Science.gov

Sample records for 4-mass tethered system

  1. Tether Transportation System Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangham, M. E.; Lorenzini, E.; Vestal, L.

    1998-01-01

    The projected traffic to geostationary earth orbit (GEO) is expected to increase over the next few decades. At the same time, the cost of delivering payloads from the Earth's surface to low earth orbit (LEO) is projected to decrease, thanks in part to the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). A comparable reduction in the cost of delivering payloads from LEO to GEO is sought. The use of in-space tethers, eliminating the requirement for traditional chemical upper stages and thereby reducing the launch mass, has been identified as such an alternative. Spinning tethers are excellent kinetic energy storage devices for providing the large delta vee's required for LEO to GEO transfer. A single-stage system for transferring payloads from LEO to GEO was proposed some years ago. The study results presented here contain the first detailed analyses of this proposal, its extension to a two-stage system, and the likely implementation of the operational system.

  2. Near Space Environments: Tethering Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucht, Nolan R.

    2013-01-01

    Near Space Environments, the Rocket University (Rocket U) program dealing with high altitude balloons carrying payloads into the upper earth atmosphere is the field of my project. The tethering from balloon to payload is the specific system I am responsible for. The tethering system includes, the lines that tie the payload to the balloon, as well as, lines that connect payloads together, if they are needed, as well as how to sever the tether to release payloads from the balloon. My objective is to design a tethering system that will carry a payload to any desired altitude and then sever by command at any given point during flight.

  3. Electrodynamic tether system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to define an Electrodynamic Tether System (ETS) that could be erected from the space station and/or platforms to function as an energy storage device. A schematic representation of the ETS concept mounted on the space station is presented. In addition to the hardware design and configuration efforts, studies are also documented involving simulations of the Earth's magnetic fields and the effects this has on overall system efficiency calculations. Also discussed are some preliminary computer simulations of orbit perturbations caused by the cyclic/night operations of the ETS. System cost estimates, an outline for future development testing for the ETS system, and conclusions and recommendations are also provided.

  4. The investigation of tethered satellite system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.

    1984-01-01

    Tethered satellite system (TSS) dynamics were studied. The dynamic response of the TSS during the entire stationkeeping phase for the first electrodynamic mission was investigated. An out of plane swing amplitude and the tether's bowing were observed. The dynamics of the slack tether was studied and computer code, SLACK2, was improved both in capabilities and computational speed. Speed hazard related to tether breakage or plasma contactor failure was examined. Preliminary values of the potential difference after the failure and of the drop of the electric field along the tether axis have been computed. The update of the satellite rotational dynamics model is initiated.

  5. Tethered Satellite System Contingency Investigation Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1) was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-46) on July 31, 1992. During the attempted on-orbit operations, the Tethered Satellite System failed to deploy successfully beyond 256 meters. The satellite was retrieved successfully and was returned on August 6, 1992. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Associate Administrator for Space Flight formed the Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1) Contingency Investigation Board on August 12, 1992. The TSS-1 Contingency Investigation Board was asked to review the anomalies which occurred, to determine the probable cause, and to recommend corrective measures to prevent recurrence. The board was supported by the TSS Systems Working group as identified in MSFC-TSS-11-90, 'Tethered Satellite System (TSS) Contingency Plan'. The board identified five anomalies for investigation: initial failure to retract the U2 umbilical; initial failure to flyaway; unplanned tether deployment stop at 179 meters; unplanned tether deployment stop at 256 meters; and failure to move tether in either direction at 224 meters. Initial observations of the returned flight hardware revealed evidence of mechanical interference by a bolt with the level wind mechanism travel as well as a helical shaped wrap of tether which indicated that the tether had been unwound from the reel beyond the travel by the level wind mechanism. Examination of the detailed mission events from flight data and mission logs related to the initial failure to flyaway and the failure to move in either direction at 224 meters, together with known preflight concerns regarding slack tether, focused the assessment of these anomalies on the upper tether control mechanism. After the second meeting, the board requested the working group to complete and validate a detailed integrated mission sequence to focus the fault tree analysis on a stuck U2 umbilical, level wind mechanical interference, and slack tether in upper tether

  6. Small Expendable-tether Deployer System (SEDS) development status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, James K.; Rupp, Charles C.; Carroll, Joseph A.; Alexander, Charles M.; Pulliam, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    Plans for proposed flight of the Small Expendable-tether Deployer System (SEDS) on a Delta II launch vehicle are discussed. The SEDS tether concept and mission requirements are outlined. Results are presented from calculations of the tether dynamics and computer modeling to determine tether behavior. The tether's thermal characteristics, electronics system, material, data collection procedure, payload, and orbital trace are described.

  7. The investigation of tethered satellite system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in tethered satellite system dynamics research is reported. A retrieval rate control law with no angular feedback to investigate the system's dynamic response was studied. The initial conditions for the computer code which simulates the satellite's rotational dynamics were extended to a generic orbit. The model of the satellite thrusters was modified to simulate a pulsed thrust, by making the SKYHOOK integrator suitable for dealing with delta functions without loosing computational efficiency. Tether breaks were simulated with the high resolution computer code SLACK3. Shuttle's maneuvers were tested. The electric potential around a severed conductive tether with insulator, in the case of a tether breakage at 20 km from the Shuttle, was computed. The electrodynamic hazards due to the breakage of the TSS electrodynamic tether in a plasma are evaluated.

  8. Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew Hall; Carroll, Joseph A.

    1992-01-01

    A tether of sufficient strength, capable of being lengthened or shortened and having appropriate apparatuses for capturing and releasing bodies at its ends, may be useful in propulsion applications. For example, a tether could allow rendezvous between spacecraft in substantially different orbits without using propellant. A tether could also allow co-orbiting spacecraft to exchange momentum and separate. Thus, a reentering spacecraft (such as the Shuttle) could give its momentum to one remaining on orbit (such as the space station). Similarly, a tether facility could gain momentum from a high I(sub sp)/low thrust mechanism (which could be an electrodynamics tether) and transfer than momentum by means of a tether to payloads headed for many different orbits. Such a facility would, in effect, combine high I(sub sp) with high thrust, although only briefly. An electrodynamic tether could propel a satellite from its launch inclination to a higher or lower inclination. Tethers could also allow samples to be taken from bodies such as the Moon. Three types of tether operations are illustrated. The following topics are discussed: (1) tether characteristics; (2) tether propulsion methods--basics, via momentum transfer, and electrodynamic tether propulsion; and (3) their use in planetary exploration.

  9. The investigation of tethered satellite system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.

    1985-01-01

    A progress report is presented that deals with three major topics related to Tethered Satellite System Dynamics. The SAO rotational dynamics computer code was updated. The program is now suitable to deal with inclined orbits. The output has been also modified in order to show the satellite Euler angles referred to the rotating orbital frame. The three-dimensional high resolution computer program SLACK3 was developed. The code simulates the three-dimensional dynamics of a tether going slack taking into account the effect produced by boom rotations. Preliminary simulations on the three-dimensional dynamics of a recoiling slack tether are shown in this report. A program to evaluate the electric potential around a severed tether is immersed in a plasma. The potential is computed on a three-dimensional grid axially symmetric with respect to the tether longitudinal axis. The electric potential variations due to the plasma are presently under investigation.

  10. Dynamics and control of multibody tethered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantzis, S.; Modi, V. J.; Pradhan, S.; Misra, A. K.

    The equations of motion for a multibody tethered satellite system in a three dimensional Keplerian orbit are derived. The model considers a multi-satellite system connected in series by flexible tethers. Both tethers and subsatellites are free to undergo three dimensional attitude motion, together with longitudinal and transverse vibration for the tether. The elastic deformations of the tethers are discretized using the assumed-mode method. In addition, the tether attachment points to the subsatellites are kept arbitrary and time varying, with deployment and retrieval degrees of freedom. The governing equations of motion are derived using an Order ( N) Lagrangian formulation. Next, two independent controllers, i.e. an attitude and vibration controller, are designed to regulate the rigid and flexible motion present in the system, excited from various maneuvres performed during the course of a mission. The former controller utilizes the thrusters and momentum-wheels located on the rigid satellites with a control algorithm based on the feedback linearization technique. On the other hand, the latter is designed using the robust linear quadratic Gaussian-loop transfer recovery method actuating the variable tether attachment point, or offset position. Both controllers are successful in suppressing unwanted disturbances in the system in a acceptable amount of time.

  11. The space station tethered elevator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Loren A.

    1989-01-01

    The optimized conceptual engineering design of a space station tethered elevator is presented. The elevator is an unmanned mobile structure which operates on a ten kilometer tether spanning the distance between the Space Station and a tethered platform. Elevator capabilities include providing access to residual gravity levels, remote servicing, and transportation to any point along a tether. The potential uses, parameters, and evolution of the spacecraft design are discussed. Engineering development of the tethered elevator is the result of work conducted in the following areas: structural configurations; robotics, drive mechanisms; and power generation and transmission systems. The structural configuration of the elevator is presented. The structure supports, houses, and protects all systems on board the elevator. The implementation of robotics on board the elevator is discussed. Elevator robotics allow for the deployment, retrieval, and manipulation of tethered objects. Robotic manipulators also aid in hooking the elevator on a tether. Critical to the operation of the tethered elevator is the design of its drive mechanisms, which are discussed. Two drivers, located internal to the elevator, propel the vehicle along a tether. These modular components consist of endless toothed belts, shunt-wound motors, regenerative power braking, and computer controlled linear actuators. The designs of self-sufficient power generation and transmission systems are reviewed. Thorough research indicates all components of the elevator will operate under power provided by fuel cells. The fuel cell systems will power the vehicle at seven kilowatts continuously and twelve kilowatts maximally. A set of secondary fuel cells provides redundancy in the unlikely event of a primary system failure. Power storage exists in the form of Nickel-Hydrogen batteries capable of powering the elevator under maximum loads.

  12. Membrane Tethering Complexes in the Endosomal System

    PubMed Central

    Spang, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Vesicles that are generated by endocytic events at the plasma membrane are destined to early endosomes. A prerequisite for proper fusion is the tethering of two membrane entities. Tethering of vesicles to early endosomes is mediated by the class C core vacuole/endosome tethering (CORVET) complex, while fusion of late endosomes with lysosomes depends on the homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting (HOPS) complex. Recycling through the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and to the plasma membrane is facilitated by the Golgi associated retrograde protein (GARP) and endosome-associated recycling protein (EARP) complexes, respectively. However, there are other tethering functions in the endosomal system as there are multiple pathways through which proteins can be delivered from endosomes to either the TGN or the plasma membrane. Furthermore, proteins that may be part of novel tethering complexes have been recently identified. Thus, it is likely that more tethering factors exist. In this review, I will provide an overview of different tethering complexes of the endosomal system and discuss how they may provide specificity in membrane traffic. PMID:27243003

  13. Tether deployment monitoring system, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An operational Tether Deployment Monitoring System (TEDEMS) was constructed that would show system functionality in a terrestrial environment. The principle function of the TEDEMS system is the launching and attachment of reflective targets onto the tether during its deployment. These targets would be tracked with a radar antenna that was pointed towards the targets by a positioning system. A spring powered launcher for the targets was designed and fabricated. An instrumentation platform and launcher were also developed. These modules are relatively heavy and will influence tether deployment scenarios, unless they are released with a velocity and trajectory closely matching that of the tether. Owing to the tracking range limitations encountered during field trails of the Radar system, final TEDEMS system integration was not completed. The major module not finished was the system control computer. The lack of this device prevented any subsystem testing or field trials to be conducted. Other items only partially complete were the instrumentation platform launcher and modules and the radar target launcher. The work completed and the tests performed suggest that the proposed system continues to be a feasible approach to tether monitoring, although additional effort is still necessary to increase the range at which modules can be detected. The equipment completed and tested, to the extent stated, is available to NASA for use on any future program that requires tether tracking capability.

  14. The flight of the Tethered Satellite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Dennis; Drobot, Adam T.; Stone, Nobie

    1992-07-01

    The U.S.-Italian Tethered Satellite System (TSS) Electrodynamics Mission flew aboard ST-46; the 500-kg satellite will be extended from the Shuttle Orbiter, to which it will remain connected via conducting insulated wire tether. TSS-1 constitutes the first effort to resolve the problem postulated in the 1920s by Langmuir, involving the determination of the dynamic current-voltage characteristics of a body that is charged to high potential and located in a magnetized plasma in the absence of physical boundaries. TSS-1 is also a first step to the use of tethers for space power generation and propulsion.

  15. Dynamic behaviour of the tethered satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibrario, B.; Musetti, B.

    1993-09-01

    The first Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1) was developed under the management of NASA and ASI; Alenia was responsible for the Sub-Satellite design and integration and Martin Marietta for the tether deployer system and for the overall system integration. The TSS-1 was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-46 mission) on July 31, 1992. It was planned to deploy, from the top of a 12 m boom, up to a total tether length of 20 km, then to remain on station while performing some scientific experiments, finally to retrieve back to the boom tip, with an intermediate stop and station at 2.4 km for further science activities. During the attempted on-orbit operations, the Tethered Satellite System failed to deploy successfully beyond 257 m. Five main anomalies occurred during the mission: (1) initial failure to retract the U2 umbilical (connecting the Sub-Satellite to the Deployer Boom); (2) initial failure to flyaway (i.e. no Sub-Satellite motion when the flyaway procedure was initiated); (3) unplanned tether deployment stop at 179 m; (4) after resuming of deployment, unplanned tether deployment stop at 257 m; (5) after the decision to abort the mission and to retrieve the Sub-Satellite, sticking of the system at 224 m (i.e. failure to move tether in either direction). Nevertheless, in spite of the largely off-nominal mission profile (almost solely due to Deployer System malfunc- tions), the observed dynamics is quite meaningful and allows an experimental validation of the TSS-1 mathematical model, in view of a reflight.

  16. NASA Langley Research Center tethered balloon systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Thomas L.; Storey, Richard W.; Youngbluth, Otto

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center tethered balloon system operations are covered in this report for the period of 1979 through 1983. Meteorological data, ozone concentrations, and other data were obtained from in situ measurements. The large tethered balloon had a lifting capability of 30 kilograms to 2500 meters. The report includes descriptions of the various components of the balloon systems such as the balloons, the sensors, the electronics, and the hardware. Several photographs of the system are included as well as a list of projects including the types of data gathered.

  17. Tethered Lubricants for Small Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lynden A. Archer

    2006-01-09

    The objective of this research project is two-fold. First, to fundamentally understand friction and relaxation dynamics of polymer chains near surfaces; and second, to develop novel self-lubricated substrates suitable for MEMS devices. During the three-year performance period of this study the PI and his students have shown using theory and experiments that systematic introduction of disorder into tethered lubricant coatings (e.g. by using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) mixtures or SAMs with nonlinear, branched architectures) can be used to significantly reduce the friction coefficient of a surface. They have also developed a simple procedure based on dielectric spectroscopy for quantifying the effect of surface disorder on molecular relaxation in lubricant coatings. Details of research accomplishments in each area of the project are described in the body of the report.

  18. Electrodynamic forces in tethered satellite systems. Part 1: System control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzer, Ehud; Kane, Thomas R.

    1994-10-01

    Part 1 of this work deals with the use of electrodynamic forces for control of tethered satellite system. A system formed by two massive end-bodies connected to each other by a current carrying tether is to be kept in an earth-pointing orientation by means of joint actions of thrusters on one of the end-bodies and electrodynamic forces acting on the tether.

  19. The first mission of the Tethered Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, C. Blake (Editor); Shea, Charlotte; Mcmahan, Tracy

    1992-01-01

    The era of space-age tethered operations moves toward reality with the launch of Tethered Satellite System-1 (TSS-1). The primary objective of this mission is to demonstrate the technology of long tethered systems in space and to demonstrate, through scientific investigations, that such systems are useful for research.

  20. Tethered Forth system for FPGA applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goździkowski, Paweł; Zabołotny, Wojciech M.

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents the tethered Forth system dedicated for testing and debugging of FPGA based electronic systems. Use of the Forth language allows to interactively develop and run complex testing or debugging routines. The solution is based on a small, 16-bit soft core CPU, used to implement the Forth Virtual Machine. Thanks to the use of the tethered Forth model it is possible to minimize usage of the internal RAM memory in the FPGA. The function of the intelligent terminal, which is an essential part of the tethered Forth system, may be fulfilled by the standard PC computer or by the smartphone. System is implemented in Python (the software for intelligent terminal), and in VHDL (the IP core for FPGA), so it can be easily ported to different hardware platforms. The connection between the terminal and FPGA may be established and disconnected many times without disturbing the state of the FPGA based system. The presented system has been verified in the hardware, and may be used as a tool for debugging, testing and even implementing of control algorithms for FPGA based systems.

  1. Electrodynamic tether system study: Extended study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This document is the final report of a study performed by Ball Space Systems Division (BSSD) for the NASA Johnson Space Center under an extension to contract NAS9-17666. The tasks for the extended study were as follows: (1) Define an interface between the Electrodynamic Tether System (ETS) and the Space Station (SS); (2) Identify growth paths for the 100 kW ETS defined in the original study to a 200 kW level of performance; (3) Quantify orbit perturbations caused by cyclic day/night operations of a Plasma Motor/Generator (PMG) on the SS and explore methods of minimizing these effects; (4) Define the analyses, precursor technology, ground tests, and precursor demonstrations leading up to a demonstration mission for an electrodynamic tether system that would be capable of producing maneuvering thrust levels of 25 newtons; and (5) Propose a development schedule for the demonstration mission and preliminary cost estimates.

  2. Shuttle/tethered satellite system conceptual design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A closed-loop control system was added to the tether reel which improves control over the tethered satellite. In addition to increasing the stability of the tethered satellite along local vertical, this control system is used for deployment and retrieval of tethered satellites. This conceptual design study describes a tether system for suspending a science payload at an altitude of 120 km from space shuttle orbiter flying at an altitude of 200 km. In addition to the hardware conceptual designs, various aspects concerning Orbiter accommodations are discussed.

  3. Plasma motor generator tether system for orbit reboost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulkower, Neal D.; Rusch, Roger J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive study of an electrodynamic tether used as a Plasma Motor Generator (PMG). The paper summarizes the work performed in the study and includes: (1) a detailed design of a 2 kW PMG tether system to be used for orbit reboost, (2) the selection of the Orbiting Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) and the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) as the primary candidate spacecraft to host the experimental system, (3) analysis of the integration of the PMG tether system with these two spacecraft, (4) the simulation of the deployment of the tether, and (5) an engineering design and development plan leading to a flight demonstration of this PMG tether.

  4. Current collection at the shuttle orbiter during the tethered satellite system tether break

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agüero, V. M.; Burke, W. J.; Gilchrist, B. E.; Stone, N. H.; Gentile, L. C.; Williams, S. D.; Cooke, D. L.; Thompson, D. C.; Bonifazi, C.; Lebreton, J.-P.

    1999-01-01

    We present measurements of currents, orbiter potentials, and plasma spectra during high-voltage arcing coincident with the tether break event on the Tethered Satellite System reflight. In addition to the unexpectedly high tether currents observed, plasma spectra indicate the presence of ion and electron populations with broad energy ranges. These data were used in combination with satellite and orbiter current-collection models to investigate the circuit behavior of the system's components. We find that arcing at the lower end of the tether supported the current flow in the tether during each phase of the break event, but with different mechanisms dominant depending on the location of the break point. With the break point inside deployer control structures, current arced to the orbiter ground, charging it to high negative potentials and allowing secondary ionization of neutral molecules near orbiter conducting surfaces. The most likely source of these neutrals is air trapped inside the tether at 1 atm of pressure that escaped through the hole in the tether insulation. When the break point was exposed to the exterior environment the tether current arced directly to the plasma. As long as the break point remained near the orbiter, the collection of electrons by conducting surfaces caused it to float at a low level of negative charging. The source of the energetic electrons detected in the payload bay remains uncertain. However, they can only have come from a region within the sheath that was more negatively charged than the orbiter's conducting surfaces.

  5. Tethered satellite system deployer flight thermal performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapter, John J.

    The Tethered Satellite System (TSS) is a Space Shuttle payload that was flown on July 31, 1992. Though anomalies prevented full deployment, the duration of the mission was approximately as planned, so it was possible to assess system thermal performance. The deployer, which supports the satellite and controls tether movement, has a thermal design that includes multilayer insulation, heaters, and the Spacelab Freon Loop. The deployer Thermal Subsystem met all requirements, and there were no anomalies during the flight. This paper summarizes the TSS deployer thermal design and compares pre- and post-flight thermal analyses. It also decribes simplified personal-computer thermal models of the TSS-1 and presents analysis results for the as-flown timeline.

  6. The flight of the tethered satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Dennis; Drobot, Adam; Stone, Nobie

    The first Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1) Electrodynamics Mission is scheduled for launch aboard the space shuttle ST-46 on July 31, 1992, as a joint mission between the United States and Italy. A 500-kg, 1.6-m-diameter satellite, attached to the shuttle by a thin (.24 cm), conducting, insulated wire (tether), will be reeled upwards from the orbiter payload to a distance of 20 km when the shuttle is at a projected altitude of 300 km.TSS-1 is an extremely ambitious mission with high-risk payoff potential. This is the type of pioneering mission NASA and the United States should be encouraging, with the risk in the achievement of the mission objectives rather than in safety. The mission has been likened to the maiden flight of a new airplane. We expect surprises and hope to set the stage for the next mission, the TSS-reflight.

  7. Dynamic control of the space tethered system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malashin, A. A.; Smirnov, N. N.; Bryukvina, O. Yu.; Dyakov, P. A.

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the problem of simultaneous dynamical stabilization and suppression of transverse and longitudinal vibrations of the space tethered system deployed along a certain trajectory. The dynamics of the system is described by a system of nonlinear partial differential equations for the longitudinal and transverse waves and we consider a non-classical version of the problem with one moving boundary. We formulate a mathematical model and perform the analytic and numerical analysis of the boundary control problem based on the Lyapunov method. A scheme of the deployment mechanism is suggested. It includes a control torque and transverse displacement of the boundary and ensures stable deployment of the whole system.

  8. Orbital Propagation of Momentum Exchange Tether Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westerhoff, John

    2002-01-01

    An advanced concept in in-space transportation currently being studied is the Momentum-Exchange/Electrodynamic Reboost Tether System (MXER). The system acts as a large momentum wheel, imparting a Av to a payload in low earth orbit (LEO) at the expense of its own orbital energy. After throwing a payload, the system reboosts itself using an electrodynamic tether to push against Earth's magnetic field and brings itself back up to an operational orbit to prepare for the next payload. The ability to reboost itself allows for continued reuse of the system without the expenditure of propellants. Considering the cost of lifting propellant from the ,ground to LEO to do the same Av boost at $10000 per pound, the system cuts the launch cost of the payload dramatically, and subsequently, the MXER system pays for itself after a small number of missions.1 One of the technical hurdles to be overcome with the MXER concept is the rendezvous maneuver. The rendezvous window for the capture of the payload is on the order of a few seconds, as opposed to traditional docking maneuvers, which can take as long ets necessary to complete a precise docking. The payload, therefore, must be able to match its orbit to meet up with the capture device on the end of the tether at a specific time and location in the future. In order to be able to determine that location, the MXER system must be numerically propagated forward in time to predict where the capture device will be at that instant. It should be kept in mind that the propagation computation must be done faster than real-time. This study focuses on the efforts to find and/or build the tools necessary to numerically propagate the motion of the MXER system as accurately as possible.

  9. Control Scheme of Tether Drag Deorbit System in Orbital Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Wei-Dong; Sun, Liang; Zhao, Guo-Wei

    In this paper, based on a dumbbell model of tethered satellite, a tension control scheme and a thrust control scheme of tether drag deorbit system in orbital plane are respectively proposed. In the tension control scheme, the tether tension can be measured by tension sensor and controlled by adjusting the tether length with a certain windlass mechanism, so that the librational angles could track the expected value; meanwhile, the tether could come back to the initial value. Because of the windlass mechanism, the slackness of tether can be avoided. In the thrust control scheme, the tether drag deorbit system is with a short tether in orbital maneuvering and the thrust acceleration imposed on the base satellite can be adjusted to avoid the slackness of tether and damp out the librational angles; besides, it is required that the regulation value of thrust acceleration meets with accuracy trajectory in practical engineering. Afterwards, a reasonable deorbit case of an abandoned GEO satellite is studied, in which the control of base satellite is considered; then, the advantages and disadvantages of two control schemes are analyzed and an improved control strategy is given. Numerical simulation results indicate that the slackness of tether can be eliminated and the librational angles are damped out according to the designed controllers, and the stability of the attitude of abandoned satellite is also guaranteed during flight. The proposed control schemes are feasible, which is useful for the flight safety.

  10. Chaotic motions of a tethered satellite system in circular orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, D. P.; PANG, Z. J.; Wen, H.; Yu, B. S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper studies the chaotic motions of a tethered satellite system by utilizing a ground-based experimental system. Based on dynamics similarity principle, a dynamical equivalent model between the on-orbit tethered satellite and its ground physical model is obtained. As a result, the space dynamics environment of the tethered satellite can be simulated via the thrust forces and the torque of a momentum wheel on the satellite simulator. The numerical results of the on-orbit tethered satellite show the chaotic motions of the attitude motion of mother satellite. The experiment shows that the torque of momentum wheel as a negative damping is able to suppress the chaotic motion.

  11. Lyapunov Orbits in the Jupiter System Using Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokelmann, Kevin; Russell, Ryan P.; Lantoine, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Various researchers have proposed the use of electrodynamic tethers for power generation and capture from interplanetary transfers. The effect of tether forces on periodic orbits in Jupiter-satellite systems are investigated. A perturbation force is added to the restricted three-body problem model and a series of simplifications allows development of a conservative system that retains the Jacobi integral. Expressions are developed to find modified locations of equilibrium positions. Modified families of Lyapunov orbits are generated as functions of tether size and Jacobi integral. Zero velocity curves and stability analyses are used to evaluate the dynamical properties of tether-modified orbits.

  12. The investigation of tethered satellite system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.

    1985-01-01

    The tether control law to retrieve the satellite was modified in order to have a smooth retrieval trajectory of the satellite that minimizes the thruster activation. The satellite thrusters were added to the rotational dynamics computer code and a preliminary control logic was implemented to simulate them during the retrieval maneuver. The high resolution computer code for modelling the three dimensional dynamics of untensioned tether, SLACK3, was made fully operative and a set of computer simulations of possible tether breakages was run. The distribution of the electric field around an electrodynamic tether in vacuo severed at some length from the shuttle was computed with a three dimensional electrodynamic computer code.

  13. Project 'VOLCANO': Electronics of tethered satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savich, N. A.

    The main goal of the 'VOLCANO' project developed jointly by the Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics and space concern 'ENERGIA' is experimental investigation of the current-voltage characteristics of the 'Collector-Boom-Emitter' system simulating the long Tethered Satellite System (TSS) in the real space flight conditions on the transport ship 'PROGRESS'. These measurements will allow scientists to determine the attainable current values for different combinations of collectors and emitters (passive metallic sphere, thermocathode, hollow cathodes and show up some prospects of active TSS. The report is concerned with the concept, purpose and tasks of the project, the planned set up of the measurement equipment on the 'PROGRESS' ship and in the container extended on the deployable 100 m long boom end.

  14. Mission-function control of tethered satellite/climber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Hirohisa; Fukatsu, Kosei; Trivailo, Pavel M.

    2015-01-01

    Because the tether of a tethered satellite system (TSS) can be extremely long, it would be difficult to inspect the damage to the tether. The ultimate configuration of a TSS could be a space elevator (SE). The tether needs to carry a crawler or climber to inspect damage to the tether or transport travelers on the SE. Coriolis force due to the climber motion causes librational motion of the tether. The numerical simulations have shown that the original mission-function (MF) control is not applicable to a TSS with a climber because it was intended for subsatellite deployment and retrieval control using a tether, not for a climber on the tether. This paper proposes a new MF control to suppress the librational motion of a tether with a climber. The proposed MF control is a modified version of the original MF control. The active force to drive the climber is determined from the MF. A simplified dynamic model of a TSS with a single climber is used to evaluate the derived controller. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified through numerical simulations.

  15. Combination Solar Sail and Electrodynamic Tether Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles L. (Inventor); Matloff, Gregory L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A propulsion system for a spacecraft includes a solar sail system and an electrodynamic tether system is presented. The solar sail system is used to generate propulsion to propel the spacecraft through space using solar photons and the electrodynamic tether system is used to generate propulsion to steer the spacecraft into orbit and to perform orbital maneuvers around a planet using the planet's magnetic field. The electrodynamic tether system can also be used to generate power for the spacecraft using the planet's magnetic field.

  16. The investigation of tethered satellite system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the rotational dynamics of the satellite was focused on the rotational amplitude increase of the satellite, with respect to the tether, during retrieval. The dependence of the rotational amplitude upon the tether tension variation to the power 1/4 was thoroughly investigated. The damping of rotational oscillations achievable by reel control was also quantified while an alternative solution that makes use of a lever arm attached with a universal joint to the satellite was proposed. Comparison simulations between the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Martin Marietta (MMA) computer code of reteival maneuvers were also carried out. The agreement between the two, completely independent, codes was extremely close, demonstrating the reliability of the models. The slack tether dynamics during reel jams was analytically investigated in order to identify the limits of applicability of the SLACK3 computer code to this particular case. Test runs with SLACK3 were also carried out.

  17. Tethering Complexes in the Arabidopsis Endomembrane System

    PubMed Central

    Vukašinović, Nemanja; Žárský, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Targeting of endomembrane transport containers is of the utmost importance for proper land plant growth and development. Given the immobility of plant cells, localized membrane vesicle secretion and recycling are amongst the main processes guiding proper cell, tissue and whole plant morphogenesis. Cell wall biogenesis and modification are dependent on vectorial membrane traffic, not only during normal development, but also in stress responses and in plant defense against pathogens and/or symbiosis. It is surprising how little we know about these processes in plants, from small GTPase regulation to the tethering complexes that act as their effectors. Tethering factors are single proteins or protein complexes mediating first contact between the target membrane and arriving membrane vesicles. In this review we focus on the tethering complexes of the best-studied plant model—Arabidopsis thaliana. Genome-based predictions indicate the presence of all major tethering complexes in plants that are known from a hypothetical last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). The evolutionary multiplication of paralogs of plant tethering complex subunits has produced the massively expanded EXO70 family, indicating a subfunctionalization of the terminal exocytosis machinery in land plants. Interpretation of loss of function (LOF) mutant phenotypes has to consider that related, yet clearly functionally-specific complexes often share some common core subunits. It is therefore impossible to conclude with clarity which version of the complex is responsible for the phenotypic deviations observed. Experimental interest in the analysis of plant tethering complexes is growing and we hope to contribute with this review by attracting even more attention to this fascinating field of plant cell biology. PMID:27243010

  18. Dynamics and stability of spinning flexible space tether systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyc, George

    This dissertation focuses on a detailed dynamical investigation of a previously unexplored tether configuration that involves a spinning two-body tethered system with flexible appendages on each end-body where the spin axis is nominally aligned along the tether. The original motivation for this work came after the flight of the first Canadian sub-orbital tether mission OEDIPUS-A in 1989 which employed this spinning tethered configuration. To everyone's surprise, one of the end-bodies was observed to exhibit a rapid divergence of its nutation angle. It was clear after this flight that there were some fundamental mechanisms associated with the interaction between the tether and the end-body that were not fully understood at that time. Hence, a Tether Dynamics Experiment (TDE) was formed and became a formal part of the scientific agenda for the follow-on mission OEDIPUS-C which flew in 1995. This dissertation describes the work that was conducted as part of the TDE and involves: theoretical investigations into the dynamics of this spinning tethered flexible body system; ground testing to validate the models and establish the tether properties; application of the models to develop a stabilization approach for OEDIPUS-C, and comparisons between theory and flight data from both OEDIPUS-A and OEDIPUS-C. Nonlinear equations of motion are developed for a spinning tethered system where the tether could be either spinning with the end-bodies or attached to small de-spun platforms on the end-bodies. Since the tether used for the OEDIPUS missions is not a string, as is often assumed, but rather a wire that has some bending stiffness, albeit small, the tether bending was also taken into account in the formulation. Two sets of ground tests are described that were used to validate the stability conditions and gain confidence in the mathematical models. One set involved hanging a body by a tether and spinning at different speeds to investigate the end-body stability. The other set

  19. Shuttle-tethered satellite system definition study extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A system requirements definition and configuration study (Phase B) of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) was conducted during the period 14 November 1977 to 27 February 1979. Subsequently a study extension was conducted during the period 13 June 1979 to 30 June 1980, for the purpose of refining the requirements identified during the main phase of the study, and studying in some detail the implications of accommodating various types of scientific experiments on the initial verification flight mission. An executive overview is given of the Tethered Satellite System definition developed during the study. The results of specific study tasks undertaken in the extension phase of the study are reported. Feasibility of the Tethered Satellite System has been established with reasonable confidence and the groundwork laid for proceeding with hardware design for the verification mission.

  20. Linear adaptive control of a single-tether system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, M. E.; Carter, J. T.; Walls, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    A control law for a single-tether orbiting satellite system based on a reduced order linear adaptive control technique is presented. The main advantages of this technique are its design simplicity and the facts that specific system parameters and model linearization are not required when designing the controller. Two controllers are developed: one which uses only tension in the tether as control actuation and one which uses both tension and in-plane thrusters as control actuation. Both a sixth-order nonlinear and an 11th-order bead model of a tethered satellite system are used for simulation purposes, demonstrating the ability of the controller to manage an uncertain system. Retrieval and stationkeeping results using these nonlinear models and the linear adaptive controller demonstrate the feasibility of the method. The robustness of the controller with respect to parameter uncertainties is also demonstrated by changing the nonlinear model and parameters within the model without redesigning the controller.

  1. A low earth orbit skyhook tether transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penzo, Paul A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the design concept of a structure, called the Skyhook Tether Transportation System (STTS) which may be used to transport mass to higher or lower orbits or to capture objects from higher or lower orbits. An analysis is presented for the possibility of the STTS to perform the function of transporting masses suborbitally, capturing the objects, and then releasing them to a higher orbit, the GEO, the moon, or for an escape. It is shown that, although the possibility of such a system is limited by the tether strength, even a modest system can yield considerable benefits in propellant savings if it is used in combination with chemical propulsion.

  2. Tethered satellite system control using electromagnetic forces and reaction wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alandi Hallaj, Mohammad Amin; Assadian, Nima

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a novel non-rotating space tethered configuration is introduced which its relative positions controlled using electromagnetic forces. The attitude dynamics is controlled by three reaction wheels in the body axes. The nonlinear coupled orbital dynamics of a dumbbell tethered satellite formation flight are derived through a constrained Lagrangian approach. These equations are presented in the leader satellite orbital frame. The tether is assumed to be mass-less and straight, and the J2 perturbation is included to the analysis. The forces and the moments of the electromagnetic coils are modeled based on the far-filed model of the magnetic dipoles. A guidance scheme for generating the desired positions as a function of time in Cartesian form is presented. The satellite tethered formation with variable length is controlled utilizing a linear controller. This approach is applied to a specified scenario and it is shown that the nonlinear guidance method and the linear controller can control the nonlinear system of the tethered formation and the results are compared with optimal control approach.

  3. Tethered wind systems for the generation of electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegler, G.; Riedler, W.

    1984-05-01

    This report, based on the findings of an Austrian feasibility study, describes balloon-borne tethered wind systems. Latest results and the components of the system are discussed and an outline of the available energy potential is compiled. An overview of economic possibilities is also given.

  4. Tether Magnetometer system for study of Mercury Magnetophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombatti, G.; Angrilli, F.; Bianchini, G.; Crepaldi, A.

    2001-11-01

    BepiColombo mission will explore Mercury and its environment; the scientific payload will be onboard two orbiters and a lander: a planetary orbiter for spectrometric analyses, a magnetospheric orbiter for the observation of the magnetic field and its interactions with the solar wind and a lander for the in-situ study of surface and subsurface properties. The environment in which the mission will operate is extremely hard due to the position and the proximity to the sun (i.e. tidal forces); payloads will be subject to high temperatures variations and harsh day-night excursions; severe radiation bombardment will damage instruments if not enough shielded. Mariner 10 observations began to outline the particular characteristics of Mercury's weak magnetic field and active magnetosphere, absence of ionosphere and atmosphere. Nevertheless the non-exhaustive data-sets has leaded to ambiguities which can be resolved only by the acquisition of new remote measurements. Objective/goal of the proposed Tethered Magnetometer System (TEMS) are measurements in low orbit (in particular MPOs orbit) of the intrinsic weak magnetic field and hydromagnetic and thermoelectric phenomena not measurable by MMO instruments. For the development of the instrument no increase in the weight and in the thermal shielding of the MPO are required. Such a system will be host on CPM (chimic propulsion module) and will have a minimal impact configuration thanks to the low mass and the low volume of the deployable subsatellite housing the magnetometer. The CPM, after the release of the Lander module, has finished his operating life and won't be used any more. Moreover, once deployed the apoapsis of the tether system will be less than 400 km, with no possibility to harm the orbiter. After all mission operations with CPM are finished a reel system deploys a 500m tether with subsatellite at the end housing the magnetometer far away from magnetic noise of the CPM; power will be used directly from the one of

  5. System protection from atmospheric electricity for aerostats with conducting tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, M. S.; Beach, G. R.; Jakubowski, P. R.; Fisher, F. A.

    1988-04-01

    Aerostat power tethers have demonstrated survival of lightning strikes, but they usually have to be reterminated or replaced afterward. Two requirements are given for the prevention of lightning damage to the tether to about 100 kA: installation of a metal-to-metal contact on the outer tether surface to ground the tether at the base flying sheave at typical flying positions; and installation of a shielding band within the outer tether jacket with a weight of about 0.05 lb/ft for a half-inch tether. This determination was made in part by high current tests and in part by electrical modeling.

  6. Tethered Vehicle Control and Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, David D. (Inventor); Aull, Mark J. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A kite system includes a kite and a ground station. The ground station includes a sensor that can be utilized to determine an angular position and velocity of the kite relative to the ground station. A controller utilizes a fuzzy logic control system to autonomously fly the kite. The system may include a ground station having powered winding units that generate power as the lines to the kite are unreeled. The control system may be configured to fly the kite in a crosswind trajectory to increase line tension for power generation. The sensors for determining the position of the kite are preferably ground-based.

  7. Tethered Vehicle Control and Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, David D. (Inventor); Aull, Mark J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A kite system includes a kite and a ground station. The ground station includes a sensor that can be utilized to determine an angular position and velocity of the kite relative to the ground station. A controller utilizes a fuzzy logic control system to autonomously fly the kite. The system may include a ground station having powered winding units that generate power as the lines to the kite are unreeled. The control system may be configured to fly the kite in a crosswind trajectory to increase line tension for power generation. The sensors for determining the position of the kite are preferably ground-based.

  8. Operator's Manual for SHEBA Powered Tether Balloon System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lappen, Cara-Lyn; Randall, David A.

    1998-01-01

    The Surface Heat and Energy Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) was an intensive field project which took place in the Arctic Ocean from October 1997 through October 1998. Its purpose was to measure as many facets of the Arctic environment as possible so that we would be able to better understand the interaction between the ice, atmosphere, and ocean and their interactions with global climate. One aspect of the atmospheric field component was launching tethered balloons to monitor the profiles of temperature, wind, pressure, and humidity, as well as examine the vertical structure of cloud droplet sizes and distributions. The tethered balloon that we used was one specially designed for use in freezing climates by SPEC Corporation in Boulder, Colorado. A special winch that was able to withstand Arctic temperature and weather became necessary when the testing of simple winch systems used in warmer climates failed under these extreme conditions. The purpose of this manual is to acquaint any new user to the powered tethered balloon system deployed at the The Surface Heat and Energy Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA ice camp. It includes a description of the preparations necessary to get ready for a launch, the mechanics of the actual launch, and an account of the proper procedure for taking down the equipment when finished. It will also include tips on how to minimize potential equipment failures, some trouble shooting, and some safety ideas. This manual is designed so that new operators can use the system with minimal previous training. At the end of this manual, the reader will find a quick checklist.

  9. Future geodesy missions: Tethered systems and formation flying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontdecaba, Jordi; Sanjurjo, Manuel; Pelaez, Jesus; Metris, Gilles; Exertier, Pierre

    Recent gravity field determination missions have shown the possibility of improving our Earth knowledge from space. GRACE has helped to the determination of temporal variations of low and mean degrees of the field while GOCE will improve the precision in the determination of higher degrees. But there is still some needs for geophysics which are not satisfied by these missions. Two areas where improvements must be done are (i) perenniality of the observations, and (ii) determination of temporal variations of higher degrees of the gravity field. These improvements can be achieved thanks to new measurement technologies with higher precision, but also using new observables. Historically, space determination of the gravity field has been done observing the perturbations of the orbit of the satellites. More recently, GRACE has introduced the use of satellite-tosatellite ranging. Goce will use onboard gradiometry. The authors have explored the possibilities of two new technologies for the determination of the gravity field: (i) tethered systems, and (ii) formation flying for all kind of configurations (not just leader-follower). To analyze the possibilities of these technologies, we obtain the covariance matrix of the coefficients of the gravity field for the different observables. This can be done providing some very reasonable hypothesis are accepted. This matrix contains a lot of information concerning the behavior of the observable. In order to obtain the matrix, we use the so-called lumped coefficients approach. We have used this method for three observables (i) tethered systems, (ii) formation flying and (iii) gradiometry (for comparison purposes). Tethers appear as a very long base gradiometers, with very interesting properties, but also very challenging from a technological point of view. One of the major advantages of the tethered systems is their multitask design. Indeed, the same cable can be used for propulsion purposes in some phases of the mission, and for

  10. Study of Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) tether system for orbit reboost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Detailed designs were produced for a 2 kW plasma motor generator tether system based largely on existing hardware and hardware designs. Specifically, the hollow cathode design and electronics are derived from ion propulsion equipment. A prototype tether was constructed and will be tested for deployment, strength, resistance to breakage and abrasion and electrical properties. In addition, laboratory development models of the electronics will be used to operate two plasma motor generator hollow cathode assemblies with this tether to verify electrical performance parameters for the complete system. Results show that a low cost demonstration of a plasma motor generator tether system appears to be feasible by the middle of the 1990s.

  11. Configuration maintaining control of three-body ring tethered system based on thrust compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Panfeng; Liu, Binbin; Zhang, Fan

    2016-06-01

    Space multi-tethered systems have shown broad prospects in remote observation missions. This paper mainly focuses on the dynamics and configuration maintaining control of space spinning three-body ring tethered system for such mission. Firstly, we establish the spinning dynamic model of the three-body ring tethered system considering the elasticity of the tether using Newton-Euler method, and then validate the suitability of this model by numerical simulation. Subsequently, LP (Likins-Pringle) initial equilibrium conditions for the tethered system are derived based on rigid body's equilibrium theory. Simulation results show that tether slack, snapping and interaction between the tethers exist in the three-body ring system, and its' configuration can not be maintained without control. Finally, a control strategy based on thrust compensation, namely thrust to simulate tether compression under LP initial equilibrium conditions is designed to solve the configuration maintaining control problem. Control effects are verified by numerical simulation compared with uncontrolled situation. Simulation results show that the configuration of the three-body ring tethered system could maintain under this active control strategy.

  12. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, R.J.; Gao, H.

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilication, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanidation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical. 2 figs.

  13. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, Robert J.; Gao, Hanrong

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilation, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical.

  14. Electrodynamic Tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles L. (Inventor); Ballance, Judy L. (Inventor); Welzyn, Kenneth J. (Inventor); Vaughn, Jason A. (Inventor); Lorenzini, Enrico (Inventor); Schuler, Peter S. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A tether system for providing thrust to or power subsystems of an artificial satellite in a low earth orbit. The tether has three main sections, an insulated section connected to the satellite, a conducting section connected to the insulating section for drawing in and releasing electrons from the space plasma and a non-conducting section for providing a tension to the other sections of the tether. An oxygen resistant coating is applied to the bare wire of the conducting section as well as the insulated wires of the insulated section that prevents breakdown during tether operations in the space plasma. The insulated and bare wire sections also surround a high tensile flexible polymer core to prevent any debris from breaking the tether during use.

  15. Effects of damping on the control dynamics of the space shuttle based on tethered systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modi, V. J.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the effects of damping on the control dynamics of the space shuttle based on tethered systems suggest that a relatively simple point mass model can provide useful information concering librational dynamics during development and retrieval of the tethered satellites. The results show that a nonlinear tension control strategy in conjunction with a suitable choice of gains and realistic damping can lead to stable retrieval maneuver with amplitudes in pitch and roll limited to acceptable values. Longitudinal and lateral vibrations of the tether are strongly coupled and can lead to the slackening of the tether. Tether vibrations can be controlled quite effectively by speeding up the retrieval at smaller tether length and/or using thruster.

  16. On the dynamics and control of tethered satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modi, Vinod J.; Misra, Arun K.; Ng, Alfred C.; Lakshmanan, Prem K.

    1992-01-01

    The rigid body dynamics and control of the tether, subsatellite and space platform are analyzed, during deployment, stationkeeping and retrieval phases using the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) approach, accounting for the mass of the tether as well as a three dimensional offset of its point of attachment. The strategies employ tension in the tether line, thrusters, motion of the offset of the tether attachment point or their hybrid combinations. An assessment of the relative merit suggests the thruster-offset hybrid controller to be the most effective in damping given disturbances.

  17. Novel aerospace mechanisms: A passive tether damping device for tethered satellite, and a pin/latch structural interface system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Presented here is a collection of development tasks that have been accomplished over the past year at the Marshall Space Flight Center's Structures and Dynamics Laboratory. Dissemination of task findings are reported for the following reasons: the task involves new or evolving technology (as in the case of a tethered satellite), and the tasks depict a technique that could have application to extravehicular activity (EVA) or robotic assembly of space structures (the pin/latch system).

  18. Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1R)-Post Flight (STS-75) Engineering Performance Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavoie, Anthony R.

    1996-01-01

    The first mission of the Tethered Satellite deployer was flown onboard Atlantis in 1992 during the Space Transportation System (STS) flight STS-46. Due to a mechanical interference with the level wind mechanism the satellite was only Deployed to 256 m rather than the planned 20,000 m. Other problems were also experienced during the STS-46 flight and several modifications were made to the Deployer and Satellite. STS-75 was a reflight of the Tethered Satellite System 1 (TSS-1) designated as Tethered Satellite System 1 Reflight (TSS-1 R) onboard Columbia. As on STS-46, the TSS payload consisted of the Deployer, the Satellite, 3 cargo bay mounted experiments: Shuttle Electrodynamic Tether System (SETS), Shuttle Potential and Return Electron Experiment (SPREE), Deployer Core Equipment (DCORE) 4 Satellite mounted experiments: Research on Electrodynamics Tether Effects (RETE), Research on Orbital Plasma Electrodynamics (ROPE), Satellite Core Instruments (SCORE), Tether Magnetic Field Experiment (TEMAG) and an aft flight deck camera: Tether Optical Phenomena Experiment (TOP). Following successful pre-launch, launch and pre-deployment orbital operations, the Deployer deployed the Tethered Satellite to 19,695 m at which point the tether broke within the Satellite Deployment Boom (SDB). The planned length for On-Station I (OST1) was 20,700 m The Satellite flew away from the Orbiter with the tether attached. The satellite was "safed" and placed in a limited power mode via the RF link. The Satellite was contacted periodically during overflights of ground stations. Cargo bay science activities continued for the period of time allocated to TSS-1 R operations.

  19. Tether System for Exchanging Payloads Between the International Space Station and the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, Robert P.

    1998-01-01

    Systems composed of several rotating and/or hanging tethers may provide a means of exchanging supplies between low Earth orbit facilities and lunar bases without requiring the use of propellant. This work develops methods for designing a tether system capable of repeatedly exchanging payloads between a LEO facility such as the International Space Station or a Space Business Park and a base on the lunar surface. In this system, a hanging tether extended upwards from the LEO facility, places a payload into a slightly elliptical orbit, where it is caught by a rotating tether in a higher elliptical orbit. This rotating tether then tosses the payload to the moon. At the moon, a long rotating "Lunavator" tether catches the payload and deposits it on the surface of the moon. By transporting an equal mass of lunar materials such as oxygen back down to the LEO facility through the tether transport system, the momentum and energy of the system is conserved, allowing frequent traffic between LEO and the lunar surface with minimal propellant requirements.

  20. A three-mass tethered system for micro-g/variable-g applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a Space-Station attached tethered system for micro-g/variable-g applications. The system consists of three platforms: the Space Station, an end mass anchored at the end of a 10 km long kevlar tether and a micro-g/variable-g laboratory with the capability of crawling along the tether. Control strategies are devised for performing both the deployment and the station-keeping maneuvers of the system. Effective algorithms are identified for damping out the major vibrational modes.

  1. A Magnetic Bumper-Tether System Using ZFC Y123

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Roy; Parks, Drew; Sawh, Ravi-Persad; Obot, Victor; Liu, Jianxiong; Arndt, G. D.

    1996-01-01

    We consider the use of magnetic forces in a bumper system, to soften docking procedures. We investigate a system which exhibits no magnetic field except during the docking process, which, if desired, can automatically tether two craft together, and which provides lateral stability during docking. A system composed of zero field cooled Y(1.7)Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) (Y123) tiles and electromagnets is proposed. The Y123 high temperature superconductor (HTS) is mounted on one craft, and the electromagnet on the other. Results of small prototype laboratory experiments are reported. The electromagnet has, for convenience, been replaced by a permanent SmCo ferromagnet in these measurements. When the two craft approach, a mirror image of the ferromagnet is induced in the Y123, and a repulsive bumper force, F(sub B), results. F(sub B) is velocity dependent, and increases with v. For presently available HTS materials, bumper pressure of approx. 3.7 N/cm(exp 2) is achieved using SmCo. This extrapolates to approx. 18 N/cm(exp 2) for an electromagnet, or a force of up to 20 tons for a 1 m(exp 2) system. After reaching a minimum distance of approach, the two colliding craft begin to separate. However, the consequent change of SmCo magnetic field at the Y123 results in a reversal of current in the Y123 so that the Y123 is attractive to the SmCo. The attractive (tether) force, F(sub T), is a function of R = B(sub Fe)/B(sub t, max), where B(sub Fe) is the field at the surface of the ferromagnet, and B(sub t, max) is the maximum trapped field of the Y123, i.e., the trapped field in the so-called critical state. For R greater than or equal to 2, F(sub T) saturates at a value comparable to F(sub B). For a range of initial approach velocities the two craft are tethered following the bumper sequence. Most of the kinetic energy of the collision is first converted to magnetic field energy in the Y123, and then into heat via the creep mechanism. About 15% of the work done against magnetic forces

  2. Transient response of an electrodynamic tether system in the ionosphere: TSS-1 first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BiléN, Sven G.; Gilchrist, Brian E.; Bonifazi, Carlo; Melchioni, Enrico

    1995-09-01

    The electrical transient response of an electrodynamic tether system in low earth orbit has been investigated experimentally and by computer simulation. Our experimental results come from the first Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1) mission flown on the space shuttle in 1992. During this mission a tethered satellite was deployed to a distance of 267 m above the shuttle using a conducting, insulated cable. It is shown by computer simulation that the electrical transient response of the system is due to a combination of both the tether electrical circuit and the interaction of the tether system with the space plasma. In general, ground measurements showed that the TSS-1 electrical circuit is approximately second order and underdamped. However, it was found that on-orbit transient decay as well as the symmetry of transient oscillations could be dramatically altered, following closely with ionospheric plasma density variations. Combined electrical circuit and plasma interaction modeling shows that these differences can be explained by accounting for ion and electron current collection capabilities of the tether end connections with the space plasma. These results have implications for the use of electrodynamic tethers for high current switched applications including direct generation of low-frequency electromagnetic signals and high electrical power generation as well as detection of natural electric field transient signatures.

  3. Current collection and current closure in the Tethered Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drobot, Adam; Satyanarayana, P.; Chang, Chia-Lie; Tsang, Kang; Papadopoulos, Dennis

    1991-01-01

    Current collection and closure-path modeling are examined analytically with respect to the Tethered Satellite System (TSS). A particle-in cell code is compared with a one-dimensional unmagnetized fluid code to model the behavior of a positively charged satellite in the ionosphere. The morphology of the sheath and the sheath-region processes are thus examined, and the influence of ions leaving the sheath region is found to cause the attraction of an electron current that is 40 times greater than the steady state value. The enhancement is transient and enhances the acceleration of the electrons in the sheath. A set of modified MHD equations, including those for ion inertia, quasineutrality, and electron drift, is employed to model TSS current closure. Whistler modes are found to exist and can be excited as the TSS passes through the ionosphere. Important conclusions include a significant fluctuation level in the steady state sheath, an ion void which affects the electron population, and some long-lived electrons trapped in the settled sheath with respect to two directions.

  4. Electrodynamic Bare Tether Systems as a Thruster for the Momentum-Exchange/Electrodynamic Reboost(MXER)Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Gallagher, D. L.

    2006-01-01

    The concept of electrodynamic tether propulsion has a number of attractive features and has been widely discussed for different applications. Different system designs have been proposed and compared during the last 10 years. In spite of this, the choice of proper design for any particular mission is a unique problem. Such characteristics of tether performance as system acceleration, efficiency, etc., should be calculated and compared on the basis of the known capability of a tether to collect electrical current. We discuss the choice of parameters for circular and tape tethers with regard to the Momentum-Exchange/Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) tether project.

  5. Design Concept for a Reusable/Propellantless MXER Tether Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCandless, B., II; Kustas, F. m.; Marshall, L. S.; Lytle, W. B.; Hansen, N. P.

    2005-01-01

    The Momentum Exchange/Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) tether facility is a transformational concept that significantly reduces the fuel requirements (and associated costs) in transferring payloads above low earth orbit (LEO). Facility reboost is accomplished without propellant by driving current against a voltage created by a conducting tether's interaction with the Earth's magnetic field (electrodynamic reboost). This system can be used for transferring a variety of payloads (scientific, cargo, and human space vehicles) to multiple destinations including geosynchronous transfer orbit, the Moon or Mars. MXER technology advancement requires development in two key areas: survivable, high tensile strength non-conducting tethers and reliable, lightweight payload catch/release mechanisms. Fundamental requirements associated with the MXER non-conducting strength tether and catch mechanism designs will be presented. Key requirements for the tether design include high specific-strength (tensile strength/material density), material survivability to the space environment (atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation), and structural survivability to micrometeoroid/orbital debris (MM/OD) impacts. The driving mechanism key,gequirements include low mass-to-capture-volume ratio, positional and velocity error tolerance, and operational reliability. Preliminary tether and catch mechanism design criteria are presented, which have been used as guidelines to "screen" and down-select initial concepts. Candidate tether materials and protective coatings are summarized along with their performance in simulated space environments (e.g., oxygen plasma, thermal cycling). A candidate catch mechanism design concept is presented along with examples of demonstration hardware.

  6. Anti-sway control of tethered satellite systems using attitude control of the main satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefian, Peyman; Salarieh, Hassan

    2015-06-01

    In this study a new method is introduced to suppress libration of a tethered satellite system (TSS). It benefits from coupling between satellites and tether libration dynamics. The control concept uses the main satellite attitude maneuvers to suppress librational motion of the tether, and the main satellite's actuators for attitude control are used as the only actuation in the system. The study considers planar motion of a two body TSS system in a circular orbit and it is assumed that the tether's motion will not change it. Governing dynamic equations of motion are derived using the extended Lagrange method. Controllability of the system around the equilibrium state is studied and a linear LQG controller is designed to regulate libration of the system. Tether tension and satellite attitude are assumed as only measurable outputs of the system. The Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is used to estimate states of the system to be used as feedback to the controller. The designed controller and observer are implemented to the nonlinear plant and simulations demonstrate that the controller lead to reduction of the tether libration propoerly. By the way, because the controller is linear, it is applicable only at low amplitudes in the vicinity of equilibrium point. To reach global stability, a nonlinear controller is demanded.

  7. The use of the tethered satellite system to perform low density aerothermodynamics studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlomagno, Giovanni M.; Deluca, Luigi; Siemers, Paul M.; Wood, George M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Tethered Satellite System (TSS) is a cooperative space system development activity of the U.S.A. and Italy. It is comprised of the Tether Satellite (TS) and the deployer. Within TSS, the Shuttle Tethered Aerothermodynamic Research Facility (STARFAC) concept has the potential to provide access to vast portions of the upper atmosphere for atmospheric and aerothermodynamic research. The feasibility and capability of the TSS to operate as a continuous open wind tunnel and to perform low density aerothermodynamic studies are investigated. This is accomplished through a modified version of the TS simulation program (SKYHOOK). The results indicate that STARFAC concept is both feasible and practical. The TS can go below 100 km but, if thrust is used, large velocity variation (delta V) maneuvers and an attitude control are required; if a satellite lift is considered, large tether tension is produced and an attitude control is required.

  8. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    The use is studied of tether systems to improve the lowest possible steady gravity level on the Space Station. Particular emphasis is placed by the microgravity community on the achievement of high quality microgravity conditions. The tether capability is explored for active control of the center of gravity and the analysis of possible tethered configurations.

  9. Switching delayed feedback control for an electrodynamic tether system in an inclined elliptic orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Hirohisa; Sugimoto, Tetsuro

    2010-04-01

    The chaotic librational motion of a tether system in elliptic orbit has been studied and controlled by delayed feedback control up to date. Contrary to the past literatures that addressed the periodic stability of tether systems, this paper studies the local stability of in-plane/out-of-plane motion of electrodynamic tether (EDT) systems in elliptic orbits with respect to the true anomaly. From the viewpoint of the local stability of tether systems, in this paper, provided that the electric current is used only for controlling the librational motion, a new simple delayed feedback control, named "switching delayed-feedback control (SDFC)" is proposed, which combines a delayed-feedback control (DFC) and variable structure system (VSS) concept. The effectiveness of the proposed method to stabilize the librational in-plane/out-of-plane periodic motion of an electrodynamic tether system in an inclined elliptic orbit with high eccentricity was demonstrated, and compared with that of the traditional delayed-feedback controllers by numerical simulations.

  10. Tether electrical characteristics design report

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, J.H.

    1989-03-24

    The design of a tether system for use in electric and magnetic fields requires an analysis of the equivalent electrical circuit of the baboon and tether. The response of this equivalent circuit to an electric or magnetic field is dependent on the connection of the tether system to the baboon. The tether will be designed so that the currents induced in the tethered baboon are approximately the same as those induce in an untethered baboon. 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Developing Capture Mechanisms and High-Fidelity Dynamic Models for the MXER Tether System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    A team consisting of collaborators from Tennessee Technological University (TTU), Marshall Space Flight Center, BD Systems, and the University of Delaware (herein called the TTU team) conducted specific research and development activities in MXER tether systems during the base period of May 15, 2004 through September 30, 2006 under contract number NNM04AB13C. The team addressed two primary topics related to the MXER tether system: 1) Development of validated high-fidelity dynamic models of an elastic rotating tether and 2) development of feasible mechanisms to enable reliable rendezvous and capture. This contractor report will describe in detail the activities that were performed during the base period of this cycle-2 MXER tether activity and will summarize the results of this funded activity. The primary deliverables of this project were the quad trap, a robust capture mechanism proposed, developed, tested, and demonstrated with a high degree of feasibility and the detailed development of a validated high-fidelity elastic tether dynamic model provided through multiple formulations.

