Science.gov

Sample records for 4-t cms coil

  1. A multi-slot surface coil for MRI of dual-rat imaging at 4 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, S. E.; Wang, R.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2011-06-01

    A slotted surface coil inspired by the hole-and-slot cavity magnetron was developed for magnetic resonance imaging of obese rats at 4 T. Full-wave analysis of the magnetic field was carried out at 170 MHz for both the slotted and circular-shaped coils. The noise figure values of two coils were investigated via the numerical calculation of the quality factors. Fat simulated phantoms to mimic overweight rats were included in the analysis with weights ranging from 300 to 900 g. The noise figures were 1.2 dB for the slotted coil and 2.4 dB for the circular coil when loaded with 600 g of simulated phantom. A slotted surface coil with eight circular slots and a circular coil with similar dimensions were built and operated in the transceiver mode, and their performances were experimentally compared. The imaging tests in phantoms demonstrated that the slotted surface coil has a deeper RF-sensitivity and better field uniformity than the single-loop RF-coil. High quality images of two overweight Zucker rats were acquired simultaneously with the slotted surface coil using standard spin-echo pulse sequences. Experimental results showed that the slotted surface coil outperformed the circular coil for imaging considerably overweight rats. Thus, the slotted surface coil can be a good tool for MRI experiments in rats on a human whole-body 4 T scanner.

  2. A microstrip transmission line volume coil for human head MR imaging at 4T.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2003-04-01

    A high-frequency RF volume coil based on the use of microstrip transmission line (MTL) has been developed for in vivo 1H MR applications on the human head at 4T. This coil is characterized by major advantages: (i) completely distributed coil circuit, (ii) high-quality factor (Q), (iii) simple coil structure, and (iv) better sensitivity and less signal-intensity variation in the MR image of the human head compared with an RF shielded birdcage coil of similar coil size. The proposed MTL volume coil does not require additional RF shielding for preventing Q degradation from radiation losses due to the unique MTL structure; thus, it provides a maximal useable space inside the volume coil when compared with most volume coils available at high fields with the same overall coil size. The intrinsic B(1) distribution of the MTL volume coil effectively compensates for the dielectric resonance effect at 4T and improves the signal homogeneity in human head MR images in the transaxial planes. The results of this study demonstrate that the MTL volume coil design provides an efficient and simple solution to RF volume coil design for human MR studies at high fields.

  3. A multi-slot surface coil for MRI of dual-rat imaging at 4T

    SciTech Connect

    Solis, S.E.; Tomasi, D.; Solis, S.E.; Wang, R.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A.O.

    2011-07-01

    A slotted surface coil inspired by the hole-and-slot cavity magnetron was developed for magnetic resonance imaging of obese rats at 4 T. Full-wave analysis of the magnetic field was carried out at 170 MHz for both the slotted and circular-shaped coils. The noise figure values of two coils were investigated via the numerical calculation of the quality factors. Fat simulated phantoms to mimic overweight rats were included in the analysis with weights ranging from 300 to 900 g. The noise figures were 1.2 dB for the slotted coil and 2.4 dB for the circular coil when loaded with 600 g of simulated phantom. A slotted surface coil with eight circular slots and a circular coil with similar dimensions were built and operated in the transceiver mode, and their performances were experimentally compared. The imaging tests in phantoms demonstrated that the slotted surface coil has a deeper RF-sensitivity and better field uniformity than the single-loop RF-coil. High quality images of two overweight Zucker rats were acquired simultaneously with the slotted surface coil using standard spin-echo pulse sequences. Experimental results showed that the slotted surface coil outperformed the circular coil for imaging considerably overweight rats. Thus, the slotted surface coil can be a good tool for MRI experiments in rats on a human whole-body 4 T scanner.

  4. Longitudinal evaluation of intramyocellular lipids (IMCLs) in tibialis anterior muscle of ob/ob and ob/+ control mice using a cryogenic surface coil at 9.4 T.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qiong; Danzer, Carsten Friedrich; Fuchs, Alexander; Krek, Wilhelm; Mueggler, Thomas; Baltes, Christof; Rudin, Markus

    2011-12-01

    Insulin resistance is a central feature of type II diabetes and is associated with alterations in skeletal muscle lipid metabolism, which manifest themselves, in part, in increased intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) accumulation. The objective of this study was to assess noninvasively the levels of IMCL longitudinally in the tibialis anterior muscle of Lep(ob) /Lep(ob) (ob/ob) mice, a genetic model of obesity and mild diabetes, and Lep(ob) /+ (ob/+) heterozygous control animals, using (1) H MRS at 9.4 T. The use of a cryogenic surface coil transceiver leads to significant increases in sensitivity. Method implementation included the assessment of the reproducibility and spatial heterogeneity of the IMCL signal and the determination of T(2) relaxation times, as IMCL levels were expressed relative to the total creatine signal, and therefore the signal ratios had to be corrected for differences in T(2) relaxation. IMCL levels were found to be significantly higher in ob/ob mice relative to ob/+ heterozygous control mice that do not develop disease. An increase in IMCL levels was observed for ob/ob mice until weeks 16/17; after this time point, IMCL levels decreased again, reaching final levels that were slightly higher than the initial values. These noninvasively detected alterations in skeletal muscle lipid metabolism in ob/ob mice were accompanied by a transient increase in plasma insulin concentrations. This study indicates that IMCL may be reliably assessed in mouse tibialis anterior muscle using a cryogenic surface coil, implying that (1) H MRS at 9.4 T represents a useful technology for the noninvasive measurement of changes in lipid metabolism in the skeletal muscle that accompany obesity.

  5. 9.4T Human MRI: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Thomas; DelaBarre, Lance; Snyder, Carl; Tian, Jinfeng; Akgun, Can; Shrivastava, Devashish; Liu, Wanzahn; Olson, Chris; Adriany, Gregor; Strupp, John; Andersen, Peter; Gopinath, Anand; van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Garwood, Michael; Ugurbil, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    This work reports the preliminary results of the first human images at the new high-field benchmark of 9.4T. A 65-cm-diameter bore magnet was used together with an asymmetric 40-cm-diameter head gradient and shim set. A multichannel transmission line (transverse electromagnetic (TEM)) head coil was driven by a programmable parallel transceiver to control the relative phase and magnitude of each channel independently. These new RF field control methods facilitated compensation for RF artifacts attributed to destructive interference patterns, in order to achieve homogeneous 9.4T head images or localize anatomic targets. Prior to FDA investigational device exemptions (IDEs) and internal review board (IRB)-approved human studies, preliminary RF safety studies were performed on porcine models. These data are reported together with exit interview results from the first 44 human volunteers. Although several points for improvement are discussed, the preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of safe and successful human imaging at 9.4T. PMID:17075852

  6. Acoustic noise reduction in a 4 T MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Mechefske, Chris K; Geris, Ryan; Gati, Joseph S; Rutt, Brian K

    2002-01-01

    High-field, high-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can generate high levels of noise. There is ongoing concern in the medical and imaging research communities regarding the detrimental effects of high acoustic levels on auditory function, patient anxiety, verbal communication between patients and health care workers and ultimately MR image quality. In order to effectively suppress the noise levels inside MRI scanners, the sound field needs to be accurately measured and characterized. This paper presents the results of measurements of the sound radiation from a gradient coil cylinder within a 4 T MRI scanner under a variety of conditions. These measurement results show: (1) that noise levels can be significantly reduced through the use of an appropriately designed passive acoustic liner; and (2) the true noise levels that are experienced by patients during echo planar imaging.

  7. Pulse Coil Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Set of relays tested easily and repeatedly. Pulse coil tester causes coil under test to generate transient voltage; waveform indicates condition of coil. Tester accommodates assembly of up to four coils at a time.

  8. Startup of Large Coil Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; Fietz, W.A.; Luton, J.N.; May, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is being used to test superconducting toroidal field coils about one-third the size of those for INTOR. Eventually, six different coils from four countries will be tested. Operations began in 1983 with acceptance testing of the helium refrigerator/liquefier system. Comprehensive shakedown of the facility and tests with the first three coils (from Japan, the United States, and Switzerland) were successfully accomplished in the summer of 1984. Currents up to 10,200 A and fields up to 6.4 T were reached. Data were obtained on performance of refrigerator, helium distribution, power supplies, controls, and data acquisition systems and on the acoustic emission, voltages, currents, and mechanical strains during charging and discharging the coils.

  9. CMS-Wave

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-27

    2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CMS -Wave 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Program CMS -Wave CMS -Wave is a two-dimensional spectral wind-wave generation and transformation model that employs a forward-marching, finite...difference method to solve the wave action conservation equation. Capabilities of CMS -Wave include wave shoaling, refraction, diffraction, reflection

  10. Coiled-Coil Design: Updated and Upgraded.

    PubMed

    Woolfson, Derek N

    2017-01-01

    α-Helical coiled coils are ubiquitous protein-folding and protein-interaction domains in which two or more α-helical chains come together to form bundles. Through a combination of bioinformatics analysis of many thousands of natural coiled-coil sequences and structures, plus empirical protein engineering and design studies, there is now a deep understanding of the sequence-to-structure relationships for this class of protein architecture. This has led to considerable success in rational design and what might be termed in biro de novo design of simple coiled coils, which include homo- and hetero-meric parallel dimers, trimers and tetramers. In turn, these provide a toolkit for directing the assembly of both natural proteins and more complex designs in protein engineering, materials science and synthetic biology. Moving on, the increased and improved use of computational design is allowing access to coiled-coil structures that are rare or even not observed in nature, for example α-helical barrels, which comprise five or more α-helices and have central channels into which different functions may be ported. This chapter reviews all of these advances, outlining improvements in our knowledge of the fundamentals of coiled-coil folding and assembly, and highlighting new coiled coil-based materials and applications that this new understanding is opening up. Despite considerable progress, however, challenges remain in coiled-coil design, and the next decade promises to be as productive and exciting as the last.

  11. Coil Welding Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesenbach, W. T.; Clark, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Positioner holds coil inside cylinder during tack welding. Welding aid spaces turns of coil inside cylinder and applies contact pressure while coil is tack-welded to cylinder. Device facilitates fabrication of heat exchangers and other structures by eliminating hand-positioning and clamping of individual coil turns.

  12. High-field magnetic resonance imaging using solenoid radiofrequency coils.

    PubMed

    Vegh, Viktor; Gläser, Philipp; Maillet, Donald; Cowin, Gary J; Reutens, David C

    2012-10-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging using dedicated high-field radiofrequency micro-coils at 16.4 T (700 MHz) was investigated. Specific solenoid coils primarily using silver and copper as conductors with enamel and polyurethane coatings were built to establish which coil configuration produces the best image. Image quality was quantified using signal-to-noise ratio and signal variation over regions of interest. Benchmarking was conducted using 5-mm diameter coils, as this size is comparable to an established coil of the same size. Our 1.4-mm-diameter coils were compared directly to each other, from which we deduce performance as a function of conductor material and coating. A variety of materials and conductor coatings allowed us to choose an optimal design, which we used to image a kidney section at 10-micron resolution. We applied zero-fill extrapolation to achieve 5-micron resolution.

  13. Forward Physics at CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Solano, Ada

    2009-03-23

    A rich program of forward physics, including very low-x QCD dynamics, photon-induced processes, underlying event and energy flow distributions, diffraction in the presence of a hard scale and even the Higgs boson search in central exclusive production, is being studied by the CMS Collaboration, taking advantage of the forward detector instrumentation around the CMS interaction point at the LHC.

  14. Apoptotic depletion of CD4+ T cells in idiopathic CD4+ T lymphocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Laurence, J; Mitra, D; Steiner, M; Lynch, D H; Siegal, F P; Staiano-Coico, L

    1996-01-01

    Progressive loss of CD4+ T lymphocytes, accompanied by opportunistic infections characteristic of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome, ahs been reported in the absence of any known etiology. The pathogenesis of this syndrome, a subset of idiopathic CD4+ T lymphocytopenia (ICL), is uncertain. We report that CD4+ T cells from seven of eight ICL patients underwent accelerated programmed cell death, a process facilitated by T cell receptor cross-linking. Apoptosis was associated with enhanced expression of Fas and Fas ligand in unstimulated cell populations, and partially inhibited by soluble anti-Fas mAb. In addition, apoptosis was suppressed by aurintricarboxylic acid, an inhibitor of calcium-dependent endonucleases and proteases, in cells from four of seven patients, The in vivo significance of these findings was supported by three factors: the absence of accelerated apoptosis in persons with stable, physiologic CD4 lymphopenia without clinical immune deficiency; detection of serum antihistone H2B autoantibodies, one consequence of DNA fragmentation, in some patients; and its selectivity, with apoptosis limited to the CD4 population in some, and occurring among CD8+ T cells predominantly in those individuals with marked depletion of both CD4+ T lymphocytes linked to clinical immune suppression have evidence for accelerated T cell apoptosis in vitro that may be pathophysiologic and amenable to therapy with apoptosis inhibitors. PMID:8609222

  15. Protective link for superconducting coil

    DOEpatents

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  16. Coiling of viscous jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribe, Neil M.

    2004-11-01

    A stream of viscous fluid falling from a sufficient height onto a surface forms a series of regular coils. I use a numerical model for a deformable fluid thread to predict the coiling frequency as a function of the thread's radius, the flow rate, the fall height, and the fluid viscosity. Three distinct modes of coiling can occur: viscous (e.g. toothpaste), gravitational (honey falling from a moderate height) and inertial (honey falling from a great height). When inertia is significant, three states of steady coiling with different frequencies can exist over a range of fall heights. The numerically predicted coiling frequencies agree well with experimental measurements in the inertial coiling regime.

  17. Quench protection design of a 9.4 T whole-body MRI superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shunzhong; Li, Yi; Dai, Yinming; Lei, Yuanzhong; Yan, Luguang

    2014-02-01

    A 9.4 T MRI superconducting magnet with a 800 mm clear warm bore in diameter is designed and fabricated for bioscience research. The superconducting magnet consisting of five coaxial solenoid coils is fabricated with NbTi Wire-in-Channel (WIC) conductor where the ratios of copper to non-copper are from 5 to 10. The four compensation solenoid coils are with rectangular NbTi/Cu strand wires. The magnet will be operated in a relative low nominal current of 224.5 A with a high level of stored energy, about 138 MJ. A protection method with the cold diodes and resistors in series across the subdivided sections and active trigger heater to accelerate quench is adopted to avoid the damage of the magnet. In the paper, the quench simulation results of currents, voltages and hot-spot temperatures based on the protection scheme are analyzed in details.

  18. CMS workload management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, D.; CMS Collaboration

    2007-10-01

    From september 2007 the LHC accelerator will start its activity and CMS, one of the four experiments, will begin to take data. The CMS computing model is based on the the Grid paradigm where data is deployed and accessed on a number of geographically distributed computing centers. In addition to real data events, a large number of simulated ones will be produced in a similar, distributed manner. Both real and simulated data will be analyzed by physicist, at an expected rate of 100000 jobs per day submitted to the Grid infrastructure. In order to reach these goals, CMS is developing two tools for the workload management (plus a set of services): ProdAgent and CRAB. The ProdAgent deals with MonteCarlo production system: it creates and configures jobs, interacts with the Framework, merges outputs to a reasonable filesize and publishes the simulated data back into CMS data bookkeeping and data location services. CRAB (Cms Remote Analysis Builder) is the tool deployed ad hoc by CMS to access those remote data. CRAB allows a generic user, without specific knowledge of the Grid infrastructure, to access data and perform its analysis as simply as in a local environment. CRAB takes care to interact with all Data Management services, from data discovery and location to output file management. An overview of the current implementation of the components of the CMS workload management is presented in this work.

  19. CMS Analysis School Model

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, S.; Shipsey, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Bloom, K.; Chan, Kai-Feng; D'Hondt, J.; Klima, B.; Narain, M.; Palla, F.; Rolandi, G.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.

    2014-01-01

    To impart hands-on training in physics analysis, CMS experiment initiated the concept of CMS Data Analysis School (CMSDAS). It was born over three years ago at the LPC (LHC Physics Centre), Fermilab and is based on earlier workshops held at the LPC and CLEO Experiment. As CMS transitioned from construction to the data taking mode, the nature of earlier training also evolved to include more of analysis tools, software tutorials and physics analysis. This effort epitomized as CMSDAS has proven to be a key for the new and young physicists to jump start and contribute to the physics goals of CMS by looking for new physics with the collision data. With over 400 physicists trained in six CMSDAS around the globe, CMS is trying to engage the collaboration in its discovery potential and maximize physics output. As a bigger goal, CMS is striving to nurture and increase engagement of the myriad talents, in the development of physics, service, upgrade, education of those new to CMS and the career development of younger members. An extension of the concept to the dedicated software and hardware schools is also planned, keeping in mind the ensuing upgrade phase.

  20. CMS Analysis School Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, S.; Shipsey, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Bloom, K.; Chan, Kai-Feng; D'Hondt, J.; Klima, B.; Narain, M.; Palla, F.; Rolandi, G.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.

    2014-06-01

    To impart hands-on training in physics analysis, CMS experiment initiated the concept of CMS Data Analysis School (CMSDAS). It was born over three years ago at the LPC (LHC Physics Centre), Fermilab and is based on earlier workshops held at the LPC and CLEO Experiment. As CMS transitioned from construction to the data taking mode, the nature of earlier training also evolved to include more of analysis tools, software tutorials and physics analysis. This effort epitomized as CMSDAS has proven to be a key for the new and young physicists to jump start and contribute to the physics goals of CMS by looking for new physics with the collision data. With over 400 physicists trained in six CMSDAS around the globe, CMS is trying to engage the collaboration in its discovery potential and maximize physics output. As a bigger goal, CMS is striving to nurture and increase engagement of the myriad talents, in the development of physics, service, upgrade, education of those new to CMS and the career development of younger members. An extension of the concept to the dedicated software and hardware schools is also planned, keeping in mind the ensuing upgrade phase.

  1. Immune responses to coiled coil supramolecular biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Rudra, Jai S; Tripathi, Pulak K; Hildeman, David A; Jung, Jangwook P; Collier, Joel H

    2010-11-01

    Self-assembly has been increasingly utilized in recent years to create peptide-based biomaterials for 3D cell culture, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine, but the molecular determinants of these materials' immunogenicity have remained largely unexplored. In this study, a set of molecules that self-assembled through coiled coil oligomerization was designed and synthesized, and immune responses against them were investigated in mice. Experimental groups spanned a range of oligomerization behaviors and included a peptide from the coiled coil region of mouse fibrin that did not form supramolecular structures, an engineered version of this peptide that formed coiled coil bundles, and a peptide-PEG-peptide triblock bioconjugate that formed coiled coil multimers and supramolecular aggregates. In mice, the native peptide and engineered peptide did not produce any detectable antibody response, and none of the materials elicited detectable peptide-specific T cell responses, as evidenced by the absence of IL-2 and interferon-gamma in cultures of peptide-challenged splenocytes or draining lymph node cells. However, specific antibody responses were elevated in mice injected with the multimerizing peptide-PEG-peptide. Minimal changes in secondary structure were observed between the engineered peptide and the triblock peptide-PEG-peptide, making it possible that the triblock's multimerization was responsible for this antibody response.

  2. CMS RATFOR System Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    CMS RATFOR SYSTEM MANUAL.(U) U 79 S M CHOQUETTE, R J ORGASS AFOSR-79-O021 NCLASSIFIED VPI/SU-TM-79- AFOSR -TR-80-0277 NI MEhLlllllElIIIIIIII...GRADUATE PROGRAM IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA FAtheqsow, AC 20041 (703) 471-4600 CMS RATFOR SYSTEM MANUAL*t Stephen M. Choquette and Richard J. Orgass DTIO...the System Manual for the RATFOR preprocessor on the IBM CMS timesharing system . Included in this paper is a language description of RATPOR, an

  3. CMS tracker visualization tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennea, M. S.; Osborne, I.; Regano, A.; Zito, G.

    2005-08-01

    This document will review the design considerations, implementations and performance of the CMS Tracker Visualization tools. In view of the great complexity of this sub-detector (more than 50 millions channels organized in 16540 modules each one of these being a complete detector), the standard CMS visualization tools (IGUANA and IGUANACMS) that provide basic 3D capabilities and integration within CMS framework, respectively, have been complemented with additional 2D graphics objects. Based on the experience acquired using this software to debug and understand both hardware and software during the construction phase, we propose possible future improvements to cope with online monitoring and event analysis during data taking.

  4. 32 CFR 1630.46 - Class 4-T: Treaty alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Class 4-T: Treaty alien. 1630.46 Section 1630.46 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.46 Class 4-T: Treaty alien. In Class 4-T shall be placed any registrant who is an alien...

  5. 32 CFR 1630.46 - Class 4-T: Treaty alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Class 4-T: Treaty alien. 1630.46 Section 1630.46 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.46 Class 4-T: Treaty alien. In Class 4-T shall be placed any registrant who is an alien...

  6. 32 CFR 1630.46 - Class 4-T: Treaty alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Class 4-T: Treaty alien. 1630.46 Section 1630.46 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.46 Class 4-T: Treaty alien. In Class 4-T shall be placed any registrant who is an alien...

  7. 32 CFR 1630.46 - Class 4-T: Treaty alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Class 4-T: Treaty alien. 1630.46 Section 1630.46 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.46 Class 4-T: Treaty alien. In Class 4-T shall be placed any registrant who is an alien...

  8. 32 CFR 1630.46 - Class 4-T: Treaty alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Class 4-T: Treaty alien. 1630.46 Section 1630.46 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.46 Class 4-T: Treaty alien. In Class 4-T shall be placed any registrant who is an alien...

  9. TPX correction coil studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J.D.

    1994-11-03

    Error correction coils are planned for the TPX (Tokamak Plasma Experiment) in order to avoid error field induced locked modes and disruption. The FT (Fix Tokamak) code is used to evaluate the ability of these correction coils to remove islands caused by symmetry breaking magnetic field errors. The proposed correction coils are capable of correcting a variety of error fields.

  10. CMS Space Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnikova, N.; Huang, C.-H.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Wildish, T.; Zhang, X.

    2014-06-01

    During the first LHC run, CMS stored about one hundred petabytes of data. Storage accounting and monitoring help to meet the challenges of storage management, such as efficient space utilization, fair share between users and groups and resource planning. We present a newly developed CMS space monitoring system based on the storage metadata dumps produced at the sites. The information extracted from the storage dumps is aggregated and uploaded to a central database. A web based data service is provided to retrieve the information for a given time interval and a range of sites, so it can be further aggregated and presented in the desired format. The system has been designed based on the analysis of CMS monitoring requirements and experiences of the other LHC experiments. In this paper, we demonstrate how the existing software components of the CMS data placement system, PhEDEx, have been re-used, dramatically reducing the development effort.

  11. CMS Space Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnikova, N.; Huang, C.-H.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Wildish, T.; Zhang, X.

    2014-01-01

    During the first LHC run, CMS stored about one hundred petabytes of data. Storage accounting and monitoring help to meet the challenges of storage management, such as efficient space utilization, fair share between users and groups and resource planning. We present a newly developed CMS space monitoring system based on the storage metadata dumps produced at the sites. The information extracted from the storage dumps is aggregated and uploaded to a central database. A web based data service is provided to retrieve the information for a given time interval and a range of sites, so it can be further aggregated and presented in the desired format. The system has been designed based on the analysis of CMS monitoring requirements and experiences of the other LHC experiments. In this paper, we demonstrate how the existing software components of the CMS data placement system, PhEDEx, have been re-used, dramatically reducing the development effort.

  12. Diffraction with CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Antonio Vilela

    2011-07-15

    The observation of diffraction at LHC with the CMS detector at {radical}(s) = 900 and 2360 GeV is presented, along with a comparison of the data with the predictions of the PYTHIA and PHOJET generators.

  13. NCSX Trim Coil Design

    SciTech Connect

    M. Kalish, A. Brooks, J. Rushinski, R. Upcavage

    2009-05-29

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory before work was stopped in 2008. The objective of this experiment was to develop the stellarator concept and evaluate it's potential as a model for future fusion power plants. Stellarator design requires very precisely positioned Modular Coils of complex shape to form 3D plasmas. In the design of NCSX, Trim Coils were required to compensate for both the positioning of the coils during assembly and the fabrication tolerances of the Modular Coils. Use of the Trim Coils allowed for larger tolerances increasing ease of assembly and decreasing overall cost. A set of Trim coils was developed to suppress the toroidal flux in island regions due to misalignment, magnetic materials, and eddy currents. The requirement imposed upon the design forced the toroidal flux in island regions below 10% of the total toroidal flux in the plasma. An analysis was first performed to evaluate candidate Trim Coil configurations iterating both the size, number, and position of the coils. The design was optimized considering both performance and cost while staying within the tight restraints presented by the space limited geometry. The final design of the Trim Coils incorporated a 48 Coil top bottom symmetric set. Fabrication costs were minimized by having only two coil types and using a planar conventional design with off the shelf commercial conductor. The Trim Coil design incorporated supports made from simple structural shapes assembled together in a way which allowed for adjustment as well as accommodation for the tolerance build up on the mating surfaces. This paper will summarize the analysis that led to the optimization of the Trim Coils set, the trim coil mechanical design, thermal and stress analysis, and the design of the supporting Trim Coil structure.

  14. Concentric Loop Surface Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Flores, R.; Rodríguez-González, A. O.; Salgado-Lujambio, P.; Barrios-Alvarez, F. A.

    2002-08-01

    A surface coil for MRI consisted of two concentric loops was developed for brain imaging. Prior to build the coil prototype, the magnetic field (B1) generated by the coil was numerically simulated. This field simulation is based on the Biot-Savart law for the circular- and square-shaped loops. From these theoretical results, we can appreciate an improvement on the B1 homogeneity. Brain images obtained at 1.5 Tesla show a good sensitivity in a particular region of interest. Also, these images compared well against images obtained with a circular-shaped coil. This receiver coil can generate high quality brain images.

  15. Electromagnetic pump stator coil

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Dahl, Leslie R.

    1996-01-01

    An electrical stator coil for an electromagnetic pump includes a continuous conductor strip having first and second terminals at opposite ends thereof and an intermediate section disposed therebetween. The strip is configured in first and second coil halves, with the first coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the first terminal to the intermediate section, and the second coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the second terminal to the intermediate section. The first and second coil halves are disposed coaxially, and the first and second terminals are disposed radially inwardly therefrom with the intermediate section being disposed radially outwardly therefrom.

  16. Electromagnetic pump stator coil

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Dahl, L.R.

    1996-06-25

    An electrical stator coil for an electromagnetic pump includes a continuous conductor strip having first and second terminals at opposite ends thereof and an intermediate section disposed therebetween. The strip is configured in first and second coil halves, with the first coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the first terminal to the intermediate section, and the second coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the second terminal to the intermediate section. The first and second coil halves are disposed coaxially, and the first and second terminals are disposed radially inwardly therefrom with the intermediate section being disposed radially outwardly therefrom. 9 figs.

  17. Coil bobbin for stable superconducting coils

    SciTech Connect

    Kashima, T.; Yamanaka, A.; Nishijima, S.; Okada, T.

    1996-12-31

    The coil bobbin for a.c. coils have been prepared with the high strength polyethylene fiber (DF) reinforced plastics (DFRP) or with hybrid composites reinforced by DF and glass fiber (GF). The coils with the bobbin were found to be markedly stable. The DF has a large negative thermal expansion coefficient and hence the circumferential thermal strain of bobbin can be designed by changing the ratio of DF to GF layer thickness (DF/GF). It was found that the thermal expansion coefficient in the circumferential direction of the outer surface changed from negative to positive with increasing DF/GF and became nearly zero at a DF/GF of approximately 5.1 kA rms class a.c. coils having a bobbin with a negative thermal expansion coefficient or small thermal contraction in the circumferential direction were fabricated and were confirmed to show higher quench current than that with a GFRP bobbin.

  18. Engineered coiled-coil protein microfibers.

    PubMed

    Hume, Jasmin; Sun, Jennifer; Jacquet, Rudy; Renfrew, P Douglas; Martin, Jesse A; Bonneau, Richard; Gilchrist, M Lane; Montclare, Jin Kim

    2014-10-13

    The fabrication of de novo proteins able to self-assemble on the nano- to meso-length scales is critical in the development of protein-based biomaterials in nanotechnology and medicine. Here we report the design and characterization of a protein engineered coiled-coil that not only assembles into microfibers, but also can bind hydrophobic small molecules. Under ambient conditions, the protein forms fibers with nanoscale structure possessing large aspect ratios formed by bundles of α-helical homopentameric assemblies, which further assemble into mesoscale fibers in the presence of curcumin through aggregation. Surprisingly, these biosynthesized fibers are able to form in conditions of remarkably low concentrations. Unlike previously designed coiled-coil fibers, these engineered protein microfibers can bind the small molecule curcumin throughout the assembly, serving as a depot for encapsulation and delivery of other chemical agents within protein-based 3D microenvironments.

  19. MRI surface-coil pair with strong inductive coupling.

    PubMed

    Mett, Richard R; Sidabras, Jason W; Hyde, James S

    2016-12-01

    A novel inductively coupled coil pair was used to obtain magnetic resonance phantom images. Rationale for using such a structure is described in R. R. Mett et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 87, 084703 (2016)]. The original rationale was to increase the Q-value of a small diameter surface coil in order to achieve dominant loading by the sample. A significant improvement in the vector reception field (VRF) is also seen. The coil assembly consists of a 3-turn 10 mm tall meta-metallic self-resonant spiral (SRS) of inner diameter 10.4 mm and outer diameter 15.1 mm and a single-loop equalization coil of 25 mm diameter and 2 mm tall. The low-frequency parallel mode was used in which the rf currents on each coil produce magnetic fields that add constructively. The SRS coil assembly was fabricated and data were collected using a tissue-equivalent 30% polyacrylamide phantom. The large inductive coupling of the coils produces phase-coherency of the rf currents and magnetic fields. Finite-element simulations indicate that the VRF of the coil pair is about 4.4 times larger than for a single-loop coil of 15 mm diameter. The mutual coupling between coils influences the current ratio between the coils, which in turn influences the VRF and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Data on a tissue-equivalent phantom at 9.4 T show a total SNR increase of 8.8 over the 15 mm loop averaged over a 25 mm depth and diameter. The experimental results are shown to be consistent with the magnetic resonance theory of the emf induced by spins in a coil, the theory of inductively coupled resonant circuits, and the superposition principle. The methods are general for magnetic resonance and other types of signal detection and can be used over a wide range of operating frequencies.

  20. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1996-06-11

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  1. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, D.; Schwall, R.E.

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil. 15 figs.

  2. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  3. Automating the CMS DAQ

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.; et al.

    2014-01-01

    We present the automation mechanisms that have been added to the Data Acquisition and Run Control systems of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment during Run 1 of the LHC, ranging from the automation of routine tasks to automatic error recovery and context-sensitive guidance to the operator. These mechanisms helped CMS to maintain a data taking efficiency above 90% and to even improve it to 95% towards the end of Run 1, despite an increase in the occurrence of single-event upsets in sub-detector electronics at high LHC luminosity.

  4. Coiling Viscous Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, L.

    1996-11-01

    A thin stream of glycerine or other viscous fluid poured onto a horizontal plane from a sufficient height piles up in a regular coil. In its steady state, this motion is analogous to the coiling of a flexible rope (L. Mahadevan and J.B. Keller, Proc. Roy. Soc.(A) to appear.). This analogy is used to solve the nonlinear free-boundary problem for the frequency of coiling and the coil radius. The results are compared with experimental results that go back to the the work of G.I. Taylor (1969).

  5. Coil system for plasmoid thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, Richard H. (Inventor); Lee, Michael H. (Inventor); Martin, Adam K. (Inventor); Fimognari, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A coil system for a plasmoid thruster includes a bias coil, a drive coil and field coils. The bias and drive coils are interleaved with one another as they are helically wound about a conical region. A first field coil defines a first passage at one end of the conical region, and is connected in series with the bias coil. A second field coil defines a second passage at an opposing end of the conical region, and is connected in series with the bias coil.

  6. Exotica in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    Selected results on exotica searches with the CMS detector are presented. The main topics are dark matter, boosted objects, long-lived particles and classic narrow resonance searches. Most of the analyses were performed with data recorded at at centre of-mass energy of 8 TeV, but first results obtained at 13 TeV are also shown.

  7. Coiled bodies without coilin.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, D W; Gall, J G

    1997-01-01

    Nuclei assembled in vitro in Xenopus egg extract contain coiled bodies that have components from three different RNA processing pathways: pre-mRNA splicing, pre-rRNA processing, and histone pre-mRNA 3'-end formation. In addition, they contain SPH-1, the Xenopus homologue of p80-coilin, a protein characteristic of coiled bodies. To determine whether coilin is an essential structural component of the coiled body, we removed it from the egg extract by immunoprecipitation. We showed that nuclei with bodies morphologically identical to coiled bodies (at the light microscope level) formed in such coilin-depleted extract. As expected, these bodies did not stain with antibodies against coilin. Moreover, they failed to stain with an antibody against the Sm proteins, although Sm proteins associated with snRNAs were still present in the extract. Staining of the coilin- and Sm-depleted coiled bodies was normal with antibodies against two nucleolar proteins, fibrillarin and nucleolin. Similar results were observed when Sm proteins were depleted from egg extract: staining of the coiled bodies with antibodies against the Sm proteins and coilin was markedly reduced but bright nucleolin and fibrillarin staining remained. These immunodepletion experiments demonstrate an interdependence between coilin and Sm snRNPs and suggest that neither is essential for assembly of nucleolar components in coiled bodies. We propose that coiled bodies are structurally heterogeneous organelles in which the components of the three RNA processing pathways may occur in separate compartments. Images PMID:9017596

  8. Rat brain MRI at 16.4T using a capacitively tunable patch antenna in combination with a receive array.

    PubMed

    Shajan, G; Hoffmann, Jens; Balla, Dávid Z; Deelchand, Dinesh K; Scheffler, Klaus; Pohmann, Rolf

    2012-10-01

    For MRI at 16.4T, with a proton Larmor frequency of 698 MHz, one of the principal RF engineering challenges is to generate a spatially homogeneous transmit field over a larger volume of interest for spin excitation. Constructing volume coils large enough to house a receive array along with the subject and to maintain the quadrature symmetry for different loading conditions is difficult at this frequency. This calls for new approaches to RF coil design for ultra-high field MR systems. A remotely placed capacitively tunable patch antenna, which can easily be adjusted to different loading conditions, was used to generate a relatively homogeneous excitation field covering a large imaging volume with a transversal profile similar to that of a birdcage coil. Since it was placed in front of the animal, this created valuable free space in the narrow magnet bore around the subject for additional hardware. To enhance the reception sensitivity, the patch antenna was combined with an actively detunable 3-channel receive coil array. In addition to increased SNR compared to a quadrature transceive surface coil, we were able to get high quality gradient echo and spin-echo images covering the whole rat brain.

  9. 42 CFR 405.800 - Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. 405.800 Section... Part B Program § 405.800 Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. A CMS contractor's (that is, a carrier... supplier enrollment application. If CMS or a CMS contractor denies a provider's or supplier's...

  10. 42 CFR 405.800 - Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. 405.800 Section... Part B Program § 405.800 Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. A CMS contractor's (that is, a carrier... supplier enrollment application. If CMS or a CMS contractor denies a provider's or supplier's...

  11. 42 CFR 405.874 - Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. 405.874 Section... Part B Program § 405.874 Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. A CMS contractor's (that is, a carrier... supplier enrollment application. If CMS or a CMS contractor denies a provider's or supplier's...

  12. 42 CFR 405.874 - Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. 405.874 Section... Part B Program § 405.874 Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. A CMS contractor's (that is, a carrier... supplier enrollment application. If CMS or a CMS contractor denies a provider's or supplier's...

  13. Precise mapping of the magnetic field in the CMS barrel yoke using cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2010-03-01

    The CMS detector is designed around a large 4 T superconducting solenoid, enclosed in a 12000-tonne steel return yoke. A detailed map of the magnetic field is required for the accurate simulation and reconstruction of physics events in the CMS detector, not only in the inner tracking region inside the solenoid but also in the large and complex structure of the steel yoke, which is instrumented with muon chambers. Using a large sample of cosmic muon events collected by CMS in 2008, the field in the steel of the barrel yoke has been determined with a precision of 3 to 8% depending on the location.

  14. Commercial applications for COIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Wayne C.; Carroll, David L.; King, D. M.; Fockler, L. A.; Stromberg, D. S.; Sexauer, M.; Milmoe, A.; Sentman, Lee H.

    2000-01-01

    The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is a high power, fiber deliverable tool, which can be used for a number of different industrial applications. COIL is of particular interest because of its short fiber deliverable wavelength, high scaleable continuous wave power, and excellent material interaction properties. In past research the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign identified and decommissioning and decontamination (DD) of nuclear facilities as a primary focus for COIL technology. DD will be a major challenge in the coming decades. The use of a robotically driven fiber delivered cutting/ablation tool in contaminated areas promises to lower risks to workers for the DD mission. Further, the high cutting speed of COIL will significantly reduce the time required to cut contaminated equipment, reducing costs. The high power of COIL will permit the dismantling of thick stacks of piping and equipment as well as reactor vessels. COIL is very promising for the removal of material from contaminated surfaces, perhaps to depths thicker than an inch. Laser cutting and ablation minimizes dust and fumes, which reduces the required number of high efficiency particulate accumulator filters, thus reducing costly waste disposal. Other potential industrial applications for COIL are shipbuilding, automotive manufacturing, heavy machinery manufacturing, tasks requiring underwater cutting or welding, and there appear to be very promising applications for high powers lasers in the oil industry.

  15. Coil spring venting arrangement

    DOEpatents

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-10-21

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed.

  16. ELECTRICAL COIL STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Hartwig, A.

    1962-09-25

    A compactly wound electrical coil is designed for carrying intense pulsed currents such as are characteristic of controlled thermonuclear reaction devices. A flat strip of conductor is tightly wound in a spiral with a matching flat strip of insulator. To provide for a high fluid coolant flow through the coil with minimum pumping pressure, a surface of the conductor is scored with parallel transverse grooves which form short longitudinal coolant pasaages when the conductor is wound in the spiral configuration. Owing to this construction, the coil is extremely resistant to thermal and magnetic shock from sudden high currents. (AEC)

  17. Correction coil cable

    DOEpatents

    Wang, S.T.

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies for the Superconducting Super Collider. The correction coil cables have wires collected in wire array with a center rib sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly. The core assembly is surrounded by an assembly housing having an inner spiral wrap and a counter wound outer spiral wrap. An alternate embodiment of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable on a particle tube in a particle tube assembly. 7 figs.

  18. Higgs physics at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzner, André G.

    2016-12-01

    This article reviews recent measurements of the properties of the standard model (SM) Higgs boson using data recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC: its mass, width and couplings to other SM particles. We also summarise highlights from searches for new physical phenomena in the Higgs sector as they are proposed in many extensions of the SM: flavour violating and invisible decay modes, resonances decaying into Higgs bosons and searches for additional Higgs bosons.

  19. Coil Knotting during Endovascular Coil Embolization for Ruptured MCA Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, S.C.; Lyo, I.U.; Shin, S.H.; Park, J.B.; Kim, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Complications during coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms include thromboembolic events, hemorrhagic complications related to procedural aneurysmal rupture and parent vessel perforation, and coil-related complications. The present report describes a rare coil-related complication involving spontaneous coil knotting. PMID:20557732

  20. A periodic table of coiled-coil protein structures.

    PubMed

    Moutevelis, Efrosini; Woolfson, Derek N

    2009-01-23

    Coiled coils are protein structure domains with two or more alpha-helices packed together via interlacing of side chains known as knob-into-hole packing. We analysed and classified a large set of coiled-coil structures using a combination of automated and manual methods. This led to a systematic classification that we termed a "periodic table of coiled coils," which we have made available at http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/ccplus/search/periodic_table. In this table, coiled-coil assemblies are arranged in columns with increasing numbers of alpha-helices and in rows of increased complexity. The table provides a framework for understanding possibilities in and limits on coiled-coil structures and a basis for future prediction, engineering and design studies.

  1. Mitochondrial Proteins Containing Coiled-Coil-Helix-Coiled-Coil-Helix (CHCH) Domains in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Modjtahedi, Nazanine; Tokatlidis, Kostas; Dessen, Philippe; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-03-01

    Members of the coiled-coil-helix-coiled-coil-helix (CHCH) domain-containing protein family that carry (CX9C) type motifs are imported into the mitochondrion with the help of the disulfide relay-dependent MIA import pathway. These evolutionarily conserved proteins are emerging as new cellular factors that control mitochondrial respiration, redox regulation, lipid homeostasis, and membrane ultrastructure and dynamics. We discuss recent insights on the activity of known (CX9C) motif-carrying proteins in mammals and review current data implicating the Mia40/CHCHD4 import machinery in the regulation of their mitochondrial import. Recent findings and the identification of disease-associated mutations in specific (CX9C) motif-carrying proteins have highlighted members of this family of proteins as potential therapeutic targets in a variety of human disorders.

  2. Borehole induction coil transmitter

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Gale; Wilt, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A borehole induction coil transmitter which is a part of a cross-borehole electromagnetic field system that is used for underground imaging applications. The transmitter consists of four major parts: 1) a wound ferrite or mu-metal core, 2) an array of tuning capacitors, 3) a current driver circuit board, and 4) a flux monitor. The core is wound with several hundred turns of wire and connected in series with the capacitor array, to produce a tuned coil. This tuned coil uses internal circuitry to generate sinusoidal signals that are transmitted through the earth to a receiver coil in another borehole. The transmitter can operate at frequencies from 1-200 kHz and supplies sufficient power to permit the field system to operate in boreholes separated by up to 400 meters.

  3. Enhancing Induction Coil Reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreter, K.; Goldstein, R.; Yakey, C.; Nemkov, V.

    2014-12-01

    In induction hardening, thermal fatigue is one of the main copper failure modes of induction heat treating coils. There have been papers published that describe this failure mode and others that describe some good design practices. The variables previously identified as the sources of thermal fatigue include radiation from the part surface, frequency, current, concentrator losses, water pressure and coil wall thickness. However, there is very little quantitative data on the factors that influence thermal fatigue in induction coils is available in the public domain. By using finite element analysis software this study analyzes the effect of common design variables of inductor cooling, and quantifies the relative importance of these variables. A comprehensive case study for a single shot induction coil with Fluxtrol A concentrator applied is used for the analysis.

  4. Linear Rogowski coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassisi, V.; Delle Side, D.

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, the employment and development of fast current pulses require sophisticated systems to perform measurements. Rogowski coils are used to diagnose cylindrical shaped beams; therefore, they are designed and built with a toroidal structure. Recently, to perform experiments of radiofrequency biophysical stresses, flat transmission lines have been developed. Therefore, in this work we developed a linear Rogowski coil to detect current pulses inside flat conductors. The system is first approached by means of transmission line theory. We found that, if the pulse width to be diagnosed is comparable with the propagation time of the signal in the detector, it is necessary to impose a uniform current as input pulse, or to use short coils. We further analysed the effect of the resistance of the coil and the influence of its magnetic properties. As a result, the device we developed is able to record pulses lasting for some hundreds of nanoseconds, depending on the inductance, load impedance, and resistance of the coil. Furthermore, its response is characterized by a sub-nanosecond rise time (˜100 ps). The attenuation coefficient depends mainly on the turn number of the coil, while the fidelity of the response depends both on the magnetic core characteristics and on the current distribution along the plane conductors.

  5. Linear Rogowski coil.

    PubMed

    Nassisi, V; Delle Side, D

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, the employment and development of fast current pulses require sophisticated systems to perform measurements. Rogowski coils are used to diagnose cylindrical shaped beams; therefore, they are designed and built with a toroidal structure. Recently, to perform experiments of radiofrequency biophysical stresses, flat transmission lines have been developed. Therefore, in this work we developed a linear Rogowski coil to detect current pulses inside flat conductors. The system is first approached by means of transmission line theory. We found that, if the pulse width to be diagnosed is comparable with the propagation time of the signal in the detector, it is necessary to impose a uniform current as input pulse, or to use short coils. We further analysed the effect of the resistance of the coil and the influence of its magnetic properties. As a result, the device we developed is able to record pulses lasting for some hundreds of nanoseconds, depending on the inductance, load impedance, and resistance of the coil. Furthermore, its response is characterized by a sub-nanosecond rise time (∼100 ps). The attenuation coefficient depends mainly on the turn number of the coil, while the fidelity of the response depends both on the magnetic core characteristics and on the current distribution along the plane conductors.

  6. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kalish, M.; Rushinski, J.; Myatt, L.; Brooks, A.; Dahlgren, F.; Chrzanowski, J.; Reiersen, W.; Freudenberg, K.

    2005-10-07

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements.

  7. Dysregulation of CD4(+) T Cell Subsets in Intracranial Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Ming-Guang; Liang, Guo-Biao; Yu, Chun-Yong; He, Wenxiu; Li, Zhi-Qing; Gao, Xu

    2016-02-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) and potential IA rupture are one of the direct causes of permanent brain damage and mortality. Interestingly, the major risk factors of IA development, including hemodynamic stress, hypertension, smoking, and genetic predispositions, are closely associated with a proinflammatory immune status. Therefore, we examined the roles of CD4(+) T cells in IA pathogenesis. IA patients exhibited peripheral CD4(+) T-cell imbalance, with overrepresented T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 activities and underrepresented Th2 and regulatory T (Treg) activities, including increased IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17 production and decreased IL-10 production from total CD4(+) T cells. Chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR6 were used to identify Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell subsets, and CD4(+)CD25(hi) was used to identify Treg cells. Based on these markers, the data then showed altered cytokine production by each cell type and shifted subpopulation frequency. Moreover, this shift in frequency was directly correlated with IA severity. To examine the underlying mechanism of CD4(+) T cell skewing, we cocultured CD4(+) T cells with autologous monocytes and found that coculture with monocytes could significantly increase IFN-γ and IL-17 production through contact-independent mechanisms, demonstrating that monocytes could potentially contribute to the altered CD4(+) T cell composition in IA. Analyzing mRNA transcripts revealed significantly upregulated IL-1β and TNF-α expression by monocytes from IA patients. We found a loss of CD4(+) T cell subset balance that was likely to promote a higher state of inflammation in IA, which may exacerbate the disease through a positive feedback loop.

  8. Status of RDMS CMS computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, V.; Golutvin, I.; Kodolova, O.; Korenkov, V.; Levchuk, L.; Shmatov, S.; Tikhonenko, E.; Zhiltsov, V.

    2016-09-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a high-performance general-purpose detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. More than twenty institutes from Russia and Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) are involved in Russia and Dubna Member States (RDMS) CMS Collaboration. A proper computing grid-infrastructure has been constructed at the RDMS institutes for the participation in the running phase of the CMS experiment. Current status of RDMS CMS computing and plans of its development to the next LHC start are presented.

  9. Normalization of CD4+ T Cell Metabolism Reverses Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yiming; Choi, Seung-Chul; Xu, Zhiwei; Perry, Daniel J.; Seay, Howard; Croker, Byron P.; Sobel, Eric S.; Brusko, Todd M.; Morel, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease in which autoreactive CD4+ T cells play an essential role. CD4+ T cells rely on glycolysis for inflammatory effector functions, but recent studies have shown that mitochondrial metabolism supports their chronic activation. How these processes contribute to lupus is unclear. Here, we show that both glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative metabolism are elevated in CD4+ T cells from lupus-prone B6.Sle1.Sle2.Sle3 (TC) mice as compared to non-autoimmune controls. In vitro, both the mitochondrial metabolism inhibitor metformin and the glucose metabolism inhibitor 2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) reduced IFNγ production, although at different stages of activation. Metformin also restored the defective IL-2 production by TC CD4+ T cells. In vivo, treatment of TC mice and other lupus models with a combination of metformin and 2DG normalized T cell metabolism and reversed disease biomarkers. Further, CD4+ T cells from SLE patients also exhibited enhanced glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism that correlated with their activation status, and their excessive IFNγ production was significantly reduced by metformin in vitro. These results suggest that normalization of T cell metabolism through the dual inhibition of glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism is a promising therapeutic venue for SLE. PMID:25673763

  10. Coiled coils and SAH domains in cytoskeletal molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    Cytoskeletal motors include myosins, kinesins and dyneins. Myosins move along tracks of actin filaments, whereas kinesins and dyneins move along microtubules. Many of these motors are involved in trafficking cargo in cells. However, myosins are mostly monomeric, whereas kinesins are mostly dimeric, owing to the presence of a coiled coil. Some myosins (myosins 6, 7 and 10) contain an SAH (single α-helical) domain, which was originally thought to be a coiled coil. These myosins are now known to be monomers, not dimers. The differences between SAH domains and coiled coils are described and the potential roles of SAH domains in molecular motors are discussed.

  11. The CMS trigger system

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2017-01-24

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, tau lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during datamore » taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.« less

  12. The CMS trigger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Damiao, D. De Jesus; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; El Sawy, M.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Chowdhury, S. Roy; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kothekar, K.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Najafabadi, M. Mohammadi; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pegoraro, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Ventura, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Ali, M. A. B. Md; Mohamad Idris, F.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Yusli, M. N.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Kierzkowski, K.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Oklinski, W.; Olszewski, M.; Pozniak, K.; Walczak, M.; Zabolotny, W.; Bargassa, P.; Silva, C. Beirão Da Cruz E.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Kaminskiy, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras De Saa, J. R.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Berruti, G. M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; du Pree, T.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, R.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tsai, J. f.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Cripps, N.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Gastler, D.; Lawson, P.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova PANEVA, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Sevilla, M. Franco; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Jung, A. W.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Low, J. F.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P., III; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, τ lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during data taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.

