbara A.; Todd, Ryan P.; Slaker, Megan; Churchill, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that infusion of anisomycin into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) disrupts the reconsolidation of a cocaine-associated memory in the rat cocaine self-administration model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to lever press for cocaine self-administration (0.5 mg/kg/infusion) along with a cue light presentation on an FR1 followed by an FR3 schedule of reinforcement for 2 hr/day. Rats were then given extinction sessions or an equivalent forced abstinence period followed by a 5 min memory reactivation session during which time they received an ip cocaine injection (10 mg/kg, ip) and were allowed to press for contingent cue light presentation. Immediately after reactivation, they were administered an intra-mPFC infusion of vehicle or anisomycin. Two additional control groups received extinction and either no memory reactivation and intra-mPFC infusions as above or intra-mPFC infusions 6 hr after memory reactivation. A fourth group received forced abstinence and intra-mPFC infusions immediately after memory reactivation. Combined cocaine + cue-induced reinstatement was given 2–3 days (early) and 8–12 days (late) later. Rats given anisomycin in the Extinction + Reactivation demonstrated decreased reinstatement, while anisomycin treatment did not alter behavior in any of the other three groups. These results suggest that extinction training may recruit the mPFC such that it renders the memory susceptible to disruption by anisomycin. These findings have implications for using extinction training prior to or in conjunction with other therapies, including reconsolidation disruption, to enhance prefrontal control over drug-seeking behavior. PMID:25576371

  13. Saline infusion sonohysterography.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Saline infusion sonohysterography consists of ultrasonographic imaging of the uterus and uterocervical cavity, using real-time ultrasonography during injection of sterile saline into the uterus. When properly performed, saline infusion sonohysterography can provide information about the uterus and endometrium. The most common indication for sonohysterography is abnormal uterine bleeding. sonohysterography should not be performed in a woman who is pregnant or could be pregnant or in a woman with a pelvic infection or unexplained pelvic tenderness. Physicians who perform or supervise diagnostic saline infusion sonohysterograpy should have training, experience, and demonstrated competence in gynecologic ultrasonography and saline infusion sonohysterography. Portions of this document were developed jointly with the American College of Radiology and the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine. PMID:14968760

  14. Copper thiocyanato complexes and cocaine - a case of 'black cocaine'.

    PubMed

    Laussmann, Tim; Grzesiak, Ireneus; Krest, Alexander; Stirnat, Kathrin; Meier-Giebing, Sigrid; Ruschewitz, Uwe; Klein, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition of a black powder confiscated by German customs was elucidated. Black powders are occasionally used as a 'transporter' for cocaine and are obviously especially designed to cloak the presence of the drug. The material consisting of cocaine, copper, iron, thiocyanate, and graphite was approached by analytical tools and chemical modelling. Graphite is added to the material probably with the intention of masking the typical infrared (IR) fingerprints of cocaine and can be clearly detected by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Cu(2+) and NCS(-) ions, when carefully reacted with cocaine hydrochloride, form the novel compound (CocH)2 [Cu(NCS)4 ] (CocH(+)  = protonated cocaine), which has been characterised by single crystal XRD, IR, NMR, UV/Vis absorption and EPR spectroscopy. Based on some further experiments the assumed composition of the original black powder is discussed. PMID:24753444

  15. Genetic Variation of the Dopamine Transporter (DAT1) Influences the Acute Subjective Responses to Cocaine in Volunteers with Cocaine Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Alex J.; Nielsen, David A.; Spellicy, Catherine J.; Hamon, Sara C.; Gingrich, Justin; Thompson-Lake, Daisy G. Y.; Nielsen, Ellen M.; Mahoney, James J.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Newton, Thomas F.; De La Garza, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objective : The aim of this study was to identify gene variants of DAT1 (SLC6A3) that modulate subjective responses to acute cocaine exposure. Methods Non-treatment seeking volunteers with cocaine use disorders (CUDs) received a single bolus infusion of saline and cocaine (40 mg, IV) in randomized order. Subjective effects were assessed with visual analog scales administered before (-15 min) and up to 20 min after infusion. Subjective effects ratings were normalized to baseline and saline infusion values were subtracted. Data was analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. DNA from subjects was genotyped for the DAT1 intron 8 (rs3836790) and 3’ UTR (rs28363170) variable number of tandem repeats. Results Participants were mostly male (~80%) and African American (~70%). No differences were found among drug use variables between groups for either polymorphism. Carriers of the 9-allele of the DAT1 3’ UTR (9,9 and 9,10) (n = 24) exhibited greater responses to cocaine for “high”, “any drug effect”, “anxious”, and “stimulated” (all p-values < 0.001) compared to individuals homozygous for the 10-allele (n = 33). For the intron 8 polymorphism, individuals homozygous for the 6 allele exhibited greater responses for “anxious” than carriers of the 5 allele (p < 0.001). Individuals possessing the genotype pattern of 10,10 and at least one 5-allele reported lower responses to “good effects”, “bad effects”, “depressed”, and “anxious” (all p-values < 0.01). Conclusions The data presented here support the hypothesis that genetic differences of DAT1 contribute to variation of subjective responses to cocaine among participants with CUDs. PMID:25850966

  16. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Performance testing carried out in the development of the prototype zero-g fluid infusion system is described and summarized. Engineering tests were performed in the course of development, both on the original breadboard device and on the prototype system. This testing was aimed at establishing baseline system performance parameters and facilitating improvements. Acceptance testing was then performed on the prototype system to verify functional performance. Acceptance testing included a demonstration of the fluid infusion system on a laboratory animal.

  17. Hapten optimization for cocaine vaccine with improved cocaine recognition.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Muthu; Kinsey, Berma M; Singh, Rana A; Kosten, Thomas R; Orson, Frank M

    2014-09-01

    In the absence of any effective pharmacotherapy for cocaine addiction, immunotherapy is being actively pursued as a therapeutic intervention. While several different cocaine haptens have been explored to develop anticocaine antibodies, none of the hapten was successfully designed, which had a protonated tropane nitrogen as is found in native cocaine under physiological conditions, including the succinyl norcocaine (SNC) hapten that has been tested in phase II clinical trials. Herein, we discuss three different cocaine haptens: hexyl norcocaine (HNC), bromoacetamido butyl norcocaine (BNC), and succinyl butyl norcocaine (SBNC), each with a tertiary nitrogen structure mimicking that of native cocaine which could optimize the specificity of anticocaine antibodies for better cocaine recognition. Mice immunized with these haptens conjugated to immunogenic proteins produced high titre anticocaine antibodies. However, during chemical conjugation of HNC and BNC haptens to carrier proteins, the 2β methyl ester group is hydrolyzed, and immunizing mice with these conjugate vaccines in mice produced antibodies that bound both cocaine and the inactive benzoylecgonine metabolite. While in the case of the SBNC conjugate, vaccine hydrolysis of the methyl ester did not appear to occur, leading to antibodies with high specificity to cocaine over BE. Although we observed similar specificity with a SNC hapten, the striking difference is that SBNC carries a positive charge on the tropane nitrogen atom, and therefore, it is expected to have better binding of cocaine. The 50% cocaine inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) value for SBNC antibodies (2.8 μm) was significantly better than the SNC antibodies (9.4 μm) when respective hapten-BSA was used as a substrate. In addition, antibodies from both sera had no inhibitory effect from BE. In contrast to BNC and HNC, the SBNC conjugate was also found to be highly stable without any noticeable hydrolysis for several months at 4 °C and 2-3

  18. Cocaine/Crack: The Big Lie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This pamphlet focuses on cocaine and crack use and the addictive nature of cocaine/crack. It contains a set of 21 questions about crack and cocaine, each accompanied by a clear and complete response. Interspersed throughout the booklet are photographs and quotes from former cocaine or crack users/addicts. Questions and answers focus on what…

  19. Influence of cue-conditioning on acquisition, maintenance and relapse of cocaine intravenous self-administration.

    PubMed

    Deroche-Gamonet, Véronique; Piat, Frédéric; Le Moal, Michel; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo

    2002-04-01

    Conditioning theories propose that, through a Pavlovian associative process, discrete stimuli acquire the ability to elicit neural states involved in the maintenance and relapse of a drug-taking behaviour. Experimental evidence indicates that drug-related cues play a role in relapse, however, their influence on the development and maintenance of drug self-administration has been poorly investigated. In this report, we analysed the effects of a drug-associated cue light on acquisition, maintenance and reinstatement of intravenous cocaine self-administration. The results show that a cocaine-associated cue light can act as an incentive in absence of the drug, but does not directly modify drug-reinforcing effects. Contingent and non-contingent presentations of a cocaine-associated cue light reinstated an extinguished self-administration behaviour. However, regardless of whether or not a cue light was associated with cocaine infusions, rats acquire cocaine intravenous self-administration reaching the same levels of intake. Furthermore, after self-administration has been acquired in presence of the cue light, the omission of the cue light or its non-contingent presentation did not modify rat behaviour. In conclusion, our work shows that cocaine-associated explicit cues do not directly interfere with the reinforcing effects of the drug.

  20. Cocaine Intoxication and Thyroid Storm

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Cocaine, a widely used sympathomimetic drug, causes thermoregulatory and cardiac manifestations that can mimic a life-threatening thyroid storm. Case. A man presented to the emergency department requesting only cocaine detoxification. He reported symptoms over the last few years including weight loss and diarrhea, which he attributed to ongoing cocaine use. On presentation he had an elevated temperature of 39.4°C and a heart rate up to 130 beats per minute. Examination revealed the presence of an enlarged, nontender goiter with bilateral continuous bruits. He was found to have thyrotoxicosis by labs and was treated for thyroid storm and cocaine intoxication concurrently. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with Graves’ disease and treated with iodine-131 therapy. Conclusion. Cocaine use should be considered a possible trigger for thyroid storm. Recognition of thyroid storm is critical because of the necessity for targeted therapy and the significant mortality associated with the condition if left untreated. PMID:26425625

  1. Covalent modification of proteins by cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shi-Xian; Bharat, Narine; Fischman, Marian C.; Landry, Donald W.

    2002-03-01

    Cocaine covalently modifies proteins through a reaction in which the methyl ester of cocaine acylates the -amino group of lysine residues. This reaction is highly specific in vitro, because no other amino acid reacts with cocaine, and only cocaine's methyl ester reacts with the lysine side chain. Covalently modified proteins were present in the plasma of rats and human subjects chronically exposed to cocaine. Modified endogenous proteins are immunogenic, and specific antibodies were elicited in mouse and detected in the plasma of human subjects. Covalent modification of proteins could explain cocaine's autoimmune effects and provide a new biochemical approach to cocaine's long-term actions.

  2. Impairment of acquisition of intravenous cocaine self-administration by RNA-interference of dopamine D1-receptors in the nucleus accumbens shell.

    PubMed

    Pisanu, Augusta; Lecca, Daniele; Valentini, Valentina; Bahi, Amine; Dreyer, Jean-Luc; Cacciapaglia, Fabio; Scifo, Andrea; Piras, Giovanna; Cadoni, Cristina; Di Chiara, Gaetano

    2015-02-01

    Microdialysis during i.v. drug self-administration (SA) have implicated nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell DA in cocaine and heroin reinforcement. However, this correlative evidence has not been yet substantiated by experimental evidence obtained by studying the effect of selective manipulation of NAc shell DA transmission on cocaine and heroin SA. In order to investigate this issue, DA D1a receptor (D1aR) expression was impaired in the NAc shell and core by locally infusing lentiviral vectors (LV) expressing specific D1aR-siRNAs (LV-siRNAs). Control rats were infused in the same areas with LV expressing GFP. Fifteen days later, rats were trained to acquire i.v. cocaine or heroin self-administration (SA). At the end of behavioral experiments, in order to evaluate the effect of LV-siRNA on D1aR expression, rats were challenged with amphetamine and the brains were processed for immunohistochemical detection of c-Fos and D1aR. Control rats acquired i.v. cocaine and heroin SA. Infusion of LV-siRNAs in the medial NAc shell reduced D1aR density and the number of c-Fos positive nuclei in the NAc shell, while sparing the core, and prevented the acquisition of cocaine, but not heroin SA. In turn, LV-siRNAs infusion in the core reduced D1aR density and the number of c-Fos positive nuclei in the same area, while sparing the shell, and failed to affect acquisition of cocaine. The differential effect of LV impairment of NAc shell D1aR on cocaine and heroin SA indicates that NAc shell DA acting on D1aR specifically mediates cocaine reinforcement. PMID:25446574

  3. Behavioral and neurochemical effects of the dopamine transporter ligand 4-chlorobenztropine alone and in combination with cocaine in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tolliver, B K; Newman, A H; Katz, J L; Ho, L B; Fox, L M; Hsu, K; Berger, S P

    1999-04-01

    The current studies evaluated the novel diphenylmethoxytropane analog 4-chlorobenztropine (4-Cl-BZT), cocaine, and combinations of the two drugs for their abilities to stimulate locomotor activity, produce cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects, and elevate extracellular dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) as measured by in vivo microdialysis. Peripherally administered cocaine was approximately twice as efficacious as 4-Cl-BZT as a locomotor stimulant and was behaviorally active at a lower dose than was 4-Cl-BZT. Cocaine also was more efficacious than 4-Cl-BZT in producing discriminative-stimulus effects in rats trained to discriminate i.p. injections of 10 mg/kg cocaine from saline. The time course of behavioral activation differed markedly between the two drugs, with much shorter onset and duration of locomotor stimulant effects for cocaine relative to 4-Cl-BZT. Similarly, i.p. cocaine (10 and 40 mg/kg) induced a pronounced, rapid, and short-lived increase in DA in the NAc, whereas i.p. 4-Cl-BZT was effective only at the higher dose and produced a more gradual, modest, and sustained (>/=2 h) elevation in accumbens DA. In contrast to i.p. administration, local infusion of 4-Cl-BZT (1-100 microM) into the NAc through the microdialysis probe elevated extracellular DA to a much greater extent than did local cocaine (nearly 2000% of baseline maximally for 4-Cl-BZT versus 400% of baseline for cocaine) and displayed a much longer duration of action than cocaine. However, when microinjected bilaterally into the NAc at 30 or 300 nmol/side, cocaine remained a more efficacious locomotor stimulant than 4-Cl-BZT. Finally, pretreatment with i.p. 4-Cl-BZT dose dependently enhanced the locomotor stimulant, discriminative stimulus effects, and NAc DA response to a subsequent low-dose i.p. cocaine challenge. The diphenylmethoxytropane analog also facilitated the emergence of stereotyped behavior and convulsions induced by high-dose cocaine. The current results

  4. Striatal 5-HT6 Receptors Regulate Cocaine Reinforcement in a Pathway-Selective Manner.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Matthew; Gibson, Alec W; Smirnov, Denis; Nair, Sunila G; Neumaier, John F

    2016-08-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the ventral striatum integrates many neurochemical inputs including dopamine and serotonin projections from midbrain nuclei to modulate drug reward. Although D1 and D2 dopamine receptors are differentially expressed in the direct and indirect pathway medium spiny neurons (dMSNs and iMSNs, respectively), 5-HT6 receptors are expressed in both pathways, more strongly than anywhere else in the brain, and are an intriguing target for neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present study, we used viral vectors utilizing dynorphin or enkephalin promoters to drive expression of 5-HT6 receptors or green fluorescent protein (GFP) selectively in the dMSNs or iMSNs of the NAc shell. Rats were then trained to self-administer cocaine. Increased 5-HT6 receptor expression in dMSNs did not change any parameter of cocaine self-administration measured. However, increasing 5-HT6 receptors in iMSNs reduced the amount of cocaine self-administered under fixed-ratio schedules, especially at low doses, increased the time to the first response and the length of the inter-infusion interval, but did not alter motivation as measured by progressive ratio 'break point' analysis. Modeling of cocaine pharmacokinetics in NAc showed that increased 5-HT6 receptors in iMSNs reduced the rat's preferred tissue cocaine concentration at each dose. Finally, increased 5-HT6 receptors in iMSNs facilitated conditioned place preference for a low dose of cocaine. We conclude that 5-HT6 receptors in iMSNs of NAcSh increase the sensitivity to the reinforcing properties of cocaine, particularly at low doses, suggesting that these receptors may be a therapeutic target for the treatment of cocaine addiction. PMID:27032690

  5. Effects of prenatal cocaine on the ventilatory response to hypoxia in newborn rabbits.

    PubMed

    Weese-Mayer, D E; Klemka-Walden, L M; Barkov, G A; Gingras, J L

    1992-01-01

    Recently, investigators have reported an alteration of postnatal respiratory pattern, deficient hypoxic arousal from sleep, and an increased incidence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) among human infants exposed to cocaine prenatally, thus suggesting that prenatal cocaine exposure may perturb the maturation of respiratory control thereby increasing the risk for SIDS. To investigate the effects of prenatal cocaine on postnatal respiration, we evaluated the ventilatory response to 0.21 FIO2 (baseline) and at 0.15, 0.10, and 0.08 FIO2 by the barometric method on days 4-5 of life in 23 New Zealand White rabbit pups born to cocaine-exposed (30 mg/kg/day of cocaine HCl by continuous subcutaneous infusion), pair-fed and free-fed does. The chamber pressure deflection (proportional to VT after appropriate calculation) was computer-sampled at 200 Hz when the unanesthetized pups were resting quietly with no gross body movements. Recording was made after 10 min acclimatization to a specific FIO2. We found that baseline ventilation did not differ significantly among study groups. However, minute ventilation (VI), inspiratory flow (VT/TI), tidal volume (VT), increased significantly with hypoxia to peak values at 0.08 FIO2 in pair-fed and free-fed pups but these measurements did not increase significantly in cocaine-exposed pups. Our finding of a deficient second phase of the hypoxic ventilatory response among cocaine-exposed pups supports the hypothesis that prenatal cocaine perturbs the maturation of respiratory control.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1483357

  6. Cocaine treatment alters oxytocin receptor binding but not mRNA production in postpartum rat dams.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, T M; McMurray, M S; Walker, C H; Johns, J M

    2006-06-01

    Gestational cocaine treatment in rat dams results in decreased oxytocin (OT) levels, up-regulated oxytocin receptor (OTR) binding density and decreased receptor affinity in the whole amygdala, all concomitant with a significant increase in maternal aggression on postpartum day six. Rat dams with no gestational drug treatment that received an infusion of an OT antagonist directly into the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) exhibited similarly high levels of maternal aggression towards intruders. Additionally, studies indicate that decreased OT release from the hypothalamic division of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is coincident with heightened maternal aggression in rats. Thus, it appears that cocaine-induced alterations in OT system dynamics (levels, receptors, production, and/or release) may mediate heightened maternal aggression following cocaine treatment, but the exact mechanisms through which cocaine impacts the OT system have not yet been determined. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that two likely mechanisms of cocaine's action would be, increased OTR binding specifically in the CeA, and decreased OT mRNA production in the PVN. Autoradiography and in situ hybridization assays were performed on targeted nuclei in brain regions of rat dams on postpartum day six, following gestational treatment twice daily with cocaine (15 mg/kg) or normal saline (1 ml/kg). We now report cocaine-induced reductions in OTR binding density in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), but not the CeA. There was no significant change in OT mRNA production in the PVN following cocaine treatment. PMID:16677710

  7. Intake-dependent effects of cocaine self-administration on impulsive choice in a delay discounting task

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Weiss, Virginia G.; Ouimet, Dominique J.; Fuchs, Rita A.; Morgan, Drake; Setlow, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine use is associated with high levels of impulsive choice (greater discounting of delayed rewards) in humans, but the cause/effect relationships between cocaine use and impulsive choice are not fully understood. In previous work, we found that both experimenter- and self-administration of fixed quantities of cocaine caused lasting increases in impulsive choice in rats. The present study extended these findings by taking into account baseline impulsive choice prior to self-administration, and by allowing rats free access to cocaine. Male Long-Evans rats were trained in a delay discounting task in which they made discrete-trial choices between small immediate and large delayed food rewards. Half of the rats were then implanted with intravenous catheters and, following recovery, allowed to self-administer cocaine HCl (1.0 mg/kg/infusion) in 6 hour sessions over 14 days. Control rats orally self-administered a sucrose solution under similar conditions. Upon completion of self-administration training, rats remained abstinent for 3 weeks before retesting in the delay discounting task. Cocaine and control groups did not differ prior to self-administration, but afterward, the cocaine group showed greater impulsive choice (fewer choices of large, delayed rewards) than controls. Additional analyses revealed that the effects of cocaine on impulsive choice were intake-dependent; rats classified as “low intake” did not differ from controls, whereas rats classified as “high intake” were significantly more impulsive than both controls and their pre-cocaine baseline. These findings are consistent with the idea that cocaine-induced, pharmacologically based neural adaptations promote the development of impulsive decision making. PMID:24841739

  8. Effects of continuous nicotine treatment and subsequent termination on cocaine versus food choice in male rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Schwienteck, Kathryn L; Negus, S Stevens; Poklis, Justin L; Banks, Matthew L

    2015-10-01

    One complicating factor in cocaine addiction may be concurrent exposure and potential dependence on nicotine. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of continuous nicotine treatment and subsequent termination on cocaine versus food choice in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). For comparison, we also determined effects of the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine on cocaine versus food choice during continuous saline and nicotine treatment. Rhesus monkeys (N = 3) responded under a concurrent schedule of food pellet (1 g) and intravenous cocaine (0-0.1 mg/kg/injection) availability. Saline and ascending nicotine doses (0.1-1.0 mg/kg/hr, intravenous) were continuously infused for 7-day treatment periods and separated by 24-hr saline treatment periods. Acute effects of mecamylamine (0.32-1.8 mg/kg, intramuscular, 15 min pretreatment) were determined during continuous saline and 0.32-mg/kg/hr nicotine treatments. During saline treatment, cocaine maintained a dose-dependent increase in cocaine choice. Nicotine treatment did not alter cocaine versus food choice. In contrast, preference of 0.032 mg/kg/injection cocaine was attenuated 24 hr following termination of 0.32-mg/kg/hr nicotine treatment, despite no somatic abstinence signs being observed. Acute mecamylamine enhanced cocaine choice during saline treatment and mainly suppressed rates of behavior during nicotine treatment. Overall, continuous nicotine exposure, up to 1 mg/kg/hr, does not enhance cocaine choice and does not produce nicotine dependence, as demonstrated by the lack of abstinence signs. PMID:26098473

  9. Cocaine Tolerance in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Søvik, Eirik; Cornish, Jennifer L.; Barron, Andrew B.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly invertebrates are being used to investigate the molecular and cellular effects of drugs of abuse to explore basic mechanisms of addiction. However, in mammals the principle factors contributing to addiction are long-term adaptive responses to repeated drug use. Here we examined whether adaptive responses to cocaine are also seen in invertebrates using the honey bee model system. Repeated topical treatment with a low dose of cocaine rendered bees resistant to the deleterious motor effects of a higher cocaine dose, indicating the development of physiological tolerance to cocaine in bees. Cocaine inhibits biogenic amine reuptake transporters, but neither acute nor repeated cocaine treatments caused measurable changes in levels of biogenic amines measured in whole bee brains. Our data show clear short and long-term behavioural responses of bees to cocaine administration, but caution that, despite the small size of the bee brain, measures of biogenic amines conducted at the whole-brain level may not reveal neurochemical effects of the drug. PMID:23741423

  10. Sigma receptors and cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sanju; Mesangeau, Christophe; Poupaert, Jacques H; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Sigma receptors have been well documented as a protein target for cocaine and have been shown to be involved in the toxic and stimulant actions of cocaine. Strategies to reduce the access of cocaine to sigma receptors have included antisense oligonucleotides to the sigma-1 receptor protein as well as small molecule ligand with affinity for sigma receptor sites. These results have been encouraging as novel protein targets that can attenuate the actions of cocaine are desperately needed as there are currently no medications approved for treatment of cocaine toxicity or addiction. Many years of research in this area have yet to produce an effective treatment and much focus was on dopamine systems. A flurry of research has been carried out to elucidate the role of sigma receptors in the blockade of cocaine effects but this research has yet to yield a clinical agent. This review summarizes the work to date on the linkage of sigma receptors and the actions of cocaine and the progress that has been made with regard to small molecules. Although there is still a lack of an agent in clinical trials with a sigma receptor mechanism of action, work is progressing and the ligands are becoming more selective for sigma systems and the potential remains high. PMID:21050176

  11. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Development of a fluid infusion system was undertaken in response to a need for an intravenous infusion device operable under conditions of zero-g. The initial design approach, pursued in the construction of the first breadboard instrument, was to regulate the pressure of the motive gas to produce a similar regulated pressure in the infusion liquid. This scheme was not workable because of the varying bag contact area, and a major design iteration was made. A floating sensor plate in the center of the bag pressure plate was made to operate a pressure regulator built into the bellows assembly, effectively making liquid pressure the directly controlled variable. Other design changes were made as experience was gained with the breadboard. Extensive performance tests were conducted on both the breadboard and the prototype device; accurately regulated flows from 6 m1/min to 100 m1/min were achieved. All system functions were shown to operate satisfactorily.

  12. Individual differences in discount rate are associated with demand for self-administered cocaine, but not sucrose.

    PubMed

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N; Woods, James H

    2013-01-01

    Substance abusers, including cocaine abusers, discount delayed rewards to a greater extent than do matched controls. In the current experiment, individual differences in discounting of delayed rewards in rats (choice of one immediate over three delayed sucrose pellets) were assessed for associations with demand for either sucrose pellets or an intravenous dose of 0.1 mg/kg/infusion cocaine. Twenty-four male Sprague Dawley rats were split into three groups based on sensitivity to delay to reinforcement. Then, demand for sucrose pellets and cocaine was determined across a range of fixed-ratio values. Delay discounting was then reassessed to determine the stability of this measure over the course of the experiment. Individual differences in impulsive choice were positively associated with elasticity of demand for cocaine, a measure of reinforcer value, indicating that rats having higher discount rates also valued cocaine more. Impulsive choice was not associated with the level of cocaine consumption as price approached 0 or with any parameter associated with demand for sucrose. Individual sensitivity to delay was correlated with the initial assessment when reassessed at the end of the experiment, although impulsive choice increased for this cohort of rats as a whole. These findings suggest that impulsive choice in rats is positively associated with valuation of cocaine, but not sucrose.

  13. Glucocorticoids and behavioral effects of psychostimulants. II: cocaine intravenous self-administration and reinstatement depend on glucocorticoid levels.

    PubMed

    Deroche, V; Marinelli, M; Le Moal, M; Piazza, P V

    1997-06-01

    Observations suggest that corticosterone, the principal glucocorticoid hormone in the rat, can modulate the behavioral effects of drugs of abuse. In this report, the influence of corticosterone on intravenous self-administration of cocaine was studied. In the first experiment, cocaine intravenous self-administration in adrenalectomized rats and in adrenalectomized rats receiving corticosterone replacement treatments was studied as a function of corticosterone concentrations and as a function of cocaine doses (0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 mg/kg/infusion). In a second experiment, we tested, in intact rats, the effect of different doses of corticosterone (0.09, 0.18, 0.37, 0.58, 0.75 mg/kg) on the reinstatement of an extinguished cocaine self-administration behavior. It is reported that adrenalectomy markedly shifts the cocaine self-administration dose-effect curve downward. This effect was dose-dependently reversed by corticosterone; a complete restoration being obtained for corticosterone levels in the range of those induced by stress. Corticosterone administration also precipitated dose-dependently the reinstatement of cocaine self-administration. The maximal effect was obtained for a dose of corticosterone producing an increase in plasma levels similar to the increase produced by an intense stress. In conclusion, our results show that glucocorticoids facilitate the reinforcing effects of cocaine and support the hypothesis that glucocorticoids are one of the biological factors determining vulnerability to substance abuse. PMID:9190876

  14. Sign-tracking predicts increased choice of cocaine over food in rats.

    PubMed

    Tunstall, Brendan J; Kearns, David N

    2015-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the tendency to sign-track to a food cue was predictive of rats' choice of cocaine over food. First, rats were trained on a procedure where insertion of a retractable lever was paired with food. A sub-group of rats - sign-trackers - primarily approached and contacted the lever, while another sub-group - goal-trackers - approached the site of food delivery. Rats were then trained on a choice task where they could choose between an infusion of cocaine (1.0 mg/kg) and a food pellet (45 mg). Sign-trackers chose cocaine over food significantly more often than did goal-trackers. These results support the incentive-salience theory of addiction and add to a growing number of studies which suggest that sign-trackers may model an addiction-prone phenotype.

  15. Sign-tracking predicts increased choice of cocaine over food in rats.

    PubMed

    Tunstall, Brendan J; Kearns, David N

    2015-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the tendency to sign-track to a food cue was predictive of rats' choice of cocaine over food. First, rats were trained on a procedure where insertion of a retractable lever was paired with food. A sub-group of rats - sign-trackers - primarily approached and contacted the lever, while another sub-group - goal-trackers - approached the site of food delivery. Rats were then trained on a choice task where they could choose between an infusion of cocaine (1.0 mg/kg) and a food pellet (45 mg). Sign-trackers chose cocaine over food significantly more often than did goal-trackers. These results support the incentive-salience theory of addiction and add to a growing number of studies which suggest that sign-trackers may model an addiction-prone phenotype. PMID:25541036

  16. Dose and elasticity of demand for self-administered cocaine in rats.

    PubMed

    Kearns, David N; Silberberg, Alan

    2016-04-01

    The present experiment tested whether the elasticity of demand for self-administered cocaine in rats is dose-dependent. Subjects lever pressed for three different doses of intravenous cocaine - 0.11, 0.33, and 1.0 mg/kg/infusion - on a demand procedure where the number of lever presses required per infusion increased within a session. The main finding was that demand for the 0.11 mg/kg dose was more elastic than it was for the two larger doses. There was no difference in demand elasticity between the 0.33 and 1.0 mg/kg doses. These results parallel findings previously reported in monkeys. The present study also demonstrated that a within-session procedure can be used to generate reliable demand curves. PMID:26866971

  17. Cocaine, Appetitive Memory and Neural Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Suchismita

    2013-01-01

    This review examines existing cognitive experimental and brain imaging research related to cocaine addiction. In section 1, previous studies that have examined cognitive processes, such as implicit and explicit memory processes in cocaine users are reported. Next, in section 2, brain imaging studies are reported that have used chronic users of cocaine as study participants. In section 3, several conclusions are drawn. They are: (a) in cognitive experimental literature, no study has examined both implicit and explicit memory processes involving cocaine related visual information in the same cocaine user, (b) neural mechanisms underlying implicit and explicit memory processes for cocaine-related visual cues have not been directly investigated in cocaine users in the imaging literature, and (c) none of the previous imaging studies has examined connectivity between the memory system and craving system in the brain of chronic users of cocaine. Finally, future directions in the field of cocaine addiction are suggested. PMID:25009766

  18. Cocaine depresses GABAA current of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ye, J H; Liu, P L; Wu, W H; McArdle, J J

    1997-10-01

    Although blockade of dopamine re-uptake and the resulting elevation of excitatory agonists is commonly thought the primary mechanism of cocaine-induced seizures, it is possible that other neurotransmitters such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are involved. To examine this possibility, the effects of cocaine on the whole cell GABA current (IGABA) of freshly isolated rat hippocampal neurons were investigated with the patch-clamp technique. Preincubation or acute application of cocaine reversibly suppressed IGABA. The IC50 was 127 microM when cocaine was applied before the application of GABA. The concentration-response relations of cocaine in various GABA concentrations revealed that cocaine inhibited IGABA non-competitively. This effect of cocaine appeared to be independent of voltage. The present study suggests that the GABA receptor/channel complex is also a target for cocaine's action. The suppression of IGABA may contribute to cocaine-induced seizures.

  19. Cocaine Use: 2002 and 2003. The NSDUH Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Cocaine, including crack cocaine, was responsible for 12.8 percent of admissions to substance abuse treatment services in 2002.1 The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) asks persons aged 12 or older to report their use of illicit drugs, including cocaine. NSDUH defines cocaine use as use of cocaine in any form, including crack cocaine.…

  20. The neuropsychology of cocaine addiction: recent cocaine use masks impairment.

    PubMed

    Woicik, Patricia A; Moeller, Scott J; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Maloney, Thomas; Lukasik, Tanya M; Yeliosof, Olga; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D; Goldstein, Rita Z

    2009-04-01

    Individuals with current cocaine use disorders (CUD) form a heterogeneous group, making sensitive neuropsychological (NP) comparisons with healthy individuals difficult. The current study examined the effects on NP functioning of four factors that commonly vary among CUD: urine status for cocaine (positive vs negative on study day), cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and dysphoria. Sixty-four cocaine abusers were matched to healthy comparison subjects on gender and race; the groups also did not differ in measures of general intellectual functioning. All subjects were administered an extensive NP battery measuring attention, executive function, memory, facial and emotion recognition, and motor function. Compared with healthy control subjects, CUD exhibited performance deficits on tasks of attention, executive function, and verbal memory (within one standard deviation of controls). Although CUD with positive urine status, who had higher frequency and more recent cocaine use, reported greater symptoms of dysphoria, these cognitive deficits were most pronounced in the CUD with negative urine status. Cigarette smoking, frequency of alcohol consumption, and dysphoria did not alter these results. The current findings replicate a previously reported statistically significant, but relatively mild NP impairment in CUD as compared with matched healthy control individuals and further suggest that frequent/recent cocaine use [corrected] may mask underlying cognitive (but not mood) disturbances. These results call for development of pharmacological agents targeted to enhance cognition, without negatively impacting mood in individuals addicted to cocaine.

  1. Nanomaterial-based cocaine aptasensors.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Dolatabadi, Jafar Ezzati Nazhad; Abnous, Khalil; de la Guardia, Miguel; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2015-06-15

    Up to now, many different methods have been developed for detection of cocaine, but most of these methods are usually time-consuming, tedious and require special or expensive equipment. Therefore, the development of simple, sensitive and rapid detection methods is necessary. In the last decade, aptamers have been used as a new biosensor platform for detection of cocaine in different samples. Aptamers are artificial single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides capable of binding to specific molecular targets with high affinity and if integrated to nanomaterials, it may lead in precise methods for cocaine detection in the common laboratories. In this review, recent advances and applications of aptamer-based biosensors and nanobiosensors, have been updated, paying attention to the use of fluorescence, colorimetric and electrochemical techniques for the detection and quantitative determination of cocaine.

  2. Metabolomics of cocaine: implications in toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is the most commonly used illicit drug among those seeking care in Emergency Departments or drug detoxification centers. Cocaine, chemically known as benzoylmethylecgonine, is a naturally occurring substance found in the leaves of the Erythroxylum coca plant. The pharmacokinetics of cocaine is dependent on multiple factors, such as physical/chemical form, route of administration, genetics and concurrent consumption of alcohol. This review aims to discuss metabolomics of cocaine, namely by presenting all known metabolites of cocaine and their roles in the cocaine-mediated toxic effects.

  3. Metabolomics of cocaine: implications in toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is the most commonly used illicit drug among those seeking care in Emergency Departments or drug detoxification centers. Cocaine, chemically known as benzoylmethylecgonine, is a naturally occurring substance found in the leaves of the Erythroxylum coca plant. The pharmacokinetics of cocaine is dependent on multiple factors, such as physical/chemical form, route of administration, genetics and concurrent consumption of alcohol. This review aims to discuss metabolomics of cocaine, namely by presenting all known metabolites of cocaine and their roles in the cocaine-mediated toxic effects. PMID:26249365

  4. [A brief review on cocaine].

    PubMed

    Renggli, R

    1985-03-30

    Alongside the much more familiar heroin, cocaine is assuming increasing importance. This one-time cultivated plant of the Indios is thriving again and posing new problems in the therapy of drug abuse. To assist the general practitioner, who is increasingly confronted with drug problems, a brief report is presented on the origins, history, use and effects of cocaine. Finally, some pointers for therapy are given.

  5. Cocaine Influences Alcohol-Seeking Behavior and Relapse Drinking in Alcohol-Preferring (P) Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Sheketha R.; Wilden, Jessica A.; Deehan, Gerald A.; McBride, William J.; Rodd, Zachary A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The results of several studies suggest that there may be common neurocircuits regulating drug-seeking behaviors. Common biological pathways regulating drug-seeking would explain the phenomenon that seeking for one drug can be enhanced by exposure to another drug of abuse. The objective of the current study was to assess the time-course effects of acute cocaine administration on alcohol seeking and relapse. Methods Alcohol-Preferring (P) rats were allowed to self-administer 15% ethanol (EtOH) and water. EtOH-seeking was assessed through use of the Pavlovian Spontaneous Recovery (PSR) model, while relapse EtOH drinking was assessed through use of the alcohol deprivation effect. Results Cocaine (0, 1 or 10 mg/kg), injected immediately, 30 min, or 4 hr prior to the 1st PSR testing session, dose-dependently increased responding on the EtOH lever compared to extinction responses and responding by saline controls. Under relapse conditions, cocaine given immediately prior to the relapse session had no effect (1 mg/kg) or reduced responding (10 mg/kg). In contrast, cocaine given 4 hr prior to the relapse session markedly enhanced EtOH responding compared to saline. Conclusion The enhanced expression of EtOH-seeking and relapse behaviors may be a result of a priming effect of cocaine on neuronal circuits mediating these behaviors. The effect of cocaine on EtOH-relapse drinking is indicative of the complex interactions that can occur between drugs of abuse; production of conflicting behaviors (immediate) and priming of relapse/seeking (4 hour delay). PMID:25346508

  6. The role of ventral and dorsal striatum mGluR5 in relapse to cocaine-seeking and extinction learning.

    PubMed

    Knackstedt, Lori A; Trantham-Davidson, Heather L; Schwendt, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a chronic, relapsing disease characterized by an inability to regulate drug-seeking behavior. Here we investigated the role of mGluR5 in the ventral and dorsal striatum in regulating cocaine-seeking following both abstinence and extinction. Animals underwent 2 weeks of cocaine self-administration followed by 3 weeks of home-cage abstinence. Animals were then reintroduced to the operant chamber for a context-induced relapse test, followed by 7-10 days of extinction training. Once responding was extinguished, cue-primed reinstatement test was conducted. Both drug-seeking tests were conducted in the presence of either mGluR5 negative allosteric modulator, MTEP or vehicle infused into either the nucleus accumbens (NA) core or dorsolateral striatum (dSTR). We found that MTEP infused in the NA core attenuated both context-induced relapse following abstinence and cue-primed reinstatement following extinction training. Blocking dSTR mGluR5 had no effect on context- or cue-induced cocaine-seeking. However, the intra-dSTR MTEP infusion on the context-induced relapse test day attenuated extinction learning for 4 days after the infusion. Furthermore, mGluR5 surface expression was reduced and LTD was absent in dSTR slices of animals undergoing 3 weeks of abstinence from cocaine but not sucrose self-administration. LTD was restored by bath application of VU-29, a positive allosteric modulator of mGluR5. Bath application of MTEP prevented the induction of LTD in dSTR slices from sucrose animals. Taken together, this data indicates that dSTR mGluR5 plays an essential role in extinction learning but not cocaine relapse, while NA core mGluR5 modulates drug-seeking following both extinction and abstinence from cocaine self-administration.

  7. Alcohol administration increases cocaine craving but not cocaine cue attentional bias

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Katherine R.; Pike, Erika; Stoops, William W.; Rush, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol consumption is a known antecedent to cocaine relapse. Through associative conditioning, it is hypothesized that alcohol increases incentive motivation for cocaine and thus the salience of cocaine-related cues, which are important in maintaining drug-taking behavior. Cocaine-using individuals display a robust cocaine cue attentional bias as measured by fixation time during the visual probe task. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the influence of alcohol administration on cocaine cue attentional bias using eye-tracking technology to directly measure attentional allocation. Methods Twenty current cocaine users completed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects study that tested the effect of three doses of alcohol (0.00, 0.325, 0.65 g/kg alcohol) on cocaine cue attentional bias using the visual probe task with eye-tracking technology. The participant-rated and physiological effects of alcohol were also assessed. Results Participants displayed a robust cocaine cue attentional bias following both placebo and alcohol administration as measured by fixation time, but not response time. Alcohol administration did not influence cocaine cue attentional bias, but increased craving for cocaine in a dose dependent manner. Alcohol produced prototypic psychomotor and participant-rated effects. Conclusions Alcohol administration increases cocaine craving but not cocaine cue attentional bias. Alcohol-induced cocaine craving suggests that alcohol increases incentive motivation for cocaine but not the salience of cocaine-related cues. PMID:26331880

  8. mTOR signalling in the nucleus accumbens shell is critical for augmented effect of TFF3 on behavioural response to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yi-Xiao; Han, Hua; Shao, Juan; Gao, Yuan; Yin, Xi; Zhu, Wei-Li; Han, Ying; Shi, Hai-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides play important roles in modulating the rewarding value of abused drugs. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) was recently reported to modulate withdrawal syndrome of morphine, but the effects of TFF3 on the cocaine-induced behavioral changes are still elusive. In the present study, cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion and conditioned place preference (CPP) rat paradigms were provided to investigate the role of TFF3 in the reward response to cocaine. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis was used to analyse the dopamine concentration. The results showed that systemic TFF3 administration (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) significantly augmented cocaine- induced hyperlocomotion and CPP formation, without any effects on locomotor activity and aversive or rewarding effects per se. TFF3 significantly augmented the increment of the dopamine concentration in the NAc and the activity of the mTOR signalling pathway induced by acute cocaine exposure (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in the NAc shell, but not the core. The Intra-NAc shell infusion of rapamycin blocked TFF3-induced hyperactivity in cocaine-treatment rats. These findings indicated that TFF3 could potentiate behavioural response to cocaine, which may be associated with regulating dopamine concentration. Furthermore, the findings indicated that mTOR signalling pathway in the NAc shell is important for TFF3-induced enhancement on the cocaine-induced behavioral changes. PMID:27282818

  9. mTOR signalling in the nucleus accumbens shell is critical for augmented effect of TFF3 on behavioural response to cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yi-Xiao; Han, Hua; Shao, Juan; Gao, Yuan; Yin, Xi; Zhu, Wei-Li; Han, Ying; Shi, Hai-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides play important roles in modulating the rewarding value of abused drugs. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) was recently reported to modulate withdrawal syndrome of morphine, but the effects of TFF3 on the cocaine-induced behavioral changes are still elusive. In the present study, cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion and conditioned place preference (CPP) rat paradigms were provided to investigate the role of TFF3 in the reward response to cocaine. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis was used to analyse the dopamine concentration. The results showed that systemic TFF3 administration (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) significantly augmented cocaine- induced hyperlocomotion and CPP formation, without any effects on locomotor activity and aversive or rewarding effects per se. TFF3 significantly augmented the increment of the dopamine concentration in the NAc and the activity of the mTOR signalling pathway induced by acute cocaine exposure (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in the NAc shell, but not the core. The Intra-NAc shell infusion of rapamycin blocked TFF3-induced hyperactivity in cocaine-treatment rats. These findings indicated that TFF3 could potentiate behavioural response to cocaine, which may be associated with regulating dopamine concentration. Furthermore, the findings indicated that mTOR signalling pathway in the NAc shell is important for TFF3-induced enhancement on the cocaine-induced behavioral changes. PMID:27282818

  10. mTOR signalling in the nucleus accumbens shell is critical for augmented effect of TFF3 on behavioural response to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yi-Xiao; Han, Hua; Shao, Juan; Gao, Yuan; Yin, Xi; Zhu, Wei-Li; Han, Ying; Shi, Hai-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides play important roles in modulating the rewarding value of abused drugs. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) was recently reported to modulate withdrawal syndrome of morphine, but the effects of TFF3 on the cocaine-induced behavioral changes are still elusive. In the present study, cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion and conditioned place preference (CPP) rat paradigms were provided to investigate the role of TFF3 in the reward response to cocaine. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis was used to analyse the dopamine concentration. The results showed that systemic TFF3 administration (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) significantly augmented cocaine- induced hyperlocomotion and CPP formation, without any effects on locomotor activity and aversive or rewarding effects per se. TFF3 significantly augmented the increment of the dopamine concentration in the NAc and the activity of the mTOR signalling pathway induced by acute cocaine exposure (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in the NAc shell, but not the core. The Intra-NAc shell infusion of rapamycin blocked TFF3-induced hyperactivity in cocaine-treatment rats. These findings indicated that TFF3 could potentiate behavioural response to cocaine, which may be associated with regulating dopamine concentration. Furthermore, the findings indicated that mTOR signalling pathway in the NAc shell is important for TFF3-induced enhancement on the cocaine-induced behavioral changes.

  11. Synergistic Self-Administration of Ethanol and Cocaine Directly into the Posterior Ventral Tegmental Area: Involvement of Serotonin-3 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Oster, Scott M.; Hauser, Sheketha R.; Toalston, Jamie E.; Bell, Richard L.; McBride, William J.; Rodd, Zachary A.

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) and cocaine are both self-administered into the posterior ventral tegmental area (VTA). Self-administration of either drug is prevented by coadministration of a serotonin (5-HT3) receptor antagonist. Electrophysiological studies indicated that cocaine and EtOH can act synergistically to stimulate VTA dopamine neurons. The current experiment assessed whether cocaine and EtOH would synergistically interact to produce a reinforcing action within the posterior VTA. Adult female Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of 13 groups. There were three control groups: artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF), a subthreshold EtOH (100 mg%) group, and a subthreshold cocaine (25 pmol/100 nl) group. The other groups self-administered 50 or 75 mg% EtOH containing 6.25, 12.5, or 25 pmol/100 nl cocaine or 100 mg% EtOH containing 3.12, 6.25, 12.5, or 25 pmol/100 nl cocaine. All rats received the assigned infusate for sessions 1 through 4, aCSF alone in sessions 5 and 6, and the original infusate during session 7. The effects of adding a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist [tropisetron, C17H20N2O2 (ICS 205,930) and C17H22N4O.C4H4O4 (LY278-584)] on coadministration of EtOH and cocaine (75 mg% + 12.5 pmol/100 nl) were determined. Rats failed to self-administer aCSF or the subthreshold concentration of EtOH or cocaine. All three concentrations of EtOH (50, 75, and 100 mg%) combined with cocaine (12.5 and 25 pmol/100 nl) supported self-administration. Adding a 5HT3 receptor antagonist attenuated coadministration of EtOH + cocaine. Overall, the data indicate that the reinforcing properties of EtOH and cocaine interacted synergistically within the posterior VTA, and these synergistic effects were mediated, at least in part, by activation of local 5-HT3 receptors. PMID:22011435

  12. Reinstatement of cocaine seeking induced by drugs, cues, and stress in adolescent and adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale In human and animal studies, adolescence marks a period of increased vulnerability to the initiation and subsequent abuse of drugs. Adolescents may be especially vulnerable to relapse, and a critical aspect of drug abuse is that it is a chronically relapsing disorder. However, little is known of how vulnerability factors such as adolescence are related to conditions that induce relapse, triggered by the drug itself, drug-associated cues, or stress. Objective The purpose of this study was to compare adolescent and adult rats on drug-, cue-, and stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. Methods On postnatal days 23 (adolescents) and 90 (adults), rats were implanted with intravenous catheters and trained to lever press for i.v. infusions of cocaine (0.4 mg/kg) during two daily 2-h sessions. The rats then self-administered i.v. cocaine for ten additional sessions. Subsequently, visual and auditory stimuli that signaled drug delivery were unplugged, and rats were allowed to extinguish lever pressing for 20 sessions. Rats were then tested on cocaine-, cue-, and yohimbine (stress)-induced cocaine seeking using a within-subject multicomponent reinstatement procedure. Results Results indicated that adolescents had heightened cocaine seeking during maintenance and extinction compared to adults. During reinstatement, adolescents (vs adults) responded more following cocaine- and yohimbine injections, while adults (vs adolescents) showed greater responding following presentations of drug-associated cues. Conclusion These results demonstrated that adolescents and adults differed across several measures of drug-seeking behavior, and adolescents may be especially vulnerable to relapse precipitated by drugs and stress. PMID:19953228

  13. Cocaine and "pharmacological kindling" in the rat.

    PubMed

    Stripling, J S

    1983-11-01

    The concept of "pharmacological kindling" has been used to explain the behavioral sensitization to cocaine produced by repeated administration of subconvulsive doses. This idea was tested by the repeated administration of cocaine to rats followed by electrical kindling of the olfactory bulb (a site at which cocaine has prominent electrophysiologic effects). No significant effect of cocaine on kindling was found. The relationship of this finding to studies using other drugs is discussed.

  14. Pyrolysis and volatilization of cocaine

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.R.; Lue, L.P.; Boni, J.P. )

    1989-05-01

    The increasing popularity of inhaling cocaine vapor prompted the present study, to determine cocaine's fate during this process. The free base of (3H)cocaine (1 microCi/50 mg) was added to a glass pipe, which was then heated in a furnace to simulate freebasing. Negative pressure was used to draw the vapor through a series of glass wool, ethanol, acidic, and basic traps. Air flow rate and temperature were found to have profound effects on the volatilization and pyrolysis of cocaine. At a temperature of 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min, 37% of the radioactivity remained in the pipe, 39% was found in the glass wool trap, and less than 1% in the remainder of the volatilization apparatus after a 10-min volatilization. Reducing the air flow rate to 100 mL/min reduced the amount of radioactivity collected in the glass wool trap to less than 10% of the starting material and increased the amount that remained in the pipe to 58%. GC/MS analysis of the contents of the glass wool trap after volatilization at 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min revealed that 60% of the cocaine remained intact, while approximately 6 and 2% of the starting material was recovered as benzoic acid and methylecgonidine, respectively. As the temperature was increased to 650 degrees C, benzoic acid and methylecgonidine accounted for 83 and 89% of the starting material, respectively, whereas only 2% of the cocaine remained intact. Quantitation of cocaine in the vapor during the course of volatilization revealed high concentrations during the first two min and low concentrations for the remaining time.

  15. Discriminative and reinforcing stimulus effects of nicotine, cocaine, and cocaine + nicotine combinations in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Newman, Jennifer L

    2011-06-01

    Concurrent cigarette smoking and cocaine use is well documented. However, the behavioral pharmacology of cocaine and nicotine combinations is poorly understood, and there is a need for animal models to examine this form of polydrug abuse. The purpose of this study was twofold: first to assess the effects of nicotine on the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine, and second, to study self-administration of nicotine/cocaine combinations in a novel polydrug abuse model. In drug discrimination experiments, nicotine increased the discriminative stimulus effects of low cocaine doses in two of three monkeys, but nicotine did not substitute for cocaine in any monkey. Self-administration of cocaine and nicotine alone, and cocaine + nicotine combinations was studied under a second-order fixed ratio 2, variable ratio 16 (FR2[VR16:S]) schedule of reinforcement. Cocaine and nicotine alone were self-administered in a dose-dependent manner. The combination of marginally reinforcing doses of cocaine and nicotine increased drug self-administration behavior above levels observed with the same dose of either cocaine or nicotine alone. These findings indicate that nicotine may increase cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects in rhesus monkeys, and illustrate the feasibility of combining cocaine and nicotine in a preclinical model of polydrug abuse. Further studies of the behavioral effects of nicotine + cocaine combinations will contribute to our understanding the pharmacology of dual nicotine and cocaine dependence, and will be useful for evaluation of new treatment medications. PMID:21480727

  16. Unrecognized "crack" cocaine abuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D; Parr, M J; Shutt, L E

    1996-10-01

    We report a case of "crack" cocaine abuse in a pregnant patient associated with haematuria, proteinuria, haemolytic anaemia, renal impairment, thrombocytopenia and pulmonary oedema. The case illustrates the problems for clinicians where unrecognized cocaine abuse interferes with the diagnosis and management of a complicated pregnancy. In addition, we discuss the principles for the safe conduct of anaesthesia in the pregnant cocaine abuser.

  17. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Infant Cortisol Reactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiden, Rina D.; Veira, Yvette; Granger, Douglas A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on infant hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and reactivity at 7 months of infant age. Participants were 168 caregiver-infant dyads (87 cocaine exposed, 81 not cocaine exposed; 47% boys). Maternal behavior, caregiving instability, and infant growth and behavior were assessed,…

  18. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-10-16

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis.

