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Sample records for 4-hydroxylase gene impact

  1. Cinnamate 4-Hydroxylase (C4H) genes from Leucaena leucocephala: a pulp yielding leguminous tree.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Omer, Sumita; Patel, Krunal; Khan, Bashir M

    2013-02-01

    Leucaena leucocephala is a leguminous tree species accounting for one-fourth of raw material supplied to paper and pulp industry in India. Cinnamate 4-Hydroxylase (C4H, EC 1.14.13.11) is the second gene of phenylpropanoid pathway and a member of cytochrome P450 family. There is currently intense interest to alter or modify lignin content of L. leucocephala. Three highly similar C4H alleles of LlC4H1 gene were isolated and characterized. The alleles shared more than 98 % sequence identity at amino acid level to each other. Binding of partial promoter of another C4H gene LlC4H2, to varying amounts of crude nuclear proteins isolated from leaf and stem tissues of L. leucocephala formed two loose and one strong complex, respectively, suggesting that the abundance of proteins that bind with the partial C4H promoter is higher in stem tissue than in leaf tissue. Quantitative Real Time PCR study suggested that among tissues of same age, root tissues had highest level of C4H transcripts. Maximum transcript level was observed in 30 day old root tissue. Among the tissues investigated, C4H activity was highest in 60 day old root tissues. Tissue specific quantitative comparison of lignin from developing seedling stage to 1 year old tree stage indicated that Klason lignin increased in tissues with age. PMID:23070917

  2. Prolyl 4-hydroxylase activity-responsive transcription factors: From hydroxylation to gene expression and neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Siddiq, Ambreena; Aminova, Leila R; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2008-01-01

    Most homeostatic processes including gene transcription occur as a result of deviations in physiological tone that threatens the survival of the organism. A prototypical homeostatic stress response includes changes in gene expression following alterations in oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate levels. Each of these cofactors plays an important role in cellular metabolism. Accordingly, a family of enzymes known as the Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (PHD) enzymes are a group of dioxygenases that have evolved to sense changes in 2-oxoglutarate, oxygen and iron via changes in enzyme activity. Indeed, PHDs are a part of an established oxygen sensor system that regulates transcriptional regulation of hypoxia/stress-regulated genes and thus are an important component of events leading to cellular rescue from oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate deprivations. The ability of PHD activity to regulate homeostatic responses to oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate metabolism has led to the development of small molecule inhibitors of the PHDs as a strategy for activating or augmenting cellular stress responses. These small molecules are proving effective in preclinical models of stroke and Parkinson's disease. However the precise protective pathways engaged by PHD inhibition are only beginning to be defined. In the current review, we summarize the role of iron, 2-oxoglutarate and oxygen in the PHD catalyzed hydroxylation reaction and provide a brief discussion of some of the transcription factors that play an effective role in neuroprotection against oxidative stress as a result of changes in PHD activity. PMID:17981760

  3. Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase of sorghum [Sorghum biocolor (L.) Moench] gene SbC4H1 restricts lignin synthesis in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (C4H) is the first hydroxylase enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway, and its content and activity affects the lignin synthesis. In this study, we isolated a C4H gene SbC4H1 from the suppression subtractive hybridization library of brown midrib (bmr) mutants of Sorghum b...

  4. Virus induced gene silencing of three putative prolyl 4-hydroxylases enhances plant growth in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    PubMed

    Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios; Sedeek, Khalid E M; Raad, Maya; Zaki, Marwa Samir; Kalaitzis, Panagiotis

    2014-07-01

    Proline hydroxylation is a major posttranslational modification of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) that is catalyzed by prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs). HRGPs such as arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) and extensios play significant roles on cell wall structure and function and their implication in cell division and expansion has been reported. We used tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based virus induced gene silencing to investigate the role of three tomato P4Hs, out of ten present in the tomato genome, in growth and development. Eight-days old tomato seedlings were infected with the appropriate TRV vectors and plants were allowed to grow under standard conditions for 6 weeks. Lower P4H mRNA levels were associated with lower hydroxyproline content in root and shoot tissues indicating successful gene silencing. P4H-silenced plants had longer roots and shoots and larger leaves. The increased leaf area can be attributed to increased cell division as indicated by the higher leaf epidermal cell number in SlP4H1- and SlP4H9-silenced plants. In contrast, SlP4H7-silenced plants had larger leaves due to enhanced cell expansion. Western blot analysis revealed that silencing of SlP4H7 and SlP4H9 was associated with reduced levels of JIM8-bound AGP and JIM11-bound extensin epitopes, while silencing of SlP4H1 reduced only the levels of AGP proteins. Collectively these results show that P4Hs have significant and distinct roles in cell division and expansion of tomato leaves.

  5. No association between schizophrenia and polymorphisms within the genes for debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (CYP2D6) and the dopamine transporter (DAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J.; Williams, J.; Asherson, P.; McGuffin, P.; Owen, M.

    1995-02-27

    It has been suggested that the cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase, debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase, is involved in the catabolism and processing of neurotransmitters subsequent to their reuptake into target cells. It is also thought to be related to the dopamine transporter that acts to take released dopamine back up into presynaptic terminals. The present study used the association approach to test the hypothesis that mutations in the genes for debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (CYP2D6) and the dopamine transporter (DAT) confer susceptibility to schizophrenia. There were no differences in allele or genotype frequencies between patients and controls in the mutations causing the poor metaboliser phenotype in CYP2D6. In addition there was no association found between schizophrenia and a 48 bp repeat within the 3{prime} untranslated region of DAT. 18 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. Prolyl 4-hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Gorres, Kelly L.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications can cause profound changes in protein function. Typically, these modifications are reversible, and thus provide a biochemical on–off switch. In contrast, proline residues are the substrates for an irreversible reaction that is the most common posttranslational modification in humans. This reaction, which is catalyzed by prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H), yields (2S,4R)-4-hydroxyproline (Hyp). The protein substrates for P4Hs are diverse. Likewise, the biological consequences of prolyl hydroxylation vary widely, and include altering protein conformation and protein–protein interactions, and enabling further modification. The best known role for Hyp is in stabilizing the collagen triple helix. Hyp is also found in proteins with collagen-like domains, as well as elastin, conotoxins, and argonaute 2. A prolyl hydroxylase domain protein acts on the hypoxia inducible factor α, which plays a key role in sensing molecular oxygen, and could act on inhibitory κB kinase and RNA polymerase II. P4Hs are not unique to animals, being found in plants and microbes as well. Here, we review the enzymic catalysts of prolyl hydroxylation, along with the chemical and biochemical consequences of this subtle but abundant posttranslational modification. PMID:20199358

  7. Proline with or without hydroxyproline influences collagen concentration and regulates prolyl 4-hydroxylase α (I) gene expression in juvenile turbo ( Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaikai; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Huihui; Liufu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Yanjiao; Peng, Mo; Ai, Qinghui

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary proline (Pro), and Pro and hydroxyproline (Hyp) in combination on the growth performance, total Hyp and collagen concentrations of tissues, and prolyl 4-hydroxylase α(I) (P4H α(I)) gene expression in juvenile turbot feeding high plant protein diets. A diet containing 50% crude protein and 12% crude lipid was formulated as the basal and control, on which other two protein and lipid contents identical experimental diets were formulated by supplementing the basal with either 0.75% Pro (Pro-0.75) or 0.75% Pro and 0.75% Hyp (Pro+Hyp). Four groups of fish in indoor seawater recirculating systems, 35 individuals each, were fed twice a day to apparent satiation for 10 weeks. The results showed that dietary Pro and Hyp supplementation had no significant effect on growth performance and feed utilization of juvenile turbot (P > 0.05). Total Hyp and collagen concentrations in muscle were significantly increased when dietary Pro and Hyp increased (P <0.05), and fish fed diet Pro+Hyp showed significantly higher free Hyp content in plasma than those fed other diets (P <0.05). The expression of P4H a(I) gene in liver and muscle was significantly up regulated in fish fed diet Pro-0.75 in comparison with control (P <0.05); however the gene was significantly down regulated in fish fed diet Pro+Hyp in muscle in comparison with fish fed diet Pro-0.75 (P <0.05). It can be concluded that supplement of crystal L-Pro and L-Hyp to high plant protein diets did not show positive effects on growth performance of juvenile turbot, but enhanced total collagen concentrations in muscle.

  8. The genetics of aflatoxin B1 metabolism. Association of the induction of aflatoxin B1-4-hydroxylase with the transcriptional activation of cytochrome P3-450 gene.

    PubMed

    Koser, P L; Faletto, M B; Maccubbin, A E; Gurtoo, H L

    1988-09-01

    The association between murine cytochrome P3-450 and hepatic aflatoxin B1-4-hydroxylase, a cytochrome P-450-dependent enzyme which converts aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) to aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), was examined by (a) purification of the cytochrome P-450 which preferentially metabolizes AFB1 to AFM1; (b) isolation of the specific cDNA clone; and (c) correlating induction of transcriptional activation of the specific message with the enzyme activity in the hepatic microsomes. Isolation of cytochromes P-450 from C57BL/6 mice, an Ah-responsive strain, pretreated with a 150 mg/kg dose of beta-naphthoflavone resulted in the partial purification of the cytochrome P-450 with preference for the metabolism of AFB1 to AFM1. Antibodies raised against this cytochrome P-450 were used to enrich hepatic mRNA for cDNA cloning. A cDNA library screened with a rat cytochrome P-450c gene probe yielded only two types of cDNA clones that contained inserts corresponding to cytochrome P1-450 and cytochrome P3-450. Specific restriction fragments of near full-length P1-450 cDNA and full-length P3-450 cDNA, hybridizing only with their respective messages, were isolated and used to assess transcriptional activation of these messages in liver and extrahepatic tissues from C57BL/6 mice treated with 3-methylcholanthrene, beta-naphthoflavone, indolylacetonitrile, and Aroclor-1254. Dose-dependent induction of the two messenger RNAs, when compared with the induction of specific enzyme activities, demonstrated the association of cytochrome P1-450 with aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity and the association of cytochrome P3-450 with AFB1-4-hydroxylase activity. This supports our earlier hypothesis that AFB1-4-hydroxylase and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase, although regulated by the Ah locus, are the products of two separate genes (Gurtoo, H.L., Dahms, R.P., Kanter, P., and Vaught, J.B. (1978) J. Biol. Chem. 253, 3952-3961). PMID:3137229

  9. Characterization of two carnation petal prolyl 4 hydroxylases.

    PubMed

    Vlad, Florina; Tiainen, Päivi; Owen, Carolyn; Spano, Thodhoraq; Daher, Firas Bou; Oualid, Fatiha; Senol, Namik Ozer; Vlad, Daniela; Myllyharju, Johanna; Kalaitzis, Panagiotis

    2010-10-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs) catalyze the proline hydroxylation, a major post-translational modification, of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins. Two carnation petal P4H cDNAs, (Dianthus caryophyllus prolyl 4-hydroxylase) DcP4H1 and DcP4H2, were identified and characterized at the gene expression and biochemical level in order to investigate their role in flower senescence. Both mRNAs showed similar patterns of expression with stable transcript abundance during senescence progression and differential tissue-specific expression with DcP4H1 and DcP4H2 strongly expressed in ovaries and stems, respectively. Recombinant DcP4H1 and DcP4H2 proteins were produced and their catalytic properties were determined. Pyridine 2,4-dicarboxylate (PDCA) was identified as a potent inhibitor of the in vitro enzyme activity of both P4Hs and used to determine whether inhibition of proline hydroxylation in petals is involved in senescence progression of cut carnation flowers. PDCA suppressed the climacteric ethylene production indicating a strong correlation between the inhibition of DcP4H1 and DcP4H2 activity in vitro by PDCA and the suppression of climacteric ethylene production in cut carnation flowers.

  10. Expression analysis of kenaf cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) ortholog during developmental and stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to clone and analyze the expression pattern of a C4H gene encoding cinnamate 4-hydroxylase from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.). A full-length C4H ortholog was cloned using degenerate primers and the RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) method. The full-length C4H ortholog...

  11. Down-regulation of p-coumaroyl quinate/shikimate 3'-hydroxylase (C3'H) and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) genes in the lignin biosynthetic pathway of Eucalyptus urophylla x E. grandis leads to improved sugar release

    DOE PAGES

    Sykes, Robert W.; Gjersing, Erica L.; Foutz, Kirk; Rottmann, William H.; Kuhn, Sean A.; Foster, Cliff E.; Ziebell, Angela; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Decker, Stephen R.; Hinchee, Maud A. W.; et al

    2015-08-27

    In this study, lignocellulosic materials provide an attractive replacement for food-based crops used to produce ethanol. Understanding the interactions within the cell wall is vital to overcome the highly recalcitrant nature of biomass. One factor imparting plant cell wall recalcitrance is lignin, which can be manipulated by making changes in the lignin biosynthetic pathway. In this study, eucalyptus down-regulated in expression of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H, EC 1.14.13.11) or p-coumaroyl quinate/shikimate 3'-hydroxylase (C3'H, EC 1.14.13.36) were evaluated for cell wall composition and reduced recalcitrance.

  12. RNAi down-regulation of cinnamate-4-hydroxylase increases artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ritesh; Vashisth, Divya; Misra, Amita; Akhtar, Md Qussen; Jalil, Syed Uzma; Shanker, Karuna; Gupta, Madan Mohan; Rout, Prashant Kumar; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Shasany, Ajit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) converts trans-cinnamic acid (CA) to p-coumaric acid (COA) in the phenylpropanoid/lignin biosynthesis pathway. Earlier we reported increased expression of AaCYP71AV1 (an important gene of artemisinin biosynthesis pathway) caused by CA treatment in Artemisia annua. Hence, AaC4H gene was identified, cloned, characterized and silenced in A. annua with the assumption that the elevated internal CA due to knock down may increase the artemisinin yield. Accumulation of trans-cinnamic acid in the plant due to AaC4H knockdown was accompanied with the reduction of p-coumaric acid, total phenolics, anthocyanin, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activities but increase in salicylic acid (SA) and artemisinin. Interestingly, feeding trans-cinnamic acid to the RNAi line increased the level of artemisinin along with benzoic (BA) and SA with no effect on the downstream metabolites p-coumaric acid, coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde, whereas p-coumaric acid feeding increased the content of downstream coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde with no effect on BA, SA, trans-cinnamic acid or artemisinin. SA is reported earlier to be inducing the artemisinin yield. This report demonstrates the link between the phenylpropanoid/lignin pathway with artemisinin pathway through SA, triggered by accumulation of trans-cinnamic acid because of the blockage at C4H. PMID:27220407

  13. RNAi down-regulation of cinnamate-4-hydroxylase increases artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ritesh; Vashisth, Divya; Misra, Amita; Akhtar, Md Qussen; Jalil, Syed Uzma; Shanker, Karuna; Gupta, Madan Mohan; Rout, Prashant Kumar; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Shasany, Ajit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) converts trans-cinnamic acid (CA) to p-coumaric acid (COA) in the phenylpropanoid/lignin biosynthesis pathway. Earlier we reported increased expression of AaCYP71AV1 (an important gene of artemisinin biosynthesis pathway) caused by CA treatment in Artemisia annua. Hence, AaC4H gene was identified, cloned, characterized and silenced in A. annua with the assumption that the elevated internal CA due to knock down may increase the artemisinin yield. Accumulation of trans-cinnamic acid in the plant due to AaC4H knockdown was accompanied with the reduction of p-coumaric acid, total phenolics, anthocyanin, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activities but increase in salicylic acid (SA) and artemisinin. Interestingly, feeding trans-cinnamic acid to the RNAi line increased the level of artemisinin along with benzoic (BA) and SA with no effect on the downstream metabolites p-coumaric acid, coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde, whereas p-coumaric acid feeding increased the content of downstream coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde with no effect on BA, SA, trans-cinnamic acid or artemisinin. SA is reported earlier to be inducing the artemisinin yield. This report demonstrates the link between the phenylpropanoid/lignin pathway with artemisinin pathway through SA, triggered by accumulation of trans-cinnamic acid because of the blockage at C4H. PMID:27220407

  14. Bioavailable affinity label for collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Vasta, James D.; Higgin, Joshua J.; Kersteen, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. Its prevalent 4-hydroxyproline residues contribute greatly to its conformational stability. The hydroxyl groups arise from a post-translational modification catalyzed by the non-heme iron-dependent enzyme, collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H). Here, we report that 4-oxo-5,6-epoxyhexanoate, a mimic of the α-ketoglutarate co-substrate, inactivates human P4H. The inactivation installs a ketone functionality in P4H, providing a handle for proteomic experiments. Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to the esterified epoxy ketone displays the phenotype of a worm lacking P4H. Thus, this affinity label can be used to mediate collagen stability in an animal, as is desirable in the treatment of a variety of fibrotic diseases. PMID:23702396

  15. Cytochrome P3-450 cDNA encodes aflatoxin B1-4-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Faletto, M B; Koser, P L; Battula, N; Townsend, G K; Maccubbin, A E; Gelboin, H V; Gurtoo, H L

    1988-09-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a potent hepatocarcinogen and ubiquitous dietary contaminant in some countries, is detoxified to aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) via cytochrome P-450-mediated AFB1-4-hydroxylase. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that the expression of AFB1-4-hydroxylase is regulated by the aryl hydrocarbon locus and suggested that different cytochrome P-450 isozymes catalyze AFB1-4-hydroxylase and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activities. We have now examined lysates from mammalian cells infected with recombinant vaccinia viruses containing expressible cytochrome P1-450 or P3-450 cDNAs for their ability to metabolize AFB1 to AFM1. Our results show that cytochrome P3-450 cDNA specifies AFB1-4-hydroxylase. This is the first direct assignment of a specific cytochrome P-450 to an AFB1 detoxification pathway. This finding may have relevance to the dietary modulation of AFB1 hepatocarcinogenesis.

  16. Down-regulation of p-coumaroyl quinate/shikimate 3'-hydroxylase (C3'H) and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) genes in the lignin biosynthetic pathway of Eucalyptus urophylla x E. grandis leads to improved sugar release

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, Robert W.; Gjersing, Erica L.; Foutz, Kirk; Rottmann, William H.; Kuhn, Sean A.; Foster, Cliff E.; Ziebell, Angela; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Decker, Stephen R.; Hinchee, Maud A. W.; Davis, Mark F.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, lignocellulosic materials provide an attractive replacement for food-based crops used to produce ethanol. Understanding the interactions within the cell wall is vital to overcome the highly recalcitrant nature of biomass. One factor imparting plant cell wall recalcitrance is lignin, which can be manipulated by making changes in the lignin biosynthetic pathway. In this study, eucalyptus down-regulated in expression of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H, EC 1.14.13.11) or p-coumaroyl quinate/shikimate 3'-hydroxylase (C3'H, EC 1.14.13.36) were evaluated for cell wall composition and reduced recalcitrance.

  17. Cinnamate-4-hydroxylase expression in Arabidopsis. Regulation in response to development and the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Lelong, D A; Cusumano, J C; Meyer, K; Chapple, C

    1997-01-01

    Cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) is the first Cyt P450-dependent monooxygenase of the phenylpropanoid pathway. To study the expression of this gene in Arabidopsis thaliana, a C4H cDNA clone from the Arabidopsis expressed sequence tag database was identified and used to isolate its corresponding genomic clone. The entire C4H coding sequence plus 2.9 kb of its promoter were isolated on a 5.4-kb HindIII fragment of this cosmid. Inspection of the promoter sequence revealed the presence of a number of putative regulatory motifs previously identified in the promoters of other phenylpropanoid pathway genes. The expression of C4H was analyzed by RNA blot hybridization analysis and in transgenic Arabidopsis carrying a C4H-beta-glucuronidase transcriptional fusion. C4H message accumulation was light-dependent, but was detectable even in dark-grown seedlings. Consistent with these data, C4H mRNA was accumulated to light-grown levels in etiolated det1-1 mutant seedlings. C4H is widely expressed in various Arabidopsis tissues, particularly in roots and cells undergoing lignification. The C4H-driven beta-glucuronidase expression accurately reflected the tissue-specificity and wound-inducibility of the C4H promoter indicated by RNA blot hybridization analysis. A modest increase in C4H expression was observed in the tt8 mutant of Arabidopsis. PMID:9085570

  18. miR-190 Enhances HIF-Dependent Responses to Hypoxia in Drosophila by Inhibiting the Prolyl-4-hydroxylase Fatiga

    PubMed Central

    De Lella Ezcurra, Ana Laura; Bertolin, Agustina Paola; Kim, Kevin; Gándara, Lautaro; Luschnig, Stefan; Perrimon, Norbert; Melani, Mariana; Wappner, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Cellular and systemic responses to low oxygen levels are principally mediated by Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs), a family of evolutionary conserved heterodimeric transcription factors, whose alpha- and beta-subunits belong to the bHLH-PAS family. In normoxia, HIFα is hydroxylated by specific prolyl-4-hydroxylases, targeting it for proteasomal degradation, while in hypoxia the activity of these hydroxylases decreases due to low oxygen availability, leading to HIFα accumulation and expression of HIF target genes. To identify microRNAs required for maximal HIF activity, we conducted an overexpression screen in Drosophila melanogaster, evaluating the induction of a HIF transcriptional reporter. miR-190 overexpression enhanced HIF-dependent biological responses, including terminal sprouting of the tracheal system, while in miR-190 loss of function embryos the hypoxic response was impaired. In hypoxic conditions, miR-190 expression was upregulated and required for induction of HIF target genes by directly inhibiting the HIF prolyl-4-hydroxylase Fatiga. Thus, miR-190 is a novel regulator of the hypoxia response that represses the oxygen sensor Fatiga, leading to HIFα stabilization and enhancement of hypoxic responses. PMID:27223464

  19. Chemical Genetics Uncovers Novel Inhibitors of Lignification, Including p-Iodobenzoic Acid Targeting CINNAMATE-4-HYDROXYLASE.

    PubMed

    Van de Wouwer, Dorien; Vanholme, Ruben; Decou, Raphaël; Goeminne, Geert; Audenaert, Dominique; Nguyen, Long; Höfer, René; Pesquet, Edouard; Vanholme, Bartel; Boerjan, Wout

    2016-09-01

    Plant secondary-thickened cell walls are characterized by the presence of lignin, a recalcitrant and hydrophobic polymer that provides mechanical strength and ensures long-distance water transport. Exactly the recalcitrance and hydrophobicity of lignin put a burden on the industrial processing efficiency of lignocellulosic biomass. Both forward and reverse genetic strategies have been used intensively to unravel the molecular mechanism of lignin deposition. As an alternative strategy, we introduce here a forward chemical genetic approach to find candidate inhibitors of lignification. A high-throughput assay to assess lignification in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings was developed and used to screen a 10-k library of structurally diverse, synthetic molecules. Of the 73 compounds that reduced lignin deposition, 39 that had a major impact were retained and classified into five clusters based on the shift they induced in the phenolic profile of Arabidopsis seedlings. One representative compound of each cluster was selected for further lignin-specific assays, leading to the identification of an aromatic compound that is processed in the plant into two fragments, both having inhibitory activity against lignification. One fragment, p-iodobenzoic acid, was further characterized as a new inhibitor of CINNAMATE 4-HYDROXYLASE, a key enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway synthesizing the building blocks of the lignin polymer. As such, we provide proof of concept of this chemical biology approach to screen for inhibitors of lignification and present a broad array of putative inhibitors of lignin deposition for further characterization. PMID:27485881

  20. A steady-state kinetic analysis of the prolyl-4-hydroxylase mechanism.

    PubMed

    Soskel, N T; Kuby, S A

    1981-01-01

    Published kinetic data by Kivirikko, et al. on the prolyl-4-hydroxylase reaction have been re-evaluated using the overall steady-state velocity equation in the forward and reverse directions for an ordered ter ter kinetic mechanism. Qualitatively, the published data for prolyl-4-hydroxylase appear to fit the predicted patterns for this kinetic mechanism. More kinetic data are needed to confirm these results and to quantitate the kinetic parameters but, tentatively, the order of substrate addition would appear to be alpha-ketoglutarate, oxygen, and peptide; and the order of product release would be hydroxylated peptide (or collagen), carbon dioxide, and succinate.

  1. Molecular cloning of the. alpha. -subunit of human prolyl 4-hydroxylase: The complete cDNA-derived amino acid sequence and evidence for alternative splicing of RNA transcripts

    SciTech Connect

    Helaakoski, T.; Vuori, K.; Myllylae, R.; Kivirikko, K.I.; Pihlajaniemi, T. )

    1989-06-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} tetramer, catalyzes the formation of 4-hydroxyproline in collagens by the hydroxylation of proline residues in peptide linkages. The authors report here on the isolation of cDNA clones encoding the {alpha}-subunit of the enzyme from human tumor HT-1080, placenta, and fibroblast cDNA libraries. Eight overlapping clones covering almost all of the corresponding 3,000-nucleotide mRNA, including all the coding sequences, were characterized. These clones encode a polypeptide of 517 amino acid residues and a signal peptide of 17 amino acids. Previous characterization of cDNA clones for the {beta}-subunit of prolyl 4-hydroxylase has indicated that its C terminus has the amino acid sequence Lys-Asp-Gly-Leu, which, it has been suggested, is necessary for the retention of a polypeptide within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. The {alpha}-subunit does not have this C-terminal sequence, and thus one function of the {beta}-subunit in the prolyl 4-hydroxylase tetramer appears to be to retain the enzyme within this cell organelle. Southern blot analyses of human genomic DNA with a cDNA probe for the {alpha}-subunit suggested the presence of only one gene encoding the two types of mRNA, which appear to result from mutually exclusive alternative splicing of primary transcripts of one gene.

  2. Human Collagen Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Is Activated by Ligands for Its Iron Center.

    PubMed

    Vasta, James D; Raines, Ronald T

    2016-06-14

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. The posttranslational hydroxylation of proline residues in collagen contributes greatly to its conformational stability. Deficient hydroxylation is associated with a variety of disease states, including scurvy. The hydroxylation of proline residues in collagen is catalyzed by an Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase (CP4H). CP4H has long been known to suffer oxidative inactivation during catalysis, and the cofactor ascorbate (vitamin C) is required to reactivate the enzyme by reducing its iron center from Fe(III) to Fe(II). Herein, we report on the discovery of the first synthetic activators of CP4H. Specifically, we find that 2,2'-bipyridine-4-carboxylate and 2,2'-bipyridine-5-carboxylate serve as ligands for the iron center in human CP4H that enhance the rate of ascorbate-dependent reactivation. This new mode of CP4H activation is available to other biheteroaryl compounds but does not necessarily extend to other prolyl 4-hydroxylases. As collagen is weakened in many indications, analogous activators of CP4H could have therapeutic benefits. PMID:27183028

  3. Inhibition of HIF-prolyl-4-hydroxylases prevents mitochondrial impairment and cell death in a model of neuronal oxytosis

    PubMed Central

    Neitemeier, S; Dolga, A M; Honrath, B; Karuppagounder, S S; Alim, I; Ratan, R R; Culmsee, C

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial impairment induced by oxidative stress is a main characteristic of intrinsic cell death pathways in neurons underlying the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, protection of mitochondrial integrity and function is emerging as a promising strategy to prevent neuronal damage. Here, we show that pharmacological inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-4-hydroxylases (HIF-PHDs) by adaptaquin inhibits lipid peroxidation and fully maintains mitochondrial function as indicated by restored mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production, reduced formation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and preserved mitochondrial respiration, thereby protecting neuronal HT-22 cells in a model of glutamate-induced oxytosis. Selective reduction of PHD1 protein using CRISPR/Cas9 technology also reduced both lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial impairment, and attenuated glutamate toxicity in the HT-22 cells. Regulation of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) expression levels and related target genes may mediate these beneficial effects. Overall, these results expose HIF-PHDs as promising targets to protect mitochondria and, thereby, neurons from oxidative cell death. PMID:27148687

  4. Chemical Genetics Uncovers Novel Inhibitors of Lignification, Including p-Iodobenzoic Acid Targeting CINNAMATE-4-HYDROXYLASE1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wouwer, Dorien; Decou, Raphaël; Audenaert, Dominique; Nguyen, Long

    2016-01-01

    Plant secondary-thickened cell walls are characterized by the presence of lignin, a recalcitrant and hydrophobic polymer that provides mechanical strength and ensures long-distance water transport. Exactly the recalcitrance and hydrophobicity of lignin put a burden on the industrial processing efficiency of lignocellulosic biomass. Both forward and reverse genetic strategies have been used intensively to unravel the molecular mechanism of lignin deposition. As an alternative strategy, we introduce here a forward chemical genetic approach to find candidate inhibitors of lignification. A high-throughput assay to assess lignification in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings was developed and used to screen a 10-k library of structurally diverse, synthetic molecules. Of the 73 compounds that reduced lignin deposition, 39 that had a major impact were retained and classified into five clusters based on the shift they induced in the phenolic profile of Arabidopsis seedlings. One representative compound of each cluster was selected for further lignin-specific assays, leading to the identification of an aromatic compound that is processed in the plant into two fragments, both having inhibitory activity against lignification. One fragment, p-iodobenzoic acid, was further characterized as a new inhibitor of CINNAMATE 4-HYDROXYLASE, a key enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway synthesizing the building blocks of the lignin polymer. As such, we provide proof of concept of this chemical biology approach to screen for inhibitors of lignification and present a broad array of putative inhibitors of lignin deposition for further characterization. PMID:27485881

  5. Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Expression Analysis of a Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase from the Marine Sponge Chondrosia reniformis.

    PubMed

    Pozzolini, Marina; Scarfì, Sonia; Mussino, Francesca; Ferrando, Sara; Gallus, Lorenzo; Giovine, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H) catalyzes the hydroxylation of proline residues in collagen. P4H has two functional subunits, α and β. Here, we report the cDNA cloning, characterization, and expression analysis of the α and β subunits of the P4H derived from the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis. The amino acid sequence of the α subunit is 533 residues long with an M r of 59.14 kDa, while the β subunit counts 526 residues with an M r of 58.75 kDa. Phylogenetic analyses showed that αP4H and βP4H are more related to the mammalian sequences than to known invertebrate P4Hs. Western blot analysis of sponge lysate protein cross-linking revealed a band of 240 kDa corresponding to an α2β2 tetramer structure. This result suggests that P4H from marine sponges shares the same quaternary structure with vertebrate homologous enzymes. Gene expression analyses showed that αP4H transcript is higher in the choanosome than in the ectosome, while the study of factors affecting its expression in sponge fragmorphs revealed that soluble silicates had no effect on the αP4H levels, whereas ascorbic acid strongly upregulated the αP4H mRNA. Finally, treatment with two different tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha inhibitors determined a significant downregulation of αP4H gene expression in fragmorphs demonstrating, for the first time in Porifera, a positive involvement of TNF in sponge matrix biosynthesis. The molecular characterization of P4H genes involved in collagen hydroxylation, including the mechanisms that regulate their expression, is a key step for future recombinant sponge collagen production and may be pivotal to understand pathological mechanisms related to extracellular matrix deposition in higher organisms.

  6. Biphenyl 4-Hydroxylases Involved in Aucuparin Biosynthesis in Rowan and Apple Are Cytochrome P450 736A Proteins1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kaufholdt, David; Broggini, Giovanni A.L.; Flachowsky, Henryk; Hänsch, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Upon pathogen attack, fruit trees such as apple (Malus spp.) and pear (Pyrus spp.) accumulate biphenyl and dibenzofuran phytoalexins, with aucuparin as a major biphenyl compound. 4-Hydroxylation of the biphenyl scaffold, formed by biphenyl synthase (BIS), is catalyzed by a cytochrome P450 (CYP). The biphenyl 4-hydroxylase (B4H) coding sequence of rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) was isolated and functionally expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). SaB4H was named CYP736A107. No catalytic function of CYP736 was known previously. SaB4H exhibited absolute specificity for 3-hydroxy-5-methoxybiphenyl. In rowan cell cultures treated with elicitor from the scab fungus, transient increases in the SaB4H, SaBIS, and phenylalanine ammonia lyase transcript levels preceded phytoalexin accumulation. Transient expression of a carboxyl-terminal reporter gene construct directed SaB4H to the endoplasmic reticulum. A construct lacking the amino-terminal leader and transmembrane domain caused cytoplasmic localization. Functional B4H coding sequences were also isolated from two apple (Malus × domestica) cultivars. The MdB4Hs were named CYP736A163. When stems of cv Golden Delicious were infected with the fire blight bacterium, highest MdB4H transcript levels were observed in the transition zone. In a phylogenetic tree, the three B4Hs were closest to coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylases involved in lignin biosynthesis, suggesting a common ancestor. Coniferaldehyde and related compounds were not converted by SaB4H. PMID:25862456

  7. Biphenyl 4-Hydroxylases Involved in Aucuparin Biosynthesis in Rowan and Apple Are Cytochrome P450 736A Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Debabrata; Gaid, Mariam M; Chizzali, Cornelia; Reckwell, Dennis; Kaufholdt, David; Beuerle, Till; Broggini, Giovanni A L; Flachowsky, Henryk; Liu, Benye; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2015-06-01

    Upon pathogen attack, fruit trees such as apple (Malus spp.) and pear (Pyrus spp.) accumulate biphenyl and dibenzofuran phytoalexins, with aucuparin as a major biphenyl compound. 4-Hydroxylation of the biphenyl scaffold, formed by biphenyl synthase (BIS), is catalyzed by a cytochrome P450 (CYP). The biphenyl 4-hydroxylase (B4H) coding sequence of rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) was isolated and functionally expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). SaB4H was named CYP736A107. No catalytic function of CYP736 was known previously. SaB4H exhibited absolute specificity for 3-hydroxy-5-methoxybiphenyl. In rowan cell cultures treated with elicitor from the scab fungus, transient increases in the SaB4H, SaBIS, and phenylalanine ammonia lyase transcript levels preceded phytoalexin accumulation. Transient expression of a carboxyl-terminal reporter gene construct directed SaB4H to the endoplasmic reticulum. A construct lacking the amino-terminal leader and transmembrane domain caused cytoplasmic localization. Functional B4H coding sequences were also isolated from two apple (Malus × domestica) cultivars. The MdB4Hs were named CYP736A163. When stems of cv Golden Delicious were infected with the fire blight bacterium, highest MdB4H transcript levels were observed in the transition zone. In a phylogenetic tree, the three B4Hs were closest to coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylases involved in lignin biosynthesis, suggesting a common ancestor. Coniferaldehyde and related compounds were not converted by SaB4H.

  8. Engineering bacterial phenylalanine 4-hydroxylase for microbial synthesis of human neurotransmitter precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuheng; Sun, Xinxiao; Yuan, Qipeng; Yan, Yajun

    2014-07-18

    5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) is a drug that is clinically effective against depression, insomnia, obesity, chronic headaches, etc. It is only commercially produced by the extraction from the seeds of Griffonia simplicifolia because of a lack of synthetic methods. Here, we report the efficient microbial production of 5-HTP via combinatorial protein and metabolic engineering approaches. First, we reconstituted and screened prokaryotic phenylalanine 4-hydroxylase activity in Escherichia coli. Then, sequence- and structure-based protein engineering dramatically shifted its substrate preference, allowing for efficient conversion of tryptophan to 5-HTP. Importantly, E. coli endogenous tetrahydromonapterin (MH4) could be utilized as the coenzyme, when a foreign MH4 recycling mechanism was introduced. Whole-cell bioconversion allowed the high-level production of 5-HTP (1.1-1.2 g/L) from tryptophan in shake flasks. On this basis, metabolic engineering efforts were further made to achieve the de novo 5-HTP biosynthesis from glucose. This work not only holds great scale-up potential but also demonstrates a strategy for expanding the native metabolism of microorganisms.

  9. Hearts of Hypoxia-inducible Factor Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase-2 Hypomorphic Mice Show Protection against Acute Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Hyvärinen, Jaana; Hassinen, Ilmo E.; Sormunen, Raija; Mäki, Joni M.; Kivirikko, Kari I.; Koivunen, Peppi; Myllyharju, Johanna

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) has a pivotal role in oxygen homeostasis and cardioprotection mediated by ischemic preconditioning. Its stability is regulated by HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylases (HIF-P4Hs), the inhibition of which is regarded as a promising strategy for treating diseases such as anemia and ischemia. We generated a viable Hif-p4h-2 hypomorph mouse line (Hif-p4h-2gt/gt) that expresses decreased amounts of wild-type Hif-p4h-2 mRNA: 8% in the heart; 15% in the skeletal muscle; 34–47% in the kidney, spleen, lung, and bladder; 60% in the brain; and 85% in the liver. These mice have no polycythemia and show no signs of the dilated cardiomyopathy or hyperactive angiogenesis observed in mice with broad spectrum conditional Hif-p4h-2 inactivation. We focused here on the effects of chronic Hif-p4h-2 deficiency in the heart. Hif-1 and Hif-2 were stabilized, and the mRNA levels of glucose transporter-1, several enzymes of glycolysis, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1, angiopoietin-2, and adrenomedullin were increased in the Hif-p4h-2gt/gt hearts. When isolated Hif-p4h-2gt/gt hearts were subjected to ischemia-reperfusion, the recovery of mechanical function and coronary flow rate was significantly better than in wild type, while cumulative release of lactate dehydrogenase reflecting the infarct size was reduced. The preischemic amount of lactate was increased, and the ischemic versus preischemic [CrP]/[Cr] and [ATP] remained at higher levels in Hif-p4h-2gt/gt hearts, indicating enhanced glycolysis and an improved cellular energy state. Our data suggest that chronic stabilization of Hif-1α and Hif-2α by genetic knockdown of Hif-p4h-2 promotes cardioprotection by induction of many genes involved in glucose metabolism, cardiac function, and blood pressure. PMID:20185832

  10. Time-dependent inactivation of chick-embryo prolyl 4-hydroxylase by coumalic acid. Evidence for a syncatalytic mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Günzler, V; Hanauske-Abel, H M; Myllylä, R; Mohr, J; Kivirikko, K I

    1987-01-01

    From the structure-activity relationships of known competitive inhibitors, coumalic acid (2-oxo-1,2H-pyran-5-carboxylic acid) was deduced to be a potential syncatalytic inhibitor for chick-embryo prolyl 4-hydroxylase. The compound caused time-dependent inactivation, the reaction rate being first-order. The inactivation constant was 0.094 min-1, the Ki 17 mM and the bimolecular rate constant 0.09 M-1 X S-1. Human prolyl 4-hydroxylase and chick embryo lysyl hydroxylase were also inactivated, though to a lesser extent. Inactivation could be prevented by adding high concentrations of 2-oxoglutarate or its competitive analogues to the reaction mixture. In Lineweaver-Burk kinetics, coumalic acid displayed S-parabolic competitive inhibition with respect to 2-oxoglutarate. The inactivation reaction had cofactor requirements similar to those for the decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate. Enzymic activity was partially preserved in the absence of iron, but the rescue was incomplete, owing to decreased stability of the enzyme under this condition. Coumalic acid also decreased the electrophoretic mobility of the alpha-subunit, but the beta-subunit was not affected. Prolonged incubation of coumalic acid above pH 6.8 led to loss of its inactivating potency, owing to hydrolysis. It is concluded that the inactivation of prolyl 4-hydroxylase by coumalic acid is due to a syncatalytic mechanism. The data also suggest that the 2-oxoglutarate-binding site of the enzyme is located within the alpha-subunit. PMID:3036081

  11. Antisense and sense expression of cDNA coding for CYP73A15, a class II cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, leads to a delayed and reduced production of lignin in tobacco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blee, K.; Choi, J. W.; O'Connell, A. P.; Jupe, S. C.; Schuch, W.; Lewis, N. G.; Bolwell, G. P.

    2001-01-01

    A number of plant species contain the class II of genes encoding the cytochrome P450, CYP73, the cognate protein of which cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase, is the second enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway. In order to begin to determine possible functionality, tobacco has been transformed with a truncated French bean class II cinnamate hydroxylase (CYP73A15) in the sense and antisense orientations. Signals for C4H protein could be detected in vascular tissue from wild-type plants using heterologous probes. The transformed plants showed a normal phenotype, even though detectable C4H protein was much reduced in tissue prints. Young propagated transformants displayed a range of reduced C4H activities, as well as either reduced or no phloroglucinol-stainable lignin. However, all mature tobacco plants showed the accumulation of lignin, even though its deposition was apparently delayed. This was not due to induction of tyrosine ammonia-lyase activity, which was not detected, but instead it is presumed due to sufficient C4H residual activity. Analysis of the lignin content of the plants showed reductions of up to 30% with a slightly reduced syringyl to guaiacyl ratio as compared to wild type. This reduction level was favourable in comparison with some other targets in the lignification pathway that have been manipulated including that of class I cinnamate 4-hydroxylase. It is proposed that the class II cinnamate 4-hydroxylase might also function in lignification in a number of species including French bean and tobacco, based on these data.

  12. The prolyl 4-hydroxylase inhibitor ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate generates effective iron deficiency in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Buss, Joan L; Chen, Guohua; Ponka, Prem; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2002-10-01

    Ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (EDHB) is commonly utilized as a substrate analog and competitive inhibitor of prolyl 4-hydroxylases. These iron-dependent enzymes have received a lot of attention for their involvement in crucial biochemical pathways such as collagen maturation and oxygen sensing. Since EDHB is also capable of chelating the enzyme-bound iron, we study here its function as a chelator. We show that the affinity of EDHB for ferric iron is significantly lower than that of desferrioxamine. Nevertheless, EDHB is sufficient to promote effective iron deficiency in cells, reflected in the activation of the iron-responsive element/iron regulatory protein regulatory network. Thus, treatment of B6 fibroblasts with EDHB results in slow activation of iron regulatory protein 1 accompanied by an increase in transferrin receptor levels and reduction of the ferritin pool.

  13. Expression, Purification, Crystallization And Preliminary X-Ray Studies of a Prolyl-4-Hydroxylase Protein From Bacillus Anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.A.; Scott, E.E.; Limburg, J.

    2009-05-26

    Collagen prolyl-4-hydroxylase (C-P4H) catalyzes the hydroxylation of specific proline residues in procollagen, which is an essential step in collagen biosynthesis. A new form of P4H from Bacillus anthracis (anthrax-P4H) that shares many characteristics with the type I C-P4H from human has recently been characterized. The structure of anthrax-P4H could provide important insight into the chemistry of C-P4Hs and into the function of this unique homodimeric P4H. X-ray diffraction data of selenomethionine-labeled anthrax-P4H recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli have been collected to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution.

  14. Enzymatic changes in phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, cinnamic-4-hydroxylase, capsaicin synthase, and peroxidase activities in capsicum under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Phimchan, Paongpetch; Chanthai, Saksit; Bosland, Paul W; Techawongstien, Suchila

    2014-07-23

    Penylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), cinnamic-4-hydroxylase (C4H), capsaicin synthase (CS), and peroxidase (POD) are involved in the capsaicinoid biosynthesis pathway and may be altered in cultivars with different pungency levels. This study clarified the action of these enzymes under drought stress for hot Capsicum cultivars with low, medium,and high pungency levels. At the flowering stage, control plants were watered at field capacity, whereas drought-induced plants were subjected to gradual drought stress. Under drought stress, PAL, C4H, CS, and POD enzyme activities increased as compared to the non-drought-stressed plants. A novel discovery was that PAL was the critical enzyme in capsaicinoid biosynthesis under drought stress because its activities and capsaicinoid increased across the different pungency levels of hot pepper cultivars examined.

  15. Isolation and characterization of isochorismate synthase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase during salinity stress, wounding, and salicylic acid treatment in Carthamus tinctorius

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Mahnaz; Dehghan, Sara; Fischer, Rainer; Wenzel, Uwe; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Kavousi, Hamid Reza; Rahnamaeian, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a prominent signaling molecule during biotic and abiotic stresses in plants biosynthesized via cinnamate and isochorismate pathways. Cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) and isochorismate synthase (ICS) are the main enzymes in phenylpropanoid and isochorismate pathways, respectively. To investigate the actual roles of these genes in resistance mechanism to environmental stresses, here, the coding sequences of these enzymes in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius), as an oilseed industrial medicinal plant, were partially isolated and their expression profiles during salinity stress, wounding, and salicylic acid treatment were monitored. As a result, safflower ICS (CtICS) and C4H (CtC4H) were induced in early time points after wounding (3–6 h). Upon salinity stress, CtICS and CtC4H were highly expressed for the periods of 6–24 h and 3–6 h after treatment, respectively. It seems evident that ICS expression level is SA concentration dependent as if safflower treatment with 1 mM SA could induce ICS much stronger than that with 0.1 mM, while C4H is less likely to be so. Based on phylogenetic analysis, safflower ICS has maximum similarity to its ortholog in Vitis vinifera up to 69%, while C4H shows the highest similarity to its ortholog in Echinacea angustifolia up to 96%. Overall, the isolated genes of CtICS and CtC4H in safflower could be considered in plant breeding programs for salinity tolerance as well as for pathogen resistance. PMID:24309561

  16. Isolation and characterization of isochorismate synthase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase during salinity stress, wounding, and salicylic acid treatment in Carthamus tinctorius.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mahnaz; Dehghan, Sara; Fischer, Rainer; Wenzel, Uwe; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Kavousi, Hamid Reza; Rahnamaeian, Mohammad

    2013-11-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a prominent signaling molecule during biotic and abiotic stresses in plants biosynthesized via cinnamate and isochorismate pathways. Cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) and isochorismate synthase (ICS) are the main enzymes in phenylpropanoid and isochorismate pathways, respectively. To investigate the actual roles of these genes in resistance mechanism to environmental stresses, here, the coding sequences of these enzymes in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius), as an oilseed industrial medicinal plant, were partially isolated and their expression profiles during salinity stress, wounding, and salicylic acid treatment were monitored. As a result, safflower ICS (CtICS) and C4H (CtC4H) were induced in early time points after wounding (3-6 h). Upon salinity stress, CtICS and CtC4H were highly expressed for the periods of 6-24 h and 3-6 h after treatment, respectively. It seems evident that ICS expression level is SA concentration dependent as if safflower treatment with 1 mM SA could induce ICS much stronger than that with 0.1 mM, while C4H is less likely to be so. Based on phylogenetic analysis, safflower ICS has maximum similarity to its ortholog in Vitis vinifera up to 69%, while C4H shows the highest similarity to its ortholog in Echinacea angustifolia up to 96%. Overall, the isolated genes of CtICS and CtC4H in safflower could be considered in plant breeding programs for salinity tolerance as well as for pathogen resistance.

  17. Characterization of bifunctional sphingolipid Δ4-desaturases/C4-hydroxylases of trypanosomatids by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vacchina, Paola; Tripodi, Karina E J; Escalante, Andrea M; Uttaro, Antonio D

    2012-07-01

    Six genes encoding putative sphingolipid desaturases have been identified in trypanosomatid genomes: one in Trypanosoma brucei (TbSLdes protein), one in Trypanosoma cruzi (TcSLdes) and four in Leishmania major (LmSLdes1-4), tandemly arrayed on chromosome 26. The six amino acid sequences showed the three characteristic histidine boxes, with a long spacer between the first and second box, as in fungal desaturases and bifunctional desaturases/hydroxylases, to which they are phylogenetically related. We functionally characterized the trypanosomatid enzymes by their expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sur2Δ mutant, which lacks C4-hydroxylase activity. The sphingoid base profile (dinitrophenyl derivatives) of each yeast mutant transformed with each one of the different parasite genes was analyzed by HPLC, using a sur2Δ mutant expressing the Schyzosaccharomyces pombe sphingolipid desaturase (SpSLdes) as positive control. TbSLdes was capable of desaturating endogenous sphingolipids at levels comparable to those found in SpSLdes. By contrast, L. major and T. cruzi enzymes showed either no or negligible activities. Using the HPLC system coupled to electrospray tandem quadrupole/time of flight mass spectrometry we were able to detect significant levels of desaturated and hydroxylated sphingoid bases in extracts of all transformed yeast mutants, except for those transformed with the empty vector. These results indicate that S. pombe, T. brucei, T. cruzi and L. major enzymes are all bifunctional. Using the same methodology, desaturated and hydroxylated sphingoid bases were detected in T. cruzi epimastigotes and L. major promastigote cells, as described previously, and in T. brucei procyclic and bloodstream forms for the first time. PMID:22542487

  18. The Skp1 protein from Toxoplasma is modified by a cytoplasmic prolyl 4-hydroxylase associated with oxygen sensing in the social amoeba Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuechi; Brown, Kevin M; Wang, Zhuo A; van der Wel, Hanke; Teygong, Crystal; Zhang, Dongmei; Blader, Ira J; West, Christopher M

    2012-07-20

    In diverse types of organisms, cellular hypoxic responses are mediated by prolyl 4-hydroxylases that use O(2) and α-ketoglutarate as substrates to hydroxylate conserved proline residues in target proteins. Whereas in metazoans these enzymes control the stability of the HIFα family of transcription factor subunits, the Dictyostelium enzyme (DdPhyA) contributes to O(2) regulation of development by a divergent mechanism involving hydroxylation and subsequent glycosylation of DdSkp1, an adaptor subunit in E3(SCF) ubiquitin ligases. Sequences related to DdPhyA, DdSkp1, and the glycosyltransferases that cap Skp1 hydroxyproline occur also in the genomes of Toxoplasma and other protists, suggesting that this O(2) sensing mechanism may be widespread. Here we show by disruption of the TgphyA locus that this enzyme is required for Skp1 glycosylation in Toxoplasma and that disrupted parasites grow slowly at physiological O(2) levels. Conservation of cellular function was tested by expression of TgPhyA in DdphyA-null cells. Simple gene replacement did not rescue Skp1 glycosylation, whereas overexpression not only corrected Skp1 modification but also restored the O(2) requirement to a level comparable to that of overexpressed DdPhyA. Bacterially expressed TgPhyA protein can prolyl hydroxylate both Toxoplasma and Dictyostelium Skp1s. Kinetic analyses showed that TgPhyA has similar properties to DdPhyA, including a superimposable dependence on the concentration of its co-substrate α-ketoglutarate. Remarkably, however, TgPhyA had a significantly higher apparent affinity for O(2). The findings suggest that Skp1 hydroxylation by PhyA is a conserved process among protists and that this biochemical pathway may indirectly sense O(2) by detecting the levels of O(2)-regulated metabolites such as α-ketoglutarate.

  19. Cardiomyocyte-specific Prolyl-4-hydroxylase Domain 2 Knock Out Protects from Acute Myocardial Ischemic Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Hölscher, Marion; Silter, Monique; Krull, Sabine; von Ahlen, Melanie; Hesse, Amke; Schwartz, Peter; Wielockx, Ben; Breier, Georg; Katschinski, Dörthe M.; Zieseniss, Anke

    2011-01-01

    Prolylhydroxylase domain proteins (PHD) are cellular oxygen-sensing molecules that regulate the stability of the α-subunit of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1. HIF-1 affects cardiac development as well as adaptation of the heart toward increased pressure overload or myocardial infarction. We have disrupted PHD2 in cardiomyocytes (cPhd −/−) using Phd2flox/flox mice in combination with MLCvCre mice, which resulted in HIF-1α stabilization and activation of HIF target genes in the heart. Although cPhd2−/− mice showed no gross abnormalities in cardiac filament structure or function, we observed a significant increased cardiac capillary area in those mice. cPhd2 −/− mice did not respond differently to increased mechanical load by transverse aortic constriction compared with their wild-type (wt) littermates. After ligation of the left anterior descending artery, however, the area at risk and area of necrosis were significantly smaller in the cPhd2−/− mice compared with Phd2 wt mice in line with the described pivotal role of HIF-1α for tissue protection in case of myocardial infarction. This correlated with a decreased number of apoptotic cells in the infarcted myocardium in the cPhd2−/− mice and significantly improved cardiac function 3 weeks after myocardial infarction. PMID:21270129

  20. HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylase-2 inhibition improves glucose and lipid metabolism and protects against obesity and metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rahtu-Korpela, Lea; Karsikas, Sara; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Mäkelä, Kari A; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Walkinshaw, Gail; Kivirikko, Kari I; Myllyharju, Johanna; Serpi, Raisa; Koivunen, Peppi

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem, predisposing subjects to metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Specific prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs) regulate the stability of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), a potent governor of metabolism, with isoenzyme 2 being the main regulator. We investigated whether HIF-P4H-2 inhibition could be used to treat obesity and its consequences. Hif-p4h-2-deficient mice, whether fed normal chow or a high-fat diet, had less adipose tissue, smaller adipocytes, and less adipose tissue inflammation than their littermates. They also had improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of the HIF-1 targets glucose transporters, glycolytic enzymes, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-1 were increased in their tissues, whereas acetyl-CoA concentration was decreased. The hepatic mRNA level of the HIF-2 target insulin receptor substrate-2 was higher, whereas that of two key enzymes of fatty acid synthesis was lower. Serum cholesterol levels and de novo lipid synthesis were decreased, and the mice were protected against hepatic steatosis. Oral administration of an HIF-P4H inhibitor, FG-4497, to wild-type mice with metabolic dysfunction phenocopied these beneficial effects. HIF-P4H-2 inhibition may be a novel therapy that not only protects against the development of obesity and its consequences but also reverses these conditions.

  1. Prolyl 4-hydroxylase from Volvox carteri. A low-Mr enzyme antigenically related to the alpha subunit of the vertebrate enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Kaska, D D; Myllylä, R; Günzler, V; Gibor, A; Kivirikko, K I

    1988-01-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase was isolated in a highly purified form from a multi-cellular green alga, Volvox carteri, by a procedure consisting of ion-exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography on poly(L-hydroxyproline) coupled to Sepharose. Two other affinity-column procedures were also developed, one involving 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetate and the other 3,4-dihydroxyphenylpropionate linked to Sepharose. The Km values of the Volvox enzyme for the co-substrates and the peptide substrate, as well as the inhibition constants for selected 2-oxoglutarate analogues, were similar to those of the enzyme from Chlamydomonas reinhardii, except that the Km for 2-oxoglutarate with the Volvox enzyme was 6-fold greater. The temperature optimum of the Volvox enzyme was also 10 degrees C higher. The apparent Mr of the Volvox enzyme by gel filtration was about 40,000, being similar to that reported for the Chlamydomonas enzyme but markedly lower than that of the vertebrate enzymes. A similar apparent Mr of about 40,000 was also found for prolyl 4-hydroxylase from the green alga Enteromorpha intestinalis, whereas the enzyme from various vascular plants gave an apparent Mr greater than 300,000. SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis demonstrated in the highly purified Volvox enzyme the presence of a major protein band doublet with a Mr of about 65,000 and a minor doublet of Mr about 55,000-57,000. A polyclonal antiserum, prepared against the Mr-65,000 doublet, stained in immunoblotting the Mr-65,000 doublet as well as the alpha subunit, but not the beta subunit, of the vertebrate prolyl 4-hydroxylase. An antiserum against the beta subunit of the vertebrate enzyme stained in immunoblotting a Mr-50,000 polypeptide in a partially purified Volvox enzyme preparation, but did not stain either the Mr-65,000 or the Mr-55,000-57,000 doublet of the highly purified enzyme. The data thus suggest that the active Volvox carteri prolyl 4-hydroxylase is an enzyme monomer antigenically related to the

  2. Characterization of recombinant plant cinnamate 4-hydroxylase produced in yeast. Kinetic and spectral properties of the major plant P450 of the phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Urban, P; Werck-Reichhart, D; Teutsch, H G; Durst, F; Regnier, S; Kazmaier, M; Pompon, D

    1994-06-15

    Helianthus tuberosus cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (CYP73 or CA4H), a member of the P450 superfamily which catalyses the first oxidative step of the phenylpropanoid pathway in higher plants by transforming cinnamate into p-coumarate, was expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The PCR-amplified CA4H open reading frame was inserted into pYeDP60 under the transcriptional control of a galactose-inducible artificial promoter. Engineered S. cerevisiae strains producing human P450 reductase or normal or overproduced amounts of yeast P450 reductase were transformed to express recombinant CA4H. When grown on galactose, yeast cells produced CA4H holoprotein bound to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane as judged from the reduced iron/carbon monoxide difference spectrum centered at 452 nm and from typical cinnamate 4-hydroxylase activity upon coupling with the different P450 reductases and NADPH. Some CA4H protein was found also addressed to the yeast mitochondria but as a low-activity form. The spectral and kinetic characterizations of the yeast-produced CA4H in different redox protein environments are presented using both assays on yeast microsomal fractions and bioconversions on living cells. Results indicate that the microsomal system constituted by the overexpressed yeast P450 reductase and CA4H is characterized by a 1:1 coupling between NADPH oxidation and cinnamate hydroxylation and by one of the highest turnover numbers reported for an NADPH-dependent P450 reaction. Based on spectral perturbation and inhibition studies, coumarate appeared to have no detectable affinity for the enzyme. A possible geometry of the substrate recognition pocket is discussed in the light of these data. PMID:8026495

  3. Cellular oxygen sensing: Importins and exportins are mediators of intracellular localisation of prolyl-4-hydroxylases PHD1 and PHD2

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, Amrei; Pientka, Friederike Katharina; Moeckel, Sylvia; Kettelhake, Antje; Hartmann, Enno; Koehler, Matthias; Depping, Reinhard

    2009-10-02

    Hypoxia-inducible factors are crucial in the regulatory process of oxygen homeostasis of vertebrate cells. Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylation of HIF-{alpha} subunits by prolyl-hydroxylases (PHD1, PHD2 and PHD3) leads to transcription of a greater number of hypoxia responsive genes. We have investigated the subcellular distribution and the molecular mechanisms regulating the intracellular allocation of PHD1 and PHD2. As reported earlier we find PHD1 located exclusively in the nucleus. We demonstrate that nuclear import of PHD1 occurs importin {alpha}/{beta} dependently and relies on a nuclear localisation signal (NLS). By contrast PHD2 is cycling between nucleus and cytoplasm, and nuclear import seems to be independent of 'classical' importin {alpha}/{beta} receptors. Furthermore, we reveal that the exit of PHD2 from the nucleus requires CRM1 and the N-terminal 100 amino acids of the protein. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of the regulation of the oxygen sensor cascade of PHDs in different cellular compartments.

  4. Overexpression of Prolyl-4-Hydroxylase-α1 Stabilizes but Increases Shear Stress-Induced Atherosclerotic Plaque in Apolipoprotein E-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin-xin; Li, Meng-meng; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Liang; Wang, Lin; Di, Ming-xue

    2016-01-01

    The rupture and erosion of atherosclerotic plaque can induce coronary thrombosis. Prolyl-4-hydroxylase (P4H) plays a central role in the synthesis of all known types of collagens, which are the most abundant constituent of the extracellular matrix in atherosclerotic plaque. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is thought to be in part caused by shear stress. In this study, we aimed to investigate a relationship between P4Hα1 and shear stress-induced atherosclerotic plaque. Carotid arteries of ApoE−/− mice were exposed to low and oscillatory shear stress conditions by the placement of a shear stress cast for 2 weeks; we divided 60 male ApoE−/− mice into three groups for treatments with saline (mock) (n = 20), empty lentivirus (lenti-EGFP) (n = 20), and lentivirus-P4Hα1 (lenti-P4Hα1) (n = 20). Our results reveal that after 2 weeks of lenti-P4Hα1 treatment both low and oscillatory shear stress-induced plaques increased collagen and the thickness of fibrous cap and decreased macrophage accumulation but no change in lipid accumulation. We also observed that overexpression of P4Ha1 increased plaque size. Our study suggests that P4Hα1 overexpression might be a potential therapeutic target in stabilizing vulnerable plaques.

  5. Pichia pastoris production of a prolyl 4-hydroxylase derived from Chondrosia reniformis sponge: A new biotechnological tool for the recombinant production of marine collagen.

    PubMed

    Pozzolini, Marina; Scarfì, Sonia; Mussino, Francesca; Salis, Annalisa; Damonte, Gianluca; Benatti, Umberto; Giovine, Marco

    2015-08-20

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H) is a α2β2 tetramer catalyzing the post-translational hydroxylation of prolines in collagen. Its recombinant production is mainly pursued to realize biotechnological tools able to generate animal contaminant-free hydroxylated collagen. One promising candidate for biomedical applications is the collagen extracted from the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis, because of its biocompatibility and because is devoid of the health risks associated with bovine and porcine collagens. Here we report on the production and selection, by enzymatic and biomolecular analyses, of a triple transformed Pichia pastoris strain expressing a stable P4H tetramer derived from C. reniformis sponge and a hydroxylated non fibrillar procollagen polypeptide from the same animal. The percentage of recombinant procollagen hydroxylated prolines inside the transformed yeast was of 36.3% analyzed by mass spectrometry indicating that the recombinant enzyme is active on its natural substrate inside the yeast cell host. Furthermore, the recombinant sponge P4H has the ability to hydroxylate its natural substrate in both X and Y positions in the Xaa-Yaa-Gly collagenous triplets. In conclusion this Pichia system seems ideal for high-level production of hydroxylated sponge- or marine-derived collagen polypeptides as well as of conotoxins or other marine proteins of high pharmacological interest needing this particular post-translational modification.

  6. Pichia pastoris production of a prolyl 4-hydroxylase derived from Chondrosia reniformis sponge: A new biotechnological tool for the recombinant production of marine collagen.

    PubMed

    Pozzolini, Marina; Scarfì, Sonia; Mussino, Francesca; Salis, Annalisa; Damonte, Gianluca; Benatti, Umberto; Giovine, Marco

    2015-08-20

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H) is a α2β2 tetramer catalyzing the post-translational hydroxylation of prolines in collagen. Its recombinant production is mainly pursued to realize biotechnological tools able to generate animal contaminant-free hydroxylated collagen. One promising candidate for biomedical applications is the collagen extracted from the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis, because of its biocompatibility and because is devoid of the health risks associated with bovine and porcine collagens. Here we report on the production and selection, by enzymatic and biomolecular analyses, of a triple transformed Pichia pastoris strain expressing a stable P4H tetramer derived from C. reniformis sponge and a hydroxylated non fibrillar procollagen polypeptide from the same animal. The percentage of recombinant procollagen hydroxylated prolines inside the transformed yeast was of 36.3% analyzed by mass spectrometry indicating that the recombinant enzyme is active on its natural substrate inside the yeast cell host. Furthermore, the recombinant sponge P4H has the ability to hydroxylate its natural substrate in both X and Y positions in the Xaa-Yaa-Gly collagenous triplets. In conclusion this Pichia system seems ideal for high-level production of hydroxylated sponge- or marine-derived collagen polypeptides as well as of conotoxins or other marine proteins of high pharmacological interest needing this particular post-translational modification. PMID:26022422

  7. Isolation and sequence of a cDNA encoding the Jerusalem artichoke cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, a major plant cytochrome P450 involved in the general phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Teutsch, H G; Hasenfratz, M P; Lesot, A; Stoltz, C; Garnier, J M; Jeltsch, J M; Durst, F; Werck-Reichhart, D

    1993-01-01

    Cinnamate 4-hydroxylase [CA4H; trans-cinnamate,NADPH:oxygen oxidoreductase (4-hydroxylating), EC 1.14.13.11] is a cytochrome P450 that catalyzes the first oxygenation step of the general phenylpropanoid metabolism in higher plants. The compounds formed are essential for lignification and defense against predators and pathogens. We recently reported the purification of this enzyme from Mn(2+)-induced Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tuber tissues. Highly selective polyclonal antibodies raised against the purified protein were used to screen a lambda gt11 cDNA expression library from wound-induced Jerusalem artichoke, allowing isolation of a 1130-base-pair insert. Typical P450 domains were identified in this incomplete sequence, which was used as a probe for the isolation of a 1.7-kilobase clone in a lambda gt10 library. A full-length open reading frame of 1515 base pairs, encoding a P450 protein of 505 residues (M(r) = 57,927), was sequenced. The N terminus, essentially composed of hydrophobic residues, matches perfectly the microsequenced N terminus of the purified protein. The calculated pI is 9.78, in agreement with the chromatographic behavior and two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of CA4H. Synthesis of the corresponding mRNA is induced in wounded plant tissues, in correlation with CA4H enzymatic activity. This P450 protein exhibits the most similarity (28% amino acid identity) with avocado CYP71, but also good similarity with CYP17 and CYP21, or with CYP1 and CYP2 families. According to current criteria, it qualifies as a member of a new P450 family. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8097885

  8. The Crystal Structure of an Algal Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Complexed with a Proline-rich Peptide Reveals a Novel Buried Tripeptide Binding Motif*

    PubMed Central

    Koski, M. Kristian; Hieta, Reija; Hirsilä, Maija; Rönkä, Anna; Myllyharju, Johanna; Wierenga, Rik K.

    2009-01-01

    Plant and algal prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs) are key enzymes in the synthesis of cell wall components. These monomeric enzymes belong to the 2-oxoglutarate dependent superfamily of enzymes characterized by a conserved jelly-roll framework. This algal P4H has high sequence similarity to the catalytic domain of the vertebrate, tetrameric collagen P4Hs, whereas there are distinct sequence differences with the oxygen-sensing hypoxia-inducible factor P4H subfamily of enzymes. We present here a 1.98-Å crystal structure of the algal Chlamydomonas reinhardtii P4H-1 complexed with Zn2+ and a proline-rich (Ser-Pro)5 substrate. This ternary complex captures the competent mode of binding of the peptide substrate, being bound in a left-handed (poly)l-proline type II conformation in a tunnel shaped by two loops. These two loops are mostly disordered in the absence of the substrate. The importance of these loops for the function is confirmed by extensive mutagenesis, followed up by enzyme kinetic characterizations. These loops cover the central Ser-Pro-Ser tripeptide of the substrate such that the hydroxylation occurs in a highly buried space. This novel mode of binding does not depend on stacking interactions of the proline side chains with aromatic residues. Major conformational changes of the two peptide binding loops are predicted to be a key feature of the catalytic cycle. These conformational changes are probably triggered by the conformational switch of Tyr140, as induced by the hydroxylation of the proline residue. The importance of these findings for understanding the specific binding and hydroxylation of (X-Pro-Gly)n sequences by collagen P4Hs is also discussed. PMID:19553701

  9. Cell-free synthesis and assembly of prolyl 4-hydroxylase: the role of the beta-subunit (PDI) in preventing misfolding and aggregation of the alpha-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    John, D C; Grant, M E; Bulleid, N J

    1993-01-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4-H) catalyses a vital post-translational modification in the biosynthesis of collagen. The enzyme consists of two distinct polypeptides forming an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer (alpha = 64 kDa, beta = 60 kDa), the beta-subunit being identical to the multifunctional enzyme protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). By studying the cell-free synthesis of the rat alpha-subunit of P4-H we have shown that the alpha-subunit can be translocated, glycosylated and the signal peptide cleaved by dog pancreatic microsomal membranes to yield both singly and doubly glycosylated forms. When translations were carried out under conditions which prevent disulfide bond formation, the product synthesized formed aggregates which were associated with the immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP). Translations carried out under conditions that promote disulfide bond formation yielded a product that was not associated with BiP but formed a complex with the endogenous beta-subunit (PDI). Complex formation was detected by co-precipitation of the newly synthesized alpha-subunit with antibodies raised against PDI, by sucrose gradient centrifugation and by chemical cross-linking. When microsomal vesicles were depleted of PDI, BiP and other soluble endoplasmic reticulum proteins, no complex formation was observed and the alpha-subunit aggregated even under conditions that promote disulfide bond formation. We have therefore demonstrated that the enzyme P4-H can be assembled at synthesis in a cell-free system and that the solubility of the alpha-subunit is dependent upon its association with PDI. Images PMID:8385607

  10. Prolyl-4-hydroxylase Domain Protein 2 Controls NF-κB/p65 Transactivation and Enhances the Catabolic Effects of Inflammatory Cytokines on Cells of the Nucleus Pulposus*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Yuan, Wen; Jiang, Shuai; Ye, Wei; Yang, Hao; Shapiro, Irving M.; Risbud, Makarand V.

    2015-01-01

    Prolyl-4-hydroxylase (PHD) proteins are key in sensing tissue hypoxia. In nucleus pulposus (NP) cells, our previous work demonstrated that PHD isoforms have a differential contribution in controlling hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-α degradation and activity. Recently we have shown that a regulatory relationship exists between PHD3 and inflammatory cytokines in NP cells. With respect to PHD2, the most abundant PHD isoform in NP cells, very little is known concerning its function and regulation under inflammatory conditions that characterize intervertebral disc degeneration. Here, we show that PHD2 is a potent regulator of the catabolic activities of TNF-α; silencing of PHD2 significantly decreased TNF-α-induced expression of catabolic markers including SDC4, MMP-3, MMP-13, and ADAMTS5, as well as several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, while partially restoring aggrecan and collagen II expression. Use of NF-κB reporters with ShPHD2, SiHIF-1α, as well as p65−/−, PHD2−/−, and PHD3−/− cells, shows that PHD2 serves as a co-activator of NF-κB/p65 signaling in HIF-1-independent fashion. Immunoprecipitation of endogenous and exogenously expressed tagged proteins, as well as fluorescence microscopy, indicates that following TNF-α treatment, PHD2 interacts and co-localizes with p65. Conversely, loss of function experiments using lentivirally delivered Sh-p65, Sh-IKKβ, and NF-κB inhibitor confirmed that cytokine-dependent PHD2 expression in NP cells requires NF-κB signaling. These findings clearly demonstrate that PHD2 forms a regulatory circuit with TNF-α via NF-κB and thereby plays an important role in enhancing activity of this cytokine. We propose that during disc degeneration PHD2 may offer a therapeutic target to mitigate the deleterious actions of TNF-α, a key proinflammatory cytokine. PMID:25635047

  11. Severe Extracellular Matrix Abnormalities and Chondrodysplasia in Mice Lacking Collagen Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Isoenzyme II in Combination with a Reduced Amount of Isoenzyme I*

    PubMed Central

    Aro, Ellinoora; Salo, Antti M.; Khatri, Richa; Finnilä, Mikko; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Sormunen, Raija; Pakkanen, Outi; Holster, Tiina; Soininen, Raija; Prein, Carina; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Aszódi, Attila; Tuukkanen, Juha; Kivirikko, Kari I.; Schipani, Ernestina; Myllyharju, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylases (C-P4H-I, C-P4H-II, and C-P4H-III) catalyze formation of 4-hydroxyproline residues required to form triple-helical collagen molecules. Vertebrate C-P4Hs are α2β2 tetramers differing in their catalytic α subunits. C-P4H-I is the major isoenzyme in most cells, and inactivation of its catalytic subunit (P4ha1−/−) leads to embryonic lethality in mouse, whereas P4ha1+/− mice have no abnormalities. To study the role of C-P4H-II, which predominates in chondrocytes, we generated P4ha2−/− mice. Surprisingly, they had no apparent phenotypic abnormalities. To assess possible functional complementarity, we established P4ha1+/−;P4ha2−/− mice. They were smaller than their littermates, had moderate chondrodysplasia, and developed kyphosis. A transient inner cell death phenotype was detected in their developing growth plates. The columnar arrangement of proliferative chondrocytes was impaired, the amount of 4-hydroxyproline and the Tm of collagen II were reduced, and the extracellular matrix was softer in the growth plates of newborn P4ha1+/−;P4ha2−/− mice. No signs of uncompensated ER stress were detected in the mutant growth plate chondrocytes. Some of these defects were also found in P4ha2−/− mice, although in a much milder form. Our data show that C-P4H-I can to a large extent compensate for the lack of C-P4H-II in proper endochondral bone development, but their combined partial and complete inactivation, respectively, leads to biomechanically impaired extracellular matrix, moderate chondrodysplasia, and kyphosis. Our mouse data suggest that inactivating mutations in human P4HA2 are not likely to lead to skeletal disorders, and a simultaneous decrease in P4HA1 function would most probably be required to generate such a disease phenotype. PMID:26001784

  12. Coffee's Impact a Matter of Genes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... levels of caffeine chemicals -- which suggest faster caffeine metabolism -- are the same variants previously linked to higher ... gene that may be connected to both caffeine metabolism and the metabolism of glucose and lipids. "How ...

  13. Impact of homeobox genes in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Moon Kyung; Park, Jong-Jae; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2016-01-01

    Homeobox genes, including HOX and non-HOX genes, have been identified to be expressed aberrantly in solid tumors. In gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, most studies have focused on the function of non-HOX genes including caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 1 (CDX1) and CDX2. CDX2 is a crucial factor in the development of pre-cancerous lesions such as Barrett’s esophagus or intestinal metaplasia in the stomach, and its tumor suppressive role has been investigated in colorectal cancers. Recently, several HOX genes were reported to have specific roles in GI cancers; for example, HOXA13 in esophageal squamous cell cancer and HOXB7 in stomach and colorectal cancers. HOXD10 is upregulated in colorectal cancer while it is silenced epigenetically in gastric cancer. Thus, it is essential to examine the differential expression pattern of various homeobox genes in specific tumor types or cell lineages, and understand their underlying mechanisms. In this review, we summarize the available research on homeobox genes and present their potential value for the prediction of prognosis in GI cancers. PMID:27729732

  14. Examining the Impact of Gene Variants on Histone Lysine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Van Rechem, Capucine; Whetstine, Johnathan R.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a boom in the amount of genome-wide sequencing data that has uncovered important and unappreciated links between certain genes, families of genes and enzymatic processes and diseases such as cancer. Such studies have highlighted the impact that chromatin modifying enzymes could have in cancer and other genetic diseases. In this review, we summarize characterized mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in histone lysine methyltransferases (KMTs), histone lysine demethylases (KDMs) and histones. We primarily focus on variants with strong disease correlations and discuss how they could impact histone lysine methylation dynamics and gene regulation. PMID:24859469

  15. Amplified and Homozygously Deleted Genes in Glioblastoma: Impact on Gene Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Inês; Tão, Hermínio; Nieto, Ana Belen; Rebelo, Olinda; Domingues, Patrícia; Vital, Ana Luísa; Patino, Maria del Carmen; Barbosa, Marcos; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Oliveira, Catarina Resende; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) displays multiple amplicons and homozygous deletions that involve relevant pathogenic genes and other genes whose role remains unknown. Methodology Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-arrays were used to determine the frequency of recurrent amplicons and homozygous deletions in GBM (n = 46), and to evaluate the impact of copy number alterations (CNA) on mRNA levels of the genes involved. Principal Findings Recurrent amplicons were detected for chromosomes 7 (50%), 12 (22%), 1 (11%), 4 (9%), 11 (4%), and 17 (4%), whereas homozygous deletions involved chromosomes 9p21 (52%) and 10q (22%). Most genes that displayed a high correlation between DNA CNA and mRNA levels were coded in the amplified chromosomes. For some amplicons the impact of DNA CNA on mRNA expression was restricted to a single gene (e.g., EGFR at 7p11.2), while for others it involved multiple genes (e.g., 11 and 5 genes at 12q14.1–q15 and 4q12, respectively). Despite homozygous del(9p21) and del(10q23.31) included multiple genes, association between these DNA CNA and RNA expression was restricted to the MTAP gene. Conclusions Overall, our results showed a high frequency of amplicons and homozygous deletions in GBM with variable impact on the expression of the genes involved, and they contributed to the identification of other potentially relevant genes. PMID:23029397

  16. Catechol estrogen formation by brain tissue: characterization of a direct product isolation assay for estrogen-2- and 4-hydroxylase activity and its application to studies of 2- and 4-hydroxyestradiol formation by rabbit hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Hersey, R.M.; Williams, K.I.; Weisz, J.

    1981-12-01

    A direct product isolation assay for quantifying the formation of 2- and 4-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2 and 4-OHE2) from (6,7-3H)estradiol by rabbit hypothalami in vitro was developed, and the assay was used to characterize some properties of estrogen-2- and 4-hydroxylase activity in this tissue. The reaction was carried out under conditions that minimized further metabolism of enzymatically formed catechol estrogens. A simple two-step separation procedure, involving the use of a neutral alumina column, followed by thin layer chromatography, was developed to isolate the enzymatically formed catechol estrogens in a radiochemically homogeneous form. The detergent, Tween-80, was found to activate the enzyme and was used routinely at a concentration of 0.1% in the assay. The formation of 2-OHE2 was linear up to 10 min and with increasing protein concentrations up to 150 micrograms/incubation. Similar values were obtained for 4-OHE2. Maximum velocities (Vmax) for the formation of 2- and 4-OHE2 were 190 and 270 pmol/mg protein . 10 min, respectively. The apparent Km values with respect to estradiol for 2-OHE2 and 4-OHE2 were 125 and 150 microM, respectively. The highest specific activity for the enzyme was present in the 100,000 X g supernatant (S3), while the activity in the microsomal fraction (P3) was less than that in the original homogenate. Enzyme activity depended on the presence of NADPH and oxygen and was inhibited by CO as well as by high concentrations of SKF-525A. Estrogen-2- and 4-hydroxylase activity in rabbit hypothalamus differed from that in rat liver in two respects. In the liver, enzyme activity was localized in the microsomal fraction and was virtually abolished by Tween-80. In contrast, enzyme activity in rabbit hypothalamus was maximal in the soluble fraction (100,000 X g supernatant)and was stimulated by the detergent.