  12. Qualification and In-Flight Demonstration of a European Tether Deployment and Momentum Transfer System on YES2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruijff, M.; van der Heide, E. J.

    2008-08-01

    This paper highlights the design, qualification and mission performance of a comprehensive tethered momentum transfer technology on ESA's second Young Engineers' Satellite (YES2), aiming specifically on the tether deployer. The deployer is designed with a broad range of near-term tether applications in mind and therefore opens up novel possibilities e.g. small satellite missions. The system contains the following critical elements. The tether, including features to enhance safety, wound up in controlled manner onto a spool core; optical deployment sensors and electronics; a "barberpole" friction brake controlled by a stepper motor; and a triple cutter system. A spring-based ejection system and, on the subsatellite side, a timer/release system facilitate the stagings required for accurate tethered momentum transfer. In addition a small, 6 kg re-entry capsule was developed with 1 kg scientific payload and parachute system. On September 25th, 2007, YES2 deployed a 32 km tether in orbit and gathered a wealth of data. This paper aims to provide an overview of the design, qualification and flight performance of the tether deployer hardware. This performance is compared to the design and from this can be concluded a suitability of the hardware for tether deployment and tethered momentum transfer.

  13. Tether fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Some fundamental aspects of tethers are presented and briefly discussed. The effects of gravity gradients, dumbbell libration in circular orbits, tether control strategies and impact hazards for tethers are among those fundamentals. Also considered are aerodynamic drag, constraints in momentum transfer applications and constraints with permanently deployed tethers. The theoretical feasibility of these concepts are reviewed.

  14. ESA astronauts assigned to Tethered Satellite System mission - STS-75

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-01-01

    The TSS project is a joint NASA/ASI (Italian Space Agency) effort. On STS-75, the five-foot diameter (1.6 metre) Italia built satellite is scheduled to be deployed on the end of a 1 mile long (20 kilometre) conductive tether to study the electrodynamic effects of moving such a tether through the Earth's magnetic field. The experiment will also test techniques for managing the tethered spacecraft at great distances. Throughout the 13-day flight, additional experiments housed in the orbiter's payload bay will give scientists access to s for microgravity and fundamental science investigations. The USMP is designed to provide the foundation for advanced scientific investigations similar to those planned aboard the International Space Station. Claude Nicollier, who is Swiss, was selected by ESA in 1978 as one of three European payload specialists to train for the SPACELAB-1 mission. He was a mission specialist on STS- 46 (31 July-8 August 1992), during which the crew members deployed ESA's retrievable science platform (EURECA) and conducted the first TSS test flight. A few months after his return from this mission Claude Nicollier was selected as mission specialist for STS-61 (2-13 December 1993). He contributed considerably to the complete success of the Hubble Space Telescope repair and refurbishment mission and in particular the replacement of the ESA-provided solar arrays. Maurizio Cheli, an Italian, was selected by ESA in May 1992 along with five other young candidates to expand the corps of ESA astronauts. He has been in Houston since mid-1992 and has qualified as mission specialist at NASA's Johnson Space Center there. STS-75 will be his first Shuttle flight. Marine Corps Lt. Col. Andrew M. Allen will command Space Shuttle Columbia's STS-75 mission. Joining Allen are Air Force Major Scott J. Horowitz, pilot; payload commander Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Ph. D; Italian Space Agency (ASI) TSS payload specialist Umberto Guidoni, Ph.D; mission specialist Jeffrey A

  15. Tethered satellite system dynamics and control review panel and related activities, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Two major tests of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) engineering and flight units were conducted to demonstrate the functionality of the hardware and software. Deficiencies in the hardware/software integration tests (HSIT) led to a recommendation for more testing to be performed. Selected problem areas of tether dynamics were analyzed, including verification of the severity of skip rope oscillations, verification or comparison runs to explore dynamic phenomena observed in other simulations, and data generation runs to explore the performance of the time domain and frequency domain skip rope observers.

  16. In-Space Transportation with Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico; Estes, Robert D.; Cosmo, Mario L.

    1998-01-01

    The annual report covers the research conducted on the following topics related to the use of spaceborne tethers for in-space transportation: ProSEDS tether modeling (current collection analyses, influence of a varying tether temperature); proSEDS mission analysis and system dynamics (tether thermal model, thermo-electro-dynamics integrated simulations); proSEDS-tether development and testing (tether requirements, deployment test plan, tether properties testing, deployment tests); and tethers for reboosting the space-based laser (mission analysis, tether system preliminary design, evaluation of attitude constraints).

  17. MSFC MXER Tether Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polsgrove, Tara; Alexander, Reginald; Bonometti, Joseph; Chapman, Jack; Garza, Lucas; Glaese, John; Glasgow, Shaun; Guendel, Herb; Houston, Vance; Johnson, Paul

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of the proposed Momentum-eXchange/Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) space hardware system. The tether system would be position cart-wheeling cables above the Earth and then, rotating like a giant sling, would capture spacecraft or payloads from space shuttles in low Earth orbits and launch them into higher orbits. This study focuses on system validation and structural design issues for MXER. Topics examined include: tether facility design, ED tether system, payload capture/catch mechanism, payload accomodations assembly (PAA), PAA rendezvous capability, and PAA capability to correct tether misthrows.

  18. Astronaut Maurizio Cheli, mission specialist, works with the Tether Optical Phenomenon System (TOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Astronaut Maurizio Cheli, mission specialist, works with the Tether Optical Phenomenon System (TOPS) on the flight deck of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia. Cheli, representing the European Space Agency (ESA), joined four other astronauts and an international payload specialists for 16 days of scientific research in Earth-orbit.

  19. Study of Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) tether system for orbit reboost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A progress report is given on a system study by TRW begun in January 1987 of a 2 kW Plasma Motor Generator Tether to be used for orbit reboost. Following the completion of the initial phase in September 1987, additional tasks were agreed on and work on them begun in March 1988. These tasks fell into three categories: tests on the prototype tether fabricated during the first phase, simulations of the spacecraft and tether system after deployment using GTOSS, and a brief investigation of the impact and feasibility of increasing the system to 20 kW and hosting it on the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle. The subcontractor, Energy Sciences Laboratory, was assigned the responsibility of performing the simulations and some mechanical tests on the prototype tether to supplement those done at TRW. A summary of the significant findings and issues from each task follows. Recommendations for future work constitutes the third section. A copy of the final briefing is in Appendix A, plus additional reports for each task and additional analysis.

  20. Applications of a dynamic tethering system to enable the deep space cam jointed observation bot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leake, Skye; McGuire, Thomas; Parsons, Michael; Hirsch, Michael P.; Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    A device capable of creating tethers for use with spacecraft that are made from a diverse material palette could serve many functions. These functions include supporting applications such as data transfer, power generation, and resource collection. Applications that are currently being considered include use in a system for orientation, data transfer, and power delivery and use as part of a free-moving camera system which would be used in proximity to a spacecraft for capturing images and video for promotional and preforming diagnostic and "self-check" operations. Materials that have been considered for use in such a tethering device have different physical attributes in order to facilitate supporting the widest possible degree of applications for use in scientific, remote sensing, power generation, and electromagnetic applications methods for the parent spacecraft. Physical properties that have been considered include: rigidity, conductivity, heat dissipation, and opacity. The proposed dynamic tethering system would be driven by 3D printing technologies. This prospective application of 3D printing remains relatively unexplored. This provides great opportunities for knowledge expansion and the development of dynamic tethers for use capturing video footage and pictures, and for other scientific endeavors.

  1. Tethered subsatellite study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. P.; Dunkin, J. A.; Galaboff, Z. J.; Johnston, K. D.; Kissel, R. R.; Rheinfurth, M. H.; Siebel, M. P. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results are presented of studies performed relating to the feasibility of deploying a subsatellite from the shuttle by means of a tether. The dynamics, the control laws, the aerodynamics, the heating, and some communication considerations of the tethered subsatellite system are considered. Nothing was found that prohibits the use of a subsatellite joined to the shuttle by a long (100 km) tether. More detailed studies directed at specific applications are recommended.

  2. Applications of Tethers in Space, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cron, A. C. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Topics discussed include tethered satellites, tether deployment, satellite systems, science applications, electrodynamic interactions, transportation applications, artificial gravity, constellations, and technology and testing.

  3. Conductive Tether Coating for Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Schuler, Pete

    2000-01-01

    The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS), which is an on-orbit demonstration of the propulsion capabilities of electrodynamic tethers in space, is a secondary payload on a Delta 11 unmanned expendable booster. The ProSEDS tether consists of a 5 km bare electrodynamic tether and a 1 0-km non-conductive leader tether. Near the Delta 11, 160 m of the conductive tether is insulated to prevent plasma electron collection from the plasma contactor and for other science requirements. The remainder of the 5-km conductive tether is coated with a new conductive coating to collect plasma electrons. A bare metal tether easily collects electrons from the plasma, but thermal concerns preclude this design. A highly emissive conductive polymer developed by Triton Systems, Inc. has been optimized for both conductivity and thermo-optical properties. The current design for the ProSEDS conductive tether is seven individually coated strands of 28 AWG aluminum wire, coated with an atomic oxygen-resistant conductive polymer composed of a mixture of COR (Colorless Oxygen Resistant) and polyanaline (PANI) known as C-COR (Conductive-Colorless Oxygen Resistant). The conductive-coated wire strands are cold-welded to individually coated strands of the insulated tether. The insulated tether is coated with 1 mil of polyimide and an atomic oxygen resistant polymer TOR-BP. The insulated tether must stand off the entire voltage of the tether (1 200 V) at various times during the mission. All seven wires are twisted around a Kevlar-29 core using the Hi-wire design. Extensive testing has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center to qualify both the conductive coating and insulating coating for use on the ProSEDS tether. The conductive coating has been exposed to a plasma to verify the coatings ability to collect electrons from the space plasma from 0 to 1500 V, and to verify the coatings ability to collect electrons after atomic oxygen exposure. The insulated coating has been

  4. Clustering of tethered satellite system simulation data by an adaptive neuro-fuzzy algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, Sunanda; Pemmaraju, Surya

    1992-01-01

    Recent developments in neuro-fuzzy systems indicate that the concepts of adaptive pattern recognition, when used to identify appropriate control actions corresponding to clusters of patterns representing system states in dynamic nonlinear control systems, may result in innovative designs. A modular, unsupervised neural network architecture, in which fuzzy learning rules have been embedded is used for on-line identification of similar states. The architecture and control rules involved in Adaptive Fuzzy Leader Clustering (AFLC) allow this system to be incorporated in control systems for identification of system states corresponding to specific control actions. We have used this algorithm to cluster the simulation data of Tethered Satellite System (TSS) to estimate the range of delta voltages necessary to maintain the desired length rate of the tether. The AFLC algorithm is capable of on-line estimation of the appropriate control voltages from the corresponding length error and length rate error without a priori knowledge of their membership functions and familarity with the behavior of the Tethered Satellite System.

  5. UAH/NASA Workshop on The Uses of a Tethered Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Potential applications of the system are categorized into four areas: geological applications, atmospheric applications, electrodynamics and plasma studies, and technology applications. The multiple-use tethered system with feedback control, will be capable of supporting a payload or satellite suspended from the Shuttle cargo bay, at distances up to 100 kilometers from the Shuttle. Experiments proposed include: geomagnetic mapping, lower atmospheric measurements, ionospheric interactions with large space structures, solar wind transport, and magnetohydrodynamic measurements.

  6. Experimental verification of chaotic control of an underactuated tethered satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zhaojun; Jin, Dongping

    2016-03-01

    This paper studies chaotic control of a tethered satellite system (TSS) driven only by a momentum-exchange device during its attitude adjustment. In dealing with such the underactuated system, an extended time-delay autosynchronization (ETDAS) is employed to stabilize the chaotic motion to a periodic motion. To obtain the control domains of the ETDAS method, a stability analysis of the controlled tethered satellite system in elliptical orbit is implemented. According to the principle of dynamic similarity, then, ground-based experiment setups are proposed and designed to emulate the in-plane motions of the TSS. Representative experiments are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the ETDAS scheme in controlling the chaotic motion of the underactuated TSS.

  7. Decentralized adaptive sliding mode control for beam synchronization of tethered InSAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinxiu; Zhang, Zhigang; Wu, Baolin

    2016-10-01

    Beam synchronization problem of tethered interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is addressed in this paper. Two antennas of the system are carried by separate satellites connected through a tether to obtain a preferable baseline. A Total Zero Doppler Steering (TZDS) is implemented to mother-satellite to cancel the residual Doppler. Subsequently attitude reference trajectories for the two satellites are generated to achieve the beam synchronization and TZDS. Thereafter, a decentralized adaptive sliding mode control law is proposed to track these reference trajectories in the presence of model uncertainties and external disturbances. Finally, the stability of closed-loop system is proved by the corollary of Barbalat's Lemma. Simulation results show the proposed control law is effective to achieve beam synchronization of the system.

  8. Multibody dynamics driving GNC and system design in tethered nets for active debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuto, Riccardo; Lavagna, Michèle; Salvi, Samuele

    2016-07-01

    Debris removal in Earth orbits is an urgent issue to be faced for space exploitation durability. Among different techniques, tethered-nets present appealing benefits and some open points to fix. Former and latter are discussed in the paper, supported by the exploitation of a multibody dynamics tool. With respect to other proposed capture mechanisms, tethered-net solutions are characterised by a safer capturing distance, a passive angular momentum damping effect and the highest flexibility to unknown shape, material and attitude of the target to interface with. They also allow not considering the centre of gravity alignment with thrust axis as a constraint, as it is for any rigid link solution. Furthermore, the introduction of a closing thread around the net perimeter ensures safer and more reliable grasping and holding. In the paper, a six degrees of freedom multibody dynamics simulator is presented: it was developed at Politecnico di Milano - Department of Aerospace Science and Technologies - and it is able to describe the orbital and attitude dynamics of tethered-nets systems and end-bodies during different phases, with great flexibility in dealing with different topologies and configurations. Critical phases as impact and wrapping are analysed by simulation to address the tethered-stack controllability. It is shown how the role of contact modelling is fundamental to describe the coupled dynamics: it is demonstrated, as a major novel contribution, how friction between the net and a tumbling target allows reducing its angular motion, stabilizing the system and allowing safer towing operations. Moreover, the so-called tethered space tug is analysed: after capture, the two objects, one passive and one active, are connected by the tethered-net flexible link, the motion of the system being excited by the active spacecraft thrusters. The critical modes prevention during this phase, by means of a closed-loop control synthesis is shown. Finally, the connection between

  9. Kinetic isolation tether experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. David; He, Xiaohua; Schoder, Robert

    1988-01-01

    Progress was made on the analysis of tether damping and on experimentation of the control system on the laboratory simulator. The damping analysis considers the dynamics of a long tether connecting two spacecraft in Earth orbit, one of the spacecraft having dominant mass. In particular, it considers the material damping of the tether. The results show that, with properly chosen tether material and braiding structure, longitudinal vibration of the tethered system is well damped. A particularly effective method of implementing attitude control for tethered satellites is to use the tether tension force to generate control torques by moving the tether attach point relative to the satellite center of mass. A scaled, one dimensional laboratory simulation of the KITE mission was built and preliminary experiments of the proposed attitude control system were performed. The simulator was built to verify theoretical predictions of attitude controllability, and to investigate the technological requirements in order to implement this concept. A detailed description of the laboratory apparatus is provided, and in addition, the results of the preliminary experiments are presented and discussed.

  10. Lifting options for stratospheric aerosol geoengineering: advantages of tethered balloon systems.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Peter; Burgoyne, Chris; Hunt, Hugh; Causier, Matt

    2012-09-13

    The Royal Society report 'Geoengineering the Climate' identified solar radiation management using albedo-enhancing aerosols injected into the stratosphere as the most affordable and effective option for geoengineering, but did not consider in any detail the options for delivery. This paper provides outline engineering analyses of the options, both for batch-delivery processes, following up on previous work for artillery shells, missiles, aircraft and free-flying balloons, as well as a more lengthy analysis of continuous-delivery systems that require a pipe connected to the ground and supported at a height of 20 km, either by a tower or by a tethered balloon. Towers are shown not to be practical, but a tethered balloon delivery system, with high-pressure pumping, appears to have much lower operating and capital costs than all other delivery options. Instead of transporting sulphuric acid mist precursors, such a system could also be used to transport slurries of high refractive index particles such as coated titanium dioxide. The use of such particles would allow useful experiments on opacity, coagulation and atmospheric chemistry at modest rates so as not to perturb regional or global climatic conditions, thus reducing scale-up risks. Criteria for particle choice are discussed, including the need to minimize or prevent ozone destruction. The paper estimates the time scales and relatively modest costs required if a tethered balloon system were to be introduced in a measured way with testing and development work proceeding over three decades, rather than in an emergency. The manufacture of a tether capable of sustaining the high tensions and internal pressures needed, as well as strong winds, is a significant challenge, as is the development of the necessary pumping and dispersion technologies. The greatest challenge may be the manufacture and launch of very large balloons, but means have been identified to significantly reduce the size of such balloons or aerostats.

  11. Study of an orbiting tethered dumbbell system having positive orbital energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, David A.

    1988-01-01

    For very long tethered systems the sum of the kinetic and potential energy can be positive. The system remains in a circular orbit as long as the masses remain vertically aligned. The system is unstable without constant control of the alignment. If the upper mass rotates forward in the direction of the orbital motion, the system escapes out of orbit. If the upper mass rotates backward, the system falls out of orbit and the lower mass impacts the body around which the system is orbiting.

  12. Bistatic LIDAR experiment proposed for the shuttle/tethered satellite system missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, D. J.; Spense, H. E.; Karl, R. R.; Horak, H. G.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1986-01-01

    A new experiment concept has been proposed for the shuttle/tethered satellite system missions, which can provide high resolution, global density mappings of certain ionospheric species. The technique utilizes bistatic LIDAR to take advantage of the unique dual platform configuration offered by these missions. A tuned, shuttle-based laser is used to excite a column of the atmosphere adjacent to the tethered satellite, while triangulating photometic detectors on the satellite are employed to measure the fluorescence from sections of the column. The fluorescent intensity at the detectors is increased about six decades over both ground-based and monostatic shuttle-based LIDAR sounding of the same region. In addition, the orbital motion of the Shuttle provides for quasi-global mapping unattainable with ground-based observations. Since this technique provides such vastly improved resolution on a synoptic scale, many important middle atmospheric studies, heretofore untenable, may soon be addressed.

  13. A tethering system for direct measurement of cardiovascular function in the caged baboon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    A device suitable for the continuous measurement of physiological activity in large, conscious monkeys has permitted the direct recording of systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate in caged baboons. The device comprises a lightweight fiberglass backpack, retained in place on the baboon by a thoracic elastic band and shoulder straps, and a flexible stainless steel tether connecting the pack to an electrocannular slip-ring in the top center of the baboon's cage. A chronically indwelling arterial catheter inserted retrograde into the abdominal aorta via the internal iliac artery and connected to a small pressure transducer on the pack provides direct measurement of blood pressure and heart rate. Body fluids can be sampled or drugs administered via an indwelling catheter in the inferior vena cava. Electrical and fluid connections between the fiberglass pack and recording and infusion equipment located outside the cage pass through the flexible tether and remain protected from the subject. The reliability of the tethering system has been demonstrated in physiological, pharmacological, and behavioral experiments with baboons.

  14. Tethered Satellites as an Enabling Platform for Operational Space Weather Monitoring Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, Brian E.; Krause, Linda Habash; Gallagher, Dennis Lee; Bilen, Sven Gunnar; Fuhrhop, Keith; Hoegy, Walt R.; Inderesan, Rohini; Johnson, Charles; Owens, Jerry Keith; Powers, Joseph; Voronka, Nestor; Williams, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Tethered satellites offer the potential to be an important enabling technology to support operational space weather monitoring systems. Space weather "nowcasting" and forecasting models rely on assimilation of near-real-time (NRT) space environment data to provide warnings for storm events and deleterious effects on the global societal infrastructure. Typically, these models are initialized by a climatological model to provide "most probable distributions" of environmental parameters as a function of time and space. The process of NRT data assimilation gently pulls the climate model closer toward the observed state (e.g., via Kalman smoothing) for nowcasting, and forecasting is achieved through a set of iterative semi-empirical physics-based forward-prediction calculations. Many challenges are associated with the development of an operational system, from the top-level architecture (e.g., the required space weather observatories to meet the spatial and temporal requirements of these models) down to the individual instruments capable of making the NRT measurements. This study focuses on the latter challenge: we present some examples of how tethered satellites (from 100s of m to 20 km) are uniquely suited to address certain shortfalls in our ability to measure critical environmental parameters necessary to drive these space weather models. Examples include long baseline electric field measurements, magnetized ionospheric conductivity measurements, and the ability to separate temporal from spatial irregularities in environmental parameters. Tethered satellite functional requirements are presented for two examples of space environment observables.

  15. All-out Test in Tethered Canoe System can Determine Anaerobic Parameters of Elite Kayakers.

    PubMed

    Messias, L H D; Ferrari, H G; Sousa, F A B; Dos Reis, I G M; Serra, C C S; Gobatto, C A; Manchado-Gobatto, F B

    2015-10-01

    The aims of this study were to use a specific all-out 30-sec tethered test to determine the anaerobic parameters in elite kayakers and verify the relationship between these results and sports performance. Twelve elite slalom kayakers were evaluated. The tethered canoe system was created and used for the all-out 30-sec test application. Measurements of peak force, mean force, minimum force, fatigue index and impulse were performed. Performance evaluation was determined by measuring the time of race in a simulated race containing 24 gates on a white-water course. Blood was collected (25-µl) for analysis of lactate concentration at rest and at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10-min intervals after both the all-out test and the simulated race. The Pearson product moment correlation shows a inverse and significant relationship of peak force, mean force and impulse with time of race. Blood lactate concentrations after the all-out test and the simulated race peak at same time (4 min). Additionally, no interaction was visualized between time and all-out test/simulated race for blood lactate concentrations (P <0.365). These results suggest a relationship between the parameters of the all-out test and performance. Thus, the tethered canoe system is a useful tool for determining parameters that could be used in training control of slalom kayakers.

  16. Current-voltage characteristics of the tethered satellite system: Measurements and uncertainties due to temperature variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. L.; Drobot, A. T.; Papadopoulos, K.; Wright, K. H.; Stone, N. H.; Gurgiolo, C.; Winningham, J. D.; Bonifazi, C.

    One of the primary goals of the Tethered Satellite System reflight mission (TSS-1R) is to determine the current-voltage characteristics of the TSS satellite orbiting in the ionosphere. While the collected current was measured directly with high reliability, the satellite potential could only be deduced from a circuit model or from interpretation of measurement data below satellite potentials of 500 Volts. The greatest uncertainty in the circuit model is the value of tether resistance R. We have provided quantitative calibration of the resistance based on instrument data for Vs < 100 Volts. We have reached the important conclusion that the R value in the TSS circuit model is correlated to temperature changes associated with the diurnal cycles along the TSS flight path. We have also applied the calibrated R value in the TSS circuit equation to construct the I-V curves that extend to high voltages. The resulting I-V characteristics are presented with error bounds on satellite potential to indicate the uncertainty associated with the tether resistance determination. The I-V relation exhibits different scalings in the high (> 100 Volts) and low (< 10 Volts) voltage regimes, which indicates a fundamental transition for the current collection physics in the ionospheric plasma surrounding the satellite.

  17. An Automated System for Measuring Microphysical and Radiative Cloud Characteristics from a Tethered Balloon

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Paul Lawson

    2004-03-15

    OAK-B135 The rate of climate change in polar regions is now felt to be a harbinger of possible global warming. Long-lived, relatively thin stratus clouds play a predominant role in transmitting solar radiation and trapping long wave radiation emitted from open water and melt ponds. In situ measurements of microphysical and radiative properties of Arctic and Antarctic stratus clouds are needed to validate retrievals from remote measurements and simulations using numerical models. While research aircraft can collect comprehensive microphysical and radiative data in clouds, the duration of these aircraft is relatively short (up to about 12 hours). During the course of the Phase II research, a tethered balloon system was developed that supports miniaturized meteorological, microphysical and radiation sensors that can collect data in stratus clouds for days at a time. The tethered balloon system uses a 43 cubic meter balloon to loft a 17 kg sensor package to altitudes u p to 2 km. Power is supplied to the instrument package via two copper conductors in the custom tether. Meteorological, microphysical and radiation data are recorded by the sensor package. Meteorological measurements include pressure, temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction. Radiation measurements are made using a 4-pi radiometer that measures actinic flux at 500 and 800 nm. Position is recorded using a GPS receiver. Microphysical data are obtained using a miniaturized version of an airborne cloud particle imager (CPI). The miniaturized CPI measures the size distribution of water drops and ice crystals from 9 microns to 1.4 mm. Data are recorded onboard the sensor package and also telemetered via a 802.11b wireless communications link. Command signals can also be sent to the computer in the sensor package via the wireless link. In the event of a broken tether, a GMRS radio link to the balloon package is used to heat a wire that burns 15 cm opening in the top of the balloon. The balloon and

  18. Modeling and Control of a Tethered Rotorcraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-30

    systems including: 2-D analysis of aerostats in response to vertical gusts [1], tethered high altitude balloons [2], and tri- tethered systems [3,4...of Aircraft, Vol. 46, No. 1, 2009, pp. 343-347. 2Aglietti, G., “Dynamic Response of a High- Altitude Tethered Balloon System,” Journal of Aircraft...elements with low mass. Further efficiency is achieved by treating each tether link as a body of revolution and assuming that tether spin is negligible

  19. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1990-01-01

    The scope of the study is to investigate ways of controlling the microgravity environment of the International Space Station by means of a tethered system. Four main study tasks were performed. First, researchers analyzed the utilization of the tether systems to improve the lowest possible steady gravity level on the Space Station and the tether capability to actively control the center of gravity position in order to compensate for activities that would upset the mass distribution of the Station. The purpose of the second task was to evaluate the whole of the experiments performable in a variable gravity environment and the related beneficial residual accelerations, both for pure and applied research in the fields of fluid, materials, and life science, so as to assess the relevance of a variable g-level laboratory. The third task involves the Tethered Variable Gravity Laboratory. The use of the facility that would crawl along a deployed tether and expose experiments to varying intensities of reduced gravity is discussed. Last, a study performed on the Attitude Tether Stabilizer concept is discussed. The stabilization effect of ballast masses tethered to the Space Station was investigated as a means of assisting the attitude control system of the Station.

  20. The stabilization interval system of a tethered descent underwater vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayvoronskiy, S. A.; Ezangina, T.; Khozhaev, I.; Efimov, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    To damp the vertical oscillations of a descent submersible caused by dusting the control system utilizing a shock-absorbing hoist located on the submersible was developed. A robust proportional-plus-integral action controller was included in the control loop to ensure acceptable dynamic properties of the system by interval variations of the module mass, the rope length, the equivalent value of stiffness of a spring linkage and the equivalent value of damping factor of the spring linkage. A parametric synthesis of the controller was carried out on the basis of the robust expansion of the coefficient method of the quality rating estimation. The system operability was confirmed by the results of the digital simulation parameters

  1. Feasibility Study of Space Based Solar Power to Tethered Aerostat Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blank, Stephen J.; Leete, Stephen J.; Jaffe, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of two-stage Space-Based Solar Power to Tethered Aerostat to Earth (SSP-TA) system architectures that offer significant advantages over conventional single stage space-to-earth architectures is being studied. There have been many proposals for the transmission of solar power collected in space to the surface of the earth so that solar energy could provide a major part of the electric power requirements on earth. There are, however, serious difficulties in implementing the single stage space-based solar power systems that have been previously studied. These difficulties arise due to: i) the cost of transporting the components needed for the extremely large microwave transmit beaming aperture into space orbit, ii) the even larger collection apertures required on earth, iii) the potential radiation hazard to personnel and equipment on earth, and iv) a lack of flexibility in location of the collection station on the earth. Two candidate system architectures are described here to overcome these difficulties. In both cases a two-stage space to tethered aerostat to earth transmission system (SSP-TA) is proposed. The use of high altitude tethered aerostats (or powered airships) avoids the effects of attenuation of EM energy propagating through the earth s lower atmosphere. This allows the use of beaming frequencies to be chosen from the range of high millimeter (THz) to near-infra-red (NIR) to the visible. This has the potential for: i) greatly reduced transportation costs to space, ii) much smaller receiver collection apertures and ground stations, iii) elimination of the potential radiation hazard to personnel and equipment on earth, and iv) ease in transportation and flexibility in location of the collection station on the earth. A preliminary comparison of system performance and efficiencies is presented.

  2. Tethered Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Lynden

    2010-09-15

    We have performed extensive experimental and theoretical studies of interfacial friction, relaxation dynamics, and thermodynamics of polymer chains tethered to points, planes, and particles. A key result from our tribology studies using lateral force microscopy (LFM) measurements of polydisperse brushes of linear and branched chains densely grafted to planar substrates is that there are exceedingly low friction coefficients for these systems. Specific project achievements include: (1) Synthesis of three-tiered lubricant films containing controlled amounts of free and pendent PDMS chains, and investigated the effect of their molecular weight and volume fraction on interfacial friction. (2.) Detailed studies of a family of hairy particles termed nanoscale organic hybrid materials (NOHMs) and demonstration of their use as lubricants.

  3. Avionics Tether Operations Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, John R.

    2001-01-01

    The activities described in this Final Report were authorized and performed under Purchase Order Number H32835D, issued as part of NASA contract number NAS8-00114. The period of performance of this PO was from March 1 to September 30, 2001. The primary work activity was the continued development and updating of the tether dynamic simulation tools GTOSS (Generalized Tethered Object System Simulation) and TSSIM (Tethered Satellite System) and use of these and other tools in the analysis of various tether dynamics problems. Several updated versions of GTOSS were delivered during the period of performance by the author of the simulation, Lang Associates' David Lang. These updates had mainly to do with updated documentation and an updated coordinate system definition to the J2000 standards. This Final Report is organized by the months in which the activities described were performed. The following sections review the Statement of Work (SOW) and activities performed to satisfy it.

  4. System engineering study of electrodynamic tether as a spaceborne generator and radiator of electromagnetic waves in the ULF/ELF frequency band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. D.; Grossi, M. D.; Lorenzini, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    The transmission and generation by orbiting tethered satellite systems of information carrying electromagnetic waves in the ULF/ELF frequency band to the Earth at suitably high signal intensities was examined and the system maintaining these intensities in their orbits for long periods of time without excessive onboard power requirements was investigated. The injection quantity power into electromagnetic waves as a function of system parameters such as tether length and orbital height was estimated. The basic equations needed to evaluate alternataing current tethered systems for external energy requirements are presented. The energy equations to tethered systems with various lengths, tether resistances, and radiation resistances, operating at different current values are applied. Radiation resistance as a function of tether length and orbital height is discussed. It is found that ULF/ELF continuously radiating systems could be maintained in orbit with moderate power requirements. The effect of tether length on the power going into electromagnetic waves and whether a single or dual tether system is preferable for the self-driven mode is discussed. It is concluded that the single tether system is preferable over the dual system.

  5. A revolutionary and operational tethered aerostat system illustrating new LTA technology. [for ground-air-ground communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menke, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    An operational tethered aerostat system, which demonstrates utility of LTA systems, is described. It was made possible by development of a reliable tethered aerostat that is used to support broadcast equipment at an altitude of 10,000 feet. Two elements of the TCOM system, the aerostat and mooring station, are particularly relevant to the LTA Workshop. They demonstrate the feasibility of using LTA vehicles in real, operational, all-weather applications and, in addition, illustrate an advance in the overall technology base of LTA. The aerostat and the mooring station, including their technical design features and demonstrated performance characteristics, are described.

  6. Multispectral imaging systems on tethered balloons for optical remote sensing education and research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Joseph A.; Nugent, Paul W.; Kaufman, Nathan A.; Pust, Nathan J.; Mikes, Devin; Knierim, Cassie; Faulconer, Nathan; Larimer, Randal M.; DesJardins, Angela C.; Knighton, W. Berk

    2012-01-01

    A set of low-cost, compact multispectral imaging systems have been developed for deployment on tethered balloons for education and outreach based on basic principles of optical remote sensing. They have proven to be sufficiently capable, and they are now being used in research as well. The imagers use tiny complementary metal-oxide semiconductor cameras with low-cost optical filters to obtain images in red and near-infrared bands, and a more recent version includes a blue band. The red and near-infrared bands are used primarily for identifying and monitoring vegetation through the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), while the blue band can be used for studying water turbidity and so forth. The imagers are designed to be carried by tethered balloons to altitudes currently up to approximately 50 m. These undergraduate-student-built imaging systems are being used by university and college students for a broad range of applications in multispectral imaging, remote sensing, and environmental science.

  7. Tether Transport System Study Summary Performed under Contract to Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderwell, Dan; Bangham, Mike; Dionne, Heather; Fleming, Beth; Klus, Bill; Herring, Karmel; Suggs, Elton; Walker, Larry; Lorenzini, Enrico; Cosmo, Mario L.; Kaiser, Markus; Vestal, Linda; Johnson, Les; Carrington, Connie

    1998-01-01

    The main rationale for this study is to reduce the mission cost of transporting payloads to GEO. A two stage tether transport system was proposed for boosting payloads from LEO to GTO/GEO. The feasibility of the concept is addressed from the point of view of orbital mechanics and other principles of physics. The report presents the results of an engineering analysis that defines the system, major elements and subsystems, and assesses the feasibility (i.e., the technology readiness level) of designing and developing the system. Results indicate that significant cost savings can be realized over traditional upper stages within a few launches. Certain key technical issues, such as payload rendezvous and capture, need to be addressed in future studies. Advancements in certain technology areas, such as power generation and highly efficient propulsion systems, will have significant effects on the overall system design.

  8. Numerical simulations of the electrodynamic interactions between the Tethered-Satellite-System and space plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vashi, Bharat I.

    1992-01-01

    The first Tethered-Satellite-System (TSS-1), scheduled for a flight in late 1992, is expected to provide relevant information related to the concept of generating an emf in a 20-km-long (or longer) conducting wire. This paper presents numerical simulations of the electrodynamic interactions between the TSS system and space plasma, using a 2D and 3D models of the system. The 2D case code simulates the motion of a long cylinder past a plasma, which is composed of electrons and H(+) ions. The system is solved by allowing the plasma to flow past the cylinder with an imposed magnetic field. The more complex 3D case is considered to study the dynamics in great detail. Results of 2D simulation show that the interaction of a satellite with plasma flowing perpendicularly to the magnetic field results in an enhancement in the current collection.

  9. Multispectral imaging system on tethered balloons for optical remote sensing education and outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Joseph A.; Nugent, Paul W.; Kaufman, Nathan; Pust, Nathan J.; Mikes, Devin; Knierim, Cassie; Faulconer, Nathan; Larimer, Randal; DesJardins, Angela; Knighton, Berk

    2012-10-01

    A set of low-cost, compact multispectral imaging systems have been developed for deployment on tethered balloons for education and outreach based on basic principles of optical remote sensing. The imagers use tiny CMOS cameras with low-cost optical filters to obtain images in red and near-infrared bands, and a more recent version include a blue band. The red and near-infrared bands are used primarily for identifying and monitoring vegetation through the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), while the blue band is used for studying water turbidity, identifying water and ice, and so forth. The imagers are designed to be carried by tethered balloons at altitudes up to approximately 50 m. Engineering and physics students at Montana State University-Bozeman gained hands-on experience during the early stages of designing and building the imagers, and a wide variety of university and college students are using the imagers for a broad range of applications to learn about multispectral imaging, remote sensing, and applications typically involving some aspect of environmental science.

  10. Proceedings of a Workshop on the Applications of Tethers in Space, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Project overview; tether deployment; satellite system description; tether fundamentals; science applications; electrodynamic interactions; transportation; artificial gravity; and constellations; were described.

  11. Tethered constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.

    1986-01-01

    The studies that have been carried out on Tethered Constellations are briefly addressed. A definition of a tethered constellation is any number of masses/platforms greater that two connected by tethers in a stable configuration. Configurations and stability constraints are reviewed. Conclusions reached are: (1) The 1-D, horizontal, passively stabilized constellations have been ruled out; (2) Fishbone constellations have been also ruled out; (3) Alternative stable 2-D configurations have been devised such as the quadrangular configuration stabilized by electrodynamic forces (ESC), the quadrangular configuration stabilized by differential air drag (DSC), and the pseudo elliptical configuration stabilized by electrodynamic forces (PEC). Typical dimensions for these constellations are 10 km (horizontal) by 20 km (vertical) with balloon diameters around 100 m in the case of a DSC and a power consumption around 7 KW for an ESC or PEC.

  12. Electrodynamic Tethers for Spacecraft Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Estes, Robert D.; Lorenzini, Enrico; Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel; Sanmartin, Juan; Vas, Irwin

    1998-01-01

    Relatively short electrodynamic tethers can use solar power to 'push' against a planetary magnetic field to achieve propulsion without the expenditure of propellant. The groundwork has been laid for this type of propulsion. NASA began developing tether technology for space applications in the 1960's. Important recent milestones include retrieval of a tether in space (TSS-1, 1992), successful deployment of a 20-km-long tether in space (SEDS-1, 1993), and operation of an electrodynamic tether with tether current driven in both directions-power and thrust modes (PMG, 1993). The planned Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) experiment will demonstrate electrodynamic tether thrust during its flight in early 2000. ProSEDS will use the flight-proven Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) to deploy a 5 km bare copper tether from a Delta II upper stage to achieve approximately 0.4 N drag thrust, thus deorbiting the stage. The experiment will use a predominantly 'bare' tether for current collection in lieu of the endmass collector and insulated tether approach used on previous missions. Theory and ground-based plasma chamber testing indicate that the bare tether is a highly-efficient current collector. The flight experiment is a precursor to utilization of the technology on the International Space Station for reboost application and the more ambitious electrodynamic tether upper stage demonstration mission which will be capable of orbit raising, lowering and inclination changes - all using electrodynamic thrust. In addition, the use of this type of propulsion may be attractive for future missions at Jupiter and any other planetary body with a magnetosphere.

  13. Space Tethers: Design Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlin, D. D.; Faile, G. C.; Hayashida, K. B.; Frost, C. L.; Wagner, C. Y.; Mitchell, M. L.; Vaughn, J. A.; Galuska, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    This document is prepared to provide a systematic process for the selection of tethers for space applications. Criteria arc provided for determining the strength requirement for tether missions and for mission success from tether severing due to micrometeoroids and orbital debris particle impacts. Background information of materials for use in space tethers is provided, including electricity-conducting tethers. Dynamic considerations for tether selection is also provided. Safety, quality, and reliability considerations are provided for a tether project.

  14. Proposed tethered unmanned aerial system for the detection of pollution entering the Chesapeake Bay area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, J.; McKay, J.; Evans, W.; Gadsden, S. Andrew

    2016-05-01

    This paper is based on a proposed unmanned aerial system platform that is to be outfitted with high-resolution sensors. The proposed system is to be tethered to a moveable ground station, which may be a research vessel or some form of ground vehicle (e.g., car, truck, or rover). The sensors include, at a minimum: camera, infrared sensor, thermal, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) camera, global positioning system (GPS), and a light-based radar (LIDAR). The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of existing methods for pollution detection of failing septic systems, and to introduce the proposed system. Future work will look at the high-resolution data from the sensors and integrating the data through a process called information fusion. Typically, this process is done using the popular and well-published Kalman filter (or its nonlinear formulations, such as the extended Kalman filter). However, future work will look at using a new type of strategy based on variable structure estimation for the information fusion portion of the data processing. It is hypothesized that fusing data from the thermal and NDVI sensors will be more accurate and reliable for a multitude of applications, including the detection of pollution entering the Chesapeake Bay area.

  15. Applications of Tethers in Space, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cron, A. C. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    The tethered satellite system is described including tether fundamentals. Applications of very long tethers in space to a broad spectrum of future space missions are explored. Topics covered include: science, transportation, constellations, artificial gravity, technology and test, and electrodynamic interactions. Recommendations to NASA are included.

  16. Overview of Future NASA Tether Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L.; Gilchrist, B.; Estes, R. D.; Lorenzini, E.

    1999-01-01

    The groundwork has been laid for tether applications in space. NASA has developed tether technology for space applications since the 1960's. Important recent milestones include retrieval of a tether in space (TSS-1, 1992), successful deployment of a 20-km-long tether in space (SEDS-1, 1993), closed loop control of tether deployment (SEDS-2, 1994), and operation of an electrodynamic tether with tether current driven in both directions-power and thrust modes (PMG, 1993). Various types of tethers and systems can be used for space transportation. Short electrodynamic tethers can use solar power to ``push'' against a planetary magnetic field to achieve propulsion without the expenditure of propellant. The planned Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) experiment will demonstrate electrodynamic tether thrust during its flight in early 2000. Utilizing completely different physical principles, long nonconducting tethers can exchange momentum between two masses in orbit to place one body into a higher orbit or a transfer orbit for lunar and planetary missions. Recently completed system studies of this concept indicate that it would be a relatively low-cost, in-space asset with long-term, multimission capability. Tethers can also be used to support space science by providing a mechanism for precision formation flying and for reaching regions of the upper atmosphere that were previously inaccessible

  17. New Tether Ozonesonde System Developed for Uintah Basin Ozone Study in February, 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. J.; Cullis, P.; Wendell, J.; Hall, E.; Jordan, A.; Albee, R.; Schnell, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    NOAA/ESRL/GMD participated in the February, 2012 UINTAH basin air quality campaign to measure ozone concentrations from surface to 300 meters above ground level. The study region, southwest of Vernal, Utah, is an active oil and gas production and exploration area. During the previous winter in 2011, an air quality study led by state and local agencies and Utah State University measured very high ozone at several sites, exceeding 140 ppbv centered near Ouray, Utah under shallow boundary layer with surface snow-cover conditions. The high ozone conditions never developed during the 2012 campaign. The weather remained dry and warm with typical ozone mixing rations ranging from 20 to 60 ppbv. In order to provide near continuous ozone profiles without consuming a balloon and ozonesonde for each sounding, a tether system was developed by the Global Monitoring Division based upon a motorized deep sea fishing rod and reel with 50 pound line. The lightweight system was shown to be rugged and reliable and capable of conducting an ascending and descending profile to 300 m within 90 minutes. Communication software and data loggers continuously monitor the radiosonde pressure to control the ascent/descent rates and altitude. The system can operate unmanned as it will ascend, descend and hold an altitude as controlled from a laptop computer located up to 30 m distant.

  18. Adolescent and Caregiver use of a Tethered Personal Health Record System

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Matthew K.; Wilcox, Lauren; Feustel, Clayton; Wasileski-Masker, Karen; Olson, Thomas A.; Simoneaux, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    Supporting adolescent patient engagement in care is an important yet underexplored topic in consumer health informatics. Personal Health Records (PHRs) show potential, but designing PHR systems to accommodate both emerging adults and their parents is challenging. We conducted a mixed-methods study with teenage adolescent patients (ages 13-17) with cancer and blood disorders, and their parents, to investigate their experiences with My-Chart, a tethered PHR system. Through analyses of usage logs and independently-conducted surveys and interviews, we found that patients and parents both valued MyChart, but had different views about the role of the PHR for care communication and management, and different attitudes about its impact on the patient’s ability to manage care. Specific motivations for using MyChart included patient–parent coordination of care activities, communication around hospital encounters, and support for transitioning to adult care. Finally, some parents had concerns about certain diagnostic test results being made available to their children. PMID:28269859

  19. The tethered satellite electrodynamics experiment project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, John M.

    1988-01-01

    NASA and Italy's PSN have undertaken the Tethered Satellite Electrodynamics Experiment, in which two tethered bodies will be equipped with data-collecting scientific instruments, as the first stage of the development of the Tethered Satellite System that can be deployed by the Space Shuttle. The experiment will give attention to the electromagnetic interaction between the satellite/tether/orbiter system and the ambient space plasma, and should demonstrate the operation of both satellite- and Shuttle-borne electrodynamic instruments with a conductive tether.

  20. Radar cross-section measurements and simulation of a tethered satellite. The small expendable deployer system end-mass payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravey, Robin L.; Fralick, Dion T.; Vedeler, Erik

    1995-01-01

    The first Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS-1), a tethered satellite system, was developed by NASA and launched March 29, 1993 as a secondary payload on a United State Air Force (USAF) Delta-2 launch vehicle. The SEDS-1 successfully deployed an instrumented end-mass payload (EMP) on a 20-km nonconducting tether from the second stage of the Delta 2. This paper describes the effort of NASA Langley Research Center's Antenna and Microwave Research Branch to provide assistance to the SEDS Investigators Working Group (IWG) in determining EMP dynamics by analyzing the mission radar skin track data. The radar cross section measurements taken and simulations done for this study are described and comparisons of the measured data with the simulated data for the EMP at 6 GHz are presented.

  1. Radar cross-section measurements and simulation of a tethered satellite. The small expendable deployer system end-mass payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravey, Robin L.; Fralick, Dion T.; Vedeler, Erik

    1995-02-01

    The first Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS-1), a tethered satellite system, was developed by NASA and launched March 29, 1993 as a secondary payload on a United State Air Force (USAF) Delta-2 launch vehicle. The SEDS-1 successfully deployed an instrumented end-mass payload (EMP) on a 20-km nonconducting tether from the second stage of the Delta 2. This paper describes the effort of NASA Langley Research Center's Antenna and Microwave Research Branch to provide assistance to the SEDS Investigators Working Group (IWG) in determining EMP dynamics by analyzing the mission radar skin track data. The radar cross section measurements taken and simulations done for this study are described and comparisons of the measured data with the simulated data for the EMP at 6 GHz are presented.

  2. Orbital Injection of the SEDSAT Satellite: Tethered Systems Dynamics and Flight Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Gullahorn, Gordon E.; Cosmo, Mario L.; Ruiz, Manuel; Pelaez, Jesus

    1996-01-01

    This report deals with the following topics which are all related to the orbital injection of the SEDSAT satellite: Dynamics and Stability of Tether Oscillations after the First Cut. The dynamics of the tether after the first cut (i.e., without the Shuttle attached to it) is investigated. The tether oscillations with the free end are analyzed in order to assess the stability of the rectilinear configuration in between the two tether cuts; analysis of Unstable Modes. The unstable modes that appear for high libration angles are further investigated in order to determine their occurrences and the possible transition from bound librations to rotations; Orbital Release Strategies for SEDSAT. A parametric analysis of the orbital decay rate of the SEDSAT satellite after the two tether cuts has been carried out as a function of the following free parameters: libration amplitude at the end of deployment, deviation angle from LV at the first cut, and orbital anomaly at the second cut. The values of these parameters that provide a minimum orbital decay rate of the satellite (after the two cuts) have been computed; and Dynamics and Control of SEDSAT. The deployment control law has been modified to cope with the new ejection velocity of the satellite from the Shuttle cargo bay. New reference profiles have been derived as well as new control parameters. Timing errors at the satellite release as a function of the variations of the initial conditions and the tension model parameters have been estimated for the modified control law.

  3. BOU: Development of a low-cost tethered balloon sensing system for monitoring the lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picos, Rodrigo; Lopez-Grifol, Alvaro; Martinez-Villagrassa, Daniel; Simó, Gemma; Wenger, Burkhard; Dünnermann, Jens; Jiménez, Maria Antonia; Cuxart, Joan

    2016-04-01

    The study of the atmospheric boundary layer, the lowest part of the atmosphere, and the processes that occur therein often requires the observation of vertical profiles of the main meteorological variables, i.e. air temperature and humidity, wind vector and barometric pressure. In particular, when the interest is focused on the air-surface interactions, a high vertical resolution over the first 500 m is required for the observations to describe the physical processes that occur immediately above the surface. Typically, these needs are covered with the use of captive balloons, which are helium-filled balloons tethered to a winch on the ground and a sensor package suspended a short distance below the balloon. Since the commercial version of such instrumental platforms are scarce and expensive, a new low-cost device has been developed in the last years: BOU (tethered Balloon sonde OWL-UIB). In this paper, we focus on the sensor package and data acquisition system part, that is able to fulfill the low-cost requirements. The system uses a low-cost Arduino Mega board as the processor, and stores all the data in a SD card, though an RF connection is also possible but more unreliable. The system has been configured to sample temperature, humidity, air pressure, wind speed, having also a magnetometer and an accelerometer. Sampling time was 1 second, though it was possible to set it faster. It is worth mentioning that the system is easily reconfigurable, and more sensors can be added. The system is powered by a Polymer battery of 1800mA , allowing the system to run continously for more than 6 hours. The temperature is acquired using three different sensors (a HYT 271 calibrated sensor with an accuracy of ±0.2 °C, plus the internal temperature sensors of the wind and pressure sensors, with accuracies around ±0.5 °C). The humidity is also sensed using the calibrated HYT 271 sensor, which features an accuracy of ±1.8%. Air pressure is sensed using a BMP080 sensor, which

  4. The role of tethers on space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The results of research and development that addressed the usefulness of tether applications in space, particularly for space station are described. A well organized and structured effort of considerable magnitude involving NASA, industry and academia have defined the engineering and technological requirements of space tethers and their broad range of economic and operational benefits. The work directed by seven NASA Field Centers is consolidated and structured to cover the general and specific roles of tethers in space as they apply to NASA's planned space station. This is followed by a description of tether systems and operations. A summary of NASA's plans for tether applications in space for years to come is given.

  5. Technology of Bare Tether Current Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Robert D.; Sanmartin, Juan R.; Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel

    1998-01-01

    The outstanding problem for useful applications of electrodynamic tethers is obtaining sufficient electron current from the ionospheric plasma. Bare tether collectors, in which the conducting tether itself, left uninsulated over kilometers of its length, acts as the collecting anode, promise to attain currents of 10 A or more from reasonably sized systems. Current collection by a bare tether is also relatively insensitive to drops in electron density, which are regularly encountered on each revolution of an orbit. This makes nighttime operation feasible. We show how the bare tether's high efficiency of current collection and ability to adjust to density variations follow from the orbital motion limited collection law of thin cylinders. We consider both upwardly deployed (power generation mode) and downwardly deployed (reboost mode) tethers, and present results that indicate how bare tether systems would perform as their magnetic and plasma environment varies in low earth orbit.

  6. The dynamic phenomena of a tethered satellite: NASA's first Tethered Satellite Mission, TSS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. S.; Mowery, D. K.; Tomlin, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    The tethered satellite system (TSS) was envisioned as a means of extending a satellite from its base (space shuttle, space station, space platform) into a lower or higher altitude in order to more efficiently acquire data and perform science experiments. This is accomplished by attaching the satellite to a tether, deploying it, then reeling it in. When its mission is completed, the satellite can be returned to its base for reuse. If the tether contains a conductor, it can also be used as a means to generate and flow current to and from the satellite to the base. When current is flowed, the tether interacts with the Earth's magnetic field, deflecting the tether. When the current flows in one direction, the system becomes a propulsive system that can be used to boost the orbiting system. In the other direction, it is a power generating system. Pulsing the current sets up a dynamic oscillation in the tether, which can upset the satellite attitude and preclude docking. A basic problem occurs around 400-m tether length, during satellite retrieval when the satellite's pendulous (rotational) mode gets in resonance with the first lateral tether string mode. The problem's magnitude is determined by the amount of skiprope present coming into this resonance condition. This paper deals with the tethered satellite, its dynamic phenomena, and how the resulting problems were solved for the first tethered satellite mission (TSS-1). Proposals for improvements for future tethered satellite missions are included. Results from the first tethered satellite flight are summarized.

  7. Tethered Satellite System (TSS) Dynamics Assessments and Analysis, TSS-1R Post Flight Data Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, John R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the analysis performed on the TSS-1R telemetry data after the flight. These analysis addressed the tether dynamics of TSS-1r. The telemetry data was provided in a CD-ROM format. The data contained on the CD-ROM was selected from available Satellite and orbiter MSID's.

  8. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in Earth orbit, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.

    1987-01-01

    A control law was developed to control the elevator during short-distance maneuvers along the tether of a 4-mass tethered system. This control law (called retarded exponential or RE) was analyzed parametrically in order to assess which control parameters provide a good dynamic response and a smooth time history of the acceleration on board the elevator. The short-distance maneuver under investigation consists of a slow crawling of the elevator over the distance of 10 m that represents a typical maneuver for fine tuning the acceleration level on board the elevator. The contribution of aerodynamic and thermal perturbations upon acceleration levels was also evaluated and acceleration levels obtained when such pertubations are taken into account were compared to those obtained by neglecting the thermal and aerodynamic forces. In addition, the preparation of a tether simulation questionnaire is illustrated. Analytic solutions to be compared to numerical cases and simulator test cases are also discussed.

  9. Optimal Control of Electrodynamic Tethers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    method.46 Even though the derivation that produced Eq. (11) required integration over a hypothetical integer number of revolutions, the optimizer ... approach to multi-revolution, long time scale optimal control of an electrodynamic tether is investigated for a tethered satellite system in Low Earth...time scale approach is used to capture the effects of the Earth’s rotating tilted magnetic field. Optimal control solutions are achieved using a

  10. Tether Technology Interchange Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, James K. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    This is a compilation of 25 papers presented at a tether technical interchange meeting in Huntsville, AL, on September 9-10, 1997. After each presentation, a technical discussion was held to clarify and expand the salient points. A wide range of subjects was covered including tether dynamics, electrodynamics, space power generation, plasma physics, ionospheric physics, towing tethers, tethered reentry schemes, and future tether missions.

  11. Atmospheric tether mission analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA is considering the use of tethered satellites to explore regions of the atmosphere inaccessible to spacecraft or high altitude research balloons. This report summarizes the Lockheed Martin Astronautics (LMA) effort for the engineering study team assessment of an Orbiter-based atmospheric tether mission. Lockheed Martin responsibilities included design recommendations for the deployer and tether, as well as tether dynamic analyses for the mission. Three tether configurations were studied including single line, multistrand (Hoytether) and tape designs.

  12. STEP Tether Dynamics Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, John R.

    2000-01-01

    The General Tethered Object Simulation System (GTOSS) has been successfully converted to the PC environment. GTOSS has been run under Microsoft Windows 95, 98 and NT4.0 with no problems noted. Adaptation to the PC environment and definition of the 3 three body configuration required resizing some of the GTOSS internal data arrays. To allow studies of the tether dynamics accompanying electrodynamic thrust, a tether current flow model has also been developed for GTOSS. This model includes effects due to the earth's magnetic field and ionosphere, tether conductivity, temperature, motion, shape and available power. Sample cases have been defined for a proposed STEP-AIRSEDS (Space Transfer using Electrodynamic Propulsion-The Michigan Technic Corporation proposed tether missions for commercial applications) three body configuration. This required definition of a 6th power scenario for GTOSS. This power scenario allows a user to specify whether orbit raising or orbit lowering is to be performed by selecting the number of the tether. Orbit raising and orbit lowering sample cases have been run successfully. Results from these runs have been included in this report. Results have only been generated so far for a three body configuration. Only point end masses have been represented. No attitude dynamics have been included. Initial results suggest that tether current can have significant and detrimental effects on tether dynamics and provisions will have to be made for control of it. This control will have to be considered in connection with desired target orbits for electrodynamic thrusting, as well as end body attitude control, momentum management of proposed control moment gyros, solar array pointing. All of these items will interact and thus, any system simulation will have to have each of these effects modeled in sufficient detail to display these interactions.

  13. Development of the Flight Tether for ProSEDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Leslie; Vaughn, Jason; Welzyn, Ken; Carroll, Joe; Brown, Norman S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) space experiment will demonstrate the use of an electrodynamic tether propulsion system to generate thrust in space by decreasing the orbital altitude of a Delta 11 Expendable Launch Vehicle second stage. ProSEDS will use the flight-proven Small Expendable Deployer System to deploy a newly designed and developed tether which will provide tether generated drag thrust of approx. 0.4 N. The development and production of very long tethers with specific properties for performance and survivability will be required to enable future tether missions. The ProSEDS tether design and the development process may provide some lessons learned for these future missions. The ProSEDS system requirements drove the design of the tether to have three different sections of tether each serving a specialized purpose. The tether is a total of 15 kilometers long: 10 kilometers of a non-conductive Dyneema lead tether; 5 km of CCOR conductive coated wire; and 220 meters of insulated wire with a protective Kevlar overbraid. Production and joining of long tether lengths involved many development efforts. Extensive testing of tether materials including ground deployment of the full-length ProSEDS tether was conducted to validate the tether design and performance before flight.

  14. Selected tether applications in space: Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorsen, M. H.; Lippy, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    System characteristics and design requirements are assessed for tether deployment. Criteria are established for comparing alternate concepts for: (1) deployment of 220 klb space shuttle from the space station; (2) tether assisted launch of a 20,000 lb payload to geosynchronous orbit; (3) placement of the 20,000 lb AXAF into 320 nmi orbit via orbiter; (4) retrieval of 20,000 lb AXAF from 205 nmi circular orbit for maintenance and reboost to 320 nmi; and (5) tethered OMV rendezvous and retrieval of OTV returning from a geosynchronous mission. Tether deployment systems and technical issues are discussed.

  15. Adaptive Hierarchical Sliding Mode Control with Input Saturation for Attitude Regulation of Multi-satellite Tethered System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Sun, Guanghui

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel adaptive hierarchical sliding mode control for the attitude regulation of the multi-satellite inline tethered system, where the input saturation is taken into account. The governing equations for the attitude dynamics of the three-satellite inline tethered system are derived firstly by utilizing Lagrangian mechanics theory. Considering the fact that the attitude of the central satellite can be adjusted by using the simple exponential stabilization scheme, the decoupling of the central satellite and the terminal ones is presented, and in addition, the new adaptive sliding mode control law is applied to stabilize the attitude dynamics of the two terminal satellites based on the synchronization and partial contraction theory. In the adaptive hierarchical sliding mode control design, the input is modeled as saturated input due to the fact that the flywheel torque is bounded, and meanwhile, an adaptive update rate is introduced to eliminate the effect of the saturated input and the external perturbation. The proposed control scheme can be applied on the two-satellite system to achieve fixed-point rotation. Numerical results validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Tethered Satellites as Enabling Platforms for an Operational Space Weather Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. Habash; Gilchrist, B. E.; Bilen, S.; Owens, J.; Voronka, N.; Furhop, K.

    2013-01-01

    Space weather nowcasting and forecasting models require assimilation of near-real time (NRT) space environment data to improve the precision and accuracy of operational products. Typically, these models begin with a climatological model to provide "most probable distributions" of environmental parameters as a function of time and space. The process of NRT data assimilation gently pulls the climate model closer toward the observed state (e.g. via Kalman smoothing) for nowcasting, and forecasting is achieved through a set of iterative physics-based forward-prediction calculations. The issue of required space weather observatories to meet the spatial and temporal requirements of these models is a complex one, and we do not address that with this poster. Instead, we present some examples of how tethered satellites can be used to address the shortfalls in our ability to measure critical environmental parameters necessary to drive these space weather models. Examples include very long baseline electric field measurements, magnetized ionospheric conductivity measurements, and the ability to separate temporal from spatial irregularities in environmental parameters. Tethered satellite functional requirements will be presented for each space weather parameter considered in this study.