  13. Aneurysm permeability following coil embolization: packing density and coil distribution

    PubMed Central

    Chueh, Ju-Yu; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Wakhloo, Ajay K; Carniato, Sarena L; Puri, Ajit S; Bzura, Conrad; Coffin, Spencer; Bogdanov, Alexei A; Gounis, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Background Rates of durable aneurysm occlusion following coil embolization vary widely, and a better understanding of coil mass mechanics is desired. The goal of this study is to evaluate the impact of packing density and coil uniformity on aneurysm permeability. Methods Aneurysm models were coiled using either Guglielmi detachable coils or Target coils. The permeability was assessed by taking the ratio of microspheres passing through the coil mass to those in the working fluid. Aneurysms containing coil masses were sectioned for image analysis to determine surface area fraction and coil uniformity. Results All aneurysms were coiled to a packing density of at least 27%. Packing density, surface area fraction of the dome and neck, and uniformity of the dome were significantly correlated (p<0.05). Hence, multivariate principal components-based partial least squares regression models were used to predict permeability. Similar loading vectors were obtained for packing and uniformity measures. Coil mass permeability was modeled better with the inclusion of packing and uniformity measures of the dome (r2=0.73) than with packing density alone (r2=0.45). The analysis indicates the importance of including a uniformity measure for coil distribution in the dome along with packing measures. Conclusions A densely packed aneurysm with a high degree of coil mass uniformity will reduce permeability. PMID:25031179

  14. Opportunistic Resource Usage in CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Peter; Hufnagel, Dirk; Dykstra, D.; Gutsche, O.; Tadel, M.; Sfiligoi, I.; Letts, J.; Wuerthwein, F.; McCrea, A.; Bockelman, B.; Fajardo, E.; Linares, L.; Wagner, R.; Konstantinov, P.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bradley, D.

    2014-01-01

    CMS is using a tiered setup of dedicated computing resources provided by sites distributed over the world and organized in WLCG. These sites pledge resources to CMS and are preparing them especially for CMS to run the experiment's applications. But there are more resources available opportunistically both on the GRID and in local university and research clusters which can be used for CMS applications. We will present CMS' strategy to use opportunistic resources and prepare them dynamically to run CMS applications. CMS is able to run its applications on resources that can be reached through the GRID, through EC2 compliant cloud interfaces. Even resources that can be used through ssh login nodes can be harnessed. All of these usage modes are integrated transparently into the GlideIn WMS submission infrastructure, which is the basis of CMS' opportunistic resource usage strategy. Technologies like Parrot to mount the software distribution via CVMFS and xrootd for access to data and simulation samples via the WAN are used and will be described. We will summarize the experience with opportunistic resource usage and give an outlook for the restart of LHC data taking in 2015.

  15. Opportunistic Resource Usage in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer, Peter; Hufnagel, Dirk; Dykstra, D.; Gutsche, O.; Tadel, M.; Sfiligoi, I.; Letts, J.; Wuerthwein, F.; McCrea, A.; Bockelman, B.; Fajardo, E.; Linares, L.; Wagner, R.; Konstantinov, P.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bradley, D.; Cms Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    CMS is using a tiered setup of dedicated computing resources provided by sites distributed over the world and organized in WLCG. These sites pledge resources to CMS and are preparing them especially for CMS to run the experiment's applications. But there are more resources available opportunistically both on the GRID and in local university and research clusters which can be used for CMS applications. We will present CMS' strategy to use opportunistic resources and prepare them dynamically to run CMS applications. CMS is able to run its applications on resources that can be reached through the GRID, through EC2 compliant cloud interfaces. Even resources that can be used through ssh login nodes can be harnessed. All of these usage modes are integrated transparently into the GlideIn WMS submission infrastructure, which is the basis of CMS' opportunistic resource usage strategy. Technologies like Parrot to mount the software distribution via CVMFS and xrootd for access to data and simulation samples via the WAN are used and will be described. We will summarize the experience with opportunistic resource usage and give an outlook for the restart of LHC data taking in 2015.

  16. Correction coil cable

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Sou-Tien

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly (10, 310) adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies (532) for the superconducting super collider. The correction coil cables (10, 310) have wires (14, 314) collected in wire arrays (12, 312) with a center rib (16, 316) sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly (18, 318 ). The core assembly (18, 318) is surrounded by an assembly housing (20, 320) having an inner spiral wrap (22, 322) and a counter wound outer spiral wrap (24, 324). An alternate embodiment (410) of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable (410) on a particle tube (733) in a particle tube assembly (732).

  17. TESLA Coil Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    Sloan’s work was actually predated by the earlier work of Nikola Tesla . Sloan mistakenly identified " Tesla Coils" as lumped tuned resonators. The...Lefvw WsnJ L REPORT o]i 3. REPRT TYPE AND OATES COVEIRD May 1992 Special/Aug 1992 - May 1992 Z TITLE AND 5U§nUT S. FUNDING NUMIHRS Tesla Coil Research...STATEMENT 1211. ’ISTRIUUTION COOD Approved for public release; dis~ribution is unlimited 13. ABSTRACT (Masrmum 200 worw) High repetition rate Tesla

  18. Meiosis specific coiled-coil proteins in Shizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, Ayami; Saito, Takamune T; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2007-05-18

    Many meiosis-specific proteins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe contain coiled-coil motifs which play essential roles for meiotic progression. For example, the coiled-coil motifs present in Meu13 and Mcp7 are required for their function as a putative recombinase cofactor complex during meiotic recombination. Mcp6/Hrs1 and Mcp5/Num1 control horsetail chromosome movement by astral microtubule organization and anchoring dynein respectively. Dhc1 and Ssm4 are also required for horsetail chromosome movement. It is clear from these examples that the coiled-coil motif in these proteins plays an important role during the progression of cells through meiosis. However, there are still many unanswered questions on how these proteins operate. In this paper, we briefly review recent studies on the meiotic coiled-coil proteins in Sz. pombe.

  19. Meiosis specific coiled-coil proteins in Shizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Ohtaka, Ayami; Saito, Takamune T; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Many meiosis-specific proteins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe contain coiled-coil motifs which play essential roles for meiotic progression. For example, the coiled-coil motifs present in Meu13 and Mcp7 are required for their function as a putative recombinase cofactor complex during meiotic recombination. Mcp6/Hrs1 and Mcp5/Num1 control horsetail chromosome movement by astral microtubule organization and anchoring dynein respectively. Dhc1 and Ssm4 are also required for horsetail chromosome movement. It is clear from these examples that the coiled-coil motif in these proteins plays an important role during the progression of cells through meiosis. However, there are still many unanswered questions on how these proteins operate. In this paper, we briefly review recent studies on the meiotic coiled-coil proteins in Sz. pombe. PMID:17509158

  20. Structure and function analysis of the CMS/CIN85 protein family identifies actin-bundling properties and heterotypic-complex formation.

    PubMed

    Gaidos, Gabriel; Soni, Shefali; Oswald, Duane J; Toselli, Paul A; Kirsch, Kathrin H

    2007-07-15

    Members of the CMS/CIN85 protein family participate in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and play a crucial role in maintaining the kidney filtration barrier. The CMS protein structure includes three Src homology 3 (SH3) domains and a proline-rich (PR) region that is connected by a 'linker' sequence to a coiled-coil (CC) domain. We show that CMS is a component of special actin-rich adhesion structures--podosomes--and demonstrate specific actin-binding properties of CMS. We have found that the entire C-terminal half of CMS is necessary for efficient binding to filamentous actin (F-actin). CMS and CIN85 can crosslink F-actin into bundles, a function that depends on the PR region and the CC domain. Removal of these domains reduces migration. CMS can also form heterotypic complexes with CIN85. CIN85 is expressed as multiple isoforms that share the CC domain, suggesting that heterotypic interactions with CMS provides a mechanism to regulate CMS binding to F-actin and thus for modulating dynamic rearrangements of the cytoskeleton.

  1. Inductively-overcoupled coil design for high resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bilgen, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    Background Maintaining the quality of magnetic resonance images acquired with the current implantable coil technology is challenging in longitudinal studies. To overcome this challenge, the principle of 'inductive overcoupling' is introduced as a method to tune and match a dual coil system. This system consists of an imaging coil built with fixed electrical elements and a matching coil equipped with tuning and matching capabilities. Overcoupling here refers to the condition beyond which the peak of the current in the imaging coil splits. Methods The combined coils are coupled inductively to operate like a transformer. Each coil circuit is electrically represented by equivalent lumped-elements. A theoretical analysis is given to identify the frequency response characteristics of the currents in each coil. The predictions from this analysis are translated into experiments and applied to locally image rat spinal cord at 9.4 T using an implantable coil as the imaging coil and an external volume coil as the matching coil. Results The theoretical analysis indicated that strong coupling between the coils divides the resonance peaks on the response curves of the currents. Once these newly generated peaks were tuned and matched to the desired frequency and impedance of operation, in vivo images were acquired from the rat spinal cord at high quality and high resolution. Conclusion After proper implementation, inductive overcoupling provides a unique opportunity for tuning and matching the coil system, and allows reliable and repeatable acquisitions of magnetic resonance data. This feature is likely to be useful in experimental studies, such as those aimed at longitudinally imaging the rat following spinal cord injury. PMID:16401343

  2. An orientable search coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, P. J.; Poblocki, M.

    2017-01-01

    We provide a design for a low cost orientable search coil that can be used to investigate the variation of magnetic flux with angle. This experiment is one of the required practical activities in the current A level physics specification for the AQA examination board in the UK. We demonstrate its performance and suggest other suitable investigations that can be undertaken.

  3. Imprinted Clay Coil Vessels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Tresa Rae

    2006-01-01

    The author teaches clay vessel construction in the fifth grade, and it is amazing what can be accomplished in one forty-five minute period when the expectations are clarified in the initial lesson. The author introduces clay coil vessels with a discussion of the sources of clay and how clay relates to fifth-grade science curriculum concepts such…

  4. Improved Coil for Hydrogen Dissociators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R.

    1984-01-01

    Flat coil has rigid printed circuit substrate. New coil structure minimizes RF electric field near glass walls of plasma vessel; therefore reduces direct electron bombardment of glass. Design lends itself well to high production and standardized dimensions.

  5. Pulse Test of Coil Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroy, Ralph E.

    1987-01-01

    Waveform of back-electromotive force reveals defects. Simple pulse test reveals defects in inductor coils. Devised for use on servovalve solenoid coils on Space Shuttle, test also applicable to transformer windings, chokes, relays, and the like.

  6. Coiled tubing operations and services

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworsky, A.S. II )

    1991-11-01

    Coiled tubing offers many advantages over conventional jointed tubing used for drilling in oil fields, including time savings, pumping flexibility, fluid placement, reduced formation damage and safety. The article gives an overview of coiled tubing history and development. Operating concepts are explained, along with descriptions of the major equipment and components associated with coiled tubing use in the oil field today.

  7. Wet Winding Improves Coil Encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    Wet-winding process encapsulates electrical coils more uniformily than conventional processes. Process requires no vacuum pump and adapts easily to existing winding machines. Encapsulant applied to each layer of wire as soon as added to coil. Wet-winding process eliminates voids, giving more uniformly encapsulated coil.

  8. Modular coils: a promising toroidal-reactor-coil system

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.K.; Furth, H.P.; Johnson, J.L.; Ludescher, C.; Weimer, K.E.

    1981-04-01

    The concept of modular coils originated from a need to find reactor-relevant stellarator windings, but its usefulness can be extended to provide an externally applied, additional rotational transform in tokamaks. Considerations of (1) basic principles of modular coils, (2) types of coils, (3) types of configurations (general, helically symmetric, helically asymmetric, with magnetic well, with magnetic hill), (4) types of rotational transform profile, and (5) structure and origin of ripples are given. These results show that modular coils can offer a wide range of vacuum magnetic field configurations, some of which cannot be obtained with the classical stellarator or torsatron coil configuration.

  9. CMS Software Notebook. First Edition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    For example, one of my file managing procedures will permit a user to enter the CMS subset to look for a missing file when it is not possible to...Box 17186 Washington, D.C. 20041 CMS userid: ORGASS Please specify if you want the user’s manual or the systems manual. The latter is designed for...8217 CMS SOFTWARE NOTEBOOK*t (First Edition) edited by Richard J. Orgass DT ’ Technical Memorandum No. 79-6 K. July 31, 1979 . ABSTRACT A brief description

  10. CD4 T-cell memory generation and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Gasper, David J; Tejera, Melba Marie; Suresh, M

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic memory is the adaptive immune system's powerful ability to remember a previous antigen encounter and react with accelerated vigor upon antigen re-exposure. It provides durable protection against reinfection with pathogens and is the foundation for vaccine-induced immunity. Unlike the relatively restricted immunologic purview of memory B cells and CD8 T cells, the field of CD4 T-cell memory must account for multiple distinct lineages with diverse effector functions, the issue of lineage commitment and plasticity, and the variable distribution of memory cells within each lineage. Here, we discuss the evidence for lineage-specific CD4 T-cell memory and summarize the known factors contributing to memory-cell generation, plasticity, and long-term maintenance.

  11. CD4+ T Cells: guardians of the phagosome.

    PubMed

    Tubo, Noah J; Jenkins, Marc K

    2014-04-01

    CD4(+) T cells are key cells of the adaptive immune system that use T cell antigen receptors to recognize peptides that are generated in endosomes or phagosomes and displayed on the host cell surface bound to major histocompatibility complex molecules. These T cells participate in immune responses that protect hosts from microbes such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Leishmania major, and Salmonella enterica, which have evolved to live in the phagosomes of macrophages and dendritic cells. Here, we review studies indicating that CD4(+) T cells control phagosomal infections asymptomatically in most individuals by secreting cytokines that activate the microbicidal activities of infected phagocytes but in a way that inhibits the pathogen but does not eliminate it. Indeed, we make the case that localized, controlled, persistent infection is necessary to maintain large numbers of CD4(+) effector T cells in a state of activation needed to eradicate systemic and more pathogenic forms of the infection. Finally, we posit that current vaccines for phagosomal infections fail because they do not produce this "periodic reminder" form of CD4(+) T cell-mediated immune control.

  12. Cellular Plasticity of CD4+ T Cells in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Brucklacher-Waldert, Verena; Carr, Edward J.; Linterman, Michelle A.; Veldhoen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Barrier sites such as the gastrointestinal tract are in constant contact with the environment, which contains both beneficial and harmful components. The immune system at the epithelia must make the distinction between these components to balance tolerance, protection, and immunopathology. This is achieved via multifaceted immune recognition, highly organized lymphoid structures, and the interaction of many types of immune cells. The adaptive immune response in the gut is orchestrated by CD4+ helper T (Th) cells, which are integral to gut immunity. In recent years, it has become apparent that the functional identity of these Th cells is not as fixed as initially thought. Plasticity in differentiated T cell subsets has now been firmly established, in both health and disease. The gut, in particular, utilizes CD4+ T cell plasticity to mold CD4+ T cell phenotypes to maintain its finely poised balance of tolerance and inflammation and to encourage biodiversity within the enteric microbiome. In this review, we will discuss intestinal helper T cell plasticity and our current understanding of its mechanisms, including our growing knowledge of an evolutionarily ancient symbiosis between microbiota and malleable CD4+ T cell effectors. PMID:25339956

  13. Design of a conduction-cooled 9.4 T REBCO magnet for whole-body MRI systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Iwai, Sadanori; Otani, Yasumi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tosaka, Taizo; Tasaki, Kenji; Nomura, Shunji; Kurusu, Tsutomu; Ueda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, So; Ishiyama, Atsushi; Urayama, Shinichi; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2016-10-01

    A project on the development of REBa2Cu3O7-δ (REBCO) magnets for ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was started in 2013. Since REBCO-coated conductors feature high mechanical strength under tensile stress and high critical current density, use of REBCO coils would allow superconducting magnets to be made smaller and lighter than conventional ones. In addition, a conduction-cooled superconducting magnet is simpler to use than one cooled by a liquid helium bath because the operation and maintenance of the cryogenic system become simpler, without the need to handle cryogenic fluid. Superconducting magnets for MRI require homogeneous, stable magnetic fields. The homogeneity of the magnetic field is highly dependent on the coil shape and position. Moreover, in REBCO magnets, the screening-current-induced magnetic field, which changes the magnetic field distribution of the magnet, is one of the critical issues. In order to evaluate the magnetic field homogeneity and the screening-current-induced magnetic field, a 1 T model magnet and some test coils were fabricated. From an evaluation of the 1 T model magnet, it was found that the main reason for magnetic field inhomogeneity was the tolerances in the z-axis positions of the coils, and therefore, it is important to control the gap between the single pancakes. In addition, we have already demonstrated the generation of an 8.27 T central magnetic field at 10 K with a small test coil. The screening-current-induced magnetic field was 0.43 T and was predictable by using an electromagnetic field simulation program. These results were reflected in the design of a conduction-cooled 9.4 T REBCO magnet for whole-body MRI systems. The magnet was composed of six main coils and two active shield coils. The total conductor length was 581 km, and the stored energy was 293 kJ. The field inhomogeneity was 24 ppm peak to peak and 3 ppm volume-root-mean-square (VRMS) for a 500 mm diameter spherical volume (DSV). The axial

  14. CMS multicore scheduling strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio; Hernandez, Jose; Holzman, Burt; Majewski, Krista; McCrea, Alison

    2014-01-01

    In the next years, processor architectures based on much larger numbers of cores will be most likely the model to continue 'Moore's Law' style throughput gains. This not only results in many more jobs in parallel running the LHC Run 1 era monolithic applications, but also the memory requirements of these processes push the workernode architectures to the limit. One solution is parallelizing the application itself, through forking and memory sharing or through threaded frameworks. CMS is following all of these approaches and has a comprehensive strategy to schedule multicore jobs on the GRID based on the glideinWMS submission infrastructure. The main component of the scheduling strategy, a pilot-based model with dynamic partitioning of resources that allows the transition to multicore or whole-node scheduling without disallowing the use of single-core jobs, is described. This contribution also presents the experiences made with the proposed multicore scheduling schema and gives an outlook of further developments working towards the restart of the LHC in 2015.

  15. Electrospun Buckling Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; Reneker, Darrell

    2009-03-01

    Electrospinning offers a useful way to produce fibers with micron and nanometer scale diameter. The present work deals with the buckling phenomenon characteristic of a jet impinging upon the surface of collector. A viscous jet may have either tensile or compressive forces along its axis. The periodic buckling that is often observed is attributed to the occurrence of compressive forces as the jet decelerates at the collector. With the increase of axial compressive stresses along the jet, a jet with circular cross sections first buckles by formation of sharp folds, and then by formation of coils. The resulting buckling patterns include zigzag patterns and coils that which can be controlled by changing parameters, such as density, viscosity, conductivity, voltage, polymer concentration, distance and volumetric flow rate. Uniformly buckled polymer fibers can be made at a rate of one turn per microsecond. An experimental apparatus was built to continuously collect buckling coils of nylon 6, from a water surface, into a multilayer sheet. These small ``springs'' and sheets will be tested for mechanical properties needed in biomedical applications.

  16. A novel protein with anti-metastasis activity on 4T1 carcinoma from medicinal fungus Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Yin, Yalin; Yu, Guojun; Jin, Yanxia; Ye, Xiangdong; Shrestha, Alok; Liu, Wei; Yu, Wenhui; Sun, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a famous fungus used in traditional Chinese medicine for nearly one thousand years. And its fruiting body is known to possess anticancer and immunomodulatory activities. This study describes the isolation, characterization, and test of antitumor activity of a C. militaris protein, called here as "C. militaris immunoregulatory protein" (CMIP). CMIP was purified through a three-step chromatographic procedure. The MS analyses showed that CMIP corresponded to an uncharacterized protein (CCM_01955) in the C. militaris transcriptional database. Circular dichroism of CMIP revealed the composition of 35.5% β-sheet, 18.5% α-helix, 17.0% turn and 29.0% random coil. No significant cytotoxicity of CMIP was observed on HeLa, HepG2 and 4T1 tumor cells. However, CMIP demonstrated anti-metastasis activity on a mouse model of 4T1 breast cancer lung metastasis. It reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung of tumor-bearing mice and prolonged their survival time. Furthermore, proliferation of the 4T1 cells was inhibited by macrophage-CMIP conditioned media. And the mRNA levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were increased significantly in peritoneal macrophages treated by CMIP. These results reveal the antitumor potential of CMIP, thus reinforcing the importance of biochemical prospecting of C. militaris.

  17. Magnetic resonance microscopy of spinal cord injury in mouse using a miniaturized implantable RF coil.

    PubMed

    Bilgen, Mehmet

    2007-01-15

    A magnetic resonance neuroimaging method is described for high-resolution imaging of spinal cord injury in live mouse. The method is based on a specially designed radio frequency coil system formed by a combination of an implantable coil and an external volume coil. The implantable coil is a 5 mm x 10 mm rectangular design with a 9.1 pF capacitor and 22 gauge copper wire and optimal for surgical implantation over the cervical or thoracic spine. The external volume coil is a standard birdcage resonator. The coils are inductively overcoupled for imaging the spinal cord at 9.4 T magnetic field strength. The inductive overcoupling provides flexibility in tuning the resonant frequency and matching the impedance of the implanted coil remotely using the tuning and matching capabilities of the volume coil. After describing the implementation of the imaging setup, in vivo data are gathered to demonstrate the imaging performance of the coil system and the feasibility of performing MR microscopy on injured mouse spinal cord.

  18. Recommendations for Review of TRADOC Pam 351-4(T).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-08

    CHAPTER 8 TRADOC PAM 351-4(T) A generic procedure must be qualified with statement like: Do x except in cases of... Do x only when circumstance y...may also not be practical or necessary in every case . 59 Neeker: It should be DTD for the endorsement of JTA plans. BOWLES: The big problem is what is...Task analsls is different when you deal with new equipment or procedures. Menchaca: In some cases of this type I have used vendors’ manuals. 90 If

  19. Development of promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger-expressing innate CD4 T cells requires stronger T-cell receptor signals than conventional CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yu; Zhu, Lingqiao; Sofi, Hanief; Lapinski, Philip E; Horai, Reiko; Mueller, Kristen; Stritesky, Gretta L; He, Xi; Teh, Hung-Sia; Wiest, David L; Kappes, Dietmar J; King, Philip D; Hogquist, Kristin A; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Sant'Angelo, Derek B; Chang, Cheong-Hee

    2012-10-02

    MHC class II-expressing thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells can mediate CD4 T-cell selection resulting in functionally distinct thymocyte-selected CD4 (T-CD4) and epithelial-selected CD4 (E-CD4) T cells, respectively. However, little is known about how T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling influences the development of these two CD4 T-cell subsets. To study TCR signaling for T-CD4 T-cell development, we used a GFP reporter system of Nur77 in which GFP intensity directly correlates with TCR signaling strength. T-CD4 T cells expressed higher levels of GFP than E-CD4 T cells, suggesting that T-CD4 T cells received stronger TCR signaling than E-CD4 T cells during selection. Elimination of Ras GTPase-activating protein enhanced E-CD4 but decreased T-CD4 T-cell selection efficiency, suggesting a shift to negative selection. Conversely, the absence of IL-2-inducible T-cell kinase that causes poor E-CD4 T-cell selection due to insufficient TCR signaling improved T-CD4 T-cell generation, consistent with rescue from negative selection. Strong TCR signaling during T-CD4 T-cell development correlates with the expression of the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein. However, although modulation of the signaling strength affected the efficiency of T-CD4 T-cell development during positive and negative selection, the signaling strength is not as important for the effector function of T-CD4 T cells. These findings indicate that innate T-CD4 T cells, together with invariant natural killer T cells and γδ T cells, receive strong TCR signals during their development and that signaling requirements for the development and the effector functions are distinct.

  20. Radiofrequency Heating at 9.4T: In Vivo Temperature Measurement Results in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Devashish; Hanson, Timothy; Schlentz, Robert; Gallaghar, William; Snyder, Carl; DelaBarre, Lance; Prakash, Surya; Iaizzo, Paul; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2009-01-01

    In vivo temperatures were correlated to the whole head average specific absorption rate (SARavg) at 9.4T using 12 anesthetized swine (mean animal weight = 52 kg, standard deviation = 6.7 kg). Correlating the temperatures and SARavg is necessary to ensure safe levels of human heating during ultra-high field MR exams. The temperatures were measured at three depths inside the brain, in the rectum, and at the head-skin of swine. A 400 MHz, continuous wave RF power was deposited to the head using a volume coil. The SARavg values were varied between 2.7–5.8 W/kg. The RF power exposure durations were varied between 1.4 –3.7 hr. To differentiate the temperature response caused by the RF from that of the anesthesia, the temperatures were recorded in four unheated swine. To study the effect of the spatial distribution of the RF and tissue properties, the temperature probes were placed at two brain locations (n = 4 swine for each location). Results showed that the in vivo brain temperatures correlated to the SARavg in a geometry-dependent manner. Additionally, 1) the skin temperature change was not the maximum temperature change; 2) the RF heating caused an inhomogeneous brain temperature distribution; and 3) the maximum temperature occurred inside the brain. PMID:17969077

  1. Functional aortic stiffness: role of CD4(+) T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Beenish A; Eberson, Lance S; Tawinwung, Supannikar; Larmonier, Nicolas; Secomb, Timothy W; Larson, Douglas F

    2015-01-01

    The immune system is suggested to be essential in vascular remodeling and stiffening. To study the dependence upon lymphocytes in vascular stiffening, we compared an angiotensin II-model of vascular stiffening in normal C57BL/6J mice with lymphocyte-deficient RAG 1(-/-) mice and additionally characterized the component of vascular stiffness due to vasoconstriction vs. vascular remodeling. Chronic angiotensin II increased aortic pulse wave velocity, effective wall stiffness, and effective Young's modulus in C57BL/6J mice by three-fold but caused no change in the RAG 1(-/-) mice. These functional measurements were supported by aortic morphometric analysis. Adoptive transfer of CD4(+) T helper lymphocytes restored the angiotensin II-mediated aortic stiffening in the RAG 1(-/-) mice. In order to account for the hydraulic vs. material effects of angiotensin II on pulse wave velocity, subcutaneous osmotic pumps were removed after 21 days of angiotensin II-infusion in the WT mice to achieve normotensive values. The pulse wave velocity (PWV) decreased from three- to two-fold above baseline values up to 7 days following pump removal. This study supports the pivotal role of the CD4(+) T-lymphocytes in angiotensin II-mediated vascular stiffening and that angiotensin II-mediated aortic stiffening is due to the additive effect of active vascular smooth muscle vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling.

  2. CMS@home: Enabling Volunteer Computing Usage for CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, L.; Borras, H.; Spiga, D.; Riahi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Volunteer computing remains a largely untapped opportunistic resource for the LHC experiments. The use of virtualization in this domain was pioneered by the Test4Theory project and enabled the running of high energy particle physics simulations on home computers. This paper describes the model for CMS to run workloads using a similar volunteer computing platform. It is shown how the original approach is exploited to map onto the existing CMS workflow and identifies missing functionality along with the components and changes that are required. The final implementation of the prototype is detailed along with the identification of areas that would benefit from further development.

  3. Coiled tubing; Operations and services

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.L.; Stephens, R.K. )

    1992-09-01

    This paper reports on coiled tubing units which are used for many types of remedial well operations, including sand plugbacks, cement squeezes, fill cleanouts, underreaming, acid stimulations, and fishing. Fishing operations include removal of inflatable bridge plugs, lock mandrels stuck in profile nipples, coiled tubing, coiled tubing bottomhole assemblies (BHAs) and wireline. Recommended guidelines for selecting candidates, proper tool string configuration and operational techniques are presented here to assist coiled tubing supervisors and company representatives in the planning and implementation of efficient and effective fishing operations. Treatment of these areas are not intended to be exhaustive, but rather generally representative of common applications. Each fishing operation requires individualized analysis and planning.

  4. Upgrades for the CMS simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, D. J.; Hildreth, M.; Ivantchenko, V. N.; Osborne, I.

    2015-05-22

    Over the past several years, the CMS experiment has made significant changes to its detector simulation application. The geometry has been generalized to include modifications being made to the CMS detector for 2015 operations, as well as model improvements to the simulation geometry of the current CMS detector and the implementation of a number of approved and possible future detector configurations. These include both completely new tracker and calorimetry systems. We have completed the transition to Geant4 version 10, we have made significant progress in reducing the CPU resources required to run our Geant4 simulation. These have been achieved through both technical improvements and through numerical techniques. Substantial speed improvements have been achieved without changing the physics validation benchmarks that the experiment uses to validate our simulation application for use in production. As a result, we will discuss the methods that we implemented and the corresponding demonstrated performance improvements deployed for our 2015 simulation application.

  5. The Recent Results from CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Jeong

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN sitting astride the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva has accumulated the proton and proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of around 5 fb-1 at the center of mass energy 7 TeV in 2011 and around 20 fb-1 at 8 TeV in 2012 with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector. The CMS detector is designed to investigate the wide range of particle physics including testing perturbative QCD and searching for Brout-Englert-Higgs (BEH) boson as well as new physics phenomena beyond the Standard Model. Observation of a new boson has moved the phase from hunting for the SM BEH boson to evaluating the consistency of this new particle with the SM expectation. The latest results from the CMS collaboration will be presented.

  6. Control of inflammatory heart disease by CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Barin, Jobert G; Čiháková, Daniela

    2013-05-01

    This review focuses on autoimmune myocarditis and its sequela, inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMI), and the inflammatory and immune mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these diseases. Several mouse models of myocarditis and DCMI have improved our knowledge of the pathogenesis of these diseases, informing more general problems of cardiac remodeling and heart failure. CD4(+) T cells are critical in driving the pathogenesis of myocarditis. We discuss in detail the role of T helper cell subtypes in the pathogenesis of myocarditis, the biology of T cell-derived effector cytokines, and the participation of other leukocytic effectors in mediating disease pathophysiology. We discuss interactions between these subsets in both suppressive and collaborative fashions. These findings indicate that cardiac inflammatory disease, and autoimmunity in general, may be more diverse in divergent effector mechanisms than has previously been appreciated.

  7. Plasticity of Human CD4 T Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Geginat, Jens; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Alfen, Johanna Sophie; Kastirr, Ilko; Gruarin, Paola; De Simone, Marco; Pagani, Massimiliano; Abrignani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to a variety of different pathogens, which induce tailored immune responses and consequently generate highly diverse populations of pathogen-specific T cells. CD4+ T cells have a central role in adaptive immunity, since they provide essential help for both cytotoxic T cell- and antibody-mediated responses. In addition, CD4+ regulatory T cells are required to maintain self-tolerance and to inhibit immune responses that could damage the host. Initially, two subsets of CD4+ helper T cells were identified that secrete characteristic effector cytokines and mediate responses against different types of pathogens, i.e., IFN-γ secreting Th1 cells that fight intracellular pathogens, and IL-4 producing Th2 cells that target extracellular parasites. It is now well established that this dichotomy is insufficient to describe the complexity of CD4+ T cell differentiation, and in particular the human CD4 compartment contains a myriad of T cell subsets with characteristic capacities to produce cytokines and to home to involved tissues. Moreover, it has become increasingly clear that these T cell subsets are not all terminally differentiated cells, but that the majority is plastic and that in particular central memory T cells can acquire different properties and functions in secondary immune responses. In addition, there is compelling evidence that helper T cells can acquire regulatory functions upon chronic stimulation in inflamed tissues. The plasticity of antigen-experienced human T cell subsets is highly relevant for translational medicine, since it opens new perspectives for immune-modulatory therapies for chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. PMID:25566245

  8. Triple Halo Coil: Development and Comparison with Other TMS Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive stimulation technique that can be used for the treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's Disease, PTSD, TBI and anxiety by regulating synaptic activity. TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder. There is a critical need to develop deep TMS coils that can stimulate deeper regions of the brain without excessively stimulating the cortex in order to provide an alternative to surgical methods. We have developed a novel multi-coil configuration called ``Triple Halo Coil'' (THC) that can stimulate deep brain regions. Investigation of induced electric and magnetic field in these regions have been achieved by computer modelling. Comparison of the results due to THC configuration have been conducted with other TMS coils such as ``Halo Coil'', circular coil and ``Figure of Eight'' coil. There was an improvement of more than 15 times in the strength of magnetic field, induced by THC configuration at 10 cm below the vertex of the head when compared with the ``Figure of Eight'' coil alone. Carver Charitable Trust.

  9. High-performance radiofrequency coils for (23)Na MRI: brain and musculoskeletal applications.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Graham C; Brown, Ryan; Lakshmanan, Karthik

    2016-02-01

    (23)Na RF coil design for brain and MSK applications presents a number of challenges, including poor coil loading for arrays of small coils and SNR penalties associated with providing (1)H capability with the same coil. The basics of RF coil design are described, as well as a review of historical approaches to dual tuning. There follows a review of published high performance coil designs for MSK and brain imaging. Several coil designs have been demonstrated at 7T and 3T which incorporate close-fitting receive arrays and in some cases design features which provide (1)H imaging with little penalty to (23)Na sensitivity. The "nested coplanar loop" approach is examined, in which small transmit-receive (1)H elements are placed within each (23)Na loop, presenting only a small perturbation to (23)Na performance and minimizing RF shielding issues. Other designs incorporating transmit-receive arrays for (23)Na and (1)H are discussed including a 9.4 T (23)Na/(1)H brain coil. Great gains in (23)Na SNR have been made with many of these designs, but simultaneously achieving high performance for 1H remains elusive.

  10. A Parallel Coiled-Coil Tetramer with Offset Helices

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,J.; Deng, Y.; Zheng, Q.; Cheng, C.; Kallenbach, N.; Lu, M.

    2006-01-01

    Specific helix-helix interactions are fundamental in assembling the native state of proteins and in protein-protein interfaces. Coiled coils afford a unique model system for elucidating principles of molecular recognition between {alpha} helices. The coiled-coil fold is specified by a characteristic seven amino acid repeat containing hydrophobic residues at the first (a) and fourth (d) positions. Nonpolar side chains spaced three and four residues apart are referred to as the 3-4 hydrophobic repeat. The presence of apolar amino acids at the e or g positions (corresponding to a 3-3-1 hydrophobic repeat) can provide new possibilities for close-packing of {alpha}-helices that includes examples such as the lac repressor tetramerization domain. Here we demonstrate that an unprecedented coiled-coil interface results from replacement of three charged residues at the e positions in the dimeric GCN4 leucine zipper by nonpolar valine side chains. Equilibrium circular dichroism and analytical ultracentrifugation studies indicate that the valine-containing mutant forms a discrete {alpha}-helical tetramer with a significantly higher stability than the parent leucine-zipper molecule. The 1.35 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the tetramer reveals a parallel four-stranded coiled coil with a three-residue interhelical offset. The local packing geometry of the three hydrophobic positions in the tetramer conformation is completely different from that seen in classical tetrameric structures yet bears resemblance to that in three-stranded coiled coils. These studies demonstrate that distinct van der Waals interactions beyond the a and d side chains can generate a diverse set of helix-helix interfaces and three-dimensional supercoil structures.

  11. Collapse pressure of coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.S.

    1996-09-01

    The collapse pressure is a measure of an external force required to collapse a tube in the absence of internal pressure. It is defined as the minimum pressure required to yield the tube in the absence of internal pressure. Coiled tubing is sometimes used in high-pressure wells. If the external pressure becomes too high, the coiled tubing will collapse. This could not only lead to serious well-control problems, but may result in extensive fishing operations. A reliable safety criterion of collapse pressure for the coiled tubing is needed by the coiled tubing operators. Theoretical models of collapse pressure are well developed for perfectly round coiled tubing but not for oval coiled tubing. Coiled tubing is initially manufactured with nearly perfect roundness, sometimes having a small ovality (typically {le} 0.5%). Perfectly round CT becomes oval owing to the plastic mechanical deformation of the coiled tubing as it spooled on and off the reel and over the gooseneck. As the cycling continues, the ovality usually increases. This ovality significantly decreases the collapse failure pressure as compared to perfectly round tubing. In this paper, an analytical model of collapse pressure for oval tubing under axial tension or compression is developed based on elastic instability theory and the von Mises criterion. The theoretical model shows satisfactory agreement with experimental data.

  12. COIL technology development at Boeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlock, Steve C.

    2002-05-01

    The historical COIL contributions at the McDonnell Douglas Research Laboratory, the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International and Boeing's Laser and Electro-Optic Systems organization are briefly described. The latter organization now contains the capabilities of the two heritage organizations. Boeing's new high pressure sealed COIL is also described.

  13. Replaceable Sleeve Protects Welder Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. L.; Simpson, C., E.

    1983-01-01

    New replaceable carbon insert for deflection coil in electron-beam welder promises to decrease maintenance costs. Inserts made from materials other than carbon (not yet tried) are less expensive, thus reducing costs even further. With carbon insert, deflection coils last longer and are easier to maintain.

  14. Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dinkel, J.A.; Biggs, J.E.

    1994-03-01

    The Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector has been developed to facilitate the location of shorted turns in magnet coils. Finding these shorted turns is necessary to determine failure modes that are a necessary step in developing future production techniques. Up to this point, coils with shorted turns had the insulation burned off without the fault having been located. This disassembly process destroyed any chance of being able to find the fault. In order to maintain a flux balance in a coupled system such as a magnet coil, the current in a shorted turn must be opposed to the incident current. If the direction of the current in each conductor can be measured relative to the incident current, then the exact location of the short can be determined. In this device, an AC voltage is applied to the magnet under test. A small hand held B-dot pickup coil monitors the magnetic field produced by current in the individual magnet conductors. The relative phase of this pickup coil voltage is compared to a reference signal derived from the input current to detect a current reversal as the B-dot pickup coil is swept over the conductors of the coil under test. This technique however, is limited to only those conductors that are accessible to the hand held probe.

  15. CMS-2 to Ada Translator Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    these translators, and to provide information to CMS -2 project managers to assist them in the evaluation of costs and risks of translating CMS -2 to Ada....The objective of this evaluation was to determine the maturity of the CMS -2 to Ada translators and associated tools, to determine the capabilities of

  16. 42 CFR 401.108 - CMS rulings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CMS rulings. 401.108 Section 401.108 Public Health... GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Confidentiality and Disclosure § 401.108 CMS rulings. (a) After... regulations, but which has been adopted by CMS as having precedent, may be published in the Federal...

  17. 42 CFR 401.108 - CMS rulings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CMS rulings. 401.108 Section 401.108 Public Health... GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Confidentiality and Disclosure § 401.108 CMS rulings. (a) After... regulations, but which has been adopted by CMS as having precedent, may be published in the Federal...

  18. 42 CFR 401.108 - CMS rulings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CMS rulings. 401.108 Section 401.108 Public Health... GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Confidentiality and Disclosure § 401.108 CMS rulings. (a) After... regulations, but which has been adopted by CMS as having precedent, may be published in the Federal...

  19. 42 CFR 401.108 - CMS rulings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CMS rulings. 401.108 Section 401.108 Public Health... GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Confidentiality and Disclosure § 401.108 CMS rulings. (a) After... regulations, but which has been adopted by CMS as having precedent, may be published in the Federal...

  20. 42 CFR 401.108 - CMS rulings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CMS rulings. 401.108 Section 401.108 Public Health... GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Confidentiality and Disclosure § 401.108 CMS rulings. (a) After... regulations, but which has been adopted by CMS as having precedent, may be published in the Federal...

  1. 45 CFR 150.203 - Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement. 150.203... CARE ACCESS CMS ENFORCEMENT IN GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL INSURANCE MARKETS CMS Enforcement Processes for... requiring CMS enforcement. CMS enforces HIPAA requirements to the extent warranted (as determined by CMS)...

  2. 45 CFR 150.203 - Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement. 150.203... CARE ACCESS CMS ENFORCEMENT IN GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL INSURANCE MARKETS CMS Enforcement Processes for... requiring CMS enforcement. CMS enforces HIPAA requirements to the extent warranted (as determined by CMS)...

  3. The Coil Method in Contemporary Ceramics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigrosh, Leon I.

    1976-01-01

    For centuries coil building has been the primary method of making pottery the world over. Many classrooms still reflect this preference for symmetrical coil building. Describes coil building and what forms can be made from it. (Author/RK)

  4. Helically Coiled Graphene Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Daigle, Maxime; Miao, Dandan; Lucotti, Andrea; Tommasini, Matteo; Morin, Jean-François

    2017-03-07

    Graphene is a zero-gap, semiconducting 2D material that exhibits outstanding charge-transport properties. One way to open a band gap and make graphene useful as a semiconducting material is to confine the electron delocalization in one dimension through the preparation of graphene nanoribbons (GNR). Although several methods have been reported so far, solution-phase, bottom-up synthesis is the most promising in terms of structural precision and large-scale production. Herein, we report the synthesis of a well-defined, helically coiled GNR from a polychlorinated poly(m-phenylene) through a regioselective photochemical cyclodehydrochlorination (CDHC) reaction. The structure of the helical GNR was confirmed by (1) H NMR, FT-IR, XPS, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy. This Riemann surface-like GNR has a band gap of 2.15 eV and is highly emissive in the visible region, both in solution and the solid state.

  5. The CMS DBS query language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Valentin; Riley, Daniel; Afaq, Anzar; Sekhri, Vijay; Guo, Yuyi; Lueking, Lee

    2010-04-01

    The CMS experiment has implemented a flexible and powerful system enabling users to find data within the CMS physics data catalog. The Dataset Bookkeeping Service (DBS) comprises a database and the services used to store and access metadata related to CMS physics data. To this, we have added a generalized query system in addition to the existing web and programmatic interfaces to the DBS. This query system is based on a query language that hides the complexity of the underlying database structure by discovering the join conditions between database tables. This provides a way of querying the system that is simple and straightforward for CMS data managers and physicists to use without requiring knowledge of the database tables or keys. The DBS Query Language uses the ANTLR tool to build the input query parser and tokenizer, followed by a query builder that uses a graph representation of the DBS schema to construct the SQL query sent to underlying database. We will describe the design of the query system, provide details of the language components and overview of how this component fits into the overall data discovery system architecture.

  6. Structural and biochemical characterizations of an intramolecular tandem coiled coil protein.

    PubMed

    Shin, Donghyuk; Kim, Gwanho; Kim, Gyuhee; Zheng, Xu; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Lee, Sangho

    2014-12-12

    Coiled coil has served as an excellent model system for studying protein folding and developing protein-based biomaterials. Most designed coiled coils function as oligomers, namely intermolecular coiled coils. However, less is known about structural and biochemical behavior of intramolecular coiled coils where coiled coil domains are covalently linked in one polypeptide. Here we prepare a protein which harbors three coiled coil domains with two short linkers, termed intramolecular tandem coiled coil (ITCC) and characterize its structural and biochemical behavior in solution. ITCC consists of three coiled coil domains whose sequences are derived from Coil-Ser and its domain swapped dimer. Modifications include positioning E (Glu) residue at "e" and K (Lys) at "g" positions throughout heptad repeats to enhance ionic interaction among its constituent coiled coil domains. Molecular modeling of ITCC suggests a compact triple helical bundle structure with the second and the third coiled coil domains forming a canonical coiled coil. ITCC exists as a mixture of monomeric and dimeric species in solution. Small-angle X-ray scattering reveals ellipsoidal molecular envelopes for both dimeric and monomeric ITCC in solution. The theoretically modeled structures of ITCC dock well into the envelopes of both species. Higher ionic strength shifts the equilibrium into monomer with apparently more compact structure while secondary structure remains unchanged. Taken together, our results suggest that our designed ITCC is predominantly monomeric structure through the enhanced ionic interactions, and its conformation is affected by the concentration of ionic species in the buffer.

  7. Coiled tubing - Operations and services

    SciTech Connect

    Gronseth, J.M. )

    1993-04-01

    Drilling with a continuous (rather than jointed) drill string is an old concept that is gaining new attention as a result of recent advances made in coiled tubing and drilling technology. The development of larger diameter, reliable, high-strength coiled tubing and smaller diameter, positive displacement motors, orienting tools, surveying systems and fixed cutting drill bits have given drilling with a continuous drill string a capability that was previously unattainable. Like its many other uses, (e.g., squeeze cementing, wellbore cleanouts, flow initiation, logging) the continuity of coiled tubing gives it several advantages over conventional drill strings. These include: drilling underbalanced safely, significantly reduced trip time, continuous circulation, smaller surface requirements. Coiled tubing drilling operations have smaller surface lease requirements than most conventional rigs due to the smaller footprint of the coiled tubing unit and associated equipment. Current coiled tubing drilling operations have the following limitations: conventional rig assistance is required for well preparation; conventional rigs must assist in running long protective and production casing strings or liners; hole sizes are smaller; working depth capabilities are shallower, coiled tubing life is less. This paper goes on to discuss the history of continuous drill strings and includes information on tubing units, circulating systems, drilling fluids, well control systems, downhole tools, orientation tools, and bottomhole assemblies. It then gives a cost comparison and an application of this type of drilling.

  8. Improved Sensing Coils for SQUIDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2007-01-01

    An improvement in the design and fabrication of sensing coils of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers has been proposed to increase sensitivity. It has been estimated that, in some cases, it would be possible to increase sensitivity by about half or to reduce measurement time correspondingly. The pertinent aspects of the problems of design and fabrication can be summarized as follows: In general, to increase the sensitivity of a SQUID magnetometer, it is necessary to maximize the magnetic flux enclosed by the sensing coil while minimizing the self-inductance of this coil. It is often beneficial to fabricate the coil from a thicker wire to reduce its self-inductance. Moreover, to optimize the design of the coil with respect to sensitivity, it may be necessary to shape the wire to other than a commonly available circular or square cross-section. On the other hand, it is not practical to use thicker superconducting wire for the entire superconducting circuit, especially if the design of a specific device requires a persistent-current loop enclosing a remotely placed SQUID sensor. It may be possible to bond a thicker sensing-coil wire to thinner superconducting wires leading to a SQUID sensor, but it could be difficult to ensure reliable superconducting connections, especially if the bonded wires are made of different materials. The main idea is to mold the sensing coil in place, to more nearly optimum cross sectional shape, instead of making the coil by winding standard pre-fabricated wire. For this purpose, a thin superconducting wire loop that is an essential part of the SQUID magnetometer would be encapsulated in a form that would serve as a mold. A low-melting-temperature superconducting metal (e.g., indium, tin, or a lead/tin alloy) would be melted into the form, which would be sized and shaped to impart the required cross section to the coil thus formed.

  9. Cross-linking reveals laminin coiled-coil architecture

    PubMed Central

    Armony, Gad; Jacob, Etai; Moran, Toot; Levin, Yishai; Mehlman, Tevie; Levy, Yaakov; Fass, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Laminin, an ∼800-kDa heterotrimeric protein, is a major functional component of the extracellular matrix, contributing to tissue development and maintenance. The unique architecture of laminin is not currently amenable to determination at high resolution, as its flexible and narrow segments complicate both crystallization and single-particle reconstruction by electron microscopy. Therefore, we used cross-linking and MS, evaluated using computational methods, to address key questions regarding laminin quaternary structure. This approach was particularly well suited to the ∼750-Å coiled coil that mediates trimer assembly, and our results support revision of the subunit order typically presented in laminin schematics. Furthermore, information on the subunit register in the coiled coil and cross-links to downstream domains provide insights into the self-assembly required for interaction with other extracellular matrix and cell surface proteins. PMID:27815530

  10. Coiled tubing. operations and services

    SciTech Connect

    Hightower, C.M. )

    1992-11-01

    Coiled tubing is being used with increasing frequency in conventional or traditional production operations. Demand for coiled pipe in these types of applications is expected to experience rapid growth as standard 2 (3/8) and 2 (7/8)-in. OD tubing sizes and units equipped to run larger pipe become more readily available. This paper reports on a recent market survey which indicated that coiled tubing used for velocity strings and standard production tubing installations are two areas with the most potential for immediate and near-term expansion. Other applications include: well casing and liners, gravel packing, artificial lift, flowlines and pipelines.

  11. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, John R.

    1987-12-01

    a method for manufacturing a magnet cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely positioned thereon, is accurately positioned at a precise location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator.

  12. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, J.R.

    1987-05-15

    A method for manufacturing a magnetic cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible substrate sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator. 1 fig.

  13. ASTROMAG coil cooling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maytal, Ben-Zion; Vansciver, Steven W.

    1990-01-01

    ASTROMAG is a planned particle astrophysics magnetic facility. Basically it is a large magnetic spectrometer outside the Earth's atmosphere for an extended period of time in orbit on a space station. A definition team summarized its scientific objectives assumably related to fundamental questions of astrophysics, cosmology, and elementary particle physics. Since magnetic induction of about 7 Tesla is desired, it is planned to be a superconducting magnet cooled to liquid helium 2 temperatures. The general structure of ASTROMAG is based on: (1) two superconducting magnetic coils, (2) dewar of liquid helium 2 to provide cooling capability for the magnets; (3) instrumentation, matter-anti matter spectrometer (MAS) and cosmic ray isotope spectrometer (CRIS); and (4) interfaces to the shuttle and space station. Many configurations of the superconducting magnets and the dewar were proposed and evaluated, since those are the heart of the ASTROMAG. Baseline of the magnet configuration and cryostat as presented in the phase A study and the one kept in mind while doing the present study are presented. ASTROMAG's development schedule reflects the plan of launching to the space station in 1995.