  17. Intracellular dissociation and reassembly of prolyl 4-hydroxylase:the alpha-subunits associated with the immunoglobulin-heavy-chain binding protein (BiP) allowing reassembly with the beta-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    John, D C; Bulleid, N J

    1996-01-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4-H) consists of two distinct polypeptides; the catalytically more important alpha-subunit and the beta-subunit, which is identical to the multifunctional enzyme protein disulphide isomerase. The enzyme appears to be assembled in vivo into an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer from newly synthesized alpha-subunits associating with an endogenous pool of beta-subunits. Using a cell-free system, we have shown previously that enzyme assembly is redox-dependent and that assembled alpha-subunits are intramolecularly disulphide-bonded [John and Bulleid (1994) Biochemistry 33, 14018-14025]. Here we have studied this assembly process within intact cells by expressing both subunits in COS-1 cells. Newly synthesized alpha-subunits were shown to assemble with the beta-subunit, to form insoluble aggregates, or to remain soluble but not associate with the beta-subunit. Treatment of cells with dithiothreitol (DTT) led to dissociation of P4-H into subunits and on removal of DTT the enzyme reassembled. This reassembly was ATP-dependent, suggesting an interaction with an ATP-dependent chaperone. This was confirmed when immunoglobulin-heavy-chain binding protein (BiP) and alpha-subunits were co-immunoprecipitated with antibodies against the alpha-subunit and BiP, respectively. These results indicate that unassembled alpha-subunits are maintained in an assembly-competent form by interacting with the molecular chaperone BiP. PMID:8760347

  18. Impact of Statins on Gene Expression in Human Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jérôme; van Eeden, Stephan F.; Obeidat, Ma’en; Sin, Don D.; Tebbutt, Scott J.; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S.; Laviolette, Michel; Paré, Peter D.; Bossé, Yohan

    2015-01-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that alter the synthesis of cholesterol. Some studies have shown a significant association of statins with improved respiratory health outcomes of patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Here we hypothesize that statins impact gene expression in human lungs and may reveal the pleiotropic effects of statins that are taking place directly in lung tissues. Human lung tissues were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection or transplantation. Gene expression was measured on a custom Affymetrix array in a discovery cohort (n = 408) and two replication sets (n = 341 and 282). Gene expression was evaluated by linear regression between statin users and non-users, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and other covariables. The results of each cohort were combined in a meta-analysis and biological pathways were studied using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The discovery set included 141 statin users. The lung mRNA expression levels of eighteen and three genes were up-regulated and down-regulated in statin users (FDR < 0.05), respectively. Twelve of the up-regulated genes were replicated in the first replication set, but none in the second (p-value < 0.05). Combining the discovery and replication sets into a meta-analysis improved the significance of the 12 up-regulated genes, which includes genes encoding enzymes and membrane proteins involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Canonical biological pathways altered by statins in the lung include cholesterol, steroid, and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. No genes encoding inflammatory, proteases, pro-fibrotic or growth factors were altered by statins, suggesting that the direct effect of statin in the lung do not go beyond its antilipidemic action. Although more studies are needed with specific lung cell types and different classes and doses of statins, the improved health outcomes and survival observed in statin

  19. Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase mechanism-based inactivation by psoralen derivatives: cloning and characterization of a C4H from a psoralen producing plant-Ruta graveolens-exhibiting low sensitivity to psoralen inactivation.

    PubMed

    Gravot, Antoine; Larbat, Romain; Hehn, Alain; Lièvre, Karine; Gontier, Eric; Goergen, Jean Louis; Bourgaud, Frédéric

    2004-02-01

    Cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H, EC 1.14.13.11) complete cDNA was cloned from the leaves of Ruta graveolens, a psoralen producing plant. The recombinant enzyme (classified CYP73A32) was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mechanism-based inactivation was investigated using various psoralen derivatives. Only psoralen and 8-methoxypsoralen were found to inactivate C4H. The inactivation was dependent on the presence of NADPH, time of pre-incubation, and inhibitor concentration. Inactivation stoichiometry was 0.9 (+/-0.2) for CYP73A1 and 1.1 (+/-0.2) for CYP73A32. SDS-PAGE analysis demonstrated that [3H]psoralen was irreversibly bound to the C4H apoprotein. K(i) and k(inact) for psoralen and 8-methoxypsoralen inactivation on the two C4H revealed a lower sensitivity for CYP73A32 compared to CYP73A1. Inactivation kinetics were also determined for CYP73A10, a C4H from another furocoumarin-producing plant, Petroselinum crispum. This enzyme was found to behave like CYP73A32, with a weak sensitivity to psoralen and 8-MOP inactivation. Cinnamic acid hydroxylation is a key step in the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoid compounds, psoralen derivatives included. Our results suggest a possible evolution of R. graveolens and P. crispum C4H that might tolerate substantial levels of psoralen derivatives in the cytoplasmic compartment without a depletive effect on C4H and the general phenylpropanoid metabolism.

  20. Impact of the cell division cycle on gene circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierbaum, Veronika; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    In growing cells, protein synthesis and cell growth are typically not synchronous, and, thus, protein concentrations vary over the cell division cycle. We have developed a theoretical description of genetic regulatory systems in bacteria that explicitly considers the cell division cycle to investigate its impact on gene expression. We calculate the cell-to-cell variations arising from cells being at different stages in the division cycle for unregulated genes and for basic regulatory mechanisms. These variations contribute to the extrinsic noise observed in single-cell experiments, and are most significant for proteins with short lifetimes. Negative autoregulation buffers against variation of protein concentration over the division cycle, but the effect is found to be relatively weak. Stronger buffering is achieved by an increased protein lifetime. Positive autoregulation can strongly amplify such variation if the parameters are set to values that lead to resonance-like behaviour. For cooperative positive autoregulation, the concentration variation over the division cycle diminishes the parameter region of bistability and modulates the switching times between the two stable states. The same effects are seen for a two-gene mutual-repression toggle switch. By contrast, an oscillatory circuit, the repressilator, is only weakly affected by the division cycle.

  1. Impact of the cell division cycle on gene circuits.

    PubMed

    Bierbaum, Veronika; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-09-25

    In growing cells, protein synthesis and cell growth are typically not synchronous, and, thus, protein concentrations vary over the cell division cycle. We have developed a theoretical description of genetic regulatory systems in bacteria that explicitly considers the cell division cycle to investigate its impact on gene expression. We calculate the cell-to-cell variations arising from cells being at different stages in the division cycle for unregulated genes and for basic regulatory mechanisms. These variations contribute to the extrinsic noise observed in single-cell experiments, and are most significant for proteins with short lifetimes. Negative autoregulation buffers against variation of protein concentration over the division cycle, but the effect is found to be relatively weak. Stronger buffering is achieved by an increased protein lifetime. Positive autoregulation can strongly amplify such variation if the parameters are set to values that lead to resonance-like behaviour. For cooperative positive autoregulation, the concentration variation over the division cycle diminishes the parameter region of bistability and modulates the switching times between the two stable states. The same effects are seen for a two-gene mutual-repression toggle switch. By contrast, an oscillatory circuit, the repressilator, is only weakly affected by the division cycle.

  2. Impact of gene editing on the study of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Patrick T; Sanz, David J; Hollywood, Jennifer A

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic and progressive autosomal recessive disorder of secretory epithelial cells, which causes obstructions in the lung airways and pancreatic ducts of 70,000 people worldwide (for recent review see Cutting Nat Rev Genet 16(1):45-56, 2015). The finding that mutations in the CFTR gene cause CF (Kerem et al. Science 245(4922):1073-1080, 1989; Riordan et al. Science 245(4922):1066-1073, 1989; Rommens et al. Science 245(4922):1059-1065, 1989), was hailed as the very happy middle of a story whose end is a cure for a fatal disease (Koshland Science 245(4922):1029, 1989). However, despite two licensed drugs (Ramsey et al. N Engl J Med 365(18):1663-1672, 2011; Wainwright et al. N Engl J Med 373(3):220-231, 2015), and a formal demonstration that repeated administration of CFTR cDNA to patients is safe and effects a modest but significant stabilisation of disease (Alton et al. Lancet Respir Med 3(9):684-691, 2015), we are still a long way from a cure, with many patients taking over 100 tablets per day, and a mean age at death of 28 years. The aim of this review is to discuss the impact on the study of CF of gene-editing techniques as they have developed over the last 30 years, up to and including the possibility of editing as a therapeutic approach. PMID:27325484

  3. Agrobacterium tumefaciens exoR controls acid response genes and impacts exopolysaccharide synthesis, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence gene expression.

    PubMed

    Heckel, Brynn C; Tomlinson, Amelia D; Morton, Elise R; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Fuqua, Clay

    2014-09-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a facultative plant pathogen and the causative agent of crown gall disease. The initial stage of infection involves attachment to plant tissues, and subsequently, biofilms may form at these sites. This study focuses on the periplasmic ExoR regulator, which was identified based on the severe biofilm deficiency of A. tumefaciens exoR mutants. Genome-wide expression analysis was performed to elucidate the complete ExoR regulon. Overproduction of the exopolysaccharide succinoglycan is a dramatic phenotype of exoR mutants. Comparative expression analyses revealed that the core ExoR regulon is unaffected by succinoglycan synthesis. Several findings are consistent with previous observations: genes involved in succinoglycan biosynthesis, motility, and type VI secretion are differentially expressed in the ΔexoR mutant. In addition, these studies revealed new functional categories regulated by ExoR, including genes related to virulence, conjugation of the pAtC58 megaplasmid, ABC transporters, and cell envelope architecture. To address how ExoR exerts a broad impact on gene expression from its periplasmic location, a genetic screen was performed to isolate suppressor mutants that mitigate the exoR motility phenotype and identify downstream components of the ExoR regulatory pathway. This suppression analysis identified the acid-sensing two-component system ChvG-ChvI, and the suppressor mutant phenotypes suggest that all or most of the characteristic exoR properties are mediated through ChvG-ChvI. Subsequent analysis indicates that exoR mutants are simulating a response to acidic conditions, even in neutral media. This work expands the model for ExoR regulation in A. tumefaciens and underscores the global role that this regulator plays on gene expression. PMID:24982308

  4. Impact of natural genetic variation on gene expression dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Marit; Sikora-Wohlfeld, Weronika; Beyer, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    DNA sequence variation causes changes in gene expression, which in turn has profound effects on cellular states. These variations affect tissue development and may ultimately lead to pathological phenotypes. A genetic locus containing a sequence variation that affects gene expression is called an "expression quantitative trait locus" (eQTL). Whereas the impact of cellular context on expression levels in general is well established, a lot less is known about the cell-state specificity of eQTL. Previous studies differed with respect to how "dynamic eQTL" were defined. Here, we propose a unified framework distinguishing static, conditional and dynamic eQTL and suggest strategies for mapping these eQTL classes. Further, we introduce a new approach to simultaneously infer eQTL from different cell types. By using murine mRNA expression data from four stages of hematopoiesis and 14 related cellular traits, we demonstrate that static, conditional and dynamic eQTL, although derived from the same expression data, represent functionally distinct types of eQTL. While static eQTL affect generic cellular processes, non-static eQTL are more often involved in hematopoiesis and immune response. Our analysis revealed substantial effects of individual genetic variation on cell type-specific expression regulation. Among a total number of 3,941 eQTL we detected 2,729 static eQTL, 1,187 eQTL were conditionally active in one or several cell types, and 70 eQTL affected expression changes during cell type transitions. We also found evidence for feedback control mechanisms reverting the effect of an eQTL specifically in certain cell types. Loci correlated with hematological traits were enriched for conditional eQTL, thus, demonstrating the importance of conditional eQTL for understanding molecular mechanisms underlying physiological trait variation. The classification proposed here has the potential to streamline and unify future analysis of conditional and dynamic eQTL as well as many

  5. Has gene duplication impacted the evolution of Eutherian longevity?

    PubMed

    Doherty, Aoife; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2016-10-01

    One of the greatest unresolved questions in aging biology is determining the genetic basis of interspecies longevity variation. Gene duplication is often the key to understanding the origin and evolution of important Eutherian phenotypes. We systematically identified longevity-associated genes in model organisms that duplicated throughout Eutherian evolution. Longevity-associated gene families have a marginally significantly higher rate of duplication compared to non-longevity-associated gene families. Anti-longevity-associated gene families have significantly increased rate of duplication compared to pro-longevity gene families and are enriched in neurodegenerative disease categories. Conversely, duplicated pro-longevity-associated gene families are enriched in cell cycle genes. There is a cluster of longevity-associated gene families that expanded solely in long-lived species that is significantly enriched in pathways relating to 3-UTR-mediated translational regulation, metabolism of proteins and gene expression, pathways that have the potential to affect longevity. The identification of a gene cluster that duplicated solely in long-lived species involved in such fundamental processes provides a promising avenue for further exploration of Eutherian longevity evolution. PMID:27378378

  6. Identification and Validation of Reference Genes and Their Impact on Normalized Gene Expression Studies across Cultivated and Wild Cicer Species.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Dumbala Srinivas; Bhatnagar-Mathur, Pooja; Reddy, Palakolanu Sudhakar; Sri Cindhuri, Katamreddy; Sivaji Ganesh, Adusumalli; Sharma, Kiran Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative Real-Time PCR (qPCR) is a preferred and reliable method for accurate quantification of gene expression to understand precise gene functions. A total of 25 candidate reference genes including traditional and new generation reference genes were selected and evaluated in a diverse set of chickpea samples. The samples used in this study included nine chickpea genotypes (Cicer spp.) comprising of cultivated and wild species, six abiotic stress treatments (drought, salinity, high vapor pressure deficit, abscisic acid, cold and heat shock), and five diverse tissues (leaf, root, flower, seedlings and seed). The geNorm, NormFinder and RefFinder algorithms used to identify stably expressed genes in four sample sets revealed stable expression of UCP and G6PD genes across genotypes, while TIP41 and CAC were highly stable under abiotic stress conditions. While PP2A and ABCT genes were ranked as best for different tissues, ABCT, UCP and CAC were most stable across all samples. This study demonstrated the usefulness of new generation reference genes for more accurate qPCR based gene expression quantification in cultivated as well as wild chickpea species. Validation of the best reference genes was carried out by studying their impact on normalization of aquaporin genes PIP1;4 and TIP3;1, in three contrasting chickpea genotypes under high vapor pressure deficit (VPD) treatment. The chickpea TIP3;1 gene got significantly up regulated under high VPD conditions with higher relative expression in the drought susceptible genotype, confirming the suitability of the selected reference genes for expression analysis. This is the first comprehensive study on the stability of the new generation reference genes for qPCR studies in chickpea across species, different tissues and abiotic stresses.

  7. Identification and Validation of Reference Genes and Their Impact on Normalized Gene Expression Studies across Cultivated and Wild Cicer Species

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Palakolanu Sudhakar; Sri Cindhuri, Katamreddy; Sivaji Ganesh, Adusumalli; Sharma, Kiran Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative Real-Time PCR (qPCR) is a preferred and reliable method for accurate quantification of gene expression to understand precise gene functions. A total of 25 candidate reference genes including traditional and new generation reference genes were selected and evaluated in a diverse set of chickpea samples. The samples used in this study included nine chickpea genotypes (Cicer spp.) comprising of cultivated and wild species, six abiotic stress treatments (drought, salinity, high vapor pressure deficit, abscisic acid, cold and heat shock), and five diverse tissues (leaf, root, flower, seedlings and seed). The geNorm, NormFinder and RefFinder algorithms used to identify stably expressed genes in four sample sets revealed stable expression of UCP and G6PD genes across genotypes, while TIP41 and CAC were highly stable under abiotic stress conditions. While PP2A and ABCT genes were ranked as best for different tissues, ABCT, UCP and CAC were most stable across all samples. This study demonstrated the usefulness of new generation reference genes for more accurate qPCR based gene expression quantification in cultivated as well as wild chickpea species. Validation of the best reference genes was carried out by studying their impact on normalization of aquaporin genes PIP1;4 and TIP3;1, in three contrasting chickpea genotypes under high vapor pressure deficit (VPD) treatment. The chickpea TIP3;1 gene got significantly up regulated under high VPD conditions with higher relative expression in the drought susceptible genotype, confirming the suitability of the selected reference genes for expression analysis. This is the first comprehensive study on the stability of the new generation reference genes for qPCR studies in chickpea across species, different tissues and abiotic stresses. PMID:26863232

  8. Identification and Validation of Reference Genes and Their Impact on Normalized Gene Expression Studies across Cultivated and Wild Cicer Species.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Dumbala Srinivas; Bhatnagar-Mathur, Pooja; Reddy, Palakolanu Sudhakar; Sri Cindhuri, Katamreddy; Sivaji Ganesh, Adusumalli; Sharma, Kiran Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative Real-Time PCR (qPCR) is a preferred and reliable method for accurate quantification of gene expression to understand precise gene functions. A total of 25 candidate reference genes including traditional and new generation reference genes were selected and evaluated in a diverse set of chickpea samples. The samples used in this study included nine chickpea genotypes (Cicer spp.) comprising of cultivated and wild species, six abiotic stress treatments (drought, salinity, high vapor pressure deficit, abscisic acid, cold and heat shock), and five diverse tissues (leaf, root, flower, seedlings and seed). The geNorm, NormFinder and RefFinder algorithms used to identify stably expressed genes in four sample sets revealed stable expression of UCP and G6PD genes across genotypes, while TIP41 and CAC were highly stable under abiotic stress conditions. While PP2A and ABCT genes were ranked as best for different tissues, ABCT, UCP and CAC were most stable across all samples. This study demonstrated the usefulness of new generation reference genes for more accurate qPCR based gene expression quantification in cultivated as well as wild chickpea species. Validation of the best reference genes was carried out by studying their impact on normalization of aquaporin genes PIP1;4 and TIP3;1, in three contrasting chickpea genotypes under high vapor pressure deficit (VPD) treatment. The chickpea TIP3;1 gene got significantly up regulated under high VPD conditions with higher relative expression in the drought susceptible genotype, confirming the suitability of the selected reference genes for expression analysis. This is the first comprehensive study on the stability of the new generation reference genes for qPCR studies in chickpea across species, different tissues and abiotic stresses. PMID:26863232

  9. The Impact of Multifunctional Genes on "Guilt by Association" Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, Jesse; Pavlidis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Many previous studies have shown that by using variants of “guilt-by-association”, gene function predictions can be made with very high statistical confidence. In these studies, it is assumed that the “associations” in the data (e.g., protein interaction partners) of a gene are necessary in establishing “guilt”. In this paper we show that multifunctionality, rather than association, is a primary driver of gene function prediction. We first show that knowledge of the degree of multifunctionality alone can produce astonishingly strong performance when used as a predictor of gene function. We then demonstrate how multifunctionality is encoded in gene interaction data (such as protein interactions and coexpression networks) and how this can feed forward into gene function prediction algorithms. We find that high-quality gene function predictions can be made using data that possesses no information on which gene interacts with which. By examining a wide range of networks from mouse, human and yeast, as well as multiple prediction methods and evaluation metrics, we provide evidence that this problem is pervasive and does not reflect the failings of any particular algorithm or data type. We propose computational controls that can be used to provide more meaningful control when estimating gene function prediction performance. We suggest that this source of bias due to multifunctionality is important to control for, with widespread implications for the interpretation of genomics studies. PMID:21364756

  10. The impact of self-identified race on epidemiologic studies of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunita; Murphy, Amy; Howrylak, Judie; Himes, Blanca; Cho, Michael H; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Hunninghake, Gary M; Fuhlbrigge, Anne; Klanderman, Barbara; Ziniti, John; Senter-Sylvia, Jody; Liu, Andy; Szefler, Stanley J; Strunk, Robert; Castro, Mario; Hansel, Nadia N; Diette, Gregory B; Vonakis, Becky M; Adkinson, N Franklin; Carey, Vincent J; Raby, Benjamin A

    2011-02-01

    Although population differences in gene expression have been established, the impact on differential gene expression studies in large populations is not well understood. We describe the effect of self-reported race on a gene expression study of lung function in asthma. We generated gene expression profiles for 254 young adults (205 non-Hispanic whites and 49 African Americans) with asthma on whom concurrent total RNA derived from peripheral blood CD4(+) lymphocytes and lung function measurements were obtained. We identified four principal components that explained 62% of the variance in gene expression. The dominant principal component, which explained 29% of the total variance in gene expression, was strongly associated with self-identified race (P<10(-16)). The impact of these racial differences was observed when we performed differential gene expression analysis of lung function. Using multivariate linear models, we tested whether gene expression was associated with a quantitative measure of lung function: pre-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)). Though unadjusted linear models of FEV(1) identified several genes strongly correlated with lung function, these correlations were due to racial differences in the distribution of both FEV(1) and gene expression, and were no longer statistically significant following adjustment for self-identified race. These results suggest that self-identified race is a critical confounding covariate in epidemiologic studies of gene expression and that, similar to genetic studies, careful consideration of self-identified race in gene expression profiling studies is needed to avoid spurious association.

  11. Systematic analysis of somatic mutations impacting gene expression in 12 tumour types

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jiarui; McConechy, Melissa K.; Horlings, Hugo M.; Ha, Gavin; Chun Chan, Fong; Funnell, Tyler; Mullaly, Sarah C.; Reimand, Jüri; Bashashati, Ali; Bader, Gary D.; Huntsman, David; Aparicio, Samuel; Condon, Anne; Shah, Sohrab P.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel hierarchical Bayes statistical model, xseq, to systematically quantify the impact of somatic mutations on expression profiles. We establish the theoretical framework and robust inference characteristics of the method using computational benchmarking. We then use xseq to analyse thousands of tumour data sets available through The Cancer Genome Atlas, to systematically quantify somatic mutations impacting expression profiles. We identify 30 novel cis-effect tumour suppressor gene candidates, enriched in loss-of-function mutations and biallelic inactivation. Analysis of trans-effects of mutations and copy number alterations with xseq identifies mutations in 150 genes impacting expression networks, with 89 novel predictions. We reveal two important novel characteristics of mutation impact on expression: (1) patients harbouring known driver mutations exhibit different downstream gene expression consequences; (2) expression patterns for some mutations are stable across tumour types. These results have critical implications for identification and interpretation of mutations with consequent impact on transcription in cancer. PMID:26436532

  12. Placental expression profile of imprinted genes impacts birth weight

    PubMed Central

    Kappil, Maya A; Green, Benjamin B; Armstrong, David A; Sharp, Andrew J; Lambertini, Luca; Marsit, Carmen J; Chen, Jia

    2015-01-01

    The importance of imprinted genes in regulating feto-placental development has been long established. However, a comprehensive assessment of the role of placental imprinted gene expression on fetal growth has yet to be conducted. In this study, we examined the association between the placental expression of 108 established and putative imprinted genes and birth weight in 677 term pregnancies, oversampled for small for gestational age (SGA) and large for gestational age (LGA) infants. Using adjusted multinomial regression analyses, a 2-fold increase in the expression of 9 imprinted genes was positively associated with LGA status: BLCAP [odds ratio (OR) = 3.78, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.83, 7.82], DLK1 [OR = 1.63, 95% CI: 1.27, 2.09], H19 [OR = 2.79, 95% CI: 1.77, 4.42], IGF2 [OR = 1.43, 95% CI:1.31, 2.40], MEG3 [OR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.19, 1.71], MEST [OR = 4.78, 95% CI: 2.64, 8.65], NNAT [OR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.86], NDN [OR = 2.52, 95% CI: 1.72, 3.68], and PLAGL1 [OR = 1.85, 95% CI: 1.40, 2.44]. For SGA status, a 2-fold increase in MEST expression was associated with decreased risk [OR = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.17, 0.58], while a 2-fold increase in NNAT expression was associated with increased risk [OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.1]. Following a factor analysis, all genes significantly associated with SGA or LGA status loaded onto 2 of the 8 gene-sets underlying the variability in the dataset. Our comprehensive placental profiling of imprinted genes in a large birth cohort supports the importance of these genes for fetal growth. Given that abnormal birth weight is implicated in numerous diseases and developmental abnormalities, the expression pattern of placental imprinted genes has the potential to be developed as a novel biomarker for postnatal health outcomes. PMID:26186239

  13. Impact of ACTH Signaling on Transcriptional Regulation of Steroidogenic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Carmen; Lalli, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The trophic peptide hormone adrenocorticotropic (ACTH) stimulates steroid hormone biosynthesis evoking both a rapid, acute response and a long-term, chronic response, via the activation of cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. The acute response is initiated by the mobilization of cholesterol from lipid stores and its delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane, a process that is mediated by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein. The chronic response results in the increased coordinated transcription of genes encoding steroidogenic enzymes. ACTH binding to its cognate receptor, melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), stimulates adenylyl cyclase, thus inducing cAMP production, PKA activation, and phosphorylation of specific nuclear factors, which bind to target promoters and facilitate coactivator protein recruitment to direct steroidogenic gene transcription. This review provides a general view of the transcriptional control exerted by the ACTH/cAMP system on the expression of genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes in the adrenal cortex. Special emphasis will be given to the transcription factors required to mediate ACTH-dependent transcription of steroidogenic genes. PMID:27065945

  14. Impact of physical activity and doping on epigenetic gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenbach, Heidi

    2011-10-01

    To achieve success in sports, many athletes consume doping substances, such as anabolic androgenic steroids and growth hormones, and ignore the negative influence of these drugs on their health. Apart from the unethical aspect of doping in sports, it is essential to consider the tremendous risk it represents to their physical condition. The abuse of pharmaceuticals which improve athletic performance may alter the expression of specific genes involved in muscle and bone metabolism by epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications. Moreover, excessive and relentless training to increase the muscle mass, may also have an influence on the health of the athletes. This stress releases neurotransmitters and growth factors, and may affect the expression of endogenous genes by DNA methylation, too. This paper focuses on the relationship between epigenetic mechanisms and sports, highlights the potential consequences of abuse of doping drugs on gene expression, and describes methods to molecularly detect epigenetic changes of gene markers reflecting the physiological or metabolic effects of doping agents.

  15. Impact of distinct insect pollinators on gene flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The vast majority of fruits and vegetables, together with some hay crops (alfalfa) and some oil-producing crops (canola) are pollinated by insects. However we have little information on how insect pollinators affect the movement of genes via pollen and even less on how distinct insect pollinators ma...

  16. Estrogen Signaling Multiple Pathways to Impact Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Maria; Galluzzo, Paola; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Steroid hormones exert profound effects on cell growth, development, differentiation, and homeostasis. Their effects are mediated through specific intracellular steroid receptors that act via multiple mechanisms. Among others, the action mechanism starting upon 17β-estradiol (E2) binds to its receptors (ER) is considered a paradigmatic example of how steroid hormones function. Ligand-activated ER dimerizes and translocates in the nucleus where it recognizes specific hormone response elements located in or near promoter DNA regions of target genes. Behind the classical genomic mechanism shared with other steroid hormones, E2 also modulates gene expression by a second indirect mechanism that involves the interaction of ER with other transcription factors which, in turn, bind their cognate DNA elements. In this case, ER modulates the activities of transcription factors such as the activator protein (AP)-1, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and stimulating protein-1 (Sp-1), by stabilizing DNA-protein complexes and/or recruiting co-activators. In addition, E2 binding to ER may also exert rapid actions that start with the activation of a variety of signal transduction pathways (e.g. ERK/MAPK, p38/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC/PKC). The debate about the contribution of different ER-mediated signaling pathways to coordinate the expression of specific sets of genes is still open. This review will focus on the recent knowledge about the mechanism by which ERs regulate the expression of target genes and the emerging field of integration of membrane and nuclear receptor signaling, giving examples of the ways by which the genomic and non-genomic actions of ERs on target genes converge. PMID:18369406

  17. Impact of obesity-related genes in Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective was to investigate the association between BMI and single nucleotide polymorphisms previously identified of obesity-related genes in two Spanish populations. Forty SNPs in 23 obesity-related genes were evaluated in a rural population characterized by a high prevalence of obesity (869 subjects, mean age 46 yr, 62% women, 36% obese) and in an urban population (1425 subjects, mean age 54 yr, 50% women, 19% obese). Genotyping was assessed by using SNPlex and PLINK for the association analysis. Results Polymorphisms of the FTO were significantly associated with BMI, in the rural population (beta 0.87, p-value <0.001). None of the other SNPs showed significant association after Bonferroni correction in the two populations or in the pooled analysis. A weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) was constructed using the risk alleles of the Tag-SNPs with a positive Beta parameter in both populations. From the first to the fifth quintile of the score, the BMI increased 0.45 kg/m2 in Hortega and 2.0 kg/m2 in Pizarra. Overall, the obesity predictive value was low (less than 1%). Conclusion The risk associated with polymorphisms is low and the overall effect on BMI or obesity prediction is minimal. A weighted genetic risk score based on genes mainly acting through central nervous system mechanisms was associated with BMI but it yields minimal clinical prediction for the obesity risk in the general population. PMID:24267414

  18. Impact of asymmetric gene repertoire between cyclostomes and gnathostomes.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2013-02-01

    Extant vertebrates are divided into the two major groups, cyclostomes and gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates). The former includes jawless fishes, hagfishes and lampreys, and the latter includes all extant jawed vertebrates. In many research fields, the phenotypic traits of the cyclostomes have been considered crucial in understanding the evolutionary process from invertebrates to vertebrates. Recent studies have suggested that the common ancestor of the extant vertebrates including hagfishes and lampreys underwent two-round of whole genome duplications, and thus the genome expansion solely does not account for phenotypic differences between cyclostomes and gnathostomes. Emerging evidence from molecular phylogeny of individual gene families indicates that the gene repertoire expanded at the common ancestor of vertebrates were later reshaped asymmetrically between the two lineages, resulting in the retention of differential gene sets. This also confuses interpretation of conserved synteny which often serves as indicator of orthology and the ploidy level. In this review, current controversy and future perspectives of cyclostome genomics are discussed with reference to evolutionary developmental biology. PMID:23291292

  19. Clinical impact of recurrently mutated genes on lymphoma diagnostics: state-of-the-art and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Rosenquist, Richard; Rosenwald, Andreas; Du, Ming-Qing; Gaidano, Gianluca; Groenen, Patricia; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Ghia, Paolo; Gaulard, Philippe; Campo, Elias; Stamatopoulos, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    Similar to the inherent clinical heterogeneity of most, if not all, lymphoma entities, the genetic landscape of these tumors is markedly complex in the majority of cases, with a rapidly growing list of recurrently mutated genes discovered in recent years by next-generation sequencing technology. Whilst a few genes have been implied to have diagnostic, prognostic and even predictive impact, most gene mutations still require rigorous validation in larger, preferably prospective patient series, to scrutinize their potential role in lymphoma diagnostics and patient management. In selected entities, a predominantly mutated gene is identified in almost all cases (e.g. Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma and hairy-cell leukemia), while for the vast majority of lymphomas a quite diverse mutation pattern is observed, with a limited number of frequently mutated genes followed by a seemingly endless tail of genes with mutations at a low frequency. Herein, the European Expert Group on NGS-based Diagnostics in Lymphomas (EGNL) summarizes the current status of this ever-evolving field, and, based on the present evidence level, segregates mutations into the following categories: i) immediate impact on treatment decisions, ii) diagnostic impact, iii) prognostic impact, iv) potential clinical impact in the near future, or v) should only be considered for research purposes. In the coming years, coordinated efforts aiming to apply targeted next-generation sequencing in large patient series will be needed in order to elucidate if a particular gene mutation will have an immediate impact on the lymphoma classification, and ultimately aid clinical decision making. PMID:27582569

  20. Clinical impact of recurrently mutated genes on lymphoma diagnostics: state-of-the-art and beyond.

    PubMed

    Rosenquist, Richard; Rosenwald, Andreas; Du, Ming-Qing; Gaidano, Gianluca; Groenen, Patricia; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Ghia, Paolo; Gaulard, Philippe; Campo, Elias; Stamatopoulos, Kostas

    2016-09-01

    Similar to the inherent clinical heterogeneity of most, if not all, lymphoma entities, the genetic landscape of these tumors is markedly complex in the majority of cases, with a rapidly growing list of recurrently mutated genes discovered in recent years by next-generation sequencing technology. Whilst a few genes have been implied to have diagnostic, prognostic and even predictive impact, most gene mutations still require rigorous validation in larger, preferably prospective patient series, to scrutinize their potential role in lymphoma diagnostics and patient management. In selected entities, a predominantly mutated gene is identified in almost all cases (e.g. Waldenström's macroglobulinemia/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma and hairy-cell leukemia), while for the vast majority of lymphomas a quite diverse mutation pattern is observed, with a limited number of frequently mutated genes followed by a seemingly endless tail of genes with mutations at a low frequency. Herein, the European Expert Group on NGS-based Diagnostics in Lymphomas (EGNL) summarizes the current status of this ever-evolving field, and, based on the present evidence level, segregates mutations into the following categories: i) immediate impact on treatment decisions, ii) diagnostic impact, iii) prognostic impact, iv) potential clinical impact in the near future, or v) should only be considered for research purposes. In the coming years, coordinated efforts aiming to apply targeted next-generation sequencing in large patient series will be needed in order to elucidate if a particular gene mutation will have an immediate impact on the lymphoma classification, and ultimately aid clinical decision making. PMID:27582569

  1. Impact of gene patents on the development of molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Toneguzzo, Frances

    2011-07-01

    There is a widely held view that gene patents in particular and patents in general, because of the exclusionary rights that they provide, are inhibiting the development of and access to critical molecular diagnostic testing. This is a highly relevant issue for healthcare delivery as we move towards personalized medicine, which relies heavily on genetic testing to tailor treatments that are specific for individual characteristics. Critics of the patent system hope to void or diminish the exclusionary aspect of patents by removing genes from the definition of what is patentable, by increasing the number of activities that fall within the research use exemption, or by compelling patent holders to license their rights non-exclusively. Although a re-examination of what constitutes patentable subject matter is an important undertaking, narrowing the definition of patentable subject matter is at best only a partial solution. Erosion of the patent system through compulsory licensing or expansion of the research use exemption runs the risk of destroying important incentives without also fully addressing the problem. To promote solutions that truly address the issues, this article distinguishes documented facts from perceptions and suggests alternative approaches to explore. The author believes that efforts to undermine the patent system are simply counterproductive and that time would be better spent addressing the real issues that lie within molecular diagnostic development.

  2. The impact of gene duplication, insertion, deletion, lateral gene transfer and sequencing error on orthology inference: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Dalquen, Daniel A; Altenhoff, Adrian M; Gonnet, Gaston H; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The identification of orthologous genes, a prerequisite for numerous analyses in comparative and functional genomics, is commonly performed computationally from protein sequences. Several previous studies have compared the accuracy of orthology inference methods, but simulated data has not typically been considered in cross-method assessment studies. Yet, while dependent on model assumptions, simulation-based benchmarking offers unique advantages: contrary to empirical data, all aspects of simulated data are known with certainty. Furthermore, the flexibility of simulation makes it possible to investigate performance factors in isolation of one another.Here, we use simulated data to dissect the performance of six methods for orthology inference available as standalone software packages (Inparanoid, OMA, OrthoInspector, OrthoMCL, QuartetS, SPIMAP) as well as two generic approaches (bidirectional best hit and reciprocal smallest distance). We investigate the impact of various evolutionary forces (gene duplication, insertion, deletion, and lateral gene transfer) and technological artefacts (ambiguous sequences) on orthology inference. We show that while gene duplication/loss and insertion/deletion are well handled by most methods (albeit for different trade-offs of precision and recall), lateral gene transfer disrupts all methods. As for ambiguous sequences, which might result from poor sequencing, assembly, or genome annotation, we show that they affect alignment score-based orthology methods more strongly than their distance-based counterparts.

  3. The impact of human copy number variation on gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Gamazon, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a flurry of important technological and methodological developments in the discovery and analysis of copy number variations (CNVs), which are increasingly enabling the systematic evaluation of their impact on a broad range of phenotypes from molecular-level (intermediate) traits to higher-order clinical phenotypes. Like single nucleotide variants in the human genome, CNVs have been linked to complex traits in humans, including disease and drug response. These recent developments underscore the importance of incorporating complex forms of genetic variation into disease mapping studies and promise to transform our understanding of genome function and the genetic basis of disease. Here we review some of the findings that have emerged from transcriptome studies of CNVs facilitated by the rapid advances in -omics technologies and corresponding methodologies. PMID:25922366

  4. Prognostic Impact of WT-1 Gene Expression in Egyptian Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hagag, Adel A; Badraia, Ibrahim M; Hassan, Samir M; Abd El-Lateef, Amal E

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer representing 23% of pediatric cancers. Wilms’ tumor -1 gene is a novel prognostic factor, minimal residual disease marker and therapeutic target in acute leukemia. Aim of the work The aim of this work was to study the impact of WT-1 gene expression in the prognosis of ALL. Patients and methods This study was conducted on 40 Egyptian children with newly diagnosed ALL who were subjected to full history taking, thorough clinical examination and laboratory investigations including; complete blood count, LDH, BM aspiration, cytochemistry, immunophenotyping, FISH technique for detection of t(12;21) and t(9;22) and assessment of WT-1 Gene by real-time PCR in BM samples at time of diagnosis. Results Positive WT-1 gene expression was found in 22 cases (55%) and negative expression in 18 cases (45%). Positive WT-1 gene expression group (n=22) includes 14 males and 8 females with mean age at presentation of 5.261 ± 0.811 while negative WT-1 gene expression group (n=18) includes 12 males and 6 females with mean age at diagnosis of 9.669 ± 3.731 with significantly older age in negative WT-1 gene expression group but no significant differences between positive and negative WT-1 gene expression groups regarding sex and clinical presentations. There were no significant differences in platelets and WBCs counts, hemoglobin and LDH levels and the number of peripheral blood and BM blast cells at diagnosis between positive and negative WT-1 gene expression groups but after induction therapy there were significantly lower BM blast cells in positive WT-1 gene expression group. There were no statistically significant differences between positive and negative WT-1 gene expression groups regarding immunophenotyping and chromosomal translocations including t(12;21) and t(9;22). There were a significantly higher relapse and death rate and a lower rate of CR, DFS, and OAS in negative WT-1 gene expression

  5. Impact of gene patents on diagnostic testing: a new patent landscaping method applied to spinocerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Berthels, Nele; Matthijs, Gert; Van Overwalle, Geertrui

    2011-01-01

    Recent reports in Europe and the United States raise concern about the potential negative impact of gene patents on the freedom to operate of diagnosticians and on the access of patients to genetic diagnostic services. Patents, historically seen as legal instruments to trigger innovation, could cause undesired side effects in the public health domain. Clear empirical evidence on the alleged hindering effect of gene patents is still scarce. We therefore developed a patent categorization method to determine which gene patents could indeed be problematic. The method is applied to patents relevant for genetic testing of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). The SCA test is probably the most widely used DNA test in (adult) neurology, as well as one of the most challenging due to the heterogeneity of the disease. Typically tested as a gene panel covering the five common SCA subtypes, we show that the patenting of SCA genes and testing methods and the associated licensing conditions could have far-reaching consequences on legitimate access to this gene panel. Moreover, with genetic testing being increasingly standardized, simply ignoring patents is unlikely to hold out indefinitely. This paper aims to differentiate among so-called ‘gene patents' by lifting out the truly problematic ones. In doing so, awareness is raised among all stakeholders in the genetic diagnostics field who are not necessarily familiar with the ins and outs of patenting and licensing. PMID:21811306

  6. Impact of variation in the BDNF gene on social stress sensitivity and the buffering impact of positive emotions: replication and extension of a gene-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    van Winkel, Mark; Peeters, Frenk; van Winkel, Ruud; Kenis, Gunter; Collip, Dina; Geschwind, Nicole; Jacobs, Nele; Derom, Catherine; Thiery, Evert; van Os, Jim; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Wichers, Marieke

    2014-06-01

    A previous study reported that social stress sensitivity is moderated by the brain-derived-neurotrophic-factor(Val66Met) (BDNF rs6265) genotype. Additionally, positive emotions partially neutralize this moderating effect. The current study aimed to: (i) replicate in a new independent sample of subjects with residual depressive symptoms the moderating effect of BDNF(Val66Met) genotype on social stress sensitivity, (ii) replicate the neutralizing impact of positive emotions, (iii) extend these analyses to other variations in the BDNF gene in the new independent sample and the original sample of non-depressed individuals. Previous findings were replicated in an experience sampling method (ESM) study. Negative Affect (NA) responses to social stress were stronger in "Val/Met" carriers of BDNF(Val66Met) compared to "Val/Val" carriers. Positive emotions neutralized the moderating effect of BDNF(Val66Met) genotype on social stress sensitivity in a dose-response fashion. Finally, two of four additional BDNF SNPs (rs11030101, rs2049046) showed similar moderating effects on social stress-sensitivity across both samples. The neutralizing effect of positive emotions on the moderating effects of these two additional SNPs was found in one sample. In conclusion, ESM has important advantages in gene-environment (GxE) research and may attribute to more consistent findings in future GxE research. This study shows how the impact of BDNF genetic variation on depressive symptoms may be explained by its impact on subtle daily life responses to social stress. Further, it shows that the generation of positive affect (PA) can buffer social stress sensitivity and partially undo the genetic susceptibility.

  7. High-resolution genome-wide scan of genes, gene-networks and cellular systems impacting the yeast ionome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To balance the demand for uptake of essential elements with their potential toxicity living cells have complex regulatory mechanisms. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen to identify genes that impact the elemental composition (‘ionome’) of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using inductively coupled plasma – mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) we quantify Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, S and Zn in 11890 mutant strains, including 4940 haploid and 1127 diploid deletion strains, and 5798 over expression strains. Results We identified 1065 strains with an altered ionome, including 584 haploid and 35 diploid deletion strains, and 446 over expression strains. Disruption of protein metabolism or trafficking has the highest likelihood of causing large ionomic changes, with gene dosage also being important. Gene over expression produced more extreme ionomic changes, but over expression and loss of function phenotypes are generally not related. Ionomic clustering revealed the existence of only a small number of possible ionomic profiles suggesting fitness tradeoffs that constrain the ionome. Clustering also identified important roles for the mitochondria, vacuole and ESCRT pathway in regulation of the ionome. Network analysis identified hub genes such as PMR1 in Mn homeostasis, novel members of ionomic networks such as SMF3 in vacuolar retrieval of Mn, and cross-talk between the mitochondria and the vacuole. All yeast ionomic data can be searched and downloaded at http://www.ionomicshub.org. Conclusions Here, we demonstrate the power of high-throughput ICP-MS analysis to functionally dissect the ionome on a genome-wide scale. The information this reveals has the potential to benefit both human health and agriculture. PMID:23151179

  8. The Impact of Genome Triplication on Tandem Gene Evolution in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lu; Cheng, Feng; Wu, Jian; Wang, Xiaowu

    2012-01-01

    Whole genome duplication (WGD) and tandem duplication (TD) are both important modes of gene expansion. However, how WGD influences tandemly duplicated genes is not well studied. We used Brassica rapa, which has undergone an additional genome triplication (WGT) and shares a common ancestor with Arabidopsis thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, and Thellungiella parvula, to investigate the impact of genome triplication on tandem gene evolution. We identified 2,137, 1,569, 1,751, and 1,135 tandem gene arrays in B. rapa, A. thaliana, A. lyrata, and T. parvula respectively. Among them, 414 conserved tandem arrays are shared by the three species without WGT, which were also considered as existing in the diploid ancestor of B. rapa. Thus, after genome triplication, B. rapa should have 1,242 tandem arrays according to the 414 conserved tandems. Here, we found 400 out of the 414 tandems had at least one syntenic ortholog in the genome of B. rapa. Furthermore, 294 out of the 400 shared syntenic orthologs maintain tandem arrays (more than one gene for each syntenic hit) in B. rapa. For the 294 tandem arrays, we obtained 426 copies of syntenic paralogous tandems in the triplicated genome of B. rapa. In this study, we demonstrated that tandem arrays in B. rapa were dramatically fractionated after WGT when compared either to non-tandem genes in the B. rapa genome or to the tandem arrays in closely related species that have not experienced a recent whole genome polyploidization event.

  9. The Impact of Genome Triplication on Tandem Gene Evolution in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lu; Cheng, Feng; Wu, Jian; Wang, Xiaowu

    2012-01-01

    Whole genome duplication (WGD) and tandem duplication (TD) are both important modes of gene expansion. However, how WGD influences tandemly duplicated genes is not well studied. We used Brassica rapa, which has undergone an additional genome triplication (WGT) and shares a common ancestor with Arabidopsis thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, and Thellungiella parvula, to investigate the impact of genome triplication on tandem gene evolution. We identified 2,137, 1,569, 1,751, and 1,135 tandem gene arrays in B. rapa, A. thaliana, A. lyrata, and T. parvula respectively. Among them, 414 conserved tandem arrays are shared by the three species without WGT, which were also considered as existing in the diploid ancestor of B. rapa. Thus, after genome triplication, B. rapa should have 1,242 tandem arrays according to the 414 conserved tandems. Here, we found 400 out of the 414 tandems had at least one syntenic ortholog in the genome of B. rapa. Furthermore, 294 out of the 400 shared syntenic orthologs maintain tandem arrays (more than one gene for each syntenic hit) in B. rapa. For the 294 tandem arrays, we obtained 426 copies of syntenic paralogous tandems in the triplicated genome of B. rapa. In this study, we demonstrated that tandem arrays in B. rapa were dramatically fractionated after WGT when compared either to non-tandem genes in the B. rapa genome or to the tandem arrays in closely related species that have not experienced a recent whole genome polyploidization event. PMID:23226149

  10. Impact of karyotype organization on interlocus recombination between T cell receptor genes in Equidae.

    PubMed

    Drbalova, Jitka; Musilova, Petra; Kubickova, Svatava; Sebestova, Hana; Vahala, Jiri; Rubes, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) genes (TRA, TRB, TRD and TRG) reside in 3 different chromosomal regions. During the maturation of T lymphocytes, the TCR genes are rearranged by site-specific recombination, a process that also predisposes T cells to aberrant rearrangements. Illegitimate recombination between the TCR genes occurs at a low level in healthy individuals, but this frequency may correlate with the risk of lymphoma. The aim of this work was to investigate interlocus recombination in equids. Illegitimate rearrangements were studied in peripheral blood lymphocytes by FISH with painting and BAC probes and by sequencing of PCR products, and the frequencies of recombination were assessed in horses and 4 other equids. The presence of several trans-rearrangement products between the TRA and TRG genes was verified by PCR in all investigated equids. Frequencies of trans-rearrangements in horses are higher than in humans, and colocalization of the TCR genes on the same chromosome increases the incidence of trans-rearrangements between them. The orientation of the TCR genes does not impact interlocus recombination itself but does affect the viability of cells carrying its products and consequently the number of trans-rearrangements observed in lymphocytes.

  11. PERMANENT GENETIC RESOURCES: Consensus primers of cyp73 genes discriminate willow species and hybrids (Salix, Salicaceae).

    PubMed

    Trung, Le Quang; VAN Puyvelde, Karolien; Triest, Ludwig

    2008-03-01

    Consensus primers, based on exon sequences of the cyp73 gene family coding for cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) of the lignin biosynthesis pathway, were designed for the tetraploid willow species Salix alba and Salix fragilis. Diagnostic alleles at species level were observed among introns of three cyp73 genes and allowed unambiguous detection of the first generation and introgressed hybrids in populations. Progeny analysis of a female S. alba with a male introgressed hybrid confirmed the codominant inheritance of each intron. Sequences of the diagnostic alleles of both species were similar to those found in the hybrids.

  12. Psychological resilience and the gene regulatory impact of posttraumatic stress in Nepali child soldiers.

    PubMed

    Kohrt, Brandon A; Worthman, Carol M; Adhikari, Ramesh P; Luitel, Nagendra P; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Ma, Jeffrey; McCreath, Heather; Seeman, Teresa E; Crimmins, Eileen M; Cole, Steven W

    2016-07-19

    Adverse social conditions in early life have been linked to increased expression of proinflammatory genes and reduced expression of antiviral genes in circulating immune cells-the conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA). However, it remains unclear whether such effects are specific to the Western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic (WEIRD) cultural environments in which previous research has been conducted. To assess the roles of early adversity and individual psychological resilience in immune system gene regulation within a non-WEIRD population, we evaluated CTRA gene-expression profiles in 254 former child soldiers and matched noncombatant civilians 5 y after the People's War in Nepal. CTRA gene expression was up-regulated in former child soldiers. These effects were linked to the degree of experienced trauma and associated distress-that is, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity-more than to child soldier status per se. Self-perceived psychological resilience was associated with marked buffering of CTRA activation such that PTSD-affected former child soldiers with high levels of personal resilience showed molecular profiles comparable to those of PTSD-free civilians. These results suggest that CTRA responses to early life adversity are not restricted to WEIRD cultural contexts and they underscore the key role of resilience in determining the molecular impact of adverse environments. PMID:27402736

  13. Impact of Phytolacca americana extracts on gene expression of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Maness, L; Goktepe, I; Chen, H; Ahmedna, M; Sang, S

    2014-02-01

    Native Americans have used Phytolacca americana to treat breast ailments, gastrointestinal disorders, rashes, and inflammation. Some anti-cancer and anti-viral research has been reported on this perennial herb, but none has been published concerning the effects of its extracts on cancer cell genes. In this study, changes in gene expression at the transcription level were evaluated in HCT-116 colon cancer cells after exposure to P. americana ethanol extract and its water fraction using the Human Cancer Pathway Finder PCR Array. Of the genes significantly affected in HCT-116 cells exposed to the ethanol extract at 3200 µg/ml, changes in expression of MYC, PLAU, and TEK may benefit the treatment of colon cancer. Exposing the cells to 1600 µg/ml of the water fraction resulted in several gene changes that may also be beneficial in the treatment of colon cancer: NME4, TEK, and THBS1. A few genes on this array that are known to play a specific role in colon cancer had activities changed in a way that may be detrimental in the treatment of colon cancer. Further studies should be performed to understand how these changes would impact colon cancer treatment.

  14. Impact of vitamin A supplementation on RAR gene expression in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Bitarafan, Sama; Harirchian, Mohammad Hossein; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Keramatipour, Mohammad; Beladi Moghadam, Nahid; Togha, Mansoureh; Nafissi, Shahriar; Siassi, Fereydoun; Eshraghian, Mohammad Reza; Mohammadzadeh Honarvar, Niyaz; Ansar, Hasti; Talebi, Saeed; Saboor-Yarghi, Ali Akbar

    2013-10-01

    Vitamin A and its derivatives have been shown to modulate the immune system via retinoic acid receptor (RAR). This study explored the impact of retinyl palmitate supplementation on RAR subtype gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The study designed as a double-blind randomized clinical trial in which relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis patients were evaluated. Both groups received one capsule 50,000 IU vitamin D3 per 2 weeks and one intramuscular injection interferon beta-1a per week. The intervention group received one 25,000 IU retinyl palmitate capsule daily for 6 months and the placebo group received one placebo capsule daily. The PBMCs were isolated from participants and the expression level changes of RAR-α and RAR-γ genes were determined by real-time PCR. After supplementation, in the intervention group, the RAR-α gene expression level was significantly decreased compared to the placebo group (p = 0.03); however, the expression of RAR-γ gene did not significantly change (p = 0.10). These results show that vitamin A supplementation can significantly downregulate the expression of RAR-α gene in PBMCs of MS patients that suggest the presence of in vivo regulatory mechanisms for the action of vitamin A on the immune system. PMID:23955709

  15. Impact of blue LED irradiation on proliferation and gene expression of cultured human keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Anja; Sticht, Carsten; Dweep, Harsh; van Abeelen, Frank A.; Gretz, Norbert; Oversluizen, Gerrit

    2015-03-01

    Blue light is known for its anti-microbial, anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory effects. Furthermore, it is already used for the treatment of neonatal jaundice and acne. However, little is known about the exact mechanisms of action on gene expression level. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of blue LED irradiation on the proliferation and gene expression in immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT) in vitro. Furthermore its safety was assessed. XTT-tests revealed a decrease in cell proliferation in blue light irradiated cells depending on the duration of light irradiation. Moreover, gene expression analysis demonstrated deregulated genes already 3 hours after blue light irradiation. 24 hours after blue light irradiation the effects seemed to be even more pronounced. The oxidative stress response was significantly increased, pointing to increased ROS production due to blue light, as well as steroid hormone biosynthesis. Downregulated pathways or biological processes were connected to anti-inflammatory response. Interestingly, also the melanoma pathway contained significantly downregulated genes 24 hours after blue light irradiation, which stands in accordance to literature that blue light can also inhibit proliferation in cancer cells. First tests with melanoma cells revealed a decrease in cell proliferation after blue light irradiation. In conclusion, blue light irradiation might open avenues to new therapeutic regimens; at least blue light seems to have no effect that induces cancer growth or formation.

  16. Tetracycline residues and tetracycline resistance genes in groundwater impacted by swine production facilities.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Roderick I; Koike, Satoshi; Krapac, Ivan; Chee-Sanford, Joanne; Maxwell, Scott; Aminov, Rustam I

    2006-01-01

    Antibiotics are used at therapeutic levels to treat disease; at slightly lower levels as prophylactics; and at low, subtherapeutic levels for growth promotion and improvement of feed efficiency. Over 88% of swine producers in the United States gave antimicrobials to grower/finisher pigs in feed as a growth promoter in 2000. It is estimated that ca. 75% of antibiotics are not absorbed by animals and are excreted in urine and feces. The extensive use of antibiotics in swine production has resulted in antibiotic resistance in many intestinal bacteria, which are also excreted in swine feces, resulting in dissemination of resistance genes into the environment. To assess the impact of manure management on groundwater quality, groundwater samples have been collected near two swine confinement facilities that use lagoons for manure storage and treatment. Several key contaminant indicators - including inorganic ions, antibiotics, and antibiotic resistance genes - were analyzed in groundwater collected from the monitoring wells. Chloride, ammonium, potassium, and sodium were predominant inorganic constituents in the manure samples and served as indicators of groundwater contamination. Based on these analyses, shallow groundwater has been impacted by lagoon seepage at both sites. Liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) was used to measure the dissolved concentrations of tetracycline, chlortetracycline, and oxytetracycline in groundwater and manure. Although tetracyclines were regularly used at both facilities, they were infrequently detected in manure samples and then at relatively trace concentrations. Concentrations of all tetracyclines and their breakdown products in the groundwater sampled were generally less than 0.5 microg/L. Bacterial tetracycline resistance genes served as distinct genotypic markers to indicate the dissemination and mobility of antibiotic resistance genes that originated from the lagoons. Applying PCR to genomic DNA extracted from the lagoon

  17. Tetracycline residues and tetracycline resistance genes in groundwater impacted by swine production facilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mackie, R.I.; Koike, S.; Krapac, I.; Chee-Sanford, J.; Maxwell, Susan; Aminov, R.I.

    2006-01-01

    Antibiotics are used at therapeutic levels to treat disease; at slightly lower levels as prophylactics; and at low, subtherapeutic levels for growth promotion and improvement of feed efficiency. Over 88% of swine producers in the United States gave antimicrobials to grower/finisher pigs in feed as a growth promoter in 2000. It is estimated that ca. 75% of antibiotics are not absorbed by animals and are excreted in urine and feces. The extensive use of antibiotics in swine production has resulted in antibiotic resistance in many intestinal bacteria, which are also excreted in swine feces, resulting in dissemination of resistance genes into the environment.To assess the impact of manure management on groundwater quality, groundwater samples have been collected near two swine confinement facilities that use lagoons for manure storage and treatment. Several key contaminant indicators-including inorganic ions, antibiotics, and antibiotic resistance genes-were analyzed in groundwater collected from the monitoring wells. Chloride, ammonium, potassium, and sodium were predominant inorganic constituents in the manure samples and served as indicators of groundwater contamination. Based on these analyses, shallow groundwater has been impacted by lagoon seepage at both sites. Liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) was used to measure the dissolved concentrations of tetracycline, chlortetracycline, and oxytetracycline in groundwater and manure. Although tetracyclines were regularly used at both facilities, they were infrequently detected in manure samples and then at relatively trace concentrations. Concentrations of all tetracyclines and their breakdown products in the groundwater sampled were generally less than 0.5 ??g/L.Bacterial tetracycline resistance genes served as distinct genotypic markers to indicate the dissemination and mobility of antibiotic resistance genes that originated from the lagoons. Applying PCR to genomic DNA extracted from the lagoon and

  18. Impact of virulence genes on sepsis severity and survival in Escherichia coli bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Rillo, Marta; Fernández-Romero, Natalia; Francisco, Carolina Navarro-San; Díez-Sebastián, Jesús; Romero-Gómez, Maria Pilar; Fernández, Francisco Arnalich; López, Jose Ramon Arribas; Mingorance, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) are a frequent cause of bacteremia and sepsis, but the role of ExPEC genetic virulence factors (VFs) in sepsis development and outcome is ill-defined. Prospective study including 120 adult patients with E. coli bacteremia to investigate the impact of bacterial and host factors on sepsis severity and mortality. Patients' clinical and demographic data were registered. Phylogenetic background of E. coli isolates was analyzed by SNP pyrosequencing and VFs by PCR. The E. coli isolates presented an epidemic population structure with 6 dominant clones making up to half of the isolates. VF gene profiles were highly diverse. Multivariate analysis for sepsis severity showed that the presence of cnf and blaTEM genes increased the risk of severe illness by 6.75 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.79–24.71) and 2.59 (95% CI 1.04–6.43) times respectively, while each point in the Pitt score increased the risk by 1.34 (95% CI 1.02–1.76) times. Multivariate analysis for mortality showed that active chemotherapy (OR 17.87, 95% CI 3.35–95.45), McCabe-Jackson Index (OR for rapidly fatal category 120.15, 95% CI 4.19–3446.23), Pitt index (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.25–2.56) and presence of fyuA gene (OR 8.05, 95% CI 1.37–47.12) were associated to increased mortality while the presence of P fimbriae genes had a protective role (OR 0.094, 95%IC 0.018–0.494). Bacteremic E. coli had a high diversity of genetic backgrounds and VF gene profiles. Bacterial VFs and host determinants had an impact on disease evolution and mortality. PMID:25654604

  19. CARDIOPULMONARY GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN NORMO- AND SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERSENSITIVE (SH) RATS: IMPACT OF PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    CARDIOPULMONARY GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN NORMO- AND SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE (SH) RATS: IMPACT OF PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) EXPOSURE. SS Nadadur UP Kodavanti, Pulmonary Toxicology Branch, ETD, ORD, NHEERL, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

  20. Middle age has a significant impact on gene expression during skin wound healing in male mice.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Hagai; Lumenta, David Benjamin; Vierlinger, Klemens; Hofner, Manuela; Kitzinger, Hugo-Benito; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Nöhammer, Christa; Chilosi, Marco; Fraifeld, Vadim E

    2016-08-01

    The vast majority of research on the impact of age on skin wound healing (WH) compares old animals to young ones. The middle age is often ignored in biogerontological research despite the fact that many functions that decline in an age-dependent manner have starting points in mid-life. With this in mind, we examined gene expression patterns during skin WH in late middle-aged versus young adult male mice, using the head and back punch models. The rationale behind this study was that the impact of age would first be detectable at the transcriptional level. We pinpointed several pathways which were over-activated in the middle-aged mice, both in the intact skin and during WH. Among them were various metabolic, immune-inflammatory and growth-promoting pathways. These transcriptional changes were much more pronounced in the head than in the back. In summary, the middle age has a significant impact on gene expression in intact and healing skin. It seems that the head punch model is more sensitive to the effect of age than the back model, and we suggest that it should be more widely applied in aging research on wound healing.

  1. Impact of high predation risk on genome-wide hippocampal gene expression in snowshoe hares.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, Sophia G; McGowan, Patrick O; Krebs, Charles J; Boonstra, Rudy

    2014-11-01

    The population dynamics of snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) are fundamental to the ecosystem dynamics of Canada's boreal forest. During the 8- to 11-year population cycle, hare densities can fluctuate up to 40-fold. Predators in this system (lynx, coyotes, great-horned owls) affect population numbers not only through direct mortality but also through sublethal effects. The chronic stress hypothesis posits that high predation risk during the decline severely stresses hares, leading to greater stress responses, heightened ability to mobilize cortisol and energy, and a poorer body condition. These effects may result in, or be mediated by, differential gene expression. We used an oligonucleotide microarray designed for a closely-related species, the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), to characterize differences in genome-wide hippocampal RNA transcript abundance in wild hares from the Yukon during peak and decline phases of a single cycle. A total of 106 genes were differentially regulated between phases. Array results were validated with quantitative real-time PCR, and mammalian protein sequence similarity was used to infer gene function. In comparison to hares from the peak, decline phase hares showed increased expression of genes involved in metabolic processes and hormone response, and decreased expression of immune response and blood cell formation genes. We found evidence for predation risk effects on the expression of genes whose putative functions correspond with physiological impacts known to be induced by predation risk in snowshoe hares. This study shows, for the first time, a link between changes in demography and alterations in neural RNA transcript abundance in a natural population.

  2. Impact of high predation risk on genome-wide hippocampal gene expression in snowshoe hares.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, Sophia G; McGowan, Patrick O; Krebs, Charles J; Boonstra, Rudy

    2014-11-01

    The population dynamics of snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) are fundamental to the ecosystem dynamics of Canada's boreal forest. During the 8- to 11-year population cycle, hare densities can fluctuate up to 40-fold. Predators in this system (lynx, coyotes, great-horned owls) affect population numbers not only through direct mortality but also through sublethal effects. The chronic stress hypothesis posits that high predation risk during the decline severely stresses hares, leading to greater stress responses, heightened ability to mobilize cortisol and energy, and a poorer body condition. These effects may result in, or be mediated by, differential gene expression. We used an oligonucleotide microarray designed for a closely-related species, the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), to characterize differences in genome-wide hippocampal RNA transcript abundance in wild hares from the Yukon during peak and decline phases of a single cycle. A total of 106 genes were differentially regulated between phases. Array results were validated with quantitative real-time PCR, and mammalian protein sequence similarity was used to infer gene function. In comparison to hares from the peak, decline phase hares showed increased expression of genes involved in metabolic processes and hormone response, and decreased expression of immune response and blood cell formation genes. We found evidence for predation risk effects on the expression of genes whose putative functions correspond with physiological impacts known to be induced by predation risk in snowshoe hares. This study shows, for the first time, a link between changes in demography and alterations in neural RNA transcript abundance in a natural population. PMID:25234370

  3. Apolipoprotein A5: A newly identified gene impacting plasmatriglyceride levels in humans and mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-09-15

    Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) is a newly described member of theapolipoprotein gene family whose initial discovery arose from comparativesequence analysis of the mammalian APOA1/C3/A4 gene cluster. Functionalstudies in mice indicated that alteration in the level of APOA5significantly impacted plasma triglyceride concentrations. Miceover-expressing human APOA5 displayed significantly reducedtriglycerides, while mice lacking apoA5 had a large increase in thislipid parameter. Studies in humans have also suggested an important rolefor APOA5 in determining plasma triglyceride concentrations. In theseexperiments, polymorphisms in the human gene were found to define severalcommon haplotypes that were associated with significant changes intriglyceride concentrations in multiple populations. Several separateclinical studies have provided consistent and strong support for theeffect with 24 percent of Caucasians, 35 percent of African-Americans and53 percent of Hispanics carrying APOA5 haplotypes associated withincreased plasma triglyceride levels. In summary, APOA5 represents anewly discovered gene involved in triglyceride metabolism in both humansand mice whose mechanism of action remains to be deciphered.

  4. The impact of non-electrical factors on electrical gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiemiao; Cutrera, Jeffry; Li, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    Electrical pulses directly and effectively boost both in vitro and in vivo gene transfer, but this process is greatly affected by non-electrical factors that exist during electroporation. These factors include, but are not limited to, the types of cells or tissues used, the property of DNA, DNA formulation, and the expressed protein. In this mini-review, we only describe and discuss a summary of DNA properties and selected DNA formulations on gene transfer via electroporation. The properties of DNA were selected for review because a substantial amount of remarkable work has been performed during the past few years but has received less notice than other work, although DNA properties appear to be critical for boosting electroporation delivery. The selected formulations will be covered in this mini-review because we are only interested in the simple formulations that could be used for cell or gene therapy via electroporation. Plus, there was an extensive review of DNA formulations in the first edition of this book. The formulations discussed in this mini-review represent novel developments in recent years and may impact electroporation significantly. These advancements in DNA formulations could prove to be important for gene delivery and disease treatment. PMID:24510810

  5. Potential impact of human mitochondrial replacement on global policy regarding germline gene modification.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tetsuya

    2014-08-01

    Previous discussions regarding human germline gene modification led to a global consensus that no germline should undergo genetic modification. However, the UK Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, having conducted at the UK Government's request a scientific review and a wide public consultation, provided advice to the Government on the pros and cons of Parliament's lifting a ban on altering mitochondrial DNA content of human oocytes and embryos, so as to permit the prevention of maternal transmission of mitochondrial diseases. In this commentary, relevant ethical and biomedical issues are examined and requirements for proceeding with this novel procedure are suggested. Additionally, potentially significant impacts of the UK legalization on global policy concerning germline gene modification are discussed in the context of recent advances in genome-editing technology. It is concluded that international harmonization is needed, as well as further ethical and practical consideration, prior to the legalization of human mitochondrial replacement.

  6. Potential impact of human mitochondrial replacement on global policy regarding germline gene modification.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tetsuya

    2014-08-01

    Previous discussions regarding human germline gene modification led to a global consensus that no germline should undergo genetic modification. However, the UK Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, having conducted at the UK Government's request a scientific review and a wide public consultation, provided advice to the Government on the pros and cons of Parliament's lifting a ban on altering mitochondrial DNA content of human oocytes and embryos, so as to permit the prevention of maternal transmission of mitochondrial diseases. In this commentary, relevant ethical and biomedical issues are examined and requirements for proceeding with this novel procedure are suggested. Additionally, potentially significant impacts of the UK legalization on global policy concerning germline gene modification are discussed in the context of recent advances in genome-editing technology. It is concluded that international harmonization is needed, as well as further ethical and practical consideration, prior to the legalization of human mitochondrial replacement. PMID:24832374

  7. Analysis of the multi-copied genes and the impact of the redundant protein coding sequences on gene annotation in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia-Feng; Chen, Qing-Li; Ren, Jing; Yang, Yan-Ling; Wang, Ji-Hua; Sun, Xiao

    2015-07-01

    The important roles of duplicated genes in evolutional process have been recognized in bacteria, archaebacteria and eukaryotes, while there is very little study on the multi-copied protein coding genes that share sequence identity of 100%. In this paper, the multi-copied protein coding genes in a number of prokaryotic genomes are comprehensively analyzed firstly. The results show that 0-15.93% of the protein coding genes in each genome are multi-copied genes and 0-16.49% of the protein coding genes in each genome are highly similar with the sequence identity ≥ 80%. Function and COG (Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins) analysis shows that 64.64% of multi-copied genes concentrate on the function of transposase and 86.28% of the COG assigned multi-copied genes concentrate on the COG code of 'L'. Furthermore, the impact of redundant protein coding sequences on the gene prediction results is studied. The results show that the problem of protein coding sequence redundancies cannot be ignored and the consistency of the gene annotation results before and after excluding the redundant sequences is negatively related with the sequences redundancy degree of the protein coding sequences in the training set.

  8. Characterisation of porin genes from Mycobacterium fortuitum and their impact on growth

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Highly pathogenic mycobacteria like Mycobacterium tuberculosis are characterised by their slow growth and their ability to reside and multiply in the very hostile phagosomal environment and a correlation between the growth rate of mycobacteria and their pathogenicity has been hypothesised. Here, porin genes from M. fortuitum were cloned and characterised to address their impact on the growth rate of fast-growing and pathogenic mycobacteria. Results Two genes encoding porins orthologous to MspA from M. smegmatis, porM1 and porM2, were cloned from M. fortuitum strains, which were originally isolated from human patients. Both porin genes were at least partially able to complement the mutations of a M. smegmatis mutant strain lacking the genes mspA and mspC with respect to the growth rate. PorM1 and porM2 were present in different strains of M. fortuitum including the type strain. Comparative expression analysis of porM genes revealed divergent porin expression among analysed M. fortuitum strains. Repression of the expression of porins by antisense technique decreased the growth rates of different M. fortuitum. The effects of over-expression of porM1 as well as porM2 varied depending on the strain and the concentration of antibiotic added to the medium and indicated that PorM1 and PorM2 enhance the growth of M. fortuitum strains, but also the diffusion of the antibiotic kanamycin into the cells. Conclusion This study demonstrates the important role of porin expression in growth as well as antibiotic susceptibility of the opportunistic bacterium M. fortuitum. PMID:19203364

  9. Impact of gene flow from cultivated beet on genetic diversity of wild sea beet populations

    PubMed

    Bartsch; Lehnen; Clegg; Pohl-Orf; Schuphan; Ellstrand

    1999-10-01

    Gene flow and introgression from cultivated plants may have important consequences for the conservation of wild plant populations. Cultivated beets (sugar beet, red beet and Swiss chard: Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) are of particular concern because they are cross-compatible with the wild taxon, sea beet (B.vs. ssp. maritima). Cultivated beet seed production areas are sometimes adjacent to sea beet populations; the numbers of flowering individuals in the former typically outnumber those in the populations of the latter. In such situations, gene flow from cultivated beets has the potential to alter the genetic composition of the nearby wild populations. In this study we measured isozyme allele frequencies of 11 polymorphic loci in 26 accessions of cultivated beet, in 20 sea beet accessions growing near a cultivated beet seed production region in northeastern Italy, and 19 wild beet accessions growing far from seed production areas. We found one allele that is specific to sugar beet, relative to other cultivated types, and a second that has a much higher frequency in Swiss chard and red beet than in sugar beet. Both alleles are typically rare in sea beet populations that are distant from seed production areas, but both are common in those that are near the Italian cultivated beet seed production region, supporting the contention that gene flow from the crop to the wild species can be substantial when both grow in proximity. Interestingly, the introgressed populations have higher genetic diversity than those that are isolated from the crop. The crop-to-wild gene flow rates are unknown, as are the fitness consequences of such alleles in the wild. Thus, we are unable to assess the long-term impact of such introgression. However, it is clear that gene flow from a crop to a wild taxon does not necessarily result in a decrease in the genetic diversity of the native plant.

  10. Impact of gene flow from cultivated beet on genetic diversity of wild sea beet populations

    PubMed

    Bartsch; Lehnen; Clegg; Pohl-Orf; Schuphan; Ellstrand

    1999-10-01

    Gene flow and introgression from cultivated plants may have important consequences for the conservation of wild plant populations. Cultivated beets (sugar beet, red beet and Swiss chard: Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) are of particular concern because they are cross-compatible with the wild taxon, sea beet (B.vs. ssp. maritima). Cultivated beet seed production areas are sometimes adjacent to sea beet populations; the numbers of flowering individuals in the former typically outnumber those in the populations of the latter. In such situations, gene flow from cultivated beets has the potential to alter the genetic composition of the nearby wild populations. In this study we measured isozyme allele frequencies of 11 polymorphic loci in 26 accessions of cultivated beet, in 20 sea beet accessions growing near a cultivated beet seed production region in northeastern Italy, and 19 wild beet accessions growing far from seed production areas. We found one allele that is specific to sugar beet, relative to other cultivated types, and a second that has a much higher frequency in Swiss chard and red beet than in sugar beet. Both alleles are typically rare in sea beet populations that are distant from seed production areas, but both are common in those that are near the Italian cultivated beet seed production region, supporting the contention that gene flow from the crop to the wild species can be substantial when both grow in proximity. Interestingly, the introgressed populations have higher genetic diversity than those that are isolated from the crop. The crop-to-wild gene flow rates are unknown, as are the fitness consequences of such alleles in the wild. Thus, we are unable to assess the long-term impact of such introgression. However, it is clear that gene flow from a crop to a wild taxon does not necessarily result in a decrease in the genetic diversity of the native plant. PMID:10583835

  11. Widespread Impact of Chromosomal Inversions on Gene Expression Uncovers Robustness via Phenotypic Buffering

    PubMed Central

    Naseeb, Samina; Carter, Zorana; Minnis, David; Donaldson, Ian; Zeef, Leo; Delneri, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The nonrandom gene organization in eukaryotes plays a significant role in genome evolution and function. Chromosomal structural changes impact meiotic fitness and, in several organisms, are associated with speciation and rapid adaptation to different environments. Small sized chromosomal inversions, encompassing few genes, are pervasive in Saccharomyces “sensu stricto” species, while larger inversions are less common in yeasts compared with higher eukaryotes. To explore the effect of gene order on phenotype, reproductive isolation, and gene expression, we engineered 16 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains carrying all possible paracentric and pericentric inversions between Ty1 elements, a natural substrate for rearrangements. We found that 4 inversions were lethal, while the other 12 did not show any fitness advantage or disadvantage in rich and minimal media. At meiosis, only a weak negative correlation with fitness was seen with the size of the inverted region. However, significantly lower fertility was seen in heterozygote invertant strains carrying recombination hotspots within the breakpoints. Altered transcription was observed throughout the genome rather than being overrepresented within the inversions. In spite of the large difference in gene expression in the inverted strains, mitotic fitness was not impaired in the majority of the 94 conditions tested, indicating that the robustness of the expression network buffers the deleterious effects of structural changes in several environments. Overall, our results support the notion that transcriptional changes may compensate for Ty-mediated rearrangements resulting in the maintenance of a constant phenotype, and suggest that large inversions in yeast are unlikely to be a selectable trait during vegetative growth. PMID:26929245

  12. Burden Analysis of Rare Microdeletions Suggests a Strong Impact of Neurodevelopmental Genes in Genetic Generalised Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Trucks, Holger; Schulz, Herbert; de Kovel, Carolien G.; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée; Sonsma, Anja C. M.; Koeleman, Bobby P.; Lindhout, Dick; Weber, Yvonne G.; Lerche, Holger; Kapser, Claudia; Schankin, Christoph J.; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Surges, Rainer; Elger, Christian E.; Gaus, Verena; Schmitz, Bettina; Helbig, Ingo; Muhle, Hiltrud; Stephani, Ulrich; Klein, Karl M.; Rosenow, Felix; Neubauer, Bernd A.; Reinthaler, Eva M.; Zimprich, Fritz; Feucht, Martha; Møller, Rikke S.; Hjalgrim, Helle; De Jonghe, Peter; Suls, Arvid; Lieb, Wolfgang; Franke, Andre; Strauch, Konstantin; Gieger, Christian; Schurmann, Claudia; Schminke, Ulf; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Genetic generalised epilepsy (GGE) is the most common form of genetic epilepsy, accounting for 20% of all epilepsies. Genomic copy number variations (CNVs) constitute important genetic risk factors of common GGE syndromes. In our present genome-wide burden analysis, large (≥ 400 kb) and rare (< 1%) autosomal microdeletions with high calling confidence (≥ 200 markers) were assessed by the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array in European case-control cohorts of 1,366 GGE patients and 5,234 ancestry-matched controls. We aimed to: 1) assess the microdeletion burden in common GGE syndromes, 2) estimate the relative contribution of recurrent microdeletions at genomic rearrangement hotspots and non-recurrent microdeletions, and 3) identify potential candidate genes for GGE. We found a significant excess of microdeletions in 7.3% of GGE patients compared to 4.0% in controls (P = 1.8 x 10-7; OR = 1.9). Recurrent microdeletions at seven known genomic hotspots accounted for 36.9% of all microdeletions identified in the GGE cohort and showed a 7.5-fold increased burden (P = 2.6 x 10-17) relative to controls. Microdeletions affecting either a gene previously implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders (P = 8.0 x 10-18, OR = 4.6) or an evolutionarily conserved brain-expressed gene related to autism spectrum disorder (P = 1.3 x 10-12, OR = 4.1) were significantly enriched in the GGE patients. Microdeletions found only in GGE patients harboured a high proportion of genes previously associated with epilepsy and neuropsychiatric disorders (NRXN1, RBFOX1, PCDH7, KCNA2, EPM2A, RORB, PLCB1). Our results demonstrate that the significantly increased burden of large and rare microdeletions in GGE patients is largely confined to recurrent hotspot microdeletions and microdeletions affecting neurodevelopmental genes, suggesting a strong impact of fundamental neurodevelopmental processes in the pathogenesis of common GGE syndromes. PMID:25950944

  13. Diversity and Impact of Rare Variants in Genes Encoding the Platelet G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Matthew L.; Norman, Jane E.; Morgan, Neil V.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Daly, Martina E.; Simpson, Michael A.; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70% had global minor allele frequency (MAF) < 0.05%. Functional annotation using six computational algorithms, experimental evidence and structural data identified 156/740 (21%) SNVs as potentially damaging to GPCR function, most commonly in regions encoding the transmembrane and C-terminal intracellular receptor domains. In 31 index cases with IPFDs (Gi-pathway defect n=15; secretion defect n=11; thromboxane pathway defect n=3 and complex defect n=2) there were 256 SNVs in the target regions of 15 stimulatory platelet GPCRs (34 unique; 12 with MAF<1% and 22 with MAF ≥ 1%). These included rare variants predicting R122H, P258T and V207A substitutions in the P2Y12 receptor that were annotated as potentially damaging, but only partially explained the platelet function defects in each case. Our data highlight that potentially damaging variants in platelet GPCR genes have low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes. PMID:25567036

  14. Nutritional impacts on gene expression in the surface mucosa of blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus).

