Science.gov

Sample records for 4-node shell elements

  1. Direct formulation of a 4-node hybrid shell element with rotational degrees of freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1990-01-01

    A simple 4-node assumed-stress hybrid quadrilateral shell element with rotational or drilling degrees of freedom is formulated. The element formulation is based directly on a 4-node element. This direct formulation requires fewer computations than a similar element that is derived from an internal 8-node isoparametric element in which the midside degrees of freedom are eliminated in favor of rotational degree of freedom at the corner nodes. The formulation is based on the principle of minimum complementary energy. The membrane part of the element has 12 degrees of freedom including rotational degrees of freedom. The bending part of the element also has 12 degrees of freedom. The bending part of the quadratic variations for both in-plane and out-of-plane displacement fields and linear variations for both in-plane and out-of-plane rotation fields are assumed along the edges of the element. The element Cartesian-coordinate system is chosen such as to make the stress field invariant with respect to node numbering. The membrane part of the stress field is based on a 9-parameter equilibrating stress field, while the bending part is based on a 13-parameter equilibrating stress field. The element passes the patch test, is nearly insensitive to mesh distortion, does not lock, possesses the desirable invariance properties, has no spurious modes, and produces accurate and reliable results.

  2. Corotational nonlinear analyses of laminated shell structures using a 4-node quadrilateral flat shell element with drilling stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Sun, Qin

    2014-06-01

    A new 4-node quadrilateral flat shell element is developed for geometrically nonlinear analyses of thin and moderately thick laminated shell structures. The flat shell element is constructed by combining a quadrilateral area coordinate method (QAC) based membrane element AGQ6-II, and a Timoshenko beam function (TBF) method based shear deformable plate bending element ARS-Q12. In order to model folded plates and connect with beam elements, the drilling stiffness is added to the element stiffness matrix based on the mixed variational principle. The transverse shear rigidity matrix, based on the first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT), for the laminated composite plate is evaluated using the transverse equilibrium conditions, while the shear correction factors are not needed. The conventional TBF methods are also modified to efficiently calculate the element stiffness for laminate. The new shell element is extended to large deflection and post-buckling analyses of isotropic and laminated composite shells based on the element independent corotational formulation. Numerical results show that the present shell element has an excellent numerical performance for the test examples, and is applicable to stiffened plates.

  3. A 4-node Bilinear Isoparametric Element in Rockwell NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, C.; Allison, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The development and evaluation of the Rockwell NASTRAN four node quadrilateral (QUAD4) element is presented. The element derivation utilizes bilinear isoparametric techniques both for membrane and bending characteristics. The QUAD4 element coordinate system, membrane properties, lumped mass matrix, and treatment of warping are based upon the COSMIC/NASTRAN QDMEMI element while the bending characteristics are based on a paper by T. J. R. Hughes. The effects of warping on the bending stiffness, consistent mass, and geometric stiffness are based upon a paper by R. H. MacNeal. Numerical integration is accomplished by Gaussian quadrature on a 2 x 2 grid. Practical user support features include variable element thickness, thermal analysis and layered composite material definitions.

  4. Cohesive Elements for Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Camanho, Pedro P.; Turon, Albert

    2007-01-01

    A cohesive element for shell analysis is presented. The element can be used to simulate the initiation and growth of delaminations between stacked, non-coincident layers of shell elements. The procedure to construct the element accounts for the thickness offset by applying the kinematic relations of shell deformation to transform the stiffness and internal force of a zero-thickness cohesive element such that interfacial continuity between the layers is enforced. The procedure is demonstrated by simulating the response and failure of the Mixed Mode Bending test and a skin-stiffener debond specimen. In addition, it is shown that stacks of shell elements can be used to create effective models to predict the inplane and delamination failure modes of thick components. The results indicate that simple shell models can retain many of the necessary predictive attributes of much more complex 3D models while providing the computational efficiency that is necessary for design.

  5. Orthotropic rotation-free thin shell elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munglani, Gautam; Vetter, Roman; Wittel, Falk K.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2015-11-01

    A method to simulate orthotropic behaviour in thin shell finite elements is proposed. The approach is based on the transformation of shape function derivatives, resulting in a new orthogonal basis aligned to a specified preferred direction for all elements. This transformation is carried out solely in the undeformed state leaving minimal additional impact on the computational effort expended to simulate orthotropic materials compared to isotropic, resulting in a straightforward and highly efficient implementation. This method is implemented for rotation-free triangular shells using the finite element framework built on the Kirchhoff-Love theory employing subdivision surfaces. The accuracy of this approach is demonstrated using the deformation of a pinched hemispherical shell (with a 18° hole) standard benchmark. To showcase the efficiency of this implementation, the wrinkling of orthotropic sheets under shear displacement is analyzed. It is found that orthotropic subdivision shells are able to capture the wrinkling behavior of sheets accurately for coarse meshes without the use of an additional wrinkling model.

  6. A Viscoelastic Hybrid Shell Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur

    1999-01-01

    An elastic large displacement thick-shell hybrid finite element is modified to allow for the calculation of viscoelastic stresses. Internal strain variables are introduced at he element's stress nodes and are employed to construct a viscous material model. First order ordinary differential equations relate the internal strain variables to the corresponding elastic strains at the stress nodes. The viscous stresses are computed from the internal strain variables using viscous moduli which are a fraction of the elastic moduli. The energy dissipated by the action of the viscous stresses in included in the mixed variational functional. Nonlinear quasi-static viscous equilibrium equations are then obtained. Previously developed Taylor expansions of the equilibrium equations are modified to include the viscous terms. A predictor-corrector time marching solution algorithm is employed to solve the algebraic-differential equations. The viscous shell element is employed to numerically simulate a stair-step loading and unloading of an aircraft tire in contact with a frictionless surface.

  7. A quadrilateral shell element using a mixed formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleeb, A. F.; Chang, T. Y.; Graf, W.

    1987-01-01

    A simple quadrilateral shell element consisting of five nodes, four corner nodes and a central node, is developed for linear elastic analysis of thin as well as moderately thick shells. Based on a modified Hellinger-Reissner principle, finite element equations are derived from the assumed displacement and strain fields. By carefully choosing appropriate strain terms, all kinematic deformation modes are suppressed. Although the present element is similar to a displacement-based degenerated shell, no locking is experienced when it is applied to thin shell problems. Five examples are given to illustrate the analysis capability of the shell element. Numerical results indicate that the element shows fast mesh convergence and gives excellent stress predictions.

  8. Asymmetric quadrilateral shell elements for finite strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areias, P.; Dias-da-Costa, D.; Pires, E. B.; Van Goethem, N.

    2013-07-01

    Very good results in infinitesimal and finite strain analysis of shells are achieved by combining either the enhanced-metric technique or the selective-reduced integration for the in-plane shear energy and an assumed natural strain technique (ANS) in a non-symmetric Petrov-Galerkin arrangement which complies with the patch-test. A recovery of the original Wilson incompatible mode element is shown for the trial functions in the in-plane components. As a beneficial side-effect, Newton-Raphson convergence behavior for non-linear problems is improved with respect to symmetric formulations. Transverse-shear and in-plane patch tests are satisfied while distorted-mesh accuracy is higher than with symmetric formulations. Classical test functions with assumed-metric components are required for compatibility reasons. Verification tests are performed with advantageous comparisons being observed in all of them. Applications to large displacement elasticity and finite strain plasticity are shown with both low sensitivity to mesh distortion and (relatively) high accuracy. A equilibrium-consistent (and consistently linearized) updated-Lagrangian algorithm is proposed and tested. Concerning the time-step dependency, it was found that the consistent updated-Lagrangian algorithm is nearly time-step independent and can replace the multiplicative plasticity approach if only moderate elastic strains are present, as is the case of most metals.

  9. Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of Shells with Large Aspect Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T. Y.; Sawamiphakdi, K.

    1984-01-01

    A higher order degenerated shell element with nine nodes was selected for large deformation and post-buckling analysis of thick or thin shells. Elastic-plastic material properties are also included. The post-buckling analysis algorithm is given. Using a square plate, it was demonstrated that the none-node element does not have shear locking effect even if its aspect ratio was increased to the order 10 to the 8th power. Two sample problems are given to illustrate the analysis capability of the shell element.

  10. A 20-DOF hybrid stress general shell element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, David S.; Pian, Theodore H. H.

    1988-01-01

    A hybrid-stress general shell element is developed based on the Hellinger-Reissner principle modified for relaxed element compatibility conditions. The element is based on a thin-shell theory with Love-Kirchhoff hypothesis. It is of quadrilateral shape with only four corner nodes and five degrees of freedom per node. The geometry of the element is approximated through a cubic polynomial surface patch. Numerical examples consisting of torsion-loaded slit cylinder and pinched cylinders with open ends and rigid diaphragmed ends demonstrate excellent performance of the present element.

  11. Summary compilation of shell element performance versus formulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Heinstein, Martin Wilhelm; Hales, Jason Dean; Breivik, Nicole L.; Key, Samuel W.

    2011-07-01

    This document compares the finite element shell formulations in the Sierra Solid Mechanics code. These are finite elements either currently in the Sierra simulation codes Presto and Adagio, or expected to be added to them in time. The list of elements are divided into traditional two-dimensional, plane stress shell finite elements, and three-dimensional solid finite elements that contain either modifications or additional terms designed to represent the bending stiffness expected to be found in shell formulations. These particular finite elements are formulated for finite deformation and inelastic material response, and, as such, are not based on some of the elegant formulations that can be found in an elastic, infinitesimal finite element setting. Each shell element is subjected to a series of 12 verification and validation test problems. The underlying purpose of the tests here is to identify the quality of both the spatially discrete finite element gradient operator and the spatially discrete finite element divergence operator. If the derivation of the finite element is proper, the discrete divergence operator is the transpose of the discrete gradient operator. An overall summary is provided from which one can rank, at least in an average sense, how well the individual formulations can be expected to perform in applications encountered year in and year out. A letter grade has been assigned albeit sometimes subjectively for each shell element and each test problem result. The number of A's, B's, C's, et cetera assigned have been totaled, and a grade point average (GPA) has been computed, based on a 4.0-system. These grades, combined with a comparison between the test problems and the application problem, can be used to guide an analyst to select the element with the best shell formulation.

  12. Optimal low-order fully integrated solid-shell elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rah, K.; Paepegem, W. Van; Habraken, A. M.; Degrieck, J.; de Sousa, R. J. Alves; Valente, R. A. F.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents three optimal low-order fully integrated geometrically nonlinear solid-shell elements based on the enhanced assumed strain (EAS) method and the assumed natural strain method for different types of structural analyses, e.g. analysis of thin homogeneous isotropic and multilayer anisotropic composite shell-like structures and the analysis of (near) incompressible materials. The proposed solid-shell elements possess eight nodes with only displacement degrees of freedom and a few internal EAS parameters. Due to the 3D geometric description of the proposed elements, 3D constitutive laws can directly be employed in these formulations. The present formulations are based on the well-known Fraeijs de Veubeke-Hu-Washizu multifield variational principle. In terms of accuracy as well as efficiency point of view, the choice of the optimal EAS parameters plays a very critical role in the EAS method, therefore a systematic numerical study has been carried out to find out the optimal EAS parameters to alleviate different locking phenomena for the proposed solid-shell formulations. To assess the accuracy of the proposed solid-shell elements, a variety of popular numerical benchmark examples related to element convergence, mesh distortions, element aspect ratios and different locking phenomena are investigated and the results are compared with the well-known solid-shell formulations available in the literature. The results of our numerical assessment show that the proposed solid-shell formulations provide very accurate results, without showing any numerical problems, for a variety of geometrically linear and nonlinear structural problems.

  13. Diagenetic changes in the elemental composition of unrecrystallized mollusk shells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ragland, P.C.; Pilkey, O.H.; Blackwelder, B. W.

    1979-01-01

    The Mg, Sr, Mn, Fe, Na and K contents were determined for 230 apparently unrecrystallized mollusk shells (gastropods and bivalves) ranging in age from late Cretaceous to Holocene. Consistent differences between the Holocene and fossil shells with respect to concentrations of all these elements are attributed to postburial diagenetic changes. Fossil-Holocene shell comparisons are made on the intergeneric level, a more severe test of compositional differences than was previous work involved with few species. The observed differences re-emphasize the need for extreme caution in the use of the many geochemical tools which assume that no compositional changes have taken place prior to recrystallization of calcareous materials. ?? 1979.

  14. A novel versatile multilayer hybrid stress solid-shell element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rah, K.; Van Paepegem, W.; Degrieck, J.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a versatile multilayer locking free hybrid stress solid-shell element that can be readily employed for a wide range of geometrically linear elastic structural analyses, i.e. from shell-like isotropic structures to multilayer anisotropic composites. This solid-shell element has eight nodes with only displacement degrees of freedom and a few internal parameters that provide the locking free behavior and accurate interlaminar stress resolution through the element thickness. These elements can be stacked on top of each other to model multilayer structures, fulfilling the interlaminar stress continuity at the interlayer surfaces and zero traction conditions on the top and bottom surfaces of composite laminates. The element formulation is based on the modified form of the well-known Fraeijs de Veubeke-Hu-Washizu (FHW) multifield variational principle with enhanced assumed strains (EAS formulation) and assumed natural strains (ANS formulation) to alleviate the different types of locking phenomena in solid-shell elements. The distinct feature of the present formulation is its ability to accurately calculate the interlaminar stress field in multilayer structures, which is achieved by incorporating an assumed stress field in a standard EAS formulation based on the FHW principle. To assess the present formulation's accuracy, a variety of popular numerical benchmark examples related to element patch tests, convergence, mesh distortion, shell and laminated composite analyses are investigated and the results are compared with those available in the literature. This assessment reveals that the proposed solid-shell formulation provides very accurate results for a wide range of structural analyses.

  15. A Shear Deformable Shell Element for Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, W. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    A three-dimensional element based on the total Lagrangian description of the motion of a layered anisotropic composite medium is developed, validated, and used to analyze layered composite shells. The element contains the following features: geometric nonlinearity, dynamic (transient) behavior, and arbitrary lamination scheme and lamina properties. Numerical results of nonlinear bending, natural vibration, and transient response are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the element.

  16. Shell Element Verification & Regression Problems for DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Zywicz, E

    2008-02-01

    A series of quasi-static regression/verification problems were developed for the triangular and quadrilateral shell element formulations contained in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's explicit finite element program DYNA3D. Each regression problem imposes both displacement- and force-type boundary conditions to probe the five independent nodal degrees of freedom employed in the targeted formulation. When applicable, the finite element results are compared with small-strain linear-elastic closed-form reference solutions to verify select aspects of the formulations implementation. Although all problems in the suite depict the same geometry, material behavior, and loading conditions, each problem represents a unique combination of shell formulation, stabilization method, and integration rule. Collectively, the thirty-six new regression problems in the test suite cover nine different shell formulations, three hourglass stabilization methods, and three families of through-thickness integration rules.

  17. Implementation of Free-Formulation-Based Flat Shell Elements into NASA Comet Code and Development of Nonlinear Shallow Shell Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barut, A.; Madenci, Erdogan; Tessler, A.

    1997-01-01

    This study presents a transient nonlinear finite element analysis within the realm of a multi-body dynamics formulation for determining the dynamic response of a moderately thick laminated shell undergoing a rapid and large rotational motion and nonlinear elastic deformations. Nonlinear strain measure and rotation, as well as 'the transverse shear deformation, are explicitly included in the formulation in order to capture the proper motion-induced stiffness of the laminate. The equations of motion are derived from the virtual work principle. The analysis utilizes a shear deformable shallow shell element along with the co-rotational form of the updated Lagrangian formulation. The shallow shell element formulation is based on the Reissner-Mindlin and Marguerre theory.

  18. An Enriched Shell Element for Delamination Simulation in Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElroy, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A formulation is presented for an enriched shell finite element capable of delamination simulation in composite laminates. The element uses an adaptive splitting approach for damage characterization that allows for straightforward low-fidelity model creation and a numerically efficient solution. The Floating Node Method is used in conjunction with the Virtual Crack Closure Technique to predict delamination growth and represent it discretely at an arbitrary ply interface. The enriched element is verified for Mode I delamination simulation using numerical benchmark data. After determining important mesh configuration guidelines for the vicinity of the delamination front in the model, a good correlation was found between the enriched shell element model results and the benchmark data set.

  19. Finite element analysis of laminated composite paraboloid of revolution shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, A.; Bandyopadhyay, J. N.; Sinha, P. K.

    1992-07-01

    A generalized formulation for the doubly curved laminated composite shell is attempted using eight-noded curved quadratic isoparametric finite elements with all three radii of curvature. The formulation is also applied to the isotropic material as a special case. In the present investigation, only the paraboloid of revolution is taken up for computing the deflections and stress resultants. Various parametric studies are carried out and the current results for both isotropic and laminated composite shells are compared with those available in the published literature. The shape functions are obtained from interpolation polynomial and the element stiffness matrices are formed on the basis of macromechanical analysis of laminates using the principle of minimum potential energy.

  20. Better Finite-Element Analysis of Composite Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    A computer program implements a finite-element-based method of predicting the deformations of thin aerospace structures made of isotropic materials or anisotropic fiber-reinforced composite materials. The technique and corresponding software are applicable to thin shell structures in general and are particularly useful for analysis of thin beamlike members having open cross-sections (e.g. I-beams and C-channels) in which significant warping can occur.

  1. Structural optimization of thin shells using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the present work was the structural optimization of thin shell structures that are subjected to stress and displacement constraints. In order to accomplish this, the structural optimization computer program DESAP1 was modified and improved. In the static analysis part of the DESAP1 computer program the torsional spring elements, which are used to analyze thin, shallow shell structures, were eliminated by modifying the membrane stiffness matrix of the triangular elements in the local coordinate system and adding a fictitious rotational stiffness matrix. This simplified the DESAP1 program input, improved the accuracy of the analysis, and saved computation time. In the optimization part of the DESAP1 program the stress ratio formula, which redesigns the thickness of each finite element of the structure, was solved by an analytical method. This scheme replaced the iterative solution that was previously used in the DESAP1 program, thus increasing the accuracy and speed of the design. The modified program was used to design a thin, cylindrical shell structure with optimum weight, and the results are reported in this paper.

  2. Nonlinear probabilistic finite element models of laminated composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelstad, S. P.; Reddy, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic finite element analysis procedure for laminated composite shells has been developed. A total Lagrangian finite element formulation, employing a degenerated 3-D laminated composite shell with the full Green-Lagrange strains and first-order shear deformable kinematics, forms the modeling foundation. The first-order second-moment technique for probabilistic finite element analysis of random fields is employed and results are presented in the form of mean and variance of the structural response. The effects of material nonlinearity are included through the use of a rate-independent anisotropic plasticity formulation with the macroscopic point of view. Both ply-level and micromechanics-level random variables can be selected, the latter by means of the Aboudi micromechanics model. A number of sample problems are solved to verify the accuracy of the procedures developed and to quantify the variability of certain material type/structure combinations. Experimental data is compared in many cases, and the Monte Carlo simulation method is used to check the probabilistic results. In general, the procedure is quite effective in modeling the mean and variance response of the linear and nonlinear behavior of laminated composite shells.

  3. Curved Thermopiezoelectric Shell Structures Modeled by Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun

    2000-01-01

    "Smart" structures composed of piezoelectric materials may significantly improve the performance of aeropropulsion systems through a variety of vibration, noise, and shape-control applications. The development of analytical models for piezoelectric smart structures is an ongoing, in-house activity at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field focused toward the experimental characterization of these materials. Research efforts have been directed toward developing analytical models that account for the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal response of piezoelectric composite materials. Current work revolves around implementing thermal effects into a curvilinear-shell finite element code. This enhances capabilities to analyze curved structures and to account for coupling effects arising from thermal effects and the curved geometry. The current analytical model implements a unique mixed multi-field laminate theory to improve computational efficiency without sacrificing accuracy. The mechanics can model both the sensory and active behavior of piezoelectric composite shell structures. Finite element equations are being implemented for an eight-node curvilinear shell element, and numerical studies are being conducted to demonstrate capabilities to model the response of curved piezoelectric composite structures (see the figure).

  4. Survey and development of finite elements for nonlinear structural analysis. Volume 2: Nonlinear shell finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The development of two new shell finite elements for applications to large deflection problems is considered. The elements in question are doubly curved and of triangular and quadrilateral planform. They are restricted to small strains of elastic materials, and can accommodate large rotations. The elements described, which are based on relatively simple linear elements, make use of a new displacement function approach specifically designed for strongly nonlinear problems. The displacement function development for nonlinear applications is based on certain beam element formulations, and the strain-displacement equations are of a shallow shell type. Additional terms were included in these equations in an attempt to avoid the large errors characteristic of shallow shell elements in certain types of problems. An incremental nonlinear solution procedure specifically adopted to the element formulation was developed. The solution procedure is of combined incremental and total Lagrangian type, and uses a new updating scheme. A computer program was written to evaluate the developed formulations. This program can accommodate small element groups in arbitrary arrangements. Two simple programs were successfully solved. The results indicate that this new type of element has definite promise and should be a fruitful area for further research.

  5. A triangular thin shell finite element: Nonlinear analysis. [structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, G. R.; Gallagher, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    Aspects of the formulation of a triangular thin shell finite element which pertain to geometrically nonlinear (small strain, finite displacement) behavior are described. The procedure for solution of the resulting nonlinear algebraic equations combines a one-step incremental (tangent stiffness) approach with one iteration in the Newton-Raphson mode. A method is presented which permits a rational estimation of step size in this procedure. Limit points are calculated by means of a superposition scheme coupled to the incremental side of the solution procedure while bifurcation points are calculated through a process of interpolation of the determinants of the tangent-stiffness matrix. Numerical results are obtained for a flat plate and two curved shell problems and are compared with alternative solutions.

  6. Finite element analysis of laminated plates and shells, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seide, P.; Chang, P. N. H.

    1978-01-01

    The finite element method is used to investigate the static behavior of laminated composite flat plates and cylindrical shells. The analysis incorporates the effects of transverse shear deformation in each layer through the assumption that the normals to the undeformed layer midsurface remain straight but need not be normal to the mid-surface after deformation. A digital computer program was developed to perform the required computations. The program includes a very efficient equation solution code which permits the analysis of large size problems. The method is applied to the problem of stretching and bending of a perforated curved plate.

  7. A triangular thin shell finite element: Linear analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, G. R.; Gallagher, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    The formulation of the linear stiffness matrix for a doubly-curved triangular thin shell element, using a modified potential energy principle, is described. The strain energy component of the potential energy is expressed in terms of displacements and displacement gradients by use of consistent Koiter strain-displacement equations. The element inplane and normal displacement fields are approximated by complete cubic polynomials. The interelement displacement admissibility conditions are met in the global representation by imposition of constraint conditions on the interelement boundaries; the constraints represent the modification of the potential energy. Errors due to the nonzero strains under rigid body motion are shown to be of small importance for practical grid refinements through performance of extensive comparison analyses.

  8. A shell finite element model of the pelvic floor muscles.

    PubMed

    d'Aulignac, D; Martins, J A C; Pires, E B; Mascarenhas, T; Jorge, R M Natal

    2005-10-01

    The pelvic floor gives support to the organs in the abdominal cavity. Using the dataset made public in (Janda et al. J. Biomech. (2003) 36(6), pp. 749-757), we have reconstructed the geometry of one of the most important parts of the pelvic floor, the levator ani, using NURB surfaces. Once the surface is triangulated, the corresponding mesh is used in a finite element analysis with shell elements. Based on the 3D behavior of the muscle we have constructed a shell that takes into account the direction of the muscle fibers and the incompressibility of the tissue. The constitutive model for the isotropic strain energy and the passive strain energy stored in the fibers is adapted from Humphrey's model for cardiac muscles. To this the active behavior of the skeletal muscle is added. We present preliminary results of a simulation of the levator ani muscle under pressure and with active contraction. This research aims at helping simulate the damages to the pelvic floor that can occur after childbirth. PMID:16298856

  9. Finite Element Analysis of Geodesically Stiffened Cylindrical Composite Shells Using a Layerwise Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhard, Craig Steven; Gurdal, Zafer; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    1996-01-01

    Layerwise finite element analyses of geodesically stiffened cylindrical shells are presented. The layerwise laminate theory of Reddy (LWTR) is developed and adapted to circular cylindrical shells. The Ritz variational method is used to develop an analytical approach for studying the buckling of simply supported geodesically stiffened shells with discrete stiffeners. This method utilizes a Lagrange multiplier technique to attach the stiffeners to the shell. The development of the layerwise shells couples a one-dimensional finite element through the thickness with a Navier solution that satisfies the boundary conditions. The buckling results from the Ritz discrete analytical method are compared with smeared buckling results and with NASA Testbed finite element results. The development of layerwise shell and beam finite elements is presented and these elements are used to perform the displacement field, stress, and first-ply failure analyses. The layerwise shell elements are used to model the shell skin and the layerwise beam elements are used to model the stiffeners. This arrangement allows the beam stiffeners to be assembled directly into the global stiffness matrix. A series of analytical studies are made to compare the response of geodesically stiffened shells as a function of loading, shell geometry, shell radii, shell laminate thickness, stiffener height, and geometric nonlinearity. Comparisons of the structural response of geodesically stiffened shells, axial and ring stiffened shells, and unstiffened shells are provided. In addition, interlaminar stress results near the stiffener intersection are presented. First-ply failure analyses for geodesically stiffened shells utilizing the Tsai-Wu failure criterion are presented for a few selected cases.

  10. Quantifying Square Membrane Wrinkle Behavior Using MITC Shell Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Mindy B.; Iwasa, Takashi; Natori, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    For future membrane based structures, quantified predictions of membrane wrinkling behavior in terms of amplitude, angle and wavelength are needed to optimize the efficiency and integrity of such structures, as well as their associated control systems. For numerical analyses performed in the past, limitations on the accuracy of membrane distortion simulations have often been related to the assumptions made while using finite elements. Specifically, this work demonstrates that critical assumptions include: effects of gravity. supposed initial or boundary conditions, and the type of element used to model the membrane. In this work, a 0.2 square meter membrane is treated as a structural material with non-negligible bending stiffness. Mixed Interpolation of Tensorial Components (MTTC) shell elements are used to simulate wrinkling behavior due to a constant applied in-plane shear load. Membrane thickness, gravity effects, and initial imperfections with respect to flatness were varied in numerous nonlinear analysis cases. Significant findings include notable variations in wrinkle modes for thickness in the range of 50 microns to 1000 microns, which also depend on the presence of an applied gravity field. However, it is revealed that relationships between overall strain energy density for cases with differing initial conditions are independent of assumed initial con&tions. In addition, analysis results indicate that the relationship between amplitude scale (W/t) and structural scale (L/t) is linear in the presence of a gravity field.

  11. Effective Simulation of Delamination in Aeronautical Structures Using Shells and Cohesive Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Camanho, Pedro P.; Turon, Albert

    2007-01-01

    A cohesive element for shell analysis is presented. The element can be used to simulate the initiation and growth of delaminations between stacked, non-coincident layers of shell elements. The procedure to construct the element accounts for the thickness offset by applying the kinematic relations of shell deformation to transform the stiffness and internal force of a zero-thickness cohesive element such that interfacial continuity between the layers is enforced. The procedure is demonstrated by simulating the response and failure of the Mixed Mode Bending test and a skin-stiffener debond specimen. In addition, it is shown that stacks of shell elements can be used to create effective models to predict the inplane and delamination failure modes of thick components. The results indicate that simple shell models can retain many of the necessary predictive attributes of much more complex 3D models while providing the computational efficiency that is necessary for design.

  12. Trace Element Uptake in Marine Bivalve Shells Constraints from Field- and Laboratory Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klünder, M.; Hippler, D.; Witbaard, R.; Frei, D.; Immenhauser, A.

    2006-12-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of the trace element signatures recorded in calcium carbonate skeletons of marine organisms as archives of past and present environmental conditions, such as temperature, salinity or nutrition level. Because of their global occurrence in the modern and ancient oceans, the trace element chemistry of bivalve shells might be used as a potential proxy for present and past environmental conditions. If the composition of bivalve shells, for instance, can be shown to represent the environment in which they lived, then shells can be used to investigate conditions in the lifetime of the animal. And as the shell material is sequentially deposited, an understanding of the internal shell structure will enable time- resolution of the analyses. Therefore, the trace element signature of bivalve shells may provide an important record of climate changes and global geochemical cycles. One of the difficulties of using the trace element signatures of bivalve shells as proxies for environmental conditions is that little is known about the mechanisms by which the trace elements are incorporated into the shells. There has been quite an amount of research into the use of bivalve shell chemistry as proxy for one or more environmental parameters, but there are relatively few datasets in which both bivalve shells and the water in which the animals lived have been analysed. It is as yet not clear to what extent the trace element incorporation into bivalve shells is governed by biological processes, like growth rate and metabolism of the animals, or by physical and crystal chemical parameters. An added difficulty is that the existing data do suggest that trace element uptake in bivalve shells may be species specific. Therefore, studies that investigate the relationships between the content of these elements in the shells and the ambient water and the possible incorporation mechanisms are needed if the potential that bivalve shells offer as

  13. Addition of higher order plate and shell elements into NASTRAN computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanaswami, R.; Goglia, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Two higher order plate elements, the linear strain triangular membrane element and the quintic bending element, along with a shallow shell element, suitable for inclusion into the NASTRAN (NASA Structural Analysis) program are described. Additions to the NASTRAN Theoretical Manual, Users' Manual, Programmers' Manual and the NASTRAN Demonstration Problem Manual, for inclusion of these elements into the NASTRAN program are also presented.

  14. K shell parameters of some lanthanide elements using bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjana, K. M.; Badiger, N. M.

    2015-02-01

    The spectrum of external bremsstrahlung (EB) transmitted through Tb and Ho is measured using a HPGe detector spectrometer. A sudden drop in transmitted intensity at K shell binding energy has been used to determine the K shell photoelectric parameters. The unwanted characteristic K x-ray photons generated just below the K edge has been avoided by carrying out a separate experiment in the same geometry. The measured values of K shell parameters have been compared with FFAST values.

  15. Shell model nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms contributing to double beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Horoi, Mihai

    2013-12-30

    Recent progress in the shell model approach to the nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay process are presented. This includes nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms to neutrionless double beta decay, a comparison between closure and non-closure approximation for {sup 48}Ca, and an updated shell model analysis of nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe.

  16. NASTRAN implementation of an isoparametric doubly-curved quadrilateral shell element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potvin, A. B.; Leick, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    A quadrilateral shell element, CQUAD4, was added to level 15.5 and subsequently to level 16.0 of NASTRAN. The element exhibited doubly curved surfaces and used biquadratic interpolation functions. Reduced integration techniques were used to improve the performance of the element in thin shell problems. The creation of several new bulk data items is discussed, along with a special module, GPNORM, to process SHLNORM bulk data cards. In addition to the theoretical basis for the element stiffness matrix, consistent mass and load matrices are presented. Several potential sources of degenerate behavior of the element were investigated. Guidelines for proper use of the element were suggested. Performance of the element on several widely published classical examples was demonstrated. The results showed a significant improvement over presently available NASTRAN shell elements for even the coarsest meshes. Potential applications to two classes of practical problems are discussed.

  17. Influences of organic matter and calcification rate on trace elements in aragonitic estuarine bivalve shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takesue, Renee K.; Bacon, Charles R.; Thompson, Janet K.

    2008-11-01

    A suite of elements (B, Na, Mg, S, K, Ca, V, Mn, Cr, Sr, and Ba) was measured in aragonitic shells of the estuarine bivalve Corbula amurensis, the Asian clam, using the Sensitive High-Resolution Ion MicroProbe with Reverse Geometry (SHRIMP RG). Our initial intent was to explore potential geochemical proxy relationships between shell chemistry and salinity (freshwater inflow) in northern San Francisco Bay (SFB). In the course of this study we observed variations in shell trace element to calcium ([M]/Ca) ratios that could only be attributed to internal biological processes. This paper discusses the nature and sources of internal trace element variability in C. amurensis shells related to the shell organic fraction and shell calcification rates. The average organic content of whole C. amurensis shells is 19%. After treating whole powdered shells with an oxidative cleaning procedure to remove organic matter, shells contained on average 33% less total Mg and 78% less total Mn. Within our analytical uncertainty, Sr and Ba contents were unchanged by the removal of organic matter. These results show that aragonitic C. amurensis shells have a large component of non-lattice-bound Mg and Mn that probably contribute to the dissimilarity of [M]/Ca profiles among five same-sized shells. Non-lattice-bound trace elements could complicate the development and application of geochemical proxy relationships in bivalve shells. Because B, Ba and Sr occur exclusively in shell aragonite, they are good candidates for external proxy relationships. [M]/Ca ratios were significantly different in prismatic and nacreous aragonite and in two valves of the same shell that had different crystal growth rates. Some part of these differences can be attributed to non-lattice-bound trace elements associated with the organic fraction. The differences in [M]/Ca ratios were also consistent with the calcification rate-dependent ion transport model developed by Carré et al. [Carré M., Bentaleb I

  18. Influences of organic matter and calcification rate on trace elements in aragonitic estuarine bivalve shells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takesue, R.K.; Bacon, C.R.; Thompson, J.K.

    2008-01-01

    A suite of elements (B, Na, Mg, S, K, Ca, V, Mn, Cr, Sr, and Ba) was measured in aragonitic shells of the estuarine bivalve Corbula amurensis, the Asian clam, using the Sensitive High-Resolution Ion MicroProbe with Reverse Geometry (SHRIMP RG). Our initial intent was to explore potential geochemical proxy relationships between shell chemistry and salinity (freshwater inflow) in northern San Francisco Bay (SFB). In the course of this study we observed variations in shell trace element to calcium ([M]/Ca) ratios that could only be attributed to internal biological processes. This paper discusses the nature and sources of internal trace element variability in C. amurensis shells related to the shell organic fraction and shell calcification rates. The average organic content of whole C. amurensis shells is 19%. After treating whole powdered shells with an oxidative cleaning procedure to remove organic matter, shells contained on average 33% less total Mg and 78% less total Mn. Within our analytical uncertainty, Sr and Ba contents were unchanged by the removal of organic matter. These results show that aragonitic C. amurensis shells have a large component of non-lattice-bound Mg and Mn that probably contribute to the dissimilarity of [M]/Ca profiles among five same-sized shells. Non-lattice-bound trace elements could complicate the development and application of geochemical proxy relationships in bivalve shells. Because B, Ba and Sr occur exclusively in shell aragonite, they are good candidates for external proxy relationships. [M]/Ca ratios were significantly different in prismatic and nacreous aragonite and in two valves of the same shell that had different crystal growth rates. Some part of these differences can be attributed to non-lattice-bound trace elements associated with the organic fraction. The differences in [M]/Ca ratios were also consistent with the calcification rate-dependent ion transport model developed by Carr?? et al. [Carr?? M., Bentaleb I

  19. Comparison of symbolic and numerical integration methods for an assumed-stress hybrid shell element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, Govind; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1993-01-01

    Hybrid shell elements have long been regarded with reserve by the commercial finite element developers despite the high degree of reliability and accuracy associated with such formulations. The fundamental reason is the inherent higher computational cost of the hybrid approach as compared to the displacement-based formulations. However, a noteworthy factor in favor of hybrid elements is that numerical integration to generate element matrices can be entirely avoided by the use of symbolic integration. In this paper, the use of the symbolic computational approach is presented for an assumed-stress hybrid shell element with drilling degrees of freedom and the significant time savings achieved is demonstrated through an example.

  20. A novel enriched CB shell element method for simulating arbitrary crack growth in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Zhuo; Cheng, Binbin

    2011-08-01

    In this work, a novel numerical method is developed for simulating arbitrary crack growth in pipes with the idea of enriched shape functions which can represent the discontinuity independent of the mesh. The concept of the enriched shape functions is introduced into the continuum-based (CB) shell element. Due to the advantage of CB shell element, the shell thickness variation and surface connection can be concerned during the deformation. The stress intensity factors of the crack in the CB shell element are calculated by using the `equivalent domain integral' method for 3D arbitrary non-planar crack. The maximum energy release rate is used as a propagation criterion. This method is proved able to capture arbitrary crack growth path in pipes which is independent of the element mesh. Numerical examples of different fracture patterns in pipes are presented here.

  1. Fully Integrated EAS-Based Solid-Shell Finite Elements in Implicit Sheet Metal Forming Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Valente, R.A. Fontes; Cardoso, R.P.R.; Alves de Sousa, R.J.; Parente, M.P.L.; Jorge, R.M. Natal

    2005-08-05

    In this communication sheet metal forming problems are analyzed with the Finite Element Method and a fully-integrated solid-shell element, based on the Enhanced Assumed Strain (EAS) method. Among the solid-shell element's distinguish features, it should be mentioned the solely use of the EAS approach in dealing with either transverse and volumetric-based locking pathologies, thus avoiding the inclusion of other mixed methods into the formulation. The adopted methodology is then able to successfully deal with small thickness shell problems within the incompressible range, aspects commonly appearing in sheet metal forming modeling with solid elements.Simulations of this type of forming processes are mainly solved resorting to membrane and shell-type finite elements, included in explicit commercial programs. Nevertheless, the presented solid-shell formulation, within a fully implicit approach, provides reliable solutions when compared to experimental results. It is also worth mentioning that the present solid-shell formulation encompasses a minimum set of enhancing strain variables, if compared to other fully integrated hexahedral finite elements in the literature.In order to assess the performance of the presented formulation, the S-Rail Forming problem of an aluminum alloy is described and analyzed, with the results being compared to experimental and numerical simulation data.

  2. A novel method for measuring K-shell photoelectric parameters of high-Z elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, S. V.; Badiger, N. M.

    2006-06-01

    The K-shell jump ratio, jump factor and the ratio of total to K-shell photoelectric cross section at K edge have been determined for Hf, Ta, Au and Pb by adopting a novel method. In this method, continuous external bremsstrahlung (EB) photons are produced in a thin nickel elemental converter by beta particles from a 90Sr-90Y weak beta source. The spectrum of EB photons transmitted through the elemental targets of Hf, Ta, Au and Pb is recorded with an HPGe detector coupled to an 8K multichannel analyser. The transmitted spectrum shows a sharp decrease in intensity at the K-shell binding energy of the target atom. The region of sharp decrease is fitted to a sigmoidal function and the K-shell jump ratio, jump factor and the ratio of total to the K-shell photoelectric cross section at K edge are determined. The measured values are compared with the theoretical values.

  3. A versatile and low order hybrid stress element for general shell geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, David S.; Pian, Theodore H. H.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid stress general shell element is developed based on the Hellinger-Reissner principle modified for relaxed element compatibility conditions. The element is based on a consistent first order thin shell theory with Love Kirchhoff hypotheses. It is of quadrilateral shape with only four corner nodes and five degrees of freedom per node. The geometry of the element is approximated through a bi-cubic polynomial surface patch. Numerical examples consist of torsion-loaded slit cylinder and pinched cylinder with open ends and rigid diaphragmed ends. Also, the representation of the rigid body motion is studied by series of parametric eigenvalue analysis of the stiffness matrix.

  4. ANS shell elements with improved transverse shear accuracy. [Assumed Natural Coordinate Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Daniel D.; Park, K. C.

    1992-01-01

    A method of forming assumed natural coordinate strain (ANS) plate and shell elements is presented. The ANS method uses equilibrium based constraints and kinematic constraints to eliminate hierarchical degrees of freedom which results in lower order elements with improved stress recovery and displacement convergence. These techniques make it possible to easily implement the element into the standard finite element software structure, and a modified shape function matrix can be used to create consistent nodal loads.

  5. Smoothed finite element method implemented in a resultant eight-node solid-shell element for geometrical linear analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Élie-Dit-Cosaque, Xavier J.-G.; Gakwaya, Augustin; Naceur, Hakim

    2015-01-01

    A smoothed finite element method formulation for the resultant eight-node solid-shell element is presented in this paper for geometrical linear analysis. The smoothing process is successfully performed on the element mid-surface to deal with the membrane and bending effects of the stiffness matrix. The strain smoothing process allows replacing the Cartesian derivatives of shape functions by the product of shape functions with normal vectors to the element mid-surface boundaries. The present formulation remains competitive when compared to the classical finite element formulations since no inverse of the Jacobian matrix is calculated. The three dimensional resultant shell theory allows the element kinematics to be defined only with the displacement degrees of freedom. The assumed natural strain method is used not only to eliminate the transverse shear locking problem encountered in thin-walled structures, but also to reduce trapezoidal effects. The efficiency of the present element is presented and compared with that of standard solid-shell elements through various benchmark problems including some with highly distorted meshes.

  6. Shear-flexible finite-element models of laminated composite plates and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Mathers, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Several finite-element models are applied to the linear static, stability, and vibration analysis of laminated composite plates and shells. The study is based on linear shallow-shell theory, with the effects of shear deformation, anisotropic material behavior, and bending-extensional coupling included. Both stiffness (displacement) and mixed finite-element models are considered. Discussion is focused on the effects of shear deformation and anisotropic material behavior on the accuracy and convergence of different finite-element models. Numerical studies are presented which show the effects of increasing the order of the approximating polynomials, adding internal degrees of freedom, and using derivatives of generalized displacements as nodal parameters.

  7. Application of the hybrid-Trefftz finite element model to thin shell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voros, Gabor

    The paper presents the results of a preliminary study on thin shallow shell element based on the hybrid-Trefftz (HT) model. This model adopts an assumed nonconforming displacement field which satisfies a priori the governing differential equations. The interelement continuity and the boundary conditions are enforced by frame fields defined in terms of the conventional nodal freedoms. In the p-extension, the frame functions involve an optional number of hierarchic displacement modes. Numerical results present the capability of the new shell element which can be implemented in existing finite element codes.

  8. Hybrid Semiloof elements for plates and shells based upon a modified Hu-Washizu principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.; Sumihara, K.

    1984-01-01

    Hybrid SemiLoof elements for plates and shells are developed based upon modified Hu-Washizu principle. In the new version of the assumed stress hybrid formulation the equilibrium equations are satisfied through the introduction of internal displacement parameters as Lagrange multipliers. The inversion of the resulting H-matrices is simplified particularly when the stresses are expressed in terms of natural coordinates. A 24-DOF triangular element and a 32-DOF quadrilateral element based on shallow shell theory are derived and evaluated.

  9. RELATIONSHIP OF AMEBOCYTES AND TERRESTRIAL ELEMENTS TO ADULT SHELL DEPOSITION IN EASTERN OYSTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fisher, William S. Submitted. Relationship of Amebocytes and Terrestrial Elements to Adult Shell Deposition in Eastern Oysters. J. Shellfish Res. 30 p. (ERL,GB 1197).

    Freshwater runoff contains terrestrial elements from geological deposits that may be vital to eastern oys...

  10. On sound transmission into a stiffened cylindrical shell with rings and stringers treated as discrete elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koval, L. R.

    1980-01-01

    In the context of the transmission of airborne noise into an aircraft fuselage, a mathematical model is presented for the transmission of an oblique plane sound wave into a finite cylindrical shell stiffened by stringers and ring frames. The rings and stringers are modeled as discrete structural elements. The numerical case studied was typical of a narrow-bodied jet transport fuselage. The numerical results show that the ring-frequency dip in the transmission loss curve that is present for a monocoque shell is still present in the case of a stiffened shell. The ring frequency effect is a result of the cylindrical geometry of the shell. Below the ring frequency, stiffening does not appear to have any significant effect on transmission loss, but above the ring frequency, stiffeners can enhance the transmission loss of a cylindrical shell.

  11. Parameterized Finite Element Modeling and Buckling Analysis of Six Typical Composite Grid Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Changliang; Wang, Junbiao; Liu, Chuang

    2014-10-01

    Six typical composite grid cylindrical shells are constructed by superimposing three basic types of ribs. Then buckling behavior and structural efficiency of these shells are analyzed under axial compression, pure bending, torsion and transverse bending by finite element (FE) models. The FE models are created by a parametrical FE modeling approach that defines FE models with original natural twisted geometry and orients cross-sections of beam elements exactly. And the approach is parameterized and coded by Patran Command Language (PCL). The demonstrations of FE modeling indicate the program enables efficient generation of FE models and facilitates parametric studies and design of grid shells. Using the program, the effects of helical angles on the buckling behavior of six typical grid cylindrical shells are determined. The results of these studies indicate that the triangle grid and rotated triangle grid cylindrical shell are more efficient than others under axial compression and pure bending, whereas under torsion and transverse bending, the hexagon grid cylindrical shell is most efficient. Additionally, buckling mode shapes are compared and provide an understanding of composite grid cylindrical shells that is useful in preliminary design of such structures.

  12. New K-shell fluorescence yields curve for elements with 3 ≤ Z ≤ 99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoudi, Salim; Kahoul, Abdelhalim; Sahnoune, Yassine; Deghfel, Bahri; Kasri, Yazid.; Khalfallah, Farid; Aylikci, Volkan; Aylikci, Nuray Küp; Medjadi, Djamel Edine; Nekkab, Mohammed

    2015-11-01

    The measured K-shell fluorescence-yield values reported in the literature from 1934 to 2015 (about 737 new measurements) were used to deduce new empirical K-shell fluorescence yields for elements in the atomic range 3 ≤ Z ≤ 99. In order to deduce the empirical K-shell fluorescence yield, the experimental data were fitted using the quantity ( ω K /(1 - ω K ))1/4 with respect to the atomic number Z. The results were compared to other theoretical, semi-empirical and experimental values reported in the literature. Reasonable agreement was obtained between our result and those of other works.

  13. Development and applications of a flat triangular element for thin laminated shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, P.

    Finite element analysis of thin laminated shells using a three-noded flat triangular shell element is presented. The flat shell element is obtained by combining the Discrete Kirchhoff Theory (DKT) plate bending element and a membrane element similar to the Allman element, but derived from the Linear Strain Triangular (LST) element. The major drawback of the DKT plate bending element is that the transverse displacement is not explicitly defined within the interior of the element. In the present research, free vibration analysis is performed both by using a lumped mass matrix and a so called consistent mass matrix, obtained by borrowing shape functions from an existing element, in order to compare the performance of the two methods. Several numerical examples are solved to demonstrate the accuracy of the formulation for both small and large rotation analysis of laminated plates and shells. The results are compared with those available in the existing literature and those obtained using the commercial finite element package ABAQUS and are found to be in good agreement. The element is employed for two main applications involving large flexible structures. The first application is the control of thermal deformations of a spherical mirror segment, which is a segment of a multi-segmented primary mirror used in a space telescope. The feasibility of controlling the surface distortions of the mirror segment due to arbitrary thermal fields, using discrete and distributed actuators, is studied. The second application is the analysis of an inflatable structure, being considered by the US Army for housing vehicles and personnel. The updated Lagrangian formulation of the flat shell element has been developed primarily for the nonlinear analysis of the tent structure, since such a structure is expected to undergo large deformations and rotations under the action of environmental loads like the wind and snow loads. The follower effects of the pressure load have been included in the

  14. Free vibration of composite skewed cylindrical shell panel by finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, Salil

    2008-03-01

    In this paper a composite triangular shallow shell element has been used for free vibration analysis of laminated composite skewed cylindrical shell panels. In the present element first-order shear deformation theory has been incorporated by taking transverse displacement and bending rotations as independent field variables. The interpolation function used to approximate transverse displacement is one order higher than for bending rotations. This has made the element free from locking in shear. Two types of mass lumping schemes have been recommended. In one of the mass lumping scheme the effect of rotary inertia has been incorporated in the element formulations. Free vibration of skewed composite cylindrical shell panels having different thickness to radius ratios ( h/R=0.01-0.2), length to radius ratios ( L/R), number of layers and fiber orientation angles have been analyzed following the shallow shell method. The results for few examples obtained in the present analysis have compared with the published results. Some new results of composite skewed cylindrical shell panels have been presented which are expected to be useful to future research in this direction.

  15. Trace element cartography of Globigerinoides ruber shells using particle-induced X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlen, M.; Bassinot, F.; Beck, L.; Khodja, H.

    2004-12-01

    Micro particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) is a nondestructive elemental analysis technique that can be used to map the distribution of elements with a spatial resolution of ±4 μm2 and a penetration depth of ±2 μm in a calcite matrix. To test its potential to improve our understanding of trace element distribution in foraminifera shells, we mapped the Mg distribution across individual chambers of the planktonic species Globigerinoides ruber. G. ruber shells were picked from equatorial Atlantic surface sediments (Sierra Leone Rise). They ranged from well-preserved to heavily dissolved tests. The mapping of trace elements across test chambers made it possible to discriminate between variability inherent to the shell material and heterogeneity linked to contaminant phases. Contaminating mineral phases were characterized by high Mg concentrations (Mg/Ca = 19.7 mmol/mol) and high levels of Si, Al, and Fe. Mg/Ca values of well-preserved shells ranged from 3.9 to 4.5 mmol/mol. The Mg to Ca ratios of partially dissolved shells varied between 1.8 and 3.4 mmol/mol between outer and inner chambers. Low and homogeneous Mg/Ca values of 2.0 and 2.3 mmol/mol were determined for chambers of a severely dissolved test.

  16. Assessing the utility of elemental ratios as a paleotemperature proxy in shells of patelloid limpets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graniero, Lauren; Surge, Donna; Gillikin, David

    2015-04-01

    Archaeological shell and fish middens are rich sources of paleoenvironmental proxy data. Carbonate hard part remains contained in such deposits have been used as archives of coastal marine climate and human-climate interactions. Oxygen isotope records from fast-growing limpet shells potentially capture summer and winter seasons, and thus, approach the full seasonal range of sea surface temperature (SST). Fast-growing shells are often short-lived, providing "snap-shots" of multi-year seasonal cycles. Patelloid limpet shells are common constituents in archaeological middens found along European, African, and South American coastlines. Oxygen isotope ratios of archaeological limpet shells from the genus, Patella, have been used to reconstruct seasonal SST and ocean circulation patterns during the Late Quaternary. Such studies depend on the ability to constrain the oxygen isotope ratio of seawater; therefore, alternative proxies are necessary for coastal localities where this is not possible. Elemental ratios (e.g., Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca) have been used as paleotemperature proxies in corals and foraminifera with varying degrees of success and appear problematic in bivalves. Here, we test whether such elemental ratios are useful as an alternative SST proxy in patelloid limpet shells.

  17. The importance of closed shell structures in the synthesis of super heavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, J. H.; Hofmann, S.; Oganessian, Y. T.

    2015-02-01

    The importance of shell closures and gaps in the single-particle energies for protons and neutrons on the stability of elements beyond Z = 100 will be described. Following the development of microscopic models with shell corrections, microscopic-macroscopic models predicted large gaps in the single-particle energy levels for protons and neutrons at Z = 102, 108 and N = 152, 162 for the same deformed shapes. Shell gaps for spherical shapes for N = 184 and Z = 114, 120 or 126 were also predicted to form an "Island of Stability" with very long half lives for fission and alpha decay. Cold fusion reactions involving beams of Ca to Zn and targets of stable 208Pb and 209Bi were pioneered at GSI and used to synthesize new elements for Z = 107 to 112 and in Japan a new isotope of 113. Hot fusion reactions between radioactive actinide targets and neutron-rich 48Ca beams were pioneered in JINR leading to the synthesis of new elements with Z = 113 to 118. Data on two neutron separation energies, spontaneous fission half lives and total half lives of super heavy elements showing the importance of reinforcement of the Z = 102, N = 152 and Z = 108, N = 162 single particle level gaps at the same deformation and Z = 114-126, N = 184 shell gaps in the synthesis of super heavy elements 107 to 118 are presented along with the latest results on their synthesis.

  18. A finite element study of the stability of spontaneous curling of thin shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaomin; Guo, Qiaohang; Chu, Kevin; Trase, Ian; Hu, Nan; Chen, Zi

    Thin shells are of great interest in engineering due to their ubiquity in nature. The mechanical instabilities of thin shells are a key factor in understanding many real world phenomena, such as the closure of a Venus flytrap or the curling of a dried leaf. Given the analytical theory that quantitatively described the stability of thin shells subject to surface stress, we are able to identify a dimensionless parameter that controls the stability of thin shells. Finite element analyses are employed to numerically examine the predictions. Bi-layer plates are fabricated where one layer is pre-stretched and has much smaller Young's modulus than the other layer to examine mechanical instability. By measuring the two principle curvatures on the plate, the onset of bifurcation can be determined. Different initial conditions and material properties are taken into account in the FEA, including initial curvature, Poisson's ratio, and the magnitude of surface stress. The numerical experiments agree well with the theory.

  19. Coupled mixed-field laminate theory and finite element for smart piezoelectric composite shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1996-01-01

    Mechanics for the analysis of laminated composite shells with piezoelectric actuators and sensors are presented. A new mixed-field laminate theory for piezoelectric shells is formulated in curvilinear coordinates which combines single-layer assumptions for the displacements and a layerwise representation for the electric potential. The resultant coupled governing equations for curvilinear piezoelectric laminates are described. Structural mechanics are subsequently developed and an 8-node finite-element is formulated for the static and dynamic analysis of adaptive composite structures of general laminations containing piezoelectric layers. Evaluations of the method and comparisons with reported results are presented for laminated piezoelectric-composite plates, a closed cylindrical shell with a continuous piezoceramic layer and a laminated composite semi-circular cantilever shell with discrete cylindrical piezoelectric actuators and/or sensors.

  20. A computer program for anisotropic shallow-shell finite elements using symbolic integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, C. M.; Bowen, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program for anisotropic shallow-shell finite elements with variable curvature is described. A listing of the program is presented together with printed output for a sample case. Computation times and central memory requirements are given for several different elements. The program is based on a stiffness (displacement) finite-element model in which the fundamental unknowns consist of both the displacement and the rotation components of the reference surface of the shell. Two triangular and four quadrilateral elements are implemented in the program. The triangular elements have 6 or 10 nodes, and the quadrilateral elements have 4 or 8 nodes. Two of the quadrilateral elements have internal degrees of freedom associated with displacement modes which vanish along the edges of the elements (bubble modes). The triangular elements and the remaining two quadrilateral elements do not have bubble modes. The output from the program consists of arrays corresponding to the stiffness, the geometric stiffness, the consistent mass, and the consistent load matrices for individual elements. The integrals required for the generation of these arrays are evaluated by using symbolic (or analytic) integration in conjunction with certain group-theoretic techniques. The analytic expressions for the integrals are exact and were developed using the symbolic and algebraic manipulation language.

  1. A Mixed Multi-Field Finite Element Formulation for Thermopiezoelectric Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun; Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1999-01-01

    Analytical formulations are presented which account for the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal response of piezoelectric composite shell structures. A new mixed multi-field laminate theory is developed which combines "single layer" assumptions for the displacements along with layerwise fields for the electric potential and temperature. This laminate theory is formulated using curvilinear coordinates and is based on the principles of linear thermopiezoelectricity. The mechanics have the inherent capability to explicitly model both the active and sensory responses of piezoelectric composite shells in thermal environment. Finite element equations are derived and implemented for an eight-noded shell element. Numerical studies are conducted to investigate both the sensory and active responses of piezoelectric composite shell structures subjected to thermal loads. Results for a cantilevered plate with an attached piezoelectric layer are com- pared with corresponding results from a commercial finite element code and a previously developed program. Additional studies are conducted on a cylindrical shell with an attached piezoelectric layer to demonstrate capabilities to achieve thermal shape control on curved piezoelectric structures.

  2. An efficient finite element with layerwise mechanics for smart piezoelectric composite and sandwich shallow shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, M. Yaqoob; Kapuria, S.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present a new efficient four-node finite element for shallow multilayered piezoelectric shells, considering layerwise mechanics and electromechanical coupling. The laminate mechanics is based on the zigzag theory that has only seven kinematic degrees of freedom per node. The normal deformation of the piezoelectric layers under the electric field is accounted for without introducing any additional deflection variables. A consistent quadratic variation of the electric potential across the piezoelectric layers with the provision of satisfying the equipotential condition of electroded surfaces is adopted. The performance of the new element is demonstrated for the static response under mechanical and electric potential loads, and for free vibration response of smart shells under different boundary conditions. The predictions are found to be very close to the three dimensional piezoelasticity solutions for hybrid shells made of not only single-material composite substrates, but also sandwich substrates with a soft core for which the equivalent single layer (ESL) theories perform very badly.

  3. Geometrically nonlinear transient analysis of laminated composite shells using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, Namita; Bandyopadhyay, J. N.

    2009-08-01

    The nonlinear transient response of composite shells with/without cutouts and initial geometric imperfection is investigated using the finite element method. The present formulation considers doubly curved shells incorporating von Kármán type nonlinear strains into the first order shear deformation theory. The analysis is carried out using quadratic C0 eight-noded isoparametric element. The governing nonlinear equations are solved by using the Newmark average acceleration method in the time integration in conjunction with modified Newton-Raphson iteration scheme. The validity of the model is demonstrated by comparing the present results with those available in the literature. Parametric studies are carried out varying the radius of curvature to width ratio and amplitude of initial geometric imperfection of laminated composite cylindrical, spherical and hyperbolic paraboloid shells with/without cutouts.

  4. Modeling of thin structures in eddy current testing with shell elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, A.; Santandrea, L.; Le Bihan, Y.; Marchand, C.

    2010-11-01

    The modeling and design of eddy currents sensors for non-destructive testing applications, generally, requires numerical methods. Among these methods, the finite element method is one of the most used. Indeed, it presents a great capability to treat a large variety of configurations. However, in the study of eddy current testing problems, the existence of structures that have a geometrical dimension smaller than the others (thin air gaps, coatings...) will lead to difficulties related to the meshing process. The introduction of particular elements such as shell elements allows to simplify the modeling of these problems. In this paper, the shell elements are used in two different 2D axisymmetric formulations, the electric formulation a* and the magnetic formulation t-ϕ in order to simulate the behaviour of the electromagnetic fields. The results obtained with the two formulations are compared with analytical solutions.