  19. Unrecognized "crack" cocaine abuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D; Parr, M J; Shutt, L E

    1996-10-01

    We report a case of "crack" cocaine abuse in a pregnant patient associated with haematuria, proteinuria, haemolytic anaemia, renal impairment, thrombocytopenia and pulmonary oedema. The case illustrates the problems for clinicians where unrecognized cocaine abuse interferes with the diagnosis and management of a complicated pregnancy. In addition, we discuss the principles for the safe conduct of anaesthesia in the pregnant cocaine abuser. PMID:8942348

  20. Recent developments in the abuse of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S

    1984-01-01

    Cocaine is a powerful euphoriant and it relieves, though only transiently, depression, dread and dysphoria. New patterns of cocaine abuse, such as the inhalation of vaporized cocaine base, the intravenous injection of cocaine hydrochloride and the smoking of coca paste, produce a brief elation that quickly gives way either to a return to the baseline mood or to displeasure, resulting in a strong desire to return to the momentary ecstatic experience, a cycle that leads to compulsive use. The enormous profits made from illicit traffic in cocaine lead to corruption, violence and political destabilization. The individual costs of cocaine abuse include loss of personal fortunes, jobs and families. The safety of cocaine use is a myth. There are a number of ways in which cocaine can be lethal. The high doses of cocaine abused today induce physical dependence, but this is less a contributory factor than the intense psychological craving to perpetuate cocaine use. There is no specific way to treat dysfunctional cocaine use; instead the treatment plan must deal with the individual's specific situation. Except for a reduction of cocaine supply at the source, preventive measures are only feasible in the context of abstinence from all abusable drugs.

  1. Effects of extended cocaine access and cocaine withdrawal on choice between cocaine and food in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Negus, S Stevens

    2010-01-01

    Chronic drug use may lead to sufficient drug intake to produce dependence and the emergence of abstinence signs during withdrawal. Although withdrawal can increase the reinforcing effects of some drugs (eg opioids), the impact of withdrawal on the reinforcing effects of stimulants like cocaine is less clear. This study used a novel cocaine vs food choice procedure to examine the relative reinforcing strength of cocaine before, during, and after exposure to graded levels of extended cocaine access. Responding in four rhesus monkeys was maintained by cocaine (0-0.1 mg/kg/injection) and food delivery under a concurrent-choice schedule during daily 2-h sessions. Under baseline conditions, cocaine maintained a dose-dependent increase in cocaine choice. Subsequently, subjects were exposed to and withdrawn from periods of extended cocaine access, which was accomplished by implementing daily 21-h supplemental sessions of cocaine self-administration in addition to daily choice sessions. During supplemental sessions, cocaine (0.1 mg/kg/injection) was available under a fixed-ratio 10/time-out X schedule, and the duration of the time-out was varied from 30 to 7.5 min. Cocaine intake increased 10-fold to >11 mg/kg/day during exposure to supplemental sessions with the shortest post-injection time-out. However, parameters of cocaine choice were not significantly affected either during or after extended cocaine access. These results do not support the hypothesis that cocaine withdrawal increases the reinforcing strength of cocaine. This differs from results with the opioid agonist heroin and suggests that withdrawal may have different functions in the maintenance of opioid and stimulant abuse. PMID:19776729

  2. Description and quantification of cocaine withdrawal signs in Planaria.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Robert B; Desai, Prarthna

    2005-01-25

    Previous work provided indirect evidence that planarians undergo abstinence-induced withdrawal from cocaine. The present study's purpose was to determine if planarians display withdrawal signs and, if so, to quantify the behaviors. Planarians were soaked in cocaine then transferred to either the same cocaine concentration or cocaine-free water. Compared to the cocaine/cocaine group, the cocaine/water group displayed a significant number of atypical behaviors, providing direct evidence of a 'withdrawal phenomenon' in planarians.

  3. Dopamine D4 receptors linked to protein kinase G are required for changes in dopamine release followed by locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Dong Kun; Shim, Yoon-Bo; Ryu, In Soo; Seo, Su Yeon; Kim, Jieun; Yang, Ju Hwan; Cho, Hyun-Wook; Choe, Eun Sang

    2015-05-01

    We previously found that the dopamine D2-type receptors (D2 and D3 receptors), coupled to protein kinase G (PKG), upregulate locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration. In this study, D4 receptors, another type of D2 receptor also coupled to PKG, were examined to determine their requirement in the regulation of locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration. The results demonstrated that repeated injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg), given once a day for seven consecutive days, significantly increased extracellular dopamine concentrations. Intra-caudate infusion of the D4 receptor agonist, PD168077 (10 nmol), and the PKG inhibitor, KT5823 (2 nmol), significantly decreased the repeated cocaine-induced increase in dopamine levels and locomotor activity. However, intra-caudate infusion of KT5823, but not PD168077, decreased ∆FosB immunoreactivity elevated by repeated cocaine administration. These findings suggest that D4 receptors linked to PKG could be a key modulator for dopamine release required for changes in locomotor activity caused by repeated cocaine exposure. PMID:25702161

  4. An investigation of interactions between hypocretin/orexin signaling and glutamate receptor surface expression in the rat nucleus accumbens under basal conditions and after cocaine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Plaza-Zabala, Ainhoa; Li, Xuan; Milovanovic, Mike; Loweth, Jessica A.; Maldonado, Rafael; Berrendero, Fernando; Wolf, Marina E.

    2013-01-01

    Hypocretin peptides are critical for the effects of cocaine on excitatory synaptic strength in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). However, little is known about their role in cocaine-induced synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). First, we tested whether hypocretin-1 by itself could acutely modulate glutamate receptor surface expression in the NAc, given that hypocretin-1 in the VTA reproduces cocaine’s effects on glutamate transmission. We found no effect of hypocretin-1 infusion on AMPA or NMDA receptor surface expression in the NAc, measured by biotinylation, either 30 min or 3 h after the infusion. Second, we were interested in whether changes in hypocretin receptor-2 (Hcrtr-2) expression contribute to cocaine-induced plasticity in the NAc. As a first step towards addressing this question, Hcrtr-2 surface expression was compared in the NAc after withdrawal from extended-access self-administration of saline (control) versus cocaine. We found that surface Hcrtr-2 levels remain unchanged following 14, 25 or 48 days of withdrawal from cocaine, a time period in which high conductance GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors progressively emerge in the NAc. Overall, our results fail to support a role for hypocretins in acute modulation of glutamate receptor levels in the NAc or a role for altered Hcrtr-2 expression in withdrawal-dependent synaptic adaptations in the NAc following cocaine self-administration. PMID:24262606

  5. The role of the neurokinin-1 receptor in stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol and cocaine seeking.

    PubMed

    Schank, Jesse R; King, Courtney E; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Heilig, Markus; Weinshenker, David; Schroeder, Jason P

    2014-04-01

    Neurokinin-1 receptors (NK1Rs) have been shown to mediate alcohol and opiate, but not cocaine reward in rodents. We recently reported that NK1R antagonism also blocks stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in rats, but it is presently unknown whether these antirelapse properties extend to other drug classes. Although some work has suggested that intracranial substance P (SP) infusion reinstates cocaine seeking following extinction, no studies have indicated a direct role for the NK1R in reinstatement of cocaine seeking. Here, we explored the effect of the NK1R antagonist L822429 on yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol or cocaine seeking in Long-Evans rats. Consistent with our previous findings with footshock-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in Wistar rats, we found that L822429 attenuates yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking, but does not affect baseline alcohol self-administration. We observed a similar suppression of yohimbine-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking by L822429, and found that Long-Evans rats exhibit greater sensitivity to NK1R antagonism than Wistar rats. Accordingly, Long-Evans rats exhibit differences in the expression of NK1Rs in some subcortical brain regions. Combined, our findings suggest that while NK1R antagonism differentially influences alcohol- and cocaine-related behavior, this receptor mediates stress-induced seeking of both drugs.

  6. The relationship between years of cocaine use and brain activation to cocaine and response inhibition cues

    PubMed Central

    Prisciandaro, James J.; Joseph, Jane E.; Myrick, Hugh; McRae-Clark, Aimee L.; Henderson, Scott; Pfeifer, James; Brady, Kathleen T.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging research has attempted to elucidate the neurobehavioral underpinnings of cocaine dependence by evaluating differences in brain activation to cocaine and response inhibition cues between cocaine dependent individuals and controls. Less research has investigated associations between task-related brain activation and cocaine use characteristics; the present study was designed to address this gap in the literature. Design Cross-sectional. Setting The Center for Brain Imaging at the Medical University of South Carolina. Participants 51 cocaine users (41 dependent). Measurements Brain activation to cocaine-cue exposure and go no-go tasks in six a priori selected brain regions of interest and cocaine use characteristics (i.e., cocaine dependence status, years of cocaine use, cocaine use in the past 90 days) assessed via standardized interviews. Findings Participants demonstrated elevated activation to cocaine (bilateral ventral striatum, dorsal caudate, amygdala; mean F=19.00, mean p<.001) and response inhibition (bilateral anterior cingulate, insula, inferior frontal gyrus; mean F=7.01, mean p=.02) cues in all hypothesized brain regions. Years of cocaine use was associated with task-related brain activation, with more years of cocaine use associated with greater activation to cocaine cues in right (F=7.97,p=.01) and left (F=5.47,p=.02) ventral striatum and greater activation to response inhibition cues in left insula (F=5.10,p=.03) and inferior frontal gyrus (F=4.12,p=.05) controlling for age, cocaine dependence status, and cocaine use in the past 90 days. Conclusions Years of cocaine use may be more centrally related to cocaine cue and response inhibition brain activation as compared to cocaine dependence diagnosis or amount of recent use. PMID:24938849

  7. Behavioral momentum of cocaine self-administration: effects of frequency of reinforcement on resistance to extinction.

    PubMed

    Quick, Stacey L; Shahan, Timothy A

    2009-07-01

    Persistent drug seeking is a defining property of substance abuse and is generally thought to depend, in part, on exposure to drug-associated contexts. Behavioral momentum theory provides a set of methods and a theoretical framework for understanding how stimulus contexts contribute to the persistence of operant behavior. Earlier research has extended behavioral momentum theory to alcohol self-administration, but not to intravenous drug self-administration. This experiment extended behavioral momentum theory to cocaine self-administration by examining the effects of frequency of cocaine reinforcement in a context on resistance to extinction. Rats self-administered 0.32 mg/kg infusions of cocaine in a multiple schedule of reinforcement arranging two distinct contexts. Responding in a Rich context was reinforced by cocaine infusions at a higher frequency (i.e. variable interval 120 s) and in a Lean context at a lower frequency (variable interval 360 s). After establishment of responding in the two contexts, resistance to extinction was examined. Preextinction response rates for cocaine were similar in the Rich and Lean contexts. Nonetheless, relative resistance to extinction was greater in the Rich context than in the Lean context. The difference in resistance to extinction in the two contexts was well described by a quantitative model of behavioral momentum. These results suggest that the frequency of drug reinforcement in a context contributes to the persistence of drug seeking in that context, and that behavioral momentum theory might be useful for understanding how drug-associated contexts contribute to the persistence of drug seeking.

  8. Behavioral momentum of cocaine self-administration: effects of frequency of reinforcement on resistance to extinction.

    PubMed

    Quick, Stacey L; Shahan, Timothy A

    2009-07-01

    Persistent drug seeking is a defining property of substance abuse and is generally thought to depend, in part, on exposure to drug-associated contexts. Behavioral momentum theory provides a set of methods and a theoretical framework for understanding how stimulus contexts contribute to the persistence of operant behavior. Earlier research has extended behavioral momentum theory to alcohol self-administration, but not to intravenous drug self-administration. This experiment extended behavioral momentum theory to cocaine self-administration by examining the effects of frequency of cocaine reinforcement in a context on resistance to extinction. Rats self-administered 0.32 mg/kg infusions of cocaine in a multiple schedule of reinforcement arranging two distinct contexts. Responding in a Rich context was reinforced by cocaine infusions at a higher frequency (i.e. variable interval 120 s) and in a Lean context at a lower frequency (variable interval 360 s). After establishment of responding in the two contexts, resistance to extinction was examined. Preextinction response rates for cocaine were similar in the Rich and Lean contexts. Nonetheless, relative resistance to extinction was greater in the Rich context than in the Lean context. The difference in resistance to extinction in the two contexts was well described by a quantitative model of behavioral momentum. These results suggest that the frequency of drug reinforcement in a context contributes to the persistence of drug seeking in that context, and that behavioral momentum theory might be useful for understanding how drug-associated contexts contribute to the persistence of drug seeking. PMID:19571742

  9. Differentiating the rapid actions of cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Roy A.; Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2011-01-01

    The subjective effects of intravenous cocaine are felt almost immediately, and this immediacy plays an important part in the drug’s rewarding impact. The primary rewarding effect of cocaine involves blockade of dopamine reuptake; however, the onset of this action is too late to account for the drug’s initial effects. Recent studies suggest that cocaine-predictive cues — including peripheral interoceptive cues generated by cocaine itself — come to cause more direct and earlier reward signalling by activating excitatory inputs to the dopamine system. The conditioned activation of the dopamine system by cocaine-predictive cues offers a new target for potential addiction therapies. PMID:21633381

  10. Multiple Gastrointestinal Complications of Crack Cocaine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Neal; Nguyen, Nhat; DePasquale, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine and its alkaloid free base “crack-cocaine” have long since been substances of abuse. Drug abuse of cocaine via oral, inhalation, intravenous, and intranasal intake has famously been associated with a number of medical complications. Intestinal ischemia and perforation remain the most common manifestations of cocaine associated gastrointestinal disease and have historically been associated with oral intake of cocaine. Here we find a rare case of two relatively uncommon gastrointestinal complications of hemorrhage and pancreatitis presenting within a single admission in a chronic crack cocaine abuser. PMID:24839446

  11. The epidemiology of cocaine use in Spain.

    PubMed

    Barrio Anta, G; Vicente Orta, J; Bravo Portela, M J; de la Fuente de Hoz, L

    1993-12-01

    Trends and patterns of cocaine use in Spain are described with the aid of different information sources such as population surveys, the State Information System on Drug Abuse, and anthropological studies. In recent years the magnitude of cocaine supply indicators has increased greatly. High levels of last-month prevalence of cocaine use have been detected among the general population--consistently higher than those for heroin-- and cocaine consumption among heroin users has increased. Although the frequency of some health problems related to cocaine use--treatment admissions, hospital emergency admissions--has increased, it is still 30 times less than for heroin. Various hypotheses to explain these discrepancies are discussed.

  12. Drug smuggling using clothing impregnated with cocaine.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Seán D; Power, John D

    2005-11-01

    A case study is presented where a woman travelling from South America to the Republic of Ireland was detained at Dublin Airport and articles of clothing she had in her luggage were found to be impregnated with cocaine. The study shows that the amount of powder recovered from the garments was approximately 14% of the total weight of the garments. The cocaine was in the form of cocaine hydrochloride and the purity was approximately 80%. An examination of the garments under filtered light highlighted the areas exposed to cocaine and indicated that the method of impregnation was by pouring liquid containing cocaine onto the clothing.

  13. A novel monoclonal antibody specific for cocaine.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjyou, Noriko; Shigetoh, Nobuyuki

    2013-08-01

    Detection systems for the illegal drug cocaine need to have a high sensitivity and specificity for cocaine and to be relatively easy to use. In the current study, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) with a high specificity for cocaine was produced. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and fluorescence quenching immunoassay were used to screen the hybridomas. The MAb S27Y (IgG1) was shown to be sensitive and specific for cocaine and quenched fluorescence. Thus, S27Y has the potential to be used in screening assays for the rapid and sensitive detection of cocaine. PMID:23909419

  14. Cocaine use and the breastfeeding mother.

    PubMed

    Jones, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is the second most commonly used illicit drug. Use in pregnancy and breastfeeding may have severe consequences for the baby due to its pharmacokinetic properties. Midwives need to be aware of the prolonged action of cocaine and be alert to the possibility of cocaine toxicity if a baby is excessively irritable and tachycardic. Euphoric highs are brief but breast milk and urine remain positive for long periods. Infant urine following exposure to cocaine via breast milk may remain positive for up to 60 hours. Mothers who snort cocaine should pump and dump breast milk for 24-48 hours. Passive inhalation of crack cocaine smoke may also result in infants with positive toxicology screens. Cocaine powder should never be applied to the nipples of breastfeeding mothers. PMID:26310088

  15. Modulating Cocaine Vaccine Potency Through Hapten Fluorination

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiaoqing; Tsuchikama, Kyoji; Janda, Kim D.

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a long-lasting relapsing illness characterized by cycles of abuse, abstinence and reinstatement, and antibody-based therapies could be a powerful therapeutic approach. Herein, we explored the possibility of using halogenated cocaine haptens to enhance the immunological properties of anti-cocaine vaccines. Three fluorine-containing cocaine haptens (GNF, GNCF and GN5F) and one chlorine-containing cocaine hapten (GNCl) were designed and synthesized, based upon the chemical scaffold of the only hapten that has reached clinical trials, succinyl norcocaine (SNC). Hapten GNF was found to retain potent cocaine affinity, and also elicit antibodies in a higher concentration than the parent structure SNC. Our data suggests that strategic hapten fluorination could be useful for not only improving upon the current cocaine vaccine undergoing clinical trials, but it may also be a valuable new approach, with application to any of the vaccines being developed for the treatment of drugs of abuse. PMID:23398531

  16. Lesions of cholinergic pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus neurons fail to affect cocaine or heroin self-administration or conditioned place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Steidl, Stephan; Wang, Huiling; Wise, Roy A

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic input to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) is known to contribute to reward. Although it is known that the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) provides an important source of excitatory input to the dopamine system, the specific role of PPTg cholinergic input to the VTA in cocaine reward has not been previously determined. We used a diphtheria toxin conjugated to urotensin-II (Dtx::UII), the endogenous ligand for urotensin-II receptors expressed by PPTg cholinergic but not glutamatergic or GABAergic cells, to lesion cholinergic PPTg neurons. Dtx::UII toxin infusion resulted in the loss of 95.78 (±0.65)% of PPTg cholinergic cells but did not significantly alter either cocaine or heroin self-administration or the development of cocaine or heroin conditioned place preferences. Thus, cholinergic cells originating in PPTg do not appear to be critical for the rewarding effects of cocaine or of heroin.

  17. The effects of a humanized recombinant anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody on the disposition of cocaethylene in mice.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Hanna N; Tabet, Michael R; Ball, William J; Norman, Andrew B

    2014-12-01

    The chimeric human/mouse anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2E2 and its further humanized variant h2E2 have been reported to sequester a significant portion of cocaine in plasma and decrease cocaine concentrations in the brain in mice and rats. However, many cocaine users co-abuse alcohol, leading to the formation of the centrally active metabolite cocaethylene. This potentially compromises the efficacy of a cocaine-specific immunotherapy. Because h2E2 has high affinity for cocaethylene as well as cocaine, the ability of h2E2 to prevent cocaethylene entry into the brain was investigated. Mice were infused with h2E2 (1.6 μmol/kg i.v.) or vehicle and after one hour were injected with cocaethylene fumarate (1.2 μmol/kg i.v.). At times from 45 s to 60 min, brain and plasma were collected and cocaethylene concentrations were measured using GC/MS. In control mice, a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model generated values for cocaethylene distribution and terminal elimination half-lives of 0.5 and 8.1 min respectively. Initial plasma cocaethylene concentrations increased 13-fold from controls in the presence of h2E2. In brain, h2E2 produced a 92% decrease in the area under the time-concentration curve for cocaethylene. The pharmacokinetics of h2E2 was also characterized in detail. A three-compartment model resolved an initial distribution half-life of 4.4 min and a second distribution half-life of 4.2 h, and a terminal elimination half-life of 7.8 days. The ability of h2E2 to protect the brain from both cocaine and cocaethylene predicts that the clinical efficacy of h2E2 will be retained in cocaine users who co-abuse alcohol. PMID:25445957

  18. The effects of a humanized recombinant anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody on the disposition of cocaethylene in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, Hanna N.; Tabet, Michael R.; Ball, William J.; Norman, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    The chimeric human/mouse anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2E2 and its further humanized variant h2E2 have been reported to sequester a significant portion of cocaine in plasma and decrease cocaine concentrations in the brain in mice and rats. However, many cocaine users co-abuse alcohol, leading to the formation of the centrally active metabolite cocaethylene. This potentially compromises the efficacy of a cocaine-specific immunotherapy. Because h2E2 has high affinity for cocaethylene as well as cocaine, the ability of h2E2 to prevent cocaethylene entry into the brain was investigated. Mice were infused with h2E2 (1.6 µmol/kg i.v.) or vehicle and after one hour were injected with cocaethylene fumarate (1.2 µmol/kg i.v.). At times from 45 seconds to 60 minutes, brain and plasma were collected and cocaethylene concentrations were measured using GC/MS. In control mice, a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model generated values for cocaethylene distribution and terminal elimination half-lives of 0.5 and 8.1 min respectively. Initial plasma cocaethylene concentrations increased 13-fold from controls in the presence of h2E2. In brain, h2E2 produced a 92% decrease in the area under the time-concentration curve for cocaethylene. The pharmacokinetics of h2E2 were also characterized in detail. A three-compartment model resolved an initial distribution half-life of 4.4 minutes and a second distribution half-life of 4.2 hours, and a terminal elimination half-life of 7.8 days. The ability of h2E2 to protect the brain from both cocaine and cocaethylene predicts that the clinical efficacy of h2E2 will be retained in cocaine users who co-abuse alcohol. PMID:25445957

  19. [Intraosseous infusion for adults].

    PubMed

    Leidel, B A; Kirchhoff, C

    2008-04-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion methods have been common for emergency treatment in infants and children for years. The role of IO access in adults is however much less clear, but its importance in this patient group is increasing, and different devices are available today. Each device has strengths and weaknesses, but all achieve rapid vascular access even in challenging situations. The potential of IO access regarding both therapeutic and diagnostic options has been shown in several operational studies in and out of hospital. Insertion times require between 1 and 2 min in most cases, while insertion and handling of the IO access devices seem to be easy and reliable. The flow rates of IO access devices for adults are lower than those of large-bore peripheral intravenous catheters, but fluid resuscitation is possible in most cases at least with pressure bag infusion systems. Most drugs administered intravenously can be given intraosseously in equivalent dosages and with the same effects. Nevertheless the limitations and risks of IO access routes need to be considered for each application. Rapid IO access is now possible in all age groups, and the 2005 AHA Guidelines favor it over drug administration via the endotracheal tube. PMID:18250995

  20. Differential regulation of mGlu5 R and ΜOPr by priming- and cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Polymnia; Zanos, Panos; Ehteramyan, Mazdak; Hourani, Susanna; Kitchen, Ian; Maldonado, Rafael; Bailey, Alexis

    2015-09-01

    The key problem for the treatment of drug addiction is relapse to drug use after abstinence that can be triggered by drug-associated cues, re-exposure to the drug itself and stress. Understanding the neurobiological mechanisms underlying relapse is essential in order to develop effective pharmacotherapies for its prevention. Given the evidence implicating the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5 R), μ-opioid receptor (MOPr), κ-opioid receptor (ΚOPr) and oxytocin receptor (OTR) systems in cocaine addiction and relapse, our aim was to assess the modulation of these receptors using a mouse model of cue- and priming-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking. Male mice were trained to self-administer cocaine (1 mg/kg/infusion, i.v.) and were randomized into different groups: (1) cocaine self-administration; (2) cocaine extinction; (3) cocaine-primed (10 mg/kg i.p.); or (4) cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking. Mice undergoing the same protocols but receiving saline instead of cocaine were used as controls. Quantitative autoradiography of mGlu5 R, MOPr, KOPr and OTR showed a persistent cocaine-induced upregulation of the mGlu5 R and OTR in the lateral septum and central amygdala, respectively. Moreover, a downregulation of mGlu5 R and MOPr was observed in the basolateral amygdala and striatum, respectively. Further, we showed that priming- but not cue-induced reinstatement upregulates mGlu5 R and MOPr binding in the nucleus accumbens core and basolateral amygdala, respectively, while cue- but not priming-induced reinstatement downregulates MOPr binding in caudate putamen and nucleus accumbens core. This is the first study to provide direct evidence of reinstatement-induced receptor alterations that are likely to contribute to the neurobiological mechanisms underpinning relapse to cocaine seeking.

  1. Putting cocaine use and cocaine-associated cardiac arrhythmias into epidemiological and clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wood, David M; Dargan, Paul I

    2010-01-01

    This is the first article in a series of three articles on cocaine-related cardiac arrhythmias, following on from the 2008 British Pharmacological Society Winter Meeting Clinical Section Symposium entitled ‘Cocaine induced cardiac arrhythmias – from ion channel to clinical treatment’. We will summarize the epidemiology of cocaine use across the world and in particular will focus on UK, Europe and US use prevalence data. We will discuss the acute cardiac and non-cardiac toxicity associated with cocaine and highlight the lack of data on the true UK prevalence of acute cocaine toxicity and on the incidence of cocaine-related cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:20573079

  2. Intravenous Cocaine Priming Reinstates Cocaine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombas, Andres S.; Freeman, Kevin B.; Roma, Peter G.; Riley, Anthony L.

    2007-01-01

    Separate groups of rats underwent an unbiased conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure involving alternate pairings of distinct environments with intravenous (IV) injections of cocaine (0.75 mg/kg) or saline immediately or 15 min after injection. A subsequent extinction phase consisted of exposure to both conditioning environments preceded by…

  3. Does surgical treatment within 4 hours after trauma have an influence on neurological remission in patients with acute spinal cord injury?

    PubMed Central

    Biglari, Bahram; Child, Christopher; Yildirim, Timur Mert; Swing, Tyler; Reitzel, Tim; Moghaddam, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Background The proper timing for surgery in patients with acute spinal cord injury is controversial. This study was conducted to detect if there is an advantage in early (within the first 4 hours after trauma) compared to late (between 4 and 24 hours after trauma) surgery on neurological outcome. Methods In this single institution prospective cohort study, data were analyzed from 51 spinal cord injured patients with an average age of 43.4 (±19.2) years. The influence of early (29 patients within the first 4 hours) as opposed to late (22 patients between 4 and 24 hours) decompression was evaluated by comparing data for neurological outcome. Patients of the study collectively suffered acute spinal fractures from C2 to L3 (cervical 39.2%, thoracic 29.4%, and lumbal 21.6%) or nonosseous lesions (9.8%). American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grades were assessed at time of admission and 6 months after trauma or longer depending on the time of release. Surgical treatment included early stabilization and decompression within 24 hours. Results No significant difference between improved neurological function, measured with the AIS, and an early or late surgery time can be seen (P=0.402). Furthermore, binary logistic regression shows no significant difference between sex or age, and AIS improvement as possible confounders. Conclusion In our study, all patients with spinal cord injury were treated with spine stabilization and decompression within the first 24 hours after trauma. Surgical decompression within the first 4 hours after trauma was not associated with improved neurological outcome compared to treatment between 4 and 24 hours. In a clinical context, this indicates that there is a time frame of at least 1 day in which optimal care is possible. PMID:27621643

  4. Cocaine self-administration punished by i.v. histamine in rat models of high and low drug abuse vulnerability: effects of saccharin preference, impulsivity, and sex.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Nathan A; Anker, Justin J; Regier, Paul S; Claxton, Alex; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2013-10-01

    A key feature of substance use disorders is continued drug consumption despite aversive consequences. This has been modeled in the animal laboratory by pairing drug self-administration with electric shock, thereby punishing drug intake (Deroche-Gamonet et al. 2004). In the present experiments, we examined the effects of punishment on i.v. cocaine self-administration by adding histamine to the cocaine solution with three different animal models of high and low vulnerability to drug abuse: rats selectively bred for high (HiS) and low (LoS) saccharin consumption, rats selected for high (HiI) and low (LoI) impulsivity, and sex differences. Animals were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.4 mg/kg/infusion) to establish a baseline of operant responding. Histamine (4.0mg/kg/infusion) was then added directly into the cocaine solution and its consequent effects on self-administration were compared to baseline. The histamine+cocaine solution was then replaced with a cocaine-only solution, and the rats' operant responding was again compared to baseline. Concurrent histamine exposure was effective in reducing cocaine consumption in all groups of rats; however, LoS and female rats took longer to return to baseline levels of cocaine consumption after histamine was removed compared to HiS and male rats. These data suggest that the reduction of drug self-administration by aversive consequences may differ in groups that vary in drug use vulnerability . Such results may inform pharmacological strategies that enhance the negative aspects of drug consumption.

  5. Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens shell attenuates cue-induced reinstatement of both cocaine and sucrose seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Guercio, Leonardo A; Schmidt, Heath D; Pierce, R Christopher

    2015-03-15

    Stimuli previously associated with drug taking can become triggers that can elicit craving and lead to relapse of drug-seeking behavior. Here, we examined the influence of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the nucleus accumbens shell on cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking, an animal model of relapse. Rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.254 mg, i.v.) for 2 h daily for 21 days, with each infusion of cocaine being paired with a cue light. After 21 days of self-administration, cocaine-taking behavior was extinguished by replacing cocaine with saline in the absence of the cue light. Next, during the reinstatement phase, DBS was administered bilaterally into the nucleus accumbens shell through bipolar stainless steel electrodes immediately prior to re-exposure to cues previously associated with cocaine reinforcement. DBS continued throughout the 2 h reinstatement session. Parallel studies examined the influence of accumbens shell DBS on reinstatement induced by cues previously associated with sucrose reinforcement. Results indicated that DBS of the nucleus accumbens shell significantly attenuated cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine and sucrose seeking. Together, these results indicate that DBS of the accumbens shell disrupts cue-induced reinstatement associated with both a drug and a natural reinforcer. PMID:25529183

  6. A therapeutic combination of metyrapone and oxazepam increases brain levels of GABA-active neurosteroids and decreases cocaine self-administration in male rats.

    PubMed

    Schmoutz, Christopher D; Guerin, Glenn F; Runyon, Scott P; Dhungana, Suraj; Goeders, Nicholas E

    2015-09-15

    In rodents, the behavioral and neurochemical effects resulting from the pharmacological blockade of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis are unclear. Metyrapone, a corticosterone synthesis inhibitor, has been demonstrated to reduce cocaine-related behaviors, especially in a low-dose combination with oxazepam, a benzodiazepine. Although this combination therapy (MET/OX) also reduces drug-taking and drug-seeking behaviors in both rodents and cocaine-dependent humans, these effects are not correlated with plasma glucocorticoid levels. In this brief report, we present data demonstrating that this MET/OX combination enhances brain levels of the GABA-active steroid metabolites, tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC) and allopregnanolone. Male rats, trained to self-administer cocaine or that received yoked-saline infusions, were pretreated with MET/OX, at doses that reduced cocaine-motivated responding, or vehicle. Allopregnanolone and THDOC were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS) in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala in the brains from these rats. THDOC levels were enhanced following MET/OX pretreatment in both brain regions, regardless of cocaine self-administration experience. However, allopregnanolone was selectively enhanced in the rats that self-administered cocaine, but not in rats in the yoked-saline group. Thus, the MET/OX combination increased neurosteroid content in brain regions important for drug addiction. These neurosteroids have been shown to reduce cocaine-related behaviors and may contribute to the behavioral effects of MET/OX combination therapy. PMID:26003946

  7. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Nucleus Accumbens Shell Attenuates Cue-Induced Reinstatement of Both Cocaine and Sucrose Seeking in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guercio, Leonardo A.; Schmidt, Heath D.; Pierce, R. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Stimuli previously associated with drug taking can become triggers that can elicit craving and lead to relapse of drug-seeking behavior. Here, we examined the influence of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the nucleus accumbens shell on cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking, an animal model of relapse. Rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.254 mg, i.v.) for 2 h daily for 21 d, with each infusion of cocaine being paired with a cue light. After 21 d of self-administration, cocaine-taking behavior was extinguished by replacing cocaine with saline in the absence of the cue light. Next, during the reinstatement phase, DBS was administered bilaterally into the nucleus accumbens shell through bipolar stainless steel electrodes immediately prior to re-exposure to cues previously associated with cocaine reinforcement. DBS continued throughout the 2 h reinstatement session. Parallel studies examined the influence of accumbens shell DBS on reinstatement induced by cues previously associated with sucrose reinforcement. Results indicated that DBS of the nucleus accumbens shell significantly attenuated cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine and sucrose seeking. Together, these results indicate that DBS of the accumbens shell disrupts cue-induced reinstatement associated with both a drug and a natural reinforcer. PMID:25529183

  8. Acute brain metabolic effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys with a history of cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Henry, Porche' Kirkland; Murnane, Kevin S; Votaw, John R; Howell, Leonard L

    2010-12-01

    Cocaine addiction involves an escalation in drug intake which alters many brain functions. The present study documented cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolic activity as a function of cocaine self-administration history. Experimentally naive rhesus monkeys (N = 6) were given increasing access to cocaine under a fixed-ratio schedule of intravenous (i.v.) drug self-administration. PET imaging with F-18 labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to measure acute intramuscular (i.m.) cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolism in the cocaine-naïve state, following 60 sessions under limited-access conditions (1 h/day), following 60 sessions under extended-access conditions (4 h/day), and following 4 weeks of drug withdrawal. In the cocaine-naïve state, cocaine-induced increases in brain metabolism were restricted to the prefrontal cortex. As cocaine exposure increased from limited to extended access, metabolic effects expanded throughout the frontal cortex and were induced within the striatum. Conversely, cocaine-induced activation was far less robust following withdrawal. The results highlight a progressive expansion of the metabolic effects of cocaine to include previously unaffected dopamine innervated brain regions as a consequence of cocaine self-administration history. The identification of brain regions progressively influenced by drug exposure may be highly relevant toward efforts to develop treatments for cocaine addiction.

  9. Acute brain metabolic effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys with a history of cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Henry, Porche' Kirkland; Murnane, Kevin S; Votaw, John R; Howell, Leonard L

    2010-12-01

    Cocaine addiction involves an escalation in drug intake which alters many brain functions. The present study documented cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolic activity as a function of cocaine self-administration history. Experimentally naive rhesus monkeys (N = 6) were given increasing access to cocaine under a fixed-ratio schedule of intravenous (i.v.) drug self-administration. PET imaging with F-18 labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to measure acute intramuscular (i.m.) cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolism in the cocaine-naïve state, following 60 sessions under limited-access conditions (1 h/day), following 60 sessions under extended-access conditions (4 h/day), and following 4 weeks of drug withdrawal. In the cocaine-naïve state, cocaine-induced increases in brain metabolism were restricted to the prefrontal cortex. As cocaine exposure increased from limited to extended access, metabolic effects expanded throughout the frontal cortex and were induced within the striatum. Conversely, cocaine-induced activation was far less robust following withdrawal. The results highlight a progressive expansion of the metabolic effects of cocaine to include previously unaffected dopamine innervated brain regions as a consequence of cocaine self-administration history. The identification of brain regions progressively influenced by drug exposure may be highly relevant toward efforts to develop treatments for cocaine addiction. PMID:20680706

  10. Acute sleep deprivation increases the rate and efficiency of cocaine self-administration, but not the perceived value of cocaine reward in rats.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Matthew D; Fang, Jidong; Grigson, Patricia Sue

    2009-12-01

    Relapse to drug seeking and drug taking is elicited by exposure to stress, drug-associated cues, or drugs of abuse themselves. According to the clinical literature, relapse also can be elicited in humans by sleep deprivation. Even so, the effect of sleep deprivation on drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviors has received relatively little attention in the laboratory (i.e., currently, no animal model exists) and the underlying circuitry remains unexplored. In the present study, 42 naïve male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to self-administer cocaine and were then divided, on the basis of their behavior, into low (n=20) and high (n=22) drug-taking groups. Self-administration behavior was extinguished, and the effect of acute sleep deprivation (0, 4, or 8h) on drug-induced reinstatement and on progressive ratio responding (i.e., on the motivation to work for drug) was investigated. The results showed that, relative to low drug-takers, high drug-takers took more drug in acquisition, made more infusion attempts during drug-induced reinstatement, worked harder for drug, and exhibited greater goal-directed behavior. Acute sleep deprivation had little impact on high drug-takers beyond increasing the rate of infusions self-administered during progressive ratio (PR) testing. Conversely, in low drug-takers, acute sleep deprivation completely abolished cocaine-induced reinstatement during extinction testing. During PR testing, however, sleep deprivation increased the speed with which low drug-taking rats initiated responding for drug, increased the rate of infusions, and increased goal-directed behavior. It did not, however, increase the perceived value of the cocaine reward (i.e., neither sleep-deprived low drug-takers nor high drug-takers exhibited a higher break point for cocaine than their non-deprived counterparts). These data are the first to demonstrate a direct link between sleep deprivation and responding for cocaine, particularly in subjects that would otherwise

  11. Impulsivity (delay discounting) for food and cocaine in male and female rats selectively bred for high and low saccharin intake.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jennifer L; Nelson, Sarah E; Anderson, Marissa M; Morgan, Andrew D; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2007-04-01

    Previous research in rats indicates that delay discounting for food, a model of impulsivity, predicted the rate of acquisition of cocaine self-administration. In other studies, rats bred for high saccharin intake (HiS) acquired cocaine self-administration at higher rates than those with low saccharin intake (LoS), and female (F) rats acquired cocaine self-administration more rapidly than males (M). The purpose of this study was to examine a possible connection between impulsivity, saccharin intake, and sex by comparing M and F rats from the HiS and LoS selectively bred lines on measures of impulsivity; i.e., their rate of delay discounting for food or i.v. cocaine infusions. The adjusting delay procedure allowed rats access to 2 response levers, and a pellet dispenser or an i.v. drug infusion pump. In 4 groups (HiS M, HiS F, LoS M, LoS F) responses under a fixed-ratio (FR) 1 schedule on one lever resulted in one 45 mg pellet immediately, and responses on the other lever resulted in 3 or 6 pellets after a delay. Four additional groups received either a small cocaine (0.2, 0.4, or 0.8 mg/kg) infusion immediately or a delayed larger infusion (3x the amount of the small infusions). The delay to the larger reinforcer began at 6 s and increased or decreased by 1 s following responses on the delay or immediate levers, respectively. A mean adjusted delay (MAD) was calculated over 30 choice trials during each daily 3-hour session, and it was used as a quantitative measure of impulsivity. In groups maintained by food, HiS rats were more impulsive (lower MADs) than LoS rats, and LoS females were more impulsive than LoS males. There were no phenotype or sex differences in delay discounting for cocaine. Understanding the relationship between impulsivity and other predictors of drug abuse (e.g., sex, saccharin intake) is important in developing prevention and treatment strategies.

  12. Adverse health consequences of cocaine abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Cregler, L. L.

    1989-01-01

    Cocaine creates a strong physical addiction and is becoming recognized as one of the most dangerous illicit drugs abused today. The myth is that cocaine is harmless and nonaddictive. An estimated 30 million Americans have used cocaine, but the number may be as high as 40 million. Five to six million individuals are compulsive users. A review of the current literature revealed multiple reports of acute myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident with a temporal relation to cocaine use. Cocaine has also been associated with acute rupture of the aorta, cardiac arrhythmia, and sudden death. Cocaine has multisystem toxicity involving neurologic, psychiatric, obstetric, pulmonary, dermatologic, and gastrointestinal systems. The dopamine depletion hypothesis may explain why cocaine is repeatedly administered; cocaine produces a transient increase in synaptic dopamine. Alterations in dopamine neurotransmission may be responsible for the development of compulsive use patterns. When cocaine use becomes compulsive, psychosocial dysfunction, deviant behaviors, and a wide spectrum of social, financial, and family problems invariably result. Addiction, major medical complications, and death are true hazards of cocaine use. PMID:2657079

  13. Multiple faces of BDNF in cocaine addiction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Wolf, Marina E.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been found to play roles in many types of plasticity including drug addiction. Here we focus on rodent studies over the past two decades that have demonstrated diverse roles of BDNF in models of cocaine addiction. First, we will provide an overview of studies showing that cocaine exposure alters (and generally increases) BDNF levels in reward-related regions including the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex, and amygdala. Then we will review evidence that BDNF contributes to behavioral changes in animal models of cocaine addiction, focusing on conditioned place preference, behavioral sensitization, maintenance and reinstatement of self-administration, and incubation of cocaine craving. Last, we will review the role of BDNF in synaptic plasticity, particularly as it relates to plasticity of AMPA receptor transmission after cocaine exposure. We conclude that BDNF regulates cocaine-induced behaviors in a highly complex manner that varies depending on the brain region (and even among different cell types within the same brain region), the nature of cocaine exposure, and the “addiction phase” examined (e.g., acquisition vs maintenance; early vs late withdrawal). These complexities make BDNF a daunting therapeutic target for treating cocaine addiction. However, recent clinical evidence suggests that the serum BDNF level may serve as a biomarker in cocaine addicts to predict future relapse, providing an alternative direction for exploring BDNF’s potential relevance to treating cocaine addiction. PMID:25449839

  14. [Continuous-infusion ketamine].

    PubMed

    Mancini, P G; Caggese, G; Di Fabio, A; Di Nino, G F; Cocchi, V

    1980-08-01

    An investigation was made of the employment of ketamin as the sole anaesthetic in general surgery, using continuous infusion of a 1% solution for both induction and maintenance in 118 cases. ECG was monitored and arterial pressure was measured invasively. Central venous pressure was also determined in 10 cases. Changes in serum enzyme values during and after surgery were examined in 35 patients. Blood samples were withdrawn before induction, after the return to consciousness, and 24 hr after the operation. Side-effects were common, but slight. Five patients suffered from nightmares, but these were persons with marked imaginative activity and a melancholic nature. Cardiocirculatory function was satisfactory. In particular, peripheral perfusion was excellent in all cases.

  15. Removing the confusion about infusion.

    PubMed

    Bayne, C G

    1997-02-01

    There is more to infusion technology than simply connecting the "pump-du-jour" to the central line. The purpose of infusion technology, its safety products and four categories of devices-elastomeric, mechanical, gas and membrane-are discussed. PMID:9287736

  16. Acquisition of cocaine self-administration in ovariectomized female rats: Effect of estradiol dose or chronic estradiol administration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ming; Becker, Jill B.

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate whether the dose of estradiol (E) administered acutely, or chronic delivery of one dose of E impacts acquisition and subsequent cocaine self-administration in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats. Five groups of female rats were compared: OVX females treated with 0, 1, 2, or 5 µg 17 β-E, 30 min prior to the self-administration session, and OVX rats that received a 1.5 mg E pellet (designed to chronically release 25 µg E/d X 60 d) implanted 1 week before cocaine self-administration initiation. Rats were tested in 1 hr sessions on a FR1 schedule with the dose of cocaine increasing every week (testing occurred 5 day/wk; doses: 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.75 mg/kg/infusion). We report that OVX rats treated with 2 µg E acquired self-administration more rapidly than all of the other groups, and animals that received 1 or 2 µg E self-administered significantly more cocaine compared to OVX+vehicle at 0.3 and 0.4 mg/kg/infusion. In contrast, OVX rats given 5 µg E acutely, or chronic E via slow-release pellets did not take more cocaine than the OVX+vehicle group at any time point. Physiological serum concentrations of E were seen with 1 or 2 µg E, but 5 µg E and the E pellet produced supra-physiological concentrations. These results suggest an inverted U-shaped dose-response curve for the effect of E on acquisition of cocaine self-administration. PMID:18054446

  17. Caregiving demands and well-being in parents of children treated with outpatient or inpatient methotrexate infusion: a report from the children's oncology group.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Katherine P; Wells, Diane K; Chen, Lu; Reeves, Elaine; Mass, Ellen; Camitta, Bruce; Hinds, Pamela S

    2014-08-01

    Parent well-being is affected by their child's oncology treatment regimen and associated caregiving demand. Parental caregiving demands and well-being were evaluated in 161 parents from 47 sites whose child was randomized to receive either a 4-hour (outpatient) or 24-hour (inpatient) methotrexate infusion during consolidation treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A majority of patients randomized to the 4-hour infusion (66.3%) received the infusion as an inpatient. The most frequently reported reasons for this were lack of an adequate outpatient facility (53.6%) and physician preference (25.0%). There were no differences between caregiving demand and well-being total scores by either randomized or actual infusion location with one exception: well-being scale fatigue scores were significantly greater (P=0.001) for parents whose child received the outpatient infusion. Mean total well-being scores for both the 24-hour arm (µ=42.6; SD 16.2) and the 4-hour arm (µ=40.6; SD 14.1) were elevated compared to healthy control populations. Additional research is needed to characterize impact of treatment setting on parental caregiving demand and well-being during their child's treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Investigators examining impact of treatment location in randomized clinical trials need to control for institutional variability in outpatient care delivery resources.

  18. [Determination of the critical time point for efficacy of L-arginine infusion therapy in a case of MELAS with frequent stroke-like episodes].

    PubMed

    Sudo, Akira; Sano, Hitomi; Kawamura, Nobuaki

    2014-01-01

    MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes) is the most representative subtype of mitochondrial diseases. Administration of L-arginine (L-Arg) or a precursor of nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed as a promising medication for MELAS because one of the pathophysiological mechanisms is supposedly a decreased capacity for NO-dependent vasodilation. We experienced a girl with MELAS and frequent stroke-like episodes who was treated with L-Arg infusion. We evaluated the efficacy of L-Arg infusion therapy based on whether her headache and nausea were disappeared and neurological symptoms were improved within 24 hours of L-Arg administration. L-Arg infusions were effective in all four episodes when the treatment was started within 4 hours of the onset of stroke-like episodes. On the other hand, the infusion was effective in only one out of five episodes when the medication was delayed by more than 4 hours after the onset. Furthermore, the early administration of L-Arg resulted in better outcomes regarding new lesions determined by brain MRI. Our data suggest that L-Arg infusion may be most effective when it is started within 4 hours of the onset of neurological symptoms in the acute phase of MELAS. The study of a large number of episodes in many patients will be needed to determine the critical time point of L-Arg administration after the onset of the acute phase of MELAS.

  19. Acquisition of cocaine self-administration with unsignaled delayed reinforcement in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Galuska, Chad M; Woods, James H

    2005-09-01

    Six experimentally naive rhesus monkeys produced 0.01 mg/kg/infusion cocaine by lever pressing under a tandem fixed-ratio 1 differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior schedule. One lever press initiated an unsignaled 15- or 30-s delay culminating in cocaine delivery. Each press made during the delay reset the delay interval. With two exceptions, responding was acquired and maintained at higher rates than responding on a second (inoperative) lever. For the exceptions, a cancellation contingency was arranged in which each formerly inoperative-lever response reset the tandem schedule. This manipulation reduced presses on the inoperative lever. Subsequently, the consequences of responding on the two levers were reversed, and the monkeys again responded at higher rates on the operative lever. As a comparison, 3 additional experimentally naive monkeys received response-independent cocaine deliveries. Although lever pressing was observed, it extinguished and was subsequently reestablished under the tandem schedule. The results suggest that although response-reinforcer contiguity is not required for cocaine to acquire reinforcing functions, a response-reinforcer relation appears necessary. PMID:16262189

  20. Cocaine self-administration disrupts mesolimbic dopamine circuit function and attenuates dopaminergic responsiveness to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Cody A; Ferris, Mark J; Jones, Sara R

    2015-08-01

    Dopaminergic projections from the ventral midbrain to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) have long been implicated in encoding associations between reward availability and environmental stimuli. As such, this circuit is instrumental in guiding behaviors towards obtaining maximal rewards based on previous experience. Cocaine acts on the dopamine system to exert its reinforcing effects and it is thought that cocaine-induced dysregulation of dopamine neurotransmission contributes to the difficulty that cocaine addicts exhibit in selecting environmentally appropriate behaviors. Here we used cocaine self-administration combined with in vivo fast scan cyclic voltammetry in anesthetised rats to examine the function of the ventral tegmental area to NAc projection neurons. Over 5 days of cocaine self-administration (fixed-ratio 1; 1.5 mg/kg/injection; 40 injections/day), animals increased their rate of intake. Following cocaine self-administration, there was a marked reduction in ventral tegmental area-stimulated NAc dopamine release. Additionally, there was a decreased augmentation of stimulated dopamine overflow in response to a cocaine challenge. These findings demonstrate that cocaine induces a hypodopaminergic state, which may contribute to the inflexible drug-taking and drug-seeking behaviors observed in cocaine abusers. Additionally, tolerance to the ability of cocaine to elevate dopamine may lead to increased cocaine intake in order to overcome decreased effects, another hallmark of cocaine abuse. PMID:26037018

  1. Impaired insight in cocaine addiction: laboratory evidence and effects on cocaine-seeking behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, S.J.; Moeller, S.J.; Maloney, T.; Parvaz, M.A.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik, P.A.; Telang, F.; Wang, G.-J.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-04-15

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are often characterized by impaired insight into behaviour. Such an insight deficit has been suggested, but never directly tested, in drug addiction. Here we tested for the first time this impaired insight hypothesis in drug addiction, and examined its potential association with drug-seeking behaviour. We also tested potential modulation of these effects by cocaine urine status, an individual difference known to impact underlying cognitive functions and prognosis. Sixteen cocaine addicted individuals testing positive for cocaine in urine, 26 cocaine addicted individuals testing negative for cocaine in urine, and 23 healthy controls completed a probabilistic choice task that assessed objective preference for viewing four types of pictures (pleasant, unpleasant, neutral and cocaine). This choice task concluded by asking subjects to report their most selected picture type; correspondence between subjects self-reports with their objective choice behaviour provided our index of behavioural insight. Results showed that the urine positive cocaine subjects exhibited impaired insight into their own choice behaviour compared with healthy controls; this same study group also selected the most cocaine pictures (and fewest pleasant pictures) for viewing. Importantly, however, it was the urine negative cocaine subjects whose behaviour was most influenced by insight, such that impaired insight in this subgroup only was associated with higher cocaine-related choice on the task and more severe actual cocaine use. These findings suggest that interventions to enhance insight may decrease drug-seeking behaviour, especially in urine negative cocaine subjects, potentially to improve their longer-term clinical outcomes.

  2. Prospective associations between brain activation to cocaine and no-go cues and cocaine relapse*

    PubMed Central

    Prisciandaro, James J.; Myrick, Hugh; Henderson, Scott; McRae-Clark, Aimee L.; Brady, Kathleen T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to predict potential for relapse to substance use following treatment could be very useful in targeting aftercare strategies. Recently, a number of investigators have focused on using neural activity measured by fMRI to predict relapse propensity. The purpose of the present study was to use fMRI to investigate prospective associations between brain reactivity to cocaine and response inhibition cues and relapse to cocaine use. Methods Thirty cocaine-dependent participants with clean cocaine urine drug screens (UDS) completed a baseline fMRI scan, including a cocaine-cue reactivity task and a go/no-go response inhibition task. After participating in a brief clinical trial of D-cycloserine for the facilitation of cocaine cue extinction, they returned for a one-week follow-up UDS. Associations between baseline activation to cocaine and inhibition cues and relapse to cocaine use were explored. Results Positive cocaine UDS was significantly associated with cocaine cue activation in the right putamen and insula, as well as bilateral occipital regions. Associations between positive cocaine UDS and activation to no-go cues were concentrated in the postcentral gyri, a region involved in response execution. Conclusions Although preliminary, these results suggest that brain imaging may be a useful tool for predicting risk for relapse in cocaine-dependent individuals. Further, larger-scale naturalistic studies are needed to corroborate and extend these findings. PMID:23683790

  3. Molecular mechanisms of cocaine reward: Combined dopamine and serotonin transporter knockouts eliminate cocaine place preference

    PubMed Central

    Sora, Ichiro; Hall, F. Scott; Andrews, Anne M.; Itokawa, Masanari; Li, Xiao-Fei; Wei, Hong-Bing; Wichems, Christine; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Murphy, Dennis L.; Uhl, George R.