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Beck, Benjamin H; Peatman, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Short-term feed deprivation is a common occurrence in both wild and farmed fish species, due to reproductive processes, seasonal variations in temperature, or in response to a disease outbreak. Fasting can have dramatic physiological and biological consequences for fish, including impacts on mucosal immunity which can, in turn, change host susceptibility to pathogens. Culture and selection of blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) has gained importance as the production of a channel catfish×blue catfish (Ictalurus punctatus×I. furcatus) hybrid has increased in the Southeast US. Following a recent examination of fasting-induced impacts on mucosal immunity in channel catfish, here we utilized Illumina-based RNA-seq expression profiling to compare changes in blue catfish gill and skin after a brief (7 day) period of fasting. Transcriptome sequencing and de novo assembly of over 194 million 100 base-pair transcript reads was followed by differential expression analysis. Fasting altered a total of 530 genes in the surface mucosa, including genes regulating the immune response, energy metabolism, mucus production, cellular cytoskeletal structure, cell proliferation, and antioxidant responses. In particular, fasting perturbed arginine synthesis and metabolism pathways in a manner likely altering macrophage activation states and immune readiness. Our findings highlight key mediators of the critical interaction between nutrition and immunity at points of pathogen adherence and entry.

  15. Acidic retinoids in small amounts promote retinyl ester formation in neonatal lung, with transient increases in retinoid homeostatic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mixing a small proportion, 10%, of retinoic acid (RA) into an oral dose of vitamin A (VA) has been shown to markedly increase retinol uptake and retinyl ester (RE) formation in the neonatal lung, as compared to VA given alone. Concomitantly, several retinoid homeostatic genes, lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT), RA-4-hydroxylase (CYP26B1), and stimulated by retinoic acid gene-6 (STRA6) were upregulated. However, whether multiple doses may act accumulatively and whether less than 10% RA can be used has not been determined. Methods Neonatal rats were treated once on postnatal day (PD) 4 or PD14 with VA alone or VA combined with 10% RA (VARA10%) or a stable analog, Am580 (VAAm10%), or they were treated with multiple doses on PD4, 7, 11, and 14. Results RE increased cumulatively with multiple dosing. However, LRAT, CYP26B1 and STRA6 mRNA levels were similar for single and multiple treatments, indicating a transient noncumulative impact on gene expression. Lung RE was elevated with as little as 0.5% RA (P < 0.05) in a single dosing study. Whereas all concentrations of VARA elevated lung RE in single dosing studies, only 10% RA increased lung RE after multiple dosing, suggesting an attenuation of RA action with repeated dosing. In contrast, VAAm10%, 2%, and 1% all significantly increased lung RE after multiple doses (P < 0.05), while also increasing the expression of LRAT and CYP26B1. Conclusions These results indicate that the neonatal lung is very sensitive to acidic retinoid exposure and suggest that a VA combined with a very small fraction of acidic retinoid could be effective in increasing the lung’s storage pool of VA. PMID:24351038

  16. Temperature and Development Impacts on Housekeeping Gene Expression in Cowpea Aphid, Aphis craccivora (Hemiptera: Aphidiae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunxiao; Pan, Huipeng; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xuguo

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is a powerful technique to quantify gene expression. To standardize gene expression studies and obtain more accurate qRT-PCR analysis, normalization relative to consistently expressed housekeeping genes (HKGs) is required. In this study, ten candidate HKGs including elongation factor 1 α (EF1A), ribosomal protein L11 (RPL11), ribosomal protein L14 (RPL14), ribosomal protein S8 (RPS8), ribosomal protein S23 (RPS23), NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NADH), vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (ATPase), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), 18S ribosomal RNA (18S), and 12S ribosomal RNA (12S) from the cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora Koch were selected. Four algorithms, geNorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper, and the ΔCt method were employed to evaluate the expression profiles of these HKGs as endogenous controls across different developmental stages and temperature regimes. Based on RefFinder, which integrates all four analytical algorithms to compare and rank the candidate HKGs, RPS8, RPL14, and RPL11 were the three most stable HKGs across different developmental stages and temperature conditions. This study is the first step to establish a standardized qRT-PCR analysis in A. craccivora following the MIQE guideline. Results from this study lay a foundation for the genomics and functional genomics research in this sap-sucking insect pest with substantial economic impact.

  17. Phevalin (aureusimine B) production by Staphylococcus aureus biofilm and impacts on human keratinocyte gene expression.

    PubMed

    Secor, Patrick R; Jennings, Laura K; James, Garth A; Kirker, Kelly R; Pulcini, Elinor Delancey; McInnerney, Kate; Gerlach, Robin; Livinghouse, Tom; Hilmer, Jonathan K; Bothner, Brian; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John E; Stewart, Philip S

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilms are associated with chronic skin infections and are orders of magnitude more resistant to antimicrobials and host responses. S. aureus contains conserved nonribosomal peptide synthetases that produce the cyclic dipeptides tyrvalin and phevalin (aureusimine A and B, respectively). The biological function of these compounds has been speculated to be involved in virulence factor gene expression in S. aureus, protease inhibition in eukaryotic cells, and interspecies bacterial communication. However, the exact biological role of these compounds is unknown. Here, we report that S. aureus biofilms produce greater amounts of phevalin than their planktonic counterparts. Phevalin had no obvious impact on the extracellular metabolome of S. aureus as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. When administered to human keratinocytes, phevalin had a modest effect on gene expression. However, conditioned medium from S. aureus spiked with phevalin amplified differences in keratinocyte gene expression compared to conditioned medium alone. Phevalin may be exploited as potential biomarker and/or therapeutic target for chronic, S. aureus biofilm-based infections.

  18. Temperature and Development Impacts on Housekeeping Gene Expression in Cowpea Aphid, Aphis craccivora (Hemiptera: Aphidiae)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xuguo

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is a powerful technique to quantify gene expression. To standardize gene expression studies and obtain more accurate qRT-PCR analysis, normalization relative to consistently expressed housekeeping genes (HKGs) is required. In this study, ten candidate HKGs including elongation factor 1 α (EF1A), ribosomal protein L11 (RPL11), ribosomal protein L14 (RPL14), ribosomal protein S8 (RPS8), ribosomal protein S23 (RPS23), NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NADH), vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (ATPase), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), 18S ribosomal RNA (18S), and 12S ribosomal RNA (12S) from the cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora Koch were selected. Four algorithms, geNorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper, and the ΔCt method were employed to evaluate the expression profiles of these HKGs as endogenous controls across different developmental stages and temperature regimes. Based on RefFinder, which integrates all four analytical algorithms to compare and rank the candidate HKGs, RPS8, RPL14, and RPL11 were the three most stable HKGs across different developmental stages and temperature conditions. This study is the first step to establish a standardized qRT-PCR analysis in A. craccivora following the MIQE guideline. Results from this study lay a foundation for the genomics and functional genomics research in this sap-sucking insect pest with substantial economic impact. PMID:26090683

  19. Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease Demonstrate Distinctive Pulmonary Gene Expressions for Vascular Response Genes: Impact of Ozone Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative gene expression profiling of multiple tissues from rat strains with genetic predisposition to diverse cardiovascular diseases (CVD) can help decode the transcriptional program that governs organ-specific functions. We examined expressions of CVD genes in the lungs of ...

  20. Evolution of gene structure in the conifer Picea glauca: a comparative analysis of the impact of intron size

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A positive relationship between genome size and intron length is observed across eukaryotes including Angiosperms plants, indicating a co-evolution of genome size and gene structure. Conifers have very large genomes and longer introns on average than most plants, but impacts of their large genome and longer introns on gene structure has not be described. Results Gene structure was analyzed for 35 genes of Picea glauca obtained from BAC sequencing and genome assembly, including comparisons with A. thaliana, P. trichocarpa and Z. mays. We aimed to develop an understanding of impact of long introns on the structure of individual genes. The number and length of exons was well conserved among the species compared but on average, P. glauca introns were longer and genes had four times more intronic sequence than Arabidopsis, and 2 times more than poplar and maize. However, pairwise comparisons of individual genes gave variable results and not all contrasts were statistically significant. Genes generally accumulated one or a few longer introns in species with larger genomes but the position of long introns was variable between plant lineages. In P. glauca, highly expressed genes generally had more intronic sequence than tissue preferential genes. Comparisons with the Pinus taeda BACs and genome scaffolds showed a high conservation for position of long introns and for sequence of short introns. A survey of 1836 P. glauca genes obtained by sequence capture mostly containing introns <1 Kbp showed that repeated sequences were 10× more abundant in introns than in exons. Conclusion Conifers have large amounts of intronic sequence per gene for seed plants due to the presence of few long introns and repetitive element sequences are ubiquitous in their introns. Results indicate a complex landscape of intron sizes and distribution across taxa and between genes with different expression profiles. PMID:24734980

  1. Memory acquisition and retrieval impact different epigenetic processes that regulate gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background A fundamental question in neuroscience is how memories are stored and retrieved in the brain. Long-term memory formation requires transcription, translation and epigenetic processes that control gene expression. Thus, characterizing genome-wide the transcriptional changes that occur after memory acquisition and retrieval is of broad interest and importance. Genome-wide technologies are commonly used to interrogate transcriptional changes in discovery-based approaches. Their ability to increase scientific insight beyond traditional candidate gene approaches, however, is usually hindered by batch effects and other sources of unwanted variation, which are particularly hard to control in the study of brain and behavior. Results We examined genome-wide gene expression after contextual conditioning in the mouse hippocampus, a brain region essential for learning and memory, at all the time-points in which inhibiting transcription has been shown to impair memory formation. We show that most of the variance in gene expression is not due to conditioning and that by removing unwanted variance through additional normalization we are able provide novel biological insights. In particular, we show that genes downregulated by memory acquisition and retrieval impact different functions: chromatin assembly and RNA processing, respectively. Levels of histone 2A variant H2AB are reduced only following acquisition, a finding we confirmed using quantitative proteomics. On the other hand, splicing factor Rbfox1 and NMDA receptor-dependent microRNA miR-219 are only downregulated after retrieval, accompanied by an increase in protein levels of miR-219 target CAMKIIγ. Conclusions We provide a thorough characterization of coding and non-coding gene expression during long-term memory formation. We demonstrate that unwanted variance dominates the signal in transcriptional studies of learning and memory and introduce the removal of unwanted variance through normalization as a

  2. Metagenomic profiles of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) between human impacted estuary and deep ocean sediments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baowei; Yang, Ying; Liang, Ximei; Yu, Ke; Zhang, Tong; Li, Xiangdong

    2013-11-19

    Knowledge of the origins and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) is essential for understanding modern resistomes in the environment. The mechanisms of the dissemination of ARGs can be revealed through comparative studies on the metagenomic profiling of ARGs between relatively pristine and human-impacted environments. The deep ocean bed of the South China Sea (SCS) is considered to be largely devoid of anthropogenic impacts, while the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) in south China has been highly impacted by intensive human activities. Commonly used antibiotics (sulfamethazine, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, tetracycline, and erythromycin) have been detected through chemical analysis in the PRE sediments, but not in the SCS sediments. In the relatively pristine SCS sediments, the most prevalent and abundant ARGs are those related to resistance to macrolides and polypeptides, with efflux pumps as the predominant mechanism. In the contaminated PRE sediments, the typical ARG profiles suggest a prevailing resistance to antibiotics commonly used in human health and animal farming (including sulfonamides, fluoroquinolones, and aminoglycosides), and higher diversity in both genotype and resistance mechanism than those in the SCS. In particular, antibiotic inactivation significantly contributed to the resistance to aminoglycosides, β-lactams, and macrolides observed in the PRE sediments. There was a significant correlation in the levels of abundance of ARGs and those of mobile genetic elements (including integrons and plasmids), which serve as carriers in the dissemination of ARGs in the aquatic environment. The metagenomic results from the current study support the view that ARGs naturally originate in pristine environments, while human activities accelerate the dissemination of ARGs so that microbes would be able to tolerate selective environmental stress in response to anthropogenic impacts.

  3. Impact of UGT2B17 gene deletion on the steroid profile of an athlete.

    PubMed

    Martín-Escudero, Pilar; Muñoz-Guerra, Jesús; Del Prado, Nayade; Galindo Canales, Mercedes; Fuentes Ferrer, Manuel; Vargas, Soledad; Soldevilla, Ana B; Serrano-Garde, Ester; Miguel-Tobal, Francisco; Maestro de Las Casas, Marisa; Fernandez-Pérez, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    The measurement of the testosterone to epitestosterone ratio (T/E ratio) in urine is often used as a marker for testosterone administration in the doping control field. This study examines the frequencies of the different expression forms of the UGT2B17 gene, and assesses their effects on this marker in volunteer subjects. The sample for this descriptive study was composed of male and female athletes aged between 16 and 55 years old who practiced different sports disciplines. All participants underwent a sports-medical physical examination, and subsequently provided 10 urine samples consecutively over a period of 48 h. The dependent variable examined was T/E and the main independent variable was the UGT2B17 gene polymorphism. During 1 year, 1410 urine samples were obtained from 141 athletes. The frequencies of the three genotypes were as follows: wt homozygotes (ins/ins) 48.2% (n = 68), mutant homozygotes (del/del) 12.1% (n = 17), and heterozygotes (ins/del) 39.7% (n = 56). Genotype distributions varied significantly (P < 0.001) according to ethnicity, 80% of Asian subjects being homozygous for the gene deletion (del/del) compared to 6.9% of Caucasian subjects. A multivariate analysis adjusted for genotype, age, sex, and sports discipline revealed that athletes with the del/del polymorphism showed a significantly lower mean T/E than heterozygotes (ins/del). In contrast, homozygous athletes for the gene insertion (ins/ins) showed higher mean T/E ratios than heterozygotes (ins/del). UGT2B17 gene deletion has a strong influence on the T/E ratio in urine, which is the most efficient indicator of testosterone prohormone misuse. Others factors studied seem not to have such an impact. The genotyping of UGT2B17 is an important source of information for understanding steroid profiling in the doping control field; therefore it is suggested that it be included in the Athletes Biological Passport.

  4. Impact of Enriched Environment on Murine T Cell Differentiation and Gene Expression Profile

    PubMed Central

    Rattazzi, Lorenza; Piras, Giuseppa; Brod, Samuel; Smith, Koval; Ono, Masahiro; D’Acquisto, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    T cells are known to be plastic and to change their phenotype according to the cellular and biochemical milieu they are embedded in. In this study, we transposed this concept at a macroscopic level assessing whether changes in the environmental housing conditions of C57/BL6 mice would influence the phenotype and function of T cells. Our study shows that exposure to 2 weeks in an enriched environment (EE) does not impact the T cell repertoire in vivo and causes no changes in the early TCR-driven activation events of these cells. Surprisingly, however, T cells from enriched mice showed a unique T helper effector cell phenotype upon differentiation in vitro. This was featured by a significant reduction in their ability to produce IFN-γ and by an increased release of IL-10 and IL-17. Microarray analysis of these cells also revealed a unique gene fingerprint with key signaling pathways involved in autoimmunity being modulated. Together, our results provide first evidence for a specific effect of EE on T cell differentiation and its associated changes in gene expression profile. In addition, our study sheds new light on the possible mechanisms by which changes in environmental factors can significantly influence the immune response of the host and favor the resolution of the inflammatory response. PMID:27746779

  5. Impact of host gene polymorphisms on susceptibility to chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Moudi, Bita; Heidari, Zahra; Mahmoudzadeh-Sagheb, Hamidreza

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection can result in a number of different clinical conditions, including asymptomatic HBV carriers to chronic hepatitis and primary hepatocellular carcinoma. Variations in cytokine genes have been discussed to affect the natural history of HBV infection. These cytokines may involve in the viral binding to the cells, modulating the host immune response to infection and pathological changes in the liver, and affecting the antiviral therapies. Various studies reveal that SNPs play an important role in pathogenesis of HBV. On the other hand, various outcomes of infection cannot be completely shown by genetic factors because these studies have inconsistent results with regard to the possible impacts of host genetic polymorphisms on susceptibility to infection. Therefore, to identify the real effects of host genetic factors in HBV susceptibility and natural history of the disease, studies with large sample size will be needed. In addition, due to the complex interactions of genetic factors it is better to identify synergies of several SNPs. Such studies can provide better insights into the novel methods of diagnosis and treatment. Current review will discuss significant genetic variations in cytokine genes that may affect the susceptibility to the chronic HBV infection. PMID:27346643

  6. The dynamic impact of hydrodynamic gene transfer on the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Ma, Shoubao; Liu, Yonghao; Lei, Lei; Hu, Bo; Liu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Hydrodynamic gene transfer (HGT) has been used as an effective and convenient way to achieve gene expressions in vivo. However, its time-dependent impact on the immune system is unknown. The aim of the current study is to investigate the dynamic changes of the immune parameters after HGT. Plasmids were delivered to BALB/c mice by HGT. Each group of mice was sacrificed on day 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 after HGT. The immune cell subsets from spleens and livers were analyzed by flow cytometry. IFN-γ, IL-6 and TNF-α in the serum were quantitated by cytometric bead array. The mice without HGT injection were used as control group on day 0. Compared to the normal mice (day 0), the T lymphocyte infiltrations in the spleen and liver were increased starting from day 1 after HGT. T cells. NK cells and myeloid cells such as dendritic cells, neutrophils and macrophages were also significantly expanded and peaked around day 2-3. Both T cells and NK cells were greatly activated. Serum levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 increased and peaked on day 1 after HGT. Most of the increased immune parameters returned to normal levels after day 4. However, the activated T cells remained at a high level, especially in the liver. In conclusion, HGT significantly increased the immune cell infiltration in the spleen and liver and activated T cells and NK cells. The immune response induced by HGT should be taken into consideration when evaluating the functions of the over-expressed genes using this strategy. PMID:26309505

  7. Impact of gene polymorphisms of gonadotropins and their receptors on human reproductive success.

    PubMed

    Casarini, Livio; Santi, Daniele; Marino, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Gonadotropins and their receptors' genes carry several single-nucleotide polymorphisms resulting in endocrine genotypes modulating reproductive parameters, diseases, and lifespan leading to important implications for reproductive success and potential relevance during human evolution. Here we illustrate common genotypes of the gonadotropins and gonadotropin receptors' genes and their clinical implications in phenotypes relevant for reproduction such as ovarian cycle length, age of menopause, testosterone levels, polycystic ovary syndrome, and cancer. We then discuss their possible role in human reproduction and adaptation to the environment. Gonadotropins and their receptors' variants are differently distributed among human populations. Some hints suggest that they may be the result of natural selection that occurred in ancient times, increasing the individual chance of successful mating, pregnancy, and effective post-natal parental cares. The gender-related differences in the regulation of the reproductive endocrine systems imply that many of these genotypes may lead to sex-dependent effects, increasing the chance of mating and reproductive success in one sex at the expenses of the other sex. Also, we suggest that sexual conflicts within the FSH and LH-choriogonadotropin receptor genes contributed to maintain genotypes linked to subfertility among humans. Because the distribution of polymorphic markers results in a defined geographical pattern due to human migrations rather than natural selection, these polymorphisms may have had only a weak impact on reproductive success. On the contrary, such genotypes could acquire relevant consequences in the modern, developed societies in which parenthood attempts often occur at a later age, during a short, suboptimal reproductive window, making clinical fertility treatments necessary.

  8. Impact of obesity and nitric oxide synthase gene G894T polymorphism on essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wrzosek, M; Sokal, M; Sawicka, A; Wlodarczyk, M; Glowala, M; Wrzosek, M; Kosior, M; Talalaj, M; Biecek, P; Nowicka, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension is a multifactorial disease caused by environmental, metabolic and genetic factors, but little is currently known on the complex interplay between these factors and blood pressure. The aim of the present study was to assess the potential impact of obesity, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D polymorphism and endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3) 4a/4b, G894T and -T786C variants on the essential hypertension. The study group consisted of 1,027 Caucasian adults of Polish nationality (45.5 ± 13.6 years old), of which 401 met the criteria for hypertension. Body weight, height and blood pressure were measured and data on self-reported smoking status were collected. Fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides were determined by standard procedures. The ACE I/D polymorphism and three polymorphisms in NOS3 gene (4a/4b, G894T, -T786C) were detected by the PCR method. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that age above 45 years, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking and male sex are important risk factors for hypertension and no significant influence of variants in ACE and NOS3 genes on this risk was recognized. Obese subjects had a 3.27-times higher risk (OR = 3.27, 95% CI: 2.37 - 4.52) of hypertension than non-obese, and in obese the NOS3 894T allele was associated with 1.37 fold higher risk of hypertension (P = 0.031). The distribution of NOS3 G894T genotypes supported the co-dominant (OR = 1.35, P = 0.034, Pfit = 0.435) or recessive (OR = 2.00, P = 0.046, Pfit = 0.286), but not dominant model of inheritance (P = 0.100). The study indicates that in obese NOS3 G894T polymorphism may enhance hypertension risk. However, in the presence of such strong risk factors as age, diabetes and smoking, the impact of this genetic variant seems to be attenuated. Further studies are needed to reveal the usefulness of G894T polymorphism in hypertension risk assessment in obese. PMID:26579574

  9. Impact of obesity and nitric oxide synthase gene G894T polymorphism on essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wrzosek, M; Sokal, M; Sawicka, A; Wlodarczyk, M; Glowala, M; Wrzosek, M; Kosior, M; Talalaj, M; Biecek, P; Nowicka, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension is a multifactorial disease caused by environmental, metabolic and genetic factors, but little is currently known on the complex interplay between these factors and blood pressure. The aim of the present study was to assess the potential impact of obesity, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D polymorphism and endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3) 4a/4b, G894T and -T786C variants on the essential hypertension. The study group consisted of 1,027 Caucasian adults of Polish nationality (45.5 ± 13.6 years old), of which 401 met the criteria for hypertension. Body weight, height and blood pressure were measured and data on self-reported smoking status were collected. Fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides were determined by standard procedures. The ACE I/D polymorphism and three polymorphisms in NOS3 gene (4a/4b, G894T, -T786C) were detected by the PCR method. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that age above 45 years, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking and male sex are important risk factors for hypertension and no significant influence of variants in ACE and NOS3 genes on this risk was recognized. Obese subjects had a 3.27-times higher risk (OR = 3.27, 95% CI: 2.37 - 4.52) of hypertension than non-obese, and in obese the NOS3 894T allele was associated with 1.37 fold higher risk of hypertension (P = 0.031). The distribution of NOS3 G894T genotypes supported the co-dominant (OR = 1.35, P = 0.034, Pfit = 0.435) or recessive (OR = 2.00, P = 0.046, Pfit = 0.286), but not dominant model of inheritance (P = 0.100). The study indicates that in obese NOS3 G894T polymorphism may enhance hypertension risk. However, in the presence of such strong risk factors as age, diabetes and smoking, the impact of this genetic variant seems to be attenuated. Further studies are needed to reveal the usefulness of G894T polymorphism in hypertension risk assessment in obese.

  10. The Impact of Gene Expression Variation on the Robustness and Evolvability of a Developmental Gene Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Garfield, David A.; Runcie, Daniel E.; Babbitt, Courtney C.; Haygood, Ralph; Nielsen, William J.; Wray, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory interactions buffer development against genetic and environmental perturbations, but adaptation requires phenotypes to change. We investigated the relationship between robustness and evolvability within the gene regulatory network underlying development of the larval skeleton in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We find extensive variation in gene expression in this network throughout development in a natural population, some of which has a heritable genetic basis. Switch-like regulatory interactions predominate during early development, buffer expression variation, and may promote the accumulation of cryptic genetic variation affecting early stages. Regulatory interactions during later development are typically more sensitive (linear), allowing variation in expression to affect downstream target genes. Variation in skeletal morphology is associated primarily with expression variation of a few, primarily structural, genes at terminal positions within the network. These results indicate that the position and properties of gene interactions within a network can have important evolutionary consequences independent of their immediate regulatory role. PMID:24204211

  11. Zinc Methionine Supplementation Impacts Gene and Protein Expression in Calf-Fed Holstein Steers with Minimal Impact on Feedlot Performance.

    PubMed

    Hergenreder, J E; Legako, J F; Dinh, T T N; Spivey, K S; Baggerman, J O; Broadway, P R; Beckett, J L; Branine, M E; Johnson, B J

    2016-06-01

    Providing cattle a more bioavailable zinc (Zn) source prior to administering a beta adrenergic agonist (βAA) may enhance the metabolic pool of primary nutrients that will influence the magnitude of the βAA response. Calf-fed Holstein steers were supplemented with a Zn methionine supplement (ZnMet; ZINPRO(®); Zinpro Corporation, Eden Prairie, MN) for 115 ± 5 days prior to harvest along with zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; Zilmax(®); Merck Animal Health, Summit, NJ) for the last 20 days with a 3-day withdrawal to evaluate the effects on growth and carcass performance together with gene and protein expression of skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and fatty acid composition of polar and neutral lipid depots. Steers (n = 1296; initial weight = 468.5 ± 0.5 kg) were sorted by weight, blocked by harvest date, and randomly assigned to pens (n = 12) and treatments: control (90 ppm Zn from ZnSO4) and ZnMet (Control plus 720 mg Zn from ZnMet/hd/d). There were no differences (P > 0.05) in growth performance or carcass characteristics. The ZnMet-fed cattle had reduced (P < 0.05) abundance of myosin heavy chain (MHC)-IIX, β1-adrenergic receptor (βAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase mRNA in skeletal muscle tissue. The ZnMet cattle had greater (P < 0.05) abundance of MHC-II protein, increased MHC-IIA and IIX cross-sectional areas (P < 0.05), an increased percentage of MHC-I fibers (P < 0.05), and a decreased percentage of MHC-IIX fibers (P < 0.05). The combination of ZnMet and ZH had positive biological effects on musculoskeletal tissue; however, these molecular effects were not significant enough to impact overall feedlot and carcass performance.

  12. Antimicrobial-resistant bacterial populations and antimicrobial resistance genes obtained from environments impacted by livestock and municipal waste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal waste water treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact...

  13. Impact of gene molecular evolution on phylogenetic reconstruction: a case study in the rosids (Superorder Rosanae, Angiosperms).

    PubMed

    Hilu, Khidir W; Black, Chelsea M; Oza, Dipan

    2014-01-01

    Rate of substitution of genomic regions is among the most debated intrinsic features that impact phylogenetic informativeness. However, this variable is also coupled with rates of nonsynonymous substitutions that underscore the nature and degree of selection on the selected genes. To empirically address these variables, we constructed four completely overlapping data sets of plastid matK, atpB, rbcL, and mitochondrial matR genes and used the rosid lineage (angiosperms) as a working platform. The genes differ in combinations of overall rates of nucleotide and amino acid substitutions. Tree robustness, homoplasy, accuracy in contrast to a reference tree, and phylogenetic informativeness are evaluated. The rapidly evolving/unconstrained matK faired best, whereas remaining genes varied in degrees of contribution to rosid phylogenetics across the lineage's 108 million years evolutionary history. Phylogenetic accuracy was low with the slowly evolving/unconstrained matR despite least amount of homoplasy. Third codon positions contributed the highest amount of parsimony informative sites, resolution and informativeness, but magnitude varied with gene mode of evolution. These findings are in clear contrast with the views that rapidly evolving regions and the 3rd codon position have inevitable negative impact on phylogenetic reconstruction at deep historic level due to accumulation of multiple hits and subsequent elevation in homoplasy and saturation. Relaxed evolutionary constraint in rapidly evolving genes distributes substitutions across codon positions, an evolutionary mode expected to reduce the frequency of multiple hits. These findings should be tested at deeper evolutionary histories.

  14. Impact of SCP-2/SCP-x gene ablation and dietary cholesterol on hepatic lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Klipsic, Devon; Landrock, Danilo; Martin, Gregory G; McIntosh, Avery L; Landrock, Kerstin K; Mackie, John T; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Kier, Ann B

    2015-09-01

    While a high-cholesterol diet induces hepatic steatosis, the role of intracellular sterol carrier protein-2/sterol carrier protein-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) proteins is unknown. We hypothesized that ablating SCP-2/SCP-x [double knockout (DKO)] would impact hepatic lipids (cholesterol and cholesteryl ester), especially in high-cholesterol-fed mice. DKO did not alter food consumption, and body weight (BW) gain decreased especially in females, concomitant with hepatic steatosis in females and less so in males. DKO-induced steatosis in control-fed wild-type (WT) mice was associated with 1) loss of SCP-2; 2) upregulation of liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP); 3) increased mRNA and/or protein levels of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBP1 and SREBP2) as well as increased expression of target genes of cholesterol synthesis (Hmgcs1 and Hmgcr) and fatty acid synthesis (Acc1 and Fas); and 4) cholesteryl ester accumulation was also associated with increased acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase-2 (ACAT2) in males. DKO exacerbated the high-cholesterol diet-induced hepatic cholesterol and glyceride accumulation, without further increasing SREBP1, SREBP2, or target genes. This exacerbation was associated both with loss of SCP-2 and concomitant downregulation of Ceh/Hsl, apolipoprotein B (ApoB), MTP, and/or L-FABP protein expression. DKO diminished the ability to secrete excess cholesterol into bile and oxidize cholesterol to bile acid for biliary excretion, especially in females. This suggested that SCP-2/SCP-x affects cholesterol transport to particular intracellular compartments, with ablation resulting in less to the endoplasmic reticulum for SREBP regulation, making more available for cholesteryl ester synthesis, for cholesteryl-ester storage in lipid droplets, and for bile salt synthesis and/or secretion. These alterations are significant findings, since they affect key processes in regulation of sterol metabolism.

  15. Impact of SCP-2/SCP-x gene ablation and dietary cholesterol on hepatic lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Klipsic, Devon; Landrock, Danilo; Martin, Gregory G; McIntosh, Avery L; Landrock, Kerstin K; Mackie, John T; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Kier, Ann B

    2015-09-01

    While a high-cholesterol diet induces hepatic steatosis, the role of intracellular sterol carrier protein-2/sterol carrier protein-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) proteins is unknown. We hypothesized that ablating SCP-2/SCP-x [double knockout (DKO)] would impact hepatic lipids (cholesterol and cholesteryl ester), especially in high-cholesterol-fed mice. DKO did not alter food consumption, and body weight (BW) gain decreased especially in females, concomitant with hepatic steatosis in females and less so in males. DKO-induced steatosis in control-fed wild-type (WT) mice was associated with 1) loss of SCP-2; 2) upregulation of liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP); 3) increased mRNA and/or protein levels of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBP1 and SREBP2) as well as increased expression of target genes of cholesterol synthesis (Hmgcs1 and Hmgcr) and fatty acid synthesis (Acc1 and Fas); and 4) cholesteryl ester accumulation was also associated with increased acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase-2 (ACAT2) in males. DKO exacerbated the high-cholesterol diet-induced hepatic cholesterol and glyceride accumulation, without further increasing SREBP1, SREBP2, or target genes. This exacerbation was associated both with loss of SCP-2 and concomitant downregulation of Ceh/Hsl, apolipoprotein B (ApoB), MTP, and/or L-FABP protein expression. DKO diminished the ability to secrete excess cholesterol into bile and oxidize cholesterol to bile acid for biliary excretion, especially in females. This suggested that SCP-2/SCP-x affects cholesterol transport to particular intracellular compartments, with ablation resulting in less to the endoplasmic reticulum for SREBP regulation, making more available for cholesteryl ester synthesis, for cholesteryl-ester storage in lipid droplets, and for bile salt synthesis and/or secretion. These alterations are significant findings, since they affect key processes in regulation of sterol metabolism. PMID:26113298

  16. Impact of SCP-2/SCP-x gene ablation and dietary cholesterol on hepatic lipid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Klipsic, Devon; Landrock, Danilo; Martin, Gregory G.; McIntosh, Avery L.; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Mackie, John T.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    While a high-cholesterol diet induces hepatic steatosis, the role of intracellular sterol carrier protein-2/sterol carrier protein-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) proteins is unknown. We hypothesized that ablating SCP-2/SCP-x [double knockout (DKO)] would impact hepatic lipids (cholesterol and cholesteryl ester), especially in high-cholesterol-fed mice. DKO did not alter food consumption, and body weight (BW) gain decreased especially in females, concomitant with hepatic steatosis in females and less so in males. DKO-induced steatosis in control-fed wild-type (WT) mice was associated with 1) loss of SCP-2; 2) upregulation of liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP); 3) increased mRNA and/or protein levels of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBP1 and SREBP2) as well as increased expression of target genes of cholesterol synthesis (Hmgcs1 and Hmgcr) and fatty acid synthesis (Acc1 and Fas); and 4) cholesteryl ester accumulation was also associated with increased acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase-2 (ACAT2) in males. DKO exacerbated the high-cholesterol diet-induced hepatic cholesterol and glyceride accumulation, without further increasing SREBP1, SREBP2, or target genes. This exacerbation was associated both with loss of SCP-2 and concomitant downregulation of Ceh/Hsl, apolipoprotein B (ApoB), MTP, and/or L-FABP protein expression. DKO diminished the ability to secrete excess cholesterol into bile and oxidize cholesterol to bile acid for biliary excretion, especially in females. This suggested that SCP-2/SCP-x affects cholesterol transport to particular intracellular compartments, with ablation resulting in less to the endoplasmic reticulum for SREBP regulation, making more available for cholesteryl ester synthesis, for cholesteryl-ester storage in lipid droplets, and for bile salt synthesis and/or secretion. These alterations are significant findings, since they affect key processes in regulation of sterol metabolism. PMID:26113298

  17. The Impact of Selection, Gene Conversion, and Biased Sampling on the Assessment of Microbial Demography.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Marguerite; Blin, Camille; Lambert, Amaury; Achaz, Guillaume; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have linked demographic changes and epidemiological patterns in bacterial populations using coalescent-based approaches. We identified 26 studies using skyline plots and found that 21 inferred overall population expansion. This surprising result led us to analyze the impact of natural selection, recombination (gene conversion), and sampling biases on demographic inference using skyline plots and site frequency spectra (SFS). Forward simulations based on biologically relevant parameters from Escherichia coli populations showed that theoretical arguments on the detrimental impact of recombination and especially natural selection on the reconstructed genealogies cannot be ignored in practice. In fact, both processes systematically lead to spurious interpretations of population expansion in skyline plots (and in SFS for selection). Weak purifying selection, and especially positive selection, had important effects on skyline plots, showing patterns akin to those of population expansions. State-of-the-art techniques to remove recombination further amplified these biases. We simulated three common sampling biases in microbiological research: uniform, clustered, and mixed sampling. Alone, or together with recombination and selection, they further mislead demographic inferences producing almost any possible skyline shape or SFS. Interestingly, sampling sub-populations also affected skyline plots and SFS, because the coalescent rates of populations and their sub-populations had different distributions. This study suggests that extreme caution is needed to infer demographic changes solely based on reconstructed genealogies. We suggest that the development of novel sampling strategies and the joint analyzes of diverse population genetic methods are strictly necessary to estimate demographic changes in populations where selection, recombination, and biased sampling are present.

  18. The Impact of Selection, Gene Conversion, and Biased Sampling on the Assessment of Microbial Demography

    PubMed Central

    Lapierre, Marguerite; Blin, Camille; Lambert, Amaury; Achaz, Guillaume; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have linked demographic changes and epidemiological patterns in bacterial populations using coalescent-based approaches. We identified 26 studies using skyline plots and found that 21 inferred overall population expansion. This surprising result led us to analyze the impact of natural selection, recombination (gene conversion), and sampling biases on demographic inference using skyline plots and site frequency spectra (SFS). Forward simulations based on biologically relevant parameters from Escherichia coli populations showed that theoretical arguments on the detrimental impact of recombination and especially natural selection on the reconstructed genealogies cannot be ignored in practice. In fact, both processes systematically lead to spurious interpretations of population expansion in skyline plots (and in SFS for selection). Weak purifying selection, and especially positive selection, had important effects on skyline plots, showing patterns akin to those of population expansions. State-of-the-art techniques to remove recombination further amplified these biases. We simulated three common sampling biases in microbiological research: uniform, clustered, and mixed sampling. Alone, or together with recombination and selection, they further mislead demographic inferences producing almost any possible skyline shape or SFS. Interestingly, sampling sub-populations also affected skyline plots and SFS, because the coalescent rates of populations and their sub-populations had different distributions. This study suggests that extreme caution is needed to infer demographic changes solely based on reconstructed genealogies. We suggest that the development of novel sampling strategies and the joint analyzes of diverse population genetic methods are strictly necessary to estimate demographic changes in populations where selection, recombination, and biased sampling are present. PMID:26931140

  19. The Impact of Selection, Gene Conversion, and Biased Sampling on the Assessment of Microbial Demography.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Marguerite; Blin, Camille; Lambert, Amaury; Achaz, Guillaume; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have linked demographic changes and epidemiological patterns in bacterial populations using coalescent-based approaches. We identified 26 studies using skyline plots and found that 21 inferred overall population expansion. This surprising result led us to analyze the impact of natural selection, recombination (gene conversion), and sampling biases on demographic inference using skyline plots and site frequency spectra (SFS). Forward simulations based on biologically relevant parameters from Escherichia coli populations showed that theoretical arguments on the detrimental impact of recombination and especially natural selection on the reconstructed genealogies cannot be ignored in practice. In fact, both processes systematically lead to spurious interpretations of population expansion in skyline plots (and in SFS for selection). Weak purifying selection, and especially positive selection, had important effects on skyline plots, showing patterns akin to those of population expansions. State-of-the-art techniques to remove recombination further amplified these biases. We simulated three common sampling biases in microbiological research: uniform, clustered, and mixed sampling. Alone, or together with recombination and selection, they further mislead demographic inferences producing almost any possible skyline shape or SFS. Interestingly, sampling sub-populations also affected skyline plots and SFS, because the coalescent rates of populations and their sub-populations had different distributions. This study suggests that extreme caution is needed to infer demographic changes solely based on reconstructed genealogies. We suggest that the development of novel sampling strategies and the joint analyzes of diverse population genetic methods are strictly necessary to estimate demographic changes in populations where selection, recombination, and biased sampling are present. PMID:26931140

  20. [Histamine H₁ receptor gene as an allergic diseases-sensitive gene and its impact on therapeutics for allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Yuto; Kuroda, Wakana; Yoshida, Haruka; Miyamoto, Yuko; Hattori, Masashi; Takeda, Noriaki; Fukui, Hiroyuki

    2011-02-01

    Therapeutics targeting disease-sensitive genes are required for the therapy of multifactorial diseases. There is no clinical report on therapeutics for allergic disease-sensitive genes. We are focusing on the histamine H₁ receptor (H1R) as a sensitive gene. H1R mediates allergy histamine signals. H1R is a rate-limiting molecule of the H1R signal because the signal is increased with elevated receptor expression level. We discovered that the stimulation of H1R induced H1R gene expression through PKCδ activation, resulting in receptor upregulation. The mechanism of H1R gene expression was revealed to play a key role in the receptor expression level in studies using cultured HeLa cells and allergic rhinitis model rats. Preseasonal prophylactic treatment with antihistamines is recommended for the therapy of pollinosis. However, the mechanism of the therapy remains to be elucidated. We demonstrated that repeated pretreatment treatment with antihistamines in the allergic rhinitis model rats resulted not only in improvement of symptoms but also in suppressed elevation of H1R mRNA levels in the nasal mucosa. A clinical trial was then initiated. When symptoms and H1R mRNA levels in the nasal mucosa of pollinosis patients with or without preseasonal prophylactic treatment with antihistamines were examined, both symptoms and high levels of H1R mRNA were significantly improved in treated compared with untreated patients. These results strongly suggest that H1R is an allergic disease-sensitive gene.

  1. Evidence of current impact of climate change on life: a walk from genes to the biosphere.

    PubMed

    Peñuelas, Josep; Sardans, Jordi; Estiarte, Marc; Ogaya, Romà; Carnicer, Jofre; Coll, Marta; Barbeta, Adria; Rivas-Ubach, Albert; Llusià, Joan; Garbulsky, Martin; Filella, Iolanda; Jump, Alistair S

    2013-08-01

    We review the evidence of how organisms and populations are currently responding to climate change through phenotypic plasticity, genotypic evolution, changes in distribution and, in some cases, local extinction. Organisms alter their gene expression and metabolism to increase the concentrations of several antistress compounds and to change their physiology, phenology, growth and reproduction in response to climate change. Rapid adaptation and microevolution occur at the population level. Together with these phenotypic and genotypic adaptations, the movement of organisms and the turnover of populations can lead to migration toward habitats with better conditions unless hindered by barriers. Both migration and local extinction of populations have occurred. However, many unknowns for all these processes remain. The roles of phenotypic plasticity and genotypic evolution and their possible trade-offs and links with population structure warrant further research. The application of omic techniques to ecological studies will greatly favor this research. It remains poorly understood how climate change will result in asymmetrical responses of species and how it will interact with other increasing global impacts, such as N eutrophication, changes in environmental N : P ratios and species invasion, among many others. The biogeochemical and biophysical feedbacks on climate of all these changes in vegetation are also poorly understood. We here review the evidence of responses to climate change and discuss the perspectives for increasing our knowledge of the interactions between climate change and life.

  2. Sexy transgenes: the impact of gene transfer and gene inactivation technologies on the understanding of mammalian sex determination.

    PubMed

    Vaiman, Daniel

    2003-06-01

    Amongst the various developmental pathways ending in a sound mammal, sex determination presents the peculiarity of a choice between two equally viable options: female or male. Therefore, destroying a 'male-determining gene' or a 'female-determining gene' should generally not be lethal. Genetic sex determination is divided into two consecutive steps: construction of the bipotential gonad, and then sex determination per se. The genes involved in the first step are in fact involved in the development of various body compartments, and their mutation is generally far from innocuous. From transgenic and inactivation studies carried out on the laboratory mouse, a complete picture of the two steps is beginning to emerge, where the gonad itself and the necessary ducts are shown to evolve in a very coordinate way, with well-defined sex-specificities. Compared with testis determination, the ovarian side of the picture is still relatively empty, but this situation can change rapidly as candidate ovarian genes for inactivation studies are beginning to be identified.

  3. Gene patents, patenting life and the impact of court rulings on US stem cell patents and research.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Kirstin R W; Cuchiara, Maude L

    2014-03-01

    In June 2013, the US Supreme Court ruled that naturally occurring genes were unpatentable in the case Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics. Up until this decision, Myriad Genetics was the only company in the USA that could legally conduct diagnostic testing for BRCA1 and 2, genes that are linked to familial breast and ovarian cancer. The court case and rulings garnered discussion in public about patenting biological materials. This paper will describe the progression of the Myriad Genetics case, similar US rulings and biological intellectual property policies. In addition, it will discuss the impact of the case on biological patents - specifically those for human embryonic stem cells.

  4. Diversity of tet resistance genes in tetracycline-resistant bacteria isolated from a swine lagoon with low antibiotic impact.

    PubMed

    Macauley, John J; Adams, Craig D; Mormile, Melanie R

    2007-12-01

    Tetracycline resistance has been extensively studied and shown to be widespread. A number of previous studies have clearly demonstrated that a variety of tetracycline resistance genes are present in swine fecal material, treatment lagoons, and the environments surrounding concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). The diversity of tetracycline resistance within a swine lagoon located at a CAFO that used only bacitricin methylene disalicylate as an antibiotic was evaluated by screening 85 tetracycline-resistant isolates for the presence of 18 different genes by performing PCR with primers that target tetracycline efflux genes of Gram-negative bacteria and ribosomal protection proteins. In addition, partial 16S rRNA sequences from each of these isolates were sequenced to determine the identity of these isolates. Of the 85 isolates examined, 17 may represent potential novel species based on BLAST results. Greater than 50% of the isolates (48 out of 85) were found to not contain targeted tet efflux genes. Though minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged widely (16 - >256 mg/L), these values did not give an indication of the tet genes present. Ten new genera were identified that contain at least one tet efflux gene. Five other genera possessed tet efflux genes that were not found in these organisms previously. Interestingly, none of the isolates possessed any of the selected ribosomal protection protein genes. Though tetracycline resistance was found in bacteria isolated from a swine CAFO lagoon, it appears that the limited antibiotic use at this CAFO might have impacted the presence and diversity of tetracycline resistance genes. PMID:18059563

  5. Evolutionary analysis of multidrug resistance genes in fungi - impact of gene duplication and family conservation.

    PubMed

    Gossani, Cristiani; Bellieny-Rabelo, Daniel; Venancio, Thiago M

    2014-11-01

    Although the emergence of bacterial drug resistance is of great concern to the scientific community, few studies have evaluated this phenomenon systematically in fungi by using genome-wide datasets. In the present study, we assembled a large compendium of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chemical genetic data to study the evolution of multidrug resistance genes (MDRs) in the fungal lineage. We found that MDRs typically emerge in widely conserved families, most of which containing homologs from pathogenic fungi, such as Candida albicans and Coccidioides immitis, which could favor the evolution of drug resistance in those species. By integrating data from chemical genetics with protein family conservation, genetic and protein interactions, we found that gene families rarely have more than one MDR, indicating that paralogs evolve asymmetrically with regard to multidrug resistance roles. Furthermore, MDRs have more genetic and protein interaction partners than non-MDRs, supporting their participation in complex biochemical systems underlying the tolerance to multiple bioactive molecules. MDRs share more chemical genetic interactions with other MDRs than with non-MDRs, regardless of their evolutionary affinity. These results suggest the existence of an intricate system involved in the global drug tolerance phenotypes. Finally, MDRs are more likely to be hit repeatedly by mutations in laboratory evolution experiments, indicating that they have great adaptive potential. The results presented here not only reveal the main genomic features underlying the evolution of MDRs, but also shed light on the gene families from which drug resistance is more likely to emerge in fungi.

  6. Cancer predisposition genes: molecular mechanisms and clinical impact on personalized cancer care: examples of Lynch and HBOC syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Up to 10% of cancers occur through the inherited mutation of a group of genes called cancer predisposition genes. Individuals who carry a mutant allele of these genes have an increased susceptibility to cancer. A growing number of cancer susceptibility genes are being identified, and the physiopathology of germline mutation-based cancer development is also being elucidated with accumulating clinical and molecular data. More importantly, the identification of familial mutations has become routine practice, which is a perfect example of bench-to-bed translational medicine. Recently, other clinical applications of predisposition genes have been exploited, especially as efficient biomarkers predicting prognosis or response to treatment. Thus, it appears interesting to give an overview of the advances and impacts of predisposition genes in personalized cancer care by taking representative and common cancer syndromes as examples: Lynch syndrome for the first example, which is related to cancer susceptibility, and breast and ovary cancer syndrome for the second example, which involves BRCA deficiency-related targeted therapy. PMID:26616728

  7. CREB-dependent gene regulation by prion protein: impact on MMP-9 and beta-dystroglycan.

    PubMed

    Pradines, Elodie; Loubet, Damien; Schneider, Benoît; Launay, Jean-Marie; Kellermann, Odile; Mouillet-Richard, Sophie

    2008-11-01

    Corruption of the normal function of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) by the scrapie isoform (PrP(Sc)) emerges as a critical causal event in Transmissible Spongiform Encaphalopathies (TSE) pathogenesis. However, PrP(C) physiological role remains unclear. By exploiting the properties of the 1C11 neuroectodermal cell line, able to convert into 1C11(5-HT) serotonergic or 1C11(NE) noradrenergic neuronal cells, we assigned a signaling function to PrP(C). Here, we establish that antibody-mediated PrP(C) ligation promotes the recruitment of the cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) transcription factor downstream from the MAPK ERK1/2, in 1C11 precursor cells and their 1C11(5-HT) and 1C11(NE) neuronal progenies. Whatever the differentiation state of 1C11 cells, the PrP(C)-dependent CREB activation triggers Egr-1 and c-fos transcription, two immediate early genes that relay CREB's role in cell survival and proliferation as well as in neuronal plasticity. Furthermore, in 1C11-derived neuronal cells, we draw a link between the PrP(C)-CREB coupling and a transcriptional regulation of the metalloproteinase MMP-9 and its inhibitor TIMP-1, which play pivotal roles in neuronal pathophysiology. Finally, the PrP(C)-dependent control on MMP-9 impacts on the processing of the transmembrane protein, beta-dystroglycan. Taken together, our data define molecular mechanisms that likely mirror PrP(C) ubiquitous contribution to cytoprotection and its involvement in neuronal plasticity.

  8. Impact of the PPAR gamma-2 gene polymorphisms on the metabolic state of postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Grygiel-Gorniak, Bogna; Mosor, Maria; Marcinkowska, Justyna; Przyslawski, Juliusz; Nowak, Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    The relationship Pro12Ala (rs1801282) and C1431T (rs3856806) polymorphisms of PPAR gamma-2 with glucose and lipid metabolism is not clear after menopause. We investigated the impact of the Pro12Ala and C1431T silent substitution in the 6th exon in PPAR gamma-2 gene on nutritional and metabolic status in 271 postmenopausal women (122 lean and 149 obese). The general linear model (GLM) approach to the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to infer the interactions between the analysed genotypes. The frequency of the Pro-T haplotype was higher in obese than in lean women (p less than 0.0349). In the analysed GLM models according to obesity status, the C1431C genotype was related to a lower glucose concentration (beta=-0.2103) in lean women, and to higher folliculotropic hormone FSH levels (beta=0.1985) and lower waist circumferences (beta=-0.1511) in obese women. The influence of C1431C was present regardless of the occurrence of the Pro12Ala polymorphism. The co-existence of the C1431C and Pro12Pro genotypes was related to lower values for triceps skinfold thickness compared those for the T1241/X and Ala12/X polymorphisms (beta=-0.1425). The presence of C1431C decreased the differences between triceps values that were determined by Pro or Ala allele. In conclusion, C1431T polymorphism seems to have a more essential influence on anthropometric and biochemical parameters than is the case with Pro12Ala polymorphism. PMID:27581934

  9. Phylogenetic Diversity of Archaea and the Archaeal Ammonia Monooxygenase Gene in Uranium Mining-Impacted Locations in Bulgaria

    PubMed Central

    Radeva, Galina; Kenarova, Anelia; Bachvarova, Velina; Popov, Ivan; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    Uranium mining and milling activities adversely affect the microbial populations of impacted sites. The negative effects of uranium on soil bacteria and fungi are well studied, but little is known about the effects of radionuclides and heavy metals on archaea. The composition and diversity of archaeal communities inhabiting the waste pile of the Sliven uranium mine and the soil of the Buhovo uranium mine were investigated using 16S rRNA gene retrieval. A total of 355 archaeal clones were selected, and their 16S rDNA inserts were analysed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) discriminating 14 different RFLP types. All evaluated archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences belong to the 1.1b/Nitrososphaera cluster of Crenarchaeota. The composition of the archaeal community is distinct for each site of interest and dependent on environmental characteristics, including pollution levels. Since the members of 1.1b/Nitrososphaera cluster have been implicated in the nitrogen cycle, the archaeal communities from these sites were probed for the presence of the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA). Our data indicate that amoA gene sequences are distributed in a similar manner as in Crenarchaeota, suggesting that archaeal nitrification processes in uranium mining-impacted locations are under the control of the same key factors controlling archaeal diversity. PMID:24711725

  10. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste.

    PubMed

    Agga, Getahun E; Arthur, Terrance M; Durso, Lisa M; Harhay, Dayna M; Schmidt, John W

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact" environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie). Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica) and Gram-positive (enterococci) bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174). The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44) by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine), low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in municipal samples than in cattle runoff or swine lagoon samples. In conclusion, we report that AMR is a very widespread phenomenon and that similar prevalences

  11. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste.

    PubMed

    Agga, Getahun E; Arthur, Terrance M; Durso, Lisa M; Harhay, Dayna M; Schmidt, John W

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact" environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie). Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica) and Gram-positive (enterococci) bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174). The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44) by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine), low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in municipal samples than in cattle runoff or swine lagoon samples. In conclusion, we report that AMR is a very widespread phenomenon and that similar prevalences

  12. Dietary tomato and lycopene impact androgen signaling- and carcinogenesis-related gene expression during early TRAMP prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lei; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Pearl, Dennis K; Erdman, John W; Moran, Nancy E; Clinton, Steven K

    2014-12-01

    Consumption of tomato products containing the carotenoid lycopene is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. To identify gene expression patterns associated with early testosterone-driven prostate carcinogenesis, which are impacted by dietary tomato and lycopene, wild-type (WT) and transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice were fed control or tomato- or lycopene-containing diets from 4 to 10 weeks of age. Eight-week-old mice underwent sham surgery, castration, or castration followed by testosterone repletion (2.5 mg/kg/d initiated 1 week after castration). Ten-week-old intact TRAMP mice exhibit early multifocal prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Of the 200 prostate cancer-related genes measured by quantitative NanoString, 189 are detectable, 164 significantly differ by genotype, 179 by testosterone status, and 30 by diet type (P < 0.05). In TRAMP, expression of Birc5, Mki67, Aurkb, Ccnb2, Foxm1, and Ccne2 is greater compared with WT and is decreased by castration. In parallel, castration reduces Ki67-positive staining (P < 0.0001) compared with intact and testosterone-repleted TRAMP mice. Expression of genes involved in androgen metabolism/signaling pathways is reduced by lycopene feeding (Srd5a1) and by tomato feeding (Srd5a2, Pxn, and Srebf1). In addition, tomato feeding significantly reduced expression of genes associated with stem cell features, Aldh1a and Ly6a, whereas lycopene feeding significantly reduced expression of neuroendocrine differentiation-related genes, Ngfr and Syp. Collectively, these studies demonstrate a profile of testosterone-regulated genes associated with early prostate carcinogenesis that are potential mechanistic targets of dietary tomato components. Future studies on androgen signaling/metabolism, stem cell features, and neuroendocrine differentiation pathways may elucidate the mechanisms by which dietary tomato and lycopene impact prostate cancer risk. PMID:25315431

  13. Palaeophylogenomics of the vertebrate ancestor--impact of hidden paralogy on hagfish and lamprey gene phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2010-07-01

    In dissecting the transition from invertebrates to vertebrates at the molecular level, whole-genome duplications are recognized as a key event. This gave rise to more copies of genes in jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes), such as the four Hox clusters in the human, compared to the single ancestral cluster in invertebrates. To date, as the most early-branching lineages in vertebrates, cyclostomes (hagfishes and lampreys) have been used for comparative analyses of gene regulations and functions. However, assignment of orthology/paralogy for cyclostomes' genes is not unambiguously demonstrated. Thus, there is a high degree of incongruence in tree topologies between gene families, although whole genome duplications postulate uniform patterns in gene phylogeny. In this review, we demonstrate how expansion of an ancient genome before the cyclostome-gnathostome split, followed by reciprocal gene loss, can cause this incongruence. This is sometimes referred to as 'hidden paralogy'. PMID:21558193

  14. Does your gene need a background check? How genetic background impacts the analysis of mutations, genes, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Christopher H; Chari, Sudarshan; Dworkin, Ian

    2013-06-01

    The premise of genetic analysis is that a causal link exists between phenotypic and allelic variation. However, it has long been documented that mutant phenotypes are not a simple result of a single DNA lesion, but are instead due to interactions of the focal allele with other genes and the environment. Although an experimentally rigorous approach focused on individual mutations and isogenic control strains has facilitated amazing progress within genetics and related fields, a glimpse back suggests that a vast complexity has been omitted from our current understanding of allelic effects. Armed with traditional genetic analyses and the foundational knowledge they have provided, we argue that the time and tools are ripe to return to the underexplored aspects of gene function and embrace the context-dependent nature of genetic effects. We assert that a broad understanding of genetic effects and the evolutionary dynamics of alleles requires identifying how mutational outcomes depend upon the 'wild type' genetic background. Furthermore, we discuss how best to exploit genetic background effects to broaden genetic research programs.

  15. Does your gene need a background check? How genetic background impacts the analysis of mutations, genes, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Christopher H.; Chari, Sudarshan; Dworkin, Ian

    2013-01-01

    The premise of genetic analysis is that a causal link exists between phenotypic and allelic variation. Yet it has long been documented that mutant phenotypes are not a simple result of a single DNA lesion, but rather are due to interactions of the focal allele with other genes and the environment. Although an experimentally rigorous approach focused on individual mutations and isogenic control strains has facilitated amazing progress within genetics and related fields, a glimpse back suggests that a vast complexity has been omitted from our current understanding of allelic effects. Armed with traditional genetic analyses and the foundational knowledge they have provided, we argue that the time and tools are ripe to return to the under-explored aspects of gene function and embrace the context-dependent nature of genetic effects. We assert that a broad understanding of genetic effects and the evolutionary dynamics of alleles requires identifying how mutational outcomes depend upon the “wild-type” genetic background. Furthermore, we discuss how best to exploit genetic background effects to broaden genetic research programs. PMID:23453263

  16. Gene Model Annotations for Drosophila melanogaster: Impact of High-Throughput Data

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Beverley B.; dos Santos, Gilberto; Crosby, Madeline A.; Emmert, David B.; St. Pierre, Susan E.; Gramates, L. Sian; Zhou, Pinglei; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Falls, Kathleen; Strelets, Victor; Russo, Susan M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2015-01-01

    We report the current status of the FlyBase annotated gene set for Drosophila melanogaster and highlight improvements based on high-throughput data. The FlyBase annotated gene set consists entirely of manually annotated gene models, with the exception of some classes of small non-coding RNAs. All gene models have been reviewed using evidence from high-throughput datasets, primarily from the modENCODE project. These datasets include RNA-Seq coverage data, RNA-Seq junction data, transcription start site profiles, and translation stop-codon read-through predictions. New annotation guidelines were developed to take into account the use of the high-throughput data. We describe how this flood of new data was incorporated into thousands of new and revised annotations. FlyBase has adopted a philosophy of excluding low-confidence and low-frequency data from gene model annotations; we also do not attempt to represent all possible permutations for complex and modularly organized genes. This has allowed us to produce a high-confidence, manageable gene annotation dataset that is available at FlyBase (http://flybase.org). Interesting aspects of new annotations include new genes (coding, non-coding, and antisense), many genes with alternative transcripts with very long 3′ UTRs (up to 15–18 kb), and a stunning mismatch in the number of male-specific genes (approximately 13% of all annotated gene models) vs. female-specific genes (less than 1%). The number of identified pseudogenes and mutations in the sequenced strain also increased significantly. We discuss remaining challenges, for instance, identification of functional small polypeptides and detection of alternative translation starts. PMID:26109357

  17. Host gene constraints and genomic context impact the expression and evolution of human microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    França, Gustavo S.; Vibranovski, Maria D.; Galante, Pedro A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that recent miRNAs tend to emerge within coding genes. Here we conjecture that human miRNA evolution is tightly influenced by the genomic context, especially by host genes. Our findings show a preferential emergence of intragenic miRNAs within old genes. We found that miRNAs within old host genes are significantly more broadly expressed than those within young ones. Young miRNAs within old genes are more broadly expressed than their intergenic counterparts, suggesting that young miRNAs have an initial advantage by residing in old genes, and benefit from their hosts' expression control and from the exposure to diverse cellular contexts and target genes. Our results demonstrate that host genes may provide stronger expression constraints to intragenic miRNAs in the long run. We also report associated functional implications, highlighting the genomic context and host genes as driving factors for the expression and evolution of human miRNAs. PMID:27109497

  18. Impacts of anthropogenic activity on the ecology of class 1 integrons and integron-associated genes in the environment

    PubMed Central

    Gaze, William H; Zhang, Lihong; Abdouslam, Nouradin A; Hawkey, Peter M; Calvo-Bado, Leo; Royle, Jeremy; Brown, Helen; Davis, Susan; Kay, Paul; Boxall, Alistair B A; Wellington, Elizabeth M H

    2011-01-01

    The impact of human activity on the selection for antibiotic resistance in the environment is largely unknown, although considerable amounts of antibiotics are introduced through domestic wastewater and farm animal waste. Selection for resistance may occur by exposure to antibiotic residues or by co-selection for mobile genetic elements (MGEs) which carry genes of varying activity. Class 1 integrons are genetic elements that carry antibiotic and quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) resistance genes that confer resistance to detergents and biocides. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and diversity of class 1 integron and integron-associated QAC resistance genes in bacteria associated with industrial waste, sewage sludge and pig slurry. We show that prevalence of class 1 integrons is higher in bacteria exposed to detergents and/or antibiotic residues, specifically in sewage sludge and pig slurry compared with agricultural soils to which these waste products are amended. We also show that QAC resistance genes are more prevalent in the presence of detergents. Studies of class 1 integron prevalence in sewage sludge amended soil showed measurable differences compared with controls. Insertion sequence elements were discovered in integrons from QAC contaminated sediment, acting as powerful promoters likely to upregulate cassette gene expression. On the basis of this data, >1 × 1019 bacteria carrying class 1 integrons enter the United Kingdom environment by disposal of sewage sludge each year. PMID:21368907

  19. Prenatal Exposure to Arsenic and Cadmium Impacts Infectious Disease-Related Genes within the Glucocorticoid Receptor Signal Transduction Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rager, Julia E.; Yosim, Andrew; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that environmental agents mediate susceptibility to infectious disease. Studies support the impact of prenatal/early life exposure to the environmental metals inorganic arsenic (iAs) and cadmium (Cd) on increased risk for susceptibility to infection. The specific biological mechanisms that underlie such exposure-mediated effects remain understudied. This research aimed to identify key genes/signal transduction pathways that associate prenatal exposure to these toxic metals with changes in infectious disease susceptibility using a Comparative Genomic Enrichment Method (CGEM). Using CGEM an infectious disease gene (IDG) database was developed comprising 1085 genes with known roles in viral, bacterial, and parasitic disease pathways. Subsequently, datasets collected from human pregnancy cohorts exposed to iAs or Cd were examined in relationship to the IDGs, specifically focusing on data representing epigenetic modifications (5-methyl cytosine), genomic perturbations (mRNA expression), and proteomic shifts (protein expression). A set of 82 infection and exposure-related genes was identified and found to be enriched for their role in the glucocorticoid receptor signal transduction pathway. Given their common identification across numerous human cohorts and their known toxicological role in disease, the identified genes within the glucocorticoid signal transduction pathway may underlie altered infectious disease susceptibility associated with prenatal exposures to the toxic metals iAs and Cd in humans. PMID:25479081

  20. Transposable elements: insertion pattern and impact on gene expression evolution in hominids.

    PubMed

    Warnefors, Maria; Pereira, Vini; Eyre-Walker, Adam

    2010-08-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) can affect the regulation of nearby genes through several mechanisms. Here, we examine to what extent recent TE insertions have contributed to the evolution of gene expression in hominids. We compare expression levels of human and chimpanzee orthologs and detect a weak increase in expression divergence (ED) for genes with species-specific TE insertions compared with unaffected genes. However, we show that genes with TE insertions predating the human-chimpanzee split also exhibit a similar increase in ED and therefore conclude that the increase is not due to the transcriptional influence of the TEs. These results are further confirmed by lineage-specific analysis of ED, using rhesus macaque as an outgroup: Human-chimpanzee ortholog pairs, where one ortholog has suffered TE insertion but not the other, do not show increased ED along the lineage where the insertion occurred, relative to the other lineage. We also show that genes with recent TE insertions tend to produce more alternative transcripts but find no evidence that the TEs themselves promote transcript diversity. Finally, we observe that TEs are enriched upstream relative to downstream of genes and show that this is due to insertional bias, rather than selection, because this bias is only observed in genes expressed in the germ line. This provides an alternative neutral explanation for the accumulation of TEs in upstream sequences.

  1. geneLAB: Expanding the Impact of NASA's Biological Research in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rayl, Nicole; Smith, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The geneLAB project is designed to leverage the value of large 'omics' datasets from molecular biology projects conducted on the ISS by making these datasets available, citable, discoverable, interpretable, reusable, and reproducible. geneLAB will create a collaboration space with an integrated set of tools for depositing, accessing, analyzing, and modeling these diverse datasets from spaceflight and related terrestrial studies.

  2. UPDATE ON SLA GENES AND THEIR IMPACT ON IMMUNE AND DISEASE INTERACTIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The swine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) complex is one of the most gene-dense regions in the swine genome. It consists of three major gene clusters, the SLA class I, class III and class II regions, that span ~1.1, 0.7 and 0.5 Mb, respectively, making the swi...

  3. Gene-diet interactions and their impact on colorectal cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Elizabeth D.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have evaluated the role of gene-diet interaction in the etiology of colorectal cancer (CRC). Historically, these studies focused on established dietary risk factors and genes involved in their metabolism. However, results from these candidate gene studies were inconsistent, possibly due to multiple testing and publication bias. In recent years, genome-wide association studies have identified a number of CRC susceptibility loci, and subsequent meta-analyses have observed limited evidence that diet may modify the risk associated with these susceptibility loci. Statistical techniques have been recently developed to evaluate the presence of interaction across the entire genome; results from these genome-wide studies have demonstrated limited evidence of interaction and have failed to replicate results from candidate gene studies and those using established susceptibility loci. However, larger sample sizes are likely needed to elucidate modest or weak interaction in genome-wide studies of gene-diet interaction. PMID:25844273

  4. Impact of thermal stress during incubation on gene expression in embryonic muscle of Peking ducks (Anasplatyrhynchos domestica).

    PubMed

    Liu, Hehe; Liu, Junying; Yan, Xiping; Li, Qingqing; Zhao, Yangmei; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rongping; Wang, Guosong; Wang, Haohan; Li, Xinxin; Yang, Chao; Li, Liang; Han, Chunchun; Wang, Jiwen

    2015-10-01

    Changes in temperature will influence poultry embryonic muscle development. However, little is known about the changes in molecular processes impacted by incubation temperature in avians. In this study, we investigated the effects of increasing the incubation temperature by 1°C from day 11-20 on the embryonic and posthatch skeletal muscle development of the Peking duck, and identified the differentially expressed genes using RNA-seq of leg muscle tissues. The results showed that altering the incubation temperature had immediate and long-lasting effects on phenotypic changes in the embryonic and post-hatching muscle development. It was shown that expression levels of total 1370 genes were altered in muscle tissues by the thermal treatments. The gene ontology (GO) analyses indicated that cellular processes including metabolism, cell cycle, catalytic activity, and enzyme regulatory activity may have involved in the muscle mass impacted by thermal manipulation. TGF-beta and insulin pathways as two classical muscle development related pathways may also involve in regulating muscle mass. These data may be helpful for understanding the physiological and biochemical processes of muscle development under environmental treatments in embryonic avians.

  5. Complex MHC Class I Gene Transcription Profiles and Their Functional Impact in Orangutans.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Natasja G; Heijmans, Corrine M C; van der Wiel, Marit K H; Blokhuis, Jeroen H; Mulder, Arend; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Doxiadis, Gaby G M; Claas, Frans H J; Parham, Peter; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2016-01-15

    MHC haplotypes of humans and the African great ape species have one copy of the MHC-A, -B, and -C genes. In contrast, MHC haplotypes of orangutans, the Asian great ape species, exhibit variation in the number of gene copies. An in-depth analysis of the MHC class I gene repertoire in the two orangutan species, Pongo abelii and Pongo pygmaeus, is presented in this article. This analysis involved Sanger and next-generation sequencing methodologies, revealing diverse and complicated transcription profiles for orangutan MHC-A, -B, and -C. Thirty-five previously unreported MHC class I alleles are described. The data demonstrate that each orangutan MHC haplotype has one copy of the MHC-A gene, and that the MHC-B region has been subject to duplication, giving rise to at least three MHC-B genes. The MHC-B*03 and -B*08 lineages of alleles each account for a separate MHC-B gene. All MHC-B*08 allotypes have the C1-epitope motif recognized by killer cell Ig-like receptor. At least one other MHC-B gene is present, pointing to MHC-B alleles that are not B*03 or B*08. The MHC-C gene is present only on some haplotypes, and each MHC-C allotype has the C1-epitope. The transcription profiles demonstrate that MHC-A alleles are highly transcribed, whereas MHC-C alleles, when present, are transcribed at very low levels. The MHC-B alleles are transcribed to a variable extent and over a wide range. For those orangutan MHC class I allotypes that are detected by human monoclonal anti-HLA class I Abs, the level of cell-surface expression of proteins correlates with the level of transcription of the allele. PMID:26685209

  6. DNA Compaction Induced by a Cationic Polymer or Surfactant Impact Gene Expression and DNA Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ainalem, Marie-Louise; Bartles, Andrew; Muck, Joscha; Dias, Rita S.; Carnerup, Anna M.; Zink, Daniele; Nylander, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in achieving gene regulation in biotechnological and biomedical applications by using synthetic DNA-binding agents. Most studies have so far focused on synthetic sequence-specific DNA-binding agents. Such approaches are relatively complicated and cost intensive and their level of sophistication is not always required, in particular for biotechnological application. Our study is inspired by in vivo data that suggest that DNA compaction might contribute to gene regulation. This study exploits the potential of using synthetic DNA compacting agents that are not sequence-specific to achieve gene regulation for in vitro systems. The semi-synthetic in vitro system we use include common cationic DNA-compacting agents, poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers and the surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which we apply to linearized plasmid DNA encoding for the luciferase reporter gene. We show that complexing the DNA with either of the cationic agents leads to gene expression inhibition in a manner that depends on the extent of compaction. This is demonstrated by using a coupled in vitro transcription-translation system. We show that compaction can also protect DNA against degradation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, our study shows that these effects are reversible and DNA can be released from the complexes. Release of DNA leads to restoration of gene expression and makes the DNA susceptible to degradation by Dnase. A highly charged polyelectrolyte, heparin, is needed to release DNA from dendrimers, while DNA complexed with CTAB dissociates with the non-ionic surfactant C12E5. Our results demonstrate the relation between DNA compaction by non-specific DNA-binding agents and gene expression and gene regulation can be achieved in vitro systems in a reliable dose-dependent and reversible manner. PMID:24671109

  7. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste

    PubMed Central

    Durso, Lisa M.; Harhay, Dayna M.; Schmidt, John W.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two “low impact” environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie). Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica) and Gram-positive (enterococci) bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174). The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44) by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine), low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in municipal samples than in cattle runoff or swine lagoon samples. In conclusion, we report that AMR is a very widespread phenomenon and that similar

  8. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Fiffer, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Genetic testing for heritable hearing loss involves a mix of patented and unpatented genes, mutations and testing methods. More than half of all hearing loss is linked to inherited mutations, and five genes are most commonly tested in the United States. There are no patents on three of these genes, but Athena Diagnostics holds exclusive licenses to test for a common mutation in the GJB2 gene associated with about 50% of all cases, as well as mutations in the MTRNR1 gene. This fragmented intellectual property landscape made hearing loss a useful case study for assessing whether patent rights in genetic testing can proliferate or overlap, and whether it is possible to gather the rights necessary to perform testing. Testing for hearing loss is widely available, primarily from academic medical centers. Based on literature reviews and interviews with researchers, research on the genetics of hearing loss has generally not been impeded by patents. There is no consistent evidence of a premium in testing prices attributable to patent status. Athena Diagnostics has, however, used its intellectual property to discourage other providers from offering some tests. There is no definitive answer about the suitability of current patenting and licensing of commonly tested genes because of continuing legal uncertainty about the extent of enforcement of patent rights. Clinicians have also expressed concerns that multiplex tests will be difficult to develop because of overlapping intellectual property and conflict with Athena’s sole provider business model. PMID:20393307

  9. Impact of gene patents and licensing practices on access to genetic testing for hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Fiffer, Melissa

    2010-04-01

    Genetic testing for heritable hearing loss involves a mix of patented and unpatented genes, mutations and testing methods. More than half of all hearing loss is linked to inherited mutations, and five genes are most commonly tested for in the United States. There are no patents on three of these genes, but Athena Diagnostics holds exclusive licenses to test for a common mutation in the GJB2 gene associated with about 50% of all cases as well as mutations in the MTRNR1 gene. This fragmented intellectual property landscape made hearing loss a useful case study to assess whether patent rights in genetic testing can proliferate or overlap, and whether it is possible to gather the rights necessary to perform testing. Testing for hearing loss is widely available, primarily from academic medical centers. Based on literature reviews and interviews with researchers, research on the genetics of hearing loss has generally not been impeded by patents. There is no consistent evidence of a premium in testing prices attributable to patent status. Athena Diagnostics has, however, used its intellectual property to discourage other providers from offering some tests. There is no definitive answer about the suitability of current patenting and licensing of commonly tested genes because of continuing legal uncertainty about the extent of enforcement of patent rights. Clinicians have also expressed concerns that multiplex tests will be difficult to develop because of overlapping intellectual property and conflict with Athena's sole provider business model.

  10. Stocking impacts the expression of candidate genes and physiological condition in introgressed brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis) populations

    PubMed Central

    Lamaze, Fabien C; Garant, Dany; Bernatchez, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Translocation of plants and animal populations between environments is one of the major forms of anthropogenic perturbation experienced by pristine populations, and consequently, human-mediated hybridization by stocking practices between wild and exogenous conspecifics is of increasing concern. In this study, we compared the expression of seven candidate genes involved in multifactorial traits and regulatory pathways for growth as a function of level of introgressive hybridization between wild and domestic brook charr to test the null hypothesis of no effect of introgression on wild fish. Our analyses revealed that the expression of two of the genes tested, cytochrome c oxidase VIIa and the growth hormone receptor isoform I, was positively correlated with the level of introgression. We also observed a positive relationship between the extent of introgression and physiological status quantified by the Fulton's condition index. The expression of other genes was influenced by other variables, including year of sampling (reflecting different thermal conditions), sampling method and lake of origin. This is the first demonstration in nature that introgression from stocked populations has an impact on the expression of genes playing a role in important biological functions that may be related with fitness in wild introgressed populations. PMID:23467764

  11. The impact of gene expression analysis on evolving views of avian brain organization.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Juan F; Molnár, Zoltán

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies have presented data on adult and developing avian brain organization. Jarvis et al. ([2013] J Comp Neurol. 521:3614-3665) identify four pallial and two subpallial gene expression domains and demonstrate that the mesopallium and adjoining divisions of the hyperpallium (hyperpallium intercalatum and hyperpallium densocellulare), have very similar gene expression profiles to each other, distinct from those of the nidopallium, the arcopallium, and the more distant divisions of the hyperpallium (hyperpallium apicale). The study proposes an update of the current nomenclature (Jarvis et al. [2005] Nat Rev Neurosci. 6:151-159). The authors perform densitometric quantifications of the in situ expression of 50 selected genes, use correlations of distances between vectors that represent these gene expression patterns within the 23 avian brain regions of their study, and group them according to similarity in their expression profiles. The generated cluster tree further supports their argument for a new terminology. The authors hypothesize that the mesopallium and adjoining divisions of the hyperpallium have a common developmental origin, and in the accompanying paper (Chen et al. [2013] J Comp Neurol. 521:3666-3701) show that these structures/subdivisions initially form continuous gene expression domains. With subsequent development these domains fold into distinct subdivisions in the dorsal and ventral avian pallium, forming mirror images to each other. Jarvis et al. ([2013] J Comp Neurol. 521:3614-3665) also demonstrate interesting principles of the functional organization of the avian brain by showing that specific sensory stimulation or motor behavior elicits gene expression in functional units perpendicular to the axis of the gene expression reversal and compare their arrangements and cell types with mammalian cortical columns.

  12. Widespread establishment and regulatory impact of Alu exons in human genes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shihao; Lin, Lan; Cai, James J; Jiang, Peng; Kenkel, Elizabeth J; Stroik, Mallory R; Sato, Seiko; Davidson, Beverly L; Xing, Yi

    2011-02-15

    The Alu element has been a major source of new exons during primate evolution. Thousands of human genes contain spliced exons derived from Alu elements. However, identifying Alu exons that have acquired genuine biological functions remains a major challenge. We investigated the creation and establishment of Alu exons in human genes, using transcriptome profiles of human tissues generated by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) combined with extensive RT-PCR analysis. More than 25% of Alu exons analyzed by RNA-Seq have estimated transcript inclusion levels of at least 50% in the human cerebellum, indicating widespread establishment of Alu exons in human genes. Genes encoding zinc finger transcription factors have significantly higher levels of Alu exonization. Importantly, Alu exons with high splicing activities are strongly enriched in the 5'-UTR, and two-thirds (10/15) of 5'-UTR Alu exons tested by luciferase reporter assays significantly alter mRNA translational efficiency. Mutational analysis reveals the specific molecular mechanisms by which newly created 5'-UTR Alu exons modulate translational efficiency, such as the creation or elongation of upstream ORFs that repress the translation of the primary ORFs. This study presents genomic evidence that a major functional consequence of Alu exonization is the lineage-specific evolution of translational regulation. Moreover, the preferential creation and establishment of Alu exons in zinc finger genes suggest that Alu exonization may have globally affected the evolution of primate and human transcriptomes by regulating the protein production of master transcriptional regulators in specific lineages.