  5. Consistent linearization of the element-independent corotational formulation for the structural analysis of general shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    A consistent linearization is provided for the element-dependent corotational formulation, providing the proper first and second variation of the strain energy. As a result, the warping problem that has plagued flat elements has been overcome, with beneficial effects carried over to linear solutions. True Newton quadratic convergence has been restored to the Structural Analysis of General Shells (STAGS) code for conservative loading using the full corotational implementation. Some implications for general finite element analysis are discussed, including what effect the automatic frame invariance provided by this work might have on the development of new, improved elements.

  6. Analytical Derivations of Single-Particle Matrix Elements in Nuclear Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatah, Aziz H.; Radhi, R. A.; Abdullah, Nzar R.

    2016-07-01

    We present analytical method to calculate single particle matrix elements used in atomic and nuclear physics. We show seven different formulas of matrix elements of the operator f(r)dr m where f(r) = rμ, rμ jJ(qr), V(r) corresponding to the Gaussian and the Yukawa potentials used in nuclear shell models and nuclear structure. In addition, we take into account a general integral formula of the matrix element that covers all seven matrix elements obtained analytically.

  7. A high transmission broadband gradient index lens using elastic shell acoustic metamaterial elements.

    PubMed

    Titovich, Alexey S; Norris, Andrew N; Haberman, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    The use of cylindrical elastic shells as elements in acoustic metamaterial devices is demonstrated through simulations and underwater measurements of a cylindrical-to-plane wave lens. Transformation acoustics of a circular region to a square dictate that the effective density in the lens remain constant and equal to that of water. Piecewise approximation to the desired effective compressibility is achieved using a square array with elements based on the elastic shell metamaterial concept developed by Titovich and Norris [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 136(4), 1601-1609 (2014)]. The sizes of the elements are chosen based on availability of shells, minimizing fabrication difficulties. The tested device is neutrally buoyant comprising 48 elements of nine different types of commercial shells made from aluminum, brass, copper, and polymers. Simulations indicate a broadband range in which the device acts as a cylindrical to plane wave lens. The experimental findings confirm the broadband quadropolar response from approximately 20 to 40 kHz, with positive gain of the radiation pattern in the four plane wave directions. PMID:27369162

  8. [Comparative analysis of trace elements in five marine-derived shell TCM using multivariate statistical analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Chen, Zhen; Fu, Yu-qiang; Gong, Hui-li; Guan, Hua-shi; Liu, Hong-bing

    2015-11-01

    A comparable study were carried out by determination of trace elements on five marine-derived shell traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) (Ostreae Concha, Haliotidis Concha, Margaritifera Concha, Meretricis Concha, and Arcae Concha), which were recorded in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia (2010 version). Seven trace elements in 51 batches of this type of shell TCM were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), combined with principal component analysis (PCA) methods. The content of element Se, which exhibited significant differences among different drugs, could be used as a key element to distinguish this type of drugs. Meanwhile, the contents of elements Co, Cu, Mo, and Ba in Haliotidis Concha, Co and As in Margaritifera Concha, Mo and As in Meretricis Concha, Mo, As, and Ba in Arcae Concha, and Zn in Meretricis Concha were relatively stable. In the PCA plot, Arcae Concha and Meretricis Concha could be efficiently distinguished from Ostreae Concha together with Haliotidis Concha, and Margaritifera Concha. The results also showed a correlation with their medicinal function. In conclusion, trace elements in marine-derived shell TCM could not be neglected for their quality control. PMID:27071261

  9. Rapid Parallel Calculation of shell Element Based On GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanga, Jian Hua; Lia, Guang Yao; Lib, Sheng; Li, Guang Yao

    2010-06-01

    Long computing time bottlenecked the application of finite element. In this paper, an effective method to speed up the FEM calculation by using the existing modern graphic processing unit and programmable colored rendering tool was put forward, which devised the representation of unit information in accordance with the features of GPU, converted all the unit calculation into film rendering process, solved the simulation work of all the unit calculation of the internal force, and overcame the shortcomings of lowly parallel level appeared ever before when it run in a single computer. Studies shown that this method could improve efficiency and shorten calculating hours greatly. The results of emulation calculation about the elasticity problem of large number cells in the sheet metal proved that using the GPU parallel simulation calculation was faster than using the CPU's. It is useful and efficient to solve the project problems in this way.

  10. Finite Element Technology In Forming Simulations - Theoretical Aspects And Practical Applications Of A New Solid-Shell Element

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarze, M.; Reese, S.

    2007-05-17

    Finite element simulations of sheet metal forming processes are highly non-linear problems. The non-linearity arises not only from the kinematical relations and the material formulation, furthermore the contact between workpiece and the forming tools leads to an increased number of iterations within the Newton-Raphson scheme. This fact puts high demands on the robustness of finite element formulations. For this reason we study the enhanced assumed strain (EAS) concept as proposed in [1]. The goal is to improve the robustness of the solid-shell formulation in deep drawing simulations.

  11. A solid-shell Cosserat point element (SSCPE) for elastic thin structures at finite deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabareen, Mahmood; Mtanes, Eli

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new solid-shell element using the Cosserat point theory for modeling thin elastic structures at finite deformations. The point-wise Green-Lagrange strain tensor is additively decomposed into homogeneous and inhomogeneous parts. Only the latter part of the strain tensor is modified by the assumed natural strain ANS concept to avoid both curvature-thickness locking and transverse shear locking. To the authors' knowledge, such modification has not been applied yet in the literature, and here it is referred to as the assumed natural inhomogeneous strain ANIS concept. Moreover, a new methodology for determining the constitutive coefficients of the strain energy function, which controls the inhomogeneous deformations, is proposed. The resulting coefficients ensure both accuracy, robustness, and elimination of all locking pathologies in the solid-shell Cosserat point element (SSCPE). The performance of the developed SSCPE is verified and tested via various benchmark problems and compared to other solid, shell, and solid-shell elements. These examples demonstrate that the SSCPE is accurate, robust, stable, free of locking, and can be used for modeling thin structures at both small and finite deformations.

  12. A solid-shell Cosserat point element ( SSCPE) for elastic thin structures at finite deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabareen, Mahmood; Mtanes, Eli

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new solid-shell element using the Cosserat point theory for modeling thin elastic structures at finite deformations. The point-wise Green-Lagrange strain tensor is additively decomposed into homogeneous and inhomogeneous parts. Only the latter part of the strain tensor is modified by the assumed natural strain ANS concept to avoid both curvature-thickness locking and transverse shear locking. To the authors' knowledge, such modification has not been applied yet in the literature, and here it is referred to as the assumed natural inhomogeneous strain ANIS concept. Moreover, a new methodology for determining the constitutive coefficients of the strain energy function, which controls the inhomogeneous deformations, is proposed. The resulting coefficients ensure both accuracy, robustness, and elimination of all locking pathologies in the solid-shell Cosserat point element ( SSCPE). The performance of the developed SSCPE is verified and tested via various benchmark problems and compared to other solid, shell, and solid-shell elements. These examples demonstrate that the SSCPE is accurate, robust, stable, free of locking, and can be used for modeling thin structures at both small and finite deformations.

  13. Developments in variational methods for high performance plate and shell elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos A.; Militello, Carmelo

    1991-01-01

    High performance elements are simple finite elements constructed to deliver engineering accuracy with coarse arbitrary grids. This is part of a series on the variational foundations of high-performance elements, with emphasis on plate and shell elements constructed with the free formulation (FF) and assumed natural strain (ANS) methods. Parameterized variational principles are studied that provide a common foundation for the FF and ANS methods, as well as for a combination of both. From this unified formulation a variant of the ANS formulation, called the assumed natural deviatoric strain (ANDES) formulation, emerges as an important special case. The first ANDES element, a high-performance 9 degrees of freedom triangular Kirchhoff plate bending element, is briefly described to illustrate the use of the new formulation.

  14. A Six-Node Curved Triangular Element and a Four-Node Quadrilateral Element for Analysis of Laminated Composite Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C. Wayne; Breiner, David M.; Gupta, Kajal K. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    Mathematical development and some computed results are presented for Mindlin plate and shell elements, suitable for analysis of laminated composite and sandwich structures. These elements use the conventional 3 (plate) or 5 (shell) nodal degrees of freedom, have no communicable mechanisms, have no spurious shear energy (no shear locking), have no spurious membrane energy (no membrane locking) and do not require arbitrary reduction of out-of-plane shear moduli or under-integration. Artificial out-of-plane rotational stiffnesses are added at the element level to avoid convergence problems or singularity due to flat spots in shells. This report discusses a 6-node curved triangular element and a 4-node quadrilateral element. Findings show that in regular rectangular meshes, the Martin-Breiner 6-node triangular curved shell (MB6) is approximately equivalent to the conventional 8-node quadrilateral with integration. The 4-node quadrilateral (MB4) has very good accuracy for a 4-node element, and may be preferred in vibration analysis because of narrower bandwidth. The mathematical developments used in these elements, those discussed in the seven appendices, have been applied to elements with 3, 4, 6, and 10 nodes and can be applied to other nodal configurations.

  15. Average M shell fluorescence yields for elements with 70≤Z≤92

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahoul, A.; Deghfel, B.; Aylikci, V.; Aylikci, N. K.; Nekkab, M.

    2015-03-01

    The theoretical, experimental and analytical methods for the calculation of average M-shell fluorescence yield (ω¯M ) of different elements are very important because of the large number of their applications in various areas of physical chemistry and medical research. In this paper, the bulk of the average M-shell fluorescence yield measurements reported in the literature, covering the period 1955 to 2005 are interpolated by using an analytical function to deduce the empirical average M-shell fluorescence yield in the atomic range of 70≤Z≤92. The results were compared with the theoretical and fitted values reported by other authors. Reasonable agreement was typically obtained between our result and other works.

  16. Average M shell fluorescence yields for elements with 70≤Z≤92

    SciTech Connect

    Kahoul, A.; Deghfel, B.; Aylikci, V.; Aylikci, N. K.; Nekkab, M.

    2015-03-30

    The theoretical, experimental and analytical methods for the calculation of average M-shell fluorescence yield (ω{sup ¯}{sub M}) of different elements are very important because of the large number of their applications in various areas of physical chemistry and medical research. In this paper, the bulk of the average M-shell fluorescence yield measurements reported in the literature, covering the period 1955 to 2005 are interpolated by using an analytical function to deduce the empirical average M-shell fluorescence yield in the atomic range of 70≤Z≤92. The results were compared with the theoretical and fitted values reported by other authors. Reasonable agreement was typically obtained between our result and other works.

  17. Elemental and Isotopic Incorporation into the Aragonitic Shells of Arctica Islandica: Insights from Temperature Controlled Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanamaker, A. D.; Gillikin, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    The long-lived ocean quahog, Arctica islandica, is a fairly well developed and tested marine proxy archive, however, the utility of elemental ratios in A. islandica shell material as environmental proxies remains questionable. To further evaluate the influence of seawater temperature on elemental and isotopic incorporation during biomineralization, A. islandica shells were grown at constant temperatures under two regimes during a 16-week period from March 27 to July 21, 2011. Seawater from the Darling Marine Center in Walpole, Maine was pumped into temperature and flow controlled tanks that were exposed to ambient food and salinity conditions. A total of 20 individual juvenile clams with an average shell height of 36 mm were stained with calcein (a commonly used biomarker) and cultured at 10.3 ± 0.3 °C for six weeks. After this, shell heights were measured and the clams were again stained with calcein and cultured at 15.0 ± 0.4 °C for an additional 9.5 weeks. The average shell growth during the first phase of the experiment was 2.4 mm with a linear extension rate of 0.40 mm/week. The average shell growth during the second phase of the experiment was 3.2 mm with an extension rate of 0.34 mm/week. Average salinity values were 30.2 ± 0.7 and 30.7 ±0.7 in the first and second phases of the experiment, respectively. Oxygen isotopes from the cultured seawater were collected throughout the experiment and provide the basis for establishing if shells grew in oxygen isotopic equilibrium. Elemental ratios (primarily Ba/Ca, Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca) in the aragonitic shells were determined via laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), while stable oxygen and carbon isotope ratios were measured using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Continuous sampling within and across the temperature conditions (from 10 °C to 15 °C) coupled with the calcein markings provides the ability to place each sample into a precise temporal framework. The

  18. Symmetry of Isoscalar Matrix Elements and Systematics in the sd and beginning of fp shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orce, J. N.; Petkov, P.; Velázquez, V.; McKay, C. J.; Lesher, S. R.; Choudry, S.; Mynk, M.; Linnemann, A.; Jolie, J.; von Brentano, P.; Werner, V.; Yates, S. W.; McEllistrem, M. T.

    2006-03-01

    A careful determination of the lifetime and measurement of the branching ratio for decay of the first 2T=1+ state in 42Sc has allowed an accurate experimental test of charge independence in the A = 42 isobaric triplet. A lifetime of 69(17) fs was measured at the University of Kentucky, while relative intensities for the 975 keV and 1586 keV transitions depopulating the first 2T=1+ state have been determined at the University of Cologne as 100(1) and 8(1), respectively. Both measurements give an isoscalar matrix element, M0, of 6.4(9) (W.u.)1/2. This result confirms charge independence for the A=42 isobaric triplet. Shell model calculations have been carried out for understanding the global trend of M0 values for A = 4n + 2 isobaric triplets ranging from A = 18 to A = 42. The 21 (T=1)+ → 01 (T=1)+ transition energies, reduced transition probabilities and M0 values are reproduced to a high degree of accuracy. The trend of M0 strength along the sd shell is interpreted in terms of the shell structure. Certain discrepancies arise at the extremes of the sd shell, for the A = 18 and A = 38 isobaric triplets, which might be explained in terms of the low valence space at the extremes of the sd shell.

  19. Symmetry of Isoscalar Matrix Elements and Systematics in the sd and beginning of fp shells

    SciTech Connect

    Orce, J. N.; McKay, C. J.; Lesher, S. R.; Choudry, S.; Mynk, M.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Petkov, P.; Velazquez, V.; Linnemann, A.; Jolie, J.; Brentano, P. von; Werner, V.; Yates, S. W.

    2006-03-13

    A careful determination of the lifetime and measurement of the branching ratio for decay of the first 2{sub T=1}{sup +} state in 42Sc has allowed an accurate experimental test of charge independence in the A = 42 isobaric triplet. A lifetime of 69(17) fs was measured at the University of Kentucky, while relative intensities for the 975 keV and 1586 keV transitions depopulating the first 2{sub T=1}{sup +} state have been determined at the University of Cologne as 100(1) and 8(1), respectively. Both measurements give an isoscalar matrix element, M0, of 6.4(9) (W.u.)1/2. This result confirms charge independence for the A=42 isobaric triplet. Shell model calculations have been carried out for understanding the global trend of M0 values for A = 4n + 2 isobaric triplets ranging from A = 18 to A = 42. The 2{sub 1(T=1)}{sup +} {yields} 0{sub 1(T=1)}{sup +} transition energies, reduced transition probabilities and M0 values are reproduced to a high degree of accuracy. The trend of M0 strength along the sd shell is interpreted in terms of the shell structure. Certain discrepancies arise at the extremes of the sd shell, for the A = 18 and A 38 isobaric triplets, which might be explained in terms of the low valence space at the extremes of the sd shell.

  20. Free Vibration Analysis of Delaminated Composite Pretwisted Rotating Shells ─ A Finite Element Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Amit; Kishimoto, Kikuo

    In this paper a finite element method is presented to study the effects of delamination on free vibration characteristics of graphite-epoxy composite pretwisted rotating shells. Lagrange’s equation of motion is used to derive the dynamic equilibrium equation and moderate rotational speeds are considered wherein the Coriolis effect is negligible. An eight noded isoparametric plate bending element is employed in the formulation incorporating rotary inertia and effects of transverse shear deformation based on Mindlin’s theory. To satisfy the compatibility of deformation and equilibrium of resultant forces and moments at the delamination crack front, a multipoint constraint algorithm is incorporated which leads to unsymmetric stiffness matrices. Parametric studies are performed in respect of location of delamination, fibre orientation, rotational speed and twist angle on natural frequencies of cylindrical shallow shells. Numerical results obtained for symmetric and unsymmetric laminates are the first known non-dimensional frequencies for the analyses carried out here.

  1. Orientation-Preserving Rod Elements for Real-Time Thin-Shell Simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Qu, Huamin; Sweet, Robert

    2011-06-01

    We propose a new computation model for simulating elastic thin shells at interactive rates. Existing graphical simulation methods are mostly based on dihedral angle energy functions, which need to compute the first order and second order partial derivatives with respect to current vertex positions as bending forces and stiffness matrices. The symbolic derivatives are complicated in nonisometric element deformations. To simplify computing the derivatives, instead of directly constructing the dihedral angle energy, we use the orientation change energy of mesh edges. A continuum-mechanics-based orientation-preserving rod element model is developed to provide the bending forces. The advantage of our method is simple bending force and stiffness matrix computation, since in the rod model, we apply a novel incremental construction of the deformation gradient tensor to linearize both tensile and orientation deformations. Consequently, our model is efficient, easy to implement, and supports both quadrilateral and triangle meshes. It also treats shells and plates uniformly. PMID:20548108

  2. Variable-node plate and shell elements with assumed natural strain and smoothed integration methods for nonmatching meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Dongwoo; Im, Seyoung

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, novel finite elements that include an arbitrary number of additional nodes on each edge of a quadrilateral element are proposed to achieve compatible connection of neighboring nonmatching meshes in plate and shell analyses. The elements, termed variable-node plate elements, are based on two-dimensional variable-node elements with point interpolation and on the Mindlin-Reissner plate theory. Subsequently the flat shell elements, termed variable-node shell elements, are formulated by further extending the plate elements. To eliminate a transverse shear locking phenomenon, the assumed natural strain method is used for plate and shell analyses. Since the variable-node plate and shell elements allow an arbitrary number of additional nodes and overcome locking problems, they make it possible to connect two nonmatching meshes and to provide accurate solutions in local mesh refinement. In addition, the curvature and strain smoothing methods through smoothed integration are adopted to improve the element performance. Several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the elements in terms of the accuracy and efficiency of the analyses.

  3. High resolution minor and trace element measurements for mussel shells using LA-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, N.; Paradis, G.; Martin, P. A.; Pfister, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    The successively deposited calcium carbonate layers in mollusk shells could offer high resolution archives of the environmental conditions the mollusk has experienced during its life. Previous studies have shown that the elemental composition of mollusk shells is related to environmental parameters. Understanding the high resolution environmental conditions recorded in the mollusk shells requires a reliable high resolution analytical method of the trace and minor element composition in the shells. In this study, we investigated three methods using different instrumental configurations to generate high resolution records/time series of a suite of minor/ trace elements in mussel shells (Mytilus californianus) using laser ablation sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and compared their advantages and disadvantages. The three methods include running the ablated sample with dry plasma, running the ablated sample with diluted nitric acid blank solution and running the ablated sample with spiked solution. We concluded that running the ablated material with the spiked solution could yield the most reproducible signal and accurate data for Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca, La/Ca, Ce/Ca and Nd/Ca. To better understand the features of the laser ablation analytical method, we did a series of tests, such as scanning at different speeds, different directions, and applying different sampling strategies and explored the possible complications that could be encountered in using the laser ablation analytical method. In addition, we compared the results from the micromilled samples analyzed by the solution based method to the those obtained from the laser ablation method. Our results demonstrate that applying the slow ablation speed and simultaneously introducing the spiked solution (i.e. along with the ablated sample in the He carrier gas) could yield high resolution and reproducible time series of element/Ca ratios throughout the life span of the mussel. An

  4. A 6-node co-rotational triangular elasto-plastic shell element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongxue; Xiang, Yu; Izzuddin, Bassam A.; Vu-Quoc, Loc; Zhuo, Xin; Zhang, Chuanjie

    2015-05-01

    A 6-node co-rotational triangular elasto-plastic shell element is developed. The local coordinate system of the element is defined by the vectors directing from one vertex to the other two vertices and their cross product. Based on such a co-rotational framework, the element rigid-body rotations are excluded in calculating the local nodal variables from the global nodal variables. The two smallest components of each nodal orientation vector are defined as rotational variables, resulting in the desired additive property for all nodal variables in a nonlinear incremental solution procedure. Different from other existing co-rotational finite element formulations, both the element tangent stiffness matrices in the local and in the global coordinate systems are symmetric owing to the commutativity of the nodal variables in calculating the second derivatives of the strain energy with respect to the local nodal variables and, through chain differentiation, with respect to the global nodal variables. For elasto-plastic analysis, the Maxwell-Huber-Hencky-von Mises yield criterion is employed together with the backward-Euler return-mapping method for the evaluation of the elasto-plastic stress state, where a consistent tangent modulus matrix is employed. To overcome locking problems, the assumed linear membrane strains and shear strains are obtained by using the line integration method proposed by MacNeal, and the assumed higher-order membrane strains are obtained by enforcing the stationarity of the mixed displacement-strain canonical functional, these assumed strains are then employed to replace the corresponding conforming strains. The reliability and convergence of the present 6-node triangular shell element formulation are verified through two elastic plate patch tests as well as two elastic and five elasto-plastic plate/shell problems undergoing large displacements and large rotations.

  5. Exact geometry solid-shell element based on a sampling surfaces technique for 3D stress analysis of doubly-curved composite shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, G. M.; Mamontov, A. A.; Plotnikova, S. V.; Mamontov, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid-mixed ANS four-node shell element by using the sampling surfaces (SaS) technique is developed. The SaS formulation is based on choosing inside the nth layer In not equally spaced SaS parallel to the middle surface of the shell in order to introduce the displacements of these surfaces as basic shell variables. Such choice of unknowns with the consequent use of Lagrange polynomials of degree In - 1 in the thickness direction for each layer permits the presentation of the layered shell formulation in a very compact form. The SaS are located inside each layer at Chebyshev polynomial nodes that allows one to minimize uniformly the error due to the Lagrange interpolation. To implement the efficient analytical integration throughout the element, the enhanced ANS method is employed. The proposed hybrid-mixed four-node shell element is based on the Hu-Washizu variational equation and exhibits a superior performance in the case of coarse meshes. It could be useful for the 3D stress analysis of thick and thin doubly-curved shells since the SaS formulation gives the possibility to obtain numerical solutions with a prescribed accuracy, which asymptotically approach the exact solutions of elasticity as the number of SaS tends to infinity.

  6. Finite-Element Modeling of Solid State Convection within Europa's Ice Shell: Implications for Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, A. C.; Pappalardo, R.

    2001-12-01

    Solid state convection within Europa's ice shell has important implications for astrobiology because it drives relatively swift, large scale vertical motion over geologically short time scales. On Europa, convection may occur within the lower portion of the floating ice shell. The strong dependence of the viscosity of ice on temperature leads to the formation of a stagnant lid at Europa's surface where convective motion ceases. Beneath the stagnant lid, convective motions facilitate cycling of nutrients through the ice shell. In upwelling areas, relatively nutrient-poor, but possibly microbe-containing and biochemically-modified ice is pushed toward the surface. Downwellings push near-surface ice modified by surface radiation down to the ocean. Dissipation of tidal heat within the ice shell is dependent on the viscosity of the ice: warm, low-viscosity ice will dissipate more energy than cold, brittle ice. This positive feedback between tidal heating and viscosity can result in isolated pockets of melting within Europa's ice shell [Wang & Stevenson, 2000]. These pockets of melt could potentially harbor isolated microbial communities for a finite amount of time. We are in the process of modifying a 3 dimensional finite-element code originally constructed to model Earth's mantle (Citcom) [Zhong, 1998] to apply to icy systems. This model will take into account tidal heating within the ice shell, and the presence of salts and partial melt within the ice. Results of our preliminary 2 dimensional modeling confirm that the convecting sub-layer of Europa's ice shell is recycled in 105 years, and confirm that isolated pockets of melt can be generated within Europa's ice shell by tidal heating. Our model can be used to calculate the mass of ice deposited beneath the stagnant lid as a function of position on Europa. These mass flux estimates coupled with models of the formation of surface features which involve breaching the stagnant lid will help identify the locations on

  7. Trace element fingerprinting of cockle (Cerastoderma edule) shells can reveal harvesting location in adjacent areas.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Fernando; Génio, Luciana; Costa Leal, Miguel; Albuquerque, Rui; Queiroga, Henrique; Rosa, Rui; Calado, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Determining seafood geographic origin is critical for controlling its quality and safeguarding the interest of consumers. Here, we use trace element fingerprinting (TEF) of bivalve shells to discriminate the geographic origin of specimens. Barium (Ba), manganese (Mn), magnesium (Mg), strontium (Sr) and lead (Pb) were quantified in cockle shells (Cerastoderma edule) captured with two fishing methods (by hand and by hand-raking) and from five adjacent fishing locations within an estuarine system (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal). Results suggest no differences in TEF of cockle shells captured by hand or by hand-raking, thus confirming that metal rakes do not act as a potential source of metal contamination that could somehow bias TEF results. In contrast, significant differences were recorded among locations for all trace elements analysed. A Canonical Analysis of Principal Coordinates (CAP) revealed that 92% of the samples could be successfully classified according to their fishing location using TEF. We show that TEF can be an accurate, fast and reliable method to determine the geographic origin of bivalves, even among locations separated less than 1 km apart within the same estuarine system. Nonetheless, follow up studies are needed to determine if TEF can reliably discriminate between bivalves originating from different ecosystems. PMID:26149418

  8. Calculation of K-shell fluorescence yields for low-Z elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekkab, M.; Kahoul, A.; Deghfel, B.; Aylikci, N. Küp; Aylikçi, V.

    2015-03-01

    The analytical methods based on X-ray fluorescence are advantageous for practical applications in a variety of fields including atomic physics, X-ray fluorescence surface chemical analysis and medical research and so the accurate fluorescence yields (ωK) are required for these applications. In this contribution we report a new parameters for calculation of K-shell fluorescence yields (ωK) of elements in the range of 11≤Z≤30. The experimental data are interpolated by using the famous analytical function (ωk/(1 -ωk)) 1 /q (were q=3, 3.5 and 4) vs Z to deduce the empirical K-shell fluorescence yields. A comparison is made between the results of the procedures followed here and those theoretical and other semi-empirical fluorescence yield values. Reasonable agreement was typically obtained between our result and other works.

  9. Finite element analysis of cylinder shell resonator and design of intelligent density meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    W, Sui X.; M, Fan Y.; X, Zhang G.; R, Qiu Z.

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of the mathematical model and finite element analysis of the cylinder shell resonator, a novel resonant liquid density meter is designed. The meter consists of a cylinder shell resonator fixed on both ends, a measurement circuit with automatic gain control and automatic phase control, and a signal processing system with microcomputer unit C8051F021. The density meter is insensitive to the liquid pressure, and it can intelligently compensate for the temperature. The experiment results show the meter characteristic coefficients of K0, K1, and K2 at 25 centigrade are -129.5668 kg m-3, -0.2535 × 106 kg m-3 s-1 and 0.6239 × 1010 kg m-3 s-2, respectively. The accuracy of the sensor is ±0.1% in range of 700-900 kg m-3

  10. Calculation of K-shell fluorescence yields for low-Z elements

    SciTech Connect

    Nekkab, M.; Kahoul, A.; Deghfel, B.; Aylikci, N. Küp; Aylikçi, V.

    2015-03-30

    The analytical methods based on X-ray fluorescence are advantageous for practical applications in a variety of fields including atomic physics, X-ray fluorescence surface chemical analysis and medical research and so the accurate fluorescence yields (ω{sub K}) are required for these applications. In this contribution we report a new parameters for calculation of K-shell fluorescence yields (ω{sub K}) of elements in the range of 11≤Z≤30. The experimental data are interpolated by using the famous analytical function (ω{sub k}/(1−ω{sub k})){sup 1/q} (were q=3, 3.5 and 4) vs Z to deduce the empirical K-shell fluorescence yields. A comparison is made between the results of the procedures followed here and those theoretical and other semi-empirical fluorescence yield values. Reasonable agreement was typically obtained between our result and other works.

  11. Instability analysis of torispherical pressure vessel heads with triangular thin-shell finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanodia, V. L.; Gallagher, R. H.; Mang, H. A.

    1977-01-01

    The elastic instability of an internally-pressurized cylindrical tank with a torispherical head is investigated using a triangular, doubly curved, thin-shell finite element. The formulation of the finite element, which is based upon cubic displacement functions and a modified principle of potential energy, is first described. Then, the element is verified by comparing numerical results for the linear, stable analysis to alternative solutions for the same problem. The subsequent instability investigation includes the solution of the linearized problem of equilibrium bifurcation, that is, of the classical eigenvalue problem, and a general nonlinear analysis, based on tracing the nonlinear load-displacement path. The critical pressure, obtained with use of the general nonlinear analysis, agrees closely with an experimental result as well as with a numerical solution stemming from an axisymmetric formulation.

  12. SAPNEW: Parallel finite element code for thin shell structures on the Alliant FX/80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamat, Manohar P.; Watson, Brian C.

    1992-02-01

    The results of a research activity aimed at providing a finite element capability for analyzing turbo-machinery bladed-disk assemblies in a vector/parallel processing environment are summarized. Analysis of aircraft turbofan engines is very computationally intensive. The performance limit of modern day computers with a single processing unit was estimated at 3 billions of floating point operations per second (3 gigaflops). In view of this limit of a sequential unit, performance rates higher than 3 gigaflops can be achieved only through vectorization and/or parallelization as on Alliant FX/80. Accordingly, the efforts of this critically needed research were geared towards developing and evaluating parallel finite element methods for static and vibration analysis. A special purpose code, named with the acronym SAPNEW, performs static and eigen analysis of multi-degree-of-freedom blade models built-up from flat thin shell elements.

  13. SAPNEW: Parallel finite element code for thin shell structures on the Alliant FX/80

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamat, Manohar P.; Watson, Brian C.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a research activity aimed at providing a finite element capability for analyzing turbo-machinery bladed-disk assemblies in a vector/parallel processing environment are summarized. Analysis of aircraft turbofan engines is very computationally intensive. The performance limit of modern day computers with a single processing unit was estimated at 3 billions of floating point operations per second (3 gigaflops). In view of this limit of a sequential unit, performance rates higher than 3 gigaflops can be achieved only through vectorization and/or parallelization as on Alliant FX/80. Accordingly, the efforts of this critically needed research were geared towards developing and evaluating parallel finite element methods for static and vibration analysis. A special purpose code, named with the acronym SAPNEW, performs static and eigen analysis of multi-degree-of-freedom blade models built-up from flat thin shell elements.

  14. A Variational Formulation for the Finite Element Analysis of Sound Wave Propagation in a Spherical Shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebiedzik, Catherine

    1995-01-01

    Development of design tools to furnish optimal acoustic environments for lightweight aircraft demands the ability to simulate the acoustic system on a workstation. In order to form an effective mathematical model of the phenomena at hand, we have begun by studying the propagation of acoustic waves inside closed spherical shells. Using a fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction model based upon variational principles, we have written a finite element analysis program and are in the process of examining several test cases. Future investigations are planned to increase model accuracy by incorporating non-linear and viscous effects.

  15. Matrix elements of scalar three-electron operators for the atomic f shell

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.E.; Judd, B.R.; Crosswhite H.

    1996-01-01

    Tables are provided for the matrix elements of an orthogonal set of Hermitian three-electron operators t{sub i} for the states of the f shell. The t{sub i} are scalar with respect to the total spin S and total orbital angular momentum L, and they are among the effective operators needed to be included in an f-electron Hamiltonian in order to represent the coupling of the ground configuration f{sup N} to excited configurations via the interelectronic Coulomb interaction. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Laser ablation ICP-MS profiling and semiquantitative determination of trace element concentrations in desert tortoise shells: Documenting the uptake of elemental toxicants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seltzer, M.D.; Berry, K.H.

    2005-01-01

    The outer keratin layer (scute) of desert tortoise shells consists of incrementally grown laminae in which various bioaccumulated trace elements are sequestered during scute deposition. Laser ablation ICP-MS examination of laminae in scutes of dead tortoises revealed patterns of trace elemental distribution from which the chronology of elemental uptake can be inferred. These patterns may be of pathologic significance in the case of elemental toxicants such as arsenic, which has been linked to both shell and respiratory diseases. Laser ablation transects, performed along the lateral surfaces of sectioned scutes, offered the most successful means of avoiding exogenous contamination that was present on the scute exterior. Semiquantitative determination of elemental concentrations was achieved using sulfur, a keratin matrix element, as an internal standard. The results presented here highlight the potential of laser ablation ICP-MS as a diagnostic tool for investigating toxic element uptake as it pertains to tortoise morbidity and mortality.

  17. Laser ablation ICP-MS profiling and semiquantitative determination of trace element concentrations in desert tortoise shells: documenting the uptake of elemental toxicants.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Michaeld; Berry, Kristinh

    2005-03-01

    The outer keratin layer (scute) of desert tortoise shells consists of incrementally grown laminae in which various bioaccumulated trace elements are sequestered during scute deposition. Laser ablation ICP-MS examination of laminae in scutes of dead tortoises revealed patterns of trace elemental distribution from which the chronology of elemental uptake can be inferred. These patterns may be of pathologic significance in the case of elemental toxicants such as arsenic, which has been linked to both shell and respiratory diseases. Laser ablation transects, performed along the lateral surfaces of sectioned scutes, offered the most successful means of avoiding exogenous contamination that was present on the scute exterior. Semiquantitative determination of elemental concentrations was achieved using sulfur, a keratin matrix element, as an internal standard. The results presented here highlight the potential of laser ablation ICP-MS as a diagnostic tool for investigating toxic element uptake as it pertains to tortoise morbidity and mortality. PMID:15740773

  18. On-shell Delta I= 3/2 kaon weak matrix elements with nonzero total momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, T.

    2009-05-20

    We present our results for the on-shell {Delta}I = 3/2 kaon decay matrix elements using domain wall fermions and the DBW2 gauge action at one coarse lattice spacing corresponding to a{sup -1} = 1.31 GeV in the quenched approximation. The on-shell matrix elements are evaluated in two different frames: the center-of-mass frame and nonzero total-momentum frame. We employ the formula proposed by Lellouch and Luescher in the center-of-mass frame, and its extension for a nonzero total-momentum frame to extract the infinite volume, on-shell, center-of-mass frame decay amplitudes. We determine the decay amplitude at the physical pion mass and momentum from the chiral extrapolation and an interpolation of the relative momentum using the results calculated in the two frames. We have obtained ReA{sub 2} = 1.66(23)(+48/-03)(+53/-0) x 10{sup -8} GeV and ImA{sub 2} = -1.181(26)(+141/-014)(+44/-0) x 10{sup -12} GeV at the physical point, using the data at the relatively large pion mass, m{sub {pi}} > 0.35 GeV. The first error is statistic, and the second and third are systematic. The second error is estimated with several fits of the chiral extrapolation including the (quenched) chiral perturbation formula at next to leading order using only lighter pion masses. The third one is estimated with an analysis using the lattice dispersion relation. The result of ReA{sub 2} is reasonably consistent with experiment.

  19. A piezolaminated composite degenerated shell finite element for active control of structures with distributed piezosensors and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balamurugan, V.; Narayanan, S.

    2008-06-01

    This paper deals with the formulation of a nine-noded piezolaminated degenerated shell finite element for modeling and analysis of multilayer composite general shell structures with bonded/embedded distributed piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The distributed PZT sensors and actuators used in the composite smart structures are relatively thin and could have arbitrary variation of curvatures and thicknesses. They cannot be modeled with shell elements based on curvilinear shell theories which would need the specification of constant shell curvatures and thicknesses. Modeling them with piezo finite elements available in popular commercial codes like ABAQUS, ANSYS, MARC, etc, would need relatively greater computational effort as they are based on solid element formulation. In view of these, the present proposed degenerated piezoelectric shell element would be a better choice giving good computational accuracy and efficiency. The main advantage of a degenerate shell element is that it is not based on any shell theories and is applicable over a wide range of curvatures and thicknesses. This element is developed by using the degenerate solid approach based on Reissner-Mindlin assumptions which allow the shear deformation and rotary inertia effect to be considered and the 3D field is reduced to a 2D field in terms of mid-surface nodal variables. Uniformly reduced integration is carried out to overcome membrane locking and shear locking and the numerical integration is carried out in all three directions to obtain accurate results. The present element has 45 elastic degrees of freedom and 10 electric degrees of freedom per piezoelectric layer in the element. The potential induced due to bending deformation is more accurately represented by assuming quadratic variation of the electric potential through the thickness of each piezoelectric layer. This is achieved by interpolating using nodal mid-plane electric potentials and one electric degree of freedom representing the

  20. A corotational flat triangular element for large strain analysis of thin shells with application to soft biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselli, Federica; Bisegna, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    A flat triangular element for the nonlinear analysis of thin shells is presented. The formulation relies on (i) a polar decomposition based corotational framework and (ii) a core-element kinematic description adopting the multiplicative superposition of membrane and bending actions. The resulting element is a refined yet simple three-node displacement-based triangle accounting for thickness extensibility and initial shell curvature, and equipped with a fully consistent tangent stiffness. Numerical tests involving shell structures made of rubber-like materials or fibred biological tissues show the effectiveness of the proposed element and its suitability to problems characterized by large displacements, large rotations, large membrane strains and bending. A Matlab toolkit implementing the present formulation is provided as supplementary material.

  1. Finite element modeling of conducting shells for eddy current NDE problems using ``impedance-type`` interface conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Badics, Z.; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Kojima, Sota; Usui, Yoshihiko; Aoki, Kazuhiko; Nakayasu, Fumio

    1997-03-01

    A 3D finite element scheme is developed to calculate eddy current probe responses (impedance or induced emf changes of coils) due to conducting shells in eddy current NDE (nondestructive evaluation) problems. These problems are related to the eddy current inspection of copper and magnetite deposit zones of steam generator tubing in PWR atomic power plants. The finite element scheme uses impedance interface conditions to model the deposit shells and calculates the probe responses by performing integrals over the shell surfaces, thereby ensuring high accuracy even if the probe signal is very small. Two benchmark arrangements are investigated. One, which has an analytical solution, is a conducting thin plate with an impedance probe. The other is a stainless steel tube with a copper shell attached to its outer surface and scanned by a transmitter-receiver probe. In both problems, the calculated probe responses show good agreement with the analytical and experimental data.

  2. Quantitative analyse of trace elements with HR-ICP-MS Element2 : an example of application in calcite shell of the Great Scallop Pecten Maximus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, M.; Chauvaud, L.; Benoit, M.; Thebault, J.; L'Helguen, S.; Hemond, C.; Maguer, J.; Sinquin, G.

    2008-12-01

    Carbonate minerals are abundant on the Earth's surface, and they are produced by a number of processes, including precipitation from hydrothermal fluids or synthesis by organisms like coral, foraminifera, molluscs, or bacteria. Consequently, they are found in a large variety of environments. Their isotopic compositions (Sr, C, or O ) and trace element concentrations are widely used to understand or reconstruct biological, geological or biogeochimical processes. A large scientific community define the elemental composition of bivalve shells a promising tool as a recorder of environmental parameters like sea surface temperature, salinity and primary productivity. But we have compile evidences that trace elements variation within shells can be species dependant or change in a complex network of environmental interactions. In this context, a better understanding of the incorporation of elements from seawater into biogenic carbonate is necessary to generalize the use of these proxies. Daily shell growth in the calcitic bivalve Pecten maximus has been extensively measured and these daily growth marks can be used to date each subsequent sample of calcium carbonate. In this study, micro- sampling of carbonate powder along the shell was carried out with a high-resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS, Finnigan Element2). This method led to a quantitative detection of trace element in biocaronates and to the accurate reconstruction of ontogenetic profiles of elemental ratios with a 3-day temporal resolution. Repeated analyses of different growth layers sections on the same valve showed that the trace elements are homogeneously distributed along the shell. Mo concentration was reproducible for several scallop individuals from a same location over different years and from different coastal temperate environments. Each profile was characterised by a background level punctuated by sharp episodic peaks occurring in spring (may). Some hypotheses will be

  3. New Method for Determining the Elemental Composition and Distribution in Semiconductor Core-Shell Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Zorn, Gilad; Dave, Shivang R.; Gao, Xiaohu; Castner, David G.

    2011-01-01

    In the biological sciences the use of core-shell quantum dots (QDs) has gained wide usage, but analytical challenges still exist for characterizing the QD structure. The application of energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to bulk materials is relatively straightforward, however, for meaningful applications of surface science techniques to multilayer nanoparticles requires novel modifications and analysis methods. To experimentally characterize the elemental composition and distribution in CdSe/CdS/ZnS QDs, we first develop a XPS signal subtraction technique capable of separating the overlapped selenium 3s (core) and sulfur 2s (shell) peaks (both peaks have binding energies near 230eV) with higher precision than is typically reported in the nanoparticle literature. This method is valid for any nanoparticle containing selenium and sulfur. Then we apply a correction formula to the XPS data and determine that the 2 nm stoichiometric CdSe core is surrounded by 2 CdS layers and a stoichimetric ZnS monolayer. These findings and the multi-approach methodology represent a significant advancement in the detailed surface science study of multi-layer nanoparticles. In agreement with recent surprising findings, the time-of-flight secondary mass spectrometry measurements suggest that the surface sites of the QDs used in this study are primarily covered with a mixture of octadecylphosphonic acid and trioctylphophine oxide. PMID:21226467

  4. SAPNEW: Parallel finite element code for thin shell structures on the Alliant FX-80

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamat, Manohar P.; Watson, Brian C.

    1992-01-01

    The finite element method has proven to be an invaluable tool for analysis and design of complex, high performance systems, such as bladed-disk assemblies in aircraft turbofan engines. However, as the problem size increase, the computation time required by conventional computers can be prohibitively high. Parallel processing computers provide the means to overcome these computation time limits. This report summarizes the results of a research activity aimed at providing a finite element capability for analyzing turbomachinery bladed-disk assemblies in a vector/parallel processing environment. A special purpose code, named with the acronym SAPNEW, has been developed to perform static and eigen analysis of multi-degree-of-freedom blade models built-up from flat thin shell elements. SAPNEW provides a stand alone capability for static and eigen analysis on the Alliant FX/80, a parallel processing computer. A preprocessor, named with the acronym NTOS, has been developed to accept NASTRAN input decks and convert them to the SAPNEW format to make SAPNEW more readily used by researchers at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  5. Simplified welding distortion analysis for fillet welding using composite shell elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mingyu; Kang, Minseok; Chung, Hyun

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the simplified welding distortion analysis method to predict the welding deformation of both plate and stiffener in fillet welds. Currently, the methods based on equivalent thermal strain like Strain as Direct Boundary (SDB) has been widely used due to effective prediction of welding deformation. Regarding the fillet welding, however, those methods cannot represent deformation of both members at once since the temperature degree of freedom is shared at the intersection nodes in both members. In this paper, we propose new approach to simulate deformation of both members. The method can simulate fillet weld deformations by employing composite shell element and using different thermal expansion coefficients according to thickness direction with fixed temperature at intersection nodes. For verification purpose, we compare of result from experiments, 3D thermo elastic plastic analysis, SDB method and proposed method. Compared of experiments results, the proposed method can effectively predict welding deformation for fillet welds.

  6. Simplified welding distortion analysis for fillet welding using composite shell elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mingyu; Kang, Minseok; Chung, Hyun

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the simplified welding distortion analysis method to predict the welding deformation of both plate and stiffener in fillet welds. Currently, the methods based on equivalent thermal strain like Strain as Direct Boundary (SDB) has been widely used due to effective prediction of welding deformation. Regarding the fillet welding, however, those methods cannot represent deformation of both members at once since the temperature degree of freedom is shared at the intersection nodes in both members. In this paper, we propose new approach to simulate deformation of both members. The method can simulate fillet weld deformations by employing composite shell element and using different thermal expansion coefficients according to thickness direction with fixed temperature at intersection nodes. For verification purpose, we compare of result from experiments, 3D thermo elastic plastic analysis, SDB method and proposed method. Compared of experiments results, the proposed method can effectively predict welding deformation for fillet welds.

  7. Sensitivity Analysis of Stability Problems of Steel Structures using Shell Finite Elements and Nonlinear Computation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kala, Zdeněk; Kala, Jiří

    2011-09-01

    The main focus of the paper is the analysis of the influence of residual stress on the ultimate limit state of a hot-rolled member in compression. The member was modelled using thin-walled elements of type SHELL 181 and meshed in the programme ANSYS. Geometrical and material non-linear analysis was used. The influence of residual stress was studied using variance-based sensitivity analysis. In order to obtain more general results, the non-dimensional slenderness was selected as a study parameter. Comparison of the influence of the residual stress with the influence of other dominant imperfections is illustrated in the conclusion of the paper. All input random variables were considered according to results of experimental research.

  8. Finite-element modeling of an acoustic cloak for three-dimensional flexible shells with structural excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, M.; Akl, W.; Elnady, T.; Elsabbagh, A.

    2011-06-01

    A finite-element model for three-dimensional acoustic cloaks in both cylindrical and spherical coordinates is presented. The model is developed through time-harmonic analysis to study pressure and velocity field distributions as well as the cloak's performance. The model developed accounts for the fluid-structure interaction of thin fluid-loaded shells. A plane strain model is used for the thin shell. Mechanical harmonic excitation is applied to the fluid-loaded shell to investigate the effect of mechanical oscillation of the shell on the performance of the acoustic cloak. In developing this model, a deeper insight into the acoustic cloak phenomena presented by Cummer and Shurig in 2007 is presented. Different nonlinear coordinate transformations are presented to study their effect on the acoustic cloak performance.

  9. Plasma-assisted synthesis and high-resolution characterization of anisotropic elemental and bimetallic core–shell magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lotnyk, A

    2014-01-01

    Summary Magnetically anisotropic as well as magnetic core–shell nanoparticles (CS-NPs) with controllable properties are highly desirable in a broad range of applications. With this background, a setup for the synthesis of heterostructured magnetic core–shell nanoparticles, which relies on (optionally pulsed) DC plasma gas condensation has been developed. We demonstrate the synthesis of elemental nickel nanoparticles with highly tunable sizes and shapes and Ni@Cu CS-NPs with an average shell thickness of 10 nm as determined with scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements. An analytical model that relies on classical kinetic gas theory is used to describe the deposition of Cu shell atoms on top of existing Ni cores. Its predictive power and possible implications for the growth of heterostructured NP in gas condensation processes are discussed. PMID:24778973

  10. Effects of sample storage and shell orientation on LA-ICPMS trace element measurements on deep-sea mussels

    PubMed Central

    Génio, Luciana; Simon, Klaus; Kiel, Steffen; Cunha, Marina R.

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical markers are being increasingly applied to fundamental questions in population and community ecology in marine habitats because they allow inferences on individuals dispersal, but vital effects, small sample size and instrumental limitation are still challenging particularly in deep-sea studies. Here we use shells of the deep-sea bivalve Idas modiolaeformis to assess potential effects of sample storage, mineralogy, and valve orientation on LA-ICPMS measurements. Trace element concentrations of 24Mg, 43Ca, 88Sr, 137Ba, 208Pb, and 238U are not affected by the two most commonly used storage methods of biologic deep-sea samples (frozen at –20°C and fixed in 95% ethanol); thus combined analysis of differently preserved specimens is possible when the number of individuals is insufficient and distinct sample fixation is needed for multiple purposes. Valve orientation had a strong impact on quantification of trace elements in the calcitic but not in the aragonitic layer of adult shells. Hence, to enable comparisons between adult shells and entirely aragonitic embryonic shells, a reference map of site-specific signatures can potentially be generated using the aragonitic layer of the adult shells. Understanding ontogenetic changes and environmental effects in trace element incorporation is critical before geochemical fingerprinting can be used as a tool for larval dispersal studies in the deep-sea. PMID:26643064

  11. High-resolution elemental records of Glycymeris glycymeris (Bivalvia) shells from the Iberian upwelling system: Ontogeny and environmental control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Pedro; Richardson, Christopher; Chenery, Simon; Butler, Paul; Reynolds, David; Gaspar, Miguel; Scourse, James

    2015-04-01

    The great potential of bivalve shells as a high-resolution geochemical proxy archive of environmental conditions at the time of growth has been known for several decades. The elemental composition of bivalve shells has been studied with the purpose of reconstructing environmental conditions: e.g. seawater temperature (Sr and Mg), primary productivity (Li, Mn, Mo and Ba), redox conditions (Mn and Mo), terrigenous inputs (Li) and pollution (Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb). However, the interpretation of such records remains extremely challenging and complex, with processes affecting element incorporation in the shell (e.g. crystal fabrics, organic matrix, shell formation mechanisms and physiological processes) and the influence of more than one environmental parameter affecting elemental composition of bivalve shells. Nevertheless, bivalve shells remain an underused source of information on environmental conditions, with the potential to record high-resolution (sub-weekly to annually), multi-centennial time series of geochemical proxy data. The relatively long-lived bivalve (>100 years) Glycymeris glycymeris occurs in coastal shelf seas of Europe and North West Africa and is a valid annually resolved sclerochronological archive for palaeonvironmental reconstructions. The temporal framework provided by absolute annually dated shell material makes Glycymeris glycymeris a valuable, albeit unexplored, resource for investigating sub-annually resolved geochemical proxies. We present a first evaluation on the potential of Ba, P and U, the latter two elements rarely studied in bivalves, in Glycymeris glycymeris shells to record variations in the environmental conditions, respectively primary productivity, dissolved inorganic phosphorus and carbonate ion concentration/pH. High-resolution (31 to 77 samples per year) profiles of elemental/Ca ratios (E/Ca) over four years of growth (2001 to 2004) were obtained by LA-ICP-MS on two shells (13 and 16 years old) live-collected in 2010 at 30 m

  12. Distributions of 15 elements on 58 absorbers from simulated Hanford Double-Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF)

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1994-11-01

    As part of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated 58 commercially available or experimental absorber materials for their ability to remove hazardous components from high-level waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, pillared layered materials, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. We tested these absorbers with a solution that simulates Hanford double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) (pH 14.0). To this simulant solution we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y), actinides (U and Am), and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, V, Zn, and Zr). For each of 870 element/absorber combinations, we measured distribution coefficients for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. On the basis of these 2610 measured distribution coefficients, we determined that many of the tested absorbers may be suitable for processing DSSF solutions.

  13. Determination of K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios in the elements between Tm( Z = 69) and Os( Z = 76) by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, N.; Tıraşoğlu, E.; Apaydın, G.

    2008-04-01

    The K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios have been measured in the elements between Tm ( Z = 69) and Os( Z = 76) without having any mass attenuation coefficient at the upper and lower energy branch of the K absorption edge. The jump factors and jump ratios for these elements have been determined by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters such as the total atomic absorption cross-sections, the K α X-ray production cross-sections, the intensity ratio of the K β and K α X-rays and the K shell fluorescence yields. We have performed the measurements for the calculations of these values in attenuation and direct excitation experimental geometry. The K X-ray photons are excited in the target using 123.6 keV gamma-rays from a strong 57Co source, and detected with an Ultra-LEGe solid state detector with a resolution 0.15 keV at 5.9 keV. The measured values have been compared with theoretical and others' experimental values. The results have been plotted versus atomic number.

  14. A computerized symbolic integration technique for development of triangular and quadrilateral composite shallow-shell finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, C. M.; Noor, A. K.

    1975-01-01

    Computerized symbolic integration was used in conjunction with group-theoretic techniques to obtain analytic expressions for the stiffness, geometric stiffness, consistent mass, and consistent load matrices of composite shallow shell structural elements. The elements are shear flexible and have variable curvature. A stiffness (displacement) formulation was used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of both the displacement and rotation components of the reference surface of the shell. The triangular elements have six and ten nodes; the quadrilateral elements have four and eight nodes and can have internal degrees of freedom associated with displacement modes which vanish along the edges of the element (bubble modes). The stiffness, geometric stiffness, consistent mass, and consistent load coefficients are expressed as linear combinations of integrals (over the element domain) whose integrands are products of shape functions and their derivatives. The evaluation of the elemental matrices is divided into two separate problems - determination of the coefficients in the linear combination and evaluation of the integrals. The integrals are performed symbolically by using the symbolic-and-algebraic-manipulation language MACSYMA. The efficiency of using symbolic integration in the element development is demonstrated by comparing the number of floating-point arithmetic operations required in this approach with those required by a commonly used numerical quadrature technique.

  15. r-adaptive methods based on element-level error indicators for parallel analysis of plates and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Militello, Carmelo; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1992-01-01

    The formulation and application of element-level error indicators based on parametrized variational principles are investigated. These indicators are ideally suited to drive adaptive mesh refinment on parallel computers where access to neighboring elements resident on different processors may incur significant computational overhead. Furthermore, such estimators are not affected by physical jumps at wavefronts or interfaces. An estimator derived from the higher-order element energy is applied to r adaptation of meshes in plates and shell structures where the exact solution is known.

  16. A geometrically nonlinear shell element for hygrothermorheologically simple linear viscoelastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    HAMMERAND,DANIEL C.; KAPANIA,RAKESH K.

    2000-05-01

    A triangular flat shell element for large deformation analysis of linear viscoelastic laminated composites is presented. Hygrothermorheologically simple materials are considered for which a change in the hygrothermal environment results in a horizontal shifting of the relaxation moduli curves on a log time scale, in addition to the usual hygrothermal loads. Recurrence relations are developed and implemented for the evaluation of the viscoelastic memory loads. The nonlinear deformation process is computed using an incremental/iterative approach with the Newton-Raphson Method used to find the incremental displacements in each step. The presented numerical examples consider the large deformation and stability of linear viscoelastic structures under deformation-independent mechanical loads, deformation-dependent pressure loads, and thermal loads. Unlike elastic structures that have a single critical load value associated with a given snapping of buckling instability phenomenon, viscoelastic structures will usually exhibit a particular instability for a range of applied loads over a range of critical times. Both creep buckling and snap-through examples are presented here. In some cases, viscoelastic results are also obtained using the quasielastic method in which load-history effects are ignored, and time-varying viscoelastic properties are simply used in a series of elastic problems. The presented numerical examples demonstrate the capability and accuracy of the formulation.

  17. The photosphere-corona Interface: enrichement of the corona in low FIP elements and helium shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, C.; Koutchmy, S.; Lamy, P.; Veselovski, I.

    2014-12-01

    Slitless consecutive spectra were obtained during the contacts of the last total solar eclipses (2008, 2009, 2010, 2012, et 2013). They allowed to show that the overabundance of low First Ionisation Potential (FIP) elements (Fe II, Ti II, Ba II) in the corona comes from the low layers of the solar atmosphere, just near and above the temperature minimum region of the high photosphere. All spectra are recorded with a fast CCD/CMOS camera, with an equivalent radial resolution of 60 milliarcseconds, or 45 km in the solar atmosphere, above a solar edge not affected by the parasitic light like it is outside of total eclipse conditions. Many emission lines of low FIP elements appear in regions situated between 200 to 600 km above the solar limb defined by the true continuum measured between the lines. This continuum appears at these altitudes where the beta of the plasma is near 1. The He I 4713 Å and He II 4686 Å (Paschen alpha line) shells appear at the height of 800 km above the solar edge and higher. The light curve I = f(h) of each ion is located at a particuliar altitude in the solar atmosphere. The scale height corresponds to a density variation, which allows to evaluate the temperature thanks to the hydrostatic equilibrium assumption. Moreover, with ionised Titanium lines taken as markers, we show a similarity between the photosphere-corona interface and the prominence-corona interface. We discuss the role of the magnetic field and the ambipolar diffusion for supplying the corona in mass, without taking into account the role of spicules. The photo-ionisation of the helium lines by the EUV coronal lines is illustrated thanks to an extract of SDO/AIA coronal stacked image simultaneously obtained.

  18. On the numerical performance of three-dimensional thick shell elements using a hybrid/mixed formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, W.; Chang, T. Y.; Saleeb, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    Three-dimensional thick shell elements with 8, 16, and 18 nodes are formulated by using the hybrid/mixed method. In bending applications, these elements are free from locking effect and give improved stress predictions. Finite element equations are derived from the Hellinger-Reissner variational principle in which both the displacement and stress fields are approximated by independent interpolation functions. For the assumption of stress parameters, three guidelines are followed: (1) suppression of kinematic deformation modes, (2) invariant element property, and (3) the constraint index exhibited by the element, when applied to constrained-media problems, must be greater than or equal to one. Numerical results are presented to show the element's behavior characteristics regarding sensitivity to locking, distortion effect (patch tests), mesh convergence and the accuracy of stress evaluation.

  19. Intrinsic electrostatic resonances of heterostructures with negative permittivity from finite-element calculations: Application to core-shell inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejdoubi, Abdelilah; Brosseau, Christian

    2007-11-01

    Herein, we report finite-element calculations of the effective (relative) permittivity of composite materials consisting of inclusions and inclusion arrays with a core-shell structure embedded in a surrounding host. The material making up the core of the two-dimensional structures, or cross sections of infinite three-dimensional objects (parallel, infinitely long, and identical cylinders) where the properties and characteristics are invariant along the perpendicular cross sectional plane, is assumed to have a negative real part of the permittivity, while the coating material (annular shell) is considered to be lossless. While strictly valid only in a dc situation, our analysis can be extended to treat electric fields that oscillate with time, provided that the wavelengths and attenuation lengths associated with the fields are much larger than the microstructure dimension in order that the homogeneous (effective-medium) representation of the composite structure makes sense. While one may identify features of the electrostatic resonance (ER) which are common to core-shell structures characterized by permittivities with real parts of opposite signs, it appears that the predicted ER positions are sensitive to the shell thickness and can be tuned through varying this geometric parameter. For example, we observe that the ER is broadened and shifted as the loss and the shell thickness are increased, respectively. We also argue that such core shell may also be valuable in controlling ER characteristics via polarization in an external electric field. In addition, by considering calculations of the electric field distribution, we find that the ER results in very strong and local-field enhancements into small parts of the shell perimeter. Our findings open up possibilities for the development of hybrid structures that could exploit the ER features for a particular application.