  17. Space Station Reboost with Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vas, Irwin E.; Kelly, Thomas J.; Scarl, Ethan A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of an electrodynamic tether system to reboost the International Space Station (ISS). One recommendation is to use a partially bare tether for electron collection. Locations are suggested as to where the tether system is to be attached at the space station. The effects of the tether system on the microgravity environment may actually be beneficial, because the system can neutralize aerodrag during quiescent periods and, if deployed from a movable boom, can permit optimization of laboratory positioning with respect to acceleration contours. Alternative approaches to tether deployment and retrieval are discussed. It is shown that a relatively short tether system, 7 km long, operating at a power level of 5 kW could provide cumulative savings or over a billion dollars during a 10-year period ending in 2012. This savings is the direct result of a reduction in the number or nights that would otherwise be required to deliver propellant for reboost, with larger cost savings for higher tether usage. In addition to economic considerations, an electrodynamic tether promises a practical backup system that could ensure ISS survival in the event of an (otherwise) catastrophic delay in propellant delivery.

  18. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in Earth orbit, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E. C.; Arnold, D. A.; Cosmo, M.; Grossi, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    The following topics related to the dynamics of the 4-mass tethered system are addressed: (1) the development of damping algorithms for damping the out-of-plane libration of the system and the interaction of the out-of-plane control with the other degrees of freedom; and (2) the development of environmental models to be added to the dynamics simulation computer code. The environmental models are specifically a new drag routine based on the Jacchia's 1977 model, a J(2) model and an accurate thermal model of the wire. Regarding topic (1) a survey of various out-of-plane libration control laws was carried out. Consequently a yo-yo control law with amplitude of the tether length variation proportional to the amplitude of the out-of-game libration has been selected. This control law provides good damping when applied to a (theoretical) two-dimensional system. In the actual 3-dimensional 4-mass tethered system, however, energy is transferred to the least damped degrees of freedom (the out-of-plane lateral deflections are still undamped in the present simulations) in such a way as to decrease the effectiveness of the algorithm for out-of-plane libration control. The addition of damping algorithms for the out-of-plane lateral deflections is therefore necessary.

  19. Dynamics and control of tethered spacecraft - A brief overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modi, V. J.; Lakshmanan, P. K.; Misra, A. K.

    1990-01-01

    Work related to the dynamics of tether connected orbiting systems and their control during deployment, operational, and retrieval phases is briefly reviewed. In particular, attention is given to the modeling of tether dynamics and control, end bodies tethered at point masses, deployment dynamics and tension control, and thruster and offset control. Directions of future efforts aimed at gaining a better understanding of the performance of tethered systems are outlined.

  20. Tethered satellite control mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrias, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    The tethered satellite control mechanisms consist of four major subsystems. The reel drive mechanism stores the tether. It is motor driven and includes a level wind to uniformly feed the tether to the reel. The lower boom mechanism serves two primary functions: (1) it measures tether length and velocity as the tether runs through the mechanism, and (2) it reads the tether tension at the reel. It also provides change the direction for the tether from the reel to the upper boom mechanism. The deployment boom positions the upper boom mechanism with satellite out of the cargo bay. The deployment function places the 500-kg satellite 20 m away from the Space Shuttle (producing a small natural gravity gradient force), impacts an initial velocity to the satellite for deployment, and allows for satellite docking at a safe distance from the body of the Space Shuttle. The upper boom mechanism (UBM) services three functions: (1) it provides tether control to the satellite as the satellite swings in and out of plane; (2) it reads tether tension in the low range during the early deployment and final retrieval parts of the mission; and (3) it produces additional tether tension at the reel when tether tension to the satellite is in the low range.

  1. Selected Tether Applications Cost Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeley, Michael G.

    1988-01-01

    Diverse cost-estimating techniques and data combined into single program. Selected Tether Applications Cost Model (STACOM 1.0) is interactive accounting software tool providing means for combining several independent cost-estimating programs into fully-integrated mathematical model capable of assessing costs, analyzing benefits, providing file-handling utilities, and putting out information in text and graphical forms to screen, printer, or plotter. Program based on Lotus 1-2-3, version 2.0. Developed to provide clear, concise traceability and visibility into methodology and rationale for estimating costs and benefits of operations of Space Station tether deployer system.

  2. Tethered body problems and relative motion orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eades, J. B., Jr.; Wolf, H.

    1972-01-01

    Selected problems dealing with orbiting tethered body systems have been studied. In addition, a relative motion orbit determination program was developed. Results from these tasks are described and discussed. The expected tethered body motions were examined, analytically, to ascertain what influence would be played by the physical parameters of the tether, the gravity gradient and orbit eccentricity. After separating the motion modes these influences were determined; and, subsequently, the effects of oscillations and/or rotations, on tether force, were described. A study was undertaken, by examining tether motions, to see what type of control actions would be needed to accurately place a mass particle at a prescribed position relative to a main vehicle. Other applications for tethers were studied. Principally these were concerned with the producing of low-level gee forces by means of stabilized tether configurations; and, the initiation of free transfer trajectories from tether supported vehicle relative positions.

  3. Bare Conductive Tether for Decelerating a Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Vaughn, Jason; Welzyn, Ken; Ballance, Judy; Carroll, Joe; Lorenzini, Enrico; Estes, bob; Schuler, Pete; Mojazza, hamid; Lennhoff, John

    2007-01-01

    A document describes a prototype of electrically conductive tethers to be used primarily to decelerate spacecraft and/or generate electric power for the spacecraft. Like prior such tethers, this tether is designed so that when it is deployed from a spacecraft in orbit, its motion across the terrestrial magnetic field induces an electric current. The Lorentz force on the current decelerates the spacecraft. Optionally, the current can be exploited to convert some orbital kinetic energy to electric energy for spacecraft systems. Whereas the conductive portions of prior such tethers are covered with electrical insulation except for end electrodes that make contact with the ionosphere, this tether includes a conductive portion that is insulated along part of its length but deliberately left bare along a substantial remaining portion of its length to make contact with the ionosphere. The conductive portions of the tether are made of coated thin aluminum wires wrapped around strong, lightweight aromatic polyamide braids. The main advantages of the present partly-bare-tether design over the prior all-insulated-tether design include greater resistance to degradation by the impact of monatomic oxygen at orbital altitude and speed and greater efficiency in collecting electrons from the ionosphere.

  4. Polymeric Coatings for Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.; Finckenor, Miria M.; Schuler, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Two polymeric coatings have been developed for the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) mission. ProSEDS is designed to provide an on-orbit demonstration of the electrodynamic propulsion capabilities of tethers in space. The ProSEDS experiment will be a secondary payload on a Delta II unmanned expendable booster scheduled for launch in August 2000. A 5-km conductive tether is attached to the Delta 11 second stage and collects current from the low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma to facilitate de-orbit of the spent stage. The conductive tether is attached to a 10-km non-conductive tether, the other end of which is attached to an endmass containing several scientific instruments. A bare metal tether would have the best conductivity but thermal concerns preclude this design. A conductive polymer developed by Triton Systems has been optimized for conductivity and thermo-optical properties. The current design for the ProSEDS conductive tether is seven strands of 28 AWG aluminum wire individually coated with 8.7 micrometers (0.35 mil) of an atomic oxygen-resistant conductive polymer composed of a mixture of 87% Clear Oxygen-Resistant polymer (COR) and 13% polyanaline (PANi), wrapped around a braided Kevlar (TM) 49 core. Extensive testing has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to qualify this material for flight on ProSEDS. Atomic oxygen exposure was performed, with solar absorptance and infrared emittance measured before and after exposure. Conductivity was measured before and after atomic oxygen exposure. High voltage tests, up to 1500 V, of the current collecting ability of the COR/PANi have been completed. Approximately 160 meters of the conductive tether closest to the Delta 11 second stage is insulated to prevent any electron reconnection to the tether from the plasma contactor. The insulation is composed of polyimide overcoated with TOR-BP, another polymeric coating developed by Triton for this mission. TOR-BP acts as both insulator

  5. The tether inspection and repair experiment (TIRE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, George M.; Loria, Alberto; Harrison, James K.

    1988-01-01

    The successful development and deployment of reusable tethers for space applications will require methods for detecting, locating, and repairing damage to the tether. This requirement becomes especially important whenever the safety of the STS or the Space Station may be diminished or when critical supplies or systems would be lost in the event of a tether failure. A joint NASA/PSN study endeavor has recently been initiated to evaluate and address the problems to be solved for such an undertaking. The objectives of the Tether Inspection and Repair Experiment (TIRE) are to develop instrumentation and repair technology for specific classes of tethers defined as standards, and to demonstrate the technologies in ground-based and in-flight testing on the STS.

  6. Electrodynamics of the Getaway Tether Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Michael; Baginski, Michael; Wheelock, Douglas

    1989-01-01

    An electrodynamic circuit model of the interaction of a pair of small tethered satellites and the ionosphere is developed and analyzed. The system under study, the Getaway Tether Experiment (GATE), is composed of two small satellites and 1 km of insulated conducting tether. The nonlinear model has elements representing the emission, collection, and resistive flow of charge through an electrically conductive tether, plasma contactors, and the ionosphere. The circuit model is incorporated into a dynamic orbital simulation to predict mission performance. Simulation results show the feasibility to bilaterally transfer energy between stored electrical energy and orbital momentum. A transient model is also developed using the circuit model and a string of N lumped-parameter modules, each consisting of resistance, capacitance, and induced potential for the tether. Transients are shown via simulation to occur over millisecond intervals.

  7. Space Tethers Programmatic Infusion Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, J. A.; Frame, K. L.

    2005-01-01

    Programmatic opportunities abound for space Cables, Stringers and Tethers, justified by the tremendous performance advantages that these technologies offer and the rather wide gaps that must be filled by the NASA Exploration program, if the "sustainability goal" is to be met. A definition and characterization of the three categories are presented along with examples. A logical review of exploration requirements shows how each class can be infused throughout the program, from small experimental efforts to large system deployments. The economics of tethers in transportation is considered along with the impact of stringers for structural members. There is an array of synergistic methodologies that interlace their fabrication, implementation and operations. Cables, stringers and tethers can enhance a wide range of other space systems and technologies, including power storage, formation flying, instrumentation, docking mechanisms and long-life space components. The existing tether (i.e., MXER) program's accomplishments are considered consistent with NASA's new vision and can readily conform to requirements-driven technology development.

  8. Membrane tether formation from blebbing cells.

    PubMed Central

    Dai, J; Sheetz, M P

    1999-01-01

    Membrane tension has been proposed to be important in regulating cell functions such as endocytosis and cell motility. The apparent membrane tension has been calculated from tether forces measured with laser tweezers. Both membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion and membrane tension contribute to the tether force. Separation of the plasma membrane from the cytoskeleton occurs in membrane blebs, which could remove the membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion term. In renal epithelial cells, tether forces are significantly lower on blebs than on membranes that are supported by cytoskeleton. Furthermore, the tether forces are equal on apical and basolateral blebs. In contrast, tether forces from membranes supported by the cytoskeleton are greater in apical than in basolateral regions, which is consistent with the greater apparent cytoskeletal density in the apical region. We suggest that the tether force on blebs primarily contains only the membrane tension term and that the membrane tension may be uniform over the cell surface. Additional support for this hypothesis comes from observations of melanoma cells that spontaneously bleb. In melanoma cells, tether forces on blebs are proportional to the radius of the bleb, and as large blebs form, there are spikes in the tether force in other cell regions. We suggest that an internal osmotic pressure inflates the blebs, and the pressure calculated from the Law of Laplace is similar to independent measurements of intracellular pressures. When the membrane tension term is subtracted from the apparent membrane tension over the cytoskeleton, the membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion term can be estimated. In both cell systems, membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion was the major factor in generating the tether force. PMID:10585959

  9. Study of certain tether safety issues. Continuation of investigation of electrodynamic stabilization and control of long orbiting tethers, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.; Grossi, M. D.; Arnold, D.

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of long tethers (10-100 km) in space are addressed under two failure situations with potential safety impact: instantaneous jamming of the reel controlling the tether during deployment and cutting of the tether due to a meteor strike or other similar phenomena. Dual and multiple mass point models were used in the SAO SKYHOOK program to determine this behavior. The results of the program runs were verified analytically or by comparison with previously verified results. The study included the effects of tether damping and air drag where appropriate. Most runs were done with the tether system undamped since we believe this best represents the true behavior of the tether. Means for controlling undesirable behavior of the tether, such as viscous dampers in the subsatellite, were also studied.

  10. Tethers in space handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reese, T. G.; Baracat, W. A.; Butner, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    The handbook provides a list and description of ongoing tether programs. This includes the joint U.S.-Italy demonstration project, and individual U.S. and Italian studies and demonstration programs. An overview of the current activity level and areas of emphasis in this emerging field is provided. The fundamental physical principles behind the proposed tether applications are addressed. Four basic concepts of gravity gradient, rotation, momentum exchange, and electrodynamics are discussed. Information extracted from literature, which supplements and enhances the tether applications is also presented. A bibliography is appended.

  11. Retrieve Tether Survival Probability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    cuts of the tether by meteorites and orbital debris , is calculated to be 99.934% for the planned experiment duration of six months or less. This is...due to the unlikely event of a strike by a large piece of orbital debris greater than 1 meter in size cutting all the lines of the tether at once. The...probability of the tether surviving multiple cuts by meteoroid and orbital debris impactors smaller than 5 cm in diameter is 99.9993% at six months

  12. Poking membrane, necking tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Greg; Powers, Thomas R.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2002-03-01

    Thin cylindrical tethers are common lipid bilayer membrane structures, arising in situations ranging from micromanipulation experiments on artificial vesicles to the dynamic structure of the Golgi apparatus. We study the shape and formation of a tether in terms of the classical soap-film problem, which is applied to the case of an membrane disk under tension subject to a point force. A tether forms from the elastic boundary layer near the point of application of the force, for sufficiently large displacement. Analytic results for various aspects of the membrane shape are given.

  13. Applications of Tethers in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cron, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings of the first workshop on applications of tethers in space are summarized. The workshop gathered personalities from industry, academic institutions and government to discuss the relatively new area of applied technology of very long tethers in space to a broad spectrum of future space missions. A large number of tethered concepts and configurations was presented covering electrodynamic interaction tethers, tethered transportation through angular momentum exchange, tethered constellations, low gravity utilization, applicable technology, and tethered test facilities. Specific recommendations were made to NASA in each area.

  14. Satellite relocation by tether deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Hrach, Frank J.

    1989-01-01

    Several new uses of satellite tethers are discussed, including: (1) using tether extension to reposition a satellite in orbit without fuel expenditure by extending a mass on the end of a tether; (2) using a tether for energy storage to power the satellite during eclipse; and (3) using a tether for eccentricity pumping to correct perturbations in the orbit and as a means of adding energy to the orbit for boosting and orbital transfer.

  15. Satellite relocation by tether deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Hrach, Frank J.

    1991-01-01

    Several new uses of satellite tethers are discussed, including: (1) using tether extension to reposition a satellite in orbit without fuel expenditure by extending a mass on the end of a tether; (2) using a tether for energy storage to power the satellite during eclipse; and (3) using a tether for eccentricity pumping to correct perturbations in the orbit and as a means of adding energy to the orbit for boosting and orbital transfer.

  16. Morpheus Tether Test #11

    NASA Video Gallery

    Morpheus conducts another tethered test, April 11, 2012. Morpheus is a full spacecraft and rocket-powered lander, which demonstrates new green technology, as well as an autonomous landing and hazar...

  17. Morpheus Tether Test #12

    NASA Video Gallery

    Morpheus conducts another tethered test, April 18, 2012. Morpheus is a full spacecraft and rocket-powered lander, which demonstrates new green technology, as well as an autonomous landing and hazar...

  18. Morpheus Tether Test #22

    NASA Video Gallery

    Morpheus conducts another tethered test, June 6, 2013. Morpheus is a full spacecraft and rocket-powered lander, which demonstrates new green technology, as well as an autonomous landing and hazard ...

  19. Morpheus Tether Test #14

    NASA Video Gallery

    Morpheus conducts another tethered test, May 8, 2012. Morpheus is a full spacecraft and rocket-powered lander, which demonstrates new green technology, as well as an autonomous landing and hazard d...

  20. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the movement of the spinal cord within the spinal column. Attachments may occur congenitally at the base of ... or may be due to narrowing of the spinal column (stenosis) with age. Tethering may also develop after ...

  1. Morpheus Tether Test #10

    NASA Video Gallery

    Morpheus conducts another tethered test, April 5, 2012. Morpheus is a full spacecraft and rocket-powered lander, which demonstrates new green technology, as well as an autonomous landing and hazard...

  2. Morpheus Tether Test #9

    NASA Video Gallery

    Morpheus conducts another tethered test, March 16, 2012. Morpheus is a full spacecraft and rocket-powered lander, which demonstrates new green technology, as well as an autonomous landing and hazar...

  3. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in Earth orbit, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Gullahorn, Gordon E.; Cosmo, Mario L.; Estes, Robert D.; Grossi, Mario D.

    1994-01-01

    This final report covers nine years of research on future tether applications and on the actual flights of the Small Expendable Deployment System (SEDS). Topics covered include: (1) a description of numerical codes used to simulate the orbital and attitude dynamics of tethered systems during station keeping and deployment maneuvers; (2) a comparison of various tethered system simulators; (3) dynamics analysis, conceptual design, potential applications and propagation of disturbances and isolation from noise of a variable gravity/microgravity laboratory tethered to the Space Station; (4) stability of a tethered space centrifuge; (5) various proposed two-dimensional tethered structures for low Earth orbit for use as planar array antennas; (6) tethered high gain antennas; (7) numerical calculation of the electromagnetic wave field on the Earth's surface on an electrodynamically tethered satellite; (8) reentry of tethered capsules; (9) deployment dynamics of SEDS-1; (10) analysis of SEDS-1 flight data; and (11) dynamics and control of SEDS-2.

  4. Tethers in Space Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosmo, M. L. (Editor); Lorenzini, E. C. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    A new edition of the Tethers in Space Handbook was needed after the last edition published in 1989. Tether-related activities have been quite busy in the 90's. We have had the flights of TSSI and TSSI-R, SEDS-1 and -2, PMG, TIPS and OEDIPUS. In less than three years there have been one international Conference on Tethers in Space, held in Washington DC, and three workshops, held at ESA/Estec in the Netherlands, at ISAS in Japan and at the University of Michigan, Ann Harbor. The community has grown and we finally have real flight data to compare our models with. The life of spaceborne tethers has not been always easy and we got our dose of setbacks, but we feel pretty optimistic for the future. We are just stepping out of the pioneering stage to start to use tethers for space science and technological applications. As we are writing this handbook TiPs, a NRL tether project is flying above our heads. There is no emphasis in affirming that as of today spacebome tethers are a reality and their potential is far from being fully appreciated. Consequently, a large amount of new information had to be incorporated into this new edition. The general structure of the handbook has been left mostly unchanged. The past editors have set a style which we have not felt needed change. The section on the flights has been enriched with information on the scientific results. The categories of the applications have not been modified, and in some cases we have mentioned the existence of related flight data. We felt that the section contributed by Joe Carroll, called Tether Data, should be maintained as it was, being a "classic" and still very accurate and not at all obsolete. We have introduced a new chapter entitled Space Science and Tethers since flight experience has shown that tethers can complement other space-based investigations. The bibliography has been updated. Due to the great production in the last few years %e had to restrict our search to works published in refereed journal

  5. TSS tether cable meteoroid/orbital debris damage analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the damage analyses performed on the tether cable used for the tethered satellite system (TSS), for the damage that could be caused by meteoroid or orbital debris impacts. The TSS consists of a tethered satellite deployer and a tethered satellite. The analytical studies were performed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with the results from the following tests: (1) hypervelocity impact tests to determine the 'critical' meteoroid particle diameter, i.e., the maximum size of a meteoroid particle which can impact the tether cable without causing 'failure'; (2) electrical resistance tests on the damaged and undamaged tether cable to determine if degradation of current flow occurred through the damaged tether cables; and (3) tensile load tests to verify the load carrying capability of the damaged tether cables. Finally, the HULL hydrodynamic computer code was used to simulate the hypervelocity impact of the tether cable by particles at velocities higher than can be tested, to determine the extent of the expected tether damage.

  6. System noise analysis of the dumbbell tethered satellite for gravity-gradient measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of the dumbbell gravity gradiometer concept for measuring short wavelength variations in the earth's gravity gradient is presented. Variations in the gradient are recorded by measuring tension variations in a vertically stabilized satellite consisting of heavy masses connected by a long wire or rod. Tension noise arises from the excitation of various mechanical oscillations of the system. The principal noise sources that were identified are fluctuations in atmospheric drag heating and drag force resulting from density variations and winds. Approximate analytical expressions are presented for the tension noise as a function of the system design parameters for various possible configurations. Computer simulations using numerical integration were performed to study the tension noise for several sample cases. Three designs consistent with Shuttle launch capabilities are discussed.

  7. Implementation Options for the PROPEL Electrodynamic Tether Demonstration Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilen, Sven G.; Johnson, Les; Gilchrist, Brian E.; Hoyt, Robert P.; Elder, Craig H.; Fuhrhop, Keith P.; Scadera, Michael P.; Stone, Nobie H.

    2014-01-01

    The PROPEL flight mission concept will demonstrate the safe use of an electrodynamic tether for generating thrust. PROPEL is being designed to be a versatile electrodynamic-tether system for multiple end users and to be flexible with respect to platform. As such, several implementation options are being explored, including a comprehensive mission design for PROPEL with a mission duration of six months; a space demonstration mission concept design with configuration of a pair of tethered satellites, one of which is the Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle; and an ESPA-based system. We report here on these possible implementation options for PROPEL. electrodynamic tether; PROPEL demonstration mission; propellantless propulsion

  8. Phase 3 study of selected tether applications in space, mid-term review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Topics addressed include: guidelines for the Space Transportation System (STS) payload deployer design; mini-orbital maneuvering vehicle (MOMV) design: shuttle tether deployer systems (STEDS); cost modeling; tethered platform analysis; fuel savings analysis; and STEDS control simulation.

  9. Tethered orbital refueling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fester, Dale A.; Rudolph, L. Kevin; Kiefel, Erlinda R.; Abbott, Peter W.; Grossrode, Pat

    1986-01-01

    One of the major applications of the space station will be to act as a refueling depot for cryogenic-fueled space-based orbital transfer vehicles (OTV), Earth-storable fueled orbit maneuvering vehicles, and refurbishable satellite spacecraft using hydrazine. One alternative for fuel storage at the space station is a tethered orbital refueling facility (TORF), separated from the space station by a sufficient distance to induce a gravity gradient force that settles the stored fuels. The technical feasibility was examined with the primary focus on the refueling of LO2/LH2 orbital transfer vehicles. Also examined was the tethered facility on the space station. It was compared to a zero-gravity facility. A tethered refueling facility should be considered as a viable alternative to a zero-gravity facility if the zero-gravity fluid transfer technology, such as the propellant management device and no vent fill, proves to be difficult to develop with the required performance.

  10. Electrodynamic Tether Propulsion for Spacecraft and Upper Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Gilchrist, Brian; Estes, Robert D.; Lorenzini, Rnrico; Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel; Sanmartin, Juan

    1998-01-01

    Relatively short electrodynamic tethers can use solar power to 'push' against a planetary magnetic field to achieve propulsion without the expenditure of propellant. The groundwork has been laid for this type of propulsion. Important recent milestones include retrieval of a tether in space (TSS-1, 1992), successful deployment of a 20-km-long tether in space (SEDS-1, 1993), and operation of an electrodynamic tether with tether current driven in both directions (PMG, 1993). The planned Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) experiment will use the flight-proven Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) to deploy a 5 km bare copper tether from a Delta II upper stage to achieve approximately 0.4 N drag thrust, thus deorbiting the stage. The experiment will use a predominantly 'bare' tether for current collection in lieu of the endmass collector and insulated tether approach used on previous missions. The flight experiment is a precursor to utilization of the technology on the International Space Station for reboost and the electrodynamic tether upper stage demonstration mission which will be capable of orbit raising, lowering and inclination changes, all using electrodynamic thrust. In addition, the use of this type of propulsion may be attractive for future missions at Jupiter.

  11. Tether Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The proceedings of the conference are presented. The objective was to provide a forum for the discussion of the structure and status of existing computer programs which are used to simulate the dynamics of a variety of tether applications in space. A major topic was different simulation models and the process of validating them. Guidance on future work in these areas was obtained from a panel discussion; the panel was composed of resource and technical managers and dynamic analysts in the tether field. The conclusions of this panel are also presented.

  12. SEDS Tether M/OD Damage Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.; Hill, S. A.

    1997-01-01

    The Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) was designed to deploy an endmass at the end of a 20-km-long tether which acts as an upper stage rocket, and the threats from the meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) particle environments on SEDS components are important issues for the safety and success of any SEDS mission. However, the possibility of severing the tether due to M/OD particle impacts is an even more serious concern, since the SEDS tether has a relatively large exposed area to the M/OD environments although its diameter is quite small. The threats from the M/OD environments became a very important issue for the third SEDS mission, since the project office proposed using the shuttle orbiter as a launch platform instead of the second stage of a Delta II expendable rocket, which was used for the first two SEDS missions. A series of hyper-velocity impact tests were performed at the Johnson Space Center and Arnold Engineering Development Center to help determine the critical particle sizes required to sever the tether. The computer hydrodynamic code or hydrocode called CTH, developed by the Sandia National Laboratories, was also used to simulate the damage on the SEDS tether caused by both the orbital debris and test particle impacts. The CTH hydrocode simulation results provided the much needed information to help determine the critical particle sizes required to sever the tether. The M/OD particle sizes required to sever the tether were estimated to be less than 0.1 cm in diameter from these studies, and these size particles are more abundant in low-Earth orbit than larger size particles. Finally, the authors performed the M/OD damage analyses for the three SEDS missions; i.e., SEDS-1, -2, and -3 missions, by using the information obtained from the hypervelocity impact test and hydrocode simulations results.

  13. System engineering study of electrodynamic tether as a spaceborne generator and radiator of electromagnetic waves in the ULF/ELF frequency band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    An electrodynamic tether deployed from a satellite in low-Earth orbit can perform, if properly instrumented, as a partially self-powered generator of electromagnetic waves in the ULF/ELF band, potentially at power levels high enough to be of practical use. Two basic problems are examined. The first is that of the level of wave power that the system can be expected to generate in the ULF/ELF radiation band. The second major question is whether an electrodynamic tethered satellite system for transmitting waves can be made partially self-powering so that power requirements for drag compensation can be met within economical constraints of mass, cost, and complexity. The theoretical developments and the system applications study are presented. The basic design criteria, the drag-compensation method, the effects on the propagation paths from orbit to Earth surface of high-altitude nuclear debris patches, and the estimate of masses and sizes are covered. An outline of recommended analytical work, to be performed as a follow-on to the present study, is contained.

  14. Tether dynamics investigations for the Canadian OEDIPUS sounding rocket program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyc, G.; Modi, V. J.; Han, R. P. S.; Misra, A. K.; Vigneron, F. R.; Berry, T. G.

    1992-08-01

    Results of an investigation of the postflight dynamics of the first flight of the Canadian Space Agency's OEDIPUS-A sounding rocket system launched in January 1989 are presented. The tether interaction with the subpayload was found to be the likely cause of the observed dynamic behavior. Based on these results and on the fact that tethered space systems of this configuration have not been previously studied, a comprehensive tether dynamics experiment has been included in the second OEDIPUS mission, scheduled for the winter of 1994. The various elements of this experiment, which include detailed analytical investigations, ground testing, development of instruments to obtain flight dynamics data, and postflight analyses, are discussed. The primary objective of this experiment is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the dynamics of a momentum-stabilized, tethered, two-body system with flexible end bodies which will be useful in the development of future tethered space systems.

  15. Electrodynamic Tethers for Spacecraft Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les

    2009-01-01

    Electrodynamic (Drag) Tether Thrust Principles: a) Uses both solar energy and consumes no propellant. b) Tether's orbital velocity v (approx. 7500 m/s) through North-pointing geomagnetic field B(sub north) (0.18 - 0.32 Gauss) induces voltage (35 - 160 V/km) in tether. c) Return current is through surrounding plasma. d) Current I produces a drag thrust force F on the tether. e) Magnetic force F from current I through insulated tether of length l: F = lI x B(sub north).

  16. Dynamics and control of tethered antennas/reflectors in orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liangdong; Bainum, Peter M.

    The system linear equations for the motion of a tethered shallow spherical shell in orbit with its symmetry axis nominally following the local vertical are developed. The shell roll, yaw, tether out-of-plane swing motion and elastic vibrations are decoupled from the shell and tether in-plane pitch motions and elastic vibrations. The neutral gravity stability conditions for the special case of a constant length rigid tether are given for in-plane motion and out-of-plant motion. It is proved that the in-plane motion of the system could be asymptotically stable based on Rupp's tension control law, for a variable length tether. However, the system simulation results indicate that the transient responses can be improved significantly, especially for the damping of the tether and shell pitch motion, by an optimal feedback control law for the rigid variable length tether model. It is also seen that the system could be unstable when the effect of tether flexibility is included if the control gains are not chosen carefully. The transient responses for three different tension control laws are compared during typical station keeping operations.

  17. Spacecraft Solar Sails Containing Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Matloff, Greg

    2005-01-01

    A report discusses a proposal to use large, lightweight solar sails embedded with electrodynamic tethers (essentially, networks of wires) to (1) propel robotic spacecraft to distant planets, then (2) exploit the planetary magnetic fields to capture the spacecraft into orbits around the planets. The purpose of the proposal is, of course, to make it possible to undertake long interplanetary missions without incurring the large cost and weight penalties of conventional rocket-type propulsion systems. Through transfer of momentum from reflected solar photons, a sail would generate thrust outward from the Sun. Upon arrival in the vicinity of a planet, the electrodynamic tethers would be put to use: Motion of the spacecraft across the planetary magnetic field would induce electric currents in the tether wires, giving rise to an electromagnetic drag force that would be exploited to brake the spacecraft for capture into orbit. The sail with embedded tethers would be made to spin to provide stability during capture. Depending upon the requirements of a particular application, it could be necessary to extend the tether to a diameter greater than that of the sail.

  18. Coordinated coupling control of tethered space robot using releasing characteristics of space tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Panfeng; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xiudong; Meng, Zhongjie; Liu, Zhengxiong; Hu, Yongxin

    2016-04-01

    Tethered space robot (TSR) is a new concept of space robot, which is released from the platform satellite, and retrieved via connected tether after space debris capture. In this paper, we propose a new coordinate control scheme for optimal trajectory and attitude tracking, and use releasing motor torque to instead the tension force, since it is difficult to track in practical. Firstly, the 6-DOF dynamics model of TSR is derived, in which the dynamics of tether releasing system is taken into account. Then, we propose and design the coordinated coupled controller, which is composed of a 6-DOF sliding mode controller and a PD controller tether's releasing. Thrust is treated as control input of the 6-DOF sliding mode controller to control the in-plane and out-of-plane angle of the tether and attitude angles of the TSR. The torque of releasing motor is used as input of PD controller, which controls the length rate of space tether. After the verification of the control scheme, finally, the simulation experiment is presented in order to validate the effectiveness of this control method. The results show that TSR can track the optimal approaching trajectory accurately. Simultaneously, the attitude angles can be changed to the desired attitude angles in control period, and the terminal accuracy is ±0.3°.

  19. Tether orientation control for lunar elevator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, Alexander A.; Guerman, Anna D.; Kosenko, Ivan I.

    2014-12-01

    This study focuses on spatial motion of the lunar elevator which is studied in the framework of elliptical restricted three-body problem. Analysis of dynamics of a spacecraft anchored to the Moon by a tether is done assuming that the tether's length can be changed according to a prescribed law. The goal is to find the control laws that allow one to compensate for the eccentricity of the orbits, i.e., to maintain the pendulum at a fixed angle with respect to the Earth-Moon direction. The results have shown that the fixed orientation of the tether can be kept for several configurations of the system; some of these configurations are found to be stable. The obtained results can be applied to study the properties and possible configurations of the lunar elevator, as well as applications for small planets and asteroids.

  20. OEDIPUS-A: Space research with a new tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. G.; Whalen, B. A.

    The launch of the tethered payload OEDIPUS-A on January 30, 1989 established a new record for the maximum length (958 m) of a space tether. The flight achieved a number of novel objectives in ionospheric plasma physics and tether technology. This report outlines the OEDIPUS experiment (defined as Observations of Electric-field Distributions in the Ionospheric Plasma—a Unique Strategy) and gives some of its preliminary scientific results.In the 1970s, the word “tether” took on new meaning as space scientists began to plan pairs of spacecraft wired together to co-orbit. Much of the work on tethers in space centers on the idea of flying the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle with a tethered subsatellite. This will materialize in 1992 when NASA and the Italian Space Agency collaborate on the Shuttle experiment Tethered Satellite System [Bonifazi, 1987]. The first version of this experiment uses a conducting tether to draw current from the ionospheric plasma, thereby inducing a variety of electrodynamic phenomena. In addition to providing an experimental facility for plasma electrodynamics, the tethered system is a large flexible structure, and hence an interesting subject for space mechanics research in its own right.

  1. The Tethered Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Lupu, Roxana Elena; Dubrovolskis, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    that the Moon's orbit evolves is limited by the modest radiative cooling rate of Earth's atmosphere, which in effect tethers the Moon to the Earth. Consequently the Moon's orbit evolves orders of magnitude more slowly than in conventional models. Slow orbital evolution promotes capture by orbital resonances that may have been important in the Earth-Moon system

  2. Modeling and Simulation of a Tethered Harpoon for Comet Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a dynamic model and simulation results of a tethered harpoon for comet sampling. This model and simulation was done in order to carry out an initial sensitivity analysis for key design parameters of the tethered system. The harpoon would contain a canister which would collect a sample of soil from a cometary surface. Both a spring ejected canister and a tethered canister are considered. To arrive in close proximity of the spacecraft at the end of its trajectory so it could be captured, the free-flying canister would need to be ejected at the right time and with the proper impulse, while the tethered canister must be recovered by properly retrieving the tether at a rate that would avoid an excessive amplitude of oscillatory behavior during the retrieval. The paper describes the model of the tether dynamics and harpoon penetration physics. The simulations indicate that, without the tether, the canister would still reach the spacecraft for collection, that the tether retrieval of the canister would be achievable with reasonable fuel consumption, and that the canister amplitude upon retrieval would be insensitive to variations in vertical velocity dispersion.

  3. Investigation of electrodynamic stabilization and control of long orbiting tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.; Arnold, D.

    1984-01-01

    The state-of-the-art in tether modelling among participants in the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) Program, the slack tether and its behavior, and certain advanced applications of the tether to problems in orbital mechanics are identified. The features and applications of the TSS software set are reviewed. Modelling the slack tether analytically with as many as 50 mass points and the application of this new model to a study of the behavior of a broken tether near the Shuttle are described. A reel control algorithm developed by SAO and examples of its use are described, including an example which also demonstrates the use of the tether in transferring a heavy payload from a low-orbiting Shuttle to a high circular orbit. Capture of a low-orbiting payload by a Space Station in high circular orbit is described. Energy transfer within a dumbbell-type spacecraft by cyclical reeling operations or gravitational effects on the natural elasticity of the connecting tether, it is shown, can circularize the orbit of the spacecraft.

  4. Guidebook for analysis of tether applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    This guidebook is intended as a tool to facilitate initial analyses of proposed tether applications in space. Topics disscussed include: orbit and orbit transfer equations; orbital perturbations; aerodynamic drag; thermal balance; micrometeoroids; gravity gradient effects; tether control strategies; momentum transfer; orbit transfer by tethered release/rendezvous; impact hazards for tethers; electrodynamic tether principles; and electrodynamic libration control issues.

  5. Electrodynamic Tethers for Novel LEO Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantner, Michael; Hoyt, Robert; Scardera, Michael; Johnson, Charles

    2011-01-01

    The exponential increase of launch system size - and cost - with deltaV makes missions requiring large total impulse cost prohibitive. Northrop Grumman and partners have matured a fundamentally different method for generating propulsion using electrodynamic tethers (EDTs) that escapes the limitations of the rocket equation. With essentially unlimited delta V, we can perform new classes of missions that are currently unaffordable or unfeasible.

  6. Hypervelocity impact testing of tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodis, William R.; Tallentire, Francis I.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental test program has been conducted to ascertain the strength losses to which representative space tether materials may be prone upon impact by hypervelocity particles of known size, density, and velocity, when the tether is under tensile loading typical of flight design loads. Twelve hypervelocity impacts were followed by tensile tests to failure to determine residual strength; relationships are established between particle velocity and strength loss due to impact damage, as well as between tether strength loss and the relationship between particle and tether diameters. Tentative design criteria are formulated in terms of a design factor allowing for strength degradation by impact.

  7. Surgical treatments on adult tethered cord syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Kong, Xiangyi; Li, Zhimin; Wang, Tianyu; Li, Yongning

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate effects of surgical treatment on adult tethered cord syndrome (TCS). A retrospective analysis of 82 adult patients (17 male cases, 82% and 24 female cases, 59%) with TCS treated by surgery was conducted between March, 2005 and December, 2015, with an average age of 31.6 years and average disease course of 6.7 years. All the 82 cases of patients received nerve electrophysiology monitoring assisted microsurgery. After surgery, all patients were followed up for an average of 2.5 years. Surgical effects were evaluated according to Hoffman grading system. As this is just a retrospective study that does not involve any interventions, ethical approval was not necessary according to the rules of the hospital. All patients were followed up, no death occurred. According to Hoffman grading system, the neurologic symptoms were improved in 22 patients (27%), stabilized in 60 patients (73%). Of 10 cases with lipoma tethered spinal cord, corresponding symptoms were improved in 2 cases. Of 32 cases with tethered spinal cord caused by dermoid cyst and epidermoid cyst, the symptoms were improved in 6 cases. Of 40 cases without occupying lesions of tethered spinal cord, the symptoms were improved in 14 cases. Besides, there was no deteriorated case. Surgical treatment on adult patients with TCS can improve the neurologic deficits which are associated with the course of disease, early treatment has much better curative effect. PMID:27861396

  8. Reactionless orbital propulsion using tether deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1990-01-01

    Examples of tether propulsion in orbit without the use of reaction mass are discussed. These include (1) using tether extension to reposition a satellite in orbit without fuel expenditure by extending a mass on the end of the tether; (2) using a tether for eccentricity pumping to add energy to the orbit for boosting and orbital transfer; and (3) length modulation of a spinning tether to transfer angular momentum between the orbit and tether spin, thus allowing changes in orbital angular momentum.

  9. TMBM: Tethered Micro-Balloons on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, M. H.; Greeley, R.; Cutts, J. A.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Murbach, M.

    2000-01-01

    The use of balloons/aerobots on Mars has been under consideration for many years. Concepts include deployment during entry into the atmosphere from a carrier spacecraft, deployment from a lander, use of super-pressurized systems for long duration flights, 'hot-air' systems, etc. Principal advantages include the ability to obtain high-resolution data of the surface because balloons provide a low-altitude platform which moves relatively slowly. Work conducted within the last few years has removed many of the technical difficulties encountered in deployment and operation of balloons/aerobots on Mars. The concept proposed here (a tethered balloon released from a lander) uses a relatively simple approach which would enable aspects of Martian balloons to be tested while providing useful and potentially unique science results. Tethered Micro-Balloons on Mars (TMBM) would be carried to Mars on board a future lander as a stand-alone experiment having a total mass of one to two kilograms. It would consist of a helium balloon of up to 50 cubic meters that is inflated after landing and initially tethered to the lander. Its primary instrumentation would be a camera that would be carried to an altitude of up to tens of meters above the surface. Imaging data would be transmitted to the lander for inclusion in the mission data stream. The tether would be released in stages allowing different resolutions and coverage. In addition during this staged release a lander camera system may observe the motion of the balloon at various heights above he lander. Under some scenarios upon completion of the primary phase of TMBM operations, the tether would be cut, allowing TMBM to drift away from the landing site, during which images would be taken along the ground.

  10. Changes in Polymeric Tether Properties Due to Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Miria M.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Watts, Edward W.

    2003-01-01

    The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) mission is designed to provide an on-orbit demonstration of the electrodynamic propulsion capabilities of tethers in space. The ProSEDS experiment will be a secondary payload on a Delta II unmanned expendable booster. A 5-km conductive tether is attached to the Delta II second stage and collects current fiom the low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma to facilitate de-orbit of the spent stage. The conductive tether is attached to a 10-km non-conductive tether, which is then attached to an endmass containing several scientific instruments. Atomic oxygen (AO) erodes most organic materials. As the orbit of the Delta II second stage decas, the AO flux (atoms/sq cm sec) increases. A nominal AO fluence of 1 x l0(exp 21) atoms/sq cm was agreed upon by the investigators as an adequate level for evaluating the performance of the tether materials. A test series was performed to determine the effect of atomic oxygen (AO) on the mechanical integrity and possible strength loss of ProSEDS tether materials. The tether materials in this study were Dyneema, an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene material used as the non-conducting portion of the ProSEDS tether, and the Kevlar core strength fiber used in the conductive tether. Samples of Dyneema and Kevlar were exposed to various levels of atomic oxygen up to 1.07 x 10(exp 21) atoms/sq cm in the Marshall Space Flight Center Atomic Oxygen Beam Facility (AOBF). Changes in mass were noted after AO exposure. The tethers were then tensile-tested until failure. AO affected both the Dyneema and Kevlar tether material strength. Dyneema exposed to 1.07 x 10(exp 21) atoms/sq cm of atomic oxygen failed due to normal handling when removed fiom the AOBF and was not tensile-tested. Another test series was performed to determine the effect of AO on the electrical properties of the ProSEDS conductive tether. The conductive tether consists of seven individually coated strands of 28 AWG 1350

  11. Dynamics and control of tethered spacecraft during deployment and retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, V. J.; Lakshmanan, P. K.; Misra, A. K.

    The potential of tether-connected orbiting systems has led to numerous studies of their dynamics and control during deployment, operational (stationkeeeping), and retrieval phases. This paper examines some of the important aspects of the studies, including the modeling of tether dynamics and control, and system dynamics and control. Significant conclusions based on these studies are discussesd, and future research that would aid in a better understanding of the system performance is outlined.

  12. Tethered float liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Daily, III, William Dean

    2016-09-06

    An apparatus for sensing the level of a liquid includes a float, a tether attached to the float, a pulley attached to the tether, a rotation sensor connected to the pulley that senses vertical movement of said float and senses the level of the liquid.

  13. Several Developments in Space Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santangelo, Andrew; Sturmfels, Rich; Rothwell, Neal

    2007-01-01

    Five reports address different aspects of development of tethers to be deployed from spacecraft in orbit around the Earth. The first report discusses proposed optoelectronic tracking of retroreflective objects located at intervals or of retroreflective coats along the entire length of a tether to measure lateral motions. The second report describes digitally controlled spooling machinery that retracts or extends a tape tether at controlled speed and tension in the spool isolated from uncontrolled tension on the outside. The third report discusses part of this machinery that pivots to accommodate misalignments between the deployed and spooled portions of the tether and contains rollers used to exert tension and speed control. The fourth report discusses aspects of designs of proposed electrodynamic tethers, which would be electrically conductive and would interact with the magnetic field of the Earth to exert forces to modify orbits of deploying spacecraft. The fifth report discusses electrical aspects of designs of electrodynamic tape tethers, including the use of solar cells or motional electromagnetic force to generate currents in tethers and the use of electron emitters and electron and ion collectors at opposite ends of tethers to make electrical contact with the thin plasma in surrounding space.

  14. SPHERES tethered formation flight testbed: advancements in enabling NASA's SPECS mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Soon-Jo; Adams, Danielle; Saenz-Otero, Alvar; Kong, Edmund; Miller, David W.; Leisawitz, David; Lorenzini, Enrico; Sell, Steve

    2006-06-01

    This paper reports on efforts to control a tethered formation flight spacecraft array for NASA's SPECS mission using the SPHERES test-bed developed by the MIT Space Systems Laboratory. Specifically, advances in methodology and experimental results realized since the 2005 SPIE paper are emphasized. These include a new test-bed setup with a reaction wheel assembly, a novel relative attitude measurement system using force torque sensors, and modeling of non-ideal tethers to account for tether vibration modes. The nonlinear equations of motion of multi-vehicle tethered spacecraft with elastic flexible tethers are derived from Lagrange's equations. The controllability analysis indicates that both array resizing and spin-up are fully controllable by the reaction wheels and the tether motor, thereby saving thruster fuel consumption. Based upon this analysis, linear and nonlinear controllers have been successfully implemented on the tethered SPHERES testbed, and tested at the NASA MSFC's flat floor facility using two and three SPHERES configurations.

  15. Elastic-Tether Suits for Artificial Gravity and Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrance, Paul; Biesinger, Paul; Rybicki, Daniel D.

    2005-01-01

    Body suits harnessed to systems of elastic tethers have been proposed as means of approximating the effects of normal Earth gravitation on crewmembers of spacecraft in flight to help preserve the crewmembers physical fitness. The suits could also be used on Earth to increase effective gravitational loads for purposes of athletic training. The suit according to the proposal would include numerous small tether-attachment fixtures distributed over its outer surface so as to distribute the artificial gravitational force as nearly evenly as possible over the wearer s body. Elastic tethers would be connected between these fixtures and a single attachment fixture on a main elastic tether that would be anchored to a fixture on or under a floor. This fixture might include multiple pulleys to make the effective length of the main tether great enough that normal motions of the wearer cause no more than acceptably small variations in the total artificial gravitational force. Among the problems in designing the suit would be equalizing the load in the shoulder area and keeping tethers out of the way below the knees to prevent tripping. The solution would likely include running tethers through rings on the sides. Body suits with a weight or water ballast system are also proposed for very slight spinning space-station scenarios, in which cases the proposed body suits will easily be able to provide the equivalency of a 1-G or even greater load.

  16. Theory and Modeling in Support of Tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. L.; Bergeron, G.; Drobot, A. D.; Papadopoulos, K.; Riyopoulos, S.; Szuszczewicz, E.

    1999-01-01

    This final report summarizes the work performed by SAIC's Applied Physics Operation on the modeling and support of Tethered Satellite System missions (TSS-1 and TSS-1R). The SAIC team, known to be Theory and Modeling in Support of Tether (TMST) investigation, was one of the original twelve teams selected in July, 1985 for the first TSS mission. The accomplishments described in this report cover the period December 19, 1985 to September 31, 1999 and are the result of a continuous effort aimed at supporting the TSS missions in the following major areas. During the contract period, the SAIC's TMST investigation acted to: Participate in the planning and the execution on both of the TSS missions; Provide scientific understanding on the issues involved in the electrodynamic tether system operation prior to the TSS missions; Predict ionospheric conditions encountered during the re-flight mission (TSS-lR) based on realtime global ionosounde data; Perform post mission analyses to enhance our understanding on the TSS results. Specifically, we have 1) constructed and improved current collection models and enhanced our understanding on the current-voltage data; 2) investigated the effects of neutral gas in the current collection processes; 3) conducted laboratory experiments to study the discharge phenomena during and after tether-break; and 4) perform numerical simulations to understand data collected by plasma instruments SPES onboard the TSS satellite; Design and produce multi-media CD that highlights TSS mission achievements and convey the knowledge of the tether technology to the general public. Along with discussions of this work, a list of publications and presentations derived from the TMST investigation spanning the reporting period is compiled.

  17. Cell Cytoskeleton and Tether Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, B.; Viana, N.B.; Salgado, L.T.; Farina, M.; Neto, V. Moura; Nussenzveig, H.M.

    2011-01-01

    We perform a detailed investigation of the force × deformation curve in tether extraction from 3T3 cells by optical tweezers. Contrary to conventional wisdom about tethers extracted from cells, we find that actin filaments are present within them, so that a revised theory of tether pulling from cells is called for. We also measure steady and maximum tether force values significantly higher than previously published ones for 3T3 cells. Possible explanations for these differences are investigated. Further experimental support of the theory of force barriers for membrane tube extension is obtained. The potential of studies on tether pulling force × deformation for retrieving information on membrane-cytoskeleton interaction is emphasized. PMID:21723813

  18. TESSX: A Mission for Space Exploration with Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosmo, Mario L.; Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Gramer, Daniel J.; Hoffman, John H.; Mazzoleni, Andre P.

    2005-01-01

    Tethers offer significant potential for substantially increasing payload mass fraction, increasing spacecraft lifetime, enhancing long-term space travel, and enabling the understanding and development of gravity-dependent technologies required for Moon and Mars exploration. The development of the Tether Electrodynamic Spin-up and Survivability Experiment (TESSX) will support applications relevant to NASA's new exploration initiative, including: artificial gravity generation, formation flying, electrodynamic propulsion, momentum exchange, and multi-amp current collection and emission. Under the broad term TESSX, we are currently evaluating several different tether system configurations and operational modes. The initial results of this work are presented, including hardware development, orbital dynamics simulations, and electrodynamics design and analysis.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Tethered Organics in Confined Spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Waksburg, Avi; Nguyen, M; Chaffe, Alan; Kidder, Michelle; Buchanan III, A C; Britt, Phillip F

    2011-01-01

    A computational method for constructing and evaluating the dynamic behaviour of functionalised hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS) MCM-41 models is reported. HMS with three pore diameters (1.7, 2.2 and 2.9 nm) were prepared, and, from these, two series of derivative structures were constructed - one with 1,3-diphenylpropyl (DPP) tethers and the other with smaller dimethylsilyl (DMS) tethers attached to the mesopores internal surfaces. Comparison with experimental data shows that simulation results correctly predict the maximum tether density that can be achieved for each tether and each pore diameter. For the smaller pore models, the extent of DPP functionalisation that can be achieved is limited by the available pore volume. However, for the larger pore model, the extent of functionalisation is limited by access to potentially reactive sites on the pore surface. The dynamic behaviour of the models was investigated over a range of temperatures (240-648 K). At lower temperatures (< 400 K), the mobility of DPP tethers in the 2.9 nm model is actually less than that observed in either the 2.2 nm model or the 1.7 nm model due to the extensive non-bonded interactions that are able to develop between tethers and the silica surface at this diameter. At higher temperatures, the free ends of these tethers break away from the surface, extend further into the pore space and the DPP mobility in the 2.9 nm model is higher than in the smaller pore systems.

  20. Selected tether applications in space: An analysis of five selected concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Ground rules and assumptions; operations; orbit considerations/dynamics; tether system design and dynamics; functional requirements; hardware concepts; and safety factors are examined for five scenarios: tethered effected separation of an Earth bound shuttle from the space station; tether effected orbit boost of a spacecraft (AXAF) into its operational orbit from the shuttle; an operational science/technology platform tether deployed from space station; a tether mediated rendezvous involving an OMV tether deployed from space station to rendezvous with an aerobraked OTV returning to geosynchronous orbit from a payload delivery mission; and an electrodynamic tether used in a dual motor/generator mode to serve as the primary energy storage facility for space station.

  1. Development of Polymer Coatings for the ProSEDS Tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Kamenetsky, Rachel R.; Finckenor, Miria; Wright, Ken

    2000-01-01

    The ProSEDS mission is designed to provide an on-orbit demonstration of the electrodynamic propulsion capabilities of tethers in space. The ProSEDS experiment will be a secondary payload on a Delta 11 unmanned, expendable booster. A 5 km conductive tether is attached to the deployer baseplate on the Delta 11 second stage and collects current from the low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma to facilitate de-orbit of the Delta II second stage. The conductive tether is attached to a 10-15 km non-conductive tether, which in turn is attached to an endmass. A bare metal tether would have the best conductivity but thermal concerns preclude this design. A conductive polymer developed by Triton Systems has been optimized for optimum conductivity and thermo-optical properties. The current design for the ProSEDS conductive tether is seven individually coated strands of 28 AWG aluminum wire, coated with 12.7 micrometers (0.5 mil) atomic oxygen-resistant conductive polymer composed of a mixture of COR and PANi, wrapped around a braided Kevlar 29 core. Extensive testing has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center to qualify this material for flight on ProSEDS. Atomic oxygen exposure has been performed, with solar absorptance and infrared emittance measured before and after exposure. Plasma chamber tests have been completed, as well as tether deployment tests. Also developed for the ProSEDS mission was the insulating polymer TOR-BP. Approximately 200 meters of the conductive tether closest to the Delta II second stage is insulated to prevent any electron reconnection to the tether from the plasma contactor. The insulating material is TOR-BP with a dielectric strength of TBD.

  2. Experimental investigation of the dynamics of spinning tethered bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, V. J.; Pradhan, S.; Chu, M.; Tyc, G.; Misra, A. K.

    1996-10-01

    Ground based experiments are conducted as a part of the OEDIPUS-C sounding rocket mission, scheduled for launch in the winter of 1995. Here OEDIPUS stands for Observation of Electrified Distribution in Ionospheric Plasma—a Unique Strategy. The OEDIPUS-C configuration consists of two spinning bodies connected by a 1 km long tether (the spin axis is nominally along the tether line). The objective is to assess dynamic behaviour of the tether and the payload. The test configuration consists of an end-body supported by a tether. The test procedure involves slow spin-up of the system and identifying the speeds corresponding to onset of the tether modes or the large amplitude end-body coning. This is referred to as the critical speed and corresponds to the stability boundary of the system. Experimental results are obtained for four different bodies to study the system stability over a wide range of mass and geometric parameters. Effect of offset of the tether attachment from the end-body centre of mass is also investigated. The observed critical speeds are compared with those given by the linear theory. The test results are generally in very good agreement with the theory, however several transient phenomena observed during the test suggest that system nonlinearities cannot be ignored when modelling such a complex system.

  3. Technologies applicable to space tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baracat, William A.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation is presented of technologies which have been accumulated over the years, both on Earth and in space, dealing with tethers, ropes and cables. Many of these technologies can be applied, with modification, to both on-going and future space tether research and demonstration missions. The major areas of tether research and technology developments presented include multimegawatt power transmission, materials and structures, dynamics and control, environmental interactions, and in-space operations. These major topical areas are presented within the context of their associated research program or study.

  4. Tethered catalysts for the hydration of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Valdez, Carlos A; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Aines, Roger D; Wong, Sergio E; Baker, Sarah E; Lightstone, Felice C; Stolaroff, Joshuah K

    2014-11-04

    A system is provided that substantially increases the efficiency of CO.sub.2 capture and removal by positioning a catalyst within an optimal distance from the air-liquid interface. The catalyst is positioned within the layer determined to be the highest concentration of carbon dioxide. A hydrophobic tether is attached to the catalyst and the hydrophobic tether modulates the position of the catalyst within the liquid layer containing the highest concentration of carbon dioxide.

  5. The PROPEL Electrodynamic Tether Mission and Connecting to the Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, Brian; Bilen, Sven; Hoyt, Rob; Stone,Nobie; Vaughn, Jason; Fuhrhop, Keith; Krause, Linda; Khazanov, George; Johnson, Les

    2012-01-01

    The exponential increase of launch system size.and cost.with delta-V makes missions that require large total impulse cost prohibitive. Led by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, a team from government, industry, and academia has developed a flight demonstration mission concept of an integrated electrodynamic (ED) tethered satellite system called PROPEL: "Propulsion using Electrodynamics". The PROPEL Mission is focused on demonstrating a versatile configuration of an ED tether to overcome the limitations of the rocket equation, enable new classes of missions currently unaffordable or infeasible, and significantly advance the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) to an operational level. We are also focused on establishing a far deeper understanding of critical processes and technologies to be able to scale and improve tether systems in the future. Here, we provide an overview of the proposed PROPEL mission. One of the critical processes for efficient ED tether operation is the ability to inject current to and collect current from the ionosphere. Because the PROPEL mission is planned to have both boost and deboost capability using a single tether, the tether current must be capable of flowing in both directions and at levels well over 1 A. Given the greater mobility of electrons over that of ions, this generally requires that both ends of the ED tether system can both collect and emit electrons. For example, hollow cathode plasma contactors (HCPCs) generally are viewed as state-of-the-art and high TRL devices; however, for ED tether applications important questions remain of how efficiently they can operate as both electron collectors and emitters. Other technologies will be highlighted that are being investigated as possible alternatives to the HCPC such as Solex that generates a plasma cloud from a solid material (Teflon) and electron emission (only) technologies such as cold-cathode electron field emission or photo-electron beam generation (PEBG) techniques.

  6. Large structures and tethers working group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, G.; Garrett, H.; Samir, U.; Barnett, A.; Raitt, J.; Sullivan, J.; Katz, I.

    1986-01-01

    The Large Structures and Tethers Working Group sought to clarify the meaning of large structures and tethers as they related to space systems. Large was assumed to mean that the characteristic length of the structure was greater than one of such relevant plasma characteristics as ion gyroradius or debey length. Typically, anything greater than or equal to the Shuttle dimensions was considered large. It was agreed that most large space systems that the tether could be better categorized as extended length, area, or volume structures. The key environmental interactions were then identified in terms of these three categories. In the following Working Group summary, these categories and the related interactions are defined in detail. The emphasis is on how increases in each of the three spatial dimensions uniquely determine the interactions with the near-Earth space environment. Interactions with the environments around the other planets and the solar wind were assumed to be similar or capable of being extrapolated from the near-Earth results. It should be remembered in the following that the effects on large systems do not just affect specific technologies but will quite likely impact whole missions. Finally, the possible effects of large systems on the plasma environment, although only briefly discussed, were felt to be of potentially great concern.

  7. SPHERES tethered formation flight testbed: application to NASA's SPECS mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Soon-Jo; Kong, Edmund M.; Miller, David W.

    2005-08-01

    This paper elaborates on theory and experiment of the formation flight control for the future space-borne tethered interferometers. The nonlinear equations of multi-vehicle tethered spacecraft system are derived by Lagrange equations and decoupling method. The preliminary analysis predicts unstable dynamics depending on the direction of the tether motor. The controllability analysis indicates that both array resizing and spin-up are fully controllable only by the reaction wheels and the tether motor, thereby eliminating the need for thrusters. Linear and nonlinear decentralized control techniques have been implemented into the tethered SPHERES testbed, and tested at the NASA MSFC's flat floor facility using two and three SPHERES configurations. The nonlinear control using feedback linearization technique performed successfully in both two SPHERES in-line configuration and three triangular configuration while varying the tether length. The relative metrology system, using the ultra sound metrology system and the inertial sensors as well as the decentralized nonlinear estimator, is developed to provide necessary state information.

  8. Elastic issues and vibration reduction in a tethered deorbiting mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Marco; Gasbarri, Paolo; Palmerini, Giovanni B.

    2016-05-01

    Recently proposed mission concepts involving harpoons or nets to capture and de-orbit debris represent an interesting application of the tethered systems, where the orbiting bodies are connected by a flexible link. These systems present a complex behavior, as flexible characteristics combine with orbital dynamics. The focus of the paper is on the dynamic behavior of the tethered system in the final phase of the de-orbiting mission, when a powerful apogee motor is used to change the debris orbit. The thrust action introduces significant issues, as elastic waves propagate along the tether, and the relevant oscillations couple with the orbital dynamics. Input shaping techniques are proposed to limit or cancel these oscillations. However, the performance of these techniques drops when non-ideal scenarios are considered. In particular, an initially slack tether is a serious issue that must be solved if acceptably low oscillations of the tether are to be obtained. Three strategies are proposed and discussed in this paper to remove the slack condition: a natural drift of the chaser by means of a single impulse, a controlled maneuver for precisely adjusting the relative distance between chaser spacecraft and debris, and a retrieval mechanism for changing the tether length.