  14. Virtual data in CMS production

    SciTech Connect

    Arbree, A. et al.

    2004-08-26

    Initial applications of the GriPhyN Chimera Virtual Data System have been performed within the context of CMS Production of Monte Carlo Simulated Data. The GriPhyN Chimera system consists of four primary components: (1) a Virtual Data Language, which is used to describe virtual data products, (2) a Virtual Data Catalog, which is used to store virtual data entries, (3) an Abstract Planner, which resolves all dependencies of a particular virtual data product and forms a location and existence independent plan, (4) a Concrete Planner, which maps an abstract, logical plan onto concrete, physical grid resources accounting for staging in/out files and publishing results to a replica location service. A CMS Workflow Planner, MCRunJob, is used to generate virtual data products using the Virtual Data Language. Subsequently, a prototype workflow manager, known as WorkRunner, is used to schedule the instantiation of virtual data products across a grid.

  15. CMS Web-Based Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Badgett, William; Lopez-Perez, Juan Antonio; Maeshima, Kaori; Soha, Aron; Sulmanas, Balys; Wan, Zongru

    2010-01-01

    With the growth in size and complexity of High Energy Physics experiments, and the accompanying increase in the number of collaborators spread across the globe, the importance of widely relaying timely monitoring and status information has grown. To this end, we present online Web Based Monitoring solutions from the CMS experiment at CERN. The web tools developed present data to the user from many underlying heterogeneous sources, from real time messaging system to relational databases. We provide the power to combine and correlate data in both graphical and tabular formats of interest to the experimentalist, with data such as beam conditions, luminosity, trigger rates, detector conditions and many others, allowing for flexibility on the user side. We also present some examples of how this system has been used during CMS commissioning and early beam collision running at the Large Hadron Collider.

  16. The CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trocino, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High-Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running with the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. We present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simple single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We discuss the optimisation of the trigger and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  17. Can Magnetic Coil Ease Tinnitus?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Go Back Sign up for VA Research Updates Technology Horizons Can magnetic coil ease tinnitus? VA trial ... help reduce the abnormal perception of sounds. The Food and Drug Administration approved the relatively painless treatment [ ...

  18. Adjustable Induction-Heating Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Rod; Bartolotta, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Improved design for induction-heating work coil facilitates optimization of heating in different metal specimens. Three segments adjusted independently to obtain desired distribution of temperature. Reduces time needed to achieve required temperature profiles.

  19. Zero-angle helical coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troendle, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Device is constructed of bimetallic stock material formed into segments of small diameters and fastened together by metal strips. Coil is useful in various types of actuators, such as temperature controls.

  20. 26 CFR 1.469-4T - Definition of activity (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Definition of activity (temporary). 1.469-4T Section 1.469-4T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxable Year for Which Deductions Taken § 1.469-4T Definition of activity (temporary). (a)...

  1. 17 CFR 240.11a1-4(T) - Bond transactions on national securities exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bond transactions on national securities exchanges. 240.11a1-4(T) Section 240.11a1-4(T) Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND....11a1-4(T) Bond transactions on national securities exchanges. A transaction in a bond, note,...

  2. The CMS integration grid testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Gregory E.

    2004-08-26

    The CMS Integration Grid Testbed (IGT) comprises USCMS Tier-1 and Tier-2 hardware at the following sites: the California Institute of Technology, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of California at San Diego, and the University of Florida at Gainesville. The IGT runs jobs using the Globus Toolkit with a DAGMan and Condor-G front end. The virtual organization (VO) is managed using VO management scripts from the European Data Grid (EDG). Gridwide monitoring is accomplished using local tools such as Ganglia interfaced into the Globus Metadata Directory Service (MDS) and the agent based Mona Lisa. Domain specific software is packaged and installed using the Distribution After Release (DAR) tool of CMS, while middleware under the auspices of the Virtual Data Toolkit (VDT) is distributed using Pacman. During a continuous two month span in Fall of 2002, over 1 million official CMS GEANT based Monte Carlo events were generated and returned to CERN for analysis while being demonstrated at SC2002. In this paper, we describe the process that led to one of the world's first continuously available, functioning grids.

  3. Upgrades for the CMS simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Lange, D. J.; Hildreth, M.; Ivantchenko, V. N.; ...

    2015-05-22

    Over the past several years, the CMS experiment has made significant changes to its detector simulation application. The geometry has been generalized to include modifications being made to the CMS detector for 2015 operations, as well as model improvements to the simulation geometry of the current CMS detector and the implementation of a number of approved and possible future detector configurations. These include both completely new tracker and calorimetry systems. We have completed the transition to Geant4 version 10, we have made significant progress in reducing the CPU resources required to run our Geant4 simulation. These have been achieved throughmore » both technical improvements and through numerical techniques. Substantial speed improvements have been achieved without changing the physics validation benchmarks that the experiment uses to validate our simulation application for use in production. As a result, we will discuss the methods that we implemented and the corresponding demonstrated performance improvements deployed for our 2015 simulation application.« less

  4. Nylon screws make inexpensive coil forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aucoin, G.; Rosenthal, C.

    1978-01-01

    Standard nylon screws act as coil form copper wire laid down in spiral thread. Completed coil may be bonded to printed-circuit board. However, it is impossible to tune coil by adjusting spacing between windings, technique sometimes used with air-core coils.

  5. Dynamics of liquid rope coiling.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mehdi; Maleki, Maniya; Golestanian, Ramin; Ribe, Neil M; Bonn, Daniel

    2006-12-01

    We present a combined experimental and numerical investigation of the coiling of a liquid "rope" falling on a solid surface, focusing on three little-explored aspects of the phenomenon: The time dependence of "inertio-gravitational" coiling, the systematic dependence of the radii of the coil and the rope on the experimental parameters, and the "secondary buckling" of the columnar structure generated by high-frequency coiling. Inertio-gravitational coiling is characterized by oscillations between states with different frequencies, and we present experimental observations of four distinct branches of such states in the frequency-fall height space. The transitions between coexisting states have no characteristic period, may take place with or without a change in the sense of rotation, and usually (but not always) occur via an intermediate "figure of eight" state. We present extensive laboratory measurements of the radii of the coil and of the rope within it, and show that they agree well with the predictions of a "slender-rope" numerical model. Finally, we use dimensional analysis to reveal a systematic variation of the critical column height for secondary buckling as a function of (dimensionless) flow rate and surface tension parameters.

  6. Equilibrium field coil concepts for INTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Strickler, D.J.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Brown, T.G.

    1981-08-01

    Methods are presented for reducing ampere-turn requirements in the EF coil system. It is shown that coil currents in an EF coil system external to the toroidal field coils can be substantially reduced by relaxing the triangularity of a D-shaped plasma. Further reductions are realized through a hybrid EF coil system using both internal and external coils. Equilibrium field coils for a poloidally asymmetric, single-null INTOR configuration are presented. It is shown that the shape of field lines in the plasma scrapeoff region and divertor channel improves as triangularity is reduced, but it does so at the possible expense of achievable stable beta values.

  7. Enabling opportunistic resources for CMS Computing Operations

    DOE PAGES

    Hufnagel, Dirk

    2015-12-23

    With the increased pressure on computing brought by the higher energy and luminosity from the LHC in Run 2, CMS Computing Operations expects to require the ability to utilize opportunistic resources resources not owned by, or a priori configured for CMS to meet peak demands. In addition to our dedicated resources we look to add computing resources from non CMS grids, cloud resources, and national supercomputing centers. CMS uses the HTCondor/glideinWMS job submission infrastructure for all its batch processing, so such resources will need to be transparently integrated into its glideinWMS pool. Bosco and parrot wrappers are used to enablemore » access and bring the CMS environment into these non CMS resources. Finally, we describe our strategy to supplement our native capabilities with opportunistic resources and our experience so far using them.« less

  8. Enabling opportunistic resources for CMS Computing Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Hufnagel, Dick

    2015-11-19

    With the increased pressure on computing brought by the higher energy and luminosity from the LHC in Run 2, CMS Computing Operations expects to require the ability to utilize “opportunistic” resources — resources not owned by, or a priori configured for CMS — to meet peak demands. In addition to our dedicated resources we look to add computing resources from non CMS grids, cloud resources, and national supercomputing centers. CMS uses the HTCondor/glideinWMS job submission infrastructure for all its batch processing, so such resources will need to be transparently integrated into its glideinWMS pool. Bosco and parrot wrappers are used to enable access and bring the CMS environment into these non CMS resources. Here we describe our strategy to supplement our native capabilities with opportunistic resources and our experience so far using them.

  9. Enabling opportunistic resources for CMS Computing Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufnagel, D.; CMS Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    With the increased pressure on computing brought by the higher energy and luminosity from the LHC in Run 2, CMS Computing Operations expects to require the ability to utilize opportunistic resources resources not owned by, or a priori configured for CMS to meet peak demands. In addition to our dedicated resources we look to add computing resources from non CMS grids, cloud resources, and national supercomputing centers. CMS uses the HTCondor/glideinWMS job submission infrastructure for all its batch processing, so such resources will need to be transparently integrated into its glideinWMS pool. Bosco and parrot wrappers are used to enable access and bring the CMS environment into these non CMS resources. Here we describe our strategy to supplement our native capabilities with opportunistic resources and our experience so far using them.

  10. Enabling opportunistic resources for CMS Computing Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Hufnagel, Dirk

    2015-12-23

    With the increased pressure on computing brought by the higher energy and luminosity from the LHC in Run 2, CMS Computing Operations expects to require the ability to utilize opportunistic resources resources not owned by, or a priori configured for CMS to meet peak demands. In addition to our dedicated resources we look to add computing resources from non CMS grids, cloud resources, and national supercomputing centers. CMS uses the HTCondor/glideinWMS job submission infrastructure for all its batch processing, so such resources will need to be transparently integrated into its glideinWMS pool. Bosco and parrot wrappers are used to enable access and bring the CMS environment into these non CMS resources. Finally, we describe our strategy to supplement our native capabilities with opportunistic resources and our experience so far using them.

  11. Coastal Modeling System (CMS) Users Manuel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    AD-A268 830 , INSTRUCTION REPORT CERC-91-1 COASTAL MODELING SYSTEM ( CMS ) USER’S MANUAL by Mary A. Cialone, David J. Mark, Lucia W. Chou, David A...THE COASTAL MODELING SYSTEM USER’S MANUAL Supplement 1 Issued August 1992 Enclosed are additions and corrections to the Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ...COVERED1 August 1992 Supplement I to September 1991 Manual 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ) User’s Manual WU

  12. The CMS Journey to LHC Physics

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-09

    An overview of the design, the construction and physics of CMS will be given. A history of construction, encompassing the R&D; and challenges faced over the last decade and a half, will be recalled using selected examples. CMS is currently in the final stages of installation and commissioning is gathering pace. After a short status report of where CMS stands today some of the expected (great) physics to come will be outlined. * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  13. The CMS Journey to LHC Physics

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    An overview of the design, the construction and physics of CMS will be given. A history of construction, encompassing the R&D; and challenges faced over the last decade and a half, will be recalled using selected examples. CMS is currently in the final stages of installation and commissioning is gathering pace. After a short status report of where CMS stands today some of the expected (great) physics to come will be outlined. * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  14. 42 CFR 422.510 - Termination of contract by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Termination of contract by CMS. 422.510 Section 422... Advantage Organizations § 422.510 Termination of contract by CMS. (a) Termination by CMS. CMS may at any time terminate a contract if CMS determines that the MA organization meets any of the following:...

  15. 42 CFR 422.510 - Termination of contract by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Termination of contract by CMS. 422.510 Section 422... Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.510 Termination of contract by CMS. (a) Termination by CMS. CMS may at any time terminate a contract if CMS determines that the MA organization meets any of...

  16. 42 CFR 423.509 - Termination of contract by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Termination of contract by CMS. 423.509 Section 423... and Contracts with Part D plan sponsors § 423.509 Termination of contract by CMS. (a) Termination by CMS. CMS may at any time terminate a contract if CMS determines that the Part D plan sponsor meets...

  17. 42 CFR 422.510 - Termination of contract by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Termination of contract by CMS. 422.510 Section 422... Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.510 Termination of contract by CMS. (a) Termination by CMS. CMS may at any time terminate a contract if CMS determines that the MA organization meets any of...

  18. 42 CFR 423.509 - Termination of contract by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Termination of contract by CMS. 423.509 Section 423... and Contracts with Part D plan sponsors § 423.509 Termination of contract by CMS. (a) Termination by CMS. CMS may at any time terminate a contract if CMS determines that the Part D plan sponsor meets...

  19. 42 CFR 423.509 - Termination of contract by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Termination of contract by CMS. 423.509 Section 423... Contracts with Part D plan sponsors § 423.509 Termination of contract by CMS. (a) Termination by CMS. CMS may at any time terminate a contract if CMS determines that the Part D plan sponsor meets any of...

  20. 42 CFR 422.510 - Termination of contract by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Termination of contract by CMS. 422.510 Section 422... Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.510 Termination of contract by CMS. (a) Termination by CMS. CMS may at any time terminate a contract if CMS determines that the MA organization meets any of...

  1. 45 CFR 150.203 - Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement. 150.203... CARE ACCESS CMS ENFORCEMENT IN GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL INSURANCE MARKETS CMS Enforcement Processes for... requiring CMS enforcement. CMS enforces PHS Act requirement to the extent warranted (as determined by...

  2. 42 CFR 422.510 - Termination of contract by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Termination of contract by CMS. 422.510 Section 422... Advantage Organizations § 422.510 Termination of contract by CMS. (a) Termination by CMS. CMS may at any time terminate a contract if CMS determines that the MA organization meets any of the following:...

  3. 42 CFR 423.509 - Termination of contract by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Termination of contract by CMS. 423.509 Section 423... and Contracts with Part D plan sponsors § 423.509 Termination of contract by CMS. (a) Termination by CMS. CMS may at any time terminate a contract if CMS determines that the Part D plan sponsor meets...

  4. 42 CFR 423.509 - Termination of contract by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Termination of contract by CMS. 423.509 Section 423... Contracts with Part D plan sponsors § 423.509 Termination of contract by CMS. (a) Termination by CMS. CMS may at any time terminate a contract if CMS determines that the Part D plan sponsor meets any of...

  5. 45 CFR 150.203 - Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement. 150.203... CARE ACCESS CMS ENFORCEMENT IN GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL INSURANCE MARKETS CMS Enforcement Processes for... requiring CMS enforcement. CMS enforces PHS Act requirement to the extent warranted (as determined by...

  6. MACSYMA at CMS. Version 309.3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    these examples are quite complicated. 1.1 Invoking Macsyma To use Macsvma on the CMS VAX you must first log in to the computer (see the System Manager ...1.8 C MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANOARDS-1963-A % JoI *ur~FILE LJ2 rCMS Technical Summary Report #88-3 f% MACSYMA AT CMS ...MACSYMA AT CMS . VERSION 309.3 Distribution/ W. Hereman, Y. Nagel and J. Strikwerda AvaIlcblflty Cces Technical Summary Report #88-3 ’Dist Sr~ci

  7. Computational analysis of residue contributions to coiled-coil topology.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Jorge; Lazaridis, Themis

    2011-11-01

    A variety of features are thought to contribute to the oligomeric and topological specificity of coiled coils. In previous work, we examined the determinants of oligomeric state. Here, we examine the energetic basis for the tendency of six coiled-coil peptides to align their α-helices in antiparallel orientation using molecular dynamics simulations with implicit solvation (EEF1.1). We also examine the effect of mutations known to disrupt the topology of these peptides. In agreement with experiment, ARG or LYS at a or d positions were found to stabilize the antiparallel configuration. The modeling suggests that this is not due to a-a' or d-d' repulsions but due to interactions with e' and g' residues. TRP at core positions also favors the antiparallel configuration. Residues that disfavor parallel dimers, such as ILE at d, are better tolerated in, and thus favor the antiparallel configuration. Salt bridge networks were found to be more stabilizing in the antiparallel configuration for geometric reasons: antiparallel helices point amino acid side chains in opposite directions. However, the structure with the largest number of salt bridges was not always the most stable, due to desolvation and configurational entropy contributions. In tetramers, the extent of stabilization of the antiparallel topology by core residues is influenced by the e' residue on a neighboring helix. Residues at b and c positions in some cases also contribute to stabilization of antiparallel tetramers. This work provides useful rules toward the goal of designing coiled coils with a well-defined and predictable three-dimensional structure.

  8. TGF-β receptor maintains CD4 T helper cell identity during chronic viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gavin M.; Wehrens, Ellen J.; Labarta-Bajo, Lara; Streeck, Hendrik; Zuniga, Elina I.

    2016-01-01

    Suppression of CD8 and CD4 T cells is a hallmark in chronic viral infections, including hepatitis C and HIV. While multiple pathways are known to inhibit CD8 T cells, the host molecules that restrict CD4 T cell responses are less understood. Here, we used inducible and CD4 T cell–specific deletion of the gene encoding the TGF-β receptor during chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection in mice, and determined that TGF-β signaling restricted proliferation and terminal differentiation of antiviral CD4 T cells. TGF-β signaling also inhibited a cytotoxic program that includes granzymes and perforin expression at both early and late stages of infection in vivo and repressed the transcription factor eomesodermin. Overexpression of eomesodermin was sufficient to recapitulate in great part the phenotype of TGF-β receptor–deficient CD4 T cells, while SMAD4 was necessary for CD4 T cell accumulation and differentiation. TGF-β signaling also restricted accumulation and differentiation of CD4 T cells and reduced the expression of cytotoxic molecules in mice and humans infected with other persistent viruses. These data uncovered an eomesodermin-driven CD4 T cell program that is continuously suppressed by TGF-β signaling. During chronic viral infection, this program limits CD4 T cell responses while maintaining CD4 T helper cell identity. PMID:27599295

  9. The structure of the GemC1 coiled coil and its interaction with the Geminin family of coiled-coil proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Caillat, Christophe; Fish, Alexander; Pefani, Dafni-Eleftheria; Taraviras, Stavros; Lygerou, Zoi; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2015-10-31

    The GemC1 coiled-coil structure has subtle differences compared with its homologues Geminin and Idas. Co-expression experiments in cells and biophysical stability analysis of the Geminin-family coiled coils suggest that the GemC1 coiled coil alone is unstable. GemC1, together with Idas and Geminin, an important regulator of DNA-replication licensing and differentiation decisions, constitute a superfamily sharing a homologous central coiled-coil domain. To better understand this family of proteins, the crystal structure of a GemC1 coiled-coil domain variant engineered for better solubility was determined to 2.2 Å resolution. GemC1 shows a less typical coiled coil compared with the Geminin homodimer and the Geminin–Idas heterodimer structures. It is also shown that both in vitro and in cells GemC1 interacts with Geminin through its coiled-coil domain, forming a heterodimer that is more stable that the GemC1 homodimer. Comparative analysis of the thermal stability of all of the possible superfamily complexes, using circular dichroism to follow the unfolding of the entire helix of the coiled coil, or intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of a unique conserved N-terminal tryptophan, shows that the unfolding of the coiled coil is likely to take place from the C-terminus towards the N-terminus. It is also shown that homodimers show a single-state unfolding, while heterodimers show a two-state unfolding, suggesting that the dimer first falls apart and the helices then unfold according to the stability of each protein. The findings argue that Geminin-family members form homodimers and heterodimers between them, and this ability is likely to be important for modulating their function in cycling and differentiating cells.

  10. Coiled tubing -- Operations and services

    SciTech Connect

    Sas-Jaworsky, A. II ); Blount, C.G. ); Tailby, R.J. )

    1993-06-01

    This paper reviews three industry authority's views on developments that will impact coiled tubing equipment and techniques for conventional land locations, Arctic and harsh offshore environments. Examples which are provided include the development of high-strength steels, composite pipe, integral lift devices, abrasive jet drilling, and extended reach drilling. It discusses the application of coiled tubing to well completion and maintenance, including the applications to plugged pipelines. The use of new steels and alloys help increase the corrosion resistance of the drilling stem along with greater load-bearing capacity. The economic advantages of coiled drilling versus jointed tubing drilling is somewhat more questionable as the cost for downhole motors and directional tools remain prohibitively high and borehole diameters remain small.

  11. Transient voltage oscillations in coils

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    Magnet coils may be excited into internal voltage oscillations by transient voltages. Such oscillations may electrically stress the magnet's dielectric components to many times its normal stress. This may precipitate a dielectric failure, and the attendant prolonged loss of service and costly repair work. Therefore, it is important to know the natural frequencies of oscillations of a magnet during the design stage, and to determine whether the expected switching transient voltages can excite the magnet into high-voltage internal oscillations. The series capacitance of a winding significantly affects its natural frequencies. However, the series capacitance is difficult to calculate, because it may comprise complex capacitance network, consisting of intra- and inter-coil turn-to-turn capacitances of the coil sections. A method of calculating the series capacitance of a winding is proposed. This method is rigorous but simple to execute. The time-varying transient voltages along the winding are also calculated.

  12. The CMS tracker control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierlamm, A.; Dirkes, G. H.; Fahrer, M.; Frey, M.; Hartmann, F.; Masetti, L.; Militaru, O.; Shah, S. Y.; Stringer, R.; Tsirou, A.

    2008-07-01

    The Tracker Control System (TCS) is a distributed control software to operate about 2000 power supplies for the silicon modules of the CMS Tracker and monitor its environmental sensors. TCS must thus be able to handle about 104 power supply parameters, about 103 environmental probes from the Programmable Logic Controllers of the Tracker Safety System (TSS), about 105 parameters read via DAQ from the DCUs in all front end hybrids and from CCUs in all control groups. TCS is built on top of an industrial SCADA program (PVSS) extended with a framework developed at CERN (JCOP) and used by all LHC experiments. The logical partitioning of the detector is reflected in the hierarchical structure of the TCS, where commands move down to the individual hardware devices, while states are reported up to the root which is interfaced to the broader CMS control system. The system computes and continuously monitors the mean and maximum values of critical parameters and updates the percentage of currently operating hardware. Automatic procedures switch off selected parts of the detector using detailed granularity and avoiding widespread TSS intervention.

  13. Bystander CD4+ T lymphocytes survive in HIV-infected human lymphoid tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grivel, Jean-Charles; Biancotto, Angelique; Ito, Yoshinori; Lima, Rosangela G.; Margolis, Leonid B.

    2003-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with depletion of CD4(+) T cells. The mechanisms of this phenomenon remain to be understood. In particular, it remains controversial whether and to what extent uninfected ("bystander") CD4(+) T cells die in HIV-infected individuals. We address this question using a system of human lymphoid tissue ex vivo. Tissue blocks were inoculated with HIV-1. After productive infection was established, they were treated with the reverse transcriptase inhibitor nevirapine to protect from infection those CD4(+) T cells that had not yet been infected. These CD4(+) T cells residing in HIV-infected tissue are by definition bystanders. Our results demonstrate that after nevirapine application the number of bystander CD4(+) T cells is conserved. Thus, in the context of HIV-infected human lymphoid tissue, productive HIV infection kills infected cells but is not sufficient to cause the death of a significant number of uninfected CD4(+) T cells.

  14. Electromagnetic Gun With Commutated Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David G.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed electromagnetic gun includes electromagnet coil, turns of which commutated in sequence along barrel. Electrical current fed to two armatures by brushes sliding on bus bars in barrel. Interaction between armature currents and magnetic field from coil produces force accelerating armature, which in turn, pushes on projectile. Commutation scheme chosen so magnetic field approximately coincides and moves with cylindrical region defined by armatures. Scheme has disadvantage of complexity, but in return, enables designer to increase driving magnetic field without increasing armature current. Attainable muzzle velocity increased substantially.

  15. Coiled tubing; Operations and services

    SciTech Connect

    Sas-Jaworsky, A. II )

    1991-12-01

    This article outlines the minimum safety requirements that should be considered for onshore and offshore oil well service operations with coiled tubing equipment. These guidelines comply with Minerals Management Service (MMS) regulations issued on May 31, 1988, for offshore work. Where specific MMS regulations are sited, the regulation reference, Incident of Non-Compliance (INC), number is provided. These guidelines can be used by operators and contractors, and although U.S. offshore operations are emphasized, they are applicable wherever coiled tubing services are used.

  16. 23 CFR 500.109 - CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false CMS. 500.109 Section 500.109 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING SYSTEMS Management Systems § 500.109 CMS. (a) For purposes of this part, congestion means the level...

  17. 23 CFR 500.109 - CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false CMS. 500.109 Section 500.109 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING SYSTEMS Management Systems § 500.109 CMS. (a) For purposes of this part, congestion means the level...

  18. 23 CFR 500.109 - CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false CMS. 500.109 Section 500.109 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING SYSTEMS Management Systems § 500.109 CMS. (a) For purposes of this part, congestion means the level...

  19. 23 CFR 500.109 - CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false CMS. 500.109 Section 500.109 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING SYSTEMS Management Systems § 500.109 CMS. (a) For purposes of this part, congestion means the level...

  20. 23 CFR 500.109 - CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false CMS. 500.109 Section 500.109 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING SYSTEMS Management Systems § 500.109 CMS. (a) For purposes of this part, congestion means the level...

  1. The status of the CMS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Dan; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The CMS experiment was completely assembled in the fall of 2008 after a decade of design, construction and installation. During the last two years, cosmic ray data were taken on a regular basis. These data have enabled CMS to align the detector components, both spatially and temporally. Initial use of muons has also established the relative alignment of the CMS tracking and muon systems. In addition, the CMS calorimetry has been crosschecked with test beam data, thus providing an initial energy calibration of CMS calorimetry to about 5%. The CMS magnet has been powered and field mapped. The trigger and data acquisition systems have been installed and run at full speed. The tiered data analysis system has been exercised at full design bandwidth for Tier0, Tier1 and Tier2 sites. Monte Carlo simulation of the CMS detector has been constructed at a detailed geometric level and has been tuned to test beam and other production data to provide a realistic model of the CMS detector prior to first collisions.

  2. CMS: Present status, limitations, and upgrade plans

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, H.W.K.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    An overview of the CMS upgrade plans will be presented. A brief status of the CMS detector will be given, covering some of the issues we have so far experienced. This will be followed by an overview of the various CMS upgrades planned, covering the main motivations for them, and the various R&D efforts for the possibilities under study. The CMS detector has been working extremely well since the start of data-taking at the LHC as is evidenced by the numerous excellent results published by CMS and presented at this workshop and recent conferences. Less well documented are the various issues that have been encountered with the detector. In the spirit of this workshop I will cover some of these issues with particular emphasis on problems that motivate some of the upgrades to the CMS detector for this decade of data-taking. Though the CMS detector has been working extremely well and expectations are great for making the most of the LHC luminosity, there have been a number of issues encountered so far. Some of these have been described and while none currently presents a problem for physics performance, some of them are expected to become more problematic, especially at the highest Phase 1 luminosities for which the majority of the integrated luminosity will be collected. These motivate upgrades for various parts of the CMS detector so that the current excellent physics performance can be maintained or even surpassed in the realm of the highest Phase 1 luminosities.

  3. The diverse use of clouds by CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Andronis, Anastasios; Bauer, Daniela; Chaze, Olivier; Colling, David; Dobson, Marc; Fayer, Simon; Girone, Maria; Grandi, Claudio; Huffman, Adam; Hufnagel, Dirk; Khan, Farrukh Aftab; Lahiff, Andrew; McCrae, Alison; Rand, Duncan; Sgaravatto, Massimo; Tiradani, Anthony; Zhang, Xiaomei

    2015-12-23

    The resources CMS is using are increasingly being offered as clouds. In Run 2 of the LHC the majority of CMS CERN resources, both in Meyrin and at the Wigner Computing Centre, will be presented as cloud resources on which CMS will have to build its own infrastructure. This infrastructure will need to run all of the CMS workflows including: Tier 0, production and user analysis. In addition, the CMS High Level Trigger will provide a compute resource comparable in scale to the total offered by the CMS Tier 1 sites, when it is not running as part of the trigger system. During these periods a cloud infrastructure will be overlaid on this resource, making it accessible for general CMS use. Finally, CMS is starting to utilise cloud resources being offered by individual institutes and is gaining experience to facilitate the use of opportunistically available cloud resources. Lastly, we present a snap shot of this infrastructure and its operation at the time of the CHEP2015 conference.

  4. The diverse use of clouds by CMS

    DOE PAGES

    Andronis, Anastasios; Bauer, Daniela; Chaze, Olivier; ...

    2015-12-23

    The resources CMS is using are increasingly being offered as clouds. In Run 2 of the LHC the majority of CMS CERN resources, both in Meyrin and at the Wigner Computing Centre, will be presented as cloud resources on which CMS will have to build its own infrastructure. This infrastructure will need to run all of the CMS workflows including: Tier 0, production and user analysis. In addition, the CMS High Level Trigger will provide a compute resource comparable in scale to the total offered by the CMS Tier 1 sites, when it is not running as part of themore » trigger system. During these periods a cloud infrastructure will be overlaid on this resource, making it accessible for general CMS use. Finally, CMS is starting to utilise cloud resources being offered by individual institutes and is gaining experience to facilitate the use of opportunistically available cloud resources. Lastly, we present a snap shot of this infrastructure and its operation at the time of the CHEP2015 conference.« less

  5. Getting Started with Drupal WebCMS

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Drupal WebCMS is accessible to EPA employees, and to onsite and offsite contractors. There are several roles in Drupal WebCMS and each allows a certain set of actions in the system. Users can have different roles in different web areas.

  6. Final Technical Report CMS fast optical calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, David R.

    2012-07-12

    This is the final report of CMS FAST OPTICAL CALORIMETRY, a grant to Fairfield University for development, construction, installation and operation of the forward calorimeter on CMS, and for upgrades of the forward and endcap calorimeters for higher luminosity and radiation damage amelioration.

  7. The Status of the Cms Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Dan

    The CMS experiment was completely assembled in the fall of 2008 after a decade of design, construction and installation. During the last two years, cosmic ray data were taken on a regular basis. These data have enabled CMS to align the detector components, both spatially and temporally. Initial use of muons has also established the relative alignment of the CMS tracking and muon systems. In addition, the CMS calorimetry has been crosschecked with test beam data, thus providing an initial energy calibration of CMS calorimetry to about 5%. The CMS magnet has been powered and field mapped. The trigger and data acquisition systems have been installed and run at full speed. The tiered data analysis system has been exercised at full design bandwidth for Tier0, Tier1 and Tier2 sites. Monte Carlo simulation of the CMS detector has been constructed at a detailed geometric level and has been tuned to test beam and other production data to provide a realistic model of the CMS detector prior to first collisions.

  8. [Two Cases of Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysm Complicated with Delayed Coil Protrusion after Coil Embolization].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takashi; Ogata, Atsushi; Ebashi, Ryo; Takase, Yukinori; Masuoka, Jun; Kawashima, Masatou; Abe, Tatsuya

    2016-07-01

    We report two cases of delayed coil protrusion after coil embolization for ruptured cerebral aneurysms. Case 1:An 82-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured small anterior communicating artery aneurysm underwent successful coil embolization. Eighteen days after the procedure, coil protrusion from the aneurysm into the right anterior cerebral artery was observed without any symptoms. Further coil protrusion did not develop after 28 days. Case 2:A 78-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured small left middle cerebral artery aneurysm underwent successful coil embolization. Twenty days after the procedure, coil protrusion from the aneurysm into the left middle cerebral artery was observed, with a transient ischemic attack. Further coil protrusion did not develop. Both patients recovered with antithrombotic treatment. Even though delayed coil protrusion after coil embolization is rare, it should be recognized as a long-term complication of coil embolization for cerebral aneurysms.

  9. Small animal simultaneous PET/MRI: initial experiences in a 9.4T microMRI

    SciTech Connect

    Maramraju, S.H.; Schlyer, D.; Maramraju, S.H.; Smith, S.D.; Junnarkar, S.S.; Schulz, D.; Stoll, S.; Ravindranath, B.; Purschke, M.L.; Rescia, S.; Southekal, S.; Pratte, J.-F.; Vaska, P.; Woody, C.L.; Schlyer, D.J.

    2011-03-25

    We developed a non-magnetic positron-emission tomography (PET) device based on the rat conscious animal PET that operates in a small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, thereby enabling us to carry out simultaneous PET/MRI studies. The PET detector comprises 12 detector blocks, each being a 4 x 8 array of lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals (2.22 x 2.22 x 5 mm{sup 3}) coupled to a matching non-magnetic avalanche photodiode array. The detector blocks, housed in a plastic case, form a 38 mm inner diameter ring with an 18 mm axial extent. Custom-built MRI coils fit inside the positron-emission tomography (PET) device, operating in transceiver mode. The PET insert is integrated with a Bruker 9.4 T 210 mm clear-bore diameter MRI scanner. We acquired simultaneous PET/MR images of phantoms, of in vivo rat brain, and of cardiac-gated mouse heart using [{sup 11}C]raclopride and 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-d-glucose PET radiotracers. There was minor interference between the PET electronics and the MRI during simultaneous operation, and small effects on the signal-to-noise ratio in the MR images in the presence of the PET, but no noticeable visual artifacts. Gradient echo and high-duty-cycle spin echo radio frequency (RF) pulses resulted in a 7% and a 28% loss in PET counts, respectively, due to high PET counts during the RF pulses that had to be gated out. The calibration of the activity concentration of PET data during MR pulsing is reproducible within less than 6%. Our initial results demonstrate the feasibility of performing simultaneous PET and MRI studies in adult rats and mice using the same PET insert in a small-bore 9.4 T MRI.

  10. Small animal simultaneous PET/MRI: initial experiences in a 9.4 T microMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsha Maramraju, Sri; Smith, S. David; Junnarkar, Sachin S.; Schulz, Daniela; Stoll, Sean; Ravindranath, Bosky; Purschke, Martin L.; Rescia, Sergio; Southekal, Sudeepti; Pratte, Jean-François; Vaska, Paul; Woody, Craig L.; Schlyer, David J.

    2011-04-01

    We developed a non-magnetic positron-emission tomography (PET) device based on the rat conscious animal PET that operates in a small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, thereby enabling us to carry out simultaneous PET/MRI studies. The PET detector comprises 12 detector blocks, each being a 4 × 8 array of lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals (2.22 × 2.22 × 5 mm3) coupled to a matching non-magnetic avalanche photodiode array. The detector blocks, housed in a plastic case, form a 38 mm inner diameter ring with an 18 mm axial extent. Custom-built MRI coils fit inside the positron-emission tomography (PET) device, operating in transceiver mode. The PET insert is integrated with a Bruker 9.4 T 210 mm clear-bore diameter MRI scanner. We acquired simultaneous PET/MR images of phantoms, of in vivo rat brain, and of cardiac-gated mouse heart using [11C]raclopride and 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose PET radiotracers. There was minor interference between the PET electronics and the MRI during simultaneous operation, and small effects on the signal-to-noise ratio in the MR images in the presence of the PET, but no noticeable visual artifacts. Gradient echo and high-duty-cycle spin echo radio frequency (RF) pulses resulted in a 7% and a 28% loss in PET counts, respectively, due to high PET counts during the RF pulses that had to be gated out. The calibration of the activity concentration of PET data during MR pulsing is reproducible within less than 6%. Our initial results demonstrate the feasibility of performing simultaneous PET and MRI studies in adult rats and mice using the same PET insert in a small-bore 9.4 T MRI.

  11. TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 expression in human CD4+ T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Hayley G.; Roostalu, Urmas; Walter, Gina J.; Gullick, Nicola J.; Frederiksen, Klaus S.; Roberts, Ceri A.; Sumner, Jonathan; Baeten, Dominique L.; Gerwien, Jens G.; Cope, Andrew P.; Geissmann, Frederic; Kirkham, Bruce W.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2014-02-01

    IL-17+ CD4+ T (Th17) cells contribute to the pathogenesis of several human inflammatory diseases. Here we demonstrate that TNF inhibitor (TNFi) drugs induce the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. TNFi-mediated induction of IL-10 in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells is Treg-/Foxp3-independent, requires IL-10 and is overcome by IL-1β. TNFi-exposed IL-17+ CD4+ T cells are molecularly and functionally distinct, with a unique gene signature characterized by expression of IL10 and IKZF3 (encoding Aiolos). We show that Aiolos binds conserved regions in the IL10 locus in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, IKZF3 and IL10 expression levels correlate in primary CD4+ T cells and Aiolos overexpression is sufficient to drive IL10 in these cells. Our data demonstrate that TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including Th17 cells and suggest a role for the transcription factor Aiolos in the regulation of IL-10 in CD4+ T cells.

  12. ESTABLISHING MEAN CD4+ T CELL VALUES AMONG HEALTHY JAVANESE ADULTS IN INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, Afiono Agung; Zaini, Khilyat Ulin Nur

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to establish mean CD4+ T cell values among healthy Javanese adults in Indonesia. Two hundred forty-one healthy adults (119 women and 122 men), aged 18-65 years, were enrolled in the study. CD4+ T cells were analyzed by immunophenotyping. The mean absolute CD4+ T cell count was 753.3 ± 270.3 cells/µl (median = 725.0 cells/µl) and the mean CD4+ T cell percentage was 32.6 ± 7.7%, (median = 31.0%). Women had a slightly higher mean absolute CD4+ T cell count and CD4+ T cell percentage (779.1 ± 271.0 cells/ µl; 33.4 ± 8.2%) than men (728.2 ± 268.3 cells/µl; 31.8 ± 7.1%), but the differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.126, p = 0.216, respectively). The mean absolute CD4+ T cell varied significantly by age group (p = 0.002). Sixty-one point seven percent of men studied (37/60) had a CD4+ T cell count less than 500 cells/µl (OR 1.8; 95% CI = 1.001-3.300). Absolute CD4+ T cell counts among Javanese Indonesians varied significantly by age.

  13. Divergent CD4+ T memory stem cell dynamics in pathogenic and nonpathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infections.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Emily K; McGary, Colleen S; Cervasi, Barbara; Micci, Luca; Lawson, Benton; Elliott, Sarah T C; Collman, Ronald G; Bosinger, Steven E; Paiardini, Mirko; Vanderford, Thomas H; Chahroudi, Ann; Silvestri, Guido

    2014-05-15

    Recent studies have identified a subset of memory T cells with stem cell-like properties (T(SCM)) that include increased longevity and proliferative potential. In this study, we examined the dynamics of CD4(+) T(SCM) during pathogenic SIV infection of rhesus macaques (RM) and nonpathogenic SIV infection of sooty mangabeys (SM). Whereas SIV-infected RM show selective numeric preservation of CD4(+) T(SCM), SIV infection induced a complex perturbation of these cells defined by depletion of CD4(+)CCR5(+) T(SCM), increased rates of CD4(+) T(SCM) proliferation, and high levels of direct virus infection. The increased rates of CD4(+) T(SCM) proliferation in SIV-infected RM correlated inversely with the levels of central memory CD4(+) T cells. In contrast, nonpathogenic SIV infection of SM evidenced preservation of both CD4(+) T(SCM) and CD4(+) central memory T cells, with normal levels of CD4(+) T(SCM) proliferation, and lack of selective depletion of CD4(+)CCR5(+) T(SCM). Importantly, SIV DNA was below the detectable limit in CD4(+) T(SCM) from 8 of 10 SIV-infected SM. We propose that increased proliferation and infection of CD4(+) T(SCM) may contribute to the pathogenesis of SIV infection in RM.

  14. A MRI rotary phased array head coil.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing Keong; Weber, Ewald; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-08-01

    A new rotary phased array (RPA) head coil that can provide homogenous brain images comparable to volumetric radiofrequency coils is proposed for magnetic resonance brain imaging applications. The design of the RPA head coil is a departure from conventional circumferential array design method, as coil elements of the RPA head coil have a "paddle-like" structure consisting of a pair of main conductors located on opposite sides, inserted equi-angularly around and over the head. A prototype 2T receive-only 4-element RPA head coil was constructed and experimentally tested against a conventional receive-only 4-element phased array head coil and a commercial receive-only quadrature birdcage head coil. Homogenous phantom images acquired by the RPA head coil show that signal intensity deep at the center of the phantom was improved as compared to the conventional phased array head coil and this improvement allow the RPA head coil to acquire homogenous brain images similar to brain images acquired with the birdcage head coil. In addition, partial parallel imaging was used in conjunction with the RPA head coil to enable rapid imaging.

  15. Coil Embolization for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of coil embolization compared with surgical clipping to treat intracranial aneurysms. The Technology Endovascular coil embolization is a percutaneous approach to treat an intracranial aneurysm from within the blood vessel without the need of a craniotomy. In this procedure, a microcatheter is inserted into the femoral artery near the groin and navigated to the site of the aneurysm. Small helical platinum coils are deployed through the microcatheter to fill the aneurysm, and prevent it from further expansion and rupture. Health Canada has approved numerous types of coils and coil delivery systems to treat intracranial aneurysms. The most favoured are controlled detachable coils. Coil embolization may be used with other adjunct endovascular devices such as stents and balloons. Background Intracranial Aneurysms Intracranial aneurysms are the dilation or ballooning of part of a blood vessel in the brain. Intracranial aneurysms range in size from small (<12 mm in diameter) to large (12–25 mm), and to giant (>25 mm). There are 3 main types of aneurysms. Fusiform aneurysms involve the entire circumference of the artery; saccular aneurysms have outpouchings; and dissecting aneurysms have tears in the arterial wall. Berry aneurysms are saccular aneurysms with well-defined necks. Intracranial aneurysms may occur in any blood vessel of the brain; however, they are most commonly found at the branch points of large arteries that form the circle of Willis at the base of the brain. In 85% to 95% of patients, they are found in the anterior circulation. Aneurysms in the posterior circulation are less frequent, and are more difficult to treat surgically due to inaccessibility. Most intracranial aneurysms are small and asymptomatic. Large aneurysms may have a mass effect, causing compression on the brain and cranial nerves and neurological deficits. When an intracranial aneurysm ruptures and bleeds

  16. SKIROC2_CMS an ASIC for testing CMS HGCAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, J.; Callier, S.; Coko, D.; Dulucq, F.; de La Taille, C.; Raux, L.; Sculac, T.; Thienpont, D.

    2017-02-01

    SKIROC2_CMS is a chip derived from CALICE SKIROC2 that provides 64 channels of low noise charge preamplifiers optimized for 50 pF pin diodes and 10 pC dynamic range. They are followed by high gain and low gain 25 ns shapers, a 13-deep 40 MHz analog memory used as a waveform sampler at 40 MHz. and 12-bit ADCs. A fast shaper followed by discriminator and TDC provide timing information to an accuracy of 50 ps, in order to test TOT and TOA techniques at system level and in test-beam. The chip was sent to fabrication in January 2016 in AMS SiGe 0,35 μm and was received in May. It was tested in the lab during the summer and will be mounted on sensors for beam-tests in the fall.

  17. Finite element coiled cochlea model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isailovic, Velibor; Nikolic, Milica; Milosevic, Zarko; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Radovic, Milos; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Cochlea is important part of the hearing system, and thanks to special structure converts external sound waves into neural impulses which go to the brain. Shape of the cochlea is like snail, so geometry of the cochlea model is complex. The simplified cochlea coiled model was developed using finite element method inside SIFEM FP7 project. Software application is created on the way that user can prescribe set of the parameters for spiral cochlea, as well as material properties and boundary conditions to the model. Several mathematical models were tested. The acoustic wave equation for describing fluid in the cochlea chambers - scala vestibuli and scala timpani, and Newtonian dynamics for describing vibrations of the basilar membrane are used. The mechanical behavior of the coiled cochlea was analyzed and the third chamber, scala media, was not modeled because it does not have a significant impact on the mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Future work is needed for more realistic geometry model. Coiled model of the cochlea was created and results are compared with initial simplified coiled model of the cochlea.

  18. Coiled tubing; Operations and services

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.L. ); Whitlow, R.R. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper reports that pulling tubing to clean out a production liner at Prudhoe Bay Unit Western Operating Area (PBU WOA) averages $600,000 to $800,000. Coiled tubing underreaming was developed to accomplish this objective at lower costs. Beginning in 1988, these operations have been improved through several generations of procedures and tool designs. Using current technology, the underreamer, in conjunction with coiled tubing, can reduce the cost of drilling out to a liner to about $50,000 or $100,000, depending on the amount and type of material to be removed. PBU WOA, operated by BP Exploration, produces about 600,000 bopd from 395 wells. Another 61 wells are used to inject produced water, seawater and miscible fluids. Most of the remedial well servicing operations are conducted using coiled tubing (CT). Three contract coiled tubing units (CTUs) work daily, performing wellbore cleanouts, stimulations, inflatable bridge plug installations and cement squeeze operations. About 42 underreaming jobs were performed from 1990 to 1991 at PBU WOA for an average cost of between $75,000 and $100,000, a cost savings of $500,000 power well compared to pulling tubing and cleaning out the wells conventionally.

  19. Pulsed COIL initiated by discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuryshev, Nikolai N.

    2004-06-01

    Pulsed mode makes COIL possible to produce pulses which power can significantly exceed that of CW COIL mode at the same flowrate of chemicals. Such a mode can find application in material treatment, in drilling for oil wells, as an optical locator, in laser frequency conversion via non-linear processes, in laser propulsion, etc. The method of volume generation of iodine atoms was shown to be the most effective one in generation of high power pulses. The base of method is substitution of molecular iodine in operation mixture for iodide which is stable in the mixture with singlet oxygen, and subsequent forced dissociation of iodide. In this approach the advantage of direct I-atom injection in laser active medium is demonstrated. The comparison of experimental results obtained with different sources used for iodide dissociation shows the electric discharge provides significantly higher electrical laser efficiency in comparison with photolysis initiation. At the same time, the specific energy of the electric discharge initiated COIL is at disadvantage in relation with that obtained with photolysis initiation. This fact is a result of active medium temperature increase due to insufficient initiation selectivity of electric discharge. Both longitudinal and transverse electric discharges were investigated as possible sources for laser initiation. The transverse discharge is more promising for increased operation pressure of active medium. The operation pressure is limited by dark reaction of iodide with singlet delta oxygen. The repetitively pulsed operation with repetition rate of up to 75 Hz of pulsed COIL is demonstrated.

  20. Wedding ring shaped excitation coil

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency.

  1. Coupled coils, magnets and Lenz's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Frank

    2010-03-01

    Great scientists in the past have experimented with coils and magnets. Here we have a variation where coupling occurs between two coils and the oscillatory motion of two magnets to give somewhat surprising results.

  2. Alternating current losses in superconducting coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wipf, S. L.; Guderjahn, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    Report examines relationship between coil loss and frequency and heat loss in coil as a function of the magnetic field H. Information is of value to manufacturers of superconducting magnets, motors and generators.

  3. Coupled Coils, Magnets and Lenz's Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Great scientists in the past have experimented with coils and magnets. Here we have a variation where coupling occurs between two coils and the oscillatory motion of two magnets to give somewhat surprising results. (Contains 6 figures and 1 footnote.)

  4. Differential T cell receptor-mediated signaling in naive and memory CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Farber, D L; Acuto, O; Bottomly, K

    1997-08-01

    Naive and memory CD4 T cells differ in cell surface phenotype, function, activation requirements, and modes of regulation. To investigate the molecular bases for the dichotomies between naive and memory CD4 T cells and to understand how the T cell receptor (TCR) directs diverse functional outcomes, we investigated proximal signaling events triggered through the TCR/CD3 complex in naive and memory CD4 T cell subsets isolated on the basis of CD45 isoform expression. Naive CD4 T cells signal through TCR/CD3 similar to unseparated CD4 T cells, producing multiple tyrosine-phosphorylated protein species overall and phosphorylating the T cell-specific ZAP-70 tyrosine kinase which is recruited to the CD3zeta subunit of the TCR. Memory CD4 T cells, however, exhibit a unique pattern of signaling through TCR/CD3. Following stimulation through TCR/CD3, memory CD4 T cells produce fewer species of tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates and fail to phosphorylate ZAP-70, yet unphosphorylated ZAP-70 can associate with the TCR/CD3 complex. Moreover, a 26/28-kDa phosphorylated doublet is associated with CD3zeta in resting and activated memory but not in naive CD4 T cells. Despite these differences in the phosphorylation of ZAP-70 and CD3-associated proteins, the ZAP-70-related kinase, p72syk, exhibits similar phosphorylation in naive and memory T cell subsets, suggesting that this kinase could function in place of ZAP-70 in memory CD4 T cells. These results indicate that proximal signals are differentially coupled to the TCR in naive versus memory CD4 T cells, potentially leading to distinct downstream signaling events and ultimately to the diverse functions elicited by these two CD4 T cell subsets.