  20. Lichens as biomonitors of uranium and other trace elements in an area of Kosovo heavily shelled with depleted uranium rounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lella, Luigi A.; Frati, Luisa; Loppi, Stefano; Protano, Giuseppe; Riccobono, Francesco

    This paper reports the results of a study using lichens as biomonitors to investigate the small-scale environmental distribution of uranium and other trace elements in an area of Kosovo (Djakovica) heavily shelled with depleted uranium (DU) anti-tank ammunition. The results of total uranium concentrations showed great variability and species-specific differences, mainly due to differences in the exposed surface area of the lichens. The uranium concentrations in lichen samples were rather similar at a site heavily shelled with DU ammunition and at a control site. Unexpectedly, the highest uranium concentrations were found at the control site. The observed U distribution can be explained by contamination of lichen thalli by soil particles. The soil geochemistry was similar at the two sampling sites. The 235U/ 238U ratios in the soil samples suggested a modest DU contribution only at the heavily shelled site. Measurements of U isotopes in lichens did not reveal DU pollution at the control site. The U isotopic ratios in lichens at the shelled site showed variable figures; only two samples were clearly contaminated by DU. There were no signs of contamination by other trace elements.

  1. Free vibration analysis of laminated plate/shell structures based on FSDT with a stabilized nodal-integrated quadrilateral element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen-Van, H.; Mai-Duy, N.; Tran-Cong, T.

    2008-06-01

    This paper reports numerical analyses of free vibration of laminated composite plate/shell structures of various shapes, span-to-thickness ratios, boundary conditions and lay-up sequences. The method is based on a novel four-node quadrilateral element, namely MISQ20, within the framework of the first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT). The element is built by incorporating a strain smoothing method into the bilinear four-node quadrilateral finite element where the strain smoothing operation is based on mesh-free conforming nodal integration. The bending and membrane stiffness matrices are based on the boundaries of smoothing cells while the shear term is evaluated by 2×2 Gauss quadrature. Through several numerical examples, the capability, efficiency and simplicity of the element are demonstrated. Convergence studies and comparison with other existing solutions in the literature suggest that the present element is robust, computationally inexpensive and free of locking.

  2. Seasonality Records From Stable Isotopes and Trace Elements in Mussel and Limpet Shells From Archaeological Sites on Gibraltar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa, D.; Ferguson, J. E.; Atkinson, T. C.; Barton, R. N.; Ditchfield, P.; Finlayson, G.; Finlayson, J. C.; Henderson, G. M.

    2007-12-01

    Seasonal resolution climate records from mid and high latitudes would allow investigation of the role of seasonality in controlling mean climate on diverse timescales, and of the evolution of climate systems such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). But achieving such seasonal resolution is difficult for regions outside the growth range of surface corals. Marine mollusc shells provide a possible archive and contain growth increments varying in scale from tidal to annual. However, finding and dating sequences of marine mollusc shells spanning long periods of time is difficult due to sea-level change and the destructional nature of most coastal environments. In this study, we have made use of the habit of hominins on Gibraltar to collect molluscs for food over at least the last 120 kyr. In archaeological excavations of two caves (Gorham's and Vanguard Caves), mollusc shells were found, in habitation levels and in sediment blown into the caves. Existing 14C, OSL, and U-series chronologies provide a chronological framework for this suite of samples. The species found are predominantly Mytilus (mussels) or Patella (limpets). Gibraltar is an interesting location for paleoclimate reconstruction due to its proximity to the boundary of modern day climate belts but also due to its anthropological and archaeological importance. To gain a quantitative understanding of the local controls on stable isotopes and trace elements within Gibraltarian shells, we have initiated a water-sampling programme; emplaced a temperature and salinity logger near the sampling site; and marked live Patella and Mytilus with fluorescent dye to firmly establish growth rates and controls on chemical composition. We have also conducted stable-isotope and trace-element analysis of modern and fossil Patella and Mytilus shells by micromilling. Recent Patella and Mytilus shells show that the oxygen isotope composition of modern shells allow the accurate reconstruction of the full seasonal range in sea

  3. Elemental Fingerprinting of Mussel Shells to Predict Population Sources and Redistribution Potential in the Gulf of Maine

    PubMed Central

    Sorte, Cascade J. B.; Etter, Ron J.; Spackman, Robert; Boyle, Elizabeth E.; Hannigan, Robyn E.

    2013-01-01

    As the climate warms, species that cannot tolerate changing conditions will only persist if they undergo range shifts. Redistribution ability may be particularly variable for benthic marine species that disperse as pelagic larvae in ocean currents. The blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, has recently experienced a warming-related range contraction in the southeastern USA and may face limitations to northward range shifts within the Gulf of Maine where dominant coastal currents flow southward. Thus, blue mussels might be especially vulnerable to warming, and understanding dispersal patterns is crucial given the species' relatively long planktonic larval period (>1 month). To determine whether trace elemental “fingerprints” incorporated in mussel shells could be used to identify population sources (i.e. collection locations), we assessed the geographic variation in shell chemistry of blue mussels collected from seven populations between Cape Cod, Massachusetts and northern Maine. Across this ∼500 km of coastline, we were able to successfully predict population sources for over two-thirds of juvenile individuals, with almost 80% of juveniles classified within one site of their collection location and 97% correctly classified to region. These results indicate that significant differences in elemental signatures of mussel shells exist between open-coast sites separated by ∼50 km throughout the Gulf of Maine. Our findings suggest that elemental “fingerprinting” is a promising approach for predicting redistribution potential of the blue mussel, an ecologically and economically important species in the region. PMID:24244724

  4. Roles of Shell Effects in Fusion Process for Synthesis of Superheavy Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Aritomo, Y.

    2007-05-22

    The effects of shell correction energy for fusion process are investigated on the basis of the fluctuation-dissipation dynamics. In the superheavy mass region, shell correction energy plays a very important role and enhances the fusion probability when the colliding partner has a strong shell structure. By analyzing the trajectory in three-dimensional coordinate space with the Langevin equation, we reveal the mechanism of the enhancement of the fusion probability caused by 'cold fusion valleys' and the temporary pocket which appears in fusion process.

  5. Optimization of heat transfer in cooled shell elements of gas-turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, N. G.; Grinkrug, M. S.

    1985-08-01

    A theoretical solution is presented for the problem of finding an optimum distribution of the coefficients of heat transfer from the coolant in the shell structures of gas-turbine engines. The approach proposed here provides a way to efficiently use the mechanical properties of materials, to optimize coolant distribution over the shell surface, and, ultimately to improve the economy and performance of gas-turbine engines.

  6. Improved assumed-stress hybrid shell element with drilling degrees of freedom for linear stress, buckling, and free vibration analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, Govind; Aminpour, Mohammad A.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    An improved four-node quadrilateral assumed-stress hybrid shell element with drilling degrees of freedom is presented. The formulation is based on Hellinger-Reissner variational principle and the shape functions are formulated directly for the four-node element. The element has 12 membrane degrees of freedom and 12 bending degrees of freedom. It has nine independent stress parameters to describe the membrane stress resultant field and 13 independent stress parameters to describe the moment and transverse shear stress resultant field. The formulation encompasses linear stress, linear buckling, and linear free vibration problems. The element is validated with standard tests cases and is shown to be robust. Numerical results are presented for linear stress, buckling, and free vibration analyses.

  7. The Shell of the Invasive Bivalve Species Dreissena polymorpha: Biochemical, Elemental and Textural Investigations.

    PubMed

    Immel, Françoise; Broussard, Cédric; Catherinet, Bastien; Plasseraud, Laurent; Alcaraz, Gérard; Bundeleva, Irina; Marin, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha is a well-established invasive model organism. Although extensively used in environmental sciences, virtually nothing is known of the molecular process of its shell calcification. By describing the microstructure, geochemistry and biochemistry/proteomics of the shell, the present study aims at promoting this species as a model organism in biomineralization studies, in order to establish a bridge with ecotoxicology, while sketching evolutionary conclusions. The shell of D. polymorpha exhibits the classical crossed-lamellar/complex crossed lamellar combination found in several heterodont bivalves, in addition to an external thin layer, the characteristics of which differ from what was described in earlier publication. We show that the shell selectively concentrates some heavy metals, in particular uranium, which predisposes D. polymorpha to local bioremediation of this pollutant. We establish the biochemical signature of the shell matrix, demonstrating that it interacts with the in vitro precipitation of calcium carbonate and inhibits calcium carbonate crystal formation, but these two properties are not strongly expressed. This matrix, although overall weakly glycosylated, contains a set of putatively calcium-binding proteins and a set of acidic sulphated proteins. 2D-gels reveal more than fifty proteins, twenty of which we identify by MS-MS analysis. We tentatively link the shell protein profile of D. polymorpha and the peculiar recent evolution of this invasive species of Ponto-Caspian origin, which has spread all across Europe in the last three centuries. PMID:27213644

  8. The Shell of the Invasive Bivalve Species Dreissena polymorpha: Biochemical, Elemental and Textural Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Cédric; Catherinet, Bastien; Plasseraud, Laurent; Alcaraz, Gérard; Bundeleva, Irina; Marin, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha is a well-established invasive model organism. Although extensively used in environmental sciences, virtually nothing is known of the molecular process of its shell calcification. By describing the microstructure, geochemistry and biochemistry/proteomics of the shell, the present study aims at promoting this species as a model organism in biomineralization studies, in order to establish a bridge with ecotoxicology, while sketching evolutionary conclusions. The shell of D. polymorpha exhibits the classical crossed-lamellar/complex crossed lamellar combination found in several heterodont bivalves, in addition to an external thin layer, the characteristics of which differ from what was described in earlier publication. We show that the shell selectively concentrates some heavy metals, in particular uranium, which predisposes D. polymorpha to local bioremediation of this pollutant. We establish the biochemical signature of the shell matrix, demonstrating that it interacts with the in vitro precipitation of calcium carbonate and inhibits calcium carbonate crystal formation, but these two properties are not strongly expressed. This matrix, although overall weakly glycosylated, contains a set of putatively calcium-binding proteins and a set of acidic sulphated proteins. 2D-gels reveal more than fifty proteins, twenty of which we identify by MS-MS analysis. We tentatively link the shell protein profile of D. polymorpha and the peculiar recent evolution of this invasive species of Ponto-Caspian origin, which has spread all across Europe in the last three centuries. PMID:27213644

  9. Analysis of Composite Skin-Stiffener Debond Specimens Using Volume Elements and a Shell/3D Modeling Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Minguet, Pierre J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The debonding of a skin/stringer specimen subjected to tension was studied using three-dimensional volume element modeling and computational fracture mechanics. Mixed mode strain energy release rates were calculated from finite element results using the virtual crack closure technique. The simulations revealed an increase in total energy release rate in the immediate vicinity of the free edges of the specimen. Correlation of the computed mixed-mode strain energy release rates along the delamination front contour with a two-dimensional mixed-mode interlaminar fracture criterion suggested that in spite of peak total energy release rates at the free edge the delamination would not advance at the edges first. The qualitative prediction of the shape of the delamination front was confirmed by X-ray photographs of a specimen taken during testing. The good correlation between prediction based on analysis and experiment demonstrated the efficiency of a mixed-mode failure analysis for the investigation of skin/stiffener separation due to delamination in the adherents. The application of a shell/3D modeling technique for the simulation of skin/stringer debond in a specimen subjected to three-point bending is also demonstrated. The global structure was modeled with shell elements. A local three-dimensional model, extending to about three specimen thicknesses on either side of the delamination front was used to capture the details of the damaged section. Computed total strain energy release rates and mixed-mode ratios obtained from shell/3D simulations were in good agreement with results obtained from full solid models. The good correlations of the results demonstrated the effectiveness of the shell/3D modeling technique for the investigation of skin/stiffener separation due to delamination in the adherents.

  10. New plate and shell elements for NASTRAN. [development of higher order triangular plate-bending finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanaswami, R.

    1973-01-01

    A new higher order triangular plate-bending finite element is presented which possesses high accuracy for practical mesh subdivisions and which uses only translations and rotations as grid point degrees of freedom. The element has 18 degrees of freedom, the transverse displacement and two rotations at the vertices and mid-side grid points of the triangle. The transverse displacement within the element is approximated by a quintic polynomial; the bending strains thus vary cubically within the element. Transverse shear flexibility is taken into account in the stiffness formulation. Two examples of static and dynamic analysis are included to show the behavior of the element.

  11. Element substitution by living organisms: the case of manganese in mollusc shell aragonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldati, Analia L.; Jacob, Dorrit E.; Glatzel, Pieter; Swarbrick, Janine C.; Geck, Jochen

    2016-03-01

    Determining the manganese concentration in shells of freshwater bivalves provides a unique way to obtain information about climate and environmental changes during time-intervals that pre-date instrumental data records. This approach, however, relies on a thorough understanding of how manganese is incorporated into the shell material –a point that remained controversial so far. Here we clarify this issue, using state-of-the-art X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy in combination with band structure calculations. We verify that in the shells of all studied species manganese is incorporated as high-spin Mn2+, i.e. manganese always has the same valence as calcium. More importantly, the unique chemical sensitivity of valence-to-core X-ray emission enables us to show that manganese is always coordinated by a CO3-octahedron. This, firstly, provides firm experimental evidence for manganese being primarily located in the inorganic carbonate. Secondly, it indicates that the structure of the aragonitic host is locally altered such that manganese attains an octahedral, calcitic coordination. This modification at the atomic level enables the bivalve to accommodate many orders of magnitude more manganese in its aragonitic shell than found in any non-biogenic aragonite. This outstanding feature is most likely facilitated through the non-classical crystallization pathway of bivalve shells.

  12. Element substitution by living organisms: the case of manganese in mollusc shell aragonite.

    PubMed

    Soldati, Analia L; Jacob, Dorrit E; Glatzel, Pieter; Swarbrick, Janine C; Geck, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Determining the manganese concentration in shells of freshwater bivalves provides a unique way to obtain information about climate and environmental changes during time-intervals that pre-date instrumental data records. This approach, however, relies on a thorough understanding of how manganese is incorporated into the shell material -a point that remained controversial so far. Here we clarify this issue, using state-of-the-art X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy in combination with band structure calculations. We verify that in the shells of all studied species manganese is incorporated as high-spin Mn(2+), i.e. manganese always has the same valence as calcium. More importantly, the unique chemical sensitivity of valence-to-core X-ray emission enables us to show that manganese is always coordinated by a CO3-octahedron. This, firstly, provides firm experimental evidence for manganese being primarily located in the inorganic carbonate. Secondly, it indicates that the structure of the aragonitic host is locally altered such that manganese attains an octahedral, calcitic coordination. This modification at the atomic level enables the bivalve to accommodate many orders of magnitude more manganese in its aragonitic shell than found in any non-biogenic aragonite. This outstanding feature is most likely facilitated through the non-classical crystallization pathway of bivalve shells. PMID:26957325

  13. Element substitution by living organisms: the case of manganese in mollusc shell aragonite

    PubMed Central

    Soldati, Analia L.; Jacob, Dorrit E.; Glatzel, Pieter; Swarbrick, Janine C.; Geck, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Determining the manganese concentration in shells of freshwater bivalves provides a unique way to obtain information about climate and environmental changes during time-intervals that pre-date instrumental data records. This approach, however, relies on a thorough understanding of how manganese is incorporated into the shell material –a point that remained controversial so far. Here we clarify this issue, using state-of-the-art X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy in combination with band structure calculations. We verify that in the shells of all studied species manganese is incorporated as high-spin Mn2+, i.e. manganese always has the same valence as calcium. More importantly, the unique chemical sensitivity of valence-to-core X-ray emission enables us to show that manganese is always coordinated by a CO3-octahedron. This, firstly, provides firm experimental evidence for manganese being primarily located in the inorganic carbonate. Secondly, it indicates that the structure of the aragonitic host is locally altered such that manganese attains an octahedral, calcitic coordination. This modification at the atomic level enables the bivalve to accommodate many orders of magnitude more manganese in its aragonitic shell than found in any non-biogenic aragonite. This outstanding feature is most likely facilitated through the non-classical crystallization pathway of bivalve shells. PMID:26957325

  14. Freshwater Inflows to San Francisco Bay and Estuary, California From Ion Microprobe Analysis of Trace Elements in Estuarine Bivalve Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takesue, R. K.; Bacon, C. R.; Brown, C. L.; Schwartz, C. L.; Wooden, J. L.

    2002-12-01

    In San Francisco Bay and Estuary, salinity and trace metal distribution are closely linked to freshwater inflow from the Sacramento-San Joaquin (S-SJ) Rivers. Because the magnitude and timing of precipitation and snow melt influence river flow, records of salinity and trace metal variations in SF Bay-Estuary may provide information about regional climate variability. Some trace elements are incorporated into growth-banded calcium carbonate bivalve shells in proportion to ambient water concentration, or with a dependence on environmental conditions such as temperature, salinity, or biological productivity. The work presented here will explore whether such geochemical tracers and proxy relationships exist in modern SF Bay and Estuary bivalve shells, with an ultimate goal of using these relationships to reconstruct past regional climatological and local environmental conditions. A fast-growing euryhaline clam Potamocorbula amurensis was chosen for modern calibration studies because its physiology and ecology are well characterized, including tissue trace metal concentrations. High resolution trace metal records in P. amurensis shells may complement ongoing monthly monitoring efforts by providing information about short-term (weekly) changes in estuarine trace metal distributions, or by providing information about distributions before monitoring began. P. amurensis shells were collected near the confluence of the S-SJ Rivers (0-12 psu) and in northern SF Bay (up to 26 psu) following flood (1995) and drought (1991) years. B, Mg, S, V, Cr, Mn, Sr, and Ba concentrations were measured in situ across growth bands in shell cross sections by secondary ionization mass spectrometry (Stanford-USGSSHRIMP-RG). [M]/Cashell profiles were compared to records of calculated Delta outflow (an estimate of net S-SJ River discharge), salinity, and temperature. S-SJ waters entering SF Bay and Estuary are naturally enriched in V. All V/Cashell profiles showed peaks corresponding to winter

  15. Lateral-torsional buckling analysis of I-beams using shell finite elements and nonlinear computation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kala, Zdeněk; Kala, Jiří

    2012-09-01

    The paper deals with the influence of correlation length, of Gauss random field, and of yield strength of a hotrolled I-beam under bending on the ultimate load carrying capacity limit state. Load carrying capacity is an output random quantity depending on input random imperfections. Latin Hypercube Sampling Method is used for sampling simulation. Load carrying capacity is computed by the programme ANSYS using shell finite elements and nonlinear computation methods. The nonlinear FEM computation model takes into consideration the effect of lateral-torsional buckling on the ultimate limit state.

  16. A Study on Embedding Genetic Algorithm to Three-Dimensional Finite Element Method by Using Shell Script

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Wataru; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Takeshita, Takaharu

    This paper presents one of the embedding methods for a genetic algorithm (GA) in the three-dimensional finite element method (3-D FEM). We use a shell script to automate the preprocesses of the 3-D FEM and to perform the genetic operation for the GA. In this paper, a surface permanent-magnet synchronous motor (SPMSM) was selected as a simple model for optimizing the shape. The capability of this method was confirmed by decreasing the cogging torque. Moreover, the evaluation of GA was performed by distributing the analytical model to several PCs for parallel processing, and the computing time was thus shortened.

  17. Variability in magnesium, carbon and oxygen isotope compositions, and trace element contents of brachiopod shells: implications for paleoceanographic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollion-Bard, Claire; Saulnier, Ségolène; Vigier, Nathalie; Schumacher, Aimryc; Chaussidon, Marc; Lécuyer, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium content in the ocean is ≈ 1290 ppm and is one of the most abundant elements. It is involved in the carbon cycle via the dissolution and precipitation of carbonates, especially Mg-rich carbonates as dolomites. The Mg/Ca ratio of the ocean is believed to have changed through time. The causes of these variations, i.e. hydrothermal activity change or enhanced precipitation of dolomite, could be constrained using the magnesium isotope composition (δ26Mg) of carbonates. Brachiopods, as marine environmental proxies, have the advantage to occur worldwide in a depth range from intertidal to abyssal, and have been found in the geological record since the Cambrian. Moreover, as their shell is in low-Mg calcite, they are quite resistant to diagenetic processes. Here we report δ26Mg, δ18O, δ13C values along with trace element contents of one modern brachiopod specimen (Terebratalia transversa) and one fossil specimen (Terebratula scillae, 2.3 Ma). We combined δ26Mg values with oxygen and carbon isotope compositions and trace element contents to look for possible shell geochemical heterogeneities in order to investigate the processes that control the Mg isotope composition of brachiopod shells. We also evaluate the potential of brachiopods as a proxy of past seawater δ26Mg values. The two investigated brachiopod shells present the same range of δ26Mg variation (up to 2 ‰)). This variation cannot be ascribed to changes in environmental parameters, i.e. temperature or pH. As previously observed, the primary layer of calcite shows the largest degree of oxygen and carbon isotope disequilibrium relative to seawater. In contrast, the δ26Mg value of this layer is comparable to that of the secondary calcite layer value. In both T. scillae and T. transversa, negative trends are observable between magnesium isotopic compositions and oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions. These trends, combined to linear relationships between δ26Mg values and REE contents, are best

  18. On the development of NURBS-based isogeometric solid shell elements: 2D problems and preliminary extension to 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouclier, R.; Elguedj, T.; Combescure, A.

    2013-11-01

    This work deals with the development of 2D solid shell non-uniform rational B-spline elements. We address a static problem, that can be solved with a 2D model, involving a thin slender structure under small perturbations. The plane stress, plane strain and axisymmetric assumption can be made. projection and reduced integration techniques are considered to deal with the locking phenomenon. The use of the approach leads to the implementation of two strategies insensitive to locking: the first strategy is based on a 1D projection of the mean strain across the thickness; the second strategy undertakes to project all the strains onto a suitably chosen 2D space. Conversely, the reduced integration approach based on Gauss points is less expensive, but only alleviates locking and is limited to quadratic approximations. The performance of the various 2D elements developed is assessed through several numerical examples. Simple extensions of these techniques to 3D are finally performed.

  19. On the implementation of the continuum shell finite element SHB8PS and application to sheet forming simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salahouelhadj, A.; Abed-Meraim, F.; Chalal, H.; Balan, T.

    2011-05-01

    In this contribution, the formulation of the SHB8PS continuum shell finite element is extended to anisotropic elastic-plastic behavior models with combined isotropic-kinematic hardening at large deformations. The resulting element is then implemented into the commercial implicit finite element code Abaqus/Standard via the UEL subroutine. The SHB8PS element is an eight-node, three-dimensional brick with displacements as the only degrees of freedom and a preferential direction called the thickness. A reduced integration scheme is adopted using an arbitrary number of integration points along the thickness direction and only one integration point in the other directions. The hourglass modes due to this reduced integration are controlled using a physical stabilization technique together with an assumed strain method for the elimination of locking. Therefore, the element can be used to model thin structures while providing an accurate description of the various through-thickness phenomena. Its performance is assessed through several applications involving different types of non-linearities: geometric, material and that induced by contact. Particular attention is given to springback prediction for a NUMISHEET benchmark problem.

  20. On-shell {delta}I=3/2 kaon weak matrix elements with nonzero total momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2009-05-01

    We present our results for the on-shell {delta}I=3/2 kaon decay matrix elements using domain wall fermions and the DBW2 gauge action at one coarse lattice spacing corresponding to a{sup -1}=1.31 GeV in the quenched approximation. The on-shell matrix elements are evaluated in two different frames: the center-of-mass frame and nonzero total-momentum frame. We employ the formula proposed by Lellouch and Luescher in the center-of-mass frame, and its extension for a nonzero total-momentum frame to extract the infinite volume, on-shell, center-of-mass frame decay amplitudes. We determine the decay amplitude at the physical pion mass and momentum from the chiral extrapolation and an interpolation of the relative momentum using the results calculated in the two frames. We have obtained ReA{sub 2}=1.66(23)((+48/-03))((+53/-0))x10{sup -8} GeV and ImA{sub 2}=-1.181(26)((+141/-014))((+44/-0))x10{sup -12} GeV at the physical point, using the data at the relatively large pion mass, m{sub {pi}}>0.35 GeV. The first error is statistic, and the second and third are systematic. The second error is estimated with several fits of the chiral extrapolation including the (quenched) chiral perturbation formula at next to leading order using only lighter pion masses. The third one is estimated with an analysis using the lattice dispersion relation. The result of ReA{sub 2} is reasonably consistent with experiment.

  1. Stress Recovery and Error Estimation for 3-D Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggs, H. R.

    2000-01-01

    The C1-continuous stress fields obtained from finite element analyses are in general lower- order accurate than are the corresponding displacement fields. Much effort has focussed on increasing their accuracy and/or their continuity, both for improved stress prediction and especially error estimation. A previous project developed a penalized, discrete least squares variational procedure that increases the accuracy and continuity of the stress field. The variational problem is solved by a post-processing, 'finite-element-type' analysis to recover a smooth, more accurate, C1-continuous stress field given the 'raw' finite element stresses. This analysis has been named the SEA/PDLS. The recovered stress field can be used in a posteriori error estimators, such as the Zienkiewicz-Zhu error estimator or equilibrium error estimators. The procedure was well-developed for the two-dimensional (plane) case involving low-order finite elements. It has been demonstrated that, if optimal finite element stresses are used for the post-processing, the recovered stress field is globally superconvergent. Extension of this work to three dimensional solids is straightforward. Attachment: Stress recovery and error estimation for shell structure (abstract only). A 4-node, shear-deformable flat shell element developed via explicit Kirchhoff constraints (abstract only). A novel four-node quadrilateral smoothing element for stress enhancement and error estimation (abstract only).

  2. On the Assumed Natural Strain method to alleviate locking in solid-shell NURBS-based finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caseiro, J. F.; Valente, R. A. F.; Reali, A.; Kiendl, J.; Auricchio, F.; Alves de Sousa, R. J.

    2014-06-01

    In isogeometric analysis (IGA), the functions used to describe the CAD geometry (such as NURBS) are also employed, in an isoparametric fashion, for the approximation of the unknown fields, leading to an exact geometry representation. Since the introduction of IGA, it has been shown that the high regularity properties of the employed functions lead in many cases to superior accuracy per degree of freedom with respect to standard FEM. However, as in Lagrangian elements, NURBS-based formulations can be negatively affected by the appearance of non-physical phenomena that "lock" the solution when constrained problems are considered. In order to alleviate such locking behaviors, the Assumed Natural Strain (ANS) method proposed for Lagrangian formulations is extended to NURBS-based elements in the present work, within the context of solid-shell formulations. The performance of the proposed methodology is assessed by means of a set of numerical examples. The results allow to conclude that the employment of the ANS method to quadratic NURBS-based elements successfully alleviates non-physical phenomena such as shear and membrane locking, significantly improving the element performance.

  3. A benchmark study of 2D and 3D finite element calculations simulating dynamic pulse buckling tests of cylindrical shells under axial impact

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1993-08-01

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the study is to compare the performance of the various analysis codes and element types with respect to a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry.

  4. A nonlinear, implicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics - User`s Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Maker, B.N.

    1995-04-14

    This report provides a user`s manual for NIKE3D, a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the finite strain static and dynamic response of inelastic solids, shells, and beams. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node truss and beam elements, and 4-node membrane and shell elements. Over twenty constitutive models are available for representing a wide range of elastic, plastic, viscous, and thermally dependent material behavior. Contact-impact algorithms permit gaps, frictional sliding, and mesh discontinuities along material interfaces. Several nonlinear solution strategies are available, including Full-, Modified-, and Quasi-Newton methods. The resulting system of simultaneous linear equations is either solved iteratively by an element-by-element method, or directly by a factorization method, for which case bandwidth minimization is optional. Data may be stored either in or out of core memory to allow for large analyses.

  5. Elastic-plastic mixed-iterative finite element analysis: Implementation and performance assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutjahjo, Edhi; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    An elastic-plastic algorithm based on Von Mises and associative flow criteria is implemented in MHOST-a mixed iterative finite element analysis computer program developed by NASA Lewis Research Center. The performance of the resulting elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is examined through a set of convergence studies. Membrane and bending behaviors of 4-node quadrilateral shell finite elements are tested for elastic-plastic performance. Generally, the membrane results are excellent, indicating the implementation of elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is appropriate.

  6. Finite element modeling of mitral leaflet tissue using a layered shell approximation

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, Mark B.; Guccione, Julius M.

    2012-01-01

    The current study presents a finite element model of mitral leaflet tissue, which incorporates the anisotropic material response and approximates the layered structure. First, continuum mechanics and the theory of layered composites are used to develop an analytical representation of membrane stress in the leaflet material. This is done with an existing anisotropic constitutive law from literature. Then, the concept is implemented in a finite element (FE) model by overlapping and merging two layers of transversely isotropic membrane elements in LS-DYNA, which homogenizes the response. The FE model is then used to simulate various biaxial extension tests and out-of-plane pressure loading. Both the analytical and FE model show good agreement with experimental biaxial extension data, and show good mutual agreement. This confirms that the layered composite approximation presented in the current study is able to capture the exponential stiffening seen in both the circumferential and radial directions of mitral leaflets. PMID:22971896

  7. Shells of Mytilus edulis as Bioarchives of the Rare Earth Element and Yttrium Distribution in Seawater and the Potential Impact of pH and Temperature Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnurangam, A.; Bau, M.; Brenner, M.; Koschinsky, A.

    2015-12-01

    The importance of bivalve shells as proxy archives for changes in environmental conditions is increasingly recognized. However, data for trace metal concentrations, specifically rare earth elements and yttrium (REY) in bivalve shells, are quite scarce. The chemistry of these elements in terms of solution speciation and complexation (mostly by carbonate) makes them particularly useful in acting as geochemical proxies of oceanic change due to the impact of temperature and pH on the activity of CO32- in seawater. We approach this issue via an in situ culture experiment using Mytilus edulis from a site in the North Sea. The M.edulis used in our study were cultured offshore with no contact to the ocean floor. We compare the REY distribution in the shells and ambient seawater with the aim of investigating which REY species is incorporated into the shell. The shells show consistent shale-normalized ("SN") REY patterns and display distinct REY features of the North Sea. The REY concentrations obtained from the shells were used to calculate apparent bulk REY partition coefficients between shells and ambient seawater (appDREYshell/seawater) and acquired results were then used in the investigation of the potential effects of pH and temperature on REY partitioning. Further comparison of appDREYshell/seawater patterns to the REY speciation in seawater suggests that the free REY3+ may be the most likely REY species that are actually incorporated from seawater into the M. edulis shell. We then modeled the REYSN patterns of a hypothetical mussel shell at pH 8.2 and 7.6 and at temperatures of 25°C and 5°C assuming that only REY3+ are incorporated into the carbonate's crystal lattice. Our findings provide the basis to further understand how we can use shells of mussels like M. edulis as bioarchives that host geochemical proxies for paleoceanic environmental reconstructions. It appears that M. edulis shells are bioarchives of some REY features of seawater and results suggest that

  8. K-Shell Diagram and Hypersatellite Spectra of 4D Transition Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Diamant, R.; Kao, C.; Huotari, S.; Hamalainen, K.; Sharon, R.; Honkimaki, V.; Buslaps, T.; Deutsch, M.

    2009-07-25

    The K-shell diagram (K{alpha}{sub 1,2} and K{beta}{sub 1,3}) and hypersatellite (HS) (K{sup h}{alpha}{sub 1,2}) spectra of Y, Zr, Mo, and Pd have been measured with high energy-resolution using photoexcitation by 90 keV synchrotron radiation. Comparison of the measured and ab initio calculated HS spectra demonstrates the importance of quantum electrodynamical (QED) effects for the HS spectra. Phenomenological fits of the measured spectra by Voigt functions yield accurate values for the shift of the HS from the diagram lines, the splitting of the HS lines, and their intensity ratio. Good agreement with theory was found for all quantities except for the intensity ratio, which is dominated by the intermediacy of the coupling of the angular momenta. The observed deviations imply that our current understanding of the variation of the coupling scheme from LS to jj across the periodic table may require some revision.

  9. Some recent progress on the measurement of K-shell ionization cross-sections of atoms by electron impact: Application to Ti and Cr elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Z.; Liu, M. T.; Fu, Y. C.; Luo, Z. M.; Tang, C. H.; Li, C. M.; Zhang, B. H.; Tang, Y. J.

    2003-07-01

    In this paper, we have taken some measures to improve the accuracy of our experimental data for K-shell ionization cross-sections by electron impact. These measures include (1) measurement of the thin target thickness with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and (2) detection efficiency calibration in the lower energy region using thick carbon target bremsstrahlung by electron impact and (3) electron reflection correction and electron mean track length correction based upon Monte Carlo method. These measures are applied to the measurement of K-shell ionization cross-sections of Ti and Cr elements from the threshold energies up to 26 keV. From the comparison with some theoretical models, empirical formulae and some previous experimental data, it is concluded that these measures taken in this paper are effective in the improvement of accuracy of experimental data. The present experimental data for Ti and Cr elements also clarify the discrepancies among some experimental data sets. In addition, these measures will also be very helpful in the measurement of K-shell ionization cross-sections for lower Z elements and in the measurement of L, M-shell ionization cross-sections for medium and higher Z elements.

  10. Neotectonics of Asia: Thin-shell finite-element models with faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, Xianghong; Bird, Peter

    1994-01-01

    As India pushed into and beneath the south margin of Asia in Cenozoic time, it added a great volume of crust, which may have been (1) emplaced locally beneath Tibet, (2) distributed as regional crustal thickening of Asia, (3) converted to mantle eclogite by high-pressure metamorphism, or (4) extruded eastward to increase the area of Asia. The amount of eastward extrusion is especially controversial: plane-stress computer models of finite strain in a continuum lithosphere show minimal escape, while laboratory and theoretical plane-strain models of finite strain in a faulted lithosphere show escape as the dominant mode. We suggest computing the present (or neo)tectonics by use of the known fault network and available data on fault activity, geodesy, and stress to select the best model. We apply a new thin-shell method which can represent a faulted lithosphere of realistic rheology on a sphere, and provided predictions of present velocities, fault slip rates, and stresses for various trial rheologies and boundary conditions. To minimize artificial boundaries, the models include all of Asia east of 40 deg E and span 100 deg on the globe. The primary unknowns are the friction coefficient of faults within Asia and the amounts of shear traction applied to Asia in the Himalayan and oceanic subduction zones at its margins. Data on Quaternary fault activity prove to be most useful in rating the models. Best results are obtained with a very low fault friction of 0.085. This major heterogeneity shows that unfaulted continum models cannot be expected to give accurate simulations of the orogeny. But, even with such weak faults, only a fraction of the internal deformation is expressed as fault slip; this means that rigid microplate models cannot represent the kinematics either. A universal feature of the better models is that eastern China and southeast Asia flow rapidly eastward with respect to Siberia. The rate of escape is very sensitive to the level of shear traction in the

  11. Study of Kα2 /Kα1 RYIED in closed and open shell Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, P. C.; Tribolet, A. D.; Reis, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Relative Yield Ion Energy Dependence (RYIED) was observed, named and reported as phenomenological evidence in 2005 (Reis et al., 2005). Since then, it was observed in transitions to the same subshell, and plausible explanations for the physics behind the phenomena have been proposed. In this work we present experimental evidence of the RYIED effect on the most inner transition possible in two Rare Earth Elements (REE), namely variations in the intensity ratio of Kα2 /Kα1 X-rays from Tm and Yb irradiated under different conditions. These REE are particularly interesting to start with since Yb has an electronic configuration where all the subshells are completely filled, whilst Tm misses one electron in the 4f subshell. Ultrapure oxides of each element were irradiated using proton beams having energies in the range of 0.9-3.6 MeV, in steps of 100 keV. Spectra were collected using the CdTe detector of the HRHE-PIXE set-up of C2TN and analysed using the DT2 code. Finally, the vanishing of the effect upon charging up of the target has been observed and will be discussed.

  12. A geometric nonlinear degenerated shell element using a mixed formulation with independently assumed strain fields. Final Report; Ph.D. Thesis, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, Wiley E.

    1991-01-01

    A mixed formulation is chosen to overcome deficiencies of the standard displacement-based shell model. Element development is traced from the incremental variational principle on through to the final set of equilibrium equations. Particular attention is paid to developing specific guidelines for selecting the optimal set of strain parameters. A discussion of constraint index concepts and their predictive capability related to locking is included. Performance characteristics of the elements are assessed in a wide variety of linear and nonlinear plate/shell problems. Despite limiting the study to geometric nonlinear analysis, a substantial amount of additional insight concerning the finite element modeling of thin plate/shell structures is provided. For example, in nonlinear analysis, given the same mesh and load step size, mixed elements converge in fewer iterations than equivalent displacement-based models. It is also demonstrated that, in mixed formulations, lower order elements are preferred. Additionally, meshes used to obtain accurate linear solutions do not necessarily converge to the correct nonlinear solution. Finally, a new form of locking was identified associated with employing elements designed for biaxial bending in uniaxial bending applications.

  13. Cross Sections for K-shell X-ray Production by Hydrogen and Helium Ions in Elements from Beryllium to Uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapicki, G.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental cross sections for K-shell x-ray production by hydrogen and helium ions (Z1=1,2) in target atoms from beryllium to uranium (Z2=4-92 ) are tabulated as compiled (7418 cross sections) from the literature (161 references were found) with the search for the data terminated in January 1988. These cross sections are compared with predictions of the first Born approximation and ECPSSR theory for inner-shell ionization. The ECPSSR accounts for the energy loss (E) and Coulomb deflection (C) of the projectile ion as well as for the perturbed stationary state (PSS) and relativistic (R) nature of the target's inner-shell electron. While the first Born approximation generally overestimates the data by orders of magnitude, the ECPSSR theory is confirmed to be, on the average, in agreement with the experiment to within 10%-20%. For light and heavy target atoms, however, systematic and opposite deviations are found in the low projectile-velocity regime. These deviations are associated with the influence of multiple outer-shell ionizations on the fluorescence yields of light elements, particularly in ionization by helium ions, and with the inaccuracy of the ECPSSR theory in the reproduction of relativistic calculations for ionization of heavy elements. The remaining discrepancies at moderate projectile velocities are prima facie attributed to inadequacies of a screened hydrogenic description for the K-shell electron.

  14. Single-Shell Tanks Leak Integrity Elements/ SX Farm Leak Causes and Locations - 12127

    SciTech Connect

    Girardot, Crystal; Harlow, Don; Venetz, Theodore; Washenfelder, Dennis; Johnson, Jeremy

    2012-07-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-91F Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal 1-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX- 111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and dry-wells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to

  15. SINGLE-SHELL TANKS LEAK INTEGRITY ELEMENTS/SX FARM LEAK CAUSES AND LOCATIONS - 12127

    SciTech Connect

    VENETZ TJ; WASHENFELDER D; JOHNSON J; GIRARDOT C

    2012-01-25

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-9IF Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal I-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX-111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and drywells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to

  16. Rare earth elements in mussel shells of the Mytilidae family as tracers for hidden and fossil high-temperature hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, Michael; Balan, Simona; Schmidt, Katja; Koschinsky, Andrea

    2010-11-01

    Bathymodiolus mussels of the Mytilidae family live in ecological niches at marine vent sites where hydrothermal fluids discharge at the seafloor and mix with ambient seawater. We report the first concentration data for rare earth elements and yttrium (REY) of Bathymodiolus shells and of low-temperature diffuse hydrothermal fluids venting in their respective habitat at three hydrothermal vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and for littoral Mytilus edulis shells from the western North Atlantic, Dingle Bay, Ireland, and from the southern North Sea, German Bight, Germany. Similar to high-temperature hydrothermal solutions expelled in the respective area, the low-temperature diffuse fluids from the hydrothermal vent sites display positive Eu anomalies. These indicate that the fluids carry a component previously involved in high-temperature water-rock interaction, as decoupling of Eu from neighbouring REY requires temperatures above about 200 °C. While the Bathymodiolus shells from the hydrothermal vent fields reflect these positive Eu anomalies, the littoral M. edulis shells studied for comparison, do not show Eu anomalies, consistent with the lack of any high-temperature hydrothermal activity in their coastal environments. Shells of mussels of the Mytilidae family, such as Bathymodiolus and M. edulis, therefore, are archives whose REY distribution can be used as a proxy for the Eu anomaly of the waters in which the mussels grew. Although the Ca carbonate of a mussel shell is precipitated from the extrapallial fluid of the mussel and not directly from seawater, the Eu/Eu* ratio of seawater is not significantly modified under the low-temperature conditions prevailing during vital processes and biomineralization. This allows one to use the positive Eu anomalies in the REY distribution patterns of Bathymodiolus shells as a tracer for hidden or fossil high-temperature hydrothermal systems where other indicators of high-temperature hydrothermalism are not

  17. Investigation of the Distribution of Elements in Snail Shell With the use of Synchrotron-Based, Micro-Beam X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, D.; Swapna, M; Cesareo, R; Brunetti, A; Akatsuka, T; Yuasa, T; Takeda, T; Tromba, G; Gigante, G

    2009-01-01

    In this study, synchrotron-based micro-beam was utilized for elemental mapping of a small animal shell. A thin X-ray spot of the order of {approx}10 em was focused on the sample. With this spatial resolution and high flux throughput, the X-ray fluorescent intensities for Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn, Cr and Cu were measured using a liquid-nitrogen-cooled 13-element energy-dispersive HpGe detector. The sample is scanned in a estep-and-repeat' mode for fast elemental mapping and generated elemental maps at 8, 10 and 12 keV. All images are of 10 em resolution and the measurement time was 1 s per point. The accumulation of trace elements was investigated from the soft-tissue in small areas. Analysis of the small areas will be better suited to establish the physiology of metals in specific structures like small animal shell and the distribution of other trace elements.

  18. Influence of the Shell Thickness and Ratio Between Core Elements on Photostability of the CdTe/CdS Core/Shell Quantum Dots Embedded in a Polymer Matrix.

    PubMed

    Doskaliuk, Nataliia; Khalavka, Yuriy; Fochuk, Petro

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports a study of photooxidation and photomodification processes of the CdTe/CdS quantum dots embedded in a polymer matrix under ambient condition. During the first few minutes of irradiation, the quasi-inverse increase in photoluminescence intensity has been observed indicating the passivation of the nanocrystal surface traps by water molecules. A prolonged irradiation of the polymer film containing CdTe/CdS quantum dots leads to a significant decrease in the photoluminescence intensity together with the "blue shift" of the photoluminescence peak energy associated with quantum dot photooxidation. The mechanisms of the CdTe/CdS core/shell quantum dot photooxidation and photomodification in a polymer matrix are discussed. We have found a correlation between the photostability of the quantum dots and the CdS shell thickness as well as the ratio of core elements. PMID:27102905

  19. Influence of the Shell Thickness and Ratio Between Core Elements on Photostability of the CdTe/CdS Core/Shell Quantum Dots Embedded in a Polymer Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doskaliuk, Nataliia; Khalavka, Yuriy; Fochuk, Petro

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports a study of photooxidation and photomodification processes of the CdTe/CdS quantum dots embedded in a polymer matrix under ambient condition. During the first few minutes of irradiation, the quasi-inverse increase in photoluminescence intensity has been observed indicating the passivation of the nanocrystal surface traps by water molecules. A prolonged irradiation of the polymer film containing CdTe/CdS quantum dots leads to a significant decrease in the photoluminescence intensity together with the "blue shift" of the photoluminescence peak energy associated with quantum dot photooxidation. The mechanisms of the CdTe/CdS core/shell quantum dot photooxidation and photomodification in a polymer matrix are discussed. We have found a correlation between the photostability of the quantum dots and the CdS shell thickness as well as the ratio of core elements.

  20. Experimental values of K to Li sub-shell, K to L, and K to M shell vacancy transfer probabilities for some rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Akman, Ferdi

    2016-09-01

    The K to Li (i=2,3), K to L, and K to M shell vacancy transfer probabilities for La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy and Er were determined at 59.54keV using a reflection geometry. The measurements were performed using an (241)Am annular radioactive source and a high resolution Si(Li) detector. The experimental results were compared with the theoretical values of Hartree-Slater and Hartree-Fock theories, semi-empirical and other available experimental results in the literature. Reasonable agreement is observed between the measured and theoretical results. PMID:27451114

  1. Present-day velocity and stress fields of the Amurian plate from thin-shell finite element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, C.; Fournier, M.

    2003-04-01

    Space geodetic data have shown that east of longitude 100°E, the southeastern and eastern Asia including Sundaland, South China, North China, and the Amurian plate move eastward at a mean rate of 1 cm/yr relative to Siberia. The relative motions between the main continental blocks of eastern Asia are low, of the order of 1-2 mm/yr. Thus, a wide region extending from the Baikal Rift to the Japan Sea and to SE Asia and Indonesia is slowly extruded eastward at a rate of ~1 cm/yr. It is generally admitted that eastward extrusion of such continental blocks accounts for 1/4 to 1/3 of deformation in Asia, while the remaining 2/3 to 3/4 are accommodated by crustal and/or lithospheric thickening. As a consequence, any dynamic model of deformation in Asia should take into account body forces due to plate thickening as well as boundary forces coming from the India-Asia collision and Pacific subductions. We present spherical thin-plate models of the Amurian continental plate using the finite element code SHELLS developed by Peter Bird (1999). This 2D modelling code simulates short-term deformation of a 2-layered lithosphere with lateral variations of crustal and lithospheric thicknesses, and heat flow. We first analyze the Amurian plate kinematics and deformation through GPS and seismotectonic data. Then we use the finite element model to define the boundary conditions that best match the observed velocity and stress fields. The best-fitting model involves a transition from NW-SE compression to eastward extrusion along the southern plate boundary, favoring the opening of the Baikal rift east of 105°E. NE-SW to EW compression along the eastern plate limit is satisfyingly reproduced by the relative motions of the Okhotsk, Pacific and Philippine Sea plates. Finally, we show that body forces due to sharp changes in crustal and lithospheric thicknesses can explain the rapid transition from NE-SW extension in the north Baikal rift to ~NS compression in the Stanovoy range.

  2. Rare earth elements in the aragonitic shell of freshwater mussel Corbicula fluminea and the bioavailability of anthropogenic lanthanum, samarium and gadolinium in river water.

    PubMed

    Merschel, Gila; Bau, Michael

    2015-11-15

    High-technology metals - such as the rare earth elements (REE) - have become emerging contaminants in the hydrosphere, yet little is known about their bioavailability. The Rhine River and the Weser River in Germany are two prime examples of rivers that are subjected to anthropogenic REE input. While both rivers carry significant loads of anthropogenic Gd, originating from contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging, the Rhine River also carries large amounts of anthropogenic La and lately Sm which are discharged into the river from an industrial point source. Here, we assess the bioavailability of these anthropogenic microcontaminants in these rivers by analyzing the aragonitic shells of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea. Concentrations of purely geogenic REE in shells of comparable size cover a wide range of about one order of magnitude between different sampling sites. At a given sampling site, geogenic REE concentrations depend on shell size, i.e. mussel age. Although both rivers show large positive Gd anomalies in their dissolved loads, no anomalous enrichment of Gd relative to the geogenic REE can be observed in any of the analyzed shells. This indicates that the speciations of geogenic and anthropogenic Gd in the river water differ from each other and that the geogenic, but not the anthropogenic Gd is incorporated into the shells. In contrast, all shells sampled at sites downstream of the industrial point source of anthropogenic La and Sm in the Rhine River show positive La and Sm anomalies, revealing that these anthropogenic REE are bioavailable. Only little is known about the effects of long-term exposure to dissolved REE and their general ecotoxicity, but considering that anthropogenic Gd and even La have already been identified in German tap water and that anthropogenic La and Sm are bioavailable, this should be monitored and investigated further. PMID:26151653

  3. Optimum rotationally symmetric shells for flywheel rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Henry W.

    2000-01-01

    A flywheel rim support formed from two shell halves. Each of the shell halves has a disc connected to the central shaft. A first shell element connects to the disc at an interface. A second shell element connects to the first shell element. The second shell element has a plurality of meridional slits. A cylindrical shell element connects to the second shell element. The cylindrical shell element connects to the inner surface of the flywheel rim. A flywheel rim support having a disc connected an outer diameter of a shaft. Two optimally shaped shell elements connect to the optimally shaped disc at an interface. The interface defines a discontinuity in a meridional slope of said support. A cylindrical shell element connects to the two shell elements. The cylindrical shell element has an outer surface for connecting to the inner surface of the flywheel rim. A flywheel rim casing includes an annular shell connected to the central shaft. The annular shell connects to the flywheel rim. A composite shell surrounds the shaft, annular shell and flywheel rim.

  4. Resonant Raman scattering contribution to attenuation of x rays at energies in lower vicinity of the K-shell ionization threshold of some elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Sharma, Veena; Kumar, Sunil; Alrakabi, Muhanad; Mehta, D.; Singh, Nirmal

    2009-05-15

    Attenuation of the x rays and gamma rays in the {sub 22}Ti, {sub 41}Nb, {sub 69}Tm, {sub 70}Yb, and {sub 71}Lu elements have been measured with special emphasis for the x ray energies (E{sub in}) in lower vicinity of the K shell ionization threshold (B{sub K}) of the element. The incident photon beam is obtained from decay of the {sup 55}Fe, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 57}Co radioisotopes, and fluorescence of the {sub 23}V, {sub 70}Yb, {sub 71}Lu, {sub 74}W, {sub 76}Os, and {sub 90}Th targets excited by the x rays and gamma rays from the radioisotopes. The measurements were performed using energy dispersive setups involving Ge detectors. The measured attenuation coefficients agree with the available theoretical values except at the photon energies with (B{sub K}-E{sub in}) less than or nearly equal to the K-shell width (GAMMA{sub K}), where significant positive deviations as large as factor of 2 have been observed. In view of reliability of the available theoretical cross sections for the photoionization and the photon scattering processes, the magnitude of positive alteration at the photon energy in lower vicinity of the ionization threshold is attributed to the K shell resonant Raman scattering (RRS) process and the corresponding cross sections have been deduced. Possible matrix effects in the energy dispersive x ray spectrometry due to RRS are also discussed.

  5. Factorization of the matrix elements of three-electron operators used in configuration-interactions studies of the atomic f shell

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, B.R.; Lo, E.

    1996-01-01

    Single-electron excitations of the atomic f shell are usually taken into account in analyses of lanthanide and actinide spectra by including six three-electron scalar operators t{sub i} in the Hamiltonian. Their matrix elements have been factorized for all f{sup N} by using the Wigner-Eckart theorem applied to Racah`s groups SO(7) and G{sub 2}. The two component parts, namely a reduced matrix element in G{sub 2} and an isoscalar factor, are tabulated. This provides a compact representation of the values of the matrix elements and also enables unusual selection rules and proportionalities to be exposed. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. A unified derivation of Hamiltonian and optical transition matrix elements for open shell diatomic and polyatomic molecules using transformation tools of modern quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenke, David W.

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we systematically derive the matrix elements of the nuclear rotation operators for open shell diatomic and polyatomic molecules in a parity adapted Hund's case (a) basis. Our expressions are valid for an arbitrary number of electrons and arbitrary electronic configurations. The common ad hoc sign changes of angular momentum operators are shown to be equivalent to a change in phase of basis functions. We show how to relate this basis to that required for scattering calculations. We also give the expressions for Einstein A coefficients for electric dipole, electric quadrupole, and magnetic dipole transitions.

  7. Dynamic pulse buckling of cylindrical shells under axial impact: A comparison of 2D and 3D finite element calculations with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several 2D and 3D finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the work is to investigate the performance of various analysis codes and element types on a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry. Four axial impact tests were performed on 4 in-diameter, 8 in-long, 304 L stainless steel cylinders with a 3/16 in wall thickness. The cylinders were struck by a 597 lb mass with an impact velocity ranging from 42.2 to 45.1 ft/sec. During the impact event, a buckle formed at each end of the cylinder, and one of the two buckles became unstable and collapsed. The instability occurred at the top of the cylinder in three tests and at the bottom in one test. Numerical simulations of the test were performed using the following codes and element types: PRONTO2D with axisymmetric four-node quadrilaterals; PRONTO3D with both four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons; and ABAQUS/Explicit with axisymmetric two-node shells and four-node quadrilaterals, and 3D four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons. All of the calculations are compared to the tests with respect to deformed shape and impact load history. As in the tests, the location of the instability is not consistent in all of the calculations. However, the calculations show good agreement with impact load measurements with the exception of an initial load spike which is proven to be the dynamic response of the load cell to the impact. Finally, the PRONIT02D calculation is compared to the tests with respect to strain and acceleration histories. Accelerometer data exhibited good qualitative agreement with the calculations. The strain comparisons show that measurements are very sensitive to gage placement.

  8. A unified derivation of Hamiltonian and optical transition matrix elements for open shell diatomic and polyatomic molecules using transformation tools of modern quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenke, David W.

    2015-04-14

    In this work, we systematically derive the matrix elements of the nuclear rotation operators for open shell diatomic and polyatomic molecules in a parity adapted Hund’s case (a) basis. Our expressions are valid for an arbitrary number of electrons and arbitrary electronic configurations. The common ad hoc sign changes of angular momentum operators are shown to be equivalent to a change in phase of basis functions. We show how to relate this basis to that required for scattering calculations. We also give the expressions for Einstein A coefficients for electric dipole, electric quadrupole, and magnetic dipole transitions.

  9. Nuclear matrix elements for 0νβ{sup −}β{sup −} decays: Comparative analysis of the QRPA, shell model and IBM predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Civitarese, Osvaldo; Suhonen, Jouni

    2013-12-30

    In this work we report on general properties of the nuclear matrix elements involved in the neutrinoless double β{sup −} decays (0νβ{sup −}β{sup −} decays) of several nuclei. A summary of the values of the NMEs calculated along the years by the Jyväskylä-La Plata collaboration is presented. These NMEs, calculated in the framework of the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), are compared with those of the other available calculations, like the Shell Model (ISM) and the interacting boson model (IBA-2)

  10. Sentinel lymph node biopsy using indigo carmine blue dye and the validity of '10% rule' and '4 nodes rule'.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Tomoya; Kinoshita, Takayuki; Hojo, Takashi; Kurihara, Hiroaki; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2012-08-01

    This is the study which assessed sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNB) using indigo carmine blue dye and the validity of the '10% rule' and '4 nodes rule'. Patients (302) were performed SNB using the combined radioisotope (RI)/indigo carmine dye method. Excised SLNs were confirmed whether they were stained and numbered in order of RI count and the percentage of radioactivity as compared to the hottest node was calculated. The relationship between histological diagnosis, dyeing and RI count was assessed. All the patients were detected SLN. Positive nodes were identified in 84 (27.8%) patients and were identified up to the third degree of hottest. All the hottest positive nodes were stained by indigo carmine. From the results, removing the three most radioactive SLNs identified all cases of nodal metastasis without complications. These stopping rules were valid and useful under indigo carmine use too. PMID:22119457

  11. Trace element proxies (Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca and Pb/Ca) in Bivalve shells: environmental signals or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillikin, D. P.; Dehairs, F.; Steenmans, D.; Meng, L.; Haifeng, T.; Navez, J.; Andre, L.; Baeyens, W.; Keppens, E.; Calmars Group,.

    2004-12-01

    Coral and sclerosponge skeletons have both been used as recorders of their environment. Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca and Pb/Ca have all shown to be useful in these substrates, giving insight into the past environment in which the skeleton grew (e.g., Lea et al., 1989, Nature 340, 373-376; Beck et al., 1992, Science 257, 644-647; Lazareth et al., 2000, Geology 28, 515-518; Rosenheim et al., 2004, Geology 32, 145-148). Although bivalves have not been studied as extensively as corals, these proxies are apparently not as reliable in bivalves (e.g., Vander Putten et al., 2000, GCA 64, 997-1011). We therefore investigate Sr/Ca and Pb/Ca in two species of aragonitic clams (Mercenaria mercenaria and Saxidomus giganteus) and Ba/Ca in the calcite layer of the mussel Mytilus edulis. Results indicate that Sr/Ca is primarily controlled by growth rate in S. giganteus whereas there was no relationship between these parameters in M. mercenaria. Pb/Ca is somewhat reproducible between specimens of S. giganteus, however long-term Pb/Ca records (1949-2003) in the shell of M. mercenaria did not show the expected curve of anthropogenically introduced lead, indicating that they are not recording environmental Pb concentrations. Therefore, Sr/Ca and Pb/Ca incorporation seem to be regulated by biological processes and not directly by environmental parameters. Ba/Ca in M. edulis shells on the other hand, does seem to be directly linked to the environment. Shells grown under laboratory and natural conditions both show the same linear relationship between dissolved Ba/Ca and shell Ba/Ca. Experiments involving manipulations of dissolved and particulate (i.e. food) Ba/Ca, suggest that the dominant pathway of barium into the shell is from the dissolved phase via the hemolymph. We were unable to explain the large peaks noted in the Ba/Ca profiles, however, they did not seem linked to phytoplankton blooms as has been previously suggested (Stecher et al., 1996, GCA 60, 3445-3456; Vander Putten et al., 2000

  12. Stress Localization in Elastic Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selden, Sarah; Evans, Arthur; Bende, Nakul; Hayward, Ryan; Santangelo, Christian

    Upon indentation, thin shells react by localizing strain energy in polygonal structures as opposed to a uniform axisymmetric distribution. While the formation of these localized structures are well-characterized for perfect shells, a change in shell thickness or the introduction of a crease fundamentally changes the nature of the shell deformation. We perform finite element simulations, in tandem with experiments to explore the effect of different shell geometries on the energy landscape. We find that the crease induces a new symmetry-breaking localization that does not appear in perfect shells, and we explore the deformation characteristics of the creased shell over a wide range of crease radii, and crease orientations.