    2001-01-01

    Cocaine blocks uptake by neuronal plasma membrane transporters for dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT), and norepinephrine (NET). Cocaine reward/reinforcement has been linked to actions at DAT or to blockade of SERT. However, knockouts of neither DAT, SERT, or NET reduce cocaine reward/reinforcement, leaving substantial uncertainty about cocaine's molecular mechanisms for reward. Conceivably, the molecular bases of cocaine reward might display sufficient redundancy that either DAT or SERT might be able to mediate cocaine reward in the other's absence. To test this hypothesis, we examined double knockout mice with deletions of one or both copies of both the DAT and SERT genes. These mice display viability, weight gain, histologic features, neurochemical parameters, and baseline behavioral features that allow tests of cocaine influences. Mice with even a single wild-type DAT gene copy and no SERT copies retain cocaine reward/reinforcement, as measured by conditioned place-preference testing. However, mice with no DAT and either no or one SERT gene copy display no preference for places where they have previously received cocaine. The serotonin dependence of cocaine reward in DAT knockout mice is thus confirmed by the elimination of cocaine place preference in DAT/SERT double knockout mice. These results provide insights into the brain molecular targets necessary for cocaine reward in knockout mice that develop in their absence and suggest novel strategies for anticocaine medication development. PMID:11320258

  4. NMDA receptor blockade in the basolateral amygdala disrupts consolidation of stimulus-reward memory and extinction learning during reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in an animal model of relapse

    PubMed Central

    Feltenstein, Matthew W.; See, Ronald E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous research from our laboratory has implicated the basolateral amygdala (BLA) complex in the acquisition and consolidation of cue-cocaine associations, as well as extinction learning, which may regulate the long-lasting control of conditioned stimuli (CS) over drug-seeking behavior. Given the well established role of NMDA glutamate receptor activation in other forms of amygdalar-based learning, we predicted that BLA-mediated drug-cue associative learning would be NMDA receptor dependent. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered i.v. cocaine (0.6 mg/kg/infusion) in the absence of explicit CS pairings (2-h sessions, 5 days), followed by a single 1-h classical conditioning (CC) session, during which they received passive infusions of cocaine discretely paired with a light+tone stimulus complex. Following additional cocaine self-administration sessions in the absence of the CS (2-h sessions, 5 days) and extinction training sessions (no cocaine or CS presentation, 2-h sessions, 7 days), the ability of the CS to reinstate cocaine-seeking on three test days was assessed. Rats received bilateral intra-BLA infusions (0.5 μl/hemisphere) of vehicle or the selective NMDA receptor antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP-5), immediately prior to the CC session (acquisition), immediately following the CC session (consolidation), or immediately following reinstatement testing (consolidation of conditioned-cued extinction learning). AP-5 administered before or after CC attenuated subsequent CS-induced reinstatement, whereas AP-5 administered immediately following the first two reinstatement tests impaired the extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior. These results suggest that NMDA receptor-mediated mechanisms within the BLA play a crucial role in the consolidation of drug-CS associations into long-term memories that, in turn, drive cocaine-seeking during relapse. PMID:17613253

  5. Anti-cocaine antibody and butyrylcholinesterase-derived cocaine hydrolase exert cooperative effects on cocaine pharmacokinetics and cocaine-induced locomotor activity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brimijoin, Stephen; Orson, Frank; Kosten, Tom; Kinsey, Berma; Shen, Xiao Yun; White, Sarah J.; Gao, Yang

    2012-01-01

    We are investigating treatments for cocaine abuse based on viral gene transfer of a cocaine hydrolase (CocH) derived from human butyrylcholinesterase, which can reduce cocaine-stimulated locomotion and cocaine-primed reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior in rats for many months. Here, in mice, we explored the possibility that anti-cocaine antibodies can complement the actions of CocH to reduce cocaine uptake in brain and block centrally-evoked locomotor stimulation. Direct injections of test proteins showed that CocH (0.3 or 1 mg/kg) was effective by itself in reducing drug levels in plasma and brain of mice given cocaine (10 mg/kg, s.c., or 20 mg/kg, i.p). Administration of cocaine antibody per se at a low dose (8 mg/kg, i.p.) exerted little effect on cocaine distribution. However, a higher dose of antibody (12 mg/kg) caused peripheral trapping (increased plasma drug levels), which led to increased cocaine metabolism by CocH, as evidenced by a 6-fold rise in plasma benzoic acid. Behavioral tests with small doses of CocH and antibody (1 and 8 mg/kg, respectively) showed that neither agent alone reduced mouse locomotor activity triggered by a very large cocaine dose (100 mg/kg, i.p.). However, dual treatment completely suppressed the locomotor stimulation. Altogether, we found cooperative and possibly synergistic actions that warrant further exploration of dual therapies for treatment of cocaine abuse. PMID:22960160

  6. [Comorbidity between cocaine addiction and personality disorders].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Montalvo, J; Lorea, I

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the current knowledge about the comorbidity between cocaine dependence and personality disorders. Results concerning a specific profile of cocaine patients are not conclusive. The prevalence rate of personality disorders in cocaine dependents is very heterogeneous (with a mean of 66% of cases), and a great variability is observed between all the studies carried out. There is a tendency for a higher proportion of cocaine dependents to be found within the cluster B category (mainly antisocial and borderline). Lastly, implications of this kind of study for future research and clinical practice are commented upon.

  7. [Comorbidity between cocaine addiction and personality disorders].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Montalvo, J; Lorea, I

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the current knowledge about the comorbidity between cocaine dependence and personality disorders. Results concerning a specific profile of cocaine patients are not conclusive. The prevalence rate of personality disorders in cocaine dependents is very heterogeneous (with a mean of 66% of cases), and a great variability is observed between all the studies carried out. There is a tendency for a higher proportion of cocaine dependents to be found within the cluster B category (mainly antisocial and borderline). Lastly, implications of this kind of study for future research and clinical practice are commented upon. PMID:17898818

  8. Molecular approaches to treatments for cocaine abuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippen-Anderson, Judith L.; George, Clifford; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.

    2003-02-01

    Cocaine is a potent stimulant of the central nervous system with severe addiction potential. Its abuse is a major problem worldwide. The exact mechanism of action of cocaine is still uncertain but it is known that its reinforcing and stimulant effects are related to its ability to inhibit the membrane bound dopamine transporter (DAT). This paper discusses efforts that are underway to identify ligands for possible use in the treatment of cocaine abuse. Much of this effort has been focussed on understanding cocaine interactions at DAT receptor sites.

  9. [Cocaine addiction: current data for the clinician].

    PubMed

    Karila, Laurent; Zarmdini, Rim; Petit, Aymeric; Lafaye, Geneviève; Lowenstein, William; Reynaud, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine remains the second most commonly used illicit drug worldwide after cannabis. Observed levels of cocaine use among countries considerably vary. An increased cocaine use is recorded in the general European population. Cocaine addiction is a worldwide public health problem, which has somatic, psychiatric, socio-economic and judicial complications. It is a multifactorial disorder variable in its clinical manifestations and heritable. Compared to the general population, there is a high prevalence of somatic and psychiatric disorders among cocaine-dependent patients. There are predictable dose-related effects of pharmacological action of cocaine and effects which are uncommon, unrelated to dose and occur randomly in this population. The number of patients entering drug treatment for primary cocaine use has been increasing in Europe for several years. However, there is no specific pharmacotherapy with established efficacy for the treatment of cocaine addiction, nor is any medication approved by regulatory authorities for such treatment. Recent controlled clinical studies and laboratory studies have highlighted some very promising medications. The perfect therapeutic platform for abstinence initiation and relapse prevention of cocaine addiction is a combination of pharmacological treatments and behavioral treatments. Targeting somatic and psychiatric comorbidity is another way to use pharmacological treatments in addictions. PMID:23727012

  10. Neuropsychiatric effects of cocaine use disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Nnadi, Charles U.; Mimiko, Olubansile A.; McCurtis, Henry L.; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2005-01-01

    Individuals who use cocaine report a variety of neuropsychiatric symptoms that are yet to be adequately targeted with treatment modalities. To address this problem requires an understanding of these symptoms and their neurobiological origins. Our paper reviewed the existing data on the neuropsychiatic implications of cocaine. We conducted a Medline search from 1984-2004 using terms, such as "cocaine", "cocaine addiction", "cocaine abuse", "cocaine neuropsychiatry" and "dual diagnosis". The search produced additional reference materials that were used in this review, although we focused on data that have likely clinical implications. The literature evidence suggested that, whereas acute cocaine overdose is potentially fatal, the ingestion of mild-to-moderate doses could result in fatal or nonfatal neuropsychiatric events. Also, chronic cocaine use may be associated with deficits in neurocognition, brain perfusion and brain activation patterns. Some of these deficits were unresolved with periods of abstinence ranging from 3-200 days. Taken together, these studies suggest the need for further investigations to fully characterize the neurobiological substrates of cocaine use disorders (CUDs) with the future possibility of more efficient treatment modalities. PMID:16334497

  11. Sleep Regulates Incubation of Cocaine Craving.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Wang, Yao; Liu, Xiaodong; Liu, Zheng; Dong, Yan; Huang, Yanhua H

    2015-09-30

    After withdrawal from cocaine, chronic cocaine users often experience persistent reduction in total sleep time, which is accompanied by increased sleep fragmentation resembling chronic insomnia. This and other sleep abnormalities have long been speculated to foster relapse and further drug addiction, but direct evidence is lacking. Here, we report that after prolonged withdrawal from cocaine self-administration, rats exhibited persistent reduction in nonrapid-eye-movement (NREM) and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, as well as increased sleep fragmentation. In an attempt to improve sleep after cocaine withdrawal, we applied chronic sleep restriction to the rats during their active (dark) phase of the day, which selectively decreased the fragmentation of REM sleep during their inactive (light) phase without changing NREM or the total amount of daily sleep. Animals with improved REM sleep exhibited decreased incubation of cocaine craving, a phenomenon depicting the progressive intensification of cocaine seeking after withdrawal. In contrast, experimentally increasing sleep fragmentation after cocaine self-administration expedited the development of incubation of cocaine craving. Incubation of cocaine craving is partially mediated by progressive accumulation of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). After withdrawal from cocaine, animals with improved REM sleep exhibited reduced accumulation of CP-AMPARs in the NAc, whereas increasing sleep fragmentation accelerated NAc CP-AMPAR accumulation. These results reveal a potential molecular substrate that can be engaged by sleep to regulate cocaine craving and relapse, and demonstrate sleep-based therapeutic opportunities for cocaine addiction. Significance statement: Sleep abnormalities are common symptoms in chronic drug users long after drug withdrawal. These withdrawal-associated sleep symptoms, particularly reduction in total sleep time and deteriorating sleep quality, have been

  12. Cocaine, a risk factor for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Galasko, G I

    1997-06-01

    Cocaine usage goes back thousands of years, to the times of the Incas. Over the past 20 years, its use has increased dramatically, especially in America, and adverse cardiovascular reactions to the drug have begun to be reported. The first report of myocardial infarction temporally related to the recreational use of cocaine appeared in 1982. Since then, myocardial infarction has become recognized as the drug's most common cardiovascular consequence, with over 250 cases now documented in the literature. This review discusses the history of cocaine use, its pharmacology, the possible pathological mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of myocardial ischaemia and infarction, and current ideas on the management of cocaine-induced myocardial infarction.

  13. Adolescent Atomoxetine Treatment in a Rodent Model of ADHD: Effects on Cocaine Self-Administration and Dopamine Transporters in Frontostriatal Regions

    PubMed Central

    Somkuwar, Sucharita S; Jordan, Chloe J; Kantak, Kathleen M; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine abuse and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are often comorbid. Preclinical research indicates that medial prefrontal (mPFC) and orbitofrontal (OFC) cortices are important neural substrates for both disorders. Using the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model of ADHD, we reported that adolescent treatment with the stimulant methylphenidate, a dopamine (DAT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporter inhibitor, enhanced cocaine self-administration during adulthood, and was associated with increased DAT function in mPFC. This study investigates the effects of atomoxetine ((R)-N-methyl-γ-(2-methylphenoxy)-benzenepropanamine hydrochloride) treatment, a selective NET inhibitor, during adolescence on cocaine self-administration and on DAT function and cell-surface expression in mPFC and OFC during adulthood. SHR acquired cocaine self-administration faster than Wistar–Kyoto and Wistar. Across cocaine doses, SHR earned more cocaine infusions and had higher progressive-ratio breakpoints than Wistar–Kyoto and Wistar, demonstrating that the SHR phenotype models comorbid ADHD and cocaine abuse. Prior atomoxetine treatment did not augment cocaine self-administration in SHR, but acquisition was enhanced in Wistar–Kyoto. No strain differences were found for DAT kinetic parameters or cellular localization in the vehicle controls. Atomoxetine did not alter DAT kinetic parameters or localization in SHR mPFC. Rather, atomoxetine decreased Vmax and DAT cell surface expression in SHR OFC, indicating that inhibition of NET by atomoxetine treatment during adolescence indirectly reduced DAT function and trafficking to the cell surface in OFC, specifically in the ADHD model. Thus, atomoxetine, unlike methylphenidate, does not enhance vulnerability to cocaine abuse in SHR and may represent an important alternative for teens with ADHD when drug addiction is a concern. PMID:23822950

  14. Higher rate alternative non-drug reinforcement produces faster suppression of cocaine seeking but more resurgence when removed.

    PubMed

    Craig, Andrew R; Nall, Rusty W; Madden, Gregory J; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-06-01

    Relapse following removal of an alternative source of reinforcement introduced during extinction of a target behavior is called resurgence. This form of relapse may be related to relapse of drug taking following loss of alternative non-drug reinforcement in human populations. Laboratory investigations of factors mediating resurgence with food-maintained behavior suggest higher rates of alternative reinforcement produce faster suppression of target behavior but paradoxically generate more relapse when alternative reinforcement is discontinued. At present, it is unknown if a similar effect occurs when target behavior is maintained by drug reinforcement and the alternative is a non-drug reinforcer. In the present experiment three groups of rats were trained to lever press for infusions of cocaine during baseline. Next, during treatment, cocaine reinforcement was suspended and an alternative response was reinforced with either high-rate, low-rate, or no alternative food reinforcement. Finally, all reinforcement was suspended to test for relapse of cocaine seeking. Higher rate alternative reinforcement produced faster elimination of cocaine seeking than lower rates or extinction alone, but when treatment was suspended resurgence of cocaine seeking occurred following only high-rate alternative reinforcement. Thus, although higher rate alternative reinforcement appears to more effectively suppress drug seeking, should it become unavailable, it can have the unfortunate effect of increasing relapse. PMID:26988268

  15. Social Stress and Escalated Drug Self-administration in Mice II. Cocaine and Dopamine in Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao; Albrechet-Souza, Lucas; Doyle, Michelle R.; Shimamoto, Akiko; DeBold, Joseph F.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Social defeat stress results in escalation of cocaine taking and long-term neural adaptations in rats. How the intensity and timing of social defeat stress determine these effects, particularly in mice, have not been well characterized. Objective This study investigated the effects of mild vs. moderate intensities and durations of social stress on intravenous cocaine self-administration as well as on dopamine (DA) release in nucleus accumbens shell (NAcSh) by using in vivo microdialysis. Methods Adult male CFW mice experienced 10 days of social defeat stress, either mild (15 attack bites in ca. 1.8 min) or moderate (30 attack bites in ca. 3.6 min), and compared to controls that were handled daily. Subsequently, the socially stressed mice were assessed for either (1) intravenous cocaine self-administration, using several unit doses (0, 0.3, 0.6, 1.0 mg/kg/infusion) under limited access conditions, or (2) neural sensitization, as determined by in vivo microdialysis of DA in the NAcSh in response to acute d-amphetamine challenge. Results Social defeat stress resulted in escalated cocaine self-administration in both mild and moderate socially stressed groups. In addition, social defeat stress led to increased DA release after d-amphetamine challenge. Conclusions These data suggest that both mild and moderate socially stressed mice exhibit increased cocaine taking compared to controls, and this increase is associated with escalated dopaminergic responses in the NAcSh. PMID:25216798

  16. The encoding of cocaine vs. natural rewards in the striatum of nonhuman primates: categories with different activations.

    PubMed

    Opris, I; Hampson, R E; Deadwyler, S A

    2009-09-29

    The behavioral and motivational changes that result from use of abused substances depend upon activation of neuronal populations in the reward centers of the brain, located primarily in the corpus striatum in primates. To gain insight into the cellular mechanisms through which abused drugs reinforce behavior in the primate brain, changes in firing of neurons in the ventral (VStr, nucleus accumbens) and dorsal (DStr, caudate-putamen) striatum to "natural" (juice) vs. drug (i.v. cocaine) rewards were examined in four rhesus monkeys performing a visual Go-Nogo decision task. Task-related striatal neurons increased firing to one or more of the specific events that occurred within a trial represented by (1) Target stimuli (Go trials) or (2) Nogotarget stimuli (Nogo trials), and (3) Reward delivery for correct performance. These three cell populations were further subdivided into categories that reflected firing exclusively on one or the other type of signaled reward (juice or cocaine) trial (20%-30% of all cells), or, a second subpopulation that fired on both (cocaine and juice) types of rewarded trial (50%). Results show that neurons in the primate striatum encoded cocaine-rewarded trials similar to juice-rewarded trials, except for (1) increased firing on cocaine-rewarded trials, (2) prolonged activation during delivery of i.v. cocaine infusion, and (3) differential firing in ventral (VStr cells) vs. dorsal (DStr cells) striatum cocaine-rewarded trials. Reciprocal activations of antithetic subpopulations of cells during different temporal intervals within the same trial suggest a functional interaction between processes that encode drug and natural rewards in the primate brain. PMID:19501630

  17. The Encoding of Cocaine vs. Natural Rewards in the Striatum of Nonhuman Primates: Categories with Different Activations

    PubMed Central

    Opris, Ioan; Hampson, Robert E.; Deadwyler, Sam A.

    2009-01-01

    The behavioral and motivational changes that result from use of abused substances depend upon activation of neuronal populations in the reward centers of the brain, located primarily in the corpus striatum in primates. To gain insight into the cellular mechanisms through which abused drugs reinforce behavior in the primate brain, changes in firing of neurons in the ventral (VStr, nucleus accumbens) and dorsal (DStr, caudate-putamen) striatum to “natural” (juice) vs. drug (intravenous (IV) cocaine) rewards were examined in four rhesus monkeys performing a visual Go-Nogo decision task. Task-related striatal neurons increased firing to one or more of the specific events that occurred within a trial represented by: 1) Target stimuli (Go trials) or 2) Nogotarget stimuli (Nogo trials), and 3) Reward delivery for correct performance. These three cell populations were further subdivided into categories that reflected firing exclusively on one or the other type of signaled reward (juice or cocaine) trial (20–30% of all cells), or, a second subpopulation that fired on both (cocaine and juice) types of rewarded trial (50%). Results show that neurons in the primate striatum encoded cocaine rewarded trials similar to juice rewarded trials, except for 1) increased firing on cocaine rewarded trials, 2) prolonged activation during delivery of IV cocaine infusion, 3) differential firing in ventral (VStr cells) vs. dorsal (DStr cells) striatum cocaine rewarded trials. Reciprocal activations of antithetic subpopulations of cells during different temporal intervals within the same trial suggest a functional interaction between processes that encode drug and natural rewards in the primate brain. PMID:19501630

  18. [Cocaine-related gastric perforation].

    PubMed

    Ring, A; Stein, E; Stern, J

    2010-06-01

    Since the 1980s the abuse of cocaine has been -associated with gastroduodenal perforations in the United States. Here, we report the case of a 28-year-old man who came to our hospital with severe abdominal pain after smoking cocaine. Physical examination revealed generalised abdominal guarding. His X-ray did not show any free intraperitoneal air. However, there was a slightly elevated white blood cell count. Upon laparoscopic exploration of the abdomen, the -patient was found to have a generalised peritonitis secondary to a perforation of the prepyloric anterior wall. The operative procedure consisted of ulcer excision and primary closure with a pyloroplasty as well as an extensive abdominal irrigation after laparotomy.

  19. Shortening Infusion Time for High-Dose Methotrexate Alters Antileukemic Effects: A Randomized Prospective Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Torben S.; Sparreboom, Alex; Cheng, Cheng; Zhou, Yinmei; Boyett, James M.; Raimondi, Susana C.; Panetta, John C.; Bowman, W. Paul; Sandlund, John T.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Relling, Mary V.; Evans, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether shortening the infusion duration of high-dose methotrexate (HDMTX; 1 g/m2) affects the in vivo accumulation of active methotrexate polyglutamates (MTXPG1-7) in leukemia cells and whether this differs among major acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) subtypes. Methods From June 2000 through October 2007, 356 children with ALL were randomly assigned to receive initial single-agent treatment with HDMTX (1 g/m2) as either a 24-hour infusion or a 4-hour infusion at two pediatric hospitals in the United States. The primary outcome measures were the accumulation of MTXPG1-7 in leukemia cells and the antileukemic effects (eg, inhibition of de novo purine synthesis in bone marrow ALL cells, and decrease in circulating ALL cells). Results The 24-hour infusion resulted in significantly higher amounts of MTXPG1-7 in bone marrow leukemia cells (median: 1,695 v 1,150 pmol/109 cells, P = .0059), and better antileukemic effects. The 24-hour infusion had the greatest effect on MTXPG1-7 accumulation in hyperdiploid ALL (median: 3,919 v 2,417 pmol/109 cells, P = .0038); T-cell ALL exhibited smaller differences in MTXPG1-7 but greater antileukemic effects with the longer infusion (median decrease in leukemia cells: 88.4% v 51.8%, P = .0075). In contrast, infusion duration had no significant impact on MTXPG1-7 accumulation or antileukemic effects in ALL with the t(12;21)/(ETV6-RUNX1) chromosomal translocation. Conclusion Shortening the infusion time of HDMTX reduces accumulation of active methotrexate in leukemia cells and decreases antileukemic effects, with differing consequences among major ALL subtypes. PMID:21444869

  20. Effects of cocaine and cocaine metabolites on cardiovascular function in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Schindler, C W; Zheng, J W; Goldberg, S R

    2001-11-01

    The effects of cocaine and the cocaine metabolites norcocaine, ecgonine methyl ester, benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene were evaluated in conscious squirrel monkeys for their effects on blood pressure and heart rate. Norcocaine, ecgonine methyl ester and benzoylecgonine are produced in vivo following cocaine use. Cocaethylene is produced in vivo following concurrent cocaine and alcohol use. Increases in both blood pressure and heart rate were observed following cocaine doses of 0.3-3.0 mg/kg. Ecgonine methyl ester and benzoylecgonine had no effect on either parameter up to doses of 10.0 mg/kg. Norcocaine increased blood pressure, but was less potent than cocaine. Norcocaine did not affect heart rate at doses up to 3.0 mg/kg. In contrast to the other metabolites, cocaethylene increased blood pressure and heart rate similarly to cocaine. These results suggest that ecgonine methyl ester and benzoylecgonine are devoid of cardiovascular effects at doses comparable to cocaine and would not be expected to contribute to cocaine's overall cardiovascular effects. Norcocaine's effect on blood pressure might contribute to the cardiovascular effects of cocaine, but this metabolite is produced only at low levels in vivo. The one metabolite that might be expected to contribute to cocaine's overall cardiovascular effect is cocaethylene, although the degree of this contribution is not clear.

  1. Anti-Cocaine Vaccine Based on Coupling a Cocaine Analog to a Disrupted Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Koob, George; Hicks, Martin J.; Wee, Sunmee; Rosenberg, Jonathan B.; De, Bishnu P.; Kaminksy, Stephen M.; Moreno, Amira; Janda, Kim D.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2012-01-01

    The challenge in developing an anti-cocaine vaccine is that cocaine is a small molecule, invisible to the immune system. Leveraging the knowledge that adenovirus (Ad) capsid proteins are highly immunogenic in humans, we hypothesized that linking a cocaine hapten to Ad capsid proteins would elicit high-affinity, high-titer antibodies against cocaine, sufficient to sequester systemically administered cocaine and prevent access to the brain, thus suppressing cocaine-induced behaviors. Based on these concepts, we developed dAd5GNE, a disrupted E1−E3− serotype 5 Ad with GNE, a stable cocaine analog, covalently linked to the Ad capsid proteins. In pre-clinical studies, dAd5GNE evoked persistent, high titer, high affinity IgG anti-cocaine antibodies, and was highly effective in blocking cocaine-induced hyperactivity and cocaine self-administration behavior in rats. Future studies will be designed to expand the efficacy studies, carry out relevant toxicology studies, and test dAd5GNE in human cocaine addicts. PMID:22229312

  2. A thermostable bacterial cocaine esterase rapidly eliminates cocaine from brain in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Howell, L L; Nye, J A; Stehouwer, J S; Voll, R J; Mun, J; Narasimhan, D; Nichols, J; Sunahara, R; Goodman, M M; Carroll, F I; Woods, J H

    2014-01-01

    A long-acting, thermostable bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE) has been identified that rapidly degrades cocaine with a KM of 1.33+0.085 μM. In vivo evaluation of CocE has shown protection against convulsant and lethal effects of cocaine in rodents, confirming the therapeutic potential of CocE against cocaine overdose. However, the current study is the first to evaluate the effects of CocE on cocaine brain levels. Positron emission tomogrpahy neuroimaging of [11C]cocaine was used to evaluate the time course of cocaine elimination from brain in the presence and absence of CocE in nonhuman primates. Systemic administration of CocE eliminated cocaine from the rhesus-monkey brain approximately three times faster than control conditions via peripheral actions through attenuating the input function from blood plasma. The efficiency of this process is sufficient to alleviate or prevent adverse central nervous system effects induced by cocaine. Although the present study used tracer doses of cocaine to access brain clearance, these findings further support the development of CocE for the treatment of acute cocaine toxicity. PMID:24984194

  3. Electroencephalographic activity and mood in cocaine-dependent outpatients: effects of cocaine cue exposure.

    PubMed

    Bauer, L O; Kranzler, H R

    1994-08-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) and subjective reactions to cocaine cues were evaluated in 18 cocaine-dependent outpatients, after 14 or fewer days of abstinence, and 16 noncocaine-dependent controls. EEG activity and desire for cocaine were recorded while subjects viewed three 5-min films that featured either cocaine-associated, erotic, or neutral stimuli. Other measures of mood state and cocaine craving, derived from the Mood Adjective Checklist and the Cocaine Craving Questionnaire, respectively, were recorded immediately after each film. Analyses of absolute EEG power within six frequency bands (delta, theta, slow and fast alpha, slow and fast beta) revealed no EEG abnormalities in the cocaine-dependent group under any condition. In both subject groups, the cocaine-associated and erotic films produced a similar reduction in total EEG power. The cocaine-associated and erotic films also produced a similar increase in the self-rated desire for cocaine, but this change only occurred in the cocaine-dependent group. PMID:7948456

  4. A thermostable bacterial cocaine esterase rapidly eliminates cocaine from brain in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Howell, L L; Nye, J A; Stehouwer, J S; Voll, R J; Mun, J; Narasimhan, D; Nichols, J; Sunahara, R; Goodman, M M; Carroll, F I; Woods, J H

    2014-01-01

    A long-acting, thermostable bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE) has been identified that rapidly degrades cocaine with a K(M) of 1.33+0.085 μM. In vivo evaluation of CocE has shown protection against convulsant and lethal effects of cocaine in rodents, confirming the therapeutic potential of CocE against cocaine overdose. However, the current study is the first to evaluate the effects of CocE on cocaine brain levels. Positron emission tomogrpahy neuroimaging of [(11)C]cocaine was used to evaluate the time course of cocaine elimination from brain in the presence and absence of CocE in nonhuman primates. Systemic administration of CocE eliminated cocaine from the rhesus-monkey brain approximately three times faster than control conditions via peripheral actions through attenuating the input function from blood plasma. The efficiency of this process is sufficient to alleviate or prevent adverse central nervous system effects induced by cocaine. Although the present study used tracer doses of cocaine to access brain clearance, these findings further support the development of CocE for the treatment of acute cocaine toxicity. PMID:24984194

  5. Intraosseous infusion in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Neal, C J; McKinley, D F

    1994-01-01

    In traumatically injured or medically unstable pediatric patients requiring resuscitation, gaining intravenous access often is frustrating for the physician and agonizing for the patient. Even when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is performed by trained professionals, cardiac arrests in children in the prehospital setting have a mortality of 79% to 100%. Immediate vascular access such as that obtained by intraosseous infusion improves survival. The intraosseous infusion technique uses the medullary cavity in the tibia as a "noncollapsible vein" for parenteral infusion. It is indicated in a child in shock or cardiac arrest when two attempts to access peripheral vasculature have failed or when more than 2 minutes have elapsed in the attempt to gain access. Epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, lidocaine, and volume expanders can be infused via the intraosseous route. Complications rarely occur. The technique described here is gaining acceptance in both prehospital and emergency department settings. PMID:8169160

  6. Manipulating a "cocaine engram" in mice.

    PubMed

    Hsiang, Hwa-Lin Liz; Epp, Jonathan R; van den Oever, Michel C; Yan, Chen; Rashid, Asim J; Insel, Nathan; Ye, Li; Niibori, Yosuke; Deisseroth, Karl; Frankland, Paul W; Josselyn, Sheena A

    2014-10-15

    Experience with drugs of abuse (such as cocaine) produces powerful, long-lasting memories that may be important in the development and persistence of drug addiction. The neural mechanisms that mediate how and where these cocaine memories are encoded, consolidated and stored are unknown. Here we used conditioned place preference in mice to examine the precise neural circuits that support the memory of a cocaine-cue association (the "cocaine memory trace" or "cocaine engram"). We found that a small population of neurons (∼10%) in the lateral nucleus of amygdala (LA) were recruited at the time of cocaine-conditioning to become part of this cocaine engram. Neurons with increased levels of the transcription factor CREB were preferentially recruited or allocated to the cocaine engram. Ablating or silencing neurons overexpressing CREB (but not a similar number of random LA neurons) before testing disrupted the expression of a previously acquired cocaine memory, suggesting that neurons overexpressing CREB become a critical hub in what is likely a larger cocaine memory engram. Consistent with theories that coordinated postencoding reactivation of neurons within an engram or cell assembly is crucial for memory consolidation (Marr, 1971; Buzsáki, 1989; Wilson and McNaughton, 1994; McClelland et al., 1995; Girardeau et al., 2009; Dupret et al., 2010; Carr et al., 2011), we also found that post-training suppression, or nondiscriminate activation, of CREB overexpressing neurons impaired consolidation of the cocaine memory. These findings reveal mechanisms underlying how and where drug memories are encoded and stored in the brain and may also inform the development of treatments for drug addiction.

  7. Accelerating cocaine metabolism as an approach to the treatment of cocaine abuse and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Charles W; Goldberg, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    One pharmacokinetic approach to the treatment of cocaine abuse and toxicity involves the development of compounds that can be safely administered to humans and that accelerate the metabolism of cocaine to inactive components. Catalytic antibodies have been developed and shown to accelerate cocaine metabolism, but their catalytic efficiency for cocaine is relatively low. Mutations of human butyrylcholinesterase and a bacterial cocaine esterase found in the soil of coca plants have also been developed. These compounds accelerate cocaine metabolism and antagonize the behavioral and toxic effects of cocaine in animal models. Of these two approaches, the human butyrylcholinesterase mutants show the most immediate promise as they would not be expected to evoke an immune response in humans. PMID:22300096

  8. Blockade of mesolimbic dopamine D3 receptors inhibits stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jeremy; Campos, Arlene C.; Kline, Nicole; Ashby, Charles R.; Hagan, Jim J.; Heidbreder, Christian A.; Gardner, Eliot L.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale The dopamine (DA) D3 receptor is preferentially expressed in the mesolimbic system. We have previously shown that selective D3 receptor blockade by the novel D3 antagonist SB-277011A inhibits cocaine’s reinforcing action and cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. Objective In the present study, we investigated whether SB-277011A similarly inhibits stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. Methods Rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.5 mg/kg per infusion, 3 h per session) for 10–14 days, followed by a once-daily extinction session for 7–14 days during which saline was substituted for cocaine. Extinction criteria were fewer than ten lever-presses per 3-h session for at least 3 consecutive days. After cocaine-seeking behavior was extinguished, each animal was tested twice for footshock-stress-induced reinstatement, once with vehicle (25% hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin) and once with one of three doses of SB-277011A in counterbalanced fashion. Results During the last 3 days of cocaine self-administration (SA), active lever-presses were approximately 100 per session under fixed-ratio 2 reinforcement (~25 mg/kg cocaine per session). After extinction, intermittent footshock (10 min, 0.5 mA, 0.5 s on with a mean inter-shock interval of 40 s) robustly reinstated the cocaine-seeking behavior (8.4±3.6 active lever-presses in last extinction session to 35.3±5.2 in animals after footshock stress). Intraperitoneal (IP) injections of SB-277011A (3, 6, and 12 mg/kg) dose-dependently blocked stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking. Reinstatement was also blocked by microinjections of SB-277011A (1.5 μg/0.5 μl per side) bilaterally into the nucleus accumbens, but not into the dorsal striatum. Conclusions The mesolimic DA D3 receptor plays an important role in mediating stress-induced reinstatement. PMID:15083257

  9. Familiar companions diminish cocaine conditioning and attenuate cocaine-stimulated dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Wen-Yu; Cherng, Chian-Fang G; Wang, Shyi-Wu; Yu, Lung

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the impact of companions on the rewarding effects of cocaine. Three cage mates, serving as companions, were housed with each experimental mouse throughout cocaine-place conditioning in a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm using conditioning doses of 10 and 20mg/kg. The presence of companions decreased the magnitude of the CPP. At 20mg/kg, cocaine stimulated dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens as evidenced by a significant decrease in total (spontaneous and electrical stimulation-provoked) DA release in accumbal superfusate samples. The presence of companions prevented this cocaine-stimulated DA release; such a reduction in cocaine-induced DA release may account for the reduction in the magnitude of the CPP in the presence of the companions. Furthermore, cocaine pretreatment (2.5mg/kg) was found to prevent the companion-produced decreases in cocaine (10mg/kg/conditioning)-induced CPP as well as the cocaine (10mg/kg)-stimulated DA release. Moreover, the presence of methamphetamine (MA) (1mg/kg)-treated companions decreased cocaine (20mg/kg/conditioning)-induced CPP and prevented the cocaine (20mg/kg)-stimulated DA release. Finally, the presence of companions decreased the magnitude of the CPP could not seem to be accounted for by cocaine-stimulated corticosterone (CORT) release. Taken together, these results indicate that familiar companions, regardless of their pharmacological status, may exert dampening effects on CPP induced by moderate to high conditioning doses of cocaine, at least in part, by preventing cocaine-stimulated DA release in the nucleus accumbens. PMID:27001454

  10. Valproate treatment and cocaine cue reactivity in cocaine-dependent individuals

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Malcolm S.; Thakkar, Vatsal

    2009-01-01

    Based on prior clinical trials indicating that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) based anticonvulsant medications reduce drug craving in cocaine dependent study participants, we tested the effects of valproate treatment on cue-induced cocaine craving. Crack cocaine dependent individuals (N=20) were tested in a randomized, placebo-controlled, within-subjects, crossover study design. Valproate treatment was titrated up to 1500 mg/day by Day 6 of treatment, cue testing was completed on Day 8 of treatment, and all study participants underwent a washout period of 5 days between active and placebo medication treatment periods. Testing included both cocaine and neutral cue exposure sessions, presented in a random and counterbalanced order. Main effects of cue exposure were found for subjective ratings of “desire to use cocaine now”, the cocaine craving index, cocaine-like high, and cocaine withdrawal. Treatment interaction effects were found with “desire to use cocaine now”, which underwent a greater increase following cocaine cue exposure in the valproate condition. Main effects of medication treatment were found, in which lower blood pressure and heart rate, and higher plasma cortisol levels, were associated with valproate treatment. Valproate treatment was also associated, at a trend level, with higher pre-test cocaine craving levels. The results demonstrate that cocaine cue reactivity is a robust phenomena across two assessment sessions, but fail to support the use of valproate as a means of reducing spontaneous and cue-induced cocaine craving. The use of valproate as a treatment for cocaine dependence is not supported. PMID:19375250

  11. Maternal Cocaine Addiction: Correlates and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawley, Theresa Lawton

    This study investigated the effects of cocaine addiction on mothers' ability to care for their children. The population interviewed included 25 cocaine-addicted mothers in a drug treatment center and a comparison group of 25 mothers of children in a Head Start program. Each mother was questioned about: (1) her pregnancy with a specific child…

  12. Children of Cocaine: Facing the Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fact Find, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Statistical data illustrate the incidence of babies who have been prenatally exposed to cocaine. The damaging effects of maternal cocaine use on the fetus, infant, and young child are described, including: (1) prenatal strokes, malformed kidneys and limbs, and deformed hearts and lungs; (2) physical problems, social and emotional problems, and…

  13. Opiate and Cocaine Exposed Newborns: Growth Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butz, Arlene M.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Royall, Richard; Kolodner, Ken; Pulsifer, Margaret B.; Lears, Mary Kathleen; Henderson, Robin; Belcher, Harolyn; Sellers, Sherri; Wilson, Modena

    1999-01-01

    Examines growth parameters at birth in 204 infants born to mothers who used cocaine and/or opiates during pregnancy. Outcome measures included birth weight, length, and head circumference. Study provides support that in utero cocaine exposure may confer more risk for somatic growth retardation at birth than opiate exposure. (Author/GCP)

  14. Children of Cocaine: Treatment and Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howze, Kate; Howze, Wendell M.

    Information concerning the treatment and care of children addicted to cocaine is provided. Contents: (1) describe the drug; (2) put cocaine use in its historical and demographic perspectives; (3) report findings of a study documenting the incidence of maternal substance abuse in Pinellas County, Florida; (4) point out false perceptions,…

  15. Repeated cocaine enhances ventral hippocampal-stimulated dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens and alters ventral hippocampal NMDA receptor subunit expression

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jeffrey L.; Forster, Gina L.; Unterwald, Ellen M.

    2014-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens is important for various reward-related cognitive processes including reinforcement learning. Repeated cocaine enhances hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and phasic elevations of accumbal dopamine evoked by unconditioned stimuli are dependent on impulse flow from the ventral hippocampus. Therefore, sensitized hippocampal activity may be one mechanism by which drugs of abuse enhance limbic dopaminergic activity. In the present study, in vivo microdialysis in freely moving adult male Sprague-Dawley rats was used to investigate the effect of repeated cocaine on ventral hippocampus-mediated dopaminergic transmission within the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens. Following seven daily injections of saline or cocaine (20 mg/kg, ip), unilateral infusion of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA, 0.5 μg) into the ventral hippocampus transiently increased both motoric activity and ipsilateral dopamine efflux in the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens, and this effect was greater in rats that received repeated cocaine compared to controls that received repeated saline. In addition, repeated cocaine altered NMDA receptor subunit expression in the ventral hippocampus, reducing the NR2A:NR2B subunit ratio. Together, these results suggest that repeated exposure to cocaine produces maladaptive ventral hippocampal-nucleus accumbens communication, in part through changes in glutamate receptor composition. PMID:24832868

  16. Alcohol and cocaine. Clinical and pharmacological interactions.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, D A

    1992-01-01

    Both clinical experience and epidemiological studies in community and specialized (e.g., treatment) populations indicate that the prevalence of co-use of alcohol and cocaine, and the comorbidity of alcoholism and cocaine addiction, are greater than would be expected from the chance occurrence of two independent conditions. Alcohol and cocaine have pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions that may account for some of this co-use. While their reinforcing properties have neuropharmacological and behavioral differences, a unified theory of reinforcement by alcohol and cocaine has been proposed, involving dopamine activity in the ventral tegmental area-nucleus accumbens circuit. Regardless of their pharmacology, the prevalent co-use of alcohol and cocaine has important implications for drug abuse treatment and indicates the need for future research on this topic.

  17. Nasal toxicity of cocaine: a hypercoagulable effect?

    PubMed Central

    Patel, R.; Shah, R.; Baredes, S.; Spillert, C. R.; Lazaro, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    Nasal insufflation of cocaine injures the nasal mucosa and can perforate the septum. Cocaine-induced vasoconstriction resulting in ischemia is one of the methods that may be responsible for this damage. We are determining whether cocaine also produces a hypercoagulable state that may compound factors which have been previously established to cause damage to the nasal mucosa and septum. This study uses Modified Recalcification Time (MRT), a test developed in our laboratory that has the ability to measure the overall coagulation process. Our study revealed no connection between cocaine and enhanced platelet function or monocyte-released tissue factor. The coagulation process was unaffected by the addition of the drug, so we conclude that cocaine does not cause a hypercoagulable state and cannot assist in the explanation regarding the ischemic changes of the nasal septum. PMID:10800286

  18. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Infant Cortisol Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Eiden, Rina D.; Veira, Yvette; Granger, Douglas A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on infant hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and reactivity at 7 months of infant age. Participants were 168 caregiver-infant dyads (87 cocaine exposed, 81 not cocaine exposed; 47% boys). Maternal behavior, caregiving instability, and infant growth and behavior were assessed, and children's saliva was sampled before, during, and after standardized procedures designed to elicit emotional arousal. Results revealed cocaine-exposed infants had a high amplitude trajectory of cortisol reactivity compared to non-cocaine-exposed infants. Infant gender and caregiving instability moderated this association. The findings support a dual hazard vulnerability model and have implications for evolutionary-developmental theories of individual differences in biological sensitivity to context. PMID:19467009

  19. Increased sensitivity to cocaine self-administration in HIV-1 transgenic rats is associated with changes in striatal dopamine transporter binding

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Scot; Sexton, Tammy; Pattison, Lindsey P.; Childers, Steven R.; Hemby, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine abuse in HIV patients accelerates the progression and severity of neuropathology, motor impairment and cognitive dysfunction compared to non-drug using HIV patients. Cocaine and HIV interact with the dopamine transporter (DAT); however, the effect of their interaction on DAT binding remains understudied. The present study compared the dose-response functions for intravenous self-administration of cocaine and heroin between male HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1 Tg) and Fischer 344 rats. The cocaine and heroin dose-response functions exhibit an inverted U-shape for both HIV-1 Tg and F344 rats. For cocaine, the number of infusions for each dose on the ascending limb was greater for HIV-1 Tg versus F344 rats. No significant changes in the heroin dose-response function were observed in HIV-1 Tg animals. Following the conclusion of self-administration experiments, DAT binding was assessed in striatal membranes. Saturation binding of the cocaine analog [125I] 3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2β-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([125I]RTI-55) in rat striatal membranes resulted in binding curves that were best fit to a two-site binding model, allowing for calculation of dissociation constant (Kd) and binding density (Bmax) values that correspond to high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Control HIV-1 Tg rats exhibited a significantly greater affinity (i.e., decrease in Kd value) in the low-affinity DAT binding site compared to control F344 rats. Furthermore, cocaine self-administration in HIV-1 Tg rats increased low-affinity Kd (i.e., decreased affinity) compared to levels observed in control F344 rats. Cocaine also increased low-affinity Bmax in HIV-1 Tg rats as compared to controls, indicating an increase in the number of low-affinity DAT binding sites. F344 rats did not exhibit any change in high- or low-affinity Kd or Bmax values following cocaine or heroin self-administration. The increase in DAT affinity in cocaine HIV-1 Tg rats is consistent with the leftward shift of the

  20. Increased Sensitivity to Cocaine Self-Administration in HIV-1 Transgenic Rats is Associated with Changes in Striatal Dopamine Transporter Binding.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scot; Sexton, Tammy; Pattison, Lindsey P; Childers, Steven R; Hemby, Scott E

    2015-09-01

    Cocaine abuse in HIV patients accelerates the progression and severity of neuropathology, motor impairment and cognitive dysfunction compared to non-drug using HIV patients. Cocaine and HIV interact with the dopamine transporter (DAT); however, the effect of their interaction on DAT binding remains understudied. The present study compared the dose-response functions for intravenous self-administration of cocaine and heroin between male HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1 Tg) and Fischer 344 rats. The cocaine and heroin dose-response functions exhibit an inverted U-shape for both HIV-1 Tg and F344 rats. For cocaine, the number of infusions for each dose on the ascending limb was greater for HIV-1 Tg versus F344 rats. No significant changes in the heroin dose-response function were observed in HIV-1 Tg animals. Following the conclusion of self-administration experiments, DAT binding was assessed in striatal membranes. Saturation binding of the cocaine analog [(125)I] 3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2β-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([(125)I]RTI-55) in rat striatal membranes resulted in binding curves that were best fit to a two-site binding model, allowing for calculation of dissociation constant (Kd) and binding density (Bmax) values that correspond to high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Control HIV-1 Tg rats exhibited a significantly greater affinity (i.e., decrease in Kd value) in the low-affinity DAT binding site compared to control F344 rats. Furthermore, cocaine self-administration in HIV-1 Tg rats increased low-affinity Kd (i.e., decreased affinity) compared to levels observed in control F344 rats. Cocaine also increased low-affinity Bmax in HIV-1 Tg rats as compared to controls, indicating an increase in the number of low-affinity DAT binding sites. F344 rats did not exhibit any change in high- or low-affinity Kd or Bmax values following cocaine or heroin self-administration. The increase in DAT affinity in cocaine HIV-1 Tg rats is consistent with the leftward shift of the

  1. Compartment syndrome following intraosseous infusion.

    PubMed

    Moen, Todd C; Sarwark, John F

    2008-08-01

    Intraosseous infusion is a valuable technique in the resuscitation of critically ill pediatric patients in whom vascular access has proved otherwise impossible. Although it is well established as a safe and reliable means of emergent access, intraosseous infusion is not without danger, nor complication. One of the rare yet most grave complications of intraosseous access is compartment syndrome. We report a case of compartment syndrome as a result of intraosseous infusion that serves to remind of the potential pitfalls of this technique. An otherwise healthy 6-year-old girl presented to our institution's pediatric intensive care unit following emergent resuscitation for a prolonged cardiac arrest. Approximately 1 hour following an uneventful soccer practice, without any antecedent cardiopulmonary symptoms or complaints, the patient collapsed and was unresponsive, not breathing, and pulseless. In the course of resuscitation, right and left tibial intraosseous lines were started. After 30 minutes of resuscitation, with multiple rounds of lidocaine and epinephrine infused through the intraosseous lines, a sustained perfusing rhythm was established. Acute compartment syndrome was diagnosed, and through anterolateral and posteromedial incisions, all 4 fascial compartments were released. While the condition of the patient's extremity improved, the overall clinical condition of the patient did not. This case highlights the fundamental principles regarding the use of intraosseous infusion and the diagnosis and management of compartment syndrome in critically ill patients. PMID:19292404

  2. [Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and delayed puberty: differential diagnosis using the LH-RH-infusion test].

    PubMed

    Vierhapper, H

    1983-08-26

    Serum concentrations of LH and FSH were determined during an intravenous infusion of LH-RH (200 micrograms, t = 4 hours) in 8 patients (age: 15 to 20 years) with delayed sexual maturation and retarded bone age. Four patients who by clinical criteria were later recognized as suffering from hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) presented during the infusion of LH-RH with only a small response of LH (and, in three cases, of FSH). In 3 patients with HH a deficiency of endogenous LH-RH due to a hypothalamic defect was suggested by an enhanced secretion of LH and FSH during a second LH-RH infusion test performed after priming of the pituitary by pulsatile, subcutaneous infusions of LH-RH (50 micrograms/night for 9 consecutive nights). The fourth patient with HH, who suffered from a pituitary adenoma, failed to display this enhanced secretion of gonadotropins following pituitary priming by intermittent administration of LH-RH. As compared with the patients with HH, 4 patients in whom puberty, although delayed, later occurred spontaneously (pubertas tarda, PT), presented with a considerably more pronounced secretion of LH and FSH during the infusion of LH-RH, and priming by intermittent subcutaneous LH-RH failed to achieve further enhancement of the secretion of LH and FSH during a second infusion test in these patients. The intravenous infusion of LH-RH in combination with a protocol of pituitary priming offers a possibility of distinguishing patients with delayed puberty from those with various forms of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. PMID:6417915

  3. Dopamine D1/D5 receptors in the dorsal hippocampus are required for the acquisition and expression of a single trial cocaine-associated memory.

    PubMed

    Kramar, Cecilia P; Barbano, M Flavia; Medina, Jorge H

    2014-12-01

    The role of the hippocampus in memory supporting associative learning between contexts and unconditioned stimuli is well documented. Hippocampal dopamine neurotransmission modulates synaptic plasticity and memory processing of fear-motivated and spatial learning tasks. Much less is known about the involvement of the hippocampus and its D1/D5 dopamine receptors in the acquisition, consolidation and expression of memories for drug-associated experiences, more particularly, in the processing of single pairing cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP) training. To determine the temporal dynamics of cocaine CPP memory formation, we trained rats in a one-pairing CPP paradigm and tested them at different time intervals after conditioning. The cocaine-associated memory lasted 24 h but not 72 h. Then, we bilaterally infused the dorsal hippocampus with the GABA A receptor agonist muscimol or the D1/D5 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390 at different stages to evaluate the mechanisms involved in the acquisition, consolidation or expression of cocaine CPP memory. Blockade of D1/D5 dopamine receptors at the moment of training impaired the acquisition of cocaine CPP memories, without having any effect when administered immediately or 12 h after training. The expression of cocaine CPP memory was also affected by the administration of SCH 23390 at the moment of the test. Conversely, muscimol impaired the consolidation of cocaine CPP memory only when administered 12 h post conditioning. These findings suggests that dopaminergic inputs to the dorsal hippocampus are required for the acquisition and expression of one trial cocaine-associated memory while neural activity of this structure is required for the late consolidation of these types of memories. PMID:25452086

  4. Effects of imipramine or GABA(B) receptor ligands on the immobility, swimming and climbing in the forced swim test in rats following discontinuation of cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Frankowska, Małgorzata; Gołda, Anna; Wydra, Karolina; Gruca, Piotr; Papp, Mariusz; Filip, Małgorzata

    2010-02-10

    We tested if discontinuation of cocaine self-administration can lead to the development of depressive-like symptoms in the forced swim test expressed as changes in immobility, swimming and climbing behaviors in rats. A "yoked" procedure in which rats were run simultaneously in groups of three, with two rats received the passive injection of cocaine or saline, was employed. Later, we examined whether acute treatment with the classical antidepressant imipramine or GABA(B) receptor ligands could alter the increases in immobility recorded after discontinuation of self-administered cocaine. We found a significant increase (44%) in the immobility time 3 days following discontinuation of cocaine (0.5mg/kg/infusion/2h daily) self-administration for 14 days; such enhancement resembled that observed in rats following the chronic mild stress. Acute administration with imipramine (15 or 30 mg/kg), the GABA(B) receptor agonists baclofen (0.125 mg/kg) and SKF 97541 (0.005 mg/kg), the positive allosteric modulator CGP 7930 (0.3mg/kg) or the antagonist SCH 50911 (0.3mg/kg) counteracted the cocaine discontinuation-induced enhancement in the immobility time. The enhanced immobility time in rats that self-administered cocaine (but not given cocaine passively) may reflect the motivated or cognitive processes of reinforced responding of cocaine and could be a potential driver of the addiction process per se. Moreover, either blockade or stimulation of GABA(B) receptors by their ligands in very low doses attenuated the enhanced immobility time in rats after discontinuation of cocaine self-administration and these findings extend preclinical studies demonstrating the potential involvement of GABA(B) receptor ligands to reduce cocaine craving.

  5. Cocaine metabolism: cocaine and norcocaine hydrolysis by liver and serum esterases.

    PubMed

    Stewart, D J; Inaba, T; Lucassen, M; Kalow, W

    1979-04-01

    The hydrolysis of cocaine and its N-demethylated product, norcocaine, by esterases was examined in liver and serum. Both liver and serum enzymatically formed ecgonine methyl ester from cocaine. The liver enzyme had a much lower affinity for cocaine than that of serum, indicating that a different form of esterase was present in liver. The liver enzyme had a similar affinity for both norcocaine and cocaine. Likewise, the serum enzyme showed similar affinities for both substrates. The Vmax estimates, however, were consistently higher for norcocaine than cocaine in both liver and serum. Benzoyl ecgonine, a major metabolite of cocaine formed by hydrolysis, was not produced enzymatically in either serum or liver; the rate of spontaneous formation at physiological pH suggests that this metabolite may arise nonenzymatically in the body.

  6. Hormones, nicotine, and cocaine: clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K

    2010-06-01

    Nicotine and cocaine each stimulate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and -gonadal axis hormones, and there is increasing evidence that the hormonal milieu may modulate the abuse-related effects of these drugs. This review summarizes some clinical studies of the acute effects of cigarette smoking or IV cocaine on plasma drug and hormone levels and subjective effects ratings. The temporal covariance between these dependent measures was assessed with a rapid (2 min) sampling procedure in nicotine-dependent volunteers or current cocaine users. Cigarette smoking and IV cocaine each stimulated a rapid increase in LH and ACTH, followed by gradual increases in cortisol and DHEA. Positive subjective effects ratings increased immediately after initiation of cigarette smoking or IV cocaine administration. However, in contrast to cocaine's sustained positive effects (<20 min), ratings of "high" and "rush" began to decrease within one or two puffs of a high-nicotine cigarette while nicotine levels were increasing. Peak nicotine levels increased progressively after each of three successive cigarettes smoked at 60 min intervals, but the magnitude of the subjective effects ratings and peak ACTH and cortisol levels diminished. Only DHEA increased consistently after successive cigarettes. The possible influence of neuroactive hormones on nicotine dependence and cocaine abuse and the implications for treatment of these addictive disorders are discussed.