  5. The CD4+ T cell methylome contributes to a distinct CD4+ T cell transcriptional signature in Mycobacterium bovis-infected cattle

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Rachael; Whiston, Ronan; Cormican, Paul; Finlay, Emma K.; Couldrey, Christine; Brady, Colm; O’Farrelly, Cliona; Meade, Kieran G.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesised that epigenetic regulation of CD4+ T lymphocytes contributes to a shift toward a dysfunctional T cell phenotype which may impact on their ability to clear mycobacterial infection. Combined RNA-seq transcriptomic profiling and Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing identified 193 significantly differentially expressed genes and 760 differentially methylated regions (DMRs), between CD4+ T cells from M. bovis infected and healthy cattle. 196 DMRs were located within 10 kb of annotated genes, including GATA3 and RORC, both of which encode transcription factors that promote TH2 and TH17 T helper cell subsets respectively. Gene-specific DNA methylation and gene expression levels for the TNFRSF4 and Interferon-γ genes were significantly negatively correlated suggesting a regulatory relationship. Pathway analysis of DMRs identified enrichment of genes involved in the anti-proliferative TGF-β signaling pathway and TGFB1 expression was significantly increased in peripheral blood leukocytes from TB-infected cattle. This first analysis of the bovine CD4+ T cell methylome suggests that DNA methylation directly contributes to a distinct gene expression signature in CD4+ T cells from cattle infected with M. bovis. Specific methylation changes proximal to key inflammatory gene loci may be critical to the emergence of a non-protective CD4+ T cell response during mycobacterial infection in cattle. PMID:27507428

  6. Coiled tubing solves multiple downhole problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, S. ); Smith, I. )

    1994-11-01

    Declining reservoir pressure and water breakthrough in the UK North Sea Magnus field has coincided with general advances in application of coiled tubing and a continuous drive to reduce operating costs, particularly in a climate of weak oil prices. These factors have led to a dramatic increase in diversity and volume of coiled tubing interventions. In the following article, coiled tubing interventions, and results of those interventions, are discussed. An assessment of future coiled tubing activity on Magnus field is provided.

  7. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Snitchler, Gregory L.; Gamble, Bruce B.; Voccio, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  8. Bow-shaped toroidal field coils

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanos, P.

    1981-05-01

    Design features of Bow-Shaped Toroidal Field Coils are described and compared with circular and D shaped coils. The results indicate that bow coils can produce higher field strengths, store more energy and be made demountable. The design offers the potential for the production of ultrahigh toroidal fields. Included are representative coil shapes and their engineering properties, a suggested structural design and an analysis of a specific case.

  9. Multi-Canted Coils, Tubes, and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaster, Mark L. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Coil, tube, and other structures configured with a plurality of individual coils, internal structures, legs or extensions with each having multiple cants per coil, internal structure, leg or extension, and wherein the cants formed therein allow for a load-deflection force when each is compressed. In addition, any horizontal or moment forces are substantially reduced and/or eliminated when a downward vertical force is applied, as minimal or no torsion is created in the individual coils, legs or extensions.

  10. CMS results on multijet correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Safronov, Grigory

    2015-04-10

    We present recent CMS measurements on multijet correlations using forward and low-p{sub T} jets, focusing on searches for BFKL and saturation phenomena. In pp collisions at √(s)=7 TeV, azimuthal correlations in dijets separated in rapidity by up to 9.4 units were measured. The results are compared to BFKL- and DGLAP-based predictions. In pp collisions at √(s)=8 TeV, cross sections for jets with p{sub T} > 21 GeV and |y| < 4.7, and for track-jets with p{sub T} > 1 GeV (minijets) are presented. The minijet results are sensitive to the bound imposed by the total inelastic cross section, and are compared to various models for taming the growth of the 2 → 2 cross section at low p{sub T}.

  11. Split Coil Forms for Rotary Transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T.

    1982-01-01

    Split cores for rotor and stator windings of rotary transformer mounted around their respective coils (which are in bobbins) and cemented together. This arrangement simplifies winding of stator coil to go in a slot in inner diameter of stator coil. One practical application of rotary transformers fabricated according to this technique is for centrifuges, in which conventional sliprings are of uncertain reliability.

  12. Inductively coupled wireless RF coil arrays.

    PubMed

    Bulumulla, S B; Fiveland, E; Park, K J; Foo, T K; Hardy, C J

    2015-04-01

    As the number of coils increases in multi-channel MRI receiver-coil arrays, RF cables and connectors become increasingly bulky and heavy, degrading patient comfort and slowing workflow. Inductive coupling of signals provides an attractive "wireless" approach, with the potential to reduce coil weight and cost while simplifying patient setup. In this work, multi-channel inductively coupled anterior arrays were developed and characterized for 1.5T imaging. These comprised MR receiver coils inductively (or "wirelessly") linked to secondary or "sniffer" coils whose outputs were transmitted via preamps to the MR system cabinet. The induced currents in the imaging coils were blocked by passive diode circuits during RF transmit. The imaging arrays were totally passive, obviating the need to deliver power to the coils, and providing lightweight, untethered signal reception with easily positioned coils. Single-shot fast spin echo images were acquired from 5 volunteers using a 7-element inductively coupled coil array and a conventionally cabled 7-element coil array of identical geometry, with the inductively-coupled array showing a relative signal-to-noise ratio of 0.86 +/- 0.07. The concept was extended to a larger 9-element coil array to demonstrate the effect of coil element size on signal transfer and RF-transmit blocking.

  13. RNA-Seq Transcriptome Analysis of Direction-Selective T4/T5 Neurons in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pankova, Katarina; Borst, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal computation underlying detection of visual motion has been studied for more than a half-century. In Drosophila, direction-selective T4/T5 neurons show supralinear signal amplification in response to stimuli moving in their preferred direction, in agreement with the prediction made by the Hassenstein-Reichardt detector. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism explaining how the Hassenstein-Reichardt model is implemented in T4/T5 cells has not been identified yet. In the present study, we utilized cell type-specific transcriptome profiling with RNA-seq to obtain a complete gene expression profile of T4/T5 neurons. We analyzed the expression of genes that affect neuronal computational properties and can underlie the molecular implementation of the core features of the Hassenstein-Reichardt model to the dendrites of T4/T5 neurons. Furthermore, we used the acquired RNA-seq data to examine the neurotransmitter system used by T4/T5 neurons. Surprisingly, we observed co-expression of the cholinergic markers and the vesicular GABA transporter in T4/T5 neurons. We verified the previously undetected expression of vesicular GABA transporter in T4/T5 cells using VGAT-LexA knock-in line. The provided gene expression dataset can serve as a useful source for studying the properties of direction-selective T4/T5 neurons on the molecular level. PMID:27684367

  14. Polyfunctional cytokine responses by central memory CD4+T cells in response to bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD4 T cells are crucial in immunity to tuberculosis (TB). Polyfunctional CD4 T cells simultaneously produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including human TB and HIV. Mycobacterium ...

  15. Polyfunctional cytokine responses by central memory CD4*T cells in response to bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD4 T cells are crucial in immunity to tuberculosis (TB). Polyfunctional CD4 T cells simultaneously produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including human TB. Mycobacterium bovis in...

  16. Chronic exposure to trichloroethylene increases DNA methylation of the Ifng promoter in CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; Blossom, Sarah J; Erickson, Stephen W; Broadfoot, Brannon; West, Kirk; Bai, Shasha; Li, Jingyun; Cooney, Craig A

    2016-10-17

    CD4(+) T cells in female MRL+/+ mice exposed to solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) skew toward effector/memory CD4(+) T cells, and demonstrate seemingly non-monotonic alterations in IFN-γ production. In the current study we examined the mechanism for this immunotoxicity using effector/memory and naïve CD4(+) T cells isolated every 6 weeks during a 40 week exposure to TCE (0.5mg/ml in drinking water). A time-dependent effect of TCE exposure on both Ifng gene expression and IFN-γ protein production was observed in effector/memory CD4(+) T cells, with an increase after 22 weeks of exposure and a decrease after 40 weeks of exposure. No such effect of TCE was observed in naïve CD4(+) T cells. A cumulative increase in DNA methylation in the CpG sites of the promoter of the Ifng gene was observed in effector/memory, but not naïve, CD4(+) T cells over time. Also unique to the Ifng promoter was an increase in methylation variance in effector/memory compared to naïve CD4(+) T cells. Taken together, the CpG sites of the Ifng promoter in effector/memory CD4(+) T cells were especially sensitive to the effects of TCE exposure, which may help explain the regulatory effect of the chemical on this gene.

  17. Selective culling of high avidity antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Ertelt, James M; Johanns, Tanner M; Mysz, Margaret A; Nanton, Minelva R; Rowe, Jared H; Aguilera, Marijo N; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-12-01

    Typhoid fever is a persistent infection caused by host-adapted Salmonella strains adept at circumventing immune-mediated host defences. Given the importance of T cells in protection, the culling of activated CD4+ T cells after primary infection has been proposed as a potential immune evasion strategy used by this pathogen. We demonstrate that the purging of activated antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection requires SPI-2 encoded virulence determinants, and is not restricted only to cells with specificity to Salmonella-expressed antigens, but extends to CD4+ T cells primed to expand by co-infection with recombinant Listeria monocytogenes. Unexpectedly, however, the loss of activated CD4+ T cells during Salmonella infection demonstrated using a monoclonal population of adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells was not reproduced among the endogenous repertoire of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells identified with MHC class II tetramer. Analysis of T-cell receptor variable segment usage revealed the selective loss and reciprocal enrichment of defined CD4+ T-cell subsets after Salmonella co-infection that is associated with the purging of antigen-specific cells with the highest intensity of tetramer staining. Hence, virulent Salmonella triggers the selective culling of high avidity activated CD4+ T-cell subsets, which re-shapes the repertoire of antigen-specific T cells that persist later after infection.

  18. 26 CFR 1.469-4T - Definition of activity (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... at the management office relate to transactions in which customers take physical possession at... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of activity (temporary). 1.469-4T... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Taxable Year for Which Deductions Taken § 1.469-4T Definition of...

  19. 26 CFR 1.1001-4T - Modifications of certain derivative contracts (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Modifications of certain derivative contracts (temporary). 1.1001-4T Section 1.1001-4T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... section applies to transfers or assignments of derivative contracts on or after July 22, 2011....

  20. CMS centres worldwide: A new collaborative infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Lucas; Gottschalk, Erik; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Experiment at the LHC is establishing a global network of inter-connected 'CMS Centres' for controls, operations and monitoring. These support: (1) CMS data quality monitoring, detector calibrations, and analysis; and (2) computing operations for the processing, storage and distribution of CMS data. We describe the infrastructure, computing, software, and communications systems required to create an effective and affordable CMS Centre. We present our highly successful operations experiences with the major CMS Centres at CERN, Fermilab, and DESY during the LHC first beam data-taking and cosmic ray commissioning work. The status of the various centres already operating or under construction in Asia, Europe, Russia, South America, and the USA is also described. We emphasise the collaborative communications aspects. For example, virtual co-location of experts in CMS Centres Worldwide is achieved using high-quality permanently-running 'telepresence' video links. Generic Web-based tools have been developed and deployed for monitoring, control, display management and outreach.

  1. Repeats in transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) genes.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Seema

    2013-06-01

    Transforming acidic coiled-coil proteins (TACC1, 2, and 3) are essential proteins associated with the assembly of spindle microtubules and maintenance of bipolarity. Dysregulation of TACCs is associated with tumorigenesis, but studies of microsatellite instability in TACC genes have not been extensive. Microsatellite or simple sequence repeat instability is known to cause many types of cancer. The present in silico analysis of SSRs in human TACC gene sequences shows the presence of mono- to hexa-nucleotide repeats, with the highest densities found for mono- and di-nucleotide repeats. Density of repeats is higher in introns than in exons. Some of the repeats are present in regulatory regions and retained introns. Human TACC genes show conservation of many repeat classes. Microsatellites in TACC genes could be valuable markers for monitoring numerical chromosomal aberrations and or cancer.

  2. Membrane fusion mediated by coiled coils: a hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bentz, J

    2000-01-01

    A molecular model of the low-pH-induced membrane fusion by influenza hemagglutinin (HA) is proposed based upon the hypothesis that the conformational change to the extended coiled coil creates a high-energy hydrophobic membrane defect in the viral envelope or HA expressing cell. It is known that 1) an aggregate of at least eight HAs is required at the fusion site, yet only two or three of these HAs need to undergo the "essential" conformational change for the first fusion pore to form (Bentz, J. 2000. Biophys. J. 78:000-000); 2) the formation of the first fusion pore signifies a stage of restricted lipid flow into the nascent fusion site; and 3) some HAs can partially insert their fusion peptides into their own viral envelopes at low pH. This suggests that the committed step for HA-mediated fusion begins with a tightly packed aggregate of HAs whose fusion peptides are inserted into their own viral envelope, which causes restricted lateral lipid flow within the HA aggregate. The transition of two or three HAs in the center of the aggregate to the extended coiled coil extracts the fusion peptide and creates a hydrophobic defect in the outer monolayer of the virion, which is stabilized by the closely packed HAs. These HAs are inhibited from diffusing away from the site to admit lateral lipid flow, in part because that would initially increase the surface area of hydrophobic exposure. The other obvious pathway to heal this hydrophobic defect, or some descendent, is recruitment of lipids from the outer monolayer of the apposed target membrane, i.e., fusion. Other viral fusion proteins and the SNARE fusion protein complex appear to fit within this hypothesis. PMID:10653801

  3. The CMS Masterclass and Particle Physics Outreach

    SciTech Connect

    Cecire, Kenneth; Bardeen, Marjorie; McCauley, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The CMS Masterclass enables high school students to analyse authentic CMS data. Students can draw conclusions on key ratios and particle masses by combining their analyses. In particular, they can use the ratio of W^+ to W^- candidates to probe the structure of the proton, they can find the mass of the Z boson, and they can identify additional particles including, tentatively, the Higgs boson. In the United States, masterclasses are part of QuarkNet, a long-term program that enables students and teachers to use cosmic ray and particle physics data for learning with an emphasis on data from CMS.

  4. 42 CFR 426.517 - CMS' statement regarding new evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CMS' statement regarding new evidence. 426.517... COVERAGE DETERMINATIONS Review of an NCD § 426.517 CMS' statement regarding new evidence. (a) CMS may... clinical experts; and (5) Presented during any hearing. (b) CMS may submit a statement regarding...

  5. 42 CFR 489.53 - Termination by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Termination by CMS. 489.53 Section 489.53 Public... Reinstatement After Termination § 489.53 Termination by CMS. (a) Basis for termination of agreement with any provider. CMS may terminate the agreement with any provider if CMS finds that any of the following...

  6. 42 CFR 489.53 - Termination by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Termination by CMS. 489.53 Section 489.53 Public... Reinstatement After Termination § 489.53 Termination by CMS. (a) Basis for termination of agreement with any provider. CMS may terminate the agreement with any provider if CMS finds that any of the following...

  7. 42 CFR 489.53 - Termination by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Termination by CMS. 489.53 Section 489.53 Public... Reinstatement After Termination § 489.53 Termination by CMS. (a) Basis for termination of agreement with any provider. CMS may terminate the agreement with any provider if CMS finds that any of the following...

  8. 42 CFR 460.20 - Notice of CMS determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notice of CMS determination. 460.20 Section 460.20... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.20 Notice of CMS determination. (a... application to CMS, CMS takes one of the following actions: (1) Approves the application. (2) Denies...

  9. 42 CFR 426.517 - CMS' statement regarding new evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CMS' statement regarding new evidence. 426.517... DETERMINATIONS Review of an NCD § 426.517 CMS' statement regarding new evidence. (a) CMS may review any new... experts; and (5) Presented during any hearing. (b) CMS may submit a statement regarding whether the...

  10. 42 CFR 489.53 - Termination by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Termination by CMS. 489.53 Section 489.53 Public... Reinstatement After Termination § 489.53 Termination by CMS. (a) Basis for termination of agreement with any provider. CMS may terminate the agreement with any provider if CMS finds that any of the following...

  11. 42 CFR 460.20 - Notice of CMS determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notice of CMS determination. 460.20 Section 460.20... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.20 Notice of CMS determination. (a... application to CMS, CMS takes one of the following actions: (1) Approves the application. (2) Denies...

  12. 42 CFR 426.517 - CMS' statement regarding new evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CMS' statement regarding new evidence. 426.517... COVERAGE DETERMINATIONS Review of an NCD § 426.517 CMS' statement regarding new evidence. (a) CMS may... clinical experts; and (5) Presented during any hearing. (b) CMS may submit a statement regarding...

  13. 42 CFR 460.20 - Notice of CMS determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notice of CMS determination. 460.20 Section 460.20... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.20 Notice of CMS determination. (a... application to CMS, CMS takes one of the following actions: (1) Approves the application. (2) Denies...

  14. 42 CFR 426.517 - CMS' statement regarding new evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CMS' statement regarding new evidence. 426.517... DETERMINATIONS Review of an NCD § 426.517 CMS' statement regarding new evidence. (a) CMS may review any new... experts; and (5) Presented during any hearing. (b) CMS may submit a statement regarding whether the...

  15. 42 CFR 426.517 - CMS' statement regarding new evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CMS' statement regarding new evidence. 426.517... COVERAGE DETERMINATIONS Review of an NCD § 426.517 CMS' statement regarding new evidence. (a) CMS may... clinical experts; and (5) Presented during any hearing. (b) CMS may submit a statement regarding...

  16. 42 CFR 489.53 - Termination by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Termination by CMS. 489.53 Section 489.53 Public... Reinstatement After Termination § 489.53 Termination by CMS. (a) Basis for termination of agreement with any provider. CMS may terminate the agreement with any provider if CMS finds that any of the following...

  17. 42 CFR 460.20 - Notice of CMS determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notice of CMS determination. 460.20 Section 460.20... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.20 Notice of CMS determination. (a... application to CMS, CMS takes one of the following actions: (1) Approves the application. (2) Denies...

  18. Role of LAP+CD4+ T cells in the tumor microenvironment of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wu; Jiang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Jia-Hao; Wang, Shi-Jun; Liao, Cun; Cai, Bin; Chen, Li-Sheng; Zhang, Sen; Guo, Yun; Cao, Yun-Fei; Gao, Feng

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the abundance and potential functions of LAP+CD4+ T cells in colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS Proportions of LAP+CD4+ T cells were examined in peripheral blood and tumor/paratumor tissues of CRC patients and healthy controls using flow cytometry. Expression of phenotypic markers such as forkhead box (Fox)p3, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein (CTLA)-4, chemokine CC receptor (CCR)4 and CCR5 was measured using flow cytometry. LAP-CD4+ and LAP+CD4+ T cells were isolated using a magnetic cell-sorting system and cell purity was analyzed by flow cytometry. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression of cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. RESULTS The proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells was significantly higher in peripheral blood from patients (9.44% ± 3.18%) than healthy controls (1.49% ± 1.00%, P < 0.001). Among patients, the proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells was significantly higher in tumor tissues (11.76% ± 3.74%) compared with paratumor tissues (3.87% ± 1.64%, P < 0.001). We also observed positive correlations between the proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells and TNM stage (P < 0.001), distant metastasis (P < 0.001) and serum level of carcinoembryonic antigen (P < 0.05). Magnetic-activated cell sorting gave an overall enrichment of LAP+CD4+ T cells (95.02% ± 2.87%), which was similar for LAP-CD4+ T cells (94.75% ± 2.76%). In contrast to LAP-CD4+ T cells, LAP+CD4+ T cells showed lower Foxp3 expression but significantly higher levels of CTLA-4, CCR4 and CCR5 (P < 0.01). LAP+CD4+ T cells expressed significantly larger amounts of IL-10 and TGF-β but lower levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-17 and interferon-γ, compared with LAP-CD4+ T cells. CONCLUSION LAP+CD4+ T cells accumulated in the tumor microenvironment of CRC patients and were involved in immune evasion mediated by IL-10 and TGF-β. PMID:28210081

  19. Normal conducting transfer coil for SQUID NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Tadayuki; Itozaki, Hideo

    2004-03-01

    We have investigated the performance of a normal conducting transfer coil (n-coil) for nondestructive evaluation with a SQUID. The transfer efficiency, which depends on frequency and wire impedance, has been calculated for several coil designs to determine the performance of the n-coil. We have fabricated a 30 mm diameter n-coil and examined its performance with a high-TC SQUID. If both the pick-up coil and the input coil have 50 turns, then at high frequencies the magnetic field produced by the input coil becomes 50% of the magnetic field at the pick-up coil, with a low cut-off frequency of 2 kHz. The experimental result agrees well with a numerical calculation, which suggests a magnitude of magnetic field detected by our SQUID equal to the magnitude of the quasi-uniform magnetic field produced by the input coil. We also confirmed that the thermal noise of the n-coil, produced by its normal resistance, does not become higher than the intrinsic magnetic field noise of the SQUID.

  20. Starch gelatinization in coiled heaters.

    PubMed

    Kelder, J D H; Ptasinski, K J; Kerkhof, P J A M

    2004-01-01

    A gelatinizing model food derived from a 5% w/w cross-linked waxy maize starch suspension was simulated in coiled heaters to assess the impact of centrifugal forces on flow and heat transfer. For four coil diameters (D = 0.25, 1, 2.5, and infinity m) and three flow rates (w = 0.5, 1, and 2 m/s), heat transfer, viscous development, and the severity of channeling were evaluated. Increasing curvature proved to suppress channeling as a result of more uniform heating and gelatinization. The maximum attainable viscosity was also higher, implying a lower starch consumption for a target viscosity. Higher flow rates necessitated longer heaters, and the maximum viscosity decreased. Moderate product velocities are therefore recommended.

  1. Three-dimensional coil inductor

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Malba, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional coil inductor is disclosed. The inductor includes a substrate; a set of lower electrically conductive traces positioned on the substrate; a core placed over the lower traces; a set of side electrically conductive traces laid on the core and the lower traces; and a set of upper electrically conductive traces attached to the side traces so as to form the inductor. Fabrication of the inductor includes the steps of forming a set of lower traces on a substrate; positioning a core over the lower traces; forming a set of side traces on the core; connecting the side traces to the lower traces; forming a set of upper traces on the core; and connecting the upper traces to the side traces so as to form a coil structure.

  2. Practical Aspects of Birdcage Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, F. David; Entzminger, George; Hauck, Cory D.; Staab, John P.

    1999-05-01

    Numerical modeling and experimental results are presented for a variety of birdcages for high-field MRI microscopy. The data include the first published numerical calculations and experimental measurements of magnetic filling factors of birdcages or other MRI coils. Fast, 3D calculations for shielded coils are demonstrated using the Biot-Savart law along with energy minimization. It is shown that the near-field, higher-order inhomogeneity effects remaining after a first-order, asymmetry correction may easily exceed 20% in situations where it is desirable to maximize filling factor. It is also found that an order-of-magnitude improvement in the accuracy of predicted capacitor values may be achieved by using a more detailed circuit model of the birdcage resonator.

  3. Practical aspects of birdcage coils.

    PubMed

    Doty, F D; Entzminger, G; Hauck, C D; Staab, J P

    1999-05-01

    Numerical modeling and experimental results are presented for a variety of birdcages for high-field MRI microscopy. The data include the first published numerical calculations and experimental measurements of magnetic filling factors of birdcages or other MRI coils. Fast, 3D calculations for shielded coils are demonstrated using the Biot-Savart law along with energy minimization. It is shown that the near-field, higher-order inhomogeneity effects remaining after a first-order, asymmetry correction may easily exceed 20% in situations where it is desirable to maximize filling factor. It is also found that an order-of-magnitude improvement in the accuracy of predicted capacitor values may be achieved by using a more detailed circuit model of the birdcage resonator.

  4. Equations determine coiled tubing collapse pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Avakov, V.; Taliaferro, W.

    1995-07-24

    A set of equations has been developed for calculating pipe collapse pressure for oval tubing such as coiled tubing. When coiled tubing is placed onto a reel, the tubing is forced into an oval shape and never again returns to perfect roundness because the coiling process exceeds the plasticity limits of the tubing. Straightening the tubing for the trip into the well does not restore roundness. The consequence of this physical property is that all coiled tubing collapse pressure calculations should be made considering oval tubing, not round tubing. Tubing collapse can occur when formation pressure against the coiled tubing exceeds the collapse resistance inherent in the coiled tubing. As coiled tubing becomes more oval in shape, it becomes more oval in shape, it becomes more susceptible to collapse from outside pressure.

  5. Rectangular coils optimization for wireless power transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhu; Guo, Yong-Xin; Kwong, Dim-Lee

    2012-01-01

    Wirelessly coupled coils are crucial for efficient power transmission in various applications. Previous design methods are only eligible for improving the efficiency of circular or square coils. This paper presents a method of characterizing and optimizing rectangular coils used in inductively coupled systems. After setting up a lumped component model for inductive coils, the efficiency can be expressed in terms of geometrical parameters of the coils. Subsequently, the power efficiency can be plotted versus these parameters in Matlab, thus getting the desired coils for optimum power transfer. With this design procedure from mathematical optimization, we eventually designed two rectangular coils spaced 10 mm apart, which achieves a power transmission efficiency of 46.4% at a frequency of 3 MHz. The design methodology is verified by simulation and measurement.

  6. Segmented Coil Fails In Steps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stedman, Ronald S.

    1990-01-01

    Electromagnetic coil degrades in steps when faults occur, continues to operate at reduced level instead of failing catastrophically. Made in segments connected in series and separated by electrically insulating barriers. Fault does not damage adjacent components or create hazard. Used to control valves in such critical applications as cooling systems of power generators and chemical process equipment, where flammable liquids or gases handled. Also adapts to electrical control of motors.

  7. Itk Signals Promote Neuroinflammation by Regulating CD4+ T-Cell Activation and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Arun K.; Kim, Do-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that interleukin-2-inducible T-cell kinase (Itk) signaling in cluster of differentiation 4-positive (CD4+) T cells promotes experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). We show that Itk−/− mice exhibit reduced disease severity, and transfer of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells into T cell-deficient recipients results in lower disease severity. We observed a significant reduction of CD4+ T cells in the CNS of Itk−/− mice or recipients of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells during EAE, which is consistent with attenuated disease. Itk−/− CD4+ T cells exhibit defective response to myelin antigen stimulation attributable to displacement of filamentous actin from the CD4+ coreceptor. This results in inadequate transmigration of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells into the CNS and across brain endothelial barriers in vitro. Finally, Itk−/− CD4+ T cells show significant reduction in production of T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 cytokines and exhibit skewed T effector/T regulatory cell ratios. These results indicate that signaling by Itk promotes autoimmunity and CNS inflammation, suggesting that it may be a viable target for treatment of MS. PMID:25568116

  8. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-4T - Elective carryforward of unused private activity bond limit (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... bond limit (temporary). 1.103(n)-4T Section 1.103(n)-4T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Excluded from Gross Income § 1.103(n)-4T Elective carryforward of unused private activity bond limit... carryforward for any one or more projects described in A-5 of this § 1.103(n)-4T (carryforward projects)....

  9. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-4T - Elective carryforward of unused private activity bond limit (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... bond limit (temporary). 1.103(n)-4T Section 1.103(n)-4T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Excluded from Gross Income § 1.103(n)-4T Elective carryforward of unused private activity bond limit... carryforward for any one or more projects described in A-5 of this § 1.103(n)-4T (carryforward projects)....

  10. 26 CFR 1.103(n)-4T - Elective carryforward of unused private activity bond limit (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... bond limit (temporary). 1.103(n)-4T Section 1.103(n)-4T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Excluded from Gross Income § 1.103(n)-4T Elective carryforward of unused private activity bond limit... carryforward for any one or more projects described in A-5 of this § 1.103(n)-4T (carryforward projects)....

  11. Coiled transmission line pulse generators

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Kenneth Fox

    2010-11-09

    Methods and apparatus are provided for fabricating and constructing solid dielectric "Coiled Transmission Line" pulse generators in radial or axial coiled geometries. The pour and cure fabrication process enables a wide variety of geometries and form factors. The volume between the conductors is filled with liquid blends of monomers, polymers, oligomers, and/or cross-linkers and dielectric powders; and then cured to form high field strength and high dielectric constant solid dielectric transmission lines that intrinsically produce ideal rectangular high voltage pulses when charged and switched into matched impedance loads. Voltage levels may be increased by Marx and/or Blumlein principles incorporating spark gap or, preferentially, solid state switches (such as optically triggered thyristors) which produce reliable, high repetition rate operation. Moreover, these Marxed pulse generators can be DC charged and do not require additional pulse forming circuitry, pulse forming lines, transformers, or an a high voltage spark gap output switch. The apparatus accommodates a wide range of voltages, impedances, pulse durations, pulse repetition rates, and duty cycles. The resulting mobile or flight platform friendly cylindrical geometric configuration is much more compact, light-weight, and robust than conventional linear geometries, or pulse generators constructed from conventional components. Installing additional circuitry may accommodate optional pulse shape improvements. The Coiled Transmission Lines can also be connected in parallel to decrease the impedance, or in series to increase the pulse length.

  12. Underbalanced coiled tubing sidetrack successful

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, J.; Berry, M.

    1995-12-18

    The technique of drilling through a completion string, underbalanced, with coiled tubing eliminated some of the problems encountered with overbalanced drilling in a group of offset wells. This project confirmed that performing drilling operations in live wells can be carried out safely and effectively. Dalen is a sour gas field in the eastern part of The Netherlands and produces from vertical fractures in the Zechstein carbonate reservoir. The proposal for Dalen 2 was to abandon the lower section of the original hole and subsequently sidetrack conventionally to the top of the reservoir, run and cement a 5-in. liner, complete the well with a 5-in. monobore completion, and install the christmas tree. This part of the operation would be performed with a workover hoist. Thereafter, a 3 3/4-in. hole would be drilled through the completion and into the reservoir, underbalanced with coiled tubing. The drilling proposal had to address a number of key issues: creating underbalanced conditions; handling sour gas production at surface; handling and treating drilling fluids at surface; removing drilled solids from the returned fluid system; and deploying a long coiled tubing drilling bottom hole assembly (BHA) into a live well. The paper discusses planning, legislative issues, well preparation, the drilling program, and lessons learned.

  13. Predicting dataset popularity for the CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V.; Li, T.; Giommi, L.; Bonacorsi, D.; Wildish, T.

    2016-10-01

    The CMS experiment at the LHC accelerator at CERN relies on its computing infrastructure to stay at the frontier of High Energy Physics, searching for new phenomena and making discoveries. Even though computing plays a significant role in physics analysis we rarely use its data to predict the system behavior itself. A basic information about computing resources, user activities and site utilization can be really useful for improving the throughput of the system and its management. In this paper, we discuss a first CMS analysis of dataset popularity based on CMS meta-data which can be used as a model for dynamic data placement and provide the foundation of data-driven approach for the CMS computing infrastructure.

  14. DJ-1/Park7 Sensitive Na(+) /H(+) Exchanger 1 (NHE1) in CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuetao; Shi, Xiaolong; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Shaqiu; Salker, Madhuri S; Mack, Andreas F; Föller, Michael; Mak, Tak W; Singh, Yogesh; Lang, Florian

    2016-08-10

    DJ-1/Park7 is a redox-sensitive chaperone protein counteracting oxidation and presumably contributing to the control of oxidative stress responses and thus inflammation. DJ-1 gene deletion exacerbates the progression of Parkinson's disease presumably by augmenting oxidative stress. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is paralleled by activation of the Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1). ROS formation in CD4(+) T cells plays a decisive role in regulating inflammatory responses. In the present study we explored whether DJ-1 is expressed in CD4(+) T cells and affects ROS production as well as NHE1 in those cells. To this end, DJ-1 and NHE1 transcript and protein levels were quantified by qRT-PCR and Western blotting respectively, intracellular pH (pHi) utilizing bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) fluorescence, NHE activity from realkalinization after an ammonium pulse, and ROS production utilizing 2',7' -dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFDA) fluorescence. As a result DJ-1 was expressed in CD4(+) T cells. ROS formation, NHE1 transcript levels, NHE1 protein, and NHE activity were higher in CD4(+) T cells from DJ-1 deficient mice than in CD4(+) T cells from wild type mice. Antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor staurosporine decreased the NHE activity in DJ-1 deficient CD4(+) T cells, and blunted the difference between DJ-1(-/-) and DJ-1(+/+) CD4(+) T cells, an observation pointing to a role of ROS in the up-regulation of NHE1 in DJ-1(-/-) CD4(+) T cells. In conclusion, DJ-1 is a powerful regulator of ROS production as well as NHE1 expression and activity in CD4(+) T cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Multi circular-cavity surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain at 4 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, A. I.; Solis-Najera, S. E.; Vázquez, F.; Wang, R. L.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Animal models in medical research has been used to study humans diseases for several decades. The use of different imaging techniques together with different animal models offers a great advantage due to the possibility to study some human pathologies without the necessity of chirurgical intervention. The employ of magnetic resonance imaging for the acquisition of anatomical and functional images is an excellent tool because its noninvasive nature. Dedicated coils to perform magnetic resonance imaging experiments are obligatory due to the improvement on the signal-to-noise ratio and reduced specific absorption ratio. A specifically designed surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain is proposed based on the multi circular-slot coil. Numerical simulations of the magnetic and electric fields were also performed using the Finite Integration Method to solve Maxwell's equations for this particular coil design and, to study the behavior of various vector magnetic field configurations and specific absorption ratio. Monkey's brain images were then acquired with a research-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging system at 4T, to evaluate the anatomical images with conventional imaging sequences. This coil showed good quality images of a monkey's brain and full compatibility with standard pulse sequences implemented in research-dedicated imager.

  16. Design of a superconducting volume coil for magnetic resonance microscopy of the mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouls, John C.; Izenson, Michael G.; Greeley, Harold P.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2008-04-01

    We present the design process of a superconducting volume coil for magnetic resonance microscopy of the mouse brain at 9.4 T. The yttrium barium copper oxide coil has been designed through an iterative process of three-dimensional finite-element simulations and validation against room temperature copper coils. Compared to previous designs, the Helmholtz pair provides substantially higher B1 homogeneity over an extended volume of interest sufficiently large to image biologically relevant specimens. A custom-built cryogenic cooling system maintains the superconducting probe at 60 ± 0.1 K. Specimen loading and probe retuning can be carried out interactively with the coil at operating temperature, enabling much higher through-put. The operation of the probe is a routine, consistent procedure. Signal-to-noise ratio in a mouse brain increased by a factor ranging from 1.1 to 2.9 as compared to a room-temperature solenoid coil optimized for mouse brain microscopy. We demonstrate images encoded at 10 × 10 × 20 μm for an entire mouse brain specimen with signal-to-noise ratio of 18 and a total acquisition time of 16.5 h, revealing neuroanatomy unseen at lower resolution. Phantom measurements show an effective spatial resolution better than 20 μm.

  17. File level provenance tracking in CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.D.; Kowalkowski, J.; Paterno, M.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Tanenbaum, W.; Riley, D.S.; /Cornell U., LEPP

    2009-05-01

    The CMS off-line framework stores provenance information within CMS's standard ROOT event data files. The provenance information is used to track how each data product was constructed, including what other data products were read to do the construction. We will present how the framework gathers the provenance information, the efforts necessary to minimize the space used to store the provenance in the file and the tools that will be available to use the provenance.

  18. Complete genome sequence of the Aneurinibacillus soli CB4(T) from soil of mountain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Sook; Lee, Keun Chul; Kim, Kwang Kyu; Lee, Byungwook

    2016-03-10

    Aneurinibacillus soli CB4(T) is a Gram-positive, motile rods and strictly aerobic bacterium. Here we present the 4.1-Mb genome sequence of the type strain of A. soli CB4(T), which consists a chromosome for the total 4,116,770bp with a G+C content of 45.9mol%. Genes related to diverse secondary metabolites were detected in this genome. The genomic data is expected to understand the possibility of industrial and commercial use by strain CB4(T).

  19. A comparison of coupling efficiencies for a Stix coil and an m equals 1 coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigman, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    This theoretical and experimental study compares the ion-cyclotron wave generating characteristics of a Stix coil (which generates waves with azimuthal mode number m = 0) with those of a coil which produces primarily m = + or -1 ion-cyclotron modes. The theoretical work of J.E. Hipp, which predicted very good coupling for the m = 1 coil, was extended to determine the scaling laws for plasma column radius and coil wavelength. Experimentally, an m = 1 coil and an m = 0 coil were used to generate ion-cyclotron waves on a beam generated plasma column with electron density = 10 to the 12th power/cu cm. Coupling resonances with peak efficiencies of approximately 40 to 50 percent were measured for both coils in low power (approximately 10k W) experiments. For equal power transfer to the plasma, the m = 0 coil voltage was more than a factor of two greater than that for the m = 1 coil.

  20. Design, fabrication, and testing of the pulse coils for the Large Coil Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chipley, K.K.; Parrelli, A.P.

    1983-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) will be able to test up to six large superconducting coils similar to those required for a tokamak reactor. In order to simulate the transient vertical field that will be part of the magnetic environment of an operating tokamak reactor, a set of pulse coils will be used in the facility. This set of two coils can be positioned in the bore of any of the test coils to provide a transient magnetic field to that particular coil. This paper describes the final design of the pulse coils and discusses the fabrication techniques used to build these coils. An extensive testing program has been carried out during fabrication to ensure that the coils will function satisfactorily.

  1. A Mechanical Coil Insertion System for Endovascular Coil Embolization of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Haraguchi, K.; Miyachi, S.; Matsubara, N.; Nagano, Y.; Yamada, H.; Marui, N.; Sano, A.; Fujimoto, H.; Izumi, T.; Yamanouchi, T.; Asai, T.; Wakabayashi, T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Like other fields of medicine, robotics and mechanization might be introduced into endovascular coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms for effective treatment. We have already reported that coil insertion force could be smaller and more stable when the coil delivery wire is driven mechanically at a constant speed. Another background is the difficulty in synchronizing operators' minds and hands when two operators control the microcatheter and the coil respectively. We have therefore developed a mechanical coil insertion system enabling a single operator to insert coils at a fixed speed while controlling the microcatheter. Using our new system, the operator manipulated the microcatheter with both hands and drove the coil using foot switches simultaneously. A delivery wire force sensor previously reported was used concurrently, allowing the operator to detect excessive stress on the wire. In vitro coil embolization was performed using three methods: simple mechanical advance of the coil; simple mechanical advance of the coil with microcatheter control; and driving (forward and backward) of the coil using foot switches in addition to microcatheter control. The system worked without any problems, and did not interfere with any procedures. In experimental coil embolization, delivery wire control using the foot switches as well as microcatheter manipulation helped to achieve successful insertion of coils. This system could offer the possibility of developing safer and more efficient coil embolization. Although we aim at total mechanization and automation of procedures in the future, microcatheter manipulation and synchronized delivery wire control are still indispensable using this system. PMID:23693038

  2. CRAB: Distributed analysis tool for CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, Leonardo; CMS Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    CMS has a distributed computing model, based on a hierarchy of tiered regional computing centers and adopts a data driven model for the end user analysis. This model foresees that jobs are submitted to the analysis resources where data are hosted. The increasing complexity of the whole computing infrastructure makes the simple analysis work flow more and more complicated for the end user. CMS has developed and deployed a dedicated tool named CRAB (CMS Remote Analysis Builder) in order to guarantee the physicists an efficient access to the distributed data whilst hiding the underlying complexity. This tool is used by CMS to enable the running of physics analysis jobs in a transparent manner over data distributed across sites. It factorizes out the interaction with the underlying batch farms, grid infrastructure and CMS data management tools, allowing the user to deal only with a simple and intuitive interface. We present the CRAB architecture, as well as the current status and lessons learnt in deploying this tool for use by the CMS collaboration. We also present the future development of the CRAB system.

  3. Virtual data in CMS analysis

    SciTech Connect

    A. Arbree et al.

    2003-10-01

    The use of virtual data for enhancing the collaboration between large groups of scientists is explored in several ways: by defining ''virtual'' parameter spaces which can be searched and shared in an organized way by a collaboration of scientists in the course of their analysis; by providing a mechanism to log the provenance of results and the ability to trace them back to the various stages in the analysis of real or simulated data; by creating ''check points'' in the course of an analysis to permit collaborators to explore their own analysis branches by refining selections, improving the signal to background ratio, varying the estimation of parameters, etc.; by facilitating the audit of an analysis and the reproduction of its results by a different group, or in a peer review context. We describe a prototype for the analysis of data from the CMS experiment based on the virtual data system Chimera and the object-oriented data analysis framework ROOT. The Chimera system is used to chain together several steps in the analysis process including the Monte Carlo generation of data, the simulation of detector response, the reconstruction of physics objects and their subsequent analysis, histogramming and visualization using the ROOT framework.

  4. Modular Coils with Low Hydrogen Content Especially for MRI of Dry Solids

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Elmar; Gröbner, Jens; Göpper, Michael; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Katrin; Flügge, Tabea; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recent advances have enabled fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of solid materials. This development has opened up new applications for MRI, but, at the same time, uncovered new challenges. Previously, MRI-invisible materials like the housing of MRI detection coils are now readily depicted and either cause artifacts or lead to a decreased image resolution. In this contribution, we present versatile, multi-nuclear single and dual-tune MRI coils that stand out by (1) a low hydrogen content for high-resolution MRI of dry solids without artifacts; (2) a modular approach with exchangeable inductors of variable volumes to optimally enclose the given object; (3) low cost and low manufacturing effort that is associated with the modular approach; (4) accurate sample placement in the coil outside of the bore, and (5) a wide, single- or dual-tune frequency range that covers several nuclei and enables multinuclear MRI without moving the sample. Materials and Methods The inductors of the coils were constructed from self-supporting copper sheets to avoid all plastic materials within or around the resonator. The components that were mounted at a distance from the inductor, including the circuit board, coaxial cable and holder were manufactured from polytetrafluoroethylene. Results and Conclusion Residual hydrogen signal was sufficiently well suppressed to allow 1H-MRI of dry solids with a minimum field of view that was smaller than the sensitive volume of the coil. The SNR was found to be comparable but somewhat lower with respect to commercial, proton-rich quadrature coils, and higher with respect to a linearly-polarized commercial coil. The potential of the setup presented was exemplified by 1H / 23Na high-resolution zero echo time (ZTE) MRI of a model solution and a dried human molar at 9.4 T. A full 3D image dataset of the tooth was obtained, rich in contrast and similar to the resolution of standard cone-beam computed tomography. PMID:26496192

  5. Optimized Geometry for Superconducting Sensing Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Pananen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2008-01-01

    An optimized geometry has been proposed for superconducting sensing coils that are used in conjunction with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and related applications in which magnetic fields of small dipoles are detected. In designing a coil of this type, as in designing other sensing coils, one seeks to maximize the sensitivity of the detector of which the coil is a part, subject to geometric constraints arising from the proximity of other required equipment. In MRI or MEG, the main benefit of maximizing the sensitivity would be to enable minimization of measurement time. In general, to maximize the sensitivity of a detector based on a sensing coil coupled with a SQUID sensor, it is necessary to maximize the magnetic flux enclosed by the sensing coil while minimizing the self-inductance of this coil. Simply making the coil larger may increase its self-inductance and does not necessarily increase sensitivity because it also effectively increases the distance from the sample that contains the source of the signal that one seeks to detect. Additional constraints on the size and shape of the coil and on the distance from the sample arise from the fact that the sample is at room temperature but the coil and the SQUID sensor must be enclosed within a cryogenic shield to maintain superconductivity.

  6. CMS-Wave Model: Part 4. An Automated Procedure for CMS-Wave in Resource-Demanding Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    user’s manual for CMS -Wave are available (Lin et al. 2008, 2006; Demirbilek et al. 2007). CMS -Wave is part of the Coastal Modeling System developed...at the same level as the subfolders. Figure 2 shows the contents of the Visser_1991 example subfolder, including two CMS -Wave simulations, named as...and the surrounding area (red line denotes the CMS domain). The Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ) was applied to evaluate current and sedimentation

  7. IL-21 induces IL-22 production in CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Yeste, Ada; Mascanfroni, Ivan D; Nadeau, Meghan; Burns, Evan J; Tukpah, Ann-Marcia; Santiago, Andrezza; Wu, Chuan; Patel, Bonny; Kumar, Deepak; Quintana, Francisco J

    2014-05-06

    Interleukin (IL)-22 produced by innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and CD4+ T cells plays an important role in host defence and mucosal homeostasis, thus it is important to investigate the mechanisms that regulate IL-22 production. We investigated the regulation IL-22 production by CD4+ T cells. Here we show that IL-21 triggers IL-22, but not IL-17 production by CD4+ T cells. STAT3, activated by IL-21, controls the epigenetic status of the il22 promoter and its interaction with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Moreover, IL-21 and AhR signalling in T cells control IL-22 production and the development of dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis in ILC-deficient mice. Thus, we have identified IL-21 as an inducer of IL-22 production in CD4+ T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Polyfunctional and IFN-γ monofunctional human CD4+ T cell populations are molecularly distinct

    PubMed Central

    Burel, Julie G.; Apte, Simon H.; Groves, Penny L.; McCarthy, James S.; Doolan, Denise L.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogen-specific polyfunctional T cell responses have been associated with favorable clinical outcomes, but it is not known whether molecular differences exist between polyfunctional and monofunctional cytokine-producing T cells. Here, we report that polyfunctional CD4+ T cells induced during Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) blood-stage infection in humans have a unique transcriptomic profile compared with IFN-γ monofunctional CD4+ T cells and, thus, are molecularly distinct. The 14-gene signature revealed in P. falciparum–reactive polyfunctional T cells is associated with cytokine signaling and lymphocyte chemotaxis, and systems biology analysis identified IL-27 as an upstream regulator of the polyfunctional gene signature. Importantly, the polyfunctional gene signature is largely conserved in Influenza-reactive polyfunctional CD4+ T cells, suggesting that polyfunctional T cells have core characteristics independent of pathogen specificity. This study provides the first evidence to our knowledge that consistent molecular differences exist between polyfunctional and monofunctional CD4+ T cells. PMID:28194431

  9. Fighting Viral Infections and Virus-Driven Tumors with Cytotoxic CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muraro, Elena; Merlo, Anna; Martorelli, Debora; Cangemi, Michela; Dalla Santa, Silvia; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Rosato, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    CD4+ T cells have been and are still largely regarded as the orchestrators of immune responses, being able to differentiate into distinct T helper cell populations based on differentiation signals, transcription factor expression, cytokine secretion, and specific functions. Nonetheless, a growing body of evidence indicates that CD4+ T cells can also exert a direct effector activity, which depends on intrinsic cytotoxic properties acquired and carried out along with the evolution of several pathogenic infections. The relevant role of CD4+ T cell lytic features in the control of such infectious conditions also leads to their exploitation as a new immunotherapeutic approach. This review aims at summarizing currently available data about functional and therapeutic relevance of cytotoxic CD4+ T cells in the context of viral infections and virus-driven tumors. PMID:28289418

  10. Clonally expanded CD4+ T cells can produce infectious HIV-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Francesco R; Sobolewski, Michele D; Fyne, Elizabeth; Shao, Wei; Spindler, Jonathan; Hattori, Junko; Anderson, Elizabeth M; Watters, Sarah A; Hill, Shawn; Wu, Xiaolin; Wells, David; Su, Li; Luke, Brian T; Halvas, Elias K; Besson, Guillaume; Penrose, Kerri J; Yang, Zhiming; Kwan, Richard W; Van Waes, Carter; Uldrick, Thomas; Citrin, Deborah E; Kovacs, Joseph; Polis, Michael A; Rehm, Catherine A; Gorelick, Robert; Piatak, Michael; Keele, Brandon F; Kearney, Mary F; Coffin, John M; Hughes, Stephen H; Mellors, John W; Maldarelli, Frank

    2016-02-16

    Reservoirs of infectious HIV-1 persist despite years of combination antiretroviral therapy and make curing HIV-1 infections a major challenge. Most of the proviral DNA resides in CD4(+)T cells. Some of these CD4(+)T cells are clonally expanded; most of the proviruses are defective. It is not known if any of the clonally expanded cells carry replication-competent proviruses. We report that a highly expanded CD4(+) T-cell clone contains an intact provirus. The highly expanded clone produced infectious virus that was detected as persistent plasma viremia during cART in an HIV-1-infected patient who had squamous cell cancer. Cells containing the intact provirus were widely distributed and significantly enriched in cancer metastases. These results show that clonally expanded CD4(+)T cells can be a reservoir of infectious HIV-1.

  11. Interleukin-7 is required for CD4+ T cell activation and autoimmune neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Brian R.; Gonzalez-Quintial, Rosana; Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Farrar, Michael A.; Miller, Stephen D.; Sauer, Karsten; McGavern, Dorian B.; Kono, Dwight H.; Baccala, Roberto; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N.