  13. Tracking responses to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill using trace elements in molluscan shells and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roopnarine, P. D.; Anderson, L.; Roopnarine, D.; Gillikin, D. P.; Goodwin, D.

    2010-12-01

    Documenting the effects of modern stressors on coastal benthic marine communities requires a combination of baseline historical data and modern dynamic data. E.g., landfall of hydrocarbons from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon rig and well explosion in the Gulf of Mexico is impacting coastal areas long affected by natural seepage, as well as petroleum exploration and development. In Louisiana, exploration in coastal areas that began in the 1920s expanded greatly with the development of the first mobile drilling barge in 1933. In total nearly 50,000 wells have been drilled in the Gulf of Mexico since the 1930s. Given this historical context, we are assessing pathways and rates at which crude oil components from the 2010 spill are incorporated into northern Gulf of Mexico coastal food webs. Sclerochronological techniques are being used to unlock the high-resolution physical and chemical records preserved within mollusc shells. We are analyzing historical specimens collected from the late 19th through late 20th centuries, baseline specimens collected in May 2010 in Louisiana and Alabama before visible hydrocarbons were present, and specimens collected in August 2010 after hydrocarbons made landfall. We are examining changes in life history traits (growth rate, recruitment, mortality, reproduction) of the commercial oyster Crassostrea virginica, and other common, co-occurring molluscs that are primary and secondary consumers in Gulf of Mexico coastal food webs. The taxa include the marsh-dwelling gastropod Littoraria irrorata and mussel Geukensia demissa, and open-water species including the bivalves Ischadium recurvum and Tellina alternata. These consumers range from epifaunal, sessile, filter feeders; to infaunal, mobile, deposit feeders; to epifaunal, mobile, omnivorous grazers. In this way, multiple potential pathways into coastal food webs are being monitored. Because environmental perturbations of many scales are recorded by the accretionary growth of mollusc shells

  14. M-shell x-ray production by 0.8-4.0-MeV 4He+ ions in ten elements from hafnium to thorium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajek, M.; Kobzev, A. P.; Sandrik, R.; Skrypnik, A. V.; Ilkhamov, R. A.; Khusmurodov, S. H.; Lapicki, G.

    1990-11-01

    M-shell x-ray production cross sections are reported for 72Hf, 73Ta, 74W, 75Re, 76Os, 77Ir, 78Pt, 79Au, 83Bi, and 90Th bombarded by 4He ions of energy 0.8-4.0 MeV. The measured cross sections are compared with the predictions of the semiclassical and first-order Born approximations and the calculations of the perturbed-stationary-state (PSS) theory that accounts for energy-loss (E), Coulomb deflection (C), and relativistic (R) effects (ECPSSR). The ECPSSR theory gives the best overall description of the measured data, although systematical discrepancies are found in the low-velocity region. Apart from deficiency of the available M-shell Coster-Kronig factors and fluorescence yields near or above Z2=74, where strong M4-M5N6,7 Coster-Kronig transitions become energetically forbidden, the increasing underestimation of the data by the ECPSSR theory with decreasing projectile velocities is genuine. In fact, we have found previously [Pajek et al., Phys. Rev. A 42, 261 (1990)] the same discrepancy for identical target elements bombarded by protons at comparably low velocities.

  15. Measurement of probabilities for vacancy transfer from the K to L shell of the elements 73{le}Z{le}92

    SciTech Connect

    Ertugrul, M.; Dogan, O.; Simsek, O.; Turgut, U.; Erdogan, H.

    1997-01-01

    K- to L-shell vacancy transfer probabilities were measured for ten elements in the atomic range 73{le}Z{le}92. Those measuring L x-ray yields from targets excited by 59.5 and 122 keV incident photons, i.e., below and above the K edge of elements, were detected with a high-resolution Si(Li) detector. For comparison with experimental results, theoretical calculations were made by using available data on radiative and radiationless transitions. The radiative transitions of these elements were observed from the relativistic Hartree-Slater model which was proposed by Scofield [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables {bold 14}, 121 (1974)]. The radiationless transitions were observed from the Dirac-Hartree-Slater model which was proposed by Chen, Craseman, and Mark [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables {bold 24}, 13 (1979)]. The measured results were found to be in good agreement with theoretically calculated values. The experimental and theoretical values were fitted versus atomic number Z.

  16. Conditions of Mytilus edulis extracellular body fluids and shell composition in a pH-treatment experiment: Acid-base status, trace elements and δ11B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Agnes; Fietzke, Jan; Melzner, Frank; BöHm, Florian; Thomsen, JöRn; Garbe-SchöNberg, Dieter; Eisenhauer, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Mytilus edulis were cultured for 3 months under six different seawater pCO2 levels ranging from 380 to 4000 μatm. Specimen were taken from Kiel Fjord (Western Baltic Sea, Germany) which is a habitat with high and variable seawater pCO2 and related shifts in carbonate system speciation (e.g., low pH and low CaCO3 saturation state). Hemolymph (HL) and extrapallial fluid (EPF) samples were analyzed for pH and total dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) to calculate pCO2 and [HCO3-]. A second experiment was conducted for 2 months with three different pCO2 levels (380, 1400 and 4000 μatm). Boron isotopes (δ11B) were investigated by LA-MC-ICP-MS (Laser Ablation-Multicollector-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry) in shell portions precipitated during experimental treatment time. Additionally, elemental ratios (B/Ca, Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) in the EPF of specimen from the second experiment were measured via ICP-OES (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry). Extracellular pH was not significantly different in HL and EPF but systematically lower than ambient water pH. This is due to high extracellular pCO2 values, a prerequisite for metabolic CO2 excretion. No accumulation of extracellular [HCO3-] was measured. Elemental ratios (B/Ca, Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) in the EPF increased slightly with pH which is in accordance with increasing growth and calcification rates at higher seawater pH values. Boron isotope ratios were highly variable between different individuals but also within single shells. This corresponds to a high individual variability in fluid B/Ca ratios and may be due to high boron concentrations in the organic parts of the shell. The mean δ11B value shows no trend with pH but appears to represent internal pH (EPF) rather than ambient water pH.

  17. Donax do and don't tell: The relationship of isotopic and elemental variations to environmental conditions in the shell chemistry of a common intertidal bivalve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, M. B.; Schellenberg, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    The bean clam (Donax gouldii) is a common bivalve found in sandy southern Californian beaches and lives to a maximum age of three years(length <25 mm). The distinct growth bands and narrow intertidal distribution of this species could provide an ideal bio-recorder of high frequency environmental variability if their skeletal chemistry (i.e., δ13C,δ18O and minor element ratios) is strongly correlated with ambient environmental conditions. To test this hypothesis D. gouldii and seawater (δ13CDIC, δ18OSeawater, and salinity) were collected every two weeks and seawater temperature was measured daily. Collected D. gouldii were milled along the commissure, perpendicular to the maximum growth axis, with a valve penetration of ~150 micrometers producing ~300 micrograms of aragonite powder that was split for determination of its stable-isotopic (δ18O, δ13C) and elemental (Sr/Ca) ratios. Variations in shell δ13C Donax show little correspondence to measured seawater δ13CDIC through the study interval. Contrary to the results presented in Killingley and Berger (1979) for Mytilus from the same area, δ13CDonax does not appear related to the strength of upwelling.Observed D. gouldii δ13CDonax and δ18ODonaxare both lighter than expected positively correlated between, suggesting kinetic effects. Weekly equilibrium values for aragonite δ18O were calculated using the Grossman and Ku (1986) paleotemperature equation from daily seawater temperatures and biweekly seawater δ18O values for October 2007 to October 2008. This predicted δ18OPredictedAragonite record was compared to measured δ18ODonax values from the milled shell margins of biweekly-collected populations of D. gouldii.Observed δ18ODonax averaged -0.6‰ lighter than δ18OPredictedAragonite for the entire study interval. Notably, this offset is not consistent through time with greatest offset in the spring. Since past variations in seawater δ18O are difficult to constrain, splits of the milled shell margins

  18. K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios in elements between Tm ( Z = 69) and Os ( Z = 76) derived from new mass attenuation coefficient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Necati; Tıraşoğlu, Engin; Apaydın, Gökhan; Aylıkcı, Volkan; Cengiz, Erhan

    2007-08-01

    The K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios were derived from new mass attenuation coefficients measured using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer for Tm, Yb elements being Tm 2O 3, Yb 2O 3 compounds and pure Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Re and Os. The measurements, in the region 56-77 keV, were done in a transmission geometry utilizing the K α1 , K α2 , K β1 and K β2 X- rays from different secondary source targets (Yb, Ta, Os, W, Re and Ir, etc.) excited by the 123.6 keV γ-photons from an 57Co annular source and detected by an Ultra-LEGe solid state detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. Experimental results have been compared with theoretically calculated values. The measured values of Tm, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Re and Os are reported here for the first time.

  19. Hydrologic and climatic implications of stable isotope and minor element analyses of authigenic calcite silts and gastropod shells from a mid-Pleistocene pluvial lake, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieniewicz, Johanna M.; Smith, Jennifer R.

    2007-11-01

    Authigenic calcite silts at Wadi Midauwara in Kharga Oasis, Egypt, indicate the prolonged presence of surface water during the Marine Isotope Stage 5e pluvial phase recognized across North Africa. Exposed over an area of ˜ 4.25 km 2, these silts record the ponding of water derived from springs along the Libyan Plateau escarpment and from surface drainage. The δ 18O values of these lacustrine carbonates (- 11.3‰ to - 8.0‰ PDB), are too high to reflect equilibrium precipitation with Nubian aquifer water or water of an exclusively Atlantic origin. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca of the silts have a modest negative covariance with silt δ 18O values, suggesting that the water may have experienced the shortest residence time in local aquifers when the water δ 18O values were highest. Furthermore, intra-shell δ 18O, Sr/Ca, and Ba/Ca analyses of the freshwater gastropod Melanoides tuberculata are consistent with a perennially fresh water source, suggesting that strong evaporative effects expected in a monsoonal climate did not occur, or that dry season spring flow was of sufficient magnitude to mute the effects of evaporation. The input of a second, isotopically heavier water source to aquifers, possibly Indian Ocean monsoonal rain, could explain the observed trends in δ 18O and minor element ratios.

  20. Imperfection Insensitive Thin Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xin

    with superior mass efficiency. An efficient computational method for the buckling analysis of corrugated and stiffened cylindrical shells subject to axial compression has been developed in this thesis. This method modifies the traditional Bloch wave method based on the stiffness matrix method of rotationally periodic structures. A highly efficient algorithm has been developed to implement the modified Bloch wave method. This method is applied in buckling analyses of a series of corrugated composite cylindrical shells and a large-scale orthogonally stiffened aluminum cylindrical shell. Numerical examples show that the modified Bloch wave method can achieve very high accuracy and require much less computational time than linear and nonlinear analyses of detailed full finite element models. This thesis presents parametric studies on a series of externally pressurized pseudo-spherical shells, i.e., polyhedral shells, including icosahedron, geodesic shells, and triambic icosahedra. Several optimization methods have been developed to further improve the performance of pseudo-spherical shells under external pressure. It has been shown that the buckling pressures of the shell designs obtained from the optimizations are much higher than the spherical shells and not sensitive to imperfections.

  1. NIKE3D a nonlinear, implicit, three-dimensional finite element code for solid and structural mechanics user's manual update summary

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M; Maker, B N; Ferencz, R M; Hallquist, J O

    2000-03-24

    This report provides the NIKE3D user's manual update summary for changes made from version 3.0.0 April 24, 1995 to version 3.3.6 March 24,2000. The updates are excerpted directly from the code printed output file (hence the Courier font and formatting), are presented in chronological order and delineated by NIKE3D version number. NIKE3D is a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the finite strain static and dynamic response of inelastic solids, shells, and beams. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node truss and beam elements, and 4-node membrane and shell elements. Thirty constitutive models are available for representing a wide range of elastic, plastic, viscous, and thermally dependent material behavior. Contact-impact algorithms permit gaps, frictional sliding, and mesh discontinuities along material interfaces. Several nonlinear solution strategies are available, including Full-, Modified-, and Quasi-Newton methods. The resulting system of simultaneous linear equations is either solved iteratively by an element-by-element method, or directly by a direct factorization method.

  2. Shell architecture, element composition, and stable isotope signature of the giant deep-sea oyster Neopycnodonte zibrowii sp. n. from the NE Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisshak, Max; López Correa, Matthias; Gofas, Serge; Salas, Carmen; Taviani, Marco; Jakobsen, Joachim; Freiwald, André

    2009-03-01

    A conspicuous new deep-sea oyster, Neopycnodonte zibrowii sp. n., is described from the Azores Archipelago, where it thrives in 420 to >500 m water depth in high densities concealed underneath overhangs. The new species reaches a relatively large size, which may exceed 20 cm, and is characterised by a very unusual hinge line morphology, straight without a bulge of the resilium. It is compared to the extant Indo-Pacific Empressostrea kostini Huber and Lorenz, 2007 and to the cosmopolitan Neopycnodonte cochlear (Poli, 1791), which has a broadly sympatric distribution at shallower depths in the Azores and Bay of Biscay. Radiocarbon dating reveals that individuals reach an impressive lifespan of one to more than five centuries, placing them among the longest-lived molluscs known to date. They often grow on top of each other, forming stacks that resemble dish piles—an effective measure to optimise shell stability with minimal biomineralisation effort, but with the drawback of increased bioerosion ultimately leading to detachment. Three microstructure types are developed in N. zibrowii: (1) the cross-foliated, calcitic, dorsal to central endostracum and aragonitic ligostracum, (2) the porous vesicular structure of the calcitic ventral endostracum, and (3) the simple prismatic aragonitic myostracum. Foliated and vesicular shell portions show sub-millimetre-scale first-order increments delineated by conchiolin-rich growth breaks (interpreted as reproductive cyclicity), and less distinct second-order increments (interpreted as annual in nature). This pattern is clearly reflected by the elemental composition with the primary growth breaks lacking Ca and Sr but including Mg and S as organic matrix constituents. The second-order increments within the calcite are mirrored by moderately co-varying Mg/Ca and S/Ca fluctuations at stable Sr concentrations, reflecting varying proportions of organic matrix. Dorsal and central endostracum transects reveal a low inter-valve, but

  3. Geometrically nonlinear analysis of layered composite plates and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, W. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1983-01-01

    A degenerated three dimensional finite element, based on the incremental total Lagrangian formulation of a three dimensional layered anisotropic medium was developed. Its use in the geometrically nonlinear, static and dynamic, analysis of layered composite plates and shells is demonstrated. A two dimenisonal finite element based on the Sanders shell theory with the von Karman (nonlinear) strains was developed. It is shown that the deflections obtained by the 2D shell element deviate from those obtained by the more accurate 3D element for deep shells. The 3D degenerated element can be used to model general shells that are not necessarily doubly curved. The 3D degenerated element is computationally more demanding than the 2D shell theory element for a given problem. It is found that the 3D element is an efficient element for the analysis of layered composite plates and shells undergoing large displacements and transient motion.

  4. Vibrations of cantilevered circular cylindrical shells Shallow versus deep shell theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. K.; Leissa, A. W.; Wang, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Free vibrations of cantilevered circular cylindrical shells having rectangular planforms are studied in this paper by means of the Ritz method. The deep shell theory of Novozhilov and Goldenveizer is used and compared with the usual shallow shell theory for a wide range of shell parameters. A thorough convergence study is presented along with comparisons to previously published finite element solutions and experimental results. Accurately computed frequency parameters and mode shapes for various shell configurations are presented. The present paper appears to be the first comprehensive study presenting rigorous comparisons between the two shell theories in dealing with free vibrations of cantilevered cylindrical shells.

  5. MVC Shell

    SciTech Connect

    Benz, Zachary; McCain, Jonathan; Bauer, Travis

    2008-06-03

    Provides the shell of a plugin based application environment that builds on MVC Framework to allow one to rapidly construct an application by using a collection of plugins. The MVC Shell is implemented in C# as a .NET 2.0 application that can then be used as a shell for building a plugin based application. The infrastructure allows for dynamically processing a specified collection of plugins in order to determine the functionality of the application, where all plugins operate within the context of the underlying MVC Framework environment.

  6. MVC Shell

    2008-06-03

    Provides the shell of a plugin based application environment that builds on MVC Framework to allow one to rapidly construct an application by using a collection of plugins. The MVC Shell is implemented in C# as a .NET 2.0 application that can then be used as a shell for building a plugin based application. The infrastructure allows for dynamically processing a specified collection of plugins in order to determine the functionality of the application, wheremore » all plugins operate within the context of the underlying MVC Framework environment.« less

  7. Shelled opisthobranchs.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Paula M

    2002-01-01

    In his contributions to the monographic series "Manual of Conchology", Henry Pilsbry reviewed the subgroup Tectibranchiata, comprising those opisthobranch snails that (at least primitively) still possess a shell (Pilsbry, 1894-1896). Exemplified by the Cephalaspidea (bubble shells), others included in this group at Pilsbry's time and since were Anaspidea (sea hares) and the shelled members of Notaspidea (side-gilled slugs) and Sacoglossa (leaf slugs). Pilsbry (and others since his time) considered tectibranchs to be the "root stock" from which more advanced gastropods such as Nudibranchia and Pulmonata were derived. Tectibranch systematics is firmly based on conchology and most species were originally described from empty shells. However, soft-anatomical characters were acknowledged quite early on as equally important in tectibranchs, due to the reduction of their shells and their evolutionary proximity to unshelled gastropods. Today, Tectibranchiata is not recognized as a natural taxon although the word "tectibranch" (like "prosobranch" and "mesogastropod") continues in vernacular use. Shelled opisthobranchs have been redistributed among various taxa, including several new ones--the unresolved basal opisthobranchs (Architectibranchia) and the "lower Heterobranchia", an enigmatic and currently much-studied group of families considered basal to all of Euthyneura (Opisthobranchia and landsnails (Pulmonata)). Despite their polyphyletic status, shelled opisthobranchs remain important subjects in evolutionary studies of gastropods--as the most basal members of nearly every opisthobranch clade and as organisms with mosaic combinations of primitive and derived features within evolutionary "trends" (e.g., loss of the shell, detorsion, concentration of the nervous system, ecological specialization, etc.). Although they play a pivotal role, the shelled opisthobranchs have received minimal attention in more comprehensive gastropod studies, often relegated to token

  8. - - and M-Shell X-Ray Production Cross-Sections for Beryllium, Aluminum, and Argon Ions Incident upon Selected Elements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Jack Lewis, Jr.

    Incident 0.5 to 2.5 MeV charged particle beams were used to ion- ize the inner-shells of selected targets and study their subsequent emission of characteristic x -rays. ('9)(,4)Be('+) ions were used to examine K-shell x-ray production from thin F, Na, Al, Si, P, Cl, and K targets, L-shell x-ray production from thin Cu, Zn, Ge, Br, Zr, and Ag targets, and M-shell x-ray production from thin Pr, Nd, Eu, Dy, Ho, Hf, W, Au, Pb, and Bi targets. L -shell x-ray production cross sections were also measured for ('27)(,13)Al('+) ions incident upon Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Zr, and Pd targets. M-shell x-ray production cross sections were measured for ('27)(,13)Al('+) and ('40)(,18)Ar('+) ions incident upon Pr, Nd, Gd, Dy, Lu, Hf, Au, Pb, Bi, and U targets. These measurements were performed using the 2.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at North Texas State University. The x-rays were detected with a Si(Li) detector whose efficiency was determined by fitting a theoretical photon absorption curve to experimentally meas- ured values. The x-ray yields were normalized to the simultaneously measured Rutherford backscattered (RBS) yields which resulted in an x-ray production cross section per incident ion. The RBS spec- trum was obtained using a standard surface barrier detector calibrated for to account for the "pulse height defect.". The experimental results are compared to the predictions of both the first Born and ECPSSR theories; each of which is composed of two parts, the direct ionization (DI) of the target electron to the con- tinuum and the capture (EC) of the target electron to the projectile. The first Born describes DI by the Plane-Wave-Born-Approximation (PWBA) and EC by the Oppenheimer-Brinkman-Kramers treatment of Nikolaev (OBKN). ECPSSR expands upon the first Born by using perturbed (PSS) and relativistic (R) target electron wave functions in addition to considering the energy loss (E) of the projectile in the target and its deviation from a straight line trajectory (Coulomb

  9. Shell Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Bill

    1982-01-01

    The author critiques the program design and educational aspects of the Shell Games, a program developed by Apple Computer, Inc., which can be used by the teacher to design objective tests for adaptation to specific assessment needs. (For related articles, see EC 142 959-962.) (Author)

  10. Production cross sections of elements near the N=126 shell in Ca48-induced reactions with Gd154,Tb159,Dy162, and Ho165 targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorov, D. A.; Werke, T. A.; Alfonso, M. C.; Bennett, M. E.; Folden, C. M.

    2014-08-01

    Excitation functions for shell-stabilized evaporation residues produced in Ca48-induced reactions with Gd154,Tb159,Dy162, and Ho165 targets have been measured in experiments performed at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. The examined energy range predominantly covers the 3n and 4n evaporation channels with higher cross sections measured for the 4n products. The σ4n are nearly invariant within experimental uncertainty in reactions with Tb159,Dy162, and Ho165 with the maxima at 12.6 ± 1.9, 12.6 ± 1.7, and 9.4 ± 1.3 mb, respectively. For the reaction with Gd154, the maximum is slightly lower at 4.0 ± 0.6 mb. A simple model to describe the measured production cross sections was employed. Capture was estimated by using the "diffused barrier formula" from the "fusion by diffusion" model proposed by Świątecki et al. [Phys. Rev. C 71, 014602 (2005)]., 10.1103/PhysRevC.71.014602 The fusion probability was estimated by using a phenomenological expression presented by Siwek-Wilczyńska et al. [Int. J. Mod. Phys. E 17, 12 (2008)]., 10.1142/S0218301308009501 The survival probability was calculated according to the formula of Vandenbosch and Huizenga [Nuclear Fission (Academic, New York, 1973)], derived from transition-state theory. The best agreement is reached between calculation and experiment upon inclusion of collective effects in the calculation of the survival probability, shown previously to be important for production of weakly deformed nuclei. This, in turn, challenges the expectation that strong shell stabilization benefits the production cross section. The present data are compared with earlier studies on production of neutron-deficient nuclei in Ca-induced reactions with lanthanide targets.

  11. Vibration of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    The vibrational characteristics and mechanical properties of shell structures are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) fundamental equations of thin shell theory, (2) characteristics of thin circular cylindrical shells, (3) complicating effects in circular cylindrical shells, (4) noncircular cylindrical shell properties, (5) characteristics of spherical shells, and (6) solution of three-dimensional equations of motion for cylinders.

  12. Building Atoms Shell by Shell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Beverly

    1993-01-01

    Describes an atom-building activity where students construct three-dimensional models of atoms using a styrofoam ball as the nucleus and pom-poms, gum drops, minimarshmallows, or other small items of two different colors to represent protons and neutrons attached. Rings of various sizes with pom-poms attached represent electron shells and…

  13. Shell worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Kenneth I.; Kennedy, Robert G., III; Fields, David E.

    2013-02-01

    The traditional concept of terraforming assumes ready availability of candidate planets with acceptable qualities: orbiting a star in its "Goldilocks zone", liquid water, enough mass, years longer than days, magnetic field, etc. But even stipulating affordable interstellar travel, we still might never find a good candidate elsewhere. Whatever we found likely would require centuries of heavy terraforming, just as Mars or Venus would here. Our increasing appreciation of the ubiquity of life suggests that any terra nova would already possess it. We would then face the dilemma of introducing alien life forms (us, our microbes) into another living world. Instead, we propose a novel method to create habitable environments for humanity by enclosing airless, sterile, otherwise useless planets, moons, and even large asteroids within engineered shells, which avoids the conundrum. These shells are subject to two opposing internal stresses: compression due to the primary's gravity, and tension from atmospheric pressure contained inside. By careful design, these two cancel each other resulting in zero net shell stress. Beneath the shell an Earth-like environment could be created similar in almost all respects to that of Home, except for gravity, regardless of the distance to the sun or other star. Englobing a small planet, moon, or even a dwarf planet like Ceres, would require astronomical amounts of material (quadrillions of tons) and energy, plus a great deal of time. It would be a quantum leap in difficulty over building Dyson Dots or industrializing our solar system, perhaps comparable to a mission across interstellar space with a living crew within their lifetime. But when accomplished, these constructs would be complete (albeit small) worlds, not merely large habitats. They could be stable across historic timescales, possibly geologic. Each would contain a full, self-sustaining ecology, which might evolve in curious directions over time. This has interesting implications

  14. K-shell-ionization cross sections for low-Z elements (11<=Z<=22) by protons in the energy range 0.5-2.5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribedi, L. C.; Tandon, P. N.

    1992-06-01

    K-shell-ionization cross sections for Na, Mg, Al, Si, Cl, K, Ca, and Ti by protons in the energy range 0.5-2.5 MeV have been measured using thin targets. Measurements have also been performed for thin targets of Fe, Ni, and Cu at a few energies. The energy range of protons for these targets corresponds to the reduced velocity (v1/v2K) range 0.2-1.1, in which the cross sections are very sensitive to the increased binding energy and the Coulomb-deflection effects. The measured ionization cross sections are compared with the predictions of the theory based on the perturbed-stationary-state approach including the Coulomb-deflection, energy-loss, and relativistic corrections. The data have been scaled according to various scaling laws to test the validity of the universal nature of the various Coulomb ionization theories based on the plane-wave Born approximation, the binary-encounter approximation, and the simplified semiclassical approximation model as given by Lægsgaard, Andersen, and Lund [in Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on the Physics of Electronic and Atomic Collisions, edited by G. Watel (North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1978), p. 353]. The measured data have also been compared with the calculations of Montenegro and Siguad [J. Phys. B 18, 299 (1985)] based on the theory of 1sσ molecular-orbital ionization.

  15. Generic element processor (application to nonlinear analysis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Gary

    1989-01-01

    The focus here is on one aspect of the Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) Testbed: finite element technology. The approach involves a Generic Element Processor: a command-driven, database-oriented software shell that facilitates introduction of new elements into the testbed. This shell features an element-independent corotational capability that upgrades linear elements to geometrically nonlinear analysis, and corrects the rigid-body errors that plague many contemporary plate and shell elements. Specific elements that have been implemented in the Testbed via this mechanism include the Assumed Natural-Coordinate Strain (ANS) shell elements, developed with Professor K. C. Park (University of Colorado, Boulder), a new class of curved hybrid shell elements, developed by Dr. David Kang of LPARL (formerly a student of Professor T. Pian), other shell and solid hybrid elements developed by NASA personnel, and recently a repackaged version of the workhorse shell element used in the traditional STAGS nonlinear shell analysis code. The presentation covers: (1) user and developer interfaces to the generic element processor, (2) an explanation of the built-in corotational option, (3) a description of some of the shell-elements currently implemented, and (4) application to sample nonlinear shell postbuckling problems.

  16. Prediction of Path Deviation in Robot Based Incremental Sheet Metal Forming by Means of a New Solid-Shell Finite Element Technology and a Finite Elastoplastic Model with Combined Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliclar, Yalin; Laurischkat, Roman; Vladimirov, Ivaylo N.; Reese, Stefanie

    2011-08-01

    The presented project deals with a robot based incremental sheet metal forming process, which is called roboforming and has been developed at the Chair of Production Systems. It is characterized by flexible shaping using a freely programmable path-synchronous movement of two industrial robots. The final shape is produced by the incremental infeed of the forming tool in depth direction and its movement along the part contour in lateral direction. However, the resulting geometries formed in roboforming deviate several millimeters from the reference geometry. This results from the compliance of the involved machine structures and the springback effects of the workpiece. The project aims to predict these deviations caused by resiliences and to carry out a compensative path planning based on this prediction. Therefore a planning tool is implemented which compensates the robots's compliance and the springback effects of the sheet metal. The forming process is simulated by means of a finite element analysis using a material model developed at the Institute of Applied Mechanics (IFAM). It is based on the multiplicative split of the deformation gradient in the context of hyperelasticity and combines nonlinear kinematic and isotropic hardening. Low-order finite elements used to simulate thin sheet structures, such as used for the experiments, have the major problem of locking, a nonphysical stiffening effect. For an efficient finite element analysis a special solid-shell finite element formulation based on reduced integration with hourglass stabilization has been developed. To circumvent different locking effects, the enhanced assumed strain (EAS) and the assumed natural strain (ANS) concepts are included in this formulation. Having such powerful tools available we obtain more accurate geometries.

  17. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel Part II : Proposal of a method to use shell element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Woong; Jang, Beom Seon; Kang, Sung Wook

    2014-06-01

    I-core sandwich panel that has been used more widely is assembled using high power CO-laser welding. Kim et al. (2013) proposed a circular cone type heat source model for the T-joint laser welding between face plate and core. It can cover the negative defocus which is commonly adopted in T-joint laser welding to provide deeper penetration. In part I, a volumetric heat source model is proposed and it is verified thorough a comparison of melting zone on the cross section with experiment results. The proposed model can be used for heat transfer analysis and thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation that occurs during laser welding. In terms of computational time, since the thermal elasto-plastic analysis using 3D solid elements is quite time consuming, shell element model with multi-layers have been employed instead. However, the conventional layered approach is not appropriate for the application of heat load at T-Joint. This paper, Part II, suggests a new method to arrange different number of layers for face plate and core in order to impose heat load only to the face plate.

  18. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Zumwalt, L.R.

    1961-11-28

    A fuel element was developed for a gas cooled nuclear reactor. The element is constructed in the form of a compacted fuel slug including carbides of fissionable material in some cases with a breeder material carbide and a moderator which slug is disposed in a canning jacket of relatively impermeable moderator material. Such canned fuel slugs are disposed in an elongated shell of moderator having greater gas permeability than the canning material wherefore application of reduced pressure to the space therebetween causes gas diffusing through the exterior shell to sweep fission products from the system. Integral fission product traps and/or exterior traps as well as a fission product monitoring system may be employed therewith. (AEC)

  19. On the vibration of axisymmetric shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heppler, G. R.; Wahl, L.

    1989-05-01

    The application of nonconventional basis functions to the linear vibration problem is explored. By employing shell coordinates the elements allow the exact geometrical modelling of shells of revolution with arbitrary meridians and the elements are able to reproduce strain free states under an arbitrary rigid body motion due to the use of these special basis functions. A generalization of the Reissner Mindlin plate theories is used because they have a broader range of applicability than the usual thin/shallow shell theories and also the trial functions need only be of class C(sup 0). The geometry treated is a hyperbola of revolution, in two configurations.

  20. K-shell photoabsorption and photoionisation of trace elements. I. Isoelectronic sequences with electron number 3 ≤N ≤ 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Mendoza, C.; Bautista, M. A.; Witthoeft, M. C.; Kallman, T. R.

    2016-05-01

    Context. With the recent launching of the Hitomi X-ray space observatory, K lines and edges of chemical elements with low cosmic abundances, namely F, Na, P, Cl, K, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu and Zn, can be resolved and used to determine important properties of supernova remnants, galaxy clusters and accreting black holes and neutron stars. Aims: The second stage of the present ongoing project involves the computation of the accurate photoabsorption and photoionisation cross sections required to interpret the X-ray spectra of such trace elements. Methods: Depending on target complexity and computer tractability, ground-state cross sections are computed either with the close-coupling Breit-Pauli R-matrix method or with the autostructure atomic structure code in the isolated-resonance approximation. The intermediate-coupling scheme is used whenever possible. In order to determine a realistic K-edge behaviour for each species, both radiative and Auger dampings are taken into account, the latter being included in the R-matrix formalism by means of an optical potential. Results: Photoabsorption and total and partial photoionisation cross sections are reported for isoelectronic sequences with electron numbers 3 ≤ N ≤ 11. The Na sequence (N = 11) is used to estimate the contributions from configurations with a 2s hole (i.e. [2s]μ) and those containing 3d orbitals, which will be crucial when considering sequences with N > 11. Conclusions: It is found that the [2s]μ configurations must be included in the target representations of species with N ≥ 11 as they contribute significantly to the monotonic background of the cross section between the L and K edges. Configurations with 3d orbitals are important in rendering an accurate L edge, but they can be practically neglected in the K-edge region.

  1. Structural Assessment of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Stanford, Bret K.; Hrinda, Glenn A.; Wang, Zhuosong; Martin, Robert a.; Kim, H. Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells, manufactured using a fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The fiber orientation angles vary continuously around the shell circumference from 10 degrees on the shell crown and keel, to 45 degrees on the shell sides. The two shells differ in that one shell has the full 24-tow course applied during each pass of the fiber placement system, while the second shell uses the fiber placement system s tow drop/add capability to achieve a more uniform shell wall thickness. The shells are tested in axial compression, and estimates of their prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads are predicted using linear finite element analyses. These preliminary predictions compare well with the test results, with an average agreement of approximately 10 percent.

  2. Shell model Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Koonin, S.E.; Dean, D.J.

    1996-10-01

    We review quantum Monte Carlo methods for dealing with large shell model problems. These methods reduce the imaginary-time many-body evolution operator to a coherent superposition of one-body evolutions in fluctuating one-body fields; resultant path integral is evaluated stochastically. We first discuss the motivation, formalism, and implementation of such Shell Model Monte Carlo methods. There then follows a sampler of results and insights obtained from a number of applications. These include the ground state and thermal properties of pf-shell nuclei, thermal behavior of {gamma}-soft nuclei, and calculation of double beta-decay matrix elements. Finally, prospects for further progress in such calculations are discussed. 87 refs.

  3. Vibration of perforated cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousseau, Peter L.

    For a credible design of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target chamber, the vibration characteristics of the chamber must be completely understood. Target chambers are usually cylindrical or spherical in shape and contain hundreds of perforations (called ports) to allow access to the inside of the chamber. The fusion reaction within the chamber creates a uniform impulsive loading, which the chamber walls must be designed to contain. Also prior to an implosion, a delicate alignment process of the drivers and diagnostics takes place. The vibration of the chamber from rotating machinery, e.g., vacuum pumps, and ambient sources must be completely understood and accounted for during these alignment procedures. This dissertation examines the vibration characteristics of perforated cylindrical shells. Because the target chambers' thickness-to-radius ratio is small, such chambers can be modeled as thin shells. Included in the text is a literature review of perforated plates and shells and examples of the use of perforated structures in constructed and proposed ICF target chambers. The natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes of perforated and unperforated cylindrical shells are studied analytically, numerically (via finite elements) and experimentally. Conclusions and comparisons between the different solution methods are made for both the perforated and unperforated cases. In addition, the dynamic response of perforated cylindrical shells to an axisymmetric impulsive loading has been identified. A demonstration showing how the convolution integral can be used to determine the response of a cylinder to a non-impulsive loading is presented.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of monodisperse spherical SiO{sub 2}-RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} (RE=rare earth elements) and SiO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Ln=Eu, Tb, Dy, Sm, Er, Ho) particles with core-shell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Yang, J.; Zhang, C.M.; Lin, J.

    2009-10-15

    Spherical SiO{sub 2} particles have been coated with rare earth oxide layers by a Pechini sol-gel process, leading to the formation of core-shell structured SiO{sub 2}-RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} (RE=rare earth elements) and SiO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Ln=Eu, Tb, Dy, Sm, Er, Ho) particles. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL), and cathodoluminescence spectra as well as lifetimes were used to characterize the resulting SiO{sub 2}-RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} (RE=rare earth elements) and SiO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}) samples. The obtained core-shell phosphors have perfect spherical shape with narrow size distribution (average size ca. 380 nm), smooth surface and non-agglomeration. The thickness of shells could be easily controlled by changing the number of deposition cycles (40 nm for two deposition cycles). Under the excitation of ultraviolet, the Ln{sup 3+} ion mainly shows its characteristic emissions in the core-shell particles from Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}) shells. - Graphical abstract: The advantages of core-shell phosphors are the easy availability of homogeneous spherical morphology in different size, and its corresponding luminescence color can change from red, yellow to green.

  5. The transuranium elements: From neptunium and plutonium to element 112

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C. |

    1996-07-26

    Beginning in the 1930`s, both chemists and physicists became interested in synthesizing new artificial elements. The first transuranium element, Np, was synthesized in 1940. Over the past six decades, 20 transuranium elements have been produced. A review of the synthesis is given. The procedure of naming the heavy elements is also discussed. It appears feasible to produce elements 113 and 114. With the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator, it should be possible to reach the superheavy elements in the region of the spherical Z=114 shell, but with fewer neutrons than the N=184 spherical shell. 57 refs, 6 figs.

  6. Discovery of element 112

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, S.

    1996-12-31

    The new elements 110, 111, and 112 were synthesized and unambiguously identified in experiments at SHIP. Due to strong shell effects the dominant decay mode is not fission, but emission of alpha particles. Theoretical investigations predict that maximum shell effects should exist in nuclei near proton number 114 and neutron number 184. Measurements give hope that isotopes of element 114 close to the island of spherical Superheavy Elements could be produced by fusion reactions using {sup 118}Pb as target. systematic studies of the reaction cross-sections indicate that transfer of nucleons is the important process to initiate the fusion.

  7. Accurate stress resultants equations for laminated composite deep thick shells

    SciTech Connect

    Qatu, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    This paper derives accurate equations for the normal and shear force as well as bending and twisting moment resultants for laminated composite deep, thick shells. The stress resultant equations for laminated composite thick shells are shown to be different from those of plates. This is due to the fact the stresses over the thickness of the shell have to be integrated on a trapezoidal-like shell element to obtain the stress resultants. Numerical results are obtained and showed that accurate stress resultants are needed for laminated composite deep thick shells, especially if the curvature is not spherical.

  8. Superheavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, S.

    The nuclear shell model predicts that the next doubly magic shell closure beyond 208Pb is at a proton number Z=114, 120, or 126 and at a neutron number N=172 or 184. The outstanding aim of experimental investigations is the exploration of this region of spherical `SuperHeavy Elements' (SHEs). Experimental methods have been developed which allowed for the identification of new elements at production rates of one atom per month. Using cold fusion reactions which are based on lead and bismuth targets, relatively neutron-deficient isotopes of the elements from 107 to 113 were synthesized at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, and/or at RIKEN in Wako, Japan. In hot fusion reactions of 48Ca projectiles with actinide targets more neutron-rich isotopes of the elements from 112 to 116 and even 118 were produced at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia. Recently, part of these data which represent the first identification of nuclei located on the predicted island of SHEs were confirmed in two independent experiments. The decay data reveal that for the heaviest elements, the dominant decay mode is α emission rather than fission. Decay properties as well as reaction cross-sections are compared with results of theoretical studies. Finally, plans are presented for the further development of the experimental set-up and the application of new techniques. At a higher sensitivity, the detailed exploration of the region of spherical SHEs will be in the center of interest of future experimental work. New data will certainly challenge theoretical studies on the mechanism of the synthesis, on the nuclear decay properties, and on the chemical behavior of these heaviest atoms at the limit of stability.

  9. Mussel shells of Mytilus edulis as bioarchives of the rare earth elements and yttrium distribution in seawater and the potential impact of pH and temperature on the partitioning behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnurangam, A.; Bau, M.; Brenner, M.; Koschinsky, A.

    2015-09-01

    Mussel shells are potential bioarchives of proxies for changes of the physico-chemical conditions in the bivalve's habitat. One such proxy is the distribution of the Rare Earths and Yttrium (REY) in seawater, as REY speciation in seawater is sensitive to pH and temperature variations, due to the impact of these parameters on the activity of CO32- in seawater. We present a new protocol for sample preparation and determination of REY concentrations in bivalve shells, that includes sample treatment with NaOCl followed by REY separation and preconcentration. The data obtained was further used to calculate REY partition coefficients between shells of M. edulis and ambient seawater, and acquired results were then used in the investigation of the potential effects of pH and temperature on REY partitioning. Shells of M. edulis mussels from the North Sea show consistent shale-normalized ("SN") REY patterns that increase from the light REY to the middle REY and decrease from the middle REY to the heavy REY. Despite being different to the general seawater REYSN pattern, the shells still display distinct REY features of seawater such as a negative CeSN anomaly and small positive YSN and GdSN anomalies. Apparent partition coefficients for the REY between the shell and seawater (appDREYshell/seawater) are low and decrease strongly from the light REY (4.04 for La) to the heavy REY (0.34 for Lu). However, assuming that only the free REY3+ are incorporated into the shell, appDREY3+shell/seawater values are higher and rather similar for all REY (102.46 for La; 113.44 for Lu), but show a slight maximum at Tb (199.18). Although the impact of vital effects i.e. REY speciation in a mussel's extrapallial fluid from which the carbonate minerals precipitate, cannot be quantified yet, it appears that M. edulis shells are bioarchives of some REY features of seawater. We modelled the REYSN patterns of a hypothetical mussel shell at pH 8.2 and 7.6 and at temperatures of 25 and 5

  10. Shell Worlds: The Question of Shell Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, K. L.; Kennedy, R. G., III; Fields, D. E.

    The initial idea of shell worlds was first proposed in the January 2009 edition of JBIS. In that paper the stability of the shell around a central world was not discussed at any length except to say that it was stable due to forces induced by gravity. This paper demonstrates in a qualitative and quantitative manner that a material shell supported by atmospheric pressure around a moon or small planet is indeed stable and does not require active measures to remain centered, provided that the central body is large enough. The minimal size of the central body to provide this stability is discussed.

  11. Identification of material constants for a composite shell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Carne, T.G.; Martinez, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    A finite element model of a composite shell was created. The model includes uncertain orthotropic elastic constants. To identify these constants, a modal survey was performed on an actual shell. The resulting modal data along with the finite element model of the shell were used in a Bayes estimation algorithm. Values of the elastic constants were estimated which minimized the differences between the test results and the finite element predictions. The estimation procedure employed the concept of successive linearization to obtain an approximate solution to the original nonlinear estimation problem.

  12. Mussel shells of Mytilus edulis as bioarchives of the distribution of rare earth elements and yttrium in seawater and the potential impact of pH and temperature on their partitioning behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnurangam, A.; Bau, M.; Brenner, M.; Koschinsky, A.

    2016-02-01

    Mussel shells are potential bioarchives of proxies for changes in the physicochemical conditions in the bivalve's habitat. One such proxy is the distribution of rare earths and yttrium (REY) in seawater, as REY speciation in seawater is sensitive to pH and temperature variations, due to the impact of these parameters on the activity of CO32- in seawater. We present a new protocol for sample preparation and determination of ultratrace concentrations of REY in bulk bivalve shells (comprised of calcite and aragonite) that includes sample treatment with NaOCl followed by REY separation and preconcentration. The data obtained were used to calculate REY partition coefficients between bulk bimineralic shells of Mytilus edulis (calcite aragonite mix) and ambient seawater, and the results acquired were then used to investigate the potential effects of pH and temperature on REY partitioning.Shells of Mytilus edulis mussels from the North Sea show consistent shale-normalized (SN) REY patterns that increase from the light REY to the middle REY and decrease from the middle REY to the heavy REY. Despite being different from the general seawater REYSN pattern, the shells still display distinct REY features of seawater, such as a negative CeSN anomaly and small positive YSN and GdSN anomalies. Apparent REY partition coefficients between shells and seawater (appDTot.REYshell/seawater) are low and decrease strongly from the light REY (4.04 for La) to the heavy REY (0.34 for Lu). However, assuming that only the free REY3+ are incorporated into the shell, modDFreeREY3+shell/seawater values are higher and comparatively similar for all REY (102.46 for La; 113.44 for Lu) but show a slight maximum at Tb (199.18). Although the impact of vital effects, such as REY speciation in a mussel's extrapallial fluid from which the carbonate minerals precipitate, cannot be quantified yet, it appears that M. edulis shells are bioarchives of some REY features of seawater.We modeled the REYSN patterns

  13. Probabilistic Dynamic Buckling of Smart Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2007-01-01

    A computational simulation method is presented to evaluate the deterministic and nondeterministic dynamic buckling of smart composite shells. The combined use of intraply hybrid composite mechanics, finite element computer codes, and probabilistic analysis enable the effective assessment of the dynamic buckling load of smart composite shells. A universal plot is generated to estimate the dynamic buckling load of composite shells at various load rates and probabilities. The shell structure is also evaluated with smart fibers embedded in the plies right next to the outer plies. The results show that, on the average, the use of smart fibers improved the shell buckling resistance by about 10% at different probabilities and delayed the buckling occurrence time. The probabilistic sensitivities results indicate that uncertainties in the fiber volume ratio and ply thickness have major effects on the buckling load while uncertainties in the electric field strength and smart material volume fraction have moderate effects. For the specific shell considered in this evaluation, the use of smart composite material is not recommended because the shell buckling resistance can be improved by simply re-arranging the orientation of the outer plies, as shown in the dynamic buckling analysis results presented in this report.

  14. Probabilistic Dynamic Buckling of Smart Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2003-01-01

    A computational simulation method is presented to evaluate the deterministic and nondeterministic dynamic buckling of smart composite shells. The combined use of composite mechanics, finite element computer codes, and probabilistic analysis enable the effective assessment of the dynamic buckling load of smart composite shells. A universal plot is generated to estimate the dynamic buckling load of composite shells at various load rates and probabilities. The shell structure is also evaluated with smart fibers embedded in the plies right below the outer plies. The results show that, on the average, the use of smart fibers improved the shell buckling resistance by about 10 percent at different probabilities and delayed the buckling occurrence time. The probabilistic sensitivities results indicate that uncertainties in the fiber volume ratio and ply thickness have major effects on the buckling load while uncertainties in the electric field strength and smart material volume fraction have moderate effects. For the specific shell considered in this evaluation, the use of smart composite material is not recommended because the shell buckling resistance can be improved by simply re-arranging the orientation of the outer plies, as shown in the dynamic buckling analysis results presented in this report.

  15. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Wheelock, C.W.; Baumeister, E.B.

    1961-09-01

    A reactor fuel element utilizing fissionable fuel materials in plate form is described. This fuel element consists of bundles of fuel-bearing plates. The bundles are stacked inside of a tube which forms the shell of the fuel element. The plates each have longitudinal fins running parallel to the direction of coolant flow, and interspersed among and parallel to the fins are ribs which position the plates relative to each other and to the fuel element shell. The plate bundles are held together by thin bands or wires. The ex tended surface increases the heat transfer capabilities of a fuel element by a factor of 3 or more over those of a simple flat plate.

  16. Trends in Ionization Energy of Transition-Metal Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Paul S.

    2005-01-01

    A rationale for the difference in the periodic trends in the ionization energy of the transition-metal elements versus the main-group elements is presented. The difference is that in the transition-metal elements, the electrons enter an inner-shell electron orbital, while in the main-group elements, the electrons enter an outer-shell electron…

  17. Damping control of 'smart' piezoelectric shell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, H. S.

    Advanced 'smart' structures with self-sensation and control capabilities have attracted much attention in recent years. 'Smart' piezoelectric structures (conventional structures integrated with piezoelectric sensor and actuator elements) possessing self-monitoring and adaptive static and/or dynamic characteristics are very promising in many applications. This paper presents a study on 'smart' piezoelectric shell structures. A generic piezoelastic vibration theory for a thin piezoelectric shell continuum made of a hexagonal piezoelectric material is first derived. Piezoelastic system equation and electrostatic charge equation are formulated using Hamilton's principle and Kirchhoff-Love thin shell assumptions. Dynamic adaptivity, damping control, of a simply supported cylindrical shell structure is demonstrated in a case study. It shows that the system damping increases with the increase of feedback voltage for odd modes. The control scheme is ineffective for all even modes because of the symmetrical boundary conditions.

  18. Fluctuating shells under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Paulose, Jayson; Vliegenthart, Gerard A.; Gompper, Gerhard; Nelson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal fluctuations strongly modify the large length-scale elastic behavior of cross-linked membranes, giving rise to scale-dependent elastic moduli. Whereas thermal effects in flat membranes are well understood, many natural and artificial microstructures are modeled as thin elastic shells. Shells are distinguished from flat membranes by their nonzero curvature, which provides a size-dependent coupling between the in-plane stretching modes and the out-of-plane undulations. In addition, a shell can support a pressure difference between its interior and its exterior. Little is known about the effect of thermal fluctuations on the elastic properties of shells. Here, we study the statistical mechanics of shape fluctuations in a pressurized spherical shell, using perturbation theory and Monte Carlo computer simulations, explicitly including the effects of curvature and an inward pressure. We predict novel properties of fluctuating thin shells under point indentations and pressure-induced deformations. The contribution due to thermal fluctuations increases with increasing ratio of shell radius to thickness and dominates the response when the product of this ratio and the thermal energy becomes large compared with the bending rigidity of the shell. Thermal effects are enhanced when a large uniform inward pressure acts on the shell and diverge as this pressure approaches the classical buckling transition of the shell. Our results are relevant for the elasticity and osmotic collapse of microcapsules. PMID:23150558

  19. Chemistry and processing of polymer shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, Emmanuel Limjuco

    The fabrication of high-quality spherical shells, used as fuel capsules in fusion experiments, is essential to the progress of the inertial confinement fusion program. Two types of shell were produced: (1) Polystyrene shells were made in a microencapsulation method. The yield, diameter, wall thickness, vacuole content, and surface finish were determined for shells prepared with an organic phase of toluene and 1,2-dichloroethane with polystyrene concentrations varied from 5 to 13 wt% and an internal water phase that sometimes contained surfactants. (2) Polyimide shells were made by vapor-phase deposition onto depolymerizable spherical mandrels. High-aspect-ratio polyimide shells with diameters ranging from 700 to 1000 mum and wall thicknesses from 2 to 13 mum have been fabricated. Estimates of the composition, surface roughness, burst and buckle pressures, elastic modulus, tensile strength, permeability, and film stress have been obtained. These shells have been characterized in terms of morphological properties: the shell dimensions (diameter and wall thickness), sphericity, wall structure, outer and inner surface finish, and transparency. The structure of the outer surface and wall cross section varied strongly with the processing conditions (e.g., deposition temperatures, system pressure), while the inner surface was shown to be very smooth. The transparency of near-stoichiometric polyimide shells and flat films was demonstrated. Rutherford backscattering and nuclear resonance analysis techniques were used to provide the elemental composition and density, which were very near the theoretical values. Polyimide shells' minimum tensile strengths and moduli were determined from burst and buckle pressure tests. The tensile strength approached that reported for Kapton-HN film. The elastic moduli varied with processing conditions. The vapor-deposited polyimide was found to possess mechanical strength properties similar to commercially available polyimides. The room

  20. Material nonlinear analysis via mixed-iterative finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutjahjo, Edhi; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is examined through a set of convergence studies. Membrane and bending behaviors are tested using 4-node quadrilateral finite elements. The membrane result is excellent, which indicates the implementation of elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is appropriate. On the other hand, further research to improve bending performance of the method seems to be warranted.

  1. Comparative study of the shell development of hard- and soft-shelled turtles

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Taniguchi, Mari; Ueno, Shintaro; Kamezaki, Naoki; Sato, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    The turtle shell provides a fascinating model for the investigation of the evolutionary modifications of developmental mechanisms. Different conclusions have been put forth for its development, and it is suggested that one of the causes of the disagreement could be the differences in the species of the turtles used – the differences between hard-shelled turtles and soft-shelled turtles. To elucidate the cause of the difference, we compared the turtle shell development in the two groups of turtle. In the dorsal shell development, these two turtle groups shared the gene expression profile that is required for formation, and shared similar spatial organization of the anatomical elements during development. Thus, both turtles formed the dorsal shell through a folding of the lateral body wall, and the Wnt signaling pathway appears to have been involved in the development. The ventral portion of the shell, on the other hand, contains massive dermal bones. Although expression of HNK-1 epitope has suggested that the trunk neural crest contributed to the dermal bones in the hard-shelled turtles, it was not expressed in the initial anlage of the skeletons in either of the types of turtle. Hence, no evidence was found that would support a neural crest origin. PMID:24754673

  2. Multiple shell fusion targets

    DOEpatents

    Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1975-10-31

    Multiple shell fusion targets for use with electron beam and ion beam implosion systems are described. The multiple shell targets are of the low-power type and use a separate relatively low Z, low density ablator at large radius for the outer shell, which reduces the focusing and power requirements of the implosion system while maintaining reasonable aspect ratios. The targets use a high Z, high density pusher shell placed at a much smaller radius in order to obtain an aspect ratio small enough to protect against fluid instability. Velocity multiplication between these shells further lowers the power requirements. Careful tuning of the power profile and intershell density results in a low entropy implosion which allows breakeven at low powers. For example, with ion beams as a power source, breakeven at 10-20 Terrawatts with 10 MeV alpha particles for imploding a multiple shell target can be accomplished.

  3. Assessment of structural analysis technology for elastic shell collapse problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, N. F., Jr.; Macy, S. C.; Mccleary, S. L.

    1989-01-01

    The prediction of the ultimate load carrying capability for compressively loaded shell structures is a challenging nonlinear analysis problem. Selected areas of finite element technology research and nonlinear solution technology are assessed. Herein, a finite element analysis procedure is applied to four shell collapse problems which have been used by computational structural mechanics researchers in the past. This assessment will focus on a number of different shell element formulations and on different approaches used to account for geometric nonlinearities. The results presented confirm that these aspects of nonlinear shell analysis can have a significant effect on the predicted nonlinear structural response. All analyses were performed using the CSM Testbed software system which allowed a convenient assessment of different element formulations with a consistent approach to solving the discretized nonlinear equations.

  4. Fast optimization of static axisymmetric shell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Jeffrey

    An axisymmetric shell optimization procedure is developed which is a fast, user-friendly and practical tool for design use in disciplines including aerospace, mechanical and civil engineering. The shape and thickness of a shell can be optimized to minimize shell mass, mass/volume ratio or stress with constraints imposed on von Mises stress and local buckling. The procedure was created with the aid of the GENOPT optimization development system (Dr. D. Bushnell, Lockheed Missiles and Space Co) and uses the FAST1 shell analysis program (Prof. C. R. Steele, Stanford University) to perform the constraint analysis. The optimization method used is the modified method of feasible directions. The procedure is fast because exact analysis methods allow complex shells to be modelled with only a few large shell elements and still retain a sufficiently accurate solution. This is of particular advantage near shell boundaries and intersections which can have small regions of very detailed variation in the solution. Finite element methods would require many small elements to capture accurately this detail with a resulting increase in computation time and model complexity. Reducing the complexity of the model also reduces the size of the required input and contributes to the simplicity of the procedure. Optimization design variables are the radial and axial coordinates of nodes and the shape parameters and thicknesses of the elements. Thickness distribution within an element can be optimized by specifying the thickness at evenly spaced control points. Spline interpolation is used to provide a smooth thickness variation between the control points. An effective method is developed for reducing the number of required stress constraint equations. Various shells have been optimized and include models for comparison with published results. Shape, thickness and shape/thickness optimization has been performed on examples including a simple aerobrake, sphere-nozzle intersections, ring

  5. Distributed neural signals on parabolic cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. D.; Li, H.; Tzou, H. S.

    2013-06-01

    Parabolic cylindrical shells are commonly used as key components in communication antennas, space telescopes, solar collectors, etc. This study focuses on distributed modal neural sensing signals on a flexible simply-supported parabolic cylindrical shell panel. The parabolic cylindrical shell is fully laminated with a piezoelectric layer on its outer surface and the piezoelectric layer is segmented into infinitesimal elements (neurons) to investigate the microscopic distributed neural sensing signals. Since the dominant vibration component of the shell is usually the transverse oscillation, a new transverse mode shape function is defined. Two shell cases, i.e., the ratio of the meridian height to the half span distance of a parabola at 1:4 (shallow) and 1:1 (deep), are studied to reveal the curvature effect to the neural sensing signals. Studies suggest that the membrane signal component dominates for lower natural modes and the bending signal component dominates for higher natural modes. The meridional membrane and bending signal components are mostly concentrated on the high-curvature areas, while the longitudinal bending component is mostly concentrated on the relatively flat areas. The concentration behavior becomes more prominent as the parabolic cylindrical shell deepens, primarily resulting from the enhanced membrane effect due to the increased curvature.

  6. Analytical and computational models of shells; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, Dec. 10-15, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Editor); Belytschko, Ted (Editor); Simo, Juan C. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Topics presented include asymptotic analysis and computation for shells, the edge effects in the Reissner-Mindlin plate theory, nonlinear problems of geometrically exact shell theories, and developments in variational methods for high performance plate and shell elements. Also presented are an assumed strain solid element model for geometrically nonlinear shell analysis, shell finite elements with six degrees of freedom per node, hierarchic plate and shell models based on p-extension, and a simple shell element formulation for large-scale elastoplastic analysis. Also discussed are the assessment of computational models for multilayered composite cylinders, shell models for impact analysis, analysis of shell structures subjected to contact-impacts, and the application of shell theory to cardiac mechanics.