  9. Emerging Insights into the Roles of Membrane Tethers from Analysis of Whole Organisms: The Tip of an Iceberg?

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Wei Hong; Gleeson, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane tethers have been identified throughout different compartments of the endomembrane system. It is now well established that a number of membrane tethers mediate docking of membrane carriers in anterograde and retrograde transport and in regulating the organization of membrane compartments. Much of our information on membrane tethers have been obtained from the analysis of individual membrane tethers in cultured cells. In the future it will be important to better appreciate the network of interactions mediated by tethers and the potential co-ordination of their collective functions in vivo. There are now a number of studies which have analyzed membrane tethers in tissues and organisms which are providing new insights into the role of this class of membrane protein at the physiological level. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of the function of membrane tethers from knock outs (or knock downs) in whole organisms and from mutations in tethers associated with disease. PMID:26973835

  10. Tethered nuclear power for the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear space power system the SP-100 is being developed for future missions where large amounts of electrical power will be required. Although it is primarily intended for unmanned spacecraft, it can be adapted to a manned space platform by tethering it above the station through an electrical transmission line which isolates the reactor far away from the inhabited platform and conveys its power back to where it is needed. The transmission line, used in conjunction with an instrument rate shield, attenuates reactor radiation in the vicinity of the space station to less than one-one hundredth of the natural background which is already there. This combination of shielding and distance attenuation is less than one-tenth the mass of boom-mounted or onboard man-rated shields that are required when the reactor is mounted nearby. This paper describes how connection is made to the platform (configuration, operational requirements) and introduces a new element the coaxial transmission tube which enables efficient transmission of electrical power through long tethers in space. Design methodology for transmission tubes and tube arrays is discussed. An example conceptual design is presented that shows SP-100 at three power levels 100 kWe, 300 kWe, and 1000 kWe connected to space station via a 2 km HVDC transmission line/tether. Power system performance, mass, and radiation hazard are estimated with impacts on space station architecture and operation.

  11. Tethered nuclear power for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear space power system the SP-100 is being developed for future missions where large amounts of electrical power will be required. Although it is primarily intended for unmanned spacecraft, it can be adapted to a manned space platform by tethering it above the station through an electrical transmission line which isolates the reactor far away from the inhabited platform and conveys its power back to where it is needed. The transmission line, used in conjunction with an instrument rate shield, attenuates reactor radiation in the vicinity of the space station to less than one-one hundredth of the natural background which is already there. This combination of shielding and distance attenuation is less than one-tenth the mass of boom-mounted or onboard man-rated shields that are required when the reactor is mounted nearby. This paper describes how connection is made to the platform (configuration, operational requirements) and introduces a new element the coaxial transmission tube which enables efficient transmission of electrical power through long tethers in space. Design methodology for transmission tubes and tube arrays is discussed. An example conceptual design is presented that shows SP-100 at three power levels 100 kWe, 300 kWe, and 1000 kWe connected to space station via a 2 km HVDC transmission line/tether. Power system performance, mass, and radiation hazard are estimated with impacts on space station architecture and operation.

  12. Characterization of the active current system around the TSS-1R satellite through magnetic field measurements taken by the Tethered Magnetometer instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, F.; Orsini, S.; Candidi, M.; Marcucci, M. F.; AcuñA, M.; Musmann, G.; Ness, N. F.

    2000-08-01

    In this paper we present the measurements and interpretations of the Tethered Magnetometer (TEMAG) experiment flown on the Tethered Satellite Mission Reflight TSS-IR. Data were taken during the active operating phase when current steps of variable amplitude were injected along the electrically conducting tether. The magnetic field shows clear signatures in the components and amplitude, dependent upon the orientation of the magnetometer boom with respect to the spacecraft ram velocity vector. In the eight events studied, current effects could be observed in the magnetic field data only when the boom was pointing toward the ram side hemisphere of the satellite. The picture emerging from the observed results suggests the formation of a current sheet on the ram side, possibly associated with the aerodynamic shock and compression of the geomagnetic field ahead of the satellite. Although the limited data do not allow full description of the phenomenology, they place important observational constraints on any theoretical model.

  13. In-Space Transportation with Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.

    1999-01-01

    Any analysis of electrodynamic tethers for Space Station applications will soon arrive at the conclusion that currents on the order of 10 A are required. For power generation, we have to foresee needs of several kilowatts even for an emergency backup system. For reboost, we need thrust forces on the order of a Newton, due to the large aerodynamic drag of the Station. In addition, we are restricted by the need to keep perturbations to the Station environment to a minimum. Very long tethers are ruled out by this condition, as they would move the system's center of gravity too much and pose additional operational problems when the Station is docking with other spacecraft. It is easy to show that "standard" tether systems, such as TSS-1, which rely on a large spherical surface to collect electron current from the ionosphere, are unsuitable for ISS applications. A study conducted by MSFC into the possible use of the TSS - 1/R system on the Space Station came to the conclusion that it did not make sense. A quick calculation, using the 10 A benchmark, shows why. TSS-LR collected I A, while the satellite was biased to 1.5 kV. This was twice what had been predicted. Even so, the current collected by the satellite was observed to increase only as the square root of the bias voltage. Thus, to achieve 10 A with the TSS-1 system under the same (daytime) conditions would require a bias voltage of 150 kV, or a tether length of over 850 km! Going to a larger surface would help some, but there is a strong law of diminishing returns for that route. Even if very large spheres were to be allowed (say of 8 m radius), which might achieve useful power levels during optimal conditions of daytime plasma densities with a tether 10 km long, they would suffer from the other Achilles heel of passive spherical collectors: a strong drop in the current (and power goes as the square of the current), as the low plasma densities are encountered during the third of the orbit which is in the Earth

  14. Electrodynamic Tethers for Reboost of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Herrmann, Melody; Vas, Irwin; Estes, Bob

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will require periodic reboost due to atmospheric aerodynamic drag. This is nominally achieved through the use of thruster firings by the attached Progress M spacecraft. Many Progress flights to the ISS are required annually. Electrodynamic tethers provide an attractive alternative in that they can provide periodic reboost or continuous drag cancellation using no consumables, propellant nor conventional propulsion elements. The system could also serve as an emergency backup reboost system used only in the event resupply and reboost are delayed for some reason. The system also has direct application to spacecraft and upper stage propulsion. Electrodynamic tethers have been demonstrated in space previously with the Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) experiment and the Tethered Satellite System (TSS-IR). The advanced electrodynamic tether proposed for ISS reboost has significant advantages over previous systems in that hi-her thrust is achievable with significantly shorter tethers and without the need for an active current collection device, hence making the system simpler and much less expensive.

  15. Applications of Tethers in Space: Workshop Proceedings, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baracat, W. A. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Topics addressed include: tethered orbital transfer vehicle operations, Centaur and Shuttle tether technology; tethered constellations, gravitational effects; Shuttle continuous open wind tunnel; optimal control laws, electrodynamic tether technology; and space station facilities.

  16. Plasma contactors for electrodynamic tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    The role plasma contactors play in effective electrodynamic tether operation is discussed. Hollow cathodes and hollow cathode-based plasma sources have been identified as leading candidates for the electrodynamic tether plasma contactor. Present experimental efforts to evaluate the suitability of these devices as plasma contactors, conducted concurrently at NASA Lewis Research Center and Colorado State University, are reviewed. These research programs include the definition of preliminary plasma contactor designs, and the characterization of their operation both as electron emitters and electron collectors to and from a simulated space plasma. Results indicate that ampere-level electron currents, sufficient for electrodynamic tether operation, can be exchanged between hollow cathode-based plasma contactors and a dilute plasma.

  17. Ground-based implementation and verification of control laws for tethered satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Greene, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    Davis and Banerjee (1990) have developed a tethered-spacecraft system model in which out-of-plane librations are damped, using a length-rate control after the tether has been deployed. Attention is presently given to the implementation of such control schemes to prototype hardware designed for space flight. A prototype reel mechanism has been constructed for use in the Getaway Tether Experiment; both the Davis and Banerjee control scheme and a converted tension-control law have been implemented with tether length and length rate available as feedback.

  18. Orbital transfer and release of tethered payloads. Continuation of investigation of electrodynamic stabilization and control of long orbiting tethers Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.; Grossi, M. D.; Arnold, D.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of reeling operations on the orbital altitude of the tether system and the development of control laws to minimize tether rebound upon payload release were studied. The use of the tether for LEO/GEO payload orbital transfer was also investigated. It was concluded that (1) reeling operations can contribute a significant amount of energy to the orbit of the system and should be considered in orbit calculations and predictions, (2) deployment of payloads, even very large payloads, using tethers is a practical and fully stable operation, (3) tether augmented LEO/GEO transfer operations yield useful payload gains under the practical constraint of fixed size OTV's, and (4) orbit to orbit satellite retrieval is limited by useful revisit times to orbital inclinations of less than forty-five degrees.

  19. Development and application of the Manned Maneuvering Unit, work restraint system, stowage container and return line tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergonz, F. H.; Okelly, J. K.; Whitsett, C. W.; Petynia, W. W.

    1981-01-01

    The Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU), a self-contained zero-gravity backpack designed for astronaut extravehicular activity, is discussed with reference to the system requirements and characteristics, and potential near-term and future uses. Attention is given to the MMU man-machine interfaces, propulsion capability, attitude control, crew restraint hardware, donning, doffing, activation, and deactivation. Specific applications discussed include: spacecraft inspection and servicing, assembly of large space systems, payload deployment/retrieval, and crew rescue.

  20. Dynamics Simulation Model for Space Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, E. M.; Pearson, J.; Oldson, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    This document describes the development of an accurate model for the dynamics of the Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) system. The MXER is a rotating tether about 100-km long in elliptical Earth orbit designed to catch payloads in low Earth orbit and throw them to geosynchronous orbit or to Earth escape. To ensure successful rendezvous between the MXER tip catcher and a payload, a high-fidelity model of the system dynamics is required. The model developed here quantifies the major environmental perturbations, and can predict the MXER tip position to within meters over one orbit.

  1. International Space Station Electrodynamic Tether Reboost Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L.; Herrmann, M.

    1998-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will require periodic reboost due to atmospheric aerodynamic drag. This is nominally achieved through the use of thruster firings by the attached Progress M spacecraft. Many Progress flights to the ISS are required annually. Electrodynamic tethers provide an attractive alternative in that they can provide periodic reboost or continuous drag cancellation using no consumables, propellant, nor conventional propulsion elements. The system could also serve as an emergency backup reboost system used only in the event resupply and reboost are delayed for some reason.

  2. An alternate approach to space missions involving a long tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzer, Ehud

    1992-07-01

    Uses of tethers for a variety of purposes in space have been investigated extensively for many years. Currently, interest is focused on two NASA missions, TSS-1 and TSS-2, in which, a satellite is to be deployed, by means of a tether, from the Shuttle, and performs a series of experiments. The tethers to be used in TSS-1 and TSS-2 are very long, namely 20 km and 100 km, respectively. Hence, significant problems of dynamics and control arise in connection with all mission phases, and it is not yet clear that all of these problems possess satisfactory solutions. This must be a source of concern, given the fact that TSS-1 and TSS-2 are manned missions involving the very valuable Shuttle. It is the purpose of this dissertation to propose alternative means to accomplish the goals of missions such as those of TSS-1 and TSS-2, a way that involves the Shuttle and astronauts either minimally or not at all. Stated most simply, the proposal is this: replace the Shuttle with an unmanned spacecraft. Although this idea was mentioned in early papers on tethered systems, its feasibility remained to be investigated. A comprehensive study of such a system is the topic of the present dissertation. The system is composed of a primary satellite, a tether, and a secondary satellite. The primary satellite carries scientific instruments, whereas the secondary one is equipped with a set of thrusters for purposes of control. First, a 3D model, in which the tether is represented by two segments, is analyzed. Thereafter, multi-segment models for the tether are considered; only part of the system states are measured, and the other states are estimated by means of a reduced order estimator. To optimize the deployment and retrieval phases, a multi-controller, MATLAB based algorithm, is employed. The result is improved performance and a significant reduction in fuel consumption. Finally, to use electrodynamic forces for orbit transfer without exciting tether bending motions, the notion of

  3. Dynamic Analysis of Capture Devices for Momentum Exchange with Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    One of the significant challenges in developing a momentum exchange / electrodynamic reboost tether system is in the analysis and design of the capture device and its effects on the overall dynamics of the system. The goal of this work is to develop appropriate tether momentum exchange models that can simulate and evaluate the requirements of such a system, and be used to create specifications on the design of a capture device. This report briefly describes dynamic model development, simulation of the momentum exchange process, evaluation of dynamic effects of errors in the momentum exchange process, and the development of guidelines in selecting dynamic properties in the design of a capture device.

  4. Attitude dynamics investigation of the OEDIPUS-A tethered rocket payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyc, G.; Han, R. P. S.

    1995-01-01

    The OEDIPUS-A tethered rocket payload consisted of two spinning subpayloads each with a pair of flexible radial booms and connected by a conductive tether. This first flight of a spinning tethered two-body system achieved a tether deployment of 958 m, which at that time was the longest space tether ever flown. Although the approximately 15-min mission was generally very successful, unexpected dynamic behavior was observed in one of the subpayloads. This paper reviews the attitude dynamics investigation that was undertaken following the flight in an attempt to understand what may have caused this dynamics anomaly. The formulation of a general mathematical model is described that consists of a rigid central body undergoing large rotations with three orthogonal pairs of flexible booms. Tether interaction with the central body is modeled as a forcing term, caused by the tether tension, to the free-body equations. Results of a parametric study are presented, which show that the interaction of the tether with the payload, which was assumed to be negligible prior to the flight, is the likely cause of the unexpected dynamic behavior. Two mechanisms associated with the tether interaction have been identified: one is a forcing term on the payload, which causes a precession of the payload angular momentum vector, and the other is additional energy dissipation in the payload.

  5. Ground-Based Experiment of Current Collection to Bare Tether in High-Speed and High-Density Plasma Generated by Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kohori, Tatsuya; Ikeda, Tomoyuki; Shimizu, Masaharu; Takagi, Hiroki; Yamada, Minetsugu; Tahara, Hirokazu

    2008-12-31

    Bare-tether systems are one of the greatest-efficiency electrodynamic tethered systems. The system with an uninsulated portion of the metallic tether itself to collect electrons from the space plasma is operated as a thruster or a power generator on a satellite. Ground-based experiments were carried out to understand phenomena of electron collection by a bare tether in space. Metallic tether samples were exposed to a simulating Low-Earth-Orbit plasma flow as varying tether sample diameter and length, and plasma velocity. A magnetic field was also applied. The normalized collection current increased with normalized tether sample potential. The tether sample diameter did not influence the normalized collection current characteristics although an increase in tether sample length decreased the normalized collection current in this experiment. The collection current characteristics were independent of plasma velocity under meso-thermal conditions. The existence of magnetic field raised the collection current because of the three-dimensional current collection effect at the edge of a tether sample under the magnetic field. Although the existence of magnetic field may raise the collection current, the effect will be small with a long tether. Accordingly, the dependence of tether diameter and length, plasma velocity and magnetic field on collection current characteristics of a bare tether in space might be small. The collection current may not exceed the OML current.

  6. A new concept of solar power satellite: Tethered-SPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Susumu; Tanaka, Koji; Higuchi, Ken; Okuizumi, Nobukatsu; Kawasaki, Shigeo; Shinohara, Naoki; Senda, Kei; Ishimura, Kousei

    2007-02-01

    Tethered solar power satellite (Tethered-SPS) consisting of a large panel with a capability of power generation/transmission and a bus system which are connected by multi-wires is proposed as an innovative solar power satellite (SPS). The power generation/transmission panel is composed of a huge number of perfectly equivalent power modules. The electric power generated by the solar cells at the surface of each module is converted to the microwave power in the same module. Since the modules are controlled by the bus system using wireless LAN, no wired signal/power interfaces are required between the modules. The attitude in which the microwave transmission antenna is directed to the ground is maintained by the gravity gradient force. The tethered panel is composed of individual tethered subpanels which are loosely connected to each other. This configuration enables an evolutional construction in which the function of the SPS grows as the construction proceeds. A scale model of the tethered subpanel can be used for the first step demonstration experiment of the SPS in the near future.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Tethered Underwater Kites for Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Amirmahdi; Olinger, David; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2015-11-01

    An emerging renewable energy technology, tethered undersea kites (TUSK), which is used to extract hydrokinetic energy from ocean and tidal currents, is studied. TUSK systems consist of a rigid-winged ``kite,'' or glider, moving in an ocean current which is connected by tethers to a floating buoy on the ocean surface. The TUSK kite is a current speed enhancement device since the kite can move in high-speed, cross-current motion at 4-6 times the current velocity, thus producing more power than conventional marine turbines. A computational simulation is developed to simulate the dynamic motion of an underwater kite and extendable tether. A two-step projection method within a finite volume formulation, along with an Open MP acceleration method, is employed to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. An immersed boundary method is incorporated to model the fluid-structure interaction of the rigid kite (with NACA 0012 airfoil shape in 2D and NACA 0021 airfoil shape in 3D simulations) and the fluid flow. PID control methods are used to adjust the kite angle of attack during power (tether reel-out) and retraction (reel-in) phases. Two baseline simulations (for kite motions in two and three dimensions) are studied, and system power output, flow field vorticity, tether tension, and hydrodynamic coefficients (lift and drag) for the kite are determined. The simulated power output shows good agreement with established theoretical results for a kite moving in two-dimensions.

  8. Flight mechanics applications for tethers in space: Cooperative Italian-US programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevilacqua, Franco; Merlina, Pietro; Anderson, John L.

    1990-01-01

    Since the 1974 proposal by Giuseppe Colombo to fly a tethered subsatellite from the Shuttle Orbiter, the creative thinking of many scientists and engineers from Italy and U.S. has generated a broad range of potential tether applications in space. Many of these applications have promise for enabling innovative research and operational activities relating to flight mechanics in earth orbit and at suborbital altitudes. From a flight mechanics standpoint the most interesting of the currently proposed flight demonstrations are: the second Tethered Satellite System experiment which offers both the potential for aerothermodynamics and hypersonics research and for atmospheric science research; the Tethered Initiated Space Recovery System which would enable orbital deboost and recovery of a re-entry vehicle and waste removal from a space station; and the Tether Elevator/Crawler System which would provide a variable microgravity environment and space station center of mass management. The outer atmospheric and orbital flight mechanics characteristics of these proposed tether flight demonstrations are described. The second Tethered Satellite System mission will deploy the tethered satellite earthward and will bring it as low as 130 km from ground and thus into the transition region between the atmosphere (non-ionized) and the partially ionized ionosphere. The atmospheric flight mechanics of the tethered satellite is discussed and simulation results are presented. The Tether Initiated Space Recovery System experiment will demonstrate the ability of a simple tether system to deboost and recover a reentry vehicle. The main feature of this demonstration is the utilization of a Small Expendable Deployment System (SEDS) and the low-tension deployment assumed to separate the reentry vehicle from the Shuttle. This low-tension deployment maneuver is discussed and its criticalities are outlined. The Tether Elevator/Crawler System is a new space element able to move in a controlled way

  9. Electrodynamic Tether Propulsion and Power Generation at Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Johnson, L.; Moore, J.; Bagenal, F.

    1998-01-01

    The results of a study performed to evaluate the feasibility and merits of using an electrodynamic tether for propulsion and power generation for a spacecraft in the Jovian system are presented. The environment of the Jovian system has properties which are particularly favorable for utilization of an electrodynamic tether. Specifically, the planet has a strong magnetic field and the mass of the planet dictates high orbital velocities which, when combined with the planet's rapid rotation rate, can produce very large relative velocities between the magnetic field and the spacecraft. In a circular orbit close to the planet, tether propulsive forces are found to be as high as 50 N and power levels as high as 1 MW.

  10. Tethered Pyrotechnic Apparatus for Acquiring a Ground Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Zimmerman, Wayne; Wu, Jiunn Jenq; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    A proposed alternative design for the balloon-borne ground-sampling system described in the immediately preceding article would not rely on free fall to drive a harpoonlike sample-collecting device into the ground. Instead, the harpoon-like sample-collecting device would be a pyrotechnically driven, tethered projectile. The apparatus would include a tripod that would be tethered to the gondola. A gun for shooting the projectile into the ground would be mounted at the apex of the tripod. The gun would include an electronic trigger circuit, a chamber at the breech end containing a pyrotechnic charge, and a barrel. A sabot would be placed in the barrel just below the pyrotechnic charge, and the tethered projectile would be placed in the barrel just below the sabot. The tripod feet would be equipped with contact sensors connected to the trigger circuit. In operation, the tripod would be lowered to the ground on its tether. Once contact with the ground was detected by the sensors on all three tripod feet, the trigger circuit would fire the pyrotechnic charge to drive the projectile into the ground. (Requiring contact among all three tripod feet and the ground would ensure that the projectile would be fired into the ground, rather than up toward the gondola or the balloon.) The tethered projectile would then be reeled back up to the gondola for analysis of the sample.

  11. A Method for Stable Deployment of an Electrodynamic Tethered Satellite in Three-Dimensional Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, B. S.; Jin, D. P.; Wen, H.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents an asymptotic stabilization strategy for the deployment of a controlled tethered satellite system in three-dimensional space, in which the tether length rate is taken as the control variable. Firstly, a rigid-rod tether model is employed to establish the nonlinear dynamic equations of in-plane and out-of-plane motions of the system. Then, by stability analysis of the linearized system at a preassigned direction to deploy, the control law and asymptotic stability condition for the deployment are obtained. The electrodynamic tethered satellite in equatorial plane is discussed. As a result, the large swing motions during deployment are stabilized asymptotically through reliance on the electrodynamic force and the tether length rate. The case studies in the paper well demonstrate the proposed stabilization control strategy.

  12. Investigation of dynamic noise affecting geodynamics information in a tethered subsatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gullahorn, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of a tethered satellite system's internal dynamics on the subsatellite were calculated including both overall motions (libration and attitude oscillations) and internal tether oscillations. The SKYHOOK tether simulation program was modified to operate with atmospheric density variations and to output quantities of interest. Techniques and software for analyzing the results were developed including noise spectral analysis. A program was begun for computing a stable configuration of a tether system subject to air drag. These configurations will be of use as initial conditions for SKYHOOK and, through linearized analysis, directly for stability and dynamical studies. A case study in which the subsatellite traverses an atmospheric density enhancement confirmed some theoretical calculations, and pointed out some aspects of the interaction with the tether system dynamics.

  13. Cluster filtering/control of bending/torsional vibrations of a tape tether using smart-film sensors/actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Hirohisa; Kunugi, Kouta; Trivailo, Pavel M.

    2016-06-01

    Tape tethers show great promise for application in space debris removal because they possess a large collecting area, which is crucial for the collection of electrons from a plasma environment in space. Tape tethers are therefore preferred over string tethers in electrodynamic tethered systems (EDTS), which operate based on the Lorentz force derived from the interaction between the electric current on the tether and the Earth's magnetic field. Vibrations of the tether may disturb the attitude of the mother satellite and the subsatellite, and are difficult to damp in space because the damping would be minimal owing to the almost zero drag force in space. Due to their relatively large width, tape tethers experience torsional deformation and therefore cannot be treated as a string tether. If torsional deformation of tape tethers is not avoided, the advantage of tape tethers as the materials for EDT systems will be deteriorated. Point-type sensors and actuators are usually used to sense and control vibrations. However, it is difficult to apply such sensors and actuators to tape tethers because of the substantial length of the tether as well as the need for a deployment mechanism, such as a reel. In order to overcome the difficulties related to vibrations, the use of smart-film sensors and actuators for sensing and controlling vibrations of tape tethers is considered in this study. In a previous study, we presented an application of smart film for sensing vibrations of tape tethers, but the actuation of tape tethers using smart-film actuators has not yet been reported. In the present paper, we mathematically derive suitable configurations of smart-film attachment to a tape tether for cluster filtering and actuation of bending and torsional vibrations of the tape tether, and carried out cluster actuation experiments. The experimental results reveal that the bending and torsional vibrations of a tape tether can be reduced by cluster actuation control based on direct

  14. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Gullahorn, Gordon E.; Estes, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    This Quarterly Report on Tethering in Earth Orbit deals with three topics: (1) Investigation of the propagation of longitudinal and transverse waves along the upper tether. Specifically, the upper tether is modeled as three massive platforms connected by two perfectly elastic continua (tether segments). The tether attachment point to the station is assumed to vibrate both longitudinally and transversely at a given frequency. Longitudinal and transverse waves propagate along the tethers affecting the acceleration levels at the elevator and at the upper platform. The displacement and acceleration frequency-response functions at the elevator and at the upper platform are computed for both longitudinal and transverse waves. An analysis to optimize the damping time of the longitudinal dampers is also carried out in order to select optimal parameters. The analytical evaluation of the performance of tuned vs. detuned longitudinal dampers is also part of this analysis. (2) The use of the Shuttle primary Reaction Control System (RCS) thrusters for blowing away a recoiling broken tether is discussed. A microcomputer system was set up to support this operation. (3) Most of the effort in the tether plasma physics study was devoted to software development. A particle simulation code has been integrated into the Macintosh II computer system and will be utilized for studying the physics of hollow cathodes.

  15. Optimal control of a spinning double-pyramid Earth-pointing tethered formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Paul

    2009-06-01

    The dynamics and control of a tethered satellite formation for Earth-pointing observation missions is considered. For most practical applications in Earth orbit, a tether formation must be spinning in order to maintain tension in the tethers. It is possible to obtain periodic spinning solutions for a triangular formation whose initial conditions are close to the orbit normal. However, these solutions contain significant deviations of the satellites on a sphere relative to the desired Earth-pointing configuration. To maintain a plane of satellites spinning normal to the orbit plane, it is necessary to utilize "anchors". Such a configuration resembles a double-pyramid. In this paper, control of a double-pyramid tethered formation is studied. The equations of motion are derived in a floating orbital coordinate system for the general case of an elliptic reference orbit. The motion of the satellites is derived assuming inelastic tethers that can vary in length in a controlled manner. Cartesian coordinates in a rotating reference frame attached to the desired spin frame provide a simple means of expressing the equations of motion, together with a set of constraint equations for the tether tensions. Periodic optimal control theory is applied to the system to determine sets of controlled periodic trajectories by varying the lengths of all interconnecting tethers (nine in total), as well as retrieval and simple reconfiguration trajectories. A modal analysis of the system is also performed using a lumped mass representation of the tethers.

  16. Aerodynamic calculations related to tethered sub-satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith; Rockaway, J. Kent

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of four aerodynamic studies that were in support of a broader, preliminary inquiry concerning the potential use of downward-deployed tethered sub-satellites for in-flight aerothermodynamic research. There are a multitude of questions regarding the general tethered satellite concept and the present report addresses only a few of these. A method for estimating drag and local surface pressure and shear on orbiting or re-entereing bodies is described, and examples based on the planned TSS-2 (Tethered Satellite System) are given. The problem of pressure measurement are explored, taking into account thermal transpiration, lag time, and the disturbed flow field created by the satellite body. The performance of an aerodynamic stabilizer, a ring-tail design, is calculated and its influence on satellite motion is illustrated. A method for optimizing future satellite shapes for desired aerodynamic properties is transitional rarefied flow with given geometric constraints is proposed and examples are shown.

  17. Satellite attitude maneuver through tether : a novel concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnar, Krishna; Kumar, K. D.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents a novel scheme to achieve passive satellite attitude maneuver. The proposed control mechanism consists of a small 'pendulum-like' subsatellite mass deployed from the satellite through two identical tethers. A simple steady state and subsequent linearized stability analyses enable predictions of analytical conditions for feasible equilibrium satellite orientations and their stability. These important results facilitate judicious choice of system design parameters. Numerical simulation establishes the feasibility of executing arbitrary satellite slewing maneuver by slowly varying the length of one of the two tethers according to a preprogrammed strategy. The passive nature of the proposed control scheme and the modest auxiliary mass and the tether lengths required make the new concept particularly attractive.

  18. Self-assembled tethered bimolecular lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Ritz, Sandra; Naumann, Renate; Schiller, Stefan; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes some of the strategies developed in our group for designing, constructing and structurally and functionally characterizing tethered bimolecular lipid membranes (tBLM). We introduce this platform as a novel model membrane system that complements the existing ones, for example, Langmuir monolayers, vesicular liposomal dispersions and bimolecular ("black") lipid membranes. Moreover, it offers the additional advantage of allowing for studies of the influence of membrane structure and order on the function of integral proteins, for example, on how the composition and organization of lipids in a mixed membrane influence the ion translocation activity of integral channel proteins. The first strategy that we introduce concerns the preparation of tethered monolayers by the self-assembly of telechelics. Their molecular architecture with a headgroup, a spacer unit (the "tether") and the amphiphile that mimics the lipid molecule allows them to bind specifically to the solid support thus forming the proximal layer of the final architecture. After fusion of vesicles that could contain reconstituted proteins from a liposomal dispersion in contact to this monolayer the tethered bimolecular lipid membrane is obtained. This can then be characterized by a broad range of surface analytical techniques, including surface plasmon spectroscopies, the quartz crystal microbalance, fluorescence and IR spectroscopies, and electrochemical techniques, to mention a few. It is shown that this concept allows for the construction of tethered lipid bilayers with outstanding electrical properties including resistivities in excess of 10 MOmega cm2. A modified strategy uses the assembly of peptides as spacers that couple covalently via their engineered sulfhydryl or lipoic acid groups at the N-terminus to the employed gold substrate, while their C-terminus is being activated afterward for the coupling of, for example, dimyristoylphosphatidylethanol amine (DMPE) lipid molecules

  19. Design and fabrication of the 20 km/10 kV electromechanical tether for TSS-1 using high impact conductor (Hiwire)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scala, E.; Bentley, D. P.; Marshall, L. S.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a 20-km electromechanical tether for the tethered satellite system (TSS) is described. The basic design requirements for electromagnetic cables and for conductors in cables subject to stresses and cyclic loading are discussed. The tether fabricatioon procedures involve: (1) conductor twisting around the core, (2) insulation extrusion, (3) strength member braiding, and (4) protective jacket braiding.

  20. Dynamics of multi-tethered pyramidal satellite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alary, D.; Andreev, K.; Boyko, P.; Ivanova, E.; Pritykin, D.; Sidorenko, V.; Tourneur, C.; Yarotsky, D.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the dynamics of a multi-tethered pyramidal satellite formation rotating about its axis of symmetry in the nominal mode. Whereas the combination of rotation and gravity-gradient forces is insufficient to maintain the mutual positions of satellites, they are assumed to be equipped with low-thrust rocket engines. We propose a control strategy that allows the stabilization of the nominal spin state and demonstrate the system's proper operation by numerically simulating its controlled motion. The discussed multi-tethered formations could be employed, for example, to provide co-location of several satellites at a slot in geostationary orbit.

  1. Command Generation and Control of Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost Tethered Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    The research completed for this NASA Graduate Student Research Program Fellowship sought to enhance the current state-of-the-art dynamic models and control laws for Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost satellite systems by utilizing command generation, specifically Input Shaping. The precise control of tethered spacecraft with flexible appendages is extremely difficult. The complexity is magnified many times when the satellite must interact with other satellites as in a momentum exchange via a tether. The Momentum Exchange Electronic Reboost Tether (MXER) concept encapsulates all of these challenging tasks [l]. Input Shaping is a command generation technique that allows flexible spacecraft to move without inducing residual vibration [2], limit transient deflection [3] and utilize fuel-efficient actuation [4]. Input shaping is implemented by convolving a sequence of impulses, known as the input shaper, with a desired system command to produce a shaped input that is then used to drive the system. This process is demonstrated in Figure 1. The shaped command is then use to drive the system without residual vibration while meeting many other performance specifications. The completed work developed tether control algorithms for retrieval. A simple model of the tether response has been developed and command shaping was implemented to minimize unwanted dynamics. A model of a flexible electrodynamic tether has been developed to investigate the tether s response during reboost. Command shaping techniques have been developed to eliminate the tether oscillations and reduce the tether s deflection to pre-specified levels during reboost. Additionally, a model for the spin-up of a tethered system was developed. This model was used in determining the parameters for optimization the resulting angular velocity.

  2. Two-Way Tether Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanger, George F.

    1994-01-01

    Safety-tether device enables crewmembers on spacecraft to retrieve crewmember drifting away from spacecraft. Alternatively, drifting crewmember who carries device uses it to grasp and return to spacecraft. Also used on Earth. For example, rescuer on vessel or pier uses it to retrieve and haul drowning or unconscious person to safety; drifting person or rescuer in water uses it to grasp and hold onto support.

  3. Practicality of using a Tether for electrodynamic reboost of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumer, John H.; Donahue, Benjamin B.; Bangham, Michal E.

    2001-02-01

    ElectroDynamic (ED) Tethers can generate continuous low thrust in a low Earth orbit. An induced current running through the length of the tether reacts with the geomagnetic field to produce thrust. The amount of thrust scales with tether length and current. The International Space Station (ISS) requires periodic reboost to maintain an approximately circular orbit above the Earth. The baseline reboost method is a traditional bi-propellant rocket thruster and tankage system which must to be refueled via Soyuz/Progress or other launch vehicle. The estimated propellant costs associated with keeping ISS in the designated orbit over a 10-year life have been extremely high. The ED Tether would draw energy from the renewable ISS Solar Array electrical power system. Propulsion requirements for ISS vary depending on solar wind and other conditions. It is projected that a ED Tether could provide the majority of the required reboost thrust for ISS for a nominal solar year. For above nominal solar wind years the ISS would have to use the rocket reboost system, but at a greatly reduced level. Thus resulting in substantial cost savings, via the reduction in the number of Earth-to-orbit launch vehicle flights to the ISS that must bring reboost propellant. However, the purposes of this paper is to further previous research on an ISS ED Tether and examine the operational and technical issues working against using a ED Tether on ISS. Issues such as Shuttle rendezvous and flight path concerns raise serious safety concerns and restrictions on tether use. Tether issues such as tether librations and off angle thrust raise concerns about impacts to microgravity payloads and the long-term effect on ISS orbital path and inclination. Operational issues such as peak power available to an ED Tether and allowable duty cycle may impose severe restrictions on tether design and ultimately limit the practicality of an ED Tether on ISS. Thus while at first glance the cost numbers appear to be

  4. Label-free measurements of membrane tether thickness using optical tweezers combined with SLIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarshar, Mohammad; Wong, Winson T.; Anvari, Bahman

    2015-03-01

    Various cellular activities such as motility, division, and endocytosis involve a change in the cell shape. The mechanical interactions between the cell membrane and cytoskeleton play an important role in regulating changes in the cell shape. Tether formation from cell membranes provides a technique to characterize the mechanical properties of cell membranes and membrane-cytoskeleton interactions. Accurate measurement of the nano-scale tether diameter is relevant to quantification of membrane tension, bending modulus, and adhesion energy of the membrane-cytoskeleton structure. We have integrated optical tweezers with quantitative phase imaging, based on spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM), to simultaneously form tethers from HEK-293 cells and measure their diameters. Tether thickness along the illumination axis was measured using the quantitative phase map of the sample, and the refractive index (RI) mismatch between the sample and the surrounding media. The RI of the tethers ranged from 1.354 to 1.368 (cell culture medium RI=1.337). Our SLIM imaging system provided a 38 nm resolution in tether thickness measurements. Tether diameter fluctuations of <100 nm were resolved on tethers that ranged between 600-900 nm in diameter. Our integrated platform also provides the ability to simultaneously manipulate and image cell organelles in a non-contact and marker-free manner at nanometer spatial resolution.

  5. Design and Test of a Tethered Pair of Satellites: Equipment Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pernicka, Henry J.; Leitner, Jesse (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A recent development in spacecraft mission design involves the increasing use of Distributed Spacecraft Systems (DSS). Several key technologies must mature sufficiently to facilitate these missions, including the use of spacecraft flying in tightly controlled formations. Such formations may be controlled using "free flying" navigation schemes, or alternatively may use tethers to constrain the formation geometry. An investigation has been initiated here to further develop this technology using two small spacecraft connected by a short tether. After insertion into orbit, the tether will be extended and various data collected on the performance of the dual-spacecraft "formation." At some later time, the tether will be cut, and the spacecraft pair will be navigated in a manner to maintain a geometry as closely as possible to that of the tethered configuration. Comparisons and evaluations of the two modes of operation can then be made so that the merits of both approaches are available to mission designers.

  6. Space Environmental Effects on Coated Tether Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gittemeier, Keith A.; Hawk, Clark W.; Finckenor, Miria M.; Watts, Ed

    2005-01-01

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville s Propulsion Research Center has teamed with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to research the effects of atomic oxygen (AO) bombardment on coated tether materials. Tethers Unlimited Inc. has provided several candidate tether materials with various coatings for AO exposure in MSFC s Atomic Oxygen Beam Facility. Additional samples were exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation at MSFC. AO erodes most organic materials, and ultraviolet radiation embrittles polymers. This test series was performed to determine the effect of AO and UV on the mechanical integrity of tether materials that were treated with AO-protective coatings, such as polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) or metallization. Both TUI's Multi-Application Survivable Tether (MAST) Experiment and Marshall Space Flight Center s Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) programs will benefit from this research by helping to determine tether materials and coatings that give the longest life with the lowest mass penalty.

  7. Atomic Oxygen Effects on Coated Tether Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gittemeier, Keith A.; Hawk, Clark W.; Finckenor, Miria M.; Watts, Ed

    2005-01-01

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville s Propulsion Research Center has teamed with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to research the effects of atomic oxygen (AO) bombardment on coated tether materials. Tethers Unlimited Inc. has provided several candidate tether materials with various coatings for (AO) exposure in MSFC's Atomic Oxygen Beam Facility. Additional samples were exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation at MSFC. AO erodes most organic materials, and ultraviolet radiation embrittles polymers. This test series was performed to determine the effect of AO and UV on the mechanical integrity of tether materials that were treated with AO-protective coatings, such as Photosil or metallization. Both TUI's Multi-Application Survivable Tether (MAST) Experiment and Marshall Space Flight Center's Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) programs will benefit from this research by helping to determine tether materials and coatings that give the longest life with the lowest mass penalty.

  8. Simulated Space Environment Effects on Tether Materials with Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Miria M.; Watts, Ed

    2005-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) erodes most organic materials. and ultraviolet radiation embrittles polymers. A previous study indicated untreated polymers such as ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) are severely degraded when exposed to AO. This test series was performed to determine the effect of AO and UV on the mechanical integrity of tether materials that were treated with AO-protective coatings. Three coating systems were evaluated for their ability to protect the underlying material from AO erosion. The first coating system is the Photosil surface modification process which incorporates silicon-containing functional groups into the top micron of an organic material. The Photosil process has had favorable results with polyurethane- and epoxy-based thermal control coatings . The second coating system is metallization, in this case nickel. The third coating system is silsesquioxane. The Marshall Space Flight Center Atomic Oxygen Beam Facility (AOBF) was used to simulate low Earth orbit AO of 5 eV energy. In addition, some tether samples were exposed to ultraviolet radiation then evaluated for any changes in mechanical strength. Tether missions, such as a momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost (MXER) tether, may benefit from this research.

  9. Tethers as Debris: Hydrocode Simulation of Impacts of Polymer Tether Fragments on Aluminum Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steven W.

    2003-01-01

    Tethers promise to find use in a variety of space applications. Despite being narrow objects, their great lengths result in them having large total areas. Consequently, tethers are very susceptible to being severed by orbital debris. Extensive work has been done designing tethers that resist severs by small debris objects, in order to lengthen their working lives. It is from this perspective that most recent work has considered the tether - debris question. The potential of intact tethers, or severed tether fragments, as debris, to pose a significant collision risk to other spacecraft has been less well studied. Understanding the consequences of such collisions is important in assessing the risks tethers pose to other spacecraft. This paper discusses the damage that polymer tethers may produce on aluminum plates, as revealed by hypervelocity impact simulations using the SPHC hydrodynamic code.

  10. Hyperbolic Injection Issues for MXER Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Kirk

    2003-01-01

    Momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost (MXER) tether technology is currently being pursued to dramatically lower the launch mass and cost of interplanetary scientific spacecraft. A spacecraft boosted from LEO to a high-energy orbit by a MXER tether has most of the orbital energy it needs to escape the Earth's gravity well. However, the final targeting of the spacecraft to its eventual trajectory, and some of the unique issues brought on by the tether boost, are the subjects of this paper.

  11. Tethered Communication Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Tiesenhausen, G.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes concept for placing several communication satellites in geostationary orbit without taking up more space than assigned to single satellite. Proposed scheme eases orbital crowding more economically than space platforms. Concept requires minimal redesign of existing satellites and accommodates many satellites in just one orbital slot. System much lighter in weight than geostationary platform and easier and more economical to transport.

  12. Dynamic analysis and trajectory tracking of a tethered space robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Mehrzad; Keshmiri, Mehdi; Misra, Arun K.

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic analysis and trajectory tracking of a Tethered Space Robot (TSR) is investigated in this paper. A hybrid controller is used to perform the control task. It consists of two components, the first one deals with librational motion of the tether, while the second one takes care of the manipulator motion. A Nonlinear Model Predictive Control (NMPC) approach is used to control the tether libration; for this purpose, the libration is described by a single degree of freedom and the tether length rate is employed as the input to suppress the librational motion. A modified Computed Torque Method (CTM) is used to control the manipulator motion. The dynamic interaction between the manipulator motion and the librational motion is considered both in the system dynamics and control of the system. Using numerical simulations, performance of the proposed control system is evaluated for end-effector positioning as well as for trajectory tracking for two cases: a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO).

  13. The Constitutive Equation for Membrane Tether Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Yao, Da-Kang; Shao, Jin-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Membrane tethers or nanotubes play a critical role in a variety of cellular and subcellular processes such as leukocyte rolling and intercellular mass transport. The current constitutive equations that describe the relationship between the pulling force and the tether velocity during tether extraction have serious limitations. Here we propose a new phenomenological constitutive equation that captures all known characteristics of nanotube formation, including nonlinearity, nonzero threshold force, and possible negative tether velocity. We used tether extraction from endothelial cells as a prototype to illustrate how to obtain the material constants in the constitutive equation. With the micropipette aspiration technique, we measured tether pulling forces at both positive and negative tether velocities. We also determined the threshold force of 55 pN experimentally for the first time. This new constitutive equation unites two established ones and provides us a unified platform to better understand not only the physiological role of tether extraction during leukocyte rolling and intercellular or intracellular transport, but also the physics of membrane tether growth or retraction. PMID:20614242

  14. Tether de-orbiting of satellites at end of mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanmartin, Juan R.; Sánchez-Torres, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    The accumulation of space debris around the Earth has become critical for Space security. The BETs project, financed by the European Commission through its FP7-Space program, is focusing on preventing generation of new debris by de-orbiting satellites at end of mission. The de-orbiting system considered, involving an electrodynamic bare tape-tether, uses no propellant and no power supply, while generating power for on-board use during de-orbiting. As an example, preliminary results are here presented on a specific orbit/satellite case: 1300 km altitude and 65 degrees inclination, and 500 kg mass. Design tether dimensions are 8 km length, 1.5 cm width, and 0.05 mm thickness; subsystem masses are limited to twice tether mass. Simple calculations, using orbit-averaging, solar mid-cycle phase, and ionospheric and geomagnetic field models, yield 2.6 months time for de-orbiting down to 200 km, with a probability of about 1 percent of debris cutting the tape. References: Sanmartin, J.R., Lorenzini, E.C., and Martinez-Sanchez, M., Electrodynamic Tether Applications and Constraints, J. Space. Rockets 47, 442-456, 2010. Sanmartin, J.R. et al., A universal system to de-orbit satellites at end of life, Journal of Space Technology and Science, to appear.

  15. Three-dimensional deployment of electro-dynamic tether via tension and current control with constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hao; Jin, Dongping; Hu, Haiyan

    2016-12-01

    The concept of space tether has found a great deal of promising applications in space engineering. A prerequisite of any space tether mission is to deploy its tether to a commanded length. This paper aims to achieving the three-dimensional deployment of an electro-dynamic tether system in a propellant-free manner via the feedback control of the tension and electric current in the tether. The proposed controller is formulated in an analytical form with an extremely low level of computational load, and can explicitly account for the physical bounds of the tether tension and electric current by using a pair of strictly increasing saturation functions. In addition, the Lyapunov analysis is made to gain an insight into the stability characteristics of the proposed control strategy. To facilitate the theoretical analysis, the dynamic model of the system is developed under the widely used dumbbell assumption, along with the geomagnetic field modeled using a tilted dipole approximation. Finally, numerical case studies on a representative electro-dynamic tether system are conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed controller and the influence of the actuating conditions and orbital inclinations.

  16. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in Earth orbit, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.; Arnold, D. A.; Grossi, M. D.; Gullahorn, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a two dimensional analytical model that describes the dynamics of an n-mass vertical tethered system is reported. Two different approaches are described: in the first one the control quantities are the independent variables while in the second one the Cartesian coordinates of each mass expressed in the orbiting reference frame are the independent variables. The latter model was used in the 3-mass version to simulate the dynamics of the tethered system in applications involving the displacement of the middle mass along the tether. In particular, issues related to reproducing predetermined acceleration profiles and g-tuning are reported.

  17. T-Rex: A Japanese Space Tether Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les

    2009-01-01

    serves both to drive the current and then to act on the current to decelerate the system. One of the most important features of tether thrusters is that they use renewable energy sources to drive the electrical current flow in either the orbit-raising or orbit-lowering modes. Sources inherent to Earth orbit are used. To raise the orbit, sunlight can be converted to the electrical energy required to drive the tether current. To lower the orbit, the orbital energy itself (supplied by the Earth-to-orbit launcher when it raises the system into orbit) is the energy source of the tether current via the action of the Lorentz Force. Electrodynamic tethers can be directly applied to a wide spectrum of uses in space. As a propulsion system, they include satellite de-orbit, transfer of a satellite from one orbit to another, altitude maintenance for large spacecraft such as the International Space Station, and since it works wherever there is a magnetic field and an ionosphere planetary exploration missions. An electrodynamic tether upper stage could be used as an Orbit Transfer Vehicle (OTV) to move payloads within low earth orbit. The OTV would rendezvous with the payload and launch vehicle, grapple the payload and maneuver it to a new orbital altitude or inclination without the use of boost propellant. The tug could then lower its orbit to rendezvous with the next payload and repeat the process. Conceivably, such a system could perform several orbital maneuvering assignments without resupply, making it relatively inexpensive to operate.

  18. Three dimensional dynamics of a flexible Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, N. A.; Cartmell, M. P.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a new flexural model for the three dimensional dynamics of the Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether (MMET) concept. This study has uncovered the relationships between planar and nonplanar motions, and the effect of the coupling between these two parameters on pragmatic circular and elliptical orbits. The tether sub-spans are modelled as stiffened strings governed by partial differential equations of motion, with specific boundary conditions. The tether sub-spans are flexible and elastic, thereby allowing three dimensional displacements. The boundary conditions lead to a specific frequency equation and the eigenvalues from this provide the natural frequencies of the orbiting flexible motorised tether when static, accelerating in monotonic spin, and at terminal angular velocity. A rotation transformation matrix has been utilised to get the position vectors of the system's components in an assumed inertial frame. Spatio-temporal coordinates are transformed to modal coordinates before applying Lagrange's equations, and pre-selected linear modes are included to generate the equations of motion. The equations of motion contain inertial nonlinearities which are essentially of cubic order, and these show the potential for intricate intermodal coupling effects. A simulation of planar and non-planar motions has been undertaken and the differences in the modal responses, for both motions, and between the rigid body and flexible models are highlighted and discussed.

  19. Sliding mode control of electromagnetic tethered satellite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallaj, Mohammad Amin Alandi; Assadian, Nima

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the control of tethered satellite formation actuated by electromagnetic dipoles and reaction wheels using the robust sliding mode control technique. Generating electromagnetic forces and moments by electric current coils provides an attractive control actuation alternative for tethered satellite system due to the advantages of no propellant consumption and no obligatory rotational motion. Based on a dumbbell model of tethered satellite in which the flexibility and mass of the tether is neglected, the equations of motion in Cartesian coordinate are derived. In this model, the J2 perturbation is taken into account. The far-field and mid-field models of electromagnetic forces and moments of two satellites on each other and the effect of the Earth's magnetic field are presented. A robust sliding mode controller is designed for precise trajectory tracking purposes and to deal with the electromagnetic force and moment uncertainties and external disturbances due to the Earth's gravitational and magnetic fields inaccuracy. Numerical simulation results are presented to validate the effectiveness of the developed controller and its superiority over the linear controller.

  20. Optimal Orbit Maneuvers with Electrodynamic Tethers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    usage with librating tethers under perturbing forces. Pelaez and Andres26 and Somenzi, et al27, also address tether stability in specific...as the most current developments became motivators for this thesis. Cited in earlier chapters, Hoy 26 J. Pelaez and Y. N. Andres, “Dynamic...

  1. Biophysical assay for tethered signaling reactions reveals tether-controlled activity for the phosphatase SHP-1.

    PubMed

    Goyette, Jesse; Salas, Citlali Solis; Coker-Gordon, Nicola; Bridge, Marcus; Isaacson, Samuel A; Allard, Jun; Dushek, Omer

    2017-03-01

    Tethered enzymatic reactions are ubiquitous in signaling networks but are poorly understood. A previously unreported mathematical analysis is established for tethered signaling reactions in surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Applying the method to the phosphatase SHP-1 interacting with a phosphorylated tether corresponding to an immune receptor cytoplasmic tail provides five biophysical/biochemical constants from a single SPR experiment: two binding rates, two catalytic rates, and a reach parameter. Tether binding increases the activity of SHP-1 by 900-fold through a binding-induced allosteric activation (20-fold) and a more significant increase in local substrate concentration (45-fold). The reach parameter indicates that this local substrate concentration is exquisitely sensitive to receptor clustering. We further show that truncation of the tether leads not only to a lower reach but also to lower binding and catalysis. This work establishes a new framework for studying tethered signaling processes and highlights the tether as a control parameter in clustered receptor signaling.

  2. Biophysical assay for tethered signaling reactions reveals tether-controlled activity for the phosphatase SHP-1

    PubMed Central

    Goyette, Jesse; Salas, Citlali Solis; Coker-Gordon, Nicola; Bridge, Marcus; Isaacson, Samuel A.; Allard, Jun; Dushek, Omer

    2017-01-01

    Tethered enzymatic reactions are ubiquitous in signaling networks but are poorly understood. A previously unreported mathematical analysis is established for tethered signaling reactions in surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Applying the method to the phosphatase SHP-1 interacting with a phosphorylated tether corresponding to an immune receptor cytoplasmic tail provides five biophysical/biochemical constants from a single SPR experiment: two binding rates, two catalytic rates, and a reach parameter. Tether binding increases the activity of SHP-1 by 900-fold through a binding-induced allosteric activation (20-fold) and a more significant increase in local substrate concentration (45-fold). The reach parameter indicates that this local substrate concentration is exquisitely sensitive to receptor clustering. We further show that truncation of the tether leads not only to a lower reach but also to lower binding and catalysis. This work establishes a new framework for studying tethered signaling processes and highlights the tether as a control parameter in clustered receptor signaling. PMID:28378014

  3. 2006 Status of the Momentum eXchange Electrodynamic Re-Boost (MXER) Tether Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, Joseph A.; Sorensen, Kirk F.; Dankanich, John W.; Frame, Kyle L.

    2006-01-01

    The MXER Tether technology development is a high-payoff/high-risk investment area within the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Program. The ISPT program is managed by the NASA Headquarters Science Mission Directorate and implemented by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The MXER concept was identified and competitively ranked within NASA's comprehensive Integrated In-Space Transportation Plan (IISTP); an agency-wide technology assessment activity. The objective of the MXER tether project within ISPT is to advance the technological maturation level for the MXER system, and its subsystems, as well as other space and terrestrial tether applications. Recent hardware efforts have focused on the manufacturability of space-survivable high-strength tether material and coatings, high-current electrodynamic tether, lightweight catch mechanism, high-accuracy propagator/predictor code, and efficient electron collection/current generation. Significant technical progress has been achieved with modest ISPT funding to the extent that MXER has evolved to a well-characterized system with greater capability as the design has been matured. Synergistic efforts in high-current electrodynamic tethers and efficient electron collection/current generation have been made possible through SBIR and STTR support. The entire development endeavor was orchestrated as a collaborative team effort across multiple individual contracts and has established a solid technology resource base, which permits a wide variety of future space cable/tether applications to be realized.

  4. Optimal Electrodynamic Tether Phasing Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bitzer, Matthew S.; Hall, Christopher D.

    2007-01-01

    We study the minimum-time orbit phasing maneuver problem for a constant-current electrodynamic tether (EDT). The EDT is assumed to be a point mass and the electromagnetic forces acting on the tether are always perpendicular to the local magnetic field. After deriving and non-dimensionalizing the equations of motion, the only input parameters become current and the phase angle. Solution examples, including initial Lagrange costates, time of flight, thrust plots, and thrust angle profiles, are given for a wide range of current magnitudes and phase angles. The two-dimensional cases presented use a non-tilted magnetic dipole model, and the solutions are compared to existing literature. We are able to compare similar trajectories for a constant thrust phasing maneuver and we find that the time of flight is longer for the constant thrust case with similar initial thrust values and phase angles. Full three-dimensional solutions, which use a titled magnetic dipole model, are also analyzed for orbits with small inclinations.

  5. Transportation using spinning tethers with emphasis on phasing and plane change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, David G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper studies the potential uses of spinning tethers as components in a transportation system. Additional degrees of freedom in the selection of transfer orbits as well as phasing control are introduced by allowing both the spin rate of the tethers to be controllable and by allowing the ejection and capture points to be anywhere along the tether length. Equations are derived for the phasing of the planar transfer problem. A construction algorithm for nonplanar transfers is developed and nonplanar phasing conditions are examined.

  6. Tethers in space: Birth and growth of a new avenue to space utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of the ideas of tether applications in space are traced from its origin in the last century past a dormant period of sixty-five years to the mid-seventies. At that time as a consequence of major revival efforts, NASA entered into serious investigations of the theoretical and practical feasibility of a large number of tethered concepts in space. These efforts culminated in the establishment of the Tethered Satellite System Project now at NASA in the advanced development phase. Extensive planning efforts are described, first, through a Tether Applications in Space Workshop which generated additional concepts and provided overall assessments and recommendations to NASA, and then through a NASA inter-center Tether Applications in Space Task Group which generated a four year program plan in the areas of further studies, technology, work and science and applications of tethers in space. An outlook into the future of tether applications that approaches some of the goals of the early visionaries is offered.

  7. Autonomous Vision-Based Tethered-Assisted Rover Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Dorian; Nesnas, Issa A.D.; Zarzhitsky, Dimitri

    2013-01-01

    Many intriguing science discoveries on planetary surfaces, such as the seasonal flows on crater walls and skylight entrances to lava tubes, are at sites that are currently inaccessible to state-of-the-art rovers. The in situ exploration of such sites is likely to require a tethered platform both for mechanical support and for providing power and communication. Mother/daughter architectures have been investigated where a mother deploys a tethered daughter into extreme terrains. Deploying and retracting a tethered daughter requires undocking and re-docking of the daughter to the mother, with the latter being the challenging part. In this paper, we describe a vision-based tether-assisted algorithm for the autonomous re-docking of a daughter to its mother following an extreme terrain excursion. The algorithm uses fiducials mounted on the mother to improve the reliability and accuracy of estimating the pose of the mother relative to the daughter. The tether that is anchored by the mother helps the docking process and increases the system's tolerance to pose uncertainties by mechanically aligning the mating parts in the final docking phase. A preliminary version of the algorithm was developed and field-tested on the Axel rover in the JPL Mars Yard. The algorithm achieved an 80% success rate in 40 experiments in both firm and loose soils and starting from up to 6 m away at up to 40 deg radial angle and 20 deg relative heading. The algorithm does not rely on an initial estimate of the relative pose. The preliminary results are promising and help retire the risk associated with the autonomous docking process enabling consideration in future martian and lunar missions.

  8. Electrodynamic Tether Operations beyond the Ionosphere in the Low-Density Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Nobie H.

    2007-01-01

    In the classical concept for the operation of electrodynamic tethers in space, a voltage is generated across the tether, either by the tether's orbital motion through the earth's planetary magnetic field or by a power supply; electrons are then collected from the ionospheric plasma at the positive pole; actively emitted back into space at the negative pole; and the circuit is closed by currents driven through the ambient conducting ionosphere. This concept has been proven to work in space by the Tethered Satellite System TSS-1 and TSS-1R Space Shuttle missions; and the Plasma Motor-Generator (PMG) tether flight experiment. However, it limits electrodynamic tether operations to the F-region of the ionosphere where the plasma density is sufficient to conduct the required currents--in other words, between altitudes of approximately 200 to 1000 km in sunlight. In the earth's shadow, the ionospheric density drops precipitously and tether operations, using the above approach, are not effective--even within this altitude range. There are numerous missions that require in-space propulsion in the Earth's shadow and/or outside of the above altitude range. This paper will, therefore, present the fundamentals of a concept that would allow electrodynamic tethers to operate almost anywhere within the magnetosphere, the region of space containing the earth's planetary magnetic field. In other words, because operations would be virtually independent of any ambient plasma, the range of electrodynamic operations would be extended into the earth's shadow and out to synchronous orbit--forty times the present operational range. The key to this concept is the active generation of plasma at each pole of the tether so that current generation ,does not depend on the conductivity of the ambient ionosphere. Arguments will be presented, based on ,existing flight data, which shed light on the behavior of charge emissions in space and show the plausibility of the concept.

  9. Grid Sphere Electrodes used for Current Collection at the Positive Pole of Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, N. H.; Moore, J. D.

    2004-01-01

    The generation of either electrical power or propulsive thrust with an electrodynamic tether system necessarily depends on driving a return current through the system's ambient space plasma environment. An electrical connection is, therefore, required between the plasma and each end of the tether. The voltage required to drive current through the system is derived either from the orbital motion of the conducting tether through the magnetic field of the Earth, or from a high-voltage power supply that taps into an external energy source (e.g., the sun). In either case, one end of the tether will receive a positive bias. This positive bias, between the tether and the ambient plasma, allows electrons to be collected effectively with a simple, passive electrode. Passive electrode contactors offer several important advantages, including simplification of the upper end-body design and operations, minimization of system mass, and an increase of system reliability and robustness. A preliminary analysis of an inflatable Grid-Sphere end-body concept is presented that is interesting because of the potential for collecting arbitrarily large currents independent of tether length, while the device has the physical characteristics of a high area-to-mass ratio, a low drag coefficient, and simplicity. In particular, we will discuss the physics of current collection by a biased Grid-Sphere and the present state-of-the-art of materials, attainable area-to-mass ratios, and deployment techniques.