  7. Oral fluid cocaine and benzoylecgonine concentrations following controlled intravenous cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Ellefsen, Kayla N; Concheiro, Marta; Pirard, Sandrine; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-03-01

    Limited oral fluid (OF) pharmacokinetic data collected with commercially available collection devices after controlled cocaine administration hinder OF result interpretations. Ten cocaine-using adults provided OF, collected with Oral-Eze(®) (OE) and StatSure Saliva Sampler™ (SS) devices, an hour prior to and up to 69 h after 25mg intravenous (IV) cocaine administration. Cocaine and benzoylecgonine (BE) were quantified by a validated 2D-GC-MS method. Large inter-subject variability was observed. Cocaine was detected in OF in the first 0.17 h sample after IV administration, with much more rapid elimination than BE. OE observed Cmax median (range) concentrations were 932 (394-1574)μg/L for cocaine and 248 (96.9-953)μg/L for BE. SS observed cocaine and BE Cmax median (range) concentrations trended lower at 732 (83.3-1892)μg/L and 360 (77.2-836)μg/L, respectively. OE and SS cocaine OF detection times were 12.5 and 6.5h and for BE 30.5 and 28.0 h, respectively at 1 μg/L. There were no significant pharmacokinetic differences between OE and SS OF collection devices, except cocaine half-life was significantly shorter in SS OF specimens. This difference could be attributed to differences in stabilizing buffers present in OF collection devices, which may affect cocaine stability in OF specimens, or decreased recovery from collection pads. Both OE and SS OF collection devices were effective in monitoring cocaine and metabolite concentrations with similar detection windows. Furthermore, we demonstrated that different confirmatory OF cutoffs can be selected to produce shorter or longer cocaine and metabolite detection windows to address specific needs of clinical and forensic drug testing programs. PMID:26851651

  8. The cerebellum on cocaine: plasticity and metaplasticity.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Sanroman, Dolores; Leto, Ketty; Cerezo-Garcia, Miguel; Carbo-Gas, María; Sanchis-Segura, Carla; Carulli, Daniela; Rossi, Ferdinando; Miquel, Marta

    2015-09-01

    Despite the fact that several data have supported the involvement of the cerebellum in the functional alterations observed after prolonged cocaine use, this brain structure has been traditionally ignored and excluded from the circuitry affected by addictive drugs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a chronic cocaine treatment on molecular and structural plasticity in the cerebellum, including BDNF, D3 dopamine receptors, ΔFosB, the Glu2 AMPA receptor subunit, structural modifications in Purkinje neurons and, finally, the evaluation of perineuronal nets (PNNs) in the projection neurons of the medial nucleus, the output of the cerebellar vermis. In the current experimental conditions in which repeated cocaine treatment was followed by a 1-week withdrawal period and a new cocaine challenge, our results showed that cocaine induced a large increase in cerebellar proBDNF levels and its expression in Purkinje neurons, with the mature BDNF expression remaining unchanged. Together with this, cocaine-treated mice exhibited a substantial enhancement of D3 receptor levels. Both ΔFosB and AMPA receptor Glu2 subunit expressions were enhanced in cocaine-treated animals. Significant pruning in Purkinje dendrite arborization and reduction in the size and density of Purkinje boutons contacting deep cerebellar projection neurons accompanied cocaine-dependent increase in proBDNF. Cocaine-associated effects point to the inhibitory Purkinje function impairment, as was evidenced by lower activity in these cells. Moreover, the probability of any remodelling in Purkinje synapses appears to be decreased due to an upregulation of extracellular matrix components in the PNNs surrounding the medial nuclear neurons.

  9. Terminal Dopamine Release Kinetics in the Accumbens Core and Shell Are Distinctly Altered after Withdrawal from Cocaine Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Repeated self-administration of cocaine is associated with impairments in motivated behaviors as well as alterations in both dopamine (DA) release and neural signaling within the nucleus accumbens (NAc). These impairments are present even after several weeks of abstinence from drug taking, suggesting that the self-administration experience induces long-lasting neuroplastic alterations in the mesolimbic DA circuit. To understand these changes at the terminal level, rats were allowed to self-administer either cocaine intravenously (∼1 mg/kg per infusion) or water to a receptacle (control) in 2-h sessions over 14 days, followed by 30 days of enforced abstinence. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was used to record real-time DA release in either NAc core or shell after electrical stimulations of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in freely-moving animals. In controls, the kinetics of DA release in the core and shell strikingly differed, with shell displaying slower release and reuptake rates than core. However, cocaine experience differentially altered these signaling patterns by NAc subregion. In the shell, cocaine rats showed less sensitivity to the dynamic range of applied stimulations than controls. In the core, by contrast, cocaine rats displayed robustly reduced peak DA release given the same stimulation, while also showing slower release and reuptake kinetics. The differential effects of cocaine self-administration on terminal function between core and shell is consistent with a region-specific functional reorganization of the mesolimbic DA system after repeated exposure and may provide an anatomical substrate for altered cognitive function after chronic drug-taking and addiction. PMID:27752541

  10. Cocaine attenuates vasoconstriction to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Bove, A.A.; Morley, D.; Vosacek, R.; Zhang, X.Y.; Shah, R. )

    1991-03-11

    The purpose of this study was to determine the combined effects of cocaine and ethanol on vasomotor tone. Using a standard isolated vascular ring preparation, 24 rings from 7 New Zealand White Rabbits were studied. All rings were denuded as verified by methacholine challenge. The dose response to NE for each ring was used as a standard for vasoconstrictors Dose response curves to ETH and C were done in random order. Concentrations of both ETH and C employed were physiologically attainable in man and below thresholds for coma or death. The dose response curve to ETH was repeated after addition of 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M C to the arterial bath. After adding 1,500 ug/ml of ETH, the dose response curve to C was repeated. Ethanol, alone caused significant vasoconstriction of arterial rings. After the addition of C to the bath, the dose response to ETH was significantly shifted to the right, peak contraction achieved was 36.6 {plus minus} 3.2% of maximal NE contraction. Cocaine alone did not result in any change in resting tension of the rings. When ETH was added to the bath, C caused vasoconstriction, the peak value equivalent to 12.5 {plus minus} 2.2% of maximal contraction to NE.

  11. Developmental trajectories of cocaine-and-other-drug-exposed and non-cocaine-exposed children.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Linda C; Cicchetti, Domenic; Acharyya, Suddhasatta; Zhang, Heping

    2003-10-01

    Few data are available concerning the trajectories of mental and motor development across time for cocaine-exposed children compared with others. Findings are presented from individual group curve analyses of the mental and motor development measured by the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II (BSID-II) on repeated visits from 3 through 36 months of a group of prenatally cocaine-and-other-drug-exposed children (n = 265) compared with those exposed to no drugs (n = 129) or no-cocaine-but-other-drugs (n = 66), including alcohol and/or tobacco. Across time, there was a general decline in motor performance but cocaine-exposed-infants showed a trend toward a greater decrease than children in the other two comparison groups. For mental performance, there was also a decline across age but only through 24 months and no differences in the trajectory of the cocaine-exposed group compared to the other two. And, across all assessment ages, cocaine-exposed-infants showed lower BSID-II mental performance compared to both non-drug and non-cocaine-exposed children. Results suggest that prenatally cocaine-exposed children show delayed developmental indices, particularly in their mental performance, but their trajectories across time are similar to those from impoverished, non-cocaine-exposed groups. PMID:14578693

  12. Mitochondrial complex I dysfunction induced by cocaine and cocaine plus morphine in brain and liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa; Silva, Lisbeth; Silva, Ana Maria; Moreno, António J; Oliveira, Catarina R; Santos, Maria S

    2013-06-01

    Mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are affected in brains of human cocaine abusers. Cocaine is known to induce mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac and hepatic tissues, but its effects on brain bioenergetics are less documented. Furthermore, the combination of cocaine and opioids (speedball) was also shown to induce mitochondrial dysfunction. In this work, we compared the effects of cocaine and/or morphine on the bioenergetics of isolated brain and liver mitochondria, to understand their specific effects in each tissue. Upon energization with complex I substrates, cocaine decreased state-3 respiration in brain (but not in liver) mitochondria and decreased uncoupled respiration and mitochondrial potential in both tissues, through a direct effect on complex I. Morphine presented only slight effects on brain and liver mitochondria, and the combination cocaine+morphine had similar effects to cocaine alone, except for a greater decrease in state-3 respiration. Brain and liver mitochondrial respirations were differentially affected, and liver mitochondria were more prone to proton leak caused by the drugs or their combination. This was possibly related with a different dependence on complex I in mitochondrial populations from these tissues. In summary, cocaine and cocaine+morphine induce mitochondrial complex I dysfunction in isolated brain and liver mitochondria, with specific effects in each tissue. PMID:23542814

  13. Novelty seeking, incentive salience and acquisition of cocaine self-administration in the rat.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Joshua S; Marusich, Julie A; Gipson, Cassandra D; Bardo, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that incentive salience plays a major role in drug abuse and the development of addiction. Additionally, novelty seeking has been identified as a significant risk factor for drug abuse. However, how differences in the readiness to attribute incentive salience relate to novelty seeking and drug abuse vulnerability has not been explored. The present experiments examined how individual differences in incentive salience attribution relate to novelty seeking and acquisition of cocaine self-administration in a preclinical model. Rats were first assessed in an inescapable novelty task and a novelty place preference task (measures of novelty seeking), followed by a Pavlovian conditioned approach task for food (a measure of incentive salience attribution). Rats then were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg/infusion) using an autoshaping procedure. The results demonstrate that animals that attributed incentive salience to a food-associated cue were higher novelty seekers and acquired cocaine self-administration more quickly at the lower dose. The results suggest that novelty-seeking behavior may be a mediator of incentive salience attribution and that incentive salience magnitude may be an indicator of drug reward.

  14. Relative reinforcing effects of cocaine, remifentanil, and their combination in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Winger, G; Galuska, C M; Hursh, S R; Woods, J H

    2006-07-01

    Human polydrug abusers often take combinations of opioids and stimulants, but it is not clear why. Behavioral economics with demand curve analysis is uniquely able to separate two of the possibilities: that the drug combination increases the reinforcing potency of the component drugs or that the drug combination is a more effective reinforcer than either drug alone. Rhesus monkeys self-administered a range of doses of cocaine, remifentanil, and combinations of the drugs through indwelling intravenous catheters; the number of responses required for each drug infusion increased across drug-availability sessions. Combining small doses of cocaine and remifentanil that by themselves resulted in very low rates of responding yielded rates of responding that were higher than the maximum maintained by any dose of the constituent drugs. Nevertheless, demand curve analysis demonstrated that the drug combination was equally elastic as the component drugs, indicating that it was not more effective as a reinforcer than either cocaine or remifentanil alone. This suggests that enhanced self-administration of this particular drug combination is due primarily to the drug enhancement of the potency of the other drug. PMID:16571623

  15. Sex differences in the conditioned rewarding effects of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Russo, Scott J; Jenab, Shirzad; Fabian, Sosimo J; Festa, Eugene D; Kemen, Lynne M; Quinones-Jenab, Vanya

    2003-04-25

    Several recent reports have demonstrated sex differences in the behavioral and neurochemical response to cocaine. However, it is not clear whether differences exist in cocaine reward or the extent to which adrenal hormones regulate cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in either sex. To address these questions, side-by-side comparisons were conducted to determine the effects of conditioning length, cocaine dose and adrenalectomy on cocaine CPP in male and female rats. Female rats demonstrated cocaine CPP after four pairing sessions, while male rats required eight pairing sessions to develop CPP for cocaine. Also, female rats developed CPP at cocaine doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg while male rats required higher cocaine doses (20 mg/kg). Overall, females had higher blood serum levels of corticosterone. Furthermore, a dose-dependent effect on serum levels of corticosterone was observed only in female rats, where rats conditioned with 20 mg/kg cocaine had significantly higher serum levels of corticosterone than rats conditioned with 5 mg/kg cocaine. However, adrenalectomy did not affect CPP for cocaine in either sex. These results suggest that a female's higher sensitivity to cocaine's rewarding effects is not completely mediated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Therefore, sex differences in the acquisition and/or expression of cocaine CPP may be regulated by other mechanisms, such as the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  16. Microcomputer Infusion Project: A Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossberg, Stephen A.; Bitter, Gary G.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the Microcomputer Infusion Project (MIP), which was developed at Arizona State University to provide faculty with the necessary hardware, software, and training to become models of computer use in both lesson development and presentation for preservice teacher education students. Topics discussed include word processing; database…

  17. Enhancing Instruction through Software Infusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sia, Archie P.

    The presence of the computer in the classroom is no longer considered an oddity; it has become an ordinary resource for teachers to use for the enhancement of instruction. This paper presents an examination of software infusion, i.e., the use of computer software to enrich instruction in an academic curriculum. The process occurs when a chosen…

  18. Infusing Culture in Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Nancy; Collins, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the culture-infused career counselling (CICC) model. Six principles are foundational to a tripartite model emphasizing cultural self-awareness, awareness of client cultural identities, and development of a culturally sensitive working alliance. The core competencies ensure the cultural validity and relevance of career…

  19. Adverse Events Following Infusion of T Cells for Adoptive Immunotherapy: A 10 Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Conrad Russell; Hanley, Patrick J.; Liu, Hao; Torrano, Vicky; Lin, Yu-Feng; Arce, James A.; Gottschalk, Stephen; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro; Louis, Chrystal U.; Leen, Ann M.; Gee, Adrian P.; Rooney, Cliona M.; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Heslop, Helen E.

    2010-01-01

    Background The FDA currently recommends at least 4 hours of recipient monitoring to detect early infusion reactions; recent catastrophic reactions to “first in man” biological agents have emphasized the importance of this rule for initial studies of new products. The value of such monitoring for better established agents is less obvious. Methods We therefore reviewed infusion-related adverse events (AEs) following administration of ex-vivo expanded T cell products (antigen specific CTLs, allodepleted T cells and genetically modified T cells) on Investigational New Drug (IND) studies in our center. Results From 1998 to 2008, we infused 381 T cell products to 180 recipients, enrolled on 18 studies, receiving T cells targeting malignancies or post-transplant viral infections. There were no Grade 3-4 infusion reactions during initial monitoring or 24 hour follow-up. Twenty four mild (grade 1-2) adverse events (AEs) occurred in 21 infusions either during or immediately following infusion (up to 6 hours), most commonly nausea and vomiting (10/24; 41.6%), likely due to the DMSO cryoprotectant, and hypotension (20.8%), attributable to diphenhydramine pre-medication. 22 additional non-severe events were reported within 24 hours of infusion, most commonly culture negative fever, chills and nausea. Increased risk of adverse effects was associated with age (IRR 0.98; 95% CI 0.96-1.00; p=0.05), while an increase risk of immediate infusion-related events was higher in patients reporting allergies (IRR 2.72; 95% CI 1.00-7.40; p=0.05); sex, disease type or T cell source (allogeneic or autologous) had no effect on frequency of adverse events. Discussion Hence infusion of T cells is safe in the outpatient setting and associated with no severe reactions, so that monitoring for one hour after infusion is likely sufficient. As many of the AEs were attributable to diphenhydramine premedication, a lower dose (0.25mg/kg) should be selected. PMID:20429793

  20. A comparison of motivations for use among users of crack cocaine and cocaine powder in a sample of simultaneous cocaine and alcohol users.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gina; Macdonald, Scott; Pakula, Basia; Roth, Eric A

    2014-03-01

    This study examined the motivations for using cocaine and alcohol comparing those who primarily smoked crack and those who primarily used cocaine powder when using simultaneously with alcohol. Motivations examined included: 1) to cope with a negative affect, 2) enhancement, 3) to be social and 4) to conform. The research design was a cross-sectional study in which clients in treatment for cocaine and alcohol problems completed a self-administered questionnaire about their substance use. Among those who primarily smoked crack or snorted cocaine when also using alcohol (n=153), there were 93 participants who reported primarily snorting cocaine and 60 participants who primarily reported smoking crack. Bivariate analyses found that those who primarily smoked crack reported lower social motivations to use alcohol and cocaine. When adjusting for other covariates in a multivariate analysis, social motivation was still significantly different between groups. Additionally, those who primarily smoked crack were more likely to be older, report higher cocaine dependence severity, be unemployed and were less likely to have completed some post-secondary education, than those who primarily snorted cocaine. No differences were found in enhancement, coping or conformity motivations between the two groups. These results suggest that simultaneous cocaine and alcohol use may have social importance to those who primarily snort cocaine, but that this importance is less evident to those who smoke crack. Consequently, future studies examining motivations for simultaneous cocaine and alcohol use should distinguish between different routes of cocaine administration. PMID:24290877

  1. Levamisole-contaminated cocaine: a hairy affair.

    PubMed

    van der Veer, Tjeerd; Pennings, Ed; Tervaert, J W Cohen; Korswagen, Lindy-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Levamisole-contaminated cocaine can induce severe systemic vasculitis. The diagnosis can be challenging, especially when substance abuse is uncertain. We present the case of a 42-year-old woman suffering from vasculitis due to levamisole-contaminated cocaine, who persistently denied substance abuse. Symptoms included ulcerating skin lesions, arthralgia and myalgia, and the occurrence of an ileal intussusception. The definitive diagnosis was made using hair testing for toxins. She recovered through cocaine abstinence, but re-exposure resulted in a severe relapse with glomerulonephritis. Importantly, at time of the relapse, the patient became positive for both myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and proteinase 3-ANCA. Cocaine-levamisole-induced vasculitis poses a great clinical challenge. The proper diagnostic strategy and therapy is still controversial. We highlight our diagnostic and therapeutic considerations, including hair testing for definitive proof of exposure. PMID:26311010

  2. Opioid and cocaine combined effect on cocaine-induced changes in HPA and HPG axes hormones in men.

    PubMed

    Goletiani, Nathalie V; Mendelson, Jack H; Sholar, Michelle B; Siegel, Arthur J; Mello, Nancy K

    2009-02-01

    Nalbuphine, a mixed micro-/kappa-opioid analgesic, may have potential as a new medication for the treatment of cocaine abuse. Kappa-opioid agonists functionally antagonize some abuse-related and locomotor effects of cocaine, and both kappa-selective and mixed micro-/kappa-opioids reduce cocaine self-administration by rhesus monkeys. Because cocaine's interactions with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and (HPA) hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes may contribute to its reinforcing properties, we examined the effects of cocaine alone and in combination with nalbuphine. Neuroendocrine effects of a single dose of cocaine alone (0.2 mg/kg, IV), with nalbuphine (5 mg/70 kg, IV)+cocaine (0.2 mg/kg, IV) in combination were compared in seven adult men (ages 18-35) who met DSM-IV criteria for current cocaine abuse. Cocaine alone, and in combination with nalbuphine was administered on separate test days under placebo-controlled, double blind conditions. Cocaine stimulated ACTH, cortisol, and LH, whereas cocaine+nalbuphine in combination produced a smaller increase in ACTH, and decreased cortisol and LH. Thus it appears that nalbuphine attenuated cocaine's effects on ACTH, cortisol, and LH. These data are consistent with our earlier report that nalbuphine modestly attenuated cocaine's positive subjective effects, and that the subjective and cardiovascular effects of cocaine+nalbuphine in combination were not additive. PMID:18848957

  3. Cocaine and alcohol interactions in the rat: contribution of cocaine metabolites to the pharmacological effects.

    PubMed

    Pan, W J; Hedaya, M A

    1999-04-01

    The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cocaine and its three metabolites, benzoylecgonine, norcocaine, and cocaethylene, were investigated in awake, freely moving rats. This work was performed to examine the effect of alcohol coadministration on the metabolic profile of cocaine and to determine the contribution of cocaine metabolites to the pharmacological responses observed after cocaine administration. The plasma and brain extracellular fluid concentration-time profiles were characterized after intravenous (iv) administration of cocaine and the three metabolites in a crossover experimental design. The neurochemical response, measured as the change in dopamine concentration in the nucleus accumbens, and the cardiovascular responses, measured as the change in the mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and QRS interval, were monitored simultaneously. Cocaethylene had the highest brain-to-plasma distribution ratio, followed by cocaine, norcocaine, and benzoylecgonine. The estimated total body clearances for cocaine, benzoylecgonine, norcocaine, and cocaethylene were 140 +/- 19, 14.7 +/- 1.2, 130 +/- 19, and 111 +/- 16 mL/min/kg, respectively. Alcohol coadministration increased the formation of norcocaine, decreased the formation of benzoylecgonine, and resulted in the formation of the pharmacologically active metabolite cocaethylene. When cocaine was administered with alcohol, 12.9 +/- 3.1% to 15.3 +/- 2.9% of the cocaine dose was converted to cocaethylene. Benzoylecgonine did not have any central nervous system or cardiovascular activities after iv administration. Compared with cocaine, norcocaine and cocaethylene had more potent and prolonged effects on the neurochemical, heart rate, and QRS interval responses, and were equipotent in increasing the mean arterial blood pressure. These results indicate that changes in the cocaine metabolic profile and the formation of the pharmacologically active metabolite cocaethylene are, at least partially, responsible

  4. Altered cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization in adult mice exposed to cocaine in utero.

    PubMed

    Crozatier, Claire; Guerriero, Rejean M; Mathieu, Flavie; Giros, Bruno; Nosten-Bertrand, Marika; Kosofsky, Barry E

    2003-12-30

    Behavioral sensitization induced by psychostimulants is characterized by increased locomotion and stereotypy and may reflect aspects of neuronal adaptations underlying drug addiction in humans. To study the developmental contributions to addictive behaviors, we measured behavioral responses in adult offspring to a cocaine sensitization paradigm following prenatal cocaine exposure. Pregnant Swiss-Webster (SW) mice were injected twice daily from embryonic days 8 to 17 (E8-E17, inclusive) with cocaine (20 or 40 mg/kg/day; COC20 and COC40, respectively), or saline vehicle (SAL and SPF40) subcutaneously (s.c.). A nutritional control group of dams were 'pair-fed' with COC40 dams (SPF40). P120 male offspring from each prenatal treatment group were assigned to a behavioral sensitization group and injected with cocaine (15 mg/kg) or saline intraperitoneally (i.p.) every other day for seven doses. Locomotor activity and stereotypy were measured during habituation, cocaine initiation, and following a cocaine challenge 21 days after the last initiation injection. As expected, animals demonstrated significantly more locomotion and stereotypic behavior following acute and recurrent injection of cocaine compared to saline-injected animals. However, for each prenatal treatment group, cocaine-sensitized animals showed unique temporal profiles for the increase in locomotor sensitization and stereotypy over the course of the sensitization protocol. Two features that distinguished the altered behavioral progression of prenatally cocaine-exposed animals (COC40) from control (SAL) animals included blunted augmentation of locomotion and enhanced patterns of stereotypic behavior. These findings provide evidence that the behavioral activating effects of cocaine in adult animals are altered following exposure to cocaine in utero.

  5. Methylphenidate attenuates limbic brain inhibition after cocaine-cues exposure in cocaine abusers.

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Tomasi, D.; Telang, F.; Fowler, J.S.; Pradhan, K.; Jayne, M.; Logan, J.; Goldstein, R.Z.; Alia-Klein, N.; Wong, C.T.

    2010-07-01

    Dopamine (phasic release) is implicated in conditioned responses. Imaging studies in cocaine abusers show decreases in striatal dopamine levels, which we hypothesize may enhance conditioned responses since tonic dopamine levels modulate phasic dopamine release. To test this we assessed the effects of increasing tonic dopamine levels (using oral methylphenidate) on brain activation induced by cocaine-cues in cocaine abusers. Brain metabolism (marker of brain function) was measured with PET and {sup 18}FDG in 24 active cocaine abusers tested four times; twice watching a Neutral video (nature scenes) and twice watching a Cocaine-cues video; each video was preceded once by placebo and once by methylphenidate (20 mg). The Cocaine-cues video increased craving to the same extent with placebo (68%) and with methylphenidate (64%). In contrast, SPM analysis of metabolic images revealed that differences between Neutral versus Cocaine-cues conditions were greater with placebo than methylphenidate; whereas with placebo the Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism (p<0.005) in left limbic regions (insula, orbitofrontal, accumbens) and right parahippocampus, with methylphenidate it only decreased in auditory and visual regions, which also occurred with placebo. Decreases in metabolism in these regions were not associated with craving; in contrast the voxel-wise SPM analysis identified significant correlations with craving in anterior orbitofrontal cortex (p<0.005), amygdala, striatum and middle insula (p<0.05). This suggests that methylphenidate's attenuation of brain reactivity to Cocaine-cues is distinct from that involved in craving. Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism in limbic regions (reflects activity over 30 minutes), which contrasts with activations reported by fMRI studies (reflects activity over 2-5 minutes) that may reflect long-lasting limbic inhibition following activation. Studies to evaluate the clinical significance of methylphenidate's blunting of cue-induced limbic

  6. Effects of estradiol on cocaine self-administration and cocaine discrimination by female rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Negus, S Stevens; Knudson, Inge M; Kelly, Maureen; Mendelson, Jack H

    2008-03-01

    The ovarian steroid hormone, estradiol, enhances the reinforcing and locomotor activating effects of cocaine in rodents under some conditions. The present study evaluated the acute effects of estradiol benzoate (E(2)beta) on cocaine self-administration and cocaine discrimination in female rhesus monkeys. Cocaine self-administration (0.10 mg/kg/inj., i.v.) was maintained on a fixed-ratio (FR) 30 schedule of reinforcement, and monkeys had access to cocaine during one 2-h session each day. E(2)beta in a cyclodextrin vehicle (0.00001-0.01 mg/kg, i.m.) was administered 30 min before test sessions conducted twice each week. Cocaine doses were administered in an irregular order during each dose-effect curve determination (0.001-0.3 mg/kg/inj.). Blood samples were collected after test sessions to determine 17beta-estradiol levels. Banana-flavored food pellets were available on an FR 30 schedule in three 1-h sessions each day. Five monkeys were trained to discriminate cocaine (0.18 mg/kg, i.m.) from saline in a two-key food-reinforced procedure, and the effects of pretreatment with E(2)beta in cyclodextrin and in sesame oil were studied. Acute administration of E(2)beta did not consistently alter the cocaine self-administration or drug discrimination dose-effect curves in comparison to saline control treatment. Females also did not self-administer E(2)beta (0.00001-0.10 mg/kg, i.v.) above saline levels. Finally, E(2)beta (0.0001-0.01 mg/kg, i.m.) did not substitute for cocaine in monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline. Taken together, these data suggest that over the dose range studied, estradiol administration does not consistently alter the abuse-related effects of cocaine in female rhesus monkeys. PMID:17507915

  7. The future potential for cocaine vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Orson, Frank M; Wang, Rongfu; Brimijoin, Stephen; Kinsey, Berma M; Singh, Rana AK; Ramakrishnan, Muthu; Wang, Helen Y; Kosten, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Addiction to cocaine is a major problem around the world, but especially in developed countries where the combination of wealth and user demand has created terrible social problems. Although only some users become truly addicted, those who are often succumb to a downward spiral in their lives from which it is very difficult to escape. From the medical perspective, the lack of effective and safe, non-addictive therapeutics has instigated efforts to develop alternative approaches for treatment, including anticocaine vaccines designed to block cocaine’s pharmacodynamic effects. Areas covered This paper discusses the implications of cocaine pharmacokinetics for robust vaccine antibody responses, the results of human vaccine clinical trials, new developments in animal models for vaccine evaluation, alternative vaccine formulations and complementary therapy to enhance anticocaine effectiveness. Expert opinion Robust anti-cocaine antibody responses are required for benefit to cocaine abusers, but since any reasonably achievable antibody level can be overcome with higher drug doses, sufficient motivation to discontinue use is also essential so that the relative barrier to cocaine effects will be appropriate for each individual. Combining a vaccine with achievable levels of an enzyme to hydrolyze cocaine to inactive metabolites, however, may substantially increase the blockade and improve treatment outcomes. PMID:24835496

  8. Smoked cocaine in socially-depressed areas

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The main objectives of this study are to describe the smoked cocaine user's profile in socially-depressed areas and their needs from a harm-reduction perspective, to investigate their use of smoking crack and compare the acute effects between injecting and smoking consumption. Methods The study took place in SAPS, Barcelona, Spain. Two focus group sessions were undertaken with a total of 8 drug users. Secondly, the 8 participants answered a structured questionnaire and in the course of the sessions, as a snowball activity, were trained to survey 6 other crack smokers. Results We obtained 56 questionnaires. The majority of participants were from non-European Community countries (62.69%), 70.2% of participants referred to sharing the smoking equipment. The most frequent symptoms reported during smoked cocaine were mydriasis (83.33%)), perspiration (72.92%) and compulsive object search (70.83%) During the group sessions, participants said that smoked cocaine is much more addictive than injected cocaine and causes more anxiety. Participants also reported the difficulty of changing from injected use to smoked use, due to the larger amount of cocaine needed to reach the same effects as when having injected. Conclusions We can conclude that the research, focused on achieving greater knowledge of the smoked cocaine user's profile, their usage of smoking crack, consumption patterns and acute effects, should be incorporated into substance misuse interventions. PMID:21059272

  9. Profiling cocaine by ATR-FTIR.

    PubMed

    Marcelo, M C A; Mariotti, K C; Ferrão, M F; Ortiz, R S

    2015-01-01

    In this article, five hundred and thirteen cocaine seizures of the State of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil) were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) in the fingerprint region (1800-650 cm(-1)) to profiling and evaluate the pharmaceutical products used as adulterants. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to identify patterns among the samples whereas partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and support vector machines discriminant analysis (SVM-DA) were used to classification the cocaine between base and salt. Spectra of standard solid mixtures of cocaine (salt and base), phenacetin, lidocaine and caffeine were used associated with PCA to predict qualitatively the profile of cocaine seizure. In HCA and PCA, salt and base group were formed correctly. Accordingly with predicted profile of the salt samples, they were majority adulterated with caffeine and lidocaine whereas base cocaine was adulterated only with phenacetin. In the discrimant analysis, all methods have classified the cocaine samples correctly with sensitivity and specificity equal to one between salt and base.

  10. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food and... Infusion pump. (a) Identification. An infusion pump is a device used in a health care facility to pump fluids into a patient in a controlled manner. The device may use a piston pump, a roller pump, or...

  11. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food and... Infusion pump. (a) Identification. An infusion pump is a device used in a health care facility to pump fluids into a patient in a controlled manner. The device may use a piston pump, a roller pump, or...

  12. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food and... Infusion pump. (a) Identification. An infusion pump is a device used in a health care facility to pump fluids into a patient in a controlled manner. The device may use a piston pump, a roller pump, or...

  13. Risk factors for cocaine-induced psychosis in cocaine-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Roncero, C; Daigre, C; Gonzalvo, B; Valero, S; Castells, X; Grau-López, L; Eiroa-Orosa, F J; Casas, M

    2013-03-01

    Cocaine consumption can induce transient psychotic symptoms, expressed as paranoia or hallucinations. Cocaine induced psychosis (CIP) is common but not developed in all cases. This is the first European study on the relationship between CIP, consumption pattern variables and personality disorders. We evaluated 173 cocaine-dependent patients over 18 years; mostly males, whose average age was 33.6 years (SD=7.8). Patients attending an outpatient addictions department were enrolled in the study and subsequently systematically evaluated using SCID I and SCID II interviews for comorbid disorders, a clinical interview for psychotic symptoms and EuropASI for severity of addiction. A high proportion of cocaine dependent patients reported psychotic symptoms under the influence of cocaine (53.8%), the most frequently reported being paranoid beliefs and suspiciousness (43.9%). A logistic regression analysis was performed, finding that a model consisting of amount of cocaine consumption, presence of an antisocial personality disorder and cannabis dependence history had 66.2% sensitivity 75.8% specificity predicting the presence of CIP. In our conclusions, we discuss the relevance of evaluating CIP in all cocaine dependent-patients, and particularly in those fulfilling the clinical profile derived from our results. These findings could be useful for a clinical approach to the risks of psychotic states in cocaine-dependent patients.

  14. Effects of chronic varenicline treatment on nicotine, cocaine, and concurrent nicotine+cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Fivel, Peter A; Kohut, Stephen J; Carroll, F Ivy

    2014-04-01

    Nicotine dependence and cocaine abuse are major public health problems, and most cocaine abusers also smoke cigarettes. An ideal treatment medication would reduce both cigarette smoking and cocaine abuse. Varenicline is a clinically available, partial agonist at α4β2* and α6β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and a full agonist at α7 nAChRs. Varenicline facilitates smoking cessation in clinical studies and reduced nicotine self-administration, and substituted for the nicotine-discriminative stimulus in preclinical studies. The present study examined the effects of chronic varenicline treatment on self-administration of IV nicotine, IV cocaine, IV nicotine+cocaine combinations, and concurrent food-maintained responding by five cocaine- and nicotine-experienced adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Varenicline (0.004-0.04 mg/kg/h) was administered intravenously every 20 min for 23 h each day for 7-10 consecutive days. Each varenicline treatment was followed by saline-control treatment until food- and drug-maintained responding returned to baseline. During control treatment, nicotine+cocaine combinations maintained significantly higher levels of drug self-administration than nicotine or cocaine alone (P<0.05-0.001). Varenicline dose-dependently reduced responding maintained by nicotine alone (0.0032 mg/kg/inj) (P<0.05), and in combination with cocaine (0.0032 mg/kg/inj) (P<0.05) with no significant effects on food-maintained responding. However, varenicline did not significantly decrease self-administration of a low dose of nicotine (0.001 mg/kg), cocaine alone (0.0032 and 0.01 mg/kg/inj), or 0.01 mg/kg cocaine combined with the same doses of nicotine. We conclude that varenicline selectively attenuates the reinforcing effects of nicotine alone but not cocaine alone, and its effects on nicotine+cocaine combinations are dependent on the dose of cocaine. PMID:24304823

  15. Blocking Infralimbic Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF or FGF2) Facilitates Extinction of Drug Seeking After Cocaine Self-Administration.

    PubMed

    Hafenbreidel, Madalyn; Twining, Robert C; Rafa Todd, Carolynn; Mueller, Devin

    2015-12-01

    Drug exposure results in structural and functional changes in brain regions that regulate reward and these changes may underlie the persistence of compulsive drug seeking and relapse. Neurotrophic factors, such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF2), are necessary for neuronal survival, growth, and differentiation, and may contribute to these drug-induced changes. Following cocaine exposure, bFGF is increased in addiction-related brain regions, including the infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex (IL-mPFC). The IL-mPFC is necessary for extinction, but whether drug-induced overexpression of bFGF in this region affects extinction of drug seeking is unknown. Thus, we determined whether blocking bFGF in IL-mPFC would facilitate extinction following cocaine self-administration. Rats were trained to lever press for intravenous infusions of cocaine before extinction. Blocking bFGF in IL-mPFC before four extinction sessions resulted in facilitated extinction. In contrast, blocking bFGF alone was not sufficient to facilitate extinction, as blocking bFGF and returning rats to their home cage had no effect on subsequent extinction. Furthermore, bFGF protein expression increased in IL-mPFC following cocaine self-administration, an effect reversed by extinction. These results suggest that cocaine-induced overexpression of bFGF inhibits extinction, as blocking bFGF during extinction permits rapid extinction. Therefore, targeted reductions in bFGF during therapeutic interventions could enhance treatment outcomes for addiction.

  16. Prolonged withdrawal following cocaine self-administration increases resistance to punishment in a cocaine binge

    PubMed Central

    Gancarz-Kausch, Amy M.; Adank, Danielle N.; Dietz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Drug addiction is characterized by compulsive drug-taking behaviors and a high propensity to relapse following drug cessation. Drug craving and seeking can increase during a period of abstinence, but this phenomenon is not observed in drug-induced reinstatement models. To investigate the effect of withdrawal on cocaine relapse, rats were exposed to extended-access cocaine self-administration and subjected to either 1 or 30 d of withdrawal. When tested during 12 h unlimited access to cocaine (binge), the duration of the withdrawal did not influence cocaine intake. However, using a histamine punishment procedure that greatly suppresses drug-taking behavior, we demonstrate that longer periods of abstinence from cocaine induce a greater persistence in responding for drug in the face of negative consequences. PMID:25363133

  17. Prolonged withdrawal following cocaine self-administration increases resistance to punishment in a cocaine binge.

    PubMed

    Gancarz-Kausch, Amy M; Adank, Danielle N; Dietz, David M

    2014-11-03

    Drug addiction is characterized by compulsive drug-taking behaviors and a high propensity to relapse following drug cessation. Drug craving and seeking can increase during a period of abstinence, but this phenomenon is not observed in drug-induced reinstatement models. To investigate the effect of withdrawal on cocaine relapse, rats were exposed to extended-access cocaine self-administration and subjected to either 1 or 30 d of withdrawal. When tested during 12 h unlimited access to cocaine (binge), the duration of the withdrawal did not influence cocaine intake. However, using a histamine punishment procedure that greatly suppresses drug-taking behavior, we demonstrate that longer periods of abstinence from cocaine induce a greater persistence in responding for drug in the face of negative consequences.

  18. Changes in endocannabinoid and N-acylethanolamine levels in rat brain structures following cocaine self-administration and extinction training.

    PubMed

    Bystrowska, Beata; Smaga, Irena; Frankowska, Małgorzata; Filip, Małgorzata

    2014-04-01

    Preclinical investigations have demonstrated that drugs of abuse alter the levels of lipid-based signalling molecules, including endocannabinoids (eCBs) and N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), in the rodent brain. In addition, several drugs targeting eCBs and/or NAEs are implicated in reward and/or seeking behaviours related to the stimulation of dopamine systems in the brain. In our study, the brain levels of eCBs (anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)) and NAEs (oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA)) were analyzed via an LC-MS/MS method in selected brain structures of rats during cocaine self-administration and after extinction training according to the "yoked" control procedure. Repeated (14days) cocaine (0.5mg/kg/infusion) self-administration and yoked drug delivery resulted in a significant decrease (ca. 52%) in AEA levels in the cerebellum, whereas levels of 2-AG increased in the frontal cortex, the hippocampus and the cerebellum and decreased in the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum. In addition, we detected increases (>150%) in the levels of OEA and PEA in the limbic areas in both cocaine treated groups, as well as an increase in the tissue levels of OEA in the dorsal striatum in only the yoked cocaine group and increases in the tissue levels of PEA in the dorsal striatum (both cocaine groups) and the nucleus accumbens (yoked cocaine group only). Compared to the yoked saline control group, extinction training (10days) resulted in a potent reduction in AEA levels in the frontal cortex, the hippocampus and the nucleus accumbens and in 2-AG levels in the hippocampus, the dorsal striatum and the cerebellum. The decreases in the limbic and subcortical areas were more apparent for rats that self-administered cocaine. Following extinction, there was a region-specific change in the levels of NAEs in rats previously injected with cocaine; a potent increase (ca. 100%) in the levels of OEA and PEA was detected in the prefrontal cortex and the

  19. Baclofen has opposite effects on escalation of cocaine self-administration: increased intake in rats selectively bred for high (HiS) saccharin intake and decreased intake in those selected for low (LoS) saccharin intake.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Nathan A; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2011-12-01

    Rats selectively bred for high saccharin intake (HiS) self-administer more cocaine, escalate their cocaine intake during long access, and reinstate cocaine seeking at higher levels than those bred for low saccharin intake (LoS). The present study was conducted to determine if baclofen, an agonist at the GABA(b) receptor, has differential effects on the escalation of i.v. cocaine intake and reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in HiS and LoS rats. HiS and LoS rats self-administered cocaine during a 2-h daily short-access (ShA) phase for 3 days and then long-access (LgA) sessions for 21 days followed by a second ShA phase. One group of HiS and LoS rats received i.p. injections of 2.5 mg/kg baclofen (HiS+B and LoS+B, respectively), and other groups of HiS and LoS rats received saline (HiS+Sal and LoS+Sal) before each daily session. In a second experiment, HiS and LoS rats self-administered i.v. cocaine during 2-h sessions for 14 days followed by a 21-day extinction period. Baclofen (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline was administered before saline- or cocaine-primed reinstatement sessions. The HiS+B group escalated their cocaine self-administration and had increased cocaine infusions in the post-LgA ShA phase. The LoS+B group self-administered less cocaine throughout the entire LgA period compared to the LoS+Sal or HiS groups. Baclofen attenuated reinstatement of cocaine seeking in both the HiS and LoS rats with no phenotype differences. Thus, baclofen had opposite effects on cocaine intake in HiS and LoS rats during escalation; but similar effects during reinstatement. These results suggest that treatment effects might vary with individual differences (HiS vs. LoS) and the phase of drug-motivated behavior that is modeled.

  20. Pharmacological modulation of lateral habenular dopamine D2 receptors alters the anxiogenic response to cocaine in a runway model of drug self-administration.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Kerisa; Bogyo, Kelsie; Schick, Tinisha; Ettenberg, Aaron

    2016-09-01

    Cocaine has long been known to produce an initial "high" followed by an aversive/anxiogenic "crash". While much is known about the neurobiology of cocaine's positive/rewarding effects, the mechanisms that give rise to the drug's negative/anxiogenic actions remain unclear. Recent research has implicated the lateral habenula (LHb) in the encoding of aversive events including the anxiogenic response to cocaine. Of particular interest in this regard are the reciprocal connections between the LHb and the ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA-DA neurons innervate different subsets of LHb cells that in turn feedback upon and modulate VTA neuronal activity. Here we examined the impact of D2 receptor activation and inhibition on the anxiogenic response to cocaine using a runway model of self-administration that is sensitive to the dual and opposing effects of the drug. Male rats ran a straight alley for IV cocaine (1.0mg/kg) following bilateral intra-LHb infusions of the D2 receptor antagonist, cis-flupenthixol (0, 7.5 or 15μg/side) or the D2 agonist, sumanirole (0, 5 or 10μg/side). Vehicle-pretreated controls developed approach-avoidance conflict behaviors about goal-box entry reflective of the dual positive and negative effects of cocaine. These behaviors were significantly diminished during LHb-D2 receptor antagonism and increased by the LHb D2 receptor agonist. These results demonstrate that activity at the D2 receptor in the lateral habenula serves to modulate the anxiogenic response to cocaine. PMID:27155504

  1. Single session of cocaine intravenous self-administration shapes goal-oriented behaviours and up-regulates Arc mRNA levels in rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Fabio; Franchi, Carlotta; Caffino, Lucia; Racagni, Giorgio; Riva, Marco A; Cervo, Luigi

    2009-04-01

    To separate the direct pharmacological effects of cocaine from those associated with active drug self-administration we employed a yoked control-operant paradigm and investigated the expression of well established markers of the rapid action of cocaine, i.e. the inducible early genes Arc and Zif268 and trophic factors, i.e. brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2), in rats after a single intravenous (i.v.) cocaine self-administration session. Animals self-administering cocaine (SA, 0.25 mg/0.1 ml saline per infusion, 2-h session) did more active lever-presses than yoked-cocaine (YC) and yoked-vehicle (YV) animals. This goal-oriented behaviour was accompanied by a selective increase in Arc mRNA levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). There were no changes in the expression of the other genes in this brain region. mRNA levels of Arc and Zif268 in striatum and Zif268 in the nucleus accumbens markedly increased both in SA and YC animals; but there was no change in the expression of FGF-2 and BDNF. No changes were observed in hippocampus, hypothalamus, frontal cortex, and midbrain in SA and YC animals compared to YV animals in any of the genes. These findings demonstrate that a single session of cocaine i.v. self-administration is sufficient to shape rat behaviour towards goal-directed behaviours and selectively up-regulate Arc expression in mPFC (of SA animals), providing the first evidence that the mPFC's function is already profoundly influenced by the first voluntary cocaine exposure.

  2. Effects of the 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP809101 in the amygdala on reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior and anxiety-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Pockros-Burgess, Lara A; Pentkowski, Nathan S; Der-Ghazarian, Taleen; Neisewander, Janet L

    2014-11-01

    Serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2CR) agonists attenuate reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. These receptors are found throughout the limbic system, including the basolateral amygdala (BlA), which is involved in forming associations between emotional stimuli and environmental cues, and the central amygdala (CeA), which is implicated in the expression of conditioned responding to emotional stimuli. This study investigated whether 5-HT2CRs in the amygdala are involved in cue and cocaine-primed reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.75 mg/kg, i.v.) which that was paired with light and tone cues, and then subsequently they underwent daily extinction training. Rats then received bilateral microinfusions of the 5-HT2CR agonist CP809101 (0.01-1.0 μg/0.2 μl/side) into either the BlA or CeA prior to tests for cue or cocaine-primed (10 mg/kg, i.p.) reinstatement. Rats were also tested for CP809101 effects on anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus-maze (EPM). Surprisingly, intra-BlA CP809101 had no effect on cue reinstatement, though it did increase anxiety-like behavior on the EPM. Intra-CeA infusions of CP809101 attenuated cocaine-primed reinstatement, an effect that was prevented with concurrent administration of the 5-HT2CR antagonist SB242084 (0.1 μg/0.2 μl/side). CP809101 had no effect on cue reinstatement or anxiety-like behavior on the EPM. These findings suggest that 5-HT2CRs in the BlA modulate anxiety, whereas those in the CeA modulate incentive motivational effects induced by cocaine priming injections.

  3. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... amounts to build up between nerve cells. This flood of dopamine ultimately disrupts normal brain communication and ... in brain circuits controlling pleasure and movement. This flood of dopamine ultimately disrupts normal brain communication and ...

  4. Influence of abstinence and conditions of cocaine access on the reinforcing strength of cocaine in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Czoty, Paul W; Martelle, Jennifer L; Nader, Michael A

    2006-12-01

    The development of addiction is marked by a transition from recreational to uncontrolled drug use. Investigators modeling this phenomenon in rodents observed increases in cocaine self-administration when conditions of drug access were altered as well as after abstinence. The present studies were designed to extend this research to nonhuman primates by examining whether the reinforcing strength of cocaine could be altered by changing conditions of cocaine availability or by introducing abstinence periods. Rhesus monkeys self-administered cocaine (0.03-0.3 mg/kg per injection) under a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement in evening sessions, with the number of injections earned serving as a measure of reinforcing strength. Alterations in the reinforcing strength of cocaine were assessed after additional access to cocaine under a fixed-ratio (FR) schedule was provided in morning sessions and following various periods of abstinence (3, 7 and 14 days) from regimens of self-administration that resulted in a range of cocaine intakes. Under baseline PR conditions, the maximum number of cocaine injections increased dose-dependently, peaking when 0.3 mg/kg per injection cocaine was available. No increases in the reinforcing strength of cocaine were observed under any condition. In contrast, a statistically significant decrease in the reinforcing strength of cocaine was observed following 14 days of abstinence under one condition. These results fail to support the views that increasing access to cocaine or abstinence enhances the reinforcing strength of cocaine. PMID:16730922

  5. Temporal Pattern of Cocaine Intake Determines Tolerance vs Sensitization of Cocaine Effects at the Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Calipari, Erin S; Ferris, Mark J; Zimmer, Benjamin A; Roberts, David CS; Jones, Sara R

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is responsible for terminating dopamine (DA) signaling and is the primary site of cocaine's reinforcing actions. Cocaine self-administration has been shown previously to result in changes in cocaine potency at the DAT. To determine whether the DAT changes associated with self-administration are due to differences in intake levels or temporal patterns of cocaine-induced DAT inhibition, we manipulated cocaine access to produce either continuous or intermittent elevations in cocaine brain levels. Long-access (LgA, 6 h) and short-access (ShA, 2 h) continuous self-administration produced similar temporal profiles of cocaine intake that were sustained throughout the session; however, LgA had greater intake. ShA and intermittent-access (IntA, 6 h) produced the same intake, but different temporal profiles, with ‘spiking' brain levels in IntA compared with constant levels in ShA. IntA consisted of 5-min access periods alternating with 25-min timeouts, which resulted in bursts of high responding followed by periods of no responding. DA release and uptake, as well as the potency of cocaine for DAT inhibition, were assessed by voltammetry in the nucleus accumbens slices following control, IntA, ShA, and LgA self-administration. Continuous-access protocols (LgA and ShA) did not change DA parameters, but the ‘spiking' protocol (IntA) increased both release and uptake of DA. In addition, high continuous intake (LgA) produced tolerance to cocaine, while ‘spiking' (IntA) produced sensitization, relative to ShA and naive controls. Thus, intake and pattern can both influence cocaine potency, and tolerance seems to be produced by high intake, while sensitization is produced by intermittent temporal patterns of intake. PMID:23719505

  6. Orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortex neurons selectively process cocaine-associated environmental cues in the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Baeg, Eun Ha; Jackson, Mark E; Jedema, Hank P; Bradberry, Charles W

    2009-09-16

    Encounters with stimuli associated with drug use are believed to contribute to relapse. To probe the neurobiology of environmentally triggered drug use, we have conducted single-unit recordings in rhesus monkeys during presentation of two distinct types of drug paired cues that differentially support drug-seeking. The animals were highly conditioned to these cues via exposure during self-administration procedures conducted over a 4 year period. The cues studied were a discriminative cue that signaled response-contingent availability of cocaine, and a discrete cue that was temporally paired with the cocaine infusion (0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg). Two cortical regions consistently activated by cocaine-associated cues in human imaging studies are the orbitofrontal (OFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), though little is known about cortical neuronal activity responses to drug cues. We simultaneously recorded single-unit activity in OFC and ACC as well as in dorsal striatum in rhesus monkeys during cocaine self-administration. Dorsal striatal neurons were less engaged by drug cues than cortical regions. Between OFC and ACC, distinct functionality was apparent in neuronal responses. OFC neurons preferentially responded to the discriminative cue, consistent with a role in cue-induced drug-seeking. In contrast, the ACC did not respond more to the discriminative cue than to the discrete cue. Also distinct from the OFC, ACC showed sustained firing throughout the 18 s duration of the discrete cue. This pattern of sustained activation in ACC is consistent with a role in reward expectation and/or in mediating behavioral effects of discrete cues paired with drug infusions. PMID:19759309

  7. Filthy Lucre: The Chemical Detection of Cocaine-Contaminated Currency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acheson, Ed

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the problem of seizing cocaine-tainted money. Describes an experiment designed to determine what percentage of paper currency is contaminated with cocaine. Considers sampling, the analysis method, contamination, levels of cocaine in money and criminal activity, and the reliability of results. (SAH)

  8. Pharmacokinetics of continuous-infusion meropenem for the treatment of Serratia marcescens ventriculitis in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Cies, Jeffrey J; Moore, Wayne S; Calaman, Sharon; Brown, Melandee; Narayan, Prithvi; Parker, Jason; Chopra, Arun

    2015-04-01

    Neither guidelines nor best practices for the treatment of external ventricular drain (EVD) and ventriculoperitoneal shunt infections exist. An antimicrobial regimen with a broad spectrum of activity and adequate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration is vital in the management of both EVD and ventriculoperitoneal infections. In this case report, we describe the pharmacokinetics of continuous-infusion meropenem for a 2-year-old girl with Serratia marcescens ventriculitis. A right frontal EVD was placed for the management of a posterior fossa mass with hydrocephalus and intraventricular hemorrhage. On hospital day 6, CSF specimens were cultured, which identified a pan-sensitive Serratia marcescens with an initial cefotaxime minimum inhibitory concentration of 1 μg/ml or less. The patient was treated with cefotaxime monotherapy from hospital days 6 to 17, during which her CSF cultures and Gram's stain remained positive. On hospital day 26, Serratia marcescens was noted to be resistant to cefotaxime (minimum inhibitory concentration > 16 μg/ml), and the antimicrobial regimen was ultimately changed to meropenem and amikacin. Meropenem was dosed at 40 mg/kg/dose intravenously every 6 hours, infused over 30 minutes, during which, simultaneous serum and CSF meropenem levels were measured. Meropenem serum and CSF levels were measured at 2 and 4 hours from the end of the infusion with the intent to perform a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis. The resulting serum meropenem levels were 12 μg/ml at 2 hours and "undetectable" at 4 hours, with CSF levels of 1 and 0.5 μg/ml at 2 and 4 hours, respectively. On hospital day 27, the meropenem regimen was changed to a continuous infusion of 200 mg/kg/day, with repeat serum and CSF meropenem levels measured on hospital day 33. The serum and CSF levels were noted to be 13 and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively. The serum level of 13 μg/ml corresponds to an estimated meropenem clearance from the serum of 10.2 ml/kg/minute. Repeat

  9. Pharmacokinetics of continuous-infusion meropenem for the treatment of Serratia marcescens ventriculitis in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Cies, Jeffrey J; Moore, Wayne S; Calaman, Sharon; Brown, Melandee; Narayan, Prithvi; Parker, Jason; Chopra, Arun

    2015-04-01

    Neither guidelines nor best practices for the treatment of external ventricular drain (EVD) and ventriculoperitoneal shunt infections exist. An antimicrobial regimen with a broad spectrum of activity and adequate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration is vital in the management of both EVD and ventriculoperitoneal infections. In this case report, we describe the pharmacokinetics of continuous-infusion meropenem for a 2-year-old girl with Serratia marcescens ventriculitis. A right frontal EVD was placed for the management of a posterior fossa mass with hydrocephalus and intraventricular hemorrhage. On hospital day 6, CSF specimens were cultured, which identified a pan-sensitive Serratia marcescens with an initial cefotaxime minimum inhibitory concentration of 1 μg/ml or less. The patient was treated with cefotaxime monotherapy from hospital days 6 to 17, during which her CSF cultures and Gram's stain remained positive. On hospital day 26, Serratia marcescens was noted to be resistant to cefotaxime (minimum inhibitory concentration > 16 μg/ml), and the antimicrobial regimen was ultimately changed to meropenem and amikacin. Meropenem was dosed at 40 mg/kg/dose intravenously every 6 hours, infused over 30 minutes, during which, simultaneous serum and CSF meropenem levels were measured. Meropenem serum and CSF levels were measured at 2 and 4 hours from the end of the infusion with the intent to perform a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis. The resulting serum meropenem levels were 12 μg/ml at 2 hours and "undetectable" at 4 hours, with CSF levels of 1 and 0.5 μg/ml at 2 and 4 hours, respectively. On hospital day 27, the meropenem regimen was changed to a continuous infusion of 200 mg/kg/day, with repeat serum and CSF meropenem levels measured on hospital day 33. The serum and CSF levels were noted to be 13 and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively. The serum level of 13 μg/ml corresponds to an estimated meropenem clearance from the serum of 10.2 ml/kg/minute. Repeat

  10. Stealing and dealing: cocaine and property crimes.

    PubMed

    Hunt, D

    1991-01-01

    A common thread in all studies of this nature is the level of use of cocaine and/or the concomitant use of other drugs, suggesting that economic necessity plays a role in the decision to commit crimes to help defray the costs of use. While a truly causal link between use and crime activity in marginal income populations is apparent. Whether that association is driven primarily by economics or lifestyle considerations is not answered by simple examination of the numbers. Statistically, the use of cocaine is related to criminal activity as a function of the income level and prior criminal experience of the user. This relationship is better defined by looking at the threshold effect in marginal income groups, where use that goes beyond what the pocket can bear produces a significantly greater chance that illegal sources will be found. However, many occasional users or even regular users with resources are able to fund their use through routine sources and never resort to criminal activity or to unconventional financial resources. A large number of cocaine users probably fall into this middle ground: they are neither the "high rollers" that often make the media nor the traditional heroin/cocaine addicts. For them, criminal activity may surface when use exceeds funds or not at all. For still others, cocaine is part of a criminal lifestyle rather than a motivation for it. Statistically, all these cocaine users look the same, though the relationship between their use and their crime may be quite varied. The descriptions of three cases discussed in an earlier paper (Hunt et al. 1985) clarify this point. The first case was a 32-year-old white male former heroin addict and former drug dealer who reported cocaine use intravenously three to four times a month, smoked marijuana weekly, and used no other drugs. He was married, working, and had a small child. He also reported dealing in stolen merchandise and clothing that he got from someone else to sell. This pattern had been

  11. Post-retrieval beta-adrenergic receptor blockade: effects on extinction and reconsolidation of cocaine-cue memories.

    PubMed

    Fricks-Gleason, Ashley N; Marshall, John F

    2008-09-01

    Contexts and discrete cues associated with drug-taking are often responsible for relapse among addicts. Animal models have shown that interference with the reconsolidation of drug-cue memories can reduce seeking of drugs or drug-paired stimuli. One such model is conditioned place preference (CPP) in which an animal is trained to associate a particular environment with the rewarding effects of a drug. Previous work from this laboratory has shown that intra-nucleus accumbens core infusions of a MEK inhibitor can interfere with reconsolidation of these drug-cue memories. A question that remains is whether post-retrieval drug effects on subsequent memories represent an interference with reconsolidation processes or rather a facilitation of extinction. In this experiment, we explore the effect of post-retrieval injections of propranolol, a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on reconsolidation and extinction of cocaine CPP. After acquisition of cocaine CPP, animals were given post-retrieval propranolol injections once or each day during a protocol of unreinforced preference tests, until the animals showed no preference for the previously cocaine-paired environment. Following a cocaine priming injection, the animals that received daily post-test propranolol injections did not reinstate their preference for the drug-paired side. In contrast, a single post-retrieval propranolol injection followed by multiple days of unreinforced preference tests failed to blunt subsequent cocaine reinstatement of the memory. These data suggest that daily post-retrieval systemic injections of propranolol decrease the conditioned preference by interfering with reconsolidation of the memory for the association between the drug-paired side and the reinforcing effects of the drug, rather than facilitating new extinction learning.