  7. Compressive behavior of a turtle's shell: experiment, modeling, and simulation.

    PubMed

    Damiens, R; Rhee, H; Hwang, Y; Park, S J; Hammi, Y; Lim, H; Horstemeyer, M F

    2012-02-01

    The turtle's shell acts as a protective armor for the animal. By analyzing a turtle shell via finite element analysis, one can obtain the strength and stiffness attributes to help design man-made armor. As such, finite element analysis was performed on a Terrapene carolina box turtle shell. Experimental data from compression tests were generated to provide insight into the scute through-thickness behavior of the turtle shell. Three regimes can be classified in terms of constitutive modeling: linear elastic, perfectly inelastic, and densification regions, where hardening occurs. For each regime, we developed a model that comprises elasticity and densification theory for porous materials and obtained all the material parameters by correlating the model with experimental data. The different constitutive responses arise as the deformation proceeded through three distinctive layers of the turtle shell carapace. Overall, the phenomenological stress-strain behavior is similar to that of metallic foams. PMID:22301179

  8. Shell Buckling Design Criteria Based on Manufacturing Imperfection Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis-based approach .for developing shell-buckling design criteria for laminated-composite cylindrical shells that accurately accounts for the effects of initial geometric imperfections is presented. With this approach, measured initial geometric imperfection data from six graphite-epoxy shells are used to determine a manufacturing-process-specific imperfection signature for these shells. This imperfection signature is then used as input into nonlinear finite-element analyses. The imperfection signature represents a "first-approximation" mean imperfection shape that is suitable for developing preliminary-design data. Comparisons of test data and analytical results obtained by using several different imperfection shapes are presented for selected shells. Overall, the results indicate that the analysis-based approach presented for developing reliable preliminary-design criteria has the potential to provide improved, less conservative buckling-load estimates, and to reduce the weight and cost of developing buckling-resistant shell structures.

  9. Air Blast-Induced Vibration of a Laminated Spherical Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yzgüksel, Hzgüseyin Murat; Türkmen, Halit S.

    The scope of this study is to investigate the dynamic behavior of a laminated spherical shell subjected to air blast load. The shell structure considered here is a hemisphere in shape and made of a glass/epoxy laminated composite material. The blast experiments are performed on the spherical shell. The strain-time history of the center of the spherical shell panel is obtained experimentally. The blast loaded spherical shell is also modeled and analyzed using ANSYS finite element software. The static analysis is performed to characterize the material. The dynamic response of the spherical shell panel obtained numerically is compared to the experimental results. It is observed that the response frequency corresponds to the higher vibration modes of the panel. The qualitative agreement is found between the numerical and experimental results.

  10. Iridescence color of shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan

    2002-06-01

    Some shells from both salt water and fresh water show the phenomenon of iridescence color. Pearls and mother-of-pearls also display this phenomenon. In the past, the cause of the iridescence color was attributed to interference. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to study the surface structure of the shell of the mollusk Pinctada Margaritifera. There is a groove structure of reflection grating on the surface area in where the iridescence color appears. An optic experiment with a laser obtained a diffraction pattern produced by the reflection grating structure of the shell. The study led to a conclusion that the iridescence color of the shell is caused by diffraction. A SEM image of the shells of an abalone Haliotis Rufescens (red abalone) showed a statistically regularly arranged tile structure that serves as a two-dimensional grating. This grating structure causes the iridescence color of the shell of red abalone. The dominant color of the iridescence of shells is caused by the uneven grating efficiency in the visible wavelength range when a shell functions as a reflection grating. The wavelength of the dominant color should be at or near the wavelength of the maximum efficiency of the grating.

  11. Environmental effects on shell microstructures of Cerastoderma edule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milano, Stefania; Schöne, Bernd R.; Witbaard, Rob

    2015-04-01

    Bivalve shells serve as sensitive recorders of environmental conditions. However, reconstruction of a specific environmental parameter is still challenging. For example, variable shell growth rates simultaneously provide information on water temperature, food availability and food quality. Likewise, shell oxygen isotope values function as a dual proxy of water temperature and salinity (=oxygen isotope signature of the ambient water). Reconstruction of water temperature from δ18Oshell requires knowledge of δ18Oshell and vice versa. Unfortunately, the incorporation of trace elements in the shell is strongly controlled by biological effects and, hence, the element-to-calcium ratios of the shell are difficult to interpret in terms of environmental variables. Here, we studied if the structural properties (shell architecture, shell microstructures, fabrics) of the shell of the common cockle can function as an alternative proxy of environmental variables. Specimens of C. edule were collected alive from the intertidal zone of the North Sea. Temperature and salinity were monitored at the site where the shells lived on hourly basis for almost one year. Each portion of the shell was temporally contextualized with the tidally-deposited growth increments. Shell microstructures (composite prismatic structures) were analyzed under with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The change of the size and shape of the mesocrystals was strongly correlated to water temperature during the growing season (May - Sep.). With rising temperatures, the size of mesocrystals increased and their morphology changed from rounded to elongated shape. Our findings suggest that shell microstructures of C. edule may serve a new, independent proxy for water temperature.

  12. Applications of spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.

    1985-01-01

    A new technique of producing hollow spheres of many materials at a very rapid rate, at very low cost, and with high reproducibility of shell diameter and wall thickness has been developed. Shells formed of metal or of other solid materials are expected to find numerous technical and industrial applications. For example, metal shells might be used as inertial confinement fusion targets, or as the principal constituents in lightweight structural materials for NASA Space Stations or DOD large antennas and mirrors, or be employed as containers for phase-change heat-storage media, or serve as containers for hazardous materials, or be employed as catalytic surface agents.

  13. Failure of Viral Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, William S.; Bruinsma, Robijn F.; Michel, Jean-Philippe; Knobler, Charles M.; Ivanovska, Irena L.; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2006-12-01

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of the structural failure of viral shells under mechanical stress. We find that discontinuities in the force-indentation curve associated with failure should appear when the so-called Föppl von Kármán (FvK) number exceeds a critical value. A nanoindentation study of a viral shell subject to a soft-mode instability, where the stiffness of the shell decreases with increasing pH, confirms the predicted onset of failure as a function of the FvK number.

  14. Modeling of microencapsulated polymer shell solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, T.; Cheung, L.; Nelson, D.; Soane, D.; Wilemski, G.; Cook, R.

    1995-03-08

    A finite element transport model has been developed and implemented to complement experimental efforts to improve the quality of ICF target shells produced via controlled-mass microencapsulation. The model provides an efficient means to explore the effect of processing variables on the dynamics of shell dimensions, concentricity, and phase behavior. Comparisons with experiments showed that the model successfully predicts the evolution of wall thinning and core/wall density differences. The model was used to efficiently explore and identify initial wall compositions and processing temperatures which resulted in concentricity improvements from 65 to 99%. The evolution of trace amounts of water entering into the shell wall was also tracked in the simulations. Comparisons with phase envelope estimations from modified UNIFAP calculations suggest that the water content trajectory approaches the two-phase region where vacuole formation via microphase separation may occur.

  15. Mussel Shell Evaluation as Bioindicator For Heavy Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrello, Avacir Casanova; Lopes, Fábio; Galvão, Tiago Dutra

    2010-05-01

    Recently, in Brazil, it has appeared a new and unusual "plague" in lazer and commercial fishing. It is caused by the parasitic larval phase of certain native bivalve mollusks of fresh water known as "Naiades" and its involves the presence of big bivalve of fresh water, mainly Anodontites trapesialis, in the tanks and dams of the fish creation. These bivalve mollusks belong to the Unionoida Order, Mycetopodidae Family. The objective of the present work was to analyze the shells of these mollusks to verify the possibility of use as bioindicators for heavy metals in freshwater. The mollusks shells were collected in a commercial fishing at Londrina-PR. A qualitative analysis was made to determine the chemical composition of the shells and verify a possible correlation with existent heavy metals in the aquatic environment. In the inner part of the shells were identified the elements Ca, P, Fe, Mn and Sr and in the outer part were identified Ca, P, Fe, Mn, Sr and Cu. The Ca ratio of the outer part by inner part of the analyzed shells is around of 1, as expected, because Ca is the main compound of mollusks shells. The ratio of P, Fe, Mn, and Sr to the Ca were constant in all analyzed shells, being close to 0.015. The ratio Cu/Ca varied among the shells, showing that this mollusk is sensitive to concentration of this element in the aquatic environment.

  16. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, T.P.

    1991-11-26

    A process is disclosed for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry. 3 figures.

  17. C-Shell Cookbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Malcolm J.

    This cookbook describes the fundamentals of writing scripts using the UNIX C shell. It shows how to combine Starlink and private applications with shell commands and constructs to create powerful and time-saving tools for performing repetitive jobs, creating data-processing pipelines, and encapsulating useful recipes. The cookbook aims to give practical and reassuring examples to at least get you started without having to consult a UNIX manual. However, it does not offer a comprehensive description of C-shell syntax to prevent you from being overwhelmed or intimidated. The topics covered are: how to run a script, defining shell variables, prompting, arithmetic and string processing, passing information between Starlink applications, obtaining dataset attributes and FITS header information, processing multiple files and filename modification, command-line arguments and options, and loops. There is also a glossary.

  18. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    A process for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry.

  19. Thin Shell Manufacturing for large Wavefront correctors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, Eric; Poutriquet, Florence

    2011-09-01

    One of the major key elements in large adaptive optical systems is the thin shell, used as a deformable mirror. Although the optical prescriptions are relaxed with respect to a passive mirror, especially in the low spatial frequency domain, other requirements, such as the cosmetic defects (scratch & dig), the tight control of the thickness uniformity and of course the fragility of the piece having an aspect ratio up to 1000:1, generate new problems during the manufacturing, testing and handling of such optics. Moreover, the optical surface has to be tested in two different ways: a classical optical test bench allows us to create a surface map of the mirror. This map is then computed to determine the force required by the actuators to flatten the mirror and this becomes also a specification for polishing and implies a good interaction with the voice coil manufacturer. More than twenty years ago Sagem - Reosc developed the first meter class thin shell for early adaptive optics experiments. Since then, large thin shell have been used as the optical part in composite mirrors and more recently the aspheric shell for the VLT Deformable Secondary Mirror has been polished and prototypes, up to scale 1, of the E-ELT M4 Adaptive Mirror have been delivered to ESO in 2010. This paper will present some recent results in the manufacturing and testing technologies of large this shell, especially focusing on the development of the 1,1 meter convex aspherical shell for the VLT M2 mirror and on the results obtained on the largest thin shell produced so far (2,5 meter in diameter) developed as a demonstrator for the future E-ELT M4.

  20. Shell forming system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor); Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Hollow shells of high uniformity are formed by emitting liquid through an outer nozzle and gas through an inner nozzle, to form a hollow extrusion, by flowing the gas at a velocity between about 1.3 and 10 times the liquid velocity. The natural breakup rate of the extrusion can be increased to decrease shell size by applying periodic perturbations to one of the materials prior to exiting the nozzles, to a nozzle, or to the extrusion.

  1. Shells and Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutley, Jane

    2009-01-01

    "Shells and Patterns" was a project the author felt would easily put smiles on the faces of her fifth-graders, and teach them about unity and the use of watercolor pencils as well. It was thrilling to see the excitement in her students as they made their line drawings of shells come to life. For the most part, they quickly got the hang of…

  2. Evolving dust shells

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, H.P.

    1981-06-15

    The reduction of the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner canonical formulation of general relativity developed in the first paper of this series is applied to the full time-evolution problem for spherically symmetric charged dust shells. Detailed pictures of shell evolution are produced. Among other things, it is found that under certain well-defined circumstances the asymptotically flat spacelike hypersurfaces of constant time ''pinch off'' and become completely closed, the closure point being a locally naked singularity.

  3. Verification of Orthogrid Finite Element Modeling Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steeve, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    The stress analysis of orthogrid structures, specifically with I-beam sections, is regularly performed using finite elements. Various modeling techniques are often used to simplify the modeling process but still adequately capture the actual hardware behavior. The accuracy of such 'Oshort cutso' is sometimes in question. This report compares three modeling techniques to actual test results from a loaded orthogrid panel. The finite element models include a beam, shell, and mixed beam and shell element model. Results show that the shell element model performs the best, but that the simpler beam and beam and shell element models provide reasonable to conservative results for a stress analysis. When deflection and stiffness is critical, it is important to capture the effect of the orthogrid nodes in the model.

  4. Bearing capacity of shell strip footing on reinforced sand

    PubMed Central

    Azzam, W.R.; Nasr, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the ultimate load capacities of shell foundations on unreinforced and reinforced sand were determined by laboratory model tests. A series of loading tests were carried out on model shell footing with and without single layer of reinforcement. The tests were done for shell foundation at different shell embedment depth and subgrade density. The results were compared with those for flat foundations without reinforcement. The model test results were verified using finite element analysis using program PLAXIS. The experimental studies indicated that, the ultimate load capacity of shell footing on reinforced subgrade is higher than those on unreinforced cases and the load settlement curves were significantly modified. The shell foundation over reinforced subgrade can be considered a good method to increase the effective depth of the foundation and decrease the resulting settlement. Also the rupture surface of shell reinforced system was significantly deeper than both normal footing and shell footing without reinforcement. The numerical analysis helps in understanding the deformation behavior of the studied systems and identifies the failure surface of reinforced shell footing. PMID:26425361

  5. Off-shell CHY amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, C. S.; Yao, York-Peng

    2016-06-01

    The Cachazo-He-Yuan (CHY) formula for on-shell scattering amplitudes is extended off-shell. The off-shell amplitudes (amputated Green's functions) are Möbius invariant, and have the same momentum poles as the on-shell amplitudes. The working principles which drive the modifications to the scattering equations are mainly Möbius covariance and energy momentum conservation in off-shell kinematics. The same technique is also used to obtain off-shell massive scalars. A simple off-shell extension of the CHY gauge formula which is Möbius invariant is proposed, but its true nature awaits further study.

  6. Strontium and barium incorporation into freshwater bivalve shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liqiang; Schöne, Bernd R.

    2015-04-01

    Despite strong vital control, trace elements of bivalve shells can potentially serve as proxies of environmental change. However, to reconstruct past environments with the geochemical properties of the shells and determine the degree to which the element levels are biologically influenced, it is essential to experimentally determine the relationship between environmental variables and the element composition of the shells. In particular, the trace element geochemistry of freshwater bivalve shells has so far received little attention. Here, we present a controlled laboratory experiment that aimed at providing a better understanding of the influence of changing environmental variables on the incorporation of trace elements into freshwater bivalve shells. Under controlled conditions, Asian clams Corbicula fluminea were reared for 5 weeks in three sets of experiments: (1) different water temperature (10, 16, and 22° C) and different food levels (an equally mixed Scenedesmu quadricanda and Chlorella vulgaris at rations of 0.4, 2, 4, and 8 × 104 cells ml-1 d-1); (2) different water temperature (10, 16, and 22° C) and different element levels (Sr, Ba); (3) five sediment types (sand, slightly muddy sand, muddy sand, slightly sandy mud and mud). In the first set of experiments, shell Sr/Ca showed a significantly negative correlation with temperature, where Sr/Ca decreased linearly by about 1.6 to 2.1% per 1° C, but responded far more weakly to food availability. On the other hand, temperature and food availability affected shell Ba/Ca ratios, which potentially confounds the interpretation of Ba/Ca variations. Moreover, shell Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca exhibited a clearly negative dependence on shells growth rate that varied significantly among combinations of temperature and food availability. In the second set of experiments, shell Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca were positively and linearly related to water Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca for all temperatures. However, significantly negative effects of

  7. Slave finite elements: The temporal element approach to nonlinear analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellin, S.

    1984-01-01

    A formulation method for finite elements in space and time incorporating nonlinear geometric and material behavior is presented. The method uses interpolation polynomials for approximating the behavior of various quantities over the element domain, and only explicit integration over space and time. While applications are general, the plate and shell elements that are currently being programmed are appropriate to model turbine blades, vanes, and combustor liners.

  8. Multi-Shell Hollow Nanogels with Responsive Shell Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Andreas J.; Dubbert, Janine; Rudov, Andrey A.; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Lindner, Peter; Karg, Matthias; Potemkin, Igor I.; Richtering, Walter

    2016-03-01

    We report on hollow shell-shell nanogels with two polymer shells that have different volume phase transition temperatures. By means of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) employing contrast variation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we show that hollow shell-shell nanocontainers are ideal systems for controlled drug delivery: The temperature responsive swelling of the inner shell controls the uptake and release, while the thermoresponsive swelling of the outer shell controls the size of the void and the colloidal stability. At temperatures between 32 °C < T < 42 °C, the hollow nanocontainers provide a significant void, which is even larger than the initial core size of the template, and they possess a high colloidal stability due to the steric stabilization of the swollen outer shell. Computer simulations showed, that temperature induced switching of the permeability of the inner shell allows for the encapsulation in and release of molecules from the cavity.

  9. Multi-Shell Hollow Nanogels with Responsive Shell Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas J.; Dubbert, Janine; Rudov, Andrey A.; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Lindner, Peter; Karg, Matthias; Potemkin, Igor I.; Richtering, Walter

    2016-01-01

    We report on hollow shell-shell nanogels with two polymer shells that have different volume phase transition temperatures. By means of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) employing contrast variation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we show that hollow shell-shell nanocontainers are ideal systems for controlled drug delivery: The temperature responsive swelling of the inner shell controls the uptake and release, while the thermoresponsive swelling of the outer shell controls the size of the void and the colloidal stability. At temperatures between 32 °C < T < 42 °C, the hollow nanocontainers provide a significant void, which is even larger than the initial core size of the template, and they possess a high colloidal stability due to the steric stabilization of the swollen outer shell. Computer simulations showed, that temperature induced switching of the permeability of the inner shell allows for the encapsulation in and release of molecules from the cavity. PMID:26984478

  10. Multi-Shell Hollow Nanogels with Responsive Shell Permeability.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Andreas J; Dubbert, Janine; Rudov, Andrey A; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Lindner, Peter; Karg, Matthias; Potemkin, Igor I; Richtering, Walter

    2016-01-01

    We report on hollow shell-shell nanogels with two polymer shells that have different volume phase transition temperatures. By means of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) employing contrast variation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we show that hollow shell-shell nanocontainers are ideal systems for controlled drug delivery: The temperature responsive swelling of the inner shell controls the uptake and release, while the thermoresponsive swelling of the outer shell controls the size of the void and the colloidal stability. At temperatures between 32 °C < T < 42 °C, the hollow nanocontainers provide a significant void, which is even larger than the initial core size of the template, and they possess a high colloidal stability due to the steric stabilization of the swollen outer shell. Computer simulations showed, that temperature induced switching of the permeability of the inner shell allows for the encapsulation in and release of molecules from the cavity. PMID:26984478

  11. Hanford double shell tank corrosion monitoring instrument tree prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, J.L.; Edgemon, G.L.; Ohl, P.C.

    1995-11-01

    High-level nuclear wastes at the Hanford site are stored underground in carbon steel double-shell and single-shell tanks (DSTs and SSTs). The installation of a prototype corrosion monitoring instrument tree into DST 241-A-101 was completed in December 1995. The instrument tree has the ability to detect and discriminate between uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) through the use of electrochemical noise measurements and a unique stressed element, three-electrode probe. The tree itself is constructed of AISI 304L stainless steel (UNS S30403), with probes in the vapor space, vapor/liquid interface and liquid. Successful development of these trees will allow their application to single shell tanks and the transfer of technology to other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Keywords: Hanford, radioactive waste, high-level waste tanks, electrochemical noise, probes, double-shell tanks, single-shell tanks, corrosion.

  12. K-shell x-ray production by 0. 5-2. 5-MeV /sub 4//sup 9/Be/sup +/ ions incident upon selected elements from fluorine to potassium

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.L.; Duggan, J.L.; McDaniel, F.D.; Lapicki, G.; Mehta, R.

    1986-10-01

    K-shell x-ray production cross sections are reported for /sub 4//sup 9/Be/sup +/ ions incident upon thin /sub 9/F, /sub 11/Na, /sub 13/Al, /sub 14/Si, /sub 15/P, /sub 17/Cl, and /sub 19/K targets. Incident-beam energies range from 0.5 to 2.5 MeV. It is found that the first Born approximation (plane-wave Born approximation plus the Oppenheimer-Brinkman-Kramers treatment by Nikolaev) greatly overpredicts the data, while the predictions of the perturbed-stationary-state theory with energy-loss, Coulomb deflection, and relativistic corrections (ECPSSR) are generally in good agreement with the data. There is a low-velocity discrepancy between the data and the ECPSSR predictions which may be due to multiple ionization effects on the fluorescence yields used to convert total ionization to x-ray production cross sections.

  13. Fully Crystalline Faceted Fe-Au Core-Shell Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Langlois, C; Benzo, P; Arenal, R; Benoit, M; Nicolai, J; Combe, N; Ponchet, A; Casanove, M J

    2015-08-12

    Fe-Au core-shell nanoparticles displaying an original polyhedral morphology have been successfully synthesized through a physical route. Analyses using transmission electron microscopy show that the Au shell forms truncated pyramids epitaxially grown on the (100) facets of the iron cubic core. The evolution of the elastic energy and strain field in the nanoparticles as a function of their geometry and composition is calculated using the finite-element method. The stability of the remarkable centered core-shell morphology experimentally observed is attributed to the weak elastic energy resulting from the low misfit at the Fe/Au (100) interface compared to the surface energy contribution. PMID:26146846

  14. The adsorption of rare earth ions using carbonized polydopamine nano shells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Xiaoqi; Luo, Huimin; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng; Liu, Rui; Hou, Xisen; Dai, Sheng

    2016-01-07

    Herein we report the structure effects of nano carbon shells prepared by carbonized polydopamine for rare earth elements (REEs) adsorption for the first time. The solid carbon sphere, 60 nm carbon shell and 500 nm carbon shell were prepared and investigated for adsorption and desorption of REEs. The adsorption of carbon shells for REEs was found to be better than the solid carbon sphere. The effect of acidities on the adsorption and desorption properties was discussed in this study. The good adsorption performance of carbon shells can be attributed to their porous structure, large specific surface area, amine group andmore » carbonyl group of dopamine.« less

  15. Shell Biorefinery: Dream or Reality?

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Yang, Huiying; Yan, Ning

    2016-09-12

    Shell biorefinery, referring to the fractionation of crustacean shells into their major components and the transformation of each component into value-added chemicals and materials, has attracted growing attention in recent years. Since the large quantities of waste shells remain underexploited, their valorization can potentially bring both ecological and economic benefits. This Review provides an overview of the current status of shell biorefinery. It first describes the structural features of crustacean shells, including their composition and their interactions. Then, various fractionation methods for the shells are introduced. The last section is dedicated to the valorization of chitin and its derivatives for chemicals, porous carbon materials and functional polymers. PMID:27484462

  16. Triggered Snap-Through of Bistable Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yijie; Huang, Shicheng; Trase, Ian; Hu, Nan; Chen, Zi

    Elastic bistable shells are common structures in nature and engineering, such as the lobes of the Venus flytrap or the surface of a toy jumping poppers. Despite their ubiquity, the parameters that control the bistability of such structures are not well understood. In this study, we explore how the geometrical features of radially symmetric elastic shells affect the shape and potential energy of a shell's stable states, and how to tune certain parameters in order to generate a snap-through transition from a convex semi-stable state to concave stable state. We fabricated a series of elastic shells with varying geometric parameters out of silicone rubber and measured the resulting potential energy in the semi-stable state. Finite element simulations were also conducted in order to determine the deformation and stress in the shells during snap-through. It was found that the energy of the semi-stable state is controlled by only two geometric parameters and a dimensionless ratio. We also noted two distinct transitions during snap-through, one between monostability and semi-bistability (the state a popper toy is in before it snaps-through and jumps), and a second transition between semi-bistability and true bistability. This work shows that it is possible to use a set of simple parameters to tailor the energy landscape of an elastic shell in order to generate complex trigger motions for their potential use in smart applications. Z.C. acknowledge support from Society in Science-Branco Weiss Fellowship, administered by ETH Zurich.

  17. A collection of edge-based elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Edge-based elements have proved useful in solving electromagnetic problems since they are nondivergent. Previous authors have presented several two and three dimensional elements. Herein, we present four types of elements which are suitable for modeling several types of three dimensional geometries. Distorted brick and triangular prism elements are given in cartesian coordinates as well as the specialized cylindrical shell and pie-shaped prism elements which are suitable for problems best described in polar cylindrical coordinates.

  18. Oyster shell conveyor used to lift shells from the dock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oyster shell conveyor used to lift shells from the dock into the receiving room housed in the 1965 concrete block addition. - J.C. Lore Oyster House, 14430 Solomons Island Road, Solomons, Calvert County, MD

  19. Finite-Element Modeling For Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Androlake, S. G.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents study of finite-element mathematical modeling as used in analyzing stresses and strains at joints between thin, shell-like components (e.g., ducts) and thicker components (e.g., flanges or engine blocks). First approach uses global/local model to evaluate system. Provides correct total response and correct representation of stresses away from any discontinuities. Second approach involves development of special transition finite elements to model transitions between shells and thicker structural components.

  20. Effects of Shell-Buckling Knockdown Factors in Large Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrinda, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    Shell-buckling knockdown factors (SBKF) have been used in large cylindrical shell structures to account for uncertainty in buckling loads. As the diameter of the cylinder increases, achieving the manufacturing tolerances becomes increasingly more difficult. Knockdown factors account for manufacturing imperfections in the shell geometry by decreasing the allowable buckling load of the cylinder. In this paper, large-diameter (33 ft) cylinders are investigated by using various SBKF's. An investigation that is based on finite-element analysis (FEA) is used to develop design sensitivity relationships. Different manufacturing imperfections are modeled into a perfect cylinder to investigate the effects of these imperfections on buckling. The analysis results may be applicable to large- diameter rockets, cylindrical tower structures, bulk storage tanks, and silos.

  1. Electron-impact-induced {ital K} plus {ital M} shell ionization in solid targets of medium-{ital Z} elements studied by means of high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ludziejewski, T.; Rymuza, P.; Sujkowski, Z.; Dousse, J.; Rheme, C.; Polasik, M.

    1996-07-01

    The {ital K}{beta}{sub 2} x-ray spectra of zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, and palladium bombarded by 150 and 300 keV electrons were measured with a high-resolution transmission curved crystal spectrometer. Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations were used for the decomposition of the experimental spectra into the {ital K}{beta}{sub 2}{ital M}{sup 0} (diagram) and {ital K}{beta}{sub 2}{ital M}{sup 1} (satellite) components. The probabilities of energy dependent (direct Coulomb and two-step) processes were estimated from the differences in the satellite line yields for electrons and photons. The satellite yields are found to be considerably enhanced in comparison with those for the proton-induced ionization recently measured and analyzed in the same way [T. Ludziejewski {ital et} {ital al}., Phys. Rev. A {bold 52}, 2791 (1995)]. This result indicates the importance of multielectron effects in the {ital K} plus {ital M} shell ionization by energetic projectiles. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Shell Creek Summers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seier, Mark; Goedeken, Suzy

    2005-01-01

    In 2002 Shell Creek Watershed Improvement Group turned to the Newman Grove Public Schools' science department to help educate the public on water quality in the watershed and to establish a monitoring system that would be used to improve surface and groundwater quality in the creek's watershed. Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality provided…

  3. Shell Higher Olefins Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how olefin isomerization and the exotic olefin metathesis reaction can be harnessed in industrial processes. Indicates that the Shell Higher Olefins Process makes use of organometallic catalysts to manufacture alpha-olefins and internal carbon-11 through carbon-14 alkenes in a flexible fashion that can be adjusted to market needs. (JN)

  4. BOWOOSS: bionic optimized wood shells with sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Göran

    2011-04-01

    In architecture, shell construction is used for the most efficient, large spatial structures. Until now the use of wood rather played a marginal role, implementing those examples of architecture, although this material offers manifold advantages, especially against the background of accelerating shortage of resources and increasing requirements concerning the energy balance. Regarding the implementation of shells, nature offers a wide range of suggestions. The focus of the examinations is on the shells of marine plankton, especially of diatoms, whose richness in species promises the discovery of entirely new construction principles. The project is targeting at transferring advantageous features of these organisms on industrial produced, modular wood shell structures. Currently a transfer of these structures in CAD - models is taking place, helping to perform stress analysis by computational methods. Micro as well as macro structures are the subject of diverse consideration, allowing to draw the necessary conclusions for an architectural design. The insights of these tests are the basis for the development of physical models on different scales, which are used to verify the different approaches. Another important aim which is promoted in the project is to enhance the competitiveness of timber construction. Downsizing of the prefabricated structural elements leads to considerable lower transportation costs as abnormal loads can be avoided as far as possible and means of transportation can be loaded with higher efficiency so that an important contribution to the sustainability in the field of architecture can also be made.

  5. 7 CFR 51.2002 - Split shell.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....2002 Split shell. Split shell means a shell having any crack which is open and conspicuous for a distance of more than one-fourth the circumference of the shell, measured in the direction of the crack....

  6. Augmented finite-element method for arbitrary cracking and crack interaction in solids under thermo-mechanical loadings.

    PubMed

    Jung, J; Do, B C; Yang, Q D

    2016-07-13

    In this paper, a thermal-mechanical augmented finite-element method (TM-AFEM) has been proposed, implemented and validated for steady-state and transient, coupled thermal-mechanical analyses of complex materials with explicit consideration of arbitrary evolving cracks. The method permits the derivation of explicit, fully condensed thermal-mechanical equilibrium equations which are of mathematical exactness in the piece-wise linear sense. The method has been implemented with a 4-node quadrilateral two-dimensional (2D) element and a 4-node tetrahedron three-dimensional (3D) element. It has been demonstrated, through several numerical examples that the new TM-AFEM can provide significantly improved numerical accuracy and efficiency when dealing with crack propagation problems in 2D and 3D solids under coupled thermal-mechanical loading conditions. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242303

  7. Hierarchic plate and shell models based on p-extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Barna A.; Sahrmann, Glenn J.

    1988-01-01

    Formulations of finite element models for beams, arches, plates and shells based on the principle of virtual work was studied. The focus is on computer implementation of hierarchic sequences of finite element models suitable for numerical solution of a large variety of practical problems which may concurrently contain thin and thick plates and shells, stiffeners, and regions where three dimensional representation is required. The approximate solutions corresponding to the hierarchic sequence of models converge to the exact solution of the fully three dimensional model. The stopping criterion is based on: (1) estimation of the relative error in energy norm; (2) equilibrium tests, and (3) observation of the convergence of quantities of interest.

  8. Nonlinear behavior of shells of revolution under cyclic loading.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H. S.; Armen, H., Jr.; Winter, R.; Pifko, A.

    1973-01-01

    A large deflection elastic-plastic analysis is presented applicable to orthotropic axisymmetric plates and shells of revolution subjected to monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. The analysis is based on the finite-element method. It employs a new higher order, fully compatible, doubly curved orthotropic shell-of-revolution element using cubic Hermitian expansions for both meridional and normal displacements. Both perfectly plastic and strain hardening behavior are considered. Strain hardening is incorporated through use of the Prager-Ziegler kinematic hardening theory, which predicts an ideal Bauschinger effect. Numerous sample problems involving monotonic and cyclic loading conditions are analyzed.

  9. Chemistry of the superheavy elements.

    PubMed

    Schädel, Matthias

    2015-03-13

    The quest for superheavy elements (SHEs) is driven by the desire to find and explore one of the extreme limits of existence of matter. These elements exist solely due to their nuclear shell stabilization. All 15 presently 'known' SHEs (11 are officially 'discovered' and named) up to element 118 are short-lived and are man-made atom-at-a-time in heavy ion induced nuclear reactions. They are identical to the transactinide elements located in the seventh period of the periodic table beginning with rutherfordium (element 104), dubnium (element 105) and seaborgium (element 106) in groups 4, 5 and 6, respectively. Their chemical properties are often surprising and unexpected from simple extrapolations. After hassium (element 108), chemistry has now reached copernicium (element 112) and flerovium (element 114). For the later ones, the focus is on questions of their metallic or possibly noble gas-like character originating from interplay of most pronounced relativistic effects and electron-shell effects. SHEs provide unique opportunities to get insights into the influence of strong relativistic effects on the atomic electrons and to probe 'relativistically' influenced chemical properties and the architecture of the periodic table at its farthest reach. In addition, they establish a test bench to challenge the validity and predictive power of modern fully relativistic quantum chemical models. PMID:25666065

  10. FABRICATION OF GAS-FILLED TUNGSTEN-COATED GLASS SHELLS

    SciTech Connect

    NIKROO,A; BAUGH,W; STEINMAN,D.A

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 Deuterium (D{sub 2}) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of {approx} 0.15 {micro}m/hr coatings with {approx} 2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 {micro}m/hr, was considerably worse ({approx} 100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 C.

  11. A variational justification of the assumed natural strain formulation of finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Militello, Carmelo; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to study the assumed natural strain (ANS) formulation of finite elements from a variational standpoint. The study is based on two hybrid extensions of the Reissner-type functional that uses strains and displacements as independent fields. One of the forms is a genuine variational principle that contains an independent boundary traction field, whereas the other one represents a restricted variational principle. Two procedures for element level elimination of the strain field are discussed, and one of them is shown to be equivalent to the inclusion of incompatible displacement modes. Also, the 4-node C(exp 0) plate bending quadrilateral element is used to illustrate applications of this theory.

  12. Beam to Shell Temperature Differencees for the CC Cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, R.; /Fermilab

    1991-02-05

    This note documents the calculation of stresses resulting from temperature differences between the CC cryostat shell and the module array support beams, and the calculation of corresponding maximum allowable temperature differences to be monitored during the cooldown of the cryostat. A finite element model of a portion of the inner vessel shell was analyzed for a uniform temperature change. The shell was assumed to be completely restrained by the support beams. A maximum allowable temperature difference was determined based on limits on secondary stress ranges prescribed by the ASME Code (Section VID, Division 2). The maximum allowable difference between the cryostat shell and the support beams was found to vary from about 18K near room temperature to about 30K as the shell temperature approaches liquid argon temperature. The allowable values are tabulated below and plotted in Figure 1. The variation results from the decrease in the coefficient of thermal expansion of stainless steels at lower temperatures. As shown in the plot, the variation is roughly linear. Note that although the shell is assumed to be at the lower temperature in Fig. 1, the limitation on temperature difference will also apply during warmup, when the shell will likely be warmer than the beams.

  13. X-ray fluorescence microtomography of SiC shells

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, G.E.; Chung, J.S.; Nagedolfeizi, M.

    1997-04-01

    TRISCO coated fuel particles contain a small kernel of nuclear fuel encapsulated by alternating layers of C and SiC. The TRISCO coated fuel particle is used in an advanced fuel designed for passive containment of the radioactive isotopes. The SiC layer provides the primary barrier for radioactive elements in the kernel. The effectiveness of this barrier layer under adverse conditions is critical to containment. The authors have begun the study of SiC shells from TRISCO fuel. They are using the fluorescent microprobe beamline 10.3.1. The shells under evaluation include some which have been cycled through a simulated core melt-down. The C buffer layers and nuclear kernels of the coated fuel have been removed by laser drilling through the SiC and then exposing the particle to acid. Elements of interest include Ru, Sb, Cs, Ce and Eu. The radial distribution of these elements in the SiC shells can be attributed to diffusion of elements in the kernel during the melt-down. Other elements in the shells originate during the fabrication of the TRISCO particles.

  14. Optimum shell design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, A. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Comparison of two methods, namely Nedler and Mead's (1965) simplex method and Davidon's (1959) variable metric method, for achieving optimum design in terms of minimum weight for rotational shells under certain constraints. The superiority of one of the methods over the other is shown to depend, among other things, upon the form of the function to be minimized, and whether or not it is continuous everywhere in values and derivatives.

  15. Electrochemical synthesis of core-shell magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovejero, Jesús G.; Bran, Cristina; Vilanova, Enrique; Kosel, Jürgen; Morales, María P.; Vazquez, Manuel

    2015-09-01

    (Fe, Ni, CoFe) @ Au core-shell magnetic nanowires have been synthesized by optimized two-step potentiostatic electrodeposition inside self-assembled nanopores of anodic aluminium templates. The optimal electrochemical parameters (e.g., potential) have been firstly determined for the growth of continuous Au nanotubes at the inner wall of pores. Then, a magnetic core was synthesized inside the Au shells under suitable electrochemical conditions for a wide spectrum of single elements and alloy compositions (e.g., Fe, Ni and CoFe alloy). Novel opportunities offered by such nanowires are discussed particularly, the magnetic behavior of (Fe, Ni, CoFe) @ Au core-shell nanowires was tested and compared with that of bare nanowires. These core-shell nanowires can be released from the template thereby opening novel opportunities for biofunctionalization of individual nanowires.

  16. Nonlinear shell analysis of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, N. F., Jr.; Gillian, R. E.; Nemeth, M. P.

    1990-01-01

    A variety of structural analyses have been performed on the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB's) to provide information that would contribute to the understanding of the failure which destroyed the Space Shuttle Challenger. This paper describes nonlinear shell analyses that were performed to characterize the behavior of an overall SRB structure and a segment of the SRB in the vicinity of the External Tank Attachment (ETA) ring. Shell finite element models were used that would accurately reflect the global load transfer in an SRB in a manner such that nonlinear shell collapse and ovalization could be assessed. The purpose of these analyses was to calculate the overall deflection and stress distributions for these SRB models when subjected to mechanical loads corresponding to critical times during the launch sequence. Static analyses of these SRB models were performed using a 'snapshot picture' of the loads. Analytical results obtained using these models show no evidence of nonlinear shell collapse for the pre-liftoff loading cases considered.

  17. Nonlinear shell analyses of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Gillian, Ronnie E.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    1989-01-01

    A variety of structural analyses have been performed on the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB's) to provide information that would contribute to the understanding of the failure which destroyed the Space Shuttle Challenger. This paper describes nonlinear shell analyses that were performed to characterize the behavior of an overall SRB structure and a segment of the SRB in the vicinity of the External Tank Attachment (ETA) ring. Shell finite element models were used that would accurately reflect the global load transfer in an SRB in a manner such that nonlinear shell collapse and ovalization could be assessed. The purpose of these analyses was to calculate the overall deflection and stress distributions for these SRB models when subjected to mechanical loads corresponding to critical times during the launch sequence. Static analyses of these SRB models were performed using a snapshot picture of the loads. Analytical results obtained using these models show no evidence of nonlinear shell collapse for the pre-liftoff loading cases considered.

  18. Finite element analysis of flexible, rotating blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, Oliver G.

    1987-01-01

    A reference guide that can be used when using the finite element method to approximate the static and dynamic behavior of flexible, rotating blades is given. Important parameters such as twist, sweep, camber, co-planar shell elements, centrifugal loads, and inertia properties are studied. Comparisons are made between NASTRAN elements through published benchmark tests. The main purpose is to summarize blade modeling strategies and to document capabilities and limitations (for flexible, rotating blades) of various NASTRAN elements.

  19. Vibrations of cantilevered shallow cylindrical shells of rectangular planform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.; Lee, J. K.; Wang, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    A cantilevered, shallow shell of circular cylindrical curvature and rectangular planform exhibits free vibration behavior which differs considerably from that of a cantilevered beam or of a flat plate. Some numerical results can be found for the problem in the previously published literature, mainly obtained by using various finite element methods. The present paper is the first definitive study of the problem, presenting accurate non-dimensional frequency parameters for wide ranges of aspect ratio, shallowness ratio and thickness ratio. The analysis is based upon shallow shell theory. Numerical results are obtained by using the Ritz method, with algebraic polynomial trial functions for the displacements. Convergence is investigated, with attention being given both to the number of terms taken for each co-ordinate direction and for each of the three components of displacement. Accuracy of the results is also established by comparison with finite element results for shallow shells and with other accurate flat plate solutions.

  20. Stress Recovery and Error Estimation for Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yazdani, A. A.; Riggs, H. R.; Tessler, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Penalized Discrete Least-Squares (PDLS) stress recovery (smoothing) technique developed for two dimensional linear elliptic problems is adapted here to three-dimensional shell structures. The surfaces are restricted to those which have a 2-D parametric representation, or which can be built-up of such surfaces. The proposed strategy involves mapping the finite element results to the 2-D parametric space which describes the geometry, and smoothing is carried out in the parametric space using the PDLS-based Smoothing Element Analysis (SEA). Numerical results for two well-known shell problems are presented to illustrate the performance of SEA/PDLS for these problems. The recovered stresses are used in the Zienkiewicz-Zhu a posteriori error estimator. The estimated errors are used to demonstrate the performance of SEA-recovered stresses in automated adaptive mesh refinement of shell structures. The numerical results are encouraging. Further testing involving more complex, practical structures is necessary.

  1. Vibrations of cantilevered shallow cylindrical shells of rectangular planform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leissa, A. W.; Lee, J. K.; Wang, A. J.

    1981-10-01

    A cantilevered, shallow shell of circular cylindrical curvature and rectangular planform exhibits free vibration behavior which differs considerably from that of a cantilevered beam or of a flat plate. Some numerical results can be found for the problem in the previously published literature, mainly obtained by using various finite element methods. The present paper is the first definitive study of the problem, presenting accurate non-dimensional frequency parameters for wide ranges of aspect ratio, shallowness ratio and thickness ratio. The analysis is based upon shallow shell theory. Numerical results are obtained by using the Ritz method, with algebraic polynomial trial functions for the displacements. Convergence is investigated, with attention being given both to the number of terms taken for each co-ordinate direction and for each of the three components of displacement. Accuracy of the results is also established by comparison with finite element results for shallow shells and with other accurate flat plate solutions.

  2. Non-linear dynamic analysis of anisotropic cylindrical shells

    SciTech Connect

    Lakis, A.A.; Selmane, A.; Toledano, A.

    1996-12-01

    A theory to predict the influence of geometric non-linearities on the natural frequencies of an empty anisotropic cylindrical shell is presented in this paper. It is a hybrid of finite element and classical thin shell theories. Sanders-Koiter non-linear and strain-displacement relations are used. Displacement functions are evaluated using linearized equations of motion. Modal coefficients are then obtained for these displacement functions. Expressions for the mass, linear and non-linear stiffness matrices are derived through the finite element method. The uncoupled equations are solved with the help of elliptic functions. The period and frequency variations are first determined as a function of shell amplitudes and then compared with the results in the literature.

  3. Effects of Imperfections on the Buckling Response of Compression-Loaded Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The results of an experimental and numerical study of the effects of imperfections on the buckling response of unstiffened thin-walled composite cylindrical shells are presented. Results that identify the individual and combined effects of traditional initial geometric shell-wall imperfections and non-traditional shell-wall thickness variations, shell-end geometric imperfections and variations in loads applied to the ends of the shells on the shell buckling response are included. In addition, results illustrating the effects of manufacturing flaws in the form of gaps between adjacent pieces of graphite-epoxy tape in some of the laminate plies are presented in detail. The shells have been analyzed with a nonlinear finite-element analysis code that accurately accounts for these effects on the buckling and nonlinear responses of the shells. The numerical results indicate that traditional and nontraditional initial imperfections can cause a significant reduction in the buckling load of a compression-loaded composite shell. Furthermore, the results indicate that the imperfections couple in a nonlinear manner. The numerical results correlate well with the experimental results. The nonlinear analysis results are also compared to the results from a traditional linear bifurcation buckling analysis. The results suggest that the nonlinear analysis procedure can be used for determining accurate, high-fidelity design knockdown factors for shell buckling and collapse. The results can also be used to determine the effects of manufacturing tolerances on the buckling response of composite shells.

  4. Effects of alga polysaccharide capsule shells on in-vivo bioavailability and disintegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Guo, Shuju; Ma, Lin; Yuan, Yi; Han, Lijun

    2012-01-01

    Gelatin has been used in hard capsule shells for more than a century, and some shortcomings have appeared, such as high moisture content and risk of transmitting diseases of animal origin to people. Based on available studies regarding gelatin and vegetable shells, we developed a new type of algal polysaccharide capsule (APPC) shells. To test whether our products can replace commercial gelatin shells, we measured in-vivo plasma concentration of 12 selected volunteers with a model drug, ibuprofen, using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), by calculating the relative bioavailability of APPC and Qualicaps® referenced to gelatin capsules and assessing bioequivalence of the three types of shells, and calculated pharmacokinetic parameters with the software DAS 2.0 (China). The results show that APPC shells possess bioequivalence with Qualicaps® and gelatin shells. Moreover, the disintegration behavior of four types of shells (APPC, Vegcaps®, Qualicaps® and gelatin shells) with the content of lactose and radioactive element (99mTc) was observed via gamma-scintigraphic images. The bioavailability and gamma-scintigraphic studies showed that APPC was not statistically different from other vegetable and gelatin capsule shells with respect to in-vivo behavior. Hence, it can be concluded that APPCs are exchangeable with other vegetable and gelatin shells.

  5. Shell structure from nuclear observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, I.; Rodríguez, Y. Colón; Cunningham, S.; Aprahamian, A.

    2016-04-01

    The appearance and disappearance of shells and subshells are determined using a previously introduced method of structural analysis. This work extends the approach and applies it to protons, in addition to neutrons, in an attempt to provide a more complete understanding of shell structure in nuclei. Experimental observables including the mean-square charge radius, as well as other spectroscopic and mass related quantities are analyzed for extrema. This analysis also uses differential observables among adjacent even-even nuclei to serve as the derivatives for these quantities of interest. Local extrema in these quantities indicate shell structure and the lack of local extrema indicate missing shell closures. The shell structure of low-mass nuclei is inconsistent likely as a consequence of the single-particle structure. Additionally, multiple shell features occurring in midshell regions are determined by combining information from two or more observables. Our results near stability complement previous observations further out.

  6. Rotating blade vibration analysis using shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.; Lee, J. K.; Wang, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Shallow shell theory and the Ritz method are employed to determine the frequencies and mode shapes of turbomachinery blades having both camber and twist, rotating with non-zero angles of attack. Frequencies obtained for different degrees of shallowness and thickness are compared with results available in the literature, obtained from finite element analyses of nonrotating blades. Frequencies are also determined for a rotating blade, showing the effects of changing the (1) angular velocity of rotation, (2) disk radius and (3) angle of attack, as well as the significance of the most important body force terms.

  7. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  8. The structure of circumstellar shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, John D.

    1993-01-01

    This document provides a report on research activities carried out with the support of NASA grant NAG 5-1174, the Structure of Circumstellar Shells, funded under the Astrophysics Data Program. The research carried out with the support of this grant is a study of the properties of circumstellar dust shells for which spectra are available through IRAS low resolution spectrometry (LRS). This research consisted of the development and application of models of axisymmetric circumstellar shells and a preliminary survey of the applicability of neural nets for analysis of the IRAS LRS spectra of circumstellar dust shells.

  9. Fiber optic well monitoring for Shell`s North Sea field

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    After eight years of development work, Alcatel Kabel Norge has reached an agreement with Shell U.K. Exploration and Production to install Alcatel`s first commercial Sub-Sea Fiber Optic Well Monitoring (FOWM) system in Shell`s Guillemot A-OP2 well on its completion in August 1996. The FOWM project was started in 1988 by Norske Shell and Alcatel. BP Norway joined the project in 1991, and additional support has been contributed by Norsk Hydro and the Norwegian Research Council. The first Alcatel FOWM system was installed in onshore gas Well 7 in NAM`s Sleen field in the Netherlands in October 1993. The final offshore test took place in late 1994, in BP Norway`s Well 2/1 A-32 in Gyda field, in the Norwegian North Sea. FOWM is a new type of permanently installed downhole monitoring system based on an optical sensor system integrating simple passive silicon resonator sensors with optical communication. The system tolerates high pressure and high temperatures (HPHT). Main elements that contribute to its high reliability are discussed.

  10. Nonideal contact in a composite shell structure with a deformable filler

    SciTech Connect

    Bedzir, A.A.; Shatskii, I.P.; Shopa, V.M.

    1995-11-01

    In [8], a model was proposed for investigating the frictional contact accompanying the compression of a deformable filler in an elastic cylindrical shell. The elastic equilibrium of coaxial continuous cylindrical shells and a deformable filler was considered in [5], taking account of the friction at the contact surfaces. In the present work, the stress-strain state and pliability of a shell system consisting of two coaxial cylindrical shells, one slotted and one continuous, that are separated by elastic filler is investigated in conditions of frictional contact. The model developed here serves as the basis for calculating the slotted elastic elements of drill shock absorbers.

  11. Equations of nonlinear dynamics of elastic shells in cylindrical Eulerian coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubov, L. M.

    2016-05-01

    The equations of dynamics of elastic shells subjected to large deformations are formulated. The Eulerian coordinates on a circular cylinder and time are accepted as independent variables, and one of the unknown functions is the distance from a point of the shell surface to the cylinder axis. The equations of dynamics of nonlinearly elastic shells in the Eulerian coordinates are convenient for exact formulation of the problem on the interaction of strongly deformable shells with moving fluids and gases. The equations obtained can be used for dynamic calculations of fluids and gases flowings in pipelines, blood vessels, hoses, and other nonlinearly deformable thin-walled tubular elements of constructions.

  12. Gas distribution and starbursts in shell galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weil, Melinda L.; Hernquist, Lars

    1993-01-01

    Detailed maps of most elliptical galaxies reveal that, whereas the greatest part of their luminous mass originates from a smooth distribution with a surface brightness approximated by a de Vaucouleurs law, a small percentage of their light is contributed by low surface brightness distortions termed 'fine structures'. The sharp-edged features called 'shells' are successfully reproduced by merger and infall models involving accretion from less massive companions. In this context, dwarf spheroidal and compact disk galaxies are likely progenitors of these stellar phenomena. However, it is probable that the sources of shell-forming material also contain significant amounts of gas. This component may play an important role in constraining the formation and evolution of shell galaxies. To investigate the effects of the gaseous component, numerical simulations were performed to study the tidal disruption of dwarf galaxies containing both gas and stars by more massive primaries, and the evolution of the ensuing debris. The calculations were performed with a hybrid N-body/hydrodynamics code. Collisionless matter is evolved using a conventional N-body technique and gas is treated using smoothed particle hydrodynamics in which self-gravitating fluid elements are represented as particles evolving according to Lagrangian hydrodynamic equations. An isothermal equation of state is employed so the gas remains at a temperature 104 K. Owing to the large mass ratio between the primary and companion, the primary is modeled as a rigid potential and the self-gravity of both galaxies is neglected.

  13. Buckling analysis of cylindrical shells with cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Limam, A.; Jullien, J.F.; Ouayou, B.S.

    1995-12-31

    In many areas of aeronautical nuclear and civil engineering practice, large thin-walled structural panels are increasingly becoming characteristic architectural features. Indeed, nuclear reactor vessels and cryogenic tanks of a launcher, for instance, are made up of several thin-walled panels welded together. Instability and buckling phenomenon present over-riding constraints on the design process. In addition, the presence of joints which are very often the origin of surface fissures poses increasing dangers on the overall stability of these structures. This research deals with the analysis of the effects of cracks on the behavior of cylindrical shells subject to external pressure. The study was divided into two major parts. In the first part, experiments were carried out with shells without cracks, in order to obtain reference data. A numerical study of various models explains the experimental results and shows the combined effect of the geometric imperfections and boundary conditions on the critical load. The second part focused on several experimental tests and numerical simulations on shells with in- depth fissures as a function of their population, orientation, length and position with respect to the welds or joints. The agreement between numerical and experimental results confirms the new possibility to design with the aid of the finite element program under the condition that the calculations are carried out by means of an appropriate numerical method.

  14. Automated shell theory for rotating structures (ASTROS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. J.; Thomas, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program for analyzing axisymmetric shells with inertial forces caused by rotation about the shell axis is developed by revising the STARS II shell program. The basic capabilities of the STARS II shell program, such as the treatment of the branched shells, stiffened wall construction, and thermal gradients, are retained.

  15. STUDIES ON SHELL FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Watabe, Norimitsu; Wilbur, Karl M.

    1961-01-01

    Details of crystal growth in the calcitostracum of Crassostrea virginica have been studied with the purpose of analyzing the formation of the overlapping rows of oriented tabular crystals characteristic of this part of the shell. Crystal elongation, orientation, and dendritic growth suggest the presence of strong concentration gradients in a thin layer of solution in which crystallization occurs. Formation of the overlapping rows can be explained by three processes observed in the shell: a two-dimensional tree-like dendritic growth in which one set of crystal branchings creeps over an adjacent set of branchings; three-dimensional dendritic growth; and growth by dislocation of crystal surfaces. Multilayers of crystals may thus be formed at one time. This is favored by infrequent secretion of a covering organic matrix which would inhibit crystal growth. The transitional zone covering the outer part of the calcitostracum and the inner part of the prismatic region is generally characterized by aggregates of small crystals with definite orientation. Growth in this zone appears to take place in a relatively homogeneous state of solution without strong concentration gradients. Thin membranes and bands of organic matrix were commonly observed in the transitional zone bordering the prismatic region. The membrane showed a very fine oriented network pattern. PMID:13783329

  16. Studies on Shell Formation

    PubMed Central

    Watabe, Norimitsu; Sharp, D. Gordon; Wilbur, Karl M.

    1958-01-01

    Electron microscope observations have been made by means of the replica method on growth processes of calcite crystals of the nacreous layer of the shell of the oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Layer formation is initiated by the secretion of a conchiolin matrix and the deposition of rounded crystal seeds on or in this material. In some areas crystal seeds are elongate and within a given area show a similar orientation, probably due to slower deposition. The seeds appear to increase in size by dendritic growth, and smaller seeds become incorporated into larger ones which come into contact to form a single layer. With further growth, crystals overlap, forming a step-like arrangement. The direction of growth is frequently different in neighboring regions. Crystal seeds deposited on crystal surfaces are usually elongate and oriented. Well developed crystals have a tabular idiomorphic form and are parallel in their growth. Rounded and irregular crystals were also observed. The crystals show reticular structure with units of the order of 100 A and striations corresponding with the rhombohedral axes of the crystals. The role of the mantle is discussed in relation to the growth patterns of crystals and shell structure. PMID:13549499

  17. Fracture mechanics analyses of partial crack closure in shell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun

    2007-12-01

    This thesis presents the theoretical and finite element analyses of crack-face closure behavior in shells and its effect on the stress intensity factor under a bending load condition. Various shell geometries, such as spherical shell, cylindrical shell containing an axial crack, cylindrical shell containing a circumferential crack and shell with double curvatures, are all studied. In addition, the influence of material orthotropy on the crack closure effect in shells is also considered. The theoretical formulation is developed based on the shallow shell theory of Delale and Erdogan, incorporating the effect of crack-face closure at the compressive edges. The line-contact assumption, simulating the crack-face closure at the compressive edges, is employed so that the contact force at the closure edges is introduced, which can be translated to the mid-plane of the shell, accompanied by an additional distributed bending moment. The unknown contact force is computed by solving a mixed-boundary value problem iteratively, that is, along the crack length, either the normal displacement of the crack face at the compressive edges is equal to zero or the contact pressure is equal to zero. It is found that due to the curvature effects crack closure may not always occur on the entire length of the crack, depending on the direction of the bending load and the geometry of the shell. The crack-face closure influences significantly the magnitude of the stress intensity factors; it increases the membrane component but decreases the bending component. The maximum stress intensity factor is reduced by the crack-face closure. The significant influence of geometry and material orthotropy on rack closure behavior in shells is also predicted based on the analytical solutions. Three-dimensional FEA is performed to validate the theoretical solutions. It demonstrates that the crack face closure occurs actually over an area, not on a line, but the theoretical solutions of the stress intensity

  18. Deformation of an elastic shell with variable thickness: a comparison of different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalousová, K.; Souček, O.; Čadek, O.

    2012-08-01

    Deformation of the outermost parts of single-plate planetary bodies is often modelled in terms of the response of a spherical elastic shell to surface or basal loading. As the thickness of such elastic lithosphere is usually much smaller than the radius of the body, the deformation is commonly approximated by that obtained for a thin elastic shell of uniform thickness. The main advantage of the thin shell approximation is its simplicity—the solution can be expressed analytically if the thickness of the shell is uniform, but even in the case of a thin shell of variable thickness, when the problem must be solved numerically, the computational costs are much lower than in a fully 3-D case. Here we analyse the error of the thin shell approximation by comparing it with the solution obtained for a shell of finite thickness using finite element methods. Special attention is paid to a shell of variable thickness and, in general, to the effect of elastic thickness variations on local deformation. For a shell of uniform thickness with the outer radius corresponding to Mars, we find that the error in radial displacement at low harmonic degrees (ℓ≤ 20) does not exceed 5 per cent for small shell thicknesses (d≤ 50 km) and 10 per cent for thick shells (d˜ 250 km). Similar accuracy is also found for a shell of variable thickness if the thin shell approximation is used. Our numerical tests indicate that local deformation of a shell is mostly sensitive to the average thickness of the shell in the near zone while the effect of thickness variations in the far zone can be neglected in the first approximation. Consequently, the extremely simple thin shell method, designed for shells of uniform thickness, can be effectively used to obtain a reasonably accurate estimate of deflection even in the case of a shell with varying thickness. Finally, we investigate the deformation of an elastic lithosphere due to viscous flow beneath the shell, and we propose an extension of the

  19. Hi shells, supershells, shell-like objects, and ''worms''

    SciTech Connect

    Heiles, C.

    1984-08-01

    We present photographic representations of the combination of two Hi surveys, so as to eliminate the survey boundaries at Vertical BarbVertical Bar = 10/sup 0/. We also present high-contrast photographs for particular velocities to exhibit weak Hi features. All of these photographs were used to prepare a new list of Hi shells, supershells, and shell-like objects. We discuss the structure of three shell-like objects that are associated with high-velocity gas, and with gas at all velocities that is associated with radio continuum loops I, II, and III. We use spatial filtering to find wiggly gas filaments: ''worms'': crawling away from the galactic plane in the inner Galaxy. The ''worms'' are probably parts of shells that are open at the top; such shells should be good sources of hot gas for the galactic halo.