  10. Tethered Ozonesonde Measurements During FRAPPE July-August 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B.; Sterling, C. W.; Cullis, P.; Hall, E. G.; Jordan, A. F.; Wendell, J.; Schnell, R. C.; McClure-Begley, A.; Thompson, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    O3 and temperature profiles were measured from tethered ozonesondes from surface to 400 m above ground level on 9 days during the summer of 2014 Colorado Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE). The portable tethered ozonesonde system was set up at one of 3 sites located next to a Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment surface monitoring station. The day and site chosen were based on the previous day O3 and weather forecast. Measurements typically began at 8:30 AM and ended at 4:30 PM, averaging 40 profiles in one day. The ozonesonde when sampling at the surface consistently read within 0-3 ppbv of the surface monitor at each of the sites with a typical daytime range of 20-90 ppbv. The hourly values were averaged at 50 meter intervals showing O3 production rates were consistently around 8 ppbv per hour from 50 to 300 meters above ground level. On sunny, light wind days the O3 mixing ratio reached a maximum of 80-90 ppbv between 14:00 and 15:00 local time. The generally constant mixing ratio with height and highest mixing ratios above the surface indicate that photochemical O3 production was taking place throughout the profile. Continuous O3 profiles from a tall tower (5 and 300 m) and daily ozonesondes tracked O3 variability through the experiment. High O3 at each site was associated with different local wind directions. At Ft. Collins winds were generally out of the southeast, at Chatfield from the northeast, and at City Park Golf Course more variable. The tether system was developed at NOAA/ESRL to provide a cost effective method to measure O3 profiles on a continuous basis. The tether system consisted of a deep sea fishing pole, electric motor driving the reel with light-weight fishing line attached to the balloon ozonesonde, a tether control box, and laptop. The in house software package monitored data and controlled the tether speed and turn-around point based on real time GPS altitude from the transmitting radiosonde.

  11. Tethers as Debris: Hydrocode Simulation of Impacts of Tether Fragments on Planar Aerospace Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steven W.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Tethers promise to find use in a variety of space applications. Despite being narrow objects, their great lengths result in them having large total areas, and so tethers are quite susceptible to being severed by orbital debris. Extensive work has been done designing tethers that resist severs by small debris objects, and hence have longer working lives. It is from this perspective that most recent work has considered the tether - debris question. The potential of intact tethers, or severed tether fragments, as debris to pose a significant collision risk to other spacecraft has been less well studied. Understanding the consequences of such encounters is important in assessing the risks to other spacecraft posed by tethers. In this paper I discuss the damage that two types of tethers may produce on planar aerospace materials, as revealed by hyper- velocity impact simulations using the SPHC hydrodynamic code. Tether types considered include a single nylon line and a complex design including metal wires. Target materials considered include the aluminum plates typically used in debris shielding, and solar panels.

  12. Tethered Test of Morpheus -- Innovation Day

    NASA Video Gallery

    Another tethered test of the Morpheus vertical test bed. This flight was on Innovation Day at Johnson Space Center. We had around 300 onlookers during this test. This test looked better than yester...

  13. Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) electrodynamic tether experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossi, Mario D.

    1995-01-01

    The Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) flight of June 26, 1993 has been the most sophisticated and most successful mission that has been carried out thus far with an electrodynamic tether. Three papers from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Washington, DC concerned with the PMG, submitted at the Fourth International Space Conference on Tethers in Space, in Washington, DC, in April 1995, are contained in this document. The three papers are (1) Electromagnetic interactions between the PMG tether and the magneto-ionic medium of the Ionosphere; (2) Tether-current-voltage characteristics, as determined by the Hollow Cathode Operation Modes; and (3) Hawaii-Hilo ground observations on the occasion for the PMG flight of June 23, 1993.

  14. Adaptive sliding mode control of tethered satellite deployment with input limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Sun, Guanghui

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel adaptive sliding mode tension control method for the deployment of tethered satellite, where the input tension limitation is taken into account. The underactuated governing equations of the tethered satellites system are firstly derived based on Lagrangian mechanics theory. Considering the fact that the tether can only resist axial stretching, the tension input is modelled as input limitation. New adaptive sliding mode laws are addressed to guarantee the stability of the tethered satellite deployment with input disturbance, meanwhile to eliminate the effect of the limitation features of the tension input. Compared with the classic control strategy, the newly proposed adaptive sliding mode control law can deploy the satellite with smaller overshoot of the in-plane angle and implement the tension control reasonably and effectively in engineering practice. The numerical results validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  15. Construction and Structural Analysis of Tethered Lipid Bilayer Containing Photosynthetic Antenna Proteins for Functional Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sumino, Ayumi; Dewa, Takehisa; Takeuchi, Toshikazu; Sugiura, Ryuta; Sasaki, Nobuaki; Misawa, Nobuo; Tero, Ryugo; Urisu, Tsuneo; Gardiner, Alastair T.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Hashimoto, Hideki; Nango, Mamoru

    2011-07-11

    The construction and structural analysis of a tethered planar lipid bilayer containing bacterial photosynthetic membrane proteins, light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2), and light-harvesting core complex (LH1-RC) is described and establishes this system as an experimental platform for their functional analysis. The planar lipid bilayer containing LH2 and/or LH1-RC complexes was successfully formed on an avidin-immobilized coverglass via an avidin-biotin linkage. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that a smooth continuous membrane was formed there. Lateral diffusion of these membrane proteins, observed by a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAY), is discussed in terms of the membrane architecture. Energy transfer from LH2 to LH1-RC within the tethered membrane architecture. Energy transfer from LH2 to LH1-RC within the tethered membrane was observed by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, indicating that the tethered membrane can mimic the natural situation.

  16. Tethers in space handbook, second edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penzo, Paul A. (Editor); Ammann, Paul W. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The Tethers in Space Handbook, Second Edition represents an update to the initial volume issued in September 1986. As originally intended, this handbook is designed to serve as a reference manual for policy makers, program managers, educators, engineers, and scientists alike. It contains information for the uninitiated, providing insight into the fundamental behavior of tethers in space. For those familiar with space tethers, it includes a summary of past and ongoing studies and programs, a complete bibliography of tether publications, and names, addresses, and phone numbers of workers in the field. Perhaps its most valuable asset is the brief description of nearly 50 tether applications which have been proposed and analyzed over the past 10 years. The great variety of these applications, from energy generation to boosting satellites to gravity wave detection is an indication that tethers will play a significant part in the future of space development. This edition of the handbook preserves the major characteristics of the original; however, some significant rearrangements and additions have been made. The first section on Tether Programs has been brought up to date, and now includes a description of TSS-2, the aerodynamic NASA/Italian Space Agency (ASI) mission. Tether Applications follows, and this section has been substantially rearranged. First, the index and cross-reference for the applications have been simplified. Also, the categories have changed slightly, with Technology and Test changed to Aerodynamics, and the Constellations category removed. In reality, tether constellations may be applicable to many of the other categories, since it is simply a different way of using tethers. Finally, to separate out those applications which are obviously in the future, a Concepts category has been added. A new section included here on Conference Summaries recognizes the fact that the tether community is growing internationally, and that meetings provide a means of

  17. The Proposed RETRIEVE Microsatellite Tether Deorbit Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-22

    orbital debris environment for a long duration mission. They have also not dem- onstrated the capability to actively control the dynamics of the tether...micrometeorite/ orbital debris (M/OD) environ- ment intact for the 6-month duration of the experiment, we chose to’construct the tether using the...to the unlikely event of a strike by a large piece of orbital debris greater than I meter in size, Figure 3. Survival probability of the which could

  18. Magnetic cleanliness verification approach on tethered satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messidoro, Piero; Braghin, Massimo; Grande, Maurizio

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic cleanliness testing was performed on the Tethered Satellite as the last step of an articulated verification campaign aimed at demonstrating the capability of the satellite to support its TEMAG (TEthered MAgnetometer) experiment. Tests at unit level and analytical predictions/correlations using a dedicated mathematical model (GANEW program) are also part of the verification activities. Details of the tests are presented, and the results of the verification are described together with recommendations for later programs.

  19. Tethered Space Satellite-1 (TSS-1): Technical Roundabouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Brian; Stevens, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    In the early 1990's US and Italian scientists collaborated to study the electrodynamics of dragging a satellite on a tether through the electrically charged portion of Earth's atmosphere called the ionosphere. An electrical current induced in the long wire could be used for power and thrust generation for a satellite. Other tether uses include momentum exchange, artificial gravity, deployment of sensors or antennas, and gravity-gradient stabilization for satellites. Before the Tethered Space Satellite (TSS-1), no long tether had ever been flown, so many questions existed on how it would actually behave. The TSS consisted of a satellite with science experiments attached to a 12.5 mile long, very thin (0.10 inch diameter) copper wire assembly wound around a spool in the deployer reel mechanism. With the Space Shuttle at an altitude of 160 nautical miles above earth, the satellite was to be deployed by raising it from the Shuttle bay on a boom facing away from Earth. Once cleared of the bay, the deployer mechanism was to slowly feed out the 12-plus miles of tether. Scientific data would be collected throughout the operation, after which the satellite would be reeled back in. Pre-flight testing system level tests involved setting up a tether receiver to catch the 12.5 mile tether onto another reel as it was being unwound by the deployer reel mechanism. Testing only the reel mechanism is straightforward. This test becomes more complicated when the TSS is mounted on the flight pallet at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The system level tests must be passed before the pallet can be installed into the Space Shuttle cargo bay. A few months before flight, the TSS payload had been integrated onto the Spacelab pallet and system level tests, including unreeling and reeling the tether, had been successfully completed. Some of this testing equipment was then shipped back to the contractor Martin Marietta. Systems-level load analyses, which cannot be run until all information about

  20. Uses of tethered atmospheric research probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, Richard

    1991-01-01

    In situ measurements in the lower thermosphere are rare because of the difficulty of reaching these altitudes with conventional instrument platforms. The emerging technology of tethered satellites as a means to probe these altitudes from above has matured to the point that a flight program is planned to verify the operational performance of a low-cost deployer mechanism for tethered satellites, and to demonstrate a basic understanding of the dynamics of tethered satellite deployment. With such operational developments at hand, it is appropriate to review some of the potential applications of tethered measurement platforms for acquiring in situ data in the upper atmosphere. This paper focuses on downward-deployed tethered satellite measurements of interest to atmospheric scientists and to hypersonic aerodynamicists, and discusses ways in which this technology may be able to support selected long-range research programs currently in progress or in various stages of pre-flight development. The intent is to illustrate for the potential user community some of the unique advantages of tethered measurement platform technology now under development, and to stimulate creative thinking about ways in which this new capability may be used in support of future research programs.

  1. Tethered elevator: A unique opportunity for space processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monti, R.

    1986-01-01

    The latest fluid dynamic and material science experiments in the microgravity environment have emphasized the importance of the residual gravity level and of the g-jitter on fluid physics phenomena. The tethered elevator presents the possibility of providing variable g-levels (both steady and g-jitter) around a very low steady g-level (that can be realized when the elevator is near the center of mass of the space station-tether complex). When positioning a variable periodic oscillation to the payload a clean g-jitter disturbance can be obtained that would not be otherwise obtainable by other systems. These two possibilities make the elevator a facility to help resolve a number of still open questions that are preventing wider utilization of the space environment in the microgravity area.

  2. Electrokinetic Stretching of Tethered DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ferree, Sean; Blanch, Harvey W.

    2003-01-01

    During electrophoretic separations of DNA in a sieving medium, DNA molecules stretch from a compact coil into elongated conformations when encountering an obstacle and relax back to a coil upon release from the obstacle. These stretching dynamics are thought to play an important role in the separation mechanism. In this article we describe a silicon microfabricated device to measure the stretching of tethered DNA in electric fields. Upon application of an electric field, electro-osmosis generates bulk fluid flow in the device, and a protocol for eliminating this flow by attaching a polymer brush to all silicon oxide surfaces is shown to be effective. Data on the steady stretching of DNA in constant electric fields is presented. The data corroborate the approximate theory of hydrodynamic equivalence, indicating that DNA is not free-draining in the presence of both electric and nonelectric forces. Finally, these data provide the first quantitative test of a Stigter and Bustamante's detailed theory of electrophoretic stretching of DNA without adjustable parameters. The agreement between theory and experiment is good. PMID:14507716

  3. Enhanced electrodynamic tether currents due to electron emission from a neutral gas discharge: Results from the TSS-1R Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, B. E.; Bonifazi, C.; Bilén, S. G.; Raitt, W. J.; Burke, W. J.; Stone, N. H.; Lebreton, J. P.

    During the reflight of the first electrodynamic Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1R) mission, the unplanned separation of the tether at the Orbiter end resulted in the highest tether current during the mission. In the moments just prior to the tether separation with 19.7 km of tether deployed and a generated electromotive force (EMF) of 3482 V, currents reaching approximately 0.97 A were shunted through the tether to the Orbiter electrical ground, which was in contact with the ionosphere primarily through its main engine surfaces. This current level was nearly twice as large as observed during any nominal operating period. As the failure point of the tether entered into the ambient plasma, the current increased to 1.1 A and maintained this level even after the break for approximately 75 s. The principal surprise in these results was that the broken end of the tether, with only a few short strands of copper wire, could support higher currents than the much larger Orbiter conducting surface areas. Analysis of possible current enhancement mechanisms revealed that only a gas-enhanced electrical discharge, providing an electron emission source, was plausible. Ground plasma chamber tests confirmed this analysis. The TSS-1R results thus represent the highest electron current emission from a neutral plasma source yet demonstrated in a space plasma. This is of interest for current collection processes in general and plasma contactor development in particular.

  4. Space time neural networks for tether operations in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.; Villarreal, James A.; Jani, Yashvant; Copeland, Charles

    1993-01-01

    A space shuttle flight scheduled for 1992 will attempt to prove the feasibility of operating tethered payloads in earth orbit. due to the interaction between the Earth's magnetic field and current pulsing through the tether, the tethered system may exhibit a circular transverse oscillation referred to as the 'skiprope' phenomenon. Effective damping of skiprope motion depends on rapid and accurate detection of skiprope magnitude and phase. Because of non-linear dynamic coupling, the satellite attitude behavior has characteristic oscillations during the skiprope motion. Since the satellite attitude motion has many other perturbations, the relationship between the skiprope parameters and attitude time history is very involved and non-linear. We propose a Space-Time Neural Network implementation for filtering satellite rate gyro data to rapidly detect and predict skiprope magnitude and phase. Training and testing of the skiprope detection system will be performed using a validated Orbital Operations Simulator and Space-Time Neural Network software developed in the Software Technology Branch at NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center.

  5. Deviation of Earth threatening asteroids using tether and ballast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, David B.

    The effects of the collision of a Near-Earth-Object (NEO) with the Earth could be catastrophic on a local, regional or global scale depending on the size of the NEO. Therefore, there is considerable interest in determining ways to mitigate the threat posed by these objects. This dissertation presents a method utilizing a tethered ballast mass for altering the trajectory of a NEO with an Earth-intersecting orbit so that it avoids hitting the Earth. The method is simulated using four different methods. The first method assumes a rigid massless tether. Using this method, a parametric study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the technique over a wide parametric space. Specifically, this study provided results in terms of deviation rates over the parametric space. After this, the massless inelastic method was used to study actual miss distances assuming the asteroid was on a collision course with the Earth. After this, a study was conducted, using the massless, inelastic model, in which the mass of the ballast was made constant, in order to determine the minimum tether length required to divert asteroids simulated based on actual asteroids from NASA's potentially hazardous asteroid (PHA) database, again assuming a massless inelastic tether. Finally, it was desired to determine how relaxing the constraints of the massless inelastic model would affect system performance. Therefore, three more models were introduced: massive inelastic, massless elastic, and massive elastic. Using these models, a study was performed to explore the effects of the changed model on system performance and to compare the results in terms of deviation, with those of the massless inelastic model. This was desired because the numerical cost of the new models was much higher than that of the massless inelastic model, so rather than conduct the study over a much larger parametric space, a smaller space was chosen, so that the results could be compared.

  6. Mechanical properties of neuronal growth cone membranes studied by tether formation with laser optical tweezers.

    PubMed Central

    Dai, J.; Sheetz, M. P.

    1995-01-01

    Many cell phenomena involve major morphological changes, particularly in mitosis and the process of cell migration. For cells or neuronal growth cones to migrate, they must extend the leading edge of the plasma membrane as a lamellipodium or filopodium. During extension of filopodia, membrane must move across the surface creating shear and flow. Intracellular biochemical processes driving extension must work against the membrane mechanical properties, but the forces required to extend growth cones have not been measured. In this paper, laser optical tweezers and a nanometer-level analysis system were used to measure the neuronal growth cone membrane mechanical properties through the extension of filopodia-like tethers with IgG-coated beads. Although the probability of a bead attaching to the membrane was constant irrespective of treatment; the probability of forming a tether with a constant force increased dramatically with cytochalasin B or D and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). These are treatments that alter the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. The force required to hold a tether at zero velocity (F0) was greater than forces generated by single molecular motors, kinesin and myosin; and F0 decreased with cytochalasin B or D and DMSO in correlation with the changes in the probability of tether formation. The force of the tether on the bead increased linearly with the velocity of tether elongation. From the dependency of tether force on velocity of tether formation, we calculated a parameter related to membrane viscosity, which decreased with cytochalasin B or D, ATP depletion, nocodazole, and DMSO. These results indicate that the actin cytoskeleton affects the membrane mechanical properties, including the force required for membrane extension and the viscoelastic behavior. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:7756561

  7. Formations of Tethered Spacecraft as Stable Platforms for Far IR and Sub-mm Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Shao, Michael; Lorenzini, Enrico C.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe current research in tethered formations for interferometry, and a roadmap to demonstrating the required key technologies via on-ground and in-orbit testing. We propose an integrated kilometer-size tethered spacecraft formation flying concept which enables Far IR and Sub-mm astronomy observations from space. A rather general model is used to predict the dynamics, control, and estimation performance of formations of spacecraft connected by tethers in LEO and deep space. These models include the orbital and tethered formation dynamics, environmental models, and models of the formation estimator/controller/commander. Both centralized and decentralized control/sensing/estimation schemes are possible, and dynamic ranges of interest for sensing/control are described. Key component/subsystem technologies are described which need both ground-based and in-orbit demonstration prior to their utilization in precision space interferometry missions using tethered formations. Defining an orbiting formation as an ensemble of orbiting spacecraft performing a cooperative task, recent work has demonstrated the validity of the tethering the spacecraft to provide both the required formation rigidity and satisfy the formation reconfiguration needs such as interferometer baseline control. In our concept, several vehicles are connected and move along the tether, so that to reposition them the connecting tether links must vary in length. This feature enables variable and precise baseline control while the system spins around the boresight. The control architecture features an interferometer configuration composed of one central combiner spacecraft and two aligned collector spacecraft. The combiner spacecraft acts as the formation leader and is also where the centralized sensing and estimation functions reside. Some of the issues analyzed with the model are: dynamic modes of deformation of the distributed structure, architecture of the formation sensor, and sources

  8. Molybdophosphonate clusters as building blocks in the oxomolybdate-organodiphosphonate/cobalt(II)-organoimine system: structural influences of secondary metal coordination preferences and diphosphonate tether lengths.

    PubMed

    Armatas, N Gabriel; Allis, Damian G; Prosvirin, Andrew; Carnutu, Gabriel; O'Connor, Charles J; Dunbar, Kim; Zubieta, Jon

    2008-02-04

    Hydrothermal conditions have been used in the preparation of a series of organic-inorganic hybrid materials of the cobalt-molybdophosphonate family. The reactions of MoO(3), cobalt(II) acetate or cobalt(II) acetylacetonate, tetra-2-pyridylpyrazine (tpyprz), and organodiphosphonic acids H(2)O(3)P(CH(2))nPO(3)H(2) (n = 1-5 and 9) of varying tether lengths yielded compounds of the general type {Co(2)(tpyprz)(H(2)O)(m)}4+/MoxOy{O(3)P(CH(2))(n)PO(3)}z. The recurring theme of the structural chemistry is the incorporation of {Mo(5)O(15)(O(3)PR)(2)}(4-) clusters as molecular building blocks observed in the structures of nine phases (compounds 2-9 and 11). The structural consequences of variations in reaction conditions are most apparent in the series with propylene diphosphonate, where four unique structures 4-7 are observed, including two distinct three-dimensional architectures for compounds 5 and 6 whose formulations differ only in the number of water molecules of crystallization. With pentyldiphosphonate, a second phase 10 is obtained which exhibits a unique cluster building block, the hexamolybdate [Mo(6)O(18){O(3)P(CH(2))(5)PO(3)}](4-). In the case of methylenediphosphonic acid, a third structural motif, the trinuclear {(Mo(3)O(8))(O(3)PCH(2)PO(3))}2- subunit, is observed in compound 1. The structural chemistry of compounds 1-11 of this study is quite distinct from that of the {Ni(2)(tpyprz)(H(2)O)(m)}(4+)/Mo(x)O(y){O(3)P(CH(2))(n)PO(3)}z family, as well as that of the copper-based family. The structural diversity of this general class of materials reflects the coordination preferences of the M(II) sites, the extent of aqua ligation to the M(II) sites, the participation of both phosphate oxygen atoms and molybdate oxo-groups in linking to the M(II) sites, and the variability in the number of attachment sites at the molybdophosphonate clusters. Since the charge densities at the peripheral oxygen atoms of the clusters are quite uniform, the attachment of {M(2)(tpyprz

  9. Magnetobraking: Use of tether electrodynamic drag for Earth return from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    It has often been proposed that a vehicle returning from Mars will use aerobraking in the Earth's atmosphere to dissipate hyperbolic excess velocity to capture into Earth orbit. Here a different system for dissipating excess velocity without expenditure of reaction mass, magnetobraking, is proposed. Magnetobraking uses the force on an electrodynamic tether in the Earth's magnetic field to produce thrust. An electrodynamic tether is deployed from the spacecraft as it approaches the Earth. The Earth's magnetic field produces a force on electrical current in the tether. If the tether is oriented perpendicularly to the Earth's magnetic field and to the direction of motion of the spacecraft, force produced by the Earth's magnetic field can be used to either brake or accelerate the spacecraft without expenditure of reaction mass. The peak acceleration on the Mars return is 0.007 m/sq sec, and the amount of braking possible is dependent on the density and current-carrying capacity of the tether, but is independent of length. A superconducting tether is required. The required critical current is shown to be within the range of superconducting technology now available in the laboratory.

  10. The mechanics of motorised momentum exchange tethers when applied to active debris removal from LEO

    SciTech Connect

    Caldecott, Ralph; Kamarulzaman, Dayangku N. S.; Kirrane, James P.; Cartmell, Matthew P.; Ganilova, Olga A.

    2014-12-10

    The concept of momentum exchange when applied to space tethers for propulsion is well established, and a considerable body of literature now exists on the on-orbit modelling, the dynamics, and also the control of a large range of tether system applications. The authors consider here a new application for the Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether by highlighting three key stages of development leading to a conceptualisation that can subsequently be developed into a technology for Active Debris Removal. The paper starts with a study of the on-orbit mechanics of a full sized motorised tether in which it is shown that a laden and therefore highly massasymmetrical tether can still be forced to spin, and certainly to librate, thereby confirming its possible usefulness for active debris removal (ADR). The second part of the paper concentrates on the modelling of the centripetal deployment of a symmetrical MMET in order to get it initialized for debris removal operations, and the third and final part of the paper provides an entry into scale modelling for low cost mission design and testing. It is shown that the motorised momentum exchange tether offers a potential solution to the removal of large pieces of orbital debris, and that dynamic methodologies can be implemented to in order to optimise the emergent design.

  11. The mechanics of motorised momentum exchange tethers when applied to active debris removal from LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldecott, Ralph; Kamarulzaman, Dayangku N. S.; Kirrane, James P.; Cartmell, Matthew P.; Ganilova, Olga A.

    2014-12-01

    The concept of momentum exchange when applied to space tethers for propulsion is well established, and a considerable body of literature now exists on the on-orbit modelling, the dynamics, and also the control of a large range of tether system applications. The authors consider here a new application for the Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether by highlighting three key stages of development leading to a conceptualisation that can subsequently be developed into a technology for Active Debris Removal. The paper starts with a study of the on-orbit mechanics of a full sized motorised tether in which it is shown that a laden and therefore highly massasymmetrical tether can still be forced to spin, and certainly to librate, thereby confirming its possible usefulness for active debris removal (ADR). The second part of the paper concentrates on the modelling of the centripetal deployment of a symmetrical MMET in order to get it initialized for debris removal operations, and the third and final part of the paper provides an entry into scale modelling for low cost mission design and testing. It is shown that the motorised momentum exchange tether offers a potential solution to the removal of large pieces of orbital debris, and that dynamic methodologies can be implemented to in order to optimise the emergent design.

  12. Study of selected tether applications in space, phase 3, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The results of a Phase 3 study of two Selected Tether Applications in Space (STAIS); deorbit of a Shuttle and launch of an Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), both from the space station using a tether were examined. The study objectives were to: perform a preliminary engineering design, define operational scenarios, develop a common cost model, perform cost benefits analyses, and develop a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS). Key features of the performance analysis were to identify the net increases in effective Shuttle cargo capability if tethers are used to assist in the deorbit of Shuttles and the launching of the OTVs from the space station and to define deployer system designs required to accomplish these tasks. Deployer concepts were designed and discussed. Operational scenarios, including timelines, for both tethered and nontethered Shuttle and OTV operations at the space station were evaluated. A summary discussion of the Selected Tether Applications Cost Model (STACOM) and the results of the cost benefits analysis are presented. Several critical technologies needed to implement tether assisted deployment of payloads are also discussed. Conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  13. Biomimicry enhances sequential reactions of tethered glycolytic enzymes, TPI and GAPDHS.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Chinatsu; Gao, Lizeng; Bergkvist, Magnus; Nelson, Jacquelyn L; Hinchman, Meleana M; Travis, Alexander J

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining activity of enzymes tethered to solid interfaces remains a major challenge in developing hybrid organic-inorganic devices. In nature, mammalian spermatozoa have overcome this design challenge by having glycolytic enzymes with specialized targeting domains that enable them to function while tethered to a cytoskeletal element. As a step toward designing a hybrid organic-inorganic ATP-generating system, we implemented a biomimetic site-specific immobilization strategy to tether two glycolytic enzymes representing different functional enzyme families: triose phosphoisomerase (TPI; an isomerase) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDHS; an oxidoreductase). We then evaluated the activities of these enzymes in comparison to when they were tethered via classical carboxyl-amine crosslinking. Both enzymes show similar surface binding regardless of immobilization method. Remarkably, specific activities for both enzymes were significantly higher when tethered using the biomimetic, site-specific immobilization approach. Using this biomimetic approach, we tethered both enzymes to a single surface and demonstrated their function in series in both forward and reverse directions. Again, the activities in series were significantly higher in both directions when the enzymes were coupled using this biomimetic approach versus carboxyl-amine binding. Our results suggest that biomimetic, site-specific immobilization can provide important functional advantages over chemically specific, but non-oriented attachment, an important strategic insight given the growing interest in recapitulating entire biological pathways on hybrid organic-inorganic devices.

  14. Tethered Solar Power Satellite for the Near-term Demonstration Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, S.

    2004-12-01

    Tethered Solar Power Satellite (Tethered-SPS) consisting of a large panel with a capability of power generation/ transmission and a bus system which are connected by multi-wires has been proposed as an innovative solar power satellite. The Tethered-SPS concept is highly robust and potentially low cost, with special features in the integration, construction, attitude control, heat management, and evolutional development strategy. Towards the practical Tethered-SPS of GW level in the future, a demonstration experiment in the near future has been investigated. The basic plan is to place a miniature tethered SPS in the low earth orbit to demonstrate the microwave power transmission to the ground. The demonstrator has a 16 m x 17.6 m panel consisting of 400 power generation/transmission modules and an end mass, which are connected with a truss and tether wires. The attitude is stabilized by the gravity-gradient force so as that the transmitting antennas in the lower plane of the panel are always directed to the ground. The experiment will be able to demonstrate the microwave power transmission more than 100 kW from the orbit to the rectenna on the ground.

  15. The Secret Life of Tethers: The Role of Tethering Factors in SNARE Complex Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Dubuke, Michelle L.; Munson, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking in eukaryotic cells is a tightly regulated process to ensure correct cargo delivery to the proper destination organelle or plasma membrane. In this review, we focus on how the vesicle fusion machinery, the SNARE complex, is regulated by the interplay of the multisubunit tethering complexes (MTC) with the SNAREs and Sec1/Munc18 (SM) proteins. Although these factors are used in different stages of membrane trafficking, e.g., Golgi to plasma membrane transport vs. vacuolar fusion, and in a variety of diverse eukaryotic cell types, many commonalities between their functions are being revealed. We explore the various protein-protein interactions and findings from functional reconstitution studies in order to highlight both their common features and the differences in their modes of regulation. These studies serve as a starting point for mechanistic explorations in other systems. PMID:27243006

  16. Currents between tethered electrodes in a magnetized laboratory plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on important plasma physics issues of electrodynamic tethers were performed. These included current propagation, formation of wave wings, limits of current collection, nonlinear effects and instabilities, charging phenomena, and characteristics of transmission lines in plasmas. The experiments were conducted in a large afterglow plasma. The current system was established with a small electron-emitting hot cathode tethered to an electron-collecting anode, both movable across the magnetic field and energized by potential difference up to V approx.=100 T(sub e). The total current density in space and time was obtained from complete measurements of the perturbed magnetic field. The fast spacecraft motion was reproduced in the laboratory by moving the tethered electrodes in small increments, applying delayed current pulses, and reconstructing the net field by a linear superposition of locally emitted wavelets. With this technique, the small-amplitude dc current pattern is shown to form whistler wings at each electrode instead of the generally accepted Alfven wings. For the beam electrode, the whistler wing separates from the field-aligned beam which carries no net current. Large amplitude return currents to a stationary anode generate current-driven microinstabilities, parallel electric fields, ion depletions, current disruptions and time-varying electrode charging. At appropriately high potentials and neutral densities, excess neutrals are ionized near the anode. The anode sheath emits high-frequency electron transit-time oscillations at the sheath-plasma resonance. The beam generates Langmuir turbulence, ion sound turbulence, electron heating, space charge fields, and Hall currents. An insulated, perfectly conducting transmission line embedded in the plasma becomes lossy due to excitation of whistler waves and magnetic field diffusion effects. The implications of the laboratory observations on electrodynamic tethers in space are discussed.

  17. Binding assays with artificial tethered membranes using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Wiltschi, Birgit; Knoll, Wolfgang; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin

    2006-06-01

    Surface sensitive optical techniques based on surface plasmon resonance have become interesting for biosciences in the context of biorecognition and binding studies at functional surfaces. We use surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPS) in combination with surface plasmon enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) for the characterization of interaction processes associated with biomembranes. The biological membrane is mimicked by a tethered membrane consisting of a planar lipid bilayer attached to a gold surface via a hydrophilic anchor peptide. The interaction between membrane-bound hydrophobic compounds and free hydrophilic molecules is monitored in real-time and with high sensitivity and selectivity by combined SPS/SPFS. In this review we shortly discuss the principles of surface plasmon resonance and its utilization in SPS and SPFS. A detailed description of the required instrumentation for combined SPS and SPFS is presented. Furthermore, we outline the design of a binding assay with a tethered bilayer and the procedure of the artificial membrane system built-up is delineated. We also present examples that demonstrate the potential of combined SPS/SPFS assays with artificial tethered membranes. The method provides insight into the interaction of integral membrane proteins with various hydrophilic ligands and the specific recognition of small lipophilic molecules by soluble proteins.

  18. Controlled Tethering Molecules via Crystal Surface Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Stephen Z. D.; Zheng, Joseph X.; Chen, William Y.

    2004-03-01

    So far, almost all experiments in tethering chain molecules onto substrates are via "grafting to" or "grafting from" polymerizations in addition to physical absorption. Issues concerning the uniformity of the tethered chain density and the molecular weight distribution of the chains tethered by polymerization always undermine the properties experimentally observed. We proposed a novel design to precisely control the tethering density of polystyrene (PS) brushes on a poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) or a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) lamellar crystal basal surface using PEO-b-PS or PLLA-b-PS diblock copolymers. As the crystallization temperature (Tc) increased in either a PEO-b-PS/mixed solution (chrolobenzene/octane) or a PLLA-b-PS/amyl acetate solution, the PEO or PLLA lamellar thickness (d) increased, and correspondingly, the number of folds per PEO or PLLA block was reduced. The reduced tethered density (Σ*) of the PS brushes thus increased. At an onset where the PS brushes are overcrowded within the solution, a drastic slope change in the relationship between (d)-1 and Tc occurs in both cases at a Σ* between 3 - 4. This illustrates that the weak to intermediate interaction changes of the PS brushes with their neighbors may be universally represented.

  19. Plasma Interactions with a Negative Biased Electrodynamic Tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Welzyn, Ken J.; Curtis, Leslie

    2003-01-01

    The ProSEDS conductive tether design incorporates two distinct types of tethers from a plasma interaction viewpoint. The 200 m closest to the Delta 11 spacecraft is insulated from the plasma, and the remaining 5000 m is semi-bare. This latter portion is semi-bare because it has a conductive coating applied to the wires to permit electron collection while also regulating the overall tether temperature. Because the tether possesses these two distinct types of tethers, a transition point exists between the two types that form a triple point with the space plasma. Insulated tethers can suffer from a second plasma interaction if the insulation is weakened or breached, such as by pinholes caused by small particle debris strikes. Because electrodynamic tethers are typically long, they have a high probability of such impacts. These impacting particles may not be of sufficient size to severe the tether, but they can easily be of sufficient size to damage the tether insulation. Samples of both the ProSEDS tether transition region and the insulated tether section (with various degrees of pinhole damage) were placed into the MSFC plasma chamber and biased to typical ProSEDS open circuit tether potentials (-500 V to -1600 V). The results of the testing showed that the transition region of the tether (i.e. the triple point) arced and burned the tether in two at -900 V, and the damaged insulated sections arced and burned in two between -1000 V and -1600, depending on the pinhole damage geometry. tether design and make the tether ready for flight. To reduce the pinhole arcing risk, ProSEDS mission operations were changed to eliminate the negative potential on the tether. The results of the testing campaign and the design changes implemented to ensure a successful flight will be described.

  20. Plasma Interactions With a Negative Biased Electrodynamic Tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Curtis, Leslie; Welzyn, Ken J.

    2004-01-01

    The ProSEDS conductive tether design incorporates two distinct types of tethers from a plasma interaction viewpoint. The 200 m closest to the Delta II spacecraft is insulated from the plasma, and the remaining 4800 m is semi-bare. This latter portion is considered semi-bare because a conductive coating, which is designed to collect electrons from the plasma, was applied to the wires to regulate the overall tether temperature. Because the tether has both insulating and conductive tether sections, a transition point exists between the two that forms a triple point with the space plasma. Also, insulated tethers can arc to the space plasma if the insulation is weakened or breached by pinholes caused by either improper handling or small meteoroid and orbital debris strikes. Because electrodynamic tethers are typically long, they have a high probability of these impacts. The particles, which strike the tether, may not have sufficient size to severe the tether, but they can easily penetrate the tether insulation producing a plasma discharge to the ambient plasma. Samples of both the ProSEDS tether transition region and the insulated tether section with various size of pinholes were placed into the MSFC plasma chamber and biased to typical ProSEDS open circuit tether potentials (-500 V to -1600 V). The results of the testing showed that the transition region of the tether (i.e. the triple point) arced to the ambient plasma at -900 V, and the tethers damaged by a pinhole or simulated debris strike arced to the plasma between -700 V and -900 V. Specific design steps were taken to eliminate the triple point issue in the ProSEDS tether design and make it ready for flight. To reduce the pinhole arcing risk, ProSEDS mission operations were changed to eliminate the high negative potential on the insulated tether. The results of the testing campaign and the design changes implemented to ensure a successful flight are described.

  1. A Model for Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Tether Momentum Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen; Johnson, David; Sorensen, Kirk; Welzyn, Ken; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost (MXER) tether systems may enable high-energy missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond by serving as an 'upper stage in space'. Existing rockets that use an MXER tether station could double their capability to launch communications satellites and help improve US competitiveness. A MXER tether station would boost spacecraft from low Earth orbit to a high-energy orbit quickly, like a high-thrust rocket. Then, using the same principles that make an electric motor work, it would slowly rebuild its orbital momentum by pushing against the Earth's magnetic field-without using any propellant. One of the significant challenges in developing a momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost tether systems is in the analysis and design of the capture mechanism and its effects on the overall dynamics of the system. This paper will present a model for a momentum-exchange tether system that can simulate and evaluate the performance and requirements of such a system.

  2. Application of the NASCAP Spacecraft Simulation Tool to Investigate Electrodynamic Tether Current Collection in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi; HabashKrause, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Recent interest in using electrodynamic tethers (EDTs) for orbital maneuvering in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) has prompted the development of the Marshall ElectroDynamic Tether Orbit Propagator (MEDTOP) model. The model is comprised of several modules which address various aspects of EDT propulsion, including calculation of state vectors using a standard orbit propagator (e.g., J2), an atmospheric drag model, realistic ionospheric and magnetic field models, space weather effects, and tether librations. The natural electromotive force (EMF) attained during a radially-aligned conductive tether results in electrons flowing down the tether and accumulating on the lower-altitude spacecraft. The energy that drives this EMF is sourced from the orbital energy of the system; thus, EDTs are often proposed as de-orbiting systems. However, when the current is reversed using satellite charged particle sources, then propulsion is possible. One of the most difficult challenges of the modeling effort is to ascertain the equivalent circuit between the spacecraft and the ionospheric plasma. The present study investigates the use of the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP) to calculate currents to and from the tethered satellites and the ionospheric plasma. NASCAP is a sophisticated set of computational tools to model the surface charging of three-dimensional (3D) spacecraft surfaces in a time-varying space environment. The model's surface is tessellated into a collection of facets, and NASCAP calculates currents and potentials for each one. Additionally, NASCAP provides for the construction of one or more nested grids to calculate space potential and time-varying electric fields. This provides for the capability to track individual particles orbits, to model charged particle wakes, and to incorporate external charged particle sources. With this study, we have developed a model of calculating currents incident onto an electrodynamic tethered satellite system, and first results are shown

  3. Space Station tethered refueling facility operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefel, E. R.; Rudolph, L. K.; Fester, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    The space-based orbital transfer vehicle will require a large cryogenic fuel storage facility at the Space Station. An alternative to fuel storage onboard the Space Station, is on a tethered orbital refueling facility (TORF) which is separated from the Space Station by a sufficient distance to induce a gravity gradient to settle the propellants. Facility operations are a major concern associated with a tethered LO2/LH2 storage depot. A study was carried out to analyze these operations so as to identify the preferred TORF deployment direction (up or down) and whether the TORF should be permanently or intermittently deployed. The analyses considered safety, contamination, rendezvous, servicing, transportation rate, communication, and viewing. An upwardly, intermittently deployed facility is the preferred configuration for a tethered cryogenic fuel storage.

  4. Shuttle tethered operations: The effect on orbital trajectory and inertial navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lardas, Mark N.

    1989-01-01

    The first full scale test of a large tethered satellite system is planned. The Orbiter will be linked to a 500 kg payload by a 20 km tether, an action with a profound effect on the trajectory of the Orbiter. For the first time in the history of the Shuttle program, the vehicle will conduct prolonged operations with the center of mass of the orbiting system a significant distance from the center of mass of the Space Shuttle Orbiter, a violation of the fundamental assumption made in both the Orbiter ground-based and onboard navigation software. Inertial navigation of tethered operations with the Shuttle is further complicated by the presence of non-conservative forces in the system: Reaction Control System (RCS) translational effects, atmospheric drag, and electro-magnetic dynamics. These can couple with the conservative tether dynamics effects, and degrade the navigation software performance. The primary effects are examined on the Orbiter's trajectory, coupling by conservative forces during tethered operations, and the impact of both on the ability to meet inertial navigation constraints. The impact of electrodynamics, different RCS control modes, commanded attitudes, and attitude deadbands are presented. Operational guidelines which optimize successful mission navigation, and necessary navigation constraints are discussed.

  5. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in Earth orbit (phase 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.

    1987-01-01

    Simulation of two short distance crawling maneuvers of the elevator both with and without environmental perturbations acting upon the system is discussed. These simulation runs were performed in order to provide results useful for the interpretation of the data from the tests, on the ground, of a scaled down engineering model of the elevator. In these simulation runs the elevator crawls along the tether in accordance to the developed mirror image motion control law (MIMCL). Results from the simulation of the 4 km long maneuver run were compared to those obtained by adopting the modified hyperbolic tangent control law (MHTCL). A preprocessor was developed for setting up the initial conditions of a tethered system with L platforms, M longitudinal dampers, and N lumped masses (platforms plus tether beads). A short test run of the 4-platform system with 3 longitudinal dampers and 10 lumper mass without any perturbation acting upon the system is illustrated. In support of the Tether Applications Working Group, SAO is preparing a catalog of tether simulations, has prepared a set of simulator test cases, obtained results from SKYHOOK, and solicited results from simulators at other institutions, and prepared a paper on a specific analytic solution.

  6. Atmospheric Electricity and Tethered Aerostats, Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-05-11

    The onset and value of corona current can be crudely estimated. Over most of the length of the wire, the field at the surface can be approximated by...the tether in this measurement. The decrease of time constant with time is due to the decrease of the field at the tether surface . It is this field ...upper atmosphere produces a positive field at the earth’s surface below. 3 some evLdt-itce tLhuL localizedi very inte-nse fields approaching 400 kV/m

  7. Protein synthesis by ribosomes with tethered subunits.

    PubMed

    Orelle, Cédric; Carlson, Erik D; Szal, Teresa; Florin, Tanja; Jewett, Michael C; Mankin, Alexander S

    2015-08-06

    The ribosome is a ribonucleoprotein machine responsible for protein synthesis. In all kingdoms of life it is composed of two subunits, each built on its own ribosomal RNA (rRNA) scaffold. The independent but coordinated functions of the subunits, including their ability to associate at initiation, rotate during elongation, and dissociate after protein release, are an established model of protein synthesis. Furthermore, the bipartite nature of the ribosome is presumed to be essential for biogenesis, since dedicated assembly factors keep immature ribosomal subunits apart and prevent them from translation initiation. Free exchange of the subunits limits the development of specialized orthogonal genetic systems that could be evolved for novel functions without interfering with native translation. Here we show that ribosomes with tethered and thus inseparable subunits (termed Ribo-T) are capable of successfully carrying out protein synthesis. By engineering a hybrid rRNA composed of both small and large subunit rRNA sequences, we produced a functional ribosome in which the subunits are covalently linked into a single entity by short RNA linkers. Notably, Ribo-T was not only functional in vitro, but was also able to support the growth of Escherichia coli cells even in the absence of wild-type ribosomes. We used Ribo-T to create the first fully orthogonal ribosome-messenger RNA system, and demonstrate its evolvability by selecting otherwise dominantly lethal rRNA mutations in the peptidyl transferase centre that facilitate the translation of a problematic protein sequence. Ribo-T can be used for exploring poorly understood functions of the ribosome, enabling orthogonal genetic systems, and engineering ribosomes with new functions.

  8. Fractional order tension control for stable and fast tethered satellite retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guanghui; Zhu, Z. H.

    2014-11-01

    The retrieval of a tethered satellite system is intrinsically unstable. This paper develops a new control strategy to retrieve the tethered satellite system stably and quickly using the fractional order control theory. The governing equation of the tethered satellite system and classic linear feedback tension control law were first reviewed and examined as a benchmark. Then, a new fractional order tension control law has been to avoid the tethered satellite winds around the main satellite near the end of retrieval by existing integer order tension control laws. The newly proposed control law has been discretized and implemented by the Laplace transform and Tustin operator. Unlike the existing integer order control laws, which are based on the feedback of current state and memoryless, the fractional order control law has the memory of previous states and thus controls the tether retrieval more smoothly while maintaining the retrieving speed. The effectiveness and advantage of the new fractional order tension control law is demonstrated numerically by comparing with its integer order counterpart. The results show that the new control law not only retrieves the subsatellite without winding around the main satellite, but also provides a better control performance with smaller in-plane libration angles.

  9. Tethered acoustic doppler current profiler platforms for measuring streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehmel, Michael S.; Stewart, James A.; Morlock, Scott E.

    2003-01-01

    A tethered-platform design with a trimaran hull and 900-megahertz radio modems is now commercially available. Continued field use has resulted in U.S. Geological Survey procedures for making tethered-platform discharge measurements, including methods for tethered-boat deployment, moving-bed tests, and measurement of edge distances.

  10. Centralized Dynamics and Control of Novel Orbiting Formations of Tethered Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.

    acting as leader of the tethered formation. An application of this problem arises when a distributed sensor array formed by a chain of tethered data-gathering vehicles is being commanded to reconfigure from a remote location by the formation leader. Another application is in radar mapping where multiple free-flying vehicles synthesize multiple apertures with the main tethered vehicle for increased coverage. In this way, a centralized control architecture distributes the information flow among the members of the sensor array. Defining an orbiting formation as an ensemble of orbiting spacecraft performing a cooperative task, we point out that, until now, only spacecraft modeled as rigid bodies have been analyzed in the literature of orbiting formations and constellations. After the formation is in place, one may identify what is known as the virtual truss, i.e. the connection between the elements of the formation, which provides structural rigidity on account of the information flow between them. Our problem is different than conventional formation dynamics problems in that the presence of a tethered spacecraft within the formation demands an investigation of the dynamics coupling between spacecraft caused by tether viscoelasticity. The dynamics model takes into account the orbital and spacecraft dynamics of each vehicle. The control architecture features a separated spacecraft, which has visibility to the entire group of tethered vehicles. This vehicle is the leader of the formation, and ensures that the spacecraft on the tether remain connected and move according to a pre-specified program. The control system design consists of a proportional-derivative feedback plus acceleration feedforward. This ensures that modeling errors are compensated appropriately, and that the commanded slew is tracked accurately. The leader is also where the centralized estimator is located. This estimator continuously updates the state of the formation and estimates inter

  11. Implementation Options for the PROPEL Electrodynamic Tether Demonstration Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilen, Sven G.; Johnson, C. Les; Gilchrist, Brian E.; Hoyt, Robert P.; Elder, Craig H.; Fuhrhop, Keith P.; Scadera, Michael; Stone, Nobie

    2014-01-01

    The PROPEL ("Propulsion using Electrodynamics") flight demonstration mission concept will demonstrate the use of an electrodynamic tether (EDT) for generating thrust, which will allow the propulsion system to overcome the limitations of the rocket equation. The mission concept has been developed by a team of government, industry, and academia partners led by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). PROPEL is being designed for versatility of the EDT system with multiple end users in mind and to be flexible with respect to platform. Previously, we reported on a comprehensive mission design for PROPEL with a mission duration of six months or longer with multiple mission goals including demonstration of significant boost, deboost, inclination change, and drag make-up activities. To explore a range of possible configurations, primarily driven by cost considerations, other mission concept designs have been pursued. In partnership with the NASA's Office of Chief Technologist (OCT) Game Changing Program, NASA MSFC Leadership, and the MSFC Advanced Concepts Office, a mission concept design was developed for a near-term EDT propulsion flight validation mission. The Electrodynamic Tether Propulsion Study (ETPS) defined an EDT propulsion system capable of very large delta-V for use on future missions developed by NASA, DoD, and commercial customers. To demonstrate the feasibility of an ETPS, the study focused on a space demonstration mission concept design with configuration of a pair of tethered satellite busses, one of which is the Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). The HTV would fly its standard ISS resupply mission. When resupply mission is complete, the ISS reconfigures and releases the HTV to perform the EDT experiment at safe orbital altitudes below the ISS. Though the focus of this particular mission concept design addresses a scenario involving the HTV or a similar vehicle, the propulsion system's capability is relevant to a number of applications, as noted above

  12. Tether radiation in Juno-type and circular-equatorial Jovian orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Torres, A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Wave radiation by a conductor carrying a steady current in both a polar, highly eccentric, low perijove orbit, as in NASA's planned Juno mission, and an equatorial low Jovian orbit (LJO) mission below the intense radiation belts, is considered. Both missions will need electric power generation for scientific instruments and communication systems. Tethers generate power more efficiently than solar panels or radioisotope power systems (RPS). The radiation impedance is required to determine the current in the overall tether circuit. In a cold plasma model, radiation occurs mainly in the Alfvén and fast magnetosonic modes, exhibiting a large refraction index. The radiation impedance of insulated tethers is determined for both modes and either mission. Unlike the Earth ionospheric case, the low-density, highly magnetized Jovian plasma makes the electron gyrofrequency much larger than the plasma frequency; this substantially modifies the power spectrum for either mode by increasing the Alfvén velocity. Finally, an estimation of the radiation impedance of bare tethers is considered. In LJO, a spacecraft orbiting in a slow downward spiral under the radiation belts would allow determining magnetic field structure and atmospheric composition for understanding the formation, evolution, and structure of Jupiter. Additionally, if the cathodic contactor is switched off, a tether floats electrically, allowing e-beam emission that generate auroras. On/off switching produces bias/current pulses and signal emission, which might be used for Jovian plasma diagnostics.

  13. Yielding Elastic Tethers Stabilize Robust Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Matt J.; Luo, Jonathon P.; Thomas, Wendy E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria and eukaryotic cells express adhesive proteins at the end of tethers that elongate reversibly at constant or near constant force, which we refer to as yielding elasticity. Here we address the function of yielding elastic adhesive tethers with Escherichia coli bacteria as a model for cell adhesion, using a combination of experiments and simulations. The adhesive bond kinetics and tether elasticity was modeled in the simulations with realistic biophysical models that were fit to new and previously published single molecule force spectroscopy data. The simulations were validated by comparison to experiments measuring the adhesive behavior of E. coli in flowing fluid. Analysis of the simulations demonstrated that yielding elasticity is required for the bacteria to remain bound in high and variable flow conditions, because it allows the force to be distributed evenly between multiple bonds. In contrast, strain-hardening and linear elastic tethers concentrate force on the most vulnerable bonds, which leads to failure of the entire adhesive contact. Load distribution is especially important to noncovalent receptor-ligand bonds, because they become exponentially shorter lived at higher force above a critical force, even if they form catch bonds. The advantage of yielding is likely to extend to any blood cells or pathogens adhering in flow, or to any situation where bonds are stretched unequally due to surface roughness, unequal native bond lengths, or conditions that act to unzip the bonds. PMID:25473833

  14. Comments on the tethered galaxy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavering, William J.

    2006-08-01

    In a recent paper Davis, Lineweaver, and Webb make the counterintuitive assertion that a galaxy held "tethered" at a fixed distance from our own could emit blueshifted light. This effect was derived from the simplest Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) spacetimes and the ΩM=0.3, ΩΛ=0.7 case, which is believed to be a good late time model of our universe. In this paper, we recover their results in a more transparent way, revise their calculations, and propose a formulation of the tethered galaxy problem based on radar distance rather than comoving "proper" distance. This formulation helps to remove the coordinate-dependent nature of the tethered galaxy problem and establishes consistency between the empty FRW model and special relativity. In the general case, we see that, although the radar distance tethering reduces the redshift of a receding object, it does not do so sufficiently to cause the blueshift as found by Davis, Lineweaver, and Webb. We also discuss some important issues raised by this approach relating to the interpretation of the redshift, velocity, and distance in relativistic cosmology.

  15. Tethered Space Satellite-1 (TSS-1): Wound About a Bolt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Brian; Stevens, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    In the early 1990's US and Italian scientists collaborated to study the electrodynamics on a long tether between two satellites as it moved through the electrically charged portion of Earth's atmosphere called the ionosphere. Potential uses for the electrical current induced in the long wire include power and thrust generation for a satellite, momentum exchange, artificial gravity, deployment of sensors or antennas, and gravity-gradient stabilization. The Tethered Space Satellite (TSS) was a first-of-its-kind experiment with long tethers in space. It consisted of a satellite with science experiments attached to a 12.5 mile long, very thin (0.10 inch diameter) copper wire assembly wound around a spool in the deployer reel mechanism. The whole mechanism sits on a pallet that is installed into the Shuttle bay. At an altitude of 160 nautical miles above earth, the satellite would be deplodeployed from the Shuttle bay by raising it on a boom facing away from Earth. Once cleared of the bay, the deployer mechanism would slowly feed out the 12-plus miles of tether. Scientific data would be collected throughout the operation, after which the satellite would be reeled back in. A receiver spool to catch the 12.5 mile tether as it was being unwound by the deployer reel mechanism was set up to do the system-level test of deployer real mechanism prior to installing the loaded pallet into the Shuttle bay. The system level tests were required before the pallet could be installed into the Space Shuttle cargo bay. A few months before flight, the system level tests, including unreeling and reeling the tether, were completed at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the TSS payload was installed onto the Spacelab pallet. Some of this testing equipment was then shipped back to the contractor, Martin Marietta. Integration with the Shuttle began. Systems-level load analyses, which cannot be run until all information about each payload is finalized, was run in parallel with the physical

  16. Ice-Tethered Profiler Contributions to the Arctic Observing Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toole, J.; Krishfield, R.; Proshutinsky, A.; Timmermans, M.

    2008-12-01

    One of the hoped-for legacies of the International Polar Year is a sustained observational program such as the Arctic Observing Network to document and build understanding of future climate and ecosystem change. In the spirit of the now-operational international Argo float program, investigators from North America, Europe and Japan are collaborating to deploy drifting, ice-based observatory instrument systems on and below floes in the Arctic to sample the polar atmosphere-ice-ocean system and to make the resulting data available to researchers world-wide in real time. One element of these observatories is the WHOI Ice-Tethered Profiler, first deployed in August 2004. The ITP consists of a surface float and electronics package that sits atop an ice floe, a weighted, plastic-jacketed wire-rope tether extending from the surface float through the ice and down to 750-800 m depth, and a profiling vehicle with sensor package that moves up and down the tether. To date, 30 ITP systems (funded by research programs in 5 countries) have been deployed in the Arctic that together have returned more than 10,000 high-vertical-resolution temperature and salinity profiles spanning approximately 7 to 760 m depth over all seasons. Examples of the science being conducted with these data will be presented, along with performance statistics for the ITP instruments and engineering improvements/enhancements that are being implemented. Plans for sustaining the ITP contribution to the Arctic Observing Network will also be reviewed and future international collaborations invited.

  17. Transitions of tethered chain molecules under tension.

    PubMed

    Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta; Binder, Kurt

    2014-09-21

    An applied tension force changes the equilibrium conformations of a polymer chain tethered to a planar substrate and thus affects the adsorption transition as well as the coil-globule and crystallization transitions. Conversely, solvent quality and surface attraction are reflected in equilibrium force-extension curves that can be measured in experiments. To investigate these effects theoretically, we study tethered chains under tension with Wang-Landau simulations of a bond-fluctuation lattice model. Applying our model to pulling experiments on biological molecules we obtain a good description of experimental data in the intermediate force range, where universal features dominate and finite size effects are small. For tethered chains in poor solvent, we observe the predicted two-phase coexistence at transitions from the globule to stretched conformations and also discover direct transitions from crystalline to stretched conformations. A phase portrait for finite chains constructed by evaluating the density of states for a broad range of solvent conditions and tensions shows how increasing tension leads to a disappearance of the globular phase. For chains in good solvents tethered to hard and attractive surfaces we find the predicted scaling with the chain length in the low-force regime and show that our results are well described by an analytical, independent-bond approximation for the bond-fluctuation model for the highest tensions. Finally, for a hard or slightly attractive surface the stretching of a tethered chain is a conformational change that does not correspond to a phase transition. However, when the surface attraction is sufficient to adsorb a chain it will undergo a desorption transition at a critical value of the applied force. Our results for force-induced desorption show the transition to be discontinuous with partially desorbed conformations in the coexistence region.

  18. Technology update: Tethered aerostat structural design and material developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherow, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    Requirements exist for an extremely stable, high performance, all-weather tethered aerostat system. This requirement has been satisfied by a 250,000 cubic foot captive buoyant vehicle as demonstrated by over a year of successful field operations. This achievement required significant advancements in several technology areas including composite materials design, aerostatics and aerodynamics, structural design, electro-mechanical design, vehicle fabrication and mooring operations. This paper specifically addresses the materials and structural design aspects of pressurized buoyant vehicles as related to the general class of Lighter Than Air vehicles.

  19. Tether-Based Investigation of the Ionosphere and Lower Thermosphere Concept Definition Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L. (Editor); Herrmann, M. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Understanding the plasma and atmosphere around the Earth in the lower altitude regions of the mesosphere, lower thermosphere, and ionosphere is important in the global electric system. An upper atmosphere tether has been proposed to NASA that would collect much-needed data to further our knowledge of the regions. The mission is proposed as a shuttle experiment that would lower a tethered probe into certain regions of Earth's atmosphere, collecting data over a 6-day period. This report is a summary of the results of a concept definition study to design engineering system that will achieve the scientific objectives of this mission.

  20. Phase 3 study of selected tether applications in space. Volume 2: Study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineering designs were developed relative to a tethered launch assist from the Shuttle for payloads up to 10,000 kg mass and the tethering of a 15,000 kg science platform from the space station. These designs are used for a cost benefit analysis which assesses the feasibility of using such systems as a practical alternative to what would otherwise be accomplished by conventional means. The term conventional as related to both these applications is intended to apply to the use of some form(s) of chemical propulsion system.

  1. Research at the earth's edge. [tethered satellite study of upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.; Wood, George M., Jr.; Siemers, Paul M.

    1988-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter-deployed Tethered Satellite System (TSS) could allow an Orbiter at a 200 km orbital altitude to reach down to atmospheric altitudes of 90 km, in order to study weather phenomena, pollutant transport, 'nuclear winter' smoke transport, atmospheric physics and dynamics, sun-earth interactions, ecosystem interactions, and radio communications. The TSS satellite, a 1.5-m diameter sphere, would carry scientific instrumentation which could initially be dedicated to the investigation of energy and momentum transfer between a tethered system and the upper atmosphere.

  2. Surfactant Behavior of Amphiphilic Polymer-Tethered Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Zhao, Hanying

    2016-04-19

    In recent years, an emerging research area has been the surfactant behavior of polymer-tethered nanoparticles. In this feature article, we have provided a general introduction to the synthesis, self-assembly, and interfacial activity of polymer-tethered inorganic nanoparticles, polymer-tethered organic nanoparticles, and polymer-tethered natural nanoparticles. In addition, applications of the polymer-tethered nanoparticles in colloidal and materials science are briefly reviewed. All research demonstrates that amphiphilic polymer-tethered nanoparticles exhibit surfactant behavior and can be used as elemental building blocks for the fabrication of advanced structures by the self-assembly approach. The polymer-tethered nanoparticles provide new opportunities to engineer materials and biomaterials possessing specific functionality and physical properties.

  3. Multivalent Rab interactions determine tether-mediated membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lürick, Anna; Gao, Jieqiong; Kuhlee, Anne; Yavavli, Erdal; Langemeyer, Lars; Perz, Angela; Raunser, Stefan; Ungermann, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Membrane fusion at endomembranes requires cross-talk between Rab GTPases and tethers to drive SNARE-mediated lipid bilayer mixing. Several tethers have multiple Rab-binding sites with largely untested function. Here we dissected the lysosomal HOPS complex as a tethering complex with just two binding sites for the Rab7-like Ypt7 protein to determine their relevance for fusion. Using tethering and fusion assays combined with HOPS mutants, we show that HOPS-dependent fusion requires both Rab-binding sites, with Vps39 being the stronger Ypt7 interactor than Vps41. The intrinsic amphipathic lipid packaging sensor (ALPS) motif within HOPS Vps41, a target of the vacuolar kinase Yck3, is dispensable for tethering and fusion but can affect tethering if phosphorylated. In combination, our data demonstrate that a multivalent tethering complex uses its two Rab bindings to determine the place of SNARE assembly and thus fusion at endomembranes. PMID:27852901

  4. Study of certain launching techniques using long orbiting tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.; Arnold, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the basic equations governing orbital transfers using long orbiting tethers is presented. A very simple approximation to the general transfer equation is derived for the case of short tethers and low eccentricity orbits. Numerical examples are calculated for the case of injection into a circular orbit from a platform in eccentric orbit and injection into eccentric orbit from a platform in circular orbit. For the case of long tethers, a method is derived for reducing tether mass and increasing payload mass by tapering the tether to maintain constant stress per unit of tether cross section. Formulas are presented for calculating the equilibrium orbital parameters taking into account the mass of the platform, tether, and payload.