  13. Tau Overexpression Impacts a Neuroinflammation Gene Expression Network Perturbed in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wes, Paul D.; Easton, Amy; Corradi, John; Barten, Donna M.; Devidze, Nino; DeCarr, Lynn B.; Truong, Amy; He, Aiqing; Barrezueta, Nestor X.; Polson, Craig; Bourin, Clotilde; Flynn, Marianne E.; Keenan, Stefanie; Lidge, Regina; Meredith, Jere; Natale, Joanne; Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Cadelina, Greg W.; Albright, Charlie F.; Cacace, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous inclusions of the microtubule-associated protein, tau, define a variety of neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To better understand the role of tau-mediated effects on pathophysiology and global central nervous system function, we extensively characterized gene expression, pathology and behavior of the rTg4510 mouse model, which overexpresses a mutant form of human tau that causes Frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). We found that the most predominantly altered gene expression pathways in rTg4510 mice were in inflammatory processes. These results closely matched the causal immune function and microglial gene-regulatory network recently identified in AD. We identified additional gene expression changes by laser microdissecting specific regions of the hippocampus, which highlighted alterations in neuronal network activity. Expression of inflammatory genes and markers of neuronal activity changed as a function of age in rTg4510 mice and coincided with behavioral deficits. Inflammatory changes were tau-dependent, as they were reversed by suppression of the tau transgene. Our results suggest that the alterations in microglial phenotypes that appear to contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease may be driven by tau dysfunction, in addition to the direct effects of beta-amyloid. PMID:25153994

  14. Tau overexpression impacts a neuroinflammation gene expression network perturbed in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wes, Paul D; Easton, Amy; Corradi, John; Barten, Donna M; Devidze, Nino; DeCarr, Lynn B; Truong, Amy; He, Aiqing; Barrezueta, Nestor X; Polson, Craig; Bourin, Clotilde; Flynn, Marianne E; Keenan, Stefanie; Lidge, Regina; Meredith, Jere; Natale, Joanne; Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Cadelina, Greg W; Albright, Charlie F; Cacace, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous inclusions of the microtubule-associated protein, tau, define a variety of neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). To better understand the role of tau-mediated effects on pathophysiology and global central nervous system function, we extensively characterized gene expression, pathology and behavior of the rTg4510 mouse model, which overexpresses a mutant form of human tau that causes Frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). We found that the most predominantly altered gene expression pathways in rTg4510 mice were in inflammatory processes. These results closely matched the causal immune function and microglial gene-regulatory network recently identified in AD. We identified additional gene expression changes by laser microdissecting specific regions of the hippocampus, which highlighted alterations in neuronal network activity. Expression of inflammatory genes and markers of neuronal activity changed as a function of age in rTg4510 mice and coincided with behavioral deficits. Inflammatory changes were tau-dependent, as they were reversed by suppression of the tau transgene. Our results suggest that the alterations in microglial phenotypes that appear to contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease may be driven by tau dysfunction, in addition to the direct effects of beta-amyloid.

  15. RNA-seq analysis of impact of PNN on gene expression and alternative splicing in corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Debra; Newman, Jeremy R.B.; McIntyre, Lauren M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The specialized corneal epithelium requires differentiated properties, specific for its role at the anterior surface of the eye. Thus, tight maintenance of the differentiated qualities of the corneal epithelial is essential. Pinin (PNN) is an exon junction component (EJC) that has dramatic implications for corneal epithelial cell differentiation and may act as a stabilizer of the corneal epithelial cell phenotype. Our studies revealed that PNN is involved in transcriptional repression complexes and spliceosomal complexes, placing PNN at the fulcrum between chromatin and mRNA splicing. Transcriptome analysis of PNN-knockdown cells revealed clear and reproducible alterations in transcript profiles and splicing patterns of a subset of genes that would significantly impact the epithelial cell phenotype. We further investigated PNN’s role in the regulation of gene expression and alternative splicing (AS) in a corneal epithelial context. Methods Human corneal epithelial (HCET) cells that carry the doxycycline-inducible PNN-knockdown shRNA vector were used to perform RNA-seq to determine differential gene expression and differential AS events. Results Multiple genes and AS events were identified as differentially expressed between PNN-knockdown and control cells. Genes upregulated by PNN knockdown included a large proportion of genes that are associated with enhanced cell migration and ECM remodeling processes, such as MMPs, ADAMs, HAS2, LAMA3, CXCRs, and UNC5C. Genes downregulated in response to PNN depletion included IGFBP5, FGD3, FGFR2, PAX6, RARG, and SOX10. AS events in PNN-knockdown cells compared to control cells were also more likely to be detected, and upregulated. In particular, 60% of exon-skipping events, detected in only one condition, were detected in PNN-knockdown cells and of the shared exon-skipping events, 92% of those differentially expressed were more frequent in the PNN knockdown. Conclusions These data suggest that lowering of PNN levels in

  16. Potential impact of gene regulatory mechanisms on the evolution of multicellularity in the volvocine algae.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in biology is how multicellular organisms can arise from their single-celled precursors. The evolution of multicellularity requires the adoption of new traits in unicellular ancestors that allows the generation of form by, for example, increasing the size and developing new cell types. But what are the genetic, cellular and biochemical bases underlying the evolution of multicellularity? Recent advances in evolutionary developmental biology suggest that the regulation of gene expression by cis-regulatory factors, gene duplication and alternative splicing contribute to phenotypic evolution. These mechanisms enable different degrees of phenotypic divergence and complexity with variation in traits from genomes with similar gene contents. In addition, signaling pathways specific to cell types are developed to guarantee the modulation of cellular and developmental processes matched to the cell types as well as the maintenance of multicellularity. PMID:26479715

  17. γ-Resorcylate Catabolic-Pathway Genes in the Soil Actinomycete Rhodococcus jostii RHA1

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Daisuke; Araki, Naoto; Motoi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Shota; Iino, Toju; Imai, Shunsuke; Masai, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    The Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 gene cluster required for γ-resorcylate (GRA) catabolism was characterized. The cluster includes tsdA, tsdB, tsdC, tsdD, tsdR, tsdT, and tsdX, which encode GRA decarboxylase, resorcinol 4-hydroxylase, hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase, maleylacetate reductase, an IclR-type regulator, a major facilitator superfamily transporter, and a putative hydrolase, respectively. The tsdA gene conferred GRA decarboxylase activity on Escherichia coli. Purified TsdB oxidized NADH in the presence of resorcinol, suggesting that tsdB encodes a unique NADH-specific single-component resorcinol 4-hydroxylase. Mutations in either tsdA or tsdB resulted in growth deficiency on GRA. The tsdC and tsdD genes conferred hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase and maleylacetate reductase activities, respectively, on E. coli. Inactivation of tsdT significantly retarded the growth of RHA1 on GRA. The growth retardation was partially suppressed under acidic conditions, suggesting the involvement of tsdT in GRA uptake. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the tsd genes constitute three transcriptional units, the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons and tsdR. Transcription of the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons was induced during growth on GRA. Inactivation of tsdR derepressed transcription of the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons in the absence of GRA, suggesting that tsd gene transcription is negatively regulated by the tsdR-encoded regulator. Binding of TsdR to the tsdR-tsdB and tsdT-tsdR intergenic regions was inhibited by the addition of GRA, indicating that GRA interacts with TsdR as an effector molecule. PMID:26319878

  18. Impact of beta2-adrenoreceptor gene variants on cardiac cavity size and systolic function in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Badenhorst, D; Norton, G R; Sliwa, K; Brooksbank, R; Essop, R; Sareli, P; Woodiwiss, A J

    2007-10-01

    In heart failure, the Arg16Gly and Gln27Glu polymorphisms of the beta2-adrenoreceptor (beta2-AR) gene are associated with exercise-capacity, clinical outcomes and response to beta-AR blocker therapy. Whether beta2-AR gene variants mediate these effects in-part through an impact on cardiac structural remodeling and pump function independent of the effects of beta-blockers is uncertain. We evaluated whether the Arg16Gly and Gln27Glu variants of the beta2-AR gene predict left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and LV end diastolic diameter (LVEDD) in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) before and 6 months after receiving standard medical therapy other than beta-AR blockers. In all, 394 patients with IDC and 393 age and gender-matched controls were genotyped for the beta2-AR gene variants using restriction-fragment length polymorphism-based techniques. LVEF and dimensions were determined in 132 patients (of whom 71 were newly diagnosed) both at baseline and after 6 months. Genotype of neither variant was associated with the presence of IDC. Moreover, beta2-AR genotype did not determine LVEF or LV dimensions prior to initiating therapy. After 6 months of therapy, LVEF increased by 7.1+/-1.0 absolute units (P<0.0001) and LVEDD decreased by 0.27+/-0.06 cm (P<0.02). Adjusting for baseline values as well as gender, age, and type of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy received, genotype was associated with neither final LVEF and LVEDD, nor change in LVEF and LVEDD. In conclusion, these data suggest that in heart failure, the functional Arg16Gly and Gln27Glu variants of the beta2-AR gene have no independent effect on adverse structural remodeling and pump function.

  19. Gene-environment interactions and the impact on obesity and lipid profile phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequencing the human genome provided the data, human intellectual capital and technology, particularly in terms of infrastructure and methodologies, to begin discovering genes involved in a wide range of human diseases and afflictions. This has led to a resurgence in genetics with the advent of geno...

  20. The impact of distinct insect pollinators on the movement of genes via pollen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in the foraging behavior and grooming patterns of pollinators can influence the patterns of gene dispersal and the resulting genetic structure of plant populations. Bumblebees groom and are thought to visit nearest neighbor plants, behaviors which are both expected to generate more local...

  1. Differential Impact of the "FMR1" Gene on Visual Processing in Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan, Cary S.; Boutet, Isabelle; Cornish, Kim; Zangenehpour, Shahin; Mullen, Kathy T.; Holden, Jeanette J. A.; Kaloustian, Vazken M. Der; Andermann, Eva; Chaudhuri, Avi

    2004-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of heritable mental retardation, affecting (~ around) 1 in 4000 males. The syndrome arises from expansion of a trinucleotide repeat in the 5'-untranslated region of the fragile X mental retardation 1 ("FMR1") gene, leading to methylation of the promoter sequence and lack of the fragile X mental…

  2. Meiotic drive impacts expression and evolution of x-linked genes in stalk-eyed flies.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Josephine A; Brand, Cara L; Paczolt, Kimberly A; Johns, Philip M; Baker, Richard H; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2014-01-01

    Although sex chromosome meiotic drive has been observed in a variety of species for over 50 years, the genes causing drive are only known in a few cases, and none of these cases cause distorted sex-ratios in nature. In stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), driving X chromosomes are commonly found at frequencies approaching 30% in the wild, but the genetic basis of drive has remained elusive due to reduced recombination between driving and non-driving X chromosomes. Here, we used RNAseq to identify transcripts that are differentially expressed between males carrying either a driving X (XSR) or a standard X chromosome (XST), and found hundreds of these, the majority of which are X-linked. Drive-associated transcripts show increased levels of sequence divergence (dN/dS) compared to a control set, and are predominantly expressed either in testes or in the gonads of both sexes. Finally, we confirmed that XSR and XST are highly divergent by estimating sequence differentiation between the RNAseq pools. We found that X-linked transcripts were often strongly differentiated (whereas most autosomal transcripts were not), supporting the presence of a relatively large region of recombination suppression on XSR presumably caused by one or more inversions. We have identified a group of genes that are good candidates for further study into the causes and consequences of sex-chromosome drive, and demonstrated that meiotic drive has had a profound effect on sequence evolution and gene expression of X-linked genes in this species.

  3. Population diversity and adaptive evolution in keratinization genes: impact of environment in shaping skin phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Pramod; Chaurasia, Amit; Bhattacharya, Aniket; Grover, Ritika; Mukerji, Mitali; Natarajan, Vivek T

    2015-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the role of climatic factors in shaping skin phenotypes, particularly pigmentation. Keratinization is another well-designed feature of human skin, which is involved in modulating transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Although this physiological process is closely linked to climate, presently it is not clear whether genetic diversity is observed in keratinization and whether this process also responds to the environmental pressure. To address this, we adopted a multipronged approach, which involved analysis of 1) copy number variations in diverse Indian and HapMap populations from varied geographical regions; 2) genetic association with geoclimatic parameters in 61 populations of dbCLINE database in a set of 549 genes from four processes namely keratinization, pigmentation, epidermal differentiation, and housekeeping functions; 3) sequence divergence in 4,316 orthologous promoters and corresponding exonic regions of human and chimpanzee with macaque as outgroup, and 4) protein sequence divergence (Ka/Ks) across nine vertebrate classes, which differ in their extent of TEWL. Our analyses demonstrate that keratinization and epidermal differentiation genes are under accelerated evolution in the human lineage, relative to pigmentation and housekeeping genes. We show that this entire pathway may have been driven by environmental selection pressure through concordant functional polymorphisms across several genes involved in skin keratinization. Remarkably, this underappreciated function of skin may be a crucial determinant of adaptation to diverse environmental pressures across world populations.

  4. DNA methylation impacts gene expression and ensures hypoxic survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shell, Scarlet S; Prestwich, Erin G; Baek, Seung-Hun; Shah, Rupal R; Sassetti, Christopher M; Dedon, Peter C; Fortune, Sarah M

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation regulates gene expression in many organisms. In eukaryotes, DNA methylation is associated with gene repression, while it exerts both activating and repressive effects in the Proteobacteria through largely locus-specific mechanisms. Here, we identify a critical DNA methyltransferase in M. tuberculosis, which we term MamA. MamA creates N⁶-methyladenine in a six base pair recognition sequence present in approximately 2,000 copies on each strand of the genome. Loss of MamA reduces the expression of a number of genes. Each has a MamA site located at a conserved position relative to the sigma factor -10 binding site and transcriptional start site, suggesting that MamA modulates their expression through a shared, not locus-specific, mechanism. While strains lacking MamA grow normally in vitro, they are attenuated in hypoxic conditions, suggesting that methylation promotes survival in discrete host microenvironments. Interestingly, we demonstrate strikingly different patterns of DNA methyltransferase activity in different lineages of M. tuberculosis, which have been associated with preferences for distinct host environments and different disease courses in humans. Thus, MamA is the major functional adenine methyltransferase in M. tuberculosis strains of the Euro-American lineage while strains of the Beijing lineage harbor a point mutation that largely inactivates MamA but possess a second functional DNA methyltransferase. Our results indicate that MamA influences gene expression in M. tuberculosis and plays an important but strain-specific role in fitness during hypoxia.

  5. Oxytocin Pathway Genes: Evolutionary Ancient System Impacting on Human Affiliation, Sociality, and Psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Ruth; Monakhov, Mikhail; Pratt, Maayan; Ebstein, Richard P

    2016-02-01

    Oxytocin (OT), a nonapeptide signaling molecule originating from an ancestral peptide, appears in different variants across all vertebrate and several invertebrate species. Throughout animal evolution, neuropeptidergic signaling has been adapted by organisms for regulating response to rapidly changing environments. The family of OT-like molecules affects both peripheral tissues implicated in reproduction, homeostasis, and energy balance, as well as neuromodulation of social behavior, stress regulation, and associative learning in species ranging from nematodes to humans. After describing the OT-signaling pathway, we review research on the three genes most extensively studied in humans: the OT receptor (OXTR), the structural gene for OT (OXT/neurophysin-I), and CD38. Consistent with the notion that sociality should be studied from the perspective of social life at the species level, we address human social functions in relation to OT-pathway genes, including parenting, empathy, and using social relationships to manage stress. We then describe associations between OT-pathway genes with psychopathologies involving social dysfunctions such as autism, depression, or schizophrenia. Human research particularly underscored the involvement of two OXTR single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs53576, rs2254298) with fewer studies focusing on other OXTR (rs7632287, rs1042778, rs2268494, rs2268490), OXT (rs2740210, rs4813627, rs4813625), and CD38 (rs3796863, rs6449197) single nucleotide polymorphisms. Overall, studies provide evidence for the involvement of OT-pathway genes in human social functions but also suggest that factors such as gender, culture, and early environment often confound attempts to replicate first findings. We conclude by discussing epigenetics, conceptual implications within an evolutionary perspective, and future directions, especially the need to refine phenotypes, carefully characterize early environments, and integrate observations of social behavior across

  6. Genetic variation of six desaturase genes in flax and their impact on fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Thambugala, Dinushika; Duguid, Scott; Loewen, Evelyn; Rowland, Gordon; Booker, Helen; You, Frank M; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2013-10-01

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is one of the richest plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids praised for their health benefits. In this study, the extent of the genetic variability of genes encoding stearoyl-ACP desaturase (SAD), and fatty acid desaturase 2 (FAD2) and 3 (FAD3) was determined by sequencing the six paralogous genes from 120 flax accessions representing a broad range of germplasm including some EMS mutant lines. A total of 6 alleles for sad1 and sad2, 21 for fad2a, 5 for fad2b, 15 for fad3a and 18 for fad3b were identified. Deduced amino acid sequences of the alleles predicted 4, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7 isoforms, respectively. Allele frequencies varied greatly across genes. Fad3a, with 110 SNPs and 19 indels, and fad3b, with 50 SNPs and 5 indels, showed the highest levels of genetic variations. While most of the SNPs and all the indels were silent mutations, both genes carried nonsense SNP mutations resulting in premature stop codons, a feature not observed in sad and fad2 genes. Some alleles and isoforms discovered in induced mutant lines were absent in the natural germplasm. Correlation of these genotypic data with fatty acid composition data of 120 flax accessions phenotyped in six field experiments revealed statistically significant effects of some of the SAD and FAD isoforms on fatty acid composition, oil content and iodine value. The novel allelic variants and isoforms identified for the six desaturases will be a resource for the development of oilseed flax with unique and useful fatty acid profiles.

  7. Impact of murine intestinal apolipoprotein A-IV expression on regional lipid absorption, gene expression, and growth

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Trang; Cook, Victoria R.; Rao, Anuradha; Weinberg, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV) is synthesized by intestinal enterocytes during lipid absorption and secreted into lymph on the surface of nascent chylomicrons. A compelling body of evidence supports a central role of apoA-IV in facilitating intestinal lipid absorption and in regulating satiety, yet a longstanding conundrum is that no abnormalities in fat absorption, feeding behavior, or weight gain were observed in chow-fed apoA-IV knockout (A4KO) mice. Herein we reevaluated the impact of apoA-IV expression in C57BL6 and A4KO mice fed a high-fat diet. Fat balance and lymph cannulation studies found no effect of intestinal apoA-IV gene expression on the efficiency of fatty acid absorption, but gut sac transport studies revealed that apoA-IV differentially modulates lipid transport and the number and size of secreted triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in different anatomic regions of the small bowel. ApoA-IV gene deletion increased expression of other genes involved in chylomicron assembly, impaired the ability of A4KO mice to gain weight and increase adipose tissue mass, and increased the distal gut hormone response to a high-fat diet. Together these findings suggest that apoA-IV may play a unique role in integrating feeding behavior, intestinal lipid absorption, and energy storage. PMID:21840868

  8. Impacts of Nonsynonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Adiponectin Receptor 1 Gene on Corresponding Protein Stability: A Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Md. Abu; Solayman, Md.; Paul, Sudip; Saha, Moumoni; Khalil, Md. Ibrahim; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Despite the reported association of adiponectin receptor 1 (ADIPOR1) gene mutations with vulnerability to several human metabolic diseases, there is lack of computational analysis on the functional and structural impacts of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the human ADIPOR1 at protein level. Therefore, sequence- and structure-based computational tools were employed in this study to functionally and structurally characterize the coding nsSNPs of ADIPOR1 gene listed in the dbSNP database. Our in silico analysis by SIFT, nsSNPAnalyzer, PolyPhen-2, Fathmm, I-Mutant 2.0, SNPs&GO, PhD-SNP, PANTHER, and SNPeffect tools identified the nsSNPs with distorting functional impacts, namely, rs765425383 (A348G), rs752071352 (H341Y), rs759555652 (R324L), rs200326086 (L224F), and rs766267373 (L143P) from 74 nsSNPs of ADIPOR1 gene. Finally the aforementioned five deleterious nsSNPs were introduced using Swiss-PDB Viewer package within the X-ray crystal structure of ADIPOR1 protein, and changes in free energy for these mutations were computed. Although increased free energy was observed for all the mutants, the nsSNP H341Y caused the highest energy increase amongst all. RMSD and TM scores predicted that mutants were structurally similar to wild type protein. Our analyses suggested that the aforementioned variants especially H341Y could directly or indirectly destabilize the amino acid interactions and hydrogen bonding networks of ADIPOR1. PMID:27294143

  9. Impacts of Nonsynonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Adiponectin Receptor 1 Gene on Corresponding Protein Stability: A Computational Approach.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Md Abu; Solayman, Md; Paul, Sudip; Saha, Moumoni; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Despite the reported association of adiponectin receptor 1 (ADIPOR1) gene mutations with vulnerability to several human metabolic diseases, there is lack of computational analysis on the functional and structural impacts of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the human ADIPOR1 at protein level. Therefore, sequence- and structure-based computational tools were employed in this study to functionally and structurally characterize the coding nsSNPs of ADIPOR1 gene listed in the dbSNP database. Our in silico analysis by SIFT, nsSNPAnalyzer, PolyPhen-2, Fathmm, I-Mutant 2.0, SNPs&GO, PhD-SNP, PANTHER, and SNPeffect tools identified the nsSNPs with distorting functional impacts, namely, rs765425383 (A348G), rs752071352 (H341Y), rs759555652 (R324L), rs200326086 (L224F), and rs766267373 (L143P) from 74 nsSNPs of ADIPOR1 gene. Finally the aforementioned five deleterious nsSNPs were introduced using Swiss-PDB Viewer package within the X-ray crystal structure of ADIPOR1 protein, and changes in free energy for these mutations were computed. Although increased free energy was observed for all the mutants, the nsSNP H341Y caused the highest energy increase amongst all. RMSD and TM scores predicted that mutants were structurally similar to wild type protein. Our analyses suggested that the aforementioned variants especially H341Y could directly or indirectly destabilize the amino acid interactions and hydrogen bonding networks of ADIPOR1. PMID:27294143

  10. Impact of duplicate gene copies on phylogenetic analysis and divergence time estimates in butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Nélida; Sison-Mangus, Marilou P; Yee, Emily N; Liswi, Saif W; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2009-01-01

    Background The increase in availability of genomic sequences for a wide range of organisms has revealed gene duplication to be a relatively common event. Encounters with duplicate gene copies have consequently become almost inevitable in the context of collecting gene sequences for inferring species trees. Here we examine the effect of incorporating duplicate gene copies evolving at different rates on tree reconstruction and time estimation of recent and deep divergences in butterflies. Results Sequences from ultraviolet-sensitive (UVRh), blue-sensitive (BRh), and long-wavelength sensitive (LWRh) opsins,EF-1α and COI were obtained from 27 taxa representing the five major butterfly families (5535 bp total). Both BRh and LWRh are present in multiple copies in some butterfly lineages and the different copies evolve at different rates. Regardless of the phylogenetic reconstruction method used, we found that analyses of combined data sets using either slower or faster evolving copies of duplicate genes resulted in a single topology in agreement with our current understanding of butterfly family relationships based on morphology and molecules. Interestingly, individual analyses of BRh and LWRh sequences also recovered these family-level relationships. Two different relaxed clock methods resulted in similar divergence time estimates at the shallower nodes in the tree, regardless of whether faster or slower evolving copies were used, with larger discrepancies observed at deeper nodes in the phylogeny. The time of divergence between the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus and the queen D. gilippus (15.3–35.6 Mya) was found to be much older than the time of divergence between monarch co-mimic Limenitis archippus and red-spotted purple L. arthemis (4.7–13.6 Mya), and overlapping with the time of divergence of the co-mimetic passionflower butterflies Heliconius erato and H. melpomene (13.5–26.1 Mya). Our family-level results are congruent with recent estimates found in

  11. Nutritional impacts on gene expression in the surface mucosa of blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Short-term feed deprivation is a common occurrence in both wild and farmed fish species, due to reproductive processes, seasonal variations in temperature, or in response to a disease outbreak. Fasting can have dramatic physiological and biological onsequences for fish, including impacts on mucosal ...

  12. Heme Signaling Impacts Global Gene Expression, Immunity and Dengue Virus Infectivity in Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Bottino-Rojas, Vanessa; Talyuli, Octávio A. C.; Jupatanakul, Natapong; Sim, Shuzhen; Dimopoulos, George; Venancio, Thiago M.; Bahia, Ana C.; Sorgine, Marcos H.; Oliveira, Pedro L.; Paiva-Silva, Gabriela O.

    2015-01-01

    Blood-feeding mosquitoes are exposed to high levels of heme, the product of hemoglobin degradation. Heme is a pro-oxidant that influences a variety of cellular processes. We performed a global analysis of heme-regulated Aedes aegypti (yellow fever mosquito) transcriptional changes to better understand influence on mosquito physiology at the molecular level. We observed an iron- and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-independent signaling induced by heme that comprised genes related to redox metabolism. By modulating the abundance of these transcripts, heme possibly acts as a danger signaling molecule. Furthermore, heme triggered critical changes in the expression of energy metabolism and immune response genes, altering the susceptibility towards bacteria and dengue virus. These findings seem to have implications on the adaptation of mosquitoes to hematophagy and consequently on their ability to transmit diseases. Altogether, these results may also contribute to the understanding of heme cell biology in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26275150

  13. Impact of diethylhexyl phthalate on gene expression and development of mammary glands of pregnant mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan; Liu, Jing-Cai; Zhao, Yong; Lai, Fang-Nong; Yang, Fan; Ge, Wei; Dou, Cheng-Li; Shen, Wei; Zhang, Xi-Feng; Chen, Hong

    2015-10-01

    The widely used diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) is a known endocrine disruptor that causes persistent alterations in the structure and function of female reproductive system, including ovaries, uterus and oviducts. To explore the molecular mechanism of the effect of DEHP on the development of mammary glands, we investigated the cell cycle, growth, proliferation and gene expression of mammary gland cells of pregnant mice exposed to DEHP. It was demonstrated, for the first time, that the mammary gland cells of pregnant mice treated with DEHP for 0.5-3.5 days post-coitum had increased proliferation, growth rate and number of cells in the G2/S phase. The expression of cell proliferation-related genes was significantly altered after short time and low-dose DEHP treatment of mammary gland cells in vivo and in vitro. These findings showed adverse effects of DEHP on mammary gland cells in pregnant mice. PMID:26170149

  14. Heme Signaling Impacts Global Gene Expression, Immunity and Dengue Virus Infectivity in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Bottino-Rojas, Vanessa; Talyuli, Octávio A C; Jupatanakul, Natapong; Sim, Shuzhen; Dimopoulos, George; Venancio, Thiago M; Bahia, Ana C; Sorgine, Marcos H; Oliveira, Pedro L; Paiva-Silva, Gabriela O

    2015-01-01

    Blood-feeding mosquitoes are exposed to high levels of heme, the product of hemoglobin degradation. Heme is a pro-oxidant that influences a variety of cellular processes. We performed a global analysis of heme-regulated Aedes aegypti (yellow fever mosquito) transcriptional changes to better understand influence on mosquito physiology at the molecular level. We observed an iron- and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-independent signaling induced by heme that comprised genes related to redox metabolism. By modulating the abundance of these transcripts, heme possibly acts as a danger signaling molecule. Furthermore, heme triggered critical changes in the expression of energy metabolism and immune response genes, altering the susceptibility towards bacteria and dengue virus. These findings seem to have implications on the adaptation of mosquitoes to hematophagy and consequently on their ability to transmit diseases. Altogether, these results may also contribute to the understanding of heme cell biology in eukaryotic cells.

  15. DNA Methylation Impacts Gene Expression and Ensures Hypoxic Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shell, Scarlet S.; Prestwich, Erin G.; Baek, Seung-Hun; Shah, Rupal R.; Sassetti, Christopher M.; Dedon, Peter C.; Fortune, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation regulates gene expression in many organisms. In eukaryotes, DNA methylation is associated with gene repression, while it exerts both activating and repressive effects in the Proteobacteria through largely locus-specific mechanisms. Here, we identify a critical DNA methyltransferase in M. tuberculosis, which we term MamA. MamA creates N6-methyladenine in a six base pair recognition sequence present in approximately 2,000 copies on each strand of the genome. Loss of MamA reduces the expression of a number of genes. Each has a MamA site located at a conserved position relative to the sigma factor −10 binding site and transcriptional start site, suggesting that MamA modulates their expression through a shared, not locus-specific, mechanism. While strains lacking MamA grow normally in vitro, they are attenuated in hypoxic conditions, suggesting that methylation promotes survival in discrete host microenvironments. Interestingly, we demonstrate strikingly different patterns of DNA methyltransferase activity in different lineages of M. tuberculosis, which have been associated with preferences for distinct host environments and different disease courses in humans. Thus, MamA is the major functional adenine methyltransferase in M. tuberculosis strains of the Euro-American lineage while strains of the Beijing lineage harbor a point mutation that largely inactivates MamA but possess a second functional DNA methyltransferase. Our results indicate that MamA influences gene expression in M. tuberculosis and plays an important but strain-specific role in fitness during hypoxia. PMID:23853579

  16. Meiotic Drive Impacts Expression and Evolution of X-Linked Genes in Stalk-Eyed Flies

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, Josephine A.; Brand, Cara L.; Paczolt, Kimberly A.; Johns, Philip M.; Baker, Richard H.; Wilkinson, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Although sex chromosome meiotic drive has been observed in a variety of species for over 50 years, the genes causing drive are only known in a few cases, and none of these cases cause distorted sex-ratios in nature. In stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), driving X chromosomes are commonly found at frequencies approaching 30% in the wild, but the genetic basis of drive has remained elusive due to reduced recombination between driving and non-driving X chromosomes. Here, we used RNAseq to identify transcripts that are differentially expressed between males carrying either a driving X (XSR) or a standard X chromosome (XST), and found hundreds of these, the majority of which are X-linked. Drive-associated transcripts show increased levels of sequence divergence (dN/dS) compared to a control set, and are predominantly expressed either in testes or in the gonads of both sexes. Finally, we confirmed that XSR and XST are highly divergent by estimating sequence differentiation between the RNAseq pools. We found that X-linked transcripts were often strongly differentiated (whereas most autosomal transcripts were not), supporting the presence of a relatively large region of recombination suppression on XSR presumably caused by one or more inversions. We have identified a group of genes that are good candidates for further study into the causes and consequences of sex-chromosome drive, and demonstrated that meiotic drive has had a profound effect on sequence evolution and gene expression of X-linked genes in this species. PMID:24832132

  17. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Long QT Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Angrist, Misha; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Heaney, Christopher; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Genetic testing for Long QT syndrome (LQTS) exemplifies patenting and exclusive licensing with different outcomes at different times. Exclusive licensing from the University of Utah changed the business model from sole provider to two US providers of LQTS testing. LQTS is associated with mutations in many genes, ten of which are now tested by two competing firms in the United States, PGxHealth and GeneDx. Until 2009, PGxHealth was sole provider, based largely on exclusive rights to patents from the University of Utah and other academic institutions. University of Utah patents were initially licensed to DNA Sciences, whose patent rights were acquired by Gennaissance, and then by Clinical Data, Inc., which owns PGxHealth. In 2002, DNA Sciences “cleared the market” by sending cease and desist patent enforcement letters to university and reference laboratories offering LQTS genetic testing. There was no test on the market for a one- to two-year period. From 2005-2008, most LQTS-related patents were controlled by Clinical Data, Inc., and its subsidiary PGxHealth. BioReference Laboratories, Inc., secured countervailing exclusive patent rights starting in 2006, also from the University of Utah, and broke the PGxHealth monopoly in early 2009, creating a duopoly for genetic testing in the United States, and expanding the number of genes for which commercial testing is available from five to ten. PMID:20393304

  18. Quercetin Impacts Expression of Metabolism- and Obesity-Associated Genes in SGBS Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Leiherer, Andreas; Stoemmer, Kathrin; Muendlein, Axel; Saely, Christoph H; Kinz, Elena; Brandtner, Eva M; Fraunberger, Peter; Drexel, Heinz

    2016-05-12

    Obesity is characterized by the rapid expansion of visceral adipose tissue, resulting in a hypoxic environment in adipose tissue which leads to a profound change of gene expression in adipocytes. As a consequence, there is a dysregulation of metabolism and adipokine secretion in adipose tissue leading to the development of systemic inflammation and finally resulting in the onset of metabolic diseases. The flavonoid quercetin as well as other secondary plant metabolites also referred to as phytochemicals have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic effects known to be protective in view of obesity-related-diseases. Nevertheless, its underlying molecular mechanism is still obscure and thus the focus of this study was to explore the influence of quercetin on human SGBS (Simpson Golabi Behmel Syndrome) adipocytes' gene expression. We revealed for the first time that quercetin significantly changed expression of adipokine (Angptl4, adipsin, irisin and PAI-1) and glycolysis-involved (ENO2, PFKP and PFKFB4) genes, and that this effect not only antagonized but in part even overcompensated the effect mediated by hypoxia in adipocytes. Thus, these results are explained by the recently proposed hypothesis that the protective effect of quercetin is not solely due to its free radical-scavenging activity but also to a direct effect on mitochondrial processes, and they demonstrate that quercetin might have the potential to counteract the development of obesity-associated complications.

  19. Quercetin Impacts Expression of Metabolism- and Obesity-Associated Genes in SGBS Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Leiherer, Andreas; Stoemmer, Kathrin; Muendlein, Axel; Saely, Christoph H.; Kinz, Elena; Brandtner, Eva M.; Fraunberger, Peter; Drexel, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by the rapid expansion of visceral adipose tissue, resulting in a hypoxic environment in adipose tissue which leads to a profound change of gene expression in adipocytes. As a consequence, there is a dysregulation of metabolism and adipokine secretion in adipose tissue leading to the development of systemic inflammation and finally resulting in the onset of metabolic diseases. The flavonoid quercetin as well as other secondary plant metabolites also referred to as phytochemicals have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic effects known to be protective in view of obesity-related-diseases. Nevertheless, its underlying molecular mechanism is still obscure and thus the focus of this study was to explore the influence of quercetin on human SGBS (Simpson Golabi Behmel Syndrome) adipocytes’ gene expression. We revealed for the first time that quercetin significantly changed expression of adipokine (Angptl4, adipsin, irisin and PAI-1) and glycolysis-involved (ENO2, PFKP and PFKFB4) genes, and that this effect not only antagonized but in part even overcompensated the effect mediated by hypoxia in adipocytes. Thus, these results are explained by the recently proposed hypothesis that the protective effect of quercetin is not solely due to its free radical-scavenging activity but also to a direct effect on mitochondrial processes, and they demonstrate that quercetin might have the potential to counteract the development of obesity-associated complications. PMID:27187453

  20. Many amino acid substitution variants identified in DNA repair genes during human population screenings are predicted to impact protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, T; Jones, I M; Mohrenweiser, H W

    2003-11-03

    Over 520 different amino acid substitution variants have been previously identified in the systematic screening of 91 human DNA repair genes for sequence variation. Two algorithms were employed to predict the impact of these amino acid substitutions on protein activity. Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) classified 226 of 508 variants (44%) as ''Intolerant''. Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) classed 165 of 489 amino acid substitutions (34%) as ''Probably or Possibly Damaging''. Another 9-15% of the variants were classed as ''Potentially Intolerant or Damaging''. The results from the two algorithms are highly associated, with concordance in predicted impact observed for {approx}62% of the variants. Twenty one to thirty one percent of the variant proteins are predicted to exhibit reduced activity by both algorithms. These variants occur at slightly lower individual allele frequency than do the variants classified as ''Tolerant'' or ''Benign''. Both algorithms correctly predicted the impact of 26 functionally characterized amino acid substitutions in the APE1 protein on biochemical activity, with one exception. It is concluded that a substantial fraction of the missense variants observed in the general human population are functionally relevant. These variants are expected to be the molecular genetic and biochemical basis for the associations of reduced DNA repair capacity phenotypes with elevated cancer risk.

  1. High-Resolution Gene Flow Model for Assessing Environmental Impacts of Transgene Escape Based on Biological Parameters and Wind Speed.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Haccou, Patsy; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Environmental impacts caused by transgene flow from genetically engineered (GE) crops to their wild relatives mediated by pollination are longstanding biosafety concerns worldwide. Mathematical modeling provides a useful tool for estimating frequencies of pollen-mediated gene flow (PMGF) that are critical for assessing such environmental impacts. However, most PMGF models are impractical for this purpose because their parameterization requires actual data from field experiments. In addition, most of these models are usually too general and ignored the important biological characteristics of concerned plant species; and therefore cannot provide accurate prediction for PMGF frequencies. It is necessary to develop more accurate PMGF models based on biological and climatic parameters that can be easily measured in situ. Here, we present a quasi-mechanistic PMGF model that only requires the input of biological and wind speed parameters without actual data from field experiments. Validation of the quasi-mechanistic model based on five sets of published data from field experiments showed significant correlations between the model-simulated and field experimental-generated PMGF frequencies. These results suggest accurate prediction for PMGF frequencies using this model, provided that the necessary biological parameters and wind speed data are available. This model can largely facilitate the assessment and management of environmental impacts caused by transgene flow, such as determining transgene flow frequencies at a particular spatial distance, and establishing spatial isolation between a GE crop and its coexisting non-GE counterparts and wild relatives.

  2. High-Resolution Gene Flow Model for Assessing Environmental Impacts of Transgene Escape Based on Biological Parameters and Wind Speed.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Haccou, Patsy; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Environmental impacts caused by transgene flow from genetically engineered (GE) crops to their wild relatives mediated by pollination are longstanding biosafety concerns worldwide. Mathematical modeling provides a useful tool for estimating frequencies of pollen-mediated gene flow (PMGF) that are critical for assessing such environmental impacts. However, most PMGF models are impractical for this purpose because their parameterization requires actual data from field experiments. In addition, most of these models are usually too general and ignored the important biological characteristics of concerned plant species; and therefore cannot provide accurate prediction for PMGF frequencies. It is necessary to develop more accurate PMGF models based on biological and climatic parameters that can be easily measured in situ. Here, we present a quasi-mechanistic PMGF model that only requires the input of biological and wind speed parameters without actual data from field experiments. Validation of the quasi-mechanistic model based on five sets of published data from field experiments showed significant correlations between the model-simulated and field experimental-generated PMGF frequencies. These results suggest accurate prediction for PMGF frequencies using this model, provided that the necessary biological parameters and wind speed data are available. This model can largely facilitate the assessment and management of environmental impacts caused by transgene flow, such as determining transgene flow frequencies at a particular spatial distance, and establishing spatial isolation between a GE crop and its coexisting non-GE counterparts and wild relatives. PMID:26959240

  3. High-Resolution Gene Flow Model for Assessing Environmental Impacts of Transgene Escape Based on Biological Parameters and Wind Speed

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Haccou, Patsy; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Environmental impacts caused by transgene flow from genetically engineered (GE) crops to their wild relatives mediated by pollination are longstanding biosafety concerns worldwide. Mathematical modeling provides a useful tool for estimating frequencies of pollen-mediated gene flow (PMGF) that are critical for assessing such environmental impacts. However, most PMGF models are impractical for this purpose because their parameterization requires actual data from field experiments. In addition, most of these models are usually too general and ignored the important biological characteristics of concerned plant species; and therefore cannot provide accurate prediction for PMGF frequencies. It is necessary to develop more accurate PMGF models based on biological and climatic parameters that can be easily measured in situ. Here, we present a quasi-mechanistic PMGF model that only requires the input of biological and wind speed parameters without actual data from field experiments. Validation of the quasi-mechanistic model based on five sets of published data from field experiments showed significant correlations between the model-simulated and field experimental-generated PMGF frequencies. These results suggest accurate prediction for PMGF frequencies using this model, provided that the necessary biological parameters and wind speed data are available. This model can largely facilitate the assessment and management of environmental impacts caused by transgene flow, such as determining transgene flow frequencies at a particular spatial distance, and establishing spatial isolation between a GE crop and its coexisting non-GE counterparts and wild relatives. PMID:26959240

  4. Unraveling the estrogen receptor (er) genes in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) reveals expression differences between the two adult life stages but little impact from polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) load.

    PubMed

    Nikoleris, Lina; Hansson, Maria C

    2015-01-15

    Estrogen receptors (ers) not only are activated by hormones but also interact with many human-derived environmental contaminants. Here, we present evidence for four expressed er genes in Atlantic salmon cDNA - two more ers (erα2 and erβ2) than previously published. To determine if er gene expression differs between two adult life-stages we sampled 20 adult salmon from the feeding phase in the Baltic Sea and during migration in the River Mörrum, Sweden. Results show that all four er genes are present in the investigated tissues, except for erα2 not appearing in the spleen. Overall, a profile analysis reveals the erα1 gene to be the most highly expressed er gene in both female and male Baltic Sea salmon tissues, and also in female River Mörrum salmon. In contrast, this gene has the lowest gene expression level of the four er genes in male salmon from the River Mörrum. The erα2 gene is expressed at the lowest levels in both female/male Baltic Sea salmon and in female River Mörrum salmon. Statistical analyses indicate a significant and complex interaction where both sex and adult life stage can impact er gene expression. Regression analyses did not demonstrate any significant relationship between polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) body burden and er gene expression level, suggesting that accumulated pollutants from the Baltic Sea may be deactivated inside the salmon's lipid tissues and have limited impact on er activity. This study is the first comprehensive analysis of four er gene expression levels in two wild salmon populations from two different adult life stages where information about PCB load is also available.

  5. GC-biased gene conversion impacts ribosomal DNA evolution in vertebrates, angiosperms, and other eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Juan S; Glémin, Sylvain; Galtier, Nicolas

    2011-09-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is one of the most conserved genes in eukaryotes. The multiples copies of rDNA in the genome evolve in a concerted manner, through unequal crossing over and/or gene conversion, two mechanisms related to homologous recombination. Recombination increases local GC content in several organisms through a process known as GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC). gBGC has been well characterized in mammals, birds, and grasses, but its phylogenetic distribution across the tree of life is poorly understood. Here, we test the hypothesis that recombination affects the evolution of base composition in 18S rDNA and examine the reliability of this thoroughly studied molecule as a marker of gBGC in eukaryotes. Phylogenetic analyses of 18S rDNA in vertebrates and angiosperms reveal significant heterogeneity in the evolution of base composition across both groups. Mammals, birds, and grasses experience increases in the GC content of the 18S rDNA, consistent with previous genome-wide analyses. In addition, we observe increased GC contents in Ostariophysi ray-finned fishes and commelinid monocots (i.e., the clade including grasses), suggesting that the genomes of these two groups have been affected by gBGC. Polymorphism analyses in rDNA confirm that gBGC, not mutation bias, is the most plausible explanation for these patterns. We also find that helix and loop sites of the secondary structure of ribosomal RNA do not evolve at the same pace: loops evolve faster than helices, whereas helices are GC richer than loops. We extend analyses to major lineages of eukaryotes and suggest that gBGC might have also affected base composition in Giardia (Diplomonadina), nudibranch gastropods (Mollusca), and Asterozoa (Echinodermata). PMID:21444650

  6. Impact of Pre-Analytical Variables on Cancer Targeted Gene Sequencing Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Luiz H; Timmers, Cynthia; Shilo, Konstantin; Zhao, Weiqiang; Zhang, Jianying; Yu, Lianbo; Natarajan, Thanemozhi G; Miller, Clinton J; Yilmaz, Ayse Selen; Liu, Tom; Amann, Joseph; Lapa E Silva, José Roberto; Ferreira, Carlos Gil; Carbone, David P

    2015-01-01

    Tumor specimens are often preserved as formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue blocks, the most common clinical source for DNA sequencing. Herein, we evaluated the effect of pre-sequencing parameters to guide proper sample selection for targeted gene sequencing. Data from 113 FFPE lung tumor specimens were collected, and targeted gene sequencing was performed. Libraries were constructed using custom probes and were paired-end sequenced on a next generation sequencing platform. A PCR-based quality control (QC) assay was utilized to determine DNA quality, and a ratio was generated in comparison to control DNA. We observed that FFPE storage time, PCR/QC ratio, and DNA input in the library preparation were significantly correlated to most parameters of sequencing efficiency including depth of coverage, alignment rate, insert size, and read quality. A combined score using the three parameters was generated and proved highly accurate to predict sequencing metrics. We also showed wide read count variability within the genome, with worse coverage in regions of low GC content like in KRAS. Sample quality and GC content had independent effects on sequencing depth, and the worst results were observed in regions of low GC content in samples with poor quality. Our data confirm that FFPE samples are a reliable source for targeted gene sequencing in cancer, provided adequate sample quality controls are exercised. Tissue quality should be routinely assessed for pre-analytical factors, and sequencing depth may be limited in genomic regions of low GC content if suboptimal samples are utilized. PMID:26605948

  7. The major histocompatibility complex genes impact pain response in DA and DA.1U rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuan; Yao, Fan-Rong; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Li, Li; Wang, Hui-Sheng; Xie, Wen; Zhao, Yan

    2015-08-01

    Our recent studies have shown that the difference in basal pain sensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimulation between Dark-Agouti (DA) rats and a novel congenic DA.1U rats is major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes dependent. In the present study, we further used DA and DA.1U rats to investigate the role of MHC genes in formalin-induced pain model by behavioral, electrophysiological and immunohistochemical methods. Behavioral results showed biphasic nociceptive behaviors increased significantly following the intraplantar injection of formalin in the hindpaw of DA and DA.1U rats. The main nociceptive behaviors were lifting and licking, especially in DA rats (P<0.001 and P<0.01). The composite pain scores (CPS) in DA rats were significantly higher than those in DA.1U rats in both phases of the formalin test (P<0.01). Electrophysiological results also showed the biphasic increase in discharge rates of C and Aδ fibers of L5 dorsal root in the two strains, and the net change of the discharge rate of DA rats was significantly higher than that of DA.1U rats (P<0.05). The mechanical thresholds decreased after formalin injection in both strains (P<0.01), and the net change in the mechanical threshold in DA was greater than that in DA.1U rats (P<0.05). The expression of RT1-B, representation of MHC class II molecule, in laminae I-II of L4/5 spinal cord in DA rats was significantly higher than that in DA.1U rats in the respective experimental group (P<0.05). These results suggested that both DA and DA.1U rats exhibited nociceptive responses in formalin-induced pain model and DA rats were more sensitive to noxious chemical stimulus than DA.1U rats, indicating that MHC genes might contribute to the difference in pain sensitivity.

  8. Impact of Mannose-Binding Protein Gene Polymorphisms in Omani Sickle Cell Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zachariah, Mathew; Al Zadjali, Shoaib; Bashir, Wafa; Al Ambusaidi, Rahma; Misquith, Rhea; Wali, Yasser; Pathare, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to study mannose-binding protein (MBP) polymorphisms in exonic and promoter region and correlate it with associated infections and vasoocculsive (VOC) episodes in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients since MBP plays an important role in innate immunity by activating the complement system. Methods We studied the genetic polymorphisms in the Exon 1 (alleles A/O) and promoter region (alleles Y/X; H/L, P/Q) of the MBL2 gene, in SCD patients as an increased incidence of infections is seen in these patients. A PCR-based, targeted genomic DNA sequencing of MBL2 was used to study 68 SCD Omani patients and 44 controls (healthy voluntary blood donors). Results In SCD patients, the frequency of the genotype related to the high production of MBL was 0.35 (YA/YA) and for intermediate/low production was 0.65 (YA/XA, XA/XA, YA/YO, XA/YO, YO/YO). The observed frequencies of MBL2 gene promoter polymorphism (-221, Y/X) were 44.4% and 20.5% for the heterozygous genotype Y/X and 3.2% and 2.2% for the homozygous (X/X) respectively between SCD patients and controls. MBL2 Exon1 gene mutations were 29.4% and 50% for the heterozygous genotype A/O and 5.9% and 6.8% respectively for the homozygous (O/O) genotype between SCD patients and controls. The distribution of variant MBL2 gene polymorphisms did not show any correlation in SCD patients with or without VOC attacks (p=0.16; OR −0.486; CI=0.177 −1.33), however, it was correlated with infections (p=0.0162; OR −3.55; CI 1.25–10.04). Conclusions Although the frequency of the genotypes and haplotypes of MBL2 in SCD patients did not differ from controls, overall in the SCD patient cohort the increased representation of variant alleles was significantly correlated with infections (p<0.05). However, these variant MBL2 polymorphisms did not seem to play a significant role in the VOC episodes in this SCD cohort. PMID:26977272

  9. Exploration of the impact of messages about genes and race on lay attitudes.

    PubMed

    Condit, C M; Parrott, R L; Bates, B R; Bevan, J; Achter, P J

    2004-11-01

    The effect of messages about genetics on lay audiences was assessed through an experimental study that exposed participants (n = 96) to a Public Service Announcement about race, genes, and heart disease. Participants who received a message that specified either 'Whites' or 'Blacks' as the subject of the message demonstrated elevated levels of racism, genetic basis for racism, and one dimension of genetic discrimination as compared to those receiving a version of the message with no race specification or in a no-message control condition. The presentation of such messages to the public is not recommended until additional research clarifies this finding and perhaps describes mitigating vocabularies or approaches.

  10. Impact of Host Genes and Strand Selection on miRNA and miRNA* Expression

    PubMed Central

    Biasiolo, Marta; Sales, Gabriele; Lionetti, Marta; Agnelli, Luca; Todoerti, Katia; Bisognin, Andrea; Coppe, Alessandro; Romualdi, Chiara; Neri, Antonino; Bortoluzzi, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulation of miRNAs expression plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of genetic, multifactorial disorders and in human cancers. We exploited sequence, genomic and expression information to investigate two main aspects of post-transcriptional regulation in miRNA biogenesis, namely strand selection regulation and expression relationships between intragenic miRNAs and host genes. We considered miRNAs expression profiles, measured in five sizeable microarray datasets, including samples from different normal cell types and tissues, as well as different tumours and disease states. First, the study of expression profiles of “sister” miRNA pairs (miRNA/miRNA*, 5′ and 3′ strands of the same hairpin precursor) showed that the strand selection is highly regulated since it shows tissue-/cell-/condition-specific modulation. We used information about the direction and the strength of the strand selection bias to perform an unsupervised cluster analysis for the sample classification evidencing that is able to distinguish among different tissues, and sometimes between normal and malignant cells. Then, considering a minimum expression threshold, in few miRNA pairs only one mature miRNA is always present in all considered cell types, whereas the majority of pairs were concurrently expressed in some cell types and alternatively in others. In a significant fraction of concurrently expressed pairs, the major and the minor forms found at comparable levels may contribute to post-transcriptional gene silencing, possibly in a coordinate way. In the second part of the study, the behaved tendency to co-expression of intragenic miRNAs and their “host” mRNA genes was confuted by expression profiles examination, suggesting that the expression profile of a given host gene can hardly be a good estimator of co-transcribed miRNA(s) for post-transcriptional regulatory networks inference. Our results point out the regulatory importance of post-transcriptional phases of mi

  11. Impact of Bi-Axial Shear on Atherogenic Gene Expression by Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Amlan; Chakraborty, Sutirtha; Jala, Venkatakrishna R; Thomas, Jonathan M; Sharp, M Keith; Berson, R Eric; Haribabu, Bodduluri

    2016-10-01

    This study demonstrated the effects of the directionality of oscillatory wall shear stress (WSS) on proliferation and proatherogenic gene expression (I-CAM, E-Selectin, and IL-6) in the presence of inflammatory mediators leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from endothelial cells grown in an orbiting culture dish. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was applied to quantify the flow in the dish, while an analytical solution representing an extension of Stokes second problem was used for validation. Results indicated that WSS magnitude was relatively constant near the center of the dish and oscillated significantly (0-0.9 Pa) near the side walls. Experiments showed that LTB4 dominated the shear effects on cell proliferation and area. Addition of LPS didn't change proliferation, but significantly affected cell area. The expression of I-CAM1, E-Selectin and IL-6 were altered by directional oscillatory shear index (DOSI, a measure of the biaxiality of oscillatory shear), but not shear magnitude. The significance of DOSI was further reinforced by the strength of its interactions with other atherogenic factors. Hence, directionality of shear appears to be an important factor in regulating gene expression and provides a potential explanation of the propensity for increased vascular lesions in regions in the arteries with oscillating biaxial flow.

  12. Parental divorce and adolescent delinquency: ruling out the impact of common genes.

    PubMed

    Burt, S Alexandra; Barnes, Ashlee R; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G

    2008-11-01

    Although the well-documented association between parental divorce and adolescent delinquency is generally assumed to be environmental (i.e., causal) in origin, genetic mediation is also possible. Namely, the behavior problems often found in children of divorce could derive from similar pathology in the parents, pathology that is both heritable and increases the risk that the parent will experience divorce. To test these alternative hypotheses, the authors made use of a novel design that incorporated timing of divorce in a sample of 610 adoptive and biological families. They reasoned that if genes common to parent and child mediate this association, nonadopted youth should manifest increased delinquency in the presence of parental divorce even if the divorce preceded their birth (i.e., was from a prior parental relationship). However, should the association be environmental in origin, the authors reasoned that adolescents should manifest increased delinquency only in response to divorce exposure, and this association should not vary by adoption status. Results firmly supported the latter, suggesting that it is the experience of parental divorce, and not common genes, that drives the association between divorce and adolescent delinquency.

  13. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Pitlick, Emily; Heaney, Christopher; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an iron metabolism disorder that leads to excess iron buildup, especially in the heart, liver, and pancreas. Mutations in the HFE gene are the single most common cause of HH, which can be treated effectively if diagnosed early. Patents cover the HFE gene, related proteins, screening methods, and testing kits. Most initial testing for HH is biochemical, but HFE DNA testing or genotyping is used to confirm a diagnosis of inherited hemochromatosis. Concerns over patents covering HFE testing emerged in 2002, when scholars argued that exclusive licensing and the patent-enabled sole provider model then in place led to high prices and limited access. Critics of the sole provider model noted that the test was available at multiple laboratories prior to the enforcement of patents. By 2007, however, Bio-Rad, Limited, acquired the key intellectual property and sub-licensed it widely. In part because of broad, non-exclusive licensing, there are now multiple providers and testing technologies, and research continues. This case study illustrates how both changes in intellectual property ownership and evolving clinical utility of HFE genetic testing in the last decade have effected the licensing of patents and availability of genetic testing. PMID:20393306

  14. Expected genetic contributions and their impact on gene flow and genetic gain.

    PubMed Central

    Woolliams, J A; Bijma, P; Villanueva, B

    1999-01-01

    Long-term genetic contributions (r(i)) measure lasting gene flow from an individual i. By accounting for linkage disequilibrium generated by selection both within and between breeding groups (categories), assuming the infinitesimal model, a general formula was derived for the expected contribution of ancestor i in category q (mu(i)(q)), given its selective advantages (s(i)(q)). Results were applied to overlapping generations and to a variety of modes of inheritance and selection indices. Genetic gain was related to the covariance between r(i) and the Mendelian sampling deviation (a(i)), thereby linking gain to pedigree development. When s(i)(q) includes a(i), gain was related to E[mu(i)(q))a(i)], decomposing it into components attributable to within and between families, within each category, for each element of s(i)(q). The formula for mu(i)(q) was consistent with previous index theory for predicting gain in discrete generations. For overlapping generations, accurate predictions of gene flow were obtained among and within categories in contrast to previous theory that gave qualitative errors among categories and no predictions within. The generation interval was defined as the period for which mu(i)(q), summed over all ancestors born in that period, equaled 1. Predictive accuracy was supported by simulation results for gain and contributions with sib-indices, BLUP selection, and selection with imprinted variation. PMID:10511574

  15. Gastric Cancer and Helicobacter pylori: Impact of hopQII Gene.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, E; Kahrizi, D; Moradi, M T; Sohrabi, M; Yari, K

    2016-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative, microaerophilic bacterium found usually in the stomach and use a number of mechanisms to survive in the stomach lumen. The presence of these bacteria in the stomach can lead to gastritis and reduction in stomach acid production. Acute inflammation can directly damage to the peripheral cells that are responsible for the secretion of acid. The risk of developing gastric carcinoma is associated to heterogeneity of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors. The HopQII is one of the outer membrane proteins involved in bacterial adherence to gastric mucosa and has been suggested to also play a role in the virulence of H. pylori. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the association between different H. pylori virulence hopQII allele and patients with gastroduodenal disorders. For this purpose 58 stomach biopsies of patients with gastric cancer and 100 saliva samples from healthy individuals were collected. Then genomic DNA was purified and PCR for was done for desired genes via specific primers. The H. pylori infections were diagnosed by PCR for GlmM gene. Then frequencies of hopQII+ and hopQII- genotypes was determined in H. pylori infected cases. Statistical analysis showed that there were not significant differences between healthy and diseased ones for genotype hopQII+. PMID:26950460

  16. Two Novel Tyrosinase (TYR) Gene Mutations with Pathogenic Impact on Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 1 (OCA1)

    PubMed Central

    Ghodsinejad Kalahroudi, Vadieh; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Arasteh Kani, Ahoura; Aryani, Omid; Tondar, Mahdi; Ahmadipour, Fatemeh; Chung, Lip Yong; Houshmand, Massoud

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders resulting from mutations of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene and presents with either complete or partial absence of pigment in the skin, hair and eyes due to a defect in an enzyme involved in the production of melanin. In this study, mutations in the TYR gene of 30 unrelated Iranian OCA1 patients and 100 healthy individuals were examined using PCR-sequencing. Additionally, in order to predict the possible effects of new mutations on the structure and function of tyrosinase, these mutations were analyzed by SIFT, PolyPhen and I-Mutant 2 software. Here, two new pathogenic p.C89S and p.H180R mutations were detected in two OCA1 patients. Moreover, the R402Q and S192Y variants, which are common non-pathogenic polymorphisms, were detected in 17.5% and 35% of the patients, respectively. The outcome of this study has extended the genotypic spectrum of OCA1 patients, which paves the way for more efficient carrier detection and genetic counseling. PMID:25216246

  17. Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) in plants: a complex gene family with major impacts on plant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Kerrie L; Bhave, Mrinal

    2007-10-01

    The ubiquitous cell membrane proteins called aquaporins are now firmly established as channel proteins that control the specific transport of water molecules across cell membranes in all living organisms. The aquaporins are thus likely to be of fundamental significance to all facets of plant growth and development affected by plant-water relations. A majority of plant aquaporins have been found to share essential structural features with the human aquaporin and exhibit water-transporting ability in various functional assays, and some have been shown experimentally to be of critical importance to plant survival. Furthermore, substantial evidence is now available from a number of plant species that shows differential gene expression of aquaporins in response to abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, or cold and clearly establishes the aquaporins as major players in the response of plants to conditions that affect water availability. This review summarizes the function and regulation of these genes to develop a greater understanding of the response of plants to water insufficiency, and particularly, to identify tolerant genotypes of major crop species including wheat and rice and plants that are important in agroforestry.

  18. Reassessing Domain Architecture Evolution of Metazoan Proteins: Major Impact of Gene Prediction Errors

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Alinda; Szláma, György; Szarka, Eszter; Trexler, Mária; Bányai, László; Patthy, László

    2011-01-01

    In view of the fact that appearance of novel protein domain architectures (DA) is closely associated with biological innovations, there is a growing interest in the genome-scale reconstruction of the evolutionary history of the domain architectures of multidomain proteins. In such analyses, however, it is usually ignored that a significant proportion of Metazoan sequences analyzed is mispredicted and that this may seriously affect the validity of the conclusions. To estimate the contribution of errors in gene prediction to differences in DA of predicted proteins, we have used the high quality manually curated UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot database as a reference. For genome-scale analysis of domain architectures of predicted proteins we focused on RefSeq, EnsEMBL and NCBI's GNOMON predicted sequences of Metazoan species with completely sequenced genomes. Comparison of the DA of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot sequences of worm, fly, zebrafish, frog, chick, mouse, rat and orangutan with those of human Swiss-Prot entries have identified relatively few cases where orthologs had different DA, although the percentage with different DA increased with evolutionary distance. In contrast with this, comparison of the DA of human, orangutan, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, worm and fly RefSeq, EnsEMBL and NCBI's GNOMON predicted protein sequences with those of the corresponding/orthologous human Swiss-Prot entries identified a significantly higher proportion of domain architecture differences than in the case of the comparison of Swiss-Prot entries. Analysis of RefSeq, EnsEMBL and NCBI's GNOMON predicted protein sequences with DAs different from those of their Swiss-Prot orthologs confirmed that the higher rate of domain architecture differences is due to errors in gene prediction, the majority of which could be corrected with our FixPred protocol. We have also demonstrated that contamination of databases with incomplete, abnormal or mispredicted sequences introduces a bias in DA

  19. CO2 induced seawater acidification impacts sea urchin larval development II: gene expression patterns in pluteus larvae.

    PubMed

    Stumpp, M; Dupont, S; Thorndyke, M C; Melzner, F

    2011-11-01

    Extensive use of fossil fuels is leading to increasing CO(2) concentrations in the atmosphere and causes changes in the carbonate chemistry of the oceans which represents a major sink for anthropogenic CO(2). As a result, the oceans' surface pH is expected to decrease by ca. 0.4 units by the year 2100, a major change with potentially negative consequences for some marine species. Because of their carbonate skeleton, sea urchins and their larval stages are regarded as likely to be one of the more sensitive taxa. In order to investigate sensitivity of pre-feeding (2 days post-fertilization) and feeding (4 and 7 days post-fertilization) pluteus larvae, we raised Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryos in control (pH 8.1 and pCO(2) 41 Pa e.g. 399 μatm) and CO(2) acidified seawater with pH of 7.7 (pCO(2) 134 Pa e.g. 1318 μatm) and investigated growth, calcification and survival. At three time points (day 2, day 4 and day 7 post-fertilization), we measured the expression of 26 representative genes important for metabolism, calcification and ion regulation using RT-qPCR. After one week of development, we observed a significant difference in growth. Maximum differences in size were detected at day 4 (ca. 10% reduction in body length). A comparison of gene expression patterns using PCA and ANOSIM clearly distinguished between the different age groups (two-way ANOSIM: Global R=1) while acidification effects were less pronounced (Global R=0.518). Significant differences in gene expression patterns (ANOSIM R=0.938, SIMPER: 4.3% difference) were also detected at day 4 leading to the hypothesis that differences between CO(2) treatments could reflect patterns of expression seen in control experiments of a younger larva and thus a developmental artifact rather than a direct CO(2) effect. We found an up regulation of metabolic genes (between 10%and 20% in ATP-synthase, citrate synthase, pyruvate kinase and thiolase at day 4) and down regulation of calcification related genes

  20. The impact of horizontal gene transfer on the adaptive ability of the human oral microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Adam P.; Kreth, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The oral microbiome is composed of a multitude of different species of bacteria, each capable of occupying one or more of the many different niches found within the human oral cavity. This community exhibits many types of complex interactions which enable it to colonize and rapidly respond to changes in the environment in which they live. One of these interactions is the transfer, or acquisition, of DNA within this environment, either from co-resident bacterial species or from exogenous sources. Horizontal gene transfer in the oral cavity gives some of the resident bacteria the opportunity to sample a truly enormous metagenome affording them considerable adaptive potential which may be key to survival in such a varying environment. In this review the underlying mechanisms of HGT are discussed in relation to the oral microbiome with numerous examples described where the direct acquisition of exogenous DNA has contributed to the fitness of the bacterial host within the human oral cavity. PMID:25250243

  1. Impact of VEGF gene polymorphisms in elderly cancer patients: clinical outcome and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Della-Morte, David; Riondino, Silvia; Ferroni, Patrizia; Palmirotta, Raffaele; Pastore, Donatella; Lauro, Davide; Guadagni, Fiorella; Roselli, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) are the key regulators in angiogenesis and have been shown to play a significant role in the progression and prognosis of angiogenesis-related diseases, such as cancer. VEGF inhibitors are a current pharmacological tumoral strategy. However, despite the strong association between aging and cancer incidence and progression, recent findings suggest impaired angiogenesis accompanied by a reduced expression of VEGF in cells derived from aging subjects. Specific variations of VEGF genes have been demonstrated to be genetic determinants for susceptibility, outcome and therapy response, especially for the solid tumors. Considering the complications present in frail elderly patients, analysis of VEGF genetic polymorphisms in these subjects may further help in tailoring an angiogenic pharmacological strategy, and in improving our ability to better understand prognosis during therapy-related to cancer.

  2. Impact of thrombophilic genes mutations on thrombosis risk in Egyptian nonmetastatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Mona Ahmed; Ismail, Mona Ahmed; Saad, Abeer Attia; Habashy, Deena Mohamed; Hafeez, Zeinab Mohamed Abdel; Boshnak, Noha Hussein

    2015-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication in cancer patients. Several genetic risk factors related to thrombophilia are known; however, their contributions to thrombotic tendency in cancer patients have conflicting results. We aimed to determine the prevalence of factor V Leiden (FVL), prothrombin (PTH) G20210A and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T gene polymorphisms in Egyptian nonmetastatic cancer patients and their influence on thrombosis risk in those patients. Factor V Leiden, PTH G20210A and MTHFR C677T polymorphisms were detected in 40 cancer patients with VTE (group 1) and 40 cancer patients with no evidence of VTE (group 2) by PCR-based DNA analysis. Factor V and MTHFR mutations were higher in group 1 than in group 2 (factor V heterozygous mutation: 20 vs. 7.5%, homozygous mutation: 10 vs. 2.5%; MTHFR heterozygous mutation: 40 vs. 25%, homozygous mutation 5 vs. 0%, respectively) (P = 0.03). Mortality rate was higher in group 1 (75%) than in group 2 (25%; P < 0.001). No difference was found between those groups regarding PTH mutation (P = 1). Mortality rate was higher in the presence of homozygous and heterozygous factor V mutation (100 and 82%, respectively) compared to the wild type (41%) (P = 0.0006). Having any of the three studied gene mutations worsened the overall survival (P = 0.0003). Cox regression proved that both thrombosis and presence of factor V mutation are independent factors affecting survival in cancer patients (P < 0.001 and P = 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, there is an association between factor V and MTHFR mutations and risk of VTE in Egyptian cancer patients. Thrombosis and presence of factor V mutation are independent factors that influence survival in those patients. PMID:25565385

  3. Sexual Polyploidization in Medicago sativa L.: Impact on the Phenotype, Gene Transcription, and Genome Methylation.

    PubMed

    Rosellini, Daniele; Ferradini, Nicoletta; Allegrucci, Stefano; Capomaccio, Stefano; Zago, Elisa Debora; Leonetti, Paola; Balech, Bachir; Aversano, Riccardo; Carputo, Domenico; Reale, Lara; Veronesi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Polyploidization as the consequence of 2n gamete formation is a prominent mechanism in plant evolution. Studying its effects on the genome, and on genome expression, has both basic and applied interest. We crossed two diploid (2n = 2x = 16) Medicago sativa plants, a subsp. falcata seed parent, and a coerulea × falcata pollen parent that form a mixture of n and 2n eggs and pollen, respectively. Such a cross produced full-sib diploid and tetraploid (2n = 4x = 32) hybrids, the latter being the result of bilateral sexual polyploidization (BSP). These unique materials allowed us to investigate the effects of BSP, and to separate the effect of intraspecific hybridization from those of polyploidization by comparing 2x with 4x full sib progeny plants. Simple sequence repeat marker segregation demonstrated tetrasomic inheritance for all chromosomes but one, demonstrating that these neotetraploids are true autotetraploids. BSP brought about increased biomass, earlier flowering, higher seed set and weight, and larger leaves with larger cells. Microarray analyses with M. truncatula gene chips showed that several hundred genes, related to diverse metabolic functions, changed their expression level as a consequence of polyploidization. In addition, cytosine methylation increased in 2x, but not in 4x, hybrids. Our results indicate that sexual polyploidization induces significant transcriptional novelty, possibly mediated in part by DNA methylation, and phenotypic novelty that could underpin improved adaptation and reproductive success of tetraploid M. sativa with respect to its diploid progenitor. These polyploidy-induced changes may have promoted the adoption of tetraploid alfalfa in agriculture. PMID:26858330

  4. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Heaney, Christopher; James, Tamara; Conover, Chris; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most commonly tested autosomal recessive disorders in the US. Clinical CF is associated with mutations in the CFTR gene, of which the most common mutation among Caucasians, ΔF508, was identified in 1989. The University of Michigan, Johns Hopkins University, and the Hospital for Sick Children, where much of the initial research occurred, hold key patents for CF genetic sequences, mutations and methods for detecting them. Several patents including the one that covers detection of the ΔF508 mutation are jointly held by the University of Michigan and the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, with Michigan administering patent licensing in the US. The University of Michigan broadly licenses the ΔF508 patent for genetic testing with over 60 providers of genetic testing to date. Genetic testing is now used in newborn screening, diagnosis, and reproductive decisions. Interviews with key researchers and intellectual property managers, a survey of laboratories’ prices for CF genetic testing, a review of literature on CF tests’ cost effectiveness, and a review of the developing market for CF testing provide no evidence that patents have significantly hindered access to genetic tests for CF or prevented financially cost-effective screening. Current licensing practices for cystic fibrosis (CF) genetic testing appear to facilitate both academic research and commercial testing. More than one thousand different CFTR mutations have been identified, and research continues to determine their clinical significance. Patents have been nonexclusively licensed for diagnostic use, and have been variably licensed for gene transfer and other therapeutic applications. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has been engaged in licensing decisions, making CF a model of collaborative and cooperative patenting and licensing practice. PMID:20393308

  5. Sexual Polyploidization in Medicago sativa L.: Impact on the Phenotype, Gene Transcription, and Genome Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Rosellini, Daniele; Ferradini, Nicoletta; Allegrucci, Stefano; Capomaccio, Stefano; Zago, Elisa Debora; Leonetti, Paola; Balech, Bachir; Aversano, Riccardo; Carputo, Domenico; Reale, Lara; Veronesi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Polyploidization as the consequence of 2n gamete formation is a prominent mechanism in plant evolution. Studying its effects on the genome, and on genome expression, has both basic and applied interest. We crossed two diploid (2n = 2x = 16) Medicago sativa plants, a subsp. falcata seed parent, and a coerulea × falcata pollen parent that form a mixture of n and 2n eggs and pollen, respectively. Such a cross produced full-sib diploid and tetraploid (2n = 4x = 32) hybrids, the latter being the result of bilateral sexual polyploidization (BSP). These unique materials allowed us to investigate the effects of BSP, and to separate the effect of intraspecific hybridization from those of polyploidization by comparing 2x with 4x full sib progeny plants. Simple sequence repeat marker segregation demonstrated tetrasomic inheritance for all chromosomes but one, demonstrating that these neotetraploids are true autotetraploids. BSP brought about increased biomass, earlier flowering, higher seed set and weight, and larger leaves with larger cells. Microarray analyses with M. truncatula gene chips showed that several hundred genes, related to diverse metabolic functions, changed their expression level as a consequence of polyploidization. In addition, cytosine methylation increased in 2x, but not in 4x, hybrids. Our results indicate that sexual polyploidization induces significant transcriptional novelty, possibly mediated in part by DNA methylation, and phenotypic novelty that could underpin improved adaptation and reproductive success of tetraploid M. sativa with respect to its diploid progenitor. These polyploidy-induced changes may have promoted the adoption of tetraploid alfalfa in agriculture. PMID:26858330

  6. Impact of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) gene mutations on male infertility.

    PubMed

    Elia, Jlenia; Mazzilli, Rossella; Delfino, Michele; Piane, Maria; Bozzao, Cristina; Spinosa, Vincenzo; Chessa, Luciana; Mazzilli, Fernando

    2014-09-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of most common mutations and intron 8 5T (IVS8-5T) polymorphism of CFTR gene in Italian: a) azoospermic males; b) non azoospermic subjects, male partners of infertile couples enrolled in assisted reproductive technology (ART) programs. Material and methods. We studied 242 subjects attending our Andrology Unit (44 azoospermic subjects and 198 non azoospermic subjects, male partners of infertile couples enrolled in ART programs). Semen analysis, molecular analysis for CFTR gene mutations and genomic variant of IVS8-5T polymorphic tract, karyotype and chromosome Y microdeletions, hormonal profile (LH, FSH, Testosterone) and seminal biochemical markers (fructose, citric acid and L-carnitine) were carried out. Results. The prevalence of the common CFTR mutations and/or the IVS8-5T polymorphism was 12.9% (4/31 cases) in secretory azoospermia, while in obstructive azoospermia was 84.6% (11/13 cases; in these, the most frequent mutations were the F508del, R117H and W1282X). Regarding the non azoospermic subjects, the prevalence of the CFTR and/or the IVS8-5T polymorphism was 11.1% (11/99 cases) in severe dyspermia, 8.1% (6/74 cases) in moderate dyspermia and finally 4.0% (1/25 cases) in normospermic subjects. Conclusions. This study confirms the highly significant prevalence of CFTR mutations in males with bilateral absence of the vas deferens or ejaculatory ducts obstruction compared with subjects with secretory azoospermia. Moreover, the significant prevalence of mutations in severely dyspermic subjects may suggest the possible involvement of CFTR even in the spermatogenic process. This could explain the unsatisfactory recovery of sperm from testicular fine needle aspiration in patients affected by genital tract blockage. PMID:25308578

  7. Impacts of light and temperature on shoot branching gradient and expression of strigolactone synthesis and signalling genes in rose.

    PubMed

    Djennane, Samia; Hibrand-Saint Oyant, Laurence; Kawamura, Koji; Lalanne, David; Laffaire, Michel; Thouroude, Tatiana; Chalain, Séverine; Sakr, Soulaiman; Boumaza, Rachid; Foucher, Fabrice; Leduc, Nathalie

    2014-03-01

    Light and temperature are two environmental factors that deeply affect bud outgrowth. However, little is known about their impact on the bud burst gradient along a stem and their interactions with the molecular mechanisms of bud burst control. We investigated this question in two acrotonic rose cultivars. We demonstrated that the darkening of distal buds or exposure to cold (5 °C) prior to transfer to mild temperatures (20 °C) both repress acrotony, allowing the burst of quiescent medial and proximal buds. We sequenced the strigolactone pathway MAX-homologous genes in rose and studied their expression in buds and internodes along the stem. Only expressions of RwMAX1, RwMAX2 and RwMAX4 were detected. Darkening of the distal part of the shoot triggered a strong increase of RwMAX2 expression in darkened buds and bark-phloem samples, whereas it suppressed the acropetal gradient of the expression of RwMAX1 observed in stems fully exposed to light. Cold treatment induced an acropetal gradient of expression of RwMAX1 in internodes and of RwMAX2 in buds along the stem. Our results suggest that the bud burst gradient along the stem cannot be explained by a gradient of expression of RwMAX genes but rather by their local level of expression at each individual position.

  8. A gene to organism approach--assessing the impact of environmental pollution in eelpout (Zoarces viviparus) females and larvae.

    PubMed

    Asker, Noomi; Carney Almroth, Bethanie; Albertsson, Eva; Coltellaro, Mariateresa; Bignell, John Paul; Hanson, Niklas; Scarcelli, Vittoria; Fagerholm, Björn; Parkkonen, Jari; Wijkmark, Emma; Frenzilli, Giada; Förlin, Lars; Sturve, Joachim

    2015-07-01

    A broad biomarker approach was applied to study the effects of marine pollution along the Swedish west coast using the teleost eelpout (Zoarces viviparus) as the sentinel species. Measurements were performed on different biological levels, from the molecular to the organismal, including measurements of messenger RNA (mRNA), proteins, cellular and tissue changes, and reproductive success. Results revealed that eelpout captured in Stenungsund had significantly higher hepatic ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity, high levels of both cytochrome P4501A and diablo homolog mRNA, and high prevalence of dead larvae and nuclear damage in erythrocytes. Eelpout collected in Göteborg harbor displayed extensive macrovesicular steatosis, whereby the majority of hepatocytes were affected throughout the liver, which could indicate an effect on lipid metabolism. Results also indicate that eelpouts collected at polluted sites might have an affected immune system, with lower mRNA expression of genes involved in the innate immune system and a higher number of lymphocytes. Biomarker assessment also was performed on livers dissected from unborn eelpout larvae collected from the ovary of the females. No significant differences were noted, which might indicate that the larvae to some extent are protected from effects of environmental pollutants. In conclusion, usage of the selected set of biological markers, covering responses from gene to organism, has demonstrated site-specific biomarker patterns that provided a broad and comprehensive picture of the impact of environmental stressors.

  9. Impacts of light and temperature on shoot branching gradient and expression of strigolactone synthesis and signalling genes in rose.