    2015-01-01

    IL-7 is known to be vital for T cell homeostasis but has previously been presumed to be dispensable for TCR-induced activation. Here, we show that IL-7 is critical for the initial activation of CD4+ T cells in that it provides some of the necessary early signaling components, such as activated STAT5 and Akt. Accordingly, short-term in vivo IL-7Rα blockade inhibited the activation and expansion of autoantigen-specific CD4+ T cells and, when used to treat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), prevented and ameliorated disease. Our studies demonstrate that IL-7 signaling is a prerequisite for optimal CD4+ T cell activation and that IL-7R antagonism may be effective in treating CD4+ T cell-mediated neuroinflammation and other autoimmune inflammatory conditions. PMID:26319414

  12. CD4 T-Cell Subsets in Malaria: TH1/TH2 Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Mazliah, Damian; Langhorne, Jean

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T-cells have been shown to play a central role in immune control of infection with Plasmodium parasites. At the erythrocytic stage of infection, IFN-γ production by CD4+ T-cells and CD4+ T-cell help for the B-cell response are required for control and elimination of infected red blood cells. CD4+ T-cells are also important for controlling Plasmodium pre-erythrocytic stages through the activation of parasite-specific CD8+ T-cells. However, excessive inflammatory responses triggered by the infection have been shown to drive pathology. Early classical experiments demonstrated a biphasic CD4+ T-cell response against erythrocytic stages in mice, in which T helper (Th)1 and antibody-helper CD4+ T-cells appear sequentially during a primary infection. While IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells do play a role in controlling acute infections, and they contribute to acute erythrocytic-stage pathology, it became apparent that a classical Th2 response producing IL-4 is not a critical feature of the CD4+ T-cell response during the chronic phase of infection. Rather, effective CD4+ T-cell help for B-cells, which can occur in the absence of IL-4, is required to control chronic parasitemia. IL-10, important to counterbalance inflammation and associated with protection from inflammatory-mediated severe malaria in both humans and experimental models, was originally considered be produced by CD4+ Th2 cells during infection. We review the interpretations of CD4+ T-cell responses during Plasmodium infection, proposed under the original Th1/Th2 paradigm, in light of more recent advances, including the identification of multifunctional T-cells such as Th1 cells co-expressing IFN-γ and IL-10, the identification of follicular helper T-cells (Tfh) as the predominant CD4+ T helper subset for B-cells, and the recognition of inherent plasticity in the fates of different CD4+ T-cells. PMID:25628621

  13. CD4 T cell activation by B cells in human Leishmania (Viannia) infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An effective adaptive immune response requires activation of specific CD4 T cells. The capacity of B cells to activate CD4 T cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) has not been evaluated. Methods CD4 T cell activation by B cells of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients was evaluated by culture of PBMCs or purified B cells and CD4 T cells with Leishmania panamensis antigens. CD4 T cell and B cell activation markers were evaluated by flow cytometry and 13 cytokines were measured in supernatants with a bead-based capture assay. The effect of Leishmania antigens on BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin was evaluated in the Ramos human B cell line by targeting the antigen with anti-IgM-biotin and anti-biotin-ovalbumin-FITC. Results Culture of PBMCs from cutaneous leishmaniasis patients with Leishmania antigens resulted in upregulation of the activation markers CD25 and CD69 as well as increased frequency of CD25hiCD127- cells among CD4 T cells. Concomitantly, B cells upregulated the costimulatory molecule CD86. These changes were not observed in PBMCs from healthy subjects, indicating participation of Leishmania-specific lymphocytes expanded in vivo. Purified B cells from these patients, when interacting with purified CD4 T cells and Leishmania antigens, were capable of inducing significant increases in CD25 and CD69 expression and CD25hiCD127- frequency in CD4 T cells. These changes were associated with upregulation of CD86 in B cells. Comparison of changes in CD4 T cell activation parameters between PBMC and B cell/CD4 T cell cultures showed no statistically significant differences; further, significant secretion of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-13 was induced in both types of cultures. Additionally, culture with Leishmania antigens enhanced BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin in Ramos human B cells. Conclusions The capacity of B cells specific for Leishmania antigens in peripheral blood of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients to

  14. Tracking Virus-Specific CD4+ T Cells during and after Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pfafferot, Katja; Heeg, Malte H.J.; Gaudieri, Silvana; Grüner, Norbert; Rauch, Andri; Gerlach, J. Tilman; Jung, Maria-Christina; Zachoval, Reinhart; Pape, Gerd R.; Schraut, Winfried; Santantonio, Teresa; Nitschko, Hans; Obermeier, Martin; Phillips, Rodney; Scriba, Thomas J.; Semmo, Nasser; Day, Cheryl; Weber, Jonathan N.; Fidler, Sarah; Thimme, Robert; Haberstroh, Anita; Baumert, Thomas F.; Klenerman, Paul; Diepolder, Helmut M.

    2007-01-01

    Background CD4+ T cell help is critical in maintaining antiviral immune responses and such help has been shown to be sustained in acute resolving hepatitis C. In contrast, in evolving chronic hepatitis C CD4+ T cell helper responses appear to be absent or short-lived, using functional assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we used a novel HLA-DR1 tetramer containing a highly targeted CD4+ T cell epitope from the hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 4 to track number and phenotype of hepatitis C virus specific CD4+ T cells in a cohort of seven HLA-DR1 positive patients with acute hepatitis C in comparison to patients with chronic or resolved hepatitis C. We observed peptide-specific T cells in all seven patients with acute hepatitis C regardless of outcome at frequencies up to 0.65% of CD4+ T cells. Among patients who transiently controlled virus replication we observed loss of function, and/or physical deletion of tetramer+ CD4+ T cells before viral recrudescence. In some patients with chronic hepatitis C very low numbers of tetramer+ cells were detectable in peripheral blood, compared to robust responses detected in spontaneous resolvers. Importantly we did not observe escape mutations in this key CD4+ T cell epitope in patients with evolving chronic hepatitis C. Conclusions/Significance During acute hepatitis C a CD4+ T cell response against this epitope is readily induced in most, if not all, HLA-DR1+ patients. This antiviral T cell population becomes functionally impaired or is deleted early in the course of disease in those where viremia persists. PMID:17653276

  15. A simple theoretical framework for understanding heterogeneous differentiation of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background CD4+ T cells have several subsets of functional phenotypes, which play critical yet diverse roles in the immune system. Pathogen-driven differentiation of these subsets of cells is often heterogeneous in terms of the induced phenotypic diversity. In vitro recapitulation of heterogeneous differentiation under homogeneous experimental conditions indicates some highly regulated mechanisms by which multiple phenotypes of CD4+ T cells can be generated from a single population of naïve CD4+ T cells. Therefore, conceptual understanding of induced heterogeneous differentiation will shed light on the mechanisms controlling the response of populations of CD4+ T cells under physiological conditions. Results We present a simple theoretical framework to show how heterogeneous differentiation in a two-master-regulator paradigm can be governed by a signaling network motif common to all subsets of CD4+ T cells. With this motif, a population of naïve CD4+ T cells can integrate the signals from their environment to generate a functionally diverse population with robust commitment of individual cells. Notably, two positive feedback loops in this network motif govern three bistable switches, which in turn, give rise to three types of heterogeneous differentiated states, depending upon particular combinations of input signals. We provide three prototype models illustrating how to use this framework to explain experimental observations and make specific testable predictions. Conclusions The process in which several types of T helper cells are generated simultaneously to mount complex immune responses upon pathogenic challenges can be highly regulated, and a simple signaling network motif can be responsible for generating all possible types of heterogeneous populations with respect to a pair of master regulators controlling CD4+ T cell differentiation. The framework provides a mathematical basis for understanding the decision-making mechanisms of CD4+ T cells, and it can be

  16. The transcriptome of HIV-1 infected intestinal CD4+ T cells exposed to enteric bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Stephanie M.; Phang, Tzu; Lee, Eric J.; Helm, Karen; Kappes, John C.; McCarter, Martin D.

    2017-01-01

    Global transcriptome studies can help pinpoint key cellular pathways exploited by viruses to replicate and cause pathogenesis. Previous data showed that laboratory-adapted HIV-1 triggers significant gene expression changes in CD4+ T cell lines and mitogen-activated CD4+ T cells from peripheral blood. However, HIV-1 primarily targets mucosal compartments during acute infection in vivo. Moreover, early HIV-1 infection causes extensive depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal tract that herald persistent inflammation due to the translocation of enteric microbes to the systemic circulation. Here, we profiled the transcriptome of primary intestinal CD4+ T cells infected ex vivo with transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1. Infections were performed in the presence or absence of Prevotella stercorea, a gut microbe enriched in the mucosa of HIV-1-infected individuals that enhanced both TF HIV-1 replication and CD4+ T cell death ex vivo. In the absence of bacteria, HIV-1 triggered a cellular shutdown response involving the downregulation of HIV-1 reactome genes, while perturbing genes linked to OX40, PPAR and FOXO3 signaling. However, in the presence of bacteria, HIV-1 did not perturb these gene sets or pathways. Instead, HIV-1 enhanced granzyme expression and Th17 cell function, inhibited G1/S cell cycle checkpoint genes and triggered downstream cell death pathways in microbe-exposed gut CD4+ T cells. To gain insights on these differential effects, we profiled the gene expression landscape of HIV-1-uninfected gut CD4+ T cells exposed to bacteria. Microbial exposure upregulated genes involved in cellular proliferation, MAPK activation, Th17 cell differentiation and type I interferon signaling. Our findings reveal that microbial exposure influenced how HIV-1 altered the gut CD4+ T cell transcriptome, with potential consequences for HIV-1 susceptibility, cell survival and inflammation. The HIV-1- and microbe-altered pathways unraveled here may serve as a molecular blueprint

  17. Genome sequence of Corynebacterium nuruki S6-4 T, isolated from alcohol fermentation starter.

    PubMed

    Shin, Na-Ri; Whon, Tae Woong; Roh, Seong Woon; Kim, Min-Soo; Jung, Mi-Ja; Lee, Jina; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2011-08-01

    Corynebacterium nuruki S6-4(T), isolated from Korean alcohol fermentation starter, is a strictly aerobic, nonmotile, Gram-positive, and rod-shaped bacterium belonging to the genus Corynebacterium and the actinomycete group. We report here the draft genome sequence of C. nuruki strain S6-4(T) (3,106,595 bp, with a G+C content of 69.5%).

  18. Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium nuruki S6-4T, Isolated from Alcohol Fermentation Starter▿

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Na-Ri; Whon, Tae Woong; Roh, Seong Woon; Kim, Min-Soo; Jung, Mi-Ja; Lee, Jina; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2011-01-01

    Corynebacterium nuruki S6-4T, isolated from Korean alcohol fermentation starter, is a strictly aerobic, nonmotile, Gram-positive, and rod-shaped bacterium belonging to the genus Corynebacterium and the actinomycete group. We report here the draft genome sequence of C. nuruki strain S6-4T (3,106,595 bp, with a G+C content of 69.5%). PMID:21685278

  19. The Transcription Factor Hobit Identifies Human Cytotoxic CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oja, Anna E.; Vieira Braga, Felipe A.; Remmerswaal, Ester B. M.; Kragten, Natasja A. M.; Hertoghs, Kirsten M. L.; Zuo, Jianmin; Moss, Paul A.; van Lier, René A. W.; van Gisbergen, Klaas P. J. M.; Hombrink, Pleun

    2017-01-01

    The T cell lineage is commonly divided into CD4-expressing helper T cells that polarize immune responses through cytokine secretion and CD8-expressing cytotoxic T cells that eliminate infected target cells by virtue of the release of cytotoxic molecules. Recently, a population of CD4+ T cells that conforms to the phenotype of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells has received increased recognition. These cytotoxic CD4+ T cells display constitutive expression of granzyme B and perforin at the protein level and mediate HLA class II-dependent killing of target cells. In humans, this cytotoxic profile is found within the human cytomegalovirus (hCMV)-specific, but not within the influenza- or Epstein–Barr virus-specific CD4+ T cell populations, suggesting that, in particular, hCMV infection induces the formation of cytotoxic CD4+ T cells. We have previously described that the transcription factor Homolog of Blimp-1 in T cells (Hobit) is specifically upregulated in CD45RA+ effector CD8+ T cells that arise after hCMV infection. Here, we describe the expression pattern of Hobit in human CD4+ T cells. We found Hobit expression in cytotoxic CD4+ T cells and accumulation of Hobit+ CD4+ T cells after primary hCMV infection. The Hobit+ CD4+ T cells displayed highly overlapping characteristics with Hobit+ CD8+ T cells, including the expression of cytotoxic molecules, T-bet, and CX3CR1. Interestingly, γδ+ T cells that arise after hCMV infection also upregulate Hobit expression and display a similar effector phenotype as cytotoxic CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These findings suggest a shared differentiation pathway in CD4+, CD8+, and γδ+ T cells that may involve Hobit-driven acquisition of long-lived cytotoxic effector function. PMID:28392788

  20. HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection predict disease outcome

    PubMed Central

    Soghoian, Damien Z.; Jessen, Heiko; Flanders, Michael; Sierra-Davidson, Kailan; Cutler, Sam; Pertel, Thomas; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Lindqvist, Madelene; Davis, Isaiah; Lane, Kimberly; Rychert, Jenna; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Brass, Abraham L.; Brenchley, Jason M.; Walker, Bruce D.; Streeck, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Early immunological events during acute HIV infection are thought to fundamentally influence long-term disease outcome. Whereas the contribution of HIV-specific CD8 T cell responses to early viral control is well established, the role of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses in the control of viral replication following acute infection is unknown. A growing body of evidence suggests that CD4 T cells - besides their helper function - have the capacity to directly recognize and kill virally infected cells. In a longitudinal study of a cohort of individuals acutely infected with HIV, we observed that subjects able to spontaneously control HIV replication in the absence of antiretroviral therapy showed a significant expansion of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses—but not CD8 T cell responses–compared to subjects who progressed to a high viral set point (p=0.038). Strikingly, this expansion occurred prior to differences in viral load or CD4 T cell count and was characterized by robust cytolytic activity and expression of a distinct profile of perforin and granzymes at the earliest time point. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the emergence of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses at baseline was highly predictive of slower disease progression and clinical outcome (average days to CD4 T cell count <350/μl was 575 versus 306, p=0.001). These data demonstrate that HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses can be used during the earliest phase of HIV infection as an immunological predictor of subsequent viral set point and disease outcome. Moreover, these data suggest that expansion of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses early during acute HIV infection contributes substantially to the control of viral replication. PMID:22378925

  1. Cocaine Enhances HIV-1–Induced CD4+ T-Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandhare, Jui; Addai, Amma B.; Mantri, Chinmay K.; Hager, Cynthia; Smith, Rita M.; Barnett, Louis; Villalta, Fernando; Kalams, Spyros A.; Dash, Chandravanu

    2015-01-01

    Substance abuse is a major barrier in eradication of the HIV epidemic because it serves as a powerful cofactor for viral transmission, disease progression, and AIDS-related mortality. Cocaine, one of the commonly abused drugs among HIV-1 patients, has been suggested to accelerate HIV disease progression. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Therefore, we tested whether cocaine augments HIV-1–associated CD4+ T-cell decline, a predictor of HIV disease progression. We examined apoptosis of resting CD4+ T cells from HIV-1–negative and HIV-1–positive donors in our study, because decline of uninfected cells plays a major role in HIV-1 disease progression. Treatment of resting CD4+ T cells with cocaine (up to 100 μmol/L concentrations) did not induce apoptosis, but 200 to 1000 μmol/L cocaine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, treatment of CD4+ T cells isolated from healthy donors with both HIV-1 virions and cocaine significantly increased apoptosis compared with the apoptosis induced by cocaine or virions alone. Most important, our biochemical data suggest that cocaine induces CD4+ T-cell apoptosis by increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and inducing mitochondrial depolarization. Collectively, our results provide evidence of a synergy between cocaine and HIV-1 on CD4+ T-cell apoptosis that may, in part, explain the accelerated disease observed in HIV-1–infected drug abusers. PMID:24486327

  2. Stephanthraniline A suppressed CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological hepatitis through impairing PKCθ function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Yang; Zhou, Li-Fei; Li, Xiao-Yu; Zhao, Jia-Wen; Xu, Shi-Fang; Huang, Wen-Hai; Gao, Li-Juan; Hao, Shu-Juan; Ye, Yi-Ping; Sun, Hong-Xiang

    2016-10-15

    Stephanthraniline A (STA), a C21 steroid isolated from Stephanotis mucronata (Blanco) Merr., was previously shown to inhibit T cells activation and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the in vivo immunosuppressive activity of STA and to elucidate its potential mechanisms. The results showed that pretreatment with STA significantly attenuated concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis and reduced CD4(+) T cells activation and aggregation in hepatic tissue in mice. STA directly suppressed the activation and proliferation of Con A-induced CD4(+) T cells, and inhibited NFAT, NFκB and MAPK signaling cascades in activated CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Moreover, it was proved that STA inhibited T cells activation and proliferation through proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling- and Ca(2+) signaling-independent way. The molecular docking studies predicted that STA could tight bind to PKCθ via five hydrogen. The further findings indicated STA directly inhibited PKCθ kinase activity, and its phosphorylation in activated CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Collectively, the present study indicated that STA could protect against CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological hepatitis in mice through PKCθ and its downstream NFAT, NFκB and MAPK signaling cascades. These results highlight the potential of STA as an effective leading compound for use in the treatment of CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  3. Abdominal visceral adiposity influences CD4+ T cell cytokine production in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ozias, Marlies K; Li, Shengqi; Hull, Holly R; Brooks, William M; Petroff, Margaret G; Carlson, Susan E

    2015-02-01

    Women with pre-gravid obesity are at risk for pregnancy complications. While the macrophage response of obese pregnant women categorized by body mass index (BMI) has been documented, the relationship between the peripheral CD4(+) T cell cytokine profile and body fat compartments during pregnancy is unknown. In this study, third trimester peripheral CD4(+) T cell cytokine profiles were measured in healthy pregnant women [n=35; pre-pregnancy BMI: 18.5-40]. CD4(+) T cells were isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and stimulated to examine their capacity to generate cytokines. Between 1 and 3weeks postpartum, total body fat was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat masses were determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Pearson's correlation was performed to assess relationships between cytokines and fat mass. Results showed that greater abdominal visceral fat mass was associated with a decrease in stimulated CD4(+) T cell cytokine expression. IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-12p70, IL-10 and IL-17A were inversely related to visceral fat mass. Chemokines CCL3 and IL-8 and growth factors G-CSF and FLT-3L were also inversely correlated. Additionally, total body fat mass was inversely correlated with FGF-2 while abdominal subcutaneous fat mass and BMI were unrelated to any CD4(+) T cell cytokine. In conclusion, lower responsiveness of CD4(+) T cell cytokines associated with abdominal visceral fat mass is a novel finding late in gestation.

  4. Altered Intracellular ATP Production by Activated CD4+ T-Cells in Very Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Gabrielli, Liliana; Chiereghin, Angela; Lazzarotto, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Background. The neonatal immune system is not fully developed at birth; newborns have adequate lymphocytes counts but these cells lack function. Objective. To assess the activity of T-cells and the influence of the main perinatal factors in very preterm infants (birth weight < 1500 g). Design. Blood samples from 59 preterm infants (21/59 were dizygotic twins) were collected at birth and at 30 days of life to measure CD4+ T-cell activity using the ImmuKnow™ assay. Fifteen healthy adults were included as a control group. Results. CD4+ T-cell activity was lower in VLBW infants compared with adults (p < 0.001). Twins showed lower immune activity compared to singletons (p = 0.005). Infants born vaginally showed higher CD4+ T-cell activity compared to those born by C-section (p = 0.031); infants born after prolonged Premature Rupture of Membranes (pPROM) showed higher CD4+ T-cell activity at birth (p = 0.002) compared to infants born without pPROM. Low CD4+ T-cell activity at birth is associated with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in the first week of life (p = 0.049). Conclusions. Preterm infants show a lack in CD4+ T-cell activity at birth. Perinatal factors such as intrauterine inflammation, mode of delivery, and zygosity can influence the adaptive immune activation capacity at birth and can contribute to exposing these infants to serious complications such as NEC. PMID:28070527

  5. Impact of nicotine on the interplay between human periodontal ligament cells and CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xin; Liu, Ying-Feng; Wong, Yong; Wu, Li-Zheng; Tan, Ling; Liu, Fen; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2016-09-01

    Periodontitis is a common infectious disease associated with destruction of periodontal ligaments and alveolar bones. CD4(+) T cell-mediated immune response is involved in the progression of periodontitis. Tobacco consumption increases the risk of periodontal disease. However, the impact of nicotine on the interaction between human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and CD4(+) T cells remains unrevealed. Our study aims to investigate the effect of nicotine on PDL cells and the cocultured CD4(+) T cells. The PDL cell cultures were established by explants from healthy individuals, exposed to nicotine or α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX), and incubated solely or in combination with CD4(+) T cells. Afterwards, cell viability, secreted cytokines, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were evaluated. In monoculture of PDL cells, nicotine dramatically repressed cell viability and increased apoptosis. Meanwhile, α-BTX largely reversed the nicotine-induced apoptosis and increased viability of PDL cells. Compared with the monoculture, MMP-1, MMP-3, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17, and IL-21 in supernatant of cocultures were markedly elevated after treatment with nicotine. Moreover, α-BTX significantly attenuated nicotine-triggered production of these components either in mono- or co-cultures. In addition, PDL cell-derived CXCL12 following nicotine treatment recruited CD4(+) T cells. Above all, nicotine deteriorated periodontitis partially by promoting PDL cell-CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory response and matrix degradation.

  6. Expression of fas protein on CD4+T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Fan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Hui-Guo

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence on the Expression of Fas protein on CD4+ T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne laser in the cases of psoriasis. Methods:the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was determined in the casee of psoriasis(n=5) pre and post-low level laser irradiation(30 min、60min and 120min)by flow cytometry as compared withthe control(n=5). Results:In the cases of psoriasis,the expression of CD4+T FAS protein 21.4+/-3.1% was increased significantly than that of control group 16.8+/-2.1% pre-irradiation, p<0.05in the control,there is no difference between pre and post- irradiation,p>0.05in the cases , the expression of CD4+T Fas protein wae positively corelated to the irradiation times, when the energy density arrived to 22.92J/cm2(60 minutes)and 45.84J/cm2(120minutes), the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was increased significantly as compared with pre-irradiation,p<0.05.Conclusion: The expression of CD4+T Fas protein may be increased by low level He-Ne laser irradiation ,the uncontrolled status of apoptosis could be corrected.

  7. Key role for CD4 T cells during mixed antibody mediated rejection of renal allografts

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, A.; Wang, J.; Pelletier, R.P.; Nadasdy, T.; Brodsky, S.; Roy, S.; Lodder, M.; Bobek, D.; Mofatt-Bruce, S.; Fairchild, R.L.; Henry, M.L.; Hadley, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    We utilized mouse models to elucidate the immunologic mechanisms of functional graft loss during mixed antibody mediated rejection of renal allografts (mixed AMR), in which humoral and cellular responses to the graft occur concomitantly. Although the majority of T cells in the graft at the time of rejection were CD8 T cells with only a minor population of CD4 T cells, depletion of CD4 but not CD8 cells prevented acute graft loss during mixed AMR. CD4 depletion eliminated anti-donor alloantibodies and conferred protection from destruction of renal allografts. ELISPOT revealed that CD4 T effectors responded to donor alloantigens by both the direct and indirect pathways of allorecognition. In transfer studies, CD4 T effectors primed to donor alloantigens were highly effective at promoting acute graft dysfunction, and exhibited the attributes of effector T cells. Laser capture microdissection and confirmatory immunostaining studies revealed that CD4 T cells infiltrating the graft produced effector molecules with graft destructive potential. Bioluminescent imaging confirmed that CD4 T effectors traffic to the graft site in immune replete hosts. These data document that host CD4 T cells can promote acute dysfunction of renal allografts by directly mediating graft injury in addition to facilitating anti-donor alloantibody responses. PMID:24410909

  8. Electromagnetic levitation coil fabrication technique for MSFC containerless processing facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Theiss, J.; Curreri, P. A.; Abbaschian, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    A technique is described for more reproducible fabrication of electromagnetic levitation coils. A split mandrel was developed upon which the coil is wound. After fabrication the mandrel can be disassembled to remove it from the coil. Previously, a full day was required to fabricate a levitation coil and the success rate for a functional coil was only 50 percent. About eight coils may be completed in one day using the technique developed and 95 percent of them are good levitation coils.

  9. Crystal Structure of a Super Leucine Zipper an Extended Two-Stranded Super Long Coiled Coil

    SciTech Connect

    J Diao

    2011-12-31

    Coiled coil is a ubiquitous structural motif in proteins, with two to seven alpha helices coiled together like the strands of a rope, and coiled coil folding and assembly is not completely understood. A GCN4 leucine zipper mutant with four mutations of K3A, D7A, Y17W, and H18N has been designed, and the crystal structure has been determined at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution. The peptide monomer shows a helix trunk with short curved N- and C-termini. In the crystal, two monomers cross in 35{sup o} and form an X-shaped dimer, and each X-shaped dimer is welded into the next one through sticky hydrophobic ends, thus forming an extended two-stranded, parallel, super long coiled coil rather than a discrete, two-helix coiled coil of the wild-type GCN4 leucine zipper. Leucine residues appear at every seventh position in the super long coiled coil, suggesting that it is an extended super leucine zipper. Compared to the wild-type leucine zipper, the N-terminus of the mutant has a dramatic conformational change and the C-terminus has one more residue Glu 32 determined. The mutant X-shaped dimer has a large crossing angle of 35{sup o} instead of 18{sup o} in the wild-type dimer. The results show a novel assembly mode and oligomeric state of coiled coil, and demonstrate that mutations may affect folding and assembly of the overall coiled coil. Analysis of the formation mechanism of the super long coiled coil may help understand and design self-assembling protein fibers.

  10. Critical evaluation of in silico methods for prediction of coiled-coil domains in proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Ching Han Chang, Catherine; Nagel, Jeremy; Porebski, Benjamin T; Hayashida, Morihiro; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Song, Jiangning; Buckle, Ashley M

    2016-03-01

    Coiled-coils refer to a bundle of helices coiled together like strands of a rope. It has been estimated that nearly 3% of protein-encoding regions of genes harbour coiled-coil domains (CCDs). Experimental studies have confirmed that CCDs play a fundamental role in subcellular infrastructure and controlling trafficking of eukaryotic cells. Given the importance of coiled-coils, multiple bioinformatics tools have been developed to facilitate the systematic and high-throughput prediction of CCDs in proteins. In this article, we review and compare 12 sequence-based bioinformatics approaches and tools for coiled-coil prediction. These approaches can be categorized into two classes: coiled-coil detection and coiled-coil oligomeric state prediction. We evaluated and compared these methods in terms of their input/output, algorithm, prediction performance, validation methods and software utility. All the independent testing data sets are available at http://lightning.med.monash.edu/coiledcoil/. In addition, we conducted a case study of nine human polyglutamine (PolyQ) disease-related proteins and predicted CCDs and oligomeric states using various predictors. Prediction results for CCDs were highly variable among different predictors. Only two peptides from two proteins were confirmed to be CCDs by majority voting. Both domains were predicted to form dimeric coiled-coils using oligomeric state prediction. We anticipate that this comprehensive analysis will be an insightful resource for structural biologists with limited prior experience in bioinformatics tools, and for bioinformaticians who are interested in designing novel approaches for coiled-coil and its oligomeric state prediction.

  11. Optimum coil insertion speed of various coils in brain aneurysm embolization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Yoshifumi; Takeuchi, Masataka; Fukasaku, Kazuaki

    2016-10-01

    A coil must comprise material with shape memory to perform optimal coil embolization. To achieve this, the alloy characteristics of the coil (hardness, shape, and thickness) must be understood. In this experiment, a catheter was fixed in the bright position and the movement of the coil was observed under a constant rate of insertion; the optimal insertion rate during clinical use was investigated. The first coil insertion speed was evaluated using simulated aneurysms in an in vivo arterial model. The results showed that the insertion force relates to the deployment shape of the coil, that the feedback through the force indicator using sound is very effective, and that the recorder is useful for analysis of coil embolization. The inserted coils during aneurysm embolization were able to wind uniformly within the aneurysm due to a variety of factors (guiding or micro-catheter position and kick-back phenomenon such as delivery wire). Optimal speed is achieved with proper coil design, which allows the coil to be inserted into the aneurysm. The shape and size of the aneurysm can help determine the necessary size and design of the coil that should be used during the optimal speed range. Aneurysm wall and coil characteristics are considered, along with the friction state of the coil (hardness, shape, and thickness), leading to improvements in safety during the insertion procedure at optimum speed.

  12. 26 CFR 51.4T - Information provided by the agencies (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... sales price (ASP) for each Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) code for the sales year...IdentifiableDataFiles/03_PartBNationalSummaryDataFile.asp to obtain the number of allowed billing units per... respective NDCs) manufactured by a single entity, CMS will multiply the annual weighted ASP by the...

  13. 26 CFR 51.4T - Information provided by the agencies (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... sales price (ASP) for each Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) code for the sales year...IdentifiableDataFiles/03_PartBNationalSummaryDataFile.asp to obtain the number of allowed billing units per... respective NDCs) manufactured by a single entity, CMS will multiply the annual weighted ASP by the...

  14. 26 CFR 51.4T - Information provided by the agencies (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... sales price (ASP) for each Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) code for the sales year...IdentifiableDataFiles/03_PartBNationalSummaryDataFile.asp to obtain the number of allowed billing units per... respective NDCs) manufactured by a single entity, CMS will multiply the annual weighted ASP by the...

  15. The Golgin Family of Coiled-Coil Tethering Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Witkos, Tomasz M.; Lowe, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The golgins are a family of predominantly coiled-coil proteins that are localized to the Golgi apparatus. Golgins are present in all eukaryotes, suggesting an evolutionary conserved function. Golgins are anchored to the Golgi membrane by their carboxy terminus and are predicted to adopt an extended conformation that projects into the surrounding cytoplasm. This arrangement is ideal for the capture or tethering of nearby membranes or cytoskeletal elements. Golgin-mediated tethering is thought to be important for vesicular traffic at the Golgi apparatus, the maintenance of Golgi architecture, as well as the positioning of the Golgi apparatus within cells. In addition to acting as tethers, some golgins can also sequester various factors at the Golgi membrane, allowing for the spatiotemporal regulation of downstream cellular functions. Although it is now established that golgins are membrane and cytoskeleton tethers, the mechanisms underlying tethering remain poorly defined. Moreover, the importance of golgin-mediated tethering in a physiological context remains to be fully explored. This review will describe our current understanding of golgin function, highlighting recent progress that has been made, and goes on to discuss outstanding questions and potential avenues for future research with regard to this family of conserved Golgi-associated proteins. PMID:26793708

  16. Force modulated conductance of artificial coiled-coil protein monolayers.

    PubMed

    Atanassov, Alexander; Hendler, Ziv; Berkovich, Inbal; Ashkenasy, Gonen; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2013-01-01

    Studies of charge transport through proteins bridged between two electrodes have been the subject of intense research in recent years. However, the complex structure of proteins makes it difficult to elucidate transport mechanisms, and the use of simple peptide oligomers may be an over simplified model of the proteins. To bridge this structural gap, we present here studies of charge transport through artificial parallel coiled-coil proteins conducted in dry environment. Protein monolayers uniaxially oriented at an angle of ∼ 30° with respect to the surface normal were prepared. Current voltage measurements, obtained using conductive-probe atomic force microscopy, revealed the mechano-electronic behavior of the protein films. It was found that the low voltage conductance of the protein monolayer increases linearly with applied force, mainly due to increase in the tip contact area. Negligible compression of the films for loads below 26 nN allowed estimating a tunneling attenuation factor, β(0) , of 0.5-0.6 Å(-1) , which is akin to charge transfer by tunneling mechanism, despite the comparably large charge transport distance. These studies show that mechano-electronic behavior of proteins can shed light on their complex charge transport mechanisms, and on how these mechanisms depend on the detailed structure of the proteins. Such studies may provide insightful information on charge transfer in biological systems.

  17. Unusually Stable Helical Coil Allotrope of Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Guan, Jie; Jiang, Jingwei; Tománek, David

    2016-12-14

    We have identified an unusually stable helical coil allotrope of phosphorus. Our ab initio density functional theory calculations indicate that the uncoiled, isolated straight one-dimensional chain is equally stable as a monolayer of black phosphorus dubbed phosphorene. The coiling tendency and the attraction between adjacent coil segments add an extra stabilization energy of ∼12 meV/atom to the coil allotrope, similar in value to the ∼16 meV/atom interlayer attraction in bulk black phosphorus. Thus, the helical coil structure is essentially as stable as black phosphorus, the most stable phosphorus allotrope known to date. With an optimum radius of 2.4 nm, the helical coil of phosphorus may fit well and even form inside wide carbon nanotubes.

  18. Current COIL research in Samara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolayev, V. D.

    1996-02-01

    Development of the high pressure singlet oxygen generator (SOG) is a very important aspect for chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL). Increasing of oxygen pressure up to 30 torr and more at conserving high O2(1(Delta) ) yield and maintaining BHP temperature at minus (10 divided by 20) degrees Celsius permits us to decrease ration [H2O]/[O2] to 5% and less. In this case COIL can operate successfully without a water vapor trap. With raising the total pressure Reynolds number increases too, diminishing boundary layers in supersonic nozzles and improving pressure recovery. The weight and dimensions of the SOG and laser become reduced for the same gas flow rate. For solving these problems the jet SOG has been suggested and developed in Lebedev Physical Institute, Samara Branch. The advantages of the jet SOG consist of the following: (1) Large and controlled specific surface of contact liquid-gas provides for high mass transfer efficiency. (2) High jets velocity guarantees fast basic hydrogen peroxide (BHP) surface renovation. (3) High gas velocity in the reaction zone diminishes O2(1(Delta) ) quenching. (4) Efficient gas-liquid heat exchange eliminates the gas heating and generation water vapor due O2(1(Delta) ) quenching. (5) Counterflowing design of the jet SOG produces the best conditions for self-cleaning gas flow of droplets in the reaction zone and gives the possibility of COIL operation without droplets separator. High pressure jet SOG has some features connected with intrachannel jet formation, free space jets reconstruction, interaction jets ensemble with counter moving gas flow and drag part of gas by jets, disintegrating jets, generation and separation of droplets, heat effects, surface renovation, impoverishment BHP surface by HO2- ions, moving solution film on the reaction zone walls, etc. In this communication our current understanding of the major processes in the jet SOG is set forth. The complex gas and hydrodynamic processes with heat and mass transfer

  19. The structure of the GemC1 coiled coil and its interaction with the Geminin family of coiled-coil proteins.

    PubMed

    Caillat, Christophe; Fish, Alexander; Pefani, Dafni Eleftheria; Taraviras, Stavros; Lygerou, Zoi; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2015-11-01

    GemC1, together with Idas and Geminin, an important regulator of DNA-replication licensing and differentiation decisions, constitute a superfamily sharing a homologous central coiled-coil domain. To better understand this family of proteins, the crystal structure of a GemC1 coiled-coil domain variant engineered for better solubility was determined to 2.2 Å resolution. GemC1 shows a less typical coiled coil compared with the Geminin homodimer and the Geminin-Idas heterodimer structures. It is also shown that both in vitro and in cells GemC1 interacts with Geminin through its coiled-coil domain, forming a heterodimer that is more stable that the GemC1 homodimer. Comparative analysis of the thermal stability of all of the possible superfamily complexes, using circular dichroism to follow the unfolding of the entire helix of the coiled coil, or intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of a unique conserved N-terminal tryptophan, shows that the unfolding of the coiled coil is likely to take place from the C-terminus towards the N-terminus. It is also shown that homodimers show a single-state unfolding, while heterodimers show a two-state unfolding, suggesting that the dimer first falls apart and the helices then unfold according to the stability of each protein. The findings argue that Geminin-family members form homodimers and heterodimers between them, and this ability is likely to be important for modulating their function in cycling and differentiating cells.

  20. Transport Vesicle Tethering at the Trans Golgi Network: Coiled Coil Proteins in Action

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Pak-yan P.; Pfeffer, Suzanne R.

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi complex is decorated with so-called Golgin proteins that share a common feature: a large proportion of their amino acid sequences are predicted to form coiled-coil structures. The possible presence of extensive coiled coils implies that these proteins are highly elongated molecules that can extend a significant distance from the Golgi surface. This property would help them to capture or trap inbound transport vesicles and to tether Golgi mini-stacks together. This review will summarize our current understanding of coiled coil tethers that are needed for the receipt of transport vesicles at the trans Golgi network (TGN). How do long tethering proteins actually catch vesicles? Golgi-associated, coiled coil tethers contain numerous binding sites for small GTPases, SNARE proteins, and vesicle coat proteins. How are these interactions coordinated and are any or all of them important for the tethering process? Progress toward understanding these questions and remaining, unresolved mysteries will be discussed. PMID:27014693

  1. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, Allan; Boozer, Allen H.

    1987-01-01

    A helical axis stellarator using only noninterlocking planar, non-circular coils, generates magnetic fields having a magnetic well and large rotational transform with resultant large equilibrium beta.

  2. The CMS Beam Halo Monitor electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, N.; Dabrowski, A. E.; Fabbri, F.; Grassi, T.; Hughes, E.; Mans, J.; Montanari, A.; Orfanelli, S.; Rusack, R.; Torromeo, G.; Stickland, D. P.; Stifter, K.

    2016-02-01

    The CMS Beam Halo Monitor has been successfully installed in the CMS cavern in LHC Long Shutdown 1 for measuring the machine induced background for LHC Run II. The system is based on 40 detector units composed of synthetic quartz Cherenkov radiators coupled to fast photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The readout electronics chain uses many components developed for the Phase 1 upgrade to the CMS Hadronic Calorimeter electronics, with dedicated firmware and readout adapted to the beam monitoring requirements. The PMT signal is digitized by a charge integrating ASIC (QIE10), providing both the signal rise time, with few nanosecond resolution, and the charge integrated over one bunch crossing. The backend electronics uses microTCA technology and receives data via a high-speed 5 Gbps asynchronous link. It records histograms with sub-bunch crossing timing resolution and is read out via IPbus using the newly designed CMS data acquisition for non-event based data. The data is processed in real time and published to CMS and the LHC, providing online feedback on the beam quality. A dedicated calibration monitoring system has been designed to generate short triggered pulses of light to monitor the efficiency of the system. The electronics has been in operation since the first LHC beams of Run II and has served as the first demonstration of the new QIE10, Microsemi Igloo2 FPGA and high-speed 5 Gbps link with LHC data.

  3. Validation of software releases for CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gutsche, Oliver; /Fermilab

    2009-03-01

    The CMS software stack currently consists of more than 2 Million lines of code developed by over 250 authors with a new version being released every week. CMS has setup a release validation process for quality assurance which enables the developers to compare to previous releases and references. This process provides the developers with reconstructed datasets of real data and MC samples. The samples span the whole range of detector effects and important physics signatures to benchmark the performance of the software. They are used to investigate interdependency effects of software packages and to find and fix bugs. The samples have to be available in a very short time after a release is published to fit into the streamlined CMS development cycle. The standard CMS processing infrastructure and dedicated resources at CERN and FNAL are used to achieve a very short turnaround of 24 hours. The here described release validation process is an integral part of CMS software development and contributes significantly to ensure stable production and analysis. It's success emphasizes the importance of a streamlined release validation process for projects with a large code basis and significant number of developers and can function as an example for future projects.

  4. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Madera, Laurence; Greenshields, Anna; Coombs, Melanie R. Power; Hoskin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and CCL2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) while production of interleukin-10 remained unchanged. The increased LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was transient and correlated with enhanced cytokine production in response to other Toll-like receptor agonists, including peptidoglycan and flagellin. In addition, 4T1-conditioned BMDMs exhibited strengthened LPS-induced nitric oxide production and enhanced phagocytosis of Escherichia coli. 4T1-mediated augmentation of macrophage responses to LPS was partially dependent on the NFκB pathway, macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and actin polymerization, as well as the presence of 4T1-secreted extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages obtained from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice displayed enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to LPS. These results suggest that uptake of 4T1-secreted factors and actin-mediated ingestion of 4T1-secreted exosomes by macrophages cause a transient enhancement of innate inflammatory responses. Mammary carcinoma-mediated regulation of innate immunity may have significant implications for our understanding of host defense and cancer progression. PMID:26177198

  5. TNFAIP3 promotes survival of CD4 T cells by restricting MTOR and promoting autophagy.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Yu; Oshima, Shigeru; Takahara, Masahiro; Maeyashiki, Chiaki; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Masanori; Nibe, Yoichi; Nozaki, Kengo; Nagaishi, Takashi; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Ma, Averil; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy plays important roles in metabolism, differentiation, and survival in T cells. TNFAIP3/A20 is a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that is thought to be a negative regulator of autophagy in cell lines. However, the role of TNFAIP3 in autophagy remains unclear. To determine whether TNFAIP3 regulates autophagy in CD4 T cells, we first analyzed Tnfaip3-deficient naïve CD4 T cells in vitro. We demonstrated that Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells exhibited reduced MAP1LC3/LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3) puncta formation, increased mitochondrial content, and exaggerated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. These results indicate that TNFAIP3 promotes autophagy after T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation in CD4 T cells. We then investigated the mechanism by which TNFAIP3 promotes autophagy signaling. We found that TNFAIP3 bound to the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) complex and that Tnfaip3-deficient cells displayed enhanced ubiquitination of the MTOR complex and MTOR activity. To confirm the effects of enhanced MTOR activity in Tnfaip3-deficient cells, we analyzed cell survival following treatment with Torin1, an MTOR inhibitor. Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells exhibited fewer cell numbers than the control cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the impaired survival of Tnfaip3-deficient cells was ameliorated with Torin1 treatment in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Torin1 was abolished by Atg5 deficiency. Thus, enhanced MTOR activity regulates the survival of Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells. Taken together, our findings illustrate that TNFAIP3 restricts MTOR signaling and promotes autophagy, providing new insight into the manner in which MTOR and autophagy regulate survival in CD4 T cells.

  6. Compact stellarators with modular coils.

    PubMed

    Garabedian, P R

    2000-07-18

    Compact stellarator designs with modular coils and only two or three field periods are now available; these designs have both good stability and quasiaxial symmetry providing adequate transport for a magnetic fusion reactor. If the bootstrap current assumes theoretically predicted values a three field period configuration is optimal, but if that net current turns out to be lower, a device with two periods and just 12 modular coils might be better. There are also attractive designs with quasihelical symmetry and four or five periods whose properties depend less on the bootstrap current. Good performance requires that there be a satisfactory magnetic well in the vacuum field, which is a property lacking in a stellarator-tokamak hybrid that has been proposed for a proof of principle experiment. In this paper, we present an analysis of stability for these configurations that is based on a mountain pass theorem asserting that, if two solutions of the problem of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium can be found, then there has to be an unstable solution. We compare results of our theory of equilibrium, stability, and transport with recently announced measurements from the large LHD experiment in Japan.

  7. Compact stellarators with modular coils

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2000-01-01

    Compact stellarator designs with modular coils and only two or three field periods are now available; these designs have both good stability and quasiaxial symmetry providing adequate transport for a magnetic fusion reactor. If the bootstrap current assumes theoretically predicted values a three field period configuration is optimal, but if that net current turns out to be lower, a device with two periods and just 12 modular coils might be better. There are also attractive designs with quasihelical symmetry and four or five periods whose properties depend less on the bootstrap current. Good performance requires that there be a satisfactory magnetic well in the vacuum field, which is a property lacking in a stellarator-tokamak hybrid that has been proposed for a proof of principle experiment. In this paper, we present an analysis of stability for these configurations that is based on a mountain pass theorem asserting that, if two solutions of the problem of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium can be found, then there has to be an unstable solution. We compare results of our theory of equilibrium, stability, and transport with recently announced measurements from the large LHD experiment in Japan. PMID:10899993

  8. Coiled tubing - Operations and services

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, D.A.; Blue, T.H. )

    1993-03-01

    Sand production can severely impact well performance and profitability by damaging production equipment or plugging wellbores. Sand control in existing wells may be required because of inadequate initial completion design, recompletion to new intervals or changes in reservoir production characteristics. The most durable and reliable sand control is by conventional gravel packing, but in some cases, conventional packs may not be economic or feasible. Improvements in coiled tubing technology and reliability have resulted in better application and increased acceptance of through-tubing sand control. Concentric gravel packing and sand consolidation are being used more because of advances in equipment, services, downhole tools and fluids. Candidates for these techniques include conventional completions that begin producing sand and wells with gravel pack failures. Economical jobs have been performed successfully in several different wellbore configurations. Some initially non-gravel packed wells are now being designed for possible through-tubing gravel packing, anticipating sand production later in the completion's producing life. This paper reviews the general procedures for installing a through-tubing, washdown mechanical gravel pack using coiled tubing conveyance and placement techniques.

  9. Accommodation of structural rearrangements in the huntingtin-interacting protein 1 coiled-coil domain

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbur, Jeremy D.; Hwang, Peter K.; Brodsky, Frances M.; Fletterick, Robert J.

    2010-03-01

    Variable packing interaction related to the conformational flexibility within the huntingtin-interacting protein 1 coiled coil domain. Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) is an important link between the actin cytoskeleton and clathrin-mediated endocytosis machinery. HIP1 has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease. The binding of HIP1 to actin is regulated through an interaction with clathrin light chain. Clathrin light chain binds to a flexible coiled-coil domain in HIP1 and induces a compact state that is refractory to actin binding. To understand the mechanism of this conformational regulation, a high-resolution crystal structure of a stable fragment from the HIP1 coiled-coil domain was determined. The flexibility of the HIP1 coiled-coil region was evident from its variation from a previously determined structure of a similar region. A hydrogen-bond network and changes in coiled-coil monomer interaction suggest that the HIP1 coiled-coil domain is uniquely suited to allow conformational flexibility.

  10. Visualization of an unstable coiled coil from the scallop myosin rod.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Brown, Jerry H; Reshetnikova, Ludmilla; Blazsek, Antal; Farkas, László; Nyitray, László; Cohen, Carolyn

    2003-07-17

    Alpha-helical coiled coils in muscle exemplify simplicity and economy of protein design: small variations in sequence lead to remarkable diversity in cellular functions. Myosin II is the key protein in muscle contraction, and the molecule's two-chain alpha-helical coiled-coil rod region--towards the carboxy terminus of the heavy chain--has unusual structural and dynamic features. The amino-terminal subfragment-2 (S2) domains of the rods can swing out from the thick filament backbone at a hinge in the coiled coil, allowing the two myosin 'heads' and their motor domains to interact with actin and generate tension. Most of the S2 rod appears to be a flexible coiled coil, but studies suggest that the structure at the N-terminal region is unstable, and unwinding or bending of the alpha-helices near the head-rod junction seems necessary for many of myosin's functional properties. Here we show the physical basis of a particularly weak coiled-coil segment by determining the 2.5-A-resolution crystal structure of a leucine-zipper-stabilized fragment of the scallop striated-muscle myosin rod adjacent to the head-rod junction. The N-terminal 14 residues are poorly ordered; the rest of the S2 segment forms a flexible coiled coil with poorly packed core residues. The unusual absence of interhelical salt bridges here exposes apolar core atoms to solvent.

  11. Statistical analysis of intrahelical ionic interactions in alpha-helices and coiled coils.

    PubMed

    Meier, Markus; Burkhard, Peter

    2006-08-01

    There are many controversies concerning whether ionic interactions in alpha-helices and coiled coils actually contribute to the stabilisation and formation of these structures. Here we used a statistical approach to probe this question. We extracted unique alpha-helical and coiled coil structures from the protein database and analysed the ionic interactions between positively and negatively charged residues. The ionic interactions were categorized according to the type, spacing and order of the residues involved. Separate datasets were produced depending on the number of alpha-helices in the coiled coils and the mutual orientation of the helices. We compared the frequency of residue configurations able to form ionic interactions with their probability to form the interaction. We found a correlation between the two variables in alpha-helices, antiparallel two-stranded coiled coils and parallel two-stranded coiled coils. This indicates that some ionic interactions are indeed important for the formation and stabilisation of alpha-helices and coiled coils. We concluded that the configurations, which have simultaneously a large probability to form the ionic interaction and a frequent occurrence, are those, which have the most stabilising effect. These are the 4RE, 3ER and 4ER interactions.

  12. Design of the coolant system for the Large Coil Test Facility pulse coils

    SciTech Connect

    Bridgman, C.; Ryan, T.L.

    1983-01-01

    The pulse coils will be a part of the Large Coil Test Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, which is designed to test six large tokamak-type superconducting coils. The pulse coil set consists of two resistive coaxial solenoid coils, mounted so that their magnetic axis is perpendicular to the toroidal field lines of the test coil. The pulse coils provide transient vertical fields at test coil locations to simulate the pulsed vertical fields present in tokamak devices. The pulse coils are designed to be pulsed for 30 s every 150 s, which results in a Joule heating of 116 kW per coil. In order to provide this capability, the pulse coil coolant system is required to deliver 6.3 L/s (100 gpm) of subcooled liquid nitrogen at 10-atm absolute pressure. The coolant system can also cool down each pulse coil from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature. This paper provides details of the pumping and heat exchange equipment designed for the coolant system and of the associated instrumentation and controls.

  13. Characterization of Coupled Coil in Seawater for Wireless Power Transfer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    9 8. Quality factor of the coils in air, seawater, and atop a ferrite plate...coils (‘blue’). quality factor of the coils in air, seawater, and atop a ferrite plate...was designed to be inserted inside the transmit coil, as shown in Figure 5(b). The receive coil was filled with a ferrite powder to increase its

  14. Exotic quarkonium states in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristella, Leonardo

    2017-03-01

    The studies of the production of the X(3872), either prompt or from B hadron decays, and of the J/ψϕ mass spectrum in B hadron decays have been carried out by using pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The cross-section ratio of the X(3872) with respect to the ψ(2S ) in the J/ψπ+π- decay channel and the fraction of X(3872) coming from B-hadron decays are measured as a function of transverse momentum (pT), covering unprecedentedly high values of pT. For the first time, the prompt production cross section for the X(3872) times the unknown branching fraction for the decay of X(3872) →J/ψπ+π- is extracted differentially in pT and compared to theoretical predictions based on the Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization approach. The dipion invariant-mass spectrum of the J/ψπ+π- system in the X(3872) decay is also investigated. A peaking structure in the J/ψϕ mass spectrum near threshold is observed in B± → J/ψϕK± decays. The data sample, selected on the basis of the dimuon decay mode of the J/ψ, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.2 fb-1. Fitting the structure to an S-wave relativistic Breit-Wigner lineshape above a three-body phase-space nonresonant component gives a signal statistical significance exceeding five standard deviations. The fitted mass and width values are m = 4148.0 ± 2.4(stat.) ± 6.3(syst.) MeV and Γ = 28-11+15 (stat.) ± 19(syst.) MeV, respectively. Evidence for an additional peaking structure at higher J/ψϕ mass is also reported. The search for resonance-like structures in the Bs0π± invariant mass spectrum do not show any unexpected result. An upper limit on the relative production of the claimed X(5568) and Bs multiplied by the unknown branching fraction of the decay X(5568) → Bsπ± is estimated to be 3.9% at 95% CL in the most conservative case.