  5. Ground assisted rendezvous with geosynchronous satellites for the disposal of space debris by means of Earth-oriented tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chobotov, Vladimir; Melamed, Nahum; Ailor, William H.; Campbell, W. Spencer

    2009-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that extended length Earth-oriented tethers in the geosynchronous (GEO) region can be used to re-orbit satellites to disposal orbits. One such approach involves the extension of a GEO based tether, collection of a debris object, and retraction of the tether, which transfers the retracted configuration to a higher energy orbit for debris disposal. The re-extension of the tether after debris disposal returns the configuration to the near-GEO altitude. The practical feasibility of such a system depends on the ability to collect GEO debris objects, attach them to a deployed tether system, and retract the tethers for transfer to the disposal orbits. This study addresses the collection and delivery of debris objects to the deployed tether system in GEO. The investigation considers the number, type and the characteristics of the debris objects as well as the collection tug that can be ground controlled to detect, rendezvous and dock with the debris objects for their delivery to the tethers system. A total of more than 400 objects are in drift orbits crossing all longitudes either below or above the geostationary radius. More than 130 objects are also known to librate around the stable points in GEO with periods of libration up to five or more years. A characterization of the position and velocity of the debris objects relative to the collection tug is investigated. Typical rendezvous performance requirements for uncooperative GEO satellites are examined, and the similarities with other approaches such as the ESA's CX-OLEV commercial mission proposal to extend the life of geostationary telecommunication satellites are noted.

  6. Computer program for the load and trajectory analysis of two DOF bodies connected by an elastic tether: Users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, G. R., Jr.; Burbick, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The derivation of the differential equations of motion of a 3 Degrees of Freedom body joined to a 3 Degrees of Freedom body by an elastic tether. The tether is represented by a spring and dashpot in parallel. A computer program which integrates the equations of motion is also described. Although the derivation of the equations of motions are for a general system, the computer program is written for defining loads in large boosters recovered by parachutes.

  7. Drop Tower tests in preparation of a Tethered Electromagnetic Docking space demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivieri, Lorenzo; Francesconi, Alessandro; Antonello, Andrea; Bettiol, Laura; Branz, Francesco; Duzzi, Matteo; Mantellato, Riccardo; Sansone, Francesco; Savioli, Livia

    2016-07-01

    A group of students of the University of Padova is recently developing some technologies to implement a Tethered Electromagnetic Docking (TED) experiment, a novel system for close rendezvous and mating manoeuvres between two spacecraft, consisting in a small tethered probe ejected by the chaser and magnetically guided by a receiving electromagnet mounted on the target. Because of the generated magnetic field, automatic self-alignment and mating are possible; then, as the tether is rewinded, the chaser is able to dock with the target. This concept allows to simplify standard docking procedures, thanks to the reduction of proximity navigation and guidance requirements, as well as consequent fuel reduction. Other interesting applications are expected, from active debris removal to space tugging; in particular, the utilization of the tethered connection for detumbling operations is considered. The realization of a space demonstrator requires a preliminary verification of the critical technologies employed in TED, in particular the magnetic guidance and the probe deploy and retrieve; in the framework of ESA "Drop your Thesis!" 2014 and 2016 campaigns the experiments FELDs (Flexible Electromagnetic Leash Docking system) and STAR (System for Tether Automatic Retrieval) have been focused on the test of such critical elements in the relevant microgravity environment of ZARM Drop Tower in Bremen. In particular, FELDs consisted in a simplified model of TED with a magnetic target interface, a passive tethered probe and its launch system: the experiment allowed to assess the passive self-alignment of the probe with respect to the target and to study the effect of friction between the tether and the release system. Similarly, STAR is investigating the tether actively controlled deployment and retrieval, with the experiment campaign planned on November 2016. In addition, another microgravity experiment is in preparation for the investigation of active magnetic navigation: PACMAN

  8. Sustaining rapid vesicular release at active zones: potential roles for vesicle tethering

    PubMed Central

    Hallermann, Stefan; Silver, R. Angus

    2016-01-01

    Rapid information processing in our nervous system relies on high-frequency fusion of transmitter-filled vesicles at chemical synapses. Some sensory synapses possess prominent electron-dense ribbon structures that provide a scaffold for tethering synaptic vesicles at the active zone (AZ), enabling sustained vesicular release. Here, we review functional data indicating that some central and neuromuscular synapses can also sustain vesicle-fusion rates that are comparable to those of ribbon-type sensory synapses. Comparison of the ultrastructure across these different types of synapses, together with recent work showing that cytomatrix proteins can tether vesicles and speed vesicle reloading, suggests that filamentous structures may play a key role in vesicle supply. We discuss potential mechanisms by which vesicle tethering could contribute to sustained high rates of vesicle fusion across ribbon-type, central, and neuromuscular synapses. PMID:23164531

  9. Electrodynamic-Tether Magnetosphere Interaction From Capture to Low Jovian Orbit of its Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanmartin, J. R.; Charro, M.; Lorenzini, E. C.; Bombardelli, C.; Bramanti, C.

    2007-12-01

    An orbiting conductive tether provides a dissipative mechanism in planets that have magnetic field and ionosphere/magnetosphere. The Jovian system is a particularly appropriate place for use of an electrodynamic tether because the magnetic field is intense, the stationary orbit is close to the planet, and moon Io provides a dense plasma torus farther away. The interaction of the tether with the magnetized plasma is analyzed under a variety of conditions, since the spacecraft is captured into an equatorial, highly elliptical orbit with perijove inside the stationary orbit, till the spacecraft reaches a low circular orbit around Jupiter, below the radiation belts. The radiation dose accumulated as the apojove distance is reduced through of sequence of perijove passes, is studied.

  10. Stability analysis and trend study of a balloon tethered in a wind, with experimental comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redd, L. T.; Bland, S. R.; Bennett, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    A stability analysis and trend study for a balloon tethered in a steady wind are presented. The linearized, stability-derivative type analysis includes balloon aerodynamics, buoyancy, mass (including apparent mass), and static forces resulting from the tether cable. The analysis has been applied to a balloon 7.64 m in length, and the results are compared with those from tow tests of this balloon. This comparison shows that the analysis gives reasonable predictions for the damping, frequencies, modes of motion, and stability boundaries exhibited by the balloon. A trend study for the 7.64-m balloon was made to illustrate how the stability boundaries are affected by changes in individual stability parameters. The trends indicated in this study may also be applicable to many other tethered-balloon systems.

  11. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in Earth orbit, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E. C.; Arnold, D. A.; Grossi, M. D.; Gullahorn, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    The g-tuning maneuvers of a 3-mass, vertical tethered system are considered. In particular, the case of reaching a zero-g acceleration level on board the middle mass from a non-zero initial condition is analyzed. A control law that provides a satisfactory transient response is derived. The constellation dynamics in the case of the middle mass travelling from one tether tip to the other is also investigated. Instabilities that take place at the end of the maneuver are analyzed and accommodated by devising suitable damping algorithms.

  12. Tethered DNA dynamics in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Donev, Aleksandar; Weisgraber, Todd; Alder, Berni J; Graham, Michael D; de Pablo, Juan J

    2009-06-21

    We study the cyclic dynamics of a single polymer tethered to a hard wall in shear flow using Brownian dynamics, the lattice Boltzmann method, and a recent stochastic event-driven molecular dynamics algorithm. We focus on the dynamics of the free end (last bead) of the tethered chain and we examine the cross-correlation function and power spectral density of the chain extensions in the flow and gradient directions as a function of chain length N and dimensionless shear rate Wi. Extensive simulation results suggest a classical fluctuation-dissipation stochastic process and question the existence of periodicity of the cyclic dynamics, as previously claimed. We support our numerical findings with a simple analytical calculation for a harmonic dimer in shear flow.

  13. Precision tethered satellite attitude control. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Tethered spacecraft possess unique dynamic characteristics which make them advantageous for certain classes of experiments. One use for which tethers are particularly well suited is to provide an isolated platform for spaceborne observatories. The advantages of tethering a pointing platform 1 or 2 km from a space shuttle or space station are that, compared to placing the observatory on the parent spacecraft, vibrational disturbances are attenuated and contamination is eliminated. In practice, all satellites have some requirement on the attitude control of the spacecraft, and tethered satellites are no exception. It has previously been shown that conventional means of performing attitude control for tethered satellites are insufficient for any mission with pointing requirements more stringent than about 1 deg. This is due mainly to the relatively large force applied by the tether to the spacecraft. A particularly effective method of implementing attitude control for tethered satellites is to use this tether tension force to generate control torques by moving the tether attach point relative to the subsatellite center of mass. A demonstration of this attitude control technique on an astrophysical pointing platform has been proposed for a space shuttle flight test project and is referred to as the Kinetic Isolation Tether Experiment (KITE).

  14. Cholesterol-based tethers and markers for model membranes investigation.

    PubMed

    Eicher-Lorka, O; Charkova, T; Matijoška, A; Kuodis, Z; Urbelis, G; Penkauskas, T; Mickevičius, M; Bulovas, A; Valinčius, G

    2016-02-01

    A series of new bifunctional cholesterol compounds for tethered bilayer membrane (tBLM) systems were synthesized and tested. The compounds containing cyclic disulfide group may be used as molecular anchors for phospholipid bilayers. Anchoring occurs through the insertion of the cholesterol moiety into the hydrophobic slab of the phospholipid layer, while the surface density of anchor molecules may be adjusted using disulfides terminated spacers. Five ethylene oxide segments between the disulfide group and the cholesteryl provide hydration of the layer separating solid support and model membrane. Another group of cholesterol derivatives described in this work contains either fluorescence probe or electroactive functional groups. We demonstrated the practical utility of these compounds for visualization of cholesterol extraction from and loading to tBLMs. We demonstrated that electroactive group containing cholesterol derivatives can be reconstituted either into vesicles or tBLMs. In both cases an electrochemical signal can be generated on electrodes from these probes. In general, the newly synthesized compound may be utilized in a variety of applications involving tethered bilayer systems and vesicles.

  15. Climber motion optimization for the tethered space elevator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Paul; Ockels, Wubbo

    2010-05-01

    The tethered space elevator could provide a revolutionary means for enabling cheap transportation to geostationary altitude and beyond. Assuming that such a system can be built, one of the dynamic design problems is determining a means of moving the elevator along the tether so as to minimize the residual in-plane librational motion of the elevator ribbon and counterweight. In particular, this paper studies the problem from the point of view of dynamic optimization. A simplified dynamic model of the elevator system is derived that accounts for the fundamental libration modes and the motion of the elevator. The model is used to solve an optimal control problem that results in zero final in-plane librational motion of the ribbon. The results show that it is possible to eliminate the in-plane librational oscillations by reversing the direction of the elevator for a short time. It is also shown that it is possible to remove excess librational energy by controlled movement of the elevator on the ribbon. The effects of out-of-plane librations are also considered, but the climber motion does not have enough control authority to damp the out-of-plane motion over short time scales.

  16. Closed Loop Control of a Tethered Magnetic Capsule Endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Taddese, Addisu Z.; Slawinski, Piotr R.; Obstein, Keith L.; Valdastri, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic field gradients have repeatedly been shown to be the most feasible mechanism for gastrointestinal capsule endoscope actuation. An inverse quartic magnetic force variation with distance results in large force gradients induced by small movements of a driving magnet; this necessitates robotic actuation of magnets to implement stable control of the device. A typical system consists of a serial robot with a permanent magnet at its end effector that actuates a capsule with an embedded permanent magnet. We present a tethered capsule system where a capsule with an embedded magnet is closed loop controlled in 2 degree-of-freedom in position and 2 degree-of-freedom in orientation. Capitalizing on the magnetic field of the external driving permanent magnet, the capsule is localized in 6-D allowing for both position and orientation feedback to be used in a control scheme. We developed a relationship between the serial robot's joint parameters and the magnetic force and torque that is exerted onto the capsule. Our methodology was validated both in a dynamic simulation environment where a custom plug-in for magnetic interaction was written, as well as on an experimental platform. The tethered capsule was demonstrated to follow desired trajectories in both position and orientation with accuracy that is acceptable for colonoscopy. PMID:28286886

  17. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of tethered bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Valincius, Gintaras; Meškauskas, Tadas; Ivanauskas, Feliksas

    2012-01-10

    The electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) of tethered bilayer membranes (tBLMs) were analyzed, and the analytical solution for the spectral response of membranes containing natural or artificially introduced defects was derived. The analysis carried out in this work shows that the EIS features of an individual membrane defect cannot be modeled by conventional electrical elements. The primary reason for this is the complex nature of impedance of the submembrane ionic reservoir separating the phospholipid layer and the solid support. We demonstrate that its EIS response, in the case of radially symmetric defects, is described by the Hankel functions of a complex variable. Therefore, neither the impedance of the submembrane reservoir nor the total impedance of tBLMs can be modeled using the conventional elements of the equivalent electrical circuits of interfaces. There are, however, some limiting cases in which the complexity of the EIS response of the submembrane space reduces. In the high frequency limit, the EIS response of a submembrane space that surrounds the defect transforms into a response of a constant phase element (CPE) with the exponent (α) value of 0.5. The onset of this transformation is, beside other parameters, dependent on the defect size. Large-sized defects push the frequency limit lower, therefore, the EIS spectra exhibiting CPE behavior with α ≈ 0.5, can serve as a diagnostic criterion for the presence of such defects. In the low frequency limit, the response is dependent on the density of the defects, and it transforms into the capacitive impedance if the area occupied by a defect is finite. The higher the defect density, the higher the frequency edge at which the onset of the capacitive behavior is observed. Consequently, the presented analysis provides practical tools to evaluate the defect density in tBLMs, which could be utilized in tBLM-based biosensor applications. Alternatively, if the parameters of the defects, e.g., ion channels

  18. Rigorous approaches to tether dynamics in deployment and retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antona, Ettore

    1987-01-01

    Dynamics of tethers in a linearized analysis can be considered as the superposition of propagating waves. This approach permits a new way for the analysis of tether behavior during deployment and retrieval, where a tether is composed by a part at rest and a part subjected to propagation phenomena, with the separating section depending on time. The dependence on time of the separating section requires the analysis of the reflection of the waves travelling toward the part at rest. Such a reflection generates a reflected wave, whose characteristics are determined. The propagation phenomena of major interest in a tether are transverse waves and longitudinal waves, all mathematically modelled by the vibrating chord equations, if the tension is considered constant along the tether. An interesting problem also considered is concerned with the dependence of the tether tension from the longitudinal position, due to microgravity, and the influence of this dependence on the propagation waves.

  19. Analysis of thermionic bare tether operation regimes in passive mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanmartín, J. R.; Chen, Xin; Sánchez-Arriaga, G.

    2017-01-01

    A thermionic bare tether (TBT) is a long conductor coated with a low work-function material. In drag mode, a tether segment extending from anodic end A to a zero-bias point B, with the standard Orbital-motion-limited current collection, is followed by a complex cathodic segment. In general, as bias becomes more negative in moving from B to cathodic end C, one first finds space-charge-limited (SCL) emission covering up to some intermediate point B*, then full Richardson-Dushman (RD) emission reaching from B* to end C. An approximate analytical study, which combines the current and voltage profile equations with results from asymptotic studies of the Vlasov-Poisson system for emissive probes, is carried out to determine the parameter domain covering two limit regimes, which are effectively controlled by just two dimensionless parameters involving ambient plasma and TBT material properties. In one such limit regime, no point B* is reached and thus no full RD emission develops. In an opposite regime, SCL segment BB* is too short to contribute significantly to the current balance.

  20. Isothermal pumping analysis for high-altitude tethered balloons

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Kirsty A.; Hunt, Hugh E. M.

    2015-01-01

    High-altitude tethered balloons have potential applications in communications, surveillance, meteorological observations and climate engineering. To maintain balloon buoyancy, power fuel cells and perturb atmospheric conditions, fluids could be pumped from ground level to altitude using the tether as a hose. This paper examines the pumping requirements of such a delivery system. Cases considered include delivery of hydrogen, sulfur dioxide (SO2) and powders as fluid-based slurries. Isothermal analysis is used to determine the variation of pressures and velocities along the pipe length. Results show that transport of small quantities of hydrogen to power fuel cells and maintain balloon buoyancy can be achieved at pressures and temperatures that are tolerable in terms of both the pipe strength and the current state of pumping technologies. To avoid solidification, transport of SO2 would require elevated temperatures that cannot be tolerated by the strength fibres in the pipe. While the use of particle-based slurries rather than SO2 for climate engineering can reduce the pipe size significantly, the pumping pressures are close to the maximum bursting pressure of the pipe. PMID:26543573

  1. Isothermal pumping analysis for high-altitude tethered balloons.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Kirsty A; Hunt, Hugh E M

    2015-06-01

    High-altitude tethered balloons have potential applications in communications, surveillance, meteorological observations and climate engineering. To maintain balloon buoyancy, power fuel cells and perturb atmospheric conditions, fluids could be pumped from ground level to altitude using the tether as a hose. This paper examines the pumping requirements of such a delivery system. Cases considered include delivery of hydrogen, sulfur dioxide (SO2) and powders as fluid-based slurries. Isothermal analysis is used to determine the variation of pressures and velocities along the pipe length. Results show that transport of small quantities of hydrogen to power fuel cells and maintain balloon buoyancy can be achieved at pressures and temperatures that are tolerable in terms of both the pipe strength and the current state of pumping technologies. To avoid solidification, transport of SO2 would require elevated temperatures that cannot be tolerated by the strength fibres in the pipe. While the use of particle-based slurries rather than SO2 for climate engineering can reduce the pipe size significantly, the pumping pressures are close to the maximum bursting pressure of the pipe.

  2. Tethers as Debris: Simulating Impacts of Tether Fragments on Shuttle Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    The SPHC hydrodynamic code was used to simulate impacts of Kevlar and aluminum projectiles on a model of the LI-900 type insulating tiles used on Space Shuffle Orbiters The intent was to examine likely damage that such tiles might experience if impacted by orbital debris consisting of tether fragments. Projectile speeds ranged from 300 meters per second to 10 kilometers per second. Damage is characterized by penetration depth, tile surface-hole diameter, tile body-cavity diameter, coating fracture diameter, tether and cavity wall material phases, and deformation of the aluminum backwall.

  3. Electrodynamics of long metallic tethers in the ionospheric plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrowolny, M.

    1978-01-01

    A study is presented of the electrodynamic interactions of long metallic tethers (lengths up to 100 km) with the ionospheric plasma. The study, which is of interest in view of possible future experiments using long tethers in space, includes the derivation of current and potential distribution along the tether, taking also the effects of internal resistance into account. Electrostatic and electrodynamic drag forces are computed and compared with aerodynamic drag.

  4. Long term dynamics and optimal control of nano-satellite deorbit using a short electrodynamic tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, R.; Zhu, Z. H.

    2013-10-01

    This paper studies the long term dynamics and optimal control of a nano-satellite deorbit by a short electrodynamic tether. The long term deorbit process is discretized into intervals and within each interval a two-phase optimal control law is proposed to achieve libration stability and fast deorbit simultaneously. The first-phase formulates an open-loop fast-deorbit control trajectory by a simplified model that assumes the slow-varying orbital elements of electrodynamic tethered system as constant and ignores perturbation forces other than the electrodynamic force. The second phase tracks the optimal trajectory derived in the first phase by a finite receding horizon control method while considering a full dynamic model of electrodynamic tether system. Both optimal control problems are solved by direct collocation method base on the Hermite-Simpson discretization schemes with coincident nodes. The resulting piecewise nonlinear programing problems in the sequential intervals reduces the problem size and improve the computational efficiency, which enable an on-orbit control application. Numerical results for deorbit control of a short electrodynamic tethered nano-satellite system in both equatorial and highly inclined orbits demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed control method. An optimal balance between the libration stability and a fast deorbit of satellite with minimum control efforts is achieved.

  5. The stochastic dynamics of tethered microcantilevers in a viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, Brian A.; Paul, Mark R.; Radiom, Milad; Ducker, William A.; Walz, John Y.

    2014-10-28

    We explore and quantify the coupled dynamics of a pair of micron scale cantilevers immersed in a viscous fluid that are also directly tethered to one another at their tips by a spring force. The spring force, for example, could represent the molecular stiffness or elasticity of a biomolecule or material tethered between the cantilevers. We use deterministic numerical simulations with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to compute the stochastic dynamics of the cantilever pair for the conditions of experiment when driven only by Brownian motion. We validate our approach by comparing directly with experimental measurements in the absence of the tether which shows excellent agreement. Using numerical simulations, we quantify the correlated dynamics of the cantilever pair over a range of tether stiffness. Our results quantify the sensitivity of the auto- and cross-correlations of equilibrium fluctuations in cantilever displacement to the stiffness of the tether. We show that the tether affects the magnitude of the correlations which can be used in a measurement to probe the properties of an attached tethering substance. For the configurations of current interest using micron scale cantilevers in water, we show that the magnitude of the fluid coupling between the cantilevers is sufficiently small such that the influence of the tether can be significant. Our results show that the cross-correlation is more sensitive to tether stiffness than the auto-correlation indicating that a two-cantilever measurement has improved sensitivity when compared with a measurement using a single cantilever.

  6. Membrane tether formation from outer hair cells with optical tweezers.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiwei; Anvari, Bahman; Takashima, Masayoshi; Brecht, Peter; Torres, Jorge H; Brownell, William E

    2002-01-01

    Optical tweezers were used to characterize the mechanical properties of the outer hair cell (OHC) plasma membrane by pulling tethers with 4.5-microm polystyrene beads. Tether formation force and tether force were measured in static and dynamic conditions. A greater force was required for tether formations from OHC lateral wall (499 +/- 152 pN) than from OHC basal end (142 +/- 49 pN). The difference in the force required to pull tethers is consistent with an extensive cytoskeletal framework associated with the lateral wall known as the cortical lattice. The apparent plasma membrane stiffness, estimated under the static conditions by measuring tether force at different tether length, was 3.71 pN/microm for OHC lateral wall and 4.57 pN/microm for OHC basal end. The effective membrane viscosity was measured by pulling tethers at different rates while continuously recording the tether force, and estimated in the range of 2.39 to 5.25 pN x s/microm. The viscous force most likely results from the viscous interactions between plasma membrane lipids and the OHC cortical lattice and/or integral membrane proteins. The information these studies provide on the mechanical properties of the OHC lateral wall is important for understanding the mechanism of OHC electromotility. PMID:11867454

  7. Arterial wall tethering as a distant boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodis, S.; Zamir, M.

    2009-11-01

    A standing difficulty in the problem of blood vessel tethering has been that only one of the two required boundary conditions can be fully specified, namely, that at the inner (endothelial) wall surface. The other, at the outer layer of the vessel wall, is not known except in the limiting case where the wall is fully tethered such that its outer layer is prevented from any displacement. In all other cases, where the wall is either free or partially tethered, a direct boundary condition is not available. We present a method of determining this missing boundary condition by considering the limiting case of a semi-infinite wall. The result makes it possible to define the degree of tethering imposed by surrounding tissue more accurately in terms of the displacement of the outer layer of the vessel wall, rather than in terms of equivalent added mass which has been done in the past. This new approach makes it possible for the first time to describe the effect of partial tethering in its full range, from zero to full tethering. The results indicate that high tethering leads to high stresses and low displacements within the vessel wall, while low tethering leads to low stresses and high displacements. Since both extremes would be damaging to wall tissue, particularly elastin, this suggest that moderate tethering would be optimum in the physiological setting.

  8. A new tether system for captive raptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    Several types of jesses are used to restrain captive raptors. The Hollywood jess described here has been tested on six species during two decades. Like the Aylmeri jess now in common use in North America, the Hollywood jess consists of a removable rolled button jess and an anklet. Unlike the Aylmeri anklet, however, the Hollywood anklet can be removed and reattached without restraining the bird. This anklet makes the Hollywood jess the safest of all jesses. It can also be used repeatedly on different individuals and allows for the bird to be released in its pen or to the wild without encumbrances.

  9. Computational analysis of the tether pulling experiment to probe plasma membrane - cytoskeleton interaction in cells

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Kristopher R.; Popel, Aleksander S.; Anvari, Bahman; Brownell, William E.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Tethers are thin membrane tubes that can be formed when relatively small and localized forces are applied to cellular membranes and lipid bilayers. Tether pulling experiments have been used to better understand the fine membrane properties. These include the interaction between the plasma membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton, which is an important factor affecting membrane mechanics. We use a computational method aimed at the interpretation and design of tether pulling experiments in cells with a strong membrane-cytoskeleton attachment. In our model, we take into account the detailed information on the topology of bonds connecting the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. We compute the force-dependent piecewise membrane deflection and bending as well as modes of stored energy in three major regions of the system: body of the tether, membrane-cytoskeleton attachment zone, and the transition zone between the two. We apply our method to three cells: cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs), human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells, and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. OHCs have a special system of pillars connecting the membrane and the cytoskeleton, and HEK and CHO cells have a bond arrangement via bonds (e.g., PIP2) which is common to many other cells. We also present a validation of our model by using experimental data on CHO and HEK cells. The proposed method can be an effective tool in the analyses of experiments to probe the properties of cellular membranes. PMID:19905340

  10. Myocardial Infarction Alters Adaptation of the Tethered Mitral Valve

    PubMed Central

    Dal-Bianco, Jacob P.; Aikawa, Elena; Bischoff, Joyce; Guerrero, J. Luis; Hjortnaes, Jesper; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Szymanski, Catherine; Bartko, Philipp E.; Seybolt, Margo M.; Handschumacher, Mark D.; Sullivan, Suzanne; Garcia, Michael L.; Mauskapf, Adam; Titus, James S.; Wylie-Sears, Jill; Irvin, Whitney S.; Chaput, Miguel; Messas, Emmanuel; Hagège, Albert A.; Carpentier, Alain; Levine, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In patients with myocardial infarction (MI), leaflet tethering by displaced papillary muscles induces mitral regurgitation (MR), which doubles mortality. Mitral valves (MVs) are larger in such patients but fibrosis sets in counterproductively. The investigators previously reported that experimental tethering alone increases mitral valve area in association with endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition. OBJECTIVES This study explored the clinically relevant situation of tethering and MI, testing the hypothesis that ischemic milieu modifies MV adaptation. METHODS Twenty-three adult sheep were examined. Under cardiopulmonary bypass, the PM tips in 6 sheep were retracted apically to replicate tethering, short of producing MR (tethered-alone). PM retraction was combined with apical MI created by coronary ligation in another 6 sheep (tethered + MI), and left ventricular (LV) remodeling was limited by external constraint in 5 additional sheep (LV constraint). Six sham-operated sheep were controls. Diastolic MV surface area was quantified by 3-dimensional echocardiography at baseline and after 58 ± 5 days, followed by histopathology and flow cytometry of excised leaflets. RESULTS Tethered + MI leaflets were markedly thicker than tethered-alone valves and sham controls. Leaflet area also increased significantly. EMT, detected as α-smooth muscle actin-positive endothelial cells, significantly exceeded that in tethered-alone and control valves. Transforming growth factor-β, matrix metalloproteinase expression, and cellular proliferation were markedly increased. Uniquely, tethering + MI showed endothelial activation with vascular adhesion molecule expression, neovascularization, and cells positive for CD45, considered a hematopoietic cell marker. Tethered + MI findings were comparable with external ventricular constraint. CONCLUSIONS MI altered leaflet adaptation, including a profibrotic increase in valvular cell activation, CD45-positive cells, and matrix turnover

  11. Tethered propellant resupply technique for space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, K. R.

    1984-01-01

    One of the primary functions of the space station is related to the propellant resupply of orbital transfer vehicles, orbital maneuvering vehicles, and satellites. Difficulties arise in the case of an acquisition of cryogenic propellants by means of a use of zero-gravity techniques. The use of the 'tethered propellant resupply technique' is, therefore, considered. A study is being conducted to determine the feasibility, design requirements, and operational limitations of this technique. Attention is given to aspects of gravity feed, transfer method selection, requirements related to the orbital transfer vehicle, hazard clearance, attitude control, depot operations, end mass velocity, the microgravity laboratory, and concept evaluation activities.

  12. Guidebook for analysis of tether applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    This guidebook is intended as a tool to facilitate initial analyses of proposed tether applications in space. The guiding philosophy is that a brief analysis of all the common problem areas is far more useful than a detailed study in any one area. Such analyses can minimize the waste of resources on elegant but fatally flawed concepts, and can identify the areas where more effort is needed on concepts which do survive the initial analyses. The simplified formulas, approximations, and analytical tools included should be used only for preliminary analyses. For detailed analyses, the references with each topic and in the bibliography may be useful.

  13. Crumpling of a Stiff Tethered Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Timonen, J.; Karttunen, Mikko

    2004-12-01

    A first-principles numerical model for crumpling of a stiff tethered membrane is introduced. This model displays wrinkles, ridge formation, ridge collapse, and initiation of stiffness divergence. The amplitude and wavelength of the wrinkles and the scaling exponent of the stiffness divergence are consistent with both theory and experiment. Close to the stiffness divergence further buckling is hindered by the nonzero thickness of the membrane, and its elastic behavior becomes similar to that of dry granular media. No change in the distribution of contact forces can be observed at the crossover, implying that the network of ridges is then simultaneously a granular force-chain network.

  14. Design Rules and Analysis of a Capture Mechanism for Rendezvous between a Space Tether and Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Kirk F.; Canfield, Stephen L.; Norris, Marshall A.

    2006-01-01

    Momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost (MXER) tether systems have been proposed to serve as an "upper stage in space". A MXER tether station would boost spacecraft from low Earth orbit to a high-energy orbit quickly, like a high-thrust rocket. Then, it would slowly rebuild its orbital momentum through electrodynamic thrust, minimizing the use of propellant. One of the primary challenges in developing a momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost tether system as identified by the 2003 MXER Technology Assessment Group is in the development of a mechanism that will enable the processes of capture, carry and release of a payload by the rotating tether as required by the MXER tether approach. This paper will present a concept that will achieve the desired goals of the capture system. This solution is presented as a multi-DOF (degree-of-freedom) capture mechanism with nearly passive operation that features matching of the capture space and expected window of capture error, efficient use of mass and nearly passive actuation during the capture process. This paper will describe the proposed capture mechanism concept and provide an evaluation of the concept through a dynamic model and experimental tests performed on a prototype article of the mechanism in a dynamically similar environment. This paper will also develop a set of rules to guide the design of such a capture mechanism based on analytical and experimental analyses. The primary contributions of this paper will be a description of the proposed capture mechanism concept, a collection of rules to guide its design, and empirical and model information that can be used to evaluate the capability of the concept

  15. Template-Tethered Collagen Mimetic Peptides for Studying Heterotrimeric Triple-Helical Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Mo, Xiao; Kim, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Collagen mimetic peptides (CMPs) have been used to elucidate the structure and stability of the triple helical conformation of collagen molecules. Although CMP homotrimers have been widely studied, very little work has been reported regarding CMP heterotrimers because of synthetic difficulties. Here we present the synthesis and characterization of homotrimers and ABB type heterotrimers comprising natural and synthetic CMP sequences that are covalently tethered to a template, a tris(2-aminoethyl) amine (TREN) succinic acid derivative. Various tethered heterotrimers comprising synthetic CMPs [(ProHypGly)6, (ProProGly)6] and CMPs representing specific domains of type I collagen were synthesized and characterized in terms of triple helical structure, thermal melting behavior and refolding kinetics. The results indicated that CMPs derived from natural type I collagen sequence can form stable heterotrimeric helical complexes with artificial CMPs and that the thermal stability and the folding rate increase with the increasing number of helical stabilizing amino acids (e.g. Hyp) in the peptide chains. Covalent tethering enhanced the thermal stability and refolding kinetics of all CMPs; however their relative values were not affected suggesting that the tethered system can be used for comparative study of heterotrimeric CMP's folding behavior in regards to chain composition and for characterization of thermally unstable CMPs. PMID:20740489

  16. Curvature sorting of proteins on a cylindrical lipid membrane tether connected to a reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pankaj; Mahata, Paritosh; Baumgart, Tobias; Das, Sovan Lal

    2012-05-01

    Membrane curvature of a biological cell is actively involved in various fundamental cell biological functions. It has been discovered that membrane curvature and binding of peripheral membrane proteins follow a symbiotic relationship. The exact mechanism behind this interplay of protein binding and membrane curvature has not yet been properly understood. To improve understanding of the mechanism, we study curvature sorting of proteins in a model system consisting of a tether pulled from a giant unilamellar vesicle using mechanical-thermodynamic models. The concentration of proteins bound to the membrane changes significantly due to curvature. This has also been observed in experiments by other researchers. We also find that there is a phase transition based on protein concentration and we discuss the coexistence of phases and stability of solutions. Furthermore, when sorting is favorable, the increase in protein concentration stabilizes the tether in the sense that less pulling force is required to maintain the tether. A similar mechanism may be in place, when motor proteins pull tethers from donor membranes.

  17. Lipid Gymnastics: Tethers and Fingers in membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayebi, Lobat; Miller, Gregory; Parikh, Atul

    2009-03-01

    A significant body of evidence now links local mesoscopic structure (e.g., shape and composition) of the cell membrane with its function; the mechanisms by which cellular membranes adopt the specific shapes remain poorly understood. Among all the different structures adopted by cellular membranes, the tubular shape is one of the most surprising one. While their formation is typically attributed to the reorganization of membrane cytoskeleton, many exceptions exist. We report the instantaneous formation of tubular membrane mesophases following the hydration under specific thermal conditions. The shapes emerge in a bimodal way where we have two distinct diameter ranges for tubes, ˜20μm and ˜1μm, namely fat fingers and narrow tethers. We study the roughening of hydrated drops of 3 lipids in 3 different spontaneous curvatures at various temp. and ionic strength to figure out the dominant effect in selection of tethers and fingers. Dynamics of the tubes are of particular interest where we observe four distinct steps of birth, coiling, uncoiling and retraction with different lifetime on different thermal condition. These dynamics appear to reflect interplay between membrane elasticity, surface adhesion, and thermal or hydrodynamic gradient.

  18. A space tethered towing method using tension and platform thrusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhongjie; Wang, Bingheng; Huang, Panfeng

    2017-01-01

    Orbit maneuver via tether is a promising countermeasure for space debris removal and satellite orbit transfer. A space tethered towing method is explored that utilizes thrust to fulfill transfer and bounded tension to stabilize tether heading. For this purpose, a time-energy optimal orbit is designed by Gauss pseudospectral method. The theoretical attitude commands are obtained by equilibria analysis. An effective attitude control strategy is presented where the commands are optimized first and then feedback controller is designed. To deal with the underactuated problem with tension constraint, hierarchical sliding mode theory is employed and an adaptive anti-windup module is added to mitigate the actuator saturation. Simulation results show that the target is towed effectively by the thrusts, and a smooth tracking for the commands of tether length and in-plane tether heading is guaranteed by the bounded tension. In addition, the designed controller also presents appreciable robustness to model error and determination error.

  19. DOE Geothermal Data Repository - Tethering Data to Information: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Weers, J.; Anderson, A.

    2014-02-01

    Data are not inherently information. Without context, data are just numbers, figures, names, or points on a line. By assigning context to data, we can validate ideas, form opinions, and generate knowledge. This is an important distinction to information scientists, as we recognize that the context in which we keep our data plays a big part in generating its value. The mechanisms used to assign this context often include their own data, supplemental to the data being described and defining semantic relationships, commonly referred to as metadata. This paper provides the status of the DOE Geothermal Data Repository (DOE GDR), including recent efforts to tether data submissions to information, discusses the important distinction between data and information, outlines a path to generate useful knowledge from raw data, and details the steps taken in order to become a node on the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS).

  20. Dielectrophoretic Stretching of DNA Tethered to a Fiber Tip

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; McNabb, David S.; Li, Jiali

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we studied the stretching of λ phage DNA molecules immobilized on an optical fiber tip attached to a force sensitive tuning fork under AC electric fields. We designed a two electrodes stretching system in a small chamber: one is a gold-coated optical fiber tip electrode, and the other is a gold-coated flat electrode. By applying a dielectrophoretic force, the immobilized λ DNA molecules on the tip are stretched and the stretching process is monitored by a fluorescent microscope. The DNA stretching in three-dimensional space is optimized by varying electrode shape, electrode gap distance, AC frequency, and solution conductivity. By observing the vibrational amplitude change of a quartz tuning fork, we measured the effects due to Joule heating and the dielectrophoretic force on the tethered DNA molecules in solution. This work demonstrates a method to manipulate and characterize immobilized λ DNA molecules on a probe tip for further study of single DNA molecules. PMID:25741602

  1. Useful dual Diels-Alder behavior of 2-azetidinone-tethered aryl imines as azadienophiles or azadienes: a beta-lactam-based stereocontrolled access to optically pure highly functionalized indolizidine systems.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Benito; Almendros, Pedro; Alonso, Jose M; Aly, Moustafa F

    2003-07-21

    Imines derived from 4-oxoazetidine-2-carbaldehydes have been found to be versatile Diels-Alder reagents in that they exhibit two reactivity patterns. 2-Azetidinone-tethered imines undergo diastereoselective reaction with Danishefsky's diene in the presence of different Lewis acids. The effect of the amount of catalyst on the conversion rate as well as on the product ratio has been studied. Under standard reaction conditions, indium(III) chloride and zinc(II) iodide provided the best yields, and indium(III) triflate the highest diastereoselectivity in the Lewis acid promoted aza-Diels-Alder cycloaddition. Treatment of the aforementioned imines with cyclopentadiene, 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene or 3,4-dihydro-2 H-pyran led to cycloadducts arising from inverse electron-demand condensation involving the beta-lactam-tethered aryl imine as the heterodiene component. In addition, the first methodology for preparing indolizidines from beta-lactams has been developed. This process involves amide bond cleavage of the beta-lactam ring in the aza-Diels-Alder cycloadducts with concomitant cyclization. Full chirality transfer occurs when the reaction is performed with an enantiomerically pure substrate.

  2. Force fluctuations in stretching a tethered polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Anoop; Vemparala, Satyavani; Rajesh, R.

    2013-08-01

    The recently proposed fluctuation relation in unfolding forces [Phys. Rev. E1539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.84.060101 84, 060101(R) (2011)] is reexamined taking into account the explicit time dependence of the force distribution. The stretching of a tethered Rouse polymer is exactly solved and the ratio of the probabilities of positive to negative forces is shown to be an exponential in force. Extensive steered molecular dynamics simulations of unfolding of deca alanine peptide confirm the form of fluctuation relation proposed earlier, but with explicit correct time dependence of unfolding forces taken into account. From exact calculations and simulations, a linear dependence of the constant in the exponential of the fluctuation relation on average unfolding forces and inverse temperature is proposed.

  3. Magnetic Tethering of Microswimmers in Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawan, Aschvin; Jana, Saikat; Ghosh, Suvojit; Jung, Sunghwan; Puri, Ishwar

    2013-03-01

    Exercising control over animal locomotion is well known in the macro world. In the micro-scale world, such methods require more sophistication. We magnetize Paramecium multimicronucleatum by internalization of magnetite nanoparticles coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA). This enables control of their motion in a microfluidic device using a magnetic field. Miniature permanent magnets embedded within the device are used to tether the magnetized organisms to specific locations along a micro-channel. Ciliary beatings of the microswimmer generate shear flows nearby. We apply this setup to enhance cross-stream mixing in a microfluidic device by supplementing molecular diffusion. The device is similar to an active micromixer but requires no external power sources or artificial actuators. We optically characterize the effectiveness of the mechanism in a variety of flow situations.

  4. Tethered actuator for vibration control of space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, H. A.; Sugimoto, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Kusagaya, T.

    2015-12-01

    Effectiveness of a micro-tension actuator for vibration control of such flexible space structures as the tethered space solar power satellites is experimentally studied on the ground. A flexible leverage is employed as the micro-tension actuator in order to control the microtension of tether. The flexible leverage is connected through a tether to the flexible beam as an experimental model of the flexible solar panel with the low first modal frequency of order 1 Hz. The nonlinearity of the flexible tether is taken into account for the vibration control since the tether becomes ineffective when it slacks, i.e., when it is tension-free. The feedback controller is designed by means of the Mission Function control algorithm. Flexural rigidity of the flexible leverage plays an important role in the vibration suppression and is studied experimentally to shed light on the effectiveness of the leverages with five different kinds of rigidity. The experimental results show not only the effect of the flexural rigidity of the flexible leverage on the control performance of the vibration suppression but also the importance of selection of the rigidity to control the vibration of tethered flexible space structures through the microtension of tethers in space.

  5. Proceedings of a Workshop on Applications of Tethers in Space, Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The objectives were to identify potential applications for tethers in space; develop a first order assessment of the feasibility and benefits of tether applications; recommend future actions necessary to enable tether applications, including required technology advancements; and stimulate industry and government planners to consider the unique properties of tethers in designs for future missions.

  6. Interaction of the Space Shuttle on-orbit autopilot with tether dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergmann, Edward V.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of Orbiter flight control on tether dynamics is studied by simulation. Open-loop effects of Orbiter jet firing on tether dynamics are shown, and the potential for closed-loop interaction between tether dynamics and Orbiter flight control is determined. The significance of these effects on Orbiter flight control and tether control is assessed.

  7. Fluid-membrane tethers: Minimal surfaces and elastic boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Thomas R.; Huber, Greg; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2002-04-01

    Thin cylindrical tethers are common lipid bilayer membrane structures, arising in situations ranging from micromanipulation experiments on artificial vesicles to the dynamic structure of the Golgi apparatus. We study the shape and formation of a tether in terms of the classical soap-film problem, which is applied to the case of a membrane disk under tension subject to a point force. A tether forms from the elastic boundary layer near the point of application of the force, for sufficiently large displacement. Analytic results for various aspects of the membrane shape are given.

  8. Tethers as Debris: Simulating Impacts of Kevlar Tethers on Shuttle Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    In a previous paper I examined the effects of impacts of polymer tethers on aluminum plates using the SPHC hydrodynamic code. In this paper I apply tether models to a new target - models of Space Shuttle tiles developed during the STS 107 accident investigation. In this three-dimensional simulation, a short tether fragment strikes a single tile supported on an aluminum backing plate. A tile of the LI-900 material is modeled. Penetration and damage to the tile and the backwall are characterized for three normal impact velocities. The tether is modeled as a bundle of eight 1-mm strands, with the bundle having dimensions 2-mm x 4-mm x 20-cm. The bulk material properties used are those of Kevlar(TradeMark) 49, for which a Mie-Gruneisen multiphase equation of state (eos) is used. In addition, the strength model is applied in a linear sense, such that tensile loads along the strand length are supported, but there is no strength in the lateral directions. Tile models include the various layers making up the tile structure. The outermost layer is a relatively dense borosilicate glass, known as RCG, 0.5-mm thick. The RCG layer is present on the top and four sides of the tile. Below this coating is the bulk of the tile, 1.8- in thick, made of LI-900, a product consisting of rigidized fiberous silica with a density of 9 lWft3. Below the main insulating layer is a bottom layer of the same material that has been treated to increase its density by approximately 69% to improve its strength. This densified layer is bonded to a Strain Isolation Pad (SIP), modeled as a refractory felt fabric. The SIP is bonded to an aluminum 2024 wall 0.1-in thick. The tile and backwall materials use a Me-Gruneisen multiphase eos, with the exception of the SIP felt, which uses a fabric equation of state. Fabrics must be crushed to the full bulk material density before bulk material properties and a Mie-Gruneisen eos are applied. Tether fragment impact speeds of 3,7, and 10 km/s are simulated, with

  9. An investigation of the unexpected attitude dynamics experienced by the OEDIPUS-A tethered sounding rocket payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tye, G.; Han, R. P. S.; Berry, T. G.

    1991-05-01

    On 30 January 1989, the OEDIPUS-A Canadian scientific research rocket was launched. The payload, weighing some 265 kg, actually consisted of two payloads, referred to as the forward and aft payloads, each with their own complement of scientific instruments, control, power, and telemetry systems. An essential scientific requirement was to precisely align the payload with the Earth's magnetic field and separate the two subpayloads along the magnetic field line to a distance of one kilometer while an electrically conducting tether connects the two payloads. During the flight of OEDIPUS-A, all scientific instruments and payload support systems functioned normally and the tethered subpayloads separated to a distance of 960 meters. However, the flight data indicated that although there was virtually no coning increase in the forward payload after separation, the coning in the aft payload increased to approximately 40 deg, which far exceeds the predicted value. In an attempt to understand what may have caused this unexpected dynamic behavior, an investigation was conducted by Bristol Aerospace. This investigation is the subject of this paper. The analysis seems to support the theory that the tether connecting the aft and fore payloads was the cause of the unexpected rapid increase in coning experienced by the aft paylaod. It appears that there are two mechanisms associated with the tether that have influenced the aft payload dynamics. The first is the tether tension which acts as an external force acting on the aft payload and the second is the added energy dissipation. More detailed analysis is needed to fully understand the complex dynamics of this tethered two-body elastic system.

  10. Association between chromosomal aberration of COX8C and tethered spinal cord syndrome: array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qiu-jiong; Bai, Shao-cong; Cheng, Cheng; Tao, Ben-zhang; Wang, Le-kai; Liang, Shuang; Yin, Ling; Hang, Xing-yi; Shang, Ai-jia

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variations have been found in patients with neural tube abnormalities. In this study, we performed genome-wide screening using high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization in three children with tethered spinal cord syndrome and two healthy parents. Of eight copy number variations, four were non-polymorphic. These non-polymorphic copy number variations were associated with Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes, and microcephaly. Gene function enrichment analysis revealed that COX8C, a gene associated with metabolic disorders of the nervous system, was located in the copy number variation region of Patient 1. Our results indicate that array-based comparative genomic hybridization can be used to diagnose tethered spinal cord syndrome. Our results may help determine the pathogenesis of tethered spinal cord syndrome and prevent occurrence of this disease. PMID:27651783

  11. Precession and circularization of elliptical space-tether motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapel, Jim D.; Grosserode, Patrick

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simplified analytic model for predicting motion of long space tethers. The perturbation model developed here addresses skip rope motion, where each end of the tether is held in place and the middle of the tether swings with a motion similar to that of a child's skip rope. If the motion of the tether midpoint is elliptical rather than circular, precession of the ellipse complicates the procedures required to damp this motion. The simplified analytic model developed in this paper parametrically predicts the precession of elliptical skip rope motion. Furthermore, the model shows that elliptic skip rope motion will circularize when damping is present in the longitudinal direction. Compared with high-fidelity simulation results, this simplified model provides excellent predictions of these phenomena.

  12. Communication: Using multiple tethers to stabilize proteins on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loong, Brandon K.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2014-08-01

    Protein surface interactions are important in many applications in biotechnology including protein arrays, but these technologies have not lived up to their transformative potential because it is difficult to attach proteins to surfaces in a manner that preserves function and theoretical understanding of the relevant phenomena remains limited. Here is reported the effect of using multiple tethers to attach a protein (lysozyme) to a surface and the effects on the structure and stability of the molecule. The simulations show how using two tethers can drastically change the folding mechanism such that a protein that is initially unstable and inactive when attached using a single tether can become more stable and functional when two tethers are used. The results offer hope that the rational design of protein arrays is possible.

  13. Communication: Using multiple tethers to stabilize proteins on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Loong, Brandon K; Knotts, Thomas A

    2014-08-07

    Protein surface interactions are important in many applications in biotechnology including protein arrays, but these technologies have not lived up to their transformative potential because it is difficult to attach proteins to surfaces in a manner that preserves function and theoretical understanding of the relevant phenomena remains limited. Here is reported the effect of using multiple tethers to attach a protein (lysozyme) to a surface and the effects on the structure and stability of the molecule. The simulations show how using two tethers can drastically change the folding mechanism such that a protein that is initially unstable and inactive when attached using a single tether can become more stable and functional when two tethers are used. The results offer hope that the rational design of protein arrays is possible.

  14. Applications of tethers in space: A review of workshop recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Well-organized and structured efforts of considerable magnitude involving NASA, industry, and academia have explored and defined the engineering and technological requirements of the use of tethers in space and have discovered their broad range of operational and economic benefits. The results of these efforts have produced a family of extremely promising candidate applications. The extensive efforts now in progress are gaining momentum and a series of flight demonstrations are being planned and can be expected to take place in a few years. This report provides an analysis and a review of NASA's second major workshop on Applications of Tethers in Space held in October 15 to 17, 1985, in Venice, Italy. It provides a summary of an up-to-date assessment and recommendations by the NASA Tether Applications in Space Program Planning Group, consisting of representatives of seven NASA Centers and responsible for tether applications program planning implementation as recommended by the workshop panels.

  15. Pilot Hartsfield in sleep restraint tethered to forward middeck lockers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Pilot Hartsfield demonstrates the sleeping accomodations onboard the Earth-orbiting Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. The sleep restraint is located in the middeck area of the spacecraft and is tethered to forward middeck lockers.

  16. 5. TETHERED MINUTEMAN MISSILE LAUNCH, TEST AREA 1100. Original is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. TETHERED MINUTEMAN MISSILE LAUNCH, TEST AREA 1-100. Original is a color print. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. Lumbosacral arachnoid cyst with tethered cord: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S. K.; Sundar, I. Vijay; Sharma, Vinod; Goel, Ravishankar S.

    2012-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are cerebrospinal fluid collections in the spine that can present with neurological symptoms or be discovered accidentally. Intradural location of such cysts especially in the lumbosacral region is relatively rare. The association of such cysts with other congenital anomalies such as tethered cord lends evidence to the developmental origin of arachnoid cysts. We report a case of lumbosacral arachnoid cyst with tethered cord in a 6-year-old male child and discuss the etiopathogenesis and management options. PMID:24082689

  18. Ionospheric wave emissions passively detected by the OEDIPUS a tether

    SciTech Connect

    James, H.G.

    1993-11-01

    This paper describes a tethered satellite experiment, OEDIPUS A, where a rocket delivered a payload over aurora, which deployed two payloads seperated by 958 m. This experiment did not employ particle beam injection, but rather emission of electromagnetic radiation as a source to excite the ionosphere. Here the author attempts to interpret wave emissions which were detected by the reciever on board, using the tether as an antenna. A number of hypotheses are investigated to account for the observed noise spectra.

  19. From the Rocket Equation to Maxwell's Equations: Electrodynamic Tether Propulsion Nears Space Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Estes, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The US space program is facing a growing challenge to its decades-long, global leadership position, as current launch costs consume valuable resources and limit achievements in science, exploration, and commercial development. More than 40% of projected launches over the next 10 years have payloads with intended destinations beyond low-Earth orbit. Therefore, more cost-effective upper stages and on-board propulsion systems are critical elements in reducing total space transportation costs. A new type of space propulsion, using electrodynamic tethers, may be capable of performing multiple sequential missions without resupply and have a potential usable lifetime of several years. They may provide an in-space infrastructure that has a very low life cycle cost and greatly enhanced mission flexibility, thus supporting the goal of reducing the cost of access to space. Electrodynamic tether thrusters work by virtue of the force the Earth's magnetic field exerts on a wire carrying an electrical current. The effect is the basis for electric motors and generators. The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) experiment, planned for launch in the summer of 2000, will demonstrate the use electrodynamic tether thrust by lowering the altitude of a Delta-H rocket's upper stage on which it will be flying. Applications of the technology include a passive deorbit system for spacecraft at their end-of-life, reusable Orbit Transfer Vehicles, propellantless reboost of the International Space Station, and propulsion and power generation for future missions to Jupiter.

  20. A Quantitative Study of Tethered Chains in Various Solution Conditions Using Langmuir Diblock Copolymer Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Michael S.

    1999-08-13

    This article summarizes our investigations of tethered chain systems using Langmuir monolayer of polydimethysiloxane-poly styrene (PDMS-PS) diblock copolymers on organic liquids. In this system, the PDMS block adsorbs to the air surface while the PS block dangles into the subphase liquid. The air surface can be made either repulsive or attractive for the tethered PS chain segments by choosing a subphase liquid which has a surface tension lower or greater than that of PS, respectively. The segment profile of the PS block is determined by neutron reflection as a function of the surface density, the molecular weights of the PS and PDMS blocks, and the solution conditions. We cover the range of reduced surface density (SIGMA) characteristic of the large body of data in the literature for systems of chains tethered onto solid surfaces from dilute solution in good or theta solvent conditions (SIGMA < 12). We emphasize quantitative comparisons with analytical profile forms and scaling predictions. We find that the strong-stretching limit invoked in analytical SCF and scaling theories is not valid over this Z range. On the other hand, over a large portion of this range (SIGMA < 5) tethered layers are well described by a renormalization group theory addressing weakly interacting or noninteracting chains. Simultaneous with the study of the profile form, the free energy of the chains is examined through the surface tension. A strong increase in the surface pressure is observed with increasing surface density which determines the maximum surface density which can be achieved. This apparently nonequilibrium effect is attributed to steric interactions and limited lateral interpenetration. This effect may explain several outstanding discrepancies regarding the adsorption of end-functionalized chains and diblock copolymers onto solid surfaces.

  1. Space Test of Bare-Wire Anode Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L.; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    An international team, lead by Tokyo Metropolitan University, is developing a mission concept for a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare-wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether propulsion. The tether is a tape with a 50-mm width, 0.05-mm thickness, and 1-km length. This will be the first space test of the OML theory. In addition, by being an engineering demonstration (of space tethers), the mission will demonstrate electric beam generation for "sounding" determination of the neutral density profile in the ionospheric "E-layer." If selected by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the mission will launch in early 2009 using an $520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above =100 km in attitude, the 1-km tape tether will be deployed at a rate of 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow.This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using electrodynamic tethers for propulsion or power generation.

  2. Dynamics of single-stranded DNA tethered to a solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radiom, Milad; Paul, Mark R.; Ducker, William A.

    2016-06-01

    Tethering is used to deliver specific biological and industrial functions. For example, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is tethered to polymerases and long sequences of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) during replication, and to solids in DNA microarrays. However, tethering ssDNA to a large object limits not only the available ssDNA conformations, but also the range of time-scales over which the mechanical responses of ssDNA are important. In this work we examine the effect of tethering by measurement of the mechanical response of ssDNA that is tethered at each end to two separate atomic force microscope cantilevers in aqueous solution. Thermal motion of the cantilevers drives the ends of the ssDNA chain at frequencies near 2 kHz. The presence of a tethered molecule makes a large difference to the asymmetric cross-correlation of two cantilevers, which enables resolution of the mechanical properties in our experiments. By analysis of the correlated motion of the cantilevers we extract the friction and stiffness of the ssDNA. We find that the measured friction is much larger than the friction that is usually associated with the unencumbered motion of ssDNA. We also find that the measured relaxation time, ∼30 μs, is much greater than prior measurements of the free-molecule relaxation time. We attribute the difference to the loss of conformational possibilities as a result of constraining the ends of the ssDNA.

  3. Static deformation of space elevator tether due to climber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Stephen; Misra, Arun K.

    2015-06-01

    As higher strength to density ratio materials become available, the construction of a space elevator on Earth becomes more plausible. Though many fundamental aspects of the mechanical behaviour of a space elevator have been previously analysed, several details have not been rigorously explored. This paper examines the deformation of the tether from its nominal state when it is loaded with a climber at any altitude. Using an assumed modes numerical approach, the equilibrium conditions governing the static deformation of the elevator tether are derived, taking into account the presence of a climber. These discretised equations are solved numerically to determine the static deformation of the tether. A spectrum of statically deformed tether profiles is presented. Strain, stress and tension profiles are also computed and discussed. In general, when a climber is present below GEO, the extension (and stress) of the portion of tether below it is reduced and that above it is largely unaffected. When a climber is present above GEO, the extension (and stress) of the portion of tether below it is increased (that above it remains largely unaffected). Finally, the absolute displacement of the apex anchor (counterweight) is plotted against climber locations.

  4. The Golgin Family of Coiled-Coil Tethering Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Witkos, Tomasz M.; Lowe, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The golgins are a family of predominantly coiled-coil proteins that are localized to the Golgi apparatus. Golgins are present in all eukaryotes, suggesting an evolutionary conserved function. Golgins are anchored to the Golgi membrane by their carboxy terminus and are predicted to adopt an extended conformation that projects into the surrounding cytoplasm. This arrangement is ideal for the capture or tethering of nearby membranes or cytoskeletal elements. Golgin-mediated tethering is thought to be important for vesicular traffic at the Golgi apparatus, the maintenance of Golgi architecture, as well as the positioning of the Golgi apparatus within cells. In addition to acting as tethers, some golgins can also sequester various factors at the Golgi membrane, allowing for the spatiotemporal regulation of downstream cellular functions. Although it is now established that golgins are membrane and cytoskeleton tethers, the mechanisms underlying tethering remain poorly defined. Moreover, the importance of golgin-mediated tethering in a physiological context remains to be fully explored. This review will describe our current understanding of golgin function, highlighting recent progress that has been made, and goes on to discuss outstanding questions and potential avenues for future research with regard to this family of conserved Golgi-associated proteins. PMID:26793708

  5. Acceleration levels on board the Space Station and a tethered elevator for micro and variable-gravity applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E. C.; Cosmo, M.; Vetrella, S.; Moccia, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the dynamics and acceleration levels of a new tethered system for micro and variable-gravity applications. The system consists of two platforms tethered on opposite sides to the Space Station. A fourth platform, the elevator, is placed in between the Space Station and the upper platform. Variable-g levels on board the elevator are obtained by moving this facility along the upper tether, while micro-g experiments are carried out on board the Space Station. By controlling the length of the lower tether the position of the system CM can be maintained on board the Space Station despite variations of the station's distribution of mass. The paper illustrates the mathematical model, the environmental perturbations and the control techniques which have been adopted for the simulation and control of the system dynamics. Two sets of results from two different simulation runs are shown. The first set shows the system dynamics and the acceleration spectra on board the Space Station and the elevator during station-keeping. The second set of results demonstrates the capability of the elevator to attain a preselected g-level.

  6. The use of tethers for payload orbital transfer. Continuation of investigation of electrodynamic stabilization and control of long orbiting tethers, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Arnold, D.

    1982-01-01

    The SKYHOOK program was used to do simulations of two cases of the use of the tether for payload orbital transfer. The transport of a payload along the tether from a heavy lower platform to an upper launching platform is considered. A numerical example of the Shuttle launching a payload using an orbital tether facility is described.

  7. Adult idiopathic scoliosis: the tethered spine.

    PubMed

    Whyte Ferguson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on an observational and treatment study using three case histories to describe common patterns of muscle and fascial asymmetry in adults with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) who have significant scoliotic curvatures that were not surgically corrected and who have chronic pain. Rather than being located in the paraspinal muscles, the myofascial trigger points (TrPs) apparently responsible for the pain were located at some distance from the spine, yet referred pain to locations throughout the thoracolumbar spine. Asymmetries in these muscles appear to tether the spine in such a way that they contribute to scoliotic curvatures. Evaluation also showed that each of these individuals had major ligamentous laxity and this may also have contributed to development of scoliotic curvatures. Treatment focused on release of TrPs found to refer pain into the spine, release of related fascia, and correction of related joint dysfunction. Treatment resulted in substantial relief of longstanding chronic pain. Treatment thus validated the diagnostic hypothesis that myofascial and fascial asymmetries were to some extent responsible for pain in adults with significant scoliotic curvatures. Treatment of these patterns of TrPs and muscle and fascial asymmetries and related joint dysfunction was also effective in relieving pain in each of these individuals after they were injured in auto accidents. Treatment of myofascial TrPs and asymmetrical fascial tension along with treatment of accompanying joint dysfunction is proposed as an effective approach to treating both chronic and acute pain in adults with scoliosis that has not been surgically corrected.