    PubMed

    Djennane, Samia; Hibrand-Saint Oyant, Laurence; Kawamura, Koji; Lalanne, David; Laffaire, Michel; Thouroude, Tatiana; Chalain, Séverine; Sakr, Soulaiman; Boumaza, Rachid; Foucher, Fabrice; Leduc, Nathalie

    2014-03-01

    Light and temperature are two environmental factors that deeply affect bud outgrowth. However, little is known about their impact on the bud burst gradient along a stem and their interactions with the molecular mechanisms of bud burst control. We investigated this question in two acrotonic rose cultivars. We demonstrated that the darkening of distal buds or exposure to cold (5 °C) prior to transfer to mild temperatures (20 °C) both repress acrotony, allowing the burst of quiescent medial and proximal buds. We sequenced the strigolactone pathway MAX-homologous genes in rose and studied their expression in buds and internodes along the stem. Only expressions of RwMAX1, RwMAX2 and RwMAX4 were detected. Darkening of the distal part of the shoot triggered a strong increase of RwMAX2 expression in darkened buds and bark-phloem samples, whereas it suppressed the acropetal gradient of the expression of RwMAX1 observed in stems fully exposed to light. Cold treatment induced an acropetal gradient of expression of RwMAX1 in internodes and of RwMAX2 in buds along the stem. Our results suggest that the bud burst gradient along the stem cannot be explained by a gradient of expression of RwMAX genes but rather by their local level of expression at each individual position. PMID:23992149

  10. Genome-Wide Nucleosome Occupancy and Positioning and Their Impact on Gene Expression and Evolution in Plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Wenli; Jiang, Jiming

    2015-08-01

    The fundamental unit of chromatin is the nucleosome that consists of a protein octamer composed of the four core histones (Hs; H3, H4, H2A, and H2B) wrapped by 147 bp of DNA. Nucleosome occupancy and positioning have proven to be dynamic and have a critical impact on expression, regulation, and evolution of eukaryotic genes. We developed nucleosome occupancy and positioning data sets using leaf tissue of rice (Oryza sativa) and both leaf and flower tissues of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We show that model plant and animal species share the fundamental characteristics associated with nucleosome dynamics. Only 12% and 16% of the Arabidopsis and rice genomes, respectively, were occupied by well-positioned nucleosomes. The cores of positioned nucleosomes were enriched with G/C dinucleotides and showed a lower C→T mutation rate than the linker sequences. We discovered that nucleosomes associated with heterochromatic regions were more spaced with longer linkers than those in euchromatic regions in both plant species. Surprisingly, different nucleosome densities were found to be associated with chromatin in leaf and flower tissues in Arabidopsis. We show that deep MNase-seq data sets can be used to map nucleosome occupancy of specific genomic loci and reveal gene expression patterns correlated with chromatin dynamics in plant genomes.

  11. Multifaceted effects of oligodendroglial exosomes on neurons: impact on neuronal firing rate, signal transduction and gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Dominik; Kuo, Wen Ping; Frühbeis, Carsten; Sun, Jyh-Jang; Zehendner, Christoph M.; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Pinto, Sheena; Toedling, Joern; Trotter, Jacqueline; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes are small membranous vesicles of endocytic origin that are released by almost every cell type. They exert versatile functions in intercellular communication important for many physiological and pathological processes. Recently, exosomes attracted interest with regard to their role in cell–cell communication in the nervous system. We have shown that exosomes released from oligodendrocytes upon stimulation with the neurotransmitter glutamate are internalized by neurons and enhance the neuronal stress tolerance. Here, we demonstrate that oligodendroglial exosomes also promote neuronal survival during oxygen–glucose deprivation, a model of cerebral ischaemia. We show the transfer from oligodendrocytes to neurons of superoxide dismutase and catalase, enzymes which are known to help cells to resist oxidative stress. Additionally, we identify various effects of oligodendroglial exosomes on neuronal physiology. Electrophysiological analysis using in vitro multi-electrode arrays revealed an increased firing rate of neurons exposed to oligodendroglial exosomes. Moreover, gene expression analysis and phosphorylation arrays uncovered differentially expressed genes and altered signal transduction pathways in neurons after exosome treatment. Our study thus provides new insight into the broad spectrum of action of oligodendroglial exosomes and their effects on neuronal physiology. The exchange of extracellular vesicles between neural cells may exhibit remarkable potential to impact brain performance. PMID:25135971

  12. Impact of cluster thinning on transcriptional regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis-related genes in 'Summer Black' grapes.

    PubMed

    Xi, Xiaojun; Zha, Qian; Jiang, Aili; Tian, Yihua

    2016-07-01

    Cluster thinning is an agronomic practice that strongly affects anthocyanin biosynthesis in the skin of grape berries. However, the impact of cluster thinning on anthocyanin biosynthesis has not been fully elucidated at the molecular level. Here, we investigated its effects on the berry quality, the biosynthesis of anthocyanins, and the expression levels of related genes from the onset of véraison to harvest in 'Summer Black' grapes. It was observed that the total soluble solid and anthocyanin content in berry skin significantly increased under cluster thinning, whereas the berry weight and titratable acidity showed no differences from the beginning of véraison to harvest. The expression level of most anthocyanin biosynthesis-related genes was significantly up-regulated by cluster thinning from the beginning of véraison and was higher at its end compared to the control. Up-regulation of flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H) and O-methyltransferase (OMT) expression, and down-regulation of flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) expression were observed, which might be the cause of shift in the anthocyanin profile. These findings provide insights into the molecular basis of the relationship between cluster thinning and anthocyanin biosynthesis in the grape berry skin. PMID:27035257

  13. 24-h Langendorff-perfused neonatal rat heart used to study the impact of adenoviral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Wiechert, S; El-Armouche, A; Rau, T; Zimmermann, W-H; Eschenhagen, T

    2003-08-01

    The human genome project has increased the demand for simple experimental systems that allow the impact of gene manipulations to be studied under controlled ex vivo conditions. We hypothesized that, in contrast to adult hearts, neonatal hearts allow long-term perfusion and efficient gene transfer ex vivo. A Langendorff perfusion system was modified to allow perfusion for >24 h with particular emphasis on uncompromised contractile activity, sterility, online measurement of force of contraction, inotropic response to beta-adrenergic stimulation, and efficient gene transfer. The hearts were perfused with serum-free medium (DMEM + medium 199, 4 + 1) supplemented with hydrocortisone, triiodothyronine, ascorbic acid, insulin, pyruvate, l-carnitine, creatine, taurine, l-glutamine, mannitol, and antibiotics recirculating (500 ml/2 hearts) at 1 ml/min. Hearts from 2 day-old rats beat constantly at 135-155 beats/min and developed active force of 1-2 mN. During 24 h of perfusion, twitch tension increased to approximately 165% of initial values (P < 0.05), whereas the inotropic response to isoprenaline remained constant. A decrease in total protein content of 10% and histological examination indicated moderate edema, but actin and calsequestrin concentration remained unchanged and perfusion pressure remained constant at 7-11 mmHg. Perfusion with a LacZ-encoding adenovirus at 3 x 108 active virus particles yielded homogeneous transfection of approximately 80% throughout the heart and did not affect heart rate, force of contraction, or response to isoprenaline compared with uninfected controls (n = 7 each). Taken together, the 24-h Langendorff-perfused neonatal rat heart is a relatively simple, inexpensive, and robust new heart model that appears feasible as a test bed for functional genomics.

  14. Impact of nandrolone decanoate on gene expression in endocrine systems related to the adverse effects of anabolic androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Alsiö, Johan; Birgner, Carolina; Björkblom, Lars; Isaksson, Pernilla; Bergström, Lena; Schiöth, Helgi B; Lindblom, Jonas

    2009-11-01

    Elite athletes, body builders and adolescents misuse anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) in order to increase muscle mass or to enhance physical endurance and braveness. The high doses misused are associated with numerous adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of chronic supratherapeutic AAS treatment on circulating hormones and gene expression in peripheral tissues related to such adverse effects. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure expression levels of in total 37 genes (including peptide hormones, cell membrane receptors, nuclear receptors, steroid synthesising enzymes and other enzymes) in the pituitary, testes, adrenals, adipose tissue, kidneys and liver of male Sprague-Dawley rats after 14-day administration of the AAS nandrolone decanoate, 3 or 15 mg/kg. Plasma glucose and levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), adiponectin, corticosterone, ghrelin, insulin and leptin were also measured. We found several expected effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, while the treatment also caused a number of other not previously identified changes in circulating factors and gene transcription levels such as the dose-dependent reduction of the beta(3)-adrenergic receptor in adipose tissue, reduction of both circulating and mRNA levels of adiponectin, up-regulation of both hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA-reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in de novo synthesis of cholesterol, and the receptor for ACTH in the adrenals. The results provide evidence for wide ranging effects of AAS on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, adipose tissue and substrates of the renal control of blood pressure.

  15. Acute impact of intermittent pneumatic leg compression frequency on limb hemodynamics, vascular function, and skeletal muscle gene expression in humans.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Ryan D; Roseguini, Bruno T; Thyfault, John P; Crist, Brett D; Laughlin, M H; Newcomer, Sean C

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms by which intermittent pneumatic leg compression (IPC) treatment effectively treats symptoms associated with peripheral artery disease remain speculative. With the aim of gaining mechanistic insight into IPC treatment, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of IPC frequency on limb hemodynamics, vascular function, and skeletal muscle gene expression. In this two study investigation, healthy male subjects underwent an hour of either high-frequency (HF; 2-s inflation/3-s deflation) or low-frequency (LF; 4-s inflation/16-s deflation) IPC treatment of the foot and calf. In study 1 (n = 11; 23.5 ± 4.7 yr), subjects underwent both HF and LF treatment on separate days. Doppler/ultrasonography was used to measure popliteal artery diameter and blood velocity at baseline and during IPC treatment. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and peak reactive hyperemia blood flow (RHBF) were determined before and after IPC treatment. In study 2 (n = 19; 22.0 ± 4.6 yr), skeletal muscle biopsies were taken from the lateral gastrocnemius of the treated and control limb at baseline and at 30- and 150-min posttreatment. Quantitative PCR was used to assess mRNA concentrations of genes associated with inflammation and vascular remodeling. No treatment effect on vascular function was observed. Cuff deflation resulted in increased blood flow (BF) and shear rate (SR) in both treatments at the onset of treatment compared with baseline (P < 0.01). BF and SR significantly diminished by 45 min of HF treatment only (P < 0.01). Both treatments reduced BF and SR and elevated oscillatory shear index compared with baseline (P < 0.01) during cuff inflation. IPC decreased the mRNA expression of cysteine-rich protein 61 from baseline and controls (P <0 .01) and connective tissue growth factor from baseline (P < 0.05) in a frequency-dependent manner. In conclusion, a single session of IPC acutely impacts limb hemodynamics and skeletal muscle gene expression in a frequency

  16. Investigating the impact of hepatitis B virus surface gene polymorphism on antigenicity using ex vivo phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Ijaz, Samreen; Szypulska, Renata; Andrews, Nick; Tedder, Richard S

    2012-11-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) is a complex protein, and understanding accurately the impact of amino acid changes on the antigenicity of the immunodominant a determinant must take this complexity into consideration. Epitope mapping with four mAbs was used to phenotype HBsAg directly from patients' sera to investigate the effect of mutations in their native genetic backbone. The expected mAb reactivity was established initially for samples harbouring 'wild-type' HBsAg sequences across genotypes A-E. The alteration of HBsAg antigenicity, defined by mAb epitope loss, was demonstrated in a number of samples with sequence-inferred amino acid changes. Individual mutations within the mapped epitopes to which the mAbs were directed usually affected their binding. However, the loss of more than one epitope was observed as the number of mutations within a sequence increased. Conversely, not all mutations occurring in the a determinant altered the HBsAg conformation. The genotype backbone, the specific amino acid substitution and amino acid changes occurring outside the major antigenic region appeared to be important in determining expression of the predicted epitope loss. These data clearly demonstrate that sequence-based methods alone may not accurately define HBsAg phenotype. This phenotyping methodology allows for the rapid and accurate identification of antigenically altered viruses and will greatly enhance current HBV surveillance, research and diagnostic activities. The data generated can be used to inform on public health issues relating to prevalence, transmission and impact of HBsAg mutants in HBV-infected populations. PMID:22855781

  17. Impacts of selective logging on inbreeding and gene flow in two Amazonian timber species with contrasting ecological and reproductive characteristics.

    PubMed

    Vinson, C C; Kanashiro, M; Harris, S A; Boshier, D H

    2015-01-01

    Selective logging in Brazil allows for the removal of up to 90% of trees above 50 cm diameter of a given timber species, independent of a species' life history characteristics or how quickly it will recover. The genetic and demographic effects of selective logging on two Amazonian timber species (Dipteryx odorata Leguminosae, Jacaranda copaia Bignoniaceae) with contrasting ecological and reproductive characteristics were assessed in the same forest. Genetic diversity and gene flow were characterized by genotyping adults and seed sampled before and after logging, using hypervariable microsatellite markers. Overall, there were no short-term genetic impacts on the J. copaia population, with commercial application of current Brazilian forest management regulations. In contrast, for D. Odorata, selective logging showed a range of genetic impacts, with a 10% loss of alleles, and reductions in siring by pollen from trees within the 546-ha study area (23-11%) and in the number of pollen donors per progeny array (2.8-1.6), illustrating the importance of the surrounding landscape. Asynchrony in flowering between D. odorata trees led to trees with no breeding partners, which could limit the species reproduction and regeneration under current regulations. The results are summarized with other published studies from the same site and the implications for forest management discussed. The different types and levels of impacts associated with each species support the idea that ecological and genetic information by species, ecological guild or reproductive group is essential in helping to derive sustainable logging guidelines for tropical forests. PMID:25402015

  18. Impacts of selective logging on inbreeding and gene flow in two Amazonian timber species with contrasting ecological and reproductive characteristics.

    PubMed

    Vinson, C C; Kanashiro, M; Harris, S A; Boshier, D H

    2015-01-01

    Selective logging in Brazil allows for the removal of up to 90% of trees above 50 cm diameter of a given timber species, independent of a species' life history characteristics or how quickly it will recover. The genetic and demographic effects of selective logging on two Amazonian timber species (Dipteryx odorata Leguminosae, Jacaranda copaia Bignoniaceae) with contrasting ecological and reproductive characteristics were assessed in the same forest. Genetic diversity and gene flow were characterized by genotyping adults and seed sampled before and after logging, using hypervariable microsatellite markers. Overall, there were no short-term genetic impacts on the J. copaia population, with commercial application of current Brazilian forest management regulations. In contrast, for D. Odorata, selective logging showed a range of genetic impacts, with a 10% loss of alleles, and reductions in siring by pollen from trees within the 546-ha study area (23-11%) and in the number of pollen donors per progeny array (2.8-1.6), illustrating the importance of the surrounding landscape. Asynchrony in flowering between D. odorata trees led to trees with no breeding partners, which could limit the species reproduction and regeneration under current regulations. The results are summarized with other published studies from the same site and the implications for forest management discussed. The different types and levels of impacts associated with each species support the idea that ecological and genetic information by species, ecological guild or reproductive group is essential in helping to derive sustainable logging guidelines for tropical forests.

  19. The impact of a leptin gene SNP on beef calf weaning weights.

    PubMed

    DeVuyst, E A; Bauer, M L; Cheng, F-C; Mitchell, J; Larson, D

    2008-06-01

    Prior research indicates that a SNP at position 305 of exon 2 in the leptin gene affects milk production in dairy cows. Dairy cows with at least one copy of the T allele have been shown to have higher milk production than CC cows. If that effect carries over to beef breeds, it is reasonable to expect that CT and TT beef cows will wean heavier calves than CC beef cows. We tested this hypothesis for a herd of mixed breed cows using anova. Results indicated that both crossbred CT and TT beef cows wean significantly heavier beef calves than CC crossbred beef cows. A lack of observations generally hinders detection of significance in other breeds. However, two other comparisons were found to be significant. The results suggest further investigation into the link between leptin genotype and calf weaning weights. Aside from interest to animal scientists, these results have the potential to alter mating and replacement selection decisions by cow-calf producers, given the importance of weaning weights on profitability.

  20. Dopamine D2 gene expression interacts with environmental enrichment to impact lifespan and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Thanos, Panayotis K.; Hamilton, John; O'Rourke, Joseph R.; Napoli, Anthony; Febo, Marcelo; Volkow, Nora D.; Blum, Kenneth; Gold, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Aging produces cellular, molecular, and behavioral changes affecting many areas of the brain. The dopamine (DA) system is known to be vulnerable to the effects of aging, which regulate behavioral functions such as locomotor activity, body weight, and reward and cognition. In particular, age-related DA D2 receptor (D2R) changes have been of particular interest given its relationship with addiction and other rewarding behavioral properties. Male and female wild-type (Drd2 +/+), heterozygous (Drd2 +/−) and knockout (Drd2 −/−) mice were reared post-weaning in either an enriched environment (EE) or a deprived environment (DE). Over the course of their lifespan, body weight and locomotor activity was assessed. While an EE was generally found to be correlated with longer lifespan, these increases were only found in mice with normal or decreased expression of the D2 gene. Drd2 +/+ EE mice lived nearly 16% longer than their DE counterparts. Drd2 +/+ and Drd2 +/− EE mice lived 22% and 21% longer than Drd2 −/− EE mice, respectively. Moreover, both body weight and locomotor activity were moderated by environmental factors. In addition, EE mice show greater behavioral variability between genotypes compared to DE mice with respect to body weight and locomotor activity. PMID:26992232

  1. Dopamine D2 gene expression interacts with environmental enrichment to impact lifespan and behavior.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Panayotis K; Hamilton, John; O'Rourke, Joseph R; Napoli, Anthony; Febo, Marcelo; Volkow, Nora D; Blum, Kenneth; Gold, Mark

    2016-04-12

    Aging produces cellular, molecular, and behavioral changes affecting many areas of the brain. The dopamine (DA) system is known to be vulnerable to the effects of aging, which regulate behavioral functions such as locomotor activity, body weight, and reward and cognition. In particular, age-related DA D2 receptor (D2R) changes have been of particular interest given its relationship with addiction and other rewarding behavioral properties. Male and female wild-type (Drd2 +/+), heterozygous (Drd2 +/-) and knockout (Drd2 -/-) mice were reared post-weaning in either an enriched environment (EE) or a deprived environment (DE). Over the course of their lifespan, body weight and locomotor activity was assessed. While an EE was generally found to be correlated with longer lifespan, these increases were only found in mice with normal or decreased expression of the D2 gene. Drd2 +/+ EE mice lived nearly 16% longer than their DE counterparts. Drd2 +/+ and Drd2 +/- EE mice lived 22% and 21% longer than Drd2 -/- EE mice, respectively. Moreover, both body weight and locomotor activity were moderated by environmental factors. In addition, EE mice show greater behavioral variability between genotypes compared to DE mice with respect to body weight and locomotor activity.

  2. Emerging links between surface nanotechnology and endocytosis: impact on nonviral gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Andrew F.; Leong, Kam W.

    2010-01-01

    Significant effort continues to be exerted toward the improvement of transfection mediated by nonviral vectors. These endeavors are often focused on the design of particulate carriers with properties that encourage efficient accumulation at the membrane surface, particle uptake, and endosomal escape. Despite its demonstrated importance in successful nonviral transfection, relatively little investigation has been done to understand the pressures driving internalized vectors into favorable nondegradative endocytic pathways. Improvements in transfection efficiency have been noted for complexes delivered with a substrate-mediated approach, but the reasons behind such enhancements remain unclear. The phenotypic changes exhibited by cells interacting with nano- and micro-featured substrates offer hints that may explain these effects. This review describes nanoscale particulate and substrate parameters that influence both the uptake of nonviral gene carriers and the endocytic phenotype of interacting cells, and explores the molecular links that may mediate these interactions. Substrate-mediated control of endocytosis represents an exciting new design parameter that will guide the creation of efficient transgene carriers. PMID:21383869

  3. Impacts of environmental stress on growth, secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and metabolite production of xerotolerant/xerophilic fungi.

    PubMed

    Medina, Angel; Schmidt-Heydt, Markus; Rodríguez, Alicia; Parra, Roberto; Geisen, Rolf; Magan, Naresh

    2015-08-01

    This paper examines the impact that single and interacting environmental stress factors have on tolerance mechanisms, molecular ecology and the relationship with secondary metabolite production by a group of mycotoxigenic species of economic importance. Growth of these fungi (Aspergillus flavus, A.ochraceus, A.carbonarius, Penicillium nordicum and P. verrucosum) is influenced by water and temperature interactions and type of solute used to induce water stress. Such abiotic stresses are overcome by the synthesis of increased amounts of low molecular weight sugar alcohols, especially glycerol and erythritol, to enable them to remain active under abiotic stress. This is accompanied by increased expression of sugar transporter genes, e.g., in A. flavus, which provides the nutritional means of tolerating such stress. The optimum conditions of water activity (a w) × temperature stress for growth are often different from those for secondary metabolite production. The genes for toxin production are clustered together and their relative expression is influenced by abiotic interacting stress factors. For example., A. flavus synthesises aflatoxins under water stress in non-ionic solutes. In contrast, P. nordicum specifically occupies a high salt (0.87 a w = 22% NaCl) niche such as cured meats, and produces ochratoxin A (OTA). There is differential and temporal expression of the genes in the secondary metabolite clusters in response to a w × temperature stress. We have used a microarray and integrated data on growth, relative expression of key genes in the biosynthetic pathways for secondary metabolite production and toxin production using a mixed growth model. This was used to correlate these factors and predict the toxin levels produced under different abiotic stress conditions. This system approach to integrate these different data sets and model the relationships could be a powerful tool for predicting the relative toxin production under extreme stress conditions

  4. Peroxisome biogenesis in mammalian cells: The impact of genes and environment.

    PubMed

    Farr, Rebecca L; Lismont, Celien; Terlecky, Stanley R; Fransen, Marc

    2016-05-01

    The initiation and progression of many human diseases are mediated by a complex interplay of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. As all diseases begin with an imbalance at the cellular level, it is essential to understand how various types of molecular aberrations, metabolic changes, and environmental stressors function as switching points in essential communication networks. In recent years, peroxisomes have emerged as important intracellular hubs for redox-, lipid-, inflammatory-, and nucleic acid-mediated signaling pathways. In this review, we focus on how nature and nurture modulate peroxisome biogenesis and function in mammalian cells. First, we review emerging evidence that changes in peroxisome activity can be linked to the epigenetic regulation of cell function. Next, we outline how defects in peroxisome biogenesis may directly impact cellular pathways involved in the development of disease. In addition, we discuss how changes in the cellular microenvironment can modulate peroxisome biogenesis and function. Finally, given the importance of peroxisome function in multiple aspects of health, disease, and aging, we highlight the need for more research in this still understudied field.

  5. Peroxisome biogenesis in mammalian cells: The impact of genes and environment.

    PubMed

    Farr, Rebecca L; Lismont, Celien; Terlecky, Stanley R; Fransen, Marc

    2016-05-01

    The initiation and progression of many human diseases are mediated by a complex interplay of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. As all diseases begin with an imbalance at the cellular level, it is essential to understand how various types of molecular aberrations, metabolic changes, and environmental stressors function as switching points in essential communication networks. In recent years, peroxisomes have emerged as important intracellular hubs for redox-, lipid-, inflammatory-, and nucleic acid-mediated signaling pathways. In this review, we focus on how nature and nurture modulate peroxisome biogenesis and function in mammalian cells. First, we review emerging evidence that changes in peroxisome activity can be linked to the epigenetic regulation of cell function. Next, we outline how defects in peroxisome biogenesis may directly impact cellular pathways involved in the development of disease. In addition, we discuss how changes in the cellular microenvironment can modulate peroxisome biogenesis and function. Finally, given the importance of peroxisome function in multiple aspects of health, disease, and aging, we highlight the need for more research in this still understudied field. PMID:26305119

  6. Converging evidence for an impact of a functional NOS gene variation on anxiety-related processes.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Manuel; Haaker, Jan; Glotzbach-Schoon, Evelyn; Schümann, Dirk; Andreatta, Marta; Mechias, Marie-Luise; Raczka, Karolina; Gartmann, Nina; Büchel, Christian; Mühlberger, Andreas; Pauli, Paul; Reif, Andreas; Kalisch, Raffael; Lonsdorf, Tina B

    2016-05-01

    Being a complex phenotype with substantial heritability, anxiety and related phenotypes are characterized by a complex polygenic basis. Thereby, one candidate pathway is neuronal nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and accordingly, rodent studies have identified NO synthase (NOS-I), encoded by NOS1, as a strong molecular candidate for modulating anxiety and hippocampus-dependent learning processes. Using a multi-dimensional and -methodological replication approach, we investigated the impact of a functional promoter polymorphism (NOS1-ex1f-VNTR) on human anxiety-related phenotypes in a total of 1019 healthy controls in five different studies. Homozygous carriers of the NOS1-ex1f short-allele displayed enhanced trait anxiety, worrying and depression scores. Furthermore, short-allele carriers were characterized by increased anxious apprehension during contextual fear conditioning. While autonomous measures (fear-potentiated startle) provided only suggestive evidence for a modulatory role of NOS1-ex1f-VNTR on (contextual) fear conditioning processes, neural activation at the amygdala/anterior hippocampus junction was significantly increased in short-allele carriers during context conditioning. Notably, this could not be attributed to morphological differences. In accordance with data from a plethora of rodent studies, we here provide converging evidence from behavioral, subjective, psychophysiological and neuroimaging studies in large human cohorts that NOS-I plays an important role in anxious apprehension but provide only limited evidence for a role in (contextual) fear conditioning. PMID:26746182

  7. Converging evidence for an impact of a functional NOS gene variation on anxiety-related processes.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Manuel; Haaker, Jan; Glotzbach-Schoon, Evelyn; Schümann, Dirk; Andreatta, Marta; Mechias, Marie-Luise; Raczka, Karolina; Gartmann, Nina; Büchel, Christian; Mühlberger, Andreas; Pauli, Paul; Reif, Andreas; Kalisch, Raffael; Lonsdorf, Tina B

    2016-05-01

    Being a complex phenotype with substantial heritability, anxiety and related phenotypes are characterized by a complex polygenic basis. Thereby, one candidate pathway is neuronal nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and accordingly, rodent studies have identified NO synthase (NOS-I), encoded by NOS1, as a strong molecular candidate for modulating anxiety and hippocampus-dependent learning processes. Using a multi-dimensional and -methodological replication approach, we investigated the impact of a functional promoter polymorphism (NOS1-ex1f-VNTR) on human anxiety-related phenotypes in a total of 1019 healthy controls in five different studies. Homozygous carriers of the NOS1-ex1f short-allele displayed enhanced trait anxiety, worrying and depression scores. Furthermore, short-allele carriers were characterized by increased anxious apprehension during contextual fear conditioning. While autonomous measures (fear-potentiated startle) provided only suggestive evidence for a modulatory role of NOS1-ex1f-VNTR on (contextual) fear conditioning processes, neural activation at the amygdala/anterior hippocampus junction was significantly increased in short-allele carriers during context conditioning. Notably, this could not be attributed to morphological differences. In accordance with data from a plethora of rodent studies, we here provide converging evidence from behavioral, subjective, psychophysiological and neuroimaging studies in large human cohorts that NOS-I plays an important role in anxious apprehension but provide only limited evidence for a role in (contextual) fear conditioning.

  8. The Impact of Interferon Lambda 3 Gene Polymorphism on Natural Course and Treatment of Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Bellanti, F.; Vendemiale, G.; Altomare, E.; Serviddio, G.

    2012-01-01

    Host genetic factors may predict the outcome and treatment response in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Very recently, three landmark genome-wide association studies identified single nucleotide polymorphisms near the interleukin 28B (IL28B) region which were more frequent in responders to treatment. IL28B encodes interferon (IFN)λ3, a type III IFN involved in host antiviral immunity. Favourable variants of the two most widely studied IL28B polymorphisms, rs12979860 and rs8099917, are strong pretreatment predictors of early viral clearance and sustained viral response in patients with genotype 1 HCV infection. Further investigations have implicated IL28B in the development of chronic HCV infection versus spontaneous resolution of acute infection and suggest that IL28B may be a key factor involved in host immunity against HCV. This paper presents an overview about the biological activity and clinical applications of IL28B, summarizing the available data on its impact on HCV infection. Moreover, the potential usefulness of IFNλ in the treatment and natural history of this disease is also discussed. PMID:22966241

  9. Economic Impact of Gene Expression Profiling in Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer in France

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Gregory; Romano, Olivier; Foa, Cyril; Vataire, Anne-Lise; Chantelard, Jean-Victor; Hervé, Robert; Barletta, Hugues; Durieux, Axel; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Salmon, Rémy

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The heterogeneous nature of breast cancer can make decisions on adjuvant chemotherapy following surgical resection challenging. Oncotype DX is a validated gene expression profiling test that predicts the likelihood of adjuvant chemotherapy benefit in early-stage breast cancer. The aim of this study is to determine the costs of chemotherapy in private hospitals in France, and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of Oncotype DX from national insurance and societal perspectives. Methods A multicenter study was conducted in seven French private hospitals, capturing retrospective data from 106 patient files. Cost estimates were used in conjunction with a published Markov model to assess the cost-effectiveness of using Oncotype DX to inform chemotherapy decision making versus standard care. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Results The cost of adjuvant chemotherapy in private hospitals was estimated at EUR 8,218 per patient from a national insurance perspective and EUR 10,305 from a societal perspective. Cost-effectiveness analysis indicated that introducing Oncotype DX improved life expectancy (+0.18 years) and quality-adjusted life expectancy (+0.17 QALYs) versus standard care. Oncotype DX was found cost-effective from a national insurance perspective (EUR 2,134 per QALY gained) and cost saving from a societal perspective versus standard care. Inclusion of lost productivity costs in the modeling analysis meant that costs for eligible patients undergoing Oncotype DX testing were on average EUR 602 lower than costs for those receiving standard care. Conclusions As Oncotype DX was found both cost and life-saving from a societal perspective, the test was considered to be dominant to standard care. However, the delay in coverage has the potential to erode the quality of the French healthcare system, thus depriving patients of technologies that could improve clinical outcomes and allow healthcare professionals to better allocate hospital resources to

  10. Efficient removal of antibiotics in surface-flow constructed wetlands, with no observed impact on antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Björn; Khan, Ghazanfar Ali; Weisner, Stefan E B; Ehde, Per Magnus; Fick, Jerker; Lindgren, Per-Eric

    2014-04-01

    Recently, there have been growing concerns about pharmaceuticals including antibiotics as environmental contaminants. Antibiotics of concentrations commonly encountered in wastewater have been suggested to affect bacterial population dynamics and to promote dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Conventional wastewater treatment processes do not always adequately remove pharmaceuticals causing environmental dissemination of low levels of these compounds. Using constructed wetlands as an additional treatment step after sewage treatment plants have been proposed as a cheap alternative to increase reduction of wastewater contaminants, however this means that the natural microbial community of the wetlands becomes exposed to elevated levels of antibiotics. In this study, experimental surface-flow wetlands in Sweden were continuously exposed to antibiotics of concentrations commonly encountered in wastewater. The aim was to assess the antibiotic removal efficiency of constructed wetlands and to evaluate the impact of low levels of antibiotics on bacterial diversity, resistance development and expression in the wetland bacterial community. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and the effect on the bacterial diversity was assessed with 16S rRNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Real-time PCR was used to detect and quantify antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in the wetlands, during and after the exposure period. The results indicated that the antibiotic removal efficiency of constructed wetlands was comparable to conventional wastewater treatment schemes. Furthermore, short-term treatment of the constructed wetlands with environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e. 100-2000 ng×l(-1)) of antibiotics did not significantly affect resistance gene concentrations, suggesting that surface-flow constructed wetlands are well-suited for wastewater treatment purposes.

  11. A gene to organism approach—assessing the impact of environmental pollution in eelpout (Zoarces viviparus) females and larvae

    PubMed Central

    Carney Almroth, Bethanie; Albertsson, Eva; Coltellaro, Mariateresa; Bignell, John Paul; Hanson, Niklas; Scarcelli, Vittoria; Fagerholm, Björn; Parkkonen, Jari; Wijkmark, Emma; Frenzilli, Giada; Förlin, Lars; Sturve, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A broad biomarker approach was applied to study the effects of marine pollution along the Swedish west coast using the teleost eelpout (Zoarces viviparus) as the sentinel species. Measurements were performed on different biological levels, from the molecular to the organismal, including measurements of messenger RNA (mRNA), proteins, cellular and tissue changes, and reproductive success. Results revealed that eelpout captured in Stenungsund had significantly higher hepatic ethoxyresorufin O‐deethylase activity, high levels of both cytochrome P4501A and diablo homolog mRNA, and high prevalence of dead larvae and nuclear damage in erythrocytes. Eelpout collected in Göteborg harbor displayed extensive macrovesicular steatosis, whereby the majority of hepatocytes were affected throughout the liver, which could indicate an effect on lipid metabolism. Results also indicate that eelpouts collected at polluted sites might have an affected immune system, with lower mRNA expression of genes involved in the innate immune system and a higher number of lymphocytes. Biomarker assessment also was performed on livers dissected from unborn eelpout larvae collected from the ovary of the females. No significant differences were noted, which might indicate that the larvae to some extent are protected from effects of environmental pollutants. In conclusion, usage of the selected set of biological markers, covering responses from gene to organism, has demonstrated site‐specific biomarker patterns that provided a broad and comprehensive picture of the impact of environmental stressors. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:1511–1523. © 2015 The Authors. Published by SETAC. PMID:25663503

  12. End-to-end gene fusions and their impact on the production of multifunctional biomass degrading enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Rizk, Mazen; Antranikian, Garabed; Elleuche, Skander

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multifunctional enzymes offer an interesting approach for biomass degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Size and conformation of separate constructs play a role in the effectiveness of chimeras. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A connecting linker allows for maximal flexibility and increased thermostability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Genes with functional similarities are the best choice for fusion candidates. -- Abstract: The reduction of fossil fuels, coupled with its increase in price, has made the search for alternative energy resources more plausible. One of the topics gaining fast interest is the utilization of lignocellulose, the main component of plants. Its primary constituents, cellulose and hemicellulose, can be degraded by a series of enzymes present in microorganisms, into simple sugars, later used for bioethanol production. Thermophilic bacteria have proven to be an interesting source of enzymes required for hydrolysis since they can withstand high and denaturing temperatures, which are usually required for processes involving biomass degradation. However, the cost associated with the whole enzymatic process is staggering. A solution for cost effective and highly active production is through the construction of multifunctional enzyme complexes harboring the function of more than one enzyme needed for the hydrolysis process. There are various strategies for the degradation of complex biomass ranging from the regulation of the enzymes involved, to cellulosomes, and proteins harboring more than one enzymatic activity. In this review, the construction of multifunctional biomass degrading enzymes through end-to-end gene fusions, and its impact on production and activity by choosing the enzymes and linkers is assessed.

  13. A common allele in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) impacts prosocial temperament and human hypothalamic-limbic structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Tost, Heike; Kolachana, Bhaskar; Hakimi, Shabnam; Lemaitre, Herve; Verchinski, Beth A.; Mattay, Venkata S.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Meyer–Lindenberg, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The evolutionarily highly conserved neuropeptide oxytocin is a key mediator of social and emotional behavior in mammals, including humans. A common variant (rs53576) in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) has been implicated in social-behavioral phenotypes, such as maternal sensitivity and empathy, and with neuropsychiatric disorders associated with social impairment, but the intermediate neural mechanisms are unknown. Here, we used multimodal neuroimaging in a large sample of healthy human subjects to identify structural and functional alterations in OXTR risk allele carriers and their link to temperament. Activation and interregional coupling of the amygdala during the processing of emotionally salient social cues was significantly affected by genotype. In addition, evidence for structural alterations in key oxytocinergic regions emerged, particularly in the hypothalamus. These neural characteristics predicted lower levels of reward dependence, specifically in male risk allele carriers. Our findings identify sex-dependent mechanisms impacting the structure and function of hypothalamic-limbic circuits that are of potential clinical and translational significance. PMID:20647384

  14. The acute impact of polyphenols from Hibiscus sabdariffa in metabolic homeostasis: an approach combining metabolomics and gene-expression analyses.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Debón, Raúl; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Senan-Campos, Oriol; Massucci, Francesco A; Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Guimerà, Roger; Camps, Jordi; Menendez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    We explored the acute multifunctional effects of polyphenols from Hibiscus sabdariffa in humans to assess possible consequences on the host's health. The expected dynamic response was studied using a combination of transcriptomics and metabolomics to integrate specific functional pathways through network-based methods and to generate hypotheses established by acute metabolic effects and/or modifications in the expression of relevant genes. Data were obtained from healthy male volunteers after 3 hours of ingestion of an aqueous Hibiscus sabdariffa extract. The data were compared with data obtained prior to the ingestion, and the overall findings suggest that these particular polyphenols had a simultaneous role in mitochondrial function, energy homeostasis and protection of the cardiovascular system. These findings suggest beneficial actions in inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidation, which are interrelated mechanisms. Among other effects, the activation of the heme oxygenase-biliverdin reductase axis, the systemic inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system, the inhibition of the angiotensin-converting enzyme, and several actions mirroring those of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists further support this notion. We also found concordant findings in the serum of the participants, which include a decrease in cortisol levels and a significant increase in the active vasodilator metabolite of bradykinin (des-Arg(9)-bradykinin). Therefore, our data support the view that polyphenols from Hibiscus sabdariffa play a regulatory role in metabolic health and in the maintenance of blood pressure, thus implying a multi-faceted impact in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26234931

  15. End-to-end gene fusions and their impact on the production of multifunctional biomass degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Mazen; Antranikian, Garabed; Elleuche, Skander

    2012-11-01

    The reduction of fossil fuels, coupled with its increase in price, has made the search for alternative energy resources more plausible. One of the topics gaining fast interest is the utilization of lignocellulose, the main component of plants. Its primary constituents, cellulose and hemicellulose, can be degraded by a series of enzymes present in microorganisms, into simple sugars, later used for bioethanol production. Thermophilic bacteria have proven to be an interesting source of enzymes required for hydrolysis since they can withstand high and denaturing temperatures, which are usually required for processes involving biomass degradation. However, the cost associated with the whole enzymatic process is staggering. A solution for cost effective and highly active production is through the construction of multifunctional enzyme complexes harboring the function of more than one enzyme needed for the hydrolysis process. There are various strategies for the degradation of complex biomass ranging from the regulation of the enzymes involved, to cellulosomes, and proteins harboring more than one enzymatic activity. In this review, the construction of multifunctional biomass degrading enzymes through end-to-end gene fusions, and its impact on production and activity by choosing the enzymes and linkers is assessed.

  16. The MDS1-EVI1 gene complex as a retrovirus integration site: impact on behavior of hematopoietic cells and implications for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Métais, Jean-Yves; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2008-03-01

    Gene therapy trials have been performed with virus-based vectors that have the ability to integrate permanently into genomic DNA and thus allow prolonged expression of corrective genes after transduction of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Adverse events observed during the X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency gene therapy trial revealed a significant risk of genotoxicity related to retrovirus vector integration and activation of adjacent proto-oncogenes, with several cases of T-cell leukemia linked to vector activation of the LMO2 gene. In patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), rhesus macaques, and mice receiving hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells transduced with retrovirus vectors, a highly non-random pattern of vector integration has been reported. The most striking finding has been overrepresentation of integrations in one specific genomic locus, a complex containing the MDS1 and the EVI1 genes. Most evidence suggests that this overrepresentation is primarily due to a modification of primitive myeloid cell behavior by overexpression of EVI1 or MDS1-EVI1, as opposed to a specific predilection for integration at this site. Three different proteins can be produced from this complex locus: MDS1, MDS1-EVI1, and EVI1. This review will summarize current knowledge regarding this locus and its gene products, with specific focus on issues with relevance to gene therapy, leukemogenesis, and hematopoiesis. Insights into the mechanisms that result in altered hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis when this locus is dysregulated could improve the safety of gene therapy in the future.

  17. The impact of a freshwater fish farm on the community of tetracycline-resistant bacteria and the structure of tetracycline resistance genes in river water.

    PubMed

    Harnisz, Monika; Korzeniewska, Ewa; Gołaś, Iwona

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a fish farm on the structure of antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in water of Drwęca River. Samples of upstream river waters; post-production waters and treated post-production waters from fish farm; as well as downstream river waters were monitored for tetracycline resistant bacteria, tetracycline resistant genes, basic physico-chemical parameters and tetracyclines concentration. The river waters was characterized by low levels of pollution, which was determined based on water temperature, pH and concentrations of dissolved oxygen and tetracycline antibiotics. Culture-dependent (heterotrophic plate counts, counts of bacteria resistant to oxytetracycline (OTC(R)) and doxycycline (DOX(R)), minimum inhibitory concentrations for oxytetracycline and doxycycline, multidrug resistance of OTC(R) and DOX(R), qualitative composition of OTC(R) and DOX(R), prevalence of tet genes in resistant isolates) and culture-independent surveys (quantity of tet gene copies) revealed no significant differences in the abundance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes between the studied samples. The only way in which the fish farm influenced water quality in the Drwęca River was by increasing the diversity of tetracycline-resistance genes. However, it should also be noted that the bacteria of the genera Aeromonas sp. and Acinetobacter sp. were able to transfer 6 out of 13 tested tet genes into Escherichiacoli, which can promote the spread of antibiotic resistance in the environment.

  18. Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are abundant in Solanaceae and have a family-specific impact on gene structure and genome organization.

    PubMed

    Seibt, Kathrin M; Wenke, Torsten; Muders, Katja; Truberg, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are highly abundant non-autonomous retrotransposons that are widespread in plants. They are short in size, non-coding, show high sequence diversity, and are therefore mostly not or not correctly annotated in plant genome sequences. Hence, comparative studies on genomic SINE populations are rare. To explore the structural organization and impact of SINEs, we comparatively investigated the genome sequences of the Solanaceae species potato (Solanum tuberosum), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), wild tomato (Solanum pennellii), and two pepper cultivars (Capsicum annuum). Based on 8.5 Gbp sequence data, we annotated 82 983 SINE copies belonging to 10 families and subfamilies on a base pair level. Solanaceae SINEs are dispersed over all chromosomes with enrichments in distal regions. Depending on the genome assemblies and gene predictions, 30% of all SINE copies are associated with genes, particularly frequent in introns and untranslated regions (UTRs). The close association with genes is family specific. More than 10% of all genes annotated in the Solanaceae species investigated contain at least one SINE insertion, and we found genes harbouring up to 16 SINE copies. We demonstrate the involvement of SINEs in gene and genome evolution including the donation of splice sites, start and stop codons and exons to genes, enlargement of introns and UTRs, generation of tandem-like duplications and transduction of adjacent sequence regions.

  19. Pharmacodynamic Impact of Carboxylesterase 1 Gene Variants in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Treated with Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bie, Peter; Ferrero, Laura; Bjerre, Ditte; Bruun, Niels E.; Egfjord, Martin; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Hansen, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Variation in the carboxylesterase 1 gene (CES1) may contribute to the efficacy of ACEIs. Accordingly, we examined the impact of CES1 variants on plasma angiotensin II (ATII)/angiotensin I (ATI) ratio in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) that underwent ACEI dose titrations. Five of these variants have previously been associated with drug response or increased CES1 expression, i.e., CES1 copy number variation, the variant of the duplicated CES1 gene with high transcriptional activity, rs71647871, rs2244613, and rs3815583. Additionally, nine variants, representatives of CES1Var, and three other CES1 variants were examined. Methods Patients with CHF, and clinical indication for ACEIs were categorized according to their CES1 genotype. Differences in mean plasma ATII/ATI ratios between genotype groups after ACEI dose titration, expressed as the least square mean (LSM) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), were assessed by analysis of variance. Results A total of 200 patients were recruited and 127 patients (63.5%) completed the study. The mean duration of the CHF drug dose titration was 6.2 (SD 3.6) months. After ACEI dose titration, there was no difference in mean plasma ATII/ATI ratios between subjects with the investigated CES1 variants, and only one previously unexplored variation (rs2302722) qualified for further assessment. In the fully adjusted analysis of effects of rs2302722 on plasma ATII/ATI ratios, the difference in mean ATII/ATI ratio between the GG genotype and the minor allele carriers (GT and TT) was not significant, with a relative difference in LSMs of 0.67 (95% CI 0.43–1.07; P = 0.10). Results of analyses that only included enalapril-treated patients remained non-significant after Bonferroni correction for multiple parallel comparisons (difference in LSM 0.60 [95% CI 0.37–0.98], P = 0.045). Conclusion These findings indicate that the included single variants of CES1 do not significantly influence plasma ATII/ATI ratios in CHF

  20. Impact of Ciprofloxacin and Clindamycin Administration on Gram-Negative Bacteria Isolated from Healthy Volunteers and Characterization of the Resistance Genes They Harbor

    PubMed Central

    Card, Roderick M.; Mafura, Muriel; Hunt, Theresa; Kirchner, Miranda; Weile, Jan; Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, and placebo administration on culturable Gram-negative isolates and the antibiotic resistance genes they harbor. Saliva and fecal samples were collected from healthy human volunteers before and at intervals, up to 1 year after antibiotic administration. Samples were plated on selective and nonselective media to monitor changes in different colony types or bacterial species. Following ciprofloxacin administration, there was a decrease of Escherichia coli in feces and after clindamycin administration a decrease of Bacteroides in feces and Leptotrichia in saliva, which all returned to pretreatment levels within 1 to 4 months. Ciprofloxacin administration also resulted in an increase in ciprofloxacin-resistant Veillonella in saliva, which persisted for 12 months. Additionally, 949 aerobic and anaerobic isolates purified from ciprofloxacin- and clindamycin-containing plates were screened for the presence of resistance genes. Resistance gene carriage was widespread in isolates from all three treatment groups, and no association was observed between genes and antibiotic administration. Although the anaerobic component of the microbiota was not a major reservoir of aerobe-associated antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes, we detected the sulfonamide resistance gene sul2 in anaerobic isolates. The longitudinal nature of the study allowed identification of distinct Escherichia coli clones harboring multiple resistance genes, including one carrying an extended-spectrum β-lactamase blaCTX-M group 9 gene, which persisted in the gut for up to 4 months. This study provided insight into the effects of antibiotic administration on healthy microbiota and the diversity of resistance genes harbored therein. PMID:25987611

  1. Mutation frequencies of the cytochrome CYP2D6 gene in Parkinson disease patients and in families

    SciTech Connect

    Lucotte, G.; Turpin, J.C.; Gerard, N.

    1996-07-26

    The frequencies of five mutations of the debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (CYP2D6) gene (mutations D6-A, B, C, D, and T), corresponding to poor metabolizer (PM) phenotypes, were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 47 patients with Parkinson disease, and compared with the findings in 47 healthy controls. These mutant alleles were about twice as frequent among patients as in controls, with an approximate relative risk ratio of 2.12 (95% confidence interval, 1.41-2.62). There seem to be no significant differences in frequencies of mutant genotypes in patients among gender and modalities of response with levodopa therapy; but frequency of the mutations was slightly enhanced after age-at-onset of 60 years. Mutations D6-B, D, and T were detected in 7 patients belonging to 10 Parkinson pedigrees. 25 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Disruption of the S41 Peptidase Gene in Mycoplasma mycoides capri Impacts Proteome Profile, H2O2 Production, and Sensitivity to Heat Shock

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Ayman B.; Brown, Mary B.; Reyes, Leticia

    2012-01-01

    Members of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster are among the most virulent of the mycoplasmas, causing worldwide economically significant diseases of cattle and goats. A distinguishing phenotype among the members of the cluster is the ability to degrade casein. The MMCAP2_0241 gene, an S41 peptidase, confers the proteolytic phenotype in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri GM12. In order to determine the impact of disruption of the gene, we used differential proteome profiling to compare the M. mycoides subsp. capri wild type with a mutant lacking the proteolytic phenotype. Disruption of MMCAP2_0241 resulted in altered phenotypes reminiscent of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC and had significant impacts on the proteome profile of the microbe. The mutant exhibited increased production of hydrogen peroxide, decreased lactate dehydrogenase activity, and increased sensitivity to heat shock. PMID:23300541

  3. Monoubiquitination of Histone 2B at the Disease Resistance Gene Locus Regulates Its Expression and Impacts Immune Responses in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Baohong; Yang, Dong-Lei; Shi, Zhenying; Dong, Hansong; Hua, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Disease resistance (R) genes are key components in plant immunity. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) E3 ubiquitin ligase genes HISTONE MONOUBIQUITINATION1 (HUB1) and HUB2 regulate the expression of R genes SUPPRESSOR OF npr1-1, CONSTITUTIVE1 (SNC1) and RESISTANCE TO PERONOSPORA PARASITICA4. An increase of SNC1 expression induces constitutive immune responses in the bonzai1 (bon1) mutant, and the loss of HUB1 or HUB2 function reduces SNC1 up-regulation and suppresses the bon1 autoimmune phenotypes. HUB1 and HUB2 mediate histone 2B (H2B) monoubiquitination directly at the SNC1 R gene locus to regulate its expression. In addition, SNC1 and HUB1 transcripts are moderately up-regulated by pathogen infection, and H2B monoubiquitination at SNC1 is enhanced by pathogen infection. Together, this study indicates that H2B monoubiquitination at the R gene locus regulates its expression and that this histone modification at the R gene locus has an impact on immune responses in plants. PMID:24664204

  4. Capturing the biological impact of CDKN2A and MC1R genes as an early predisposing event in melanoma and non melanoma skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Escámez, María José; Garcia-Garcia, Francisco; Tell-Marti, Gemma; Fabra, Àngels; Martínez-Santamaría, Lucía; Badenas, Celia; Aguilera, Paula; Pevida, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín; del Río, Marcela; Puig, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Germline mutations in CDKN2A and/or red hair color variants in MC1R genes are associated with an increased susceptibility to develop cutaneous melanoma or non melanoma skin cancer. We studied the impact of the CDKN2A germinal mutation p.G101W and MC1R variants on gene expression and transcription profiles associated with skin cancer. To this end we set-up primary skin cell co-cultures from siblings of melanoma prone-families that were later analyzed using the expression array approach. As a result, we found that 1535 transcripts were deregulated in CDKN2A mutated cells, with over-expression of immunity-related genes (HLA-DPB1, CLEC2B, IFI44, IFI44L, IFI27, IFIT1, IFIT2, SP110 and IFNK) and down-regulation of genes playing a role in the Notch signaling pathway. 3570 transcripts were deregulated in MC1R variant carriers. In particular, genes related to oxidative stress and DNA damage pathways were up-regulated as well as genes associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer and Huntington. Finally, we observed that the expression signatures indentified in phenotypically normal cells carrying CDKN2A mutations or MC1R variants are maintained in skin cancer tumors (melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma). These results indicate that transcriptome deregulation represents an early event critical for skin cancer development. PMID:24742402

  5. Impact of Lipoprotein Lipase Gene Polymorphism, S447X, on Postprandial Triacylglycerol and Glucose Response to Sequential Meal Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Shatwan, Israa M; Minihane, Anne-Marie; Williams, Christine M; Lovegrove, Julie A; Jackson, Kim G; Vimaleswaran, Karani S

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key rate-limiting enzyme for the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol (TAG) in chylomicrons and very low-density lipoprotein. Given that postprandial assessment of lipoprotein metabolism may provide a more physiological perspective of disturbances in lipoprotein homeostasis compared to assessment in the fasting state, we have investigated the influence of two commonly studied LPL polymorphisms (rs320, HindIII; rs328, S447X) on postprandial lipaemia, in 261 participants using a standard sequential meal challenge. S447 homozygotes had lower fasting HDL-C (p = 0.015) and a trend for higher fasting TAG (p = 0.057) concentrations relative to the 447X allele carriers. In the postprandial state, there was an association of the S447X polymorphism with postprandial TAG and glucose, where S447 homozygotes had 12% higher TAG area under the curve (AUC) (p = 0.037), 8.4% higher glucose-AUC (p = 0.006) and 22% higher glucose-incremental area under the curve (IAUC) (p = 0.042). A significant gene-gender interaction was observed for fasting TAG (p = 0.004), TAG-AUC (Pinteraction = 0.004) and TAG-IAUC (Pinteraction = 0.016), where associations were only evident in men. In conclusion, our study provides novel findings of an effect of LPL S447X polymorphism on the postprandial glucose and gender-specific impact of the polymorphism on fasting and postprandial TAG concentrations in response to sequential meal challenge in healthy participants. PMID:26999119

  6. Impact of Maspin Polymorphism rs2289520 G/C and Its Interaction with Gene to Gene, Alcohol Consumption Increase Susceptibility to Oral Cancer Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Po-Yu; Miao, Nae-Fang; Lin, Chiao-Wen; Chou, Ying-Erh; Yang, Shun-Fa; Huang, Hui-Chuan; Chang, Hsiu-Ju; Tsai, Hsiu-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify gene polymorphisms of mammary serine protease inhibitor (Maspin) specific to patients with oral cancer susceptibility and clinicopathological status. Methodology/Principal Findings Three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the Maspin gene from 741 patients with oral cancer and 601 non-cancer controls were analyzed by real-time PCR. The participants with G/G homozygotes or with G/C heterozygotes of Maspin rs2289520 polymorphism had a 2.07-fold (p = 0.01) and a 2.01-fold (p = 0.02) risk of developing oral cancer compared to those with C/C homozygotes. Moreover, gene-gene interaction increased the risk of oral cancer susceptibility among subjects expose to oral cancer related risk factors, including areca, alcohol, and tobacco consumption. Conclusion G allele of Maspin rs2289520 polymorphism may be a factor that increases the susceptibility to oral cancer. The interactions of gene to oral cancer-related environmental risk factors have a synergetic effect that can further enhance oral cancer development. PMID:27525723

  7. The Impact of Serum Amyloid P-Component on Gene Expression in RAW264.7 Mouse Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Xi, Dan; Zhao, Jinzhen; Liu, Jichen; Xiong, Haowei; He, Wenshuai; Hu, Jing; Lai, Wenyan; Guo, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Serum amyloid P-component (SAP) contributes to host defense and prevents fibrosis. Macrophages are the most abundant inflammatory cell type in atherosclerotic plaques. In the present study, using (3)H-cholesterol-labeled counting radioactivity assay, we demonstrated that the apoAI-mediated cholesterol efflux in RAW264.7 macrophages was increased by SAP treatment in a time- and dose-dependent manner. We analyzed global gene expression changes upon SAP treatment using RNA sequencing. As a result, a total of 175 differentially expressed genes were identified, of which 134 genes were downregulated and 41 genes were upregulated in SAP treated cells compared to control cells. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed decreased expression of 5 genes and an increase in expression of 1 gene upon SAP treatment. Gene ontology analysis showed that genes involved in response to stimulus were significantly enriched in differentially expressed genes. Beyond protein-coding genes, we also identified 8 differentially expressed long noncoding RNAs. Our study may provide new insights into mechanisms underlying the functional role of SAP in macrophages. PMID:27239478

  8. Genetically engineered Oenococcus oeni strains to highlight the impact of estA2 and estA7 esterase genes on wine ester profile.

    PubMed

    Darsonval, M; Alexandre, H; Grandvalet, C

    2016-12-01

    Besides deacidifying wine, Oenococcus oeni bring significant changes in the chemical composition of wine by releasing esters by the action of their own esterases. The impact of O. oeni esterases remains relatively unexplored. Four esterase genes were identified from O. oeni genome (estA2, estA7, estC, and estB). The dual objective of this study was, first to use a genetic tool enabling the expression of esterase genes in enological conditions and, second, to investigate the impact of O. oeni esterase gene expression during winemaking on wine aromatic profile. Both estA2 and estA7 genes were successfully cloned and expressed in O. oeni and recombinant strains were inoculated in Aligoté wine to initiate malolactic fermentation (MLF). Ester profile of experimental wine was established by SPME-GC-MS. EstA2 caused significant decreases in the concentrations of isoamyl acetate, ethyl hexanoate, isobutyl acetate, and hexyl acetate, by 42.7%, 23.4%, 51.5%, and 28.9%, respectively. EstA2 has preferential hydrolytic activity toward acetate esters from higher alcohols. EstA7 has synthetic activity toward hexyl acetate with a significant 22.7% increase. This study reports the first efficient expression system enabling the production of a functional protein in O. oeni in enological conditions. PMID:27554142

  9. Integrative analysis of SF-1 transcription factor dosage impact on genome-wide binding and gene expression regulation.

    PubMed

    Doghman, Mabrouka; Figueiredo, Bonald C; Volante, Marco; Papotti, Mauro; Lalli, Enzo

    2013-10-01

    Steroidogenic Factor-1 (SF-1) is a nuclear receptor that has a pivotal role in the development of adrenal glands and gonads and in the control of steroid hormone production, being also implicated in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors. We have analyzed the mechanisms how SF-1 controls gene expression in adrenocortical cells and showed that it regulates different categories of genes according to its dosage. Significant correlations exist between the localization of SF-1-binding sites in chromatin under different dosage conditions and dosage-dependent regulation of gene expression. Our study revealed unexpected functional interactions between SF-1 and Neuron-Restrictive Silencer Factor/RE1-Silencing Transcription Factor (NRSF/REST), which was first characterized as a repressor of neuronal gene expression in non-neuronal tissues, in the regulation of gene expression in steroidogenic cells. When overexpressed, SF-1 reshapes the repertoire of NRSF/REST-regulated genes, relieving repression of key steroidogenic genes. These data show that NRSF/REST has a novel function in regulating gene expression in steroidogenic cells and suggest that it may have a broad role in regulating tissue-specific gene expression programs. PMID:23907384

  10. The impact of widespread regulatory neofunctionalization on homeolog gene evolution following whole-genome duplication in maize

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Thomas E.; Langdale, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Whole-genome duplications are a widespread feature of plant genome evolution, having been detected in all flowering plant lineages. Despite the prevalence of these events, the extent to which duplicated genes (homeolog gene pairs) functionally diverge (neofunctionalization) is unclear. We present a genome-wide analysis of molecular evolution and regulatory neofunctionalization in maize (Zea mays L.). We demonstrate that 13% of all homeolog gene pairs in maize are regulatory neofunctionalized in leaves, and that regulatory neofunctionalized genes experience enhanced purifying selection. We show that significantly more genes have been regulatory neofunctionalized in foliar leaves than in husk leaves and that both leaf types have experienced selection for distinct functional roles. Furthermore, we demonstrate that biased subgenome expression dominance occurs only in the presence of regulatory neofunctionalization and that in nonregulatory neofunctionalized genes subgenome dominance is progressively acquired during development. Taken together, our study reveals several novel insights into the evolution of maize, genes, and gene expression, and provides a general model for gene evolution following whole-genome duplication in plants. PMID:24788921

  11. Use of gene probes to assess the impact and effectiveness of aerobic in situ bioremediation of TCE

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.; Chakraborty, Romy; Fleming, James M.; Gregory, Ingrid R.; Bowman, John P.; Jimenez, Luis; Zhang, Dai; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Brockman, Fred J.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2009-03-15

    Gene probe hybridization was used to determine distribution and expression of co-metabolic genes at a contaminated site as it underwent in situ methanotrophic bioremediation of trichloroethylene (TCE). The bioremediation strategies tested included a series of air, air:methane, and air:methane:nutrient pulses of the test plot using horizontal injection wells. During the test period, the levels of TCE reduced drastically in almost all test samples. Sediment core samples (n = 367) taken from 0 m (surface)-43 m depth were probed for gene coding for methanotrophic soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and heterotrophic toluene dioxygenase (TOD), which are known to co-metabolize TCE. The same sediment samples were also probed for genes coding for methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) (catalyzing the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde) to assess specifically changes in methylotrophic bacterial populations in the site. Gene hybridization results showed that the frequency of detection of sMMO genes were stimulated approximately 250% following 1% methane:air (v/v) injection. Subsequent injection of 4% methane:air (v/v) resulted in an 85% decline probably due to nutrient limitations, since addition of nutrients (gaseous nitrogen and phosphorus) thereafter caused an increase in the frequency of detection of sMMO genes. Detection of TOD genes declined during the process, and eventually they were non-detectable by the final treatment, suggesting that methanotrophs displaced the TOD gene containing heterotrophs. Active transcription of sMMO and TOD was evidenced by hybridization to mRNA. These analyses combined with results showing the concomitant decline in TCE concentrations, increases in chloride concentration and increases in methanotroph viable counts, provide multiple lines of evidence that TCE remediation was caused specifically by methanotrophs. Our results suggest that sMMO genes are responsible for most, if not all, of the observed biodegradation of TCE. This study

  12. Disruption of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 K5 capsule biosynthesis, through loss of distinct kfi genes, modulates interaction with intestinal epithelial cells and impact on cell health.

    PubMed

    Nzakizwanayo, Jonathan; Kumar, Sandeep; Ogilvie, Lesley A; Patel, Bhavik A; Dedi, Cinzia; Macfarlane, Wendy M; Jones, Brian V

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is among the best characterised probiotics, with a proven clinical impact in a range of conditions. Despite this, the mechanisms underlying these "probiotic effects" are not clearly defined. Here we applied random transposon mutagenesis to identify genes relevant to the interaction of EcN with intestinal epithelial cells. This demonstrated mutants disrupted in the kfiB gene, of the K5 capsule biosynthesis cluster, to be significantly enhanced in attachment to Caco-2 cells. However, this phenotype was distinct from that previously reported for EcN K5 deficient mutants (kfiC null mutants), prompting us to explore further the role of kfiB in EcN:Caco-2 interaction. Isogenic mutants with deletions in kfiB (EcNΔkfiB), or the more extensively characterised K5 capsule biosynthesis gene kfiC (EcNΔkfiC), were both shown to be capsule deficient, but displayed divergent phenotypes with regard to impact on Caco-2 cells. Compared with EcNΔkfiC and the EcN wild-type, EcNΔkfiB exhibited significantly greater attachment to Caco-2 cells, as well as apoptotic and cytotoxic effects. In contrast, EcNΔkfiC was comparable to the wild-type in these assays, but was shown to induce significantly greater COX-2 expression in Caco-2 cells. Distinct differences were also apparent in the pervading cell morphology and cellular aggregation between mutants. Overall, these observations reinforce the importance of the EcN K5 capsule in host-EcN interactions, but demonstrate that loss of distinct genes in the K5 pathway can modulate the impact of EcN on epithelial cell health. PMID:25790373

  13. Disruption of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 K5 capsule biosynthesis, through loss of distinct kfi genes, modulates interaction with intestinal epithelial cells and impact on cell health.

    PubMed

    Nzakizwanayo, Jonathan; Kumar, Sandeep; Ogilvie, Lesley A; Patel, Bhavik A; Dedi, Cinzia; Macfarlane, Wendy M; Jones, Brian V

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is among the best characterised probiotics, with a proven clinical impact in a range of conditions. Despite this, the mechanisms underlying these "probiotic effects" are not clearly defined. Here we applied random transposon mutagenesis to identify genes relevant to the interaction of EcN with intestinal epithelial cells. This demonstrated mutants disrupted in the kfiB gene, of the K5 capsule biosynthesis cluster, to be significantly enhanced in attachment to Caco-2 cells. However, this phenotype was distinct from that previously reported for EcN K5 deficient mutants (kfiC null mutants), prompting us to explore further the role of kfiB in EcN:Caco-2 interaction. Isogenic mutants with deletions in kfiB (EcNΔkfiB), or the more extensively characterised K5 capsule biosynthesis gene kfiC (EcNΔkfiC), were both shown to be capsule deficient, but displayed divergent phenotypes with regard to impact on Caco-2 cells. Compared with EcNΔkfiC and the EcN wild-type, EcNΔkfiB exhibited significantly greater attachment to Caco-2 cells, as well as apoptotic and cytotoxic effects. In contrast, EcNΔkfiC was comparable to the wild-type in these assays, but was shown to induce significantly greater COX-2 expression in Caco-2 cells. Distinct differences were also apparent in the pervading cell morphology and cellular aggregation between mutants. Overall, these observations reinforce the importance of the EcN K5 capsule in host-EcN interactions, but demonstrate that loss of distinct genes in the K5 pathway can modulate the impact of EcN on epithelial cell health.

  14. Challenges and complexities in estimating both the functional impact and the disease risk associated with the extensive genetic variation in human DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Mohrenweiser, Harvey W; Wilson, David M; Jones, Irene M

    2003-05-15

    Individual risk and the population incidence of disease result from the interaction of genetic susceptibility and exposure. DNA repair is an example of a cellular process where genetic variation in families with extreme predisposition is documented to be associated with high disease likelihood, including syndromes of premature aging and cancer. Although the identification and characterization of new genes or variants in cancer families continues to be important, the focus of this paper is the current status of efforts to define the impact of polymorphic amino acid substitutions in DNA repair genes on individual and population cancer risk. There is increasing evidence that mild reductions in DNA repair capacity, assumed to be the consequence of common genetic variation, affect cancer predisposition. The extensive variation being found in the coding regions of DNA repair genes and the large number of genes in each of the major repair pathways results in complex genotypes with potential to impact cancer risk in the general population. The implications of this complexity for molecular epidemiology studies, as well as concepts that may make these challenges more manageable, are discussed. The concepts include both experimental and computational approaches that could be employed to develop predictors of disease susceptibility based on DNA repair genotype, focusing initially on studies to assess functional impact on individual proteins and pathways and then on molecular epidemiology studies to assess exposure-dependent health risk. In closing, we raise some of the non-technical challenges to the utilization of the full richness of the genetic variation to reduce disease occurrence and ultimately improve health care. PMID:12714187

  15. Use of gene probes to assess the impact and effectiveness of aerobic In situ bioremediation of TCE.

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.; Chakraborty, Romy; Fleming, James M.; Gregory, Ingrid R.; Bowman, John P.; Jimenez, Luis; Zhang, Dai; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Brockman, Fred J.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2009-03-01

    Gene probe hybridization was used to determine distribution and expression of co-metabolic genes at a contaminated site as it underwent in situ methanotrophic bioremediation of trichloroethylene (TCE). The bioremediation strategies tested consisted of a series of air, air:methane, and air:methane:nutrient pulses using a horizontal injection well. Sediment core samples (n=367) taken from 0 (surface)-43m depth were probed for genes coding for soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and toluene dioxygenase (TOD), which are known to cometabolize TCE. The same samples were also probed for genes coding for methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) to access changes in methylotrophic bacterial populations. Hybridization results showed that the frequency of detection of sMMO genes were stimulated approximately 250% following 1% methane:air (v/v) injection. Subsequent 4% methane:air (v/v) injection resulted in an 85% decline probably due to nutrient limitations, since subsequent addition of nutrients (gaseous nitrogen and phosphorus) caused an increase in the frequency of detection of sMMO genes. Detection of TOD genes declined during the process becoming non-detectable by the final treatment. These patterns indicate methanotrophs displaced heterotrophs containing TOD genes. Active transcription of sMMO and TOD was evidenced by hybridization to mRNA. These analyses combined with studies showing the concomitant decline in TCE concentrations, increases in methanotroph viable counts, increased mineralization rates of TCE, and increases in chloride inventories provide multiple lines of evidence that TCE remediation was caused specifically by methanotrophs. This work suggests that sMMO genes are responsible for most, if not all, of the biodegradation of TCE observed. This study demonstrated that the use of nucleic acid analytical methods provided a gene specific assessment of the effects of in situ treatment technologies.

  16. Monitoring and assessing the impact of wastewater treatment on release of both antibiotic-resistant bacteria and their typical genes in a Chinese municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2014-08-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are important hotspots for the spread of antibiotic resistance. However, the release and impact factors of both antibiotic resistant bacteria and the relevant genes over long periods in WWTPs have rarely been investigated. In this study, the fate of bacteria and genes resistant to six commonly used antibiotics was assessed over a whole year. In WWTP effluent and biosolids, a high prevalence of heterotrophic bacteria resistant to vancomycin, cephalexin, sulfadiazine and erythromycin were detected, each with a proportion of over 30%. The corresponding genes (vanA, ampC, sulI and ereA) were all detected in proportions of (2.2 ± 0.8) × 10(-10), (6.2 ± 3.2) × 10(-9), (1.2 ± 0.8) × 10(-7) and (7.6 ± 4.8) × 10(-8), respectively, in the effluent. The sampling season imposed considerable influence on the release of all ARB. High release loads of most ARB were detected in the spring, while low release loads were generally found in the winter. In comparison, the ARG loads changed only slightly over various seasons. No statistical relevance was found between all ARB abundances and their corresponding genes over the long-term investigation period. This inconsistent behavior indicates that bacteria and genes should both be considered when exploring resistance characteristics in wastewater. A redundancy analysis was adopted to assess the impact of wastewater quality and operational conditions on antibiotic resistance. The results indicated that most ARB and ARG proportions were positively related to the COD and turbidity of the raw sewage, while negatively related to those of the effluent. DO and temperature exhibited strong negative relevance to most ARB prevalence. PMID:24927359

  17. An integrative “omics” approach identifies new candidate genes to impact aroma volatiles in peach fruit

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ever since the recent completion of the peach genome, the focus of genetic research in this area has turned to the identification of genes related to important traits, such as fruit aroma volatiles. Of the over 100 volatile compounds described in peach, lactones most likely have the strongest effect on fruit aroma, while esters, terpenoids, and aldehydes have minor, yet significant effects. The identification of key genes underlying the production of aroma compounds is of interest for any fruit-quality improvement strategy. Results Volatile (52 compounds) and gene expression (4348 genes) levels were profiled in peach fruit from a maturity time-course series belonging to two peach genotypes that showed considerable differences in maturation characteristics and postharvest ripening. This data set was analyzed by complementary correlation-based approaches to discover the genes related to the main aroma-contributing compounds: lactones, esters, and phenolic volatiles, among others. As a case study, one of the candidate genes was cloned and expressed in yeast to show specificity as an ω-6 Oleate desaturase, which may be involved in the production of a precursor of lactones/esters. Conclusions Our approach revealed a set of genes (an alcohol acyl transferase, fatty acid desaturases, transcription factors, protein kinases, cytochromes, etc.) that are highly associated with peach fruit volatiles, and which could prove useful in breeding or for biotechnological purposes. PMID:23701715

  18. Methylation impact analysis of erythropoietin (EPO) Gene to hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activity.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Firli Rahmah Primula; Fatchiyah, Fatchiyah

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a glycoprotein hormone that play a role as key regulator in the production of red blood cells. The promoter region of EPO is methylated in normoxic (non-hypoxia) condition, but not in hypoxic condition. Methylation of the EPO enhancer region decline the transcription activity of EPO gene. The aim of this study is to investigate how different methylation percentage affected on the regulation and transcriptional activity of EPO gene. The DNA sequence of erythropoietin gene and protein sequence was retrieved from the sequence database of NCBI. DNA structure was constructed using 3D-DART web server and modeling structure of HIF1 predicted using SWISS-MODEL web server. Methylated DNA sequence of EPO gene using performed with YASARA View software and docking of EPO gene and transcription factor HIF1 analyzed by using HADDOCK webserver. Our result showed that binding energy in 46% methylated DNA was higher (-161,45 kcal/mol) than in unmethylated DNA (-194,16 kcal/mol) and 8% methylated DNA (-175,94 kcal/mol). So, we presume that a silencing mechanism of the Epo gene by methylation is correlated with the binding energy, which is required for interaction. A higher methylation percentage correlates with a higher binding energy which can cause an unstable interaction between DNA and transcription factor. In conclution, methylation of promoter and enhancer region of Epo gene leads to silencing. PMID:24023421

  19. Transcriptional similarity in couples reveals the impact of shared environment and lifestyle on gene regulation through modified cytosines

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is a complex and quantitative trait that is influenced by both genetic and non-genetic regulators including environmental factors. Evaluating the contribution of environment to gene expression regulation and identifying which genes are more likely to be influenced by environmental factors are important for understanding human complex traits. We hypothesize that by living together as couples, there can be commonly co-regulated genes that may reflect the shared living environment (e.g., diet, indoor air pollutants, behavioral lifestyle). The lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from unrelated couples of African ancestry (YRI, Yoruba people from Ibadan, Nigeria) from the International HapMap Project provided a unique model for us to characterize gene expression pattern in couples by comparing gene expression levels between husbands and wives. Strikingly, 778 genes were found to show much smaller variances in couples than random pairs of individuals at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 5%. Since genetic variation between unrelated family members in a general population is expected to be the same assuming a random-mating society, non-genetic factors (e.g., epigenetic systems) are more likely to be the mediators for the observed transcriptional similarity in couples. We thus evaluated the contribution of modified cytosines to those genes showing transcriptional similarity in couples as well as the relationships these CpG sites with other gene regulatory elements, such as transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Our findings suggested that transcriptional similarity in couples likely reflected shared common environment partially mediated through cytosine modifications. PMID:27326381

  20. Transcriptional similarity in couples reveals the impact of shared environment and lifestyle on gene regulation through modified cytosines.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ke; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is a complex and quantitative trait that is influenced by both genetic and non-genetic regulators including environmental factors. Evaluating the contribution of environment to gene expression regulation and identifying which genes are more likely to be influenced by environmental factors are important for understanding human complex traits. We hypothesize that by living together as couples, there can be commonly co-regulated genes that may reflect the shared living environment (e.g., diet, indoor air pollutants, behavioral lifestyle). The lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from unrelated couples of African ancestry (YRI, Yoruba people from Ibadan, Nigeria) from the International HapMap Project provided a unique model for us to characterize gene expression pattern in couples by comparing gene expression levels between husbands and wives. Strikingly, 778 genes were found to show much smaller variances in couples than random pairs of individuals at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 5%. Since genetic variation between unrelated family members in a general population is expected to be the same assuming a random-mating society, non-genetic factors (e.g., epigenetic systems) are more likely to be the mediators for the observed transcriptional similarity in couples. We thus evaluated the contribution of modified cytosines to those genes showing transcriptional similarity in couples as well as the relationships these CpG sites with other gene regulatory elements, such as transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Our findings suggested that transcriptional similarity in couples likely reflected shared common environment partially mediated through cytosine modifications. PMID:27326381

  1. IMPACT OF AGE AND AUTOANTIBODY STATUS ON THE GENE EXPRESSION OF SCLERODERMA FIBROBLASTS IN RESPONSE TO SILICA STIMULATION.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Wei, P; Guo, X J; Zhou, D; Zhang, W Z; Assassi, S; Zhou, X D

    2013-09-01

    Environmental factors are believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Silica exposure has been implicated as potentially hazardous in epidemiological studies of SSc. It can activate fibroblasts to express profibrotic genes at certain conditions. The aim of this study is to examine whether the fibroblasts of SSc patients respond to silica particles with specific gene expressions differentially from normal control fibroblasts. The fibroblasts obtained from skin biopsies of 96 SSc patients and 104 controls were examined. Silica particles were used to perturb the cultures of the fibroblasts in time-course and dose-response assays. The transcript levels of COL1A2, COL3A1, MIVIP1, MMP3, TIMP3 and CTGF genes of the fibroblasts were measured with quantitative RT-PCR. The results showed that the expressions of all six genes in SSc fibroblasts under silica perturbation appeared significantly different from normal control fibroblasts. In age stratified analysis, compared to control fibroblasts, SSc fibroblasts from patients at age 30-40 years and 50-60 years displayed significantly decreased expressions of MMP1 gene in all dosage assays and increased expression of COL3A1 genes started at low dosages perturbation of silica particles, respectively. In autoantibody stratified analysis, specific gene expression patterns were significantly associated with autoantibody-subgroups of fibroblasts. A common feature of SSc fibroblasts was unstable and a wide range of gene expression changes in response to silica perturbation. Our studies may suggest an altered intrinsic dynamic control in SSc fibroblasts. In addition, sensitivity and specificity of SSc fibroblasts to potentially hazardous environmental trigger is age and autoantibody-subgroup-dependent. The fibroblasts of SSc patients at age 30-60 years may be more sensitive to silica perturbation toward a profibrotic gene expression. PMID:25435887

  2. Transcriptional similarity in couples reveals the impact of shared environment and lifestyle on gene regulation through modified cytosines.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ke; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is a complex and quantitative trait that is influenced by both genetic and non-genetic regulators including environmental factors. Evaluating the contribution of environment to gene expression regulation and identifying which genes are more likely to be influenced by environmental factors are important for understanding human complex traits. We hypothesize that by living together as couples, there can be commonly co-regulated genes that may reflect the shared living environment (e.g., diet, indoor air pollutants, behavioral lifestyle). The lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from unrelated couples of African ancestry (YRI, Yoruba people from Ibadan, Nigeria) from the International HapMap Project provided a unique model for us to characterize gene expression pattern in couples by comparing gene expression levels between husbands and wives. Strikingly, 778 genes were found to show much smaller variances in couples than random pairs of individuals at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 5%. Since genetic variation between unrelated family members in a general population is expected to be the same assuming a random-mating society, non-genetic factors (e.g., epigenetic systems) are more likely to be the mediators for the observed transcriptional similarity in couples. We thus evaluated the contribution of modified cytosines to those genes showing transcriptional similarity in couples as well as the relationships these CpG sites with other gene regulatory elements, such as transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Our findings suggested that transcriptional similarity in couples likely reflected shared common environment partially mediated through cytosine modifications.