  15. Imaging CD4+ T cell interstitial migration in the inflamed dermis

    PubMed Central

    Gaylo, Alison; Overstreet, Michael G.; Fowell, Deborah J.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of CD4+ T cells to carry out effector functions is dependent upon the rapid and efficient migration of these cells in inflamed peripheral tissues through an as-yet undefined mechanism. The application of multiphoton microscopy to the study of the immune system provides a tool to measure the dynamics of immune responses within intact tissues. Here we present a protocol for non-invasive intravital multiphoton imaging of CD4+ T cells in the inflamed mouse ear dermis. Use of a custom imaging platform and a venous catheter allows for the visualization of CD4+ T cell dynamics in the dermal interstitium, with the ability to interrogate these cells in real-time via the addition of blocking antibodies to key molecular components involved in motility. This system provides advantages over both in vitro models and surgically invasive imaging procedures. Understanding the pathways used by CD4+ T cells for motility may ultimately provide insight into the basic function of CD4+ T cells as well as the pathogenesis of both autoimmune diseases and pathology from chronic infections. PMID:27078264

  16. A colitogenic memory CD4+ T cell population mediates gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Vivian; Agle, Kimberle; Chen, Xiao; Beres, Amy; Komorowski, Richard; Belle, Ludovic; Taylor, Carolyn; Zhu, Fenlu; Haribhai, Dipica; Williams, Calvin B.; Verbsky, James; Blumenschein, Wendy; Sadekova, Svetlana; Bowman, Eddie; Ballantyne, Christie; Weaver, Casey; Serody, David A.; Vincent, Benjamin; Serody, Jonathan; Cua, Daniel J.; Drobyski, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Damage to the gastrointestinal tract is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and is attributable to T cell–mediated inflammation. In this work, we identified a unique CD4+ T cell population that constitutively expresses the β2 integrin CD11c and displays a biased central memory phenotype and memory T cell transcriptional profile, innate-like properties, and increased expression of the gut-homing molecules α4β7 and CCR9. Using several complementary murine GVHD models, we determined that adoptive transfer and early accumulation of β2 integrin–expressing CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal tract initiated Th1-mediated proinflammatory cytokine production, augmented pathological damage in the colon, and increased mortality. The pathogenic effect of this CD4+ T cell population critically depended on coexpression of the IL-23 receptor, which was required for maximal inflammatory effects. Non–Foxp3-expressing CD4+ T cells produced IL-10, which regulated colonic inflammation and attenuated lethality in the absence of functional CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. Thus, the coordinate expression of CD11c and the IL-23 receptor defines an IL-10–regulated, colitogenic memory CD4+ T cell subset that is poised to initiate inflammation when there is loss of tolerance and breakdown of mucosal barriers. PMID:27500496

  17. The mechanism of phosphorylation of anti-HIV D4T by nucleoside diphosphate kinase.

    PubMed

    Schneider, B; Biondi, R; Sarfati, R; Agou, F; Guerreiro, C; Deville-Bonne, D; Veron, M

    2000-05-01

    The last step in the intracellular activation of antiviral nucleoside analogs is the addition of the third phosphate by nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase resulting in the synthesis of the viral reverse transcriptase substrates. We have previously shown that dideoxynucleotide analogs and 3'-deoxy-3'-azidothymidine (AZT) as di- or triphosphate are poor substrates for NDP kinase. By use of protein fluorescence, we monitor the phosphotransfer between the enzyme and the nucleotide analog. Here, we have studied the reactivity of D4T (2',3'-dideoxy-2',3'-didehydrothymidine; stavudine) as di- (DP) or triphosphate (TP) at the pre-steady state. The catalytic efficiency of D4T-DP or -TP is increased by a factor of 10 compared with AZT-DP or -TP, respectively. We use an inactive mutant of NDP kinase to monitor the binding of a TP derivative, and show that the affinity for D4T-TP is in the same range as for the natural substrate deoxythymidine triphosphate, but is 30 times higher than for AZT-TP. Our results indicate that D4T should be efficiently phosphorylated after intracellular maturation of a prodrug into D4T-monophosphate.

  18. Computational modeling of heterogeneity and function of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Carbo, Adria; Hontecillas, Raquel; Andrew, Tricity; Eden, Kristin; Mei, Yongguo; Hoops, Stefan; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The immune system is composed of many different cell types and hundreds of intersecting molecular pathways and signals. This large biological complexity requires coordination between distinct pro-inflammatory and regulatory cell subsets to respond to infection while maintaining tissue homeostasis. CD4+ T cells play a central role in orchestrating immune responses and in maintaining a balance between pro- and anti- inflammatory responses. This tight balance between regulatory and effector reactions depends on the ability of CD4+ T cells to modulate distinct pathways within large molecular networks, since dysregulated CD4+ T cell responses may result in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The CD4+ T cell differentiation process comprises an intricate interplay between cytokines, their receptors, adaptor molecules, signaling cascades and transcription factors that help delineate cell fate and function. Computational modeling can help to describe, simulate, analyze, and predict some of the behaviors in this complicated differentiation network. This review provides a comprehensive overview of existing computational immunology methods as well as novel strategies used to model immune responses with a particular focus on CD4+ T cell differentiation. PMID:25364738

  19. Single wall carbon nanotube electrode system capable of quantitative detection of CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonhyub; Park, Gayoung; Lee, Seoho; Hwang, Suk-Won; Min, Namki; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2017-04-15

    Development of CNT-based CD4(+) T cell imunosensors remains in its infancy due to the poor immobilization efficiency, lack of reproducibility, and difficulty in providing linear quantification. Here, we developed a fully-integrated single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based immunosensor capable of selective capture and linear quantification of CD4(+) T cells with greater dynamic range. By employing repeated two-step oxygen (O2) plasma treatment processes with 35 days of recovery periods, we achieved the enhanced functionalization of the CNT surface and the removal of the byproduct of spray-coated SWCNTs that hinders charge transfer and stable CD4(+) T cell sensing. As a result, a linear electrochemical signal was generated in direct proportion to the bound cells. The slope of a SWCNT electrode in a target concentration range (10(2)~10(6)cells/mL) was 4.55×10(-2)μA per concentration decade, with the lowest detection limit of 1×10(2)cells/mL. Since the reduced number of CD4(+) T cell counts in patients' peripheral blood corresponds to the progression of HIV disease, our CD4(+) T cell-immunosensor provides a simple and low-cost platform which can fulfill the requirement for the development of point-of-care (POC) diagnostic technologies for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients in resource-limited countries.

  20. Cell death by pyroptosis drives CD4 T-cell depletion in HIV-1 infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doitsh, Gilad; Galloway, Nicole L. K.; Geng, Xin; Yang, Zhiyuan; Monroe, Kathryn M.; Zepeda, Orlando; Hunt, Peter W.; Hatano, Hiroyu; Sowinski, Stefanie; Muñoz-Arias, Isa; Greene, Warner C.

    2014-01-01

    The pathway causing CD4 T-cell death in HIV-infected hosts remains poorly understood although apoptosis has been proposed as a key mechanism. We now show that caspase-3-mediated apoptosis accounts for the death of only a small fraction of CD4 T cells corresponding to those that are both activated and productively infected. The remaining over 95% of quiescent lymphoid CD4 T cells die by caspase-1-mediated pyroptosis triggered by abortive viral infection. Pyroptosis corresponds to an intensely inflammatory form of programmed cell death in which cytoplasmic contents and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, are released. This death pathway thus links the two signature events in HIV infection--CD4 T-cell depletion and chronic inflammation--and creates a pathogenic vicious cycle in which dying CD4 T cells release inflammatory signals that attract more cells to die. This cycle can be broken by caspase 1 inhibitors shown to be safe in humans, raising the possibility of a new class of `anti-AIDS' therapeutics targeting the host rather than the virus.

  1. Pharmacological interference with protein-protein interactions mediated by coiled-coil motifs.

    PubMed

    Strauss, H M; Keller, S

    2008-01-01

    Coiled coils are bundles of intertwined alpha-helices that provide protein-protein interaction sites for the dynamic assembly and disassembly of protein complexes. The coiled-coil motif combines structural versatility and adaptability with mechanical strength and specificity. Multimeric proteins that rely on coiled-coil interactions are structurally and functionally very diverse, ranging from simple homodimeric transcription factors to elaborate heteromultimeric scaffolding clusters. Several coiled-coil-bearing proteins are of outstanding pharmacological importance, most notably SNARE proteins involved in vesicular trafficking of neurotransmitters and viral fusion proteins. Together with their crucial roles in many physiological and pathological processes, the structural simplicity and reversible nature of coiled-coil associations render them a promising target for pharmacological interference, as successfully exemplified by botulinum toxins and viral fusion inhibitors. The alpha-helical coiled coil is a ubiquitous protein domain that mediates highly specific homo- and heteromeric protein-protein interactions among a wide range of proteins. The coiled-coil motif was first proposed by Crick on the basis of X-ray diffraction data on alpha-keratin more than 50 years ago (Crick 1952, 1953) and nowadays belongs to the best-characterized protein interaction modules. By definition, a coiled coil is an oligomeric protein assembly consisting of several right-handed amphipathic alpha-helices that wind around each other into a superhelix (or a supercoil) in which the hydrophobic surfaces of the constituent helices are in continuous contact, forming a hydrophobic core. Both homomeric and heteromeric coiled coils with different stoichiometries are possible, and the helices can be aligned in either a parallel or an antiparallel topology (Harbury et al. 1993, 1994). Stoichiometry and topology are governed by the primary structure, that is, the sequence of the polypeptide chains

  2. The Physics of the CMS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sanabria, J. C.

    2007-10-26

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will start running 2008 producing proton-proton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. Four large experiments will operate together with this accelerator: ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. The main scientific goal of this project is to understand in detail the mechanism for electro-weak symmetry breaking and to search for physics beyond the standard model of particles. ATLAS and CMS are general purpose detectors designed for search and discovery of new physics, and optimized to search for Higgs and signals of supersymmetric matter (SUSY). In this paper the main features of the CMS detector will be presented and its potential for Higgs and SUSY discoveries will be discussed.

  3. Fireworks: A physics event display for CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalskyi, D.; Tadel, M.; Mrak-Tadel, A.; Bellenot, B.; Kuznetsov, V.; Jones, C.D.; Bauerdick, L. Case, M.; Mulmenstadt, J.; Yagil, A.; /UC, San Diego

    2010-01-01

    Fireworks is a CMS event display which is specialized for the physics studies case. This specialization allows us to use a stylized rather than 3D-accurate representation when appropriate. Data handling is greatly simplified by using only reconstructed information and ideal geometry. Fireworks provides an easy-to-use interface which allows a physicist to concentrate only on the data in which he is interested. Data is presented via graphical and textual views. Fireworks is built using the Eve subsystem of the CERN ROOT project and CMS's FWLite project. The FWLite project was part of CMS's recent code redesign which separates data classes into libraries separate from algorithms producing the data and uses ROOT directly for C++ object storage, thereby allowing the data classes to be used directly in ROOT.

  4. Calorimeter Simulation with Hadrons in CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Piperov, Stefan; /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Fermilab

    2008-11-01

    CMS is using Geant4 to simulate the detector setup for the forthcoming data from the LHC. Validation of physics processes inside Geant4 is a major concern in view of getting a proper description of jets and missing energy for signal and background events. This is done by carrying out an extensive studies with test beam using the prototypes or real detector modules of the CMS calorimeter. These data are matched with Geant4 predictions using the same framework that is used for the entire CMS detector. Tuning of the Geant4 models is carried out and steps to be used in reproducing detector signals are defined in view of measurements of energy response, energy resolution, transverse and longitudinal shower profiles for a variety of hadron beams over a broad energy spectrum between 2 to 300 GeV/c. The tuned Monte Carlo predictions match many of these measurements within systematic uncertainties.

  5. Beyond the discovery: Higgs results from CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankel, Rainer

    2016-11-01

    The observation of a Higgs boson at a mass near 125 GeV in the year 2012 has been a milestone for elementary particle physics. Since this fundamental discovery, the CMS collaboration has scrutinized the complete LHC Run I dataset in depth, and studied the properties of the observed state in full detail. This includes investigations of more elusive production and decay modes, as well as searches for first indications of an extended Higgs sector, which would represent very likely a promising gateway to new physics. This article summarizes recent Higgs results from the CMS experiment.

  6. Physics with CMS and Electronic Upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlf, James W.

    2016-08-01

    The current funding is for continued work on the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) as part of the Energy Frontier experimental program. The current budget year covers the first year of physics running at 13 TeV (Run 2). During this period we have concentrated on commisioning of the μTCA electronics, a new standard for distribution of CMS trigger and timing control signals and high bandwidth data aquistiion as well as participating in Run 2 physics.

  7. CD4+ T cell anergy prevents autoimmunity and generates regulatory T cell precursors

    PubMed Central

    Kalekar, Lokesh A.; Schmiel, Shirdi E.; Nandiwada, Sarada L.; Lam, Wing Y.; Barsness, Laura O.; Zhang, Na; Stritesky, Gretta L.; Malhotra, Deepali; Pauken, Kristen E.; Linehan, Jonathan L.; O’Sullivan, M. Gerard; Fife, Brian T.; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Mueller, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    The role that anergy, an acquired state of T cell functional unresponsiveness, plays in natural peripheral tolerance remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that anergy is selectively induced in fetal antigen-specific maternal CD4+ T cells during pregnancy. A naturally occurring subpopulation of anergic polyclonal CD4+ T cells, enriched in self antigen-specific T cell receptors, is also observed in healthy hosts. Neuropilin-1 expression in anergic conventional CD4+ T cells is associated with thymic regulatory T cell (Treg cell)-related gene hypomethylation, and this correlates with their capacity to differentiate into Foxp3+ Treg cells that suppress immunopathology. Thus, our data suggest that not only is anergy induction important in preventing autoimmunity, but it also generates the precursors for peripheral Treg cell differentiation. PMID:26829766

  8. Cell-to-cell transfer of M. tuberculosis antigens optimizes CD4 T cell priming.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Ernst, Joel D

    2014-06-11

    During Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other respiratory infections, optimal T cell activation requires pathogen transport from the lung to a local draining lymph node (LN). However, the infected inflammatory monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) that transport M. tuberculosis to the local lymph node are relatively inefficient at activating CD4 T cells, possibly due to bacterial inhibition of antigen presentation. We found that infected migratory DCs release M. tuberculosis antigens as soluble, unprocessed proteins for uptake and presentation by uninfected resident lymph node DCs. This transfer of bacterial proteins from migratory to local DCs results in optimal priming of antigen-specific CD4 T cells, which are essential in controlling tuberculosis. Additionally, this mechanism does not involve transfer of the whole bacterium and is distinct from apoptosis or exosome shedding. These findings reveal a mechanism that bypasses pathogen inhibition of antigen presentation by infected cells and generates CD4 T cell responses that control the infection.

  9. Development of a device for selective removal of CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Hirokazu; Ninomiya, Kasumi; Yoshida, Makoto; Matsuo, Hidenori; Shibuya, Noritoshi

    2003-06-01

    To control antigen (Ag)-specific immune cells is important in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In particular, controlling the immune response of autoimmune T cells is effective in the treatment of these diseases. The development of a device that can remove CD4+ T cells specifically by extracorporeal circulation is now in progress, with the aim to deplete autoimmune T cells. We developed a removal material made of polypropylene non-woven fabrics with anti human CD4 monoclonal antibody immobilized on the surface. Using a column packed with the removal material, we succeeded in removing CD4+ T cells specifically from peripheral whole blood by direct perfusion. Moreover, CD4+ T cells can be specifically removed even from blood with lower surface antigen density by in vitro activation.

  10. Functional investigation of the plant-specific long coiled-coil proteins PAMP-INDUCED COILED-COIL (PICC) and PICC-LIKE (PICL) in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, Sowmya; Mackey, David; Meier, Iris

    2013-01-01

    We have identified and characterized two Arabidopsis long coiled-coil proteins PAMP-INDUCED COILED-COIL (PICC) and PICC-LIKE (PICL). PICC (147 kDa) and PICL (87 kDa) are paralogs that consist predominantly of a long coiled-coil domain (expanded in PICC), with a predicted transmembrane domain at the immediate C-terminus. Orthologs of PICC and PICL were found exclusively in vascular plants. PICC and PICL GFP fusion proteins are anchored to the cytoplasmic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by a C-terminal transmembrane domain and a short tail domain, via a tail-anchoring mechanism. T-DNA-insertion mutants of PICC and PICL as well as the double mutant show an increased sensitivity to the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) in a post-germination growth response. PICC, but not PICL gene expression is induced by the bacterial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) flg22. T-DNA insertion alleles of PICC, but not PICL, show increased susceptibility to the non-virulent strain P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 hrcC, but not to the virulent strain P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. This suggests that PICC mutants are compromised in PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). The data presented here provide first evidence for the involvement of a plant long coiled-coil protein in a plant defense response.

  11. Innovative applications stimulate coiled tubing development

    SciTech Connect

    Sas-Jaworsky, A. II; Bell, S.

    1996-06-01

    Coiled tubing (CT) is increasingly becoming a viable option to many conventional well operations worldwide. Advanced technology, new equipment and recent field applications have shown CT to be a lower-cost, reliable and effective tool for drilling and recompleting certain wells. Seven example applications from two recent coiled tubing technical conferences are described.

  12. Operator coil monitoring Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-05-16

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software`s ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY-101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations is correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ``ENABLE`` and ``DISABLE`` controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords.

  13. Magnetic Fields at the Center of Coils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, Philippe; Hui, Kaleonui; Goldman, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    In this note we synthesize and extend expressions for the magnetic field at the center of very short and very long current-carrying coils. Elementary physics textbooks present the following equation for the magnetic field inside a very long current-carrying coil (solenoid): B[subscript sol] = µ[subscript 0] (N/L) I, (1) where I is the current, N…

  14. Functional Investigation of the Plant-Specific Long Coiled-Coil Proteins PAMP-INDUCED COILED-COIL (PICC) and PICC-LIKE (PICL) in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Venkatakrishnan, Sowmya; Mackey, David; Meier, Iris

    2013-01-01

    We have identified and characterized two Arabidopsis long coiled-coil proteins PAMP-INDUCED COILED-COIL (PICC) and PICC-LIKE (PICL). PICC (147 kDa) and PICL (87 kDa) are paralogs that consist predominantly of a long coiled-coil domain (expanded in PICC), with a predicted transmembrane domain at the immediate C-terminus. Orthologs of PICC and PICL were found exclusively in vascular plants. PICC and PICL GFP fusion proteins are anchored to the cytoplasmic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by a C-terminal transmembrane domain and a short tail domain, via a tail-anchoring mechanism. T-DNA-insertion mutants of PICC and PICL as well as the double mutant show an increased sensitivity to the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) in a post-germination growth response. PICC, but not PICL gene expression is induced by the bacterial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) flg22. T-DNA insertion alleles of PICC, but not PICL, show increased susceptibility to the non-virulent strain P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 hrcC, but not to the virulent strain P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. This suggests that PICC mutants are compromised in PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). The data presented here provide first evidence for the involvement of a plant long coiled-coil protein in a plant defense response. PMID:23451199

  15. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, A.; Boozer, A.H.

    1984-03-06

    The present invention generates stellarator fields having favorable properties (magnetic well and large rotational transform) by a simple coil system consisting only of unlinked planar non-circular coils. At large rotational transform toroidal effects on magnetic well and rotational transform are small and can be ignored. We do so herein, specializing in straight helical systems.

  16. Evidence-based pathology: umbilical cord coiling.

    PubMed

    Khong, T Y

    2010-12-01

    The generation of a pathology test result must be based on criteria that are proven to be acceptably reproducible and clinically relevant to be evidence-based. This review de-constructs the umbilical cord coiling index to illustrate how it can stray from being evidence-based. Publications related to umbilical cord coiling were retrieved and analysed with regard to how the umbilical coiling index was calculated, abnormal coiling was defined and reference ranges were constructed. Errors and other influences that can occur with the measurement of the length of the umbilical cord or of the number of coils can compromise the generation of the coiling index. Definitions of abnormal coiling are not consistent in the literature. Reference ranges defining hypocoiling or hypercoiling have not taken those potential errors or the possible effect of gestational age into account. Even the way numerical test results in anatomical pathology are generated, as illustrated by the umbilical coiling index, warrants a critical analysis into its evidence base to ensure that they are reproducible or free from errors.

  17. 49 CFR 236.730 - Coil, receiver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coil, receiver. 236.730 Section 236.730 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Coil, receiver. Concentric layers of insulated wire wound around the core of a receiver of an...

  18. Precise Fabrication of Electromagnetic-Levitation Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E.; Curreri, P.; Theiss, J.; Abbaschian, G.

    1985-01-01

    Winding copper tubing on jig ensures reproducible performance. Sequence of steps insures consistent fabrication of levitation-and-melting coils. New method enables technician to produce eight coils per day, 95 percent of them acceptable. Method employs precise step-by-step procedure on specially designed wrapping and winding jig.

  19. Optimal Coil Orientation for Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Lars; Neumann, Gunnar; Oung, Stephen; Schweikard, Achim; Trillenberg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We study the impact of coil orientation on the motor threshold (MT) and present an optimal coil orientation for stimulation of the foot. The result can be compared to results of models that predict this orientation from electrodynamic properties of the media in the skull and from orientations of cells, respectively. We used a robotized TMS system for precise coil placement and recorded motor-evoked potentials with surface electrodes on the abductor hallucis muscle of the right foot in 8 healthy control subjects. First, we performed a hot-spot search in standard (lateral) orientation and then rotated the coil in steps of 10° or 20°. At each step we estimated the MT. For navigated stimulation and for correlation with the underlying anatomy a structural MRI scan was obtained. Optimal coil orientation was 33.1±18.3° anteriorly in relation to the standard lateral orientation. In this orientation the threshold was 54±18% in units of maximum stimulator output. There was a significant difference of 8.0±5.9% between the MTs at optimal and at standard orientation. The optimal coil orientations were significantly correlated with the direction perpendicular to the postcentral gyrus (). Robotized TMS facilitates sufficiently precise coil positioning and orientation to study even small variations of the MT with coil orientation. The deviations from standard orientation are more closely matched by models based on field propagation in media than by models based on orientations of pyramidal cells. PMID:23593200

  20. Operator coil monitoring acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-06-05

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software`s ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ``ENABLE`` and ``DISABLE`` controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords.

  1. Innate-like CD4 T cells selected by thymocytes suppress adaptive immune responses against bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yu; Gray, Brian M.; Sofi, Mohammed H.; Bauler, Laura D.; Eaton, Kathryn A.; O'Riordan, Mary X. D.; Chang, Cheong-Hee

    2012-01-01

    We have reported a new innate-like CD4 T cell population that expresses cell surface makers of effector/memory cells and produce Th1 and Th2 cytokines immediately upon activation. Unlike conventional CD4 T cells that are selected by thymic epithelial cells, these CD4 T cells, named T-CD4 T cells, are selected by MHC class II expressing thymocytes. Previously, we showed that the presence of T-CD4 T cells protected mice from airway inflammation suggesting an immune regulatory role of T-CD4 T cells. To further understand the function of T-CD4 T cells, we investigated immune responses mediated by T-CD4 T cells during bacterial infection because the generation of antigen specific CD4 T cells contributes to clearance of infection and for the development of immune memory. The current study shows a suppressive effect of T-CD4 T cells on both CD8 and CD4 T cell-mediated immune responses during Listeria and Helicobacter infections. In the mouse model of Listeria monocytogenes infection, T-CD4 T cells resulted in decreasedfrequency of Listeria-specific CD8 T cells and the killing activity of them. Furthermore, mice with T-CD4 T cells developed poor immune memory, demonstrated by reduced expansion of antigen-specific T cells and high bacterial burden upon re-infection. Similarly, the presence of T-CD4 T cells suppressed the generation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells in Helicobacter pylori infected mice. Thus, our studies reveal a novel function of T-CD4 T cells in suppressing anti-bacterial immunity. PMID:23264931

  2. A quartz nanopillar hemocytometer for high-yield separation and counting of CD4+ T lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Seol, Jin-Kyeong; Wu, Yu; Ji, Seungmuk; Kim, Gil-Sung; Hyung, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Seung-Yong; Lim, Hyuneui; Fan, Rong; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2012-03-01

    We report the development of a novel quartz nanopillar (QNP) array cell separation system capable of selectively capturing and isolating a single cell population including primary CD4+ T lymphocytes from the whole pool of splenocytes. Integrated with a photolithographically patterned hemocytometer structure, the streptavidin (STR)-functionalized-QNP (STR-QNP) arrays allow for direct quantitation of captured cells using high content imaging. This technology exhibits an excellent separation yield (efficiency) of ~95.3 +/- 1.1% for the CD4+ T lymphocytes from the mouse splenocyte suspensions and good linear response for quantitating captured CD4+ T-lymphoblasts, which is comparable to flow cytometry and outperforms any non-nanostructured surface capture techniques, i.e. cell panning. This nanopillar hemocytometer represents a simple, yet efficient cell capture and counting technology and may find immediate applications for diagnosis and immune monitoring in the point-of-care setting.We report the development of a novel quartz nanopillar (QNP) array cell separation system capable of selectively capturing and isolating a single cell population including primary CD4+ T lymphocytes from the whole pool of splenocytes. Integrated with a photolithographically patterned hemocytometer structure, the streptavidin (STR)-functionalized-QNP (STR-QNP) arrays allow for direct quantitation of captured cells using high content imaging. This technology exhibits an excellent separation yield (efficiency) of ~95.3 +/- 1.1% for the CD4+ T lymphocytes from the mouse splenocyte suspensions and good linear response for quantitating captured CD4+ T-lymphoblasts, which is comparable to flow cytometry and outperforms any non-nanostructured surface capture techniques, i.e. cell panning. This nanopillar hemocytometer represents a simple, yet efficient cell capture and counting technology and may find immediate applications for diagnosis and immune monitoring in the point-of-care setting

  3. Increased Mucosal CD4+ T Cell Activation in Rhesus Macaques following Vaccination with an Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Bukh, Irene; Calcedo, Roberto; Roy, Soumitra; Carnathan, Diane G.; Grant, Rebecca; Qin, Qiuyue; Boyd, Surina; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Veeder, Christin L.; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Betts, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The possibility that vaccination with adenovirus (AdV) vectors increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of HIV acquisition within the Step trial. Modeling this within rhesus macaques is complicated because human adenoviruses, including human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5), are not endogenous to macaques. Here, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector (simian adenovirus 7 [SAdV-7]) enhances mucosal T cell activation within rhesus macaques. Following intramuscular SAdV-7 vaccination, we observed a pronounced increase in SAdV-7-specific CD4+ T cell responses in peripheral blood and, more dramatically, in rectal mucosa tissue. Vaccination also induced a significant increase in the frequency of activated memory CD4+ T cells in SAdV-7- and HAdV-5-vaccinated animals in the rectal mucosa but not in peripheral blood. These fluctuations within the rectal mucosa were also associated with a pronounced decrease in the relative frequency of naive resting CD4+ T cells. Together, these results indicate that peripheral vaccination with an AdV vector can increase the activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells, potentially providing an experimental model to further evaluate the role of host-vector interactions in increased HIV acquisition after AdV vector vaccination. IMPORTANCE The possibility that vaccination with a human adenovirus 5 vector increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition within the Step trial. In this study, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector in rhesus macaques enhances mucosal CD4+ T cell activation, the main cell target of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/HIV. The results showed that vaccination with an adenoviral vector indeed increases activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and potentially increases susceptibility to SIV

  4. Epigenetic Alterations May Regulate Temporary Reversal of CD4+ T Cell Activation Caused by Trichloroethylene Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Nelson, Ashley R.; Cooney, Craig A.; Reisfeld, Brad; Blossom, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that short-term (4 weeks) or chronic (32 weeks) exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) in drinking water of female MRL+/+ mice generated CD4+ T cells that secreted increased levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and expressed an activated (CD44hiCD62Llo) phenotype. In contrast, the current study of subchronic TCE exposure showed that midway in the disease process both of these parameters of CD4+ T cell activation were reversed. This phase of the disease process may represent an attempt by the body to counteract the inflammatory effects of TCE. The decrease in CD4+ T cell production of IFN-γ following subchronic TCE exposure could not be attributed to skewing toward a Th2 or Th17 phenotype or to an increase in Treg cells. Instead, the suppression corresponded to alterations in markers used to assess DNA methylation, namely increased expression of retrotransposons Iap (intracisternal A particle) and Muerv (murine endogenous retrovirus). Also observed was an increase in the expression of Dnmt1 (DNA methyltransferase-1) and decreased expression of several genes known to be downregulated by DNA methylation, namely Ifng, Il2, and Cdkn1a. CD4+ T cells from a second study in which MRL+/+ mice were treated for 17 weeks with TCE showed a similar increase in Iap and decrease in Cdkn1a. In addition, DNA collected from the CD4+ T cells in the second study showed TCE-decreased global DNA methylation. Thus, these results described the biphasic nature of TCE-induced alterations in CD4+ T cell function and suggested that these changes represented potentially reversible alterations in epigenetic processes. PMID:22407948

  5. [Levels of antiplatelet factor 4-heparin antibodies and 4T score for heparin induced thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Martinuzzo, Marta E; Cerrato, Graciela S; Iglesias Varela, Maria L; Adamczuk, Yolanda P; Pombo, Gonzalo; Forastiero, Ricardo R

    2012-01-01

    Heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an immune-mediated disorder due to antibodies anti platelet factor 4-heparin (HPIA). Thrombocytopenia is often moderate but certain patients can develop morbid thrombotic complications. HPIA detection by ELISA has high sensitivity but low specificity, and low titers (without clinical significance) are frequent. A pretest clinical score (4T's) was developed in order to recognize patients that are at high risk of HIT. The aim of this study was to correlate HPIA levels and the 4T's score of consecutive patients derived to our center. We evaluated 84 patients (35 of them developed thrombosis); the clinical questionnaire was sent along with the sample and was analyzed by an investigator who did not know the patients' characteristics, and 4T's scores were calculated before performing the laboratory tests. HPIA were measured by ELISA (Asserachrom HPIA) that detects IgG, IgM and IgA isotypes, (the only reagent available in our country). 4T's score correlated with HPIA levels (rho spearman 0.472, p < 0.001). Patients with 4T's = 6 had higher absorbance percentages than those with = 5 (67 vs. 39%, p < 0.001), and patients with thrombosis also presented higher titers (59 vs. 39%, p = 0.017) than those who did not develop this complication. In conclusion, high titers of HPIA measured by EIA which detects the 3 isotypes, clearly correlate with 4T's score = 6 and are more frequent in patients who develop thrombosis, just as reported when an IgG specific ELISA is used.

  6. Quorum-Sensing in CD4+ T Cell Homeostasis: A Hypothesis and a Model

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Afonso R. M.; Amado, Inês F.; Reynolds, Joseph; Berges, Julien; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen; Freitas, Antonio A.

    2012-01-01

    Homeostasis of lymphocyte numbers is believed to be due to competition between cellular populations for a common niche of restricted size, defined by the combination of interactions and trophic factors required for cell survival. Here we propose a new mechanism: homeostasis of lymphocyte numbers could also be achieved by the ability of lymphocytes to perceive the density of their own populations. Such a mechanism would be reminiscent of the primordial quorum-sensing systems used by bacteria, in which some bacteria sense the accumulation of bacterial metabolites secreted by other elements of the population, allowing them to “count” the number of cells present and adapt their growth accordingly. We propose that homeostasis of CD4+ T cell numbers may occur via a quorum-sensing-like mechanism, where IL-2 is produced by activated CD4+ T cells and sensed by a population of CD4+ Treg cells that expresses the high-affinity IL-2Rα-chain and can regulate the number of activated IL-2-producing CD4+ T cells and the total CD4+ T cell population. In other words, CD4+ T cell populations can restrain their growth by monitoring the number of activated cells, thus preventing uncontrolled lymphocyte proliferation during immune responses. We hypothesize that malfunction of this quorum-sensing mechanism may lead to uncontrolled T cell activation and autoimmunity. Finally, we present a mathematical model that describes the key role of IL-2 and quorum-sensing mechanisms in CD4+ T cell homeostasis during an immune response. PMID:22654881

  7. Homeostatically Maintained Resting Naive CD4+ T Cells Resist Latent HIV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Kobayahi-Ishihara, Mie; Wada, Yamato; Terahara, Kazutaka; Takeyama, Haruko; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Tokunaga, Kenzo; Yamagishi, Makoto; Martinez, Javier P.; Meyerhans, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Homeostatic proliferation (HSP) is a major mechanism by which long-lived naïve and memory CD4+ T cells are maintained in vivo and suggested to contribute to the persistence of the latent HIV-1 reservoir. However, while many in vitro latency models rely on CD4+ T cells that were initially differentiated via T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation into memory/effector cells, latent infection of naïve resting CD4+ T cells maintained under HSP conditions has not been fully addressed. Here, we describe an in vitro HSP culture system utilizing the cytokines IL-7 and IL-15 that allows studying latency in naïve resting CD4+ T cells. CD4+ T cells isolated from several healthy donors were infected with HIV pseudotypes expressing GFP and cultured under HSP conditions or TCR conditions as control. Cell proliferation, phenotype, and GFP expression were analyzed by flow cytometry. RNA expression was quantified by qRT-PCR. Under HSP culture conditions, latently HIV-1 infected naïve cells are in part maintained in the non-dividing (= resting) state. Although a few HIV-1 provirus+ cells were present in these resting GFP negative cells, the estimated level of GFP transcripts per infected cell seems to indicate a block at the post-transcriptional level. Interestingly, neither TCR nor the prototypic HDAC inhibitor SAHA were able to reactivate HIV-1 provirus from these cells. This lack of reactivation was not due to methylation of the HIV LTR. These results point to a mechanism of HIV control in HSP-cultured resting naïve CD4+ T cells that may be distinct from that in TCR-stimulated memory/effector T cells. PMID:27990142

  8. Various factors affect coiled tubing limits

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.S.

    1996-01-15

    Safety and reliability remain the primary concerns in coiled tubing operations. Factors affecting safety and reliability include corrosion, flexural bending, internal (or external) pressure and tension (or compression), and mechanical damage due to improper use. Such limits as coiled tubing fatigue, collapse, and buckling need to be understood to avoid disaster. With increased use of coiled tubing, operators will gain more experience. But at the same time, with further research and development of coiled tubing, the manufacturing quality will be improved and fatigue, collapse, and buckling models will become more mature, and eventually standard specifications will be available. This paper reviews the uses of coiled tubing and current research on mechanical behavior of said tubing. It also discusses several models used to help predict fatigue and failure levels.

  9. Magnetron surface coil for brain MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alfredo O

    2006-08-01

    A resonator surface coil was developed for magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and tested on a clinical imager. This resonator design was based on the cavity magnetron with an 8 slot-and-hole configuration. High-resolution brain images were obtained from a water-filled phantom and from a healthy volunteer brain. To compare coil performance, SNR-vs.-depth plots were computed for a single-loop coil and the magnetron prototype from phantom images. These experimentally acquired profiles show an important improvement in SNR. Thus, the magnetron surface coil can generate brain images with a high resolution and penetration capacity. The high sensitivity of this coil makes it a good candidate to be used in multicoil imaging sequences.

  10. Rod-Coil Block Polyimide Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Kinder, James D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    This invention is a series of rod-coil block polyimide copolymers that are easy to fabricate into mechanically resilient films with acceptable ionic or protonic conductivity at a variety of temperatures. The copolymers consist of short-rigid polyimide rod segments alternating with polyether coil segments. The rods and coil segments can be linear, branched or mixtures of linear and branched segments. The highly incompatible rods and coil segments phase separate, providing nanoscale channels for ion conduction. The polyimide segments provide dimensional and mechanical stability and can be functionalized in a number of ways to provide specialized functions for a given application. These rod-coil black polyimide copolymers are particularly useful in the preparation of ion conductive membranes for use in the manufacture of fuel cells and lithium based polymer batteries.

  11. Gene Editing of CCR5 in Autologous CD4 T Cells of Persons Infected with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Tebas, Pablo; Stein, David; Tang, Winson W.; Frank, Ian; Wang, Shelley Q.; Lee, Gary; Spratt, S. Kaye; Surosky, Richard T.; Giedlin, Martin A.; Nichol, Geoff; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Ando, Dale G.; Kalos, Michael; Collman, Ronald G.; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn; Plesa, Gabriela; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND CCR5 is the major coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We investigated whether site-specific modification of the gene (“gene editing”) — in this case, the infusion of autologous CD4 T cells in which the CCR5 gene was rendered permanently dysfunctional by a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) — is safe. METHODS We enrolled 12 patients in an open-label, nonrandomized, uncontrolled study of a single dose of ZFN-modified autologous CD4 T cells. The patients had chronic aviremic HIV infection while they were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. Six of them underwent an interruption in antiretroviral treatment 4 weeks after the infusion of 10 billion autologous CD4 T cells, 11 to 28% of which were genetically modified with the ZFN. The primary outcome was safety as assessed by treatment-related adverse events. Secondary outcomes included measures of immune reconstitution and HIV resistance. RESULTS One serious adverse event was associated with infusion of the ZFN-modified autologous CD4 T cells and was attributed to a transfusion reaction. The median CD4 T-cell count was 1517 per cubic millimeter at week 1, a significant increase from the preinfusion count of 448 per cubic millimeter (P<0.001). The median concentration of CCR5-modified CD4 T cells at 1 week was 250 cells per cubic millimeter. This constituted 8.8% of circulating peripheral-blood mononuclear cells and 13.9% of circulating CD4 T cells. Modified cells had an estimated mean half-life of 48 weeks. During treatment interruption and the resultant viremia, the decline in circulating CCR5-modified cells (−1.81 cells per day) was significantly less than the decline in unmodified cells (−7.25 cells per day) (P = 0.02). HIV RNA became undetectable in one of four patients who could be evaluated. The blood level of HIV DNA decreased in most patients. CONCLUSIONS CCR5-modified autologous CD4 T-cell infusions are safe within the limits of this study. (Funded by the National

  12. Coiled tubing; Operations and services

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.T.; Wimberly, R.D.

    1992-10-01

    Oil and gas wells that flow on initial completion eventually reach a condition of liquid loading that kills the wells. This results form declining reservoir pressure, decreased gas volume (velocity), increased water production and other factors that cause liquids to accumulate at the bottom of the well and exert back pressure on the formation. This restricts or in some cases prevents fluid entry into the wellbore form the formation. Flowing production can be restored or increased by reducing surface backpressure, well bore stimulation, pressure maintenance or by installing a string of smaller diameter tubing. This paper reports on installation (hanging off) of a concentric string of coiled tubing inside existing production tubing which is an economically viable, safe, convenient and effective alterative for returning some of these liquid loaded )logged-up) wells to flowing status.

  13. Detection of alpha-helical coiled-coil dimer formation by spin-labeled synthetic peptides: a model parallel coiled-coil peptide and the antiparallel coiled coil formed by a replica of the ProP C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Hillar, Alexander; Tripet, Brian; Zoetewey, David; Wood, Janet M; Hodges, Robert S; Boggs, Joan M

    2003-12-30

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine relative peptide orientation within homodimeric, alpha-helical coiled-coil structures. Introduction of cysteine (Cys) residues into peptides/proteins for spin labeling allows detection of their oligomerization from exchange broadening or dipolar interactions between residues within 25 A of each other. Two synthetic peptides containing Cys substitutions were used: a 35-residue model peptide and the 30-residue ProP peptide. The model peptide is known to form a stable, parallel homodimeric coiled coil, which is partially destabilized by Cys substitutions at heptad a and d positions (peptides C30a and C33d). The ProP peptide, a 30-residue synthetic peptide, corresponds to residues 468-497 of osmoregulatory transporter ProP from Escherichia coli. It forms a relatively unstable, homodimeric coiled coil that is predicted to be antiparallel in orientation. Cys was introduced in heptad g positions of the ProP peptide, near the N-terminus (K473C, creating peptide C473g) or closer to the center of the sequence (E480C, creating peptide C480g). In contrast to the destabilizing effect of Cys substitution at the core heptad a or d positions of model peptides C30a and C33d, circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that Cys substitutions at the heptad g positions of the ProP peptide had little or no effect on coiled-coil stability. Thermal denaturation analysis showed that spin labeling increased the stability of the coiled coil for all peptides. Strong exchange broadening was detected for both C30a and C33d, in agreement with a parallel structure. EPR spectra of C480g had a large hyperfine splitting of about 90 G, indicative of strong dipole-dipole interactions and a distance between spin-labeled residues of less than 9 A. Spin-spin interactions were much weaker for C473g. These results supported the hypothesis that the ProP peptide primarily formed an antiparallel coiled coil, since formation of a parallel dimer

  14. A study on geometry effect of transmission coil for micro size magnetic induction coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyung Hwa; Jun, Byoung Ok; Kim, Seunguk; Lee, Gwang Jun; Ryu, Mingyu; Choi, Ji-Woong; Jang, Jae Eun

    2016-05-01

    The effects of transmission (Tx) coil structure have been studied for micro-size magnetic induction coil. The size of the receiving (Rx) coil should be shrunk to the micrometer level for the various new applications such as micro-robot and wireless body implanted devices. In case of the macro-scale magnetic induction coil, the power transmission efficiency is generally considered to be higher as the inductance of the transmission coil became larger; however, the large size difference between macro-size Tx coil and micro-size Rx coil can decrease the power transmission efficiency due to the difference of resonance frequency. Here, we study a correlation of the power transmission with the size and distance between the macro-size Tx and micro-size Rx coils using magnetic induction technique. The maximum power efficiency was 0.28/0.23/0.13/0.12% at the distance of 0.3/1/3/5 cm between Rx and Tx coil. In addition, more efficient wireless power transferring method is suggested with a floating coil for the body implantable devices. The voltage output increased up to 5.4 mV than the original one Tx coil system. The results demonstrated the foundational wireless power transferring system with enhanced power efficiency.

  15. Intra-coil interactions in split gradient coils in a hybrid MRI-LINAC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fangfang; Freschi, Fabio; Sanchez Lopez, Hector; Repetto, Maurizio; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    An MRI-LINAC system combines a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) to provide image-guided radiotherapy for targeting tumors in real-time. In an MRI-LINAC system, a set of split gradient coils is employed to produce orthogonal gradient fields for spatial signal encoding. Owing to this unconventional gradient configuration, eddy currents induced by switching gradient coils on and off may be of particular concern. It is expected that strong intra-coil interactions in the set will be present due to the constrained return paths, leading to potential degradation of the gradient field linearity and image distortion. In this study, a series of gradient coils with different track widths have been designed and analyzed to investigate the electromagnetic interactions between coils in a split gradient set. A driving current, with frequencies from 100 Hz to 10 kHz, was applied to study the inductive coupling effects with respect to conductor geometry and operating frequency. It was found that the eddy currents induced in the un-energized coils (hereby-referred to as passive coils) positively correlated with track width and frequency. The magnetic field induced by the eddy currents in the passive coils with wide tracks was several times larger than that induced by eddy currents in the cold shield of cryostat. The power loss in the passive coils increased with the track width. Therefore, intra-coil interactions should be included in the coil design and analysis process.

  16. Particle Tracking Model (PTM) with Coastal Modeling System (CMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-31

    System ( CMS ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER...www.erdc.usace.army.mil/Missions/WaterResources/CIRP.aspx Coastal Inlets Research Program Particle Tracking Model (PTM) with Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ) The...System ( CMS ), which provides coupled wave and current forcing for PTM simulations. CMS -PTM is implemented in the Surface-water Modeling System, a

  17. Mosquito coil emissions and health implications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weili; Zhang, Junfeng; Hashim, Jamal H; Jalaludin, Juliana; Hashim, Zailina; Goldstein, Bernard D

    2003-09-01

    Burning mosquito coils indoors generates smoke that can control mosquitoes effectively. This practice is currently used in numerous households in Asia, Africa, and South America. However, the smoke may contain pollutants of health concern. We conducted the present study to characterize the emissions from four common brands of mosquito coils from China and two common brands from Malaysia. We used mass balance equations to determine emission rates of fine particles (particulate matter < 2.5 microm in diameter; PM(2.5)), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aldehydes, and ketones. Having applied these measured emission rates to predict indoor concentrations under realistic room conditions, we found that pollutant concentrations resulting from burning mosquito coils could substantially exceed health-based air quality standards or guidelines. Under the same combustion conditions, the tested Malaysian mosquito coils generated more measured pollutants than did the tested Chinese mosquito coils. We also identified a large suite of volatile organic compounds, including carcinogens and suspected carcinogens, in the coil smoke. In a set of experiments conducted in a room, we examined the size distribution of particulate matter contained in the coil smoke and found that the particles were ultrafine and fine. The findings from the present study suggest that exposure to the smoke of mosquito coils similar to the tested ones can pose significant acute and chronic health risks. For example, burning one mosquito coil would release the same amount of PM(2.5) mass as burning 75-137 cigarettes. The emission of formaldehyde from burning one coil can be as high as that released from burning 51 cigarettes.

  18. Mosquito coil emissions and health implications.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weili; Zhang, Junfeng; Hashim, Jamal H; Jalaludin, Juliana; Hashim, Zailina; Goldstein, Bernard D

    2003-01-01

    Burning mosquito coils indoors generates smoke that can control mosquitoes effectively. This practice is currently used in numerous households in Asia, Africa, and South America. However, the smoke may contain pollutants of health concern. We conducted the present study to characterize the emissions from four common brands of mosquito coils from China and two common brands from Malaysia. We used mass balance equations to determine emission rates of fine particles (particulate matter < 2.5 microm in diameter; PM(2.5)), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aldehydes, and ketones. Having applied these measured emission rates to predict indoor concentrations under realistic room conditions, we found that pollutant concentrations resulting from burning mosquito coils could substantially exceed health-based air quality standards or guidelines. Under the same combustion conditions, the tested Malaysian mosquito coils generated more measured pollutants than did the tested Chinese mosquito coils. We also identified a large suite of volatile organic compounds, including carcinogens and suspected carcinogens, in the coil smoke. In a set of experiments conducted in a room, we examined the size distribution of particulate matter contained in the coil smoke and found that the particles were ultrafine and fine. The findings from the present study suggest that exposure to the smoke of mosquito coils similar to the tested ones can pose significant acute and chronic health risks. For example, burning one mosquito coil would release the same amount of PM(2.5) mass as burning 75-137 cigarettes. The emission of formaldehyde from burning one coil can be as high as that released from burning 51 cigarettes. PMID:12948883

  19. Occurrence of 4-tert-butylphenol (4-t-BP) biodegradation in an aquatic sample caused by the presence of Spirodela polyrrhiza and isolation of a 4-t-BP-utilizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yuka; Toyama, Tadashi; Yu, Ning; Wang, Xuan; Sei, Kazunari; Ike, Michihiko

    2013-04-01

    Although 4-tert-butylphenol (4-t-BP) is a serious aquatic pollutant, its biodegradation in aquatic environments has not been well documented. In this study, 4-t-BP was obviously and repeatedly removed from water from four different environments in the presence of Spirodela polyrrhiza, giant duckweed, but 4-t-BP persisted in the environmental waters in the absence of S. polyrrhiza. Also, 4-t-BP was not removed from autoclaved pond water with sterilized S. polyrrhiza. These results suggest that the 4-t-BP removal from the environmental waters was caused by biodegradation stimulated by the presence of S. polyrrhiza rather than by uptake by the plant. Moreover, Sphingobium fuliginis OMI capable of utilizing 4-t-BP as a sole carbon and energy source was isolated from the S. polyrrhiza rhizosphere. Strain OMI degraded 4-t-BP via a meta-cleavage pathway, and also degraded a broad range of alkylphenols with linear or branched alkyl side chains containing two to nine carbon atoms. Root exudates of S. polyrrhiza stimulated 4-t-BP degradation and cell growth of strain OMI. Thus, the stimulating effects of S. polyrrhiza root exudates on 4-t-BP-degrading bacteria might have contributed to 4-t-BP removal in the environmental waters with S. polyrrhiza. These results demonstrate that the S. polyrrhiza-bacteria association may be applicable to the removal of highly persistent 4-t-BP from wastewaters or polluted aquatic environments.

  20. 42 CFR 438.724 - Notice to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notice to CMS. 438.724 Section 438.724 Public...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Sanctions § 438.724 Notice to CMS. (a) The State must give the CMS Regional Office written notice whenever it imposes or lifts a sanction for one of the...

  1. 42 CFR 425.200 - Agreement with CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Agreement with CMS. 425.200 Section 425.200 Public... Agreement § 425.200 Agreement with CMS. (a) General. In order to participate in the Shared Savings Program, an ACO must enter into a participation agreement with CMS for a period of not less than three...

  2. 42 CFR 422.210 - Assurances to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Assurances to CMS. 422.210 Section 422.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... to CMS. (a) Assurances to CMS. Each organization will provide assurance satisfactory to the...