  12. Cognitive Impairment in Acute Cocaine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Brendan J.; Yeager, Kenneth R.; Pepper, Tom H.; Beversdorf, David Q.

    2005-01-01

    Objective To perform a pilot study to examine a range of cognitive flexibility tasks early in cocaine withdrawal. Background Previous neuropsychological investigations of cocaine withdrawal have conflicted regarding whether impaired cognitive flexibility occurs. However, most studies have examined patients later in withdrawal. Anxiety and yohimbine-induced panic are greatest early in withdrawal, and both anxiety and increased noradrenergic tone can impair cognitive flexibility. Method Twelve patients acutely withdrawing from cocaine were compared with gender-, age-, and estimated premorbid intelligence–matched control subjects on tests of cognitive flexibility as well as verbal fluency, verbal memory, spatial memory, and attention. Results As predicted, impairments were found on the cognitive flexibility tasks. Impairments also were present in verbal fluency and verbal memory but not spatial memory or attention. Conclusions We propose that the cognitive flexibility impairment may relate to the increased noradrenergic activation recently described in cocaine withdrawal. Impairments on verbal tasks may also relate to an impaired flexibility in the search of semantic networks. Further research will explore the effects of pharmacologic manipulation of the noradrenergic system on cognition in acute withdrawal. Recently, propranolol has been shown to benefit patients in cocaine withdrawal. Further research will explore whether impaired cognitive flexibility related to altered noradrenergic tone could serve as a mechanism for this treatment response. PMID:15970730

  13. Gambling Problems Among Community Cocaine Users.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Magali; Nguyen, Noël; Bertrand, Karine; Perreault, Michel; Jutras-Aswad, Didier; Morvannou, Adèle; Bruneau, Julie; Berbiche, Djamal; Roy, Élise

    2016-09-01

    Cocaine use is highly prevalent and a major public health problem. While some studies have reported frequent comorbidity problems among cocaine users, few studies have included evaluation of gambling problems. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of gambling problems and compare those who were at-risk gamblers with non-problem gamblers in terms of mental health problems, substance use problems, and some risk factors (i.e. family antecedents, erroneous perceptions and coping strategies) among individuals who smoke or inject cocaine. A total of 424 smoked or injected cocaine users recruited through community-based programs in Montreal (Quebec) completed the questionnaire, including the Canadian Pathological Gambling Index, the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, the CAGE, and the Severity Dependence Scale. Of the sample, 18.4 % were considered at-risk gamblers, of whom 7.8 % had problems gambling and 10.6 % were moderate-risk gamblers. The at-risk group was more likely to have experienced a recent phobic disorder and alcohol problems than the non-problem group. A multivariate analysis showed that, compared to those who were non-problem gamblers, the at-risk ones were more likely to have lost a large sum of money when they first started gambling, believed that their luck would turn, and gambled in reaction to painful life events. These results indicate the need to include routines for screening to identify gambling problem among cocaine users. PMID:26983825

  14. Internally concealed cocaine: analytical and diagnostic aspects.

    PubMed

    Bogusz, M J; Althoff, H; Erkens, M; Maier, R D; Hofmann, R

    1995-09-01

    Thirty persons arrested at Frankfurt airport for smuggling internally concealed cocaine in 1993/1994 were investigated. An X-ray examination (in all 30 cases), immunochemical examination of urine (in 27 cases) and of saliva (in 20 cases) was performed in parallel. An X-ray examination gave positive results in all examined persons. EMIT cocaine metabolite assay (cut off 300 ng benzoylecgonine (BE)/mL) was positive in eight urine samples. After reducing the cut off to 150 ng BE/mL urine, eleven samples were classified as positive. The results were confirmed by means of chromatographic determinations. These findings showed limited role of immunological examination of urine as a screening test in suspected smuggling of internally concealed drugs. All saliva samples showed negative immunochemical results. The number of concealed containers ranged from 44 to 135 per person. The amount of cocaine hydrochloride found in particular cases ranged from 242 to 1050 g net weight, divided into containers weighing from 5.7 to 13.8 g. Drug packages were obviously machine-made. The packages smuggled by a particular person were uniform. However, a distinct interpersonal variability in drug packages was observed, in regard to the number of protective layers (4-7), size, weight, and cocaine purity. This may be helpful for the identification of production site. The leaching of cocaine from selected containers was investigated in a stirring bath and was independent of the conditions applied. PMID:7595327

  15. Novel pharmacotherapeutic treatments for cocaine addiction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine is a stimulant that leads to the rapid accumulation of catecholamines and serotonin in the brain due to prevention of their re-uptake into the neuron that released the neurotransmitter. Cocaine dependence is a public health concern and cause of significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. At present, there are no approved medications for the treatment of this devastating illness, and behavioral interventions have proven to be of limited use. However, there have been a number of recent trials testing promising agents including dopamine agonists, GABAergic medications and the cocaine vaccine. Here we discuss the most recent human clinical trials of potential medications for treatment of cocaine dependence, as well as pre-clinical studies for another promising agent, levo tetrahydropalmatine. Examination of these recent findings shows promise for GABAergic medications and the cocaine vaccine, as well as unique medications such as disulfiram, whose mechanism remains to be determined. Future work may also confirm specific subgroups of patients for treatment response based on clinical characteristics, biomarkers and pharmacogenetics. This review highlights the need for further, bigger studies in order to determine optimal clinical usage. PMID:22047090

  16. The Safety of Target-Controlled Infusions.

    PubMed

    Schnider, Thomas W; Minto, Charles F; Struys, Michel M R F; Absalom, Anthony R

    2016-01-01

    Target-controlled infusion (TCI) technology has been available in most countries worldwide for clinical use in anesthesia for approximately 2 decades. This infusion mode uses pharmacokinetic models to calculate infusion rates necessary to reach and maintain the desired drug concentration. TCI is computationally more complex than traditional modes of drug administration. The primary difference between TCI and conventional infusions is that TCI decreases the infusion rate at regular intervals to account for the uptake of drug into saturable compartments. Although the calculated infusion rates are consistent with manually controlled infusion rates, there are concerns that TCI administration of IV anesthetics could introduce unique safety concerns. After approximately 2 decades of clinical use, it is appropriate to assess the safety of TCI. Our aim in this article was to describe safety-relevant issues related to TCI, which should have emerged after its use in millions of patients. We collected information from published medical literature, TCI manufacturers, and publicly available governmental Web sites to find evidence of safety issues with the clinical use of TCI. Although many case reports emphasize that IV anesthesia is technically more demanding than inhaled anesthesia, including human errors associated with setting up IV infusions, no data suggest that a TCI mode of drug delivery introduces unique safety issues other than selecting the wrong pharmacokinetic model. This is analogous to the risk of selecting the wrong drug with current infusion pumps. We found no evidence that TCI is not at least as safe as anesthetic administration using constant rate infusions. PMID:26516801

  17. Adenovirus Capsid-Based Anti-Cocaine Vaccine Prevents Cocaine from Binding to the Nonhuman Primate CNS Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Maoz, Anat; Hicks, Martin J; Vallabhjosula, Shankar; Synan, Michael; Kothari, Paresh J; Dyke, Jonathan P; Ballon, Douglas J; Kaminsky, Stephen M; De, Bishnu P; Rosenberg, Jonathan B; Martinez, Diana; Koob, George F; Janda, Kim D; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a major problem for which there is no approved pharmacotherapy. We have developed a vaccine to cocaine (dAd5GNE), based on the cocaine analog GNE linked to the capsid proteins of a serotype 5 adenovirus, designed to evoke anti-cocaine antibodies that sequester cocaine in the blood, preventing access to the CNS. To assess the efficacy of dAd5GNE in a large animal model, positron emission tomography (PET) and the radiotracer [11C]PE2I were used to measure cocaine occupancy of the dopamine transporter (DAT) in nonhuman primates. Repeat administration of dAd5GNE induced high anti-cocaine titers. Before vaccination, cocaine displaced PE2I from DAT in the caudate and putamen, resulting in 62±4% cocaine occupancy. In contrast, dAd5GNE-vaccinated animals showed reduced cocaine occupancy such that when anti-cocaine titers were >4 × 105, the cocaine occupancy was reduced to levels of <20%, significantly below the 47% threshold required to evoke the subjective ‘high' reported in humans. PMID:23660705

  18. Adenovirus capsid-based anti-cocaine vaccine prevents cocaine from binding to the nonhuman primate CNS dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Maoz, Anat; Hicks, Martin J; Vallabhjosula, Shankar; Synan, Michael; Kothari, Paresh J; Dyke, Jonathan P; Ballon, Douglas J; Kaminsky, Stephen M; De, Bishnu P; Rosenberg, Jonathan B; Martinez, Diana; Koob, George F; Janda, Kim D; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-10-01

    Cocaine addiction is a major problem for which there is no approved pharmacotherapy. We have developed a vaccine to cocaine (dAd5GNE), based on the cocaine analog GNE linked to the capsid proteins of a serotype 5 adenovirus, designed to evoke anti-cocaine antibodies that sequester cocaine in the blood, preventing access to the CNS. To assess the efficacy of dAd5GNE in a large animal model, positron emission tomography (PET) and the radiotracer [(11)C]PE2I were used to measure cocaine occupancy of the dopamine transporter (DAT) in nonhuman primates. Repeat administration of dAd5GNE induced high anti-cocaine titers. Before vaccination, cocaine displaced PE2I from DAT in the caudate and putamen, resulting in 62±4% cocaine occupancy. In contrast, dAd5GNE-vaccinated animals showed reduced cocaine occupancy such that when anti-cocaine titers were >4 × 10(5), the cocaine occupancy was reduced to levels of <20%, significantly below the 47% threshold required to evoke the subjective 'high' reported in humans. PMID:23660705

  19. Reduced Metabolsim in Brain 'Control Networks' Following Cocaine-Cues Exposure in Female Cocaine Abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Telang, F.; Goldstein, R.Z.; Alia-Klein, N.; Wong, C.T.

    2011-03-01

    Gender differences in vulnerability for cocaine addiction have been reported. Though the mechanisms are not understood, here we hypothesize that gender differences in reactivity to conditioned-cues, which contributes to relapse, are involved. To test this we compared brain metabolism (using PET and {sup 18}FDG) between female (n = 10) and male (n = 16) active cocaine abusers when they watched a neutral video (nature scenes) versus a cocaine-cues video. Self-reports of craving increased with the cocaine-cue video but responses did not differ between genders. In contrast, changes in whole brain metabolism with cocaine-cues differed by gender (p<0.05); females significantly decreased metabolism (-8.6% {+-} 10) whereas males tended to increase it (+5.5% {+-} 18). SPM analysis (Cocaine-cues vs Neutral) in females revealed decreases in frontal, cingulate and parietal cortices, thalamus and midbrain (p<0.001) whereas males showed increases in right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44/45) (only at p<0.005). The gender-cue interaction showed greater decrements with Cocaine-cues in females than males (p<0.001) in frontal (BA 8, 9, 10), anterior cingulate (BA 24, 32), posterior cingulate (BA 23, 31), inferior parietal (BA 40) and thalamus (dorsomedial nucleus). Females showed greater brain reactivity to cocaine-cues than males but no differences in craving, suggesting that there may be gender differences in response to cues that are not linked with craving but could affect subsequent drug use. Specifically deactivation of brain regions from 'control networks' (prefrontal, cingulate, inferior parietal, thalamus) in females could increase their vulnerability to relapse since it would interfere with executive function (cognitive inhibition). This highlights the importance of gender tailored interventions for cocaine addiction.

  20. Cocaine abuse in North America: a milestone in history.

    PubMed

    Das, G

    1993-04-01

    The euphoric effects of coca leaves have been known to mankind for thousands of years. Yet the first epidemic of cocaine use in America occurred during the late 19th century. Initially, there were no laws restricting the consumption or sale of cocaine. In fact, cocaine was freely available in drug stores, saloons, from mail-order vendors, and even in grocery stores. It is reported that one drug manufacturer, in 1885, was selling cocaine in 15 different forms, including cigarettes, cheroots, inhalants, cordials, crystals, and solutions. Many famous imported wines, such as "Vin Mariani," contained a mixture of wine and coca. For consumers on budgets, the wonder drug was available as Coca-Cola and dozens of other soda pops and pick-me-up drinks. One of them even had a simple and direct name, Dope. Soon enough, the ill effects of cocaine became apparent, and by the 1920s cocaine was the most feared of all illicit drugs. Most states began enacting laws against cocaine use. President William Taft proclaimed cocaine as Public Enemy No. 1, and in 1914 the Congress passed the Harrison act, which tightly regulated the distribution and sale of cocaine. By the late 1950s, cocaine use in the United States was simply considered a problem in the past. Unfortunately, the people who were aware of the nation's first cocaine epidemic gradually passed away, and America once again was ready for its fling with cocaine in the 1960s. Today, it is estimated that upwards of 50 million Americans, that is one in four, have used cocaine. In addition, another fifty thousand people use this substance for the first time each day. More than 6 million Americans use cocaine on a regular basis. Little wonder, then, that America as well as the other countries have declared a "War on Drugs." In this review, pharmacology of cocaine, major complications arising from its use, and efforts to curb its abuse are discussed. PMID:8473543

  1. Repeated Administration of a Mutant Cocaine Esterase: Effects on Plasma Cocaine Levels, Cocaine-Induced Cardiovascular Activity, and Immune Responses in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Gregory T.; Brim, Remy L.; Noon, Kathleen R.; Narasimhan, Diwahar; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Woods, James H.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the capacity of a long-acting mutant form of a naturally occurring bacterial double mutant cocaine esterase (DM CocE) to antagonize the reinforcing, discriminative, convulsant, and lethal effects of cocaine in rodents and reverse the increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) produced by cocaine in rhesus monkeys. This study was aimed at characterizing the immunologic responses to repeated dosing with DM CocE and determining whether the development of anti-CocE antibodies altered the capacity of DM CocE to reduce plasma cocaine levels and ameliorate the cardiovascular effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys. Under control conditions, intravenous administration of cocaine (3 mg/kg) resulted in a rapid increase in the plasma concentration of cocaine (n = 2) and long-lasting increases in MAP and HR (n = 3). Administration of DM CocE (0.32 mg/kg i.v.) 10 min after cocaine resulted in a rapid hydrolysis of cocaine with plasma levels below detection limits within 5 to 8 min. Elevations in MAP and HR were significantly reduced within 25 and 50 min of DM CocE administration, respectively. Although slight (10-fold) increases in anti-CocE antibodies were observed after the fourth administration of DM CocE, these antibodies did not alter the capacity of DM CocE to reduce plasma cocaine levels or ameliorate cocaine's cardiovascular effects. Anti-CocE titers were transient and generally dissipated within 8 weeks. Together, these results suggest that highly efficient cocaine esterases, such as DM CocE, may provide a novel and effective therapeutic for the treatment of acute cocaine intoxication in humans. PMID:22518021

  2. Repeated administration of a mutant cocaine esterase: effects on plasma cocaine levels, cocaine-induced cardiovascular activity, and immune responses in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gregory T; Brim, Remy L; Noon, Kathleen R; Narasimhan, Diwahar; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Sunahara, Roger K; Woods, James H; Ko, Mei-Chuan

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the capacity of a long-acting mutant form of a naturally occurring bacterial double mutant cocaine esterase (DM CocE) to antagonize the reinforcing, discriminative, convulsant, and lethal effects of cocaine in rodents and reverse the increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) produced by cocaine in rhesus monkeys. This study was aimed at characterizing the immunologic responses to repeated dosing with DM CocE and determining whether the development of anti-CocE antibodies altered the capacity of DM CocE to reduce plasma cocaine levels and ameliorate the cardiovascular effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys. Under control conditions, intravenous administration of cocaine (3 mg/kg) resulted in a rapid increase in the plasma concentration of cocaine (n = 2) and long-lasting increases in MAP and HR (n = 3). Administration of DM CocE (0.32 mg/kg i.v.) 10 min after cocaine resulted in a rapid hydrolysis of cocaine with plasma levels below detection limits within 5 to 8 min. Elevations in MAP and HR were significantly reduced within 25 and 50 min of DM CocE administration, respectively. Although slight (10-fold) increases in anti-CocE antibodies were observed after the fourth administration of DM CocE, these antibodies did not alter the capacity of DM CocE to reduce plasma cocaine levels or ameliorate cocaine's cardiovascular effects. Anti-CocE titers were transient and generally dissipated within 8 weeks. Together, these results suggest that highly efficient cocaine esterases, such as DM CocE, may provide a novel and effective therapeutic for the treatment of acute cocaine intoxication in humans. PMID:22518021

  3. Acyclovir kinetics after intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, P; Whitley, R J; Blum, M R; Keeney, R E; Barton, N; Cocchetto, D M; Good, S; Hemstreet, G P; Kirk, L E; Page, D A; Elion, G B

    1979-12-01

    The disposition and safety of the antiviral drug acyclovir were studied in 14 subjects with advanced malignancies. Acyclovir was administered by a 1-hr intravenous infusion at doses of 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/kg. At the end of infusion, mean peak plasma levels (+/- SEM), determined by radioimmunoassay, were 6.4 +/- 0.7, 12.1 +/- 2.3, 14.9 +/- 2.7, and 33.7 +/- 7.1 microM. The plasma concentration-time profiles could be described by a biexponential equation. The half-life of acyclovir in the slow disposition phase ranged from 2.2 to 5 hr and the drug was detected in the plasma for at least 18 hr after infusion. The total body clearance ranged from 117 to 396 ml/min/1.73 m2. A proportionality between area under the curve and dose suggests that acyclovir exhibits dose-independent kinetics in the dose range studied. There was wide variation in cumulative urinary excretion of unchanged drug, ranging from 30 to 69% of the dose. From renal clearances of acyclovir, which were higher than creatinine clearances, it appears that both glomerular filtration and tubular secretion contribute to its renal excretion. Analysis of the urine by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography revealed the presence of the metabolite 9-carboxymethoxymethylguanine. There was no indication of toxicity either clinically or from laboratory findings in any of the study subjects. This study demonstrates that in addition to selectivity and low toxicity, the kinetic profile and metabolic disposition of acyclovir make it an attractive candidate for therapy in a variety of herpes infections.

  4. Acquisition of i.v. cocaine self-administration in adolescent and adult male rats selectively bred for high and low saccharin intake.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jennifer L; Anderson, Marissa M; Nelson, Sarah E; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2007-05-16

    Adolescence and excessive intake of saccharin have each been previously associated with enhanced vulnerability to drug abuse. In the present study, we focused on the relationship between these two factors using male adolescent and adult rats selectively bred for high (HiS) and low (LoS) levels of saccharin intake. On postnatal day 25 (adolescents) or 150 (adults), rats were implanted with an intravenous catheter and trained to self-administer cocaine (0.4 mg/kg) using an autoshaping procedure that consisted of two 6-h sessions. In the first 6 h, rats were given non-contingent cocaine infusions at random intervals 10 times per hour, and during the second 6-h session, rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine under a fixed ratio 1 (FR 1) lever-response contingency. Acquisition was defined as a total of at least 250 infusions over 5 consecutive days, and rats were given 30 days to meet the acquisition criterion. Subsequently, saccharin phenotype scores were determined by comparing 24-h saccharin and water consumption in two-bottle tests to verify HiS/LoS status. Adolescent LoS rats had a faster rate of acquisition of cocaine self-administration than adult LoS rats; however, adolescent and adult HiS rats acquired at the same rate. Both HiS and LoS adolescents had significantly higher saccharin phenotype scores than HiS and LoS adults, respectively. Additionally, saccharin score was negatively correlated with the number of days to meet the acquisition criterion for cocaine self-administration, but this was mostly accounted for by the HiS adolescents. These results suggest that during adolescence, compared with adulthood, rats have both an increased avidity for sweets and vulnerability to initiate drug abuse.

  5. Generalization of norcocaine to the discriminative stimulus properties of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Mckenna, M L; Ho, B T; Englert, L F

    1979-02-01

    In rats trained to discriminate 10 mg/kg cocaine from 1 mg/kg saline, norcocaine, the N-demethylated metabolite, at doses of 2.5 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, produced a dose response curve similar to that of cocaine and generalized to cocaine at the two higher doses. As with cocaine, the discriminative stimulus produced by the norcocaine was partially attenuated by the dopaminergic antagonist pimozide and the amine depletor reserpine. Benzoylecgonine, benzoylnorecgonine and ecgonine methyl ester in doses of 10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg did not generalize to cocaine.

  6. Analysis of volatile organic compounds from illicit cocaine samples

    SciTech Connect

    Robins, W.H.; Wright, B.W.

    1994-07-01

    Detection of illicit cocaine hydrochloride shipments can be improved if there is a greater understanding of the identity and quantity of volatile compounds present. This study provides preliminary data concerning the volatile organic compounds detected in a limited Set of cocaine hydrochloride samples. In all cases, cocaine was one of the major volatile compounds detected. Other tropeines were detected in almost all samples. Low concentrations of compounds that may be residues of processing solvents were observed in some samples. The equilibrium emissivity of. cocaine from cocaine hydrochloride was investigated and a value of 83 parts-per-trillion was determined.

  7. Effects of chronic cocaine abuse on postsynaptic dopamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.; Schlyer, D.; Shiue, C.Y.; Alpert, R.; Dewey, S.L.; Logan, J.; Bendriem, B.; Christman, D. )

    1990-06-01

    To assess the effects of chronic cocaine intoxication on dopamine receptors in human subjects, the authors evaluated ({sup 18}F)N-methylspiroperidol binding using positron emission tomography in 10 cocaine abusers and 10 normal control subjects. Cocaine abusers who had been detoxified for 1 week or less showed significantly lower values for uptake of ({sup 18}F)N-methylspiroperidol in striatum than the normal subjects, whereas the cocaine abusers who had been detoxified for 1 month showed values comparable to those obtained from normal subjects. The authors conclude that postsynaptic dopamine receptor availability decreases with chronic cocaine abuse but may recover after a drug-free interval.

  8. Crack cocaine causing fatal vasoconstriction of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Williams, Joanne; Wasserberger, Jonathan

    2006-08-01

    Cocaine is the most powerful central nervous stimulant found in nature. All forms of cocaine cause tachycardia and vasoconstriction. A smokable, rapidly reacting form of cocaine base, "crack," is highly addictive. Smoking crack introduces a high concentration of cocaine into the bloodstream, rendering it especially dangerous. We report a case that visually demonstrates severe aortic vasoconstriction from the suprarenal aorta and extending to both femoral arteries and beyond, resulting in renal failure and fatal bowel ischemia after a 5-day binge of crack cocaine.

  9. Infusion-related air embolism.

    PubMed

    Cook, Lynda S

    2013-01-01

    Vascular air embolism as a medically induced complication may be associated with numerous treatments and therapies. In infusion therapy, the risk is associated with venous and arterial catheterization as well as various other invasive procedures and much of the equipment used for them. The manner of air entry and the presentation of symptoms may vary greatly. Appropriate treatment options are dependent on air entry routes. Nurses need to be aware of the common and seldom-considered causes of air embolism to be able to guard against this complication, yet adequately support the patient if it occurs.

  10. Multicriteria wavenumber selection in cocaine classification.

    PubMed

    Anzanello, M J; Kahmann, A; Marcelo, M C A; Mariotti, K C; Ferrão, M F; Ortiz, R S

    2015-11-10

    Cocaine ATR-FTIR spectra consist of a large number of wavenumbers that typically decreases the performance of exploratory and predictive multivariate techniques. This paper proposes a framework for selecting the most relevant wavenumbers to classify cocaine samples into two categories regarding chemical composition, i.e. salt and base. The proposed framework builds a wavenumber importance index based on the Bhattacharyya distance (BD) followed by a procedure that removes wavenumbers from the spectra according to the order suggested by the BD index. The recommended wavenumber subset is chosen based on multiple criteria assessing classification performance, which are recalculated after each wavenumber is eliminated. The method was applied to ATR-FTIR spectra from 513 samples of cocaine, remarkably reducing the percent of retained wavenumbers and yielding near to perfect classifications in the testing set. In addition, we compared our propositions with other methods tailored to wavenumber selection; we found that the proposed framework, which relies on simple mathematical fundamentals, yielded competitive results.

  11. Vaccines against stimulants: cocaine and MA

    PubMed Central

    Kosten, Thomas; Domingo, Coreen; Orson, Frank; Kinsey, Berma

    2014-01-01

    While the worldwide prevalence of cocaine use remains significant, medications, or small molecule approaches, to treat drug addictions have met with limited success. Anti-addiction vaccines, on the other hand, have demonstrated great potential for treating drug abuse using a distinctly different mechanism of eliciting an antibody response that blocks the pharmacological effects of drugs. We provide a review of vaccine-based approaches to treating stimulant addictions; specifically and cocaine addictions. This selective review article focuses on the one cocaine vaccine that has been into clinical trials and presents new data related to pre-clinical development of a methamphetamine (MA) vaccine. We also review the mechanism of action for vaccine induced antibodies to abused drugs, which involves kinetic slowing of brain entry as well as simple blocking properties. We present pre-clinical innovations for MA vaccines including hapten design, linkage to carrier proteins and new adjuvants beyond alum. We provide some new information on hapten structures and linkers and variations in protein carriers. We consider a carrier, outer membrance polysaccharide coat protein (OMPC), that provides some self-adjuvant through lipopolysaccharide components and provide new results with a monophosopholipid adjuvant for the more standard carrier proteins with cocaine and MA. The review then covers the clinical trials with the cocaine vaccine TA-CD. The clinical prospects for advances in this field over the next few years include a multi-site cocaine vaccine clinical trial to be reported in 2013 and phase 1 clinical trials of a MA vaccine in 2014. PMID:23509915

  12. Causal Pathways Between Impulsiveness, Cocaine Use Consequences, and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Lister, Jamey J.; Ledgerwood, David M.; Lundahl, Leslie H.; Greenwald, Mark K.

    2014-01-01

    Aims The present study examined whether lifetime cocaine use consequences mediate the relationship between trait impulsiveness and current depression symptoms among regular cocaine users. Methods Regular cocaine users (N = 108) were assessed using: Barratt Impulsiveness Scale subscales (non-planning, attentional, motor sub-scales) to measure trait impulsiveness; a standardized Drug History and Use Questionnaire to measure cocaine use and related consequences; and Beck Depression Inventory to measure current depression symptoms. Results All impulsiveness subscales were positively associated with an earlier age of first cocaine use, a higher degree of current depression symptoms and a greater number of lifetime cocaine use consequences. In three separate simple mediation tests, lifetime cocaine use consequences partially mediated the relationship between each of the impulsiveness subscales (non-planning: R2 = .42; attentional: R2 = .40; motor: R2 = .24) and current depression symptoms. Separate moderated mediation analyses failed to demonstrate an interaction between lifetime cocaine use and cocaine-related consequences predicting depression symptoms for the mediation models. Conclusions Cocaine-related consequences function in a more nuanced manner than just an outcome of impulsiveness or cocaine use, but as a pathway between trait impulsiveness and current depression symptoms. PMID:25280245

  13. Decreased brain dopamine cell numbers in human cocaine users.

    PubMed

    Little, Karley Y; Ramssen, Eric; Welchko, Ryan; Volberg, Vitaly; Roland, Courtney J; Cassin, Bader

    2009-08-15

    Cocaine use diminishes striatal and midbrain dopamine neuronal components in both post-mortem and in vivo human experiments. The diffuse nature of these declines suggests the possibility that cocaine use might cause a loss of dopamine neurons in humans. Previous rodent studies have not detected cocaine-induced dopamine cell damage. The present experiment involved counting midbrain dopamine neurons utilizing both melanin and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity. Well-preserved blocks ranging from +38 mm obex to +45 mm obex were examined in 10 cocaine users and 9 controls. Sections were also examined for signs of acute pathological injury by counting activated macrophages and microglia. Melanized cells at six midbrain levels were significantly reduced in cocaine users by both drug exposures. The estimated total number of melanized dopamine cells in the anterior midbrain was significantly reduced in cocaine users by 16%. Results with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity were less conclusive because of variability in staining. Both activated macrophages and activated microglia were significantly increased among cocaine users. Cocaine exposure may have neurotoxic effects on dopamine neurons in humans. The infiltration of phagocytic cells suggests that the lower number of dopamine cells found in cocaine users was a relatively recent effect. The loss of dopamine cells could contribute to and intensify cocaine dependence, as well as anhedonic and depressive symptoms, in some cocaine users. Further efforts at clarifying the pathophysiological mechanisms involved may help explain treatment refractoriness, and identify targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19233481

  14. Demonstration of specific binding of cocaine to human spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Yazigi, R.A.; Odem, R.R.; Polakoski, K.L. )

    1991-10-09

    Exposure of males to cocaine has been linked to abnormal development of their offspring. To investigate the possible role of sperm, this study examined the interaction of cocaine with human spermatozoa. Washed sperm were incubated with tritiated cocaine and the samples were filtered and the remaining radioactivity quantitated. The specific binding was optimal at 20 minutes and 23C. Competition studies with tritiated cocaine indicated the presence of approximately 3.6 {times} 10{sup 3} binding sites per cell, with a high affinity receptor dissociation constant. Cocaine concentrations as high as 670 {mu}mol/L had no detectable effect on either the motility or viability of the cells. These results support the hypothesis that the sperm may act as a vector to transport cocaine into an ovum. This novel mechanism could be involved in the abnormal development of offspring of cocaine-exposed males.

  15. Malignant hypertension-associated thrombotic microangiopathy following cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Lamia, Rais; El Ati, Zohra; Ben Fatma, Lilia; Zouaghi, Karim; Smaoui, Wided; Rania, Khedher; Krid, Madiha; Ben Hmida, Fathi; Béji, Soumaya; Ben Moussa, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine is one of the most commonly used illicit drugs with distribution and consumption throughout the world. Acute renal failure associated with rhabdomyolysis, direct vasoconstriction and hemodynamic alteration is well described in patients with cocaine intoxication. Cocaine use is associated with high blood pressure and may rarely induce malignant hypertension associated with thrombotic microangiopathy. We report the case of a patient who developed malignant hypertension associated with thrombotic microangiopathy after chronic consumption of cocaine. A kidney biopsy revealed thrombotic microangiopathy with fibrinoid necrosis of arterioles and glomerular tufts. He required dialysis sessions. Cocaine-mediated endothelial injury and platelet activation may play important pathogenetic roles in cocaine abusers who develop malignant hypertension associated with thrombotic microangiopathy. Clinicians need to be aware of this rare feature of cocaine intoxication. PMID:26787585

  16. Design of low cost smart infusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputra, Yohanes David; Purnamaningsih, Retno Wigajatri

    2015-01-01

    We propose design of a smart infusion device suitable for public hospitals in Indonesia. The device comprised of LED, photodiode and DC motor to measure and control the infusion rate, using the principle of LED beam absorption. The infusion rate was identified by using microcontroller and displayed through computer unit. Experiment results for different flow rate level and concentration of Dextrose showed that the device is able to detect, measure, and control the infusion droplets flow rate by the average error rate of 1.0081%.

  17. Cocaine and metabolite concentrations in DBS and venous blood after controlled intravenous cocaine administration

    PubMed Central

    Ellefsen, Kayla N; da Costa, Jose Luiz; Concheiro, Marta; Anizan, Sebastien; Barnes, Allan J; Pirard, Sandrine; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-01-01

    Background: DBS are an increasingly common clinical matrix. Methods & results: Sensitive and specific methods for DBS and venous blood cocaine and metabolite detection by LC–HRMS and 2D GC–MS, respectively, were validated to examine correlation between concentrations following controlled intravenous cocaine administration. Linear ranges from 1 to 200 µg/l were achieved, with acceptable bias and imprecision. Authentic matched specimens’ (392 DBS, 97 venous blood) cocaine and benzoylecgonine concentrations were qualitatively similar, but DBS had much greater variability (21.4–105.9 %CV) and were lower than in blood. Conclusion: DBS offer advantages for monitoring cocaine intake; however, differences between capillary and venous blood and DBS concentration variability must be addressed. PMID:26327184

  18. The effects of novelty-seeking phenotypes and sex differences on acquisition of cocaine self-administration in selectively-bred High-Responder and Low-Responder rats

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brooke A.; Clinton, Sarah M.; Akil, Huda; Becker, Jill B.

    2008-01-01

    Individual differences in exploratory behavior can predictably influence psychostimulant self-administration behavior. Male rats that exhibit a high degree of locomotor activity in a novel environment (High Responders, HR) will self-administer cocaine more readily than males exhibiting low levels of novelty-induced locomotion (Low Responders, LR). The present experiment investigates the combined influences of the sex of an individual and individual phenotypes in novelty-induced locomotion to predispose animals to acquire cocaine self-administration behavior, in male and female rats selectively bred for the HR-LR phenotypes. We first established that HR females, like their male counterparts, exhibit a dramatically greater locomotor response to novelty and less anxiety-like behavior than do LR females. While locomotor behavior was subtly influenced by estrous stage, with both HR and LR females showing increased activity during metestrus and diestrus compared to proestrus and estrus, the effect did not obscure HR-LR differences. When male and female HR-LR animals were trained to self-administer cocaine (2 h/day, 5 days/wk × 3 wk, 0.2 mg cocaine/kg/infusion), HR males and females acquired cocaine self-administration significantly faster than their LR counterparts. Furthermore, HR females self-administered significantly more cocaine than all other groups. In conclusion, female rats, like males, exhibit HR-LR phenotypes that predict rapidity of acquiring cocaine self-administration. Moreover, HR females self-administer more cocaine than HR males and both LR groups. PMID:18445506

  19. Perioperative Continuous Ropivacaine Wound Infusion in Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Randomized Controlled Double-blind Trial.

    PubMed

    Fassoulaki, Argyro; Vassi, Emilia; Korkolis, Dimitrios; Zotou, Marianna

    2016-02-01

    Wound infusion with local anesthetics has been used for postoperative pain relief with variable results. This randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial examines the effect of ropivacaine infusion on pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A total of 110 patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups. After induction of anesthesia a 75-mm catheter was inserted subcutaneously and connected to an elastomeric pump containing either 0.75% ropivacaine (ropivacaine group) or normal saline (control group) for 24 hours postoperatively. Before skin closure, each hole was infiltrated with 2 mL of 0.75% ropivacaine or normal saline according to randomization. Pain at rest, pain during cough, and analgesic consumption were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit and at 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively. Analgesic requirements and pain scores were recorded 1 and 3 months after surgery. The ropivacaine group reported less pain during cough (P=0.044) in the postanesthesia care unit (P=0.017) and 4 hours postoperatively (P=0.038). Ropivacaine wound infusion had no effect on late and chronic pain. PMID:26679680

  20. AAVrh.10-Mediated Expression of an Anti-Cocaine Antibody Mediates Persistent Passive Immunization That Suppresses Cocaine-Induced Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Jonathan B.; Hicks, Martin J.; De, Bishnu P.; Pagovich, Odelya; Frenk, Esther; Janda, Kim D.; Wee, Sunmee; Koob, George F.; Hackett, Neil R.; Kaminsky, Stephen M.; Worgall, Stefan; Tignor, Nicole; Mezey, Jason G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cocaine addiction is a major problem affecting all societal and economic classes for which there is no effective therapy. We hypothesized an effective anti-cocaine vaccine could be developed by using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer vector as the delivery vehicle to persistently express an anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody in vivo, which would sequester cocaine in the blood, preventing access to cognate receptors in the brain. To accomplish this, we constructed AAVrh.10antiCoc.Mab, an AAVrh.10 gene transfer vector expressing the heavy and light chains of the high affinity anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody GNC92H2. Intravenous administration of AAVrh.10antiCoc.Mab to mice mediated high, persistent serum levels of high-affinity, cocaine-specific antibodies that sequestered intravenously administered cocaine in the blood. With repeated intravenous cocaine challenge, naive mice exhibited hyperactivity, while the AAVrh.10antiCoc.Mab-vaccinated mice were completely resistant to the cocaine. These observations demonstrate a novel strategy for cocaine addiction by requiring only a single administration of an AAV vector mediating persistent, systemic anti-cocaine passive immunity. PMID:22486244

  1. Comparative behavioral pharmacology and toxicology of cocaine and its ethanol-derived metabolite, cocaine ethyl-ester (cocaethylene)

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.L.; Terry, P.; Witkin, J.M. )

    1992-01-01

    The present study compared the behavioral and toxic effects of cocaine and its ethanol derived metabolite, cocaine ethyl-ester (cocaethylene). Both drugs produced qualitatively similar psychomoter stimulant effects. Cocaine and cocaethylene increased locomotor activity in mice, with cocaine approximately four times more potent than cocaethylene. The durations of action of ED{sub 75} doses of each of the drugs were comparable. Each of the drugs also produced stimulation of operant responding in rats. In rats and squirrel monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine injections from saline, cocaine was approximately three to five times more potent than cocaethylene in producing these cocaine-like interoceptive effects. In contrast to the behavioral effects, cocaine and cocaethylene were equipotent in producing convulsions, and cocaethylene was more potent than cocaine in producing lethality. These results suggest that the conversion of cocaine to cocaethylene with simultaneous cocaine and alcohol use may produce an increased risk of toxicity due to a decrease in the potency of cocaethylene in producing psychomotor stimulant effects, and its increased potency in producing toxicity.

  2. Prenatal Cocaine Exposures and Dose-Related Cocaine Effects on Infant Tone and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Chiriboga, Claudia A.; Kuhn, Louise; Wasserman, Gail A.

    2015-01-01

    Background In experimental models, prenatal cocaine exposure has been found to perturb monoaminergic development. In humans, numerous studies have sought clinical correlates, but few have focused on dose-related effects, especially as regards neurologic function beyond the neonatal period. Objective To assess whether prenatal cocaine exposure has adverse effects on infant neurologic, developmental and behavioral outcomes and whether any effects are dose-dependent. Design/Methods Infants (398) were enrolled at birth from an urban hospital. Drug exposure was ascertained with biomarkers in hair (n=395), urine (n=170) and meconium (n=109). Children were followed prospectively and 286 (72%) were evaluated blind to drug exposure at 6 months of age with the Bayley scales, Fagan Scale of Infant Intelligence and a standardized neurological examination. Results Certain neurological findings increased significantly by the amount of cocaine detected in maternal hair, e.g. abnormality of tone, as indicated by extensor posture was detected among 28% of cocaine-unexposed infants, 43% of infants exposed to lower and 48% exposed to higher cocaine levels in maternal hair (p<0.009). Persistent fisting increased in a similar dose-dependent manner. These associations persisted in adjusted analyses. Prenatal cocaine exposure was not associated with developmental scores (mental, motor or novelty preference) but was associated with lower orientation scores in adjusted analyses. Conclusions At 6 months of age, prenatal cocaine exposure was associated with abnormalities of tone and posture and with lower orientation scores. Perturbations in monoaminergic systems by cocaine exposure during fetal development may explain the observed neurological and behavioral symptoms. Whether such findings in infancy increase the risk of later neurobehavioral problems requires further study. PMID:17234383

  3. Atomoxetine Does Not Alter Cocaine Use in Cocaine Dependent Individuals: A Double Blind Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Lisa S.; Wong, Conrad J.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Campbell, Charles L.; Rush, Craig R.; Lofwall, Michelle R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cocaine abuse continues to be a significant public health problem associated with morbidity and mortality. To date, no pharmacotherapeutic approach has proven effective for treating cocaine use disorders. Preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that noradrenergic activity may play a role in mediating some effects of cocaine and may be a rational target for treatment. Methods This double blind, placebo-controlled randomized, parallel group, 12-week outpatient clinical trial enrolled cocaine dependent individuals seeking treatment to examine the potential efficacy of the selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, atomoxetine (80 mg/day; p.o.; n=25), compared to placebo (n=25). Subjects were initially stratified on cocaine use (<15 days or ≥15 days of the last 30), age and race using urn randomization. Attendance, medication adherence and study compliance were reinforced with contingency management, and weekly counseling was offered. An array of measures (vital signs, laboratory chemistries, cognitive and psychomotor tests, cocaine craving and urine samples for drug testing) was collected throughout the study and at follow-up. Results Survival analysis revealed no differences in study retention between the two groups, with approximately 56% of subjects completing the 12-week study (Cox analysis X2=.72; p=.40; Hazard Ratio 1.48 [CI 0.62–3.39]). GEE analysis of the proportion of urine samples positive for benzoylecgonine, a cocaine metabolite, revealed no differences between the atomoxetine and placebo groups (X2=0.2, p=.66; OR=0.89 [95% CI 0.41 – 1.74). Atomoxetine was generally well tolerated in this population. Conclusions These data provide no support for the utility of atomoxetine in the treatment of cocaine dependence. PMID:23200303

  4. The 5-HT(2C) receptor agonist lorcaserin reduces cocaine self-administration, reinstatement of cocaine-seeking and cocaine induced locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Harvey-Lewis, Colin; Li, Zhaoxia; Higgins, Guy A; Fletcher, Paul J

    2016-02-01

    Lorcaserin (Lorqess, Belviq(®)) is a selective 5-HT(2C) receptor agonist that has received FDA approval for the treatment of obesity. 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists are also efficacious in decreasing multiple aspects of cocaine motivation and reward in preclinical models. This would suggest that lorcaserin is a clinically available therapeutic with the potential to treat cocaine addiction. Here we report the effects of lorcaserin (0.1 mg/kg-1.0 mg/kg) on multiple aspects of cocaine-related behaviours in rats. We find that lorcaserin dose-dependently decreases cocaine self-administration on progressive and fixed ratio schedules of reinforcement. Lorcaserin also reduces reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behaviour in response to priming injections of cocaine and/or reintroduction of cocaine-associated cues. Finally, lorcaserin dose-dependently decreases cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion. Our results, when considered in concert with similar emergent findings in non-human primates, strongly support continued research into the potential of lorcaserin as a clinical treatment for cocaine addiction.

  5. Oxytocin Reduces Cocaine Seeking and Reverses Chronic Cocaine-Induced Changes in Glutamate Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Luyi; Sun, Wei-Lun; Young, Amy B.; Lee, Kunhee; McGinty, Jacqueline F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oxytocin, a neurohypophyseal neuropeptide, is a potential mediator and regulator of drug addiction. However, the cellular mechanisms of oxytocin in drug seeking remain unknown. Methods: In the present study, we used a self-administration/reinstatement model to study the effects of oxytocin on cocaine seeking and its potential interaction with glutamate function at the receptor level. Results: Systemic oxytocin dose-dependently reduced cocaine self-administration during various schedules of reinforcement, including fixed ratio 1, fixed ratio 5, and progressive ratio. Oxytocin also attenuated reinstatement to cocaine seeking induced by cocaine prime or conditioned cues. Western-blot analysis indicated that oxytocin increased phosphorylation of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-type glutamate receptor GluA1 subunit at the Ser 845 site with or without accompanying increases in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, in several brain regions, including the prefrontal cortex, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, amygdala, and dorsal hippocampus. Immunoprecipitation of oxytocin receptor and GluA1 subunit receptors further demonstrated a physical interaction between these 2 receptors, although the interaction was not influenced by chronic cocaine or oxytocin treatment. Oxytocin also attenuated sucrose seeking in a GluA1- or extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-independent manner. Conclusions: These findings suggest that oxytocin mediates cocaine seeking through interacting with glutamate receptor systems via second messenger cascades in mesocorticolimbic regions. PMID:25539504

  6. Bacterial cocaine esterase: a protein-based therapy for cocaine overdose and addiction

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Diwahar; Woods, James H; Sunahara, Roger K

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine is highly addictive and there are no pharmacotherapeutic drugs available to treat acute cocaine toxicity or chronic abuse. Antagonizing an inhibitor such as cocaine using a small molecule has proven difficult. The alternative approach is to modify cocaine’s pharmacokinetic properties by sequestering or hydrolyzing it in serum and limiting access to its sites of action. We took advantage of a bacterial esterase (CocE) that has evolved to hydrolyze cocaine and have developed it as a therapeutic that rapidly and specifically clears cocaine from the subject. Native enzyme was unstable at 37°C, thus limiting CocE’s potential. Innovative computational methods based on the protein’s structure helped elucidate its mechanism of destabilization. Novel protein engineering methodologies were applied to substantially improve its stability in vitro and in vivo. These improvements rendered CocE as a powerful and efficacious therapeutic to treat cocaine intoxication and lead the way towards developing a therapy for addiction. PMID:22300094

  7. The skinny on cocaine: insights into eating behavior and body weight in cocaine-dependent men.

    PubMed

    Ersche, Karen D; Stochl, Jan; Woodward, Jeremy M; Fletcher, Paul C

    2013-12-01

    There is a general assumption that weight loss associated with cocaine use reflects its appetite suppressing properties. We sought to determine whether this was justified by characterizing, in detail, alterations in dietary food intake and body composition in actively using cocaine-dependent individuals. We conducted a cross-sectional case-control comparison of 65 male volunteers from the local community, half of whom satisfied the DSM-IV-TR criteria for cocaine dependence (n=35) while the other half had no personal or family history of a psychiatric disorder, including substance abuse (n=30). Assessments were made of eating behavior and dietary food intake, estimation of body composition, and measurement of plasma leptin. Although cocaine users reported significantly higher levels of dietary fat and carbohydrates as well as patterns of uncontrolled eating, their fat mass was significantly reduced compared with their non-drug using peers. Levels of leptin were associated with fat mass, and with the duration of stimulant use. Tobacco smoking status or concomitant use of medication did not affect the significance of the results. Weight changes in cocaine users reflect fundamental perturbations in fat regulation. These are likely to be overlooked in clinical practice but may produce significant health problems when cocaine use is discontinued during recovery.

  8. Daily stressor sensitivity, abuse effects, and cocaine use in cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Waldrop, Angela E; Back, Sudie E; Brady, Kathleen T; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P; McRae, Aimee L; Saladin, Michael E

    2007-12-01

    This study highlights respondent sensitivity to daily hassles as it relates to situational cocaine use and perceived long-term effects of adverse events in childhood. Data were drawn from a larger study on stress reactivity in cocaine dependent individuals. Participants (n=104) were cocaine dependent men and women without comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). They completed the Early Trauma Inventory (ETI), the Daily Hassles Scale (DHS), the Inventory of Drug-Taking Situations (IDTS), and the Time-Line Follow-Back (TLFB; for 90 days prior to interview). There were no gender differences in the amount or frequency of cocaine use, although the patterns of use differed between male and female users. Overall, there were some associations in the patterns of cocaine use and sensitivity to daily hassles, particularly the use in response to conflict with others. Early negative life events were positively related to response to daily hassles, but current triggers were more relevant. Reactivity to cocaine cues was related to daily hassle sensitivity among women only. Limitations and implications of the findings are discussed.