  3. Impact of the Autism-Associated Long Noncoding RNA MSNP1AS on Neuronal Architecture and Gene Expression in Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    DeWitt, Jessica J.; Grepo, Nicole; Wilkinson, Brent; Evgrafov, Oleg V.; Knowles, James A.; Campbell, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) MSNP1AS (moesin pseudogene 1, antisense) as a functional element revealed by genome wide significant association with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). MSNP1AS expression was increased in the postmortem cerebral cortex of individuals with ASD and particularly in individuals with the ASD-associated genetic markers on chromosome 5p14.1. Here, we mimicked the overexpression of MSNP1AS observed in postmortem ASD cerebral cortex in human neural progenitor cell lines to determine the impact on neurite complexity and gene expression. ReNcell CX and SK-N-SH were transfected with an overexpression vector containing full-length MSNP1AS. Neuronal complexity was determined by the number and length of neuronal processes. Gene expression was determined by strand-specific RNA sequencing. MSNP1AS overexpression decreased neurite number and neurite length in both human neural progenitor cell lines. RNA sequencing revealed changes in gene expression in proteins involved in two biological processes: protein synthesis and chromatin remodeling. These data indicate that overexpression of the ASD-associated lncRNA MSNP1AS alters the number and length of neuronal processes. The mechanisms by which MSNP1AS overexpression impacts neuronal differentiation may involve protein synthesis and chromatin structure. These same biological processes are also implicated by rare mutations associated with ASD, suggesting convergent mechanisms. PMID:27690106

  4. Identification of differentially expressed genes in rat silicosis model by suppression subtractive hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhongyuan; Liu, Baoan; Feng, Deyun; Chen, Chen; Li, Xiang; Hu, Yongbin; Peng, Jinwu; Liu, Yu; Du, Jing; Fu, Chunyan; Wen, Jifang

    2008-08-01

    The critical molecular mechanism in the development of the pulmonary fibrosis remains unknown, leaving diagnosed patients with a poor prognosis. To isolate the genes specifically up-regulated in pulmonary fibrosis, we established a rat silicosis model 360 d after treatment with crystalline silica suspension. Radiographs of chests showed that some scattered high-density shadows appeared in the lung field. Typical microscopic fibrosing silicotic nodules formed in the lung, alveolar epithelial cells and bronchial epithelial cells, particularly around the partial fibrosing silicotic nodules; some of them showed atypical hyperplasia that suggested a correlation between silicosis and lung cancer. Suppression subtractive hybridization analysis was performed to compare gene expression in lung tissue with silicosis and normal lung tissue. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that the expressions of seven novel cDNA sequences identified by suppression subtractive hybridization in lung tissue with silicosis differed from normal lung tissue. Bioinformatics analysis showed that 47 positive clones represented 35 genes containing two putative proteins and four predicted similar proteins. The analysis also showed that some screened genes in silicosis, such as prolyl 4-hydroxylases, actin-related protein-2/3 complex and acidic mammalian chitinase, have not been previously reported. These genes may provide new clues for investigating the molecular mechanisms in the development of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:18685790

  5. Impacts of adding FGDG on the abundance of nitrification and denitrification functional genes during dairy manure and sugarcane pressmud co-composting.

    PubMed

    Li, Qunliang; Guo, Xiaobo; Lu, Yanyu; Shan, Guangchun; Huang, Junhao

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the impacts of flue gas desulphurization gypsum (FGDG) amendment on the nitrification and denitrification during composting, dairy manure and sugarcane pressmud co-composting with FGDG (CPG) and without FGDG (CP) were conducted in this work. The physico-chemical parameters and the copies of nitrification and denitrification functional genes with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) during composting were analyzed. FGDG amendment displayed an inhibitory effect on the copies of 16S rDNA and delayed the occurrence of the highest gene copies of amoA during composting. The nxrA gene copies was inhibited by FGDG amendment during the mature phase. The addition of FGDG increased the relative content of narG and nirS during composting, contributing to more NO3(-)-N being reduced to NO2(-)-N. The amoA showed significant negative correlation with OM and NH4(+)-N, and positive correlation with NO3(-)-N. The nxrA displayed a negative correlation with temperature. These results demonstrated FGDG amendment significantly affected the copies of nitrification and denitrification functional genes, which changed the nitrogen flux of composting. Taken together, these data shed an insight into FGDG amendment affecting the nitrogen transformation during composting on a molecular level. PMID:27422049

  6. Impact of UV and Peracetic Acid Disinfection on the Prevalence of Virulence and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Wastewater Effluents

    PubMed Central

    Biswal, Basanta Kumar; Khairallah, Ramzi; Bibi, Kareem; Mazza, Alberto; Gehr, Ronald; Masson, Luke

    2014-01-01

    Wastewater discharges may increase the populations of pathogens, including Escherichia coli, and of antimicrobial-resistant strains in receiving waters. This study investigated the impact of UV and peracetic acid (PAA) disinfection on the prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the most abundant E. coli pathotype in municipal wastewaters. Laboratory disinfection experiments were conducted on wastewater treated by physicochemical, activated sludge, or biofiltration processes; 1,766 E. coli isolates were obtained for the evaluation. The target disinfection level was 200 CFU/100 ml, resulting in UV and PAA doses of 7 to 30 mJ/cm2 and 0.9 to 2.0 mg/liter, respectively. The proportions of UPECs were reduced in all samples after disinfection, with an average reduction by UV of 55% (range, 22% to 80%) and by PAA of 52% (range, 11% to 100%). Analysis of urovirulence genes revealed that the decline in the UPEC populations was not associated with any particular virulence factor. A positive association was found between the occurrence of urovirulence and antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). However, the changes in the prevalence of ARGs in potential UPECs were different following disinfection, i.e., UV appears to have had no effect, while PAA significantly reduced the ARG levels. Thus, this study showed that both UV and PAA disinfections reduced the proportion of UPECs and that PAA disinfection also reduced the proportion of antimicrobial resistance gene-carrying UPEC pathotypes in municipal wastewaters. PMID:24727265

  7. Impact of UV and peracetic acid disinfection on the prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes in uropathogenic Escherichia coli in wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Basanta Kumar; Khairallah, Ramzi; Bibi, Kareem; Mazza, Alberto; Gehr, Ronald; Masson, Luke; Frigon, Dominic

    2014-06-01

    Wastewater discharges may increase the populations of pathogens, including Escherichia coli, and of antimicrobial-resistant strains in receiving waters. This study investigated the impact of UV and peracetic acid (PAA) disinfection on the prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the most abundant E. coli pathotype in municipal wastewaters. Laboratory disinfection experiments were conducted on wastewater treated by physicochemical, activated sludge, or biofiltration processes; 1,766 E. coli isolates were obtained for the evaluation. The target disinfection level was 200 CFU/100 ml, resulting in UV and PAA doses of 7 to 30 mJ/cm(2) and 0.9 to 2.0 mg/liter, respectively. The proportions of UPECs were reduced in all samples after disinfection, with an average reduction by UV of 55% (range, 22% to 80%) and by PAA of 52% (range, 11% to 100%). Analysis of urovirulence genes revealed that the decline in the UPEC populations was not associated with any particular virulence factor. A positive association was found between the occurrence of urovirulence and antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). However, the changes in the prevalence of ARGs in potential UPECs were different following disinfection, i.e., UV appears to have had no effect, while PAA significantly reduced the ARG levels. Thus, this study showed that both UV and PAA disinfections reduced the proportion of UPECs and that PAA disinfection also reduced the proportion of antimicrobial resistance gene-carrying UPEC pathotypes in municipal wastewaters. PMID:24727265

  8. Impact of Global and Gene-Specific DNA Methylation in de Novo or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Treated with Decitabine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Ying; Yuan, You-Qing; Zhou, Dong-Ming; Wang, Zi-Yan; Ju, Song-Guang; Sun, Yu; Li, Jun; Fu, Jin-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    In this investigation, global DNA methylation patterns and the specific methylation status of 5 genes were studied in DNA from peripheral blood (PB) and impact on progression free survival (PFS) and overall-survival (OS) in patients with de novo or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treated with decitabine-based regimens waas assessed. DNA was isolated from PB samples at the time of -1, 1, and 7 days of chemotherapy. Global methylation was determined by ELISA, and the CpG island DNA methylation profile of 5 genes using a DNA methylation PCR system. Our data demonstrated that patients with a high level of 5-mC had a poor prognosis after demethylation therapy and those who have low levels of 5-mC in PB achieved higher CR and better SO, but there was no significant correlation found between the 5-mC levels and other clinical features before treatment except the disease status. Higher methylation status of Sox2 and Oct4 genes was associated with differential response to demethylation therapy. A relatively low methylation percentage in one or both of these two genes was also associated with longer OS after decitabine based chemotherapy. We also suggest that global DNA and Oct-4/Sox2 methylation might impact on the pathogenesis of leukemia and play an important role in the initiation and progression. Moreover, dynamic analysis of 5-mC and Oct-4/Sox2 in peripheral blood nucleated cells of leukemia patients may provide clues to important molecular diagnostic and prognostic targets. PMID:26838251

  9. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Skeehan, Katie; Heaney, Christopher; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Genetic testing for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) includes genotyping for apolipoprotein E, for late-onset AD, and three rare autosomal dominant, early-onset forms of AD associated with different genes (APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2). According to researchers, patents have not impeded research in the field, nor were patents an important consideration in the quest for the genetic risk factors. Athena Diagnostics holds exclusive licenses from Duke University for three “method” patents covering APOE genetic testing. Athena offers tests for APOE and genes associated with early onset, autosomal dominant AD. One of those presenilin genes is patented and exclusively licensed to Athena; the other presenilin gene was patented but the patent was allowed to lapse; and one (APP) is patented only as a research tool and patent claims do not cover diagnostic use. Direct-to-consumer testing is available for some AD-related genes, apparently without a license. Athena Diagnostics consolidated its position in the market for AD genetic testing by collecting exclusive rights to patents arising from university research. Duke University also used its licenses to Athena to enforce adherence to clinical guidelines, including elimination of the service from Smart Genetics, which was offering direct-to-consumer risk assessment based on APOE genotyping. PMID:20393312

  10. Long-term impacts of selective logging on two Amazonian tree species with contrasting ecological and reproductive characteristics: inferences from Eco-gene model simulations.

    PubMed

    Vinson, C C; Kanashiro, M; Sebbenn, A M; Williams, T C R; Harris, S A; Boshier, D H

    2015-08-01

    The impact of logging and subsequent recovery after logging is predicted to vary depending on specific life history traits of the logged species. The Eco-gene simulation model was used to evaluate the long-term impacts of selective logging over 300 years on two contrasting Brazilian Amazon tree species, Dipteryx odorata and Jacaranda copaia. D. odorata (Leguminosae), a slow growing climax tree, occurs at very low densities, whereas J. copaia (Bignoniaceae) is a fast growing pioneer tree that occurs at high densities. Microsatellite multilocus genotypes of the pre-logging populations were used as data inputs for the Eco-gene model and post-logging genetic data was used to verify the output from the simulations. Overall, under current Brazilian forest management regulations, there were neither short nor long-term impacts on J. copaia. By contrast, D. odorata cannot be sustainably logged under current regulations, a sustainable scenario was achieved by increasing the minimum cutting diameter at breast height from 50 to 100 cm over 30-year logging cycles. Genetic parameters were only slightly affected by selective logging, with reductions in the numbers of alleles and single genotypes. In the short term, the loss of alleles seen in J. copaia simulations was the same as in real data, whereas fewer alleles were lost in D. odorata simulations than in the field. The different impacts and periods of recovery for each species support the idea that ecological and genetic information are essential at species, ecological guild or reproductive group levels to help derive sustainable management scenarios for tropical forests. PMID:24424164

  11. Impact of agricultural management on bacterial laccase-encoding genes with possible implications for soil carbon storage in semi-arid Mediterranean olive farming

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Background: In this work, we aimed to gain insights into the contribution of soil bacteria to carbon sequestration in Mediterranean habitats. In particular, we aimed to use bacterial laccase-encoding genes as molecular markers for soil organic C cycling. Using rainfed olive farming as an experimental model, we determined the stability and accumulation levels of humic substances and applied these data to bacterial laccase-encoding gene expression and diversity in soils under four different agricultural management systems (bare soils under tillage/no tillage and vegetation cover under chemical/mechanical management). Materials and Methods: Humic C (> 104 Da) was subjected to isoelectric focusing. The GC-MS method was used to analyze aromatic hydrocarbons. Real-Time PCR quantification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) for functional bacterial laccase-like multicopper oxidase (LMCO)-encoding genes and transcripts were also carried out. Results: Soils under spontaneous vegetation, eliminated in springtime using mechanical methods for more than 30 years, showed the highest humic acid levels as well as the largest bacterial population rich in laccase genes and transcripts. The structure of the bacterial community based on LMCO genes also pointed to phylogenetic differences between these soils due to the impact of different management systems. Soils where herbicides were used to eliminate spontaneous vegetation once a year and those where pre-emergence herbicides resulted in bare soils clustered together for DNA-based DGGE analysis, which indicated a certain amount of microbial selection due to the application of herbicides. When LMCO-encoding gene expression was studied, soils where cover vegetation was managed either with herbicides or with mechanical methods showed less than 10% similarity, suggesting that the type of weed management strategy used can impact weed community composition and consequently laccase substrates derived from vegetation decay

  12. Impact of enrofloxacin and florfenicol therapy on the spread of OqxAB gene and intestinal microbiota in chickens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Sun, Jian; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Shao, Yang; Li, Liang; Fang, Liang-Xing; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-08-30

    Horizontal transfer of plasmid-encoded multidrug-resistant determinants is a major health problem and has attracted much public attention. We studied the dissemination of the efflux pump gene oqxAB located on transferable plasmid pHXY0908 between Salmonella Typhimurium and Escherichia coli in the gut of chickens. After an inoculation with Salmonella Typhimurium harboring oqxAB-bearing plasmid pHXY0908, chickens were treated with enrofloxacin and florfenicol. Inoculated, but non-treated chickens were included as a control group. Our results revealed that commensal E. coli isolates from the gut of chickens acquired the oqxAB-bearing plasmid in both treated and non-treated groups. Additionally, in the florfenicol treatment group, the average isolation rate of oqxAB-positive E. coli was significantly higher than that in the non-treated group. PFGE analysis showed that oqxAB-positive E. coli strains belonged to different patterns with one predominating. Moreover, multilocus sequence typing analysis revealed that E. coli ST533 was closely associated with the spread of oqxAB gene. qPCR analysis indicated that antibiotic administration provided selective advantages for sustaining a significantly high level of oqxAB gene from the DNA extracted from the feces. There was also a fluctuation in the intestinal microbiota with antibiotic therapy. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the oqxAB gene could be readily spread within the intestinal microflora. This could be enhanced by administrated with clinical doses of florfenicol and enrofloxacin, resulting in the enlargement of resistance gene reservoirs. In addition, ST533 E. coli isolates were found to contribute to transfer of the oqxAB gene. PMID:27527758

  13. Postprandial kinetics of gene expression of proteins involved in the digestive process in rainbow trout (O. mykiss) and impact of diet composition.

    PubMed

    Borey, Marion; Panserat, Stephane; Surget, Anne; Cluzeaud, Marianne; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Herman, Alexandre; Lazzarotto, Viviana; Corraze, Geneviève; Médale, Françoise; Lauga, Beatrice; Burel, Christine

    2016-08-01

    The impact of increased incorporation of plant ingredients on diets for rainbow trout was evaluated in terms of gene expression of gastric (gastric lipase, pepsinogen) and intestinal (prolidase, maltase, phospholipase A2) digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters (peptide and glucose transporters), as well as of postprandial levels of plasma glucose, triglycerides and total free amino acids. For that purpose, trout alevins were fed from the start of exogenous feeding one of three different experimental diets: a diet rich in fish meal and fish oil (FM-FO), a plant-based diet (noFM-noFO) totally free from fish meal and fish oil, but containing plant ingredients and a Mixed diet (Mixed) intermediate between the FM-FO and noFM-noFO diets. After 16 months of rearing, all fish were left unfed for 72 h and then given a single meal to satiation. Blood, stomach and anterior intestine were sampled before the meal and at 2, 6 and 12 h after this meal. The postprandial kinetics of gene expression of gastric and intestinal digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters were then followed in trout fed the FM-FO diet. The postprandial profiles showed that the expression of almost all genes studied was stimulated by the presence of nutrients in the digestive tract of trout, but the timing (appearance of peaks) varied between genes. Based on these data, we have focused on the molecular response to dietary factors in the stomach and the intestine at 6 and 12 h after feeding, respectively. The reduction in FM and FO levels of dietary incorporation induced a significant decrease in the gene expression of gastric lipase, GLUT2 and PEPT1. The plasma glucose and triglycerides levels were also reduced in trout fed the noFM-noFO diet. Consequently, the present study suggests a decrease in digestive capacities in trout fed a diet rich in plant ingredients.

  14. Altered expression of mir-222 and mir-25 influences diverse gene expression changes in transformed normal and anaplastic thyroid cells, and impacts on MEK and TRAIL protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Aherne, Sinéad T.; Smyth, Paul; Freeley, Michael; Smith, Leila; Spillane, Cathy; O'leary, John; Sheils, Orla

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and accounts for the majority of endocrine cancer-related deaths each year. Our group and others have previously demonstrated dysfunctional microRNA (miRNA or miR) expression in the context of thyroid cancer. The objective of the present study was to investigate the impact of synthetic manipulation of expression of miR-25 and miR-222 in benign and malignant thyroid cells. miR-25 and miR-222 expression was upregulated in 8505C (an anaplastic thyroid cell line) and Nthy-ori (a SV40-immortalised thyroid cell line) cells, respectively. A transcriptomics-based approach was utilised to identify targets of the two miRNAs and real-time PCR and western blotting were used to validate a subset of the targets. Almost 100 mRNAs of diverse functions were found to be either directly or indirectly targeted by both miR-222 and miR-25 [fold change ≥2, false discovery rate (FDR) ≤0.05]. Gene ontology analysis showed the miR-25 gene target list to be significantly enriched for genes involved in cell adhesion. Fluidigm real-time PCR technologies were used to validate the downregulation of 23 and 22 genes in response to miR-25 and miR-222 overexpression, respectively. The reduction of the expression of two miR-25 protein targets, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MEK4), was also validated. Manipulating the expression of both miR-222 and miR-25 influenced diverse gene expression changes in thyroid cells. Increased expression of miR-25 reduced MEK4 and TRAIL protein expression, and cell adhesion and apoptosis are important aspects of miR-25 functioning in thyroid cells. PMID:27353001

  15. ROS production and gene expression in alveolar macrophages exposed to PM(2.5) from Baghdad, Iraq: Seasonal trends and impact of chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Samera H; Schauer, James J; Antkiewicz, Dagmara S; Shafer, Martin M; Kadhim, Ahmed Kh

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of changes in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) composition on oxidative stress markers in an in-vitro alveolar macrophage (AM) model. Fifty-three PM2.5 samples were collected during a year-long PM sampling campaign in Baghdad, Iraq, a semi-arid region of the country. Monthly composites were analyzed for chemical composition and for biological activity using in-vitro measurements of ROS production and gene expression in the AM model. Twelve genes that were differentially expressed upon PM exposure were identified and their co-associations with the composition of PM2.5 were examined. Ten of those genes were up-regulated in January and April composites; samples which also exhibited high ROS activity and relatively high PM mass concentration. ROS production was statistically correlated with total PM2.5 mass, levoglucosan (a wood burning tracer) and several trace elements of the PM (especially V and Ni, which are associated with oil combustion). The expression of several cytokine genes was found to be moderately associated with PM mass, crustal materials (indication of dusty days or dust storms) and certain metals (e.g. V, Fe and Ni) in the PM. Thus, the ROS activity association with PM2.5, may, in part, be driven by redox-active metals. The antioxidant response genes (Nqo1 and Hmox1) were moderately associated with polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and showed a good correlation (r-Pearson of >0.7) with metals linked to vehicle-related emissions (i.e. Cu, Zn and Sb). Examining these associations in a larger sample pool (e.g. daily samples) would improve the power of the analysis and may strengthen the implication of these chemicals in the oxidative stress of biological systems, which could aid in the development of new metrics of PM toxicity. PMID:26618301

  16. A candidate gene based approach validates Md-PG1 as the main responsible for a QTL impacting fruit texture in apple (Malus x domestica Borkh)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Apple is a widely cultivated fruit crop for its quality properties and extended storability. Among the several quality factors, texture is the most important and appreciated, and within the apple variety panorama the cortex texture shows a broad range of variability. Anatomically these variations depend on degradation events occurring in both fruit primary cell wall and middle lamella. This physiological process is regulated by an enzymatic network generally encoded by large gene families, among which polygalacturonase is devoted to the depolymerization of pectin. In apple, Md-PG1, a key gene belonging to the polygalacturonase gene family, was mapped on chromosome 10 and co-localized within the statistical interval of a major hot spot QTL associated to several fruit texture sub-phenotypes. Results In this work, a QTL corresponding to the position of Md-PG1 was validated and new functional alleles associated to the fruit texture properties in 77 apple cultivars were discovered. 38 SNPs genotyped by gene full length resequencing and 2 SSR markers ad hoc targeted in the gene metacontig were employed. Out of this SNP set, eleven were used to define three significant haplotypes statistically associated to several texture components. The impact of Md-PG1 in the fruit cell wall disassembly was further confirmed by the cortex structure electron microscope scanning in two apple varieties characterized by opposite texture performance, such as ‘Golden Delicious’ and ‘Granny Smith’. Conclusions The results here presented step forward into the genetic dissection of fruit texture in apple. This new set of haplotypes, and microsatellite alleles, can represent a valuable toolbox for a more efficient parental selection as well as the identification of new apple accessions distinguished by superior fruit quality features. PMID:23496960

  17. ROS production and gene expression in alveolar macrophages exposed to PM(2.5) from Baghdad, Iraq: Seasonal trends and impact of chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Samera H; Schauer, James J; Antkiewicz, Dagmara S; Shafer, Martin M; Kadhim, Ahmed Kh

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of changes in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) composition on oxidative stress markers in an in-vitro alveolar macrophage (AM) model. Fifty-three PM2.5 samples were collected during a year-long PM sampling campaign in Baghdad, Iraq, a semi-arid region of the country. Monthly composites were analyzed for chemical composition and for biological activity using in-vitro measurements of ROS production and gene expression in the AM model. Twelve genes that were differentially expressed upon PM exposure were identified and their co-associations with the composition of PM2.5 were examined. Ten of those genes were up-regulated in January and April composites; samples which also exhibited high ROS activity and relatively high PM mass concentration. ROS production was statistically correlated with total PM2.5 mass, levoglucosan (a wood burning tracer) and several trace elements of the PM (especially V and Ni, which are associated with oil combustion). The expression of several cytokine genes was found to be moderately associated with PM mass, crustal materials (indication of dusty days or dust storms) and certain metals (e.g. V, Fe and Ni) in the PM. Thus, the ROS activity association with PM2.5, may, in part, be driven by redox-active metals. The antioxidant response genes (Nqo1 and Hmox1) were moderately associated with polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and showed a good correlation (r-Pearson of >0.7) with metals linked to vehicle-related emissions (i.e. Cu, Zn and Sb). Examining these associations in a larger sample pool (e.g. daily samples) would improve the power of the analysis and may strengthen the implication of these chemicals in the oxidative stress of biological systems, which could aid in the development of new metrics of PM toxicity.

  18. Postprandial kinetics of gene expression of proteins involved in the digestive process in rainbow trout (O. mykiss) and impact of diet composition.

    PubMed

    Borey, Marion; Panserat, Stephane; Surget, Anne; Cluzeaud, Marianne; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Herman, Alexandre; Lazzarotto, Viviana; Corraze, Geneviève; Médale, Françoise; Lauga, Beatrice; Burel, Christine

    2016-08-01

    The impact of increased incorporation of plant ingredients on diets for rainbow trout was evaluated in terms of gene expression of gastric (gastric lipase, pepsinogen) and intestinal (prolidase, maltase, phospholipase A2) digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters (peptide and glucose transporters), as well as of postprandial levels of plasma glucose, triglycerides and total free amino acids. For that purpose, trout alevins were fed from the start of exogenous feeding one of three different experimental diets: a diet rich in fish meal and fish oil (FM-FO), a plant-based diet (noFM-noFO) totally free from fish meal and fish oil, but containing plant ingredients and a Mixed diet (Mixed) intermediate between the FM-FO and noFM-noFO diets. After 16 months of rearing, all fish were left unfed for 72 h and then given a single meal to satiation. Blood, stomach and anterior intestine were sampled before the meal and at 2, 6 and 12 h after this meal. The postprandial kinetics of gene expression of gastric and intestinal digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters were then followed in trout fed the FM-FO diet. The postprandial profiles showed that the expression of almost all genes studied was stimulated by the presence of nutrients in the digestive tract of trout, but the timing (appearance of peaks) varied between genes. Based on these data, we have focused on the molecular response to dietary factors in the stomach and the intestine at 6 and 12 h after feeding, respectively. The reduction in FM and FO levels of dietary incorporation induced a significant decrease in the gene expression of gastric lipase, GLUT2 and PEPT1. The plasma glucose and triglycerides levels were also reduced in trout fed the noFM-noFO diet. Consequently, the present study suggests a decrease in digestive capacities in trout fed a diet rich in plant ingredients. PMID:26920536

  19. Bidirectional rescue of extreme genetic predispositions to anxiety: impact of CRH receptor 1 as epigenetic plasticity gene in the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Sotnikov, S V; Markt, P O; Malik, V; Chekmareva, N Y; Naik, R R; Sah, A; Singewald, N; Holsboer, F; Czibere, L; Landgraf, R

    2014-02-11

    The continuum of physiological anxiety up to psychopathology is not merely dependent on genes, but is orchestrated by the interplay of genetic predisposition, gene x environment and epigenetic interactions. Accordingly, inborn anxiety is considered a polygenic, multifactorial trait, likely to be shaped by environmentally driven plasticity at the genomic level. We here took advantage of the extreme genetic predisposition of the selectively bred high (HAB) and low anxiety (LAB) mouse model exhibiting high vs low anxiety-related behavior and tested whether and how beneficial (enriched environment) vs detrimental (chronic mild stress) environmental manipulations are capable of rescuing phenotypes from both ends of the anxiety continuum. We provide evidence that (i) even inborn and seemingly rigid behavioral and neuroendocrine phenotypes can bidirectionally be rescued by appropriate environmental stimuli, (ii) corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (Crhr1), critically involved in trait anxiety, shows bidirectional alterations in its expression in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) upon environmental stimulation, (iii) these alterations are linked to an increased methylation status of its promoter and, finally, (iv) binding of the transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) to the Crhr1 promoter contributes to its gene expression in a methylation-sensitive manner. Thus, Crhr1 in the BLA is critically involved as plasticity gene in the bidirectional epigenetic rescue of extremes in trait anxiety.

  20. Overexpression of folate biosynthesis genes in rice (Oryza sativa L.) and evaluation of their impact on seed folate content.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wei; Cheng, Zhi-jun; Lei, Cai-lin; Wang, Xiao-le; Wang, Jiu-lin; Wang, Jie; Wu, Fu-qing; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiu-ping; Zhai, Hu-qu; Wan, Jian-min

    2014-12-01

    Folate (vitamin B9) deficiency is a global health problem especially in developing countries where the major staple foods such as rice contain extremely low folates. Biofortification of rice could be an alternative complement way to fight folate deficiency. In this study, we evaluated the availability of the genes in each step of folate biosynthesis pathway for rice folate enhancement in the japonica variety kitaake genetic background. The first enzymes GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI) and aminodeoxychorismate synthase (ADCS) in the pterin and para-aminobenzoate branches resulted in significant increase in seed folate content, respectively (P < 0.01). Overexpression of two closely related enzymes dihydrofolate synthase (DHFS) and folypolyglutamate synthase (FPGS), which perform the first and further additions of glutamates, produced slightly increase in seed folate content separately. The GTPCHI transgene was combined with each of the other transgenes except ADCS to investigate the effects of gene stacking on seed folate accumulation. Seed folate contents in the gene-stacked plants were higher than the individual low-folate transgenic parents, but lower than the high-folate GTPCHI transgenic lines, pointing to an inadequate supply of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) precursor initiated by ADCS in constraining folate overproduction in gene-stacked plants.

  1. Correlations between in situ denitrification activity and nir-gene abundances in pristine and impacted prairie streams

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David W.; Trippett, Clare; Dodds, Walter K.; O’Brien, Jonathan M.; Banner, Eric B.K.; Head, Ian M.; Smith, Marilyn S.; Yang, Richard K.; Knapp, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Denitrification is a process that reduces nitrogen levels in headwaters and other streams. We compared nirS and nirK abundances with the absolute rate of denitrification, the longitudinal coefficient of denitrification (i.e., Kden, which represents optimal denitrification rates at given environmental conditions), and water quality in seven prairie streams to determine if nir-gene abundances explain denitrification activity. Previous work showed that absolute rates of denitrification correlate with nitrate levels; however, no correlation has been found for denitrification efficiency, which we hypothesise might be related to gene abundances. Water-column nitrate and soluble-reactive phosphorus levels significantly correlated with absolute rates of denitrification, but nir-gene abundances did not. However, nirS and nirK abundances significantly correlated with Kden, as well as phosphorus, although no correlation was found between Kden and nitrate. These data confirm that absolute denitrification rates are controlled by nitrate load, but intrinsic denitrification efficiency is linked to nirS and nirK gene abundances. PMID:20724046

  2. Impact of mutations in hemA and hemH genes on pyoverdine production by Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC17400.

    PubMed

    Baysse, C; Matthijs, S; Pattery, T; Cornelis, P

    2001-11-27

    A Pseudomonas fluorescens Tn5 mutant, with decreased production of the siderophore pyoverdine, was obtained, with the transposon inserted in the hemA gene coding for glutamyl tRNA reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step of heme biosynthesis. Since this mutant was leaky, a second round of transposition was needed to obtain a second mutant completely auxotrophic for the heme precursor delta-aminolevulinate (ALA). Pyoverdine production by this mutant is ALA-dependent at concentrations above those needed to sustain growth. A transposon mutant in the hemH gene that encodes the enzyme ferrochelatase showing a characteristic red fluorescence upon UV exposure as a result of porphyrins accumulation, was obtained by selecting transconjugants on LB medium containing hemin. The DeltahemH mutant was characterized and the corresponding hemH gene sequenced. Antibodies against P. fluorescens HemH detected the protein both in soluble and membrane fractions of the wild-type and confirmed the absence of the enzyme in the mutant. The DeltahemH mutant failed to produce pyoverdine, but the production of the siderophore was restored by introduction of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa hemH gene in trans. These results indicate that de novo heme biosynthesis is needed for a normal level of siderophore pyoverdine production. PMID:11728716

  3. Potential impacts of disinfection processes on elimination and deactivation of antibiotic resistance genes during water and wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Michael C

    2012-07-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), in association with antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB), have been identified as widespread contaminants of treated drinking waters and wastewaters. As a consequence, concerns have been raised that ARB or ARG transport between aquatic compartments may enhance the spread of antibiotic resistance amongst non-resistant bacterial communities by means of horizontal gene transfer processes. Most often, discussion of horizontal gene transfer focuses on the probable role of conjugative plasmid or transposon exchange, which requires live ARB donor cells. Conventional water and wastewater disinfection processes generally provide highly effective means for mitigating the transport of live ARB; thereby minimizing risks of conjugative gene transfer. However, even if ARB present in a treated water are fully inactivated during a disinfection process, the possibility remains that intact remnants of DNA contained within the resulting cell debris could still confer resistance genotypes to downstream bacterial populations by means of natural transformation and/or transduction, which do not require live donor cells. Thus, a systematic evaluation of the capability of common disinfection technologies to ensure the destruction of bacterial DNA, in addition to pathogen inactivation, seems warranted. With that objective in mind, this review seeks to provide a concise introduction to the significance of ARB and ARG occurrence in environmental systems, coupled with a review of the role that commonly used water and wastewater disinfection processes may play in minimizing ARG transport and dissemination.

  4. Transposable element dynamics and PIWI regulation impacts lncRNA and gene expression diversity in Drosophila ovarian cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Sytnikova, Yuliya A.; Rahman, Reazur; Chirn, Gung-wei; Clark, Josef P.

    2014-01-01

    Piwi proteins and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) repress transposable elements (TEs) from mobilizing in gonadal cells. To determine the spectrum of piRNA-regulated targets that may extend beyond TEs, we conducted a genome-wide survey for transcripts associated with PIWI and for transcripts affected by PIWI knockdown in Drosophila ovarian somatic sheet (OSS) cells, a follicle cell line expressing the Piwi pathway. Despite the immense sequence diversity among OSS cell piRNAs, our analysis indicates that TE transcripts are the major transcripts associated with and directly regulated by PIWI. However, several coding genes were indirectly regulated by PIWI via an adjacent de novo TE insertion that generated a nascent TE transcript. Interestingly, we noticed that PIWI-regulated genes in OSS cells greatly differed from genes affected in a related follicle cell culture, ovarian somatic cells (OSCs). Therefore, we characterized the distinct genomic TE insertions across four OSS and OSC lines and discovered dynamic TE landscapes in gonadal cultures that were defined by a subset of active TEs. Particular de novo TEs appeared to stimulate the expression of novel candidate long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in a cell lineage-specific manner, and some of these TE-associated lncRNAs were associated with PIWI and overlapped PIWI-regulated genes. Our analyses of OSCs and OSS cells demonstrate that despite having a Piwi pathway to suppress endogenous mobile elements, gonadal cell TE landscapes can still dramatically change and create transcriptome diversity. PMID:25267525

  5. Transposable element dynamics and PIWI regulation impacts lncRNA and gene expression diversity in Drosophila ovarian cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Sytnikova, Yuliya A; Rahman, Reazur; Chirn, Gung-Wei; Clark, Josef P; Lau, Nelson C

    2014-12-01

    Piwi proteins and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) repress transposable elements (TEs) from mobilizing in gonadal cells. To determine the spectrum of piRNA-regulated targets that may extend beyond TEs, we conducted a genome-wide survey for transcripts associated with PIWI and for transcripts affected by PIWI knockdown in Drosophila ovarian somatic sheet (OSS) cells, a follicle cell line expressing the Piwi pathway. Despite the immense sequence diversity among OSS cell piRNAs, our analysis indicates that TE transcripts are the major transcripts associated with and directly regulated by PIWI. However, several coding genes were indirectly regulated by PIWI via an adjacent de novo TE insertion that generated a nascent TE transcript. Interestingly, we noticed that PIWI-regulated genes in OSS cells greatly differed from genes affected in a related follicle cell culture, ovarian somatic cells (OSCs). Therefore, we characterized the distinct genomic TE insertions across four OSS and OSC lines and discovered dynamic TE landscapes in gonadal cultures that were defined by a subset of active TEs. Particular de novo TEs appeared to stimulate the expression of novel candidate long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in a cell lineage-specific manner, and some of these TE-associated lncRNAs were associated with PIWI and overlapped PIWI-regulated genes. Our analyses of OSCs and OSS cells demonstrate that despite having a Piwi pathway to suppress endogenous mobile elements, gonadal cell TE landscapes can still dramatically change and create transcriptome diversity.

  6. Oxidant-NO dependent gene regulation in dogs with type I diabetes: impact on cardiac function and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The mechanisms responsible for the cardiovascular mortality in type I diabetes (DM) have not been defined completely. We have shown in conscious dogs with DM that: 1) baseline coronary blood flow (CBF) was significantly decreased, 2) endothelium-dependent (ACh) coronary vasodilation was impaired, and 3) reflex cholinergic NO-dependent coronary vasodilation was selectively depressed. The most likely mechanism responsible for the depressed reflex cholinergic NO-dependent coronary vasodilation was the decreased bioactivity of NO from the vascular endothelium. The goal of this study was to investigate changes in cardiac gene expression in a canine model of alloxan-induced type 1 diabetes. Methods Mongrel dogs were chronically instrumented and the dogs were divided into two groups: one normal and the other diabetic. In the diabetic group, the dogs were injected with alloxan monohydrate (40-60 mg/kg iv) over 1 min. The global changes in cardiac gene expression in dogs with alloxan-induced diabetes were studied using Affymetrix Canine Array. Cardiac RNA was extracted from the control and DM (n = 4). Results The array data revealed that 797 genes were differentially expressed (P < 0.01; fold change of at least ±2). 150 genes were expressed at significantly greater levels in diabetic dogs and 647 were significantly reduced. There was no change in eNOS mRNA. There was up regulation of some components of the NADPH oxidase subunits (gp91 by 2.2 fold, P < 0.03), and down-regulation of SOD1 (3 fold, P < 0.001) and decrease (4 - 40 fold) in a large number of genes encoding mitochondrial enzymes. In addition, there was down-regulation of Ca2+ cycling genes (ryanodine receptor; SERCA2 Calcium ATPase), structural proteins (actin alpha). Of particular interests are genes involved in glutathione metabolism (glutathione peroxidase 1, glutathione reductase and glutathione S-transferase), which were markedly down regulated. Conclusion our findings suggest that type I diabetes

  7. Down-Regulation of KORRIGAN-Like Endo-β-1,4-Glucanase Genes Impacts Carbon Partitioning, Mycorrhizal Colonization and Biomass Production in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Kalluri, Udaya C.; Payyavula, Raja S.; Labbé, Jessy L.; Engle, Nancy; Bali, Garima; Jawdy, Sara S.; Sykes, Robert W.; Davis, Mark; Ragauskas, Arthur; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    A greater understanding of the genetic regulation of plant cell wall remodeling and the impact of modified cell walls on plant performance is important for the development of sustainable biofuel crops. Here, we studied the impact of down-regulating KORRIGAN-like cell wall biosynthesis genes, belonging to the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene family, on Populus growth, metabolism and the ability to interact with symbiotic microbes. The reductions in cellulose content and lignin syringyl-to-guaiacyl unit ratio, and increase in cellulose crystallinity of cell walls of PdKOR RNAi plants corroborated the functional role of PdKOR in cell wall biosynthesis. Altered metabolism and reduced growth characteristics of RNAi plants revealed new implications on carbon allocation and partitioning. The distinctive metabolome phenotype comprised of a higher phenolic and salicylic acid content, and reduced lignin, shikimic acid and maleic acid content relative to control. Plant sustainability implications of modified cell walls on beneficial plant-microbe interactions were explored via co-culture with an ectomycorrhizal fungus, Laccaria bicolor. A significant increase in the mycorrhization rate was observed in transgenic plants, leading to measurable beneficial growth effects. These findings present new evidence for functional interconnectedness of cellulose biosynthesis pathway, metabolism and mycorrhizal association in plants, and further emphasize the consideration of the sustainability implications of plant trait improvement efforts. PMID:27757116

  8. Impacts of coexisting antibiotics, antibacterial residues, and heavy metals on the occurrence of erythromycin resistance genes in urban wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gao, Pin; He, Shi; Huang, Shenglin; Li, Kanzhu; Liu, Zhenhong; Xue, Gang; Sun, Weimin

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global challenge and represents a growing threat on human health worldwide. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are generally considered as hotspots for control and/or dissemination of antibiotic resistance. The role of antibiotics, antibacterial residues, and heavy metals played on the evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance is still not well understood. Here, the occurrence of antibiotics (i.e., macrolides, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and quinolones), antibacterial residues (i.e., triclosan), as well as heavy metals (i.e., cadmium, chromium, copper, zinc, lead, and nickel) in urban wastewater was investigated. Also, the abundances of erythromycin resistance genes (ERY-ARGs) including ere(A), ere(B), mef(A)/mef(E), erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), and msr(A)/msr(B) genes were screened. A relationship between certain antibiotics, antibacterial residues, and heavy metals and ERY-ARGs was demonstrated. ERY presented significant correlations (0.883 < r < 0.929, P < 0.05) with ere(A), ere(B), and mef(A)/mef(E) genes, while tetracycline exhibited a significant correlation (r = 0.829, P < 0.05) with erm(B) genes. It is noteworthy that triclosan correlated significantly (0.859 < r < 0.956, P < 0.05) with ere(A), ere(B), mef(A)/mef(E), and erm(B) genes. In addition, significantly positive correlations (0.823 < r < 0.871, P < 0.05) were observed between zinc and lead and certain ERY-ARGs (i.e., ere(B), mef(A)/mef(E), erm(B), etc.). Further investigations should be involved to elucidate the co-selection and/or cross-selection mechanisms due to co-existence of these selective factors in urban wastewater.

  9. Impact of Thermal Stress on Kidney-Specific Gene Expression in Farmed Regional and Imported Rainbow Trout.

    PubMed

    Verleih, Marieke; Borchel, Andreas; Krasnov, Aleksei; Rebl, Alexander; Korytář, Tomáš; Kühn, Carsten; Goldammer, Tom

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal water temperatures can be stressful for fish in aquaculture and can therefore negatively influence their welfare. Although the kidney is the crucial organ associated with the primary stress response, knowledge about the stress-modulated kidney transcriptome in salmonids is limited. In the present study, we used a comparative microarray approach to characterize the general gene expression profiles of rainbow trout trunk kidney after a 2-week acclimation to mild heat (23 °C) and cold stress (8 °C). Hypothesizing that local adaptation influences stress performance, we aimed to identify differences in the temperature-induced gene expression in the regional trout strain BORN, in addition to a common imported strain. Moderate temperature challenge provoked typical stress response clusters, including heat-shock proteins or cold-inducible factors, in addition to altered energy metabolism in trout kidney. Mild cold, in particular, enhanced renal protein degradation processes, as well as mRNA and protein synthesis, while it also triggered fatty acid biosynthesis. Mild heat led to cytoskeleton-stabilizing processes and might have facilitated cell damage and infection. Furthermore, both breeding lines used different strategies for energy provision, cellular defense, and cell death/survival pathways. As a main finding, the genes involved in energy provision showed generally higher transcript levels at both temperatures in BORN trout compared to imported trout, indicating adjusted metabolic rates under local environmental conditions. Altogether, this study provides a general overview of stress-induced transcriptional patterns in rainbow trout trunk kidney, in addition to identifying genes and networks that contribute to the robustness of the BORN strain. Our analyses suggest SERPINH1 and CIRBP as general marker genes for heat stress and cold stress in trout, respectively.

  10. The impact of selection, gene flow and demographic history on heterogeneous genomic divergence: three-spine sticklebacks in divergent environments.

    PubMed

    Ferchaud, Anne-Laure; Hansen, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneous genomic divergence between populations may reflect selection, but should also be seen in conjunction with gene flow and drift, particularly population bottlenecks. Marine and freshwater three-spine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) populations often exhibit different lateral armour plate morphs. Moreover, strikingly parallel genomic footprints across different marine-freshwater population pairs are interpreted as parallel evolution and gene reuse. Nevertheless, in some geographic regions like the North Sea and Baltic Sea, different patterns are observed. Freshwater populations in coastal regions are often dominated by marine morphs, suggesting that gene flow overwhelms selection, and genomic parallelism may also be less pronounced. We used RAD sequencing for analysing 28 888 SNPs in two marine and seven freshwater populations in Denmark, Europe. Freshwater populations represented a variety of environments: river populations accessible to gene flow from marine sticklebacks and large and small isolated lakes with and without fish predators. Sticklebacks in an accessible river environment showed minimal morphological and genomewide divergence from marine populations, supporting the hypothesis of gene flow overriding selection. Allele frequency spectra suggested bottlenecks in all freshwater populations, and particularly two small lake populations. However, genomic footprints ascribed to selection could nevertheless be identified. No genomic regions were consistent freshwater-marine outliers, and parallelism was much lower than in other comparable studies. Two genomic regions previously described to be under divergent selection in freshwater and marine populations were outliers between different freshwater populations. We ascribe these patterns to stronger environmental heterogeneity among freshwater populations in our study as compared to most other studies, although the demographic history involving bottlenecks should also be considered in the

  11. Expression profiles of key phenylpropanoid genes during Vanilla planifolia pod development reveal a positive correlation between PAL gene expression and vanillin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Fock-Bastide, Isabelle; Palama, Tony Lionel; Bory, Séverine; Lécolier, Aurélie; Noirot, Michel; Joët, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    In Vanilla planifolia pods, development of flavor precursors is dependent on the phenylpropanoid pathway. The distinctive vanilla aroma is produced by numerous phenolic compounds of which vanillin is the most important. Because of the economic importance of vanilla, vanillin biosynthetic pathways have been extensively studied but agreement has not yet been reached on the processes leading to its accumulation. In order to explore the transcriptional control exerted on these pathways, five key phenylpropanoid genes expressed during pod development were identified and their mRNA accumulation profiles were evaluated during pod development and maturation using quantitative real-time PCR. As a prerequisite for expression analysis using qRT-PCR, five potential reference genes were tested, and two genes encoding Actin and EF1 were shown to be the most stable reference genes for accurate normalization during pod development. For the first time, genes encoding a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (VpPAL1) and a cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (VpC4H1) were identified in vanilla pods and studied during maturation. Among phenylpropanoid genes, differential regulation was observed from 3 to 8 months after pollination. VpPAL1 was gradually up-regulated, reaching the maximum expression level at maturity. In contrast, genes encoding 4HBS, C4H, OMT2 and OMT3 did not show significant increase in expression levels after the fourth month post-pollination. Expression profiling of these key phenylpropanoid genes is also discussed in light of accumulation patterns for key phenolic compounds. Interestingly, VpPAL1 gene expression was shown to be positively correlated to maturation and vanillin accumulation.

  12. Impact of I30T and I30M substitution in MPZ gene associated with Dejerine-Sottas syndrome type B (DSSB): A molecular modeling and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Agrahari, Ashish; George Priya Doss, C

    2015-10-01

    Myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene encodes MPZ protein is a vital component of the myelin sheath. Mutationsassociated with MPZ gene leads to severe de-hypomyelination Dejerine-Sottas syndrome type B (DSSB) also termed as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 3. In this work, we employed a set of various in silico prediction methods to screen 97 nsSNPs associated with MPZ gene. Based on this, we identified the nsSNPs to be most deleterious and pathogenic associated with DSSB. To get more insight into the mutational effect at three-dimensional structural level, we modeled the homology structure of native type as well as I30T and I30M mutant of MPZ protein using Modeler 9.13 software. Molecular dynamics simulation was initiated to explain the impact of the mutation on its structure and function. The obtained results depict that the protein with I30T mutation had variable structural conformation and dynamic behavior than native and mutant I30M of MPZ protein. We hope our computational insight might be helpful in rationalizing the deleterious mutations in DSSB and the advancement of novel pharmacological strategy. PMID:26135405

  13. Impact of I30T and I30M substitution in MPZ gene associated with Dejerine-Sottas syndrome type B (DSSB): A molecular modeling and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Agrahari, Ashish; George Priya Doss, C

    2015-10-01

    Myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene encodes MPZ protein is a vital component of the myelin sheath. Mutationsassociated with MPZ gene leads to severe de-hypomyelination Dejerine-Sottas syndrome type B (DSSB) also termed as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 3. In this work, we employed a set of various in silico prediction methods to screen 97 nsSNPs associated with MPZ gene. Based on this, we identified the nsSNPs to be most deleterious and pathogenic associated with DSSB. To get more insight into the mutational effect at three-dimensional structural level, we modeled the homology structure of native type as well as I30T and I30M mutant of MPZ protein using Modeler 9.13 software. Molecular dynamics simulation was initiated to explain the impact of the mutation on its structure and function. The obtained results depict that the protein with I30T mutation had variable structural conformation and dynamic behavior than native and mutant I30M of MPZ protein. We hope our computational insight might be helpful in rationalizing the deleterious mutations in DSSB and the advancement of novel pharmacological strategy.

  14. High Sequence Variability of the ppE18 Gene of Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains Potentially Impacts Effectivity of Vaccine Candidate M72/AS01E.

    PubMed

    Homolka, Susanne; Ubben, Tanja; Niemann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The development of an effective vaccine is urgently needed to fight tuberculosis (TB) which is still the leading cause of death from a single infectious agent worldwide. One of the promising vaccine candidates M72/AS01E consists of two proteins subunits PepA and PPE18 coded by Rv0125 and Rv1196. However, preliminary data indicate a high level of sequence variability among clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains that might have an impact on the vaccine efficacy. To further investigate this finding, we determined ppE18 sequence variability in a well-characterized reference collection of 71 MTBC strains from 23 phylogenetic lineages representing the global MTBC diversity. In total, 100 sequence variations consisting of 96 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), three insertions and one deletion were detected resulting in 141 variable positions distributed over the entire gene. The majority of SNPs detected were non-synonymous (n = 68 vs. n = 28 synonymous). Strains from animal adapted lineages, e.g., M. bovis, showed a significant higher diversity than the human pathogens such as M. tuberculosis Haarlem. SNP patterns specific for different lineages as well as for deeper branches in the phylogeny could be identified. The results of our study demonstrate a high variability of the ppE18 gene even in the N-terminal domains that is normally highly conserved in ppe genes. As the N-terminal region interacts with TLR2 receptor inducing a protective anti-inflammatory immune response, genetic heterogeneity has a potential impact on the vaccine efficiency, however, this has to be investigated in future studies.

  15. Derivation of Tissue-specific Functional Gene Sets to Aid Transcriptomic Analysis of Chemical Impacts on the Teleost Reproductive Axis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are a powerful tool for unsupervised analysis of chemical impacts on biological systems. However, the lack of well annotated biological pathways for many aquatic organisms, including fish, and the poor power of microarray-based analyses to detect diffe...

  16. Impact of diurnal temperature variation on grape berry development, proanthocyanidin accumulation, and the expression of flavonoid pathway genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the impact of temperature on proanthocyanidin (PA) accumulation in grape skins, despite its significance in berry composition and wine quality. Field grown grapes (cv. Merlot) were cooled during the day or heated at night by +/- 8 °C, from fruit set to véraison in three seasons...

  17. Endosymbiotic and horizontal gene transfer in microbial eukaryotes: Impacts on cell evolution and the tree of life.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian

    2012-03-01

    The evolution of microbial eukaryotes, in particular of photosynthetic lineages, is complicated by multiple instances of endosymbiotic and horizontal gene transfer (E/HGT) resulting from plastid origin(s). Our recent analysis of diatom membrane transporters provides evidence of red and/or green algal origins of 172 of the genes encoding these proteins (ca. 25% of the examined phylogenies), with the majority putatively derived from green algae. These data suggest that E/HGT has been an important driver of evolutionary innovation among diatoms (and likely other stramenopiles), and lend further support to the hypothesis of an ancient, cryptic green algal endosymbiosis in "chromalveolate" lineages. Here, we discuss the implications of our findings on the understanding of eukaryote evolution and inference of the tree of life.

  18. Silencing of vacuolar invertase and asparagine synthetase genes and its impact on acrylamide formation of fried potato products.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaobiao; Gong, Huiling; He, Qunyan; Zeng, Zixian; Busse, James S; Jin, Weiwei; Bethke, Paul C; Jiang, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Acrylamide is produced in a wide variety of carbohydrate-rich foods during high-temperature cooking. Dietary acrylamide is a suspected human carcinogen, and health concerns related to dietary acrylamide have been raised worldwide. French fries and potato chips contribute a significant proportion to the average daily intake of acrylamide, especially in developed countries. One way to mitigate health concerns related to acrylamide is to develop potato cultivars that have reduced contents of the acrylamide precursors asparagine, glucose and fructose in tubers. We generated a large number of silencing lines of potato cultivar Russet Burbank by targeting the vacuolar invertase gene VInv and the asparagine synthetase genes StAS1 and StAS2 with a single RNA interference construct. The transcription levels of these three genes were correlated with reducing sugar (glucose and fructose) and asparagine content in tubers. Fried potato products from the best VInv/StAS1/StAS2-triple silencing lines contained only one-fifteenth of the acrylamide content of the controls. Interestingly, the extent of acrylamide reduction of the best triple silencing lines was similar to that of the best VInv-single silencing lines developed previously from the same potato cultivar Russet Burbank. These results show that an acrylamide mitigation strategy focused on developing potato cultivars with low reducing sugars is likely to be an effective and sufficient approach for minimizing the acrylamide-forming potential of French fry processing potatoes. PMID:26079224

  19. The impact of pollination syndrome and habitat on gene flow: a comparative study of two Streptocarpus (Gesneriaceae) species.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Mark; Möller, Michael; Edwards, Trevor J; Bellstedt, Dirk U; Villiers, Margaret de

    2007-10-01

    Gene flow through pollen and seed dispersal is important in terms of population differentiation and eventually speciation. Seed and pollen flow are affected in turn by habitats and pollen vectors. We examined the effect of different pollinators and habitats on gene flow by comparing two species of Streptocarpus, using microsatellite and chloroplast RFLP markers. Populations of the forest-dwelling S. primulifolius were highly differentiated according to nuclear microsatellite data and had mutually exclusive chloroplast haplotypes. This result is congruent with infrequent seed dispersal and limited between-population foraging by the long-tongued fly pollinator Stenobasipteron wiedemanni. In contrast, populations of S. dunnii growing in exposed crags had lower levels of population differentiation according to both nuclear and chloroplast data, congruent with a hypothesis of more effective between population seed dispersal and greater pollen-mediated gene flow due to the sunbird pollinator Nectarinia famosa. The population genetic behavior of these species is reflected in their taxonomy and phylogenetic position; S. primulifolius belongs to a taxonomically complex clade in which recent speciation is evident, while the clade containing S. dunnii is characterized by taxonomically well-defined species on longer phylogenetic branches. Our study shows that pollinator movements and seed dispersal patterns are a major determinant of the evolutionary trajectories of these species.

  20. Coupling of enhancer and insulator properties identified in two retrotransposons modulates their mutagenic impact on nearby genes.

    PubMed

    Conte, Caroline; Dastugue, Bernard; Vaury, Chantal

    2002-03-01

    We recently reported a novel transposition system in which two retroelements from Drosophila melanogaster, ZAM and Idefix, are highly mobilized and preferentially insert within intergenic regions. Among the loci where new copies are detected, a hot spot for their insertion was identified at the white locus, where up to three elements occurred within a 3-kb fragment upstream of the transcriptional start site of white. We have used these insertions as molecular entry points to throw light on the mutagenic effect exerted by multiple insertions of retrotransposons within intergenic regions of a genome. Analysis of the molecular mechanisms by which ZAM and Idefix elements interfere with the regulation of the white gene has shown that ZAM bears cis-acting regulatory sequences able to enhance transcription of the white gene in the eyes of the flies. This activation may be counteracted by Idefix, which acts as an insulator able to isolate the white gene from the upstream ZAM enhancer. In addition to revealing a novel insulator sequence with its own specific features, our data clearly illustrate how retroelements can act as epigenetic factors able to interfere with the transcriptional regulation of their host. PMID:11865056

  1. Silencing of vacuolar invertase and asparagine synthetase genes and its impact on acrylamide formation of fried potato products.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaobiao; Gong, Huiling; He, Qunyan; Zeng, Zixian; Busse, James S; Jin, Weiwei; Bethke, Paul C; Jiang, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Acrylamide is produced in a wide variety of carbohydrate-rich foods during high-temperature cooking. Dietary acrylamide is a suspected human carcinogen, and health concerns related to dietary acrylamide have been raised worldwide. French fries and potato chips contribute a significant proportion to the average daily intake of acrylamide, especially in developed countries. One way to mitigate health concerns related to acrylamide is to develop potato cultivars that have reduced contents of the acrylamide precursors asparagine, glucose and fructose in tubers. We generated a large number of silencing lines of potato cultivar Russet Burbank by targeting the vacuolar invertase gene VInv and the asparagine synthetase genes StAS1 and StAS2 with a single RNA interference construct. The transcription levels of these three genes were correlated with reducing sugar (glucose and fructose) and asparagine content in tubers. Fried potato products from the best VInv/StAS1/StAS2-triple silencing lines contained only one-fifteenth of the acrylamide content of the controls. Interestingly, the extent of acrylamide reduction of the best triple silencing lines was similar to that of the best VInv-single silencing lines developed previously from the same potato cultivar Russet Burbank. These results show that an acrylamide mitigation strategy focused on developing potato cultivars with low reducing sugars is likely to be an effective and sufficient approach for minimizing the acrylamide-forming potential of French fry processing potatoes.

  2. Site-specific impacts on gene expression and behavior in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed in situ to streams adjacent to sewage treatment plants

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Environmental monitoring for pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors in the aquatic environment traditionally employs a variety of methods including analytical chemistry, as well as a variety of histological and biochemical endpoints that correlate with the fish fitness. It is now clear that analytical chemistry alone is insufficient to identify aquatic environments that are compromised because these measurements do not identify the biologically available dose. The biological endpoints that are measured are important because they relate to known impairments; however, they are not specific to the contaminants and often focus on only a few known endpoints. These studies can be enhanced by looking more broadly at changes in gene expression, especially if the analysis focuses on biochemical pathways. The present study was designed to obtain additional information for well-characterized sites adjacent to sewage treatment plants in MN that are thought to be impacted by endocrine disruptors. Results Here we examine five sites that have been previously characterized and examine changes in gene expression in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) that have been caged for 48 h in each of the aquatic environments. We find that the gene expression changes are characteristic and unique at each of the five sites. Also, fish exposed to two of the sites, 7 and 12, present a more aggressive behavior compared to control fish. Conclusion Our results show that a short-term exposure to sewage treatment plant effluents was able to induce a site-specific gene expression pattern in the fathead minnow gonad and liver. The short-term exposure was also enough to affect fish sexual behavior. Our results also show that microarray analysis can be very useful at determining potential exposure to chemicals, and could be used routinely as a tool for environmental monitoring. PMID:19811676

  3. Carbon cycling and carbon metabolism by soil fungi in a boreal forest: impacts of wildfire and permafrost on functional genes, isotope signatures, and ectomycorrhizae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, M. P.; Harden, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control the stabilization and destabilization of soil carbon within boreal forest ecosystems is of great importance to the global carbon budget. Much is currently known about boreal soil carbon dynamics in relation to biophysical and landscape variables such as temperature, moisture, wildfire intensity, and stand age. We have less information regarding the controls on decomposition at the molecular scale, where interactions between microbial communities, their genetic `potential' for decomposition, functional genes, enzyme synthesis, and organic matter transformations occur. We have entered an age in which these connections can be made at the molecular scale, but what form do they take, and can they scale up to affect carbon dynamics at the level of the ecosystem? We examined these molecular scale processes in mature boreal forest soils and soils that had been impacted by wildfire near Delta Junction, Alaska. We also examined the interactive effect of permafrost presence, which reduces soil drainage, with wildfire. We focused on three themes: linking microbial communities and laccase functional genes to soil laccase enzyme activity and lignin decomposition, assessing substrate availability using the natural abundance δ13C isotope ratios of microbial biomass, and the influence of ectomycorrhizal mats on decomposition. Wildfire reduced fungal biomass, laccase functional gene abundance, laccase activity, and δ13C-lignin decomposition. Relationships between gene abundance and microbial activity were significant and logarithmic in form. Soil drainage, which is mediated by the presence of permafrost, had little effect on the abundance of fungi, functional genes, or potential process rates. Microbial biomass δ13C was always enriched relative to soil organic matter, and this difference was greater in control soils compared to wildfire-affected soils, indicating that ÄΔδ13C MB-SOIL may indicate the level of bioavailability of soil

  4. Impact of single-gene and dual-gene Bt broccoli on the herbivore Pieris rapae (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) and its pupal endoparasitoid Pteromalus puparum (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Mao; Zhao, Jian-zhou; Shelton, Anthony M; Cao, Jun; Earle, Elizabeth D

    2008-08-01

    Transgenic brassica crops producing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are being investigated as candidates for field release to control lepidopteran pests. Information on the potential impact of Bt brassica crops on pests and non-target natural enemies is needed as part of an environmental risk assessment prior to the commercial release. This first tier study provides insight into the tritrophic interactions among Bt broccoli plants, the herbivore Pieris rapae and its parasitoid Pteromalus puparum. We first evaluated the efficacy of three types of Bt broccoli plants, cry1Ac, cry1C and cry1Ac + cry1C, on different instars of P. rapae. Bt broccoli effectively controlled P. rapae larvae, although later instars were more tolerant. The efficacy of different Bt broccoli plants on P. rapae larvae was consistently cry1Ac > cry1Ac + cry1C > cry1C. When the parasitoid P. puparum developed in a P. rapae pupa (host) that had developed from Bt plant-fed older larvae, developmental time, total number and longevity of the P. puparum generated from the Bt plant-fed host were significantly affected compared with those generated from the non-Bt control plant-fed host. Simultaneously, negative effects on P. rapae pupae were found, i.e. pupal length, width and weight were significantly reduced after older P. rapae larvae fed on different Bt plants for 1 or 2 days. Cry1C toxin was detected using ELISA in P. rapae pupae after older larvae fed on cry1C broccoli. However, no Cry1C toxin was detected in newly emerged P. puparum adults developing in Bt-fed hosts. Only a trace amount of toxin was detected from entire P. puparum pupae dissected from the Bt plant-fed host. Moreover, no negative effect was found on the progeny of P. puparum developing from the Bt plant-fed host when subsequently supplied with a healthy host, P. rapae pupae. The reduced quality of the host appears to be the only reason for the observed deleterious effects on P. puparum. Our data suggest that

  5. Impact of polymorphisms of the GGCX gene on maintenance warfarin dose in Chinese populations: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lihong; Zhang, Jinhua; Xiao, Shiji; Huang, Jinlong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Shen, Jianzhen

    2015-09-01

    The meta-analysis was conducted to investigate the impact of gamma-glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX) on maintenance warfarin dose. 8 studies were included, focusing on the impact of GGCX single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on mean daily warfarin dose (MDWD). GGCX (rs699664; AA versus GG, GA versus GG, A versus GG) and GGCX (rs12714145; GA versus GG, AA versus GG, A versus GG) showed no significant differences on mean daily warfarin dose (MDWD). This meta-analysis was the first to report the relationship between GGCX SNPs and MDWD in Chinese populations. No evidence could be found in the relationship between SNPs of GGCX (rs699664 and rs12714145) and maintenance warfarin dose.

  6. Early Phenylpropanoid Biosynthetic Steps in Cannabis sativa: Link between Genes and Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Docimo, Teresa; Consonni, Roberto; Coraggio, Immacolata; Mattana, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (C4H) and 4-Coumarate: CoA ligase (4CL) catalyze the first three steps of the general phenylpropanoid pathway whereas chalcone synthase (CHS) catalyzes the first specific step towards flavonoids production. This class of specialized metabolites has a wide range of biological functions in plant development and defence and a broad spectrum of therapeutic activities for human health. In this study, we report the isolation of hemp PAL and 4CL cDNA and genomic clones. Through in silico analysis of their deduced amino acid sequences, more than an 80% identity with homologues genes of other plants was shown and phylogenetic relationships were highlighted. Quantitative expression analysis of the four above mentioned genes, PAL and 4CL enzymatic activities, lignin content and NMR metabolite fingerprinting in different Cannabis sativa tissues were evaluated. Furthermore, the use of different substrates to assay PAL and 4CL enzymatic activities indicated that different isoforms were active in different tissues. The diversity in secondary metabolites content observed in leaves (mainly flavonoids) and roots (mainly lignin) was discussed in relation to gene expression and enzymatic activities data. PMID:23812081

  7. Early phenylpropanoid biosynthetic steps in Cannabis sativa: link between genes and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Docimo, Teresa; Consonni, Roberto; Coraggio, Immacolata; Mattana, Monica

    2013-06-28

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (C4H) and 4-Coumarate: CoA ligase (4CL) catalyze the first three steps of the general phenylpropanoid pathway whereas chalcone synthase (CHS) catalyzes the first specific step towards flavonoids production. This class of specialized metabolites has a wide range of biological functions in plant development and defence and a broad spectrum of therapeutic activities for human health. In this study, we report the isolation of hemp PAL and 4CL cDNA and genomic clones. Through in silico analysis of their deduced amino acid sequences, more than an 80% identity with homologues genes of other plants was shown and phylogenetic relationships were highlighted. Quantitative expression analysis of the four above mentioned genes, PAL and 4CL enzymatic activities, lignin content and NMR metabolite fingerprinting in different Cannabis sativa tissues were evaluated. Furthermore, the use of different substrates to assay PAL and 4CL enzymatic activities indicated that different isoforms were active in different tissues. The diversity in secondary metabolites content observed in leaves (mainly flavonoids) and roots (mainly lignin) was discussed in relation to gene expression and enzymatic activities data.

  8. Ultraviolet filters differentially impact the expression of key endocrine and stress genes in embryos and larvae of Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Several organic UV filters have hormonal activity in vertebrates, as demonstrated in fishes, rodents and human cells. Despite the accumulation of filter contaminants in aquatic systems, research on their effects on the endocrine systems of freshwaters invertebrates is scarce. In this work, the effects of five frequently used UV filters were investigated in embryos and larvae of Chironomus riparius, which is a reference organism in ecotoxicology. LC50 values for larvae as well as the percentage of eclosion of eggs were determined following exposures to: octyl-p-methoxycinnamate (OMC) also known as 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC); 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC); 4-hydroxybenzophenone (4HB); octocrylene (OC); and octyldimethyl-p-aminobenzoate (OD-PABA). To assess sublethal effects, expression levels of the genes coding for the ecdysone receptor (EcR) and heat shock protein HSP70 were investigated as biomarkers for endocrine and stress effects at the cellular level. Life-stage-dependent sensitivity was found. In embryos, all of the UV filters provoked a significant overexpression of EcR at 24h after exposure. OC, 4MBC and OD-PABA also triggered transcriptional activation of the hsp70 stress gene in embryos. In contrast, in larvae, only 4MBC and OMC/EHMC increased EcR and hsp70 mRNA levels and OD-PABA upregulated only the EcR gene. These results revealed that embryos are particularly sensitive to UV filters, which affect endocrine regulation during development. Most UV filters also triggered the cellular stress response, and thus exhibit proteotoxic effects. The differences observed between embryos and larvae and the higher sensitivity of embryos highlight the importance of considering different life stages when evaluating the environmental risks of pollutants, particularly when analyzing endocrine effects. PMID:26994811

  9. Ultraviolet filters differentially impact the expression of key endocrine and stress genes in embryos and larvae of Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Several organic UV filters have hormonal activity in vertebrates, as demonstrated in fishes, rodents and human cells. Despite the accumulation of filter contaminants in aquatic systems, research on their effects on the endocrine systems of freshwaters invertebrates is scarce. In this work, the effects of five frequently used UV filters were investigated in embryos and larvae of Chironomus riparius, which is a reference organism in ecotoxicology. LC50 values for larvae as well as the percentage of eclosion of eggs were determined following exposures to: octyl-p-methoxycinnamate (OMC) also known as 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC); 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC); 4-hydroxybenzophenone (4HB); octocrylene (OC); and octyldimethyl-p-aminobenzoate (OD-PABA). To assess sublethal effects, expression levels of the genes coding for the ecdysone receptor (EcR) and heat shock protein HSP70 were investigated as biomarkers for endocrine and stress effects at the cellular level. Life-stage-dependent sensitivity was found. In embryos, all of the UV filters provoked a significant overexpression of EcR at 24h after exposure. OC, 4MBC and OD-PABA also triggered transcriptional activation of the hsp70 stress gene in embryos. In contrast, in larvae, only 4MBC and OMC/EHMC increased EcR and hsp70 mRNA levels and OD-PABA upregulated only the EcR gene. These results revealed that embryos are particularly sensitive to UV filters, which affect endocrine regulation during development. Most UV filters also triggered the cellular stress response, and thus exhibit proteotoxic effects. The differences observed between embryos and larvae and the higher sensitivity of embryos highlight the importance of considering different life stages when evaluating the environmental risks of pollutants, particularly when analyzing endocrine effects.

  10. Occurrence of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes in hospital and urban wastewaters and their impact on the receiving river.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; Chamorro, Sara; Marti, Elisabet; Huerta, Belinda; Gros, Meritxell; Sànchez-Melsió, Alexandre; Borrego, Carles M; Barceló, Damià; Balcázar, Jose Luis

    2015-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become a major health concern; thus, there is a growing interest in exploring the occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment as well as the factors that contribute to their emergence. Aquatic ecosystems provide an ideal setting for the acquisition and spread of ARGs due to the continuous pollution by antimicrobial compounds derived from anthropogenic activities. We investigated, therefore, the pollution level of a broad range of antibiotics and ARGs released from hospital and urban wastewaters, their removal through a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and their presence in the receiving river. Several antimicrobial compounds were detected in all water samples collected. Among antibiotic families, fluoroquinolones were detected at the highest concentration, especially in hospital effluent samples. Although good removal efficiency by treatment processes was observed for several antimicrobial compounds, most antibiotics were still present in WWTP effluents. The results also revealed that copy numbers of ARGs, such as blaTEM (resistance to β-lactams), qnrS (reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones), ermB (resistance to macrolides), sulI (resistance to sulfonamides) and tetW (resistance to tetracyclines), were detected at the highest concentrations in hospital effluent and WWTP influent samples. Although there was a significant reduction in copy numbers of these ARGs in WWTP effluent samples, this reduction was not uniform across analyzed ARGs. Relative concentration of ermB and tetW genes decreased as a result of wastewater treatment, whereas increased in the case of blaTEM, sulI and qnrS genes. The incomplete removal of antibiotics and ARGs in WWTP severely affected the receiving river, where both types of emerging pollutants were found at higher concentration in downstream waters than in samples collected upstream from the discharge point. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a widespread occurrence of

  11. Impact of different colours of artificial light at night on melatonin rhythm and gene expression of gonadotropins in European perch.

    PubMed

    Brüning, Anika; Hölker, Franz; Franke, Steffen; Kleiner, Wibke; Kloas, Werner

    2016-02-01

    The distribution and intensity of artificial light at night, commonly referred to as light pollution, is consequently rising and progressively also ecological implications come to light. Low intensity light is known to suppress nocturnal melatonin production in several fish species. This study aims to examine the least suppressive light colour for melatonin excreted into the holding water and the influence of different light qualities and quantities in the night on gene expression of gonadotropins in fish. European perch (Perca fluviatilis) were exposed to light of different wavelengths during the night (blue, green, and red). Melatonin concentrations were measured from water samples every 3h during a 24h period. Gene expression of gonadotropins was measured in perch exposed to different light colours and was additionally examined for perch subjected to different intensities of white light (0 lx, 1 lx, 10 lx, 100 lx) during the night. All different light colours caused a significant drop of melatonin concentration; however, blue light was least suppressive. Gene expression of gonadotropins was not influenced by nocturnal light of different light colours, but in female perch gonadotropin expression was significantly reduced by white light already at the lowest level (1 lx). We conclude that artificial light with shorter wavelengths at night is less effective in disturbing biological rhythms of perch than longer wavelengths, coinciding with the light situation in freshwater habitats inhabited by perch. Different light colours in the night showed no significant effect on gonadotropin expression, but white light in the night can disturb reproductive traits already at very low light intensities. These findings indicate that light pollution has not only the potential to disturb the melatonin cycle but also the reproductive rhythm and may therefore have implications on whole species communities.

  12. Impact of different colours of artificial light at night on melatonin rhythm and gene expression of gonadotropins in European perch.

    PubMed

    Brüning, Anika; Hölker, Franz; Franke, Steffen; Kleiner, Wibke; Kloas, Werner

    2016-02-01

    The distribution and intensity of artificial light at night, commonly referred to as light pollution, is consequently rising and progressively also ecological implications come to light. Low intensity light is known to suppress nocturnal melatonin production in several fish species. This study aims to examine the least suppressive light colour for melatonin excreted into the holding water and the influence of different light qualities and quantities in the night on gene expression of gonadotropins in fish. European perch (Perca fluviatilis) were exposed to light of different wavelengths during the night (blue, green, and red). Melatonin concentrations were measured from water samples every 3h during a 24h period. Gene expression of gonadotropins was measured in perch exposed to different light colours and was additionally examined for perch subjected to different intensities of white light (0 lx, 1 lx, 10 lx, 100 lx) during the night. All different light colours caused a significant drop of melatonin concentration; however, blue light was least suppressive. Gene expression of gonadotropins was not influenced by nocturnal light of different light colours, but in female perch gonadotropin expression was significantly reduced by white light already at the lowest level (1 lx). We conclude that artificial light with shorter wavelengths at night is less effective in disturbing biological rhythms of perch than longer wavelengths, coinciding with the light situation in freshwater habitats inhabited by perch. Different light colours in the night showed no significant effect on gonadotropin expression, but white light in the night can disturb reproductive traits already at very low light intensities. These findings indicate that light pollution has not only the potential to disturb the melatonin cycle but also the reproductive rhythm and may therefore have implications on whole species communities. PMID:26584071

  13. Impact of elvitegravir on human adipocytes: Alterations in differentiation, gene expression and release of adipokines and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Moure, Ricardo; Domingo, Pere; Gallego-Escuredo, José M; Villarroya, Joan; Gutierrez, Maria Del Mar; Mateo, Maria G; Domingo, Joan C; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2016-08-01

    Elvitegravir is a recently developed integrase inhibitor used for antiretroviral treatment of HIV infection. Secondary effects, including disturbances in lipid metabolism and, ultimately, in adipose tissue distribution and function, are common concerns associated with antiretroviral treatments. Here, we provide the first study of the effects of elvitegravir (in comparison with efavirenz, a non-nucleoside analog inhibitor of reverse transcriptase; and raltegravir, another integrase inhibitor) on human adipocyte differentiation, gene expression and secretion of adipokines and cytokines. Elvitegravir impaired adipogenesis and adipocyte metabolism in human SGBS adipocytes in a concentration-dependent manner (delaying acquisition of adipocyte morphology and reducing the expression of adipogenesis marker genes such as PPARγ, glucose transporter GLUT4, lipoprotein lipase, and the adipokines adiponectin and leptin). Compared with efavirenz, the effects of elvitegravir were similar but tended to occur at higher concentrations than those elicited by efavirenz, or were somewhat less intense than those caused by efavirenz at similar concentration. Elvitegravir tended to cause a more moderate induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines than efavirenz. Efavirenz induced a marked concentration-dependent increase in interleukin-8 expression and release whereas elvitregravir had little effect. Raltegravir had totally neutral actions of adipogenesis, adipocyte metabolism-related gene expression and release of adipokines and cytokines. In conclusion, elvitegravir alters adipocyte differentiation and function and promotes induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines similarly to efavirenz, but several effects were less intense. Further assessment of lipid metabolism and adipose tissue function in patients administered elvitegravir-based regimes is advisable considering that totally neutral effects of elvitegravir on lipid homeostasis cannot be anticipated from the current study in

  14. Functional Impact and Evolution of a Novel Human Polymorphic Inversion That Disrupts a Gene and Creates a Fusion Transcript.

    PubMed

    Puig, Marta; Castellano, David; Pantano, Lorena; Giner-Delgado, Carla; Izquierdo, David; Gayà-Vidal, Magdalena; Lucas-Lledó, José Ignacio; Esko, Tõnu; Terao, Chikashi; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Cáceres, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Despite many years of study into inversions, very little is known about their functional consequences, especially in humans. A common hypothesis is that the selective value of inversions stems in part from their effects on nearby genes, although evidence of this in natural populations is almost nonexistent. Here we present a global analysis of a new 415-kb polymorphic inversion that is among the longest ones found in humans and is the first with clear position effects. This inversion is located in chromosome 19 and has been generated by non-homologous end joining between blocks of transposable elements with low identity. PCR genotyping in 541 individuals from eight different human populations allowed the detection of tag SNPs and inversion genotyping in multiple populations worldwide, showing that the inverted allele is mainly found in East Asia with an average frequency of 4.7%. Interestingly, one of the breakpoints disrupts the transcription factor gene ZNF257, causing a significant reduction in the total expression level of this gene in lymphoblastoid cell lines. RNA-Seq analysis of the effects of this expression change in standard homozygotes and inversion heterozygotes revealed distinct expression patterns that were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. Moreover, we have found a new fusion transcript that is generated exclusively from inverted chromosomes around one of the breakpoints. Finally, by the analysis of the associated nucleotide variation, we have estimated that the inversion was generated ~40,000-50,000 years ago and, while a neutral evolution cannot be ruled out, its current frequencies are more consistent with those expected for a deleterious variant, although no significant association with phenotypic traits has been found so far.

  15. The impacts of neutralized acid mine drainage contaminated water on the expression of selected endocrine-linked genes in juvenile Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus exposed in vivo.