  8. DNA Electrochemistry with Tethered Methylene Blue

    PubMed Central

    Pheeney, Catrina G.

    2012-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB′), covalently attached to DNA through a flexible C12 alkyl linker, provides a sensitive redox reporter in DNA electrochemistry measurements. Tethered, intercalated MB′ is reduced through DNA-mediated charge transport; the incorporation of a single base mismatch at position 3, 10, or 14 of a 17-mer causes an attenuation of the signal to 62 ± 3% of the well-matched DNA, irrespective of position in the duplex. The redox signal intensity for MB′–DNA is found to be least 3-fold larger than that of Nile blue (NB)–DNA, indicating that MB′ is even more strongly coupled to the π-stack. The signal attenuation due to an intervening mismatch does, however, depend on DNA film density and the backfilling agent used to passivate the surface. These results highlight two mechanisms for reduction of MB′ on the DNA-modified electrode: reduction mediated by the DNA base pair stack and direct surface reduction of MB′ at the electrode. These two mechanisms are distinguished by their rates of electron transfer that differ by 20-fold. The extent of direct reduction at the surface can be controlled by assembly and buffer conditions. PMID:22512327

  9. Power transmission studies for tethered SP-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.

    1988-01-01

    The tether and/or transmission line connecting the SP-100 to Space Station presents some unorthodox challenges in high voltage engineering, power transmission, and distribution. The line, which doubles as a structural element of this unusual spacecraft, will convey HVDC from SP-100 to the platform in low Earth orbit, and environment where the local plasma is sufficient to cause breakdown of exposed conductors at potentials of only a few hundred volts. Its anticipated several years operation, and continuously accumulating exposure to meteoroids and debris, raises an increasing likelihood that mechanical damage, including perforation, will be sustained in service. The present concept employs an array of gas insulated solid wall aluminum coaxial tubes; a conceptual design which showed basic feasibility of the SP-100 powered Space Station. Practical considerations of launch, deployment and assembly have led to investigation of reel deployable, dielectric insulated coaxial cables. To be competitive, the dielectric would have to operate reliably in a radiation environment under electrical stresses exceeding 50 kV/cm. The SP-100 transmission line high voltage interfaces are also considered.

  10. Power transmission studies for tethered SP-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.

    1988-01-01

    The tether and/or transmission line connecting the SP-100 to space station presents some unorthodox challenges in high voltage engineering, power transmission, and distribution. The line, which doubles as a structural element of this unusual spacecraft, will convey HVDC from SP-100 to the platform in low Earth orbit, and environment where the local plasma is sufficient to cause breakdown of exposed conductors at potentials of only a few hundred volts. Its anticipated several years operation, and continuously accumulating exposure to meteoroids and debris, raises an increasing likelihood that mechanical damage, including perforation, will be sustained in service. The present concept employs an array of gas insulated solid wall aluminum coaxial tubes; a conceptual design which showed basic feasibility of the SP-100 powered space station. Practical considerations of launch, deployment and assembly have lead to investigation of reel deployable, dielectric insulated coaxial cables. To be competitive, the dielectric would have to operate reliably in a radiation environment under electrical stresses exceeding 50 kV/cm. The SP-100 transmission line high voltage interfaces are also considered.

  11. Two-Stage Winch for Kites and Tethered Balloons or Blimps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Ted; Bland, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    A winch system provides a method for launch and recovery capabilities for kites and tethered blimps or balloons. Low power consumption is a key objective, as well as low weight for portability. This is accomplished by decoupling the tether-line storage and wind ing/ unwinding functions, and providing tailored and efficient mechanisms for each. The components of this system include rotational power input devices such as electric motors or other apparatus, line winding/unwinding reel(s), line storage reel(s), and independent drive trains. Power is applied to the wind/unwind reels to transport the tether line. Power is also applied to a line storage reel, from either the wind/unwind power source, the wind/unwind reel itself, or separate power source. The speeds of the two reels are synchronized, but not dependent on each other. This is accomplished via clutch mechanisms, variable transmissions, or independent motor controls. The speed of the storage reel is modulated as the effective diameter of the reel changes with line accumulation.

  12. An Engineered Membrane to Measure Electroporation: Effect of Tethers and Bioelectronic Interface

    PubMed Central

    Hoiles, William; Krishnamurthy, Vikram; Cranfield, Charles G.; Cornell, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the construction and predictive models for a platform comprised of an engineered tethered membrane. The platform provides a controllable and physiologically relevant environment for the study of the electroporation process. The mixed self-assembled membrane is formed via a rapid solvent exchange technique. The membrane is tethered to the gold electrode and includes an ionic reservoir separating the membrane and gold surface. Above the membrane, there is an electrolyte solution, and a gold counterelectrode. A voltage is applied between the gold electrodes and the current measured. The current is dependent on the energy required to form aqueous pores and the conductance of each pore. A two-level predictive model, consisting of a macroscopic and a continuum model, is developed to relate the pore dynamics to the measured current. The macroscopic model consists of an equivalent circuit model of the tethered membrane, and asymptotic approximations to the Smoluchowski-Einstein equation of electroporation that is dependent on the pore conductance and the energy required to form aqueous pores. The continuum model is a generalized Poisson-Nernst-Planck (GPNP) system where an activity coefficient to account for steric effects of ions is added to the standard PNP system. The GPNP is used to evaluate the conductance of aqueous pores, and the electrical energy required to form the pores. As an outcome of the setup of the device and the two-level model, biologically important variables can be estimated from experimental measurements. To validate the accuracy of the two-level model, the predicted current is compared with experimentally measured current for different tethering densities. PMID:25229142

  13. Modifying electronic properties at the silicon-molecule interface using atomic tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Christina A.

    2010-12-01

    The electronic properties at the semiconductor-molecule interface can be altered by changing the nature of covalent attachment. We examine the change in work function of the silicon surface after formation of Si-O-C, Si-C-C, and Si-S-C bonded alkyl monolayers and separate charge transfer and dipolar contributions. The chemical state, monolayer structure, and electronic properties of aliphatic monolayers with oxygen, carbon, and sulfur covalent linkages to the Si(1 1 1) surface were investigated with contact angle wetting, spectroscopic ellipsometry, infrared vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy. Vibrational spectra indicate aliphatic films tethered to Si with few gauche defects in agreement with hydrophobic contact angles and ellipsometric thickness measurements. Core level electronic spectra taken as a function of semiconductor doping reveal shifts in binding energy attributed to molecular bonding. Valence band spectra reveal the work function of the molecule-Si composite as a function of semiconductor doping and atomic tether. By combining valence band spectra with core level spectra, the electronic properties of the molecule-Si system can be understood. In particular, the relative contribution of charge transfer due to surface band bending and the polarization due to molecular dipoles were determined. The O, C, and S atomic tethers induce differing amounts of band bending and interface dipoles which can be utilized to engineer the electronic properties of molecule-semiconductor junctions.

  14. Response kinetics of tethered Rhodobacter sphaeroides to changes in light intensity.

    PubMed

    Berry, R M; Armitage, J P

    2000-03-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides can swim toward a wide range of attractants (a process known as taxis), propelled by a single rotating flagellum. The reversals of motor direction that cause tumbles in Eschericia coli taxis are replaced by brief motor stops, and taxis is controlled by a complex sensory system with multiple homologues of the E. coli sensory proteins. We tethered photosynthetically grown cells of R. sphaeroides by their flagella and measured the response of the flagellar motor to changes in light intensity. The unstimulated bias (probability of not being stopped) was significantly larger than the bias of tethered E. coli but similar to the probability of not tumbling in swimming E. coli. Otherwise, the step and impulse responses were the same as those of tethered E. coli to chemical attractants. This indicates that the single motor and multiple sensory signaling pathways in R. sphaeroides generate the same swimming response as several motors and a single pathway in E. coli, and that the response of the single motor is directly observable in the swimming pattern. Photo-responses were larger in the presence of cyanide or the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide 4-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), consistent with the photo-response being detected via changes in the rate of electron transport.

  15. Otolith tethering in the zebrafish otic vesicle requires Otogelin and α-Tectorin

    PubMed Central

    Stooke-Vaughan, Georgina A.; Obholzer, Nikolaus D.; Baxendale, Sarah; Megason, Sean G.; Whitfield, Tanya T.

    2015-01-01

    Otoliths are biomineralised structures important for balance and hearing in fish. Their counterparts in the mammalian inner ear, otoconia, have a primarily vestibular function. Otoliths and otoconia form over sensory maculae and are attached to the otolithic membrane, a gelatinous extracellular matrix that provides a physical coupling between the otolith and the underlying sensory epithelium. In this study, we have identified two proteins required for otolith tethering in the zebrafish ear, and propose that there are at least two stages to this process: seeding and maintenance. The initial seeding step, in which otolith precursor particles tether directly to the tips of hair cell kinocilia, fails to occur in the einstein (eis) mutant. The gene disrupted in eis is otogelin (otog); mutations in the human OTOG gene have recently been identified as causative for deafness and vestibular dysfunction (DFNB18B). At later larval stages, maintenance of otolith tethering to the saccular macula is dependent on tectorin alpha (tecta) function, which is disrupted in the rolling stones (rst) mutant. α-Tectorin (Tecta) is a major constituent of the tectorial membrane in the mammalian cochlea. Mutations in the human TECTA gene can cause either dominant (DFNA8/12) or recessive (DFNB21) forms of deafness. Our findings indicate that the composition of extracellular otic membranes is highly conserved between mammals and fish, reinforcing the view that the zebrafish is an excellent model system for the study of deafness and vestibular disease. PMID:25758224

  16. Theoretical investigation of EM wave generation and radiation in the ULF, ELF, and VLF bands by the electrodynamic orbiting tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Robert D.; Grossi, Mario D.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of electromagnetic wave generation by an electrodynamic tethered satellite system is important both for the ordinary operation of such systems and for their possible application as orbiting transmitters. The tether's ionospheric circuit closure problem is closely linked with the propagation of charge-carrying electromagnetic wave packets away from the tethered system. Work is reported which represents a step towards a solution to the problem that takes into account the effects of boundaries and of vertical variations in plasma density, collision frequencies, and ion species. The theory of Alfen wave packet generation by an electrodynamic tethered system in an infinite plasma medium is reviewed, and brief summary of previous work on the problem is given. The consequences of the presence of the boundaries and the vertical nonuniformity are then examined. One of the most significant new features to emerge when ion-neutral collisions are taken into account is the coupling of the Alfven waves to the fast magnetosonic wave. This latter wave is important, as it may be confined by vertical variations in the Alfven speed to a sort of leaky ionospheric wave guide, the resonances of which could be of great importance to the signal received on the Earth's surface. The infinite medium solution for this case where the (uniform) geomagnetic field makes an arbitrary angle with the vertical is taken as the incident wave-packet. Even without a full solution, a number of conclusions can be drawn, the most important of which may be that the electromagnetic field associated with the operation of a steady-current tethered system will probably be too weak to detect on the Earth's surface, even for large tethered currents. This is due to the total reflection of the incident wave at the atmospheric boundary and the inability of a steady-current tethered system to excite the ionospheric wave-guide. An outline of the approach to the numerical problem is given. The use of

  17. Microgel Tethering For Microarray-Based Nucleic Acid Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiaoguang

    Molecular diagnostics (MDx) have radically changed the process of clinical microbial identification based on identifying genetic information, MDx approaches are both specific and fast. They can identify microbes to the species and strain level over a time scale that can be as short as one hour. With such information clinicians can administer the most effective and appropriate antimicrobial treatment at an early time point with substantial implications both for patient well-being and for easing the burden on the health-care system. Among the different MDx approaches, such as fluorescence in-situ hybridization, microarrays, next-generation sequencing, and mass spectrometry, point-of-care MDx platforms are drawing particular interest due to their low cost, robustness, and wide application. This dissertation develops a novel MDx technology platform capable of high target amplification and detection performance. For nucleic acid target detection, we fabricate an array of electron-beam-patterned microgels on a standard glass microscope slide. The microgels can be as small as a few hundred nanometers. The unique way of energy deposition during electron-beam lithography provides the microgels with a very diffuse water -gel interface that enables them to not only serve as substrates to immobilize DNA probes but do so while preserving them in a highly hydrated environment that optimizes their performance. Benefiting from the high spatial resolution provided by such techniques as position-sensitive microspotting and dip-pen nanolithography, multiple oligonucleotide probes known as molecular beacons (MBs) can be patterned on microgels. Furthermore, nucleic acid target amplification can be conducted in direct contact with the microgel-tethered detection array. Specifically, we use an isothermal RNA amplification reaction - nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA). ssRNA amplicons of from the NASBA reaction can directly hybridize with microgel-tethered MBs, and the

  18. Variation in Outcome in Tethered Cord Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Noorulain; Qadeer, Mohsin

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Fifty patients surgically treated for tethered cord syndrome (TCS) were retrospectively studied at Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi from 2010 until 2014. Purpose To assess the common presentations of TCS in our part of the world and the surgical outcome of the different presentations. Overview of Literature TCS is a stretch-induced functional disorder of the spinal cord with its caudal part anchored by an inelastic structure, which results in characteristic symptoms and signs. Due to the variety of lesions and clinical presentations and the absence of high-quality clinical outcome data, the decision regarding treatment is difficult. Methods Fifty consecutive patients with TCS were reviewed retrospectively with a follow-up period of 12–48 months. The majority of the patients were 0-15 years of age with the mean age of 4 years. The presenting complaints and the associated pathologies were documented, and the patients were assessed using the new Karachi TCS severity scale for clinical assessment. Results Eighty five percent of the patients with thickened filum terminale improved. Sixty six percent of the patients with diastematomyelia, 60% with lipoma and only 46% with myelomeningocele showed clinical improvement postoperatively. Sixty two percent of the patients who presented with paraperesis improved following surgery while 37% remained stable and only one patient deteriorated. Back and leg pain improved in 93% of patients and 50% of patients with urinary impairment improved. Conclusions Outcome of patients with TCS varies according to pathology and severity of symptoms. Diastematomyelia and thickened filum had the best outcome. The Karachi TCS severity scale is a valid tool for future studies. PMID:27559452

  19. Application of tethered balloon and kite measurements using chilled mirror hygrometers during the ARM WVIOP in the fall of 1996 in Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Porch, W.; Balsley, B.; Jensen, M.; Cole, H.; Lesht, B.; Liljegren, J.; Richardson, S.; Revercomb, H.

    1997-12-01

    Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas, and its measurement is currently so imprecise that long term trends are difficult to document. This problem was the focus of a Water Vapor Intensive Operations Period (WVIOP) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site near Billings, OK in September 1996. The part of this comparison involved tethered-balloon and kite profiling of meteorological parameters and dew-point measurements using a light-weight chilled-mirror system. The tethered balloon system was used when the winds were less than about 12 m/s. The kite system was used when winds were in the 12--15 m/s range. In this abstract, the authors will focus on comparisons on boundary-layer profiles using the tethered systems and conventional rawinsonde measurements at ARM SGP. The tethered systems were limited to profiles up to 1 km above ground level. Of particular interest, is the representativity of the rapid-ascent measurements associated with rawinsonde launches and the longer-term profiling associated with the tethered system in the boundary layer. Comparisons show that profiles differed significantly in both temperature (1 to 2 C) and water vapor (5 to 10%). Both calibration and representativity contribute to these differences.

  20. Application of tethered balloon and kite measurements using chilled mirror hygrometers during the ARM WVIOP in the fall of 1996 in Oklahoma.

    SciTech Connect

    Porch, W.; Balsley, B.; Cole, H.; Jensen, M.; Lesht, B.; Lijegren, J.; Richardson, S.; Revercomb, H.; Environmental Research; LANL; Univ. of Colorado; National Center for Atmospheric Research; PNL; Univ. of Oklahaoma; Univ. of Wisconsin

    1998-01-01

    Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas, and its measurement is currently so imprecise that long term trends are difficult to document. This problem was the focus of a Water Vapor Intensive Operations Period (WVIOP) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site near Billings, OK in September 1996. The part of this comparison involved tethered-balloon and kite profiling of meteorological parameters and dew-point measurements using a light-weight chilled-mirror system. The tethered balloon system was used when the winds were less than about 12 m/s. The kite system was used when winds were in the 12--15 m/s range. In this abstract, the authors will focus on comparisons on boundary-layer profiles using the tethered systems and conventional rawinsonde measurements at ARM SGP. The tethered systems were limited to profiles up to 1 km above ground level. Of particular interest, is the representativity of the rapid-ascent measurements associated with radiosonde launches and the longer-term profiling associated with the tethered system in the boundary layer. Comparisons show that profiles differed significantly in both temperature (1 to 2 C) and water vapor (5 to 10%). Both calibration and representativity contribute to these differences.

  1. BOLAS: A Canadian-US Ionospheric Tether Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyc, George; Vigneron, Frank; Jablonski, Alexander; James, H. Gordon; Carrington, Connie; Rupp, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Everyday, international broadcasters, ships, and aircraft use a naturally conducting atmospheric layer, the ionosphere, to reflect communications signals over the Earth's horizon. A better understanding of this layer, with its irregularities, instabilities, and dynamics, would improve communications transmission and reception. This atmospheric layer is also a lens that can distort signal transmissions from communications, navigation, and surveillance satellites. The ionosphere over Canada and other high latitude countries can carry large currents and is particularly dynamic, so that a scientific understanding of this layer is critical. The BOLAS (Bistatic Observations using Low Altitude Satellites) mission would characterize reflective and transmissive properties of the ionosphere by flying two satellites, each with identical HF receivers, dipole antennas, particle probes, and GPS receivers. The satellites would be connected by a non-conducting tether to maintain a 100 m separation, and would cartwheel in the orbit plane to spatially survey the ionosphere. The six-month mission would fly in a high inclination, 350 x 600 km orbit, and would be active during passes over the auroral region of Canada. This paper discusses the system requirements and architecture, spacecraft and operations concepts, and mission design, as well as team organization, international cooperation and the scientific and technological benefits that are expected.

  2. Detergent interaction with tethered bilayer lipid membranes for protein reconstitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broccio, Matteo; Zan Goh, Haw; Loesche, Mathias

    2009-03-01

    Tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) are self-assembled biomimetic structures in which the membrane is separated from a solid substrate by a nm-thick hydrated submembrane space. These model systems are being used in binding studies of peripheral proteins and exotoxins. Here we aim at their application for the reconstitution of water-insoluble integral membrane proteins. As an alternative to fusion of preformed proteoliposomes we study the direct reconstitution of such proteins for applications in biosensing and pharmaceutical screening. For reconstitution, highly insulating tBLMs (R˜10^5-10^6 φ) were temporarily incubated with a detergent to screen for conditions that keep the detergent-saturated membranestable and ready to incorporate detergent-solubilized proteins. We assess the electrical characteristics, i.e. specific resistance and capacitance, by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) under timed incubation with decylmaltoside and dodecylmaltoside detergents in a regime around their critical micelle concentration, 1.8 mM and 0.17 mM respectively and demonstrate the restoration of the tBLM upon detergent removal. Thereby a range of concentration and incubation times was identified, that represents optimal conditions for the subsequent membrane protein reconstitution.

  3. Molecular dynamics study of tethered polymers in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Gratton, Y; Slater, G W

    2005-08-01

    Single macromolecules can now be isolated and characterized experimentally using techniques such as optical tweezers and videomicroscopy. An interesting and important single-molecule problem is that of the dynamics of a polymer chain tethered to a solid surface and subjected to a shear flow. An experimental study of such a system was reported by Doyle et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4769 (2000)), and their results showed a surprising recirculating motion of the DNA chain. We explore this problem using molecular dynamics computer simulations with explicit hydrodynamic interactions. The dynamical properties of a Freely Jointed Chain (FJC) with Finitely Extensible Nonlinear Elastic (FENE) links are examined in similar conditions (i.e., confined between two surfaces and in the presence of a Poiseuille flow). We see the remarkable cyclic polymer motion observed experimentally, and we show that a simple cross-correlation function can be used to measure the corresponding period of motion. We also propose a new empirical equation relating the magnitude of the shear flow to the amount of chain deformation, an equation that appears to apply for both weak and strong flows. Finally, we report on packing effects near the molecularly flat wall, an associated chain-sticking phenomenon, and the impact of the chain hydrodynamic drag on the local fluid flow.

  4. Computational analysis of the tether-pulling experiment to probe plasma membrane-cytoskeleton interaction in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Kristopher R.; Popel, Aleksander S.; Anvari, Bahman; Brownell, William E.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2009-10-01

    Tethers are thin membrane tubes that can be formed when relatively small and localized forces are applied to cellular membranes and lipid bilayers. Tether pulling experiments have been used to better understand the fine membrane properties. These include the interaction between the plasma membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton, which is an important factor affecting membrane mechanics. We use a computational method aimed at the interpretation and design of tether pulling experiments in cells with a strong membrane-cytoskeleton attachment. In our model, we take into account the detailed information in the topology of bonds connecting the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. We compute the force-dependent piecewise membrane deflection and bending as well as modes of stored energy in three major regions of the system: body of the tether, membrane-cytoskeleton attachment zone, and the transition zone between the two. We apply our method to three cells: cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs), human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells, and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. OHCs have a special system of pillars connecting the membrane and the cytoskeleton, and HEK and CHO cells have the membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion arrangement via bonds (e.g., PIP2), which is common to many other cells. We also present a validation of our model by using experimental data on CHO and HEK cells. The proposed method can be an effective tool in the analyses of experiments to probe the properties of cellular membranes.

  5. Ozone profiles from tethered balloon measurements in an urban plume experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngbluth, O., Jr.; Storey, R. W.; Clendenin, C. G.; Jones, S.; Leighty, B.

    1981-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center used two tethered balloon systems to measure ozone in the general area of Norfolk, Va. The large balloon system which has an altitude range of 1,500 meters was located at Wallops Island, Va., and the smaller balloon which has an altitude range of 900 meters was located at Chesapeake, Va. Each balloon system measured ozone, temperature, humidity, wind speed, and wind direction from ground to its maximum altitude. From these measurements and from the location of the balloon sites, areas of ozone generation and ozone transport may be inferred. The measurements which were taken during August 1979 are discussed as well as the measurement techniques.

  6. Low Earth Orbit Environmental Effects on Space Tether Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckernor, Miria M.; Gitlemeier, Keith A.; Hawk, Clark W.; Watts, Ed

    2005-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation erode and embrittle most polymeric materials. This research was designed to test several different materials and coatings under consideration for their application to space tethers, for resistance to these effects. The samples were vacuum dehydrated, weighed and then exposed to various levels of AO or UV radiation at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. They were then re-weighed to determine mass loss due to atomic oxygen erosion, inspected for damage and tensile tested to determine strength loss. The experiments determined that the Photosil coating process, while affording some protection, damaged the tether materials worse than the AO exposure. TOR-LM also failed to fully protect the materials, especially from UV radiation. The POSS and nickel coatings did provide some protection to the tethers, which survived the entire test regime. M5 was tested, uncoated, and survived AO exposure, though its brittleness prevented any tensile testing.

  7. The dynamics of a space station tethered refueling facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, P.; Rudolph, L. K.; Fester, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    The fluid stored in a tethered orbital refueling facility is settled at the bottom of the storage tanks by gravity-gradient forces. The fluid motions (slosh) induced by outside disturbances must be limited to ensure the tank outlet is not uncovered during a fluid transfer. The dynamics of a LO2/LH2 TORF attached to the space station have been analyzed to identify design parameters necessary to limit fluid motion. Using the worst case disturbance of a shuttle docking at the space station, the fluid motion was found to be a function of tether length and allowable facility swing angle. Acceptable fluid behavior occurs for tether lengths of at least 1000 ft. To ensure motions induced by separate disturbances do not add to unacceptable values, a slosh damping coefficient of 5 percent is recommended.

  8. ROAR: A 3-D tethered rocket simulation code

    SciTech Connect

    York, A.R. II; Ludwigsen, J.S.

    1992-04-01

    A high-velocity impact testing technique, utilizing a tethered rocket, is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The technique involves tethering a rocket assembly to a pivot location and flying it in a semicircular trajectory to deliver the rocket and payload to an impact target location. Integral to developing this testing technique is the parallel development of accurate simulation models. An operational computer code, called ROAR (Rocket-on-a-Rope), has been developed to simulate the three-dimensional transient dynamic behavior of the tether and motor/payload assembly. This report presents a discussion of the parameters modeled, the governing set of equations, the through-time integration scheme, and the input required to set up a model. Also included is a sample problem and a comparison with experimental results.

  9. Reliability of Tethered Swimming Evaluation in Age Group Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Amaro, Nuno; Marinho, Daniel A; Batalha, Nuno; Marques, Mário C; Morouço, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the reliability of tethered swimming in the evaluation of age group swimmers. The sample was composed of 8 male national level swimmers with at least 4 years of experience in competitive swimming. Each swimmer performed two 30 second maximal intensity tethered swimming tests, on separate days. Individual force-time curves were registered to assess maximum force, mean force and the mean impulse of force. Both consistency and reliability were very strong, with Cronbach’s Alpha values ranging from 0.970 to 0.995. All the applied metrics presented a very high agreement between tests, with the mean impulse of force presenting the highest. These results indicate that tethered swimming can be used to evaluate age group swimmers. Furthermore, better comprehension of the swimmers ability to effectively exert force in the water can be obtained using the impulse of force. PMID:25114742

  10. One kilometer tether observations of auroral electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shigeto; Whalen, Brian A.

    The OEDIPUS (Observations of Electric-field Distributions in the Ionospheric Plasma - a Unique Strategy) rocket was launched on January 30, 1989 from the Andoya range in Norway to an apogee of 512 km during an active auroral display. Two payloads, fully instrumented with plasma diagnostics but connected by a conducting tether were separated in flight along geomagnetic field lines to a distance of 1 km. Energetic electron, ion and thermal ion observations at the both ends of the payload were made in and near several auroral forms. Tether (interpayload) voltages and currents were monitored by using a high impedance voltmeter and a low impedance ammeter. Results of comparisons between charged particle observations and the tether voltage and current measurements indicate clearly the validity of electric field measurements made by this technique.

  11. Deployment dynamics of tethered-net for space debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Minghe; Guo, Jian; Gill, Eberhard

    2017-03-01

    A tethered-net is a promising method for space debris capturing. However, its deployment dynamics is complex because of the flexibility, and its dependency of the deployment parameters is insufficiently understood. To investigate the deployment dynamics of tethered-net, four critical deployment parameters, namely maximum net area, deployment time, traveling distance and effective period are identified in this paper, and the influence of initial deployment conditions on these four parameters is investigated. Besides, a comprehensive study on a model for the tethered-net based on absolute nodal coordinates formulation (ANCF) is provided. Simulations show that the results based on the ANCF modeling method present a good agreement with that based on the conventional mass-spring modeling method. Moreover, ANCF model is capable of describing the flexibility between two nodes on the net. However, it is more computationally expensive.

  12. The Momentum-eXchange/Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) Tether Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorenson, K. F.

    2004-12-01

    Within NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Projects Office exists Emerging Propulsion Technologies (EPT) Investment Area that is advancing emerging propulsion concepts that have potential to lower the cost of space transportation, enable new missions, and/or increase the payload capability. The current, primary investment of EPT is the Momentum-eXchange/Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) tether concept. The MXER tether is a long, rotating cable in an elliptical Earth orbit whose rapid rotation allows it to catch a payload in a low Earth orbit and throw it to a high-energy orbit. The orbital energy transferred by the MXER tether to the payload is restored to the tether via electrodynamic tether propulsion. This technique uses solar power to drive electrical current collected from the ionosphere through the tether, resulting in a magnetic interaction with the terrestrial field. Since the Earth itself serves as the reaction mass, the thrust force is generated without propellant, and allows the MXER facility to be repeatedly reused without resupply. Essentially, the MXER facility is a `propellantless' upper stage that could assist nearly every mission going beyond low Earth orbit. Payloads to interplanetary destinations would especially benefit from the boost provided by the MXER facility, resulting in launch vehicle cost reductions, increased payload fractions, and more frequent mission opportunities. Some of the benefits to space exploration include: (1) Multi-use, in-space, `propellantless' infrastructure, (2) Useable by essentially all missions beyond LEO, (3) Lowers overall mission costs and/or enables larger payloads, (4) ``Panama Canal" of space transportation, (5) A spiral development for future generations, (6) Readily scales up or down, (7) Future transportation to and from Lunar surface.

  13. Ionospheric wave emissions passively detected by the OEDIPUS A tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. G.

    1993-11-01

    The tethered sounding rocket payload OEDIPUS A was launched over aurora in the evening of Juanary 30, 1989. A conducting thether between the instrumented subpayloads was extended to 958 m during the flight which attained an apogee altitude of 512 km. Electron fluxes of up to approximately 2 x 10(exp 8)/sq cm/s/sr were recorded by an onboard energetic particle detector throughout much of the flight. Electron density measurements were made by the bistatic transmitter-receiver set high-frequenct exciter (HEX) and receiver for exciter (REX) using a special technique based on the characteristics of the Z mode of propagation. This electron density information was used to identify the frequency limits of propagation of various emissions in the 0-5 MHz bandwith of the receiver REX which was configured for passive detection of rf current induced in the tether. On two occasions in the flight, sharply delimited depletions of ambient density correlated closely with enhancements of radio noise, notably in the whistler mode at frequencies below 800 kHz. These depletions were located on the flanks of 'inverted-V' structures in the precipitating electron fluxes. The whistler mode emissions were very weak compared with that can be observed at greater heights in the auroral topside ionosphere. However, their detection apparently was enhanced by a resonance condition between the tether length and the wavelength of sheath waves. By ray tracing analysis, depletions were found incapable of trapping the whistler mode waves, which exhibited levels 8-10 dB higher than those outside the depletion, or of rendering them more detectable by the tether than unguided waves. The tether resonance may compensate for the tether's relative inefficiency as a receiving antenna because of its orientation along the magnetic field direction. It is inferred that the waves are generated close to the payload by suprathermal electrons.

  14. Anchoring a Leviathan: How the Nuclear Membrane Tethers the Genome

    PubMed Central

    Czapiewski, Rafal; Robson, Michael I.; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the nuclear envelope has many distinct direct connections to chromatin that contribute to genome organization. The functional consequences of genome organization on gene regulation are less clear. Even less understood is how interactions of lamins and nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) with chromatin can produce anchoring tethers that can withstand the physical forces of and on the genome. Chromosomes are the largest molecules in the cell, making megadalton protein structures like the nuclear pore complexes and ribosomes seem small by comparison. Thus to withstand strong forces from chromosome dynamics an anchoring tether is likely to be much more complex than a single protein-protein or protein-DNA interaction. Here we will briefly review known NE-genome interactions that likely contribute to spatial genome organization, postulate in the context of experimental data how these anchoring tethers contribute to gene regulation, and posit several hypotheses for the physical nature of these tethers that need to be investigated experimentally. Significantly, disruption of these anchoring tethers and the subsequent consequences for gene regulation could explain how mutations in nuclear envelope proteins cause diseases ranging from muscular dystrophy to lipodystrophy to premature aging progeroid syndromes. The two favored hypotheses for nuclear envelope protein involvement in disease are (1) weakening nuclear and cellular mechanical stability, and (2) disrupting genome organization and gene regulation. Considerable experimental support has been obtained for both. The integration of both mechanical and gene expression defects in the disruption of anchoring tethers could provide a unifying hypothesis consistent with both. PMID:27200088

  15. A simulation strategy for the atomistic modeling of flexible molecules covalently tethered to rigid surfaces: application to peptides.

    PubMed

    Curcó, David; Zanuy, David; Nussinov, Ruth; Alemán, Carlos

    2011-03-01

    A computational strategy to model flexible molecules tethered to a rigid inert surface is presented. The strategy is able to provide uncorrelated relaxed microstructures at the atomistic level. It combines an algorithm to generate molecules tethered to the surface without atomic overlaps, a method to insert solvent molecules and ions in the simulation box, and a powerful relaxation procedure. The reliability of the strategy has been investigated by simulating two different systems: (i) mixed monolayers consisting of binary mixtures of long-chain alkyl thiols of different lengths adsorbed on a rigid inert surface and (ii) CREKA (Cys-Arg-Glu-Lys-Ala), a short linear pentapeptide that recognizes clotted plasma proteins and selectively homes to tumors, covalently tethered to a rigid inert surface in aqueous solution. In the first, we examined the segregation of the two species in the monolayers using different long-chain:short-chain ratios, whereas in the second, we explored the conformational space of CREKA and ions distribution considering densities of peptides per nm(2) ranging from 0.03 to 1.67. Results indicate a spontaneous segregation in alkyl thiol monolayers, which enhances when the concentration of longest chains increases. However, the whole conformational profile of CREKA depends on the number of molecules tethered to the surface pointing out the large influence of molecular density on the intermolecular interactions, even though the bioactive conformation was found as the most stable in all cases.

  16. Minimally invasive surgical technique for tethered surgical drains

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Shane R; Satpathy, Jibanananda; Waligora, Andrew C; Ugwu-Oju, Obinna

    2017-01-01

    A feared complication of temporary surgical drain placement is from the technical error of accidentally suturing the surgical drain into the wound. Postoperative discovery of a tethered drain can frequently necessitate return to the operating room if it cannot be successfully removed with nonoperative techniques. Formal wound exploration increases anesthesia and infection risk as well as cost and is best avoided if possible. We present a minimally invasive surgical technique that can avoid the morbidity associated with a full surgical wound exploration to remove a tethered drain when other nonoperative techniques fail.

  17. Adult tethered cord syndrome resembling plantar fasciitis and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Amir Reza; Kanesalingam, Kavitha; Srinivasan, Venkataramanan; Price, Rupert Francis

    2013-12-05

    Adult tethered cord syndrome without spinal dysraphism is rare, and can present with subtle symptoms that could mimic other pathologies. As a result, timely diagnosis of this condition has proved to be a significant challenge. It is crucial for clinicians to be aware of adult tethered cord syndrome and its presenting symptoms in order to achieve early diagnosis and subsequent management. We present such a case with particular attention to the presenting history and examination. Following diagnosis, the patient underwent a laminectomy and cord untethering, resulting in significant improvement to his symptoms.

  18. Tethered Lunar Subsatellites for Multipoint and Low Altitude Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael; Vondrak, Richard R.; Hoyt, Robert P.; Mesarch, Michael A.; Farrell, William M.; Keller, John W.; Clark, Pamela E.; Petro, Noah E.; Hwang, Kyoung-Joo

    2016-01-01

    The difficulty in making global measurements in orbit close to planetary bodies (and in particular the Moon) seriously constrains our ability to collect crucial, high-resolution data. We describe a unique and groundbreaking approach using tethered subsatellites to make measurements arbitrarily close to planetary surfaces, particularly those with no atmosphere, and to determine altitude profiles of geophysical parameters. The approach is feasible with current technology, and the subsatellite could be as small as a CubeSat. The initial results of a feasibility study and mission design for a tethered lunar CubeSat indicate that it is achievable.

  19. Applications of the Electrodynamic Tether to Interstellar Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matloff, Gregory L.; Johnson, Les

    2005-01-01

    After considering relevant properties of the local interstellar medium and defining a sample interstellar mission, this paper considers possible interstellar applications of the electrodynamic tether, or EDT. These include use of the EDT to provide on-board power and affect trajectory modifications and direct application of the EDT to starship acceleration. It is demonstrated that comparatively modest EDTs can provide substantial quantities of on-board power, if combined with a large-area electron-collection device such as the Cassenti toroidal-field ramscoop. More substantial tethers can be used to accomplish large-radius thrustless turns. Direct application of the EDT to starship acceleration is apparently infeasible.

  20. The tethered galaxy problem: a possible window to explore cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangmatitham, Matipon; Nemiroff, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    In the tethered galaxy problem, a hypothetical galaxy is being held at a fixed proper distance. Contrary to Newtonian intuition, it has been shown that this tethered galaxy can have a nonzero redshift. However, constant proper distance has been suggested as unphysical in a cosmological setting and therefore other definitions have been suggested. The tethered galaxy problem is therefore reviewed in Friedmann cosmology. In this work, different tethers are considered as possible local cosmological discriminators.

  1. Astronauts Conrad and Gordon demonstrate tethering procedures for news media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Charles Conrad (left), command pilot, and Richard F. Gordon (right), pilot, demonstrate tether procedure between their Gemini 11 spacecraft and the Agena Target Docking Vehicle at the post flight press conference. They use models of their spacecraft and its Agena to illustrate maneuvers.

  2. Astronauts Conrad and Gordon demonstrate tethering procedures for news media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Charles Conrad (center), command pilot, and Richard F. Gordon (right), pilot, demonstrate tether procedure between their Gemini 11 spacecraft and the Agena Target Docking Vehicle at the post flight press conference. They use models of their spacecraft and its Agena to illustrate maneuvers. At left is George Low, Deputy Director, Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston.

  3. Analysis of Tethers in Sampling Near Earth Objects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    Arizona Press, 1994 30. Redd , Frank. "Tether Platform Applications" Internet article, August 1996 (URL: http//www.engineering.usu.edu/Dep.. .papers...Office of Aerospace Studies, Kirland AFB, New Mexico , in June 1997. Captain Wong was married to Jennifer Ingalls frvm and has one daughter, Janelle

  4. Fortissimo: A Japanese Space Test Of Bare Wire Anode Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    A Japanese led international team is developing a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether (EDT) propulsion. The tether is a tape with a width of 25 mm, thickness of 0.05 mm, and is 300 m in length. This will be the first space test of OML theory. The mission will launch in the summer of 2009 using an S520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above approx. 100 km in attitude, the tape tether will be deployed at a rate of approx. 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow. The total amount of current collected will be used to assess the validity of OML theory. This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using EDTs for propulsion or power generation.

  5. Tethered Nanoparticle -Polymer Composites: Phase behavior and rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangal, Rahul; Archer, Lynden A.

    2014-03-01

    Polymer nanocomposites with particle radius (a) approaching the radius of gyration (Rg) of entangled host polymer have been reported to exhibit an unusual negative reinforcement effect, which leads to an anomalous reduction in relative an anomalous reduction in relative viscosity at low particle loadings (φ) . This so-called Non-Einsteinian flow behavior is understood to be sensitive to the dispersion state of particles in host polymer. We studied suspensions of SiO2 nanoparticles tethered with polethylene glycol (PEG) in polymethylmethacralate (PMMA) with molecular weights (Mw) from 17 KDa to 280 KDa. Due to strong enthalpic interactions between PEG and PMMA (χ = -0.65), nanoparticles are expected to be well-dispersed, independent of Mw of PMMA. Using small angle x-ray scattering measurements we show that the phase stability of suspensions depends on Mw of the tethered PEG, host PMMA, and φ. Particles functionalized with low molecular weight PEG aggregate at low φ, but disperse at high φ. In contrast, nanoparticles functionalized with higher molecular weight PEG are well dispersed for host chain lengths (P) to tethered chain length (N), (P/N), is as high as 160. The stability boundary of these suspensions extends well beyond expectations for nanocomposites based on tethered PEG chains suspended in PEG. Through in-depth analysis of rheology and x-ray photon correlation spectra we explore the fundamental origins of non-Einsteinian flow behavior. King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Advanced Photon Source (APS).

  6. 75 FR 47316 - Centennial Challenges 2010 Strong Tether Challenge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    .... 2451 (314)(d). The 2010 Strong Tether Challenge is scheduled and teams that wish to compete may... designed to encourage development of very strong, lightweight material for use in a multitude of structural... prize competitors must (1) register and comply with all requirements in the rules and team agreement;...

  7. Applications of Tethers in Space: Workshop Proceedings, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baracat, W. A. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The complete documentation of the workshop including all addresses, panel reports, charts, and summaries are presented. This volume presents all the reports on the fundamentals of applications of tethers in space. These applications include electrodynamic interactions, transportation, gravity utilization, constellations, technology and test, and science applications.

  8. Stabilized platform for tethered balloon soundings of broadband long- and short-wave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Alzheimer, J.M.; Anderson, G.A.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1993-01-01

    Changes in the composition of trace gases in the earth`s atmosphere have been reported by many observers, and a general concern has been expressed regarding possible changes to the earth`s climate that may be caused by radiatively active gases introduced into the earth`s atmosphere by man`s activities. Radiatively active trace gases produce temperature changes in the earth`s atmosphere through changes in radiative flux divergence. Our knowledge of and means of measuring radiative flux divergence is very limited. A few observations of vertical radiative flux divergences have been reported from aircraft from radiometersondes from towers and from large tethered balloons. These measurement techniques suffers from one or more drawbacks, including shallow sounding depths (towers), high cost (aircraft), complicated logistics (large tethered balloons), and limitation to nighttime hours (radiometersondes). Changes in radiative flux divergence caused by anthropogenic trace gases are expected to be quite small, and will be difficult to measure with existing broadband radiative flux instruments. The emphasis of present research in global climate change is thus being focused on improving radiative transfer algorithms in global climate models. The radiative parameterizations in these models are at an early stage of development and information is needed regarding their performance, especially in cloudy conditions. The impetus for the research reported in this paper is the need for a device that can supplement existing means of measuring vertical profiles of long- and short-wave irradiance and radiative flux divergence. We have designed a small tethered-balloon-based system that can make radiometric soundings through the atmospheric boundary layer. This paper discusses the concept, the design considerations, and the design and construction of this sounding system. The performance of the system will be tested in a series of balloon flights scheduled for the fall and winter of 1992.

  9. Stabilized platform for tethered balloon soundings of broadband long- and short-wave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Alzheimer, J.M.; Anderson, G.A.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1993-01-01

    Changes in the composition of trace gases in the earth's atmosphere have been reported by many observers, and a general concern has been expressed regarding possible changes to the earth's climate that may be caused by radiatively active gases introduced into the earth's atmosphere by man's activities. Radiatively active trace gases produce temperature changes in the earth's atmosphere through changes in radiative flux divergence. Our knowledge of and means of measuring radiative flux divergence is very limited. A few observations of vertical radiative flux divergences have been reported from aircraft from radiometersondes from towers and from large tethered balloons. These measurement techniques suffers from one or more drawbacks, including shallow sounding depths (towers), high cost (aircraft), complicated logistics (large tethered balloons), and limitation to nighttime hours (radiometersondes). Changes in radiative flux divergence caused by anthropogenic trace gases are expected to be quite small, and will be difficult to measure with existing broadband radiative flux instruments. The emphasis of present research in global climate change is thus being focused on improving radiative transfer algorithms in global climate models. The radiative parameterizations in these models are at an early stage of development and information is needed regarding their performance, especially in cloudy conditions. The impetus for the research reported in this paper is the need for a device that can supplement existing means of measuring vertical profiles of long- and short-wave irradiance and radiative flux divergence. We have designed a small tethered-balloon-based system that can make radiometric soundings through the atmospheric boundary layer. This paper discusses the concept, the design considerations, and the design and construction of this sounding system. The performance of the system will be tested in a series of balloon flights scheduled for the fall and winter of 1992.

  10. Numerical modeling of a spar platform tethered by a mooring cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiangqian; Yoo, Wan-Suk

    2015-07-01

    Virtual simulation is an economical and efficient method in mechanical system design. Numerical modeling of a spar platform, tethered by a mooring cable with a spherical joint is developed for the dynamic simulation of the floating structure in ocean. The geometry modeling of the spar is created using finite element methods. The submerged part of the spar bears the buoyancy, hydrodynamic drag force, and effect of the added mass and Froude-Krylov force. Strip theory is used to sum up the forces acting on the elements. The geometry modeling of the cable is established based on the lumped-mass-and-spring modeling through which the cable is divided into 10 elements. A new element-fixed local frame is used, which is created by the element orientation vector and relative velocity of the fluid, to express the loads acting on the cable. The bottom of the cable is fixed on the seabed by spring forces, while the top of the cable is connected to the bottom of the spar platform by a modified spherical joint. This system suffers the propagating wave and current in the X-direction and the linear wave theory is applied for setting of the propagating wave. Based on the numerical modeling, the displacement-load relationships are analyzed, and the simulation results of the numerical modeling are compared with those by the commercial simulation code, ProteusDS. The comparison indicates that the numerical modeling of the spar platform tethered by a mooring cable is well developed, which provides an instruction for the optimization of a floating structure tethered by a mooring cable system.

  11. The International Tethered Cord Partnership: Beginnings, process, and status

    PubMed Central

    Mulholland, Celene B.; Aranda, Guzmán; Arredondo, Luis Angel; Calgua, Erwin; Contreras, Fernando; Espinoza, Dulce Maria; Gonzalez, Juan Bosco; Hoil, Jose A.; Komolafe, Edward; Lazareff, Jorge A.; Liu, Yunhui; Soto-Mancilla, Juan Luis; Mannucci, Graciela; Nan, Bao; Portillo, Santiago; Zhao, Hongyu

    2011-01-01

    Background: Spina bifida presents a significant cause of childhood morbidity in lower- and middle-income nations. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of literature examining outcomes among children with spina bifida in these countries. The goal of the International Tethered Cord Parternship is twofold: (1) to establish an international surveillance database to examine the correlation between time of repair and clinical outcomes in children with spina bifida and tethered cord; and (2) to foster collaboration among international institutions around pediatric neurosurgical concerns. Methods: Twelve institutions in 7 countries committed to participating in the International Tethered Cord Partnership. A neurosurgeon at each institution will evaluate all children presenting with spina bifida and/or tethered cord using the survey instrument after appropriate consent is obtained. The instrument was developed collaboratively and based on previous measures of motor and sensory function, ambulation, and continence. All institutions who have begun collecting data received appropriate Institutional Review Board approval. All data will be entered into a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) compliant database. In addition, a participant restricted internet forum was created to foster communication and includes non–project-specific communications, such as case and journal article discussion. Results: From October 2010 to December 2010, 82 patients were entered from the various study sites. Conclusion: To our knowledge this is the first international pediatric neurosurgical database focused on clinical outcomes and predictors of disease progression. The collaborative nature of the project will not only increase knowledge of spina bifida and tethered cord, but also foster discussion and further collaboration between neurosurgeons internationally. PMID:21541204

  12. One kilometer (1 km) electric solar wind sail tether produced automatically.

    PubMed

    Seppänen, Henri; Rauhala, Timo; Kiprich, Sergiy; Ukkonen, Jukka; Simonsson, Martin; Kurppa, Risto; Janhunen, Pekka; Hæggström, Edward

    2013-09-01

    We produced a 1 km continuous piece of multifilament electric solar wind sail tether of μm-diameter aluminum wires using a custom made automatic tether factory. The tether comprising 90,704 bonds between 25 and 50 μm diameter wires is reeled onto a metal reel. The total mass of 1 km tether is 10 g. We reached a production rate of 70 m/24 h and a quality level of 1‰ loose bonds and 2‰ rebonded ones. We thus demonstrated that production of long electric solar wind sail tethers is possible and practical.

  13. Learning characteristics of a space-time neural network as a tether skiprope observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.; Villarreal, James A.; Jani, Yashvant; Copeland, Charles

    1992-01-01

    The Software Technology Laboratory at JSC is testing a Space Time Neural Network (STNN) for observing tether oscillations present during retrieval of a tethered satellite. Proper identification of tether oscillations, known as 'skiprope' motion, is vital to safe retrieval of the tethered satellite. Our studies indicate that STNN has certain learning characteristics that must be understood properly to utilize this type of neural network for the tethered satellite problem. We present our findings on the learning characteristics including a learning rate versus momentum performance table.

  14. Learning characteristics of a space-time neural network as a tether skiprope observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.; Villarreal, James A.; Jani, Yashvant; Copeland, Charles

    1993-01-01

    The Software Technology Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center is testing a Space Time Neural Network (STNN) for observing tether oscillations present during retrieval of a tethered satellite. Proper identification of tether oscillations, known as 'skiprope' motion, is vital to safe retrieval of the tethered satellite. Our studies indicate that STNN has certain learning characteristics that must be understood properly to utilize this type of neural network for the tethered satellite problem. We present our findings on the learning characteristics including a learning rate versus momentum performance table.

  15. Low-Cost Propellant Launch From a Tethered Balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian

    2006-01-01

    A document presents a concept for relatively inexpensive delivery of propellant to a large fuel depot in low orbit around the Earth, for use in rockets destined for higher orbits, the Moon, and for remote planets. The propellant is expected to be at least 85 percent of the mass needed in low Earth orbit to support the NASA Exploration Vision. The concept calls for the use of many small ( 10 ton) spin-stabilized, multistage, solid-fuel rockets to each deliver 250 kg of propellant. Each rocket would be winched up to a balloon tethered above most of the atmospheric mass (optimal altitude 26 2 km). There, the rocket would be aimed slightly above the horizon, spun, dropped, and fired at a time chosen so that the rocket would arrive in orbit near the depot. Small thrusters on the payload (powered, for example, by boil-off gases from cryogenic propellants that make up the payload) would precess the spinning rocket, using data from a low-cost inertial sensor to correct for small aerodynamic and solid rocket nozzle misalignment torques on the spinning rocket; would manage the angle of attack and the final orbit insertion burn; and would be fired on command from the depot in response to observations of the trajectory of the payload so as to make small corrections to bring the payload into a rendezvous orbit and despin it for capture by the depot. The system is low-cost because the small rockets can be mass-produced using the same techniques as those to produce automobiles and low-cost munitions, and one or more can be launched from a U.S. territory on the equator (Baker or Jarvis Islands in the mid-Pacific) to the fuel depot on each orbit (every 90 minutes, e.g., any multiple of 6,000 per year).

  16. Synthesis, Characterization, and Modeling of Nanotube Materials with Variable Stiffness Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, S. J. V.; Herzog, M. N.; Odegard, G. M.; Gates, T. S.; Fay, C. C.

    2004-01-01

    Synthesis, mechanical testing, and modeling have been performed for carbon nanotube based materials. Tests using nanoindentation indicated a six-fold enhancement in the storage modulus when comparing the base material (no nanotubes) to the composite that contained 5.3 wt% of nanotubes. To understand how crosslinking the nanotubes may further alter the stiffness, a model of the system was constructed using nanotubes crosslinked with a variable stiffness tether (VST). The model predicted that for a composite with 5 wt% nanotubes at random orientations, crosslinked with the VST, the bulk Young's modulus was reduced by 30% compared to the noncrosslinked equivalent.

  17. Compact, planar, translational piezoelectric bimorph actuator with Archimedes’ spiral actuating tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenye; Liu, Sanwei; Xie, Xin; Livermore, Carol

    2016-12-01

    The design, analytical modelling, finite element analysis (FEA), and experimental characterization of a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) out-of-plane (vertical) translational piezoelectric lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) bimorph actuator supported on Archimedes’ spiral tethers are presented. Three types of bimorph actuators with different electrode patterns (with spiral tethers half actuated, fully actuated with uniform polarity, or fully actuated with reversed polarity) are designed and modelled. The two actuators with the highest predicted performance (half actuated and fully actuated with uniform polarity) are implemented and characterized. Both designs are fabricated by commercial processes and are compatible with integration into more complex MEMS systems. Analytical modelling and FEA are used to analyze and predict the actuators’ displacements and blocking forces. Experimental measurements of the deflections and blocking forces of actuators with full uniform actuation and half actuation validate the design. At an applied voltage of 110 V, the out-of-plane deflections of the actuators with half actuation and full uniform actuation are measured at about 17 µm and 29 µm respectively, in good agreement with analytical predictions of 17.3 µm and 34.2 µm and FEA predictions of 17.1 µm and 25.8 µm. The blocking force for devices with half-actuated tethers is predicted to be 12 mN (analytical) and 10 mN (FEA), close to the experimental value of 9 mN. The blocking force for devices with full uniform actuation is predicted to be 23 mN (analytical) and 17 mN (FEA), as compared with 15 mN in experiments.

  18. Role of vesicle tethering factors in the ER-Golgi membrane traffic

    PubMed Central

    Sztul, Elizabeth; Lupashin, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Tethers are a diverse group of loosely related proteins and protein complexes grouped into 3 families based on structural and functional similarities. A well-accepted role for tethering factors is the initial attachment of transport carriers to acceptor membranes prior to fusion. However, accumulating evidence indicates that tethers are more than static bridges. Tethers have been shown to interact with components of the fusion machinery and with components involved in vesicle formation. Tethers belonging to the 3 families act at the same stage of traffic, suggesting that they mediate distinct events during vesicle tethering. Thus, multiple tether-facilitated events are required to provide selectivity to vesicle fusion. In this review, we highlight findings that support this model. PMID:19887069

  19. Self-consistent field theory of tethered polymers: One dimensional, three dimensional, strong stretching theories and the effects of excluded-volume-only interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Suo, Tongchuan Whitmore, Mark D.

    2014-11-28

    We examine end-tethered polymers in good solvents, using one- and three-dimensional self-consistent field theory, and strong stretching theories. We also discuss different tethering scenarios, namely, mobile tethers, fixed but random ones, and fixed but ordered ones, and the effects and important limitations of including only binary interactions (excluded volume terms). We find that there is a “mushroom” regime in which the layer thickness is independent of the tethering density, σ, for systems with ordered tethers, but we argue that there is no such plateau for mobile or disordered anchors, nor is there one in the 1D theory. In the other limit of brushes, all approaches predict that the layer thickness scales linearly with N. However, the σ{sup 1/3} scaling is a result of keeping only excluded volume interactions: when the full potential is included, the dependence is faster and more complicated than σ{sup 1/3}. In fact, there does not appear to be any regime in which the layer thickness scales in the combination Nσ{sup 1/3}. We also compare the results for two different solvents with each other, and with earlier Θ solvent results.

  20. Investigation of EM Emissions by the Electrodynamic Tether, Inclusive of an Observational Program (EMET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    Our TSS-1/R investigation, which we shall refer to as EMET in this report, was an integral part of the effort by the TSS-1/R Investigators' Working Group (IWG) to come to an understanding of the complex interaction between the tethered satellite system and the ionosphere. All of the space-borne experiments were designed to collect data relevant to the local interaction. Only the ground- based experiments, EMET and its Italian counterpart Observations on the Earth's Surface of Electromagnetic Emissions (OESEE), held out any hope of characterizing the long range effects of the interaction. This was to be done by detecting electromagnetic waves generated by the system in the ionosphere, assuming the signal reached the Earth's surface with sufficient amplitude. As the type of plasma waves excited to carry charge away from the charge-exchange regions of the system at each end of the tether is one of the theoretical points about which there is greatest disagreement, a definitive identification of tether-generated waves could mark significant progress in the so-called current closure problem of electrodynamic tethers. Dr. Mario Grossi of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) initiated the investigation, and his experience in the field of ULF-ELF waves and their detection was invaluable throughout its course. Rice University had the responsibility of setting up the EMET ULF-VLF ground stations under a subcontract from SAO. Principal Investigator (PI) for the Rice effort was Prof. William E. Gordon, who was primary observer at the Arecibo Observatory during TSS-LR. Dr. Steve Noble handled major day-to-day operations, training, and planning for the ground-based measurements. Dr. James McCoy of NASA JSC, a member of the Mona/Arecibo team, was pilot for the numerous flights ferrying personnel and equipment between Puerto Rico and Mona Island. Final responsibility for the measurements rested with SAO, and the activities of field personnel and SAO investigators were

  1. Tether-mission design for multiple flybys of moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanmartin, J. R. S.; Charro, M. C.; Sanchez-Arriaga, G. S. A.; Sanchez-Torres, A. S. T.

    2015-10-01

    A tether mission to carry out multiple flybys of Jovian moon Europa is here presented. There is general agreement on elliptic-orbit flybys of Europa resulting in cost to attain given scientific goals lower than if actually orbiting the moon, tethers being naturally fit to fly-by rather than orbit moons1. The present mission is similar in this respect to the Clipper mission considered by NASA, the basic difference lying in location of periapsis, due to different emphasis on mission-challenge metrics. Clipper minimizes damaging radiation-dose by avoiding the Jupiter neighborhood and its very harsh environment; periapsis would be at Europa, apoapsis as far as moon Callisto. As in all past outer-planet missions, Clipper faces, however, critical power and propulsion needs. On the other hand, tethers can provide both propulsion and power, but must reach near the planet to find high plasma density and magnetic field values, leading to high induced tether current, and Lorentz drag and power. The bottom line is a strong radiation dose under the very intense Radiation Belts of Jupiter. Mission design focuses on limiting dose. Perijove would be near Jupiter, at about 1.2-1.3 Jovian radius, apojove about moon Ganymede, corresponding to 1:1 resonance with Europa, so as to keep dose down: setting apojove at Europa, for convenient parallel flybys, would require two perijove passes per flyby (the Ganymede apojove, resulting in high eccentricity, about 0.86, is also less requiring on tether operations). Mission is designed to attain reductions in eccentricity per perijove pass as high as Δe ≈ - 0.04. Due the low gravity-gradient, tether spinning is necessary to keep it straight, plasma contactors placed at both ends taking active turns at being cathodic. Efficiency of capture of the incoming S/C by the tether is gauged by the ratio of S/C mass to tether mass; efficiency is higher for higher tape-tether length and lower thickness and perijove. Low tether bowing due to the Lorentz

  2. An Ice-Tethered Instrument for Sustained Observation of Arctic Upper-Ocean Freshwater and Heat Content Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toole, J. M.; Proshutinsky, A.; Krishfield, R. A.; Dohherty, K. W.

    2003-12-01

    To address the Arctic gap in the global ocean observing system, we are developing an expendable, ice-tethered instrument capable of making long-term observations of freshwater and heat content variability beneath the ice pack. The system will consist of a small surface package that will support a weighted tether extending down 500 or more meters into the water column along which a variant of the now-operational Moored Profiler instrument will travel. Conductivity-Temperature-Depth data from the Profiler will be transmitted to the surface unit via an inductive modem, be combined with any additional sensor data (such as atmospheric pressure and temperature) and relayed to shore using a satellite data telemetry unit. We envision a loose array of these Ice-Tethered Profilers repeatedly sampling the thermohaline properties of the upper ocean below the perennial ice pack at daily to weekly time scale. Beyond estimating vertically-integrated quantities such as freshwater anomalies, the better-than 1-m-vertical-resolution data will also be valuable for documenting and assessing double-diffusive layering, thermohaline intrusions and mesoscale eddies, all possibly important to the evolution of the Arctic ice-ocean system. Multi-year lifetime and modest cost will permit basin-scale coverage (about 20 or more systems) to be maintained through regular seeding of replacement units as necessary, similar to the surface ice buoys (measuring sea ice drift, sea level atmospheric pressure, and 2-meter air temperature) of the International Arctic Buoy Program (IABP). Operationally, the array will serve as the Arctic analogue of the ARGO float program now being initiated at lower latitudes. Further information on the Ice-Tethered Profiler system is available at http://ioeb.whoi.edu/itp.