  20. Design of an Electrostatic Comb Actuator Based on Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon, Thet Thet; Ghazalli, Zakri; Ahmad, Asnul Hadi; Ismail, Mohd Fazli; Muhamad, Khairul Fikri

    2011-05-01

    Electrostatic comb actuators were designed using finite element modeling and analysis, so-called finite element method (FEM). Design objective was to generate maximum actuating force within the constraints. 2D and 3D FE models of the comb structures were developed in general-purpose FE code. The element geometries were 4-node plate element for 2D model and 8-node brick element for 3D models. Electrostatic field strength and voltage analysis of the FE models were performed to compute generated voltage and electrostatic force in the structure. Subsequently done was the structural analysis to examine structural response to the electrostatic force. The initial finite element model was verified with the published experimental result. Based on the amount of force generated and lateral deflection of the comb fingers, the best possible design of choice was determined. The finite element computations show that the comb structure having high aspect ratio with smaller gaps can provide higher actuation force.

  1. Stress and vibraton analyses of anisotropic shells of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1988-01-01

    An efficient computational strategy is presented for reducing the cost of the stress and free vibration analyses of laminated anisotropic shells of revolution. The analytical formulation is based on a form of the Sanders-Budiansky shell theory including the effects of both the transverse shear deformation and the laminated anisotropic material response. The fundamental unknowns consist of the eight strain components, the eight stress resultants and the five generalized displacements of the shell. Each of the shell variables is expressed in terms of trigonometric functions (Fourier series) in the circumferential co-ordinate, and a three-field mixed finite element model is used for the discretization in the meridional direction. The shell response associated with a range of Fourier harmonics is approximated by a linear combination of a few global approximation vectors, which are generated at a particular value of the Fourier harmonic, within that range. The full equations of the finite element model are solved for only a single Fourier harmonic, and the response corresponding to the other Fourier harmonics is generated using a reduced system of equations with considerably fewer degrees of freedom.

  2. Imperfection Insensitivity Analyses of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Farrokh, Babak; Stanford, Bret K.; Weaver, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Two advanced composite tow-steered shells, one with tow overlaps and another without overlaps, were previously designed, fabricated and tested in end compression, both without cutouts, and with small and large cutouts. In each case, good agreement was observed between experimental buckling loads and supporting linear bifurcation buckling analyses. However, previous buckling tests and analyses have shown historically poor correlation, perhaps due to the presence of geometric imperfections that serve as failure initiators. For the tow-steered shells, their circumferential variation in axial stiffness may have suppressed this sensitivity to imperfections, leading to the agreement noted between tests and analyses. To investigate this further, a numerical investigation was performed in this study using geometric imperfections measured from both shells. Finite element models of both shells were analyzed first without, and then, with measured imperfections that were then, superposed in different orientations around the shell longitudinal axis. Small variations in both the axial prebuckling stiffness and global buckling load were observed for the range of imperfections studied here, which suggests that the tow steering, and resulting circumferentially varying axial stiffness, may result in the test-analysis correlation observed for these shells.

  3. Testing refined shell-model interactions in the s d shell: Coulomb excitation of 26Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebeck, B.; Seidlitz, M.; Blazhev, A.; Reiter, P.; Altenkirch, R.; Bauer, C.; Butler, P. A.; de Witte, H.; Elseviers, J.; Gaffney, L. P.; Hess, H.; Huyse, M.; Kröll, T.; Lutter, R.; Pakarinen, J.; Pietralla, N.; Radeck, F.; Scheck, M.; Schneiders, D.; Sotty, C.; van Duppen, P.; Vermeulen, M.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Miniball Collaboration; Rex-Isolde Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shell-model calculations crucially depend on the residual interaction used to approximate the nucleon-nucleon interaction. Recent improvements to the empirical universal s d interaction (USD) describing nuclei within the s d shell yielded two new interactions—USDA and USDB—causing changes in the theoretical description of these nuclei. Purpose: Transition matrix elements between excited states provide an excellent probe to examine the underlying shell structure. These observables provide a stringent test for the newly derived interactions. The nucleus 26Na with 7 valence neutrons and 3 valence protons outside the doubly-magic 16O core is used as a test case. Method: A radioactive beam experiment with 26Na (T1 /2=1 ,07 s ) was performed at the REX-ISOLDE facility (CERN) using Coulomb excitation at safe energies below the Coulomb barrier. Scattered particles were detected with an annular Si detector in coincidence with γ rays observed by the segmented MINIBALL array. Coulomb excitation cross sections of the beam have been obtained by normalization to the well known Coulomb excitation cross sections of the 104Pd target. Results: The observation of three γ -ray transitions in 26Na together with available spectroscopic data allows us to determine E 2 - and M 1 -transitional matrix elements. Results are compared to theoretical predictions. Conclusion: The improved theoretical description of 26Na could be validated. Remaining discrepancies between experimental data and theoretical predictions indicate the need for future experiments and possibly further theoretical improvements.

  4. Biomechanics of turtle shells: how whole shells fail in compression.

    PubMed

    Magwene, Paul M; Socha, John J

    2013-02-01

    Turtle shells are a form of armor that provides varying degrees of protection against predation. Although this function of the shell as armor is widely appreciated, the mechanical limits of protection and the modes of failure when subjected to breaking stresses have not been well explored. We studied the mechanical properties of whole shells and of isolated bony tissues and sutures in four species of turtles (Trachemys scripta, Malaclemys terrapin, Chrysemys picta, and Terrapene carolina) using a combination of structural and mechanical tests. Structural properties were evaluated by subjecting whole shells to compressive and point loads in order to quantify maximum load, work to failure, and relative shell deformations. The mechanical properties of bone and sutures from the plastral region of the shell were evaluated using three-point bending experiments. Analysis of whole shell structural properties suggests that small shells undergo relatively greater deformations before failure than do large shells and similar amounts of energy are required to induce failure under both point and compressive loads. Location of failures occurred far more often at sulci than at sutures (representing the margins of the epidermal scutes and the underlying bones, respectively), suggesting that the small grooves in the bone created by the sulci introduce zones of weakness in the shell. Values for bending strength, ultimate bending strain, Young's modulus, and energy absorption, calculated from the three-point bending data, indicate that sutures are relatively weaker than the surrounding bone, but are able to absorb similar amounts of energy due to higher ultimate strain values. PMID:23203474

  5. Nonlinear Local Bending Response and Bulging Factors for Longitudinal Cracks in Pressurized Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Young, Richard D.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Results of a geometrically nonlinear finite element parametric study to determine curvature correction factors or "bulging factors" that account for increased stresses due to curvature for longitudinal cracks in unstiffened pressurized cylindrical shells are presented. Geometric parameters varied in the study include the shell radius, the shell wall thickness, and the crack length. The major results are presented in graphs of the bulging factor as a function of the applied load and as a function of geometric parameters that include the shell radius, the shell thickness and the crack length. The computed bulging factors are compared with solutions based on linear shallow shell theory, and with semi-empirical solutions that approximately account for the nonlinear deformation in the vicinity of the crack. The effect of biaxial loads on the computed bulging factors is also discussed.

  6. Biomineralisation in Mollusc shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphin, Y.; Cuif, J. P.; Salomé, M.; Williams, C. T.

    2009-04-01

    The main components of Mollusc shells are carbonate minerals: calcite and aragonite. ACC is present in larval stages. Calcite and aragonite can be secreted simultaneously by the mantle. Despite the small number of varieties, the arrangement of the mineral components is diverse, and dependant upon the taxonomy. They are also associated with organic components much more diverse, the diversity of which reflects the large taxonomic diversity. From TGA analyses, the organic content (water included) is high (>5% in some layers). The biomineralisation process is not a passive precipitation process, but is strongly controlled by the organism. The biological-genetic control is shown by the constancy of the arrangement of the layers, the mineralogy and the microstructure in a given species. Microstructural units (i.e. tablets, prisms etc.) have shapes that do not occur in non-biogenic counterparts. Nacreous tablets, for example, are flattened on their crystallographic c axis, which is normally the axis of maximum growth rate for non-biogenic aragonite. Morever, their inner structure is species-specific: the arrangements of nacreous tablets in Gastropoda - Cephalopoda, and in Bivalvia differ, and the inner arrangement of the nacreous tablets is different in ectocochlear and endocochlear Cephalopoda. The organic-mineral ratios also differ in the various layers of a shell. Differences in chemical composition also demonstrates the biological-genetic control: for example, aragonite has a low Sr content unknown in non-biogenic samples; two aragonitic layers in a shell have different Sr and Mg contents, S is higher in calcitic layers. Decalcification releases soluble (SOM) and insoluble (IOM) organic components. Insoluble components form the main part of the intercrystalline membranes, and contain proteins, polysaccharides and lipids. Soluble phases are present within the crystals and the intercrystalline membranes. These phases are composed of more or less glycosylated proteins

  7. detached_shells_carbon_stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hony, Sacha; Bouwman, Jeroen; Waters, Laurens

    2004-09-01

    We propose to obtain 19-37 micrometer IRS spectra of the detached shells around nearby carbon-stars. We have selected a small (11) sample of bright, well studied, carbon-stars with known detached shells. The sample covers a range of angular diameters of the detached shells from 8-200" and stellar effective temperatures between 800-2600 K. With the spectra of the dust in the detached shell we aim to establish: i) The location of the shell. ii) The chemistry of the shell in order to constrain it's origin. iii) Test the MgS identification for the ``30'' micrometer emission feature. iv) Determine observationally the relationship between the ``30'' micrometer feature peak-position and the distance to the star. These observations will contribute greatly to the understanding AGB-star mass loss, in general, and the phenomenon of detached shells around carbon-stars, in particular. They will also be used to develop a diagnostic tool that allows to study detached shell properties of distant carbon-stars, that cannot be spatially resolved, based on their IR spectrum alone. The total requested time is 2.5h.

  8. Foam shell cryogenic ICF target

    DOEpatents

    Darling, Dale H.

    1987-01-01

    A uniform cryogenic layer of DT fuel is maintained in a fusion target having a low density, small pore size, low Z rigid foam shell saturated with liquid DT fuel. Capillary action prevents gravitational slumping of the fuel layer. The saturated shell may be cooled to produce a solid fuel layer.

  9. Manufacturing Complicated Shells And Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobol, Paul J.; Faucher, Joseph E.

    1993-01-01

    Explosive forming, wax filling, and any one of welding, diffusion bonding, or brazing used in method of manufacturing large, complicated shell-and-liner vessels or structures. Method conceived for manufacture of film-cooled rocket nozzles but applicable to joining large coaxial shells and liners in general.

  10. Dynamic stability of periodic shells with moving loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzzene, M.; Baz, A.

    2006-10-01

    A moving load causes the radial displacements of an axi-symmetric shell to be several times higher than that produced by the static application of the same load. The travel velocity of the moving load affects the amplitude of the radial response and a critical velocity above which the shell response becomes unstable can be identified. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to analyze the dynamic response of axi-symmetric shells subjected to axially moving loads. The model accounts for the effect of periodically placing stiffening rings along the shell, on the dynamic response and stability characteristics of the shell. Shape functions obtained from the steady-state solution of the equation of motion for a uniform shell are utilized in the development of the FEM. The model is formulated in a reference frame moving with the load in order to enable study of the shell stability using wave propagation and attenuation criteria. Hence, the critical velocity can be identified as the minimum velocity allowing the propagation of applied perturbations. Such stability boundaries are conveniently identified through a transfer matrix formulation. The model is used to determine the critical velocities of the moving load for various arrangements and geometry of the stiffening rings. The obtained results indicate that stiffening the shell generally increases the critical velocity and generates a pattern of alternating stable and unstable regions. The presented analysis provides a viable means for designing a wide variety of stable dynamic systems operating with fast moving loads such as crane booms, robotic arms and gun barrels.

  11. Dynamic stability of periodic shells with moving loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzzene, Massimo; Baz, Amr M.

    2001-08-01

    A moving load causes the radial displacements of an axi- symmetric shell to be several times higher than that produced by the static application of the same load. The travel velocity of the moving load affects the amplitude of the radial response and a critical velocity above which the shell response becomes unstable can be identified. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to analyze the dynamic response of axi-symmetric shells subjected to axially moving loads. The model accounts for the effect of periodically placing stiffening rings along the shell, on the dynamic response and stability characteristics of the shell. Shape functions obtained from the steady-state solution of the equation of motion for a uniform shell are utilized in the development of the FEM. The model is formulated in a reference frame moving with the load in order to enable studying the shell stability using wave propagation and attenuation criteria. Hence, the critical velocity can be identified as the minimum velocity allowing the propagation of applied perturbations. Such stability boundaries are conveniently identified through a transfer mis formulation. The model is used to determine the critical velocities of the moving load for various arrangements and geometry of the stiffening rings. The obtained results indicate that stiffening the shell generally increases the critical velocity and generates a pattern of alternating stable and unstable regions. The presented analysis provides a viable means for designing a wide variety of stable dynamic systems operating with fast moving loads such as crane booms, robotic arms and gun barrels.

  12. Improved Connector Shell for Cable Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, A. L.; Rotta, J. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Cable connector shell improves electrostatic and electromagnetic shielding by electrically connecting cable braid around entire circumference. Connector cable braid is slipped over ferrule and sleeve is slipped over braid, clamping it tightly to shell. Connector shell completely shields cable conductors.

  13. Core-shell nanostructured catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Lee, Ilkeun; Joo, Ji Bong; Zaera, Francisco; Yin, Yadong

    2013-08-20

    Novel nanotechnologies have allowed great improvements in the syn-thesis of catalysts with well-controlled size, shape, and surface properties. Transition metal nanostructures with specific sizes and shapes, for instance, have shown great promise as catalysts with high selectivities and relative ease of recycling. Researchers have already demonstrated new selective catalysis with solution-dispersed or supported-metal nanocatalysts, in some cases applied to new types of reactions. Several challenges remain, however, particularly in improving the structural stability of the catalytic active phase. Core-shell nanostructures are nanoparticles encapsulated and protected by an outer shell that isolates the nanoparticles and prevents their migration and coalescence during the catalytic reactions. The synthesis and characterization of effective core-shell catalysts has been at the center of our research efforts and is the focus of this Account. Efficient core-shell catalysts require porous shells that allow free access of chemical species from the outside to the surface of nanocatalysts. For this purpose, we have developed a surface-protected etching process to prepare mesoporous silica and titania shells with controllable porosity. In certain cases, we can tune catalytic reaction rates by adjusting the porosity of the outer shell. We also designed and successfully applied a silica-protected calcination method to prepare crystalline shells with high surface area, using anatase titania as a model system. We achieved a high degree of control over the crystallinity and porosity of the anatase shells, allowing for the systematic optimization of their photocatalytic activity. Core-shell nanostructures also provide a great opportunity for controlling the interaction among the different components in ways that might boost structural stability or catalytic activity. For example, we fabricated a SiO₂/Au/N-doped TiO₂ core-shell photocatalyst with a sandwich structure that showed

  14. Nonlinear Local Bending Response and Bulging Factors for Longitudinal and Circumferential Cracks in Pressurized Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Results of a geometrically nonlinear finite element parametric study to determine curvature correction factors or bulging factors that account for increased stresses due to curvature for longitudinal and circumferential cracks in unstiffened pressurized cylindrical shells are presented. Geometric parameters varied in the study include the shell radius, the shell wall thickness, and the crack length. The major results are presented in the form of contour plots of the bulging factor as a function of two nondimensional parameters: the shell curvature parameter, lambda, which is a function of the shell geometry, Poisson's ratio, and the crack length; and a loading parameter, eta, which is a function of the shell geometry, material properties, and the applied internal pressure. These plots identify the ranges of the shell curvature and loading parameters for which the effects of geometric nonlinearity are significant. Simple empirical expressions for the bulging factor are then derived from the numerical results and shown to predict accurately the nonlinear response of shells with longitudinal and circumferential cracks. The numerical results are also compared with analytical solutions based on linear shallow shell theory for thin shells, and with some other semi-empirical solutions from the literature, and limitations on the use of these other expressions are suggested.

  15. Design and Analysis of Tow-Steered Composite Shells Using Fiber Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a sub-scale advanced composite shell design is evaluated to determine its potential for use on a future aircraft fuselage. Two composite shells with the same nominal 8-ply [+/-45/+/-Theta](sub s) layup are evaluated, where Theta indicates a tow-steered ply. To build this shell, a fiber placement machine would be used to steer unidirectional prepreg tows as they are placed around the circumference of a 17-inch diameter right circular cylinder. The fiber orientation angle varies continuously from 10 degrees (with respect to the shell axis of revolution) at the crown, to 45 degrees on the side, and back to 10 degrees on the keel. All 24 tows are placed at each point on every fiber path in one structure designated as the shell with overlaps. The resulting pattern of tow overlaps causes the laminate thickness to vary between 8 and 16 plies. The second shell without tow overlaps uses the capability of the fiber placement machine to cut and add tows at any point along the fiber paths to fabricate a shell with a nearly uniform 8-ply laminate thickness. Issues encountered during the design and analysis of these shells are presented and discussed. Static stiffness and buckling loads of shells with tow-steered layups are compared with the performance of a baseline quasi-isotropic shell using both finite element analyses and classical strength of materials theory.

  16. The effects of laterally varying icy shell structure on the tidal response of Ganymede and Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, G.; Wahr, J.; Zhong, S.

    2014-03-01

    We use a finite-element model to solve for the response of Ganymede and Europa to tidal forcing from Jupiter, using various icy shell models with laterally variable (3-D) structure. In all cases, the shell is assumed to be underlain by a liquid-water ocean. Icy shells with laterally varying thickness are derived from a thermal conduction model. Three-dimensional shear modulus profiles for the shell are built either from a conduction model or, for Europa, by assuming a hemispherical difference in composition. Icy shell structures with a nonglobal ocean are built for Ganymede. Using these shell structures to calculate the tidal response of Ganymede and Europa, we conclude the following: (1) the presence of lateral variations in thickness or in shear modulus would not degrade future attempts to use tidal observations to decide on the existence or absence of a liquid ocean and to determine the mean icy shell thickness. (2) Given accurate enough observations, the presence of lateral variations in thickness or in shear modulus could be determined by searching for nondegree-2 components in the tidal response. (3) In the absence of significant viscous convective flow in the shell, the effects of a laterally varying shear modulus on the tidal response would be smaller than those of a laterally varying shell thickness. (4) If the shell is partially grounded, tidal observations of either gravity or uplift would be able to roughly differentiate regions where the ice is grounded from those where it is floating.

  17. The Discoveries of Bohrium, Hassium, Meitnerium, and the New Region of Deformed Shell Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenzenberg, Gottfried

    2003-03-01

    The investigation of the light trans-actinide elements was not only exciting as it included the discovery of a number of new chemical elements. It led also to the discovery of a new region of shell nuclei existing beyond the macroscopic stability limit. Theory explained this in terms of a new shell region of deformed nuclei which bridge the trans-uranium nuclei and the predicted superheavy elements. This contribution will give a brief historic overview over these discoveries, experimental developments, and the impact on ongoing and future superheavy-element research.

  18. Layerwise Finite Elements for Smart Piezoceramic Composite Plates in Thermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.; Lee, Ho-Jun

    1996-01-01

    Analytical formulations are presented which account for the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal response of piezoelectric composite laminates and plate structures. A layerwise theory is formulated with the inherent capability to explicitly model the active and sensory response of piezoelectric composite plates having arbitrary laminate configurations in thermal environments. Finite element equations are derived and implemented for a bilinear 4-noded plate element. Application cases demonstrate the capability to manage thermally induced bending and twisting deformations in symmetric and antisymmetric composite plates with piezoelectric actuators, and show the corresponding electrical response of distributed piezoelectric sensors. Finally, the resultant stresses in the thermal piezoelectric composite laminates are investigated.

  19. Design and Analysis of an X-Ray Mirror Assembly Using the Meta-Shell Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClelland, Ryan S.; Bonafede, Joseph; Saha, Timo T.; Solly, Peter M.; Zhang, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Lightweight and high resolution optics are needed for future space-based x-ray telescopes to achieve advances in high-energy astrophysics. Past missions such as Chandra and XMM-Newton have achieved excellent angular resolution using a full shell mirror approach. Other missions such as Suzaku and NuSTAR have achieved lightweight mirrors using a segmented approach. This paper describes a new approach, called meta-shells, which combines the fabrication advantages of segmented optics with the alignment advantages of full shell optics. Meta-shells are built by layering overlapping mirror segments onto a central structural shell. The resulting optic has the stiffness and rotational symmetry of a full shell, but with an order of magnitude greater collecting area. Several meta-shells so constructed can be integrated into a large x-ray mirror assembly by proven methods used for Chandra and XMM-Newton. The mirror segments are mounted to the meta-shell using a novel four point semi-kinematic mount. The four point mount deterministically locates the segment in its most performance sensitive degrees of freedom. Extensive analysis has been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the four point mount and meta-shell approach. A mathematical model of a meta-shell constructed with mirror segments bonded at four points and subject to launch loads has been developed to determine the optimal design parameters, namely bond size, mirror segment span, and number of layers per meta-shell. The parameters of an example 1.3 m diameter mirror assembly are given including the predicted effective area. To verify the mathematical model and support opto-mechanical analysis, a detailed finite element model of a meta-shell was created. Finite element analysis predicts low gravity distortion and low sensitivity to thermal gradients.

  20. Shell forming apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Granett, Dan (Inventor); Akutagawa, Wesley M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A nozzle assembly is described for use in a system that forms small gas-filled shells, which avoids the need for holding a miniature inner nozzle precisely concentric with a miniature outer nozzle. The outer nozzle has a diameter which is less than about 0.7 millimeter, which results in fluid passing through the nozzle having a progressively greater velocity at locations progressively further from the walls of the outer nozzle across most of the nozzle. This highly variable velocity profile automatically forces gas to the center of the outer nozzle. The end of the inner nozzle, which emits gas, is spaced upstream from the tip of the outer nozzle, to provide a distance along which to center the gas. This self-centering characteristic permits the inner nozzle to be positioned so its axis is not concentric with the axis of the outer nozzle.

  1. Composite shell spacecraft seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barackman, Victor J. (Inventor); Pulley, John K. (Inventor); Simon, Xavier D. (Inventor); McKee, Sandra D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A two-part seat (10) providing full body support that is specific for each crew member (30) on an individual basis. The two-part construction for the seat (10) can accommodate many sizes and shapes for crewmembers (30) because it is reconfigurable and therefore reusable for subsequent flights. The first component of the two-part seat construction is a composite shell (12) that surrounds the crewmember's entire body and is generically fitted to their general size in height and weight. The second component of the two-part seat (10) is a cushion (20) that conforms exactly to the specific crewmember's entire body and gives total body support in more complex environment.

  2. Single-shell tank retrieval program mission analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, W.J.

    1998-08-11

    This Mission Analysis Report was prepared to provide the foundation for the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Program, a new program responsible for waste removal for the SSTS. The SST Retrieval Program is integrated with other Tank Waste Remediation System activities that provide the management, technical, and operations elements associated with planning and execution of SST and SST Farm retrieval and closure. This Mission Analysis Report provides the basis and strategy for developing a program plan for SST retrieval. This Mission Analysis Report responds to a US Department of Energy request for an alternative single-shell tank retrieval approach (Taylor 1997).

  3. An Energy Decaying Scheme for Nonlinear Dynamics of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottasso, Carlo L.; Bauchau, Olivier A.; Choi, Jou-Young; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A novel integration scheme for nonlinear dynamics of geometrically exact shells is developed based on the inextensible director assumption. The new algorithm is designed so as to imply the strict decay of the system total mechanical energy at each time step, and consequently unconditional stability is achieved in the nonlinear regime. Furthermore, the scheme features tunable high frequency numerical damping and it is therefore stiffly accurate. The method is tested for a finite element spatial formulation of shells based on mixed interpolations of strain tensorial components and on a two-parameter representation of director rotations. The robustness of the, scheme is illustrated with the help of numerical examples.

  4. Wilson lines and gauge invariant off-shell amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotko, Piotr

    2014-07-01

    We study matrix elements of Fourier-transformed straight infinite Wilson lines as a way to calculate gauge invariant tree-level amplitudes with off-shell gluons. The off-shell gluons are assigned "polarization vectors" which (in the Feynman gauge) are transverse to their off-shell momenta and define the direction of the corresponding Wilson line operators. The infinite Wilson lines are first regularized to prove the correctness of the method. We have implemented the method in a computer FORM program that can calculate gluonic matrix elements of Wilson line operators automatically. In addition we formulate the Feynman rules that are convenient in certain applications, e.g. proving the Ward identities. Using both the program and the Feynman rules we calculate a few examples, in particular the matrix elements corresponding to gauge invariant g * g * g * g and g * g * g * g * g processes. An immediate application of the approach is in the high energy scattering, as in a special kinematic setup our results reduce to the form directly related to Lipatov's vertices. Thus the results we present can be directly transformed into Lipatov's vertices, in particular into RRRP and RRRRP vertices with arbitrary "orientation" of reggeized gluons. Since the formulation itself is not restricted to high-energy scattering, we also apply the method to a decomposition of an ordinary on-shell amplitude into a set of gauge invariant objects.

  5. Buckling characteristic of multi-laminated composite elliptical cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassegne, Samuel Kinde; Chun, Kyoung-Sik

    2015-03-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite materials continue to experience increased adoption in aerospace, marine, automobile, and civil structures due to their high specific strength, high stiffness, and light weight. This increased use has been accompanied by applications involving non-traditional configurations such as compression members with elliptical cross-sections. To model such shapes, we develop and report an improved generalized shell element called 4EAS-FS through a combination of enhanced assumed strain and the substitute shear strain fields. A flat shell element has been developed by combining a membrane element with drilling degree-of-freedom and a plate bending element. We use the element developed to determine specifically buckling loads and mode shapes of composite laminates with elliptical cross-section including transverse shear deformations. The combined influence of shell geometry and elliptical cross-sectional parameters, fiber angle, and lay-up on the buckling loads of an elliptical cylinder is examined. It is hoped that the critical buckling loads and mode shapes presented here will serve as a benchmark for future investigations.

  6. Buckling and Damage Resistance of Transversely-Loaded Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardle, Brian L.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental and numerical work was conducted to better understand composite shell response to transverse loadings which simulate damage-causing impact events. The quasi-static, centered, transverse loading response of laminated graphite/epoxy shells in a [+/-45(sub n)/O(sub n)](sub s) layup having geometric characteristics of a commercial fuselage are studied. The singly-curved composite shell structures are hinged along the straight circumferential edges and are either free or simply supported along the curved axial edges. Key components of the shell response are response instabilities due to limit-point and/or bifurcation buckling. Experimentally, deflection-controlled shell response is characterized via load-deflection data, deformation-shape evolutions, and the resulting damage state. Finite element models are used to study the kinematically nonlinear shell response, including bifurcation, limit-points, and postbuckling. A novel technique is developed for evaluating bifurcation from nonlinear prebuckling states utilizing asymmetric spatial discretization to introduce numerical perturbations. Advantages of the asymmetric meshing technique (AMT) over traditional techniques include efficiency, robustness, ease of application, and solution of the actual (not modified) problems. The AMT is validated by comparison to traditional numerical analysis of a benchmark problem and verified by comparison to experimental data. Applying the technique, bifurcation in a benchmark shell-buckling problem is correctly identified. Excellent agreement between the numerical and experimental results are obtained for a number of composite shells although predictive capability decreases for stiffer (thicker) specimens which is attributed to compliance of the test fixture. Restraining the axial edge (simple support) has the effect of creating a more complex response which involves unstable bifurcation, limit-point buckling, and dynamic collapse. Such shells were noted to bifurcate into

  7. It's elemental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Periodic Table of the elements will now have to be updated. An international team of researchers has added element 110 to the Earth's armory of elements. Though short-lived—of the order of microseconds, element 110 bottoms out the list as the heaviest known element on the planet. Scientists at the Heavy Ion Research Center in Darmstadt, Germany, made the 110-proton element by colliding a lead isotope with nickel atoms. The element, which is yet to be named, has an atomic mass of 269.

  8. Glass shell manufacturing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, R. L.; Ebner, M. A.; Nolen, R. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Highly-uniform, hollow glass spheres (shells), which are used for inertial confinement fusion targets, were formed from metal-organic gel powder feedstock in a vertical furnace. As a result of the rapid pyrolysis caused by the furnace, the gel is transformed to a shell in five distinct stages: (a) surface closure of the porous gel; (b) generation of a closed-cell foam structure in the gel; (c) spheridization of the gel and further expansion of the foam; (d) coalescence of the closed-cell foam to a single-void shell; and (e) fining of the glass shell. The heat transfer from the furnace to the falling gel particle was modeled to determine the effective heating rate of the gel. The model predicts the temperature history for a particle as a function of mass, dimensions, specific heat, and absorptance as well as furnace temperature profile and thermal conductivity of the furnace gas. A model was developed that predicts the gravity-induced degradation of shell concentricity in falling molten shells as a function of shell characteristics and time.

  9. Crack problems in cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard plate or shell theories were used as a starting point to study the fracture problems in thin-walled cylindrical and spherical shells, assuming that the plane of the crack is perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. Since recent studies have shown that local shell curvatures may have a rather considerable effect on the stress intensity factor, the crack problem was considered in conjunction with a shell rather than a plate theory. The material was assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous, so that approximate solutions may be obtained by approximating the local shell crack geometry with an ideal shell which has a solution, namely a spherical shell with a meridional crack, a cylindrical shell with a circumferential crack, or a cylindrical shell with an axial crack. A method of solution for the specially orthotropic shells containing a crack was described; symmetric and skew-symmetric problems are considered in cylindrical shells with an axial crack.

  10. MicroShell Minimalist Shell for Xilinx Microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werne, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    MicroShell is a lightweight shell environment for engineers and software developers working with embedded microprocessors in Xilinx FPGAs. (MicroShell has also been successfully ported to run on ARM Cortex-M1 microprocessors in Actel ProASIC3 FPGAs, but without project-integration support.) Micro Shell decreases the time spent performing initial tests of field-programmable gate array (FPGA) designs, simplifies running customizable one-time-only experiments, and provides a familiar-feeling command-line interface. The program comes with a collection of useful functions and enables the designer to add an unlimited number of custom commands, which are callable from the command-line. The commands are parameterizable (using the C-based command-line parameter idiom), so the designer can use one function to exercise hardware with different values. Also, since many hardware peripherals instantiated in FPGAs have reasonably simple register-mapped I/O interfaces, the engineer can edit and view hardware parameter settings at any time without stopping the processor. MicroShell comes with a set of support scripts that interface seamlessly with Xilinx's EDK tool. Adding an instance of MicroShell to a project is as simple as marking a check box in a library configuration dialog box and specifying a software project directory. The support scripts then examine the hardware design, build design-specific functions, conditionally include processor-specific functions, and complete the compilation process. For code-size constrained designs, most of the stock functionality can be excluded from the compiled library. When all of the configurable options are removed from the binary, MicroShell has an unoptimized memory footprint of about 4.8 kB and a size-optimized footprint of about 2.3 kB. Since MicroShell allows unfettered access to all processor-accessible memory locations, it is possible to perform live patching on a running system. This can be useful, for instance, if a bug is

  11. Linear versus nonlinear theories for laminated composite plates and shells

    SciTech Connect

    Qatu, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    Linear and nonlinear shear-deformation theories for laminated composite plates and shells are discussed in this paper. The emphasis here is on the range of validity for each class of theories. The finite element method is used to determine the maximum stresses for a wide range of statically loaded plate and shell panels with various thickness ratios. This paper concludes that for the vast majority of composite materials and for moderately thick plates and shells, stresses normally reach the maximum allowable stress before nonlinear terms can become important. This has been demonstrated by showing that for the limiting case of shear deformation theories (in which the minimum span length (or radius) to thickness ratio is 20), the material usually fails before the maximum deflection reaches the magnitude of the thickness (where nonlinear terms start to become significant).

  12. Passively Damped Laminated Piezoelectric Shell Structures with Integrated Electric Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1999-01-01

    Multi-field mechanics are presented for curvilinear piezoelectric laminates interfaced with distributed passive electric components. The equations of motion for laminated piezoelectric shell structures with embedded passive electric networks are directly formulated and solved using a finite element methodology. The modal damping and frequencies of the piezoelectric shell are calculated from the poles of the system. Experimental and numerical results are presented for the modal damping and frequency of composite beams with a resistively shunted piezoceramic patch. The modal damping and frequency of plates, cylindrical shells and cylindrical composite blades with piezoelectric-resistor layers are predicted. Both analytical and experimental studies illustrate a unique dependence of modal damping and frequencies on the shunting resistance and show the effect of structural shape and curvature on piezoelectric damping.

  13. Meshless analysis of shear deformable shells: boundary and interface constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Jorge C.; Pimenta, Paulo M.; Wriggers, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Meshless methods provide a highly continuous approximation field, convenient for thin structures like shells. Nevertheless, the lack of Kronecker Delta property makes the formulation of essential boundary conditions not straightforward, as the trial and test fields cannot be tailored to boundary values. Similar problem arise when different approximation regions must be joined, in a multi-region problem, such as kinks, folds or joints. This work presents three approaches to impose both kinematic conditions: the well-known Lagrange multiplier method, used since the beginning of the element free Galerkin method; a pure penalty approach; and the recently rediscovered alternative of Nitsche's method. We use the discretization technique for thick Reissner-Mindlin shells and adapt the weak form as to separate displacement and rotational degrees of freedom and obtain suitable and separate stabilization parameters. This approach enables the modeling of discontinuous shells and local refinement on multi-region problems.

  14. Comparative study of shell swab and shell crush methods for the recovery of Salmonella from shell eggs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swabbing (SW) is the standard methodology for the recovery of resident microorganisms from shell eggs in Japan. A comparative study of shell swab (SW) and a shell crush (CR) technique was performed to recover the laboratory-inoculated Salmonella from shell eggs. It was found that the recovery of ...

  15. K-shell and L-shell plasma spectroscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Charatis, G. )

    1990-10-01

    Detailed atomic level populations in high temperature and dense plasmas have become increasingly important in laser generated plasmas. Certain spectral line intensity ratios are density-dependent while others are temperature-dependent. Both can be used to extract information concerning population kinetics and ion level populations. In order to be useful these dependencies must be characterized by independent means. In laser produced plasmas this can be done via holographic interferometry for electron density determinations and via the slope of the H-like free-bound continuum of K-shell lines for electron temperature determinations. The characterization of density- and temperature-dependent L-shell lines can be accomplished in ionization balance experiments in which laser irradiance is varied on targets which contain both K-shell and L-shell emitters. The K-shell free-bound continua provide the local temperature determination while holographic interferometry yields density profile information, from which the temperature and density dependent L-shell lines can be characterized. This paper discusses these concepts.

  16. Chemical effect on the K shell absorption parameters of some selected cerium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akman, F.; Kaçal, M. R.; Durak, R.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the photoelectric cross section values of Ce, CeCl3.7H2O, Ce2(SO4)3, Ce(OH)4 and Ce2O3 samples were measured in the energy range from 31.82 keV up to 51.70 keV by adopting in narrow beam geometry. Using these photoelectric cross sections, the K shell photoelectric cross sections at the K-edge, the K shell absorption jump ratios and jump factors, the Davisson-Kirchner ratios and K shell oscillator strength values were estimated experimentally. The measured parameters were compared with the theoretical calculated values. It is observed that the K shell photoelectric cross section at the K-edge and K shell oscillator strength values of an element are affected by the chemical environment of material while the K shell absorption jump ratio, K shell absorption jump factor and Davisson-Kirchner ratio are not affected by the chemical environment of material for the present samples. To the best of our knowledge, the chemical effects on the Davisson-Kirchner ratio and K shell oscillator strength have not been discussed for any element by now.

  17. Wave interpretation of numerical results for the vibration in thin conical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Guangjian; Elliott, Stephen J.

    2014-05-01

    The dynamic behaviour of thin conical shells can be analysed using a number of numerical methods. Although the overall vibration response of shells has been thoroughly studied using such methods, their physical insight is limited. The purpose of this paper is to interpret some of these numerical results in terms of waves, using the wave finite element, WFE, method. The forced response of a thin conical shell at different frequencies is first calculated using the dynamic stiffness matrix method. Then, a wave finite element analysis is used to calculate the wave properties of the shell, in terms of wave type and wavenumber, as a function of position along it. By decomposing the overall results from the dynamic stiffness matrix analysis, the responses of the shell can then be interpreted in terms of wave propagation. A simplified theoretical analysis of the waves in the thin conical shell is also presented in terms of the spatially-varying ring frequency, which provides a straightforward interpretation of the wave approach. The WFE method provides a way to study the types of wave that travel in thin conical shell structures and to decompose the response of the numerical models into the components due to each of these waves. In this way the insight provided by the wave approach allows us to analyse the significance of different waves in the overall response and study how they interact, in particular illustrating the conversion of one wave type into another along the length of the conical shell.

  18. Studies on Shell Formation

    PubMed Central

    Tsujii, Tadashi; Sharp, D. Gordon; Wilbur, Karl M.

    1958-01-01

    The submicroscopic structure of the growing surface of the shell of the oyster, Crassostrea virginica, was studied by means of shadowed replicas. The outer edge of the prismatic region consists of a fine grained matrix enclosing crystals, the surfaces of which show a finely pebbled structure. Crystal size varies continously from 0.01 µ to 8 µ. The matrix surface shows no evidence of fibrous structure. The outer portions of the prismatic region exhibit a tile-like arrangement of large crystals separated by granular matrix 0.02 to 0.08 µ in thickness. The exposed crystal surfaces have indentations of varying form which appear as roughly parallel grooves spaced at intervals of approximately 0.3 µ. The final form of this region is believed to result from the random distribution of crystal seeds, which grow without orientation and through coalescence and growth come into contact, producing polygonal areas. The crystal arrangement of the nacreous region is one of overlapping rows of crystals in side to side contact, and with one end of each crystal free, permitting continued increase in length. Crystal angles and plane indices are presented. PMID:13549498

  19. Insulative laser shell coupler

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, P.A.; Anderson, A.T.; Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-20

    A segmented coaxial laser shell assembly having at least two water jacket sections, two pairs of interconnection half rings, a dielectric break ring, and a pair of threaded ring sections is disclosed. Each water jacket section with an inner tubular section that defines an inner laser cavity with water paths adjacent to at least a portion of the exterior of the inner tubular section, and mating faces at the end of the water jacket section through which the inner laser cavity opens and which defines at least one water port therethrough in communication with the water jackets. The water paths also define in their external surface a circumferential notch set back from and in close proximity to the mating face. The dielectric break ring has selected thickness and is placed between, and in coaxial alignment with, the mating faces of two of the adjacent water jacket sections. The break ring also defines an inner laser cavity of the same size and shape as the inner laser cavity of the water jacket sections and at least one water passage through the break ring to communicate with at least one water port through the mating faces of the water jacket sections. 4 figs.

  20. Insulative laser shell coupler

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Phillip A.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A segmented coaxial laser shell assembly having at least two water jacket sections, two pairs of interconnection half rings, a dialectric break ring, and a pair of threaded ring sections. Each water jacket section with an inner tubular section that defines an inner laser cavity with water paths adjacent to at least a portion of the exterior of the inner tubular section, and mating faces at the end of the water jacket section through which the inner laser cavity opens and which defines at least one water port therethrough in communication with the water jackets. The water paths also define in their external surface a circumferential notch set back from and in close proximity to the mating face. The dielectric break ring has selected thickness and is placed between, and in coaxial alignment with, the mating faces of two of the adjacent water jacket sections. The break ring also defines an inner laser cavity of the same size and shape as the inner laser cavity of the water jacket sections and at least one water passage through the break ring to communicate with at least one water port through the mating faces of the water jacket sections.

  1. Recovery of Salmonella from commercial shell eggs by shell rinse and shell crush methodologies.

    PubMed

    Musgrove, M T; Jones, D R; Northcutt, J K; Harrison, M A; Cox, N A; Ingram, K D; Hinton, A J

    2005-12-01

    Salmonella is the most important human pathogen associated with shell eggs. Salmonella Enteritidis is the serotype most often implicated in outbreaks, although other serotypes have been recovered from eggs and from the commercial shell egg washing environment. Many sample methods are used to recover microorganisms from eggshells and membranes. A shell rinse and modified shell-and-membrane crush method for recovery of Salmonella were compared. Eggs were collected from 3 commercial shell-washing facilities (X, Y, and Z) during 3 visits. Twelve eggs were collected from each of 10 to 12 locations along the egg processing chain. After being transported back to the laboratory, each egg was sampled first by a shell rinse method and then by a shell crush method. For each technique (rinse or crush), 2 pools of 5 eggs per location sampled were selectively enriched for the recovery of Salmonella. Presumptive samples positive for Salmonella were confirmed serologically. Overall, there were 10.1% (40/396) Salmonella-positive pooled samples. Salmonella were recovered by the shell rinse and shell crush techniques (4.8 vs. 5.3%, respectively). Plant X yielded 21.5% Salmonella positives, whereas less than 5% of samples from plants Y and Z were found to be contaminated with the organism (4.2 and 4.5%, respectively). Salmonella was recovered more often from unwashed eggs (15.8%) than from washed eggs (8.3%). For some eggs, Salmonella was only recovered by one of the methods. Use of both approaches in the same experiment increased sampling sensitivity, although in most cases, crushing provided more sensitive Salmonella recovery. PMID:16479955

  2. Collapsing thin shells with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsate, Térence; Rocha, Jorge V.; Santarelli, Raphael

    2014-06-01

    We construct exact solutions describing the motion of rotating thin shells in a fully backreacted five-dimensional rotating black hole spacetime. The radial equation of motion follows from the Darmois-Israel junction conditions, where both interior and exterior geometries are taken to be equal angular momenta Myers-Perry solutions. We show that rotation generates anisotropic pressures and momentum along the shell. Gravitational collapse scenarios including rotation are analyzed and a new class of stationary solutions is introduced. Energy conditions for the anisotropic matter shell are briefly discussed. We find that the weak energy condition is not violated for the collapse scenario where the shell starts at rest from infinity, nor for the new class of stationary solutions in anti-de Sitter. We further prove that the cosmic censorship conjecture is always satisfied in our setup.

  3. Shell Scores with Interactive Video.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemke, Ron

    1991-01-01

    Documents Shell Oil's success with interactive video training (IVT) and identifies the costs involved in this long-term investment. Provides guidelines for judging the effectiveness of IVT programs. (SK)

  4. Intergalactic shells at large redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. M.; Silk, J.

    1981-01-01

    The intergalactic shells produced by galactic explosions at large redshift, whose interiors cool by inverse Compton scattering off the cosmic background radiation, have a characteristic angular size of about 1 arcmin at peak brightness. At z values lower than 2, the shells typically have a radius of 0.5 Mpc, a velocity of about 50 km/sec, a metal abundance of about 0.0001 of cosmic values, and strong radiation in H I(Lyman-alpha), He II 304 A, and the IR fine-structure lines of C II and Si II. The predicted extragalactic background emission from many shells, strongly peaked toward the UV, sets an upper limit to the number of exploding sources at z values of about 10. Shell absorption lines of H I, C II, Si II, and Fe II, which may be seen at more recent epochs in quasar spectra, may probe otherwise invisible explosions in the early universe.

  5. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  6. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  7. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  8. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  9. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed....

  10. Nematic textures in spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, V.; Nelson, D. R.

    2006-08-01

    The equilibrium texture of nematic shells is studied as a function of their thickness. For ultrathin shells the ground state has four short (1)/(2) disclination lines but, as the thickness of the film increases, a three-dimensional escaped configuration composed of two pairs of half-hedgehogs becomes energetically favorable. We derive an exact solution for the nematic ground state in the one Frank constant approximation and study the stability of the corresponding texture against thermal fluctuations.

  11. Marine bivalve geochemistry and shell ultrastructure from modern low pH environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, S.; Rodolfo-Metalpa, R.; Griesshaber, E.; Schmahl, W. W.; Buhl, D.; Hall-Spencer, J. M.; Baggini, C.; Fehr, K. T.; Immenhauser, A.

    2011-10-01

    Bivalve shells can provide excellent archives of past environmental change but have not been used to interpret ocean acidification events. We investigated carbon, oxygen and trace element records from different shell layers in the mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis (from the Mediterranean) and M. edulis (from the Wadden Sea) combined with detailed investigations of the shell ultrastructure. Mussels from the harbour of Ischia (Mediterranean, Italy) were transplanted and grown in water with mean pHT 7.3 and mean pHT 8.1 near CO2 vents on the east coast of the island of Ischia. The shells of transplanted mussels were compared with M. edulis collected at pH ~8.2 from Sylt (German Wadden Sea). Most prominently, the shells recorded the shock of transplantation, both in their shell ultrastructure, textural and geochemical record. Shell calcite, precipitated subsequently under acidified seawater responded to the pH gradient by an in part disturbed ultrastructure. Geochemical data from all test sites show a strong metabolic effect that exceeds the influence of the low-pH environment. These field experiments showed that care is needed when interpreting potential ocean acidification signals because various parameters affect shell chemistry and ultrastructure. Besides metabolic processes, seawater pH, factors such as salinity, water temperature, food availability and population density all affect the biogenic carbonate shell archive.

  12. Deformation of compound shells under action of internal shock wave loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernobryvko, Marina; Kruszka, Leopold; Avramov, Konstantin

    2015-09-01

    The compound shells under the action of internal shock wave loading are considered. The compound shell consists of a thin cylindrical shell and two thin parabolic shells at the edges. The boundary conditions in the shells joints satisfy the equality of displacements. The internal shock wave loading is modelled as the surplus pressure surface. This pressure is a function of the shell coordinates and time. The strain rate deformation of compound shell takes place in both the elastic and in plastic stages. In the elastic stage the equations of the structure motions are obtained by the assumed-modes method, which uses the kinetic and potential energies of the cylindrical and two parabolic shells. The dynamic behaviour of compound shells is treated. In local plastic zones the 3-D thermo-elastic-plastic model is used. The deformations are described by nonlinear model. The stress tensor elements are determined using dynamic deformation theory. The deformation properties of materials are influenced by the strain rate behaviour, the influence of temperature parameters, and the elastic-plastic properties of materials. The dynamic yield point of materials and Pisarenko-Lebedev's criterion of destruction are used. The modified adaptive finite differences method of numerical analysis is suggested for those simulations. The accuracy of the numerical simulation is verified on each temporal step of calculation and in the case of large deformation gradients.

  13. Structural Characterization of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells with Large Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Turpin, Jason D.; Gardner, Nathaniel W.; Stanford, Bret K.; Martin, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells with large cutouts, manufactured using an automated fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The fiber orientation angles of the shells vary continuously around their circumference from +/- 10 degrees on the crown and keel, to +/- 45 degrees on the sides. The raised surface features on one shell result from application of all 24 tows during each fiber placement system pass, while the second shell uses the tow drop/add capability of the system to achieve a more uniform wall thickness. These unstiffened shells, both without and with small cutouts, were previously tested in axial compression and buckled elastically. In this study, a single unreinforced cutout, scaled to represent a cargo door on a commercial aircraft, is machined into one side of each shell. The prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads of these shells with large cutouts are also computed using linear finite element structural analyses for preliminary comparisons with test data. During testing, large displacements are observed around the large cutouts, but the shells maintain an average of 91 percent of the axial stiffness, and also carry 85 percent of the buckling loads, when compared to the pristine shells without cutouts. These relatively small reductions indicate that there is great potential for using tow steering to mitigate the adverse effects of large cutouts on the overall structural performance.

  14. Structural Performance of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells With Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Turpin, Jason D.; Stanford, Bret K.; Martin, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The structural performance of two advanced composite tow-steered shells with cutouts, manufactured using an automated fiber placement system, is assessed using both experimental and analytical methods. The shells' fiber orientation angles vary continuously around their circumference from +/-10 degrees on the crown and keel, to +/-45 degrees on the sides. The raised surface features on one shell result from application of all 24 tows during each fiber placement system pass, while the second shell uses the system's tow drop/add capability to achieve a more uniform wall thickness. These unstiffened shells were previously tested in axial compression and buckled elastically. A single cutout, scaled to represent a passenger door on a commercial aircraft, is then machined into one side of each shell. The prebuckling axial stiffnesses and bifurcation buckling loads of the shells with cutouts are also computed using linear finite element structural analyses for initial comparisons with test data. When retested, large deflections were observed around the cutouts, but the shells carried an average of 92 percent of the axial stiffness, and 86 percent of the buckling loads, of the shells without cutouts. These relatively small reductions in performance demonstrate the potential for using tow steering to mitigate the adverse effects of typical design features on the overall structural performance.

  15. Biosorption of Lanthanides from Aqueous Solutions Using Pretreated Buccinum tenuissimum Shell Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Koto, Yusuke; Kano, Naoki; Wang, Yudan; Sakamoto, Nobuo; Imaizumi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Biosorption experiment from aqueous solutions containing known amount of rare earth elements (REEs) using pre-treated Buccinum tenuissimum shell was explored to evaluate the efficiency of shell biomass as sorbent for REEs. In this work, four kinds of sieved shell samples: (a) “Ground original sample”, (b) “Heat-treatment (480°C, 6 hours) sample”, (c) “Heat-treatment (950°C, 6 hours) sample” and (d) “Heat-treatment (950°C, 6 hours) and water added sample” were used. Furthermore, to confirm the characteristics of the shell biomass, the crystal structure, the surface morphology, and the specific surface area of these shell samples were determined. Consequently, the following matters have been mainly clarified. (1) The crystal structure of the shell biomass was transformed from aragonite (CaCO3) into calcite (CaCO3) phase by heat-treatment (480°C, 6 hours); then mainly transformed into calcium oxide (CaO) by heat-treatment (950°C, 6 hours), and calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) by heat-treatment (950°C, 6 hours) and adding water. (2) The shell biomass showed excellent sorption capacity for lanthanides. (3) Adsorption isotherms using the shell biomass can be described by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms satisfactorily for lanthanides except “heat-treatment (950°C, 6 hours) sample”. (4) Shell biomass (usually treated as waste material) can be an efficient sorbent for lanthanides in future. PMID:20981250

  16. Mesoscale modeling of functional properties in core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeri, John; Heinonen, Olle; Karpeev, Dmitry; Nakhmanson, Serge

    2015-03-01

    Core-shell nanoparticle systems of Zn-ZnO and ZnO-TiO2 are studied computationally using the highly scalable MOOSE finite-element framework, developed at Idaho National Lab. The elastic anisotropic mismatch of the core and shell create an imprinting effect within the shell that produces a wide variation of strains. Due to this diversity of strains, the sharp band gap edges of the bulk semiconductor are observed to be ``thinned-out'' much like amorphous silicon. We show that a variety of factors, such as particle size, core-to-shell volume ratio, applied hydrostatic pressure, shell microstructure, as well as the effect of surface elasticity, can influence the distribution of optical band-gap values within the particle, which may prove useful within the field of photovoltaics. Part of the work by O.H. was supported by Award 70NANB14H012 from U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology as part of the Center for Hierarchical Material Design.

  17. Vibration control of cylindrical shells using active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Manas C.; Chen, Tung-Huei; Baz, Amr M.

    1997-05-01

    The fundamentals of controlling the structural vibration of cylindrical shells treated with active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments are presented. The effectiveness of the ACLD treatments in enhancing the damping characteristics of thin cylindrical shells is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to describe the dynamic interaction between the shells and the ACLD treatments. The FEM is used to predict the natural frequencies and the modal loss factors of shells which are partially treated with patches of the ACLD treatments. The predictions of the FEM are validated experimentally using stainless steel cylinders which are 20.32 cm in diameter, 30.4 cm in length and 0.05 cm in thickness. The cylinders are treated with ACLD patches of different configurations in order to target single or multi-modes of lobar vibrations. The ACLD patches used are made of DYAD 606 visco-elastic layer which is sandwiched between two layers of PVDF piezo-electric films. Vibration attenuations of 85% are obtained with maximum control voltage of 40 volts. Such attenuations are attributed to the effectiveness of the ACLD treatment in increasing the modal damping ratios by about a factor of four over those of conventional passive constrained layer damping (PCLD) treatments. The obtained results suggest the potential of the ACLD treatments in controlling the vibration of cylindrical shells which constitute the major building block of many critical structures such as cabins of aircrafts, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles.

  18. A violin shell model: vibrational modes and acoustics.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin E

    2015-03-01

    A generic physical model for the vibro-acoustic modes of the violin is described treating the body shell as a shallow, thin-walled, guitar-shaped, box structure with doubly arched top and back plates. comsol finite element, shell structure, software is used to identify and understand the vibrational modes of a simply modeled violin. This identifies the relationship between the freely supported plate modes when coupled together by the ribs and the modes of the assembled body shell. Such coupling results in a relatively small number of eigenmodes or component shell modes, of which a single volume-changing breathing mode is shown to be responsible for almost all the sound radiated in the monopole signature mode regime below ∼1 kHz for the violin, whether directly or by excitation of the Helmholtz f-hole resonance. The computations describe the influence on such modes of material properties, arching, plate thickness, elastic anisotropy, f-holes cut into the top plate, the bass-bar, coupling to internal air modes, the rigid neck-fingerboard assembly, and, most importantly, the soundpost. Because the shell modes are largely determined by the symmetry of the guitar-shaped body, the model is applicable to all instruments of the violin family. PMID:25786935

  19. Tri-soft shell technique.

    PubMed

    Arshinoff, Steve A; Norman, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Soft-shell techniques exist for lower viscosity dispersive with higher viscosity cohesive ophthalmic viscosurgical devices (OVDs) (soft-shell technique [SST]), viscoadaptive OVDs with balanced salt solution (ultimate soft-shell technique), intraoperative floppy-iris syndrome (soft-shell bridge), and many specific modifications for disinserted zonular fibers, frayed iris strands, Fuchs endothelial dystrophy, small holes in the posterior capsule with protruding vitreous, capsular dye use, and others. Soft-shell techniques exist because it is rheologically impossible to control the surgical environment with a single OVD as well as with an ordered combination of rheologically different OVDs. Surgeons frequently confuse these techniques because of their multitude. This paper unifies all SSTs into a single improved tri-soft shell technique (TSST), from which basic specific applications to unusual circumstances are simple and intuitive. As shown with previous SSTs, the TSST allows surgeons to perform complex tasks with greater surgical facility and to protect endothelial cells better than with single OVDs. PMID:23889867

  20. XPRT: An expert system shell

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrell, G.D.

    1988-09-01

    XPRT is a rule-based expert system shell written in the C programming language. This report contains a detailed description of the commands available in XPRT and also describes the syntax rules needed to construct a knowledge base. The shell's source code uses standard ANSI C, which allows it to run on any computer that can compile a C program. The executable code occupies 70K of PC memory. XPRT's inference engine can be commanded to backward chain or forward chain. Heuristics may be employed to reduce the search space of knowledge base rules. XPRT can read and write external files and spawn processes. The shell is mainly a symbolic processor but can handle numerical data as well. A mechanism of weighted facts and rules is used as an approach for handling uncertainty. XPRT is a no-frills shell with some very practical commands. The shell was used to write an expert system that is currently scheduling over a dozen software programs to maintain and manage a large departmental database. XPRT continues to evolve, and our organization is finding the shell to be a valuable programming tool. 6 refs.

  1. A Shell/3D Modeling Technique for the Analysis of Delaminated Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; OBrien, T. Kevin

    2000-01-01

    A shell/3D modeling technique was developed for which a local solid finite element model is used only in the immediate vicinity of the delamination front. The goal was to combine the accuracy of the full three-dimensional solution with the computational efficiency of a shell finite element model. Multi-point constraints provided a kinematically compatible interface between the local 3D model and the global structural model which has been meshed with shell finite elements. Double Cantilever Beam, End Notched Flexure, and Single Leg Bending specimens were analyzed first using full 3D finite element models to obtain reference solutions. Mixed mode strain energy release rate distributions were computed using the virtual crack closure technique. The analyses were repeated using the shell/3D technique to study the feasibility for pure mode I, mode II and mixed mode I/II cases. Specimens with a unidirectional layup and with a multidirectional layup were simulated. For a local 3D model, extending to a minimum of about three specimen thicknesses on either side of the delamination front, the results were in good agreement with mixed mode strain energy release rates obtained from computations where the entire specimen had been modeled with solid elements. For large built-up composite structures the shell/3D modeling technique offers a great potential for reducing the model size, since only a relatively small section in the vicinity of the delamination front needs to be modeled with solid elements.

  2. A coupled global-local shell model with continuous interlaminar shear stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruttmann, F.; Wagner, W.; Knust, G.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper layered composite shells subjected to static loading are considered. The theory is based on a multi-field functional, where the associated Euler-Lagrange equations include besides the global shell equations formulated in stress resultants, the local in-plane equilibrium in terms of stresses and a constraint which enforces the correct shape of warping through the thickness. Within a four-node element the warping displacements are interpolated with layerwise cubic functions in thickness direction and constant shape throughout the element reference surface. Elimination of stress, warping and Lagrange parameters on element level leads to a mixed hybrid shell element with 5 or 6 nodal degrees of freedom. The implementation in a finite element program is simple. The computed interlaminar shear stresses are automatically continuous at the layer boundaries. Also the stress boundary conditions at the outer surfaces are fulfilled and the integrals of the shear stresses coincide exactly with the independently interpolated shear forces without introduction of further constraints. The essential feature of the element formulation is the fact that it leads to usual shell degrees of freedom, which allows application of standard boundary or symmetry conditions and computation of shell structures with intersections.