  9. Modification of pharmacokinetic and abuse-related effects of cocaine by human-derived cocaine hydrolase in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Charles W.; Justinova, Zuzana; Lafleur, David; Woods, Doug; Roschke, Viktor; Hallak, Hussein; Sklair-Tavron, Liora; Redhi, Godfrey H.; Yasar, Sevil; Bergman, Jack; Goldberg, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Although substantial research effort has focused on developing pharmacological treatments for cocaine abuse, no effective medications have been developed. Recent studies show that enzymes that metabolize cocaine in the periphery, forestalling its entry into the brain, can prevent cocaine toxicity and its behavioral effects in rodents. Here we report on effects of one such enzyme (Albu-CocH) on the pharmacokinetic and behavioral effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys. Albu-CocH was developed from successive mutations of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and has 1000-fold greater catalytic activity against cocaine than naturally occurring BChE. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that Albu-CocH (5 mg/kg) had a half-life of 56.6 hours in squirrel monkeys. In these studies, plasma levels of cocaine following i.v. 1 mg/kg cocaine were reduced two hours after administration of Albu-CocH, whereas plasma levels of the cocaine metabolite ecgonine methyl ester were increased. These effects were still evident 72 hrs following Albu-CocH administration. In behavioral experiments in monkeys, pretreatment with 5 mg/kg Albu-CocH dramatically decreased self-administration of a reinforcing dose of i.v. cocaine (30 μg/kg/injection) for over 24 hours. Pretreatment with 5 mg/kg Albu-CocH also attenuated the reinstatement of extinguished cocaine self-administration by an i.v. priming injection of cocaine (0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg) and, in separate studies, attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine. The ability of Albu-CocH to attenuate the abuse-related effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys indicates that further investigation of BChE mutants as potential treatment for cocaine abuse and toxicity is warranted. PMID:22264200

  10. A recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody inhibits the distribution of cocaine to the brain in rats.

    PubMed

    Norman, Andrew B; Gooden, Felicia C T; Tabet, Michael R; Ball, William J

    2014-07-01

    The monoclonal antibody (mAb), h2E2, is a humanized version of the chimeric human/murine anti-cocaine mAb 2E2. The recombinant h2E2 protein was produced in vitro from a transfected mammalian cell line and retained high affinity (4 nM Kd) and specificity for cocaine over its inactive metabolites benzoylecgonine (BE) and ecgonine methyl ester. In rats, pharmacokinetic studies of h2E2 (120 mg/kg i.v.) showed a long terminal elimination half-life of 9.0 days and a low volume of distribution at steady state (Vdss) of 0.3 l/kg. Pretreatment with h2E2 produced a dramatic 8.8-fold increase in the area under the plasma cocaine concentration-time curve (AUC) and in brain a concomitant decrease of 68% of cocaine's AUC following an i.v. injection of an equimolar cocaine dose. Sequestration of cocaine in plasma by h2E2, shown via reduction of cocaine's Vdss, indicates potential clinical efficacy. Although the binding of cocaine to h2E2 in plasma should inhibit distribution and metabolism, the elimination of cocaine remained multicompartmental and was still rapidly eliminated from plasma despite the presence of h2E2. BE was the major cocaine metabolite, and brain BE concentrations were sixfold higher than in plasma, indicating that cocaine is normally metabolized in the brain. In the presence of h2E2, brain BE concentrations were decreased and plasma BE was increased, consistent with the observed h2E2-induced changes in cocaine disposition. The inhibition of cocaine distribution to the brain confirms the humanized mAb, h2E2, as a lead candidate for development as an immunotherapy for cocaine abuse. PMID:24733787

  11. Cocaine Self-Administration Elevates GluN2B within dmPFC Mediating Heightened Cue-Elicited Operant Responding

    PubMed Central

    Szumlinski, Karen K; Wroten, Melissa G; Miller, Bailey W; Sacramento, Arianne D; Cohen, Matan; Ben-Shahar, Osnat; Kippin, Tod E

    2016-01-01

    Cue-elicited drug-craving correlates with hyperactivity within prefrontal cortex (PFC), which is theorized to result from dysregulated excitatory neurotransmission. The NMDA glutamate receptor is highly implicated in addiction-related neuroplasticity. As NMDA receptor function is regulated critically by its GluN2 subunits, herein, we assayed the relation between incubated cue-elicited cocaine-seeking following extended access to intravenous cocaine (6 h/d; 0.25 mg/infusion for 10 d) and the expression of GluN2A/B receptor subunits within PFC sub regions during early versus late withdrawal (respectively, 3 vs. 30 days). Cocaine-seeking rats exhibited elevated GluN2B expression within the dorsomedial aspect of the PFC (dmPFC); this effect was apparent at both 3 and 30 days withdrawal and occurred in cocaine-experienced rats, regardless of experiencing an extinction test or not. Thus, elevated dmPFC GluN2B expression appears to reflect a pharmacodynamic response to excessive cocaine intake that is independent of the duration of drug withdrawal or re-exposure to drug-taking context. The functional relevance of elevated dmPFC GluN2B expression for drug-seeking was assessed by the local infusion of the prototypical GluN2B-selective antagonist ifenprodil (1.0 µg/side). Ifenprodil did not alter cue-elicited responding in animals with a history of saline self-administration. In contrast, ifenprodil lowered cue-elicited cocaine-seeking, while potentiating cue-elicited sucrose-seeking. Thus, the effects of an intra-dmPFC ifenprodil infusion upon cue reactivity are reinforcer-specific, arguing in favor of targeting GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors as a pharmacological strategy for reducing behavioral reactivity to drug-associated cues with the potential benefit of heightening the reinforcing properties of cues associated with non-drug primary rewards. PMID:27478879

  12. The Brain-Specific Neural Zinc Finger Transcription Factor 2b (NZF-2b/7ZFMyt1) Suppresses Cocaine Self-Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekar, Vijay; Dreyer, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    Brain-specific neural-zinc-finger transcription factor-2b (NZF2b/7ZFMyt1) is induced in the mesolimbic dopaminergic region after chronic cocaine exposure and lentiviral-mediated expression of NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 in the nucleus accumbens results in decreased locomotor activity (Chandrasekar and Dreyer, 2010). In this study the role of NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 in active cocaine seeking and of its interaction with histone deacetylase on the altered behavior has been observed. Localized expression of NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 in the nucleus accumbens resulted in attenuated cocaine self-administration, whereas silencing this transcription factor with lentiviruses expressing siRNAs increased the animal′s motivation to self-infuse cocaine. Low doses of sodium butyrate, a potent inhibitor of histone deacetylase, were sufficient to reverse the NZF2b/7ZFMyt1-mediated decrease in cocaine self-administration. NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 expression resulted in strong induction of transcription factors REST1 and NAC1 and of the dopamine D2 receptor, with concomitant inhibition of BDNF and its receptor TrkB. We show that NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 colocalizes with histone deacetylase-2 (HDAC2), probably overcoming the suppression of transcriptional activity caused by Lingo1. These findings show that molecular adaptations mediated by NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 expression possibly lead to decreased responsiveness to the reinforcing properties of cocaine and play a prominent role in affecting the behavioral changes induced by the drug. PMID:20407577

  13. Social defeat stress-induced sensitization and escalated cocaine self-administration: The role of ERK signaling in the rat ventral tegmental area

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Jasmine J.; Chartoff, Elena H.; Holly, Elizabeth N.; Potter, David N.; Carlezon, William A.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Intermittent social defeat stress can induce neuroadaptations that promote compulsive drug taking. Within the mesocorticolimbic circuit, repeated cocaine administration activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Objective The present experiments examine whether changes in ERK phosphorylation are necessary for the behavioral and neural adaptations that occur as a consequence of intermittent defeat stress. Materials and methods Rats were exposed to four brief intermittent defeats over the course of 10 days. Ten days after the last defeat, rats were challenged with cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline, and ERK activity was examined in mesocorticolimbic regions. To determine the role of ERK in defeat stress-induced behavioral sensitization, we bilaterally microinjected the MAPK/ERK kinase inhibitor U0126 (1 μg/side) or vehicle (20% DMSO) into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) prior to each of 4 defeats. Ten days following the last defeat, locomotor activity was assessed for the expression of behavioral cross-sensitization to cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Thereafter, rats self-administered cocaine under fixed and progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement, including a 24-h continuous access “binge” (0.3 mg/kg/infusion). Results We found that repeated defeat stress increased ERK phosphorylation in the VTA. Inhibition of VTA ERK prior to each social defeat attenuated the development of stress-induced sensitization and prevented stress-induced enhancement of cocaine self-administration during a continuous access binge. Conclusions These results suggest that enhanced activation of ERK in the VTA due to brief defeats is critical in the induction of sensitization and escalated cocaine taking. PMID:25373870

  14. Case Study: The Chemistry of Cocaine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewprashad, Brahmadeo

    2011-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's case study focuses on the chemistry of cocaine to teach a number of core concepts in organic chemistry. It also requires that students read and analyze an original research paper on…

  15. Cocaine Babies: Florida's Substance-Exposed Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpring, Jayme

    This report is designed to provide Florida's school personnel with assistance in working with students prenatally exposed to cocaine or other toxic substances. The report offers background data, practical strategies for teaching and learning, and resources for networking. The first chapter outlines statistics on the incidence of the problem of…

  16. Cocaine-induced pulmonary changes: HRCT findings *

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Renata Rocha; Zanetti, Gláucia; Souza, Arthur Soares; de Souza, Luciana Soares; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate HRCT scans of the chest in 22 patients with cocaine-induced pulmonary disease. Methods: We included patients between 19 and 52 years of age. The HRCT scans were evaluated by two radiologists independently, discordant results being resolved by consensus. The inclusion criterion was an HRCT scan showing abnormalities that were temporally related to cocaine use, with no other apparent causal factors. Results: In 8 patients (36.4%), the clinical and tomographic findings were consistent with "crack lung", those cases being studied separately. The major HRCT findings in that subgroup of patients included ground-glass opacities, in 100% of the cases; consolidations, in 50%; and the halo sign, in 25%. In 12.5% of the cases, smooth septal thickening, paraseptal emphysema, centrilobular nodules, and the tree-in-bud pattern were identified. Among the remaining 14 patients (63.6%), barotrauma was identified in 3 cases, presenting as pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, and hemopneumothorax, respectively. Talcosis, characterized as perihilar conglomerate masses, architectural distortion, and emphysema, was diagnosed in 3 patients. Other patterns were found less frequently: organizing pneumonia and bullous emphysema, in 2 patients each; and pulmonary infarction, septic embolism, eosinophilic pneumonia, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema, in 1 patient each. Conclusions: Pulmonary changes induced by cocaine use are varied and nonspecific. The diagnostic suspicion of cocaine-induced pulmonary disease depends, in most of the cases, on a careful drawing of correlations between clinical and radiological findings. PMID:26398752

  17. [Toxic cardiomyopathy due to cocaine use].

    PubMed

    Díaz, D E; Nieto, R; Brown, A; Arrocha, J A; Ramirez, J A; Acuña, E L; Blandón, R; Quiroz, J A

    1993-05-01

    The clinical record of 5 patients are studied. They were hospitalized in Santo Tomás Hospital with history of chronic and massive intoxication with inhaled and ingested cocaine. They all had cardiomegaly: in one, of grade I; in three, of grade III. The echocardiography mode B showed global cardiomegaly with dilatation of cavities and ejection fraction of 20% or below.

  18. Discriminative stimulus properties of cocaine, norcocaine, and N-allylnorcocaine.

    PubMed

    Bedford, J A; Nail, G L; Borne, R F; Wilson, M C

    1981-01-01

    A discriminative stimulus paradigm was employed to train eight male and female Wistar rats to discriminate 5.0 mg/kg cocaine HCl from 2.0 ml/kg saline. Subjects responded in a two bar operant chamber on an FR 30 schedule for food reinforcement. All sessions followed a 10 minute pretreatment with either saline, the training dose of cocaine, four probe doses of cocaine HCl (1.0, 2.5, 7.5, 10 mg/kg), four probe doses of norcocaine (1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 mg/kg) or four probe doses of N-allylnorcocaine (5.0, 7.5, 10, 20 mg/kg). All probe doses were treated using an extinction procedure. The three highest doses of cocaine generalized to cocaine while the 1.0 mg/kg dose of cocaine generalized to saline. The two highest doses of norcocaine generalized to cocaine while the 2.5 mg/kg dose of norcocaine resulted in 57% responding on the cocaine lever with the 1.0 mg/kg dose generalizing to saline. Only the highest dose of N-allylnorcocaine was found to generalize to cocaine with the intermediate doses resulting in an intermediate level of responding occurring on the cocaine lever. The 5.0 mg/kg dose of N-allylnorcocaine generalized to saline.

  19. Cocaine and kidney injury: a kaleidoscope of pathology

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Narender; Pullman, James M.; Coco, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine is abused worldwide as a recreational drug. It is a potent activator of the sympathetic nervous system leading to intense vasoconstriction, endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, platelet activation and decrease in prostaglandins E2 and prostacyclin. Cocaine can lead to widespread systemic adverse effects such as stroke, myocardial infarction, arterial dissection, vascular thrombosis and rhabdomyolysis. In human and rat kidneys, cocaine has been associated with glomerular, tubular, vascular and interstitial injury. It is not uncommon to diagnose cocaine-related acute kidney injury (AKI), malignant hypertension and chronic kidney disease. Cocaine abuse can lead to AKI by rhabdomyolysis, vasculitis, infarction, thrombotic microangiopathy and malignant hypertension. It is reported that 50–60% of people who use both cocaine and heroin are at increased risk of HIV, hepatitis and additional risk factors that can cause kidney diseases. While acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is a known cause of AKI, an association of AIN with cocaine is unusual and seldom reported. We describe a patient with diabetes mellitus, hypertension and chronic hepatitis C, who presented with AKI. Urine toxicology was positive for cocaine and a kidney biopsy was consistent with AIN. Illicit drugs such as cocaine or contaminants may have caused AIN in this case and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of causes of AKI in a patient with substance abuse. We review the many ways that cocaine adversely impacts on kidney function. PMID:25859366

  20. Effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on infant reactivity and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Eiden, Rina D.; McAuliffe, Shannon; Kachadourian, Lorig; Coles, Claire; Colder, Craig; Schuetze, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of prenatal cocaine exposure and associated risk factors on infant reactivity and regulation at 7 months of infant age. Participants consisted of 167 mother-infant dyads participating in an ongoing longitudinal study of prenatal cocaine exposure, who completed the arm-restraint procedure at the 7-month assessment (87 cocaine exposed, 80 non-cocaine exposed). We hypothesized that cocaine exposed infants would display higher arousal or reactivity and lower regulation during a procedure designed to arouse anger/frustration. Results indicated that cocaine exposed infants were more reactive to increases in the level of stress from trial 1 to trial 2 but exhibited no change in the number of regulatory strategies as stress increased, unlike the control group infants. Infant birth weight moderated the association between cocaine exposure and infant regulation. Among cocaine exposed infants, those with lower birth weight displayed higher reactivity compared to those with higher birth weight. Contrary to expectations, there were no indirect effects between cocaine exposure and infant reactivity/regulation via environmental risk, parenting, or birth weight. Results are supportive of a teratological model of prenatal cocaine exposure for infant reactivity/regulation in infancy. PMID:18822371

  1. Cocaine downregulates beta-adrenergic receptors in pregnant sheep myometrium.

    PubMed

    Wang, F L; Gauvin, J M; Dombrowski, M P; Smith, Y R; Christopher, K A; Hurd, W W

    1996-01-01

    Cocaine abuse is associated with premature labor. Although cocaine is known to competitively inhibit beta-adrenergic receptor binding, cocaine's effect on receptor downregulation is uncertain. This study was designed to determine the in vitro effect of cocaine on downregulation of beta-adrenergic receptors in pregnant myometrium. Pregnant sheep myometrium was incubated with either cocaine, isoproterenol, or a cocaine metabolite, benzoylecgonine. Membrane fractions were assayed for beta-adrenergic receptors using (125I)-cyanopindolol and the beta 2-adrenergic antagonist ICI 118,551. We found that cocaine (10(-6) to 10(-4) mol/L), but not benzoylecgonine, downregulated both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors, but did not further augment receptor downregulation by isoproterenol. The 46% decrease in beta-adrenergic receptors seen after exposure to cocaine was similar to the 53% decrease seen after isoproterenol. We hypothesize downregulation of beta-adrenergic receptors by cocaine may play a role in the association of cocaine abuse with premature labor.

  2. Neuroplasticity in the mesolimbic dopamine system and cocaine addiction

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, M J; Kalivas, P W; Shaham, Y

    2008-01-01

    The main characteristics of cocaine addiction are compulsive drug use despite adverse consequences and high rates of relapse during periods of abstinence. A current popular hypothesis is that compulsive cocaine use and cocaine relapse is due to drug-induced neuroadaptations in reward-related learning and memory processes, which cause hypersensitivity to cocaine-associated cues, impulsive decision making and abnormal habit-like learned behaviours that are insensitive to adverse consequences. Here, we review results from studies on the effect of cocaine exposure on selected signalling cascades, growth factors and physiological processes previously implicated in neuroplasticity underlying normal learning and memory. These include the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glutamate transmission, and synaptic plasticity (primarily in the form of long-term potentiation and depression, LTP and LTD). We also discuss the degree to which these cocaine-induced neuroplasticity changes in the mesolimbic dopamine system mediate cocaine psychomotor sensitization and cocaine-seeking behaviours, as assessed in animal models of drug addiction. Finally, we speculate on how these factors may interact to initiate and sustain cocaine psychomotor sensitization and cocaine seeking. PMID:18345022

  3. Infusing Systems Thinking into Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Charles W.; Tomlin, James H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the role of career counselors in infusing systems thinking into occupational advising. The authors conducted a qualitative review and analysis of selected literature on systems thinking and analyzed trends for adaptation to career counseling practice. This analysis suggests that career counselors need to infuse systems…

  4. Cocaethylene formation following ethanol and cocaine administration by different routes.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Ellen D; Harris, Debra S; Everhart, E Thomas; Mendelson, John; Jacob, Peyton; Jones, Reese T

    2011-04-01

    Ethanol alters the hepatic biotransformation of cocaine, resulting in transesterification to a novel active metabolite, cocaethylene. Because of first pass metabolism, oral drug administration might be expected to produce relatively larger concentrations of cocaethylene than would intravenous or smoked administration. We, therefore, compared the effects of route of cocaine administration on the formation and elimination of cocaethylene. Six experienced cocaine users were tested in 6 sessions, approximately 1 week apart. Deuterium-labeled cocaine (d₅) was administered in all conditions. Oral cocaine-d₅ 2.0 mg/kg, intravenous cocaine-d₅ 1.0 mg/kg, and smoked cocaine-d₅ (200 mg) were administered after oral ethanol 1.0 g/kg or placebo. A small, intravenous dose of deuterated cocaethylene (d₃) also was administered with all conditions for determination of cocaethylene formation. Physiologic and subjective effects were recorded and plasma cocaine-d₅, cocaethylene-d₅, cocaethylene-d₃, and benzoylecgonine-d₅ were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. About 24% (± 11) of intravenous cocaine was converted to cocaethylene. The oral route (34% ± 20) was significantly greater than from the smoked route (18% ± 11) and showed a trend toward significance for greater formation of cocaethylene compared to the intravenous route. Within each route, the cocaine-ethanol combination produced greater increases in heart rate and rate-pressure product than cocaine alone. Global intoxication effects across time after smoking or intravenous administration were significantly greater when cocaine and ethanol were both given. Administration of cocaine by different routes alters the amount of cocaethylene formed through hepatic first-pass effects. Increased cardiovascular and subjective effects might explain the toxicity and popularity of the combined drugs. PMID:21463066

  5. The Role of Acetylcholine in Cocaine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Mark J; Adinoff, Bryon

    2008-01-01

    Central nervous system cholinergic neurons arise from several discrete sources, project to multiple brain regions, and exert specific effects on reward, learning, and memory. These processes are critical for the development and persistence of addictive disorders. Although other neurotransmitters, including dopamine, glutamate, and serotonin, have been the primary focus of drug research to date, a growing preclinical literature reveals a critical role of acetylcholine (ACh) in the experience and progression of drug use. This review will present and integrate the findings regarding the role of ACh in drug dependence, with a primary focus on cocaine and the muscarinic ACh system. Mesostriatal ACh appears to mediate reinforcement through its effect on reward, satiation, and aversion, and chronic cocaine administration produces neuroadaptive changes in the striatum. ACh is further involved in the acquisition of conditional associations that underlie cocaine self-administration and context-dependent sensitization, the acquisition of associations in conditioned learning, and drug procurement through its effects on arousal and attention. Long-term cocaine use may induce neuronal alterations in the brain that affect the ACh system and impair executive function, possibly contributing to the disruptions in decision making that characterize this population. These primarily preclinical studies suggest that ACh exerts a myriad of effects on the addictive process and that persistent changes to the ACh system following chronic drug use may exacerbate the risk of relapse during recovery. Ultimately, ACh modulation may be a potential target for pharmacological treatment interventions in cocaine-addicted subjects. However, the complicated neurocircuitry of the cholinergic system, the multiple ACh receptor subtypes, the confluence of excitatory and inhibitory ACh inputs, and the unique properties of the striatal cholinergic interneurons suggest that a precise target of cholinergic

  6. Disrupting astrocyte–neuron lactate transfer persistently reduces conditioned responses to cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Boury-Jamot, B; Carrard, A; Martin, J L; Halfon, O; Magistretti, P J; Boutrel, B

    2016-01-01

    A central problem in the treatment of drug addiction is the high risk of relapse often precipitated by drug-associated cues. The transfer of glycogen-derived lactate from astrocytes to neurons is required for long-term memory. Whereas blockade of drug memory reconsolidation represents a potential therapeutic strategy, the role of astrocyte–neuron lactate transport in long-term conditioning has received little attention. By infusing an inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase into the basolateral amygdala of rats, we report that disruption of astrocyte-derived lactate not only transiently impaired the acquisition of a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference but also persistently disrupted an established conditioning. The drug memory was rescued by L-Lactate co-administration through a mechanism requiring the synaptic plasticity-related transcription factor Zif268 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway but not the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf). The long-term amnesia induced by glycogenolysis inhibition and the concomitant decreased expression of phospho-ERK were both restored with L-Lactate co-administration. These findings reveal a critical role for astrocyte-derived lactate in positive memory formation and highlight a novel amygdala-dependent reconsolidation process, whose disruption may offer a novel therapeutic target to reduce the long-lasting conditioned responses to cocaine. PMID:26503760

  7. Disrupting astrocyte-neuron lactate transfer persistently reduces conditioned responses to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Boury-Jamot, B; Carrard, A; Martin, J L; Halfon, O; Magistretti, P J; Boutrel, B

    2016-08-01

    A central problem in the treatment of drug addiction is the high risk of relapse often precipitated by drug-associated cues. The transfer of glycogen-derived lactate from astrocytes to neurons is required for long-term memory. Whereas blockade of drug memory reconsolidation represents a potential therapeutic strategy, the role of astrocyte-neuron lactate transport in long-term conditioning has received little attention. By infusing an inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase into the basolateral amygdala of rats, we report that disruption of astrocyte-derived lactate not only transiently impaired the acquisition of a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference but also persistently disrupted an established conditioning. The drug memory was rescued by L-Lactate co-administration through a mechanism requiring the synaptic plasticity-related transcription factor Zif268 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway but not the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf). The long-term amnesia induced by glycogenolysis inhibition and the concomitant decreased expression of phospho-ERK were both restored with L-Lactate co-administration. These findings reveal a critical role for astrocyte-derived lactate in positive memory formation and highlight a novel amygdala-dependent reconsolidation process, whose disruption may offer a novel therapeutic target to reduce the long-lasting conditioned responses to cocaine. PMID:26503760

  8. Cocaine and specific cocaine metabolites induce von Willebrand Factor release from endothelial cells in a tissue-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, William E.; Moore, Emily E.; Penkala, Rebecca A.; Bolgiano, D.; López, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cocaine use is associated with arterial thrombosis, including myocardial infarction and stroke. Cocaine use results in increased plasma von Willebrand Factor (VWF), accelerated atherosclerosis, and platelet-rich arterial thrombi, suggesting that cocaine activates the endothelium, promoting platelet-VWF interactions. Approach and Results Human umbilical vein (HUVEC), brain microvasculature (BMVEC), or coronary artery (CAEC) endothelial cells were treated with cocaine or metabolites benzoylecgonine, cocaethylene, norcocaine, or ecgonine methylester. Supernatant VWF concentration and multimer structure were measured, and platelet–VWF strings formed on the endothelial surface under flow were quantified. Cocaine, benzoylecgonine, and cocaethylene induced endothelial VWF release, with the two metabolites being more potent than the parent molecule. BMVEC were more sensitive to cocaine and metabolites than were HUVEC or CAEC. CAEC released VWF into the supernatant but did not form VWF–platelet strings. Intracellular cAMP concentration was not increased after treatment with cocaine or its metabolites. Conclusions Both cocaine and metabolites benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene induced endothelial VWF secretion, possibly explaining thrombotic risk after cocaine ingestion. VWF secretion is likely to vary between vascular beds, with brain endothelial cells being particularly sensitive. These results suggest that clinical management of cocaine-induced ischemia may benefit from therapies aimed at disrupting the VWF–platelet interaction. PMID:23539221

  9. Certain or uncertain cocaine expectations influence accumbens dopamine responses to self-administered cocaine and non-rewarded operant behavior.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Manoranjan S; Duvauchelle, Christine L

    2008-09-01

    Uncertainty and errors in predicting natural rewards influence associative learning and dopamine activity. The present study was conducted to determine the influence of cue-induced cocaine uncertainty, certainty and prediction error on nucleus accumbens dopamine (NAcc DA) in rats. For Certainty training, distinctive sensory cues were present during cocaine availability and alternate cues were paired with non-reinforced (saline) operant sessions. For Uncertainty training, all cues were equally associated with both cocaine and non-reinforcement. After training, animals self-administered cocaine or saline in the presence of conditioned cues while NAcc DA responses were assessed using in vivo microdialysis. Findings revealed cocaine-stimulated NAcc DA increased significantly less in Certainty--compared to Uncertainty-trained animals, and cocaine-paired cues in the absence of cocaine (Negative Prediction Error) resulted in a significant depression of baseline NAcc DA. These findings provide support for enhanced DA activity during cocaine uncertainty or the development of conditioned cocaine tolerance in subjects certain of a cocaine outcome.

  10. Myocardial uptake of cocaine and effects of cocaine on myocardial substrate utilization and perfusion in hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Wang, G.J.; Oster, Z.H.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Yonekura, Y.; Fujibayashi, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Kubota, K.

    1992-12-31

    Cocaine abuse is a problem causing world-wide concern and the number of deaths following cocaine use is increasing. Cardiovascular complications following cocaine include severe tachyarrythmias, pulmonary edema, myocardial infarction, and acute renal failure, which are major problems confronting emergency facilities. While the studies of cocaine effects on the brain have been given the most attention, it is clear that the effects of cocaine on the cardiovascular system are of great importance, given the increasing number of reports on sudden death and myocardial infarctions in young adults related to cocaine use. The precise mechanisms of cardiotoxic actions of cocaine are unclear. We investigated the whole-body distribution of C-14-labeled cocaine to determine the cocaine-binding sites, including blocking experiments to determine the nature of regional binding sites, and differential response of the normal vs. diseased heart (hypertensive cardiomyopathy) in an animal model to mimic a potentially high risk population. We investigated the acute effects of cocaine on myocardial metabolism using two myocardial energy substrate analogs, fatty acid and glucose with comparison with regional perfusion.

  11. Myocardial uptake of cocaine and effects of cocaine on myocardial substrate utilization and perfusion in hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Wang, G.J. ); Oster, Z.H. ); Knapp, F.F. Jr. ); Yonekura, Y. . Faculty of Medicine); Fujibayashi, Y. . Hospital); Yamamoto, K. . Medical School); Kubota, K. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai

    1992-01-01

    Cocaine abuse is a problem causing world-wide concern and the number of deaths following cocaine use is increasing. Cardiovascular complications following cocaine include severe tachyarrythmias, pulmonary edema, myocardial infarction, and acute renal failure, which are major problems confronting emergency facilities. While the studies of cocaine effects on the brain have been given the most attention, it is clear that the effects of cocaine on the cardiovascular system are of great importance, given the increasing number of reports on sudden death and myocardial infarctions in young adults related to cocaine use. The precise mechanisms of cardiotoxic actions of cocaine are unclear. We investigated the whole-body distribution of C-14-labeled cocaine to determine the cocaine-binding sites, including blocking experiments to determine the nature of regional binding sites, and differential response of the normal vs. diseased heart (hypertensive cardiomyopathy) in an animal model to mimic a potentially high risk population. We investigated the acute effects of cocaine on myocardial metabolism using two myocardial energy substrate analogs, fatty acid and glucose with comparison with regional perfusion.

  12. Chronic Cocaine Dampens Dopamine Signaling during Cocaine Intoxication and Unbalances D1 over D2 Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kicheon; Pan, Yingtian

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine increases triggered by cocaine and consequent stimulation of dopamine receptors (including D1 and D2) are associated with its rewarding effects. However, while facilitation of D1 receptor (D1R) signaling enhances the rewarding effects of cocaine, facilitation of D2R signaling decreases it, which indicates that for cocaine to be rewarding it must result in a predominance of D1R over D2R signaling. Moreover, the transition to compulsive cocaine intake might result from an imbalance between D1R and D2R signaling. To test the hypothesis that chronic cocaine use unbalances D1R over D2R signaling during cocaine intoxication, we used microprobe optical imaging to compare dynamic changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i, marker of neuronal activation) to acute cocaine in striatal D1R-EGFP and D2R-EGFP-expressing neurons between control and chronically treated mice. Chronic cocaine attenuated responses to acute cocaine in D1R (blunting Ca2+ increases by 67 ± 16%) and D2R (blunting Ca2+ decrease by 72 ± 17%) neurons in most D1R and D2R neurons (∼75%). However, the dynamics of this attenuation during cocaine intoxication was longer lasting for D2R than for D1R. Thus, whereas control mice showed a fast but short-lasting predominance of D1R over D2R signaling (peaking at ∼8 min) during acute cocaine intoxication, in chronically treated mice D1R predominance was sustained for >30 min (throughout the measurement period). Thus, chronic cocaine use dramatically reduced cocaine-induced DA signaling, shifting the balance between D1R and D2R signaling during intoxication to a predominance of D1R (stimulatory) over D2R (inhibitory) signaling, which might facilitate compulsive intake in addiction. PMID:24089490

  13. Effects of progesterone and testosterone on cocaine self-administration and cocaine discrimination by female rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Knudson, Inge M; Kelly, Maureen; Fivel, Peter A; Mendelson, Jack H

    2011-10-01

    The neuroactive steroid hormone progesterone attenuates cocaine's abuse-related effects in women and in rodents under some conditions, but the effects of testosterone are unknown. We compared the acute effects of progesterone (0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mg/kg, intramuscularly (i.m.)), testosterone (0.001, 0.003, and 0.01 mg/kg, i.m.), and placebo on cocaine self-administration and cocaine discrimination dose-effect curves in female rhesus monkeys. Cocaine self-administration (0.03 mg/kg per inj.) was maintained on a fixed ratio 30 schedule of reinforcement, and monkeys had unlimited access to cocaine for 2 h each day. Cocaine doses were administered in an irregular order during each dose-effect curve determination, and the same dose order was used in each subject in all treatment conditions. Blood samples for hormone analysis were collected at the end of each test session. Banana-flavored food pellets (1 g) were also available in three 1-h daily sessions. In drug discrimination studies, the effects of pretreatment with progesterone (0.032-0.32 mg/kg, i.m.) and testosterone (0.001-0.01 mg/kg, i.m.) on the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine (0.18 mg/kg, i.m.) were examined. Progesterone and testosterone did not alter cocaine discrimination, and did not substitute for cocaine. In contrast, progesterone and testosterone each significantly decreased cocaine self-administration, and produced a downward and rightward shift in the cocaine self-administration dose-effect curve. These findings are concordant with clinical reports that progesterone administration may decrease ratings of positive subjective effects of cocaine in women, and suggest the possible value of neuroactive steroid hormones for the treatment of cocaine abuse and reduction of risk for relapse. PMID:21796112

  14. Substituting a long-acting dopamine uptake inhibitor for cocaine prevents relapse to cocaine seeking.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Sánchez, Clara; Ferragud, Antonio; Ramos-Miguel, Alfredo; García-Sevilla, Jesús A; Canales, Juan J

    2013-07-01

    The treatment of cocaine addiction remains a challenge. The dopamine replacement approach in cocaine addiction involves the use of a competing dopaminergic agonist that might suppress withdrawal and drug craving in abstinent individuals. Although it has long been postulated that such an approach may be therapeutically successful, preclinical or clinical evidence showing its effectiveness to prevent relapse is scant. We used in rats a procedure that involved substitution of the N-substituted benztropine analog 3α-[bis(4'-fluorophenyl)methoxy]-tropane (AHN-1055), a long-acting dopamine uptake inhibitor (DUI), for cocaine. Maintenance treatment was self-administered. After extinction, reinstatement of drug seeking was induced by cocaine priming. We measured the contents of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), c-Fos and Fas-associated death domain (FADD) proteins in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) following reinstatement. DUI, but not amphetamine, substitution led to extinction of active lever presses, as did saline substitution. DUI substitution significantly reduced cocaine-induced reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior, which was strongly elicited after saline substitution. Rats passively yoked to DUI also showed reduced cocaine-primed reinstatement. Reductions in drug seeking during reinstatement were matched by downward shifts in the contents of BDNF, c-Fos and FADD proteins in the mPFC, which were elevated in relapsing rats. These data indicate that DUI substitution not only leads to extinction of self-administration behavior but also prevents reinstatement of drug seeking induced by cocaine re-exposure. Thus, DUI substitution therapy using compounds with low abuse potential, even if received passively in the context previously paired with drug taking, may provide an effective treatment for stimulant addiction.

  15. Effect expectancies for cocaine intoxication: initial vs. descendent phases.

    PubMed

    Schafer, J; Fals-Stewart, W

    1993-01-01

    This study examined the association between proximal vs. distal effect expectancies for cocaine consumption in a college student population with (N = 26) and without (N = 69) cocaine experience. Participants completed the Cocaine Effect Expectancy Questionnaire-Likert (CEEQL) and were asked to respond to each item twice: first, their belief about that specific effect during the initial phase of cocaine intoxication; and second, in relation to their belief about that effect during the descendent period. Positive and negative scales were scored for each subject. Positive expectancies were not associated between the two time points, while negative expectancies were. Users reported significantly less negative expected effects of cocaine, while nonusers and users held similar beliefs about the positive effects of cocaine. This latter effect was replicated in an independent sample (N = 140).

  16. Inhalational model of cocaine exposure in mice: neuroteratological effects.

    PubMed

    He, Fang; Lidow, Irina A; Lidow, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    We developed a novel inhalation-based mouse model of prenatal cocaine exposure. This model approximates cocaine abuse via smoking, the preferred route of cocaine administration by heavy drug users. The model is also characterized by (i) absence of procedural stress from drug administration, (ii) long-term drug exposure starting weeks before pregnancy and continuing throughout the entire gestation, and (iii) self-administration of cocaine in multi-hour daily sessions reminiscent of drug binges, which allows animals to set up the levels of their own drug consumption. The offspring of female mice inhaling cocaine in our model displayed no gross alterations in their cortical cytoarchitecture. These offspring, however, showed significant impairments in sustained attention and spatial working memory. We hope that the introduction of the present model will lead to a significant increase in our understanding of outcomes of prenatal cocaine exposure. PMID:16414242

  17. Effect expectancies for cocaine intoxication: initial vs. descendent phases.

    PubMed

    Schafer, J; Fals-Stewart, W

    1993-01-01

    This study examined the association between proximal vs. distal effect expectancies for cocaine consumption in a college student population with (N = 26) and without (N = 69) cocaine experience. Participants completed the Cocaine Effect Expectancy Questionnaire-Likert (CEEQL) and were asked to respond to each item twice: first, their belief about that specific effect during the initial phase of cocaine intoxication; and second, in relation to their belief about that effect during the descendent period. Positive and negative scales were scored for each subject. Positive expectancies were not associated between the two time points, while negative expectancies were. Users reported significantly less negative expected effects of cocaine, while nonusers and users held similar beliefs about the positive effects of cocaine. This latter effect was replicated in an independent sample (N = 140). PMID:8506788

  18. Comparison of Two High-Dose Magnesium Infusion Regimens in the Treatment of Status Asthmaticus

    PubMed Central

    Vaiyani, Danish

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the feasibility and safety of a simplified high-dose magnesium sulfate infusion (sHDMI) for the treatment of status asthmaticus. METHODS: We retrospectively compared 2 different high-dose magnesium sulfate infusion regimens, as adjunctive treatment in status asthmatics, using data that were preciously collected. The initial high-dose, prolonged magnesium infusion (HDMI) regimen consisted of a loading dose of 75 mg/kg (weight ≤ 30 kg) or 50 mg/kg (weight > 30 kg) over a period of 30 to 45 minutes followed by a continuous infusion of 40 mg/kg/hr for an additional 4 hours. This was compared to the sHDMI regimen that consisted of 50 mg/kg/hr for 5 hours. No loading dose was given to the patients in the sHDMI arm. Obese patients were dosed by using ideal body weight. Physiologic parameters (i.e., heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation) and serum magnesium (SrMg) concentrations were monitored during administration of magnesium sulfate. RESULTS: Nineteen patients receiving the initial HDMI regimen were compared with 10 patients who received the sHDMI regimen. There was no significant difference in SrMg concentrations or physiologic parameters between the 2 dose regimens. CONCLUSIONS: The HDMI and sHDMI regimens both produced SrMg concentrations that are associated with bronchodilation. The safety profile was also similar for the 2 regimens. The unambiguity of sHDMI has the potential to reduce medication errors that are associated with calculation of the loading dose, product preparation, and ultimate administration. PMID:27453701

  19. Effects of intranasal cocaine on sympathetic nerve discharge in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, T N; Grayburn, P A; Snyder, R W; Hansen, J; Chavoshan, B; Landau, C; Lange, R A; Hillis, L D; Victor, R G

    1997-01-01

    Cocaine-induced cardiovascular emergencies are mediated by excessive adrenergic stimulation. Animal studies suggest that cocaine not only blocks norepinephrine reuptake peripherally but also inhibits the baroreceptors, thereby reflexively increasing sympathetic nerve discharge. However, the effect of cocaine on sympathetic nerve discharge in humans is unknown. In 12 healthy volunteers, we recorded blood pressure and sympathetic nerve discharge to the skeletal muscle vasculature using intraneural microelectrodes (peroneal nerve) during intranasal cocaine (2 mg/kg, n = 8) or lidocaine (2%, n = 4), an internal local anesthetic control, or intravenous phenylephrine (0.5-2.0 microg/kg, n = 4), an internal sympathomimetic control. Experiments were repeated while minimizing the cocaine-induced rise in blood pressure with intravenous nitroprusside to negate sinoaortic baroreceptor stimulation. After lidocaine, blood pressure and sympathetic nerve discharge were unchanged. After cocaine, blood pressure increased abruptly and remained elevated for 60 min while sympathetic nerve discharge initially was unchanged and then decreased progressively over 60 min to a nadir that was only 2+/-1% of baseline (P < 0.05); however, plasma venous norepinephrine concentrations (n = 5) were unchanged up to 60 min after cocaine. Sympathetic nerve discharge fell more rapidly but to the same nadir when blood pressure was increased similarly with phenylephrine. When the cocaine-induced increase in blood pressure was minimized (nitroprusside), sympathetic nerve discharge did not decrease but rather increased by 2.9 times over baseline (P < 0.05). Baroreflex gain was comparable before and after cocaine. We conclude that in conscious humans the primary effect of intranasal cocaine is to increase sympathetic nerve discharge to the skeletal muscle bed. Furthermore, sinoaortic baroreflexes play a pivotal role in modulating the cocaine-induced sympathetic excitation. The interplay between these

  20. Maternal cocaine use without evidence of fetal exposure.

    PubMed

    Potter, S; Klein, J; Valiante, G; Stack, D M; Papageorgiou, A; Stott, W; Lewis, D; Koren, G; Zelazo, P R

    1994-10-01

    We report a case of lack of fetal exposure to cocaine and benzoylecgonine as evidenced by meconium and hair analysis, but exposure to nicotine and its metabolite cotinine, after extensive maternal use of cocaine and nicotine. These data suggest that the mode of maternal use of cocaine and individual differences in placental handling of the drug may protect some fetuses, and highlight the need to address interpatient variability.

  1. Genetic variants in the cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript gene (CARTPT) and cocaine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Lohoff, Falk W.; Bloch, Paul J.; Weller, Andrew E.; Nall, Aleksandra H.; Doyle, Glenn A.; Buono, Russell J.; Ferraro, Thomas N.; Kampman, Kyle M.; Pettinati, Helen M.; Dackis, Charles A.; Oslin, David W.; O'Brien, Charles P.; Berrettini, Wade H.

    2008-01-01

    Dopaminergic brain systems have been implicated to play a major role in drug reward, thus making genes involved in these circuits plausible candidates for susceptibility to substance use disorders. The cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide (CARTPT) is involved in reward and feeding behavior and has functional characteristics of an endogenous psychostimulant. In this study we tested the hypothesis that variation in the CARTPT gene increases susceptibility to cocaine dependence in individuals of African descent. Genotypes of three HapMap tagging SNPs (rs6894758; rs11575893; rs17358300) across the CARTPT gene region were obtained in cocaine dependent individuals (n=348) and normal controls (n=256). All subjects were of African descent. There were no significant differences in allele, genotype or haplotype frequencies between cases and controls for any of the tested SNPs. Our results do not support an association of the CARTPT gene with cocaine dependence; however, additional studies using larger samples, comprehensive SNP coverage, and different populations are necessary to conclusively rule out CARTPT as a contributing factor in the etiology of cocaine dependence. PMID:18572320

  2. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I–III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  3. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Needleman, Steven M

    2013-07-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I-III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  4. Cocaine Hydrolase Gene Transfer Demonstrates Cardiac Safety and Efficacy against Cocaine-Induced QT Prolongation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Vishakantha; Reyes, Santiago; Geng, Liyi; Gao, Yang; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Cocaine addiction is associated with devastating medical consequences, including cardiotoxicity and risk-conferring prolongation of the QT interval. Viral gene transfer of cocaine hydrolase engineered from butyrylcholinesterase offers therapeutic promise for treatment-seeking drug users. Although previous preclinical studies have demonstrated benefits of this strategy without signs of toxicity, the specific cardiac safety and efficacy of engineered butyrylcholinesterase viral delivery remains unknown. Here, telemetric recording of electrocardiograms from awake, unrestrained mice receiving a course of moderately large cocaine doses (30 mg/kg, twice daily for 3 weeks) revealed protection against a 2-fold prolongation of the QT interval conferred by pretreatment with cocaine hydrolase vector. By itself, this prophylactic treatment did not affect QT interval duration or cardiac structure, demonstrating that viral delivery of cocaine hydrolase has no intrinsic cardiac toxicity and, on the contrary, actively protects against cocaine-induced QT prolongation.

  5. Relationship between intravenous use and achieving initial cocaine abstinence.

    PubMed

    Budney, A J; Higgins, S T; Bickel, W; Kent, L

    1993-04-01

    This study assessed whether route of cocaine administration (intravenous vs. intranasal) influences cocaine abstinence during the first 6 weeks of outpatient treatment. Fifty-nine persons received behavioral treatment or standard drug counselling in an outpatient clinic. Based on information collected at intake, intravenous users had fewer years of education, were employed in less skilled jobs, were less likely to be married, reported more negative consequences from cocaine use, reported using more cocaine per occasion and spent more money on cocaine per week than intranasal users. Intravenous and intranasal users did not differ significantly in the average duration of continuous cocaine abstinence (mean = 2.6 vs. mean = 3.3 weeks achieved during 6 weeks of treatment). The duration of abstinence between intravenous and intranasal users was equal in the behavioral treatment (mean = 4.2). In standard treatment the average duration was less among intravenous than intranasal users (mean = 0.9 vs. mean = 2.4), but that difference did not achieve statistical significance. Hepatitis and employment instability were associated with shorter periods of cocaine abstinence among intravenous users, whereas employment instability, lower job skill level, drug use severity and reports of memory loss were associated with shorter periods of cocaine abstinence among intranasal users. These results indicate that i.v. cocaine users can achieve a period of initial abstinence in an outpatient setting comparable to the duration of typical inpatient hospitalizations, although special types of outpatient treatment may be necessary to obtain a positive outcome.

  6. Effects of cocaine on maternal behavior and neurochemistry.

    PubMed

    Nephew, Benjamin C; Febo, Marcelo

    2012-03-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder that involves drug seeking and abuse despite the negative social and health consequences. While the potential effects of cocaine on child development have been extensively studied over the last 30 years, few researchers have focused on the effects of cocaine on maternal behavior, which includes offspring care and maternal aggression towards an unfamiliar individual. In humans, maternal cocaine use can lead to child neglect, abuse, and disrupt the mother-child bond. While it has been argued the developmental effects of maternal cocaine use on children were initially overstated, it is clear that disruptions of typical maternal behavior (i.e. postpartum depression, anxiety disorders) are detrimental to the physical and emotional health of offspring. Cocaine use in mothers is commonly associated with psychological disorders, including depression and anxiety, and it is postulated that many of the negative effects of maternal cocaine use on offspring are mediated through changes in maternal behavior. This review will summarize research on cocaine and maternal behavior in animal and human studies, discuss potential mechanisms, and suggest therapeutic strategies for treating cocaine-affected maternal behavior which may improve the physical and behavioral health of both mother and child. The primary objective is to stimulate future communication, cooperation, and collaboration between researchers who use animals and humans to study cocaine and maternal behavior. PMID:22942878

  7. Cocaine inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors influences dopamine release

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Rodriguez, Alexandra; Zhang, Lifen; Zhou, Fuwen; Gong, Suzhen; Gu, Howard; De Biasi, Mariella; Zhou, Fu-Ming; Dani, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) potently regulate dopamine (DA) release in the striatum and alter cocaine's ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit nAChR-mediated currents in midbrain DA neurons and consequently alter DA release in the dorsal and ventral striatum. At very high concentrations, cocaine also inhibits voltage-gated Na channels in DA neurons. Furthermore, our results show that partial inhibition of nAChRs by cocaine reduces evoked DA release. This diminution of DA release via nAChR inhibition more strongly influences release evoked at low or tonic stimulation frequencies than at higher (phasic) stimulation frequencies, particularly in the dorsolateral striatum. This cocaine-induced shift favoring phasic DA release may contribute to the enhanced saliency and motivational value of cocaine-associated memories and behaviors. PMID:25237305

  8. Cocaine inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors influences dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Rodriguez, Alexandra; Zhang, Lifen; Zhou, Fuwen; Gong, Suzhen; Gu, Howard; De Biasi, Mariella; Zhou, Fu-Ming; Dani, John A

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) potently regulate dopamine (DA) release in the striatum and alter cocaine's ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit nAChR-mediated currents in midbrain DA neurons and consequently alter DA release in the dorsal and ventral striatum. At very high concentrations, cocaine also inhibits voltage-gated Na channels in DA neurons. Furthermore, our results show that partial inhibition of nAChRs by cocaine reduces evoked DA release. This diminution of DA release via nAChR inhibition more strongly influences release evoked at low or tonic stimulation frequencies than at higher (phasic) stimulation frequencies, particularly in the dorsolateral striatum. This cocaine-induced shift favoring phasic DA release may contribute to the enhanced saliency and motivational value of cocaine-associated memories and behaviors. PMID:25237305

  9. Cocaine triggers epigenetic alterations in the corticostriatal circuit.

    PubMed

    Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh

    2015-12-01

    Acute and repeated exposure to cocaine induces long-lasting alterations in neural networks that underlie compulsive drug seeking and taking. Cocaine exposure triggers complex adaptations in the brain that are mediated by dynamic patterns of gene expression that are translated into enduring changes. Recently, epigenetic modifications have been unveiled as critical mechanisms underlying addiction that contribute to drug-induced plasticity by regulating gene expression. These alterations are also now linked to the heritability of cocaine-induced phenotypes. This review focuses on how changes in the epigenome, such as altered DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNAs, regulate transcription of specific genes that contribute to cocaine addiction.

  10. Cannabidiol Rescues Acute Hepatic Toxicity and Seizure Induced by Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Luciano Rezende; Gomides, Lindisley Ferreira; David, Bruna Araújo; Antunes, Maísa Mota; Diniz, Ariane Barros; Moreira, Fabrício de Araújo; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is a commonly abused illicit drug that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The most severe and common complications are seizures, ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction, and acute liver injury. Here, we demonstrated that acute cocaine intoxication promoted seizure along with acute liver damage in mice, with intense inflammatory infiltrate. Considering the protective role of the endocannabinoid system against cell toxicity, we hypothesized that treatment with an anandamide hydrolysis inhibitor, URB597, or with a phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), protects against cocaine toxicity. URB597 (1.0 mg/kg) abolished cocaine-induced seizure, yet it did not protect against acute liver injury. Using confocal liver intravital microscopy, we observed that CBD (30 mg/kg) reduced acute liver inflammation and damage induced by cocaine and prevented associated seizure. Additionally, we showed that previous liver damage induced by another hepatotoxic drug (acetaminophen) increased seizure and lethality induced by cocaine intoxication, linking hepatotoxicity to seizure dynamics. These findings suggest that activation of cannabinoid system may have protective actions on both liver and brain induced by cocaine, minimizing inflammatory injury promoted by cocaine, supporting its further clinical application in the treatment of cocaine abuse. PMID:25999668

  11. Neurotensin agonist attenuates nicotine potentiation to cocaine sensitization.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Paul; Boules, Mona; Stennett, Bethany; Richelson, Elliott

    2014-03-01

    Tobacco usage typically precedes illicit drug use in adolescent and young adult populations. Several animal studies suggest nicotine increases the risk for subsequent cocaine abuse, and may be a negative prognostic factor for treatment of cocaine addiction; i.e., a "gateway drug". Neurotensin (NT) is a 13-amino acid neuropeptide that modulates dopamine, acetylcholine, glutamate, and GABA neurotransmission in brain reward pathways. NT69L, a NT(8-13) analog, blocks behavioral sensitization (an animal model for psychostimulant addiction) to nicotine, and nicotine self-administration in rats. The present study tested the effect of NT69L on the potentiating effects of nicotine on cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Male Wistar rats were injected daily for seven days with nicotine or saline (control) followed by four daily injections of cocaine. NT69L was administered 30 min prior to the last cocaine injection. Behavior was recorded with the use of activity chambers. Subchronic administration of nicotine enhanced cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization in Wistar rats, consistent with an hypothesized gateway effect. These behavioral effects of cocaine were attenuated by pretreatment with NT69L. The effect of the neurotensin agonist on cocaine sensitization in the nicotine treated group indicated a possible therapeutic effect for cocaine addiction, even in the presence of enhanced behavioral sensitization induced by nicotine. PMID:25379267

  12. Acute coronary syndrome after levamisole-adultered cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Katarzyna; Grabherr, Silke; Shiferaw, Kebede; Doenz, Franceso; Augsburger, Marc; Mangin, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine is a well known trigger of acute coronary syndromes. Over the last 10 years levamisole, a veterinary anthelminthic drug has been increasingly used as an adulterant of cocaine. Levamisole was used to treat pediatric nephritic syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis before being withdrawn from the market due to its significant toxicity, i.e. hematological complications and vasculitis. The major complications of levamisole-adultered cocaine reported up to now are hematological and dermatological. The case reported here is of a 25 year old man with a history of cocaine abuse who died at home after complaining of retrosternal pain. Postmortem CT-angiography, autopsy, and chemical and toxicological analyses were performed. An eroded coronary artery plaque was found at the proximal segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Two myocardial infarct scars were present in the left ventricle. Microscopic examination of the coronary artery revealed infiltration of eosinophils into the adventitia and intima. Toxicological examination confirmed the presence of cocaine and its metabolites in the peripheral blood, and of levamisole in the urine and pericardial fluid. Eosinophilic inflammatory coronary artery pathologies have been clinically linked to coronary dissection, hypersensitivity coronary syndrome and vasospastic allergic angina. The coronary pathology in the presented case could be a complication of levamisole-adultered cocaine use, in which an allergic or immune-mediated mechanism might play a role. The rise in cocaine addiction worldwide and the increase of levamisole adulterated cocaine highlights the importance of updating our knowledge of the effects of adultered cocaine abuse. PMID:24365689

  13. Relationship between intravenous use and achieving initial cocaine abstinence.

    PubMed

    Budney, A J; Higgins, S T; Bickel, W; Kent, L

    1993-04-01

    This study assessed whether route of cocaine administration (intravenous vs. intranasal) influences cocaine abstinence during the first 6 weeks of outpatient treatment. Fifty-nine persons received behavioral treatment or standard drug counselling in an outpatient clinic. Based on information collected at intake, intravenous users had fewer years of education, were employed in less skilled jobs, were less likely to be married, reported more negative consequences from cocaine use, reported using more cocaine per occasion and spent more money on cocaine per week than intranasal users. Intravenous and intranasal users did not differ significantly in the average duration of continuous cocaine abstinence (mean = 2.6 vs. mean = 3.3 weeks achieved during 6 weeks of treatment). The duration of abstinence between intravenous and intranasal users was equal in the behavioral treatment (mean = 4.2). In standard treatment the average duration was less among intravenous than intranasal users (mean = 0.9 vs. mean = 2.4), but that difference did not achieve statistical significance. Hepatitis and employment instability were associated with shorter periods of cocaine abstinence among intravenous users, whereas employment instability, lower job skill level, drug use severity and reports of memory loss were associated with shorter periods of cocaine abstinence among intranasal users. These results indicate that i.v. cocaine users can achieve a period of initial abstinence in an outpatient setting comparable to the duration of typical inpatient hospitalizations, although special types of outpatient treatment may be necessary to obtain a positive outcome. PMID:8508724

  14. Financial analysis for the infusion alliance.

    PubMed

    Perucca, Roxanne

    2010-01-01

    Providing high-quality, cost-efficient care is a major strategic initiative of every health care organization. Today's health care environment is transparent; very competitive; and focused upon providing exceptional service, safety, and quality. Establishing an infusion alliance facilitates the achievement of organizational strategic initiatives, that is, increases patient throughput, decreases length of stay, prevents the occurrence of infusion-related complications, enhances customer satisfaction, and provides greater cost-efficiency. This article will discuss how to develop a financial analysis that promotes value and enhances the financial outcomes of an infusion alliance. PMID:20841984

  15. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    PubMed

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas.