    PubMed

    Truter, Johannes Christoff; va Wyk, Johannes Hendrik; Oberholster, Paul Johan; Botha, Anna-Maria

    2014-02-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a global environmental concern due to detrimental impacts on river ecosystems. Little is however known regarding the biological impacts of neutralized AMD on aquatic vertebrates despite excessive discharge into watercourses. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the endocrine modulatory potential of neutralized AMD, using molecular biomarkers in the teleost fish Oreochromis mossambicus in exposure studies. Surface water was collected from six locations downstream of a high density sludge (HDS) AMD treatment plant and a reference site unimpacted by AMD. The concentrations of 28 elements, including 22 metals, were quantified in the exposure water in order to identify potential links to altered gene expression. Relatively high concentrations of manganese (~ 10mg/l), nickel (~ 0.1mg/l) and cobalt (~ 0.03 mg/l) were detected downstream of the HDS plant. The expression of thyroid receptor-α (trα), trβ, androgen receptor-1 (ar1), ar2, glucocorticoid receptor-1 (gr1), gr2, mineralocorticoid receptor (mr) and aromatase (cyp19a1b) was quantified in juvenile fish after 48 h exposure. Slight but significant changes were observed in the expression of gr1 and mr in fish exposed to water collected directly downstream of the HDS plant, consisting of approximately 95 percent neutralized AMD. The most pronounced alterations in gene expression (i.e. trα, trβ, gr1, gr2, ar1 and mr) was associated with water collected further downstream at a location with no other apparent contamination vectors apart from the neutralized AMD. The altered gene expression associated with the "downstream" locality coincided with higher concentrations of certain metals relative to the locality adjacent to the HDS plant which may indicate a causative link. The current study provides evidence of endocrine disruptive activity associated with neutralized AMD contamination in regard to alterations in the expression of key genes linked to the thyroid, interrenal and

  16. The impact of HIV-1 genetic diversity on the efficacy of a combinatorial RNAi-based gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Carrillo, E; Berkhout, B

    2015-06-01

    A hurdle for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) therapy is the genomic diversity of circulating viruses and the possibility that drug-resistant virus variants are selected. Although RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool to stably inhibit HIV-1 replication by the expression of antiviral short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) in transduced T cells, this approach is also vulnerable to pre-existing genetic variation and the development of viral resistance through mutation. To prevent viral escape, we proposed to combine multiple shRNAs against important regions of the HIV-1 RNA genome, which should ideally be conserved in all HIV-1 subtypes. The vulnerability of RNAi therapy to viral escape has been studied for a single subtype B strain, but it is unclear whether the antiviral shRNAs can inhibit diverse virus isolates and subtypes, including drug-resistant variants that could be present in treated patients. To determine the breadth of the RNAi gene therapy approach, we studied the susceptibility of HIV-1 subtypes A-E and drug-resistant variants. In addition, we monitored the evolution of HIV-1 escape variants. We demonstrate that the combinatorial RNAi therapy is highly effective against most isolates, supporting the future testing of this gene therapy in appropriate in vivo models.

  17. Improved Phytophthora resistance in commercial chickpea (Cicer arietinum) varieties negatively impacts symbiotic gene signalling and symbiotic potential in some varieties.

    PubMed

    Plett, Jonathan M; Plett, Krista L; Bithell, Sean L; Mitchell, Chris; Moore, Kevin; Powell, Jeff R; Anderson, Ian C

    2016-08-01

    Breeding disease-resistant varieties is one of the most effective and economical means to combat soilborne diseases in pulse crops. Commonalities between pathogenic and mutualistic microbe colonization strategies, however, raises the concern that reduced susceptibility to pathogens may simultaneously reduce colonization by beneficial microbes. We investigate here the degree of overlap in the transcriptional response of the Phytophthora medicaginis susceptible chickpea variety 'Sonali' to the early colonization stages of either Phytophthora, rhizobial bacteria or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. From a total of 6476 genes differentially expressed in Sonali roots during colonization by any of the microbes tested, 10.2% were regulated in a similar manner regardless of whether it was the pathogenic oomycete or a mutualistic microbe colonizing the roots. Of these genes, 49.7% were oppositely regulated under the same conditions in the moderately Phytophthora resistant chickpea variety 'PBA HatTrick'. Chickpea varieties with improved resistance to Phytophthora also displayed lower colonization by rhizobial bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi leading to an increased reliance on N and P from soil. Together, our results suggest that marker-based breeding in crops such as chickpea should be further investigated such that plant disease resistance can be tailored to a specific pathogen without affecting mutualistic plant:microbe interactions.

  18. Improved Phytophthora resistance in commercial chickpea (Cicer arietinum) varieties negatively impacts symbiotic gene signalling and symbiotic potential in some varieties.

    PubMed

    Plett, Jonathan M; Plett, Krista L; Bithell, Sean L; Mitchell, Chris; Moore, Kevin; Powell, Jeff R; Anderson, Ian C

    2016-08-01

    Breeding disease-resistant varieties is one of the most effective and economical means to combat soilborne diseases in pulse crops. Commonalities between pathogenic and mutualistic microbe colonization strategies, however, raises the concern that reduced susceptibility to pathogens may simultaneously reduce colonization by beneficial microbes. We investigate here the degree of overlap in the transcriptional response of the Phytophthora medicaginis susceptible chickpea variety 'Sonali' to the early colonization stages of either Phytophthora, rhizobial bacteria or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. From a total of 6476 genes differentially expressed in Sonali roots during colonization by any of the microbes tested, 10.2% were regulated in a similar manner regardless of whether it was the pathogenic oomycete or a mutualistic microbe colonizing the roots. Of these genes, 49.7% were oppositely regulated under the same conditions in the moderately Phytophthora resistant chickpea variety 'PBA HatTrick'. Chickpea varieties with improved resistance to Phytophthora also displayed lower colonization by rhizobial bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi leading to an increased reliance on N and P from soil. Together, our results suggest that marker-based breeding in crops such as chickpea should be further investigated such that plant disease resistance can be tailored to a specific pathogen without affecting mutualistic plant:microbe interactions. PMID:27103212

  19. The changing impact of genes and environment on brain development during childhood and adolescence: Initial findings from a neuroimaging study of pediatric twins

    PubMed Central

    LENROOT, RHOSHEL K.; GIEDD, JAY N.

    2010-01-01

    Human brain development is created through continuing complex interactions of genetic and environmental influences. The challenge of linking specific genetic or environmental risk factors to typical or atypical behaviors has led to interest in using brain structural features as an intermediate phenotype. Twin studies in adults have found that many aspects of brain anatomy are highly heritable, demonstrating that genetic factors provide a significant contribution to variation in brain structures. Less is known about the relative impact of genes and environment while the brain is actively developing. We summarize results from the ongoing National Institute of Mental Health child and adolescent twin study that suggest that heritability of different brain areas changes over the course of development in a regionally specific fashion. Areas associated with more complex reasoning abilities become increasingly heritable with maturation. The potential mechanisms by which gene–environment interactions may affect heritability values during development is discussed. PMID:18838036

  20. U.S. EPA regulation of plant-incorporated protectants: assessment of impacts of gene flow from pest-resistant plants.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Chris A; Martinez, Jeannette C

    2011-06-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency licenses pesticide-expressing plants under the authority of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). Transgenes and their pesticidal products represent pesticides under FIFRA and are referred to as plant-incorporated protectants (PIPs). When sexually compatible wild relatives (SCWR) are sympatric with PIP crops, there is a need to assess the potential for adverse effects to man and the environment resulting from transgene introgression in accord with FIFRA requirements. Genetic compatibility, introgression, weediness of SCWR × PIP hybrids, seed dispersal, and dormancy, among other parameters, as well as effects on other species (herbivores and beneficial insects), all need to be considered as part of the risk assessment for experimental use under Section 5 or registration under Section 3 of FIFRA. EPA is currently developing data requirements and guidance toward addressing potential gene flow impacts from PIPs.

  1. BNC2 is a putative tumor suppressor gene in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma and impacts cell survival after oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Cesaratto, Laura; Grisard, Eleonora; Coan, Michela; Zandonà, Luigi; De Mattia, Elena; Poletto, Elena; Cecchin, Erika; Puglisi, Fabio; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Mucignat, Maria Teresa; Zucchetto, Antonella; Stocco, Gabriele; Colombatti, Alfonso; Nicoloso, Milena S; Spizzo, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Rs3814113 is the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) showing the strongest association with high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC) incidence and is located in an intergenic region about 44 kb downstream of basonuclin 2 (BNC2) gene. Lifetime number of ovulations is associated with increased risk to develop HGSOC, probably because of cell damage of extrauterine Müllerian epithelium by ovulation-induced oxidative stress. However, the impact of low-penetrance HGSOC risk alleles (e.g. rs3814113) on the damage induced by oxidative stress remains unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether rs3814113 genetic interval regulates BNC2 expression and whether BNC2 expression levels impact on cell survival after oxidative stress. To do this, we analyzed gene expression levels of BNC2 first in HGSOC data sets and then in an isogenic cell line that we engineered to carry a 5 kb deletion around rs3814113. Finally, we silenced BNC2 and measured surviving cells after hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment to simulate oxidative stress after ovulation. In this paper, we describe that BNC2 expression levels are reduced in HGSOC samples compared with control samples, and that BNC2 expression levels decrease following oxidative stress and ovulation in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Moreover, deletion of 5 kb surrounding rs3814113 decreases BNC2 expression levels in an isogenic cell line, and silencing of BNC2 expression levels increases cell survival after H2O2 treatment. Altogether, our findings suggest that the intergenic region located around rs3814113 regulates BNC2 expression, which in turn affects cell survival after oxidative stress response. Indeed, HGSOC samples present lower BNC2 expression levels that probably, in the initial phases of oncogenic transformation, conferred resistance to oxidative stress and ultimately reduced the clearance of cells with oxidative-induced damages.

  2. Inactivation of thyA in Staphylococcus aureus Attenuates Virulence and Has a Strong Impact on Metabolism and Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kriegeskorte, Andre; Block, Desiree; Drescher, Mike; Windmüller, Nadine; Mellmann, Alexander; Baum, Cathrin; Neumann, Claudia; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Liebau, Eva; Hertel, Patrick; Seggewiss, Jochen; Becker, Karsten; Proctor, Richard A.; Peters, Georg

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus thymidine-dependent small-colony variants (TD-SCVs) are frequently isolated from patients with chronic S. aureus infections after long-term treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX). While it has been shown that TD-SCVs were associated with mutations in thymidylate synthase (TS; thyA), the impact of such mutations on protein function is lacking. In this study, we showed that mutations in thyA were leading to inactivity of TS proteins, and TS inactivity led to tremendous impact on S. aureus physiology and virulence. Whole DNA microarray analysis of the constructed ΔthyA mutant identified severe alterations compared to the wild type. Important virulence regulators (agr, arlRS, sarA) and major virulence determinants (hla, hlb, sspAB, and geh) were downregulated, while genes important for colonization (fnbA, fnbB, spa, clfB, sdrC, and sdrD) were upregulated. The expression of genes involved in pyrimidine and purine metabolism and nucleotide interconversion changed significantly. NupC was identified as a major nucleoside transporter, which supported growth of the mutant during TMP-SMX exposure by uptake of extracellular thymidine. The ΔthyA mutant was strongly attenuated in virulence models, including a Caenorhabditis elegans killing model and an acute pneumonia mouse model. This study identified inactivation of TS as the molecular basis of clinical TD-SCV and showed that thyA activity has a major role for S. aureus virulence and physiology. PMID:25073642

  3. Delivery method, target gene structure and growth properties of target cells impact mutagenic responses to reactive nitrogen and oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Young Kim, Min; Hoon Lim, Chang; Trudel, Laura J.; Deen, William M.; Wogan, Gerald N.

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulated production of nitric oxide (NO•) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) by inflammatory cells in vivo may contribute to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Here we compare cytotoxicity and mutagenicity induced by NO• and ROS in TK6 and AS52 cells, delivered by two methods: a well-characterized delivery system; and a novel adaptation of a system for co-culture. When exposed to preformed NO•, a cumulative dose of 620 µM•min reduced viability of TK6 cells at 24 h to 36% and increased mutation frequencies in the HPRT and TK1 genes to 7.7 × 106 (p < 0.05) and 24.8 × 106 (p < 0.01), 2.7- and 3.7-fold higher than background, respectively. In AS52 cells, cumulative doses of 1700 and 3700 µM•min reduced viability to 49% and 22%, respectively, and increased mutation frequency 10.2- and 14.6-fold higher than the argon control (132 × 106 and 190 × 106, respectively). These data show that TK6 cells were more sensitive than AS52 cells to killing by NO•. However, the two cell lines were very similar in relative susceptibility to mutagenesis; on the basis of fold-increases in MF, average relative sensitivity values [(MFexp/MFcontrol) /cumulative NO• dose] were 5.16 × 10−3 µM−1min−1, and 4.97 × 10−3µM−1min−1 for AS52 cells. When AS52 cells were exposed to reactive species generated by activated macrophages in the co-culture system, cell killing was greatly reduced by addition of NMA to the culture medium, and was completely abrogated by combined additions of NMA and the superoxide scavenger Tiron, indicating the relative importance of NO• to loss of viability. Exposure in the co-culture system for 48 h increased mutation frequency in the gpt gene by more than 9 fold, and NMA plus Tiron again completely prevented the response. Molecular analysis of gpt mutants induced by preformed NO• or by activated macrophages revealed that both doubled the frequency of gene inactivation (40% in induced vs 20% in spontaneous mutants). Sequencing showed

  4. Impact of type 2 diabetes on the gene expression of bone-related factors at sites receiving dental implants.

    PubMed

    Conte, A; Ghiraldini, B; Casarin, R C; Casati, M Z; Pimentel, S P; Cirano, F R; Duarte, P M; Ribeiro, F V

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the influence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on the gene expression of bone-related factors in alveolar bone tissue from sites designated to receive dental implants. Bone biopsies were harvested from sites of planned implants for 19 systemically healthy patients and 35 patients with T2DM (17 with better-controlled T2DM (glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels ≤8%) and 18 with poorly controlled T2DM (HbA1c levels >8%)). The mRNA levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha, transforming growth factor beta, receptor activator of the nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG), runt-related transcription factor 2, alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein (BSP), type I collagen (COL-I), and osteocalcin were evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. T2DM up-regulates RANKL levels and the ratio of RANKL/OPG, whereas it down-regulates COL-I and BSP expression (P<0.05). Higher mRNA levels of RANKL/OPG were observed in the poorly controlled T2DM patients compared to those with better-controlled T2DM and systemically healthy patients (P<0.05). A lower amount of COL-I and BSP was detected in the biopsies from individuals with poorly controlled T2DM compared to systemically healthy patients (P<0.05). In conclusion, RANKL, RANKL/OPG, COL-I, and BSP are negatively affected in diabetics. Additionally, the patient's glycaemic status appears to modulate bone-related genes in a different manner.

  5. Impacts of CO2 concentration on growth, lipid accumulation, and carbon-concentrating-mechanism-related gene expression in oleaginous Chlorella.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianhua; Xu, Hui; Luo, Yuanchan; Wan, Minxi; Huang, Jianke; Wang, Weiliang; Li, Yuanguang

    2015-03-01

    Biodiesel production by microalgae with photosynthetic CO2 biofixation is thought to be a feasible way in the field of bioenergy and carbon emission reduction. Knowledge of the carbon-concentrating mechanism plays an important role in improving microalgae carbon fixation efficiency. However, little information is available regarding the dramatic changes of cells suffered upon different environmental factors, such as CO2 concentration. The aim of this study was to investigate the growth, lipid accumulation, carbon fixation rate, and carbon metabolism gene expression under different CO2 concentrations in oleaginous Chlorella. It was found that Chlorella pyrenoidosa grew well under CO2 concentrations ranging from 1 to 20 %. The highest biomass and lipid productivity were 4.3 g/L and 107 mg/L/day under 5 % CO2 condition. Switch from high (5 %) to low (0.03 %, air) CO2 concentration showed significant inhibitory effect on growth and CO2 fixation rate. The amount of the saturated fatty acids was increased obviously along with the transition. Low CO2 concentration (0.03 %) was suitable for the accumulation of saturated fatty acids. Reducing the CO2 concentration could significantly decrease the polyunsaturated degree in fatty acids. Moreover, the carbon-concentrating mechanism-related gene expression revealed that most of them, especially CAH2, LCIB, and HLA3, had remarkable change after 1, 4, and 24 h of the transition, which suggests that Chlorella has similar carbon-concentrating mechanism with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The findings of the present study revealed that C. pyrenoidosa is an ideal candidate for mitigating CO2 and biodiesel production and is appropriate as a model for mechanism research of carbon sequestration.

  6. Adenovirus vector induced Innate Immune responses: Impact upon efficacy and toxicity in gene therapy and vaccine applications

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Zachary C.; Appledorn, Daniel M.; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Extensively characterized, modified, and employed for a variety of purposes, Adenovirus (Ad) vectors are generally regarded as having great potential by many applied virologists who wish to manipulate and use viral biology to achieve beneficial clinical outcomes. Despite widespread functional prominence and utility, (i.e.: Ad based clinical trials have begun to progress to critical Phase III levels, it has recently become apparent that investigations regarding the innate immune response to Ads may reveal not only reasons behind previous failures, but also reveal novel insights that will allow for safer, more efficacious uses of this important gene transfer platform. Insights gained by the exploration of Ad induced innate immune responses will likely be most important to the fields of vaccine development, since Ad based vaccines are highly acknowledged as one of the more promising vaccine platforms in development today. Adenovirus is currently known to interact with several different extracellular, intracellular, and membrane bound innate immune sensing systems. Past and recent studies involving manipulation of the Ad infectious cycle as well as use of different mutants have shed light on some of the initiation mechanisms underlying Ad induced immune responses. More recent studies using microarray based analyses, genetically modified cell lines and/or mouse mutants, and advanced generation Ad vectors have revealed important new insights into the scope and mechanism of this cellular defensive response. This review is an attempt to synthesize these studies, update Ad biologists to the current knowledge surrounding these increasingly important issues, as well point areas where future research should be directed. It should also serve as a sobering reality to researchers exploring the use of any gene transfer vector, as to the complexities potentially involved when contemplating use of such vectors for human applications. PMID:18036698

  7. Novel polymorphisms in the promoter region of the perforin gene among distinct Brazilian populations and their functional impact.

    PubMed

    Garcia, F B; Kashima, S; Rodrigues, E S; Silva, I T; Malta, T M; Nicolete, L D de Figueiredo; Haddad, R; Moraes-Souza, H; Covas, D T

    2014-06-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells play a crucial role in eliminating tumour and virus-infected cells. The perforin is a key part of the arsenal that these cells use to destroy their targets. In this study, we characterized single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the promoter region of the perforin gene among distinct Brazilian ethnic groups. The study was carried out by sequencing this region in three groups: European, African and Asian descents. We demonstrated for the first time the occurrence of three new polymorphisms in the promoter region of gene PRF1: 494A/G (rs78058707), 720G/A (rs75925789) and 1176C/T (rs75183511). Three other SNPs already described in the literature 63A/G (rs35401316), 112A/G (rs10999428) and 1012C/T (rs35069510) were also detected. The SNPs are distributed differently in the ethnic groups studied. The 112G allele was observed at high frequency, especially among Asian descents (48.1%). The 1012T allele was detected only among European descents, the 494G allele only among Asian descents and 1176T allele only in African descents. Based on the association between the polymorphisms described, ten new haplotypes were originated. In functional analysis, we noticed that SNPs present in most common haplotypes cannot induce significant differences in expression levels of perforin alone. In conclusion, this study demonstrates for the first time the existence of three new polymorphisms in perforin promoter and, contrary to what was stated, the presence of these SNPs does not alter the levels of protein expression.

  8. The impact of genome-wide supported schizophrenia risk variants in the neurogranin gene on brain structure and function.

    PubMed

    Walton, Esther; Geisler, Daniel; Hass, Johanna; Liu, Jingyu; Turner, Jessica; Yendiki, Anastasia; Smolka, Michael N; Ho, Beng-Choon; Manoach, Dara S; Gollub, Randy L; Roessner, Veit; Calhoun, Vince D; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying genetic risk for schizophrenia, a highly heritable psychiatric condition, are still under investigation. New schizophrenia risk genes discovered through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), such as neurogranin (NRGN), can be used to identify these mechanisms. In this study we examined the association of two common NRGN risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with functional and structural brain-based intermediate phenotypes for schizophrenia. We obtained structural, functional MRI and genotype data of 92 schizophrenia patients and 114 healthy volunteers from the multisite Mind Clinical Imaging Consortium study. Two schizophrenia-associated NRGN SNPs (rs12807809 and rs12541) were tested for association with working memory-elicited dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activity and surface-wide cortical thickness. NRGN rs12541 risk allele homozygotes (TT) displayed increased working memory-related activity in several brain regions, including the left DLPFC, left insula, left somatosensory cortex and the cingulate cortex, when compared to non-risk allele carriers. NRGN rs12807809 non-risk allele (C) carriers showed reduced cortical gray matter thickness compared to risk allele homozygotes (TT) in an area comprising the right pericalcarine gyrus, the right cuneus, and the right lingual gyrus. Our study highlights the effects of schizophrenia risk variants in the NRGN gene on functional and structural brain-based intermediate phenotypes for schizophrenia. These results support recent GWAS findings and further implicate NRGN in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia by suggesting that genetic NRGN risk variants contribute to subtle changes in neural functioning and anatomy that can be quantified with neuroimaging methods. PMID:24098564

  9. Impact of urbanization and agriculture on the occurrence of bacterial pathogens and stx genes in coastal waterbodies of central California.

    PubMed

    Walters, Sarah P; Thebo, Anne L; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2011-02-01

    Fecal pollution enters coastal waters through multiple routes, many of which originate from land-based activities. Runoff from pervious and impervious land surfaces transports pollutants from land to sea and can cause impairment of coastal ocean waters. To understand how land use practices and water characteristics influence concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and pathogens in natural waters, fourteen coastal streams, rivers, and tidal lagoons, surrounded by variable land use and animal densities, were sampled every six weeks over two years (2008 & 2009). Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB; Escherichia coli and Enterococci) and Salmonella concentrations, the occurrence of Bacteroidales human, ruminant, and pig-specific fecal markers, E. coli O157:H7, and Shiga toxin (stx) genes present in E. coli, were measured. In addition, environmental and climatic variables (e.g., temperature, salinity, rainfall), as well as human and livestock population densities and land cover were quantified. Concentrations of FIB and Salmonella were correlated with each other, but the occurrence of host-specific Bacteroidales markers did not correlate with FIB or pathogens. FIB and Salmonella concentrations, as well as the occurrence of E. coli harboring stx genes, were positively associated with the fraction of the surrounding subwatershed that was urban, while the occurrence of E. coli O157:H7 was positively associated with the agricultural fraction. FIB and Salmonella concentrations were negatively correlated to salinity and temperature, and positively correlated to rainfall. Areal loading rates of FIB, Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 to the coastal ocean were calculated for stream and river sites and varied with land cover, salinity, temperature, and rainfall. Results suggest that FIB and pathogen concentrations are influenced, in part, by their flux from the land, which is exacerbated during rainfall; once waterborne, bacterial persistence is affected by water temperature and

  10. Impact of gene patents and licensing practices on access to genetic testing for inherited susceptibility to cancer: comparing breast and ovarian cancers with colon cancers.

    PubMed

    Cook-Deegan, Robert; DeRienzo, Christopher; Carbone, Julia; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Heaney, Christopher; Conover, Christopher

    2010-04-01

    Genetic testing for inherited susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer can be compared with similar testing for colorectal cancer as a "natural experiment." Inherited susceptibility accounts for a similar fraction of both cancers and genetic testing results guide decisions about options for prophylactic surgery in both sets of conditions. One major difference is that in the United States, Myriad Genetics is the sole provider of genetic testing, because it has sole control of relevant patents for BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, whereas genetic testing for familial colorectal cancer is available from multiple laboratories. Colorectal cancer-associated genes are also patented, but they have been nonexclusively licensed. Prices for BRCA1 and 2 testing do not reflect an obvious price premium attributable to exclusive patent rights compared with colorectal cancer testing, and indeed, Myriad's per unit costs are somewhat lower for BRCA1/2 testing than testing for colorectal cancer susceptibility. Myriad has not enforced patents against basic research and negotiated a Memorandum of Understanding with the National Cancer Institute in 1999 for institutional BRCA testing in clinical research. The main impact of patenting and licensing in BRCA compared with colorectal cancer is the business model of genetic testing, with a sole provider for BRCA and multiple laboratories for colorectal cancer genetic testing. Myriad's sole-provider model has not worked in jurisdictions outside the United States, largely because of differences in breadth of patent protection, responses of government health services, and difficulty in patent enforcement.

  11. Sexual Dimorphism and Aging in the Human Hyppocampus: Identification, Validation, and Impact of Differentially Expressed Genes by Factorial Microarray and Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guebel, Daniel V.; Torres, Néstor V.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: In the brain of elderly-healthy individuals, the effects of sexual dimorphism and those due to normal aging appear overlapped. Discrimination of these two dimensions would powerfully contribute to a better understanding of the etiology of some neurodegenerative diseases, such as “sporadic” Alzheimer. Methods: Following a system biology approach, top-down and bottom-up strategies were combined. First, public transcriptome data corresponding to the transition from adulthood to the aging stage in normal, human hippocampus were analyzed through an optimized microarray post-processing (Q-GDEMAR method) together with a proper experimental design (full factorial analysis). Second, the identified genes were placed in context by building compatible networks. The subsequent ontology analyses carried out on these networks clarify the main functionalities involved. Results: Noticeably we could identify large sets of genes according to three groups: those that exclusively depend on the sex, those that exclusively depend on the age, and those that depend on the particular combinations of sex and age (interaction). The genes identified were validated against three independent sources (a proteomic study of aging, a senescence database, and a mitochondrial genetic database). We arrived to several new inferences about the biological functions compromised during aging in two ways: by taking into account the sex-independent effects of aging, and considering the interaction between age and sex where pertinent. In particular, we discuss the impact of our findings on the functions of mitochondria, autophagy, mitophagia, and microRNAs. Conclusions: The evidence obtained herein supports the occurrence of significant neurobiological differences in the hippocampus, not only between adult and elderly individuals, but between old-healthy women and old-healthy men. Hence, to obtain realistic results in further analysis of the transition from the normal aging to incipient

  12. Impact of CCL2 and Its Receptor CCR2 Gene Polymorphism in North Indian Population: A Comparative Study in Different Ethnic Groups Worldwide.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vibha; Srivastava, Neena; Srivastava, Priyanka; Mittal, Rama Devi

    2013-07-01

    Chemokine are small, inducible pro-inflammatory cytokines involved in many biological processes, such as migration of leukocytes, atherosclerosis, angiogenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis. Chemokine are also known to influence tumor cell's activity. Specifically, tumor cells express chemokine receptors in a non random manner suggesting a role of chemokine in metastatic destination of tumor cells. The present study was conducted to determine distribution of (Chemokine receptor 2) CCR2 V64I, Chemokine ligand 2 CCL2 I/D, and CCL2 2518 A>G gene polymorphisms in North Indian population and compare with different populations globally. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based analysis was conducted in 200 normal healthy individuals of similar ethnicity. Allelic frequencies in wild type (GG) of CCR2 V64I G>A were 63 % G; CCL2 I/D 42 % II; CCL2 2518 A>G 40.5 % A. The minor variant allele frequency in our population was as follows: 19.5 % for CCR2 V64I, 35.5 % for CCL2 I/D, 35.3 % for CCL2 2518 A>G. We further compared frequency distribution for these genes with various published studies in different ethnicity. Our results suggested that frequency in chemokine genes exhibit distinctive pattern in India that could be attributed to ethnicity variation. This could assist in high-risk screening of human exposed to environmental carcinogens and cancer predisposition in different ethnic groups. Thus, they signify an impact of ethnicity and provide a basis for future epidemiological and clinical studies.

  13. Fungal endophytes of Catharanthus roseus enhance vindoline content by modulating structural and regulatory genes related to terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Shiv S.; Singh, Sucheta; Babu, C. S. Vivek; Shanker, Karuna; Srivastava, N. K.; Shukla, Ashutosh K.; Kalra, Alok

    2016-01-01

    Not much is known about the mechanism of endophyte-mediated induction of secondary metabolite production in Catharanthus roseus. In the present study two fungal endophytes, Curvularia sp. CATDLF5 and Choanephora infundibulifera CATDLF6 were isolated from the leaves of the plant that were found to enhance vindoline content by 229–403%. The isolated endophytes did not affect the primary metabolism of the plant as the maximum quantum efficiency of PSII, net CO2 assimilation, plant biomass and starch content of endophyte-inoculated plants was similar to endophyte-free control plants. Expression of terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) pathway genes, geraniol 10-hydroxylase (G10H), tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), strictosidine synthase (STR), 16-hydoxytabersonine-O-methyltransferase (16OMT), desacetoxyvindoline-4-hydroxylase (D4H), deacetylvindoline-4-O-acetyltransferase (DAT) were upregulated in endophyte-inoculated plants. Endophyte inoculation upregulated the expression of the gene for transcriptional activator octadecanoid-responsive Catharanthus AP2-domain protein (ORCA3) and downregulated the expression of Cys2/His2-type zinc finger protein family transcriptional repressors (ZCTs). The gene for the vacuolar class III peroxidase (PRX1), responsible for coupling vindoline and catharanthine, was upregulated in endophyte-inoculated plants. These endophytes may enhance vindoline production by modulating the expression of key structural and regulatory genes of vindoline biosynthesis without affecting the primary metabolism of the host plant. PMID:27220774

  14. Unraveling new genes associated with seed development and metabolism in Bixa orellana L. by expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis.

    PubMed

    Soares, Virgínia L F; Rodrigues, Simone M; de Oliveira, Tahise M; de Queiroz, Talisson O; Lima, Lívia S; Hora-Júnior, Braz T; Gramacho, Karina P; Micheli, Fabienne; Cascardo, Júlio C M; Otoni, Wagner C; Gesteira, Abelmon S; Costa, Marcio G C

    2011-02-01

    The tropical tree Bixa orellana L. produces a range of secondary metabolites which biochemical and molecular biosynthesis basis are not well understood. In this work we have characterized a set of ESTs from a non-normalized cDNA library of B. orellana seeds to obtain information about the main developmental and metabolic processes taking place in developing seeds and their associated genes. After sequencing a set of randomly selected clones, most of the sequences were assigned with putative functions based on similarity, GO annotations and protein domains. The most abundant transcripts encoded proteins associated with cell wall (prolyl 4-hydroxylase), fatty acid (acyl carrier protein), and hormone/flavonoid (2OG-Fe oxygenase) synthesis, germination (MADS FLC-like protein) and embryo development (AP2/ERF transcription factor) regulation, photosynthesis (chlorophyll a-b binding protein), cell elongation (MAP65-1a), and stress responses (metallothionein- and thaumatin-like proteins). Enzymes were assigned to 16 different metabolic pathways related to both primary and secondary metabolisms. Characterization of two candidate genes of the bixin biosynthetic pathway, BoCCD and BoOMT, showed that they belong, respectively, to the carotenoid-cleavage dioxygenase 4 (CCD4) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) families, and are up-regulated during seed development. It indicates their involvement in the synthesis of this commercially important carotenoid pigment in seeds of B. orellana. Most of the genes identified here are the first representatives of their gene families in B. orellana. PMID:20563648

  15. Fungal endophytes of Catharanthus roseus enhance vindoline content by modulating structural and regulatory genes related to terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Shiv S; Singh, Sucheta; Babu, C S Vivek; Shanker, Karuna; Srivastava, N K; Shukla, Ashutosh K; Kalra, Alok

    2016-01-01

    Not much is known about the mechanism of endophyte-mediated induction of secondary metabolite production in Catharanthus roseus. In the present study two fungal endophytes, Curvularia sp. CATDLF5 and Choanephora infundibulifera CATDLF6 were isolated from the leaves of the plant that were found to enhance vindoline content by 229-403%. The isolated endophytes did not affect the primary metabolism of the plant as the maximum quantum efficiency of PSII, net CO2 assimilation, plant biomass and starch content of endophyte-inoculated plants was similar to endophyte-free control plants. Expression of terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) pathway genes, geraniol 10-hydroxylase (G10H), tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), strictosidine synthase (STR), 16-hydoxytabersonine-O-methyltransferase (16OMT), desacetoxyvindoline-4-hydroxylase (D4H), deacetylvindoline-4-O-acetyltransferase (DAT) were upregulated in endophyte-inoculated plants. Endophyte inoculation upregulated the expression of the gene for transcriptional activator octadecanoid-responsive Catharanthus AP2-domain protein (ORCA3) and downregulated the expression of Cys2/His2-type zinc finger protein family transcriptional repressors (ZCTs). The gene for the vacuolar class III peroxidase (PRX1), responsible for coupling vindoline and catharanthine, was upregulated in endophyte-inoculated plants. These endophytes may enhance vindoline production by modulating the expression of key structural and regulatory genes of vindoline biosynthesis without affecting the primary metabolism of the host plant. PMID:27220774

  16. A multi-year assessment of the environmental impact of transgenic Eucalyptus trees harboring a bacterial choline oxidase gene on biomass, precinct vegetation and the microbial community.

    PubMed

    Oguchi, Taichi; Kashimura, Yuko; Mimura, Makiko; Yu, Xiang; Matsunaga, Etsuko; Nanto, Kazuya; Shimada, Teruhisa; Kikuchi, Akira; Watanabe, Kazuo N

    2014-10-01

    A 4-year field trial for the salt tolerant Eucalyptus globulus Labill. harboring the choline oxidase (codA) gene derived from the halobacterium Arthrobacter globiformis was conducted to assess the impact of transgenic versus non-transgenic trees on biomass production, the adjacent soil microbial communities and vegetation by monitoring growth parameters, seasonal changes in soil microbes and the allelopathic activity of leaves. Three independently-derived lines of transgenic E. globulus were compared with three independent non-transgenic lines including two elite clones. No significant differences in biomass production were detected between transgenic lines and non-transgenic controls derived from same seed bulk, while differences were seen compared to two elite clones. Significant differences in the number of soil microbes present were also detected at different sampling times but not between transgenic and non-transgenic lines. The allelopathic activity of leaves from both transgenic and non-transgenic lines also varied significantly with sampling time, but the allelopathic activity of leaves from transgenic lines did not differ significantly from those from non-transgenic lines. These results indicate that, for the observed variables, the impact on the environment of codA-transgenic E. globulus did not differ significantly from that of the non-transformed controls on this field trial. PMID:24927812

  17. Comparison of GENCODE and RefSeq gene annotation and the impact of reference geneset on variant effect prediction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background A vast amount of DNA variation is being identified by increasingly large-scale exome and genome sequencing projects. To be useful, variants require accurate functional annotation and a wide range of tools are available to this end. McCarthy et al recently demonstrated the large differences in prediction of loss-of-function (LoF) variation when RefSeq and Ensembl transcripts are used for annotation, highlighting the importance of the reference transcripts on which variant functional annotation is based. Results We describe a detailed analysis of the similarities and differences between the gene and transcript annotation in the GENCODE and RefSeq genesets. We demonstrate that the GENCODE Comprehensive set is richer in alternative splicing, novel CDSs, novel exons and has higher genomic coverage than RefSeq, while the GENCODE Basic set is very similar to RefSeq. Using RNAseq data we show that exons and introns unique to one geneset are expressed at a similar level to those common to both. We present evidence that the differences in gene annotation lead to large differences in variant annotation where GENCODE and RefSeq are used as reference transcripts, although this is predominantly confined to non-coding transcripts and UTR sequence, with at most ~30% of LoF variants annotated discordantly. We also describe an investigation of dominant transcript expression, showing that it both supports the utility of the GENCODE Basic set in providing a smaller set of more highly expressed transcripts and provides a useful, biologically-relevant filter for further reducing the complexity of the transcriptome. Conclusions The reference transcripts selected for variant functional annotation do have a large effect on the outcome. The GENCODE Comprehensive transcripts contain more exons, have greater genomic coverage and capture many more variants than RefSeq in both genome and exome datasets, while the GENCODE Basic set shows a higher degree of concordance with RefSeq and

  18. Impact of molecular weight in four-branched star vectors with narrow molecular weight distribution on gene delivery efficiency.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Yasushi; Borovkov, Alexey; Zhou, Yue-Min; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Nakayama, Yasuhide

    2009-12-01

    A series of star-shaped cationic polymers, termed star vectors (SVs), has been developed as effective nonviral gene delivery carriers. In this study, we separated SVs into several fractions having different molecular weights with very narrow molecular weight distributions in order to examine in detail the influence of the molecular weight of the SVs on the gene transfection efficiency. As a model compound for several types of SVs, 4-branched poly(N,N-dimethylaminopropyl acrylamide) having a molecular weight (M(n)) of approximately 35 kDa and polydispersity of 1.6 was prepared by iniferter-based radical polymerization. The SVs were separated using size-exclusion chromatography to obtain seven fractions having M(n) ranging from 27 kDa to 73 kDa with polydispersity ranging from 1.1 to 1.2. All the fractionated SVs have similar pH of 10.2-10.4 and were able to interact with and condense luciferase-encoding plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) to yield SV/DNA polyplexes. A water-soluble tetrazolium-1 (WST) assay showed that all SVs had minimal cellular cytotoxicity under an N/P charge ratio of 10. The critical micellar concentration decreased with an increase in the M(n) of the fractionated SVs; however, the particle size of the polyplexes, exclusion activity of ethidium bromide, and zeta-potential of the polyplexes increased. An in vitro evaluation using COS-1 cells at an N/P ratio of 10 showed that transfection activity increased almost linearly with M(n). The highest transfection activity was obtained for SVs with the highest M(n) (73 kDa), which was over 7 times that for the SVs with the lowest M(n) (27 kDa), the nonfractionated original SV, or PEI standard. The transfection efficiency was more correlated with the amphiphilicity or hydrophobicity of the SVs and the surface potential and condensate density of the polyplexes than with the particle size.

  19. Impact of CAG repeat length in the androgen receptor gene on male infertility - a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Feifan; Lan, Aihua; Lin, Zhidi; Song, Jianfei; Zhang, Yuening; Li, Jiatong; Gu, Kailong; Lv, Baihao; Zhao, Dong; Zeng, Siping; Zhang, Ruoheng; Zhao, Wei; Pan, Zhengyan; Deng, Xiaozhen; Yang, Xiaoli

    2016-07-01

    CAG repeats are polymorphic nucleotide repeats present in the androgen receptor gene. Many studies have estimated the association between CAG repeat length and male infertility, but the conclusions are controversial. Previous meta-analyses have come to different conclusions; however, new studies have been published. An updated meta-analysis was conducted. PubMed, CBM, CNKI and Web of Science databases were systematically searched for studies published from 1 January 2000 to 1 October 2015. Case-control studies on the association between CAG repeat length and male infertility using appropriate methodology were included. Forty studies were selected, including 3858 cases and 3161 controls. Results showed statistically significantly longer CAG repeat length among cases compared with controls (SMD = 0.14; 95% CI, 0.02-0.26). Shorter repeat length was associated with a lower risk of male infertility compared with a longer repeat length in the overall analysis (OR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.66-0.95). Moreover, CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility in Caucasian populations, but not Asian or Egyptian populations. Subgroup analysis revealed no significant difference in German populations, but CAG repeat length was associated with male infertility in China and the USA. There were no significant differences between cases and controls in azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia.

  20. The Impact on Genetic Testing of Mutational Patterns of CFTR Gene in Different Clinical Macrocategories of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Marco; Bruno, Sabina M; Pierandrei, Silvia; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Testino, Giancarlo; Truglio, Gessica; Strom, Roberto; Quattrucci, Serena

    2016-07-01

    More than 2000 sequence variations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene are known. The marked genetic heterogeneity, poor functional characterization of the vast majority of sequence variations, and an uncertain genotype-phenotype relationship complicate the definition of mutational search strategies. We studied the effect of the marked genetic heterogeneity detected in a case series comprising 610 patients of cystic fibrosis (CF), grouped in different clinical macrocategories, on the operative characteristics of the genetic test designed to fully characterize CF patients. The detection rate in each clinical macrocategory and at each mutational step was found to be influenced by genetic heterogeneity. The definition of a single mutational panel that is suitable for all clinical macrocategories proved impossible. Only for classic CF with pancreas insufficiency did a reduced number of mutations yield a detection rate of diagnostic value. All other clinical macrocategories required an extensive genetic search. The search for specific mutational classes appears to be useful only in specific CF clinical forms. A flowchart defining a mutational search that may be adopted for different CF clinical forms, optimized in respect to those already available, is proposed. The findings also have consequences for carrier screening strategies. PMID:27157324

  1. Gender-specific gene-environment interaction in alcohol dependence: the impact of daily life events and GABRA2.

    PubMed

    Perry, Brea L; Pescosolido, Bernice A; Bucholz, Kathleen; Edenberg, Howard; Kramer, John; Kuperman, Samuel; Schuckit, Marc Alan; Nurnberger, John I

    2013-09-01

    Gender-moderated gene-environment interactions are rarely explored, raising concerns about inaccurate specification of etiological models and inferential errors. The current study examined the influence of gender, negative and positive daily life events, and GABRA2 genotype (SNP rs279871) on alcohol dependence, testing two- and three-way interactions between these variables using multi-level regression models fit to data from 2,281 White participants in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism. Significant direct effects of variables of interest were identified, as well as gender-specific moderation of genetic risk on this SNP by social experiences. Higher levels of positive life events were protective for men with the high-risk genotype, but not among men with the low-risk genotype or women, regardless of genotype. Our findings support the disinhibition theory of alcohol dependence, suggesting that gender differences in social norms, constraints and opportunities, and behavioral undercontrol may explain men and women's distinct patterns of association.

  2. Gene-environment interaction from international cohorts: impact on development and evolution of occupational and environmental lung and airway disease.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Adam; Christiani, David C

    2015-06-01

    Environmental and occupational pulmonary diseases impose a substantial burden of morbidity and mortality on the global population. However, it has been long observed that only some of those who are exposed to pulmonary toxicants go on to develop disease; increasingly, it is being recognized that genetic differences may underlie some of this person-to-person variability. Studies performed throughout the globe are demonstrating important gene-environment interactions for diseases as diverse as chronic beryllium disease, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, silicosis, asbestosis, byssinosis, occupational asthma, and pollution-associated asthma. These findings have, in many instances, elucidated the pathogenesis of these highly complex diseases. At the same time, however, translation of this research into clinical practice has, for good reasons, proceeded slowly. No genetic test has yet emerged with sufficiently robust operating characteristics to be clearly useful or practicable in an occupational or environmental setting. In addition, occupational genetic testing raises serious ethical and policy concerns. Therefore, the primary objective must remain ensuring that the workplace and the environment are safe for all. PMID:26024343

  3. The Impact on Genetic Testing of Mutational Patterns of CFTR Gene in Different Clinical Macrocategories of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Marco; Bruno, Sabina M; Pierandrei, Silvia; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Testino, Giancarlo; Truglio, Gessica; Strom, Roberto; Quattrucci, Serena

    2016-07-01

    More than 2000 sequence variations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene are known. The marked genetic heterogeneity, poor functional characterization of the vast majority of sequence variations, and an uncertain genotype-phenotype relationship complicate the definition of mutational search strategies. We studied the effect of the marked genetic heterogeneity detected in a case series comprising 610 patients of cystic fibrosis (CF), grouped in different clinical macrocategories, on the operative characteristics of the genetic test designed to fully characterize CF patients. The detection rate in each clinical macrocategory and at each mutational step was found to be influenced by genetic heterogeneity. The definition of a single mutational panel that is suitable for all clinical macrocategories proved impossible. Only for classic CF with pancreas insufficiency did a reduced number of mutations yield a detection rate of diagnostic value. All other clinical macrocategories required an extensive genetic search. The search for specific mutational classes appears to be useful only in specific CF clinical forms. A flowchart defining a mutational search that may be adopted for different CF clinical forms, optimized in respect to those already available, is proposed. The findings also have consequences for carrier screening strategies.

  4. Gene-environment interaction from international cohorts: impact on development and evolution of occupational and environmental lung and airway disease.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Adam; Christiani, David C

    2015-06-01

    Environmental and occupational pulmonary diseases impose a substantial burden of morbidity and mortality on the global population. However, it has been long observed that only some of those who are exposed to pulmonary toxicants go on to develop disease; increasingly, it is being recognized that genetic differences may underlie some of this person-to-person variability. Studies performed throughout the globe are demonstrating important gene-environment interactions for diseases as diverse as chronic beryllium disease, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, silicosis, asbestosis, byssinosis, occupational asthma, and pollution-associated asthma. These findings have, in many instances, elucidated the pathogenesis of these highly complex diseases. At the same time, however, translation of this research into clinical practice has, for good reasons, proceeded slowly. No genetic test has yet emerged with sufficiently robust operating characteristics to be clearly useful or practicable in an occupational or environmental setting. In addition, occupational genetic testing raises serious ethical and policy concerns. Therefore, the primary objective must remain ensuring that the workplace and the environment are safe for all.

  5. Impact of protein supplementation and exercise in preventing changes in gene expression profiling in woman muscles after long-term bedrest as revealed by microarray analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopard, Angele; Lecunff, Martine; Danger, Richard; Teusan, Raluca; Jasmin, Bernard J.; Marini, Jean-Francois; Leger, Jean

    Long duration space flights have a dramatic impact on human physiology and under such a condition, skeletal muscles are known to be one of the most affected systems. A thorough understanding of the basic mechanisms leading to muscle impairment under microgravity, which causes significant loss of muscle mass as well as structural disorders, is necessary for the development of efficient space flight countermeasures. This study was conducted under the aegis of the European Space Agency (ESA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration of the USA (NASA), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), and the French "Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales" (CNES). It gave us the opportunity to investigate for the first time the effects of prolonged disuse (long-term bedrest, LTBR) on the transcriptome of different muscle types in healthy women (control, n=8), as well as the potential beneficial impact of protein supplementation (nutrition, n=8) and a combined resistance and aerobic exercise training program (exercise, n=8). Pre- (LTBR -8) and post- (LTBR +59) biopsies were obtained from vastus lateralis (VL) and soleus (SOL) muscles from each subject. Skeletal muscle gene expression profiles were obtained using a custom made microarray containing 6681 muscle-relevant genes. 555 differentiallyexpressed and statistically-significant genes were identified in control group following 60 days of LTBR, including 348 specific for SOL, 83 specific for VL, and 124 common for the two types of muscle (p<0.05). After LTBR, both muscle types exhibited a consistent decrease in pathways involved in fatty acid oxidation, ATP synthesis, and oxidative phosphorylation (p<0.05). However, the postural SOL muscle exhibited a higher level of changes with mRNA encoding proteins involved in protein synthesis and activation of protein degradation (mainly ubiquitinproteasome components) (p<0.05). Major changes in muscle function, such as those involved in calcium signaling and muscle structure including

  6. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  7. Anthocyanin accumulation and expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes in radish (Raphanus sativus).

    PubMed

    Park, Nam Il; Xu, Hui; Li, Xiaohua; Jang, In Hyuk; Park, Suhyoung; Ahn, Gil Hwan; Lim, Yong Pyo; Kim, Sun Ju; Park, Sang Un

    2011-06-01

    Radish [Raphanus sativus (Rs)] is an important dietary vegetable in Asian countries, especially China, Japan, and Korea. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of anthocyanin accumulation in radish, the gene expression of enzymes directly involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis was analyzed. These genes include phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H), 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL), chalcone synthase (CHS), chalcone isomerase (CHI), flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H), dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR), and anthocyanidin synthase (ANS). RsDFR and RsANS were found to accumulate in the flesh or skin of two radish cultivars (Man Tang Hong and Hong Feng No.1). Radish skin contained higher CHS, CHI, and F3H transcript levels than radish flesh in all three cultivars. In the red radish, 16 anthocyanins were separated and identified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and elctrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Some of them were acylated with coumaroyl, malonoyl, feruoyl, and caffeoyl moieties. Furthermore (-)-epicatechin and ferulic acid were also identified in the three cultivars.

  8. Accumulation of kaempferitrin and expression of phenyl-propanoid biosynthetic genes in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shicheng; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Dong Ha; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) is cultivated worldwide for its fiber; however, the medicinal properties of this plant are currently attracting increasing attention. In this study, we investigated the expression levels of genes involved in the biosynthesis of kaempferitrin, a compound with many biological functions, in different kenaf organs. We found that phenylalanine ammonia lyase (HcPAL) was more highly expressed in stems than in other organs. Expression levels of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (HcC4H) and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (Hc4CL) were highest in mature leaves, followed by stems and young leaves, and lowest in roots and mature flowers. The expression of chalcone synthase (HcCHS), chalcone isomerase (HcCHI), and flavone 3-hydroxylase (HcF3H) was highest in young flowers, whereas that of flavone synthase (HcFLS) was highest in leaves. An analysis of kaempferitrin accumulation in the different organs of kenaf revealed that the accumulation of this compound was considerably higher (>10-fold) in leaves than in other organs. On the basis of a comparison of kaempferitrin contents with the expression levels of different genes in different organs, we speculate that HcFLS plays an important regulatory role in the kaempferitrin biosynthetic pathway in kenaf.

  9. Chemical changes and overexpressed genes in sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) upon methyl jasmonate treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigang; Wang, Xi; Chen, Feng; Kim, Hyun-Jin

    2007-02-01

    The effects of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) on the production of bioactive chemicals and gene expression in sweet basil were investigated. The total amount of phenolic compounds significantly increased in sweet basil after 0.5 mM MeJA treatment. Among the phenolic compounds, rosmarinic acid (RA) and caffeic acid (CA) were identified, and their amounts increased by 55 and 300%, respectively. The total amount of terpenoids also significantly increased after the same treatment. Particularly, eugenol and linalool increased by 56 and 43%, respectively. To better understand the signaling effect of MeJA on sweet basil, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to identify the MeJA up-regulated genes. Among the 576 cDNA clones screened from the forward SSH cDNA library, 28 were found to be up-regulated by the MeJA treatment. Sequencing of these cDNA clones followed by BLAST searching revealed six unique transcripts displaying high similarities to the known enzymes and peptide, that is, lipoxygenase (LOX), cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (C4H), prephenate dehydrogenase (PDH), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), acid phosphatase (APase), and pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR), which play significant roles in the formation of secondary metabolites in sweet basil. Northern blot further confirmed the increased production at transcriptional level of LOX, C4H, PDH, PPO, PPR, and APase.

  10. Differential expression of flavonoid biosynthesis genes and accumulation of phenolic compounds in common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohua; Park, Nam Il; Xu, Hui; Woo, Sun-Hee; Park, Cheol Ho; Park, Sang Un

    2010-12-01

    Common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) is a short-season grain crop that is a source of rutin and other phenolic compounds. In this study, we isolated the cDNAs of 11 F. esculentum enzymes in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway, namely, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H), 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL) 1 and 2, chalcone synthase (CHS), chalcone isomerase (CHI), flavone 3-hydroxylase (F3H), flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H), flavonol synthase (FLS) 1 and 2, and anthocyanidin synthase (ANS). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that these genes were most highly expressed in the stems and roots. However, high performance liquid chromatography analysis indicated that their flavonoid products, such as rutin and catechin, accumulated in the flowers and leaves. These results suggested that flavonoids may be transported within F. esculentum. In addition, light and dark growth conditions affected the expression levels of the biosynthesis genes and accumulation of phenolic compounds in F. esculentum sprouts.

  11. A gene responsible for prolyl-hydroxylation of moss-produced recombinant human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Juliana; Altmann, Friedrich; Graf, Manuela; Stadlmann, Johannes; Reski, Ralf; Decker, Eva L

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant production of pharmaceutical proteins is crucial, not only for personalized medicine. While most biopharmaceuticals are currently produced in mammalian cell culture, plant-made pharmaceuticals gain momentum. Post-translational modifications in plants are similar to those in humans, however, existing differences may affect quality, safety and efficacy of the products. A frequent modification in higher eukaryotes is prolyl-4-hydroxylase (P4H)-catalysed prolyl-hydroxylation. P4H sequence recognition sites on target proteins differ between humans and plants leading to non-human posttranslational modifications of recombinant human proteins produced in plants. The resulting hydroxyprolines display the anchor for plant-specific O-glycosylation, which bears immunogenic potential for patients. Here we describe the identification of a plant gene responsible for non-human prolyl-hydroxylation of human erythropoietin (hEPO) recombinantly produced in plant (moss) bioreactors. Targeted ablation of this gene abolished undesired prolyl-hydroxylation of hEPO and thus paves the way for plant-made pharmaceuticals humanized via glyco-engineering in moss bioreactors.

  12. Impact of Metabolic Regulators on the Expression of the Obesity Associated Genes FTO and NAMPT in Human Preadipocytes and Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schönberg, Maria; Bernhard, Falk; Büttner, Petra; Landgraf, Kathrin; Kiess, Wieland; Körner, Antje

    2011-01-01

    Background FTO and NAMPT/PBEF/visfatin are thought to play a role in obesity but their transcriptional regulation in adipocytes is not fully understood. In this study, we evaluated the transcriptional regulation of FTO and NAMPT in preadipocytes and adipocytes by metabolic regulators. Methodology and Principal Findings We assessed FTO mRNA expression during human adipocyte differentiation of Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) cells and primary subcutaneous preadipocytes in vitro and evaluated the effect of the metabolic regulators glucose, insulin, dexamethasone, IGF-1 and isoproterenol on FTO and NAMPT mRNA expression in SGBS preadipocytes and adipocytes. FTO mRNA levels were not significantly modulated during adipocyte differentiation. Also, metabolic regulators had no impact on FTO expression in preadipocytes or adipocytes. In SGBS preadipocytes NAMPT expression was more than 3fold induced by dexamethasone and isoproterenol and 1.6fold by dexamethasone in adipocytes. Complete glucose restriction caused an increase in NAMPT mRNA expression by more than 5fold and 1.4fold in SGBS preadipocytes and adipocytes, respectively. Conclusion FTO mRNA expression is not significantly affected by differentiation or metabolic regulators in human adipocytes. The stimulation of NAMPT expression by dexamethasone, isoproterenol and complete glucose restriction may indicate a regulation of NAMPT by metabolic stress, which was more pronounced in preadipocytes compared to mature adipocytes. PMID:21687707

  13. Arsenic impacted the development, thyroid hormone and gene transcription of thyroid hormone receptors in bighead carp larvae (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis).

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong-Jie; Xiang, Ping; Tang, Ming-Hu; Sun, Li; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-02-13

    Arsenic (As) contamination in aquatic environment adversely impacts aquatic organisms. The present study assessed the toxicity of different As species and concentrations on bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) at early life stage, a major fish in Yangtze River, China. We measured the changes in embryo and larvae survival rate, larvae aberration, concentrations of thyroid hormone thyroxine, and transcription levels of thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) in fish larvae after exposing to arsenite (AsIII) or arsenate (AsV) at 0, 10, 30, 50, 100, or 150 μg L(-1) for 78 h. As concentrations ≤ 150 μg L(-1) had limited effect on embryo survival rate (6-8% inhibition), but larvae survival rate decreased to 53-57% and larvae aberration rate increased to 20-24% after As exposure. Moreover, thyroxine levels elevated by 23% and 50% at 100 μg L(-1) AsIII and 150 μg L(-1) AsV. Besides, AsIII and AsV decreased the transcriptional levels of TRα by 72 and 53%, and TRβ by 91 and 81% at 150 μg L(-1) As. Our data showed that AsIII and AsV had limited effect on carp embryo survival, but they were both toxic to carp larvae, with AsIII showing more effect than AsV. As concentrations <150μg L(-1) adversely influenced the development of bighead carp larvae and disturbed their thyroid hormone homeostasis. PMID:26513566

  14. Arsenic impacted the development, thyroid hormone and gene transcription of thyroid hormone receptors in bighead carp larvae (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis).

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong-Jie; Xiang, Ping; Tang, Ming-Hu; Sun, Li; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-02-13

    Arsenic (As) contamination in aquatic environment adversely impacts aquatic organisms. The present study assessed the toxicity of different As species and concentrations on bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) at early life stage, a major fish in Yangtze River, China. We measured the changes in embryo and larvae survival rate, larvae aberration, concentrations of thyroid hormone thyroxine, and transcription levels of thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) in fish larvae after exposing to arsenite (AsIII) or arsenate (AsV) at 0, 10, 30, 50, 100, or 150 μg L(-1) for 78 h. As concentrations ≤ 150 μg L(-1) had limited effect on embryo survival rate (6-8% inhibition), but larvae survival rate decreased to 53-57% and larvae aberration rate increased to 20-24% after As exposure. Moreover, thyroxine levels elevated by 23% and 50% at 100 μg L(-1) AsIII and 150 μg L(-1) AsV. Besides, AsIII and AsV decreased the transcriptional levels of TRα by 72 and 53%, and TRβ by 91 and 81% at 150 μg L(-1) As. Our data showed that AsIII and AsV had limited effect on carp embryo survival, but they were both toxic to carp larvae, with AsIII showing more effect than AsV. As concentrations <150μg L(-1) adversely influenced the development of bighead carp larvae and disturbed their thyroid hormone homeostasis.

  15. Cadherin-13, a risk gene for ADHD and comorbid disorders, impacts GABAergic function in hippocampus and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, O; Selten, M M; Sich, S; Popp, S; Bacmeister, L; Amendola, E; Negwer, M; Schubert, D; Proft, F; Kiser, D; Schmitt, A G; Gross, C; Kolk, S M; Strekalova, T; van den Hove, D; Resink, T J; Nadif Kasri, N; Lesch, K P

    2015-01-01

    Cadherin-13 (CDH13), a unique glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored member of the cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules, has been identified as a risk gene for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and various comorbid neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions, including depression, substance abuse, autism spectrum disorder and violent behavior, while the mechanism whereby CDH13 dysfunction influences pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders remains elusive. Here we explored the potential role of CDH13 in the inhibitory modulation of brain activity by investigating synaptic function of GABAergic interneurons. Cellular and subcellular distribution of CDH13 was analyzed in the murine hippocampus and a mouse model with a targeted inactivation of Cdh13 was generated to evaluate how CDH13 modulates synaptic activity of hippocampal interneurons and behavioral domains related to psychopathologic (endo)phenotypes. We show that CDH13 expression in the cornu ammonis (CA) region of the hippocampus is confined to distinct classes of interneurons. Specifically, CDH13 is expressed by numerous parvalbumin and somatostatin-expressing interneurons located in the stratum oriens, where it localizes to both the soma and the presynaptic compartment. Cdh13−/− mice show an increase in basal inhibitory, but not excitatory, synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Associated with these alterations in hippocampal function, Cdh13−/− mice display deficits in learning and memory. Taken together, our results indicate that CDH13 is a negative regulator of inhibitory synapses in the hippocampus, and provide insights into how CDH13 dysfunction may contribute to the excitatory/inhibitory imbalance observed in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as ADHD and autism. PMID:26460479

  16. Impact of multiple Alcohol Dehydrogenase gene polymorphisms on risk of laryngeal, esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    An, Jiaze; Zhao, Junsheng; Zhang, Xiyang; Ding, Rui; Geng, Tingting; Feng, Tian; Jin, Tianbo

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol intake is positively associated with the risk of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancers; but its effect on gastric or colorectal cancer is controversial. Previous study had identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of Alcohol Dehydrogenase (ADH) genes associated with UADT cancers in European and Japanese populations. We sought to determine if these SNPs associated with laryngeal, esophageal, gastric or colorectal cancer in Chinese population. We conducted a case-control study among 1577 cases and 1013 healthy controls from northwest China. Five SNPs associated with UADT cancers risk were selected from previous genome-wide association studies and genotyped using Sequenom Mass-ARRAY technology. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by unconditional logistic regression adjusting for age and gender. We identified that the minor alleles of rs1789924 and rs971074 were associated with decreased risk of laryngeal cancer (OR = 0.311; 95% CI = 0.161-0.602; P < 0.001) and esophagus cancer (OR = 0.711; 95% CI = 0.526-0.962; P = 0.027) in allelic model analysis, respectively. In the genetic model analysis, we found the “C/T” genotype of rs1789924 was associated with decreased laryngeal cancer risk in codominant model (P = 0.046) and overdominant model (P = 0.013); the “C/T-T/T” genotype of rs1789924 was associated with reduced risk of laryngeal cancer under dominant model (P = 0.013). Additionally, none of the SNPs was associated with gastric or colorectal cancer in our study. Our data shed new light on the association between ADH SNPs and respiratory and digestive tract cancers susceptibility in the Han Chinese population. PMID:26396927

  17. Impact of Lipoprotein Lipase Gene Polymorphism, S447X, on Postprandial Triacylglycerol and Glucose Response to Sequential Meal Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Shatwan, Israa M.; Minihane, Anne-Marie; Williams, Christine M.; Lovegrove, Julie A.; Jackson, Kim G.; Vimaleswaran, Karani S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key rate-limiting enzyme for the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol (TAG) in chylomicrons and very low-density lipoprotein. Given that postprandial assessment of lipoprotein metabolism may provide a more physiological perspective of disturbances in lipoprotein homeostasis compared to assessment in the fasting state, we have investigated the influence of two commonly studied LPL polymorphisms (rs320, HindIII; rs328, S447X) on postprandial lipaemia, in 261 participants using a standard sequential meal challenge. S447 homozygotes had lower fasting HDL-C (p = 0.015) and a trend for higher fasting TAG (p = 0.057) concentrations relative to the 447X allele carriers. In the postprandial state, there was an association of the S447X polymorphism with postprandial TAG and glucose, where S447 homozygotes had 12% higher TAG area under the curve (AUC) (p = 0.037), 8.4% higher glucose-AUC (p = 0.006) and 22% higher glucose-incremental area under the curve (IAUC) (p = 0.042). A significant gene–gender interaction was observed for fasting TAG (p = 0.004), TAG-AUC (Pinteraction = 0.004) and TAG-IAUC (Pinteraction = 0.016), where associations were only evident in men. In conclusion, our study provides novel findings of an effect of LPL S447X polymorphism on the postprandial glucose and gender-specific impact of the polymorphism on fasting and postprandial TAG concentrations in response to sequential meal challenge in healthy participants. PMID:26999119

  18. Impact of supplementary royal jelly on in vitro maturation of sheep oocytes: genes involved in apoptosis and embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Valiollahpoor Amiri, Mohammad; Deldar, Hamid; Ansari Pirsaraei, Zarbakht

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing culture conditions lead to the improvement of oocyte developmental competence and additives with anti-oxidative activity in culture media improved embryonic development. Royal jelly (RJ) is a product from the cephalic glands of nurse bees that has considerable health effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different concentrations of RJ on the maturation, cleavage, and blastocyst rates and gene expression in the oocyte and cumulus cells during in vitro maturation (IVM) of sheep oocyte. IVM of oocyte was performed in the presence of control (RJ0), 2.5 (RJ2.5), 5 (RJ5), 10 (RJ10), 20 (RJ20), and 40 (RJ40) mg/mL of RJ. Following the maturation period, parthenogenetic activation was carried out in two treatment groups (RJ0 and RJ10) and embryonic development was examined three and eight days thereafter. Moreover, the relative expression of BCL2 and BAX in oocyte as well as BCL2, BAX, HAS2, PTGS2, and STAR in cumulus cells were assessed. The results indicated that the addition of 10 mg/mL of RJ (90 ± 4.51%) to the maturation medium linearly increased the oocyte maturation rate compared to the control group (57 ± 2.42%), then it remained constant to the RJ40 (93 ± 3.10%) group. The higher RJ concentrations were associated with increased (p < 0.01) cleavage (53.3 ± 1.55% to 82.3 ± 2.82%) and blastocyst rate (15.5 ± 1.16% to 33.8 ± 3.09%) from the RJ0 to the RJ10 group. The relative mRNA expression of BCL2 and BAX in the oocyte was higher at RJ10. In cumulus cells, the expression of BCL2 was not affected, but that of BAX decreased, and expression of HAS2, PTGS2, and STAR were increased following the addition of RJ to the maturation media. In conclusion, the addition of 10 mg/mL of RJ to maturation medium improved blastocyst formation and decreased the apoptotic incidence in sheep cumulus cells and the oocyte during the in vitro development.

  19. Sphingolipid metabolism is strikingly different between pollen and leaf in Arabidopsis as revealed by compositional and gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Luttgeharm, Kyle D; Kimberlin, Athen N; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Cerny, Ronald L; Napier, Johnathan A; Markham, Jonathan E; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2015-07-01

    Although sphingolipids are essential for male gametophytic development in Arabidopsis thaliana, sphingolipid composition and biosynthetic gene expression have not been previously examined in pollen. In this report, electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS/MS was applied to characterization of sphingolipid compositional profiles in pollen isolated from wild type Arabidopsis Col-0 and a long-chain base (LCB) Δ4 desaturase mutant. Pollen fractions were highly enriched in glucosylceramides (GlcCer) relative to levels previously reported in leaves. Accompanying the loss of the Δ4 unsaturated LCB sphingadiene (d18:2) in the Δ4 desaturase mutant was a 50% reduction in GlcCer concentrations. In addition, pollen glycosylinositolphosphoceramides (GIPCs) were found to have a complex array of N-acetyl-glycosylated GIPCs, including species with up to three pentose units that were absent from leaf GIPCs. Underlying the distinct sphingolipid composition of pollen, genes for key biosynthetic enzymes for GlcCer and d18:2 synthesis and metabolism were more highly expressed in pollen than in leaves or seedlings, including genes for GlcCer synthase (GCS), sphingoid base C-4 hydroxylase 2 (SBH2), LCB Δ8 desaturases (SLD1 and SLD2), and LOH2 ceramide synthase (LOH2). Overall, these findings indicate strikingly divergent sphingolipid metabolism between pollen and leaves in Arabidopsis, the significance of which remains to be determined.

  20. Diversity of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase Genes (dsrAB) in a Salt Marsh Impacted by Long-Term Acid Mine Drainage▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, John W.; Zierenberg, Robert A.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) play a major role in the coupled biogeochemical cycling of sulfur and chalcophilic metal(loid)s. By implication, they can exert a strong influence on the speciation and mobility of multiple metal(loid) contaminants. In this study, we combined DsrAB gene sequencing and sulfur isotopic profiling to identify the phylogeny and distribution of SRB and to assess their metabolic activity in salt marsh sediments exposed to acid mine drainage (AMD) for over 100 years. Recovered dsrAB sequences from three sites sampled along an AMD flow path indicated the dominance of a single Desulfovibrio species. Other major sequence clades were related most closely to Desulfosarcina, Desulfococcus, Desulfobulbus, and Desulfosporosinus species. The presence of metal sulfides with low δ34S values relative to δ34S values of pore water sulfate showed that sediment SRB populations were actively reducing sulfate under ambient conditions (pH of ∼2), although possibly within less acidic microenvironments. Interestingly, δ34S values for pore water sulfate were lower than those for sulfate delivered during tidal inundation of marsh sediments. 16S rRNA gene sequence data from sediments and sulfur isotope data confirmed that sulfur-oxidizing bacteria drove the reoxidation of biogenic sulfide coupled to oxygen or nitrate reduction over a timescale of hours. Collectively, these findings imply a highly dynamic microbially mediated cycling of sulfate and sulfide, and thus the speciation and mobility of chalcophilic contaminant metal(loid)s, in AMD-impacted marsh sediments. PMID:20472728

  1. Impacts of supplementing chemical fertilizers with organic fertilizers manufactured using pig manure as a substrate on the spread of tetracycline resistance genes in soil.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yijun; Hao, Yangyang; Shen, Min; Zhao, Qingxin; Li, Qing; Hu, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Using pig manure (PM) compost as a partial substitute for the conventional chemical fertilizers (CFs) is considered an effective approach in sustainable agricultural systems. This study aimed to analyze the impacts of supplementing CF with organic fertilizers (OFs) manufactured using pig manure as a substrate on the spread of tetracycline resistance genes (TRGs) as well as the community structures and diversities of tetracycline-resistant bacteria (TRB) in bulk and cucumber rhizosphere soils. In this study, three organic fertilizers manufactured using the PM as a substrate, namely fresh PM, common OF, and bio-organic fertilizer (BF), were supplemented with a CF. Composted manures combined with a CF did not significantly increase TRB compared with the CF alone, but PM treatment resulted in the long-term survival of TRB in soil. The use of CF+PM also increased the risk of spreading TRGs in soil. As beneficial microorganisms in BF may function as reservoirs for the spread of antibiotic resistance genes, care should be taken when adding them to the OF matrix. The PM treatment significantly altered the community structures and increased the species diversity of TRB, especially in the rhizosphere soil. BF treatment caused insignificant changes in the community structure of TRB compared with CF treatment, yet it reduced the species diversities of TRB in soil. Thus, the partial use of fresh PM as a substitute for CF could increase the risk of spread of TRGs. Apart from plant growth promotion, BF was a promising fertilizer owing to its potential ability to control TRGs. PMID:27152658

  2. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Inherited Susceptibility to Cancer: Comparing Breast and Ovarian Cancers to Colon Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Cook-Deegan, Robert; DeRienzo, Christopher; Carbone, Julia; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Heaney, Christopher; Conover, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Genetic testing for inherited susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer can be compared to similar testing for colorectal cancer as a “natural experiment.” Inherited susceptibility accounts for a similar fraction of both cancers and genetic testing results guide decisions about options for prophylactic surgery in both sets of conditions. One major difference is that in the United States, Myriad Genetics is the sole provider of genetic testing, because it has sole control of relevant patents for BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes whereas genetic testing for familial colorectal cancer is available from multiple laboratories. Colorectal cancer-associated genes are also patented, but they have been nonexclusively licensed. Prices for BRCA1 and 2 testing do not reflect an obvious price premium attributable to exclusive patent rights compared to colorectal cancer testing, and indeed Myriad’s per unit costs are somewhat lower for BRCA1/2 testing than testing for colorectal cancer susceptibility. Myriad has not enforced patents against basic research, and negotiated a Memorandum of Understanding with the National Cancer Institute in 1999 for institutional BRCA testing in clinical research. The main impact of patenting and licensing in BRCA compared to colorectal cancer is the business model of genetic testing, with a sole provider for BRCA and multiple laboratories for colorectal cancer genetic testing. Myriad’s sole provider model has not worked in jurisdictions outside the United States, largely because of differences in breadth of patent protection, responses of government health services, and difficulty in patent enforcement. PMID:20393305

  3. Transcriptional Profiles of Hybrid Eucalyptus Genotypes with Contrasting Lignin Content Reveal That Monolignol Biosynthesis-related Genes Regulate Wood Composition.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Tomotaka; Iwata, Eiji; Nakahama, Katsuhiko; Fukuda, Yujiroh; Hayashi, Kazunori; Nanto, Kazuya; Rosa, Antonio C; Kawaoka, Akiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Eucalyptus species constitutes the most widely planted hardwood trees in temperate and subtropical regions. In this study, we compared the transcript levels of genes involved in lignocellulose formation such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin biosynthesis in two selected 3-year old hybrid Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus urophylla × Eucalyptus grandis) genotypes (AM063 and AM380) that have different lignin content. AM063 and AM380 had 20.2 and 35.5% of Klason lignin content and 59.0 and 48.2%, α-cellulose contents, respectively. We investigated the correlation between wood properties and transcript levels of wood formation-related genes using RNA-seq with total RNAs extracted from developing xylem tissues at a breast height. Transcript levels of cell wall construction genes such as cellulose synthase (CesA) and sucrose synthase (SUSY) were almost the same in both genotypes. However, AM063 exhibited higher transcript levels of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and xyloglucan endotransglucoxylase than those in AM380. Most monolignol biosynthesis-related isozyme genes showed higher transcript levels in AM380. These results indicate monolignol biosynthesis-related genes may regulate wood composition in Eucalyptus. Flavonoids contents were also observed at much higher levels in AM380 as a result of the elevated transcript levels of common phenylpropanoid pathway genes, phenylalanine ammonium lyase, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL). Secondary plant cell wall formation is regulated by many transcription factors. We analyzed genes encoding NAC, WRKY, AP2/ERF, and KNOX transcription factors and found higher transcript levels of these genes in AM380. We also observed increased transcription of some MYB and LIM domain transcription factors in AM380 compared to AM063. All these results show that genes related to monolignol biosynthesis may regulate the wood composition and help maintain the ratio of cellulose and lignin contents in Eucalyptus plants. PMID

  4. Transcriptional Profiles of Hybrid Eucalyptus Genotypes with Contrasting Lignin Content Reveal That Monolignol Biosynthesis-related Genes Regulate Wood Composition

    PubMed Central

    Shinya, Tomotaka; Iwata, Eiji; Nakahama, Katsuhiko; Fukuda, Yujiroh; Hayashi, Kazunori; Nanto, Kazuya; Rosa, Antonio C.; Kawaoka, Akiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Eucalyptus species constitutes the most widely planted hardwood trees in temperate and subtropical regions. In this study, we compared the transcript levels of genes involved in lignocellulose formation such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin biosynthesis in two selected 3-year old hybrid Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus urophylla × Eucalyptus grandis) genotypes (AM063 and AM380) that have different lignin content. AM063 and AM380 had 20.2 and 35.5% of Klason lignin content and 59.0 and 48.2%, α-cellulose contents, respectively. We investigated the correlation between wood properties and transcript levels of wood formation-related genes using RNA-seq with total RNAs extracted from developing xylem tissues at a breast height. Transcript levels of cell wall construction genes such as cellulose synthase (CesA) and sucrose synthase (SUSY) were almost the same in both genotypes. However, AM063 exhibited higher transcript levels of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and xyloglucan endotransglucoxylase than those in AM380. Most monolignol biosynthesis-related isozyme genes showed higher transcript levels in AM380. These results indicate monolignol biosynthesis-related genes may regulate wood composition in Eucalyptus. Flavonoids contents were also observed at much higher levels in AM380 as a result of the elevated transcript levels of common phenylpropanoid pathway genes, phenylalanine ammonium lyase, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL). Secondary plant cell wall formation is regulated by many transcription factors. We analyzed genes encoding NAC, WRKY, AP2/ERF, and KNOX transcription factors and found higher transcript levels of these genes in AM380. We also observed increased transcription of some MYB and LIM domain transcription factors in AM380 compared to AM063. All these results show that genes related to monolignol biosynthesis may regulate the wood composition and help maintain the ratio of cellulose and lignin contents in Eucalyptus plants. PMID

  5. Impact of Food Components on in vitro Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Secretion—A Potential Mechanism for Dietary Influence on Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, Margaret; Bourguignon, Julia; Jackson, Kyle; Orciga, Michael-Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a pivotal messenger in the inflammatory process in migraine. Limited evidence indicates that diet impacts circulating levels of CGRP, suggesting that certain elements in the diet may influence migraine outcomes. Interruption of calcium signaling, a mechanism which can trigger CGRP release, has been suggested as one potential route by which exogenous food substances may impact CGRP secretion. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of foods and a dietary supplement on two migraine-related mechanisms in vitro: CGRP secretion from neuroendocrine CA77 cells, and calcium uptake by differentiated PC12 cells. Ginger and grape pomace extracts were selected for their anecdotal connections to reducing or promoting migraine. S-petasin was selected as a suspected active constituent of butterbur extract, the migraine prophylactic dietary supplement. Results showed a statistically significant decrease in stimulated CGRP secretion from CA77 cells following treatment with ginger (0.2 mg dry ginger equivalent/mL) and two doses of grape pomace (0.25 and 1.0 mg dry pomace equivalent/mL) extracts. Relative to vehicle control, CGRP secretion decreased by 22%, 43%, and 87%, respectively. S-petasin at 1.0 μM also decreased CGRP secretion by 24%. Meanwhile, S-petasin and ginger extract showed inhibition of calcium influx, whereas grape pomace had no effect on calcium. These results suggest that grape pomace and ginger extracts, and S-petasin may have anti-inflammatory propensity by preventing CGRP release in migraine, although potentially by different mechanisms, which future studies may elucidate further. PMID:27376323

  6. Impact of loss of BH3-only proteins on the development and treatment of MLL-fusion gene-driven AML in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bilardi, Rebecca A; Anstee, Natasha S; Glaser, Stefan P; Robati, Mikara; Vandenberg, Cassandra J; Cory, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the apoptosis pathway controlled by opposing members of the Bcl-2 protein family plays a central role in cancer development and resistance to therapy. To investigate how pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only proteins impact on acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we generated mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-AF9 and MLL-ENL AMLs from BH3-only gene knockout mice. Disease development was not accelerated by loss of Bim, Puma, Noxa, Bmf, or combinations thereof; hence these BH3-only proteins are apparently ineffectual as tumor suppressors in this model. We tested the sensitivity of MLL-AF9 AMLs of each genotype in vitro to standard chemotherapeutic drugs and to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, with or without the BH3 mimetic ABT-737. Loss of Puma and/or Noxa increased resistance to cytarabine, daunorubicin and etoposide, while loss of Bim protected against cytarabine and loss of Bmf had no impact. ABT-737 increased sensitivity to the genotoxic drugs but was not dependent on any BH3-only protein tested. The AML lines were very sensitive to bortezomib and loss of Noxa conveyed significant resistance. In vivo, several MLL-AF9 AMLs responded well to daunorubicin and this response was highly dependent on Puma and Noxa but not Bim. Combination therapy with ABT-737 provided little added benefit at the daunorubicin dose trialed. Bortezomib also extended survival of AML-bearing mice, albeit less than daunorubicin. In summary, our genetic studies reveal the importance of Puma and Noxa for the action of genotoxics currently used to treat MLL-driven AML and suggest that, while addition of ABT-737-like BH3 mimetics might enhance their efficacy, new Noxa-like BH3 mimetics targeting Mcl-1 might have greater potential. PMID:27584789

  7. Impact of Food Components on in vitro Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Secretion-A Potential Mechanism for Dietary Influence on Migraine.