  3. Parameter identification of material constants in a composite shell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.R.; Carne, T.G.

    1988-01-01

    One of the basic requirements in engineering analysis is the development of a mathematical model describing the system. Frequently, comparisons with test data are used as a measurement of the adequacy of the model. An attempt is typically made to update or improve the model to provide a test-verified analysis tool. System identification provides a systematic procedure for accomplishing this task. The terms system identification, parameter estimation, and model correlation all refer to techniques that use test information to update or verify mathematical models. The goal of system identification is to improve the correlation of model predictions with measured test data, and produce accurate, predictive models. For nonmetallic structures the modeling task is often difficult due to uncertainties in the elastic constants. In this work a parameter identification procedure was used to determine the elastic constants of a cylindrical, graphite epoxy composite shell. A finite element model of the shell was created, which included uncertain orthotropic elastic constants. A modal survey test was then performed on the shell. The resulting modal data, along with the finite element model of the shell, were used in a Bayes estimation algorithm. This permitted the use of covariance matrices to weight the confidence in the initial parameter values as well as confidence in the measured test data. The estimation procedure also employed the concept of successive linearization to obtain an approximate solution to the original nonlinear estimation problem. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Measurement of K Shell Photoelectric Cross Sections at a K Edge--A Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayak, S. V.; Badiger, N. M.

    2007-01-01

    We describe in this paper a new method for measuring the K shell photoelectric cross sections of high-Z elemental targets at a K absorption edge. In this method the external bremsstrahlung (EB) photons produced in the Ni target foil by beta particles from a weak[superscript 90]Sr-[superscript 90]Y beta source are passed through an elemental target…

  5. Chemical characterization of element 112.

    PubMed

    Eichler, R; Aksenov, N V; Belozerov, A V; Bozhikov, G A; Chepigin, V I; Dmitriev, S N; Dressler, R; Gäggeler, H W; Gorshkov, V A; Haenssler, F; Itkis, M G; Laube, A; Lebedev, V Ya; Malyshev, O N; Oganessian, Yu Ts; Petrushkin, O V; Piguet, D; Rasmussen, P; Shishkin, S V; Shutov, A V; Svirikhin, A I; Tereshatov, E E; Vostokin, G K; Wegrzecki, M; Yeremin, A V

    2007-05-01

    The heaviest elements to have been chemically characterized are seaborgium (element 106), bohrium (element 107) and hassium (element 108). All three behave according to their respective positions in groups 6, 7 and 8 of the periodic table, which arranges elements according to their outermost electrons and hence their chemical properties. However, the chemical characterization results are not trivial: relativistic effects on the electronic structure of the heaviest elements can strongly influence chemical properties. The next heavy element targeted for chemical characterization is element 112; its closed-shell electronic structure with a filled outer s orbital suggests that it may be particularly susceptible to strong deviations from the chemical property trends expected within group 12. Indeed, first experiments concluded that element 112 does not behave like its lighter homologue mercury. However, the production and identification methods used cast doubt on the validity of this result. Here we report a more reliable chemical characterization of element 112, involving the production of two atoms of (283)112 through the alpha decay of the short-lived (287)114 (which itself forms in the nuclear fusion reaction of 48Ca with 242Pu) and the adsorption of the two atoms on a gold surface. By directly comparing the adsorption characteristics of (283)112 to that of mercury and the noble gas radon, we find that element 112 is very volatile and, unlike radon, reveals a metallic interaction with the gold surface. These adsorption characteristics establish element 112 as a typical element of group 12, and its successful production unambiguously establishes the approach to the island of stability of superheavy elements through 48Ca-induced nuclear fusion reactions with actinides. PMID:17476264

  6. Chemical characterization of element 112

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, R.; Aksenov, N. V.; Belozerov, A. V.; Bozhikov, G. A.; Chepigin, V. I.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Dressler, R.; Gäggeler, H. W.; Gorshkov, V. A.; Haenssler, F.; Itkis, M. G.; Laube, A.; Lebedev, V. Ya.; Malyshev, O. N.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Petrushkin, O. V.; Piguet, D.; Rasmussen, P.; Shishkin, S. V.; Shutov, A. V.; Svirikhin, A. I.; Tereshatov, E. E.; Vostokin, G. K.; Wegrzecki, M.; Yeremin, A. V.

    2007-05-01

    The heaviest elements to have been chemically characterized are seaborgium (element 106), bohrium (element 107) and hassium (element 108). All three behave according to their respective positions in groups 6, 7 and 8 of the periodic table, which arranges elements according to their outermost electrons and hence their chemical properties. However, the chemical characterization results are not trivial: relativistic effects on the electronic structure of the heaviest elements can strongly influence chemical properties. The next heavy element targeted for chemical characterization is element 112; its closed-shell electronic structure with a filled outer s orbital suggests that it may be particularly susceptible to strong deviations from the chemical property trends expected within group 12. Indeed, first experiments concluded that element 112 does not behave like its lighter homologue mercury. However, the production and identification methods used cast doubt on the validity of this result. Here we report a more reliable chemical characterization of element 112, involving the production of two atoms of 283112 through the alpha decay of the short-lived 287114 (which itself forms in the nuclear fusion reaction of 48Ca with 242Pu) and the adsorption of the two atoms on a gold surface. By directly comparing the adsorption characteristics of 283112 to that of mercury and the noble gas radon, we find that element 112 is very volatile and, unlike radon, reveals a metallic interaction with the gold surface. These adsorption characteristics establish element 112 as a typical element of group 12, and its successful production unambiguously establishes the approach to the island of stability of superheavy elements through 48Ca-induced nuclear fusion reactions with actinides.

  7. Survey and development of finite elements for nonlinear structural analysis. Volume 1: Handbook for nonlinear finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A survey of research efforts in the area of geometrically nonlinear finite elements is presented. The survey is intended to serve as a guide in the choice of nonlinear elements for specific problems, and as background to provide directions for new element developments. The elements are presented in a handbook format and are separated by type as beams, plates (or shallow shells), shells, and other elements. Within a given type, the elements are identified by the assumed displacement shapes and the forms of the nonlinear strain equations. Solution procedures are not discussed except when a particular element formulation poses special problems or capabilities in this regard. The main goal of the format is to provide quick access to a wide variety of element types, in a consistent presentation format, and to facilitate comparison and evaluation of different elements with regard to features, probable accuracy, and complexity.

  8. Mass measurements demonstrate a strong N=28 shell gap in argon.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Z; George, S; Ahn, S; Browne, J; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Carpino, J F; Chung, H; Cyburt, R H; Estradé, A; Famiano, M; Gade, A; Langer, C; Matoš, M; Mittig, W; Montes, F; Morrissey, D J; Pereira, J; Schatz, H; Schatz, J; Scott, M; Shapira, D; Smith, K; Stevens, J; Tan, W; Tarasov, O; Towers, S; Wimmer, K; Winkelbauer, J R; Yurkon, J; Zegers, R G T

    2015-01-16

    We present results from recent time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. We report the first mass measurements of ^{48}Ar and ^{49}Ar and find atomic mass excesses of -22.28(31)  MeV and -17.8(1.1)  MeV, respectively. These masses provide strong evidence for the closed shell nature of neutron number N=28 in argon, which is therefore the lowest even-Z element exhibiting the N=28 closed shell. The resulting trend in binding-energy differences, which probes the strength of the N=28 shell, compares favorably with shell-model calculations in the sd-pf shell using SDPF-U and SDPF-MU Hamiltonians. PMID:25635542

  9. Overview of Hanford Single Shell Tank (SST) Structural Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Rast, Richard S.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.

    2013-11-14

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project (SSTIP) in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration, Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford Single-Shell Tanks. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS. The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford Single-Shell Tanks has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analysis of the remaining Hanford Single-Shell Tanks is scheduled for FY2014. Hanford Single-Shell Tanks are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than 1/4 inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of

  10. Computational procedures for postbuckling of composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, G. M.; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1989-01-01

    A recently developed finite-element capability for general nonlinear shell analysis, featuring the use of three-dimensional constitutive equations within an efficient resultant-oriented framework, is employed to simulate the postbuckling response of an axially compressed composite cylindrical panel with a circular cutout. The problem is a generic example of modern composite aircraft components for which postbuckling strength (i.e., fail-safety) is desired in the presence of local discontinuities such as holes and cracked stiffeners. While the computational software does a reasonable job of predicting both the buckling load and the qualitative aspects of postbuckling (compared both with experiment and another code) there are some discrepancies due to: (1) uncertainties in the nominal layer material properties, (2) structural sensitivity to initial imperfections, and (3) the neglect of dynamic and local material delamination effects in the numerical model. Corresponding refinements are suggested for the realistic continuation of this type of analysis.

  11. Torrefaction of pomaces and nut shells.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Bor-Sen; Valenzuela-Medina, Diana; Bilbao-Sainz, Cristina; Klamczynski, Artur K; Avena-Bustillos, Roberto J; Milczarek, Rebecca R; Du, Wen-Xian; Glenn, Greg M; Orts, William J

    2015-02-01

    Apple, grape, olive, and tomato pomaces as well as almond and walnut shells were torrefied at different temperatures and times in a muffle furnace. The fiber content and thermal stability of the raw byproducts were examined and the moisture and ash contents, elemental composition, and gross calorific values of the raw and torrefied samples were characterized. Response surface methodology and a central composite design were used to examine the effects of temperature and time on mass and energy yields of the torrefied byproducts. Raw apple pomace had the highest hemicellulose content, whereas raw grape pomace had the highest lignin content. Raw tomato pomace had the highest gross calorific value because of its high carbon content. Temperature had a larger effect on mass and energy yields than time. Grape pomace generally had the highest mass and energy yields. Also, energy yields of the byproducts could be predicted from mass loss values. PMID:25479394

  12. Tearing resistance of a thin shell against projectile penetration: Material property effects

    SciTech Connect

    Trinh, K.V.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents results from a series of finite element analyses performed to study material effects on the tearing resistance of a thin shell subjected to projectile penetration. These analyses simulated a round, slender projectile impacting the top center of a metallic cylindrical shell at high speed. We varied eight selected shell material properties systematically using an L18 matrix (design of experiment technique). From the results, we determined effects of the eight properties on the minimum projectile velocity required to penetrate the shell. The material properties examined here included: yield strength, hardening and recovery characteristics, heat coefficient, initial porosity, and damage exponent (a void growth parameter). The DYNA2D finite element code along with the Sandia plasticity/damage model for ductile metals were used in the analyses.

  13. Buckling of Cracked Laminated Composite Cylindrical Shells Subjected to Combined Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahbakhsh, Hamidreza; Shariati, Mahmoud

    2013-10-01

    A series of finite element analysis on the cracked composite cylindrical shells under combined loading is carried out to study the effect of loading condition, crack size and orientation on the buckling behavior of laminated composite cylindrical shells. The interaction buckling curves of cracked laminated composite cylinders subject to different combinations of axial compression, bending, internal pressure and external pressure are obtained, using the finite element method. Results show that the internal pressure increases the critical buckling load of the CFRP cylindrical shells and bending and external pressure decrease it. Numerical analysis show that axial crack has the most detrimental effect on the buckling load of a cylindrical shell and results show that for lower values of the axial compressive load and higher values of the external pressure, the buckling is usually in the global mode and for higher values of axial compressive load and lower levels of external pressure the buckling mode is mostly in the local mode.

  14. Assessing open-system behavior of 14C in terrestrial gastropod shells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rech, Jason A.; Pigati, Jeffrey S.; Lehmann, Sophie B.; McGimpsey, Chelsea N.; Grimley, David A.; Nekola, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    In order to assess open-system behavior of radiocarbon in fossil gastropod shells, we measured the 14C activity on 10 aliquots of shell material recovered from Illinoian (~190-130 ka) and pre-Illinoian (~800 ka) loess and lacustrine deposits in the Midwestern USA. Eight of the 10 aliquots yielded measurable 14C activities that ranged from 0.25 to 0.53 percent modern carbon (pMC), corresponding to apparent 14C ages between 48.2 and 42.1 ka. This small level of open-system behavior is common in many materials that are used for 14C dating (e.g. charcoal), and typically sets the upper practical limit of the technique. Two aliquots of gastropod shells from the Illinoian-aged Petersburg Silt (Petersburg Section) in central Illinois, USA, however, yielded elevated 14C activities of 1.26 and 1.71 pMC, which correspond to apparent 14C ages of 35.1 and 32.7 ka. Together, these results suggest that while many fossil gastropods shells may not suffer from major (>1%) open-system problems, this is not always the case. We then examined the mineralogy, trace element chemistry, and physical characteristics of a suite of fossil and modern gastropod shells to identify the source of contamination in the Petersburg shells and assess the effectiveness of these screening techniques at identifying samples suitable for 14C dating. Mineralogical (XRD) and trace element analyses were inconclusive, which suggests that these techniques are not suitable for assessing open-system behavior in terrestrial gastropod shells. Analysis with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), however, identified secondary mineralization (calcium carbonate) primarily within the inner whorls of the Petersburg shells. This indicates that SEM examination, or possibly standard microscope examination, of the interior of gastropod shells should be used when selecting fossil gastropod shells for 14C dating.

  15. Assessing open-system behavior of 14C in terrestrial gastropod shells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rech, J.A.; Pigati, J.S.; Lehmann, S.B.; McGimpsey, C.N.; Grimley, D.A.; Nekola, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    In order to assess open-system behavior of radiocarbon in fossil gastropod shells, we measured the 14C activity on 10 aliquots of shell material recovered from Illinoian (~190-130 ka) and pre-Illinoian (~800 ka) loess and lacustrine deposits in the Midwestern USA. Eight of the 10 aliquots yielded measurable 14C activities that ranged from 0.25 to 0.53 percent modern carbon (pMC), corresponding to apparent 14C ages between 48.2 and 42.1 ka. This small level of open-system behavior is common in many materials that are used for 14C dating (e.g. charcoal), and typically sets the upper practical limit of the technique. Two aliquots of gastropod shells from the Illinoian-aged Petersburg Silt (Petersburg Section) in central Illinois, USA, however, yielded elevated 14C activities of 1.26 and 1.71 pMC, which correspond to apparent 14C ages of 35.1 and 32.7 ka. Together, these results suggest that while many fossil gastropods shells may not suffer from major (>1%) open-system problems, this is not always the case. We then examined the mineralogy, trace element chemistry, and physical characteristics of a suite of fossil and modern gastropod shells to identify the source of contamination in the Petersburg shells and assess the effectiveness of these screening techniques at identifying samples suitable for 14C dating. Mineralogical (XRD) and trace element analyses were inconclusive, which suggests that these techniques are not suitable for assessing open-system behavior in terrestrial gastropod shells. Analysis with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), however, identified secondary mineralization (calcium carbonate) primarily within the inner whorls of the Petersburg shells. This indicates that SEM examination, or possibly standard microscope examination, of the interior of gastropod shells should be used when selecting fossil gastropod shells for 14C dating. ?? 2011 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.

  16. Semiclassical environment of collapsing shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Kinjal; Paranjape, Aseem

    2009-12-01

    We explore in detail the semiclassical environment of collapsing shells of matter, and determine the semiclassical flux measured by a variety of observers. This study is a preliminary step in a broader investigation of thermodynamic properties of the geometry of collapsing objects. Specifically, in this paper we consider spherically symmetric null and timelike collapsing shells which form an event horizon, and calculate the flux measured by observers both inside and outside the shell, and both inside and outside the event horizon, and find nontrivial results in most of the cases. Additionally, we also investigate the environment of a shell which collapses but does not form a horizon, halting at some radius larger than the Schwarzschild radius, and find that such an object generically gives rise to a pulse of radiation which is sharply peaked as it travels inwards and is reflected at the origin, and eventually emerges from the shell in a thermalized form. Our results have potential consequences in addressing questions pertaining, e.g. to black hole entropy and backreaction.

  17. Foam shell project: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Overturf, G.; Reibold, B.; Cook, B.; Schroen-Carey, D.

    1994-03-25

    The authors report on their work to produce a foam shell target for two possible applications: (1) as liquid-layered cryogenic target on Omega Upgrade, and (2) as a back-up design for the NIF. This target consists of a roughly 1 mm diameter and 100 {mu}m thick spherical low-density foam shell surrounding a central void. The foam will be slightly overfilled with liquid D{sub 2} or DT, the overfilled excess being symmetrically distributed on the inside of the shell and supported by thermal gradient techniques. The outside of the foam is overcoated with full density polymer which must be topologically smooth. The technology for manufacturing this style of foam shell involves microencapsulation techniques and has been developed by the Japanese at ILE. Their goal is to determine whether this technology can be successfully adapted to meet US ICF objectives. To this end a program of foam shell development has been initiated at LLNL in collaboration with both the General Atomics DOE Target Fabrication Contract Corporation and the Target Fabrication Group at LLE.

  18. Statistical mechanics of thin spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmrlj, Andrej; Nelson, David R.

    We explore how thermal fluctuations affect the mechanics of thin amorphous spherical shells via renormalization group calculations. It is well known that for flat solid membranes thermal fluctuations effectively increase the bending rigidity and reduce the bulk and shear moduli. This is still true for spherical shells. However, the additional coupling between the shell curvature, the local in-plane stretching modes and the local out-of-plane undulations leads to novel phenomena. In spherical shells thermal fluctuations effectively produce negative surface tension, which is equivalent to applying external pressure. We find that small spherical shells are stable, but for sufficiently large shells this thermally generated ``pressure'' becomes big enough to crush spherical shells. Such shells can be reinflated by increasing internal pressure, where the effective shell size grows non-linearly as a function of internal pressure with a power law exponent characteristic for thermally fluctuating flat membranes under uniform tension.

  19. Identification of material constants for a composite shell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Carne, T.G.; Martinez, D.R.

    1987-03-01

    One of the basic requirements of an engineering analysis is the development of an adequate mathematical model describing the system. Frequently, comparisons with test data are used as a measure of the model's adequacy, or the test data are directly used to update or modify the model. For nonmetallic structures, the modeling task is often more difficult due to uncertainties in the elastic constants. System identification provides a methodology for systematically updating the mathematical model for improved correlation with test data. In this work a finite element model of a composite shell was created. The model includes uncertain orthotropic elastic constants. To identify these constants, a modal survey was performed on an actual shell. The resulting modal data along with the finite element model of the shell were used in a Bayes estimation algorithm. Values of the elastic constants were estimated which minimized the differences between the test results and the finite element predictions. The estimation procedure employed the concept of successive linearization to obtain an approximate solution to the original nonlinear estimation problem.

  20. [Providing the Optimal Insolation of a Photobiological Architectural Shell for Microalgae Cultivation].

    PubMed

    Ermachenko, P A; Buzalo, N S; Perevjazka, D S

    2016-01-01

    Translucent architectural shells with microalgae are considered as an element of local photobiological treatment facilities integrated in the urban environment. A mathematical microalgae growth model for the prediction of insolation and temperature behaviour in the medium during microalgae cultivation under dynamically fluctuating natural lighting is presented. The task of optimizing the parameters of photobiological architectural shell with respect to temperature and insolation is set. The results of numerical experiments for the model problem are shown. PMID:27192842

  1. Stochastic estimation of level density in nuclear shell-model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Noritaka; Utsuno, Yutaka; Futamura, Yasunori; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2016-06-01

    An estimation method of the nuclear level density stochastically based on nuclear shell-model calculations is introduced. In order to count the number of the eigen-values of the shell-model Hamiltonian matrix, we perform the contour integral of the matrix element of a resolvent. The shifted block Krylov subspace method enables us its efficient computation. Utilizing this method, the contamination of center-of-mass motion is clearly removed.

  2. Laminated Thin Shell Structures Subjected to Free Vibration in a Hygrothermal Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Guptill, James D.

    1994-01-01

    Parametric studies were performed to assess the effects of various parameters on the free-vibration behavior (natural frequencies) of (+/- theta)(sub 2) angle-ply, fiber composite, thin shell structures in a hygrothermal environment. Knowledge of the natural frequencies of structures is important in considering their response to various kinds of excitation, especially when structures and force systems are complex and when excitations are not periodic. The three dimensional, finite element structural analysis computer code CSTEM was used in the Cray YMP computer environment. The fiber composite shell was assumed to be cylindrical and made from T300 graphite fibers embedded in an intermediate-modulus, high-strength matrix. The following parameters were investigated: the length and the laminate thickness of the shell, the fiber orientation, the fiber volume fraction, the temperature profile through the thickness of the laminate, and laminates with different ply thicknesses. The results indicate that the fiber orientation and the length of the laminated shell had significant effects on the natural frequencies. The fiber volume fraction, the laminate thickness, and the temperature profile through the shell thickness had weak effects on the natural frequencies. Finally, the laminates with different ply thicknesses had an insignificant influence on the behavior of the vibrated laminated shell. Also, a single through-the-thickness, eight-node, three dimensional composite finite element analysis appears to be sufficient for investigating the free-vibration behavior of thin, composite, angle-ply shell structures.

  3. Shell corrections in stopping powers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichsel, H.

    2002-05-01

    One of the theories of the electronic stopping power S for fast light ions was derived by Bethe. The algorithm currently used for the calculation of S includes terms known as the mean excitation energy I, the shell correction, the Barkas correction, and the Bloch correction. These terms are described here. For the calculation of the shell corrections an atomic model is used, which is more realistic than the hydrogenic approximation used so far. A comparison is made with similar calculations in which the local plasma approximation is utilized. Close agreement with the experimental data for protons with energies from 0.3 to 10 MeV traversing Al and Si is found without the need for adjustable parameters for the shell corrections.

  4. Asymptotic safety goes on shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Dario

    2012-01-01

    It is well known in quantum field theory that the off-shell effective action depends on the gauge choice and field parametrization used in calculating it. Nevertheless, the typical scheme in which the scenario of asymptotically safe gravity is investigated is an off-shell version of the functional renormalization group equation. Working with the Einstein-Hilbert truncation as a test bed, we develop a new scheme for the analysis of asymptotically safe gravity in which the on-shell part of the effective action is singled out and we show that the beta function for the essential coupling has no explicit gauge dependence. In order to reach our goal, we introduce several technical novelties, including a different decomposition of the metric fluctuations, a new implementation of the ghost sector and a new cut-off scheme. We find a nontrivial fixed point, with a value of the cosmological constant that is independent of the gauge-fixing parameters.

  5. Chemical Analysis Of Beryllium Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, J; Cook, R

    2005-11-17

    There is a need to understand the level of high-Z impurities in Beryllium shells prepared by sputter coating. The Ignition Point Design Requirements state the following: ''Except for allowed ingredients, as listed in the ablator composition entries, the ablator material in all layers shall contain sufficiently low impurity levels that the sum over all impurities of atom fraction*Z{sup 2} shall be less than or equal to 0.2''. This is a tight specification that requires careful materials analysis. Early in the first quarter of FY06, we undertook a study of Be shell impurities via ICP-MS{sup 2} and determined that the impurity levels in the sputtered shells are very close to the specification.

  6. Buckling analysis of laminated thin shells in a hot environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Guptil, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of parametric studies to assess the effects of various parameters on the buckling behavior of angle-ply, laminated thin shells in a hot environment. These results were obtained by using a three-dimensional finite element analysis. An angle-ply, laminated thin shell with fiber orientation of (theta/-theta)(sub 2) was subjected to compressive mechanical loads. The laminated thin shell had a cylindrical geometry. The laminate contained T300 graphite fibers embedded in an intermediate-modulus, high-strength (IMHS) matrix. The fiber volume fraction was 55 percent and the moisture content was 2 percent. The residual stresses induced into the laminate structure during the curing were taken into account. Parametric studies were performed to examine the effect on the critical buckling load of the following parameters: cylinder length and thickness, internal hydrostatic pressure, different ply thicknesses, different temperature profiles through the thickness of the structure, and different lay up configurations and fiber volume fractions. In conjunction with these parameters the ply orientation was varied from 0 deg to 90 deg. Seven ply angles were examined: 0 deg, 15 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, 60 deg, 75 deg, and 90 deg. The results show that the ply angle theta and the laminate thickness had significant effects on the critical buckling load. The fiber volume fraction, the fiber orientations, and the internal hydrostatic pressure had important effects on the critical buckling load. The cylinder length had a moderate influence on the buckling load. The thin shell with (theta/-theta)(sub 2) or (theta/-theta)(sub s) angle-ply laminate had better buckling-load performance than the thin shell with (theta)(sub 4) angle-ply laminate. The temperature profiles through the laminate thickness and various laminates with the different ply thicknesses has insignificant effects on the buckling behavior of the thin shells.

  7. Element abundances of classical novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrea, J.; Drechsel, H.; Starrfield, S.

    1994-11-01

    Physical conditions and element abundances in the optically thin shells of 11 classical novae with outbursts between 1978 and 1989 were determined from an analysis of UV and optical spectra obtained during the nebular stage. Eight novae were studied on the basis of new optical and UV spectra. The accuracy of the element abundances depends on whether or not simultaneous UV spectra were available to determine individual ionization stage dependent gas temperatures. Generally, slightly higher than solar abundances of helium and pronounced overabundances of the heavier elements were found. QU Vul turned out to be an ONeMg nova, while the other objects belong to the class of CO novae. The nature of V2214 Oph could not be completely clarified. The novae V1668 Cyg (1978), V693 CrA (1981), and V1370 Aql (1982), for which published element abundances exist, were reanalyzed to check the consistency of our spectral analysis approach. Satisfactory agreement of the results was found. Photoionization calculations were carried out for PW Vul using the code of Aldrovandi, Pequignot, and Stasinska. A synthetic spectrum was generated for the parameters derived from the analysis of the UV and optical spectra, which is in very good agreement with the observations. The spectral analysis technique was then applied to the model spectrum and reproduced the model parameters well. Electron temperatures for the C(2+) and C(3+) ions between 7 500 and 12,000 K and for N(4+) betwen 12,000 and 16,000 K were derived. For PW Vul these temperatures remained relatively constant over several months. The decline in density of the ejected shells with time could be investigated for V842 Cen, QV Vul, V977 Sco, and V443 Sct, and was found to deviate from the relation Ne proportional to t-2 for free expansion of a shell in a different way for each object. A possible explanation may be the complex density structure of the shells. This suspicion is supported by high resolution spectra (ESO 3.6m telescope

  8. Shell may expand detergent alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-23

    Shell Chemical is studying plans to expand detergent alcohols capacity in the US, CW has learned. The company is considering adding capacity for about 80 million lbs/year. If the project is approved, it would be implemented at the company`s Geismar, LA site. Shell will make a final decision on whether to proceed with the project within six months. It has been rumored to be considering a capacity addition as a result of tightening supply of natural and synthetic detergent alcohols.

  9. Glass shell manufacturing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolen, R. L., Jr.; Ebner, M. A.; Downs, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A heat transfer model was developed that mathematically describes the heating and calculates the thermal history of a gel particle in free-fall through the furnace. The model parameters that greatly affect the calculations were found to be gel particle mass, geometry, specific heat, and furnace gas. Empirical testing of the model has commenced. The code calculations and the initial empirical testing results both indicate that the gel-to-shell transformation occurs early and rapidly in the thermal history of the gel particle, and that for current work the heat transfer rate is not a limitation in shell production.

  10. On Closed Shells in Nuclei

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Mayer, M. G.

    1948-02-01

    It has been suggested in the past that special numbers of neutrons or protons in the nucleus form a particularly stable configuration.{sup1} The complete evidence for this has never been summarized, nor is it generally recognized how convincing this evidence is. That 20 neutrons or protons (Ca{sup40}) form a closed shell is predicted by the Hartree model. A number of calculations support this fact.{sup2} These considerations will not be repeated here. In this paper, the experimental facts indicating a particular stability of shells of 50 and 82 protons and of 50, 82, and 126 neutrons will be listed.

  11. The Shell-Model Code NuShellX@MSU

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.A.; Rae, W.D.M.

    2014-06-15

    Use of the code NuShellX@MSU is outlined. It connects to the ENSDF data files for automatic comparisons to energy level data. Operator overlaps provide predictions for spectroscopic factors, two-nucleon transfer amplitudes, nuclear moments, gamma decay and beta decay.

  12. Analysis of Thick Sandwich Shells with Embedded Ceramic Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Smith, C.; Lumban-Tobing, F.

    1996-01-01

    The Composite Armored Vehicle (CAV) is an advanced technology demonstrator of an all-composite ground combat vehicle. The CAV upper hull is made of a tough light-weight S2-glass/epoxy laminate with embedded ceramic tiles that serve as armor. The tiles are bonded to a rubber mat with a carefully selected, highly viscoelastic adhesive. The integration of armor and structure offers an efficient combination of ballistic protection and structural performance. The analysis of this anisotropic construction, with its inherent discontinuous and periodic nature, however, poses several challenges. The present paper describes a shell-based 'element-layering' technique that properly accounts for these effects and for the concentrated transverse shear flexibility in the rubber mat. One of the most important advantages of the element-layering technique over advanced higher-order elements is that it is based on conventional elements. This advantage allows the models to be portable to other structural analysis codes, a prerequisite in a program that involves the computational facilities of several manufacturers and government laboratories. The element-layering technique was implemented into an auto-layering program that automatically transforms a conventional shell model into a multi-layered model. The effects of tile layer homogenization, tile placement patterns, and tile gap size on the analysis results are described.

  13. Finite Element Modeling of the Buckling Response of Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Moore, David F.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Rankin, Charles C.

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of different modeling approaches for predicting sandwich panel buckling response is described. The study considers sandwich panels with anisotropic face sheets and a very thick core. Results from conventional analytical solutions for sandwich panel overall buckling and face-sheet-wrinkling type modes are compared with solutions obtained using different finite element modeling approaches. Finite element solutions are obtained using layered shell element models, with and without transverse shear flexibility, layered shell/solid element models, with shell elements for the face sheets and solid elements for the core, and sandwich models using a recently developed specialty sandwich element. Convergence characteristics of the shell/solid and sandwich element modeling approaches with respect to in-plane and through-the-thickness discretization, are demonstrated. Results of the study indicate that the specialty sandwich element provides an accurate and effective modeling approach for predicting both overall and localized sandwich panel buckling response. Furthermore, results indicate that anisotropy of the face sheets, along with the ratio of principle elastic moduli, affect the buckling response and these effects may not be represented accurately by analytical solutions. Modeling recommendations are also provided.

  14. Elemental health

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.

    1997-01-01

    Trace elements used in nutritional supplements and vitamins are discussed in the article. Relevant studies are briefly cited regarding the health effects of selenium, chromium, germanium, silicon, zinc, magnesium, silver, manganese, ruthenium, lithium, and vanadium. The toxicity and food sources are listed for some of the elements. A brief summary is also provided of the nutritional supplements market.

  15. Modal interaction in laminated stiffened plates and shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeggane, Madjid

    A buckled shell element model is developed for the analysis of nonlinear modal interaction of local and overall instabilities of axially compressed laminated thin walled stiffened structures. The new element, contains within itself all the essential local modes liable to be triggered in the interaction and the associated second order fields. Amplitude modulation in the form of "slowly varying" functions is employed to describe the variation of amplitude of local buckles as they come under the influence of overall bending of the structure. The buckled element is formulated using h-p version type polynomials in two dimensions. First the local buckling and the associated postbuckling response of a substructure are studied using a first order shear deformation theory (SDT) based on an asymptotic approach. The efficiency and accuracy of the SDT is highlighted by comparing the results to those computed by the classical (Kirchoff) theory (CPT). The effects of shear deformation and imperfection-sensitivity are discussed. Brief parametric studies which investigate the influence of level of shell curvature, stockiness of the stiffener and material properties are presented. Second, a locally buckled shell element, in which the first and second order fields are embedded, is presented to investigate the effect of local-overall modal interaction. This model can be used to analyze panels, subjected to axial compression which can be designed for service in their locally postbuckled states. The interaction of two local modes and the overall mode is then studied. In certain cases, for example in doubly symmetric columns, a second local mode is triggered in the interaction and this is accounted for by treating the problem as the interaction of overall with two local modes. Examples of box columns, I-section columns, and sandwich plates and shells are studied. Various bench mark computations testify to the accuracy and efficiency of the present algorithm, whether when compared to

  16. Method and apparatus for an inflatable shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of assembling an inflatable shell of a structure comprises folding a plurality of shell sections about a set of fold lines and integrating the plurality of shell sections together with one another to form the shell. In another embodiment, an inflatable shell comprises a plurality of shell sections, each shell section having two pairs of fold lines for folding into stowage comprising a first gore section having a plurality of first gore panels layered and collectively folded about at a first set of fold lines. Each layer of the first gore panels and second gore panels are configured such that, once the first gore panel and second gore panel are attached to one another at the respective side edges of each panel, the lines of attachment forming a second set of fold lines for the shell section. A system and method for fabricating gore panels is also disclosed.

  17. Elastic-plastic failure analysis of pressure burst tests of thin toroidal shells

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.P.; Holliday, J.E.; Larson, L.D.

    1998-07-01

    This paper provides a comparison between test and analysis results for bursting of thin toroidal shells. Testing was done by pressurizing two toroidal shells until failure by bursting. An analytical criterion for bursting is developed based on good agreement between structural instability predicted by large strain-large displacement elastic-plastic finite element analysis and observed burst pressure obtained from test. The failures were characterized by loss of local stability of the membrane section of the shells consistent with the predictions from the finite element analysis. Good agreement between measured and predicted burst pressure suggests that incipient structural instability as calculated by an elastic-plastic finite element analysis is a reasonable way to calculate the bursting pressure of thin membrane structures.

  18. Shell Games: Uncovering Periodic Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1983-01-01

    Describes activities (demonstrations/experiments) used to introduce history of periodic properties--without electrons, orbitals, filling shells, or any conception of atoms beyond Dalton's model. Activities supplement first chapter in a currently available chemistry text. Indicates potential danger of experiments if proper safety precautions are…

  19. Solutocapillary convection in spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Pravin; Zebib, Abdelfattah; McQuillan, Barry

    2005-01-01

    A linear stability study of solutocapillary driven Marangoni instabilities in small spherical shells is presented. The shells contain a binary fluid with an evaporating solvent. The viscosity is a strong function of the solvent concentration, the inner surface of the shell is assumed impermeable and stress free, while nonlinear boundary conditions are modeled and prescribed at the receding outer boundary. A time-dependent diffusive state is possible and may lose stability through the Marangoni mechanism due to surface tension dependence on solvent concentration (buoyant forces are negligible in this microscale problem). A frozen-time or quasisteady state linear stability analysis is performed to compute the critical Reynolds number and degree of surface harmonics, as well as the maximum growth rate of perturbations at specified parameters. The development of maximum growth rates in time was also computed by solving the initial value problem with random initial conditions. Results from both approaches are in good agreement except at short times where there is dependence on initial conditions. The physical problem models the manufacturing of spherical shells used as targets in inertial confinement fusion experiments where perfect sphericity is demanded for efficient fusion ignition. It is proposed that the Marangoni instability might be the source of observed surface roughness. Comparisons with the available experiments are made with reasonable qualitative and quantitative agreement.

  20. Shell structures for biogas plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sasse, L.

    1982-01-01

    The shell structures designed for biogas plants of the fixed-dome type by the Bremen Overseas Research and Development Association are described. Biogas digesters of the design described have been successfully tested in Rwanda and India without structural or contractural problems.

  1. Optimal design of geodesically stiffened composite cylindrical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendron, G.; Guerdal, Z.

    1992-01-01

    An optimization system based on the finite element code Computations Structural Mechanics (CSM) Testbed and the optimization program, Automated Design Synthesis (ADS), is described. The optimization system can be used to obtain minimum-weight designs of composite stiffened structures. Ply thickness, ply orientations, and stiffener heights can be used as design variables. Buckling, displacement, and material failure constraints can be imposed on the design. The system is used to conduct a design study of geodesically stiffened shells. For comparison purposes, optimal designs of unstiffened shells and shells stiffened by rings and stingers are also obtained. Trends in the design of geodesically stiffened shells are identified. An approach to include local stress concentrations during the design optimization process is then presented. The method is based on a global/local analysis technique. It employs spline interpolation functions to determine displacements and rotations from a global model which are used as 'boundary conditions' for the local model. The organization of the strategy in the context of an optimization process is described. The method is validated with an example.

  2. Use of the Bethe equation for inner-shell ionization by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Cedric J.; Llovet, Xavier; Salvat, Francesc

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed calculated cross sections for K-, L-, and M-shell ionization by electron impact to determine the energy ranges over which these cross sections are consistent with the Bethe equation for inner-shell ionization. Our analysis was performed with K-shell ionization cross sections for 26 elements, with L-shell ionization cross sections for seven elements, L3-subshell ionization cross sections for Xe, and M-shell ionization cross sections for three elements. The validity (or otherwise) of the Bethe equation could be checked with Fano plots based on a linearized form of the Bethe equation. Our Fano plots, which display theoretical cross sections and available measured cross sections, reveal two linear regions as predicted by de Heer and Inokuti [in Electron Impact Ionization, edited by T. D. Märk and G. H. Dunn, (Springer-Verlag, Vienna, 1985), Chap. 7, pp. 232-276]. For each region, we made linear fits and determined values of the two element-specific Bethe parameters. We found systematic variations of these parameters with atomic number for both the low- and the high-energy linear regions of the Fano plots. We also determined the energy ranges over which the Bethe equation can be used.

  3. Use of the Bethe Equation for Inner-Shell Ionization by Electron Impact

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Cedric J.; Llovet, Xavier; Salvat, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed calculated cross sections for K-, L-, and M-shell ionization by electron impact to determine the energy ranges over which these cross sections are consistent with the Bethe equation for inner-shell ionization. Our analysis was performed with K-shell ionization cross sections for 26 elements, with L-shell ionization cross sections for seven elements, with L3-subshell ionization cross sections for Xe, and with M-shell ionization cross sections for three elements. The validity or otherwise of the Bethe equation could be checked with Fano plots based on a linearized form of the Bethe equation. Our Fano plots, which display theoretical cross sections and available measured cross sections, reveal two linear regions as predicted by de Heer and Inokuti. For each region, we made linear fits and determined values of the two element-specific Bethe parameters. We found systematic variations of these parameters with atomic number for both the low- and the high-energy linear regions of the Fano plots. We also determined the energy ranges over which the Bethe equation can be used. PMID:27546903

  4. Recent advances in shell theory. [application of asymptotic approach to thin walled shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmonds, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    The results reviewed are divided into two categories: those that relate two-dimensional shell theory to three-dimensional elasticity theory and those concerned with shell theory per se. In the second category results for general elastic systems that carry over, by specialization or analogy, to shells and results that are unique to shell theory itself are considered.

  5. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  6. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  7. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  8. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  9. 7 CFR 981.6 - Shelled almonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shelled almonds. 981.6 Section 981.6 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.6 Shelled almonds. Shelled almonds mean raw or roasted almonds...

  10. Developments in Cylindrical Shell Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Today high-performance computing systems and new analytical and numerical techniques enable engineers to explore the use of advanced materials for shell design. This paper reviews some of the historical developments of shell buckling analysis and design. The paper concludes by identifying key research directions for reliable and robust methods development in shell stability analysis and design.

  11. 7 CFR 984.10 - Shelled walnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shelled walnuts. 984.10 Section 984.10 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.10 Shelled walnuts. Shelled walnuts means walnut kernels after...

  12. 7 CFR 984.10 - Shelled walnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shelled walnuts. 984.10 Section 984.10 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.10 Shelled walnuts. Shelled walnuts means walnut kernels after...

  13. 7 CFR 984.10 - Shelled walnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shelled walnuts. 984.10 Section 984.10 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.10 Shelled walnuts. Shelled walnuts means walnut kernels after...

  14. 7 CFR 984.10 - Shelled walnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shelled walnuts. 984.10 Section 984.10 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.10 Shelled walnuts. Shelled walnuts means walnut kernels after...

  15. 7 CFR 984.10 - Shelled walnuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shelled walnuts. 984.10 Section 984.10 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.10 Shelled walnuts. Shelled walnuts means walnut kernels after...

  16. 7 CFR 51.2002 - Split shell.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....2002 Split shell. Split shell means a shell having any crack which is open and conspicuous for a... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1 2...

  17. Error analysis of finite element solutions for postbuckled cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sistla, Rajaram; Thurston, Gaylen A.

    1989-01-01

    A general method of error analysis and correction is investigated for the discrete finite-element results for cylindrical shell structures. The method for error analysis is an adaptation of the method of successive approximation. When applied to the equilibrium equations of shell theory, successive approximations derive an approximate continuous solution from the discrete finite-element results. The advantage of this continuous solution is that it contains continuous partial derivatives of an order higher than the basis functions of the finite-element solution. Preliminary numerical results are presented in this paper for the error analysis of finite-element results for a postbuckled stiffened cylindrical panel modeled by a general purpose shell code. Numerical results from the method have previously been reported for postbuckled stiffened plates. A procedure for correcting the continuous approximate solution by Newton's method is outlined.

  18. Analytic formula for quadrupole-quadrupole matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosensteel, G.

    1990-12-01

    An analytic formula is reported for general matrix elements of the microscopic quadrupole-quadrupole operator in the U(3)-boson approximation. The complete infinite-dimensional basis of A-fermion wave functions is compatible with the harmonic-oscillator shell model and consists of np-nh configurations, with spurious center-of-mass excitations removed, which are symmetry adapted to the Elliott U(3) and symplectic Sp(3,R) models. The formula expresses the general Q2.Q2 matrix element with respect to this complete orthonormal basis as a Racah SU(3) U coefficient times a closed-shell matrix element. An oscillator closed-shell matrix element of Q2.Q2 is a square root of a rational function of the integer quantum numbers of the U(3) basis.

  19. Elemental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Esther Gnanamalar Sarojini; Saat, Rohaida Mohd.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a learning module integrating three disciplines--physics, chemistry, and biology--and based on four elements: carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and silicon. Includes atomic model and silicon-based life activities. (YDS)

  20. Superheavy Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of creating elements with an atomic number of around 114. Describes the underlying physics responsible for the limited extent of the periodic table and enumerates problems that must be overcome in creating a superheavy nucleus. (GS)

  1. Parameter identification of material constants in a composite shell structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, David R.; Carne, Thomas G.

    1988-01-01

    One of the basic requirements in engineering analysis is the development of a mathematical model describing the system. Frequently comparisons with test data are used as a measurement of the adequacy of the model. An attempt is typically made to update or improve the model to provide a test verified analysis tool. System identification provides a systematic procedure for accomplishing this task. The terms system identification, parameter estimation, and model correlation all refer to techniques that use test information to update or verify mathematical models. The goal of system identification is to improve the correlation of model predictions with measured test data, and produce accurate, predictive models. For nonmetallic structures the modeling task is often difficult due to uncertainties in the elastic constants. A finite element model of the shell was created, which included uncertain orthotropic elastic constants. A modal survey test was then performed on the shell. The resulting modal data, along with the finite element model of the shell, were used in a Bayes estimation algorithm. This permitted the use of covariance matrices to weight the confidence in the initial parameter values as well as confidence in the measured test data. The estimation procedure also employed the concept of successive linearization to obtain an approximate solution to the original nonlinear estimation problem.

  2. Nonlinear thermo-mechanical analysis of stiffened composite laminates by a new finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barut, Atila

    A new stiffened shell element combining shallow beam and shallow shell elements is developed for geometrically nonlinear analysis of stiffened composite laminates under thermal and/or mechanical loading. The formulation of this element is based on the principal of virtual displacements in conjunction with the co-rotational form of the total Lagrangian description of motion. In the finite element formulation, both the shell and the beam (stiffener) elements account for transverse shear deformations and material anisotropy. The cross-section of the stiffener (beam) can be arbitrary in geometry and lamination. In order to combine the stiffener with the shell element, constraint conditions are applied to the displacement and rotation fields of the stiffener. These constraint conditions ensure that the cross-section of the stiffener remains co-planar with the shell section after deformation. The resulting expressions for the displacement and rotation fields of the stiffener involve only the nodal unknowns of the shell element, thus reducing the total number of degrees of freedom. Also, the discretization of the entire stiffened shell structure becomes more flexible.

  3. The Magellania venosa Biomineralizing Proteome: A Window into Brachiopod Shell Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Daniel J.; Mann, Karlheinz; Häussermann, Vreni; Schilhabel, Markus B.; Lüter, Carsten; Griesshaber, Erika; Schmahl, Wolfgang; Wörheide, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Brachiopods are a lineage of invertebrates well known for the breadth and depth of their fossil record. Although the quality of this fossil record attracts the attention of paleontologists, geochemists, and paleoclimatologists, modern day brachiopods are also of interest to evolutionary biologists due to their potential to address a variety of questions ranging from developmental biology to biomineralization. The brachiopod shell is a composite material primarily composed of either calcite or calcium phosphate in close association with proteins and polysaccharides which give these composite structures their material properties. The information content of these biomolecules, sequestered within the shell during its construction, has the potential to inform hypotheses focused on describing how brachiopod shell formation evolved. Here, using high throughput proteomic approaches and next generation sequencing, we have surveyed and characterized the first shell-proteome and shell-forming transcriptome of any brachiopod, the South American Magellania venosa (Rhynchonelliformea: Terebratulida). We find that the seven most abundant proteins present in the shell are unique to M. venosa, but that these proteins display biochemical features found in other metazoan biomineralization proteins. We can also detect some M. venosa proteins that display significant sequence similarity to other metazoan biomineralization proteins, suggesting that some elements of the brachiopod shell-forming proteome are deeply evolutionarily conserved. We also employed a variety of preparation methods to isolate shell proteins and find that in comparison to the shells of other spiralian invertebrates (such as mollusks) the shell ultrastructure of M. venosa may explain the effects these preparation strategies have on our results. PMID:25912046

  4. The Magellania venosa Biomineralizing Proteome: A Window into Brachiopod Shell Evolution.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Daniel J; Mann, Karlheinz; Häussermann, Vreni; Schilhabel, Markus B; Lüter, Carsten; Griesshaber, Erika; Schmahl, Wolfgang; Wörheide, Gert

    2015-05-01

    Brachiopods are a lineage of invertebrates well known for the breadth and depth of their fossil record. Although the quality of this fossil record attracts the attention of paleontologists, geochemists, and paleoclimatologists, modern day brachiopods are also of interest to evolutionary biologists due to their potential to address a variety of questions ranging from developmental biology to biomineralization. The brachiopod shell is a composite material primarily composed of either calcite or calcium phosphate in close association with proteins and polysaccharides which give these composite structures their material properties. The information content of these biomolecules, sequestered within the shell during its construction, has the potential to inform hypotheses focused on describing how brachiopod shell formation evolved. Here, using high throughput proteomic approaches and next generation sequencing, we have surveyed and characterized the first shell-proteome and shell-forming transcriptome of any brachiopod, the South American Magellania venosa (Rhynchonelliformea: Terebratulida). We find that the seven most abundant proteins present in the shell are unique to M. venosa, but that these proteins display biochemical features found in other metazoan biomineralization proteins. We can also detect some M. venosa proteins that display significant sequence similarity to other metazoan biomineralization proteins, suggesting that some elements of the brachiopod shell-forming proteome are deeply evolutionarily conserved. We also employed a variety of preparation methods to isolate shell proteins and find that in comparison to the shells of other spiralian invertebrates (such as mollusks) the shell ultrastructure of M. venosa may explain the effects these preparation strategies have on our results. PMID:25912046

  5. Shell Model Depiction of Isospin Mixing in sd Shell

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Yi Hua; Smirnova, Nadya A.; Caurier, Etienne

    2011-11-30

    We constructed a new empirical isospin-symmetry breaking (ISB) Hamiltonian in the sd(1s{sub 1/2}, 0d{sub 5/2} and 0d{sub 3/2}) shell-model space. In this contribution, we present its application to two important case studies: (i){beta}-delayed proton emission from {sup 22}Al and (ii) isospin-mixing correction to superallowed 0{sup +}{yields}0{sup +}{beta}-decay ft-values.

  6. On chaotic behavior of gravitating stellar shells.

    PubMed

    Barkov, M V; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G S; Neishtadt, A I; Belinski, V A

    2005-03-01

    Motion of two gravitating spherical stellar shells around a massive central body is considered. Each shell consists of point particles with the same specific angular momenta and energies. In the case when one can neglect the influence of gravitation of one ("light") shell onto another ("heavy") shell ("restricted problem") the structure of the phase space is described. The scaling laws for the measure of the domain of chaotic motion and for the minimal energy of the light shell sufficient for its escape to infinity are obtained. PMID:15836258

  7. K-shell transitions in L-shell ions with the EBIT calorimeter spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, Natalie; Brown, G. V.; Wilms, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.

    2015-08-01

    With the large improvement in effective area of Astro-H's micro-calorimeter soft X-ray spectrometer (SXS) over grating spectrometers, high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy with good signal to noise will become more commonly available, also for faint and extended sources. This will result in a range of spectral lines being resolved for the first time in celestial sources, especially in the Fe region. However, a large number of X-ray line energies in the atomic databases are known to a lesser accuracy than that expected for Astro-H/SXS, or have no known uncertainty at all. To benchmark the available calculations, we have therefore started to measure reference energies of K-shell transition in L-shell ions for astrophysically relevant elements in the range 11 ≤ Z ≤ 28 (Na to Ni), using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's EBIT-I electron beam ion trap coupled with the NASA/GSFC EBIT calorimeter spectrometer (ECS). The ECS has a resolution of ~5eV, i.e., similar to Astro-H/SXS and Chandra/HETG. A comparison to crystal spectra of lower charge states of sulfur with ~0.6eV resolution shows that the analysis of spectra taken at ECS resolution allows us to determine the transition energies of the strongest components.Work at LLNL was performed under the auspices of DOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by NASA's APRA program.

  8. Multi-proxies Approach of Climatic Records In Terrestrial Mollusks Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labonne, M.; Rousseau, D. D.; Ben Othman, D.; Luck, J. M.; Metref, S.

    Fossil land snails shells constitute a valuable source of information for the study of Quaternary deposits as they are commonly preserved in many regions and notably in loess sequences. The use of stable isotope composition of the carbonate in the shells was previously applied to reconstruct past climate or environnements but the technic was not widely exploited and compared with other proxies from the same sequence. In this study, we have analysed stables isotopes, trace elements and Sr isotopes from both shells of land snails Vertigo modesta and the sediment from the Eustis upper Pleistocene loess sequence (Nebraska, USA). This serie developed during the last glaciation and records the last deglaciation between 18,000 and 12,000 B.P. years. We compare the paleoclimatic information obtained by different proxies, such as mag- netic susceptibility, temperature and moisture estimated by land snails assemblage with geochemical data measured on land snails shells in order to validate the climatic information obtained with this proxy. Our study demonstrates that shell carbonate reflects environmental conditions estimated by other proxies. Carbon and oxygen iso- topes show cyclic variations (millenial cycles) along the profile which correlate with stratigraphic units and could be link with the retreat of the Laurentide ice sheet. Trace element and Sr isotopes in the shells indicate various origins for the eolian dusts in the two main loess units along the sequence.

  9. Improving data resolution and statistical rigor in the analysis of bivalve shells as environmental archives.

    PubMed

    Shoults-Wilson, W Aaron; Seymour, Lynne; Unrine, Jason M; Wisniewski, Jason M; Black, Marsha C

    2014-02-01

    Bivalves secrete their shells in an annual fashion, resulting in discrete bands of growth within each shell. In doing so, they may incorporate trace elements in concentrations reflecting exposure. This may make it possible to use them as archives of environmental information, such as contamination events. In this study, we used laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to analyze trace elements (Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn) on a fly-scanning transect perpendicular to the growth annuli of the freshwater bivalve Elliptio hopetonensis collected from the Altamaha river system. Concentrations of Mn from multiple shells at each site were correlated and average Mn data series were formed. Periodicity of Mn data was determined and sampling errors removed using an autoregression model. The Mn data series at each site were shown to have regular fluctuations of high and low concentrations. Fluctuations were similar between the shells from the same site but different between shells from different sites, demonstrating that Mn deposition in the shells of E. hopetonensis follows a regular, seasonal pattern but that growth differs between sites with different environments. Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn could not be analyzed in a statistically robust manner. This is the first study to attempt to improve data resolution by using the fly-scanning approach and, additionally, the first to apply an autoregression model to Mn data from bivalve annuli. Further study is required to develop this approach for environmental monitoring. PMID:24305745

  10. Shell growth and environmental control of methanophyllic Thyasirid bivalves from Svalbard cold seeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Michael; Åström, Emmelie; Ambrose, William; Locke, William; Oliver, Graham; Hong, Wei-Li; Carroll, JoLynn

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of molluscan shell material (sclerochronology) can provide information about an organism's age, growth history, and environmental conditions during its lifetime. Bivalve molluscs are common members of hydrothermal vents and methane cold seeps communities where, supported by chemosynthetic symbionts, they can reach high density and biomass. But little is known about methane-associated bivalve populations inhabiting high-Arctic cold seeps, and sclerochronological analysis of methane-influenced bivalves is rare. We measured growth rates and elemental and isotopic shell signatures in a newly discovered species of bivalve (Thyasiridae) from cold seeps at 350-390m depth southwest of Svalbard. First discovered in 2014, recently described shells of Thyasira capitanea sp.nov. were found at 2 independent seep systems in Storfjordrenna. Mean shell carbon isotopic ratios from inorganic δ13C (mean = -4.8‰) and organic δ13C (mean = -26.9‰) fractions clearly indicate a methane influenced habitat and food source for these organisms. Shell mineral ratios (Li/Ca, Mg/Ca, Mn/Ca, Fe/Ca, Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca, Pb/Ca) sampled along the axis of growth with laser-ablated ICP-MS exhibit variability through time and between sites, suggesting that concentrations of these elements that may be affected by methane emissions. The mineralogical data also elucidates the internal pattern of shell deposition and growth checks, and combined with the isotopic and growth rate data, enables us to interpret the temporal history of methane release from these locations.

  11. High-temperature ceramic heat exchanger element for a solar thermal receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strumpf, H. J.; Kotchick, D. M.; Coombs, M. G.

    1982-01-01

    A study has been completed on the development of a high-temperature ceramic heat exchanger element to be integrated into a solar reciver producing heated air. A number of conceptual designs were developed for heat exchanger elements of differing configuration. These were evaluated with respect to thermal performance, pressure drop, structural integrity, and fabricability. The final design selection identified a finned ceramic shell as the most favorable concept. The ceramic shell is surrounded by a larger metallic shell. The flanges of the two shells are sealed to provide a leak-tight pressure vessel. The ceramic shell is fabricated by an innovative combination of slip casting the receiver walls and precision casting the heat transfer finned plates. The fins are bonded to the shell during firing. Fabrication of a one-half scale demonstrator ceramic receiver has been completed.

  12. Relative performance of antisymmetric angle-ply laminated stiffened hypar shell roofs with cutout in terms of static behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Puja B.; Mitra, Anirban; Sahoo, Sarmila

    2016-01-01

    A review of literature reveals that bending analysis of laminated composite stiffened hypar shells with cutout have not received due attention. Being a doubly ruled surface, a skewed hypar shell fulfils aesthetic as well as ease of casting requirements. Further, this shell allows entry of north light making it suitable as civil engineering roofing units. Hypar shell with cutout subjected to uniformly distributed load exhibits improved performances with stiffeners. Hence relative performances of antisymmetric angle-ply laminated composite stiffened hypar shells in terms of displacements and stress resultants are studied in this paper under static loading. A curved quadratic isoparametric eight noded element and three noded beam elements are used to model the shell surface and the stiffeners respectively. Results obtained from the present study are compared with established ones to check the correctness of the present approach. A number of additional problems of antisymmetric angle-ply laminated composite stiffened hypar shells are solved for various fibre orientations, number of layers and boundary conditions. Results are interpreted from practical application standpoints and findings important for a designer to decide on the shell combination among a number of possible options are highlighted.

  13. Pressure Shell Approach to Integrated Environmental Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.

    2011-01-01

    The next generation of exploration mission human systems will require environmental protection such as radiation protection that is effective and efficient. In order to continue human exploration, habitat systems will require special shells to protect astronauts from hostile environments. The Pressure Shell Approach to integrated environmental (radiation) protection is a multi-layer shell that can be used for multifunctional environmental protection. Self-healing, self-repairing nano technologies and sensors are incorporated into the shell. This shell consists of multiple layers that can be tailored for specific environmental protection needs. Mainly, this innovation focuses on protecting crew from exposure to micrometeorites, thermal, solar flares, and galactic cosmic ray (GCR) radiation. The Pressure Shell Approach consists of a micrometeoroid and secondary ejecta protection layer; a thin, composite shell placed in between two layers that is non-structural; an open cavity layer that can be filled with water, regolith, or polyethylene foam; a thicker composite shell that is a structural load bearing that is placed between two layers; and a bladder coating on the interior composite shell. This multi-layer shell creates an effective radiation protection system. Most of its layers can be designed with the materials necessary for specific environments. In situ materials such as water or regolith can be added to the shell design for supplemental radiation protection.

  14. On Hybrid and mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1981-01-01

    Three versions of the assumed stress hybrid model in finite element methods and the corresponding variational principles for the formulation are presented. Examples of rank deficiency for stiffness matrices by the hybrid stress model are given and their corresponding kinematic deformation modes are identified. A discussion of the derivation of general semi-Loof elements for plates and shells by the hybrid stress method is given. It is shown that the equilibrium model by Fraeijs de Veubeke can be derived by the approach of the hybrid stress model as a special case of semi-Loof elements.