  16. Visualizing enzyme infusion into apple tissue.

    PubMed

    Culver, C A; Bjurlin, M A; Fulcher, R G

    2000-12-01

    Enzymes traditionally used in food processing are applied to ground or macerated tissue with little or no retention of cellular structure. More recently developed applications use enzymes to selectively alter tissue properties while retaining some structure. Process development has been hindered by the lack of conclusive evidence showing that enzyme infusion into plant tissue pieces is possible. This study provides direct evidence that such infusion is possible by using fluorescence microscopy to monitor vacuum infusion of fluorescein-labeled alpha-amylase into apple cubes. This method is generally applicable to any plant or animal tissue and to any macromolecule capable of derivatization. PMID:11141264

  17. Space Tethers Programmatic Infusion Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, J. A.; Frame, K. L.

    2005-01-01

    Programmatic opportunities abound for space Cables, Stringers and Tethers, justified by the tremendous performance advantages that these technologies offer and the rather wide gaps that must be filled by the NASA Exploration program, if the "sustainability goal" is to be met. A definition and characterization of the three categories are presented along with examples. A logical review of exploration requirements shows how each class can be infused throughout the program, from small experimental efforts to large system deployments. The economics of tethers in transportation is considered along with the impact of stringers for structural members. There is an array of synergistic methodologies that interlace their fabrication, implementation and operations. Cables, stringers and tethers can enhance a wide range of other space systems and technologies, including power storage, formation flying, instrumentation, docking mechanisms and long-life space components. The existing tether (i.e., MXER) program's accomplishments are considered consistent with NASA's new vision and can readily conform to requirements-driven technology development.

  18. Extended Access Cocaine Self-Administration Results in Tolerance to the Dopamine-Elevating and Locomotor-Stimulating Effects of Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Calipari, Erin S.; Ferris, Mark J.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    Tolerance to the neurochemical and psychoactive effects of cocaine after repeated use is a hallmark of cocaine addiction in humans. However, comprehensive studies on tolerance to the behavioral, psychoactive, and neurochemical effects of cocaine following contingent administration in rodents are lacking. We outlined the consequences of extended access cocaine self-administration as it related to tolerance to the psychomotor activating, dopamine (DA) elevating, and DA transporter (DAT) inhibiting effects of cocaine. Cocaine self-administration (1.5 mg/kg/inj; 40 inj; 5 days), which resulted in escalation of first hour intake, caused reductions in evoked DA release and reduced maximal rates of uptake through the DAT as measured by slice voltammetry in the nucleus accumbens core. Further, we report reductions in cocaine-induced uptake inhibition as measured by fast scan cyclic voltammetry, and a corresponding increase in the dose of cocaine required for 50% inhibition of DA uptake (Ki) at the DAT. Cocaine tolerance at the DAT translated to reductions in cocaine-induced DA overflow as measured by microdialysis. Additionally, cocaine-induced elevations in locomotor activity and stereotypy were reduced, while rearing behavior was enhanced in animals with a history of cocaine self-administration. Here we demonstrate both neurochemical and behavioral cocaine tolerance in an extended-access rodent model of cocaine abuse, which allows for a better understanding of the neurochemical and psychomotor tolerance that develops to cocaine in human addicts. PMID:24102293

  19. A Recombinant Humanized Anti-Cocaine Monoclonal Antibody Inhibits the Distribution of Cocaine to the Brain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gooden, Felicia C. T.; Tabet, Michael R.; Ball, William J.

    2014-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (mAb), h2E2, is a humanized version of the chimeric human/murine anti-cocaine mAb 2E2. The recombinant h2E2 protein was produced in vitro from a transfected mammalian cell line and retained high affinity (4 nM Kd) and specificity for cocaine over its inactive metabolites benzoylecgonine (BE) and ecgonine methyl ester. In rats, pharmacokinetic studies of h2E2 (120 mg/kg i.v.) showed a long terminal elimination half-life of 9.0 days and a low volume of distribution at steady state (Vdss) of 0.3 l/kg. Pretreatment with h2E2 produced a dramatic 8.8-fold increase in the area under the plasma cocaine concentration-time curve (AUC) and in brain a concomitant decrease of 68% of cocaine’s AUC following an i.v. injection of an equimolar cocaine dose. Sequestration of cocaine in plasma by h2E2, shown via reduction of cocaine’s Vdss, indicates potential clinical efficacy. Although the binding of cocaine to h2E2 in plasma should inhibit distribution and metabolism, the elimination of cocaine remained multicompartmental and was still rapidly eliminated from plasma despite the presence of h2E2. BE was the major cocaine metabolite, and brain BE concentrations were sixfold higher than in plasma, indicating that cocaine is normally metabolized in the brain. In the presence of h2E2, brain BE concentrations were decreased and plasma BE was increased, consistent with the observed h2E2-induced changes in cocaine disposition. The inhibition of cocaine distribution to the brain confirms the humanized mAb, h2E2, as a lead candidate for development as an immunotherapy for cocaine abuse. PMID:24733787

  20. Effects of phendimetrazine treatment on cocaine vs food choice and extended-access cocaine consumption in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Blough, Bruce E; Fennell, Timothy R; Snyder, Rodney W; Negus, S Stevens

    2013-12-01

    There is currently no Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacotherapy for cocaine addiction. Monoamine releasers such as d-amphetamine constitute one class of candidate medications, but clinical use and acceptance are hindered by their own high-abuse liability. Phendimetrazine (PDM) is a schedule III anorectic agent that functions as both a low-potency monoamine-uptake inhibitor and as a prodrug for the monoamine-releaser phenmetrazine (PM), and it may serve as a clinically available, effective, and safer alternative to d-amphetamine. This study determined efficacy of chronic PDM to reduce cocaine self-administration by rhesus monkeys (N=4) using a novel procedure that featured both daily assessments of cocaine vs food choice (to assess medication efficacy to reallocate behavior away from cocaine choice and toward choice of an alternative reinforcer) and 20 h/day cocaine access (to allow high-cocaine intake). Continuous 21-day treatment with ramping PDM doses (days 1-7: 0.32 mg/kg/h; days 8-21: 1.0 mg/kg/h) reduced cocaine choices, increased food choices, and nearly eliminated extended-access cocaine self-administration without affecting body weight. There was a trend for plasma PDM and PM levels to correlate with efficacy to decrease cocaine choice such that the monkey with the highest plasma PDM and PM levels also demonstrated the greatest reductions in cocaine choice. These results support further consideration of PDM as a candidate anti-cocaine addiction pharmacotherapy. Moreover, PDM may represent a novel pharmacotherapeutic approach for cocaine addiction because it may simultaneously function as both a monoamine-uptake inhibitor (via the parent drug PDM) and as a monoamine releaser (via the active metabolite PM). PMID:23893022

  1. Interaction between behavioral and pharmacological treatment strategies to decrease cocaine choice in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Blough, Bruce E; Negus, S Stevens

    2013-02-01

    Behavioral and pharmacotherapeutic approaches constitute two prominent strategies for treating cocaine dependence. This study investigated interactions between behavioral and pharmacological strategies in a preclinical model of cocaine vs food choice. Six rhesus monkeys, implanted with a chronic indwelling double-lumen venous catheter, initially responded under a concurrent schedule of food delivery (1-g pellets, fixed-ratio (FR) 100 schedule) and cocaine injections (0-0.1 mg/kg/injection, FR 10 schedule) during continuous 7-day treatment periods with saline or the agonist medication phenmetrazine (0.032-0.1 mg/kg/h). Subsequently, the FR response requirement for cocaine or food was varied (food, FR 100; cocaine, FR 1-100; cocaine, FR 10; food, FR 10-300), and effects of phenmetrazine on cocaine vs food choice were redetermined. Decreases in the cocaine FR or increases in the food FR resulted in leftward shifts in the cocaine choice dose-effect curve, whereas increases in the cocaine FR or decreases in the food FR resulted in rightward shifts in the cocaine choice dose-effect curve. The efficacy of phenmetrazine to decrease cocaine choice varied systematically as a function of the prevailing response requirements, such that phenmetrazine efficacy was greatest when cocaine choice was maintained by relatively low unit cocaine doses. These results suggest that efficacy of pharmacotherapies to modulate cocaine use can be influenced by behavioral contingencies of cocaine availability. Agonist medications may be most effective under contingencies that engender choice of relatively low cocaine doses. PMID:22968813

  2. Concentrations of cocaine and benzoylecgonine in femoral blood from cocaine-related deaths compared with venous blood from impaired drivers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alan Wayne; Holmgren, Anita

    2014-01-01

    The concentrations of cocaine and its major metabolite benzoylecgonine (BZE) were determined in femoral blood from 132 cocaine-related deaths and compared with venous blood from 988 apprehended drivers. Cocaine and BZE were determined by solid-phase extraction and isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with limits of quantitation of 0.02 mg/L for both substances. Significantly more men (95-98%) than women (2-5%) abused cocaine, although their mean age was about the same (29-30 years). Mean age (±SD) of cocaine-related deaths was 29 ± 7 years, which was not significantly different from 30 ± 8 years in traffic cases (P > 0.05). The median concentration of cocaine in blood in 61 fatalities was 0.10 mg/L compared with 0.06 mg/L in traffic cases (P < 0.001). In drug intoxication deaths, the median concentration of cocaine was 0.13 mg/L (N = 25), which was not significantly different from 0.09 mg/L (N = 36) in other causes of death. Cocaine-related deaths mostly involved mixed drug intoxications including co-ingestion of heroin, cannabis, amphetamines as well as legal drugs, such as benzodiazepines and/or ethanol. The concentrations of cocaine in blood from living and deceased persons overlapped, which makes it infeasible to predict toxicity from the analytical toxicology results alone. PMID:24327622

  3. Acute and chronic cocaine behavioral effects in novel versus familiar environments: open-field familiarity differentiates cocaine locomotor stimulant effects from cocaine emotional behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    Carey, Robert J; DePalma, Gail; Damianopoulos, Ernest

    2005-03-30

    Cocaine is a potent stimulant drug, but its stimulant effects can be substantially modulated by environmental novelty versus familiarity. In this report, we varied exposures to a novel environment as a way to assess the impact of environmental familiarity versus novelty upon the locomotor activation induced by acute and chronic cocaine treatments. In experiment 1, the effects of 1 (PE1) versus 0 (PE0) pre-exposures to the test environment were compared for their impact upon the locomotor stimulant, central zone entry and grooming effects induced by an acute cocaine (10 mg/kg) treatment. In experiment 2, the effects of 10 (PE10) versus 0 (PE0) pre-exposures upon the cocaine effects were compared. Experiment 3 assessed the effects of nine cocaine treatments (10.0 mg/kg) initiated in a novel environment (PE0) versus familiar environment (PE10). In all experiments, cocaine had a potent locomotor stimulant effect in a novel environment, which was attenuated by environmental familiarity such that in PE10 groups, cocaine did not reliably induce an acute locomotor stimulant effect. Environmental novelty/familiarity, however, did not reliably alter cocaine effects upon central zone penetration, grooming behavior, or the neurochemical effects induced by cocaine. In the chronic treatment regimen, the PE0 group exhibited a tolerance-like decrease in locomotor activation, but the PE10 group exhibited a sensitization-like increase in locomotor activation. Despite the marked directional changes in the locomotor stimulant effects of cocaine treatments, initiated in a novel (PE0) versus familiar (PE10) environment, the same asymptotic levels of locomotor activation were achieved. In contrast, the behavioral measures of central zone activity progressively increased with repeated treatments regardless of whether the environment was initially novel (PE0) or familiar (PE10). Thus, habituation factors can profoundly alter the locomotor stimulant effects of cocaine and can induce pseudo

  4. Transformation of cocaine during water chlorination.

    PubMed

    González-Mariño, Iria; Quintana, José Benito; Rodríguez, Isaac; Sánchez-Méndez, Noemí; Cela, Rafael

    2012-12-01

    The stability of cocaine and its two main human metabolites, benzoylecgonine and ecgonine methyl ester, in chlorine-containing waters has been investigated by direct injection of different reaction time aliquots in a liquid chromatograph (LC) coupled to a quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometer (QTOF-MS). Factors potentially affecting cocaine degradation (the only compound showing a significant decrease in the preliminary study) were evaluated in detail by means of a Box-Behnken experimental design. Sample pH resulted to be the most important variable, increasing both the rate of chlorination-mediated reactions and the ester hydrolysis process. From these reactions, and due to the high mass accuracy measurements obtained with the QTOF system, four by-products could be positively identified: benzoylecgonine, norcocaine, norbenzoylecgonine and N-formylnorcocaine. Finally, their formation and cocaine degradation yields were assessed under chlorination experiments with two real surface water samples. In one of them, showing a low anthropogenic impact, benzoylecgonine and norcocaine were notably generated even after only 1 h of reaction, whereas at higher contact times also norbenzoylecgonine and N-formylnorcocaine could be determined with a lower yield. On the other hand, the second sample, with a higher organic matter content, consumed rapidly the chlorine, so that only benzoylecgonine was produced. These findings point out the convenience of monitoring the described transformation products, in addition to the precursor illicit drug, during drinking water production, taking into account that cocaine traces might be present in water catchments and particularly in areas with high population densities.

  5. Cocaine Induced Pleural and Pericardial Effusion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alqalyoobi, Shehabaldin; Vaidya, Omkar; Abu Ghanimah, Al-Ma'Mon; Elkhanany, Ahmed; Gohar, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old African American female with chronic cocaine use for 20 years, presented with two-day history of exertional shortness of breath and pleuritic chest pain. She was admitted three years back with acute kidney injury and skin rashes. At that time, skin biopsy was consistent with leukocytoclastic vasculitis and renal biopsy revealed proliferative glomerulonephritis. She responded to oral prednisone and mycophenolate with complete recovery of her kidney functions. Skin rash was waxing and waning over the last two years. On the second admission, patient was found to have large pleural effusion on computerized tomography scan and pericardial effusion on echocardiogram as shown in the figures. Pleural fluid analysis was exudative. Her serology was negative for ANA (antineutrophilic antibody) and anti-dsDNA (double stranded DNA). Complements levels were normal. She had positive low titers of ANCA levels. The patient was started on a course of prednisone for 6 months. Her pleural and pericardial effusion resolved completely on follow-up imaging with computerized tomography scan and echocardiogram. This case is unique since the pericardial and pleural effusions developed without any other etiology in the setting of cocaine; hence, we describe this clinical syndrome as cocaine induced pleural and pericardial effusions syndrome (CIPP). PMID:25918664

  6. Cocaine induced pleural and pericardial effusion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alqalyoobi, Shehabaldin; Vaidya, Omkar; Abu Ghanimah, Al-Ma'Mon; Elkhanany, Ahmed; Gohar, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old African American female with chronic cocaine use for 20 years, presented with two-day history of exertional shortness of breath and pleuritic chest pain. She was admitted three years back with acute kidney injury and skin rashes. At that time, skin biopsy was consistent with leukocytoclastic vasculitis and renal biopsy revealed proliferative glomerulonephritis. She responded to oral prednisone and mycophenolate with complete recovery of her kidney functions. Skin rash was waxing and waning over the last two years. On the second admission, patient was found to have large pleural effusion on computerized tomography scan and pericardial effusion on echocardiogram as shown in the figures. Pleural fluid analysis was exudative. Her serology was negative for ANA (antineutrophilic antibody) and anti-dsDNA (double stranded DNA). Complements levels were normal. She had positive low titers of ANCA levels. The patient was started on a course of prednisone for 6 months. Her pleural and pericardial effusion resolved completely on follow-up imaging with computerized tomography scan and echocardiogram. This case is unique since the pericardial and pleural effusions developed without any other etiology in the setting of cocaine; hence, we describe this clinical syndrome as cocaine induced pleural and pericardial effusions syndrome (CIPP).

  7. Chronic cocaine disrupts mesocortical learning mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Buchta, William C; Riegel, Arthur C

    2015-12-01

    The addictive power of drugs of abuse such as cocaine comes from their ability to hijack natural reward and plasticity mechanisms mediated by dopamine signaling in the brain. Reward learning involves burst firing of midbrain dopamine neurons in response to rewards and cues predictive of reward. The resulting release of dopamine in terminal regions is thought to act as a teaching signaling to areas such as the prefrontal cortex and striatum. In this review, we posit that a pool of extrasynaptic dopaminergic D1-like receptors activated in response to dopamine neuron burst firing serve to enable synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex in response to rewards and their cues. We propose that disruptions in these mechanisms following chronic cocaine use contribute to addiction pathology, in part due to the unique architecture of the mesocortical pathway. By blocking dopamine reuptake in the cortex, cocaine elevates dopamine signaling at these extrasynaptic receptors, prolonging D1-receptor activation and the subsequent activation of intracellular signaling cascades, and thus inducing long-lasting maladaptive plasticity. These cellular adaptations may account for many of the changes in cortical function observed in drug addicts, including an enduring vulnerability to relapse. Therefore, understanding and targeting these neuroadaptations may provide cognitive benefits and help prevent relapse in human drug addicts.

  8. Chronic cocaine disrupts mesocortical learning mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Buchta, William C; Riegel, Arthur C

    2015-12-01

    The addictive power of drugs of abuse such as cocaine comes from their ability to hijack natural reward and plasticity mechanisms mediated by dopamine signaling in the brain. Reward learning involves burst firing of midbrain dopamine neurons in response to rewards and cues predictive of reward. The resulting release of dopamine in terminal regions is thought to act as a teaching signaling to areas such as the prefrontal cortex and striatum. In this review, we posit that a pool of extrasynaptic dopaminergic D1-like receptors activated in response to dopamine neuron burst firing serve to enable synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex in response to rewards and their cues. We propose that disruptions in these mechanisms following chronic cocaine use contribute to addiction pathology, in part due to the unique architecture of the mesocortical pathway. By blocking dopamine reuptake in the cortex, cocaine elevates dopamine signaling at these extrasynaptic receptors, prolonging D1-receptor activation and the subsequent activation of intracellular signaling cascades, and thus inducing long-lasting maladaptive plasticity. These cellular adaptations may account for many of the changes in cortical function observed in drug addicts, including an enduring vulnerability to relapse. Therefore, understanding and targeting these neuroadaptations may provide cognitive benefits and help prevent relapse in human drug addicts. PMID:25704202

  9. Chronic cocaine disrupts mesocortical learning mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Buchta, William C.; Riegel, Arthur C.

    2016-01-01

    The addictive power of drugs of abuse such as cocaine comes from their ability to hijack natural reward and plasticity mechanisms mediated by dopamine signaling in the brain. Reward learning involves burst firing of midbrain dopamine neurons in response to rewards and cues predictive of reward. The resulting release of dopamine in terminal regions is thought to act as a teaching signaling to areas such as the prefrontal cortex and striatum. In this review, we posit that a pool of extrasynaptic dopaminergic D1-like receptors activated in response to dopamine neuron burst firing serve to enable synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex in response to rewards and their cues. We propose that disruptions in these mechanisms following chronic cocaine use contribute to addiction pathology, in part due to the unique architecture of the mesocortical pathway. By blocking dopamine reuptake in the cortex, cocaine elevates dopamine signaling at these extra-synaptic receptors, prolonging D1-receptor activation and the subsequent activation of intracellular signaling cascades, and thus inducing long-lasting maladaptive plasticity. These cellular adaptations may account for many of the changes in cortical function observed in drug addicts, including an enduring vulnerability to relapse. Therefore, understanding and targeting these neuroadaptations may provide cognitive benefits and help prevent relapse in human drug addicts. PMID:25704202

  10. Long-acting cocaine hydrolase for addiction therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiabin; Xue, Liu; Hou, Shurong; Jin, Zhenyu; Zhang, Ting; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine abuse is a world-wide public health and social problem without a US Food and Drug Administration-approved medication. An ideal anticocaine medication would accelerate cocaine metabolism, producing biologically inactive metabolites by administration of an efficient cocaine-specific exogenous enzyme. Our recent studies have led to the discovery of the desirable, highly efficient cocaine hydrolases (CocHs) that can efficiently detoxify and inactivate cocaine without affecting normal functions of the CNS. Preclinical and clinical data have demonstrated that these CocHs are safe for use in humans and are effective for accelerating cocaine metabolism. However, the actual therapeutic use of a CocH in cocaine addiction treatment is limited by its short biological half-life (e.g., 8 h or shorter in rats). Here we demonstrate a novel CocH form, a catalytic antibody analog, which is a fragment crystallizable (Fc)-fused CocH dimer (CocH-Fc) constructed by using CocH to replace the Fab region of human IgG1. The CocH-Fc not only has a high catalytic efficiency against cocaine but also, like an antibody, has a considerably longer biological half-life (e.g., ∼107 h in rats). A single dose of CocH-Fc was able to accelerate cocaine metabolism in rats even after 20 d and thus block cocaine-induced hyperactivity and toxicity for a long period. Given the general observation that the biological half-life of a protein drug is significantly longer in humans than in rodents, the CocH-Fc reported in this study could allow dosing once every 2–4 wk, or longer, for treatment of cocaine addiction in humans. PMID:26712009

  11. Adolescent cocaine and injection stress effects on the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Raap, D K; Morin, B; Medici, C N; Smith, R F

    2000-09-15

    Chronic cocaine exposure during critical periods of development induces short- and long-term effects. During the pubertal period, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis undergoes many dynamic changes. The present study investigated whether chronic periadolescent cocaine alters reproductive maturity in the rat. Sixty female Long-Evans hooded rats were randomly assigned to one of three conditions (20 mg cocaine/kg/day, saline injected and uninjected), for dosing from postnatal day 21 (P21) through P60. Several indicators of reproductive maturation and functioning were assessed during and following treatment. Cocaine exposure had no effect on the onset of puberty or on the date of first ovulation. The number of proestrus-estrus transitions was significantly lower in cocaine-exposed females compared to uninjected females, but not compared to saline-injected controls. This reduction was observed during exposure to cocaine, as well as after the cessation of injections. During the dosing period, cocaine-exposed rats also exhibited a greater number of cycles that had no clear P-E transition than did UN subjects; this effect disappeared once injections stopped. These alterations suggest immediate, and possibly persisting, alterations in the control of ovulation after chronic cocaine exposure throughout adolescence. Interestingly, during the injection period, the saline-injected females had a significantly greater number of diestrus days compared to uninjected and cocaine-injected animals, as well as a lower proportion of regular 4- and 5-day cycles. These differences disappeared once injections stopped. These results suggest a stress-induced irregularity of the estrous cycle, possibly attenuated by cocaine and recoverable after exposure. The present findings indicate that the HPG axis is susceptible to short-term, and possibly to long-term, alterations induced by cocaine exposure throughout the adolescent period.

  12. Long-acting cocaine hydrolase for addiction therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiabin; Xue, Liu; Hou, Shurong; Jin, Zhenyu; Zhang, Ting; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-01-12

    Cocaine abuse is a world-wide public health and social problem without a US Food and Drug Administration-approved medication. An ideal anticocaine medication would accelerate cocaine metabolism, producing biologically inactive metabolites by administration of an efficient cocaine-specific exogenous enzyme. Our recent studies have led to the discovery of the desirable, highly efficient cocaine hydrolases (CocHs) that can efficiently detoxify and inactivate cocaine without affecting normal functions of the CNS. Preclinical and clinical data have demonstrated that these CocHs are safe for use in humans and are effective for accelerating cocaine metabolism. However, the actual therapeutic use of a CocH in cocaine addiction treatment is limited by its short biological half-life (e.g., 8 h or shorter in rats). Here we demonstrate a novel CocH form, a catalytic antibody analog, which is a fragment crystallizable (Fc)-fused CocH dimer (CocH-Fc) constructed by using CocH to replace the Fab region of human IgG1. The CocH-Fc not only has a high catalytic efficiency against cocaine but also, like an antibody, has a considerably longer biological half-life (e.g., ∼107 h in rats). A single dose of CocH-Fc was able to accelerate cocaine metabolism in rats even after 20 d and thus block cocaine-induced hyperactivity and toxicity for a long period. Given the general observation that the biological half-life of a protein drug is significantly longer in humans than in rodents, the CocH-Fc reported in this study could allow dosing once every 2-4 wk, or longer, for treatment of cocaine addiction in humans.

  13. Maturation of coordinated IEG expression by cocaine during adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Caster, Joseph M.; Kuhn, Cynthia M.

    2009-01-01

    Adolescence may be critical period for drug addiction. Young adolescent male rats have greater locomotor responses than adults after acute low dose cocaine administration. Further, repeated cocaine administration produces as much or more conditioned place preference but reduced locomotor sensitization in adolescents compared to adults. Acute activation of neurons by cocaine induces long-term changes in behavior by activating transcriptional complexes. The purpose of the present study was to correlate cocaine-induced locomotor activity with neuronal activation in subregions of the striatum and cortex by acute cocaine in young adolescent (post natal (PN) 28) and adult (PN 65) male rats by measuring the induction of the plasticity-associated immediate early genes (IEGs) c-fos and zif268 using in situ hybridization. Animals were treated with saline, low (10 mg/kg), or high (40 mg/kg) dose cocaine in locomotor activity chambers and killed 30 min later. Low dose cocaine induced more locomotor activity and striatal c-fos expression in adolescents than adults whereas high dose cocaine induced more locomotor activity, striatal c-fos, and striatal zif268 expression in adults. Locomotor activity correlated with the expression of both genes in adults but correlated with striatal c-fos only in adolescents. Finally, there was a significant correlation between the expression of c-fos and zif268 in the adult striatum but not in adolescents. Our results suggest that the coordinated expression of transcription factors by cocaine continues to develop during adolescence. The immature regulation of transcription factors by cocaine could explain why adolescents show unique sensitivity to specific long-term behavioral alterations following cocaine treatment. PMID:19245875

  14. Long-acting cocaine hydrolase for addiction therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiabin; Xue, Liu; Hou, Shurong; Jin, Zhenyu; Zhang, Ting; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-01-12

    Cocaine abuse is a world-wide public health and social problem without a US Food and Drug Administration-approved medication. An ideal anticocaine medication would accelerate cocaine metabolism, producing biologically inactive metabolites by administration of an efficient cocaine-specific exogenous enzyme. Our recent studies have led to the discovery of the desirable, highly efficient cocaine hydrolases (CocHs) that can efficiently detoxify and inactivate cocaine without affecting normal functions of the CNS. Preclinical and clinical data have demonstrated that these CocHs are safe for use in humans and are effective for accelerating cocaine metabolism. However, the actual therapeutic use of a CocH in cocaine addiction treatment is limited by its short biological half-life (e.g., 8 h or shorter in rats). Here we demonstrate a novel CocH form, a catalytic antibody analog, which is a fragment crystallizable (Fc)-fused CocH dimer (CocH-Fc) constructed by using CocH to replace the Fab region of human IgG1. The CocH-Fc not only has a high catalytic efficiency against cocaine but also, like an antibody, has a considerably longer biological half-life (e.g., ∼107 h in rats). A single dose of CocH-Fc was able to accelerate cocaine metabolism in rats even after 20 d and thus block cocaine-induced hyperactivity and toxicity for a long period. Given the general observation that the biological half-life of a protein drug is significantly longer in humans than in rodents, the CocH-Fc reported in this study could allow dosing once every 2-4 wk, or longer, for treatment of cocaine addiction in humans. PMID:26712009

  15. The History of Target-Controlled Infusion.

    PubMed

    Struys, Michel M R F; De Smet, Tom; Glen, John Iain B; Vereecke, Hugo E M; Absalom, Anthony R; Schnider, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Target-controlled infusion (TCI) is a technique of infusing IV drugs to achieve a user-defined predicted ("target") drug concentration in a specific body compartment or tissue of interest. In this review, we describe the pharmacokinetic principles of TCI, the development of TCI systems, and technical and regulatory issues addressed in prototype development. We also describe the launch of the current clinically available systems.

  16. Quality of life, needs, and interest among cocaine users: differences by cocaine use intensity and lifetime severity of addiction to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Morales-Manrique, C C; Palepu, A; Castellano-Gomez, M; Aleixandre-Benavent, R; Valderrama-Zurián, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    We examined the quality of life (QoL) of 149 patients who were recruited in 2005 at outpatient treatment centers for cocaine dependence in Spain. Important life areas and life areas with potential need and interest to change in order to improve the QoL were analyzed in terms of patients? cocaine use intensity within the previous six months and lifetime severity addiction to cocaine. The Spanish versions of the Drug User Quality of Life Scale and the Lifetime Severity Index for Cocaine were used to measure QoL, needs and interest, and severity addiction to cocaine. The data analysis employed t-tests, linear regression, Mann?Whitney U tests, multivariate regression, and chi-square tests. Tailoring treatment programs to address the life areas that are considered relevant to cocaine users considering their intensity of consumption and lifetime severity addiction to cocaine may improve retention and treatment outcomes. Further research needs to consider patients of different ethnic backgrounds and cultural contexts. The study's limitations are noted.

  17. Environmental enrichment protects against the acquisition of cocaine self-administration in adult male rats, but does not eliminate avoidance of a drug-associated saccharin cue.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Matthew D; Blum, Joshua S; Acosta-Torres, Stefany; Grigson, Patricia S

    2012-02-01

    One of the most menacing consequences of drug addiction is the devaluation of natural rewards (e.g. food, sex, work, money, caring for one's offspring). However, evidence also suggests that natural rewards, such as an enriched environment, can devalue drugs of abuse. Thus, this study used a rodent model to test whether exposure to an enriched environment could protect adult rats from acquiring cocaine self-administration and from the resultant drug-induced devaluation of a natural saccharin reward cue. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with intravenous jugular catheters. Rats were then separated into two housing conditions: an enriched condition, including social companions(four/cage) and novel objects (e.g. balls, polyethylene tubes, paper, etc.), and a nonenriched condition where the rats were singly housed with no novel objects. During testing, the rats were given 5-min access to 0.15% saccharin, followed by 1 h to self-administer saline or cocaine (0.167 mg/infusion) on fixed ratio and progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement. The results showed that rats that were singly housed in the nonenriched environment fell into two groups: low drug-takers (n=34) and high drug-takers (n=12). In comparison, only one out of the 22 rats housed in the enriched environment was a high drug-taker. Thus, all rats in the enriched environment, except one, behaved like low drug-takers under the nonenriched condition. As such, these rats self-administered almost no drug on either the fixed ratio or the progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement and were extremely slow to self-administer their first cocaine infusion. Interestingly, despite their very low levels of drug self-administration, low-drug-taking rats housed in the enriched environment continued to avoid intake of the drug-associated saccharin cue. Taken together, these data suggest that the enriched environment itself served as a salient natural reward that reduced cocaine seeking and cocaine taking, but

  18. Amelioration of the cardiovascular effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys by a long-acting mutant form of cocaine esterase.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gregory T; Carey, Kathy A; Narasimhan, Diwahar; Nichols, Joseph; Berlin, Aaron A; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Sunahara, Roger K; Woods, James H; Ko, Mei-Chuan

    2011-04-01

    A long-acting mutant form of a naturally occurring bacterial cocaine esterase (T172R/G173Q CocE; double mutant CocE (DM CocE)) has previously been shown to antagonize the reinforcing, convulsant, and lethal effects of cocaine in rodents. However, the effectiveness and therapeutic characteristics of DM CocE in nonhuman primates, in a more clinically relevant context, are unknown. The current studies were aimed at (1) characterizing the cardiovascular effects of cocaine in freely moving rhesus monkeys, (2) evaluating the capacity of DM CocE to ameliorate these cocaine-induced cardiovascular effects when administered 10 min after cocaine, and (3) assessing the immunological responses of monkeys to DM CocE following repeated administration. Intravenous administration of cocaine produced dose-dependent increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) that persisted throughout the 2-h observation period following a dose of 3.2 mg/kg cocaine. Cocaine failed to produce reliable changes in electrocardiograph (ECG) parameters, body temperature, and locomotor activity. DM CocE produced a rapid and dose-dependent amelioration of the cardiovascular effects, with saline-like MAP measures restored within 5-10 min, and saline-like HR measures restored within 20-40 min of DM CocE administration. Although administration of DM CocE produced increases in anti-CocE antibodies, they did not appear to have a neutralizing effect on the capacity of DM CocE to reverse the cardiovascular effects of cocaine. In conclusion, these findings in monkeys provide strong evidence to suggest that highly efficient cocaine esterases, such as DM CocE, can provide a potential therapeutic option for treatment of acute cocaine intoxication in humans. PMID:21289605

  19. Functional consequences of cocaine expectation: findings in a non-human primate model of cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Porrino, Linda J; Beveridge, Thomas J R; Smith, Hilary R; Nader, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to stimuli and environments associated with drug use is considered one of the most important contributors to relapse among substance abusers. Neuroimaging studies have identified neural circuits underlying these responses in cocaine-dependent subjects. But these studies are often difficult to interpret because of the heterogeneity of the participants, substances abused, and differences in drug histories and social variables. Therefore, the goal of this study was to assess the functional effects of exposure to cocaine-associated stimuli in a non-human primate model of cocaine self-administration, providing precise control over these variables, with the 2-[(14) C]deoxyglucose method. Rhesus monkeys self-administered 0.3 mg/kg/injection cocaine (n = 4) under a fixed-interval 3-minute (FI 3-min) schedule of reinforcement (30 injections/session) for 100 sessions. Control animals (n = 4) underwent identical schedules of food reinforcement. Sessions were then discontinued for 30 days, after which time, monkeys were exposed to cocaine- or food-paired cues, and the 2-[(14) C]deoxyglucose experiment was conducted. The presentation of the cocaine-paired cues resulted in significant increases in functional activity within highly restricted circuits that included portions of the pre-commissural striatum, medial prefrontal cortex, rostral temporal cortex and limbic thalamus when compared with control animals presented with the food-paired cues. The presentation of cocaine-associated cues increased brain functional activity in contrast to the decreases observed after cocaine consumption. Furthermore, the topography of brain circuits engaged by the expectation of cocaine is similar to the distribution of effects during the earliest phases of cocaine self-administration, prior to the onset of neuroadaptations that accompany chronic cocaine exposure. PMID:25684556

  20. A remote drip infusion monitoring system employing Bluetooth.

    PubMed

    Amano, Hikaru; Ogawa, Hidekuni; Maki, Hiromichi; Tsukamoto, Sosuke; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Caldwell, W Morton

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a remote drip infusion monitoring system for use in hospitals. The system consists of several infusion monitoring devices and a central monitor. The infusion monitoring device employing a Bluetooth module can detect the drip infusion rate and an empty infusion solution bag, and then these data are sent to the central monitor placed at the nurses' station via the Bluetooth. The central monitor receives the data from several infusion monitoring devices and then displays graphically them. Therefore, the developed system can monitor intensively the drip infusion situation of the several patients at the nurses' station.

  1. Effects of chronic cocaine in rat C6 astroglial cells

    PubMed Central

    BADISA, RAMESH B.; GOODMAN, CARL B.

    2012-01-01

    Investigations with astroglial cells carry equal importance as those with neurons in drug abuse studies. The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of chronic cocaine administration on cell viability, nitric oxide (NO) production, general respiratory status of mitochondria and total protein levels in rat astroglioma cells after 24 h of treatment. In addition, the effect of cocaine was assessed for 24 h on brine shrimp larvae in order to study their sensitivity to the drug. It was observed that cocaine caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in astroglial cell viability with an LC50 of 4.717 mM. It was found that cocaine did not induce or inhibit NO production in the cells. Evaluation of mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity in terms of formazan production in astroglial cells indicated that cocaine significantly interfered with the general respiratory status of mitochondria with an ED50 of 6.153 mM. Furthermore, cocaine was shown to deplete the total protein levels in the cells with an ED50 of 5.435 mM. In vivo study with brine shrimp larvae showed that these larvae were highly sensitive to cocaine with an ED50 of 2.41 mM. In summary, our findings suggest that cocaine-induced cytotoxicity in the cells was non-specific. The cumulative effect arising from the significant loss of respiration and total cellular proteins is the cause of astroglial cell death. PMID:22735768

  2. Effects of chronic cocaine in rat C6 astroglial cells.

    PubMed

    Badisa, Ramesh B; Goodman, Carl B

    2012-09-01

    Investigations with astroglial cells carry equal importance as those with neurons in drug abuse studies. The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of chronic cocaine administration on cell viability, nitric oxide (NO) production, general respiratory status of mitochondria and total protein levels in rat astroglioma cells after 24 h of treatment. In addition, the effect of cocaine was assessed for 24 h on brine shrimp larvae in order to study their sensitivity to the drug. It was observed that cocaine caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in astroglial cell viability with an LC(50) of 4.717 mM. It was found that cocaine did not induce or inhibit NO production in the cells. Evaluation of mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity in terms of formazan production in astroglial cells indicated that cocaine significantly interfered with the general respiratory status of mitochondria with an ED(50) of 6.153 mM. Furthermore, cocaine was shown to deplete the total protein levels in the cells with an ED(50) of 5.435 mM. In vivo study with brine shrimp larvae showed that these larvae were highly sensitive to cocaine with an ED(50) of 2.41 mM. In summary, our findings suggest that cocaine-induced cytotoxicity in the cells was non-specific. The cumulative effect arising from the significant loss of respiration and total cellular proteins is the cause of astroglial cell death. PMID:22735768

  3. Marijuana and Cocaine Effect Expectancies and Drug Use Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, John; Brown, Sandra A.

    1991-01-01

    Content analyzed self-reports from 704 college students and used results to develop Marijuana Effect Expectancy Questionnaire and Cocaine Effect Expectancy Questionnaire. Identified six marijuana expectancies and five cocaine expectancies. Drug effect expectancies distinguished between patterns of nonuse and varying degrees of use of these two…

  4. Decreased striatal dopaminergic responsiveness in detoxified cocaine-dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    Volkow, N D; Wang, G J; Fowler, J S; Logan, J; Gatley, S J; Hitzemann, R; Chen, A D; Dewey, S L; Pappas, N

    1997-04-24

    Cocaine blocks the reuptake of dopamine, a neurotransmitter involved in the control of movement, cognition, motivation and reward. This leads to an increase in extracellular dopamine; the reinforcing effect of cocaine is associated with elevated dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens. But addiction to cocaine involves other effects, such as craving, loss of control and compulsive drug intake; the role of the dopamine system in these effects is less well-understood. We therefore used positron emission tomography (PET) to compare the responses of cocaine addicts and normal controls to intravenous methylphenidate, a drug that, like cocaine, causes an increase in synaptic dopamine. Addicts showed reduced dopamine release in the striatum, the brain region where the nucleus accumbens is located, and also had a reduced 'high' relative to controls. In contrast, addicts showed an increased response to methylphenidate in the thalamus (a region that conveys sensory input to the cortex). This thalamic response was associated with cocaine craving and was not seen in control subjects. Thus, our findings challenge the notion that addiction involves an enhanced striatal dopamine response to cocaine and/or an enhanced induction of euphoria. Moreover, they suggest a participation of thalamic dopamine pathways in cocaine addiction, a possibility that merits further investigation. PMID:9126741

  5. Cognitive Predictors of Children's Attitudes toward Alcohol and Cocaine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Lisa J.; Sigelman, Carol K.; Brewster, Albert B.; Leach, Diane B.; Mack, Keisha L.; Rinehart, Cheryl S.; Sorongon, Alberto G.

    2003-01-01

    Examines age differences in, and associations among, children's attitudes and intentions regarding alcohol and cocaine use and possible cognitive underpinnings of such orientations. Attitudes and intentions were negative and became less negative with age for alcohol, but more negative with age for cocaine. The cognitive predictors contributed to…

  6. Reactivity and Regulation in Children Prenatally Exposed to Cocaine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Tracy; Bendersky, Margaret; Ramsay, Douglas; Lewis, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Children prenatally exposed to cocaine may be at elevated risk for adjustment problems in early development because of greater reactivity and reduced regulation during challenging tasks. Few studies have examined whether cocaine-exposed children show such difficulties during the preschool years, a period marked by increased social and cognitive…

  7. Miracle or Menace?: The Arrival of Cocaine 1860-1900.

    PubMed

    Jay, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The arrival of cocaine was the formative episode in the modern understanding of the benefits and dangers of neurostimulants. European culture and medicine had historically been poor in stimulant plants and drugs. When coca and cocaine appeared in nineteenth-century Europe, doctors, pharmacists, and the public struggled to understand their benefits and risks, and to formulate a distinction between use and abuse.

  8. On the atomic structure of cocaine in solution.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Andrew J; Busch, Sebastian; Pardo, Luis Carlos; Callear, Samantha K; Biggin, Philip C; McLain, Sylvia E

    2016-01-14

    Cocaine is an amphiphilic drug which has the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, a combination of neutron diffraction and computation has been used to investigate the atomic scale structure of cocaine in aqueous solutions. Both the observed conformation and hydration of cocaine appear to contribute to its ability to cross hydrophobic layers afforded by the BBB, as the average conformation yields a structure which might allow cocaine to shield its hydrophilic regions from a lipophilic environment. Specifically, the carbonyl oxygens and amine group on cocaine, on average, form ∼5 bonds with the water molecules in the surrounding solvent, and the top 30% of water molecules within 4 Å of cocaine are localized in the cavity formed by an internal hydrogen bond within the cocaine molecule. This water mediated internal hydrogen bonding suggests a mechanism of interaction between cocaine and the BBB that negates the need for deprotonation prior to interaction with the lipophilic portions of this barrier. This finding also has important implications for understanding how neurologically active molecules are able to interact with both the blood stream and BBB and emphasizes the use of structural measurements in solution in order to understand important biological function.

  9. Cocaine: Pharmacology, Effects, and Treatment of Abuse. National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Monograph 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, John, Ed.

    This monograph consists of eight papers which refer in one way or another to the pharmacology of cocaine. The papers are: (1) Cocaine 1984: Introduction and Overview" (John Grabowski); (2) "Cocaine: A Growing Public Health Problem" (Edgar H. Adams and Jack Durell); (3) "Neural Mechanisms of the Reinforcing Action of Cocaine" (Roy A. Wise); (4)…

  10. Thallium scintigraphy during dobutamine infusion: nonexercise-dependent screening test for coronary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.R.; Palac, R.T.; Freeman, M.L.; Virupannavar, S.; Loeb, H.S.; Kaplan, E.; Gunnar, R.M.

    1984-03-01

    Exercise thallium scintigraphy has proven to be a sensitive method for detecting coronary artery disease (CAD). However, early redistribution of thallium and inadequate exercise can reduce its sensitivity. In this study, dobutamine was infused in incremental doses (5, 10, 15, and 20 micrograms/kg/min) in 24 patients being evaluated for chest pain. Thallium scintigraphy was completed during the maximum dose of dobutamine tolerated and repeated 4 hours later. Significant CAD was present in 16 patients; the remaining eight had normal coronaries. Exercise ECG was obtained in 23 patients. During dobutamine thallium scintigraphy, reversible perfusion defects occurred in 15 of 16 CAD and in one of eight non-CAD patients, resulting in a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 87%. Exercise ECG had a sensitivity of 60% and a specificity of 63%. We conclude that: (1) dobutamine thallium scintigraphy appears to be a sensitive method for detecting significant CAD and provided a more sensitive screening test than exercise ECG; (2) dobutamine thallium scintigraphy is especially useful in patients who cannot exercise; and (3) because imaging occurs during dobutamine infusion, the problem of early redistribution may be mitigated.

  11. Preclinical Assessment of Lisdexamfetamine as an Agonist Medication Candidate for Cocaine Addiction: Effects in Rhesus Monkeys Trained to Discriminate Cocaine or to Self-Administer Cocaine in a Cocaine Versus Food Choice Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Hutsell, Blake A.; Blough, Bruce E.; Poklis, Justin L.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic amphetamine treatment decreases cocaine consumption in preclinical and human laboratory studies and in clinical trials. Lisdexamfetamine is an amphetamine prodrug in which L-lysine is conjugated to the terminal nitrogen of d-amphetamine. Prodrugs may be advantageous relative to their active metabolites due to slower onsets and longer durations of action; however, lisdexamfetamine treatment’s efficacy in decreasing cocaine consumption is unknown. Methods: This study compared lisdexamfetamine and d-amphetamine effects in rhesus monkeys using two behavioral procedures: (1) a cocaine discrimination procedure (training dose = 0.32mg/kg cocaine, i.m.); and (2) a cocaine-versus-food choice self-administration procedure. Results: In the cocaine-discrimination procedure, lisdexamfetamine (0.32–3.2mg/kg, i.m.) substituted for cocaine with lower potency, slower onset, and longer duration of action than d-amphetamine (0.032–0.32mg/kg, i.m.). Consistent with the function of lisdexamfetamine as an inactive prodrug for amphetamine, the time course of lisdexamfetamine effects was related to d-amphetamine plasma levels by a counter-clockwise hysteresis loop. In the choice procedure, cocaine (0–0.1mg/kg/injection, i.v.) and food (1g banana-flavored pellets) were concurrently available, and cocaine maintained a dose-dependent increase in cocaine choice under baseline conditions. Treatment for 7 consecutive days with lisdexamfetamine (0.32–3.2mg/kg/day, i.m.) or d-amphetamine (0.032–0.1mg/kg/h, i.v.) produced similar dose-dependent rightward shifts in cocaine dose-effect curves and decreases in preference for 0.032mg/kg/injection cocaine. Conclusions: Lisdexamfetamine has a slower onset and longer duration of action than amphetamine but retains amphetamine’s efficacy to reduce the choice of cocaine in rhesus monkeys. These results support further consideration of lisdexamfetamine as an agonist-based medication candidate for cocaine addiction. PMID

  12. Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Patient with Cocaine Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Abu-Abed Abdin, Asma; Hamza, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad S; Ahmed, Awab

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is characterized by elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, hyperglycemia, and elevated ketones in urine and blood. Hyperglycemia is a key component of DKA; however, a subset of DKA patients can present with near-normal blood glucose, an entity described as "euglycemic DKA." This rare phenomenon is thought to be due to starvation and food restriction in insulin dependent diabetic patients. Cocaine abuse is considered a trigger for development of DKA. Cocaine also has anorexic effects. We describe an interesting case of euglycemic DKA in a middle-aged diabetic female presenting with elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, with near-normal blood glucose, in the settings of noncompliance to insulin and cocaine abuse. We have postulated that cocaine abuse was implicated in the pathophysiology of euglycemic DKA in this case. This case highlights complex physiological interplay between type-1 diabetes, noncompliance to insulin, and cocaine abuse leading to DKA, with starvation physiology causing development of euglycemic DKA.

  13. Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Patient with Cocaine Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Abu-Abed Abdin, Asma; Hamza, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad S; Ahmed, Awab

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is characterized by elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, hyperglycemia, and elevated ketones in urine and blood. Hyperglycemia is a key component of DKA; however, a subset of DKA patients can present with near-normal blood glucose, an entity described as "euglycemic DKA." This rare phenomenon is thought to be due to starvation and food restriction in insulin dependent diabetic patients. Cocaine abuse is considered a trigger for development of DKA. Cocaine also has anorexic effects. We describe an interesting case of euglycemic DKA in a middle-aged diabetic female presenting with elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, with near-normal blood glucose, in the settings of noncompliance to insulin and cocaine abuse. We have postulated that cocaine abuse was implicated in the pathophysiology of euglycemic DKA in this case. This case highlights complex physiological interplay between type-1 diabetes, noncompliance to insulin, and cocaine abuse leading to DKA, with starvation physiology causing development of euglycemic DKA. PMID:27579186

  14. Disrupted Functional Connectivity with Dopaminergic Midbrain in Cocaine Abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi, D.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, R.; Carrillo, J.; Maloney, T.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik, P.A.; Telang, F.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-06-01

    Chronic cocaine use is associated with disrupted dopaminergic neurotransmission but how this disruption affects overall brain function (other than reward/motivation) is yet to be fully investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that cocaine addicted subjects will have disrupted functional connectivity between the midbrain (where dopamine neurons are located) and cortical and subcortical brain regions during the performance of a sustained attention task. We measured brain activation and functional connectivity with fMRI in 20 cocaine abusers and 20 matched controls. When compared to controls, cocaine abusers had lower positive functional connectivity of midbrain with thalamus, cerebellum, and rostral cingulate, and this was associated with decreased activation in thalamus and cerebellum and enhanced deactivation in rostral cingulate. These findings suggest that decreased functional connectivity of the midbrain interferes with the activation and deactivation signals associated with sustained attention in cocaine addicts.

  15. Cocaine and metabolites in waste and surface water across Belgium.

    PubMed

    van Nuijs, Alexander L N; Pecceu, Bert; Theunis, Laetitia; Dubois, Nathalie; Charlier, Corinne; Jorens, Philippe G; Bervoets, Lieven; Blust, Ronny; Neels, Hugo; Covaci, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine abuse, a growing social problem, is currently estimated from population surveys, consumer interviews and crime statistics. A new approach based on the analysis of cocaine (COC) and metabolites, benzoylecgonine (BE) and ecgonine methyl ester (EME), in water samples was applied to 28 rivers and 37 waste water treatment plants in Belgium using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. While EME was undetectable, COC and BE were detectable with concentrations ranging from <1 to 753 ng/L and <1 to 2258 ng/L, respectively. BE concentrations were employed to calculate the local amount of abused cocaine. The highest values (up to 1.8 g/day cocaine per 1000 inhabitants) were found in large cities and during weekends. The estimation of cocaine abuse through water analysis can be executed on regular basis without cooperation of patients. It also gives clear geographical information, while prevention campaigns can easily be implemented and evaluated.