  3. 42 CFR 460.18 - CMS evaluation of applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CMS evaluation of applications. 460.18 Section 460... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.18 CMS evaluation of applications. CMS evaluates an application for approval as a PACE organization on the basis of the...

  4. 42 CFR 457.1003 - CMS review of waiver requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CMS review of waiver requests. 457.1003 Section 457.1003 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Waivers: General Provisions § 457.1003 CMS review of waiver requests. CMS will review the waiver...

  5. 42 CFR 438.724 - Notice to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice to CMS. 438.724 Section 438.724 Public...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Sanctions § 438.724 Notice to CMS. (a) The State must give the CMS Regional Office written notice whenever it imposes or lifts a sanction for one of the...

  6. 42 CFR 460.18 - CMS evaluation of applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CMS evaluation of applications. 460.18 Section 460... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.18 CMS evaluation of applications. CMS evaluates an application for approval as a PACE organization on the basis of the...

  7. 42 CFR 411.386 - CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive. 411.386... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.386 CMS's advisory... described in § 411.370. CMS has not and does not issue a binding advisory opinion on the subject matter...

  8. 42 CFR 411.379 - When CMS accepts a request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false When CMS accepts a request. 411.379 Section 411.379... Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.379 When CMS accepts a request. (a) Upon receiving a request for an advisory opinion, CMS promptly makes an initial determination of whether...

  9. 42 CFR 411.386 - CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive. 411.386... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.386 CMS's advisory... described in § 411.370. CMS has not and does not issue a binding advisory opinion on the subject matter...

  10. 42 CFR 405.1834 - CMS reviewing official procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CMS reviewing official procedure. 405.1834 Section... Determinations and Appeals § 405.1834 CMS reviewing official procedure. (a) Scope. A provider that is a party to... Administrator by a designated CMS reviewing official who considers whether the decision of the...

  11. 42 CFR 438.724 - Notice to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notice to CMS. 438.724 Section 438.724 Public...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Sanctions § 438.724 Notice to CMS. (a) The State must give the CMS Regional Office written notice whenever it imposes or lifts a sanction for one of the...

  12. 42 CFR 411.379 - When CMS accepts a request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false When CMS accepts a request. 411.379 Section 411.379... Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.379 When CMS accepts a request. (a) Upon receiving a request for an advisory opinion, CMS promptly makes an initial determination of whether...

  13. 42 CFR 411.386 - CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive. 411.386... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.386 CMS's advisory... described in § 411.370. CMS has not and does not issue a binding advisory opinion on the subject matter...

  14. 42 CFR 460.18 - CMS evaluation of applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CMS evaluation of applications. 460.18 Section 460... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.18 CMS evaluation of applications. CMS evaluates an application for approval as a PACE organization on the basis of the...

  15. 42 CFR 457.1003 - CMS review of waiver requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CMS review of waiver requests. 457.1003 Section 457.1003 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Waivers: General Provisions § 457.1003 CMS review of waiver requests. CMS will review the waiver...

  16. 42 CFR 425.200 - Agreement with CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Agreement with CMS. 425.200 Section 425.200 Public... Agreement § 425.200 Agreement with CMS. (a) General. In order to participate in the Shared Savings Program, an ACO must enter into a participation agreement with CMS for a period of not less than three...

  17. 42 CFR 405.1834 - CMS reviewing official procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CMS reviewing official procedure. 405.1834 Section... Determinations and Appeals § 405.1834 CMS reviewing official procedure. (a) Scope. A provider that is a party to... Administrator by a designated CMS reviewing official who considers whether the decision of the...

  18. 42 CFR 457.1003 - CMS review of waiver requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CMS review of waiver requests. 457.1003 Section 457.1003 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Waivers: General Provisions § 457.1003 CMS review of waiver requests. CMS will review the waiver...

  19. 42 CFR 403.248 - Administrative review of CMS determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Administrative review of CMS determinations. 403... Certification Program: General Provisions § 403.248 Administrative review of CMS determinations. (a) This section provides for administrative review if CMS determines— (1) Not to certify a policy; or (2) That...

  20. 42 CFR 422.210 - Assurances to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Assurances to CMS. 422.210 Section 422.210 Public...) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Relationships With Providers § 422.210 Assurances to CMS. (a) Assurances to CMS. Each organization will provide assurance satisfactory to the Secretary that...

  1. 42 CFR 411.386 - CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive. 411.386... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.386 CMS's advisory... described in § 411.370. CMS has not and does not issue a binding advisory opinion on the subject matter...

  2. 42 CFR 438.724 - Notice to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notice to CMS. 438.724 Section 438.724 Public...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Sanctions § 438.724 Notice to CMS. (a) The State must give the CMS Regional Office written notice whenever it imposes or lifts a sanction for one of the...

  3. 42 CFR 411.386 - CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive. 411.386... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.386 CMS's advisory... described in § 411.370. CMS has not and does not issue a binding advisory opinion on the subject matter...

  4. 42 CFR 433.320 - Procedures for refunds to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedures for refunds to CMS. 433.320 Section 433... Overpayments to Providers § 433.320 Procedures for refunds to CMS. (a) Basic requirements. (1) The agency must refund the Federal share of overpayments that are subject to recovery to CMS through a credit on...

  5. 42 CFR 425.200 - Agreement with CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Agreement with CMS. 425.200 Section 425.200 Public... Agreement § 425.200 Agreement with CMS. (a) General. In order to participate in the Shared Savings Program, an ACO must enter into a participation agreement with CMS for a period of not less than three...

  6. 42 CFR 405.1834 - CMS reviewing official procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CMS reviewing official procedure. 405.1834 Section... Determinations and Appeals § 405.1834 CMS reviewing official procedure. (a) Scope. A provider that is a party to... Administrator by a designated CMS reviewing official who considers whether the decision of the...

  7. 42 CFR 403.248 - Administrative review of CMS determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Administrative review of CMS determinations. 403... Certification Program: General Provisions § 403.248 Administrative review of CMS determinations. (a) This section provides for administrative review if CMS determines— (1) Not to certify a policy; or (2) That...

  8. 42 CFR 403.248 - Administrative review of CMS determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Administrative review of CMS determinations. 403... Certification Program: General Provisions § 403.248 Administrative review of CMS determinations. (a) This section provides for administrative review if CMS determines— (1) Not to certify a policy; or (2) That...

  9. 42 CFR 422.2264 - Guidelines for CMS review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guidelines for CMS review. 422.2264 Section 422... Guidelines for CMS review. In reviewing marketing material or election forms under § 422.2262 of this part, CMS determines that the marketing materials— (a) Provide, in a format (and, where appropriate,...

  10. 42 CFR 422.210 - Assurances to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Assurances to CMS. 422.210 Section 422.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... to CMS. (a) Assurances to CMS. Each organization will provide assurance satisfactory to the...

  11. 42 CFR 433.320 - Procedures for refunds to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for refunds to CMS. 433.320 Section 433... Overpayments to Providers § 433.320 Procedures for refunds to CMS. (a) Basic requirements. (1) The agency must refund the Federal share of overpayments that are subject to recovery to CMS through a credit on...

  12. 42 CFR 411.379 - When CMS accepts a request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false When CMS accepts a request. 411.379 Section 411.379... Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.379 When CMS accepts a request. (a) Upon receiving a request for an advisory opinion, CMS promptly makes an initial determination of whether...

  13. 42 CFR 460.18 - CMS evaluation of applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CMS evaluation of applications. 460.18 Section 460... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.18 CMS evaluation of applications. CMS evaluates an application for approval as a PACE organization on the basis of the...

  14. 42 CFR 422.210 - Assurances to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Assurances to CMS. 422.210 Section 422.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... to CMS. (a) Assurances to CMS. Each organization will provide assurance satisfactory to the...

  15. 42 CFR 433.320 - Procedures for refunds to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for refunds to CMS. 433.320 Section 433... Overpayments to Providers § 433.320 Procedures for refunds to CMS. (a) Basic requirements. (1) The agency must refund the Federal share of overpayments that are subject to recovery to CMS through a credit on...

  16. 42 CFR 405.1834 - CMS reviewing official procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CMS reviewing official procedure. 405.1834 Section... Determinations and Appeals § 405.1834 CMS reviewing official procedure. (a) Scope. A provider that is a party to... Administrator by a designated CMS reviewing official who considers whether the decision of the...

  17. 42 CFR 411.379 - When CMS accepts a request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false When CMS accepts a request. 411.379 Section 411.379... Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.379 When CMS accepts a request. (a) Upon receiving a request for an advisory opinion, CMS promptly makes an initial determination of whether...

  18. 42 CFR 460.18 - CMS evaluation of applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CMS evaluation of applications. 460.18 Section 460... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.18 CMS evaluation of applications. CMS evaluates an application for approval as a PACE organization on the basis of the...

  19. 42 CFR 433.320 - Procedures for refunds to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Procedures for refunds to CMS. 433.320 Section 433... Overpayments to Providers § 433.320 Procedures for refunds to CMS. (a) Basic requirements. (1) The agency must refund the Federal share of overpayments that are subject to recovery to CMS through a credit on...

  20. 42 CFR 422.210 - Assurances to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assurances to CMS. 422.210 Section 422.210 Public...) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Relationships With Providers § 422.210 Assurances to CMS. (a) Assurances to CMS. Each organization will provide assurance satisfactory to the Secretary that...

  1. 42 CFR 438.724 - Notice to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notice to CMS. 438.724 Section 438.724 Public...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Sanctions § 438.724 Notice to CMS. (a) The State must give the CMS Regional Office written notice whenever it imposes or lifts a sanction for one of the...

  2. 42 CFR 411.379 - When CMS accepts a request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false When CMS accepts a request. 411.379 Section 411.379... Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.379 When CMS accepts a request. (a) Upon receiving a request for an advisory opinion, CMS promptly makes an initial determination of whether...

  3. 42 CFR 433.320 - Procedures for refunds to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for refunds to CMS. 433.320 Section 433... Overpayments to Providers § 433.320 Procedures for refunds to CMS. (a) Basic requirements. (1) The agency must refund the Federal share of overpayments that are subject to recovery to CMS through a credit on...

  4. 42 CFR 457.1003 - CMS review of waiver requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CMS review of waiver requests. 457.1003 Section 457.1003 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Waivers: General Provisions § 457.1003 CMS review of waiver requests. CMS will review the waiver...

  5. 42 CFR 457.1003 - CMS review of waiver requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CMS review of waiver requests. 457.1003 Section 457.1003 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Waivers: General Provisions § 457.1003 CMS review of waiver requests. CMS will review the waiver...

  6. 42 CFR 403.248 - Administrative review of CMS determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Administrative review of CMS determinations. 403... Certification Program: General Provisions § 403.248 Administrative review of CMS determinations. (a) This section provides for administrative review if CMS determines— (1) Not to certify a policy; or (2) That...

  7. 42 CFR 405.1834 - CMS reviewing official procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CMS reviewing official procedure. 405.1834 Section... Determinations and Appeals § 405.1834 CMS reviewing official procedure. (a) Scope. A provider that is a party to... Administrator by a designated CMS reviewing official who considers whether the decision of the...

  8. 42 CFR 403.248 - Administrative review of CMS determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administrative review of CMS determinations. 403... Certification Program: General Provisions § 403.248 Administrative review of CMS determinations. (a) This section provides for administrative review if CMS determines— (1) Not to certify a policy; or (2) That...

  9. A high-throughput eight-channel probe head for murine MRI at 9.4 T.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Titus; Müller, Matthias; Barnes, Hannah; Neubauer, Stefan; Schneider, Jürgen E

    2010-07-01

    Murine MRI studies are conducted on dedicated MR systems, typically equipped with ultra-high-field magnets (>or=4.7 T; bore size: approximately 12-25 cm), using a single transmit-receive coil (volume or surface coil in linear or quadrature mode) or a transmit-receive coil combination. Here, we report on the design and characterization of an eight-channel volume receive-coil array for murine MRI at 400 MHz. The array was combined with a volume-transmit coil and integrated into one probe head. Therefore, the animal handling is fully decoupled from the radiofrequency setup. Furthermore, fixed tune and match of the coils and a reduced number of connectors minimized the setup time. Optimized preamplifier design was essential for minimizing the noise coupling between the elements. A comprehensive characterization of transmit volume resonator and receive coil array is provided. The performance of the coil array is compared to a quadrature-driven birdcage coil with identical sensitive volume. It is shown that the miniature size of the elements resulted in coil noise domination and therefore reduced signal-to-noise-ratio performance in the center compared to the quadrature birdcage. However, it allowed for 3-fold accelerated imaging of mice in vivo, reducing scan time requirements and thus increasing the number of mice that can be scanned per unit of time.

  10. Commissioning of the CMS High Level Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Agostino, Lorenzo; et al.

    2009-08-01

    The CMS experiment will collect data from the proton-proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a centre-of-mass energy up to 14 TeV. The CMS trigger system is designed to cope with unprecedented luminosities and LHC bunch-crossing rates up to 40 MHz. The unique CMS trigger architecture only employs two trigger levels. The Level-1 trigger is implemented using custom electronics, while the High Level Trigger (HLT) is based on software algorithms running on a large cluster of commercial processors, the Event Filter Farm. We present the major functionalities of the CMS High Level Trigger system as of the starting of LHC beams operations in September 2008. The validation of the HLT system in the online environment with Monte Carlo simulated data and its commissioning during cosmic rays data taking campaigns are discussed in detail. We conclude with the description of the HLT operations with the first circulating LHC beams before the incident occurred the 19th September 2008.

  11. CMS results on exclusive and diffractive production

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Gilvan A.

    2015-04-10

    We present recent CMS measurements of diffractive and exclusive processes, using data collected at 7 TeV at the LHC. Measurements of soft single- and double-diffractive cross sections are presented, as well as measurements of photon-induced processes including studies of exclusive WW production via photon-photon exchange.

  12. The CMS Remote Analysis Builder (CRAB)

    SciTech Connect

    Spiga, D.; Cinquilli, M.; Servoli, L.; Lacaprara, S.; Fanzago, F.; Dorigo, A.; Merlo, M.; Farina, F.; Fanfani, A.; Codispoti, G.; Bacchi, W.; /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U /CERN /INFN, CNAF /INFN, Trieste /Fermilab

    2008-01-22

    The CMS experiment will produce several Pbytes of data every year, to be distributed over many computing centers geographically distributed in different countries. Analysis of this data will be also performed in a distributed way, using grid infrastructure. CRAB (CMS Remote Analysis Builder) is a specific tool, designed and developed by the CMS collaboration, that allows a transparent access to distributed data to end physicist. Very limited knowledge of underlying technicalities are required to the user. CRAB interacts with the local user environment, the CMS Data Management services and with the Grid middleware. It is able to use WLCG, gLite and OSG middleware. CRAB has been in production and in routine use by end-users since Spring 2004. It has been extensively used in studies to prepare the Physics Technical Design Report (PTDR) and in the analysis of reconstructed event samples generated during the Computing Software and Analysis Challenge (CSA06). This involved generating thousands of jobs per day at peak rates. In this paper we discuss the current implementation of CRAB, the experience with using it in production and the plans to improve it in the immediate future.

  13. Commissioning of the CMS Forward Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashish; /SUNY, Buffalo

    2008-12-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is scheduled for physics data taking in summer 2009 after the commissioning of high energy proton-proton collisions at Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At the core of the CMS all-silicon tracker is the silicon pixel detector, comprising three barrel layers and two pixel disks in the forward and backward regions, accounting for a total of 66 million channels. The pixel detector will provide high-resolution, 3D tracking points, essential for pattern recognition and precise vertexing, while being embedded in a hostile radiation environment. The end disks of the pixel detector, known as the Forward Pixel detector, has been assembled and tested at Fermilab, USA. It has 18 million pixel cells with dimension 100 x 150 {micro}m{sup 2}. The complete forward pixel detector was shipped to CERN in December 2007, where it underwent extensive system tests for commissioning prior to the installation. The pixel system was put in its final place inside the CMS following the installation and bake out of the LHC beam pipe in July 2008. It has been integrated with other sub-detectors in the readout since September 2008 and participated in the cosmic data taking. This report covers the strategy and results from commissioning of CMS forward pixel detector at CERN.

  14. 26 CFR 1.468A-4T - Treatment of nuclear decommissioning fund (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treatment of nuclear decommissioning fund...-4T Treatment of nuclear decommissioning fund (temporary). (a) In general. A nuclear decommissioning... income earned by the assets of the nuclear decommissioning fund. (b) Modified gross income. For...

  15. Identification of beryllium-dependent peptides recognized by CD4+ T cells in chronic beryllium disease

    PubMed Central

    Falta, Michael T.; Mack, Douglas G.; Tinega, Alex N.; Crawford, Frances; Giulianotti, Marc; Santos, Radleigh; Clayton, Gina M.; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xuewu; Maier, Lisa A.; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous disorder characterized by an influx of beryllium (Be)-specific CD4+ T cells into the lung. The vast majority of these T cells recognize Be in an HLA-DP–restricted manner, and peptide is required for T cell recognition. However, the peptides that stimulate Be-specific T cells are unknown. Using positional scanning libraries and fibroblasts expressing HLA-DP2, the most prevalent HLA-DP molecule linked to disease, we identified mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that bind to MHCII and Be, forming a complex recognized by pathogenic CD4+ T cells in CBD. These peptides possess aspartic and glutamic acid residues at p4 and p7, respectively, that surround the putative Be-binding site and cooperate with HLA-DP2 in Be coordination. Endogenous plexin A peptides and proteins, which share the core motif and are expressed in lung, also stimulate these TCRs. Be-loaded HLA-DP2–mimotope and HLA-DP2–plexin A4 tetramers detected high frequencies of CD4+ T cells specific for these ligands in all HLA-DP2+ CBD patients tested. Thus, our findings identify the first ligand for a CD4+ T cell involved in metal-induced hypersensitivity and suggest a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of a common antigen specificity in CBD. PMID:23797096

  16. The differentiation and protective function of cytolytic CD4 T cells in influenza infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD4 T cells that recognize peptide antigen in the context of Class II MHC can differentiate into various subsets that are characterized by their helper functions. However, increasing evidence indicates that CD4 cells with direct cytolytic activity play a role in chronic, as well as, acute infections...

  17. 26 CFR 1.883-4T - Qualified shareholder stock ownership test (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Qualified shareholder stock ownership test... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Foreign Corporations § 1.883-4T Qualified shareholder stock...)(B). (C) If the individual directly owns stock in the corporation seeking qualified...

  18. Interleukin 4-producing CD4+ T cells in the skin of cats with allergic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Roosje, P J; Dean, G A; Willemse, T; Rutten, V P M G; Thepen, T

    2002-03-01

    Lesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis has a cellular infiltrate and a CD4/CD8 ratio comparable to that in humans with atopic dermatitis. CD4+ helper T cells and in particular cells belonging to the Th2 subset play an important role in disease pathogenesis in humans. We investigated the cytokine pattern of CD4+ T cells in situ, with special emphasis on the putative presence of cells producing interleukin 4 (IL4), in cats with allergic dermatitis. Immunohistochemical procedures were used to determine that CD4+ T cells in lesional and nonlesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis can produce IL4, as occurs in humans. Lesional and nonlesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis had significantly more IL4+ T cells (P = 0.001) than did skin of healthy control cats. Double staining indicated that all IL4+ cells were positive for pan-T or CD4 markers. Double labeling for mast cell chymase and IL4 stained primarily different cells. Western blotting demonstrated cross-reactivity between the antibody against human IL4 and a feline recombinant IL4. These results indicate that IL4 is primarily produced by CD4+ T cells and is also present in clinically uninvolved skin, indicating a role in the pathogenesis of allergic dermatitis in cats.

  19. Bromelain treatment reduces CD25 expression on activated CD4+ T cells in vitro✩

    PubMed Central

    Secor, Eric R.; Singh, Anurag; Guernsey, Linda A.; McNamara, Jeff T.; Zhan, Lijun; Maulik, Nilanjana; Thrall, Roger S.

    2009-01-01

    Bromelain (Br), an extract from pineapple stem with cysteine protease activity, exerts anti-inflammatory effects in a number of inflammatory models. We have previously shown that Br treatment decreased activated CD4+ T cells and has a therapeutic role in an ovalbumin-induced murine model of allergic airway disease. The current study was designed to determine the effect of Br on CD4+ T cell activation, specifically the expression of CD25 in vitro. CD25 is up regulated upon T cell activation, found as a soluble fraction (sCD25) and is a therapeutic target in inflammation, autoimmunity and allergy. Br treatment of anti-CD3 stimulated CD4+ T cells reduced CD25 expression in a dose and time dependent manner. This reduction of CD25 was dependent on the proteolytic action of Br as the addition of E64 (a cysteine protease inhibitor) abrogated this response. The concentration of sCD25 was increased in supernatants of Br treated activated CD4+ T cells as compared to control cells, suggesting that Br proteolytically cleaved cell-surface CD25. This novel mechanism of action identifies how Br may exert its therapeutic benefits in inflammatory conditions. PMID:19162239

  20. 26 CFR 1.892-4T - Commercial activities (temporary regulations).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Commercial activities (temporary regulations). 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Miscellaneous Provisions § 1.892-4T Commercial... the conduct of a commercial activity or income received by a controlled commercial entity or...

  1. 26 CFR 1.892-4T - Commercial activities (temporary regulations).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Commercial activities (temporary regulations). 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Miscellaneous Provisions § 1.892-4T Commercial activities... of a commercial activity or income received by a controlled commercial entity or received...

  2. 26 CFR 1.1001-4T - Modifications of certain derivative contracts (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Modifications of certain derivative contracts... Recognition of Gain Or Loss § 1.1001-4T Modifications of certain derivative contracts (temporary). (a) Certain assignments. For purposes of § 1.1001-1(a), the transfer or assignment of a derivative contract is not...

  3. In situ depletion of CD4+ T cells in human skin by Zanolimumab.

    PubMed

    Villadsen, L S; Skov, L; Dam, T N; Dagnaes-Hansen, F; Rygaard, J; Schuurman, J; Parren, P W H I; van de Winkel, J G J; Baadsgaard, O

    2007-02-01

    CD4(+) T cells, in activated or malignant form, are involved in a number of diseases including inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis, and T cell lymphomas such as the majority of cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCL). Targeting CD4 with an antibody that inhibits and/or eliminates disease-driving T cells in situ may therefore be a useful approach in the treatment of inflammatory and malignant skin diseases. Depletion of CD4(+) T cells in intact inflamed human skin tissue by Zanolimumab, a fully human therapeutic monoclonal antibody (IgG1, kappa) against CD4, was studied in a human psoriasis xenograft mouse model. Zanolimumab treatment was shown to induce a significant reduction in the numbers of inflammatory mononuclear cells in upper dermis. This reduction in inflammatory mononuclear cells in situ was primarily due to a significant reduction in the numbers of skin-infiltrating CD4(+), but not CD8(+) CD3(+) T cells. The capacity of Zanolimumab to deplete the CD4(+) T cells in the skin may be of importance in diseases where CD4(+) T cells play a central role. Indeed, in a phase II clinical trial Zanolimumab has shown a dose-dependent clinical response in patients with CTCL and the antibody is currently in a phase III clinical trial for CTCL, a disease for which there is no safe and effective treatment available today.

  4. 17 CFR 240.11a1-4(T) - Bond transactions on national securities exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bond transactions on national....11a1-4(T) Bond transactions on national securities exchanges. A transaction in a bond, note, debenture, or other form of indebtedness effected on a national securities exchange by a member for its...

  5. 17 CFR 240.11a1-4(T) - Bond transactions on national securities exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bond transactions on national....11a1-4(T) Bond transactions on national securities exchanges. A transaction in a bond, note, debenture, or other form of indebtedness effected on a national securities exchange by a member for its...

  6. 17 CFR 240.11a1-4(T) - Bond transactions on national securities exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bond transactions on national....11a1-4(T) Bond transactions on national securities exchanges. A transaction in a bond, note, debenture, or other form of indebtedness effected on a national securities exchange by a member for its...

  7. 17 CFR 240.11a1-4(T) - Bond transactions on national securities exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bond transactions on national....11a1-4(T) Bond transactions on national securities exchanges. A transaction in a bond, note, debenture, or other form of indebtedness effected on a national securities exchange by a member for its...

  8. Registration of tufted-naked seed in upland cotton germplasm 9023n4t

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A naked-tufted mutant called 9023n4t (PI 667553) was developed from the cultivar SC 9023 (Gossypium hirsutum L.) through chemical mutagenesis. This germplasm was developed by the Department of Plant and Soil Science, Texas Tech University and released in April, 2013. This mutant is quite unique sinc...

  9. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi impairs CD4 T cell responses by reducing antigen availability.

    PubMed

    Atif, Shaikh M; Winter, Sebastian E; Winter, Maria G; McSorley, Stephen J; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is associated with a disseminated febrile illness in humans, termed typhoid fever, while Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes localized gastroenteritis in immunocompetent individuals. One of the genetic differences between both pathogens is the presence in S. Typhi of TviA, a regulatory protein that shuts down flagellin (FliC) expression when bacteria transit from the intestinal lumen into the intestinal mucosa. Here we investigated the consequences of TviA-mediated flagellum gene regulation on flagellin-specific CD4 T cell responses in a mouse model of S. Typhimurium infection. Introduction of the S. Typhi tviA gene into S. Typhimurium suppressed antigen presentation of dendritic cells to flagellin-specific CD4 T cells in vitro. Furthermore, TviA-mediated repression of flagellin expression impaired the activation and proliferation of naive flagellin-specific CD4 T cells in Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes, which was accompanied by increased bacterial dissemination to the spleen. We conclude that TviA-mediated repression of flagellin expression reduces antigen availability, thereby weakening flagellin-specific CD4 T cell responses.

  10. The BMP Pathway Participates in Human Naive CD4+ T Cell Activation and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Víctor G.; Sacedón, Rosa; Hidalgo, Laura; Valencia, Jaris; Fernández-Sevilla, Lidia M.; Hernández-López, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) form a group of secreted factors that belongs to the TGF-β superfamily. Among different roles in a number of immune cell types, BMPs are known to regulate T cell development within the thymus, although the role of BMP signaling in human mature T cells remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that canonical BMP signaling is necessary during two critical events that regulate the size and function of human naive CD4+ T cell population: activation and homeostasis. Upon stimulation via TCR, naive CD4+ T cells upregulate the expression of BMP ligands triggering canonical BMP signaling in CD25+ cells. Blockade of BMP signaling severely impairs CD4+ T cell proliferation after activation mainly through regulation of IL-2, since the addition of this cytokine recuperates normal T cell expansion after inhibition of BMP signaling. Similarly, activation of canonical BMP pathway is required for both the maintenance of cell survival and the homeostatic proliferation induced by IL-7, a key factor for T cell homeostasis. Moreover, upregulation of two critical receptors for T cell homeostasis, CXCR4 and CCR9, triggered by IL-7 is also abrogated in the absence of BMP signaling. Collectively, we describe important roles of the canonical BMP signaling in human naive CD4+ T cell activation and homeostasis that could be valuable for clinical application. PMID:26110906

  11. Cytotoxic CD4 T Cells: Differentiation, Function, and Application to Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Sette, Alessandro; Weiskopf, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) has spread through most tropical and subtropical areas of the world and represents a serious public health problem. The control of DENV infection has not yet been fully successful due to lack of effective therapeutics or vaccines. Nevertheless, a better understanding of the immune responses against DENV infection may reveal new strategies for eliciting and improving antiviral immunity. T cells provide protective immunity against various viral infections by generating effector cells that cooperate to eliminate antigens and memory cells that can survive for long periods with enhanced abilities to control recurring pathogens. Following activation, CD8 T cells can migrate to sites of infection and kill infected cells, whereas CD4 T cells contribute to the elimination of pathogens by trafficking to infected tissues and providing help to innate immune responses, B cells, as well as CD8 T cells. However, it is now evident that CD4 T cells can also perform cytotoxic functions and induce the apoptosis of target cells. Importantly, accumulating studies demonstrate that cytotoxic CD4 T cells develop following DENV infections and may play a crucial role in protecting the host from severe dengue disease. We review our current understanding of the differentiation and function of cytotoxic CD4 T cells, with a focus on DENV infection, and discuss the potential of harnessing these cells for the prevention and treatment of DENV infection and disease. PMID:28003809

  12. Cytotoxic CD4 T Cells: Differentiation, Function, and Application to Dengue Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Sette, Alessandro; Weiskopf, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) has spread through most tropical and subtropical areas of the world and represents a serious public health problem. The control of DENV infection has not yet been fully successful due to lack of effective therapeutics or vaccines. Nevertheless, a better understanding of the immune responses against DENV infection may reveal new strategies for eliciting and improving antiviral immunity. T cells provide protective immunity against various viral infections by generating effector cells that cooperate to eliminate antigens and memory cells that can survive for long periods with enhanced abilities to control recurring pathogens. Following activation, CD8 T cells can migrate to sites of infection and kill infected cells, whereas CD4 T cells contribute to the elimination of pathogens by trafficking to infected tissues and providing help to innate immune responses, B cells, as well as CD8 T cells. However, it is now evident that CD4 T cells can also perform cytotoxic functions and induce the apoptosis of target cells. Importantly, accumulating studies demonstrate that cytotoxic CD4 T cells develop following DENV infections and may play a crucial role in protecting the host from severe dengue disease. We review our current understanding of the differentiation and function of cytotoxic CD4 T cells, with a focus on DENV infection, and discuss the potential of harnessing these cells for the prevention and treatment of DENV infection and disease.

  13. Genome Sequence of Creatinine-Fermenting Tissierella creatinophila Strain KRE 4T (DSM 6911)

    PubMed Central

    Nacke, Heiko; Daniel, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tissierella creatinophila strain KRE 4T (DSM 6911) is a strictly anaerobic, creatinine-fermenting, and creatine-fermenting organism, which has been isolated from sewage sludge. The draft genome consists of one circular chromosome (2.5 Mb) and harbors 2,533 predicted protein-encoding genes. PMID:28336595

  14. Polyfunctional CD4 T cells in the response to bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyfunctional CD4 T cells simultaneously produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including human TB and HIV. However, the assessment of this response in bovine infections was not fe...

  15. Getting the Skinny on CD4+ T Cell Survival in Fatty Livers

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher M.; Lemon, Stanley M.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma. In the March 10 issue of Nature, Greten and colleagues report that this metabolic disruption affects tumor surveillance by depleting CD4+ T helper cells through lipotoxic mechanisms associated with NAFLD. PMID:27096315

  16. N@a and N@d: Oligomer and Partner Specification by Asparagine in Coiled-Coil Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jordan M; Bartlett, Gail J; Boyle, Aimee L; Danon, Jonathan J; Rush, Laura E; Lupas, Andrei N; Woolfson, Derek N

    2017-02-17

    The α-helical coiled coil is one of the best-studied protein-protein interaction motifs. As a result, sequence-to-structure relationships are available for the prediction of natural coiled-coil sequences and the de novo design of new ones. However, coiled coils adopt a wide range of oligomeric states and topologies, and our understanding of the specification of these and the discrimination between them remains incomplete. Gaps in our knowledge assume more importance as coiled coils are used increasingly to construct biomimetic systems of higher complexity; for this, coiled-coil components need to be robust, orthogonal, and transferable between contexts. Here, we explore how the polar side chain asparagine (Asn, N) is tolerated within otherwise hydrophobic helix-helix interfaces of coiled coils. The long-held view is that Asn placed at certain sites of the coiled-coil sequence repeat selects one oligomer state over others, which is rationalized by the ability of the side chain to make hydrogen bonds, or interactions with chelated ions within the coiled-coil interior of the favored state. We test this with experiments on de novo peptide sequences traditionally considered as directing parallel dimers and trimers, and more widely through bioinformatics analysis of natural coiled-coil sequences and structures. We find that when located centrally, rather than near the termini of such coiled-coil sequences, Asn does exert the anticipated oligomer-specifying influence. However, outside of these bounds, Asn is observed less frequently in the natural sequences, and the synthetic peptides are hyperthermostable and lose oligomer-state specificity. These findings highlight that not all regions of coiled-coil repeat sequences are equivalent, and that care is needed when designing coiled-coil interfaces.

  17. Quantitative proteomic analysis of CMS-related changes in Honglian CMS rice anther.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qingping; Hu, Chaofeng; Hu, Jun; Li, Shaoqing; Zhu, Yingguo

    2009-10-01

    Honglian (HL) cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is one of the rice CMS types and has been widely used in hybrid rice production in China. The CMS line (Yuetai A, YTA) has a Yuetai B (maintainer line, YTB) nuclear genome, but has a rearranged mitochondrial (mt) genome consisting of Yuetai B. The fertility of hybrid (HL-6) was restored by restorer gene in nuclear genome of restorer line (9311). We used isotope-code affinity tag (ICAT) technology to perform the protein profiling of uninucleate stage rice anther and identify the CMS-HL related proteins. Two separate ICAT analyses were performed in this study: (1) anthers from YTA versus anthers from YTB, and (2) anthers from YTA versus anthers from HL-6. Based on the two analyses, a total of 97 unique proteins were identified and quantified in uninucleate stage rice anther under the error rate of less than 10%, of which eight proteins showed abundance changes of at least twofold between YTA and YTB. Triosephosphate isomerase, fructokinase II, DNA-binding protein GBP16 and ribosomal protein L3B were over-expressed in YTB, while oligopeptide transporter, floral organ regulator 1, kinase and S-adenosyl-L: -methionine synthetase were over-expressed in YTA. Reduction of the proteins associated with energy production and lesser ATP equivalents detected in CMS anther indicated that the low level of energy production played an important role in inducing CMS-HL.

  18. Spaced-based search coil magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hospodarsky, George B.

    2016-12-01

    Search coil magnetometers are one of the primary tools used to study the magnetic component of low-frequency electromagnetic waves in space. Their relatively small size, mass, and power consumption, coupled with a good frequency range and sensitivity, make them ideal for spaceflight applications. The basic design of a search coil magnetometer consists of many thousands of turns of wire wound on a high permeability core. When a time-varying magnetic field passes through the coil, a time-varying voltage is induced due to Faraday's law of magnetic induction. The output of the coil is usually attached to a preamplifier, which amplifies the induced voltage and conditions the signal for transmission to the main electronics (usually a low-frequency radio receiver). Search coil magnetometers are usually used in conjunction with electric field antenna to measure electromagnetic plasma waves in the frequency range of a few hertz to a few tens of kilohertzs. Search coil magnetometers are used to determine the properties of waves, such as comparing the relative electric and magnetic field amplitudes of the waves, or to investigate wave propagation parameters, such as Poynting flux and wave normal vectors. On a spinning spacecraft, they are also sometimes used to determine the background magnetic field. This paper presents some of the basic design criteria of search coil magnetometers and discusses design characteristics of sensors flown on a number of spacecraft.

  19. Correcting coils in end magnets of accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassab, L. R.; Gouffon, P.

    1998-05-01

    We present an empirical investigation of the correcting coils behavior used to homogenize the field distribution of the race-track microtron accelerator end magnets. These end magnets belong to the second stage of the 30.0 MeV cw electron accelerator under construction at IFUSP, the race-track microtron booster, in which the beam energy is raised from 1.97 to 5.1 MeV. The correcting coils are attached to the pole faces and are based on the inhomogeneities of the magnetic field measured. The performance of these coils, when operating the end magnets with currents that differ by +/-10% from the one used in the mappings that originated the coils copper leads, is presented. For one of the magnets, adjusting conveniently the current of the correcting coils makes it possible to homogenize field distributions of different intensities, once their shapes are practically identical to those that originated the coils. For the other one, the shapes are changed and the coils are less efficient. This is related to intrinsic factors that determine the inhomogeneities. However, we obtained uniformity of 0.001% in both cases.

  20. High CD4+ T cell density is associated with poor prognosis in patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinglei; Hao, Chongli; Cheng, Guangzhou; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xiang; Li, Chang; Qiu, Juhui; Ding, Kejia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of CD4+ T cells in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) tissues in situ. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the distribution of CD4+ T cells in 131 NMIBC tissues. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression models were applied to estimate overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results: NMIBC patients were divided into two groups based on the median frequency of CD4+ T cells (median, 1/×400 high resolution). On univariate analysis, CD4+ T cell density was inversely associated with overall survival (P = 0.01). In those patients with high CD4+ T density, 5-year OS rates was only 77%, compared with 86% in those with low density, respectively. Although CD4+ T cell density showed no prognostic significance for RFS (P = 0.36), 5-year RFS rates of patients with high CD4+ T density (58%) was lower than those of patients with low CD4+ T density (65%, respectively). By multivariate analysis, tumor infiltrating CD4+ T cell density emerged as an independent prognostic factor for OS (HR, 2.75; P = 0.004). In addition, no association was found between CD4+ T cell density and any clinicopathological variables (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that CD4+ T cells could potentially serve as a poor prognostic marker for patients with NMIBC. PMID:26617883

  1. Estradiol reduces susceptibility of CD4+ T cells and macrophages to HIV-infection.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Biswas, Nabanita; Patel, Mickey V; Barr, Fiona D; Crist, Sarah G; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Fahey, John V; Wira, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of the HIV epidemic in women requires urgent efforts to find effective preventive methods. Even though sex hormones have been described to influence HIV infection in epidemiological studies and regulate different immune responses that may affect HIV infection, the direct role that female sex hormones play in altering the susceptibility of target cells to HIV-infection is largely unknown. Here we evaluated the direct effect of 17-β-estradiol (E2) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) in HIV-infection of CD4(+) T-cells and macrophages. Purified CD4(+) T-cells and monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in vitro from peripheral blood and infected with R5 and X4 viruses. Treatment of CD4(+) T-cells and macrophages with E2 prior to viral challenge reduced their susceptibility to HIV infection in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of E2 2 h after viral challenge however did not result in reduced infection. In contrast, EE reduced infection in macrophages to a lesser extent than E2 and had no effect on CD4(+) T-cell infection. Reduction of HIV-infection induced by E2 in CD4(+) T-cells was not due to CCR5 down-regulation, but was an entry-mediated mechanism since infection with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV was not modified by E2. In macrophages, despite the lack of an effect of E2 on CCR5 expression, E2-treatment reduced viral entry 2 h after challenge and increased MIP-1β secretion. These results demonstrate the direct effect of E2 on susceptibility of HIV-target cells to infection and indicate that inhibition of target cell infection involves cell-entry related mechanisms.

  2. Vitamin D Actions on CD4(+) T Cells in Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Colleen Elizabeth; Hubler, Shane L; Moore, Jerott R; Barta, Lauren E; Praska, Corinne E; Nashold, Faye E

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes and integrates research on vitamin D and CD4(+) T-lymphocyte biology to develop new mechanistic insights into the molecular etiology of autoimmune disease. A deep understanding of molecular mechanisms relevant to gene-environment interactions is needed to deliver etiology-based autoimmune disease prevention and treatment strategies. Evidence linking sunlight, vitamin D, and the risk of multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes is summarized to develop the thesis that vitamin D is the environmental factor that most strongly influences autoimmune disease development. Evidence for CD4(+) T-cell involvement in autoimmune disease pathogenesis and for paracrine calcitriol signaling to CD4(+) T lymphocytes is summarized to support the thesis that calcitriol is sunlight's main protective signal transducer in autoimmune disease risk. Animal modeling and human mechanistic data are summarized to support the view that vitamin D probably influences thymic negative selection, effector Th1 and Th17 pathogenesis and responsiveness to extrinsic cell death signals, FoxP3(+)CD4(+) T-regulatory cell and CD4(+) T-regulatory cell type 1 (Tr1) cell functions, and a Th1-Tr1 switch. The proposed Th1-Tr1 switch appears to bridge two stable, self-reinforcing immune states, pro- and anti-inflammatory, each with a characteristic gene regulatory network. The bi-stable switch would enable T cells to integrate signals from pathogens, hormones, cell-cell interactions, and soluble mediators and respond in a biologically appropriate manner. Finally, unanswered questions and potentially informative future research directions are highlighted to speed delivery of etiology-based strategies to reduce autoimmune disease.

  3. Estradiol Reduces Susceptibility of CD4+ T Cells and Macrophages to HIV-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Biswas, Nabanita; Patel, Mickey V.; Barr, Fiona D.; Crist, Sarah G.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Fahey, John V.; Wira, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of the HIV epidemic in women requires urgent efforts to find effective preventive methods. Even though sex hormones have been described to influence HIV infection in epidemiological studies and regulate different immune responses that may affect HIV infection, the direct role that female sex hormones play in altering the susceptibility of target cells to HIV-infection is largely unknown. Here we evaluated the direct effect of 17-β-estradiol (E2) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) in HIV-infection of CD4+ T-cells and macrophages. Purified CD4+ T-cells and monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in vitro from peripheral blood and infected with R5 and X4 viruses. Treatment of CD4+ T-cells and macrophages with E2 prior to viral challenge reduced their susceptibility to HIV infection in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of E2 2 h after viral challenge however did not result in reduced infection. In contrast, EE reduced infection in macrophages to a lesser extent than E2 and had no effect on CD4+ T-cell infection. Reduction of HIV-infection induced by E2 in CD4+ T-cells was not due to CCR5 down-regulation, but was an entry-mediated mechanism since infection with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV was not modified by E2. In macrophages, despite the lack of an effect of E2 on CCR5 expression, E2–treatment reduced viral entry 2 h after challenge and increased MIP-1β secretion. These results demonstrate the direct effect of E2 on susceptibility of HIV-target cells to infection and indicate that inhibition of target cell infection involves cell-entry related mechanisms. PMID:23614015

  4. Complementary Dendritic Cell–activating Function of CD8+ and CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mailliard, Robbie B.; Egawa, Shinichi; Cai, Quan; Kalinska, Anna; Bykovskaya, Svetlana N.; Lotze, Michael T.; Kapsenberg, Martien L.; Storkus, Walter J.; Kalinski, Pawel

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) activated by CD40L-expressing CD4+ T cells act as mediators of “T helper (Th)” signals for CD8+ T lymphocytes, inducing their cytotoxic function and supporting their long-term activity. Here, we show that the optimal activation of DCs, their ability to produce high levels of bioactive interleukin (IL)-12p70 and to induce Th1-type CD4+ T cells, is supported by the complementary DC-activating signals from both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Cord blood– or peripheral blood–isolated naive CD8+ T cells do not express CD40L, but, in contrast to naive CD4+ T cells, they are efficient producers of IFN-γ at the earliest stages of the interaction with DCs. Naive CD8+ T cells cooperate with CD40L-expressing naive CD4+ T cells in the induction of IL-12p70 in DCs, promoting the development of primary Th1-type CD4+ T cell responses. Moreover, the recognition of major histocompatibility complex class I–presented epitopes by antigen-specific CD8+ T cells results in the TNF-α– and IFN-γ–dependent increase in the activation level of DCs and in the induction of type-1 polarized mature DCs capable of producing high levels of IL-12p70 upon a subsequent CD40 ligation. The ability of class I–restricted CD8+ T cells to coactivate and polarize DCs may support the induction of Th1-type responses against class I–presented epitopes of intracellular pathogens and contact allergens, and may have therapeutical implications in cancer and chronic infections. PMID:11854360

  5. Difficulties in precise quantitation of CD4+ T lymphocytes for clinical trials: a review.

    PubMed

    Fei, D T; Paxton, H; Chen, A B

    1993-09-01

    Maintenance of CD4+ T helper lymphocyte counts has been used as a surrogate marker of efficacy for drugs in the treatment of AIDS. In a multicenter clinical trial, subtle improvement of CD4+ T cell counts may be masked and misinterpreted if care is not paid to likely sources that can contribute to the variability of measurement of CD4+ T lymphocytes. This review addresses major areas that can contribute to the variability of measurement of CD4+ T lymphocytes, with emphasis on applications to multicenter clinical trials, and proposes areas of improvement that may not be well recognized by the medical community. Whereas there are excellent guidelines for immunophenotyping, equal attention is needed in hematologic enumeration of WBC and absolute lymphocytes. In particular, allowing the margin of error acceptable to blood cell standards for HIV-infected specimens is unsatisfactory. Special attention should also be given to the stability of lymphocytes in the anticoagulant during storage, the lysing method, the quality assurance programs as well as intrasubject fluctuations which may be derived from exercise, medications and diurnal variations. Awareness of these contributing factors by physicians and technical analysts will expedite the discovery of potential therapy in the treatment of AIDS. For a multicenter clinical trial, it is advisable to select a centralized laboratory adopting a uniform protocol with regard to sample preparation and handling, using more stringent quality controls for hematologic analysers, calibration of instruments and immunophenotyping. Pending a true reference standard that can monitor the variation of the entire analytical procedure, we anticipate that future interlaboratory quality assurance programs will include absolute T lymphocyte count, an important parameter for assessing the accuracy and consistency of CD4+ T helper cell counts generated from a laboratory.

  6. Vitamin D Actions on CD4+ T Cells in Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Colleen Elizabeth; Hubler, Shane L.; Moore, Jerott R.; Barta, Lauren E.; Praska, Corinne E.; Nashold, Faye E.

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes and integrates research on vitamin D and CD4+ T-lymphocyte biology to develop new mechanistic insights into the molecular etiology of autoimmune disease. A deep understanding of molecular mechanisms relevant to gene–environment interactions is needed to deliver etiology-based autoimmune disease prevention and treatment strategies. Evidence linking sunlight, vitamin D, and the risk of multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes is summarized to develop the thesis that vitamin D is the environmental factor that most strongly influences autoimmune disease development. Evidence for CD4+ T-cell involvement in autoimmune disease pathogenesis and for paracrine calcitriol signaling to CD4+ T lymphocytes is summarized to support the thesis that calcitriol is sunlight’s main protective signal transducer in autoimmune disease risk. Animal modeling and human mechanistic data are summarized to support the view that vitamin D probably influences thymic negative selection, effector Th1 and Th17 pathogenesis and responsiveness to extrinsic cell death signals, FoxP3+CD4+ T-regulatory cell and CD4+ T-regulatory cell type 1 (Tr1) cell functions, and a Th1–Tr1 switch. The proposed Th1–Tr1 switch appears to bridge two stable, self-reinforcing immune states, pro- and anti-inflammatory, each with a characteristic gene regulatory network. The bi-stable switch would enable T cells to integrate signals from pathogens, hormones, cell–cell interactions, and soluble mediators and respond in a biologically appropriate manner. Finally, unanswered questions and potentially informative future research directions are highlighted to speed delivery of etiology-based strategies to reduce autoimmune disease. PMID:25852682

  7. Routine phasing of coiled-coil protein crystal structures with AMPLE

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jens M. H.; Keegan, Ronan M.; Bibby, Jaclyn; Winn, Martyn D.; Mayans, Olga; Rigden, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Coiled-coil protein folds are among the most abundant in nature. These folds consist of long wound α-helices and are architecturally simple, but paradoxically their crystallographic structures are notoriously difficult to solve with molecular-replacement techniques. The program AMPLE can solve crystal structures by molecular replacement using ab initio search models in the absence of an existent homologous protein structure. AMPLE has been benchmarked on a large and diverse test set of coiled-coil crystal structures and has been found to solve 80% of all cases. Successes included structures with chain lengths of up to 253 residues and resolutions down to 2.9 Å, considerably extending the limits on size and resolution that are typically tractable by ab initio methodologies. The structures of two macromolecular complexes, one including DNA, were also successfully solved using their coiled-coil components. It is demonstrated that both the ab initio modelling and the use of ensemble search models contribute to the success of AMPLE by comparison with phasing attempts using single structures or ideal polyalanine helices. These successes suggest that molecular replacement with AMPLE should be the method of choice for the crystallo­graphic elucidation of a coiled-coil structure. Furthermore, AMPLE may be able to exploit the presence of a coiled coil in a complex to provide a convenient route for phasing. PMID:25866657

  8. Phase reconstruction from multiple coil data using a virtual reference coil

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dennis L.; Payne, Allison; Todd, Nick; Hadley, J. Rock

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This paper develops a method to obtain optimal estimates of absolute magnetization phase from multiple-coil MRI data. Methods The element-specific phases of a multi-element receiver coil array are accounted for by using the phase of a real or virtual reference coil that is sensitive over the entire imaged volume. The virtual-reference coil is generated as a weighted combination of measurements from all receiver coils. The phase-corrected multiple coil complex images are combined using the inverse covariance matrix. These methods are tested on images of an agar phantom, an in vivo breast, and an anesthetized rabbit obtained using combinations of four, nine, and three receiver channels, respectively. Results The four- and three- channel acquisitions require formation of a virtual-reference receiver coil while one channel of the nine-channel receive array has a sensitivity profile covering the entire imaged volume. Referencing to a real or virtual coil gives receiver phases that are essentially identical except for the individual receiver channel noise. The resulting combined images, which account for receiver channel noise covariance, show the expected reduction in phase variance. Conclusions The proposed virtual reference coil method determines a phase distribution for each coil from which an optimal phase map can be obtained. PMID:24006172

  9. Crystal Structure of the Central Coiled-Coil Domain from Human Liprin-[beta]2

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, Ryan L.; Tang, Ming-Yun; Sawaya, Michael R.; Phillips, Martin L.; Bowie, James U.