    PubMed

    Slavin, Margaret; Bourguignon, Julia; Jackson, Kyle; Orciga, Michael-Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a pivotal messenger in the inflammatory process in migraine. Limited evidence indicates that diet impacts circulating levels of CGRP, suggesting that certain elements in the diet may influence migraine outcomes. Interruption of calcium signaling, a mechanism which can trigger CGRP release, has been suggested as one potential route by which exogenous food substances may impact CGRP secretion. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of foods and a dietary supplement on two migraine-related mechanisms in vitro: CGRP secretion from neuroendocrine CA77 cells, and calcium uptake by differentiated PC12 cells. Ginger and grape pomace extracts were selected for their anecdotal connections to reducing or promoting migraine. S-petasin was selected as a suspected active constituent of butterbur extract, the migraine prophylactic dietary supplement. Results showed a statistically significant decrease in stimulated CGRP secretion from CA77 cells following treatment with ginger (0.2 mg dry ginger equivalent/mL) and two doses of grape pomace (0.25 and 1.0 mg dry pomace equivalent/mL) extracts. Relative to vehicle control, CGRP secretion decreased by 22%, 43%, and 87%, respectively. S-petasin at 1.0 μM also decreased CGRP secretion by 24%. Meanwhile, S-petasin and ginger extract showed inhibition of calcium influx, whereas grape pomace had no effect on calcium. These results suggest that grape pomace and ginger extracts, and S-petasin may have anti-inflammatory propensity by preventing CGRP release in migraine, although potentially by different mechanisms, which future studies may elucidate further. PMID:27376323

  8. Recurrent mutations of the exportin 1 gene (XPO1) and their impact on selective inhibitor of nuclear export compounds sensitivity in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jardin, Fabrice; Pujals, Anais; Pelletier, Laura; Bohers, Elodie; Camus, Vincent; Mareschal, Sylvain; Dubois, Sydney; Sola, Brigitte; Ochmann, Marlène; Lemonnier, François; Viailly, Pierre-Julien; Bertrand, Philippe; Maingonnat, Catherine; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Gaulard, Philippe; Damotte, Diane; Delarue, Richard; Haioun, Corinne; Argueta, Christian; Landesman, Yosef; Salles, Gilles; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Figeac, Martin; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Molina, Thierry Jo; Picquenot, Jean Michel; Cornic, Marie; Fest, Thierry; Milpied, Noel; Lemasle, Emilie; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Moeller, Peter; Dyer, Martin J S; Sundstrom, Christer; Bastard, Christian; Tilly, Hervé; Leroy, Karen

    2016-09-01

    Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) is an entity of B-cell lymphoma distinct from the other molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We investigated the prevalence, specificity, and clinical relevance of mutations of XPO1, which encodes a member of the karyopherin-β nuclear transporters, in a large cohort of PMBL. PMBL cases defined histologically or by gene expression profiling (GEP) were sequenced and the XPO1 mutational status was correlated to genetic and clinical characteristics. The XPO1 mutational status was also assessed in DLBCL, Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and mediastinal gray-zone lymphoma (MGZL).The biological impact of the mutation on Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) compounds (KPT-185/330) sensitivity was investigated in vitro. XPO1 mutations were present in 28/117 (24%) PMBL cases and in 5/19 (26%) HL cases but absent/rare in MGZL (0/20) or DLBCL (3/197). A higher prevalence (50%) of the recurrent codon 571 variant (p.E571K) was observed in GEP-defined PMBL and was associated with shorter PFS. Age, International Prognostic Index and bulky mass were similar in XPO1 mutant and wild-type cases. KPT-185 induced a dose-dependent decrease in cell proliferation and increased cell-death in PMBL cell lines harboring wild type or XPO1 E571K mutant alleles. Experiments in transfected U2OS cells further confirmed that the XPO1 E571K mutation does not have a drastic impact on KPT-330 binding. To conclude the XPO1 E571K mutation represents a genetic hallmark of the PMBL subtype and serves as a new relevant PMBL biomarker. SINE compounds appear active for both mutated and wild-type protein. Am. J. Hematol. 91:923-930, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27312795

  9. The Drosophila Su(var)3–7 Gene Is Required for Oogenesis and Female Fertility, Genetically Interacts with piwi and aubergine, but Impacts Only Weakly Transposon Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Begeot, Flora; Koryakov, Dmitry E.; Todeschini, Anne-Laure; Ronsseray, Stéphane; Vieira, Cristina; Spierer, Pierre; Delattre, Marion

    2014-01-01

    Heterochromatin is made of repetitive sequences, mainly transposable elements (TEs), the regulation of which is critical for genome stability. We have analyzed the role of the heterochromatin-associated Su(var)3–7 protein in Drosophila ovaries. We present evidences that Su(var)3–7 is required for correct oogenesis and female fertility. It accumulates in heterochromatic domains of ovarian germline and somatic cells nuclei, where it co-localizes with HP1. Homozygous mutant females display ovaries with frequent degenerating egg-chambers. Absence of Su(var)3–7 in embryos leads to defects in meiosis and first mitotic divisions due to chromatin fragmentation or chromosome loss, showing that Su(var)3–7 is required for genome integrity. Females homozygous for Su(var)3–7 mutations strongly impair repression of P-transposable element induced gonadal dysgenesis but have minor effects on other TEs. Su(var)3–7 mutations reduce piRNA cluster transcription and slightly impact ovarian piRNA production. However, this modest piRNA reduction does not correlate with transposon de-silencing, suggesting that the moderate effect of Su(var)3–7 on some TE repression is not linked to piRNA production. Strikingly, Su(var)3–7 genetically interacts with the piwi and aubergine genes, key components of the piRNA pathway, by strongly impacting female fertility without impairing transposon silencing. These results lead us to propose that the interaction between Su(var)3–7 and piwi or aubergine controls important developmental processes independently of transposon silencing. PMID:24820312

  10. Impact of loss of BH3-only proteins on the development and treatment of MLL-fusion gene-driven AML in mice.

    PubMed

    Bilardi, Rebecca A; Anstee, Natasha S; Glaser, Stefan P; Robati, Mikara; Vandenberg, Cassandra J; Cory, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the apoptosis pathway controlled by opposing members of the Bcl-2 protein family plays a central role in cancer development and resistance to therapy. To investigate how pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only proteins impact on acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we generated mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-AF9 and MLL-ENL AMLs from BH3-only gene knockout mice. Disease development was not accelerated by loss of Bim, Puma, Noxa, Bmf, or combinations thereof; hence these BH3-only proteins are apparently ineffectual as tumor suppressors in this model. We tested the sensitivity of MLL-AF9 AMLs of each genotype in vitro to standard chemotherapeutic drugs and to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, with or without the BH3 mimetic ABT-737. Loss of Puma and/or Noxa increased resistance to cytarabine, daunorubicin and etoposide, while loss of Bim protected against cytarabine and loss of Bmf had no impact. ABT-737 increased sensitivity to the genotoxic drugs but was not dependent on any BH3-only protein tested. The AML lines were very sensitive to bortezomib and loss of Noxa conveyed significant resistance. In vivo, several MLL-AF9 AMLs responded well to daunorubicin and this response was highly dependent on Puma and Noxa but not Bim. Combination therapy with ABT-737 provided little added benefit at the daunorubicin dose trialed. Bortezomib also extended survival of AML-bearing mice, albeit less than daunorubicin. In summary, our genetic studies reveal the importance of Puma and Noxa for the action of genotoxics currently used to treat MLL-driven AML and suggest that, while addition of ABT-737-like BH3 mimetics might enhance their efficacy, new Noxa-like BH3 mimetics targeting Mcl-1 might have greater potential. PMID:27584789

  11. An apple rootstock overexpressing a peach CBF gene alters growth and flowering in the scion but does not impact cold hardiness or dormancy.

    PubMed

    Artlip, Timothy S; Wisniewski, Michael E; Arora, Rajeev; Norelli, John L

    2016-01-01

    The C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factor is involved in responses to low temperature and water deficit in many plant species. Overexpression of CBF genes leads to enhanced freezing tolerance and growth inhibition in many species. The overexpression of a peach CBF (PpCBF1) gene in a transgenic line of own-rooted apple (Malus×domestica) M.26 rootstock (T166) trees was previously reported to have additional effects on the onset of dormancy and time of spring budbreak. In the current study, the commercial apple cultivar 'Royal Gala' (RG) was grafted onto either non-transgenic M.26 rootstocks (RG/M.26) or transgenic M.26 (T166) rootstocks (RG/T166) and field grown for 3 years. No PpCBF1 transcript was detected in the phloem or cambium of RG scions grafted on T166 rootstocks indicating that no graft transmission of transgene mRNA had occurred. In contrast to own-rooted T166 trees, no impact of PpCBF1 overexpression in T166 rootstocks was observed on the onset of dormancy, budbreak or non-acclimated leaf-cold hardiness in RG/T166 trees. Growth, however, as measured by stem caliper, current-year shoot extension and overall height, was reduced in RG/T166 trees compared with RG/M.26 trees. Although flowering was evident in both RG/T166 and RG/M.26 trees in the second season, the number of trees in flower, the number of shoots bearing flowers, and the number of flower clusters per shoot was significantly higher in RG/M.26 trees than RG/T166 trees in both the second and third year after planting. Elevated levels of RGL (DELLA) gene expression were observed in RG/T166 trees and T166 trees, which may play a role in the reduced growth observed in these tree types. A model is presented indicating how CBF overexpression in a rootstock might influence juvenility and flower abundance in a grafted scion. PMID:26981253

  12. An apple rootstock overexpressing a peach CBF gene alters growth and flowering in the scion but does not impact cold hardiness or dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Artlip, Timothy S; Wisniewski, Michael E; Arora, Rajeev; Norelli, John L

    2016-01-01

    The C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factor is involved in responses to low temperature and water deficit in many plant species. Overexpression of CBF genes leads to enhanced freezing tolerance and growth inhibition in many species. The overexpression of a peach CBF (PpCBF1) gene in a transgenic line of own-rooted apple (Malus×domestica) M.26 rootstock (T166) trees was previously reported to have additional effects on the onset of dormancy and time of spring budbreak. In the current study, the commercial apple cultivar ‘Royal Gala’ (RG) was grafted onto either non-transgenic M.26 rootstocks (RG/M.26) or transgenic M.26 (T166) rootstocks (RG/T166) and field grown for 3 years. No PpCBF1 transcript was detected in the phloem or cambium of RG scions grafted on T166 rootstocks indicating that no graft transmission of transgene mRNA had occurred. In contrast to own-rooted T166 trees, no impact of PpCBF1 overexpression in T166 rootstocks was observed on the onset of dormancy, budbreak or non-acclimated leaf-cold hardiness in RG/T166 trees. Growth, however, as measured by stem caliper, current-year shoot extension and overall height, was reduced in RG/T166 trees compared with RG/M.26 trees. Although flowering was evident in both RG/T166 and RG/M.26 trees in the second season, the number of trees in flower, the number of shoots bearing flowers, and the number of flower clusters per shoot was significantly higher in RG/M.26 trees than RG/T166 trees in both the second and third year after planting. Elevated levels of RGL (DELLA) gene expression were observed in RG/T166 trees and T166 trees, which may play a role in the reduced growth observed in these tree types. A model is presented indicating how CBF overexpression in a rootstock might influence juvenility and flower abundance in a grafted scion. PMID:26981253

  13. An apple rootstock overexpressing a peach CBF gene alters growth and flowering in the scion but does not impact cold hardiness or dormancy.

    PubMed

    Artlip, Timothy S; Wisniewski, Michael E; Arora, Rajeev; Norelli, John L

    2016-01-01

    The C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factor is involved in responses to low temperature and water deficit in many plant species. Overexpression of CBF genes leads to enhanced freezing tolerance and growth inhibition in many species. The overexpression of a peach CBF (PpCBF1) gene in a transgenic line of own-rooted apple (Malus×domestica) M.26 rootstock (T166) trees was previously reported to have additional effects on the onset of dormancy and time of spring budbreak. In the current study, the commercial apple cultivar 'Royal Gala' (RG) was grafted onto either non-transgenic M.26 rootstocks (RG/M.26) or transgenic M.26 (T166) rootstocks (RG/T166) and field grown for 3 years. No PpCBF1 transcript was detected in the phloem or cambium of RG scions grafted on T166 rootstocks indicating that no graft transmission of transgene mRNA had occurred. In contrast to own-rooted T166 trees, no impact of PpCBF1 overexpression in T166 rootstocks was observed on the onset of dormancy, budbreak or non-acclimated leaf-cold hardiness in RG/T166 trees. Growth, however, as measured by stem caliper, current-year shoot extension and overall height, was reduced in RG/T166 trees compared with RG/M.26 trees. Although flowering was evident in both RG/T166 and RG/M.26 trees in the second season, the number of trees in flower, the number of shoots bearing flowers, and the number of flower clusters per shoot was significantly higher in RG/M.26 trees than RG/T166 trees in both the second and third year after planting. Elevated levels of RGL (DELLA) gene expression were observed in RG/T166 trees and T166 trees, which may play a role in the reduced growth observed in these tree types. A model is presented indicating how CBF overexpression in a rootstock might influence juvenility and flower abundance in a grafted scion.

  14. Analysis of the effects of surface treatments on nickel release from nitinol wires and their impact on candidate gene expression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    McLucas, E; Rochev, Y; Carroll, W M; Smith, T J

    2008-03-01

    Nitinol has many applications in the medical device industry, however the large amount of nickel, a known allergen and carcinogen remains a serious concern. Studies have already shown that nickel ions induce the differential expression of a range of genes, including cell adhesion molecules. This study sought to determine the level of nickel ions released from nitinol wires that had been surface treated by etching and mechanically polishing or etching and pickling compared to untreated wires and determine the biological impact of the wires on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) at the transcriptional level by real-time PCR. The four different wire types were incubated in media and the amount of nickel eluted after 24, 48 and 72 h was determined. HUVECs were then cultured and incubated with the four different wire types for 24 h. Cells were harvested, RNA isolated and real-time PCR was carried out to measure the expression levels of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin, three known inflammatory mediators, compared to control cells. E-selectin, a marker of endothelial cell injury and activation was found to be significantly up-regulated in cells incubated with wires that released the highest amount of nickel ions. Nickel ions are released from nitinol wires with certain surface characteristics and these ions have a biological effect on HUVECs in vitro. PMID:18250966

  15. Genome-wide discovered psychosis-risk gene ZNF804A impacts on white matter microstructure in health, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Mallas, Emma-Jane; Carletti, Francesco; Chaddock, Christopher A; Woolley, James; Picchioni, Marco M; Shergill, Sukhwinder S; Kane, Fergus; Allin, Matthew P G; Barker, Gareth J; Prata, Diana P

    2016-01-01

    Background. Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) have both been associated with reduced microstructural white matter integrity using, as a proxy, fractional anisotropy (FA) detected using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Genetic susceptibility for both illnesses has also been positively correlated in recent genome-wide association studies with allele A (adenine) of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1344706 of the ZNF804A gene. However, little is known about how the genomic linkage disequilibrium region tagged by this SNP impacts on the brain to increase risk for psychosis. This study aimed to assess the impact of this risk variant on FA in patients with SZ, in those with BD and in healthy controls. Methods. 230 individuals were genotyped for the rs1344706 SNP and underwent DTI. We used tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) followed by an analysis of variance, with threshold-free cluster enhancement (TFCE), to assess underlying effects of genotype, diagnosis and their interaction, on FA. Results. As predicted, statistically significant reductions in FA across a widely distributed brain network (p < 0.05, TFCE-corrected) were positively associated both with a diagnosis of SZ or BD and with the double (homozygous) presence of the ZNF804A rs1344706 risk variant (A). The main effect of genotype was medium (d = 0.48 in a 44,054-voxel cluster) and the effect in the SZ group alone was large (d = 1.01 in a 51,260-voxel cluster), with no significant effects in BD or controls, in isolation. No areas under a significant diagnosis by genotype interaction were found. Discussion. We provide the first evidence in a predominantly Caucasian clinical sample, of an association between ZNF804A rs1344706 A-homozygosity and reduced FA, both irrespective of diagnosis and particularly in SZ (in overlapping brain areas). This suggests that the previously observed involvement of this genomic region in psychosis susceptibility, and in impaired functional connectivity, may be

  16. Use of 16S rRNA Gene Terminal Restriction Fragment Analysis To Assess the Impact of Solids Retention Time on the Bacterial Diversity of Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Saikaly, Pascal E.; Stroot, Peter G.; Oerther, Daniel B.

    2005-01-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA genes was used to investigate the reproducibility and stability in the bacterial community structure of laboratory-scale sequencing batch bioreactors (SBR) and to assess the impact of solids retention time (SRT) on bacterial diversity. Two experiments were performed. In each experiment two sets of replicate SBRs were operated for a periods of three times the SRT. One set was operated at an SRT of 2 days and another set was operated at an SRT of 8 days. Samples for T-RFLP analysis were collected from the two sets of replicate reactors. HhaI, MspI, and RsaI T-RFLP profiles were analyzed using cluster analysis and diversity statistics. Cluster analysis with Ward's method using Jaccard distance and Hellinger distance showed that the bacterial community structure in both sets of reactors from both experimental runs was dynamic and that replicate reactors were clustered together and evolved similarly from startup. Richness (S), evenness (E), the Shannon-Weaver index (H), and the reciprocal of Simpson's index (1/D) were calculated, and the values were compared between the two sets of reactors. Evenness values were higher for reactors operated at an SRT of 2 days. Statistically significant differences in diversity (H and D) between the two sets of reactors were tested using a randomization procedure, and the results showed that reactors from both experimental runs that were operated at an SRT of 2 days had higher diversity (H and D) at the 5% level. T-RFLP analysis with diversity indices proved to be a powerful tool to analyze changes in the bacterial community diversity in response to changes in the operational parameters of activated-sludge systems. PMID:16204492

  17. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A (VEGFA) Gene Polymorphisms Have an Impact on Survival in a Subgroup of Indolent Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Santos, Carol; Martinez-Velasquez, Jimena; Fernandez-Cuevas, Belen; Polo, Natividad; Navarro, Belen; Millan, Isabel; Garcia, Jose Miguel; Collado, Rosa; Sanchez-Godoy, Pedro; Carbonell, Felix; Garcia-Vela, Jose Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated angiogenesis contributes to the pathogenesis of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). We investigated the impact of VEGFA gene diversity on the clinical outcome of patients with this disease. A VEGFA haplotype conformed by positions rs699947 (–1540C>A), rs833061 (–460T>C) and rs2010963 (405C>G) and two additional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs3025039 (936C>T) and rs25648 (1032C>T), were analysed in 239 patients at the time of their CLL diagnosis. Here, we showed that homozygosity for rs699947/rs833061/rs2010963 ACG haplotype (ACG+/+ genotype) correlated with a reduced survival in CLL patients (ACG+/+ vs other genotypes: HR = 2.3, p = 0.002; recessive model). In multivariate analysis, the ACG+/+ genotype was identified as a novel independent prognostic factor (HR = 2.1, p = 0.005). Moreover, ACG homozygosity subdivided patients with CLL with otherwise indolent parameters into prognostic subgroups with different outcomes. Specifically, patients carrying the ACG+/+ genotype with mutated IgVH, very low and low-risk cytogenetics, initial clinical stage, CD38 negative status or early age at diagnosis showed a shorter survival (ACG+/+ vs other genotypes: HR = 3.5, p = 0.035; HR = 3.4, p = 0.001; HR = 2.2, p = 0.035; HR = 3.4, p = 0.0001 and HR = 3.1, p = 0.009, respectively). In conclusion, VEGFA ACG+/+ genotype confers an adverse effect in overall survival in CLL patients with an indolent course of the disease. These observations support the biological and prognostic implications of VEGFA genetics in CLL. PMID:24971577

  18. The impact of exposure-biased sampling designs on detection of gene-environment interactions in case-control studies with potential exposure misclassification.

    PubMed

    Stenzel, Stephanie L; Ahn, Jaeil; Boonstra, Philip S; Gruber, Stephen B; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2015-05-01

    With limited funding and biological specimen availability, choosing an optimal sampling design to maximize power for detecting gene-by-environment (G-E) interactions is critical. Exposure-enriched sampling is often used to select subjects with rare exposures for genotyping to enhance power for tests of G-E effects. However, exposure misclassification (MC) combined with biased sampling can affect characteristics of tests for G-E interaction and joint tests for marginal association and G-E interaction. Here, we characterize the impact of exposure-biased sampling under conditions of perfect exposure information and exposure MC on properties of several methods for conducting inference. We assess the Type I error, power, bias, and mean squared error properties of case-only, case-control, and empirical Bayes methods for testing/estimating G-E interaction and a joint test for marginal G (or E) effect and G-E interaction across three biased sampling schemes. Properties are evaluated via empirical simulation studies. With perfect exposure information, exposure-enriched sampling schemes enhance power as compared to random selection of subjects irrespective of exposure prevalence but yield bias in estimation of the G-E interaction and marginal E parameters. Exposure MC modifies the relative performance of sampling designs when compared to the case of perfect exposure information. Those conducting G-E interaction studies should be aware of exposure MC properties and the prevalence of exposure when choosing an ideal sampling scheme and method for characterizing G-E interactions and joint effects.

  19. Prognostic impact of RUNX1 and ETV6 gene copy number on pediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia with or without hyperdiploidy.

    PubMed

    Kutlay, Nuket Yurur; Pekpak, Esra; Altıner, Sule; Ileri, Talia; Vicdan, Arzu Nedime; Dinçaslan, Handan; Ince, Elif Unal; Tukun, Fatma Ajlan

    2016-09-01

    The ETV6/RUNX1 fusion gene is a valuable prognostic marker that is frequently observed in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-cell ALL). However, the clinical significance of copy number aberrations in these genes remains unclear. In this study, the effects of various aberrations inETV6 and RUNX1 gene copy number on disease prognosis were evaluated in 21 pediatric patients diagnosed with B-cell ALL with/without t(12;21). The prognostic significance of changes in gene copy number of ETV6 or RUNX1 in the presence or absence of hyperdiploidy, trisomy 21, and t(12;21) translocation were also evaluated. RUNX1 gene copy number amplifications were detected in 83 % of the patients who lacked t(12;21) and in all of the patients with hyperdiploidy. Trisomy 21 was detected in 78 % of the patients with hyperdiploidy. Changes in ETV6 gene copy number were detected in patients who lacked both the t(12;21) translocation and RUNX1 gene copy number amplifications. However, RUNX1 gene copy number amplification and ETV6 deletion were observed in all of the patients with t(12;21). RUNX1 gene copy number amplification was associated with hyperdiploidy, but not with t(12;21). Thus, the evaluation of distinct FISH and cytogenetic patterns in patients with B-cell ALL may strengthen the prognostic significance of changes in gene copy number. PMID:27393278

  20. Sequence determinants spanning -35 motif and AT-rich spacer region impacting Ehrlichia chaffeensis Sigma 70-dependent promoter activity of two differentially expressed p28 outer membrane protein genes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huitao; Jakkula, Laxmi U. M. R.; Von Ohlen, Tonia; Ganta, Roman R.

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligate intracellular tick-borne bacterium which causes the disease, human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Ehrlichia chaffeensis contains only two sigma factors, σ32 and σ70. It is difficult to study E. chaffeensis gene regulation due to lack of a transformation system. We developed an Escherichia coli-based transcription system to study E. chaffeensis transcriptional regulation. An E. coli strain with its σ70 repressed with trp promoter is used to express E. chaffeensis σ70. The E. coli system and our previously established in vitro transcription system were used to map transcriptional differences of two Ehrlichia genes encoding p28-outer membrane proteins 14 and 19. We mapped the -10 and -35 motifs and the AT rich spacers located between the two motifs by performing detailed mutational analysis. Mutations within the -35 motif of the genes impacted transcription differently, while -10 motif deletions had no impact. The AT-rich spacers also contributed to transcriptional differences. We further demonstrated that the domain 4.2 of E. chaffeensis σ70 is important for regulating promoter activity and the deletion of region 1.1 of E. chaffeensis σ70 causes enhancement of the promoter activity. This is the first study defining the promoters of two closely related E. chaffeensis genes. PMID:27402867

  1. An apple rootstock overexpressing a peach CBF gene alters growth and flowering in the scion but does not impact cold hardiness or dormancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The C-repeat Binding Factor (CBF) transcription factor is involved in responses to low temperature and water deficit in many plant species. Overexpression of CBF genes leads to enhanced freezing tolerance and growth inhibition in many species. The overexpression of a peach CBF (PpCBF1) gene in a t...

  2. Inhibition of HIF prolyl-4-hydroxylases by FG-4497 reduces brain tissue injury and edema formation during ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Reischl, Stefan; Li, Lexiao; Walkinshaw, Gail; Flippin, Lee A; Marti, Hugo H; Kunze, Reiner

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke results in disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), edema formation and neuronal cell loss. Some neuroprotective factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) favor edema formation, while others such as erythropoietin (Epo) can mitigate it. Both factors are controlled by hypoxia inducible transcription factors (HIF) and the activity of prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHD). We hypothesize that activation of the adaptive hypoxic response by inhibition of PHD results in neuroprotection and prevention of vascular leakage. Mice, subjected to cerebral ischemia, were pre- or post-treated with the novel PHD inhibitor FG-4497. Inhibition of PHD activity resulted in HIF-1α stabilization, increased expression of VEGF and Epo, improved outcome from ischemic stroke and reduced edema formation by maintaining BBB integrity. Additional in vitro studies using brain endothelial cells and primary astrocytes confirmed that FG-4497 induces the HIF signaling pathway, leading to increased VEGF and Epo expression. In an in vitro ischemia model, using combined oxygen and glucose deprivation, FG-4497 promoted the survival of neurons. Furthermore, FG-4497 prevented the ischemia-induced rearrangement and gap formation of the tight junction proteins zonula occludens 1 and occludin, both in cultured endothelial cells and in infarcted brain tissue in vivo. These results indicate that FG-4497 has the potential to prevent cerebral ischemic damage by neuroprotection and prevention of vascular leakage.

  3. Inhibition of HIF prolyl-4-hydroxylases by FG-4497 reduces brain tissue injury and edema formation during ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Reischl, Stefan; Li, Lexiao; Walkinshaw, Gail; Flippin, Lee A; Marti, Hugo H; Kunze, Reiner

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke results in disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), edema formation and neuronal cell loss. Some neuroprotective factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) favor edema formation, while others such as erythropoietin (Epo) can mitigate it. Both factors are controlled by hypoxia inducible transcription factors (HIF) and the activity of prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHD). We hypothesize that activation of the adaptive hypoxic response by inhibition of PHD results in neuroprotection and prevention of vascular leakage. Mice, subjected to cerebral ischemia, were pre- or post-treated with the novel PHD inhibitor FG-4497. Inhibition of PHD activity resulted in HIF-1α stabilization, increased expression of VEGF and Epo, improved outcome from ischemic stroke and reduced edema formation by maintaining BBB integrity. Additional in vitro studies using brain endothelial cells and primary astrocytes confirmed that FG-4497 induces the HIF signaling pathway, leading to increased VEGF and Epo expression. In an in vitro ischemia model, using combined oxygen and glucose deprivation, FG-4497 promoted the survival of neurons. Furthermore, FG-4497 prevented the ischemia-induced rearrangement and gap formation of the tight junction proteins zonula occludens 1 and occludin, both in cultured endothelial cells and in infarcted brain tissue in vivo. These results indicate that FG-4497 has the potential to prevent cerebral ischemic damage by neuroprotection and prevention of vascular leakage. PMID:24409307

  4. Cell Killing Mechanisms and Impact on Gene Expression by Gemcitabine and 212Pb-Trastuzumab Treatment in a Disseminated i.p. Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    In pre-clinical studies, combination therapy with gemcitabine and targeted radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using 212Pb-trastuzumab showed tremendous therapeutic potential in the LS-174T tumor xenograft model of disseminated intraperitoneal disease. To better understand the underlying molecular basis for the observed cell killing efficacy, gene expression profiling was performed after a 24 h exposure to 212Pb-trastuzumab upon gemcitabine (Gem) pre-treatment in this model. DNA damage response genes in tumors were quantified using a real time quantitative PCR array (qRT-PCR array) covering 84 genes. The combination of Gem with α-radiation resulted in the differential expression of apoptotic genes (BRCA1, CIDEA, GADD45α, GADD45γ, IP6K3, PCBP4, RAD21, and p73), cell cycle regulatory genes (BRCA1, CHK1, CHK2, FANCG, GADD45α, GTSE1, PCBP4, MAP2K6, NBN, PCBP4, and SESN1), and damaged DNA binding and repair genes (BRCA1, BTG2, DMC1, ERCC1, EXO1, FANCG, FEN1, MSH2, MSH3, NBN, NTHL1, OGG1, PRKDC, RAD18, RAD21, RAD51B, SEMA4G, p73, UNG, XPC, and XRCC2). Of these genes, the expression of CHK1, GTSE1, EXO1, FANCG, RAD18, UNG and XRCC2 were specific to Gem/212Pb-trastuzumab administration. In addition, the present study demonstrates that increased stressful growth arrest conditions induced by Gem/212Pb-trastuzumab could suppress cell proliferation possibly by up-regulating genes involved in apoptosis such as p73, by down-regulating genes involved in cell cycle check point such as CHK1, and in damaged DNA repair such as RAD51 paralogs. These events may be mediated by genes such as BRCA1/MSH2, a member of BARC (BRCA-associated genome surveillance complex). The data suggest that up-regulation of genes involved in apoptosis, perturbation of checkpoint genes, and a failure to correctly perform HR-mediated DSB repair and mismatch-mediated SSB repair may correlate with the previously observed inability to maintain the G2/M arrest, leading to cell death. PMID:27467592

  5. Cell Killing Mechanisms and Impact on Gene Expression by Gemcitabine and 212Pb-Trastuzumab Treatment in a Disseminated i.p. Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E; Baidoo, Kwamena E; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2016-01-01

    In pre-clinical studies, combination therapy with gemcitabine and targeted radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using 212Pb-trastuzumab showed tremendous therapeutic potential in the LS-174T tumor xenograft model of disseminated intraperitoneal disease. To better understand the underlying molecular basis for the observed cell killing efficacy, gene expression profiling was performed after a 24 h exposure to 212Pb-trastuzumab upon gemcitabine (Gem) pre-treatment in this model. DNA damage response genes in tumors were quantified using a real time quantitative PCR array (qRT-PCR array) covering 84 genes. The combination of Gem with α-radiation resulted in the differential expression of apoptotic genes (BRCA1, CIDEA, GADD45α, GADD45γ, IP6K3, PCBP4, RAD21, and p73), cell cycle regulatory genes (BRCA1, CHK1, CHK2, FANCG, GADD45α, GTSE1, PCBP4, MAP2K6, NBN, PCBP4, and SESN1), and damaged DNA binding and repair genes (BRCA1, BTG2, DMC1, ERCC1, EXO1, FANCG, FEN1, MSH2, MSH3, NBN, NTHL1, OGG1, PRKDC, RAD18, RAD21, RAD51B, SEMA4G, p73, UNG, XPC, and XRCC2). Of these genes, the expression of CHK1, GTSE1, EXO1, FANCG, RAD18, UNG and XRCC2 were specific to Gem/212Pb-trastuzumab administration. In addition, the present study demonstrates that increased stressful growth arrest conditions induced by Gem/212Pb-trastuzumab could suppress cell proliferation possibly by up-regulating genes involved in apoptosis such as p73, by down-regulating genes involved in cell cycle check point such as CHK1, and in damaged DNA repair such as RAD51 paralogs. These events may be mediated by genes such as BRCA1/MSH2, a member of BARC (BRCA-associated genome surveillance complex). The data suggest that up-regulation of genes involved in apoptosis, perturbation of checkpoint genes, and a failure to correctly perform HR-mediated DSB repair and mismatch-mediated SSB repair may correlate with the previously observed inability to maintain the G2/M arrest, leading to cell death. PMID:27467592

  6. The c4h, tat, hppr and hppd Genes Prompted Engineering of Rosmarinic Acid Biosynthetic Pathway in Salvia miltiorrhiza Hairy Root Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shouhong; Saechao, Saengking; Di, Peng; Chen, Junfeng; Chen, Wansheng

    2011-01-01

    Rational engineering to produce biologically active plant compounds has been greatly impeded by our poor understanding of the regulatory and metabolic pathways underlying the biosynthesis of these compounds. Here we capitalized on our previously described gene-to-metabolite network in order to engineer rosmarinic acid (RA) biosynthesis pathway for the production of beneficial RA and lithospermic acid B (LAB) in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy root cultures. Results showed their production was greatly elevated by (1) overexpression of single gene, including cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (c4h), tyrosine aminotransferase (tat), and 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate reductase (hppr), (2) overexpression of both tat and hppr, and (3) suppression of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (hppd). Co-expression of tat/hppr produced the most abundant RA (906 mg/liter) and LAB (992 mg/liter), which were 4.3 and 3.2-fold more than in their wild-type (wt) counterparts respectively. And the value of RA concentration was also higher than that reported before, that produced by means of nutrient medium optimization or elicitor treatment. It is the first report of boosting RA and LAB biosynthesis through genetic manipulation, providing an effective approach for their large-scale commercial production by using hairy root culture systems as bioreactors. PMID:22242141

  7. The impact of oregano (Origanum heracleoticum) essential oil and carvacrol on virulence gene transcription by Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Mith, Hasika; Clinquart, Antoine; Zhiri, Abdesselam; Daube, Georges; Delcenserie, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine, via reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis, the effect of oregano essential oil (Origanum heracleoticum) and carvacrol, its major component, on the expression of virulence-associated genes in enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 ATCC strain 35150. Both oregano oil and carvacrol demonstrated their efficacy firstly, by inhibiting the transcription of the ler gene involved in upregulation of the LEE2, LEE3 and LEE4 promoters and of attaching and effacing lesions and secondly by decreasing both Shiga toxin and fliC genes expression. In addition, a decrease in luxS gene transcription involved in quorum sensing was observed. These results were dose dependent and showed a specific effect of O. heracleoticum and carvacrol in downregulating the expression of virulence genes in EHEC O157:H7. These findings suggest that oregano oil and carvacrol have the potential to mitigate the adverse health effects caused by virulence gene expression in EHEC O157:H7, through the use of these substances as natural antibacterial additives in foods or as an alternative to antibiotics. PMID:25790499

  8. The impact of oregano (Origanum heracleoticum) essential oil and carvacrol on virulence gene transcription by Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Mith, Hasika; Clinquart, Antoine; Zhiri, Abdesselam; Daube, Georges; Delcenserie, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine, via reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis, the effect of oregano essential oil (Origanum heracleoticum) and carvacrol, its major component, on the expression of virulence-associated genes in enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 ATCC strain 35150. Both oregano oil and carvacrol demonstrated their efficacy firstly, by inhibiting the transcription of the ler gene involved in upregulation of the LEE2, LEE3 and LEE4 promoters and of attaching and effacing lesions and secondly by decreasing both Shiga toxin and fliC genes expression. In addition, a decrease in luxS gene transcription involved in quorum sensing was observed. These results were dose dependent and showed a specific effect of O. heracleoticum and carvacrol in downregulating the expression of virulence genes in EHEC O157:H7. These findings suggest that oregano oil and carvacrol have the potential to mitigate the adverse health effects caused by virulence gene expression in EHEC O157:H7, through the use of these substances as natural antibacterial additives in foods or as an alternative to antibiotics.

  9. Genes and gene regulation

    SciTech Connect

    MacLean, N.

    1988-01-01

    Genetics has long been a central topic for biologists, and recent progress has captured the public imagination as well. This book addresses questions that are at the leading edge of this continually advancing discipline. In tune with the increasing emphasis on molecular biology and genetic engineering, this text emphasizes the molecular aspects of gene expression, and the evolution of gene sequence organization and control. It reviews the genetic material of viruses, bacteria, and of higher organisms. Cells and organisms are compared in terms of gene numbers, their arrangements within a cell, and the control mechanisms which regulate the activity of genes.

  10. Correlation of Quantitative PCR for a Poultry-Specific Brevibacterium Marker Gene with Bacterial and Chemical Indicators of Water Pollution in a Watershed Impacted by Land Application of Poultry Litter▿

    PubMed Central

    Weidhaas, Jennifer L.; Macbeth, Tamzen W.; Olsen, Roger L.; Harwood, Valerie J.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of fecal contamination from human and agricultural animal waste on water quality is a major public health concern. Identification of the dominant source(s) of fecal pollution in a watershed is necessary for assessing the safety of recreational water and protecting water resources. A field study was conducted using quantitative PCR (qPCR) for the 16S rRNA gene of Brevibacterium sp. LA35 to track feces-contaminated poultry litter in environmental samples. Based on sensitivity and specificity characteristics of the qPCR method, the Bayesian conditional probability that detection of the LA35 marker gene in a water sample represented a true-positive result was 93%. The marker's covariance with fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and metals associated with poultry litter was also assessed in litter, runoff, surface water, and groundwater samples. LA35 was detected in water and soil samples collected throughout the watershed, and its concentration covaried with concentrations of Escherichia coli, enterococci, As, Cu, P, and Zn. Significantly greater concentrations of FIB, As, Cu, P, and Zn were observed in edge-of-field runoff samples in which LA35 was detected, compared to samples in which it was not detected. Furthermore, As, Cu, P, and Zn concentrations covaried in environmental samples in which LA35 was detected and typically did not in samples in which the marker gene was not detected. The covariance of the poultry-specific LA35 marker gene with these known contaminants from poultry feces provides further evidence that it is a useful tool for assessing the impact of poultry-derived fecal pollution in environmental waters. PMID:21278274

  11. Correlation of quantitative PCR for a poultry-specific brevibacterium marker gene with bacterial and chemical indicators of water pollution in a watershed impacted by land application of poultry litter.

    PubMed

    Weidhaas, Jennifer L; Macbeth, Tamzen W; Olsen, Roger L; Harwood, Valerie J

    2011-03-01

    The impact of fecal contamination from human and agricultural animal waste on water quality is a major public health concern. Identification of the dominant source(s) of fecal pollution in a watershed is necessary for assessing the safety of recreational water and protecting water resources. A field study was conducted using quantitative PCR (qPCR) for the 16S rRNA gene of Brevibacterium sp. LA35 to track feces-contaminated poultry litter in environmental samples. Based on sensitivity and specificity characteristics of the qPCR method, the Bayesian conditional probability that detection of the LA35 marker gene in a water sample represented a true-positive result was 93%. The marker's covariance with fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and metals associated with poultry litter was also assessed in litter, runoff, surface water, and groundwater samples. LA35 was detected in water and soil samples collected throughout the watershed, and its concentration covaried with concentrations of Escherichia coli, enterococci, As, Cu, P, and Zn. Significantly greater concentrations of FIB, As, Cu, P, and Zn were observed in edge-of-field runoff samples in which LA35 was detected, compared to samples in which it was not detected. Furthermore, As, Cu, P, and Zn concentrations covaried in environmental samples in which LA35 was detected and typically did not in samples in which the marker gene was not detected. The covariance of the poultry-specific LA35 marker gene with these known contaminants from poultry feces provides further evidence that it is a useful tool for assessing the impact of poultry-derived fecal pollution in environmental waters.

  12. Comprehensive analysis of HPV16 integration in OSCC reveals no significant impact of physical status on viral oncogene and virally disrupted human gene expression.

    PubMed

    Olthof, Nadine C; Speel, Ernst-Jan M; Kolligs, Jutta; Haesevoets, Annick; Henfling, Mieke; Ramaekers, Frans C S; Preuss, Simon F; Drebber, Uta; Wieland, Ulrike; Silling, Steffi; Lam, Wan L; Vucic, Emily A; Kremer, Bernd; Klussmann, Jens-P; Huebbers, Christian U

    2014-01-01

    Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 is an independent risk factor for the development of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC). However, it is unclear whether viral integration is an essential hallmark in the carcinogenic process of OSCC and whether HPV integration correlates with the level of viral gene transcription and influences the expression of disrupted host genes. We analyzed 75 patients with OSCC. HPV16-positivity was proven by p16(INK4A) immunohistochemistry, PCR and FISH. Viral integration was examined using DIPS- as well as APOT-PCR. Viral E2, E6 and E7 gene expression levels were quantified by quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT-q)PCR. Expression levels of 7 human genes disrupted by the virus were extracted from mRNA expression profiling data of 32 OSCCs. Viral copy numbers were assessed by qPCR in 73 tumors. We identified 37 HPV16-human fusion products indicating viral integration in 29 (39%) OSCC. In the remaining tumors (61%) only episome-derived PCR products were detected. When comparing OSCC with or without an integration-derived fusion product, we did not find significant differences in the mean RNA expression of viral genes E2, E6 and E7 or the viral copy numbers per cell, nor did the RNA expression of the HPV-disrupted genes differ from either group of OSCC. In conclusion, our data do not support the hypothesis that integration affects the levels of viral and/or HPV-disrupted human gene transcripts. Thus constitutive, rather than a high level, of expression of oncogene transcripts appears to be required in HPV-related OSCC. PMID:24586376

  13. Impact of viral E2-gene status on outcome after radiotherapy for patients with human papillomavirus 16-positive cancer of the uterine cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Lindel, Katja . E-mail: Katja_Lindel@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Villiers, Ethel-Michele de; Burri, Philipp; Studer, Ueli; Altermatt, Hans J.; Greiner, Richard H.; Gruber, Guenther

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: Integration of high-risk papillomavirus DNA has been considered an important step in oncogenic progression to cervical carcinoma. Disruption of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genome within the E2 gene is frequently a consequence. This study investigated the influence of episomal viral DNA on outcome in patients with advanced cervical cancer treated with primary radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Paraffin-embedded biopsies of 82 women with locally advanced cervical cancer could be analyzed for HPV infection by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by use of SPF1/2 primers. E2-gene intactness of HPV-16-positive samples was analyzed in 3 separate amplification reactions by use of the E2A, E2B, E2C primers. Statistical analyses (Kaplan-Meier method; log-rank test) were performed for overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS), and distant metastases-free survival (DMFS). Results: Sixty-one (75%) of 82 carcinomas were HPV positive, 44 of them for HPV-16 (72%). Seventeen of the 44 HPV-16-positive tumors (39%) had an intact E2 gene. Patients with a HPV-16-positive tumor and an intact E2 gene showed a trend for a better DFS (58% vs. 38%, p = 0.06) compared with those with a disrupted E2 gene. A nonsignificant difference occurred regarding OS (87% vs. 66%, p = 0.16) and DMFS (57% vs. 48%, p = 0.15). Conclusion: E2-gene status may be a promising new target, but more studies are required to elucidate the effect of the viral E2 gene on outcome after radiotherapy in HPV-positive tumors.

  14. Impact of Aeration and Heme-Activated Respiration on Lactococcus lactis Gene Expression: Identification of a Heme-Responsive Operon▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Martin Bastian; Garrigues, Christel; Tuphile, Karine; Brun, Célia; Vido, Karin; Bennedsen, Mads; Møllgaard, Henrik; Gaudu, Philippe; Gruss, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a widely used food bacterium mainly characterized for its fermentation metabolism. However, this species undergoes a metabolic shift to respiration when heme is added to an aerobic medium. Respiration results in markedly improved biomass and survival compared to fermentation. Whole-genome microarrays were used to assess changes in L. lactis expression under aerobic and respiratory conditions compared to static growth, i.e., nonaerated. We observed the following. (i) Stress response genes were affected mainly by aerobic fermentation. This result underscores the differences between aerobic fermentation and respiration environments and confirms that respiration growth alleviates oxidative stress. (ii) Functions essential for respiratory metabolism, e.g., genes encoding cytochrome bd oxidase, menaquinone biosynthesis, and heme uptake, are similarly expressed under the three conditions. This indicates that cells are prepared for respiration once O2 and heme become available. (iii) Expression of only 11 genes distinguishes respiration from both aerobic and static fermentation cultures. Among them, the genes comprising the putative ygfCBA operon are strongly induced by heme regardless of respiration, thus identifying the first heme-responsive operon in lactococci. We give experimental evidence that the ygfCBA genes are involved in heme homeostasis. PMID:18487342

  15. Occurrence of tetracycline-resistant fecal coliforms and their resistance genes in an urban river impacted by municipal wastewater treatment plant discharges.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chong-Miao; Du, Cong; Xu, Huan; Miao, Yan-Hui; Cheng, Yan-Yan; Tang, Hao; Zhou, Jin-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance of fecal coliforms in an urban river poses great threats to both human health and the environment. To investigate the occurrence and distribution of antibiotic resistant bacteria in an urban river, water samples were collected from the Chanhe River in Xi'an, China. After membrane filtration of water samples, the tetracycline resistance rate of fecal coliforms and their resistance genes were detected by plating and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. We found that fecal coliforms were generally resistant to tetracycline and saw average resistance rates of 44.7%. The genes tetA and tetB were widely detected, and their positive rate was 60%-100% and 40%-90%, respectively. We found few strains containing tetC, tetK, tetQ and tetX, and we did not identify any strains containing tetG, tetM or tetO. The prevalence of tetA and tetB over other genes indicated that the main mechanism for resistance to tetracycline is by changes to the efflux pump. Our analysis of the types and proportion of tetracycline resistance genes in the Chanhe River at locations upstream and downstream of the urban center suggests that the increased number of tetracycline-resistant fecal coliforms and spatial variation of tetracycline resistance genes diversity were related to municipal wastewater treatment plant discharge.

  16. Impact of nitrogen sources on gene expression and toxin production in the diazotroph Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii CS-505 and non-diazotroph Raphidiopsis brookii D9.

    PubMed

    Stucken, Karina; John, Uwe; Cembella, Allan; Soto-Liebe, Katia; Vásquez, Mónica

    2014-06-01

    Different environmental nitrogen sources play selective roles in the development of cyanobacterial blooms and noxious effects are often exacerbated when toxic cyanobacteria are dominant. Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii CS-505 (heterocystous, nitrogen fixing) and Raphidiopsis brookii D9 (non-N₂ fixing) produce the nitrogenous toxins cylindrospermopsin (CYN) and paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), respectively. These toxin groups are biosynthesized constitutively by two independent putative gene clusters, whose flanking genes are target for nitrogen (N) regulation. It is not yet known how or if toxin biosynthetic genes are regulated, particularly by N-source dependency. Here we show that binding boxes for NtcA, the master regulator of N metabolism, are located within both gene clusters as potential regulators of toxin biosynthesis. Quantification of intra- and extracellular toxin content in cultures at early stages of growth under nitrate, ammonium, urea and N-free media showed that N-sources influence neither CYN nor PST production. However, CYN and PST profiles were altered under N-free medium resulting in a decrease in the predicted precursor toxins (doCYN and STX, respectively). Reduced STX amounts were also observed under growth in ammonium. Quantification of toxin biosynthesis and transport gene transcripts revealed a constitutive transcription under all tested N-sources. Our data support the hypothesis that PSTs and CYN are constitutive metabolites whose biosynthesis is correlated to cyanobacterial growth rather than directly to specific environmental conditions. Overall, the constant biosynthesis of toxins and expression of the putative toxin-biosynthesis genes supports the usage of qPCR probes in water quality monitoring of toxic cyanobacteria. PMID:24956074

  17. Impact of nitrogen sources on gene expression and toxin production in the diazotroph Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii CS-505 and non-diazotroph Raphidiopsis brookii D9.

    PubMed

    Stucken, Karina; John, Uwe; Cembella, Allan; Soto-Liebe, Katia; Vásquez, Mónica

    2014-06-20

    Different environmental nitrogen sources play selective roles in the development of cyanobacterial blooms and noxious effects are often exacerbated when toxic cyanobacteria are dominant. Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii CS-505 (heterocystous, nitrogen fixing) and Raphidiopsis brookii D9 (non-N₂ fixing) produce the nitrogenous toxins cylindrospermopsin (CYN) and paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), respectively. These toxin groups are biosynthesized constitutively by two independent putative gene clusters, whose flanking genes are target for nitrogen (N) regulation. It is not yet known how or if toxin biosynthetic genes are regulated, particularly by N-source dependency. Here we show that binding boxes for NtcA, the master regulator of N metabolism, are located within both gene clusters as potential regulators of toxin biosynthesis. Quantification of intra- and extracellular toxin content in cultures at early stages of growth under nitrate, ammonium, urea and N-free media showed that N-sources influence neither CYN nor PST production. However, CYN and PST profiles were altered under N-free medium resulting in a decrease in the predicted precursor toxins (doCYN and STX, respectively). Reduced STX amounts were also observed under growth in ammonium. Quantification of toxin biosynthesis and transport gene transcripts revealed a constitutive transcription under all tested N-sources. Our data support the hypothesis that PSTs and CYN are constitutive metabolites whose biosynthesis is correlated to cyanobacterial growth rather than directly to specific environmental conditions. Overall, the constant biosynthesis of toxins and expression of the putative toxin-biosynthesis genes supports the usage of qPCR probes in water quality monitoring of toxic cyanobacteria.

  18. Impact of Nitrogen Sources on Gene Expression and Toxin Production in the Diazotroph Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii CS-505 and Non-Diazotroph Raphidiopsis brookii D9

    PubMed Central

    Stucken, Karina; John, Uwe; Cembella, Allan; Soto-Liebe, Katia; Vásquez, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Different environmental nitrogen sources play selective roles in the development of cyanobacterial blooms and noxious effects are often exacerbated when toxic cyanobacteria are dominant. Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii CS-505 (heterocystous, nitrogen fixing) and Raphidiopsis brookii D9 (non-N2 fixing) produce the nitrogenous toxins cylindrospermopsin (CYN) and paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), respectively. These toxin groups are biosynthesized constitutively by two independent putative gene clusters, whose flanking genes are target for nitrogen (N) regulation. It is not yet known how or if toxin biosynthetic genes are regulated, particularly by N-source dependency. Here we show that binding boxes for NtcA, the master regulator of N metabolism, are located within both gene clusters as potential regulators of toxin biosynthesis. Quantification of intra- and extracellular toxin content in cultures at early stages of growth under nitrate, ammonium, urea and N-free media showed that N-sources influence neither CYN nor PST production. However, CYN and PST profiles were altered under N-free medium resulting in a decrease in the predicted precursor toxins (doCYN and STX, respectively). Reduced STX amounts were also observed under growth in ammonium. Quantification of toxin biosynthesis and transport gene transcripts revealed a constitutive transcription under all tested N-sources. Our data support the hypothesis that PSTs and CYN are constitutive metabolites whose biosynthesis is correlated to cyanobacterial growth rather than directly to specific environmental conditions. Overall, the constant biosynthesis of toxins and expression of the putative toxin-biosynthesis genes supports the usage of qPCR probes in water quality monitoring of toxic cyanobacteria. PMID:24956074

  19. A Comprehensive In Silico Analysis on the Structural and Functional Impact of SNPs in the Congenital Heart Defects Associated with NKX2-5 Gene-A Molecular Dynamic Simulation Approach.

    PubMed

    Abdul Samad, Firoz; Suliman, Bandar A; Basha, Syed Hussain; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) presented as structural defects in the heart and blood vessels during birth contribute an important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many Single nucletotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in different genes have been associated with various types of congenital heart defects. NKX 2-5 gene is one among them, which encodes a homeobox-containing transcription factor that plays a crucial role during the initial phases of heart formation and development. Mutations in this gene could cause different types of congenital heart defects, including Atrial septal defect (ASD), Atrial ventricular block (AVB), Tetralogy of fallot and ventricular septal defect. This highlights the importance of studying the impact of different SNPs found within this gene that might cause structural and functional modification of its encoded protein. In this study, we retrieved SNPs from the database (dbSNP), followed by identification of potentially deleterious Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) and prediction of their effect on proteins by computational screening using SIFT and Polyphen. Furthermore, we have carried out molecular dynamic simulation (MDS) in order to uncover the SNPs that would cause the most structural damage to the protein altering its biological function. The most important SNP that was found using our approach was rs137852685 R161P, which was predicted to cause the most damage to the structural features of the protein. Mapping nsSNPs in genes such as NKX 2-5 would provide valuable information about individuals carrying these polymorphisms, where such variations could be used as diagnostic markers. PMID:27152669

  20. Studying Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Area What are genes? Genes are sections of DNA that contain instructions for making the molecules—many ... material in an organism. This includes genes and DNA elements that control the activity of genes. Does ...

  1. Impact of Institutional Care on Attachment Disorganization and Insecurity of Ukrainian Preschoolers: Protective Effect of the Long Variant of the Serotonin Transporter Gene (5HTT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Dobrova-Krol, Natasha; van IJzendoorn, Marinus

    2012-01-01

    Institutional care has been shown to lead to insecure and disorganized attachments and indiscriminate friendliness. Some children, however, are surprisingly resilient to the adverse environment. Here the protective role of the long variant of the serotonin receptor gene (5HTT) is explored in a small hypothesis-generating study of 37 Ukrainian…

  2. Phylogenetic distribution of genes encoding β-glucuronidase activity in human colonic bacteria and the impact of diet on faecal glycosidase activities.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Freda M; Maison, Nathalie; Holtrop, Grietje; Young, Pauline; Stevens, Valerie J; Ince, Jennifer; Johnstone, Alexandra M; Lobley, Gerald E; Flint, Harry J; Louis, Petra

    2012-08-01

    Bacterial β-glucuronidase in the human colon plays an important role in cleaving liver conjugates of dietary compounds and xenobiotics, while other glycosidase activities are involved in the conversion of dietary plant glycosides. Here we detected an increase in β-glucuronidase activity in faecal samples from obese volunteers following a high-protein moderate carbohydrate weight-loss diet, compared with a weight maintenance diet, but little or no changes were observed when the type of fermentable carbohydrate was varied. Other faecal glycosidase activities showed little or no change over a fivefold range of dietary NSP intake, although α-glucosidase increased on a resistant starch-enriched diet. Two distinct groups of gene, gus and BG, have been reported to encode β-glucuronidase activity among human colonic bacteria. Degenerate primers were designed against these genes. Overall, Firmicutes were found to account for 96% of amplified gus sequences, with three operational taxonomic units particularly abundant, whereas 59% of amplified BG sequences belonged to Bacteroidetes and 41% to Firmicutes. A similar distribution of operational taxonomic units was found in a published metagenome dataset involving a larger number of volunteers. Seven cultured isolates of human colonic bacteria that carried only the BG gene gave relatively low β-glucuronidase activity that was not induced by 4-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucuronide. By comparison, in three of five isolates that possessed only the gus gene, β-glucuronidase activity was induced.

  3. CHEMICALLY ACTIVATED LUCIFASE GENE EXPRESSION (CALUX) CELL BIOASSAY ANALYSIS FOR THE ESTIMATION OF DIOXIN-LIKE ACTIVITIY: CRITICAL PARAMETERS OF THE CALUX PROCEDURE THAT IMPACT ASSAY RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chemically Activated Luciferase gene expression (CALUX) in vitro cell bioassay is an emerging bioanalytical tool that is increasingly being used for the screening and relative quantification of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds. Since CALUX analyses provide a biological respo...

  4. Impact of broiler egg storage on the relative expression of selected blastoderm genes associated with apoptosis, oxidative stress, and fatty acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cool temperature storage of eggs prior to incubation is a frequent practice by commercial broiler hatcheries. However, continued storage beyond 7 days leads to a progressively increase in the rate of early embryonic mortality. In this study, we examined the relative expression of 31 genes associat...

  5. Inorganic and organic fertilizers impact the abundance and proportion of antibiotic resistance and integron-integrase genes in agricultural grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Nõlvak, Hiie; Truu, Marika; Kanger, Kärt; Tampere, Mailiis; Espenberg, Mikk; Loit, Evelin; Raave, Henn; Truu, Jaak

    2016-08-15

    Soil fertilization with animal manure or its digestate may facilitate an important antibiotic resistance dissemination route from anthropogenic sources to the environment. This study examines the effect of mineral fertilizer (NH4NO3), cattle slurry and cattle slurry digestate amendment on the abundance and proportion dynamics of five antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and two classes of integron-integrase genes (intI1 and intI2) in agricultural grassland soil. Fertilization was performed thrice throughout one vegetation period. The targeted ARGs (sul1, tetA, blaCTX-M, blaOXA2 and qnrS) encode resistance to several major antibiotic classes used in veterinary medicine such as sulfonamides, tetracycline, cephalosporins, penicillin and fluoroquinolones, respectively. The non-fertilized grassland soil contained a stable background of tetA, blaCTX-M and sul1 genes. The type of applied fertilizer significantly affected ARGs and integron-integrase genes abundances and proportions in the bacterial community (p<0.001 in both cases), explaining 67.04% of the abundance and 42.95% of the proportion variations in the grassland soil. Both cattle slurry and cattle slurry digestate proved to be considerable sources of ARGs, especially sul1, as well as integron-integrases. Sul1, intI1 and intI2 levels in grassland soil were elevated in response to each organic fertilizer's application event, but this increase was followed by a stage of decrease, suggesting that microbes possessing these genes were predominantly entrained into soil via cattle slurry or its digestate application and had somewhat limited survival potential in a soil environment. However, the abundance of these three target genes did not decrease to a background level by the end of the study period. TetA was most abundant in mineral fertilizer treated soil and blaCTX-M in cattle slurry digestate amended soil. Despite significantly different abundances, the abundance dynamics of bacteria possessing these genes were

  6. Inorganic and organic fertilizers impact the abundance and proportion of antibiotic resistance and integron-integrase genes in agricultural grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Nõlvak, Hiie; Truu, Marika; Kanger, Kärt; Tampere, Mailiis; Espenberg, Mikk; Loit, Evelin; Raave, Henn; Truu, Jaak

    2016-08-15

    Soil fertilization with animal manure or its digestate may facilitate an important antibiotic resistance dissemination route from anthropogenic sources to the environment. This study examines the effect of mineral fertilizer (NH4NO3), cattle slurry and cattle slurry digestate amendment on the abundance and proportion dynamics of five antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and two classes of integron-integrase genes (intI1 and intI2) in agricultural grassland soil. Fertilization was performed thrice throughout one vegetation period. The targeted ARGs (sul1, tetA, blaCTX-M, blaOXA2 and qnrS) encode resistance to several major antibiotic classes used in veterinary medicine such as sulfonamides, tetracycline, cephalosporins, penicillin and fluoroquinolones, respectively. The non-fertilized grassland soil contained a stable background of tetA, blaCTX-M and sul1 genes. The type of applied fertilizer significantly affected ARGs and integron-integrase genes abundances and proportions in the bacterial community (p<0.001 in both cases), explaining 67.04% of the abundance and 42.95% of the proportion variations in the grassland soil. Both cattle slurry and cattle slurry digestate proved to be considerable sources of ARGs, especially sul1, as well as integron-integrases. Sul1, intI1 and intI2 levels in grassland soil were elevated in response to each organic fertilizer's application event, but this increase was followed by a stage of decrease, suggesting that microbes possessing these genes were predominantly entrained into soil via cattle slurry or its digestate application and had somewhat limited survival potential in a soil environment. However, the abundance of these three target genes did not decrease to a background level by the end of the study period. TetA was most abundant in mineral fertilizer treated soil and blaCTX-M in cattle slurry digestate amended soil. Despite significantly different abundances, the abundance dynamics of bacteria possessing these genes were

  7. To Be or Not to Be a Pseudogene: A Molecular Epidemiological Approach to the mclx Genes and Its Impact in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lopes Santos, Catarina; Nebenzahl-Guimaraes, Hanna; Vaz Mendes, Marta; van Soolingen, Dick; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis presents a myriad of symptoms, progression routes and propagation patterns not yet fully understood. Whereas for a long time research has focused solely on the patient immunity and overall susceptibility, it is nowadays widely accepted that the genetic diversity of its causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, plays a key role in this dynamic. This study focuses on a particular family of genes, the mclxs (Mycobacterium cyclase/LuxR-like genes), which codify for a particular and nearly mycobacterial-exclusive combination of protein domains. mclxs genes were found to be pseudogenized by frameshift-causing insertion(s)/deletion(s) in a considerable number of M. tuberculosis complex strains and clinical isolates. To discern the functional implications of the pseudogenization, we have analysed the pattern of frameshift-causing mutations in a group of M. tuberculosis isolates while taking into account their microbial-, patient- and disease-related traits. Our logistic regression-based analyses have revealed disparate effects associated with the transcriptional inactivation of two mclx genes. In fact, mclx2 (Rv1358) pseudogenization appears to be primarily driven by the microbial phylogenetic background, being mainly related to the Euro-American (EAm) lineage; on the other hand, mclx3 (Rv2488c) presents a higher tendency for pseudogenization among isolates from patients born on the Western Pacific area, and from isolates causing extra-pulmonary infections. These results contribute to the overall knowledge on the biology of M. tuberculosis infection, whereas at the same time launch the necessary basis for the functional assessment of these so far overlooked genes.

  8. To Be or Not to Be a Pseudogene: A Molecular Epidemiological Approach to the mclx Genes and Its Impact in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Marta Vaz; van Soolingen, Dick; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis presents a myriad of symptoms, progression routes and propagation patterns not yet fully understood. Whereas for a long time research has focused solely on the patient immunity and overall susceptibility, it is nowadays widely accepted that the genetic diversity of its causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, plays a key role in this dynamic. This study focuses on a particular family of genes, the mclxs (Mycobacterium cyclase/LuxR-like genes), which codify for a particular and nearly mycobacterial-exclusive combination of protein domains. mclxs genes were found to be pseudogenized by frameshift-causing insertion(s)/deletion(s) in a considerable number of M. tuberculosis complex strains and clinical isolates. To discern the functional implications of the pseudogenization, we have analysed the pattern of frameshift-causing mutations in a group of M. tuberculosis isolates while taking into account their microbial-, patient- and disease-related traits. Our logistic regression-based analyses have revealed disparate effects associated with the transcriptional inactivation of two mclx genes. In fact, mclx2 (Rv1358) pseudogenization appears to be primarily driven by the microbial phylogenetic background, being mainly related to the Euro-American (EAm) lineage; on the other hand, mclx3 (Rv2488c) presents a higher tendency for pseudogenization among isolates from patients born on the Western Pacific area, and from isolates causing extra-pulmonary infections. These results contribute to the overall knowledge on the biology of M. tuberculosis infection, whereas at the same time launch the necessary basis for the functional assessment of these so far overlooked genes. PMID:26035295

  9. [Impacts of suboptimal temperature and low light intensity on the activities and gene expression of photosynthetic enzymes in cucumber seedling leaves].

    PubMed

    Bi, Huan-Gai; Wang, Mei-Ling; Jiang, Zhen-Sheng; Dong, Xu-Bing; Ai, Xi-Zhen

    2011-11-01

    Taking the cucumber cultivar 'Jinyou 3' as test material, this paper studied the variations of the mRNA expression and activities of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA), and transketolase (TK) in cucumber seedling leaves under suboptimal temperature and low light intensity (ST+LL). In the treatment of ST+LL, the leaf area and the dry mass per plant decreased remarkably, compared with the control. On the early days of ST+LL treatment, the gene expression of Rubisco rbcL and rbcS, FBPase, GAPDH, FBA, and TK declined markedly, the activities of the enzymes except TK obviously weakened, and the photosynthetic rate (P(n)) decreased rapidly. 3 days later, the gene expression of Rubisco rbcL and rbcS and the initial activity of Rubisco showed a continuous decrease but the decrement was obviously lesser, the total activity of Rubisco and the activities and gene expression of FBPase, GAPDH, FBA, and TK had an increasing trend, and the P(n) ascended simultaneously. When the treating time exceeded 6 days, the gene expression and the activities of Rubisco and FBPase tended to be constant, while those of the other enzymes as well as the P(n) presented a decreasing trend. These results suggested that the decline of the gene expression and activities of the photosynthetic enzymes in cucumber seedlings under suboptimal temperature and low light intensity was the important reason which led to the decrease of P(n). The adaptation of photosynthetic apparatus in cucumber seedlings to suboptimal temperature and low light intensity was related to the activation mechanisms of photosynthetic enzymes.

  10. Impact of pnpR, a LysR-type regulator-encoding gene, on the cellular processes of Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiongzhen; Tu, Hui; Huang, Fei; Wang, Yicheng; Dong, Weiliang; Wang, Wenhui; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Fei; Cui, Zhongli

    2016-06-01

    LysR-type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs) regulate various cellular processes in bacteria. pnpR is an LTTR-encoding gene involved in the regulation of hydroquinone (HQ) degradation, and its effects on the cellular processes of Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4 were investigated at the physiological, biochemical and molecular levels. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that pnpR positively regulated its own expression and that of the pnpC1C2DECX1X2 operon; additionally, pnpR partially regulated the expression of pnpA when P. putida was grown on para-nitrophenol (PNP) or HQ. Strains DLL-E4 and DLL-ΔpnpR exhibited similar cellular morphologies and growth rates. Transcriptome analysis revealed that pnpR regulated the expression of genes in addition to those involved in PNP degradation. A total of 20 genes were upregulated and 19 genes were downregulated by at least 2-fold in strain DLL-ΔpnpR relative to strain DLL-E4. Bioinformatic analysis revealed putative PnpR-binding sites located in the upstream regions of genes involved in PNP degradation, carbon catabolite repression and other cellular processes. The utilization of L-aspartic acid, L-histidine, L-pyroglutamic acid, L-serine, γ-aminobutyric acid, D,L-lactic acid, D-saccharic acid, succinic acid and L-alaninamide was increased at least 1.3-fold in strain DLL-ΔpnpR as shown by BIOLOG assays, indicating that pnpR plays a potential negative regulation role in the utilization of carbon sources. PMID:27190157

  11. The Coevolutionary Period of Wolbachia pipientis Infecting Drosophila ananassae and Its Impact on the Evolution of the Host Germline Stem Cell Regulating Genes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Young; Aquadro, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    The endosymbiotic bacteria Wolbachia pipientis is known to infect a wide range of arthropod species yet less is known about the coevolutionary history it has with its hosts. Evidence of highly identical W. pipientis strains in evolutionary divergent hosts suggests horizontal transfer between hosts. For example, Drosophila ananassae is infected with a W. pipientis strain that is nearly identical in sequence to a strain that infects both D. simulans and D. suzukii, suggesting recent horizontal transfer among these three species. However, it is unknown whether the W. pipientis strain had recently invaded all three species or a more complex infectious dynamic underlies the horizontal transfers. Here, we have examined the coevolutionary history of D. ananassae and its resident W. pipientis to infer its period of infection. Phylogenetic analysis of D. ananassae mitochondrial DNA and W. pipientis DNA sequence diversity revealed the current W. pipientis infection is not recent. In addition, we examined the population genetics and molecular evolution of several germline stem cell (GSC) regulating genes of D. ananassae. These studies reveal significant evidence of recent and long-term positive selection at stonewall in D. ananassae, whereas pumillio showed patterns of variation consistent with only recent positive selection. Previous studies had found evidence for adaptive evolution of two key germline differentiation genes, bag of marbles (bam) and benign gonial cell neoplasm (bgcn), in D. melanogaster and D. simulans and proposed that the adaptive evolution at these two genes was driven by arms race between the host GSC and W. pipientis. However, we did not find any statistical departures from a neutral model of evolution for bam and bgcn in D. ananassae despite our new evidence that this species has been infected with W. pipientis for a period longer than the most recent infection in D. melanogaster. In the end, analyzing the GSC regulating genes individually showed two

  12. Integron associated mobile genes

    PubMed Central

    Labbate, Maurizio; Boucher, Yan; Luu, Ivan; Chowdhury, Piklu Roy; Stokes, H.W.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) impacts on the evolution of prokaryotes in both the short and long-term. The short-term impacts of mobilized genes are a concern to humans since LGT explains the global rise of multi drug resistant pathogens seen in the past 70 years. However, LGT has been a feature of prokaryotes from the earliest days of their existence and the concept of a bifurcating tree of life is not entirely applicable to prokaryotes since most genes in extant prokaryotic genomes have probably been acquired from other lineages. Successful transfer and maintenance of a gene in a new host is understandable if it acts independently of cell networks and confers an advantage. Antibiotic resistance provides an example of this whereby a gene can be advantageous in virtually any cell across broad species backgrounds. In a longer evolutionary context however laterally transferred genes can be assimilated into even essential cell networks. How this happens is not well understood and we discuss recent work that identifies a mobile gene, unique to a cell lineage, which is detrimental to the cell when lost. We also present some additional data and believe our emerging model will be helpful in understanding how mobile genes integrate into cell networks. PMID:22754748

  13. A Graphical Systems Model and Tissue-specific Functional Gene Sets to Aid Transcriptomic Analysis of Chemical Impacts on the Female Teleost Reproductive Axis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oligonucleotide microarrays and other ‘omics’ approaches are powerful tools for unsupervised analysis of chemical impacts on biological systems. However, the lack of well annotated biological pathways for many aquatic organisms, including fish, and the poor power of microarray-b...

  14. Inactivation of genes coding for mitochondrial Nd7 and Nd9 complex I subunits in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Impact of complex I loss on respiration and energetic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Massoz, Simon; Larosa, Véronique; Plancke, Charlotte; Lapaille, Marie; Bailleul, Benjamin; Pirotte, Dorothée; Radoux, Michèle; Leprince, Pierre; Coosemans, Nadine; Matagne, René F; Remacle, Claire; Cardol, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    In Chlamydomonas, unlike in flowering plants, genes coding for Nd7 (NAD7/49 kDa) and Nd9 (NAD9/30 kDa) core subunits of mitochondrial respiratory-chain complex I are nucleus-encoded. Both genes possess all the features that facilitate their expression and proper import of the polypeptides in mitochondria. By inactivating their expression by RNA interference or insertional mutagenesis, we show that both subunits are required for complex I assembly and activity. Inactivation of complex I impairs the cell growth rate, reduces the respiratory rate, leads to lower intracellular ROS production and lower expression of ROS scavenging enzymes, and is associated to a diminished capacity to concentrate CO2 without compromising photosynthetic capacity.

  15. Inactivation of genes coding for mitochondrial Nd7 and Nd9 complex I subunits in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Impact of complex I loss on respiration and energetic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Massoz, Simon; Larosa, Véronique; Plancke, Charlotte; Lapaille, Marie; Bailleul, Benjamin; Pirotte, Dorothée; Radoux, Michèle; Leprince, Pierre; Coosemans, Nadine; Matagne, René F; Remacle, Claire; Cardol, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    In Chlamydomonas, unlike in flowering plants, genes coding for Nd7 (NAD7/49 kDa) and Nd9 (NAD9/30 kDa) core subunits of mitochondrial respiratory-chain complex I are nucleus-encoded. Both genes possess all the features that facilitate their expression and proper import of the polypeptides in mitochondria. By inactivating their expression by RNA interference or insertional mutagenesis, we show that both subunits are required for complex I assembly and activity. Inactivation of complex I impairs the cell growth rate, reduces the respiratory rate, leads to lower intracellular ROS production and lower expression of ROS scavenging enzymes, and is associated to a diminished capacity to concentrate CO2 without compromising photosynthetic capacity. PMID:24316185

  16. Relationship between gene expression and the accumulation of catechin during spring and autumn in tea plants (Camellia sinensis L.)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Tian, Heng-lu; Wu, Jian-Hua; Cang, Ren-Rong; Wang, Run-Xian; Qi, Xiao-Hua; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Xue-Hao

    2015-01-01

    The tea plant (Camellia sinensis L.) is an important commercial crop with remarkably high catechin concentrations. Tea is popular worldwide given the plant's health benefits. Catechins are the main astringent substance in tea and are synthesized mainly via the phenylpropanoid pathway. In this study, eight cultivars of tea plants harvested both in spring and autumn were used to investigate differences in catechin concentrations by using high-performance liquid chromatography. The expression levels of genes associated with catechin biosynthesis were investigated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that the total catechin (TC) concentrations were significantly higher in tea plants harvested in autumn than in those harvested in spring, based on higher concentrations of epigallocatechin (EGC) in autumn tea (P<0.01). The expression of the genes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H), flavonoid 3′,5′-hydroxylase (F3′5′H), dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR), and anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) is closely related to the TC content of tea plants in both spring and autumn. Positive correlations between PAL, cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H), F3H, and DFR expression and EGC accumulation in autumn tea were identified, with correlation coefficients of 0.710, 0.763, 0.884, and 0.707, respectively. A negative correlation between ANS expression level and EGC concentrations in tea plants harvested in spring was noted (r=−0.732). Additionally, negative correlations between F3H and ANS expression levels and the catechin content were identified in spring tea, whereas the correlations were positive in autumn tea. Significant differences in the F3H and ANS expression levels between spring and autumn tea indicate that F3H and ANS are potentially key genes affecting catechin accumulation in tea plants. PMID:26504566

  17. Regulatory elements in the 5'region of 16SrRNA gene of Bacillus sp. strain SJ­101

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Braj R; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Alarifi, Saud A; Musarrat, Javed

    2009-01-01

    Advancement in bioinformatics with the development of computational tools has enabled the in­silico prediction and identification of transcription regulatory factors and other genetic elements with great ease. In this study, computational analysis of sequence homology of 546 bp 5’ region of 16SrRNA gene of Bacillus sp. strain SJ­101 resulted in identification of promoter­like sequences within the rrn gene. Using BPROM tool, the regulatory motifs like -35 and -10 boxes were mapped at 392 and 411 positions, respectively. Furthermore, the cis-acting elements as the binding sites for transcription factors (TF) cpxR and argR were identified at positions 413 and 416 at the upstream of an open reading frame (ORF). The probable functions of the putative TFs were predicted through the Uni­Prot/Swiss­Prot protein database. Search for the Shine­Dalgarno sequence (SD) found the presence of highly conserved SD sequence (AATACC), and a short 42 bp coding sequence/ORF bounded with characteristic transcription start site (AAC) and a stop codon (TGA) at positions 426 and 465 downstream to the promoter elements. A 13 amino acid long translation product of a short ORF has exhibited 100% homology with protein sequences of Bacillus spp., while showing some degree of polymorphism with other reference strains. The comparative homology of the small protein exhibited maximum similarity with Prolyl­4 hydroxylase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with 4.11 ZSCORE. The highly conserved regulatory elements and the putative ORF predicted within the 16SrRNA gene may help understand the role of relatively unexplored short ORFs within rrn operon, and their functional products in genetic regulatory mechanisms in eubacteria. PMID:19759811

  18. Relationship between gene expression and the accumulation of catechin during spring and autumn in tea plants (Camellia sinensis L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Tian, Heng-Lu; Wu, Jian-Hua; Cang, Ren-Rong; Wang, Run-Xian; Qi, Xiao-Hua; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Xue-Hao

    2015-01-01

    The tea plant (Camellia sinensis L.) is an important commercial crop with remarkably high catechin concentrations. Tea is popular worldwide given the plant's health benefits. Catechins are the main astringent substance in tea and are synthesized mainly via the phenylpropanoid pathway. In this study, eight cultivars of tea plants harvested both in spring and autumn were used to investigate differences in catechin concentrations by using high-performance liquid chromatography. The expression levels of genes associated with catechin biosynthesis were investigated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that the total catechin (TC) concentrations were significantly higher in tea plants harvested in autumn than in those harvested in spring, based on higher concentrations of epigallocatechin (EGC) in autumn tea (P<0.01). The expression of the genes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H), flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H), dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR), and anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) is closely related to the TC content of tea plants in both spring and autumn. Positive correlations between PAL, cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H), F3H, and DFR expression and EGC accumulation in autumn tea were identified, with correlation coefficients of 0.710, 0.763, 0.884, and 0.707, respectively. A negative correlation between ANS expression level and EGC concentrations in tea plants harvested in spring was noted (r=-0.732). Additionally, negative correlations between F3H and ANS expression levels and the catechin content were identified in spring tea, whereas the correlations were positive in autumn tea. Significant differences in the F3H and ANS expression levels between spring and autumn tea indicate that F3H and ANS are potentially key genes affecting catechin accumulation in tea plants. PMID:26504566

  19. Dietary Lecithin Decreases Skeletal Muscle COL1A1 and COL3A1 Gene Expression in Finisher Gilts.

    PubMed

    Akit, Henny; Collins, Cherie; Fahri, Fahri; Hung, Alex; D'Souza, Daryl; Leury, Brian; Dunshea, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary lecithin on skeletal muscle gene expression of collagen precursors and enzymes involved in collagen synthesis and degradation. Finisher gilts with an average start weight of 55.9 ± 2.22 kg were fed diets containing either 0, 4, 20 or 80 g/kg soybean lecithin prior to harvest for six weeks and the rectus abdominis muscle gene expression profile was a