  16. Hair testing for cocaine and metabolites by GC/MS: criteria to quantitatively assess cocaine use.

    PubMed

    López-Guarnido, O; Álvarez, I; Gil, F; Rodrigo, L; Cataño, H C; Bermejo, A M; Tabernero, M J; Pla, A; Hernández, A F

    2013-08-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive method has been developed and validated for the determination of cocaine and its main metabolites (benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene) in human hair. The method involved solid-phase extraction with an Oasis HLB extraction cartridge and subsequent analysis by GC/MS. The limit of detection was 0.01 ng mg(-1) for cocaine, 0.04 for benzoylecgonine and 0.03 for cocaethylene. The method validation included linearity (with a correlation coefficient >0.99 over the range 0.2-50 ng mg(-1) ), intra- and inter-day precision (always lower than 12%) and accuracy (mean relative error always below 17%) to meet the bioanalytical acceptance criteria. The procedure was further applied to 40 hair samples from self-reported cocaine users arrested by the police who provided a positive urine-analysis for cocaine, and was demonstrated to be suitable for its application in forensic toxicology. New approaches were raised to detect false-negative results that allow a better interpretation of hair testing results. PMID:22407992

  17. Opponent process properties of self-administered cocaine.

    PubMed

    Ettenberg, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, data collected in our laboratory have demonstrated that self-administered cocaine produces Opponent-Process-like behavioral effects. Animals running a straight alley once each day for IV cocaine develop over trials an approach-avoidance conflict about re-entering the goal box. This conflict behavior is characterized by a stop in forward locomotion (usually at the very mouth of the goal box) followed by a turn and 'retreat' back toward the goal box. The results of a series of studies conducted over the past decade collectively suggest that the behavioral ambivalence exemplified by rats running the alley for IV cocaine stems from concurrent and opponent positive (rewarding) and negative (anxiogenic) properties of the drug--both of which are associated with the goal box. These opponent properties of cocaine have been shown to result from temporally distinct affective states. Using a conditioned place preference test, we have been able to demonstrate that while the initial immediate effects of IV cocaine are reinforcing, the state present 15 min post-injection is aversive. In our most recent work, the co-administration of IV cocaine with either oral ethanol or IV heroin was found to greatly diminish the development and occurrence of retreat behaviors in the runway. It may therefore be that the high incidence of co-abuse of cocaine with either ethanol or heroin, stems from the users' motivation to alleviate some of the negative side effects of cocaine. It would seem then that the Opponent Process Theory has provided a useful conceptual framework for the study of the behavioral consequences of self-administered cocaine including the notion that both positive and negative reinforcement mechanisms are involved in the development and maintenance of cocaine abuse.

  18. Enhanced regional brain metabolic responses to benzodiazepines in cocaine abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Fowler, J.S.

    1997-05-01

    While dopamine (DA) appears to be crucial for cocaine reinforcement, its involvement in cocaine addiction is much less clear. Using PET we have shown persistent reductions in striatal DA D2 receptors (which arc predominantly located on GABA cells) in cocaine abusers. This finding coupled to GABA`s role as an effector for DA led us to investigate if there were GABAergic abnormalities in cocaine abusers. In this study we measured regional brain metabolic responses to lorazepam, to indirectly assess GABA function (benzodiazepines facilitate GABAergic neurotransmission). Methods: The experimental subjects consisted of 12 active cocaine abusers and 32 age matched controls. Each subject underwent two PET FDG scans obtained within 1 week of each other. The first FDG scan was obtained after administration of placebo (3 cc of saline solution) given 40-50 minutes prior to FDG; and the second after administration of lorazepam (30 {mu}g/kg) given 40-50 minutes prior to FDG. The subjects were blind to the drugs received. Results: Lorazepam-induced sleepiness was significantly greater in abusers than in controls (p<0.001). Lorazepam-induced decreases in brain glucose metabolism were significantly larger in cocaine abusers than in controls. Whereas in controls whole brain metabolism decreased 13{+-}7 %, in cocaine abusers it decreased 21{+-}13 % (p < 0.05). Lorazepam-induced decrements in regional metabolism were significantly larger in striatum (p < 0.0 1), thalamus (p < 0.01) and cerebellum (p < 0.005) of cocaine abusers than of controls (ANOVA diagnosis by condition (placebo versus lorazepam) interaction effect). The only brain region for which the absolute metabolic changes-induced by lorazepam in cocaine abusers were equivalent to those in controls was the orbitofrontal cortex. These results document an accentuated sensitivity to benzodiazepines in cocaine abusers which is compatible with disrupted GABAergic function in these patients.

  19. Opponent process properties of self-administered cocaine.

    PubMed

    Ettenberg, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, data collected in our laboratory have demonstrated that self-administered cocaine produces Opponent-Process-like behavioral effects. Animals running a straight alley once each day for IV cocaine develop over trials an approach-avoidance conflict about re-entering the goal box. This conflict behavior is characterized by a stop in forward locomotion (usually at the very mouth of the goal box) followed by a turn and 'retreat' back toward the goal box. The results of a series of studies conducted over the past decade collectively suggest that the behavioral ambivalence exemplified by rats running the alley for IV cocaine stems from concurrent and opponent positive (rewarding) and negative (anxiogenic) properties of the drug--both of which are associated with the goal box. These opponent properties of cocaine have been shown to result from temporally distinct affective states. Using a conditioned place preference test, we have been able to demonstrate that while the initial immediate effects of IV cocaine are reinforcing, the state present 15 min post-injection is aversive. In our most recent work, the co-administration of IV cocaine with either oral ethanol or IV heroin was found to greatly diminish the development and occurrence of retreat behaviors in the runway. It may therefore be that the high incidence of co-abuse of cocaine with either ethanol or heroin, stems from the users' motivation to alleviate some of the negative side effects of cocaine. It would seem then that the Opponent Process Theory has provided a useful conceptual framework for the study of the behavioral consequences of self-administered cocaine including the notion that both positive and negative reinforcement mechanisms are involved in the development and maintenance of cocaine abuse. PMID:15019422

  20. Effects of chronic buspirone treatment on cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Fivel, Peter A; Kohut, Stephen J; Bergman, Jack

    2013-02-01

    Cocaine abuse and dependence is a major public health problem that continues to challenge medication-based treatment. Buspirone (Buspar) is a clinically available, non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic medication that acts on both serotonin and dopamine systems. In recent preclinical studies, acute buspirone treatment reduced cocaine self-administration at doses that did not also decrease food-reinforced behavior in rhesus monkeys (Bergman et al, 2012). The present study evaluated the effectiveness of chronic buspirone treatment on self-administration of cocaine and food. Five adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained to self-administer cocaine and food during four 1-h daily sessions under a second-order schedule of reinforcement (FR2 [VR 16:S]). Buspirone (0.32 and 0.56 mg/kg/h) was administered intravenously through one lumen of a double-lumen catheter every 20 min for 23 h each day for 7-10 consecutive days. Each buspirone treatment period was followed by saline control treatment until drug- and food-maintained responding returned to baseline levels. Buspirone significantly reduced responding maintained by cocaine, and shifted the dose-effect curve downwards. Buspirone had minimal effects on food-maintained responding. In cocaine discrimination studies, buspirone (0.1-0.32 mg/kg, IM) did not antagonize the discriminative stimulus and rate-altering effects of cocaine in four of six monkeys. These findings indicate that buspirone selectively attenuates the reinforcing effects of cocaine in a nonhuman primate model of cocaine self-administration, and has variable effects on cocaine discrimination. PMID:23072835

  1. Development of individual insulin infusion profiles for open loop infusion systems.

    PubMed

    Strack, T; Krause, U; Schulz, G; Beyer, J; Beutelspacher, F; Nagel, J

    1984-04-01

    A computer controlled syringe-type insulin infusion pump storing up to 254 different infusion rates, eight different meal programs and two different basal rates automatically changeable during 24 h in EPROM was used for insulin infusion applying a wavy step profile. This profile approaching the physiological postprandial insulin secretion of the B-cell was calculated by an algorithm following the biphasic insulin secretion model proposed by E. Cerasi . The computer program for the open loop infusion device simulated the feed-back structure of a closed loop insulin secretion control by an algorithm based upon a theoretical postprandial blood sugar profile. Fifteen unstable juvenile onset insulin requiring diabetics could be well controlled after two to three days of an intravenous open loop insulin infusion program. The programs consisted of two constant basal rates and superimposed wavy step profile programs activated at the beginning of each meal. The preabsorptive bolus or cephalic phase was an additional tool both for improved postprandial blood sugar control and further reduction of insulin consumption. The programmable insulin infusion device proved as a valuable tool for the study of a sophisticated insulin infusion profile suitable as well for open loop as for closed loop insulin infusion systems.

  2. Sex Differences in Psychiatric Comorbidity and Plasma Biomarkers for Cocaine Addiction in Abstinent Cocaine-Addicted Subjects in Outpatient Settings

    PubMed Central

    Pedraz, María; Araos, Pedro; García-Marchena, Nuria; Serrano, Antonia; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermín; Ruiz, Juan Jesús; Pastor, Antoni; Barrios, Vicente; Chowen, Julie A.; Argente, Jesús; Torrens, Marta; de la Torre, Rafael; Rodríguez De Fonseca, Fernando; Pavón, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    There are sex differences in the progression of drug addiction, relapse, and response to therapies. Because biological factors participate in these differences, they should be considered when using biomarkers for addiction. In the current study, we evaluated the sex differences in psychiatric comorbidity and the concentrations of plasma mediators that have been reported to be affected by cocaine. Fifty-five abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects diagnosed with lifetime cocaine use disorders (40 men and 15 women) and 73 healthy controls (48 men and 25 women) were clinically assessed with the diagnostic interview “Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders.” Plasma concentrations of chemokines, cytokines, N-acyl-ethanolamines, and 2-acyl-glycerols were analyzed according to history of cocaine addiction and sex, controlling for covariates age and body mass index (BMI). Relationships between these concentrations and variables related to cocaine addiction were also analyzed in addicted subjects. The results showed that the concentrations of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (CCL2/MCP-1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (CXCL12/SDF-1) were only affected by history of cocaine addiction. The plasma concentrations of interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) were affected by history of cocaine addiction and sex. In fact, whereas cytokine concentrations were higher in control women relative to men, these concentrations were reduced in cocaine-addicted women without changes in addicted men. Regarding fatty acid derivatives, history of cocaine addiction had a main effect on the concentration of each acyl derivative, whereas N-acyl-ethanolamines were increased overall in the cocaine group, 2-acyl-glycerols were decreased. Interestingly, N-palmitoleoyl-ethanolamine (POEA) was only increased in cocaine-addicted women. The covariate BMI had a significant

  3. Sex differences in psychiatric comorbidity and plasma biomarkers for cocaine addiction in abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects in outpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Pedraz, María; Araos, Pedro; García-Marchena, Nuria; Serrano, Antonia; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermín; Ruiz, Juan Jesús; Pastor, Antoni; Barrios, Vicente; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús; Torrens, Marta; de la Torre, Rafael; Rodríguez De Fonseca, Fernando; Pavón, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    There are sex differences in the progression of drug addiction, relapse, and response to therapies. Because biological factors participate in these differences, they should be considered when using biomarkers for addiction. In the current study, we evaluated the sex differences in psychiatric comorbidity and the concentrations of plasma mediators that have been reported to be affected by cocaine. Fifty-five abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects diagnosed with lifetime cocaine use disorders (40 men and 15 women) and 73 healthy controls (48 men and 25 women) were clinically assessed with the diagnostic interview "Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders." Plasma concentrations of chemokines, cytokines, N-acyl-ethanolamines, and 2-acyl-glycerols were analyzed according to history of cocaine addiction and sex, controlling for covariates age and body mass index (BMI). Relationships between these concentrations and variables related to cocaine addiction were also analyzed in addicted subjects. The results showed that the concentrations of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (CCL2/MCP-1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (CXCL12/SDF-1) were only affected by history of cocaine addiction. The plasma concentrations of interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) were affected by history of cocaine addiction and sex. In fact, whereas cytokine concentrations were higher in control women relative to men, these concentrations were reduced in cocaine-addicted women without changes in addicted men. Regarding fatty acid derivatives, history of cocaine addiction had a main effect on the concentration of each acyl derivative, whereas N-acyl-ethanolamines were increased overall in the cocaine group, 2-acyl-glycerols were decreased. Interestingly, N-palmitoleoyl-ethanolamine (POEA) was only increased in cocaine-addicted women. The covariate BMI had a significant

  4. The Ability of Bacterial Cocaine Esterase to Hydrolyze Cocaine Metabolites and Their Simultaneous Quantification Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Brim, Remy L.; Noon, Kathleen R.; Collins, Gregory T.; Nichols, Joseph; Narasimhan, Diwahar; Sunahara, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine toxicity is a widespread problem in the United States, responsible for more than 500,000 emergency department visits a year. There is currently no U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacotherapy to directly treat cocaine toxicity. To this end, we have developed a mutant bacterial cocaine esterase (DM-CocE), which has been previously shown to rapidly hydrolyze cocaine into inert metabolites, preventing and reversing toxicity with limited immunogenic potential. Herein we describe the ability of DM-CocE to hydrolyze the active cocaine metabolites norcocaine and cocaethylene and its inability to hydrolyze benzoylecgonine. DM-CocE hydrolyzes norcocaine and cocaethylene with 58 and 45% of its catalytic efficiency for cocaine in vitro as measured by a spectrophotometric assay. We have developed a mass spectrometry method to simultaneously detect cocaine, benzoylecgonine, norcocaine, and ecgonine methyl ester to quantify the effect of DM-CocE on normal cocaine metabolism in vivo. DM-CocE administered to rats 10 min after a convulsant dose of cocaine alters the normal metabolism of cocaine, rapidly decreasing circulating levels of cocaine and norcocaine while increasing ecgonine methyl ester formation. Benzoylecgonine was not hydrolyzed in vivo, but circulating concentrations were reduced, suggesting that DM-CocE may bind and sequester this metabolite. These findings suggest that DM-CocE may reduce cocaine toxicity by eliminating active and toxic metabolites along with the parent cocaine molecule. PMID:21885621

  5. The ability of bacterial cocaine esterase to hydrolyze cocaine metabolites and their simultaneous quantification using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brim, Remy L; Noon, Kathleen R; Collins, Gregory T; Nichols, Joseph; Narasimhan, Diwahar; Sunahara, Roger K; Woods, James H

    2011-12-01

    Cocaine toxicity is a widespread problem in the United States, responsible for more than 500,000 emergency department visits a year. There is currently no U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacotherapy to directly treat cocaine toxicity. To this end, we have developed a mutant bacterial cocaine esterase (DM-CocE), which has been previously shown to rapidly hydrolyze cocaine into inert metabolites, preventing and reversing toxicity with limited immunogenic potential. Herein we describe the ability of DM-CocE to hydrolyze the active cocaine metabolites norcocaine and cocaethylene and its inability to hydrolyze benzoylecgonine. DM-CocE hydrolyzes norcocaine and cocaethylene with 58 and 45% of its catalytic efficiency for cocaine in vitro as measured by a spectrophotometric assay. We have developed a mass spectrometry method to simultaneously detect cocaine, benzoylecgonine, norcocaine, and ecgonine methyl ester to quantify the effect of DM-CocE on normal cocaine metabolism in vivo. DM-CocE administered to rats 10 min after a convulsant dose of cocaine alters the normal metabolism of cocaine, rapidly decreasing circulating levels of cocaine and norcocaine while increasing ecgonine methyl ester formation. Benzoylecgonine was not hydrolyzed in vivo, but circulating concentrations were reduced, suggesting that DM-CocE may bind and sequester this metabolite. These findings suggest that DM-CocE may reduce cocaine toxicity by eliminating active and toxic metabolites along with the parent cocaine molecule.

  6. The ability of bacterial cocaine esterase to hydrolyze cocaine metabolites and their simultaneous quantification using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brim, Remy L; Noon, Kathleen R; Collins, Gregory T; Nichols, Joseph; Narasimhan, Diwahar; Sunahara, Roger K; Woods, James H

    2011-12-01

    Cocaine toxicity is a widespread problem in the United States, responsible for more than 500,000 emergency department visits a year. There is currently no U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacotherapy to directly treat cocaine toxicity. To this end, we have developed a mutant bacterial cocaine esterase (DM-CocE), which has been previously shown to rapidly hydrolyze cocaine into inert metabolites, preventing and reversing toxicity with limited immunogenic potential. Herein we describe the ability of DM-CocE to hydrolyze the active cocaine metabolites norcocaine and cocaethylene and its inability to hydrolyze benzoylecgonine. DM-CocE hydrolyzes norcocaine and cocaethylene with 58 and 45% of its catalytic efficiency for cocaine in vitro as measured by a spectrophotometric assay. We have developed a mass spectrometry method to simultaneously detect cocaine, benzoylecgonine, norcocaine, and ecgonine methyl ester to quantify the effect of DM-CocE on normal cocaine metabolism in vivo. DM-CocE administered to rats 10 min after a convulsant dose of cocaine alters the normal metabolism of cocaine, rapidly decreasing circulating levels of cocaine and norcocaine while increasing ecgonine methyl ester formation. Benzoylecgonine was not hydrolyzed in vivo, but circulating concentrations were reduced, suggesting that DM-CocE may bind and sequester this metabolite. These findings suggest that DM-CocE may reduce cocaine toxicity by eliminating active and toxic metabolites along with the parent cocaine molecule. PMID:21885621

  7. Effects of the dopamine/norepinephrine releaser phenmetrazine on cocaine self-administration and cocaine-primed reinstatement in rats

    PubMed Central

    Czoty, Paul W.; Tran, Phuong; Thomas, Leanne N.; Martin, Thomas J.; Grigg, Amanda; Blough, Bruce E.; Beveridge, Thomas J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Like other monoamine releasers such as d-amphetamine, chronic treatment with phenmetrazine can attenuate cocaine self-administration in monkeys. Objectives The present studies extended this finding to rodents and to cocaine-primed reinstatement, a putative laboratory animal model of relapse. Methods In Experiment 1, rats self-administered food pellets or injections of 0.19 mg/kg cocaine (i.v.) under a progressive-ratio schedule. When responding was stable, subcutaneous osmotic pumps were implanted containing saline or (+)-phenmetrazine (25 or 50 mg/kg per day). In Experiment 2, rats self-administered injections of 0.75 mg/kg cocaine under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule in daily 6-hr sessions. When responding was stable, rats were removed from the self-administration environment for 7 days and treated continuously with saline, 5 mg/kg per day d-amphetamine or phenmetrazine (25 or 50 mg/kg per day) via osmotic pumps. Rats were then returned to the self-administration context while treatment continued, and responding was extinguished by removing response-contingent stimulus changes and cocaine injections. Once responding was extinguished, reinstatement tests were conducted using cocaine injections (10 mg/kg i.p.). Results Phenmetrazine decreased self-administration of cocaine, but not food pellets, during the 14-day treatment period; effects persisted for several days after treatment was discontinued. Moreover, cocaine-induced increases in responding during the reinstatement test were attenuated by d-amphetamine and both phenmetrazine doses. Conclusions These results extend the study of the effects of phenmetrazine on cocaine self-administration to a rodent model, and provide further support for the use of monoamine releasers as agonist medications for cocaine abuse. PMID:25673020

  8. Brief intermittent cocaine self-administration and abstinence sensitizes cocaine effects on the dopamine transporter and increases drug seeking.

    PubMed

    Calipari, Erin S; Siciliano, Cody A; Zimmer, Benjamin A; Jones, Sara R

    2015-02-01

    Although traditional sensitization paradigms, which result in an augmentation of cocaine-induced locomotor behavior and dopamine (DA) overflow following repeated experimenter-delivered cocaine injections, are often used as a model to study drug addiction, similar effects have been difficult to demonstrate following cocaine self-administration. We have recently shown that intermittent access (IntA) to cocaine can result in increased cocaine potency at the DA transporter (DAT); however, traditional sensitization paradigms often show enhanced effects following withdrawal/abstinence periods. Therefore, we determined a time course of IntA-induced sensitization by examining the effects of 1 or 3 days of IntA, as well as a 7-day abstinence period on DA function, cocaine potency, and reinforcement. Here we show that cocaine potency is increased following as little as 3 days of IntA and further augmented following an abstinence period. In addition, IntA plus abstinence produced greater evoked DA release in the presence of cocaine as compared with all other groups, demonstrating that following abstinence, both cocaine's ability to increase DA release and inhibit uptake at the DAT, two separate mechanisms for increasing DA levels, are enhanced. Finally, we found that IntA-induced sensitization of the DA system resulted in an increased reinforcing efficacy of cocaine, an effect that was augmented after the 7-day abstinence period. These results suggest that sensitization of the DA system may have an important role in the early stages of drug abuse and may drive the increased drug seeking and taking that characterize the transition to uncontrolled drug use. Human data suggest that intermittency, sensitization, and periods of abstinence have an integral role in the process of addiction, highlighting the importance of utilizing pre-clinical models that integrate these phenomena, and suggesting that IntA paradigms may serve as novel models of human addiction. PMID:25212486

  9. Brief Intermittent Cocaine Self-Administration and Abstinence Sensitizes Cocaine Effects on the Dopamine Transporter and Increases Drug Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Calipari, Erin S; Siciliano, Cody A; Zimmer, Benjamin A; Jones, Sara R

    2015-01-01

    Although traditional sensitization paradigms, which result in an augmentation of cocaine-induced locomotor behavior and dopamine (DA) overflow following repeated experimenter-delivered cocaine injections, are often used as a model to study drug addiction, similar effects have been difficult to demonstrate following cocaine self-administration. We have recently shown that intermittent access (IntA) to cocaine can result in increased cocaine potency at the DA transporter (DAT); however, traditional sensitization paradigms often show enhanced effects following withdrawal/abstinence periods. Therefore, we determined a time course of IntA-induced sensitization by examining the effects of 1 or 3 days of IntA, as well as a 7-day abstinence period on DA function, cocaine potency, and reinforcement. Here we show that cocaine potency is increased following as little as 3 days of IntA and further augmented following an abstinence period. In addition, IntA plus abstinence produced greater evoked DA release in the presence of cocaine as compared with all other groups, demonstrating that following abstinence, both cocaine's ability to increase DA release and inhibit uptake at the DAT, two separate mechanisms for increasing DA levels, are enhanced. Finally, we found that IntA-induced sensitization of the DA system resulted in an increased reinforcing efficacy of cocaine, an effect that was augmented after the 7-day abstinence period. These results suggest that sensitization of the DA system may have an important role in the early stages of drug abuse and may drive the increased drug seeking and taking that characterize the transition to uncontrolled drug use. Human data suggest that intermittency, sensitization, and periods of abstinence have an integral role in the process of addiction, highlighting the importance of utilizing pre-clinical models that integrate these phenomena, and suggesting that IntA paradigms may serve as novel models of human addiction. PMID:25212486

  10. A Thermally Stable Form of Bacterial Cocaine Esterase: A Potential Therapeutic Agent for Treatment of Cocaine Abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Brim, Remy L.; Nance, Mark R.; Youngstrom, Daniel W.; Narasimhan, Diwahar; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Tesmer, John J.G.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Woods, James H.

    2010-09-03

    Rhodococcal cocaine esterase (CocE) is an attractive potential treatment for both cocaine overdose and cocaine addiction. CocE directly degrades cocaine into inactive products, whereas traditional small-molecule approaches require blockade of the inhibitory action of cocaine on a diverse array of monoamine transporters and ion channels. The usefulness of wild-type (wt) cocaine esterase is hampered by its inactivation at 37 C. Herein, we characterize the most thermostable form of this enzyme to date, CocE-L169K/G173Q. In vitro kinetic analyses reveal that CocE-L169K/G173Q displays a half-life of 2.9 days at 37 C, which represents a 340-fold improvement over wt and is 15-fold greater than previously reported mutants. Crystallographic analyses of CocE-L169K/G173Q, determined at 1.6-{angstrom} resolution, suggest that stabilization involves enhanced domain-domain interactions involving van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding. In vivo rodent studies reveal that intravenous pretreatment with CocE-L169K/G173Q in mice provides protection from cocaine-induced lethality for longer time periods before cocaine administration than wt CocE. Furthermore, intravenous administration (pretreatment) of CocE-L169K/G173Q prevents self-administration of cocaine in a time-dependent manner. Termination of the in vivo effects of CoCE seems to be dependent on, but not proportional to, its clearance from plasma as its half-life is approximately 2.3 h and similar to that of wt CocE (2.2 h). Taken together these data suggest that CocE-L169K/G173Q possesses many of the properties of a biological therapeutic for treating cocaine abuse but requires additional development to improve its serum half-life.

  11. [Impulsivity and compulsivity in cocaine dependent individuals].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Serrano, María José; Cesar Peraleslópez, José; Moreno-López, Laura; Santos-Ruiz, Ana; Pérez-García, Miguel; Verdejogarcía, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    A recent theoretical approach describes addiction as a dynamic behavioural change process on the impulsivity-compulsivity axis. However, on the basis of current evidence, it is still difficult to establish a selective association between the course of addiction and individual transition along this axis. The aim of this study is to categorize each of the individuals in a sample of cocaine-dependent patients (CDI) as mainly impulsive or mainly compulsive, on the basis of their performance in neuropsychological inhibition and perseveration tests, and to test the association between the assigned category and their scores in trait impulsivity, and severity of cocaine addiction (measured by means of self-report assessment tools). A total of 42 CDI and 65 healthy control individuals (HCI) were assessed using the UPPS-P Scale (to explore trait impulsivity), the Stroop and Go/No Go (to assess response inhibition), and Revised-Strategy Application and Probabilistic Reversal tests (to assess response perseveration). Forty-five per cent of the CDIs were classified as compulsive, and this subgroup scored significantly higher than the impulsive group on the UPPS-P dimensions of lack of perseverance and lack of premeditation. A substantial proportion of CDIs can be classified as compulsive. No differences between compulsive and impulsive CDIs were found with regard to severity of exposure to cocaine; however, patients classified as compulsive by means of neuropsychological tasks are less perseverative in the pursuit of long-term objectives and more prone to make under-meditated decisions, as shown by trait impulsivity assessment questionnaires. PMID:22648313

  12. Concurrent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion and Intra-arterial Drug Infusion via Ipsilateral Common Carotid Artery Catheter in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Van Winkle, Jessica A.; Chen, Bo; Lei, I-Farn; Pereira, Benedict; Rajput, Padmesh S.; Lyden, Patrick D.

    2012-01-01

    Pre-clinical development of therapy for acute ischemic stroke requires robust animal models; the rodent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) model using a nylon filament inserted into the internal carotid artery is the most popular. Drug screening requires targeted delivery of test substance in a controlled manner. To address these needs, we developed a novel method for delivering substances directly into the ischemic brain during MCAo in the awake rat. An indwelling catheter is placed in the common carotid artery ipsilateral to the occlusion at the time of the surgical placement of the occluding filament. The internal and common carotid arteries are left patent to allow superfusion anterograde. The surgeries can be completed quickly to allow rapid recovery from anesthesia; tests substances can be infused at any given time for any given duration. To simulate clinical scenarios, the occluding filament can be removed minutes or hours later (reperfusion) followed by therapeutic infusions. By delivering drug intra-arterially to the target tissue, “first pass” loss in the liver is reduced and drug effects are concentrated in the ischemic zone. To validate our method, rats were infused with Evans blue dye either intra-arterially or intravenously during a 4 hour MCAo. After a 30 minute reperfusion period, the dye was extracted from each hemisphere and quantitated with a spectrophotometer. Significantly more dye was measured in the ischemic hemispheres that received the dye intra-arterially. PMID:23261656

  13. Effects of anti-cocaine vaccine and viral gene transfer of cocaine hydrolase in mice on cocaine toxicity including motor strength and liver damage

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Geng, Liyi; Orson, Frank; Kinsey, Berma; Kosten, Thomas R; Shen, Xiaoyun; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In developing an vivo drug-interception therapy to treat cocaine abuse and hinder relapse into drug seeking provoked by re-encounter with cocaine, two promising agents are: 1) a cocaine hydrolase enzyme (CocH) derived from human butyrylcholinesterase and delivered by gene transfer: 2) an anti-cocaine antibody elicited by vaccination. Recent behavioral experiments showed that antibody and enzyme work in a complementary fashion to reduce cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity in rats and mice. Our present goal was to test protection against liver damage and muscle weakness in mice challenged with massive doses of cocaine at or near the LD50 level (100 to 120 mg/kg, i.p.). We found that, when the interceptor proteins were combined at doses that were only modestly protective in isolation (enzyme, 1 mg/kg; antibody, 8 mg/kg), they provided complete protection of liver tissue and motor function. When the enzyme levels were ~ 400-fold higher, after in vivo transduction by adeno-associated viral vector, similar protection was observed from CocH alone. PMID:22935511

  14. Quinine enhances the behavioral stimulant effect of cocaine in mice.

    PubMed

    Huertas, Adriana; Wessinger, William D; Kucheryavykh, Yuri V; Sanabria, Priscila; Eaton, Misty J; Skatchkov, Serguei N; Rojas, Legier V; Maldonado-Martínez, Gerónimo; Inyushin, Mikhail Y

    2015-02-01

    The Na(+)-dependent dopamine transporter (DAT) is primarily responsible for regulating free dopamine (DA) concentrations in the brain by participating in the majority of DA uptake; however, other DA transporters may also participate, especially if cocaine or other drugs of abuse compromise DAT. Recently, such cocaine-insensitive low-affinity mono- and poly-amine OCT transporters were described in astrocytes which use DA as a substrate. These transporters are from a different transporter family and while insensitive to cocaine, they are specifically blocked by quinine and some steroids. Quinine is inexpensive and is often found in injected street drugs as an "adulterant". The present study was designed to determine the participation of OCTs in cocaine dependent behavioral and physiological changes in mice. Using FVB mice we showed, that daily single injections of quinine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) co-administered with cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) for 10 days significantly enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor behavioral sensitization. Quinine had no significant effect on the time course of behavioral activation. In astrocytes from the ventral tegmental area of mice, transporter currents of quinine-sensitive monoamine transporters were also augmented after two weeks of cocaine administration. The importance of low-affinity high-capacity transporters for DA clearance is discussed, explaining the known ability of systemically administered DAT inhibitors to anomalously increase DA clearance.

  15. Effect of serotonin on platelet function in cocaine exposed blood

    PubMed Central

    Ziu, Endrit; Hadden, Coedy; Li, Yicong; Lowery, Curtis Lee; Singh, Preeti; Ucer, Serra S.; Mercado, Charles P.; Gu, Howard H.; Kilic, Fusun

    2014-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors counteract the pro-thrombotic effect of elevated plasma 5-HT by down-regulating the 5-HT uptake rates of platelets. Cocaine also down-regulates the platelet 5-HT uptake rates but in contrast, the platelets of cocaine-injected mice show a much higher aggregation rate than the platelets of control mice. To examine the involvement of plasma 5-HT in cocaine-mediated platelet aggregation, we studied the function of platelets isolated from wild-type and transgenic, peripheral 5-HT knock-out (TPH1-KO) mice, and cocaine-insensitive dopamine transporter knock in (DAT-KI) mice. In cocaine-injected mice compared to the control mice, the plasma 5-HT level as well as the surface level of P-selectin was elevated; in vitro platelet aggregation in the presence of type I fibrillar collagen was enhanced. However, cocaine injection lowered the 5-HT uptake rates of platelets and increased the plasma 5-HT levels of the DAT-KI mice but did not change their platelets aggregation rates further which are already hyper-reactive. Furthermore, the in vitro studies supporting these in vivo findings suggest that cocaine mimics the effect of elevated plasma 5-HT level on platelets and in 5-HT receptor- and transporter-dependent pathways in a two-step process propagates platelet aggregation by an additive effect of 5-HT and nonserotonergic catecholamine. PMID:25091505

  16. Evidence for opponent-process actions of intravenous cocaine.

    PubMed

    Ettenberg, A; Raven, M A; Danluck, D A; Necessary, B D

    1999-11-01

    The present experiment was devised to test a prediction of the Opponent-Process Theory of drug action. This theory presumes that the initial affective experience of a subject treated with cocaine would be diametrically different immediately after administration compared to some point later in time when the positive impact of the drug had subsided. A conditioned place-preference procedure was employed in which a novel environment was paired with the effects of cocaine either immediately after, 5 min after, or 15 min after an intravenous injection of 0.75 mg/kg cocaine. It was hypothesized that animals would come to prefer environments associated with the immediate positive effects of cocaine and avoid environments associated with the drug's subsequent negative effects. The results confirmed this hypothesis. While the 0-min delay and 5-min delay groups exhibited conditioned preferences for the cocaine-paired environment, the 15-min delay group came to avoid the side of the preference apparatus paired with cocaine. These data, therefore, serve as additional support for an Opponent-Process account of cocaine's actions.

  17. Structural analysis of thermostabilizing mutations of cocaine esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, Diwahar; Nance, Mark R.; Gao, Daquan; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Macdonald, Joanne; Tamburi, Patricia; Yoon, Dan; Landry, Donald M.; Woods, James H.; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Tesmer, John J.G.; Sunahara, Roger K.

    2010-09-03

    Cocaine is considered to be the most addictive of all substances of abuse and mediates its effects by inhibiting monoamine transporters, primarily the dopamine transporters. There are currently no small molecules that can be used to combat its toxic and addictive properties, in part because of the difficulty of developing compounds that inhibit cocaine binding without having intrinsic effects on dopamine transport. Most of the effective cocaine inhibitors also display addictive properties. We have recently reported the use of cocaine esterase (CocE) to accelerate the removal of systemic cocaine and to prevent cocaine-induced lethality. However, wild-type CocE is relatively unstable at physiological temperatures ({tau}{sub 1/2} {approx} 13 min at 37 C), presenting challenges for its development as a viable therapeutic agent. We applied computational approaches to predict mutations to stabilize CocE and showed that several of these have increased stability both in vitro and in vivo, with the most efficacious mutant (T172R/G173Q) extending half-life up to 370 min. Here we present novel X-ray crystallographic data on these mutants that provide a plausible model for the observed enhanced stability. We also more extensively characterize the previously reported variants and report on a new stabilizing mutant, L169K. The improved stability of these engineered CocE enzymes will have a profound influence on the use of this protein to combat cocaine-induced toxicity and addiction in humans.

  18. Sensitivity to cocaine conditioned reward depends on sex and age

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Elena; Wade, Dean; Izenwasser, Sari

    2009-01-01

    Human and animal laboratory studies show that females and males respond differently to drugs and that drug administration during adolescence leads to different behavioral effects than during adulthood. Adult female rats are more sensitive to the behavioral effects of cocaine than adult males, but it is not known if the same effect of sex exists during adolescence. In the present study, sensitivity to the conditioned reward of cocaine was evaluated using a conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm where adolescent (PND 34) and adult (PND 66) male and female rats were trained and tested for the development of CPP to multiple doses of cocaine. Female rats developed CPP at lower doses than males, regardless of age. In addition, adolescent male and female rats established a CPP at lower doses of cocaine than adult male and female rats, respectively. Thus, both age and sex altered cocaine conditioned reward with the order of sensitivity being adolescent females > adult females > adolescent males > adult males. These data show that adolescents are more sensitive to the conditioned rewarding properties of cocaine than adults and that females respond to lower doses of cocaine compared to males regardless of age. PMID:19032962

  19. Limitations to the generality of cocaine locomotor sensitization.

    PubMed

    Marusich, Julie A; Branch, Marc N; Dallery, Jesse

    2008-08-01

    Repeated exposure to cocaine often leads to tolerance to effects on operant behavior, whereas sensitization often develops to effects on locomotor activity. The purpose of the present set of experiments was to examine if locomotor sensitization to cocaine would develop in the presence or absence of an operant contingency in rats. In Experiment 1, rats lever pressed on an FR schedule of reinforcement, and were administered chronic cocaine. Tolerance to effects of cocaine on lever pressing developed in most subjects. No subjects developed locomotor sensitization even when the operant contingency was removed. Experiment 2 examined effects of chronic cocaine administration in rats with no exposure to an operant contingency. Tolerance developed to locomotor effects of cocaine in some subjects, but none developed sensitization. In Experiment 3, rats were exposed to a shorter drug regimen, and given time off before a sensitization-test session. Some, but not all subjects showed locomotor sensitization during the test session. The present results, therefore, show that locomotor sensitization to cocaine is not an inevitable consequence of repeated exposure to the drug.

  20. Role for M5 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Fedorova, Irina; Wörtwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P D; Rasmussen, Thøger; Thomsen, Morgane; Bolwig, Tom G; Knitowski, Karen M; McKinzie, David L; Yamada, Masahisa; Wess, Jürgen; Basile, Anthony

    2003-10-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors of the M5 subtype are expressed by dopamine-containing neurons of the ventral tegmentum. These M5 receptors modulate the activity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, which play an important role in mediating reinforcing properties of abused psychostimulants like cocaine. The potential role of M5 receptors in the reinforcing effects of cocaine was investigated using M5 receptor-deficient mice in a model of acute cocaine self-administration. The M5-deficient mice self-administered cocaine at a significantly lower rate than wild-type controls. In the conditioned place preference procedure, a classic test for evaluating the rewarding properties of drugs, M5-deficient mice spent significantly less time in the cocaine-paired compartment than control mice. Moreover, the severity of the cocaine withdrawal syndrome (withdrawal-associated anxiety measured in the elevated plus-maze) was significantly attenuated in mice lacking the M5 receptor. These results demonstrate that M5 receptors play an important role in mediating both cocaine-associated reinforcement and withdrawal.

  1. Diet influences cocaine withdrawal behaviors in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Loebens, M; Barros, H M T

    2003-01-01

    The effects of drugs of abuse might depend on several environmental factors, among them the individual's feeding habits. It was our objective to study the influence of the diet on cocaine acute behavioral effects and during the first 5 days of withdrawal after prolonged treatment. Rats were fed a balanced diet, high-protein diet, high-carbohydrate diet or high-fat diet from weaning to adulthood. Adult rats were injected with 15 mg/kg cocaine 24, 5 and 1 h before the forced swimming retest or the drug was administered daily during 15 days and the animals were evaluated in the forced swimming test on five daily occasions after drug withdrawal. Diets alone did not induce significant behavioral differences in locomotion, immobility, swimming, climbing or head shakes. Acute cocaine reduced immobility during the forced swimming test and increased locomotion demonstrating a nonspecific antiimmobility effect related to hyperactivity. Acute cocaine reduced head shakes of rats fed high-protein and high-carbohydrate diets. After cocaine withdrawal, head shakes were decreased for rats fed any of the diets and rats were more immobile if fed a high-fat diet and were less immobile if fed a high-protein or high-carbohydrate diet. In conclusion, differences in the amounts of macronutrients in the diet may cause different behavioral outcomes after acute cocaine and during cocaine withdrawal.

  2. Cultural Congruence and Infusion Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Abitz, Tracey L

    2016-01-01

    The importance of cultural competence in every nursing practice setting in today's world cannot be understated. Unconscious bias can have detrimental effects on therapeutic relationships and health outcomes. Nursing models of cultural competence by Purnell, Leininger, and Campinha-Bacote are reviewed. The Kleinman Model and LEARN Model offer questions and guidelines to facilitate assessment of patients' understanding of illness and treatment. The Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice contains elements of diversity and cultural competence throughout. Self-reflection of one's own values, beliefs, biases, and practice as an infusion nurse will promote the development of cultural competence. PMID:26934161

  3. Histone arginine methylation in cocaine action in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Damez-Werno, Diane M; Sun, HaoSheng; Scobie, Kimberly N; Shao, Ningyi; Rabkin, Jaclyn; Dias, Caroline; Calipari, Erin S; Maze, Ian; Pena, Catherine J; Walker, Deena M; Cahill, Michael E; Chandra, Ramesh; Gancarz, Amy; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Landry, Joseph A; Cates, Hannah; Lobo, Mary-Kay; Dietz, David; Allis, C David; Guccione, Ernesto; Turecki, Gustavo; Defilippi, Paola; Neve, Rachael L; Hurd, Yasmin L; Shen, Li; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-08-23

    Repeated cocaine exposure regulates transcriptional regulation within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), and epigenetic mechanisms-such as histone acetylation and methylation on Lys residues-have been linked to these lasting actions of cocaine. In contrast to Lys methylation, the role of histone Arg (R) methylation remains underexplored in addiction models. Here we show that protein-R-methyltransferase-6 (PRMT6) and its associated histone mark, asymmetric dimethylation of R2 on histone H3 (H3R2me2a), are decreased in the NAc of mice and rats after repeated cocaine exposure, including self-administration, and in the NAc of cocaine-addicted humans. Such PRMT6 down-regulation occurs selectively in NAc medium spiny neurons (MSNs) expressing dopamine D2 receptors (D2-MSNs), with opposite regulation occurring in D1-MSNs, and serves to protect against cocaine-induced addictive-like behavioral abnormalities. Using ChIP-seq, we identified Src kinase signaling inhibitor 1 (Srcin1; also referred to as p140Cap) as a key gene target for reduced H3R2me2a binding, and found that consequent Srcin1 induction in the NAc decreases Src signaling, cocaine reward, and the motivation to self-administer cocaine. Taken together, these findings suggest that suppression of Src signaling in NAc D2-MSNs, via PRMT6 and H3R2me2a down-regulation, functions as a homeostatic brake to restrain cocaine action, and provide novel candidates for the development of treatments for cocaine addiction. PMID:27506785

  4. Cocaine selectively increases striatonigral dynorphin levels by a dopaminergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sivam, S P

    1989-09-01

    The influence of the acute (single dose) or subchronic (one dose daily for 4 days) administration of cocaine to Sprague-Dawley rats on striatal enkephalin (Met5-enkephalin) and striatonigral tachykinin (substance P) and dynorphin [dynorphin A (1-8), DYN] levels was investigated. The peptide levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. The concentrations of the striatal levels of dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine and their acid metabolites were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. An acute administration of cocaine (20 or 30 mg/kg i.p.) did not affect the peptide levels in the striatum or in the substantia nigra. A regimen of subchronic administration of cocaine (20 mg/kg/day for 4 days) increased the striatonigral DYN levels, without altering the levels of Met5-enkephalin or substance P. The increase in DYN levels were persistent for at least 4 days after the last dose of the subchronic administration of cocaine. The DYN levels returned to control values by 12 days after the last dose. The DA levels in the striatum were increased 30 min after a single dose of cocaine. None of the other treatments elicited any changes in DA or 5-hydroxytryptamine or their metabolites. The subchronic cocaine administration to dopaminergic denervated rats with 6-hydroxydopamine failed to evoke any increase in DYN levels in the striatum or substantia nigra. The concurrent administration of the D1 DA antagonist, SCH-23390, or the D2 DA antagonist, spiperone, to the subchronic regimen of cocaine also blocked the cocaine-induced increase in DYN levels. These results indicate that cocaine selectively enhances the synthesis or decreases the release of DYN in the striatonigral neurons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Cell type specific expression of p11 controls cocaine reward

    PubMed Central

    Arango-Lievano, Margarita; Schwarz, Justin T.; Vernov, Mary; Wilkinson, Matthew B.; Bradbury, Kathryn; Feliz, Akira; Marongiu, Roberta; Gelfand, Yaroslav; Warner-Schmidt, Jennifer; Nestler, Eric J.; Greengard, Paul; Russo, Scott J.; Kaplitt, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The high rate of comorbidity between depression and cocaine addiction suggests shared molecular mechanisms and anatomical pathways. Limbic structures, such as the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc), play a crucial role in both disorders, yet how different cell types within these structures contribute to the pathogenesis remains elusive. Downregulation of p11 (S100A10) specifically in the NAc elicits depressive like behaviors in mice but its role in drug addiction is unknown. Methods We combine mouse genetics and viral strategies to determine how the titration of p11 levels within the entire NAc affects the rewarding actions of cocaine on behavior (6 to 8 mice per group) and molecular correlates (3 experiments, 5 to 8 mice per group). Finally, the manipulation of p11 expression in distinct NAc dopaminoceptive neuronal subsets distinguished cell type specific effects of p11 on cocaine reward (5 to 8 mice per group). Results We demonstrate that p11 knockout mice have enhanced cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP), which is reproduced by the focal downregulation of p11 in the NAc of wild-type mice. In wild-type mice, cocaine reduced p11 expression in the NAc, while p11 overexpression exclusively in the NAc reduced cocaine CPP. Finally, we identify dopamine receptor-1 (D1) expressing medium spiny neurons (MSNs) as key mediators of p11’s effects on cocaine reward. Conclusions Our data provide evidence that disruption of p11 homeostasis in the NAc particularly in D1 expressing MSNs may underlie pathophysiological mechanisms of cocaine rewarding action. Treatments to counter maladaptation of p11 levels may provide novel therapeutic opportunities for cocaine addiction. PMID:24725970

  6. Hippocampal neurogenesis protects against cocaine-primed relapse

    PubMed Central

    Deschaux, Olivier; Vendruscolo, Leandro; Schlosburg, Joel; Diaz-Aguilar, Luis; Yuan, Clara J.; Sobieraj, Jeffery C.; George, Olivier; Koob, George F.; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates a functional role for the hippocampus in mediating relapse to cocaine-seeking behavior and extinction-induced inhibition of cocaine seeking, and dentate gyrus neurogenesis in the hippocampus may have a role. Here, we tested the hypothesis that disruption of normal hippocampal activity during extinction alters relapse to cocaine-seeking behavior as a function of dentate gyrus neurogenesis. Adult rats were trained to self-administer cocaine on a fixed-ratio schedule, followed by extinction and cocaine-primed reinstatement testing. Some rats received low frequency stimulation (LFS; 2 Hz for 25 min) after each extinction session in the dorsal or ventral hippocampal formation. All rats received an injection of the mitotic marker 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label developing dentate gyrus neurons during self-administration, as well as before or after extinction and LFS. We found that LFS during extinction did not alter extinction behavior, but enhanced cocaine-primed reinstatement. Cocaine self-administration reduced levels of twenty-four day old BrdU cells and dentate gyrus neurogenesis, which was normalized by extinction. LFS during extinction prevented extinction-induced normalization of dentate gyrus neurogenesis and potentiated cocaine-induced reinstatement of drug seeking. LFS inhibition of extinction-induced neurogenesis was not due to enhanced cell death, revealed by quantification of activated caspase3 labeled cells. These data suggest that LFS during extinction disrupts hippocampal networking via disrupting neurogenesis and also strengthens relapse-like behaviors. Thus, newly born dentate gyrus neurons during withdrawal and extinction learning facilitate hippocampal networking that mediates extinction-induced inhibition of cocaine seeking and may play a key role in preventing relapse. PMID:23278919

  7. Early adolescent cocaine use as determined by hair analysis in a prenatal cocaine exposure cohort

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Tamara Duckworth; Behnke, Marylou; Eyler, Fonda Davis; Szabo, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Preclinical and other research suggest that youth with prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) may be at high risk for cocaine use due to both altered brain development and exposure to unhealthy environments. Methods Participants are early adolescents who were prospectively enrolled in a longitudinal study of PCE prior to or at birth. Hair samples were collected from the youth at ages 10½ and 12½ (N=263). Samples were analyzed for cocaine and its metabolites using ELISA screening with gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) confirmation of positive samples. Statistical analyses included comparisons between the hair-positive and hair-negative groups on risk and protective factors chosen a priori as well as hierarchical logistical regression analyses to predict membership in the hair-positive group. Results Hair samples were positive for cocaine use for 14% (n=36) of the tested cohort. Exactly half of the hair-positive preteens had a history of PCE. Group comparisons revealed that hair-negative youth had significantly higher IQ scores at age 10½; the hair-positive youth had greater availability of cigarettes, alcohol, and other drugs in the home; caregivers with more alcohol problems and depressive symptoms; less nurturing home environments; and less positive attachment to their primary caregivers and peers. The caregivers of the hair-positive preteens reported that the youth displayed more externalizing and social problems, and the hair-positive youth endorsed more experimentation with cigarettes, alcohol, and/or other drugs. Mental health problems, peer drug use, exposure to violence, and neighborhood characteristics did not differ between the groups. Regression analyses showed that the availability of drugs in the home had the greatest predictive value for hair-positive group membership while higher IQ, more nurturing home environments, and positive attachment to caregivers or peers exerted some protective effect. Conclusion The results do not support a

  8. Effects of the kappa opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) on cocaine versus food choice and extended-access cocaine intake in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hutsell, Blake A; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Negus, Sidney Stevens; Banks, Matthew L

    2016-03-01

    The dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system has been implicated as one potential neurobiological modulator of the abuse-related effects of cocaine and as a potential target for medications development. This study determined effects of the KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) on cocaine self-administration under a novel procedure that featured two daily components: (1) a 2-hour 'choice' component (9:00-11:00 am) when monkeys could choose between food pellets and cocaine injections (0-0.1 mg/kg per injection, intravenous) and (2) a 20-hour 'extended-access' component (noon to 8:00 am) when cocaine (0.1 mg/kg per injection) was available under a fixed-ratio schedule to promote high daily cocaine intakes. Rhesus monkeys (n = 4) were given 14 days of exposure to the choice + extended-access procedure then treated with nor-BNI (3.2 or 10.0 mg/kg, intramuscular), and cocaine choice and extended-access cocaine intake were evaluated for an additional 14 days. Consistent with previous studies, cocaine maintained both a dose-dependent increase in cocaine choice during choice components and a high level of cocaine intake during extended-access components. Neither 3.2 nor 10 mg/kg nor-BNI significantly altered cocaine choice or extended-access cocaine intake. In two additional monkeys, nor-BNI also had no effect on cocaine choice or extended-access cocaine intake when it was administered at the beginning of exposure to the extended-access components. Overall, these results do not support a major role for the dynorphin/KOR system in modulating cocaine self-administration under these conditions in non-human primates nor do they support the clinical utility of KOR antagonists as a pharmacotherapeutic strategy for cocaine addiction. PMID:25581305

  9. Coca and cocaine in Peru: an international policy assessment.

    PubMed

    Morales, E

    Using part of a set of ethnographic data gathered over a 5-year period on the political economy of cocaine in Peru, the study examines the impact of coca and cocaine on the social and economic policies of Peru. Before assessing the Peruvian government's role in international drug policy, the article briefly surveys the traditional use of coca and production, trafficking, and abuse of cocaine within the context of a much larger national problem. The paper concludes with a critical evaluation of the limited investment in crop substitution and eradication programs supported by the American government. PMID:2289840

  10. A fibre optic chemical sensor for the detection of cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. Hien; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.; Hardwick, S. A.

    2010-09-01

    A fibre-optic chemical sensor for the detection of cocaine has been developed, based on a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) containing a fluorescein moiety as the signalling group. The fluorescent MIP was formed and covalently attached to the distal end of an optical fibre. The sensor exhibited an increase in fluorescence intensity in response to cocaine in the concentration range of 0 - 500 μM in aqueous acetonitrile mixtures with good reproducibility over 24 h. Selectivity for cocaine over others drugs has also been demonstrated.

  11. Cocaine use and delayed myocardial ischaemia and/or infarction

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Kee Wei; Wood, Alice

    2014-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman was admitted into the coronary care unit following chest pain after using cocaine. She was found to have significant myocardial ischaemia on blood and ECG investigations despite a recent coronary angiogram that had not demonstrated flow-limiting coronary disease. This case report summarises the risks of myocardial ischaemia and/or infarction for patients taking cocaine and the pathophysiology behind it, focusing in particular on the risks of delayed reaction some time after cocaine ingestion. PMID:25201873

  12. The Bermuda Triangle of cocaine-induced neuroadaptations.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Marina E

    2010-09-01

    Activation of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the nucleus accumbens is critical for goal-directed behaviors including cocaine seeking. Studies in cocaine-experienced rodents have revealed three major categories of neuroadaptations that influence the ability of glutamate inputs to activate MSNs: changes in synaptic AMPA receptor levels, changes in extracellular non-synaptic glutamate levels and changes in MSN intrinsic membrane excitability. Most studies have focused on one of these adaptations. This review will consider the possibility that they are causally related and speculate about how time-dependent changes in their interactions may regulate MSN output during early and late withdrawal from repeated cocaine exposure. PMID:20655604

  13. The Bermuda Triangle of cocaine-induced neuroadaptations.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Marina E

    2010-09-01

    Activation of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the nucleus accumbens is critical for goal-directed behaviors including cocaine seeking. Studies in cocaine-experienced rodents have revealed three major categories of neuroadaptations that influence the ability of glutamate inputs to activate MSNs: changes in synaptic AMPA receptor levels, changes in extracellular non-synaptic glutamate levels and changes in MSN intrinsic membrane excitability. Most studies have focused on one of these adaptations. This review will consider the possibility that they are causally related and speculate about how time-dependent changes in their interactions may regulate MSN output during early and late withdrawal from repeated cocaine exposure.

  14. Delay discounting of cocaine by rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Woolverton, William L; Myerson, Joel; Green, Leonard

    2007-06-01

    The p