  3. Tethered capsule OCT endomicroscopy: from bench to bedside at the primary care office (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gora, Michalina J.; Simmons, Leigh H.; Tiernan, Aubrey R.; Grant, Catriona N.; Soomro, Amna R.; Walker Corkery, Elizabeth S.; Rosenberg, Mireille; Metlay, Joshua P.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a swallowable tethered capsule OCT endomicroscopy (TCE) device that acquires microscopic images of the entire esophagus in unsedated subjects in a quick and comfortable procedure. To test its capabilities of TCE to become a population-based screening device, we conducted a clinical feasibility study in the primary care office. The swept-source OCT imaging system (1310nm central wavelength, 40kHz A-line rate, 10um axial resolution) together with the tethered capsule catheter (11x25mm capsule attached to a flexible tether) were transferred to the PCP office where unsedated patients scheduled for non-urgent PCP visits swallowed the capsule and microscopic OCT images of the entire esophagus were collected. After the whole length of the esophagus was imaged, the catheter was disinfected for reuse. Twenty subjects were enrolled in the study, including nine female and eleven male. All TCE procedures were performed by a nurse and lasted in average 5:42 ± 1:54 min. High-resolution images of the esophagus were obtained in all seventeen subjects that swallowed the capsule. Our clinical experience in this cohort, subject feedback, image quality, and technological adaptations for efficient utilization in this setting will be presented. The ease and simplicity of the procedure combined with high quality of the images demonstrate the potential for this technology to become a population-based screening device. Technology limitations and future development guided by findings from this initial experience will be discussed with the goal of effectively translating TCE to the outpatient primary care setting.

  4. Tethered Balloon Operations at ARM AMF3 Site at Oliktok Point, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexheimer, D.; Lucero, D. A.; Helsel, F.; Hardesty, J.; Ivey, M.

    2015-12-01

    Oliktok Point has been the home of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (ARM) third ARM Mobile Facility, or AMF3, since October 2013. The AMF3 is operated through Sandia National Laboratories and hosts instrumentation collecting continuous measurements of clouds, aerosols, precipitation, energy, and other meteorological variables. The Arctic region is warming more quickly than any other region due to climate change and Arctic sea ice is declining to record lows. Sparsity of atmospheric data from the Arctic leads to uncertainty in process comprehension, and atmospheric general circulation models (AGCM) are understood to underestimate low cloud presence in the Arctic. Increased vertical resolution of meteorological properties and cloud measurements will improve process understanding and help AGCMs better characterize Arctic clouds. SNL is developing a tethered balloon system capable of regular operation at AMF3 in order to provide increased vertical resolution atmospheric data. The tethered balloon can be operated within clouds at altitudes up to 7,000' AGL within DOE's R-2204 restricted area. Pressure, relative humidity, temperature, wind speed, and wind direction are recorded at multiple altitudes along the tether. These data were validated against stationary met tower data in Albuquerque, NM. The altitudes of the sensors were determined by GPS and calculated using a line counter and clinometer and compared. Wireless wetness sensors and supercooled liquid water content sensors have also been deployed and their data has been compared with other sensors. This presentation will provide an overview of the balloons, sensors, and test flights flown, and will provide a preliminary look at data from sensor validation campaigns and test flights.

  5. Tethered Formation Configurations: Meeting the Scientific Objectives of Large Aperture and Interferometric Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Rodger E.; Quinn, David A.; Brodeur, Stephen J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    With the success of the Hubble Space Telescope, it has become apparent that new frontiers of science and discovery are made every time an improvement in imaging resolution is made. For the HST working primarily in the visible and near-visible spectrum, this meant designing, building, and launching a primary mirror approximately three meters in diameter. Conventional thinking tells us that accomplishing a comparable improvement in resolution at longer wavelengths for Earth and Space Science applications requires a corresponding increase in the size of the primary mirror. For wavelengths in the sub-millimeter range, a very large telescope with an effective aperture in excess of one kilometer in diameter would be needed to obtain high quality angular resolution. Realistically a single aperture this large is practically impossible. Fortunately such large apertures can be constructed synthetically. Possibly as few as three 34 meter diameter mirrors flying in precision formation could be used to collect light at these longer wavelengths permitting not only very large virtual aperture science to be carried out, but high-resolution interferometry as well. To ensure the longest possible mission duration, a system of tethered spacecraft will be needed to mitigate the need for a great deal of propellant. A spin-stabilized, tethered formation will likely meet these requirements. Several configurations have been proposed which possibly meet the needs of the Space Science community. This paper discusses two of them, weighing the relative pros and cons of each concept. The ultimate goal being to settle on a configuration which combines the best features of structure, tethers, and formation flying to meet the ambitious requirements necessary to make future large synthetic aperture and interferometric science missions successful.

  6. Tethered Formation Configurations: Meeting the Scientific Objectives of Large Aperture and Interferometric Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Rodger E.; Quinn, David A.

    2004-01-01

    With the success of the Hubble Space Telescope, it has become apparent that new frontiers of science and discovery are made every time an improvement in imaging resolution is made. For the HST working primarily in the visible and near-visible spectrum, this meant designing, building and launching a primary mirror approximately three meters in diameter. Conventional thinking tells us that accomplishing a comparable improvement in resolution at longer wavelengths for Earth and Space Science applications requires a corresponding increase in the size of the primary mirror. For wavelengths in the sub-millimeter range, a very large telescope with an effective aperture in excess of one kilometer in diameter would be needed to obtain high quality angular resolution. Realistically a single aperture this large is practically impossible. Fortunately such large apertures can be constructed synthetically. Possibly as few as three 3 - 4 meter diameter mirrors flying in precision formation could be used to collect light at these longer wavelengths permitting not only very large virtual aperture science to be carried out, but high-resolution interferometry as well. To ensure the longest possible mission duration, a system of tethered spacecraft will be needed to mitigate the need for a great deal of propellant. A spin-stabilized, tethered formation will likely meet these requirements. Several configurations have been proposed which possibly meet the needs of the Space Science community. This paper discusses two of them, weighing the relative pros and cons of each concept. The ultimate goal being to settle on a configuration which combines the best features of structure, tethers and formation flying to meet the ambitious requirements necessary to make future large synthetic aperture and interferometric science missions successful.

  7. Determination of Force Coresponding to Maximal Lactate Steady State in Tethered Swimming

    PubMed Central

    PAPOTI, MARCELO; VITÓRIO, RICARDO; ARAÚJO, GUSTAVO G.; DA SILVA, ADELINO S. R.; SANTHIAGO, VANESSA; MARTINS, LUIZ E. B.; CUNHA, SÉRGIO A.; GOBATTO, CLAUDIO A.

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of the present investigation was to verify if the aerobic capacity (AC) measured in tethered swimming corresponds to the maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) and its correlation with 30 min and 400m free style swimming. Twenty-five swimmers were submitted to an incremental tethered swimming test (ITS) with an initial load of 20N and increments of 10N each 3min. After each stage of 3min, the athletes had 30s of interval to blood sample collections that were used to measure blood lactate concentrations ([La−]). The ACBI was determined by the abrupt increase in [La−] versus force (F). The points obtained between [La−] versus force (N) were adjusted by an exponential curve model to determine AC corresponding to 3.5mmol.l−1 (AC3.5) and 4.0mmol.l−1 (AC4.0). After these procedures, the swimmers performed maximal efforts of 30min and 400m in free style swimming. We used the distance performed in 30min and the time performed in 400m to calculate the median velocities (i.e. V30 and V400) of these protocols. After one week, in order to measure the MLSS, nine athletes performed three 30-min tethered swimming efforts with intensities of 90, 100, and 110% of ACBI. The ANOVA one-way was used to compare the ACBI, AC3.5 and AC4.0. Correlations between ACs, and between ACs and V30 and V400 (p<0.05) were determined using the Pearson’s correlation coefficient. The intensity corresponding to 100% of ACBI was similar to the MLSS. It was observed significant correlations of the aerobic capacities (i.e. ACBI, AC3.5 and AC4.0) with V30 (r>0.91) and V400 (r>0.63). According to our results, it is possible to conclude that the ACBI corresponds to the MLSS, and both the AC - individually determined - and the AC - determined using fixed blood lactate concentrations of 3.5 and 4.0mmol.l−1 - can be used to predict the mean velocity of 30min and 400m in free style swimming. In addition to that, the tethered swimming system can be used for aerobic development in places

  8. Long distance cell communication using spherical tether balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, R. K.; Rajagopalan, Vasudevan; Vasudevan, Rajagopalan; Mehrotra, R. K.; Sreenivasan, S.; Pawaskar, M.; Subba Rao Jonnalagadda, Venkata; Buduru, Suneelkumar; Kulkarni, P. M.

    A proof-of-concept experiment was conducted for long-range cell communication for rural tele-phony and internet. We designed and fabricated a spherical tether balloon to carry the con-ventional micro base transceiver station (BTS) along with three slotted antenna to cover 2-pi radius. AC power and optical fiber were anchored along with the tether line. A special fre-quency license was obtained from Wireless Planning Commission (WPC) wing of Department of Telecommunication (DoT), India for the period of experiment so as not to affect the opera-tional networks. The experiments were carried out for different BTS heights up to 500 meter. Signal measurement both in data mode and voice quality were done in different quadrant using mobile vans. This paper describes the methodology (under patenting) and utility of technique for operational application.

  9. In situ assembly of enzyme inhibitors using extended tethering.

    PubMed

    Erlanson, Daniel A; Lam, Joni W; Wiesmann, Christian; Luong, Tinh N; Simmons, Robert L; DeLano, Warren L; Choong, Ingrid C; Burdett, Matthew T; Flanagan, W Michael; Lee, Dennis; Gordon, Eric M; O'Brien, Tom

    2003-03-01

    Cysteine aspartyl protease-3 (caspase-3) is a mediator of apoptosis and a therapeutic target for a wide range of diseases. Using a dynamic combinatorial technology, 'extended tethering', we identified unique nonpeptidic inhibitors for this enzyme. Extended tethering allowed the identification of ligands that bind to discrete regions of caspase-3 and also helped direct the assembly of these ligands into small-molecule inhibitors. We first designed a small-molecule 'extender' that irreversibly alkylates the cysteine residue of caspase-3 and also contains a thiol group. The modified protein was then screened against a library of disulfide-containing small-molecule fragments. Mass-spectrometry was used to identify ligands that bind noncovalently to the protein and that also form a disulfide linkage with the extender. Linking the selected fragments with binding elements from the extenders generates reversible, tight-binding molecules that are druglike and distinct from known inhibitors. One molecule derived from this approach inhibited apoptosis in cells.

  10. Tethering toxins and peptide ligands for modulation of neuronal function

    PubMed Central

    Ibañez-Tallon, Inés; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2011-01-01

    Tethering genetically encoded peptide toxins or ligands close to their point of activity at the cell plasma membrane provides a new approach to the study of cell networks and neuronal circuits, as it allows selective targeting of specific cell populations, enhances the working concentration of the ligand or blocker peptide, and permits the engineering of a large variety of t-peptides (e.g., including use of fluorescent markers, viral vectors and point mutation variants). This review describes the development of tethered toxins and peptides derived from the identification of the cell surface nAChR modulator lynx1, the existence of related endogenous cell surface modulators of nAChR and AMPA receptors, and the application of the t-toxin and t-neuropeptide technology to the dissection of neuronal circuits in metazoans. PMID:22119144

  11. Acyclic Tethers Mimicking Subunits of Polysaccharide Ligands: Selectin Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report on the design and synthesis of molecules having E- and P-selectins blocking activity both in vitro and in vivo. The GlcNAc component of the selectin ligand sialyl LewisX was replaced by an acyclic tether that links two saccharide units. The minimization of intramolecular dipole–dipole interactions and the gauche effect would be at the origin of the conformational bias imposed by this acyclic tether. The stereoselective synthesis of these molecules, their biochemical and biological evaluations using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), and in vivo assays are described. Because the structure of our analogues differs from the most potent E-selectin antagonists reported, our acyclic analogues offer new opportunities for chemical diversity. PMID:25221666

  12. Forces and Motion: Dynamics of the Tethered Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In this 'Lift off to Learning' series, Loren Shriver, commander of STS 46, and the other members of the mission (Claude Nicollier, Marsha Ivins, Andrew Allen, Jeffrey Hoffman, Franklin Chiang-Diaz, and Franco Maerba) use computer graphics, and physical experiments to explain how the tethered satellite to be deployed during their mission will be raised, how it works, the influence of the Shuttle on the satellite and the satellite's influence on the Shuttle's orbit, the gravitational effects, and other effects concerning the Theoretical Physics used to plan this mission (gravity gradient force, center of mass, angular momentum, centrifugal force, and coriolis effect). This video ends with a discussion of the technology transfer and utilization of this tethered satellite concept and design.

  13. Exploration of planetesimals by a tripartite tethered spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Richard B.

    1990-01-01

    Asteroids and comets exert such a small gravitational force that it is not practical to survey them from orbit. One must instead continuously accelerate using maneuvering rockets to move around the surface. A space exploration craft in three parts connected by lightweight cables can survey asteroids and comets, and deploy landers, without requiring the large thrusters and the continuous depletion of fuel required by a single craft. The spacecraft is deployed by spinning up from a compact configuration using low thrust jets, and then maintain surveying orbit without any major expenditure of energy. The triangular tether arrangement is stable, but care must be taken in changing orbits and with deploying and recovering samples, as can be demonstrated with a simple simulation. Even 100 km long tethers occupy a low payload fraction.

  14. Asteroid rotation control via a tethered solar sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Youtao; Wu, Jingyun

    2016-12-01

    The rotation of asteroids causes difficulties in the exploration of asteroids or prevention of asteroids impact on the Earth. We propose to use a solar sail to control, i.e., slow down or stop the rotational motion of an asteroid. First, the dynamic model of a tethered solar sail in the rotating gravitational field of an asteroid is presented. An optimal control method is employed to determine the control law of the tethered solar sail. The optimal control problem is converted into a nonlinear programming problem with the Gauss pseudospectral method. Simulation results show that this method can effectively slow down or even stop the rotation of an asteroid. A solar sail of 105 m2 can stop the rotation of the asteroid Apophis in 1000 days.

  15. Impaired tethering and fusion of GLUT4 vesicles in insulin-resistant human adipose cells.

    PubMed

    Lizunov, Vladimir A; Lee, Jo-Ping; Skarulis, Monica C; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Cushman, Samuel W; Stenkula, Karin G

    2013-09-01

    Systemic glucose homeostasis is profoundly influenced by adipose cell function. Here we investigated GLUT4 dynamics in living adipose cells from human subjects with varying BMI and insulin sensitivity index (Si) values. Cells were transfected with hemagglutinin (HA)-GLUT4-green fluorescent protein (GFP)/mCherry (red fluorescence), and were imaged live using total internal reflection fluorescence and confocal microscopy. HA-GLUT4-GFP redistribution to the plasma membrane (PM) was quantified by surface-exposed HA epitope. In the basal state, GLUT4 storage vesicle (GSV) trafficking to and fusion with the PM were invariant with donor subject Si, as was total cell-surface GLUT4. In cells from insulin-sensitive subjects, insulin augmented GSV tethering and fusion approximately threefold, resulting in a corresponding increase in total PM GLUT4. However, with decreasing Si, these effects diminished progressively. All insulin-induced effects on GLUT4 redistribution and trafficking correlated strongly with Si and only weakly with BMI. Thus, while basal GLUT4 dynamics and total cell-surface GLUT4 are intact in human adipose cells, independent of donor Si, cells from insulin-resistant donors show markedly impaired GSV tethering and fusion responses to insulin, even after overnight culture. This altered insulin responsiveness is consistent with the hypothesis that adipose cellular dysfunction is a primary contributor to systemic metabolic dysfunction.

  16. Tethering RNA to chromatin for fluorescence microscopy based analysis of nuclear organization.

    PubMed

    Pankert, Teresa; Jegou, Thibaud; Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Rippe, Karsten

    2017-02-14

    Nuclear RNAs emerge as important factors to orchestrate the dynamic organization of the nucleus into functional subcompartments. By tethering RNAs to distinct genomic loci, RNA-dependent chromatin changes can be dissected by fluorescence microscopic analysis. Here we describe how this approach is implemented in mammalian cells. It involves two high-affinity protein-nucleic acid interactions that can be established with a number of different protein domains and DNA and RNA sequences. A prototypic system is described here in detail: It consists of the binding of MS2 bacteriophage coat protein to its RNA recognition sequence and the interaction between the bacterial LacI repressor protein to its target lacO operator DNA sequence. Via these interactions RNAs tagged with the MS2 recognition sequences can be recruited to a locus with integrated lacO repeats. By inducing RNA-chromatin binding a number of RNA-dependent activities can be dissected: (i) The RNA-induced compaction or decondensation of chromatin, (ii) identification of RNA-interacting chromatin modifiers that set epigenetic signals such as posttranslational histone modifications, and (iii) nuclear relocation of a genomic locus targeted by the tethered RNA. Thus, a variety of RNA-dependent activities can be evaluated with the MS2-LacI system, which are crucial for understanding how RNA shapes nuclear organization.

  17. Fractional order sliding mode control for tethered satellite deployment with disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Junjie; Zhu, Zheng H.; Wang, Wei; Li, Aijun; Wang, Changqing

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a fractional order sliding mode control for the deployment of tethered space systems with the consideration of uncertainty of external disturbances and unmodeled system dynamics. The proposed fractional order sliding mode control consists of two sub-sliding manifolds that are defined separately for the actuated and unactuated states. This, in turn, generates a control scheme to make all states move toward to the desired states. The stability analysis of the proposed control law indicates not only all states converge to the desired states at equilibrium but also disturbances caused by the uncertainty can be suppressed satisfactorily. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the influences of fractional order and sub-sliding manifold of unactuated states on the performance of the proposed control law. The performance is compared with the sliding mode, PD and fractional order PD control laws for a baseline scenario of tether deployment. The proposed control law performs better than others in the settling time and the maximum pitch angle control in the presence of unwanted disturbances. Effectiveness and robustness of the proposed control law are demonstrated by computer simulations.

  18. Downward-deployed tethered platforms for high enthalpy aerothermodynamic research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, George M.; Siemers, Paul M.; Squires, R. Kenneth; Wolf, Henry; Carlomagno, Giovanni M.

    1988-01-01

    The data on aerothermodynamic and aerodynamic interactions at altitudes above 50 km is extremely limited because of the relative inaccessibility of the region to research vehicles of any sort. This paper addresses the practicability of using downward deployed satellites tethered to an orbiting host vehicle in order to obtain steady-state data in the upper reaches of the region above 80 or 90 km.

  19. Shuttle Tethered Aerothermodynamics Research Facilty (STARFAC) instrumentation requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, G. M.; Siemers, P. M.; Carlomagno, G. M.; Hoffman, J.

    1986-01-01

    The instrumentation requirements for the Shuttle Tethered Aerothermodynamic Research Facility (STARFAC) are presented. The typical physical properties of the terrestrial atmosphere are given along with representative atmospheric daytime ion concentrations and the equilibrium and nonequilibrium gas property comparison from a point away from a wall. STARFAC science and engineering measurements are given as are the TSS free stream gas analysis. The potential nonintrusive measurement techniques for hypersonic boundary layer research are outlined along with the quantitative physical measurement methods for aerothermodynamic studies.

  20. Preliminary investigation of the electrodynamics of a conducting tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    An introductory study of the properties of an electrically conducting tether flown from the shuttle is presented. Only a single configuration is considered: a vertical conductor moving normally across the Earth's field, connecting the shuttle to a large conducting balloon that passively extracts electrons from the ionosphere. The distortions in the plasma at maximum current collection are described, as are the local and distant wakes. Numerical values are given.

  1. Initiation of Coronal Mass Ejections by Tether-Cutting Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present and interpret examples of the eruptive motion and flare brightening observed in the onset of magnetic explosions that produce coronal mass ejections. The observations are photospheric magnetograms and sequences of coronal and/or chromospheric images. In our examples, the explosion is apparently driven by the ejective eruption of a sigmoidal sheared-field flux rope from the core of an initially closed bipole. This eruption is initiated (triggered and unleashed) by reconnection located either (1) internally, low in the sheared core field, or (2) externally, at a magnetic null above the closed bipole. The internal reconnection is commonly called 'tether-cutting" reconnection, and the external reconnection is commonly called "break-out' reconnection. We point out that break-out reconnection amounts to external tether cutting. In one example, the eruptive motion of the sheared core field starts several minutes prior to any detectable brightening in the coronal images. We suggest that in this case the eruption is triggered by internal tether-cutting reconnection that at first is too slow and/or too localized to produce detectable heating in the coronal images. This work is supported by NASA's Office of Space Science through its Solar & Heliospheric Physics Supporting Research & Technology program and its Sun-Earth Connection Guest Investigator program.

  2. A Tether-Based Variable-Gravity Research Facility Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Kirk

    2006-01-01

    The recent announcement of a return to the Moon and a mission to Mars has made the question of human response to lower levels of gravity more important. Recent advances in tether technology spurred by NASA s research in MXER tethers has led to a re-examination of the concept of a variable-gravity research facility (xGRF) for human research in low Earth orbit. Breakthroughs in simplified inertial tracking have made it possible to consider eliminating the despun section of previous designs. This, in turn, improves the prospect of a facility based entirely around a tether, with the human module on one end and a countermass on the other. With such a configuration, propellantless spinup and spindown is also possible based on the conservation of angular momentum from a gravity-gradient configuration to a spinning configuration. This not only saves large amounts of propellant but vastly simplifies crew and consumable resupply operations, since these can now be done in a microgravity configuration. The importance of the science to be obtained and the performance improvements in this new design argue strongly for further investigation.

  3. Hollow cathode-based plasma contactor experiments for electrodynamic tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The role plasma contactors play in effective electrodynamic tether operation is discussed. Hollow cathodes and hollow cathode-based plasma sources have been identified as leading candidates for the electrodynamic tether plasma contactor. Present experimental efforts to evaluate the suitability of these devices as plasma contactors are reviewed. This research includes the definition of preliminary plasma contactor designs, and the characterization of their operation as electron collectors from a simulated space plasma. The discovery of an 'ignited mode' regime of high contactor efficiency and low impedance is discussed, as well as is the application of recent models of the plasma coupling process to contactor operation. Results indicate that ampere-level electron currents can be exchanged between hollow cathode-based plasma contactors and a dilute plasma in this regime. A discussion of design considerations for plasma contactors is given which includes expressions defining the total mass flow rate and power requirements of plasma contactors operating in both the cathodic and anodic regimes, and correlation of this to the tether current. Finally, future ground and spaceflight experiments are proposed to resolve critical issues of plasma contactor operation.

  4. Non-coding Y RNAs as tethers and gates

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Sandra L; Belair, Cedric; Boccitto, Marco; Chen, Xinguo; Sim, Soyeong; Taylor, David W; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) called Y RNAs are abundant components of both animal cells and a variety of bacteria. In all species examined, these ~100 nt RNAs are bound to the Ro 60 kDa (Ro60) autoantigen, a ring-shaped protein that also binds misfolded ncRNAs in some vertebrate nuclei. Although the function of Ro60 RNPs has been mysterious, we recently reported that a bacterial Y RNA tethers Ro60 to the 3′ to 5′ exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) to form RYPER (Ro60/Y RNA/PNPase Exoribonuclease RNP), a new RNA degradation machine. PNPase is a homotrimeric ring that degrades single-stranded RNA, and Y RNA-mediated tethering of Ro60 increases the effectiveness of PNPase in degrading structured RNAs. Single particle electron microscopy of RYPER suggests that RNA threads through the Ro60 ring into the PNPase cavity. Further studies indicate that Y RNAs may also act as gates to regulate entry of RNA substrates into the Ro60 channel. These findings reveal novel functions for Y RNAs and raise questions about how the bacterial findings relate to the roles of these ncRNAs in animal cells. Here we review the literature on Y RNAs, highlighting their close relationship with Ro60 proteins and the hypothesis that these ncRNAs function generally to tether Ro60 rings to diverse RNA-binding proteins. PMID:24036917

  5. Guided electromagnetic waves observed on a conducting ionospheric tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. G.; Balmain, K. G.

    2001-01-01

    On the up leg of its flight through the auroral nightside ionosphere to an apogee of 824 km, the tethered double payload Observations of Electric Field Distributions in the Ionospheric Plasma: A Unique Strategy (OEDIPUS) C was the site of experiments on wire-guided electromagnetic (EM) waves. Waves were transmitted from the upper subpayload to a receiver on the lower subpayload along a conducting wire aligned within a few degrees of the Earth's magnetic field. Such EM waves were observed at almost all frequencies in the range 0.1-8.0 MHz. There was a deep stop band between the cyclotron and upper hybrid resonance frequencies where the cold plasma theory predicts a propagation cutoff, and there were shallower attenuation bands at frequencies where hot-plasma electrostatic waves may affect the guided EM modes. Resonances of the wire-guided waves with the tether length were observed throughout the entire tethered portion of the flight. The resonances appear as a set of fringes when all the data are presented in a frequency-versus-time summary. The fringe shapes in this summary have been compared with the predictions of an early theory, which give generally good agreement. The exceptions are frequencies close to the stop band, where cold-plasma dispersion effects are expected to be greatest. Another theory based on a different derivation of the dispersion relation includes a vacuum sheath gap outside the conductor. The absolute fringe intensities and positions predicted agree moderately well with the observations.

  6. The effect of particle size on the morphology and thermodynamics of diblock copolymer/tethered-particle membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Edwards, Brian J.

    2015-06-07

    A combination of self-consistent field theory and density functional theory was used to examine the effect of particle size on the stable, 3-dimensional equilibrium morphologies formed by diblock copolymers with a tethered nanoparticle attached either between the two blocks or at the end of one of the blocks. Particle size was varied between one and four tenths of the radius of gyration of the diblock polymer chain for neutral particles as well as those either favoring or disfavoring segments of the copolymer blocks. Phase diagrams were constructed and analyzed in terms of thermodynamic diagrams to understand the physics associated with the molecular-level self-assembly processes. Typical morphologies were observed, such as lamellar, spheroidal, cylindrical, gyroidal, and perforated lamellar, with the primary concentration region of the tethered particles being influenced heavily by particle size and tethering location, strength of the particle-segment energetic interactions, chain length, and copolymer radius of gyration. The effect of the simulation box size on the observed morphology and system thermodynamics was also investigated, indicating possible effects of confinement upon the system self-assembly processes.

  7. The effect of particle size on the morphology and thermodynamics of diblock copolymer/tethered-particle membranes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Edwards, Brian J

    2015-06-07

    A combination of self-consistent field theory and density functional theory was used to examine the effect of particle size on the stable, 3-dimensional equilibrium morphologies formed by diblock copolymers with a tethered nanoparticle attached either between the two blocks or at the end of one of the blocks. Particle size was varied between one and four tenths of the radius of gyration of the diblock polymer chain for neutral particles as well as those either favoring or disfavoring segments of the copolymer blocks. Phase diagrams were constructed and analyzed in terms of thermodynamic diagrams to understand the physics associated with the molecular-level self-assembly processes. Typical morphologies were observed, such as lamellar, spheroidal, cylindrical, gyroidal, and perforated lamellar, with the primary concentration region of the tethered particles being influenced heavily by particle size and tethering location, strength of the particle-segment energetic interactions, chain length, and copolymer radius of gyration. The effect of the simulation box size on the observed morphology and system thermodynamics was also investigated, indicating possible effects of confinement upon the system self-assembly processes.

  8. The effect of surface tethering on the folding of the src-SH3 protein domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Zhuoyun; Jewett, Andrew I.; Soto, Patricia; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2009-03-01

    The effect of surface tethering on the folding mechanism of the src-SH3 protein domain was investigated using a coarse-grained Gō-type protein model. The protein was tethered at various locations along the protein chain and the thermodynamics and kinetics of folding were studied using replica exchange and constant temperature Langevin dynamics. Our simulations reveal that tethering in a structured part of the transition state can dramatically alter the folding mechanism, while tethering in an unstructured part leaves the folding mechanism unaltered as compared to bulk folding. Interestingly, there is only modest correlation between the tethering effect on the folding mechanism and its effect on thermodynamic stability and folding rates. We suggest locations on the protein at which tethering could be performed in single-molecule experiments so as to leave the folding mechanism unaltered from the bulk.

  9. Modeling of induced currents from electrodynamic tethers in a laboratory plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urrutia, J. M.; Stenzel, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    The presently accepted picture of the current path for electrodynamic tethers envisions a quasi-dc current flow in a 'phantom loop' consisting of the tether, two field-aligned current channels into the ionosphere and a cross-field closing current in the E-layer. Predictions are made on the establishment and maintenance of a current loop in space based on observations of time-dependent currents between tethered electrodes in a large laboratory magnetoplasma. In addition to radiation from the contactors ('whistler wings'), the insulated tether is observed to emit waves (a 'whistler wedge'). The 'wedge' provides closure during loop formation by carrying cross-field polarization currents. Whistler spread within the ray cone leads to overlapping of the current wings not far from the tether hence minimizing the role of the ionospheric closure. Maintenance of the loop requires the continuous emission of whistler waves by the entire tether thereby providing severe radiation losses.

  10. A tethered-balloon PTRMS sampling approach for surverying of landscape-scale biogenic VOC fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Jim; Penuelas, J.; Guenther, Alex B.; Seco, R.; Turnipseed, A.; Jiang, X.; Filella, I.; Estiraste, M.; Sardans, J.; Ogaya, R.; Llusia, J.; Rapparini, F.

    2014-01-01

    To survey landscape-scale fluxes of biogenic gases, a100-meterTeflon tube was attached to a tethered balloon as a sampling inlet for a fast response Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTRMS). Along with meteorological instruments deployed on the tethered balloon and at 3-mand outputs from a regional weather model, these observations were used to estimate landscape scale biogenic volatile organic compound fluxes with two micrometeorological techniques: mixed layer variance and surface layer gradients. This highly mobile sampling system was deployed at four field sites near Barcelona to estimate landscape-scale BVOC emission factors in a relatively short period (3 weeks). The two micrometeorological techniques agreed within the uncertainty of the flux measurements at all four sites even though the locations had considerable heterogeneity in species distribution and complex terrain. The observed fluxes were significantly different than emissions predicted with an emission model using site-specific emission factors and land-cover characteristics. Considering the wide range in reported BVOC emission factors of VOCs for individual vegetation species (more than an order of magnitude), this flux estimation technique is useful for constraining BVOC emission factors used as model inputs.

  11. Relative Contribution of Arms and Legs in 30 s Fully Tethered Front Crawl Swimming

    PubMed Central

    Morouço, Pedro G.; Marinho, Daniel A.; Izquierdo, Mikel; Neiva, Henrique; Marques, Mário C.

    2015-01-01

    The relative contribution of arm stroke and leg kicking to maximal fully tethered front crawl swimming performance remains to be solved. Twenty-three national level young swimmers (12 male and 11 female) randomly performed 3 bouts of 30 s fully tethered swimming (using the whole body, only the arm stroke, and only the leg kicking). A load-cell system permitted the continuous measurement of the exerted forces, and swimming velocity was calculated from the time taken to complete a 50 m front crawl swim. As expected, with no restrictions swimmers were able to exert higher forces than that using only their arm stroke or leg kicking. Estimated relative contributions of arm stroke and leg kicking were 70.3% versus 29.7% for males and 66.6% versus 33.4% for females, with 15.6% and 13.1% force deficits, respectively. To obtain higher velocities, male swimmers are highly dependent on the maximum forces they can exert with the arm stroke (r = 0.77, P < 0.01), whereas female swimmers swimming velocity is more related to whole-body mean forces (r = 0.81, P < 0.01). The obtained results point that leg kicking plays an important role over short duration high intensity bouts and that the used methodology may be useful to identify strength and/or coordination flaws. PMID:26539511

  12. Relative Contribution of Arms and Legs in 30 s Fully Tethered Front Crawl Swimming.

    PubMed

    Morouço, Pedro G; Marinho, Daniel A; Izquierdo, Mikel; Neiva, Henrique; Marques, Mário C

    2015-01-01

    The relative contribution of arm stroke and leg kicking to maximal fully tethered front crawl swimming performance remains to be solved. Twenty-three national level young swimmers (12 male and 11 female) randomly performed 3 bouts of 30 s fully tethered swimming (using the whole body, only the arm stroke, and only the leg kicking). A load-cell system permitted the continuous measurement of the exerted forces, and swimming velocity was calculated from the time taken to complete a 50 m front crawl swim. As expected, with no restrictions swimmers were able to exert higher forces than that using only their arm stroke or leg kicking. Estimated relative contributions of arm stroke and leg kicking were 70.3% versus 29.7% for males and 66.6% versus 33.4% for females, with 15.6% and 13.1% force deficits, respectively. To obtain higher velocities, male swimmers are highly dependent on the maximum forces they can exert with the arm stroke (r = 0.77, P < 0.01), whereas female swimmers swimming velocity is more related to whole-body mean forces (r = 0.81, P < 0.01). The obtained results point that leg kicking plays an important role over short duration high intensity bouts and that the used methodology may be useful to identify strength and/or coordination flaws.

  13. Multiple LacI-mediated loops revealed by Bayesian statistics and tethered particle motion

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stephanie; van de Meent, Jan-Willem; Phillips, Rob; Wiggins, Chris H.; Lindén, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial transcription factor LacI loops DNA by binding to two separate locations on the DNA simultaneously. Despite being one of the best-studied model systems for transcriptional regulation, the number and conformations of loop structures accessible to LacI remain unclear, though the importance of multiple coexisting loops has been implicated in interactions between LacI and other cellular regulators of gene expression. To probe this issue, we have developed a new analysis method for tethered particle motion, a versatile and commonly used in vitro single-molecule technique. Our method, vbTPM, performs variational Bayesian inference in hidden Markov models. It learns the number of distinct states (i.e. DNA–protein conformations) directly from tethered particle motion data with better resolution than existing methods, while easily correcting for common experimental artifacts. Studying short (roughly 100 bp) LacI-mediated loops, we provide evidence for three distinct loop structures, more than previously reported in single-molecule studies. Moreover, our results confirm that changes in LacI conformation and DNA-binding topology both contribute to the repertoire of LacI-mediated loops formed in vitro, and provide qualitatively new input for models of looping and transcriptional regulation. We expect vbTPM to be broadly useful for probing complex protein–nucleic acid interactions. PMID:25120267

  14. Tethered Chains in Poor Solvent Conditions: An Experimental Study Involving Langmuir Diblock Copolymer Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, M.S.; Lee, L.T.; Majewski, J.; Satija, S.; Smith, G.S.

    1998-10-13

    We have employed Langmuir monolayer of highly asymmetric polydimethylsiloxane- polystyrene (PDMS-PS) diblock copolymers on dioctyl phthalate (DOP) at temperatures ranging from 22 "C to -35 `C as a model system for tethered chains in poor solvent conditions. The thicknesses of the tethered PS layers extending into the DOP subphase, measured by neutron reflection, decrease with decreasing temperature (T) over this entire r~ge. However, the v~iation with T becomes weak below -20 "C. At the ]owest T, the layer thicknesses are contracted 55 % -75 `% of their values at the theta condition (T8 = 22 "C), but are still quite swollen compared to the fully collapsed, nonsolvent limit. The contraction of the layer with decreasing T is determined as a function of surface density and molecular weight. These data are compared to universal scaling forms. The PS segments are depleted from the air surface over the entire T range, the thickness of the depletion layer increasing slightly with decreasing T. The free energy of the surface layer is probed by surface tension measurements. Negative surface pressures are observed at low coverages for both PDMS-PS and PDMS monolayer, indicating metastability toward lateral phase separation. Evidence for a trruisition from a dispersed phase to a condensed phase with decreasing T was observed in the reflectivity at very low PDMS-PS coverage.

  15. Acquisition of Ice-Tethered Profilers with Velocity (ITP-V) Instruments for Future Arctic Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    typically sits atop an ice floe, a weighted, wire -rope tether suspended from the surface package, and an instrumented underwater unit that travels...up and down the wire tether (Figure 1). The current design of the ITP surface expression is a conical-shaped buoy that houses a controller, inductive...jacketed wire rope tether and end weight should the ice fracture or melt, and to provide modest protection in the event of ice ridging. The profiler

  16. Microfluidics-based side view flow chamber reveals tether-to-sling transition in rolling neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Marki, Alex; Gutierrez, Edgar; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Groisman, Alex; Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils rolling at high shear stress (above 6 dyn/cm2) form tethers in the rear and slings in the front. Here, we developed a novel photo-lithographically fabricated, silicone(PDMS)-based side-view flow chamber to dynamically visualize tether and sling formation. Fluorescently membrane-labeled mouse neutrophils rolled on P-selectin substrate at 10 dyn/cm2. Most rolling cells formed 5 tethers that were 2–30 μm long. Breaking of a single tether caused a reproducible forward microjump of the cell, showing that the tether was load-bearing. About 15% of all tether-breaking events resulted in slings. The tether-to-sling transition was fast (<100 ms) with no visible material extending above the rolling cell, suggesting a very low bending modulus of the tether. The sling downstream of the rolling cell aligned according to the streamlines before landing on the flow chamber. These new observations explain how slings form from tethers and provide insight into their biomechanical properties. PMID:27357741

  17. Investigation of dynamic noise affecting geodynamics information in a tethered subsatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gullahorn, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    Work performed as part of an investigation of noise affecting instrumentation in a tethered subsatellite, was studied. The following specific topics were addressed during the reporting period: a method for stabilizing the subsatellite against the rotational effects of atmospheric perturbation was developed; a variety of analytic studies of tether dynamics aimed at elucidating dynamic noise processes were performed; a novel mechanism for coupling longitudinal and latitudinal oscillations of the tether was discovered, and random vibration analysis for modeling the tethered subsatellite under atmospheric perturbation were studied.

  18. Three-dimensional characterization of tethered microspheres by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumberg, Seth; Gajraj, Arivalagan; Pennington, Matthew W.; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2005-01-01

    Tethered particle microscopy is a powerful tool to study the dynamics of DNA molecules and DNA-protein complexes in single-molecule experiments. We demonstrate that stroboscopic total internal reflection microscopy can be used to characterize the three-dimensional spatiotemporal motion of DNA-tethered particles. By calculating characteristic measures such as symmetry and time constants of the motion, well-formed tethers can be distinguished from defective ones for which the motion is dominated by aberrant surface effects. This improves the reliability of measurements on tether dynamics. For instance, in observations of protein-mediated DNA looping, loop formation is distinguished from adsorption and other nonspecific events.

  19. Modelling of Tethered Space-Web Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, D. J.; Cartnell, M. P.

    Large structures in space are an essential milestone in the path of many projects, from solar power collectors to space stations. In space, as on Earth, these large projects may be split up into more manageable sections, dividing the task into multiple replicable parts. Specially constructed spider robots could assemble these structures piece by piece over a membrane or space- web, giving a method for building a structure while on orbit. The modelling and applications of these space-webs are discussed, along with the derivation of the equations of motion of the structure. The presentation of some preliminary results from the solution of these equations will show that space-webs can take a variety of different forms, and give some guidelines for configuring the space-web system.

  20. Investigation of dynamic noise affecting geodynamics information in a tethered subsatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gullahorn, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    Measurement of the gradient of the gravitational acceleration from a satellite platform is likely to provide the next improvement in knowledge of the Earth's gravity field after the upcoming Geopotential Research Mission. Observations from the subsatellite of a tethered satellite system (TSS) would increase sensitivity and resolution due to the low altitude possible. However, the TSS is a dynamically noisy system and would be perturbed by atmospheric drag fluctuations. The dynamic noise is being modeled in order to evaluate the feasibility of TSS gradiometry and to design methods of abating the error caused by this noise. The demonstration flights of the TSS are to provide an opportunity to directly observe the dynamical environment and refine modeling techniques. Random vibration analysis as a technique for modeling the TSS under atmospheric perturbation was studied.

  1. Fullerenic structures and such structures tethered to carbon materials

    DOEpatents

    Goel, Anish; Howard, Jack B.; Vander Sande, John B.

    2010-01-05

    The fullerenic structures include fullerenes having molecular weights less than that of C.sub.60 with the exception of C.sub.36 and fullerenes having molecular weights greater than C.sub.60. Examples include fullerenes C.sub.50, C.sub.58, C.sub.130, and C.sub.176. Fullerenic structure chemically bonded to a carbon surface is also disclosed along with a method for tethering fullerenes to a carbon material. The method includes adding functionalized fullerene to a liquid suspension containing carbon material, drying the suspension to produce a powder, and heat treating the powder.

  2. Fullerenic structures and such structures tethered to carbon materials

    DOEpatents

    Goel, Anish; Howard, Jack B.; Vander Sande, John B.

    2012-10-09

    The fullerenic structures include fullerenes having molecular weights less than that of C.sub.60 with the exception of C.sub.36 and fullerenes having molecular weights greater than C.sub.60. Examples include fullerenes C.sub.50, C.sub.58, C.sub.130, and C.sub.176. Fullerenic structure chemically bonded to a carbon surface is also disclosed along with a method for tethering fullerenes to a carbon material. The method includes adding functionalized fullerene to a liquid suspension containing carbon material, drying the suspension to produce a powder, and heat treating the powder.

  3. Investigation of nonlinear E.M. phenomena in the tethered magnetospheric cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpert, Yakov L.

    1990-01-01

    Nonlinear effects of parametric and of heating type, produced in a plasma under the action of an electric field E(sub 0)(e exp i(omega)t), are considered in this work in connection with the Tethered Magnetospheric Cloud (TMC) accompanying the Tether Satellite System (TSS). The theoretical results show that these phenomena should appear in the ionosphere at high altitudes Z greater than or = (150-200) km, particularly, at Z approximately = 300 km of the TSS system orbit. Therefore, it is of a special interest to search these phenomena by such a unique experiment as the forthcoming first TSS-I and by the future, perhaps modified TSS missions. Because of the parametric decay instability, new branches of wave may be excited both around the electron and ion Lengmuir frequencies Omega (sub 0) = 2(pi)f(sub 0) and Omega (sub 0) = 2(pi)f(sub 0) under the influence of high frequency (HF), (f less than or = 10(exp 6) to few 10(exp 6) Hz), strong electric waves. The heating of all the kinds of particles is growing up very quickly in the ionosphere with altitude in the extra low and very low frequency ranges, F approximately = (1 to 10(exp 4) Hz, discussed below. The temperatures (energies), for example, of the electrons accelerated by the electric field become larger than the ionization potential in this frequency range already at altitudes Z greater than or = (150 - 200) km when the amplitude of the electric field is the absolute value of E(sub 0) approximately = (1-2) mV/m. The sources of these electric fields may be in the TSS-I mission, that so called Phantom Loop (PL) - the Tethered Electrodynamic Tail (TET), and the different kind of electromagnetic oscillations produced by different kinds of instabilities in the TMC plasma. The growth rates of these instabilities will become very high in the TSS surrounding magnetoplasma. However, in the future TSS missions, special artificial sources (generators) of electric fields should be used for these investigations.

  4. Determination of design and operation parameters for upper atmospheric research instrumentation to yield optimum resolution with deconvolution. Appendix 7. [Transform Domain Skiprope Observer for tethered satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.

    1993-01-01

    Because of the interesting science which can be performed using a satellite attached by a very long tether to a mother vehicle in orbit, such as the Space Shuttle, NASA will deploy TSS-1 (Tethered Satellite System) in 1992. A very long tether (20 km in this case) has the possibility of undergoing oscillations of several different types, or modes, and higher harmonics of these modes. The purpose of this document is to describe a method for detecting the amplitude, frequency, and phase (and predicting future motion in the steady state) of these modes, in particular, the skiprope mode, using tethered satellite dynamics measurements. Specifically the rotation rate data about two orthogonal axes, calculated from output from satellite gyroscopes, are used. The data of interest are the satellite pitch and roll rate measurements. NASA has determined to use two methods to diagnose skiprope properties and predict future values. One of these, a Fourier transform domain approach, is the subject of this notebook. The main program and all subroutines are described along with the test plan for evaluating the Frequency Domain Skiprope Observer.

  5. Polydopamine tethered enzyme/metal-organic framework composites with high stability and reusability.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoling; Yang, Cheng; Ge, Jun; Liu, Zheng

    2015-12-07

    An enzyme/metal-organic framework (MOF) composite with both highly stable and easily reusable features was prepared via tethering enzyme/MOF nanocrystals with polydopamine (PDA). The micrometer-sized PDA tethered enzyme/MOF composite can be easily repeatedly used without obvious activity loss, promising for efficient enzymatic catalysis at low cost with long-term operational stability under harsh conditions.

  6. Effects of tethering a multistate folding protein to a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuai; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2011-05-01

    Protein/surface interactions are important in a variety of fields and devices, yet fundamental understanding of the relevant phenomena remains fragmented due to resolution limitations of experimental techniques. Molecular simulation has provided useful answers, but such studies have focused on proteins that fold through a two-state process. This study uses simulation to show how surfaces can affect proteins which fold through a multistate process by investigating the folding mechanism of lysozyme (PDB ID: 7LZM). The results demonstrate that in the bulk 7LZM folds through a process with four stable states: the folded state, the unfolded state, and two stable intermediates. The folding mechanism remains the same when the protein is tethered to a surface at most residues; however, in one case the folding mechanism changes in such a way as to eliminate one of the intermediates. An analysis of the molecular configurations shows that tethering at this site is advantageous for protein arrays because the active site is both presented to the bulk phase and stabilized. Taken as a whole, the results offer hope that rational design of protein arrays is possible once the behavior of the protein on the surface is ascertained.

  7. Effects of tethering a multistate folding protein to a surface.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuai; Knotts, Thomas A

    2011-05-14

    Protein/surface interactions are important in a variety of fields and devices, yet fundamental understanding of the relevant phenomena remains fragmented due to resolution limitations of experimental techniques. Molecular simulation has provided useful answers, but such studies have focused on proteins that fold through a two-state process. This study uses simulation to show how surfaces can affect proteins which fold through a multistate process by investigating the folding mechanism of lysozyme (PDB ID: 7LZM). The results demonstrate that in the bulk 7LZM folds through a process with four stable states: the folded state, the unfolded state, and two stable intermediates. The folding mechanism remains the same when the protein is tethered to a surface at most residues; however, in one case the folding mechanism changes in such a way as to eliminate one of the intermediates. An analysis of the molecular configurations shows that tethering at this site is advantageous for protein arrays because the active site is both presented to the bulk phase and stabilized. Taken as a whole, the results offer hope that rational design of protein arrays is possible once the behavior of the protein on the surface is ascertained.

  8. A proposed ringing analysis model for higher order tether response

    SciTech Connect

    Natvig, B.J.

    1994-12-31

    The problem of high-frequency transient responses of Tension Leg Platforms, TLPs, under certain severe sea situations has been known for some time. Until recently, it was not known that this type of loading and response mechanism could produce tether loads of critical importance to the structural integrity of such structures. Presently, there is considerable ongoing discussion as to what causes tether ringing. NPD (1992) assembled a document where the views of the Norwegian Shelf operators and one Norwegian engineering company were summarized. At present there seems to be consensus that ringing, at least to a large extent, is caused by nonlinearities in the free surface variable wetting region of the TLP. Ringing is not predicted by linearized frequency domain analysis methods. There are a number of variable wetting contributions. Some of these are fairly obvious while others are less straight forward. A number of the contributions, of purely theoretical or engineering nature, identified to date are discussed in this paper. Based on this an intuitive method for ringing analysis is presented.

  9. Cellulose Microfibril Formation by Surface-Tethered Cellulose Synthase Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Basu, Snehasish; Omadjela, Okako; Gaddes, David; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Zimmer, Jochen; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2016-02-23

    Cellulose microfibrils are pseudocrystalline arrays of cellulose chains that are synthesized by cellulose synthases. The enzymes are organized into large membrane-embedded complexes in which each enzyme likely synthesizes and secretes a β-(1→4) glucan. The relationship between the organization of the enzymes in these complexes and cellulose crystallization has not been explored. To better understand this relationship, we used atomic force microscopy to visualize cellulose microfibril formation from nickel-film-immobilized bacterial cellulose synthase enzymes (BcsA-Bs), which in standard solution only form amorphous cellulose from monomeric BcsA-B complexes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques show that surface-tethered BcsA-Bs synthesize highly crystalline cellulose II in the presence of UDP-Glc, the allosteric activator cyclic-di-GMP, as well as magnesium. The cellulose II cross section/diameter and the crystal size and crystallinity depend on the surface density of tethered enzymes as well as the overall concentration of substrates. Our results provide the correlation between cellulose microfibril formation and the spatial organization of cellulose synthases.

  10. Transport Vesicle Tethering at the Trans Golgi Network: Coiled Coil Proteins in Action

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Pak-yan P.; Pfeffer, Suzanne R.

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi complex is decorated with so-called Golgin proteins that share a common feature: a large proportion of their amino acid sequences are predicted to form coiled-coil structures. The possible presence of extensive coiled coils implies that these proteins are highly elongated molecules that can extend a significant distance from the Golgi surface. This property would help them to capture or trap inbound transport vesicles and to tether Golgi mini-stacks together. This review will summarize our current understanding of coiled coil tethers that are needed for the receipt of transport vesicles at the trans Golgi network (TGN). How do long tethering proteins actually catch vesicles? Golgi-associated, coiled coil tethers contain numerous binding sites for small GTPases, SNARE proteins, and vesicle coat proteins. How are these interactions coordinated and are any or all of them important for the tethering process? Progress toward understanding these questions and remaining, unresolved mysteries will be discussed. PMID:27014693

  11. Interplay of matrix stiffness and protein tethering in stem cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jessica H.; Vincent, Ludovic G.; Fuhrmann, Alexander; Choi, Yu Suk; Hribar, Kolin C.; Taylor-Weiner, Hermes; Chen, Shaochen; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-10-01

    Stem cells regulate their fate by binding to, and contracting against, the extracellular matrix. Recently, it has been proposed that in addition to matrix stiffness and ligand type, the degree of coupling of fibrous protein to the surface of the underlying substrate, that is, tethering and matrix porosity, also regulates stem cell differentiation. By modulating substrate porosity without altering stiffness in polyacrylamide gels, we show that varying substrate porosity did not significantly change protein tethering, substrate deformations, or the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stromal cells and marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. Varying protein-substrate linker density up to 50-fold changed tethering, but did not affect osteogenesis, adipogenesis, surface-protein unfolding or underlying substrate deformations. Differentiation was also unaffected by the absence of protein tethering. Our findings imply that the stiffness of planar matrices regulates stem cell differentiation independently of protein tethering and porosity.

  12. Shortest Path Planning for a Tethered Robot or an Anchored Cable

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, P.G.

    1999-02-22

    We consider the problem of planning shortest paths for a tethered robot with a finite length tether in a 2D environment with polygonal obstacles. We present an algorithm that runs in time O((k{sub 1} + 1){sup 2}n{sup 4}) and finds the shortest path or correctly determines that none exists that obeys the constraints; here n is the number obstacle vertices, and k{sub 1} is the number loops in the initial configuration of the tether. The robot may cross its tether but nothing can cross obstacles, which cause the tether to bend. The algorithm applies as well for planning a shortest path for the free end of an anchored cable.

  13. Tethered mass-spring experiment in a quasi-Keplerian Taylor-Couette device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Derek Man Hon; Stemmley, Steven; Caspary, Kyle; Gilson, Erik; Sloboda, Peter; Ji, Hantao; Blackman, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Angular momentum transport in astrophysical accretion disks is primarily attributed to the magnetorotational instability (MRI). High electrical conductivity in these disks causes magnetic field lines to be ``frozen-into'' matter, and spring-like magnetic tension between neighboring fluid elements arises. The tethered mass-spring model is commonly used to describe this system. We attempt to demonstrate this analog in the laboratory. The behavior of such a model is explored in a quasi-Keplerian Taylor-Couette device with neutrally buoyant test masses, metal springs, and water as the medium. Masses, spring strengths, and flow profiles are varied to investigate stability conditions. Motion capture and video analysis are utilized to examine the trajectories of test masses. Results obtained are presented and compared to predictions from MRI theory. Complications from hydrodynamic turbulence, secondary flows, and finite-size effects are discussed. Corresponding mitigation efforts are also proposed. This research is supported by the Department of Energy.

  14. Photoresponsive coumarin-tethered multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles for release of anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Karthik, S; Puvvada, Nagaprasad; Kumar, B N Prashanth; Rajput, Shashi; Pathak, Amita; Mandal, Mahitosh; Singh, N D Pradeep

    2013-06-12

    Recently, photoresponsive nanoparticles have received significant attention because of their ability to provide spatial and temporal control over the drug release. In the present work, we report for the first time photoresponsive multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) fabricated using coumarin-based phototrigger and Fe/Si MNPs for controlled delivery of anticancer drug chlorambucil. Further, newly fabricated photoresponsive multifunctional MNPs were also explored for cell luminescence imaging. In vitro biological studies revealed that coumarin tethered Fe/Si MNPs of ~9 nm size efficiently delivered the anticancer drug chlorambucil into cancer cells and thereby improving the drug action to kill the cancer cells upon irradiation. Such multifunctional MNPs with strong fluorescence, good biocompatibility and efficient photocontrolled drug release ability will be of great benefit in the construction of light-activated multifunctional nano drug delivery systems.

  15. Mesostructured fatty acid-tethered silicas: sustaining the order by co-templating with bulky precursors.

    PubMed

    El Kadib, Abdelkrim; Katir, Nadia; Finiels, Annie; Castel, Annie; Marcotte, Nathalie; Molvinger, Karine; Biolley, Christine; Gaveau, Philippe; Bousmina, Mosto; Brunel, Daniel

    2013-02-07

    The co-condensation of functional alkoxysilanes with tetraethoxysilane in the presence of a structure directing agent under sol-gel process chemistry is a common way to access functional organosilica with an ordered mesostructure. In this report, bulky silylated fatty acid methyl esters were used both as co-templating bio-molecules and functionalizing agents in the process of supra-molecular silica mineralization. The highest structural regularity in terms of pore size distribution and channel size homogeneity was observed for carboxy-tethered silica possessing SBA-15-type architecture due to an enhanced fatty acid precursor-surfactant interaction. The carboxylic surface embedded within the hydrophobic environment of the fatty compounds confers to these materials interesting reactive-surface properties with promising applications as drug-delivery systems and bio-catalytic nanoreactors.

  16. The tethering of chromatin to the nuclear envelope supports nuclear mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Sarah M.; Koo, Peter K.; Zhao, Yao; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; King, Megan C.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is thought to be the primary mechanical defence of the nucleus. However, the lamina is integrated within a network of lipids, proteins and chromatin; the interdependence of this network poses a challenge to defining the individual mechanical contributions of these components. Here, we isolate the role of chromatin in nuclear mechanics by using a system lacking lamins. Using novel imaging analyses, we observe that untethering chromatin from the inner nuclear membrane results in highly deformable nuclei in vivo, particularly in response to cytoskeletal forces. Using optical tweezers, we find that isolated nuclei lacking inner nuclear membrane tethers are less stiff than wild-type nuclei and exhibit increased chromatin flow, particularly in frequency ranges that recapitulate the kinetics of cytoskeletal dynamics. We suggest that modulating chromatin flow can define both transient and long-lived changes in nuclear shape that are biologically important and may be altered in disease. PMID:26074052

  17. Controlling Two-dimensional Tethered Vesicle Motion Using an Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Yoshina-Ishii, Chiaki; Boxer, Steven G.

    2008-01-01

    We recently introduced methods to tether phospholipid vesicles or proteoliposomes onto a fluid supported lipid bilayer using DNA hybridization. These intact tethered vesicles diffuse in two dimensions parallel to the supporting membrane surface. In this paper, we report the dynamic response of individual tethered vesicles to an electric field applied parallel to the bilayer surface. Vesicles respond to the field by moving in the direction of electro-osmotic flow, and this can be used to reversibly concentrate tethered vesicles against a barrier. By adding increasing amounts of negatively charged phosphatidylserine to the supporting bilayer to increase electro-osmosis, the electrophoretic mobility of the tethered vesicles can be increased. The electro-osmotic contribution can be modeled well by a sphere connected to a cylindrical anchor in a viscous membrane with charged head groups. The electrophoretic force on the negatively charged tethered vesicles opposes the electro-osmotic force. By increasing the amount of negative charge on the tethered vesicle, drift in the direction of electro-osmotic flow can be slowed; at high negative charge on the tethered vesicle, motion can be forced in the direction of electrophoresis. The balance between these forces can be visualized on a patterned supporting bilayer containing negatively charged lipids which themselves reorganize in an externally applied electric field to create a gradient of charge within a corralled region. The charge gradient at the surface creates a gradient of electro-osmotic flow, and vesicles carrying similar amounts of negative charge can be focused to a region perpendicular to the applied field where electrophoresis is balanced by electro-osmosis, away from the corral boundary. Electric fields are effective tools to direct tethered vesicles, concentrate them and to measure the tethered vesicle’s electrostatic properties. PMID:16489833

  18. Cisplatin-tethered gold nanospheres for multimodal chemo-radiotherapy of glioblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setua, Sonali; Ouberai, Myriam; Piccirillo, Sara G.; Watts, Colin; Welland, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains the most aggressive and challenging brain tumour to treat. We report the first successful chemo-radiotherapy on patient derived treatment resistant GBM cells using a cisplatin-tethered gold nanosphere. After intracellular uptake, the nanosphere effects DNA damage which initiates caspase-mediated apoptosis in those cells. In the presence of radiation, both gold and platinum of cisplatin, serve as high atomic number radiosensitizers leading to the emission of ionizing photoelectrons and Auger electrons. This resulted in enhanced synergy between cisplatin and radiotherapy mediated cytotoxicity, and photo/Auger electron mediated radiosensitisation leading to complete ablation of the tumour cells in an in vitro model system. This study demonstrates the potential of designed nanoparticles to target aggressive cancers in the patient derived cell lines providing a platform to move towards treatment strategies.Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains the most aggressive and challenging brain tumour to treat. We report the first successful chemo-radiotherapy on patient derived treatment resistant GBM cells using a cisplatin-tethered gold nanosphere. After intracellular uptake, the nanosphere effects DNA damage which initiates caspase-mediated apoptosis in those cells. In the presence of radiation, both gold and platinum of cisplatin, serve as high atomic number radiosensitizers leading to the emission of ionizing photoelectrons and Auger electrons. This resulted in enhanced synergy between cisplatin and radiotherapy mediated cytotoxicity, and photo/Auger electron mediated radiosensitisation leading to complete ablation of the tumour cells in an in vitro model system. This study demonstrates the potential of designed nanoparticles to target aggressive cancers in the patient derived cell lines providing a platform to move towards treatment strategies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c

  19. Theory of plasma contractors for electrodynamic tethered satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, D. E.; Katz, I.

    1986-01-01

    Recent data from ground and space experiments indicate that plasma releases from an object dramatically reduce the sheath impedance between the object and the ambient plasma surrounding it. Available data is in qualitative accord with the theory developed to quantify the flow of current in the sheath. Electron transport in the theory is based on a fluid model of a collisionless plasma with an effective collision frequency comparable to frequencies of plasma oscillations. The theory leads to low effective impedances varying inversely with the square root of the injected plasma density. To support such a low impedance mode of operation using an argon plasma source for example requires that only one argon ion be injected for each thirty electrons extracted from the ambient plasma. The required plasma flow rates are quite low; to extract one ampere of electron current requires a mass flow rate of about one gram of argon per day.

  20. Advanced Electrodynamic Tether Systems: Modeling of Scattering and Unsteady Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-06

    spacecraft and satellites. A high altitude nuclear detonation would likely create a new high energy electron belt and increase the radiation risk to...deflection of high energy particles into their loss cone. On July 9, 1962, the United States detonated 1.4 Megaton nuclear warhead code-named ”Starfish...In addition, the explosion created a thin region of very high energy electrons near L = 1.2 [6]. On October 28, 1962, the U.S.S.R. detonated a