  15. Numerical treatment of a geometrically nonlinear planar Cosserat shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Oliver; Neff, Patrizio; Bîrsan, Mircea

    2016-05-01

    We present a new way to discretize a geometrically nonlinear elastic planar Cosserat shell. The kinematical model is similar to the general six-parameter resultant shell model with drilling rotations. The discretization uses geodesic finite elements (GFEs), which leads to an objective discrete model which naturally allows arbitrarily large rotations. GFEs of any approximation order can be constructed. The resulting algebraic problem is a minimization problem posed on a nonlinear finite-dimensional Riemannian manifold. We solve this problem using a Riemannian trust-region method, which is a generalization of Newton's method that converges globally without intermediate loading steps. We present the continuous model and the discretization, discuss the properties of the discrete model, and show several numerical examples, including wrinkling of thin elastic sheets in shear.

  16. Combined experimental/analytical modeling of shell/payload structures

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.R.; Miller, A.K.; Carne, T.G.

    1985-12-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of computed modal frequencies obtained from a combined experimental/analytical model of a shell/payload structure. A component mode synthesis technique was used which incorporated free modes and residual effects. The total structure is physically divided into the two subsystems which are connected through stiff joints. The payload was tested to obtain its free-free modes, while a finite element model of the shell was analyzed to obtain its modal description. Both the translational and rotational components of the experimental mode shapes at the payload interface were used in the coupling. Sensitivity studies were also performed to determine the effect of neglecting the residual terms of the payload. Results from a previous study of a combined experimental/analytical model for a beam structure are also given. The beam structure was used to examine the basic procedures and difficulties in experimentally measuring, and analytically accounting for the rotational and residual quantities.

  17. Magnetization processes in core/shell exchange-spring structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J. S.

    2015-05-01

    The magnetization reversal processes in cylindrical and spherical soft core/hard shell exchange-spring structures are investigated via the analytical nucleation theory and are verified with numerical micromagnetic simulations. At small core sizes, the nucleation of magnetic reversal proceeds via the modified bulging mode, where the transverse component of the magnetization is only semi-coherent in direction and the nucleation field contains a contribution from self-demagnetization. For large core sizes, the modified curling mode, where the magnetization configuration is vortex-like, is favored at nucleation. The preference for the modified curling mode is beneficial in that the flux-closure allows cylindrical and spherical core/shell exchange-spring elements to be densely packed into bulk permanent magnets without affecting the nucleation field, thereby offering the potential for high energy product.

  18. Turbine blade with spar and shell

    DOEpatents

    Davies, Daniel O.; Peterson, Ross H.

    2012-04-24

    A turbine blade with a spar and shell construction in which the spar and the shell are both secured within two platform halves. The spar and the shell each include outward extending ledges on the bottom ends that fit within grooves formed on the inner sides of the platform halves to secure the spar and the shell against radial movement when the two platform halves are joined. The shell is also secured to the spar by hooks extending from the shell that slide into grooves formed on the outer surface of the spar. The hooks form a serpentine flow cooling passage between the shell and the spar. The spar includes cooling holes on the lower end in the leading edge region to discharge cooling air supplied through the platform root and into the leading edge cooling channel.

  19. The shell coal gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Koenders, L.O.M.; Zuideveld, P.O.

    1995-12-01

    Future Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (ICGCC) power plants will have superior environmental performance and efficiency. The Shell Coal Gasification Process (SCGP) is a clean coal technology, which can convert a wide range of coals into clean syngas for high efficiency electricity generation in an ICGCC plant. SCGP flexibility has been demonstrated for high-rank bituminous coals to low rank lignites and petroleum coke, and the process is well suited for combined cycle power generation, resulting in efficiencies of 42 to 46% (LHV), depending on choice of coal and gas turbine efficiency. In the Netherlands, a 250 MWe coal gasification combined cycle plant based on Shell technology has been built by Demkolec, a development partnership of the Dutch Electricity Generating Board (N.V. Sep). The construction of the unit was completed end 1993 and is now followed by start-up and a 3 year demonstration period, after that the plant will be part of the Dutch electricity generating system.

  20. Glass shell manufacturing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolen, R. L.; Downs, R. L.; Ebner, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Highly-uniform, hollow glass spheres, which are used for inertial-confinement fusion targets, are formed from metal-organic gel powder feedstock in a drop-tower furnace. The modelling of this gel-to-sphere transformation has consisted of three phases: gel thermochemistry, furnance-to-gel heat transfer, and gravity-driven degradation of the concentricity of the molten shell. The heat transfer from the furnace to the free-falling gel particle was modelled with forced convection. The gel mass, dimensions, and specific heat as well as furnace temperature profile and furnace gas conductivity, were controlled variables. This model has been experimentally verified. In the third phase, a mathematical model was developed to describe the gravity-driven degradation of concentricity in molten glass shells.

  1. Investigation of buckling behavior of carbon nanotube/shape memory polymer composite shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guanghui; Yang, Qingsheng; Zhang, Qiang

    2012-04-01

    Shape memory polymer(SMP) is a class of smart materials used in intelligent biomedical devices and industrial application as sensors or actuators for their ability to change shape under a predetermined stimulus. Carbon nanotube (CNT)/shape memory polymer (SMP) composites demonstrate good mechanical properties and shape memory effect. In this work, a model of CNT/SMP composite shell with a vaulted cross-section was established. This composite shell structure could further elevate the recovery stress of CNT/SMP composites. The folding properties of CNT/SMP composite shell structure were analyzed by finite element method and the influence of structural parameters on the buckling behavior of the shell was studied using the energy conservation principle. The results indicate that vaulted cross-section shell had unique mechanical properties. The structural parameters, such as the vaulted radius and the total length have a great impact on buckling moment of the shell. This shell structure is expected to achieve effective control of buckling and deploying process, relying on the special shape memory property of SMP and high elastic modulus CNTs. Moreover, it could also largely avoid the vibration problem during the deploying process.

  2. Hypersonic vibrations of Ag@SiO2 (cubic core)-shell nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing Ya; Wang, Zhi Kui; Lim, Hock Siah; Ng, Ser Choon; Kuok, Meng Hau; Tran, Toan Trong; Lu, Xianmao

    2010-12-28

    The intriguing optical and catalytic properties of metal-silica core-shell nanoparticles, inherited from their plasmonic metallic cores together with the rich surface chemistry and increased stability offered by their silica shells, have enabled a wide variety of applications. In this work, we investigate the confined vibrational modes of a series of monodisperse Ag@SiO(2) (cubic core)-shell nanospheres synthesized using a modified Stöber sol-gel method. The particle-size dependence of their mode frequencies has been mapped by Brillouin light scattering, a powerful tool for probing hypersonic vibrations. Unlike the larger particles, the observed spheroidal-like mode frequencies of the smaller ones do not scale with inverse diameter. Interestingly, the onset of the deviation from this linearity occurs at a smaller particle size for higher-energy modes than for lower-energy ones. Finite element simulations show that the mode displacement profiles of the Ag@SiO(2) core-shells closely resemble those of a homogeneous SiO(2) sphere. Simulations have also been performed to ascertain the effects that the core shape and the relative hardness of the core and shell materials have on the vibrations of the core-shell as a whole. As the vibrational modes of a particle have a bearing on its thermal and mechanical properties, the findings would be of value in designing core-shell nanostructures with customized thermal and mechanical characteristics. PMID:21087022

  3. Nonlinear Bulging Factors for Longitudinal and Circumferential Cracks in Cylindrical Shells Subjected to Combined Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Results of a geometrically nonlinear finite element parametric study to determine curvature correction factors or bulging factors that account for increased crack-tip stresses due to curvature for longitudinal and circumferential cracks in unstiffened cylindrical shells subjected to combined loads are presented. Nondimensional parameters varied in the study include the shell curvature parameter, l , which is a function of the shell radius, the shell wall thickness, and the crack length; a pressure loading parameter, h , which is a function of the shell geometry, material properties and the applied internal pressure; and a biaxial loading parameter, c , which is the ratio of the farfield axial stress to the farfield circumferential stress. The major results are presented in the form of contour plots of the bulging factor as a function of these three nondimensional parameters. These plots identify the ranges of the shell curvature and loading parameters for which the effects of geometric nonlinearity are significant, and show the effect of the biaxial loads on the value of the bulging factor. Simple empirical expressions for the bulging factor are then derived from the numerical results and are shown to predict accurately the nonlinear response of shells with longitudinal and circumferential cracks.

  4. Resource Letter NSM-1: New insights into the nuclear shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, David Jarvis; Hamilton, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the spherical shell model as applied to nuclei. The nuclear shell model describes the structure of nuclei starting with a nuclear core developed by the classical neutron and proton magic numbers N,Z=2,8,20,28,50,82, 126, where gaps occur in the single-particle energies as a shell is filled, and the interactions of valence nucleons that reside beyond that core. Various modern extensions of this model for spherical nuclei are likewise described. Significant extensions of the nuclear shell model include new magic numbers for spherical nuclei and now for deformed nuclei as well. When both protons and neutrons have shell gaps at the same spherical or deformed shapes, they can reinforce each other to give added stability to that shape and lead to new magic numbers. The vanishings of the classical spherical shell model energy gaps and magic numbers in new neutron-rich nuclei are described. Spherical and deformed shell gaps are seen to be critical for the existence of elements with Z > 100.

  5. Experimental validation of L-shell x-ray fluorescence computed tomography imaging: phantom study.

    PubMed

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the current advances in nanoscience, molecular biochemistry, and x-ray detector technology, x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) has been considered for molecular imaging of probes containing high atomic number elements, such as gold nanoparticles. The commonly used XFCT imaging performed with K-shell x rays appears to have insufficient imaging sensitivity to detect the low gold concentrations observed in small animal studies. Low energy fluorescence L-shell x rays have exhibited higher signal-to-background ratio and appeared as a promising XFCT mode with greatly enhanced sensitivity. The aim of this work was to experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of L-shell XFCT imaging and to assess its achievable sensitivity. We built an experimental L-shell XFCT imaging system consisting of a miniature x-ray tube and two spectrometers, a silicon drift detector (SDD), and a CdTe detector placed at [Formula: see text] with respect to the excitation beam. We imaged a 28-mm-diameter water phantom with 4-mm-diameter Eppendorf tubes containing gold solutions with concentrations of 0.06 to 0.1% Au. While all Au vials were detectable in the SDD L-shell XFCT image, none of the vials were visible in the CdTe L-shell XFCT image. The detectability limit of the presented L-shell XFCT SDD imaging setup was 0.007% Au, a concentration observed in small animal studies. PMID:26839910

  6. Experimental analysis and numerical modeling of mollusk shells as a three dimensional integrated volume.

    PubMed

    Faghih Shojaei, M; Mohammadi, V; Rajabi, H; Darvizeh, A

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a new numerical technique is presented to accurately model the geometrical and mechanical features of mollusk shells as a three dimensional (3D) integrated volume. For this purpose, the Newton method is used to solve the nonlinear equations of shell surfaces. The points of intersection on the shell surface are identified and the extra interior parts are removed. Meshing process is accomplished with respect to the coordinate of each point of intersection. The final 3D generated mesh models perfectly describe the spatial configuration of the mollusk shells. Moreover, the computational model perfectly matches with the actual interior geometry of the shells as well as their exterior architecture. The direct generation technique is employed to generate a 3D finite element (FE) model in ANSYS 11. X-ray images are taken to show the close similarity of the interior geometry of the models and the actual samples. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to provide information on the microstructure of the shells. In addition, a set of compression tests were performed on gastropod shell specimens to obtain their ultimate compressive strength. A close agreement between experimental data and the relevant numerical results is demonstrated. PMID:23137621

  7. A Shell/3D Modeling Technique for Delaminations in Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    1999-01-01

    A shell/3D modeling technique was developed for which a local solid finite element model is used only in the immediate vicinity of the delamination front. The goal was to combine the accuracy of the full three-dimensional solution with the computational efficiency of a plate or shell finite element model. Multi-point constraints provide a kinematically compatible interface between the local 3D model and the global structural model which has been meshed with plate or shell finite elements. For simple double cantilever beam (DCB), end notched flexure (ENF), and single leg bending (SLB) specimens, mixed mode energy release rate distributions were computed across the width from nonlinear finite element analyses using the virtual crack closure technique. The analyses served to test the accuracy of the shell/3D technique for the pure mode I case (DCB), mode II case (ENF) and a mixed mode I/II case (SLB). Specimens with a unidirectional layup where the delamination is located between two 0 plies, as well as a multidirectional layup where the delamination is located between two non-zero degree plies, were simulated. For a local 3D model extending to a minimum of about three specimen thicknesses in front of and behind the delamination front, the results were in good agreement with mixed mode strain energy release rates obtained from computations where the entire specimen had been modeled with solid elements. For large built-up composite structures modeled with plate elements, the shell/3D modeling technique offers a great potential, since only a relatively small section in the vicinity of the delamination front needs to be modeled with solid elements.

  8. Hyperspectral cathodoluminescence imaging of modern and fossil carbonate shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Jennifer; Cusack, Maggie; Paterson, Niall W.; Edwards, Paul; Lee, Martin R.; Martin, Robert

    2006-09-01

    Optical cathodoluminescence (CL) is commonly used to identify diagenetically altered carbonate fossils, yet such an interpretation is problematic as present-day carbonate shells may also luminesce. Hyperspectral CL imaging combines CL microscopy and CL spectroscopy to quantitatively analyze luminescence emission. Cold optical CL and hyperspectral CL imaging were carried out on four modern biominerals, a Rhynchonelliform brachiopod, a Craniid brachiopod, a bivalve, and the eggshell of the domestic fowl. A fossil Craniid brachiopod was analyzed to compare luminescence emission with that from the modern Craniid brachiopod. The beam conditions used for optical CL vary between studies, which hinders the direct comparison of CL analyses. This study assesses the effect of beam current and beam diameter on the intensity of luminescence emission. By characterizing the effect of beam conditions on different CaCO3 biominerals, comparisons can be made between CL studies. Hyperspectral CL imaging can be carried out in combination with WDS element analysis. By comparing hyperspectral CL images with element maps the causes of luminescence can to some extent be determined. The intensity of luminescence emitted from the modern biominerals differs under the same beam conditions. All four modern shells emit blue luminescence. In N. anomala, there is a correlation between Mn2+ concentration and luminescence intensity in the 620- to 630-nm wavelength band, which is apparent in the inner region of the shell. The fossil Craniid also emits blue luminescence, and texture within the shell wall is apparent; however, the luminescence emission between 620 and 630 nm that is evident in N. anomala is absent.

  9. Cross Sections for Inner-Shell Ionization by Electron Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Llovet, Xavier; Powell, Cedric J.; Salvat, Francesc; Jablonski, Aleksander

    2014-03-15

    An analysis is presented of measured and calculated cross sections for inner-shell ionization by electron impact. We describe the essentials of classical and semiclassical models and of quantum approximations for computing ionization cross sections. The emphasis is on the recent formulation of the distorted-wave Born approximation by Bote and Salvat [Phys. Rev. A 77, 042701 (2008)] that has been used to generate an extensive database of cross sections for the ionization of the K shell and the L and M subshells of all elements from hydrogen to einsteinium (Z = 1 to Z = 99) by electrons and positrons with kinetic energies up to 1 GeV. We describe a systematic method for evaluating cross sections for emission of x rays and Auger electrons based on atomic transition probabilities from the Evaluated Atomic Data Library of Perkins et al. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, UCRL-ID-50400, 1991]. We made an extensive comparison of measured K-shell, L-subshell, and M-subshell ionization cross sections and of Lα x-ray production cross sections with the corresponding calculated cross sections. We identified elements for which there were at least three (for K shells) or two (for L and M subshells) mutually consistent sets of cross-section measurements and for which the cross sections varied with energy as expected by theory. The overall average root-mean-square deviation between the measured and calculated cross sections was 10.9% and the overall average deviation was −2.5%. This degree of agreement between measured and calculated ionization and x-ray production cross sections was considered to be very satisfactory given the difficulties of these measurements.

  10. Atomic inner-shell transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crasemann, B.; Chen, M. H.; Mark, H.

    1984-01-01

    Atomic inner-shell processes have quite different characteristics, in several important aspects, from processes in the optical regime. Energies are large, e.g., the 1s binding energy reaches 100 keV at Z = 87; relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic effects therefore are strong. Radiationless transitions vastly dominate over photon emission in most cases. Isolated inner-shell vacancies have pronounced single-particle character, with correlations generally contributing only approximately 1 eV to the 1s and 2p binding energies; the structure of such systems is thus well tractable by independent-particle self-consistent-field atomic models. For systems containing multiple deep inner-shell vacancies, or for highly stripped ions, the importance of relativistic intermediate coupling and configuration interaction becomes pronounced. Cancellation of the Coulomb interaction can lead to strong manifestations of the Breit interaction in such phenomena as multiplet splitting and hypersatellite X-ray shifts. Unique opportunities arise for the test of theory.

  11. Structural investigations of core-shell nanowires using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Keplinger, Mario; Mårtensson, Thomas; Stangl, Julian; Wintersberger, Eugen; Mandl, Bernhard; Kriegner, Dominik; Holý, Václav; Bauer, Günther; Deppert, Knut; Samuelson, Lars

    2009-05-01

    The fabrication of core-shell structures is crucial for many nanowire device concepts. For the proper tailoring of their electronic properties, control of structural parameters such as shape, size, diameter of core and shell, their chemical composition, and information on their strain fields is mandatory. Using synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies and finite element simulations, we determined the chemical composition, dimensions, and strain distribution for series of InAs/InAsP core-shell wires grown on Si(111) with systematically varied growth parameters. In particular we detect initiation of plastic relaxation of these structures with increasing shell thickness and/or increasing phosphorus content. We establish a phase diagram, defining the region of parameters leading to pseudomorphic nanowire growth. This is important to avoid extended defects which are detrimental for their electronic properties. PMID:19320494

  12. Use of extracts from oyster shell and soil for cultivation of Spirulina maxima.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joo-Young; Kim, Sunmin; Lee, Hansol; Kim, Kyochan; Kim, Woong; Park, Min S; Kwon, Jong-Hee; Yang, Ji-Won

    2014-12-01

    Calcium ion and trace metals play important roles in various metabolisms of photosynthetic organisms. In this study, simple methods were developed to extract calcium ion and micronutrients from oyster shell and common soil, and the prepared extracts were tested as a replacement of the corresponding chemicals that are essential for growth of microalgae. The oyster shell and soil were treated with 0.1 M sodium hydroxide or with 10 % hydrogen peroxide, respectively. The potential application of these natural sources to cultivation was investigated with Spirulina maxima. When compared to standard Zarrouk medium, the Spirulina maxima cultivated in a modified Zarrouk media with elements from oyster shell and soil extract exhibited increases in biomass, chlorophyll, and phycocyanin by 17, 16, and 64 %, respectively. These results indicate that the extracts of oyster shell and soil provide sufficient amounts of calcium and trace metals for successful cultivation of Spirulina maxima. PMID:24871274

  13. Effect of Ice-Shell Thickness Variations on the Tidal Deformation of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choblet, G.; Cadek, O.; Behounkova, M.; Tobie, G.; Kozubek, T.

    2015-12-01

    Recent analysis of Enceladus's gravity and topography has suggested that the thickness of the ice shell significantly varies laterally - from 30-40 km in the south polar region to 60 km elsewhere. These variations may influence the activity of the geysers and increase the tidal heat production in regions where the ice shell is thinned. Using a model including a regional or global subsurface ocean and Maxwell viscoelasticity, we investigate the impact of these variations on the tidal deformation of the moon and its heat production. For that purpose, we use different numerical approaches - finite elements, local application of 1d spectral method, and a generalized spectral method. Results obtained with these three approaches for various models of ice-shell thickness variations are presented and compared. Implications of a reduced ice shell thickness for the south polar terrain activity are discussed.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of Zn 3P 2/ZnS core/shell nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T.; Wu, P. C.; Guo, Z. D.; Dai, Y.; Meng, H.; Fang, X. L.; Shi, Z. J.; Dai, L.; Qin, G. G.

    2011-05-01

    Fully-surrounded Zn3P2/ZnS core/shell nanowires (NWs) were synthesized for the first time via a two-step method: a catalyst free chemical vapor deposition followed by a low-pressure vulcanization process. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and high-angle angular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the morphologies, crystal structure, and element composition of the core/shell NWs. The band structure analysis demonstrates that the Zn3P2/ZnS core-shell NW type-II heterostructures have bright potential in photovoltaic nanodevice applications. The core/shell NW growth method used here can be extended to other material system.

  15. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-01-01

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water. PMID:23389344

  16. Benchmarking the QUAD4/TRIA3 element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitrof, Stephen M.; Venkayya, Vipperla B.

    1993-09-01

    The QUAD4 and TRIA3 elements are the primary plate/shell elements in NASTRAN. These elements enable the user to analyze thin plate/shell structures for membrane, bending and shear phenomena. They are also very new elements in the NASTRAN library. These elements are extremely versatile and constitute a substantially enhanced analysis capability in NASTRAN. However, with the versatility comes the burden of understanding a myriad of modeling implications and their effect on accuracy and analysis quality. The validity of many aspects of these elements were established through a series of benchmark problem results and comparison with those available in the literature and obtained from other programs like MSC/NASTRAN and CSAR/NASTRAN. Never-the-less such a comparison is never complete because of the new and creative use of these elements in complex modeling situations. One of the important features of QUAD4 and TRIA3 elements is the offset capability which allows the midsurface of the plate to be noncoincident with the surface of the grid points. None of the previous elements, with the exception of bar (beam), has this capability. The offset capability played a crucial role in the design of QUAD4 and TRIA3 elements. It allowed modeling layered composites, laminated plates and sandwich plates with the metal and composite face sheets. Even though the basic implementation of the offset capability is found to be sound in the previous applications, there is some uncertainty in relatively simple applications. The main purpose of this paper is to test the integrity of the offset capability and provide guidelines for its effective use. For the purpose of simplicity, references in this paper to the QUAD4 element will also include the TRIA3 element.

  17. Benchmarking the QUAD4/TRIA3 element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitrof, Stephen M.; Venkayya, Vipperla B.

    1993-01-01

    The QUAD4 and TRIA3 elements are the primary plate/shell elements in NASTRAN. These elements enable the user to analyze thin plate/shell structures for membrane, bending and shear phenomena. They are also very new elements in the NASTRAN library. These elements are extremely versatile and constitute a substantially enhanced analysis capability in NASTRAN. However, with the versatility comes the burden of understanding a myriad of modeling implications and their effect on accuracy and analysis quality. The validity of many aspects of these elements were established through a series of benchmark problem results and comparison with those available in the literature and obtained from other programs like MSC/NASTRAN and CSAR/NASTRAN. Never-the-less such a comparison is never complete because of the new and creative use of these elements in complex modeling situations. One of the important features of QUAD4 and TRIA3 elements is the offset capability which allows the midsurface of the plate to be noncoincident with the surface of the grid points. None of the previous elements, with the exception of bar (beam), has this capability. The offset capability played a crucial role in the design of QUAD4 and TRIA3 elements. It allowed modeling layered composites, laminated plates and sandwich plates with the metal and composite face sheets. Even though the basic implementation of the offset capability is found to be sound in the previous applications, there is some uncertainty in relatively simple applications. The main purpose of this paper is to test the integrity of the offset capability and provide guidelines for its effective use. For the purpose of simplicity, references in this paper to the QUAD4 element will also include the TRIA3 element.

  18. Modal analysis of a shell-payload structure using test data

    SciTech Connect

    Carne, T.G.; Martinez, D.R.; Tucker, M.D.; Lauffer, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of computed modal frequencies obtained from a combined experimental/analytical model for a shell-payload structure. The total structure is physically divided into two subsystems, the shell and the internal payload, which are connected through a stiff joint. The payload was tested to obtain its free modes, while a finite element model of the shell was analyzed to obtain its modal description. A component mode synthesis technique was investigated which incorporates free modes and residual flexibility. The experimental modal data base for the payload was directly coupled with the finite element modal model of the shell to create an experimental/analytical model of the total structure. Both the translational and rotational elements of the payload mode shapes at the interface were measured and used in the coupling. The modal frequencies, computed using the combined experimental/analytical model, were then compared to those from a modal test of the entire structure. The sensitivity of the combined model to the residual flexibilities was also determined. Finally, recommended procedures for developing combined experimental/analytical models of shell-payload structures are given.

  19. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Bean, R.W.

    1963-11-19

    A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

  20. Understanding irregular shell formation of Nautilus in aquaria: chemical composition and structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Moini, Mehdi; O'Halloran, Aoife; Peters, Alan M; France, Christine A M; Vicenzi, Edward P; DeWitt, Tamsen G; Langan, Esther; Walsh, Tim; Speakman, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Irregular shell formation and black lines on the outside of live chambered nautilus shells have been observed in all adult specimens at aquariums and zoos soon after the organisms enter aquaria. Black lines have also been observed in wild animals at sites of broken shell, but continued growth from that point returns to a normal, smooth structure. In contrast, rough irregular deposition of shell continues throughout residence in aquaria. The composition and reasons for deposition of the black material and mitigation of this irregular shell formation is the subject of the current study. A variety of analytical techniques were used, including stable isotope mass spectrometry (SI-MS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), micro x-ray fluorescence (µXRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) based X-ray microanalysis. Results indicate that the black material contains excess amounts of copper, zinc, and bromine which are unrelated to the Nautilus diet. The combination of these elements and proteins plays an important role in shell formation, growth, and strengthening. Further study will be needed to compare the proteomics of the shell under aquaria versus natural wild environments. The question remains as to whether the occurrence of the black lines indicates normal healing followed by growth irregularities that are caused by stress from chemical or environmental conditions. In this paper we begin to address this question by examining elemental and isotopic differences of Nautilus diet and salt water. The atomic composition and light stable isotopic ratios of the Nautilus shell formed in aquaria verses wild conditions are presented. PMID:24797217

  1. The curse of physiology—challenges and opportunities in the interpretation of geochemical data from mollusk shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöne, Bernd R.

    2008-10-01

    Physiology corrupts geochemical records of mollusk shells in many ways, e.g., by actively controlling the incorporation of trace elements in the skeleton. However, the effects of variable biomineralization rates and growth cessation have largely remained unconsidered. Mediated by endogenous timekeeping mechanisms, mollusks stop growing skeletal material on a regular basis ranging from ultradian to annual timescales. During growth cessation, the shells do not record environmental conditions. Shell growth also stops when environmental conditions are beyond the physiological tolerance of the organism, e.g., above and below genetically determined, species-specific thermal extremes where shell growth slows and eventually ceases. Such growth disruptions can occur at non-periodic time intervals. Due to growth retardations and halts, proxy records of mollusk shells are thus incomplete, and reconstructed environmental amplitudes prone to truncation. Furthermore, environmental records are biased toward the physiological optimum of the animal. Favorable environmental conditions increase shell growth, whereas adverse environmental conditions result in reduced shell production and lowered overall metabolism. Not least, the duration of the growing season and overall growth rate decrease as the mollusk grows older. Mathematical modeling approaches can significantly improve proxy records obtained from mollusk shells. For example, if the duration of growth cessation is known, it may be possible to model the missing environmental record. It is also fairly easy to account for age-related growth trends, or variable time-averaging in different portions of the shell. However, a major premise for a reliable interpretation of proxy records from a mollusk shell or other organisms secreting biogenic hard parts is a proper understanding of the physiology, and of course, a high-resolution record of the many different environmental factors that may influence physiology and shell growth. The

  2. Element Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Describes a research assignment for 8th grade students on the elements of the periodic table. Students use web-based resources and a chemistry handbook to gather information, construct concept maps, and present the findings to the full class using the mode of their choice: a humorous story, a slideshow or gameboard, a brochure, a song, or skit.…

  3. Mercury, elemental

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mercury , elemental ; CASRN 7439 - 97 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  4. Improved finite-element methods for rotorcraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinnant, Howard E.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the research directed at improving finite-element methods for rotorcraft airframes is presented. The development of a modification to the finite element method which eliminates interelement discontinuities is covered. The following subject areas are discussed: geometric entities, interelement continuity, dependent rotational degrees of freedom, and adaptive numerical integration. This new methodology is being implemented as an anisotropic, curvilinear, p-version, beam, shell, and brick finite element program.

  5. Influence of shell effects on the formation of light nuclei in collisions of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Antonenko, N.V.; Dzholos, R.V. )

    1989-07-01

    Various approaches to calculation of the coefficients of the transport equation which describes the process of multinucleon transfers, are analyzed. It is shown that, without resorting to the averaging of matrix elements over many shell configurations, one can obtain expressions for transition probabilities that include the effects of nuclear shell structure. On this basis, the yield of light nuclei in reactions induced by heavy ions is studied in the framework of the degenerate-shell model. The calculations, which are carried out on the assumption that the wave functions of high-lying one-particle states of the system are not concentrated in one nucleus but are distributed over the two nuclei proportionally to their volumes, lead to an appreciable increase of the yield of light elements as compared to calculations in which one-particle states are assumed to belong to only one of the nuclei forming the double system.

  6. On axisymmetric/diamond-like mode transitions in axially compressed core-shell cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fan; Potier-Ferry, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Recent interests in curvature- and stress-induced pattern formation and pattern selection motivate the present study. Surface morphological wrinkling of a cylindrical shell supported by a soft core subjected to axial compression is investigated based on a nonlinear 3D finite element model. The post-buckling behavior of core-shell cylinders beyond the first bifurcation often leads to complicated responses with surface mode transitions. The proposed finite element framework allows predicting and tracing these bifurcation portraits from a quantitative standpoint. The occurrence and evolution of 3D instability modes including sinusoidally deformed axisymmetric patterns and non-axisymmetric diamond-like modes will be highlighted according to critical dimensionless parameters. Besides, the phase diagram obtained from dimensional analyses and numerical results could be used to guide the design of core-shell cylindrical systems to achieve the desired instability patterns.

  7. Stable Tearing and Buckling Responses of Unstiffened Aluminum Shells with Long Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Rose, Cheryl A.

    1999-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental study of the nonlinear response of thin, unstiffened, aluminum cylindrical shells with a long longitudinal crack are presented. The shells are analyzed with a nonlinear shell analysis code that accurately accounts for global and local structural response phenomena. Results are presented for internal pressure and for axial compression loads. The effect of initial crack length on the initiation of stable crack growth and unstable crack growth in typical shells subjected to internal pressure loads is predicted using geometrically nonlinear elastic-plastic finite element analyses and the crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. The results of these analyses and of the experiments indicate that the pressure required to initiate stable crack growth and unstable crack growth in a shell subjected to internal pressure loads decreases as the initial crack length increases. The effects of crack length on the prebuckling, buckling and postbuckling responses of typical shells subjected to axial compression loads are also described. For this loading condition, the crack length was not allowed to increase as the load was increased. The results of the analyses and of the experiments indicate that the initial buckling load and collapse load for a shell subjected to axial compression loads decrease as the initial crack length increases. Initial buckling causes general instability or collapse of a shell for shorter initial crack lengths. Initial buckling is a stable local response mode for longer initial crack lengths. This stable local buckling response is followed by a stable postbuckling response, which is followed by general or overall instability of the shell.

  8. Stable Tearing and Buckling Responses of Unstiffened Aluminum Shells with Long Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Rose, Cheryl A.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental study of the nonlinear response of thin, unstiffened, aluminum cylindrical shells with a long longitudinal crack are presented. The shells are analyzed with a nonlinear shell analysis code that accurately accounts for global and local structural response phenomena. Results are presented for internal pressure and for axial compression loads. The effect of initial crack length on the initiation of stable crack growth and unstable crack growth in typical shells subjected to internal pressure loads is predicted using geometrically nonlinear elastic-plastic finite element analyses and the crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. The results of these analyses and of the experiments indicate that the pressure required to initiate stable crack growth and unstable crack growth in a shell subjected to internal pressure loads decreases as the initial crack length increases. The effects of crack length on the prebuckling, buckling and postbuckling responses of typical shells subjected to axial compression loads are also described. For this loading condition, the crack length was not allowed to increase as the load was increased. The results of the analyses and of the experiments indicate that the initial buckling load and collapse load for a shell subjected to axial compression loads decrease as the initial crack length increases. Initial buckling causes general instability or collapse of a shell for shorter initial crack lengths. Initial buckling is a stable local response mode for longer initial crack lengths. This stable local buckling response is followed by a stable postbuckling response, which is followed by general or overall instability of the shell.

  9. Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for parallel analysis of shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, Scott C.; Felippa, Carlos A.; Park, K. C.

    1994-01-01

    The formulation and application of element-level, element-independent error indicators is investigated. This research culminates in the development of an error indicator formulation which is derived based on the projection of element deformation onto the intrinsic element displacement modes. The qualifier 'element-level' means that no information from adjacent elements is used for error estimation. This property is ideally suited for obtaining error values and driving adaptive mesh refinements on parallel computers where access to neighboring elements residing on different processors may incur significant overhead. In addition such estimators are insensitive to the presence of physical interfaces and junctures. An error indicator qualifies as 'element-independent' when only visible quantities such as element stiffness and nodal displacements are used to quantify error. Error evaluation at the element level and element independence for the error indicator are highly desired properties for computing error in production-level finite element codes. Four element-level error indicators have been constructed. Two of the indicators are based on variational formulation of the element stiffness and are element-dependent. Their derivations are retained for developmental purposes. The second two indicators mimic and exceed the first two in performance but require no special formulation of the element stiffness mesh refinement which we demonstrate for two dimensional plane stress problems. The parallelizing of substructures and adaptive mesh refinement is discussed and the final error indicator using two-dimensional plane-stress and three-dimensional shell problems is demonstrated.

  10. Analysis of toughening mechanisms in the Strombus gigas shell.

    PubMed

    DiPette, Scott; Ural, Ani; Santhanam, Sridhar

    2015-08-01

    A finite element analysis of the fracture mechanisms in the Strombus gigas conch shell is presented in this work. The S. gigas shell has a complex microarchitecture that consists of three main macroscopic layers of calcium carbonate: the inner, middle, and outer layers. Each layer is composed of lamellae of calcium carbonate, held together by a cohesive organic protein. As a result of this elaborate architecture, the S. gigas shell exhibits a much greater damage tolerance than the calcium carbonate by itself, with a work of fracture reported to be three magnitudes of order greater. The two main energy dissipating factors that contribute to this are multiple, parallel cracking along first-order interfaces in the inner and outer layers and crack bridging through the second-order interfaces of the middle layer. Finite element analysis was conducted to simulate and replicate flexural strength and work-of-fracture results obtained in the literature for both dry and wet physical bend test specimens. Several parameters were varied including protein strength and fracture toughness, initial protein damage, and the relative heights of macroscopic layers in order to create a model that predicted published, experimental results. The simulations indicate that having some initially weakened protein interfaces is key to matching the parallel cracking in the inner layer of the physical specimens. The wet models exhibit significantly higher work of fracture compared to the dry specimens in large part due to a crack growth resistance behavior in the middle layer, which was successfully modeled. The parametric studies that have been performed on the finite element models provide guidelines for manufacturing the ideal S. gigas-inspired, biomimetic composite. PMID:25955562

  11. Ion microprobe assessment of the heterogeneity of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in Pecten maximus and Mytilus edulis (bivalvia) shell calcite precipitated at constant temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, P. S.; Clarke, L. J.; Kennedy, H.; Richardson, C. A.

    2009-07-01

    Small-scale heterogeneity of biogenic carbonate elemental composition can be a significant source of error in the accurate use of element/Ca ratios as geochemical proxies. In this study ion microprobe (SIMS) profiles showed significant small-scale variability of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in new shell calcite of the marine bivalves Pecten maximus and Mytilus edulis that was precipitated during a constant-temperature culturing experiment. Elevated Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios were found to be associated with the deposition of elaborate shell features, i.e. a shell surface stria in P. maximus and surface shell disturbance marks in both species, the latter a common occurrence in bivalve shells. In both species the observed small-scale elemental heterogeneity most likely was not controlled by variable transport of ions to the extra-pallial fluid, but by factors such as the influence of shell organic content and/or crystal size and orientation, the latter reflecting conditions at the shell crystal-solution interface. In the mid and innermost regions of the P. maximus shell the lack of significant small-scale variation of Mg/Ca ratios, which is consistent with growth at constant temperature, suggest a potential application as a palaeotemperature proxy. Cross-growth band element/Ca ratio profiles in the interior of bivalve shells may provide more promising palaeo-environmental tools than sampling from the outer region of bivalve shells.

  12. Cracked shells under skew-symmetric loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelale, F.

    1982-01-01

    A shell containing a through crack in one of the principal planes of curvature and under general skew-symmetric loading is considered. By employing a Reissner type shell theory which takes into account the effect of transverse shear strains, all boundary conditions on the crack surfaces are satisfied separately. Consequently, unlike those obtained from the classical shell theory, the angular distributions of the stress components around the crack tips are shown to be identical to the distributions obtained from the plane and antiplane elasticity solutions. Extensive results are given for axially and circumferentially cracked cylindrical shells, spherical shells, and toroidal shells under uniform inplane shearing, out of plane shearing, and torsion. The effect of orthotropy on the results is also studied.

  13. Flow past a porous approximate spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasacharya, D.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, the creeping flow of an incompressible viscous liquid past a porous approximate spherical shell is considered. The flow in the free fluid region outside the shell and in the cavity region of the shell is governed by the Navier Stokes equation. The flow within the porous annulus region of the shell is governed by Darcy’s Law. The boundary conditions used at the interface are continuity of the normal velocity, continuity of the pressure and Beavers and Joseph slip condition. An exact solution for the problem is obtained. An expression for the drag on the porous approximate spherical shell is obtained. The drag experienced by the shell is evaluated numerically for several values of the parameters governing the flow.

  14. SPSM and its application in cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Wu; Zhou, Su-Lian; Peng, Hui

    2008-03-01

    In naval architectures, the structure of prismatic shell is used widely. But there is no suitable method to analyze this kind of structure. Stiffened prismatic shell method (SPSM) presented in this paper, is one of the harmonic semi-analytic methods. Theoretically, strong stiffened structure can be analyzed economically and accurately. SPSM is based on the analytical solution of the governing differential equations for orthotropic cylindrical shells. In these differential equations, the torsional stiffness, bending stiffness and the exact position of each stiffener are taken into account with the Heaviside singular function. An algorithm is introduced, in which the actions of stiffeners on shells are replaced by external loads at each stiffener position. Stiffened shells can be computed as non-stiffened shells. Eventually, the displacement solution of the equations is acquired by the introduction of Green function. The stresses in a corrugated transverse bulkhead without pier base of an oil tanker are computed by using SPSM.

  15. Thermal stresses in thick laminated composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.

    1993-01-01

    The paper provides an analytical formulation to investigate the thermomechanical behavior of thick composite shells subjected to a temperature distribution which varies arbitrarily in the radial direction. For illustrative purposes, shells under uniform temperature change are presented. It is found that thermal twist would occur even for symmetric laminated shells. Under uniform temperature rise, results for off-axis graphite/epoxy shells show that extensional-shear coupling can cause tensile radial stress throughout the shell and tensile hoop stress in the inner region. Laminated graphite/epoxy shells can exhibit negative effective thermal expansion coefficients in the longitudinal and transverse directions. Finally, the stacking sequence has a strong influence on the thermal stress distributions.

  16. Development of Nanolaminate Thin Shell Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.

    2002-12-01

    The space science community has identified a need for ultra-light weight, large aperture optical systems that are capable of producing high-resolution images of low contrast. Current mirror technologies are limited due either to not being scalable to larger sizes at reasonable masses, or to lack of surface finish, dimensional stability in a space environment or long fabrication times. This paper will discuss the development of thin-shell, nano-laminate mirror substrates that are capable of being electro-actively figured. This technology has the potential to substantially reduce the cost of space based optics by allowing replication of ultra-lightweight primary mirrors from a master precision tool. Precision master tools have been shown to be used multiple times with repeatable surface quality results with less than one week fabrication times for the primary optical mirror substrate. Current development has developed a series of 0.25 and 0.5 meter spherical nanolaminate mirrors that are less than 0.5 kg/m2 areal density before electroactive components are mounted, and a target of less than 2.0 kg/m with control elements. This paper will provide an overview of nanolaminate materials for optical mirrors, modeling of their behavior under figure control and experiments conducted to validate precision control.

  17. Shell boosts recovery at Kernridge

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.

    1984-01-01

    Since acquiring the Kernridge property in December 1979, Shell Oil Co. has drilled more than 1,800 wells and steadily increased production from 42,000 to 89,000 b/d of oil. Currently, the Kernridge Production Division of Shell California Production Inc. (SCPI), a newly formed subsidiary of Shell Oil Co., is operator for the property. The property covers approximately 35,000 mostly contiguous net acres, with production concentrated mainly on about 5,500 net acres. SCPI's four major fields in the area are the North and South Belridge, Lost Hills, and Antelope Hills. Most of the production comes from the North and South Belridge fields, which were previously held by the Belridge Oil Co. Productive horizons in the fields are the Tulare, Diatomite, Brown Shale, Antelope Shale, 64 Zone, and Agua sand. The Tulare and Diatomite are the two major reservoirs SCPI is developing. The Tulare, encountered between 400 and 1,300 ft, is made up of fine- to coarse-grained, unconsolidated sands with interbedded shales and silt stones and contains 13 /sup 0/ API oil. Using steam drive as the main recovery method, SCPI estimates an ultimate recovery from the Tulare formation of about 60% of the original 1 billion barrels in place. The Diatomite horizon, found between 800 and 3,500 ft and containing light, 28 /sup 0/ API oil, has high porosity (more than 60%), low permeability (less than 1 md), and natural fractures. Because of the Diatomite's low permeability, fracture stimulation is being used to increase well productivity. SCPI anticipates that approximately 5% of the almost 2 billion barrels of oil originally in place will be recovered by primary production.

  18. Structural design criteria for filament-wound composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.; Jensen, D. W.; Claus, S. J.; Pai, S. P.; Hipp, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced composite cylinders, manufactured by filament winding, provide a cost effective solution to many present structural applications; however, the compressive performance of filament-wound cylinders is lower than comparable shells fabricated from unidirectional tape. The objective of this study was to determine the cause of this reduction in thin filament-wound cylinders by relating the manufacturing procedures to the quality of the cylinder and to its compressive performance. The experiments on cylinder buckling were complemented by eigenvalue buckling analysis using a detailed geometric model in a finite element analysis. The applicability of classical buckling analyses was also investigated as a design tool.

  19. Scattering of low-energy neutrinos on atomic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babič, Andrej; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-01

    We present a derivation of the total cross section for inelastic scattering of low-energy solar neutrinos and reactor antineutrinos on bound electrons, resulting in a transition of the electron to an excited state. The atomic-shell structure of various chemical elements is treated in terms of a nonrelativistic approximation. We estimate the interaction rates for modern neutrino detectors, in particular the Borexino and GEMMA experiments. We establish that in these experiments the effect can be safely neglected, but it could be accessible to future large-volume neutrino detectors with low energy threshold.

  20. Scattering of low-energy neutrinos on atomic shells

    SciTech Connect

    Babič, Andrej; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-28

    We present a derivation of the total cross section for inelastic scattering of low-energy solar neutrinos and reactor antineutrinos on bound electrons, resulting in a transition of the electron to an excited state. The atomic-shell structure of various chemical elements is treated in terms of a nonrelativistic approximation. We estimate the interaction rates for modern neutrino detectors, in particular the Borexino and GEMMA experiments. We establish that in these experiments the effect can be safely neglected, but it could be accessible to future large-volume neutrino detectors with low energy threshold.

  1. Double-shell tank waste transfer facilities integrity assessment plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hundal, T.S.

    1998-09-30

    This document presents the integrity assessment plan for the existing double-shell tank waste transfer facilities system in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of Hanford Site. This plan identifies and proposes the integrity assessment elements and techniques to be performed for each facility. The integrity assessments of existing tank systems that stores or treats dangerous waste is required to be performed to be in compliance with the Washington State Department of Ecology Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code WAC-173-303-640 requirements.

  2. Utilization of porous carbons derived from coconut shell and wood in natural rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The porous carbons derived from cellulose are renewable and environmentally friendly. Coconut shell and wood derived porous carbons were characterized with elemental analysis, ash content, x-ray diffraction, infrared absorbance, particle size, surface area, and pore volume. The results were compared...

  3. Boson shells harboring charged black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Laemmerzahl, Claus; List, Meike

    2010-11-15

    We consider boson shells in scalar electrodynamics coupled to Einstein gravity. The interior of the shells can be empty space, or harbor a black hole or a naked singularity. We analyze the properties of these types of solutions and determine their domains of existence. We investigate the energy conditions and present mass formulae for the composite black hole-boson shell systems. We demonstrate that these types of solutions violate black hole uniqueness.

  4. Monodisperse functional colloidosomes with tailored nanoparticle shells.

    PubMed

    Sander, J S; Studart, A R

    2011-04-01

    We report the assembly of monodisperse colloidosomes containing a wide range of functional nanoparticles in the outer shell using a double emulsion templating method in a microfluidic device. By selecting nanoparticles of specific functionalities, hollow capsules with inert, magnetic, photocatalytic, and potentially biocompatible and piezoelectric shells are easily obtained. Proper control over the surface chemistry of the nanoparticles forming the shell and of the liquid interfaces involved is key to enable the assembly of colloidosomes using this double emulsification route. PMID:21384846

  5. Elemental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    He set out to prove that ocean sediments contain elevated levels of the rare element iridium because of the natural weathering of the continents. Instead, what Ariel Anbar found was new evidence that a meteorite may have had a role in the mass extinctions that marked the end of the Cretaceous era.By studying the geochemical properties of iridium, Anbar, a professor of earth and environmental sciences and chemistry at the University of Rochester, found that the residence time—a measure of the rate at which an element settles out of water into sediments—of iridium in ocean water is 2000 to 20,000 years. That finding suggests that a large deposit of iridium could have lingered in the world's oceans long enough to explain the thickness of the iridium-rich sediment layers at the K-T boundary.

  6. A comparison of NASTRAN (Cosmic) and experimental results for the vibration of thick open cylindrical cantilevered shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mindle, W. L.; Torvik, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    The natural frequencies and associated mode shapes for three thick open cantilevered cylindrical shells were determined both numerically and experimentally. The shells ranged in size from moderately to very thick with length to thickness ratios of 16, 8 and 5.6, the independent dimension being the shell thickness. The shell geometry is characterized by a circumferential angle of the 142 degrees and a ratio of length to inner radii arc length near 1.0. The finite element analysis was performed using NASTRAN's (COSMIC) triangular plate bending element CTRIA2, which includes membrane effects. The experimental results were obtained through holographic interferometry which enables one to determine the resonant frequencies as well as mode shapes from photographs of time-averaged holograms.

  7. Electron Shell as a Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpeshin, F. F.

    2002-11-01

    Main principles of the resonance effect arising in the electron shells in interaction of the nuclei with electromagnetic radiation are analyzed and presented in the historical aspect. Principles of NEET are considered from a more general position, as compared to how this is usually presented. Characteristic features of NEET and its reverse, TEEN, as internal conversion processes are analyzed, and ways are offered of inducing them by laser radiation. The ambivalent role of the Pauli exclusion principles in NEET and TEEN processes is investigated.

  8. Graphical evaluation of relativistic matrix elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, K. N.

    1978-01-01

    A graphical representation of angular momentum was used to evaluate relativistic matrix elements between antisymmetrized states of many particle configurations having any number of open shells. The antisymmetrized matrix element was expanded as a sum of semisymmetrized matrix elements. The diagram representing a semisymmetrized matrix element was composed of four diagram blocks; the bra block, the ket block, the spectator block, and the interaction block. The first three blocks indicate the couplings of the two interacting configurations while the last depends on the interaction and is the replaceable component. Interaction blocks for relativistic operators and commonly used potentials were summarized in ready to use forms. A simple step by step procedure was prescribed generally for calculating antisymmetrized matrix elements of one and two particle operators.

  9. The fragmentation of expanding shells - I. Limitations of the thin-shell approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, James E.; Wünsch, Richard; Whitworth, Anthony; Palouš, Jan

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the gravitational fragmentation of expanding shells in the context of the linear thin-shell analysis. We make use of two very different numerical schemes; the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement code and a version of the Benz smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. We find that the agreement between the two codes is excellent. We use our numerical results to test the thin-shell approximation and we find that the external pressure applied to the shell has a strong effect on the fragmentation process. In cases where shells are not pressure-confined, the shells thicken as they expand and hydrodynamic flows perpendicular to the plane of the shell suppress fragmentation at short wavelengths. If the shells are pressure-confined internally and externally, so that their thickness remains approximately constant during their expansion, the agreement with the analytical solution is better.

  10. Thin-shell instability in collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, M. E.; Ahmed, H.; Doria, D.; Sarri, G.; Walder, R.; Folini, D.; Bret, A.; Ynnerman, A.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-09-01

    Thin-shell instability is one process which can generate entangled structures in astrophysical plasma on collisional (fluid) scales. It is driven by a spatially varying imbalance between the ram pressure of the inflowing upstream plasma and the downstream's thermal pressure at a nonplanar shock. Here we show by means of a particle-in-cell simulation that an analog process can destabilize a thin shell formed by two interpenetrating, unmagnetized, and collisionless plasma clouds. The amplitude of the shell's spatial modulation grows and saturates after about ten inverse proton plasma frequencies, when the shell consists of connected piecewise linear patches.

  11. Plans for Double Shell Experiments on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, D. S.; Daughton, W. S.; Gunderson, M. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Watt, R. G.; Kline, J. L.; Hayes, A. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Boswell, M.; Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Batha, S. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.

    2015-11-01

    Double-shells are an alternative approach to achieving indirect drive ignition. These targets consist of a low-Z ablatively-driven outer shell that impacts a high-Z inner shell filled with DT fuel. In contrast to single-shell designs, double-shell targets burn the fuel via volume ignition, albeit with a lower gain. While double-shell capsules are complicated to fabricate, their design includes several beneficial metrics such as a low convergence pusher (C.R. < 10), low implosion speed (~ 250 km/s), a simple few-ns laser drive in a vacuum hohlraum, less sensitivity to hohlraum asymmetries, and low expected laser-plasma instabilities. We present preliminary double-shell capsule designs for NIF using a cryogenic gas DT fill which are optimized for yield and minimized for fall-line mix. Challenges will be discussed, as well as uncertainties and trade-offs in the physics issues compared to single-shells. A development path for double-shell experiments on NIF will be presented. Work performed under the auspices of DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  12. Core/shell colloidal semiconductor nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Benoit; Nadal, Brice; Bouet, Cecile; Patriarche, Gilles; Dubertret, Benoit

    2012-11-14

    We have recently synthesized atomically flat semiconductor colloidal nanoplatelets with quasi 2D geometry. Here, we show that core/shell nanoplatelets can be obtained with a 2D geometry that is conserved. The epitaxial growth of the shell semiconductor is performed at room temperature. We report the detailed synthesis of CdSe/CdS and CdSe/CdZnS structures with different shell thicknesses. The shell growth is characterized both spectroscopically and structurally. In particular, the core/shell structure appears very clearly on high-resolution, high-angle annular dark-field transmission electron microscope images, thanks to the difference of atomic density between the core and the shell. When the nanoplatelets stand on their edge, we can precisely count the number of atomic planes forming the core and the shell. This provides a direct measurement, with atomic precision, of the core nanoplatelets thickness. The constraints exerted by the shell growth on the core is analyzed using global phase analysis. The core/shell nanoplatelets we obtained have narrow emission spectra with full-width at half-maximum close to 20 nm, and quantum yield that can reach 60%. PMID:23057684

  13. Fracture Mitigation Strategies in Gastropod Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Christopher; Kisailus, David

    2013-04-01

    For hundreds of millions of years, gastropods have been evolving, modifying their external calcified shells for defense against shell-breaking and drilling predators. They have evolved primarily to use two different aragonitic microstructures: the evolutionary older Nacre (mother of pearl) structure and the more recently developed crossed-lamellar structure. By using both of these structures, gastropods are able to produce shells that are significantly tougher then geologic aragonite. However, the crossed-lamellar structure allows for a wider variety of shell morphologies, ensuring its increasing presence since the Mesozoic Marine Revolution more than 200 million years ago.

  14. Shell appraising deepwater discovery off Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, M. ); Lambers, E.J.T.; Steffens, G.S. )

    1993-05-10

    Shell International Petroleum Co. Ltd. negotiated a farmout in 1990 from Occidental International Exploration and Production Co. for Block SC-38 in the South China Sea off Palawan, Philippines, following Oxy's discovery of gas in 1989 in a Miocene Nido limestone buildup. Under the terms of the farmout agreement, Shell became operator with a 50% share. Following the disappointing well North Iloc 1, Shell was successful in finding oil and gas in Malampaya 1. Water 700-1,000 m deep, remoteness, and adverse weather conditions have imposed major challenges for offshore operations. The paper describes the tectonic setting; the Nido limestone play; the Malampaya discovery; and Shell's appraisal studies.

  15. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  16. Material with core-shell structure

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Claudia; Richard, Monique N.; Dehne, Aaron; Phillips, Jonathan; Stamm, Kimber L.; Fanson, Paul T.

    2011-11-15

    Disclosed is a material having a composite particle, the composite particle including an outer shell and a core. The core is made from a lithium alloying material and the outer shell has an inner volume that is greater in size than the core of the lithium alloying material. In some instances, the outer mean diameter of the outer shell is less than 500 nanometers and the core occupies between 5 and 99% of the inner volume. In addition, the outer shell can have an average wall thickness of less than 100 nanometers.

  17. Buckling-induced encapsulation of structured elastic shells under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jongmin; Perdigou, Claude; Chen, Elizabeth R.; Bertoldi, Katia; Reis, Pedro M.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a class of continuum shell structures, the Buckliball, which undergoes a structural transformation induced by buckling under pressure loading. The geometry of the Buckliball comprises a spherical shell patterned with a regular array of circular voids. In order for the pattern transformation to be induced by buckling, the possible number and arrangement of these voids are found to be restricted to five specific configurations. Below a critical internal pressure, the narrow ligaments between the voids buckle, leading to a cooperative buckling cascade of the skeleton of the ball. This ligament buckling leads to closure of the voids and a reduction of the total volume of the shell by up to 54%, while remaining spherical, thereby opening the possibility of encapsulation. We use a combination of precision desktop-scale experiments, finite element simulations, and scaling analyses to explore the underlying mechanics of these foldable structures, finding excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement. Given that this folding mechanism is induced by a mechanical instability, our Buckliball opens the possibility for reversible encapsulation, over a wide range of length scales. PMID:22451901

  18. Microscopic Shell Model Calculations for the Fluorine Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Bruce R.; Dikmen, Erdal; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.; Shirokov, Andrey M.

    2015-10-01

    Using a formalism based on the No Core Shell Model (NCSM), we have determined miscroscopically the core and single-particle energies and the effective two-body interactions that are the input to standard shell model (SSM) calculations. The basic idea is to perform a succession of a Okubo-Lee-Suzuki (OLS) transformation, a NCSM calculation, and a second OLS transformation to a further reduced space, such as the sd-shell, which allows the separation of the many-body matrix elements into an ``inert'' core part plus a few valence-nucleons calculation. In the present investigation we use this technique to calculate the properties of the nuclides in the Fluorine isotopic chain, using the JISP16 nucleon-nucleon interaction. The obtained SSM input, along with the results of the SSM calculations for the Fluorine isotopes, will be presented. This work supported in part by TUBITAK-BIDEB, the US DOE, the US NSF, NERSC, and the Russian Ministry of Education and Science.

  19. Shell model predictions for 124Sn double-β decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horoi, Mihai; Neacsu, Andrei

    2016-02-01

    Neutrinoless double-β (0 ν β β ) decay is a promising beyond standard model process. Two-neutrino double-β (2 ν β β ) decay is an associated process that is allowed by the standard model, and it was observed in about 10 isotopes, including decays to the excited states of the daughter. 124Sn was the first isotope whose double-β decay modes were investigated experimentally, and despite few other recent efforts, no signal has been seen so far. Shell model calculations were able to make reliable predictions for 2 ν β β decay half-lives. Here we use shell model calculations to predict the 2 ν β β decay half-life of 124Sn. Our results are quite different from the existing quasiparticle random-phase approximation results, and we envision that they will be useful for guiding future experiments. We also present shell model nuclear matrix elements for two potentially competing mechanisms to the 0 ν β β decay of 124Sn.

  20. Shell bone histology indicates terrestrial palaeoecology of basal turtles

    PubMed Central

    Scheyer, Torsten M; Sander, P.Martin

    2007-01-01

    The palaeoecology of basal turtles from the Late Triassic was classically viewed as being semi-aquatic, similar to the lifestyle of modern snapping turtles. Lately, this view was questioned based on limb bone proportions, and a terrestrial palaeoecology was suggested for the turtle stem. Here, we present independent shell bone microstructural evidence for a terrestrial habitat of the oldest and basal most well-known turtles, i.e. the Upper Triassic Proterochersis robusta and Proganochelys quenstedti. Comparison of their shell bone histology with that of extant turtles preferring either aquatic habitats or terrestrial habitats clearly reveals congruence with terrestrial turtle taxa. Similarities in the shell bones of these turtles are a diploe structure with well-developed external and internal cortices, weak vascularization of the compact bone layers and a dense nature of the interior cancellous bone with overall short trabeculae. On the other hand, ‘aquatic’ turtles tend to reduce cortical bone layers, while increasing overall vascularization of the bone tissue. In contrast to the study of limb bone proportions, the present study is independent from the uncommon preservation of appendicular skeletal elements in fossil turtles, enabling the palaeoecological study of a much broader range of incompletely known turtle taxa in the fossil record. PMID:17519193