    2012-02-07

    Liprins are a conserved family of scaffolding proteins important for the proper regulation and development of neuronal synapses. Humans have four liprin-{alpha}s and two liprin-{beta}s which all contain long coiled-coil domains followed by three tandem SAM domains. Complex interactions between the coiled-coil and SAM domains are thought to create liprin scaffolds, but the structural and biochemical properties of these domains remain largely uncharacterized. In this study we find that the human liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coil forms an extended dimer. Several protease-resistant subdomains within the liprin-{beta}1 and liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coils were also identified. A 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the central, protease-resistant core of the liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coil reveals a parallel helix orientation. These studies represent an initial step toward determining the overall architecture of liprin scaffolds and understanding the molecular basis for their synaptic functions.

  10. A Set of Computationally Designed Orthogonal Antiparallel Homodimers that Expands the Synthetic Coiled-Coil Toolkit

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Molecular engineering of protein assemblies, including the fabrication of nanostructures and synthetic signaling pathways, relies on the availability of modular parts that can be combined to give different structures and functions. Currently, a limited number of well-characterized protein interaction components are available. Coiled-coil interaction modules have been demonstrated to be useful for biomolecular design, and many parallel homodimers and heterodimers are available in the coiled-coil toolkit. In this work, we sought to design a set of orthogonal antiparallel homodimeric coiled coils using a computational approach. There are very few antiparallel homodimers described in the literature, and none have been measured for cross-reactivity. We tested the ability of the distance-dependent statistical potential DFIRE to predict orientation preferences for coiled-coil dimers of known structure. The DFIRE model was then combined with the CLASSY multistate protein design framework to engineer sets of three orthogonal antiparallel homodimeric coiled coils. Experimental measurements confirmed the successful design of three peptides that preferentially formed antiparallel homodimers that, furthermore, did not interact with one additional previously reported antiparallel homodimer. Two designed peptides that formed higher-order structures suggest how future design protocols could be improved. The successful designs represent a significant expansion of the existing protein-interaction toolbox for molecular engineers. PMID:25337788

  11. Inhibition of the 26S proteasome by peptide mimics of the coiled-coil region of its ATPase subunits.

    PubMed

    Inobe, Tomonao; Genmei, Reiko

    Regulation of proteasomal degradation is an indispensable tool for biomedical studies. Thus, there is demand for novel proteasome inhibitors. Proteasomal degradation requires formation of coiled-coil structure by the N-terminal region of ATPase subunits of the proteasome cap. Here we show that peptides that mimic the N-terminal coiled-coil region of ATPase subunits interfere with proteasome function. These results suggest that coiled-coil peptides represent promising new proteasome inhibitors and that N-terminal coiled-coil regions of ATPase subunits are targets for proteasome inhibition.

  12. Reconstitution of CD4 T Cells in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid after Initiation of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy▿

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Kenneth S.; Vinton, Carol; Hage, Chadi A.; Kohli, Lisa M.; Twigg, Homer L.; Klatt, Nichole R.; Zwickl, Beth; Waltz, Jeffrey; Goldman, Mitchell; Douek, Daniel C.; Brenchley, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The massive depletion of gastrointestinal-tract CD4 T cells is a hallmark of the acute phase of HIV infection. In contrast, the depletion of the lower-respiratory-tract mucosal CD4 T cells as measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid is more moderate and similar to the depletion of CD4 T cells observed in peripheral blood (PB). To understand better the dynamics of disease pathogenesis and the potential for the reconstitution of CD4 T cells in the lung and PB following the administration of effective antiretroviral therapy, we studied cell-associated viral loads, CD4 T-cell frequencies, and phenotypic and functional profiles of antigen-specific CD4 T cells from BAL fluid and blood before and after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The major findings to emerge were the following: (i) BAL CD4 T cells are not massively depleted or preferentially infected by HIV compared to levels for PB; (ii) BAL CD4 T cells reconstitute after the initiation of HAART, and their infection frequencies decrease; (iii) BAL CD4 T-cell reconstitution appears to occur via the local proliferation of resident BAL CD4 T cells rather than redistribution; and (iv) BAL CD4 T cells are more polyfunctional than CD4 T cells in blood, and their functional profile is relatively unchanged after the initiation of HAART. Taken together, these data suggest mechanisms for mucosal CD4 T-cell depletion and interventions that might aid in the reconstitution of mucosal CD4 T cells. PMID:20610726

  13. Corrosion degradation mechanisms in coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, R.D.; Cayard, M.S.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews the historical aspects related to the development of coiled tubing for oilfield drilling, logging, workover and production operations. It focuses on the metallurgical and process variables of coiled tubing and their interrelationship with aspects of the downhole service environment and the resultant corrosion performance. Special emphasis is placed on (1) operating conditions that can lead to excessive corrosion and/or cracking damage and corrosion fatigue and (2) metallurgical and processing parameters which can be controlled to maximize coiled tubing resistance to corrosion degradation.

  14. Coiled tubing 1994: Enhanced value through innovation

    SciTech Connect

    Teel, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the growth in use of coiled tubing in well completion and development processes. Larger tubing is now available and operations expand into more demanding and critical areas as a result of research and development, innovation, and better understanding of materials and tube development. This article highlights significant coiled tubing operations, services, practices, and applications since 1990. It describes the types of materials used in coiled tubing and the strength associated with each type. Various case studies are described which use this tubing in both horizontal and directional drilling. It also is discussed as it relates to various types of enhanced recovery techniques for oil and gas wells.

  15. Collapse tests expand coiled tubing uses

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, E.J.; Mason, C.M. )

    1990-03-05

    Tests on coiled tubing have allowed the authors' company to decrease well work costs for some operations, especially squeeze cementing. They conducted collapse tests of 1.5 in. (0.095 in. and 0.109-in. wall thickness) and 1.75-in. (0.109-in. wall thickness) OD coiled tubing while under imposed axial load and differential pressure. These tests were performed to define accurate field operating limits for this size of coiled tubing. Findings from these tests are reported and discussed.

  16. Characterization of a 3D MEMS fabricated micro-solenoid at 9.4 T.

    PubMed

    Mohmmadzadeh, M; Baxan, N; Badilita, V; Kratt, K; Weber, H; Korvink, J G; Wallrabe, U; Hennig, J; von Elverfeldt, D

    2011-01-01

    We present for the first time a complete characterization of a micro-solenoid for high resolution MR imaging of mass- and volume-limited samples based on three-dimensional B(0), B(1) per unit current (B(1)(unit)) and SNR maps. The micro-solenoids are fabricated using a fully micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) compatible process in conjunction with an automatic wire-bonder. We present 15 μm isotropic resolution 3D B(0) maps performed using the phase difference method. The resulting B(0) variation in the range of [-0.07 ppm to -0.157 ppm] around the coil center, compares favorably with the 0.5 ppm limit accepted for MR microscopy. 3D B(1)(unit) maps of 40 μm isotropic voxel size were acquired according to the extended multi flip angle (ExMFA) method. The results demonstrate that the characterized microcoil provides a high and uniform sensitivity distribution around its center (B(1)(unit) = 3.4 mT/A ± 3.86%) which is in agreement with the corresponding 1D theoretical data computed along the coil axis. The 3D SNR maps reveal a rather uniform signal distribution around the coil center with a mean value of 53.69 ± 19%, in good agreement with the analytical 1D data along coil axis in the axial slice. Finally, we prove the microcoil capabilities for MR microscopy by imaging Eremosphaera viridis cells with 18 μm isotropic resolution.

  17. Helical coil thermal hydraulic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramello, M.; Bertani, C.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    A model has been developed in Matlab environment for the thermal hydraulic analysis of helical coil and shell steam generators. The model considers the internal flow inside one helix and its associated control volume of water on the external side, both characterized by their inlet thermodynamic conditions and the characteristic geometry data. The model evaluates the behaviour of the thermal-hydraulic parameters of the two fluids, such as temperature, pressure, heat transfer coefficients, flow quality, void fraction and heat flux. The evaluation of the heat transfer coefficients as well as the pressure drops has been performed by means of the most validated literature correlations. The model has been applied to one of the steam generators of the IRIS modular reactor and a comparison has been performed with the RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code applied to an inclined straight pipe that has the same length and the same elevation change between inlet and outlet of the real helix. The predictions of the developed model and RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code are in fairly good agreement before the dryout region, while the dryout front inside the helical pipes is predicted at a lower distance from inlet by the model.

  18. Noncationic Rigid and Anisotropic Coiled-Coil Proteins Exhibit Cell-Penetration Activity.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Norihisa; Hagiwara, Kyoji; Ito, Yoshihiro; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Osada, Yoshihito; Sano, Ken-ichi

    2015-08-04

    Numerous cationic peptides that penetrate cells have been studied intensively as drug delivery system carriers for cellular delivery. However, cationic molecules tend to be cytotoxic and cause inflammation, and their stability in the blood is usually low. We have previously demonstrated that a rigid and fibrous cationic coiled-coil protein exhibited cell-penetrating ability superior to that of previously reported cell-penetrating peptides. Making use of structural properties, here we describe the cell-penetrating activity of a rigid and fibrous coiled-coil protein with a noncationic surface. A fibrous coiled-coil protein of pI 6.5 penetrated 100% of the cells tested in vitro at a concentration of 500 nM, which is comparable to that of previously reported cell-penetrating peptides. We also investigated the effect of cell-strain dependency and short-term cytotoxicity.

  19. Magnetic propulsion of a magnetic device using three square-Helmholtz coils and a square-Maxwell coil.

    PubMed

    Ha, Yong H; Han, Byung H; Lee, Soo Y

    2010-02-01

    We introduce a square coil system for remote magnetic navigation of a magnetic device without any physical movements of the coils. We used three square-Helmholtz coils and a square-Maxwell coil for magnetic propulsion of a small magnet along the desired path. All the square coils are mountable on a cubic frame that has an opening to accommodate a living subject. The square-Helmholtz coils control the magnetic propulsion direction by generating uniform magnetic field along the desired direction while the square-Maxwell coil controls the propulsion force by generating magnetic gradient field. We performed magnetic propulsion experiments with a down-scaled coil set and a three-channel coil driver. Experimental results demonstrate that we can use the square coil set for magnetic navigation of a magnetic device without any physical movements of the coils.

  20. Screen-printed flexible MRI receive coils.

    PubMed

    Corea, Joseph R; Flynn, Anita M; Lechêne, Balthazar; Scott, Greig; Reed, Galen D; Shin, Peter J; Lustig, Michael; Arias, Ana C

    2016-03-10

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an inherently signal-to-noise-starved technique that limits the spatial resolution, diagnostic image quality and results in typically long acquisition times that are prone to motion artefacts. This limitation is exacerbated when receive coils have poor fit due to lack of flexibility or need for padding for patient comfort. Here, we report a new approach that uses printing for fabricating receive coils. Our approach enables highly flexible, extremely lightweight conforming devices. We show that these devices exhibit similar to higher signal-to-noise ratio than conventional ones, in clinical scenarios when coils could be displaced more than 18 mm away from the body. In addition, we provide detailed material properties and components performance analysis. Prototype arrays are incorporated within infant blankets for in vivo studies. This work presents the first fully functional, printed coils for 1.5- and 3-T clinical scanners.

  1. Evolution of coiled tubing drilling technology accelerates

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.; Adam, B.

    1993-09-01

    This paper reviews the status of coiled tubing technology in oil and gas drilling operations. The paper starts with a description of current coiled tubing technology and provides a cost comparison between conventional and coiled tubing drilling. The results show that offshore operations are already competitive while onshore operations will still lag behind conventional drilling methods. A list of known coiled tubing drilling operations is provided which gives the current borehole diameters and depths associated with this technology. The paper then goes on to provide the advantages and disadvantages of the technology. The advantages include improved well control, a continuous drillstring, reduced mobilization costs, simplified logging and measurement-while drilling measurements, and less tripping required. The disadvantages include high friction with the borehole wall, downhole motors required, limited drillhole size, and fatigued or damaged sections of the tubing cannot be removed. Finally, a review of the reliability of this technology is provided.

  2. The Magnetic Field of Helmholtz Coils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berridge, H. J. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the magnetic field of Helmholtz coils qualitatively and then provides the basis for a quantitative expression. Since the mathematical calculations are very involved, a computer program for solving the mathematical expression is presented and explained. (GS)

  3. Electrical wire insulation and electromagnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Bich, George J.; Gupta, Tapan K.

    1984-01-01

    An electromagnetic coil for high temperature and high radiation application in which glass is used to insulate the electrical wire. A process for applying the insulation to the wire is disclosed which results in improved insulation properties.

  4. Cooling arrangement for a superconducting coil

    DOEpatents

    Herd, Kenneth Gordon; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon

    1998-06-30

    A superconducting device, such as a superconducting rotor for a generator or motor. A vacuum enclosure has an interior wall surrounding a cavity containing a vacuum. A superconductive coil is placed in the cavity. A generally-annularly-arranged, thermally-conductive sheet has an inward-facing surface contacting generally the entire outward-facing surface of the superconductive coil. A generally-annularly-arranged coolant tube contains a cryogenic fluid and contacts a generally-circumferential portion of the outward-facing surface of the sheet. A generally-annularly-arranged, thermally-insulative coil overwrap generally circumferentially surrounds the sheet. The coolant tube and the inward-facing surface of the coil overwrap together contact generally the entire outward-facing surface of the sheet.

  5. Cooling arrangement for a superconducting coil

    DOEpatents

    Herd, K.G.; Laskaris, E.T.

    1998-06-30

    A superconducting device is disclosed, such as a superconducting rotor for a generator or motor. A vacuum enclosure has an interior wall surrounding a cavity containing a vacuum. A superconductive coil is placed in the cavity. A generally-annularly-arranged, thermally-conductive sheet has an inward-facing surface contacting generally the entire outward-facing surface of the superconductive coil. A generally-annularly-arranged coolant tube contains a cryogenic fluid and contacts a generally-circumferential portion of the outward-facing surface of the sheet. A generally-annularly-arranged, thermally-insulative coil overwrap generally circumferentially surrounds the sheet. The coolant tube and the inward-facing surface of the coil overwrap together contact generally the entire outward-facing surface of the sheet. 3 figs.

  6. Differentiation of distinct long-lived memory CD4 T cells in intestinal tissues after oral Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, P A; Fu, H H; Qiu, Z; Khairallah, C; Pham, Q M; Puddington, L; Khanna, K M; Lefrançois, L; Sheridan, B S

    2017-03-01

    Mucosal antigen-specific CD4 T-cell responses to intestinal pathogens remain incompletely understood. Here we examined the CD4 T-cell response after oral infection with an internalin A 'murinized' Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). Oral Lm infection induced a robust endogenous listeriolysin O (LLO)-specific CD4 T-cell response with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics in the intestine. Circulating LLO-specific CD4 T cells transiently expressed the 'gut-homing' integrin α4β7 and accumulated in the intestinal lamina propria and epithelium where they were maintained independent of interleukin (IL)-15. The majority of intestinal LLO-specific CD4 T cells were CD27(-) Ly6C(-) and CD69(+) CD103(-) while the lymphoid LLO-specific CD4 T cells were heterogeneous based on CD27 and Ly6C expression and predominately CD69(-). LLO-specific effector CD4 T cells transitioned into a long-lived memory population that phenotypically resembled their parent effectors and displayed hallmarks of residency. In addition, intestinal effector and memory CD4 T cells showed a predominant polyfunctional Th1 profile producing IFNγ, TNFα, and IL-2 at high levels with minimal but detectable levels of IL-17A. Depletion of CD4 T cells in immunized mice led to elevated bacterial burden after challenge infection highlighting a critical role for memory CD4 T cells in controlling intestinal intracellular pathogens.

  7. Differentiation of distinct long-lived memory CD4 T cells in intestinal tissues after oral Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, PA; Fu, HH; Qiu, Z; Khairallah, C; Pham, QM; Puddington, L; Khanna, KM; Lefrançois, L; Sheridan, BS

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal antigen-specific CD4 T cell responses to intestinal pathogens remain incompletely understood. Here we examined the CD4 T cell response after oral infection with an internalin A ‘murinized’ Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). Oral Lm infection induced a robust endogenous listeriolysin O (LLO)-specific CD4 T cell response with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics in the intestine. Circulating LLO-specific CD4 T cells transiently expressed the ‘gut-homing’ integrin α4β7 and accumulated in the intestinal lamina propria and epithelium where they were maintained independent of IL-15. The majority of intestinal LLO-specific CD4 T cells were CD27− Ly6C− and CD69+ CD103− while the lymphoid LLO-specific CD4 T cells were heterogeneous based on CD27 and Ly6C expression and predominately CD69−. LLO-specific effector CD4 T cells transitioned into a long-lived memory population that phenotypically resembled their parent effectors and displayed hallmarks of residency. In addition, intestinal effector and memory CD4 T cells showed a predominant polyfunctional Th1 profile producing IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2 at high levels with minimal but detectable levels of IL-17A. Depletion of CD4 T cells in immunized mice led to elevated bacterial burden after challenge infection highlighting a critical role for memory CD4 T cells in controlling intestinal intracellular pathogens. PMID:27461178

  8. Human memory, but not naive, CD4+ T cells expressing transcription factor T-bet might drive rapid cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Si-fei; Zhang, Yan-nan; Yang, Bin-yan; Wu, Chang-you

    2014-12-19

    We found that after stimulation for a few hours, memory but not naive CD4(+) T cells produced a large amount of IFN-γ; however, the mechanism of rapid response of memory CD4(+) T cells remains undefined. We compared the expression of transcription factors in resting or activated naive and memory CD4(+) T cells and found that T-bet, but not pSTAT-1 or pSTAT-4, was highly expressed in resting memory CD4(+) T cells and that phenotypic characteristics of T-bet(+)CD4(+) T cells were CD45RA(low)CD62L(low) CCR7(low). After short-term stimulation, purified memory CD4(+) T cells rapidly produced effector cytokines that were closely associated with the pre-existence of T-bet. By contrast, resting naive CD4(+) T cells did not express T-bet, and they produced cytokines only after sustained stimulation. Our further studies indicated that T-bet was expressed in the nuclei of resting memory CD4(+) T cells, which might have important implications for rapid IFN-γ production. Our results indicate that the pre-existence and nuclear mobilization of T-bet in resting memory CD4(+) T cells might be a possible transcriptional mechanism for rapid production of cytokines by human memory CD4(+) T cells.

  9. Coiled tubing cuts horizontal screen repair cost

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, W.; Hill, P.; Johnston, R.

    1996-01-01

    This article presents a case history of the successful workover performed by a coiled tubing unit (CTU) on Mississippi Canyon (MC) Block 109 Well A-24 in the US Gulf of Mexico to clean out sand and install new concentric screen for sand control. Workover design and operational details discussed are: Workover design -- hole-cleaning hydraulics, CT and screen predictions and comparison considerations; Workover operations -- cleanout, running packer and screens, coiled tubing (CT) weights, acid treatment and nitrogen lift and flow back.

  10. Heterogeneous Superconducting Low-Noise Sensing Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Penanen, Konstantin I.; Ho Eom, Byeong

    2008-01-01

    A heterogeneous material construction has been devised for sensing coils of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers that are subject to a combination of requirements peculiar to some advanced applications, notably including low-field magnetic resonance imaging for medical diagnosis. The requirements in question are the following: The sensing coils must be large enough (in some cases having dimensions of as much as tens of centimeters) to afford adequate sensitivity; The sensing coils must be made electrically superconductive to eliminate Johnson noise (thermally induced noise proportional to electrical resistance); and Although the sensing coils must be cooled to below their superconducting- transition temperatures with sufficient cooling power to overcome moderate ambient radiative heat leakage, they must not be immersed in cryogenic liquid baths. For a given superconducting sensing coil, this combination of requirements can be satisfied by providing a sufficiently thermally conductive link between the coil and a cold source. However, the superconducting coil material is not suitable as such a link because electrically superconductive materials are typically poor thermal conductors. The heterogeneous material construction makes it possible to solve both the electrical- and thermal-conductivity problems. The basic idea is to construct the coil as a skeleton made of a highly thermally conductive material (typically, annealed copper), then coat the skeleton with an electrically superconductive alloy (typically, a lead-tin solder) [see figure]. In operation, the copper skeleton provides the required thermally conductive connection to the cold source, while the electrically superconductive coating material shields against Johnson noise that originates in the copper skeleton.

  11. Passive energy dump for superconducting coil protection

    DOEpatents

    Luton, J.N. Jr.

    1973-01-16

    The patent describes a passive resistance type energy dump for the protection of the coils of a superconducting magnet. Insertion heaters are immersed in a rigid container filled with a fusible alloy. The energy dump is connected across the coils of the superconducting magnet wherein individual heater elements are connected singly to the windings or otherwise according to the energy dumping requirements upon transition of the magnet to a normal state.

  12. Coil tests and superconductor code calculations for the stellarator W7-X coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldzuhn, J.; Ehmler, H.; Hoelting, A.; Hertel, K.; Sborchia, C.; Genini, L.; Schild, T.

    2006-07-01

    For the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X, a plasma fusion experiment, the performance of the superconducting coils is tested in a cryogenic test facility. Focus is on the quench behaviour of these coils. Some key data of the coils are given here. The coil quench data, obtained during the tests, are compared to GANDALF code calculations. GANDALF is a one-dimensional finite elements code for the simulation of the quench properties of superconducting CICC cables. Good consistency between measurement and calculation is found for the development of the resistive voltage and temperature increase during the quench.

  13. pH sensitive coiled coils: a strategy for enhanced liposomal drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reja, Rahi M.; Khan, Mohsina; Singh, Sumeet K.; Misra, Rajkumar; Shiras, Anjali; Gopi, Hosahudya N.

    2016-02-01

    Stimuli responsive controlled release from liposome based vesicles is a promising strategy for the site specific delivery of drugs. Herein, we report the design of pH sensitive coiled coils and their incorporation into the liposome as triggers for the controlled release of encapsulated drugs. The designed coiled coil peptides with the incorporation of environment sensitive fluorescent amino acids were found to be stable at physiological pH and unstructured while changing the pH of the environment to either acidic or basic. This pH dependent conformational switch of the coiled-coil polypeptides was exploited as triggers for the enhanced release of the encapsulated drug molecules from liposomes. The SEM, DLS and TEM analysis revealed the uniform morphology of the peptide liposome hybrid vesicles. Further, the drug encapsulated liposome internalization experiments with cancer cells revealed the enhanced release and accumulation of drugs in the acidic lysosomal compartments in comparison with liposomes without coiled coils.Stimuli responsive controlled release from liposome based vesicles is a promising strategy for the site specific delivery of drugs. Herein, we report the design of pH sensitive coiled coils and their incorporation into the liposome as triggers for the controlled release of encapsulated drugs. The designed coiled coil peptides with the incorporation of environment sensitive fluorescent amino acids were found to be stable at physiological pH and unstructured while changing the pH of the environment to either acidic or basic. This pH dependent conformational switch of the coiled-coil polypeptides was exploited as triggers for the enhanced release of the encapsulated drug molecules from liposomes. The SEM, DLS and TEM analysis revealed the uniform morphology of the peptide liposome hybrid vesicles. Further, the drug encapsulated liposome internalization experiments with cancer cells revealed the enhanced release and accumulation of drugs in the acidic

  14. AC loss measurements in HTS coil assemblies with hybrid coil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenan; Long, Nicholas J.; Staines, Mike; Badcock, Rodney A.; Bumby, Chris W.; Buckley, Robert G.; Amemiya, Naoyuki

    2016-09-01

    Both AC loss and wire cost in coil windings are critical factors for high temperature superconductor (HTS) AC machinery applications. We present AC loss measurement results in three HTS coil assemblies at 77 K and 65 K which have a hybrid coil structure comprising one central winding (CW) and two end windings (EWs) wound with ReBCO and BSCCO wires with different self-field I c values at 77 K. All AC loss results in the coil assemblies are hysteretic and the normalized AC losses in the coil assemblies at different temperatures can be scaled with the I c value of the coil assemblies. The normalised results show that AC loss in a coil assembly with BSCCO CW can be reduced by using EWs wound with high I c ReBCO wires, whilst further AC loss reduction can be achieved by replacing the BSCCO CW with ReBCO CW. The results imply that a flexible hybrid coil structure is possible which considers both AC loss and wire cost in coil assemblies.

  15. The Rad50 coiled-coil domain is indispensable for Mre11 complex functions.

    PubMed

    Hohl, Marcel; Kwon, Youngho; Galván, Sandra Muñoz; Xue, Xiaoyu; Tous, Cristina; Aguilera, Andrés; Sung, Patrick; Petrini, John H J

    2011-09-04

    The Mre11 complex (Mre11, Rad50 and Xrs2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) influences diverse functions in the DNA damage response. The complex comprises the globular DNA-binding domain and the Rad50 hook domain, which are linked by a long and extended Rad50 coiled-coil domain. In this study, we constructed rad50 alleles encoding truncations of the coiled-coil domain to determine which Mre11 complex functions required the full length of the coils. These mutations abolished telomere maintenance and meiotic double-strand break (DSB) formation, and severely impaired homologous recombination, indicating a requirement for long-range action. Nonhomologous end joining, which is probably mediated by the globular domain of the Mre11 complex, was also severely impaired by alteration of the coiled-coil and hook domains, providing the first evidence of their influence on this process. These data show that functions of Mre11 complex are integrated by the coiled coils of Rad50.

  16. Addition of maraviroc to antiretroviral therapy decreased interferon-γ mRNA in the CD4+ T cells of patients with suboptimal CD4+ T-cell recovery.

    PubMed

    Minami, Rumi; Takahama, Soichiro; Kaku, Yu; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    The CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc (MVC), is associated with an enhanced CD4+ T-cell response independent of virological suppression; however, its mechanism of action has not been elucidated. In this study, we confirmed the effect of MVC on CD4+ T-cell count recovery in immunological non-responders, and compared the conventional combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) with MVC-intensified cART. We also investigated the effect of MVC on interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production in CD4+ T cells in vitro and in vivo, and evaluated the relationship between the mRNA level of IFN-γ and the degree of CD4+ T-cell count recovery. In vitro analysis indicated that MVC significantly decreased mRNA levels of IFN-γ in HIV-Tat stimulated CD4+ T cells from healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Of the 18 HIV-infected patients treated with MVC-intensified cART, 12 had a significantly increased CD4+ T-cell count after 24 weeks of additional treatment with MVC. In patients exhibiting a response in CD4+ T-cell counts, mRNA levels of IFN-γ in CD4+ T cells were lower than those in patients showing a non-response at baseline and at week 24, while mRNA levels of IFN-γ decreased in both groups at 24 weeks. In conclusion, MVC decreased the mRNA level of IFN-γ in CD4+ T cells in vitro and in vivo, especially in patients whose CD4+ T-cell count increased significantly. We also found that the lower baseline IFN-γ mRNA level and the larger decreased rate of IFN-γ mRNA in CD4+ T cells were associated with a good response to MVC regarding CD4+ T-cell recovery.

  17. Antigen affinity and antigen dose exert distinct influences on CD4 T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Keck, Simone; Schmaler, Mathias; Ganter, Stefan; Wyss, Lena; Oberle, Susanne; Huseby, Eric S; Zehn, Dietmar; King, Carolyn G

    2014-10-14

    Cumulative T-cell receptor signal strength and ensuing T-cell responses are affected by both antigen affinity and antigen dose. Here we examined the distinct contributions of these parameters to CD4 T-cell differentiation during infection. We found that high antigen affinity positively correlates with T helper (Th)1 differentiation at both high and low doses of antigen. In contrast, follicular helper T cell (TFH) effectors are generated after priming with high, intermediate, and low affinity ligand. Unexpectedly, memory T cells generated after priming with very low affinity antigen remain impaired in their ability to generate secondary Th1 effectors, despite being recalled with high affinity antigen. These data challenge the view that only strongly stimulated CD4 T cells are capable of differentiating into the TFH and memory T-cell compartments and reveal that differential strength of stimulation during primary T-cell activation imprints unique and long lasting T-cell differentiation programs.

  18. CD4+ T-cell survival in the GI tract requires dectin-1 during fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, R A; Dambuza, I M; Vautier, S; Taylor, J A; Reid, D M; Bain, C C; Underhill, D M; Masopust, D; Kaplan, D H; Brown, G D

    2016-01-01

    Dectin-1 is an innate antifungal C-type lectin receptor necessary for protective antifungal immunity. We recently discovered that Dectin-1 is involved in controlling fungal infections of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, but how this C-type lectin receptor mediates these activities is unknown. Here, we show that Dectin-1 is essential for driving fungal-specific CD4+ T-cell responses in the GI tract. Loss of Dectin-1 resulted in abrogated dendritic cell responses in the mesenteric lymph nodes (mLNs) and defective T-cell co-stimulation, causing substantial increases in CD4+ T-cell apoptosis and reductions in the cellularity of GI-associated lymphoid tissues. CD8+ T-cell responses were unaffected by Dectin-1 deficiency. These functions of Dectin-1 have significant implications for our understanding of intestinal immunity and susceptibility to fungal infections. PMID:26349660

  19. Inflammation-induced effector CD4+ T cell interstitial migration is alpha-v integrin dependent

    PubMed Central

    Overstreet, Michael G.; Gaylo, Alison; Angermann, Bastian; Hughson, Angela; Hyun, Young-min; Lambert, Kris; Acharya, Mridu; Billroth-Maclurg, Alison C.; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Topham, David J.; Yagita, Hideo; Kim, Minsoo; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin; Fowell, Deborah J.

    2014-01-01

    Leukocytes must traverse inflamed tissues to effectively control local infection. Although motility in dense tissues appears to be integrin-independent actin-myosin based, during inflammation changes to the extracellular matrix (ECM) may necessitate distinct motility requirements. Indeed, we found that T cell interstitial motility was critically dependent on RGD-binding integrins in the inflamed dermis. Inflammation-induced deposition of fibronectin was functionally linked to increased αv integrin expression on effector CD4+ T cells. Using intravital multi-photon imaging, we found that CD4+ T cell motility was dependent on αv expression. Selective αv blockade or knockdown arrested TH1 motility in the inflamed tissue and attenuated local effector function. These data show a context-dependent specificity of lymphocyte movement in inflamed tissues that is essential for protective immunity. PMID:23933892

  20. Manipulating Antigenic Ligand Strength to Selectively Target Myelin-Reactive CD4+ T Cells in EAE

    PubMed Central

    Sabatino, Joseph J.; Rosenthal, Kristen M.

    2010-01-01

    The development of antigen-specific therapies for the selective tolerization of autoreactive T cells remains the Holy Grail for the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This quest remains elusive, however, as the numerous antigen-specific strategies targeting myelin-specific T cells over the years have failed to result in clinical success. In this review, we revisit the antigen-based therapies used in the treatment of myelin-specific CD4+ T cells in the context of the functional avidity and the strength of signal of the encephalitogenic CD4+ T cell repertoire. In light of differences in activation thresholds, we propose that autoreactive T cells are not all equal, and therefore tolerance induction strategies must incorporate ligand strength in order to be successful in treating EAE and ultimately the human disease MS. PMID:19904613

  1. Auxiliary coil controls temperature of RF induction heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Auxiliary coil controls the temperature of an RF induction furnace that is powered by a relatively unstable RF generator. Manual or servoed adjustments of the relative position of the auxiliary coil, which is placed in close proximity to the RF coil, changes the looseness of the RF coil and hence the corresponding heating effect of its RF field.

  2. [Surface coils for magnetic-resonance images].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-González, Alfredo Odón; Amador-Baheza, Ricardo; Rojas-Jasso, Rafael; Barrios-Alvarez, Fernando Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    Since the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico, the development of this important medical imaging technology has been almost non-existing in our country. The very first surface coil prototypes for clinical applications in magnetic resonance imaging has been developed at the Center of Research in Medical Imaging and Instrumentation of the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa (Metropolitan Autonomous University, Campus Iztapalapa). Two surface coil prototypes were built: a) a circular-shaped coil and b) a square-shaped coil for multiple regions of the body, such as heart, brain, knee, hands, and ankles. These coils were tested on the 1.5T imager of the ABC Hospital-Tacubaya, located in Mexico City. Brain images of healthy volunteers were obtained in different orientations: sagittal, coronal, and axial. Since images showed a good-enough clinical quality for diagnosis, it is fair to say that these coil prototypes can be used in the clinical environment, and with small modifications, they can be made compatible with almost any commercial scanner. This type of development can offer new alternatives for further collaboration between the research centers and the radiology community, in the search of new applications and developments of this imaging technique.

  3. A classic zinc finger from friend of GATA mediates an interaction with the coiled-coil of transforming acidic coiled-coil 3.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Raina J Y; Yi Lee, Stella Hoi; Bartle, Natalie; Sum, Eleanor Y; Visvader, Jane E; Matthews, Jacqueline M; Mackay, Joel P; Crossley, Merlin

    2004-09-17

    Classic zinc finger domains (cZFs) consist of a beta-hairpin followed by an alpha-helix. They are among the most abundant of all protein domains and are often found in tandem arrays in DNA-binding proteins, with each finger contributing an alpha-helix to effect sequence-specific DNA recognition. Lone cZFs, not found in tandem arrays, have been postulated to function in protein interactions. We have studied the transcriptional co-regulator Friend of GATA (FOG), which contains nine zinc fingers. We have discovered that the third cZF of FOG contacts a coiled-coil domain in the centrosomal protein transforming acidic coiled-coil 3 (TACC3). Although FOG-ZF3 exhibited low solubility, we have used a combination of mutational mapping and protein engineering to generate a derivative that was suitable for in vitro and structural analysis. We report that the alpha-helix of FOG-ZF3 recognizes a C-terminal portion of the TACC3 coiled-coil. Remarkably, the alpha-helical surface utilized by FOG-ZF3 is the same surface responsible for the well established sequence-specific DNA-binding properties of many other cZFs. Our data demonstrate the versatility of cZFs and have implications for the analysis of many as yet uncharacterized cZF proteins.

  4. Identification of two regulatory elements controlling Fucosyltransferase 7 transcription in murine CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Pink, Matthias; Ratsch, Boris A; Mardahl, Maibritt; Schröter, Micha F; Engelbert, Dirk; Triebus, Julia; Hamann, Alf; Syrbe, Uta

    2014-11-01

    Fucosyltransferase VII encoded by the gene Fut7 is essential in CD4(+) T cells for the generation of E- and P-selectin ligands (E- and P-lig) which facilitate recruitment of lymphocytes into inflamed tissues and into the skin. This study aimed to identify regulatory elements controlling the inducible Fut7 expression in CD4(+) T cells that occurs upon activation and differentiation of naive T cells into effector cells. Comparative analysis of the histone modification pattern in non-hematopoetic cells and CD4(+) T cell subsets revealed a differential histone modification pattern within the Fut7 locus including a conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) identified by cross-species conservation comparison suggesting that regulatory elements are confined to this region. Cloning of the CNS located about 500 bp upstream of the Fut7 locus, into a luciferase reporter vector elicited reporter activity after transfection of the αβ-WT T cell line, but not after transfection of primary murine CD4(+) Th1 cells. As quantification of different Fut7 transcripts revealed a predominance of transcripts lacking the first exons in primary Th1 cells we searched for an alternative promoter. Cloning of an intragenic region spanning a 1kb region upstream of exon 4 into an enhancer-containing vector indeed elicited promoter activity. Interestingly, also the CNS enhanced activity of this intragenic minimal promoter in reporter assays in primary Th1 cells suggesting that both elements interact in primary CD4(+) T cells to induce Fut7 transcription.

  5. Viral Load and CD4+ T-Cell Dynamics in Primary HIV-1 Subtype C Infection

    PubMed Central

    Novitsky, Vladimir; Woldegabriel, Elias; Kebaabetswe, Lemme; Rossenkhan, Raabya; Mlotshwa, Busisiwe; Bonney, Caitlin; Finucane, Mariel; Musonda, Rosemary; Moyo, Sikhulile; Wester, Carolyn; van Widenfelt, Erik; Makhema, Joseph; Lagakos, Stephen; Essex, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Most knowledge of primary HIV-1 infection is based on subtype B studies, whereas the evolution of viral parameters in the early phase of HIV-1 subtype C infection is not well characterized. Methods The kinetics of viral RNA, proviral DNA, CD4+ T-cell count, and subsets of CD4+ T cells expressing CCR5 or CXCR4 were characterized in 8 acute and 62 recent subtype C infections over the first year postseroconversion. Results The viral RNA peak was 6.25 ± 0.92 log10 copies per milliliter. After seroconversion, heterogeneity among acute cases was evident by patterns of change in viral load and CD4+ T-cell count over time. The patterns were supported by the rate of viral RNA decline from peak (P = 0.022), viral RNA means (P = 0.005), CD4 levels (P <0.001), and CD4 decline to 350 (P = 0.011) or 200 (P = 0.046). Proviral DNA had no apparent peak and its mean was 2.59 ± 0.69 log10 per 106 peripheral blood mononuclear cell. In recent infections, viral RNA set point was 4.00 ± 0.97 log10 and viral RNA correlated inversely with CD4+ T cells (P <0.001) and directly with proviral DNA (P <0.001). Conclusions Distinct patterns of viral RNA evolution may exist shortly after seroconversion in HIV-1 subtype C infection. The study provides better understanding of the early phase of subtype C infection. PMID:19295336

  6. Studying the Role for CD4+ T Cell Subsets in Human Lupus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    subsets in human lupus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Insoo Kang, M.D. CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Studying the role for CD4+ T cell subsets in human lupus 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0150 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We have investigated whether and how autoimmune complex (AIC) in SLE ( lupus ) can

  7. Innate lymphoid cells regulate CD4+ T-cell responses to intestinal commensal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Matthew R; Monticelli, Laurel A; Fung, Thomas C; Ziegler, Carly G K; Grunberg, Stephanie; Sinha, Rohini; Mantegazza, Adriana R; Ma, Hak-Ling; Crawford, Alison; Angelosanto, Jill M; Wherry, E John; Koni, Pandelakis A; Bushman, Frederic D; Elson, Charles O; Eberl, Gérard; Artis, David; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2013-06-06

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently characterized family of immune cells that have critical roles in cytokine-mediated regulation of intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity. Alterations in ILC responses are associated with multiple chronic human diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, implicating a role for ILCs in disease pathogenesis. Owing to an inability to target ILCs selectively, experimental studies assessing ILC function have predominantly used mice lacking adaptive immune cells. However, in lymphocyte-sufficient hosts ILCs are vastly outnumbered by CD4(+) T cells, which express similar profiles of effector cytokines. Therefore, the function of ILCs in the presence of adaptive immunity and their potential to influence adaptive immune cell responses remain unknown. To test this, we used genetic or antibody-mediated depletion strategies to target murine ILCs in the presence of an adaptive immune system. We show that loss of retinoic-acid-receptor-related orphan receptor-γt-positive (RORγt(+)) ILCs was associated with dysregulated adaptive immune cell responses against commensal bacteria and low-grade systemic inflammation. Remarkably, ILC-mediated regulation of adaptive immune cells occurred independently of interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-22 or IL-23. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and functional analyses revealed that RORγt(+) ILCs express major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) and can process and present antigen. However, rather than inducing T-cell proliferation, ILCs acted to limit commensal bacteria-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses. Consistent with this, selective deletion of MHCII in murine RORγt(+) ILCs resulted in dysregulated commensal bacteria-dependent CD4(+) T-cell responses that promoted spontaneous intestinal inflammation. These data identify that ILCs maintain intestinal homeostasis through MHCII-dependent interactions with CD4(+) T cells that limit pathological adaptive immune cell responses to commensal

  8. Cytotoxic activity of CD4+ T cells against autologous tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Konomi, Y; Sekine, T; Takayama, T; Fuji, M; Tanaka, T

    1995-09-01

    The 51Cr-release assay is mostly applied to detecting the cytotoxic activity of CD8+ T cells, and little is known about the activity of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, the correlation between the cytotoxic activity of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells and the incubation period with autologous tumor cells was analyzed by two methods. The incubation periods were 4 and 20 h (4 h and 20 h assay) for the 51Cr-release assay. Eight pairs of tumor cells and T cells were assayed. T cells were fractionated into CD4+ and CD8+ T cells by using magnetic beads and panning methods, and those cells were activated by culture with recombinant interleukin-2 and immobilized anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody. In 6 out of 8 cases, no cytotoxic activity of CD4+ T cells was detected by the 4 h assay, whereas cytotoxic activity was detected in all cases in the 20 h assay. The cytotoxic activities in 20 h assay of CD4+ T cells were increased 67-fold in comparison with the activities in 4 h assay (range: 5-197). In the case of CD8+ T cells, cytotoxic activities were detected in 6 out of 8 cases in the 4 h assay. The lytic unit ratio of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was calculated as 1.5 in the 20 h assay (range: 0.2- > 7.2) versus 0.4 in the 4 h assay (range: < 0.1-1.3). Cytotoxic activities in colorimetric assay using Crystal Violet with a 24 h incubation were similar to those in the 20 h 51Cr-release assay in all eight cases. These results indicate that CD4+ T cells have cytotoxic activity as strong as that of CD8+ T cells towards autologous tumor cells.

  9. Limited HIV-1 Reactivation in Resting CD4+ T cells from Aviremic Patients under Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Abbas, Wasim; Bouchat, Sophie; Gatot, Jean-Stéphane; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Kabeya, Kabamba; Clumeck, Nathan; De Wit, Stéphane; Van Lint, Carine; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    A latent viral reservoir that resides in resting CD4+ T cells represents a major barrier for eradication of HIV infection. We test here the impact of HIV protease inhibitor (PI) based combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) over nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based cART on HIV-1 reactivation and integration in resting CD4+ T cells. This is a prospective cohort study of patients with chronic HIV-1 infection treated with conventional cART with an undetectable viremia. We performed a seven-year study of 47 patients with chronic HIV-infection treated with cART regimens and with undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA levels for at least 1 year. Of these 47 patients treated with cART, 24 were treated with a PI-based regimen and 23 with a NNRTI-based regimen as their most recent treatment for more than one year. We evaluated the HIV-1 reservoir using reactivation assay and integrated HIV-1 DNA, respectively, in resting CD4+ T cells. Resting CD4+ T cells isolated from PI-treated patients compared to NNRTI-treated patients showed a limited HIV-1 reactivation upon T-cell stimulation (p = 0·024) and a lower level of HIV-1 integration (p = 0·024). Our study indicates that PI-based cART could be more efficient than NNRTI-based cART for limiting HIV-1 reactivation in aviremic chronically infected patients. PMID:27922055

  10. The Induction and Maintenance of Transplant Tolerance Engages Both Regulatory and Anergic CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Besançon, Alix; Baas, Marije; Goncalves, Tania; Valette, Fabrice; Waldmann, Herman; Chatenoud, Lucienne; You, Sylvaine

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic tolerance to self-antigens or foreign antigens is thought to depend on constant vigilance by Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Previous work using a pancreatic islet allograft model and a short pulse of CD3 antibody therapy has shown that CD8(+) T cells become anergic and use TGFβ and coinhibitory signaling as their contribution to the tolerance process. Here, we examine the role of CD4(+) T cells in tolerization by CD3 antibodies. We show that both Foxp3(+) Tregs and CD4(+) T cell anergy play a role in the induction of tolerance and its maintenance. Foxp3(+) Tregs resisted CD3 antibody-mediated depletion, unlike intragraft Th1 CD4(+) lymphocytes coexpressing granzyme B and Tbx21, which were selectively eliminated. Tregs were mandatory for induction of tolerance as their depletion at the time of CD3 antibody therapy or for a short time thereafter, by an antibody to CD25 (PC61), led to graft rejection. Early treatment with CTLA-4 antibody gave the same outcome. In contrast, neither PC61 nor anti-CTLA-4 given late, at day 100 posttransplant, reversed tolerance once established. Ablation of Foxp3 T cells after diphtheria toxin injection in tolerant Foxp3(DTR) recipient mice provided the same outcome. Alloreactive T cells had been rendered intrinsically unresponsive as total CD4(+) or Treg-deprived CD4(+) T cells from tolerant recipients were unable to mount donor-specific IFN-γ responses. In addition, intragraft Treg-deprived CD4(+) T cells lacked proliferative capacities, expressed high levels of the inhibitory receptor PD-1, and exhibited a CD73(hi)FR4(hi) phenotype, thus reflecting a state of T cell anergy. We conclude that Tregs play a substantive and critical role in guiding the immune system toward tolerance of the allograft, when induced by CD3 antibody, but are less important for maintenance of the tolerant state, where T cell anergy appears sufficient.

  11. Activation of CD4+ T lymphocytes form interleukin 2-deficient mice by costimulatory B7 molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Razi-Wolf, Z; Höllander, G A; Reiser, H

    1996-01-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2)-deficient (IL-2-/-) mice develop hemolytic anemia and chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Importantly, the induction of disease in IL-2-deficient mice is critically dependent on CD4+ T cells. We have studied the requirements of T cells from IL-2-deficient mice for costimulation with B7 antigens. Stable B7-1 or B7-2 chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell transfectants could synergize with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) to induce the proliferation of CD4+ T cells from IL-2-/- mutant mice. Further mechanistic studies established that B7-induced activation resulted in surface expression of the alpha chain of the IL-2 receptor. B7-induced proliferation occurred independently of IL-4 and was largely independent of the common gamma chain of the IL-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, and IL-15 receptors. Finally, anti-B7-2 but not anti-B7-1 mAb was able to inhibit the activation of IL-2-/- T cells induced by anti-CD3 mAb in the presence of syngeneic antigen-presenting cells. The results of our experiments indicate that IL-2-/- CD4+ T cells remain responsive to B7 stimulation and raise the possibility that B7 antagonists have a role in the prevention/treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8610140

  12. Regulation of the Neurodegenerative Process Associated to Parkinson's Disease by CD4+ T-cells.

    PubMed

    González, Hugo; Contreras, Francisco; Pacheco, Rodrigo

    2015-12-01

    Neuroinflammation constitutes a fundamental process involved in the physiopathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Microglial cells play a central role in the outcome of neuroinflammation and consequent neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Current evidence indicates that CD4+ T-cells infiltrate the central nervous system (CNS) in PD, where they play a critical role determining the functional phenotype of microglia, thus regulating the progression of the neurodegenerative process. Here, we first analysed the pathogenic role of inflammatory phenotypes and the beneficial role of anti-inflammatory phenotypes of encephalitogenic CD4+ T-cells involved in the physiopathology of PD. Next, we discussed how alterations of neurotransmitter levels observed in the basal ganglia throughout the time course of PD progression could be strongly affecting the behaviour of encephalitogenic CD4+ T-cells and thereby the outcome of the neuroinflammatory process and the consequent neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Afterward, we integrated the evidence indicating the involvement of an antigen-specific immune response mediated by T-cells and B-cells against CNS-derived self-constituents in PD. Consistent with the involvement of a relevant autoimmune component in PD, we also reviewed the polymorphisms of both, class I and class II major histocompatibility complexes, associated to the risk of PD. Overall, this study gives an overview of how an autoimmune component involved in PD plays a fundamental role in the progression of the neurodegenerative process.

  13. Immune-responsiveness of CD4+ T cells during Streptococcus suis serotype 2 infection

    PubMed Central

    Lecours, Marie-Pier; Letendre, Corinne; Clarke, Damian; Lemire, Paul; Galbas, Tristan; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile; Thibodeau, Jacques; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Segura, Mariela

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Streptococcus suis infection, a major swine and human pathogen, is only partially understood and knowledge on the host adaptive immune response is critically scarce. Yet, S. suis virulence factors, particularly its capsular polysaccharide (CPS), enable this bacterium to modulate dendritic cell (DC) functions and potentially impair the immune response. This study aimed to evaluate modulation of T cell activation during S. suis infection and the role of DCs in this response. S. suis-stimulated total mouse splenocytes readily produced TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ, CCL3, CXCL9, and IL-10. Ex vivo and in vivo analyses revealed the involvement of CD4+ T cells and a Th1 response. Nevertheless, during S. suis infection, levels of the Th1-derived cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ were very low. A transient splenic depletion of CD4+ T cells and a poor memory response were also observed. Moreover, CD4+ T cells secreted IL-10 and failed to up-regulate optimal levels of CD40L and CD69 in coculture with DCs. The CPS hampered release of several T cell-derived cytokines in vitro. Finally, a correlation was established between severe clinical signs of S. suis disease and impaired antibody responses. Altogether, these results suggest S. suis interferes with the adaptive immune response. PMID:27905502

  14. CD4+ T cell–independent DNA vaccination against opportunistic infections

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mingquan; Ramsay, Alistair J.; Robichaux, Myles B.; Norris, Karen A.; Kliment, Corrine; Crowe, Christopher; Rapaka, Rekha R.; Steele, Chad; McAllister, Florencia; Shellito, Judd E.; Marrero, Luis; Schwarzenberger, Paul; Zhong, Qiu; Kolls, Jay K.

    2005-01-01

    Depletion or dysfunction of CD4+ T lymphocytes profoundly perturbs host defenses and impairs immunogenicity of vaccines. Here, we show that plasmid DNA vaccination with a cassette encoding antigen (OVA) and a second cassette encoding full-length CD40 ligand (CD40L), a molecule expressed on activated CD4+ T lymphocytes and critical for T cell helper function, can elicit significant titers of antigen-specific immunoglobulins in serum and Tc1 CD8+ T cell responses in CD4-deficient mice. To investigate whether this approach leads to CD4+ T cell–independent vaccine protection against a prototypic AIDS-defining infection, Pneumocystis (PC) pneumonia, we used serum from mice vaccinated with PC-pulsed, CD40L-modifed DCs to immunoprecipitate PC antigens. Kexin, a PC antigen identified by this approach, was used in a similar DNA vaccine strategy with or without CD40L. CD4-deficient mice receiving DNA vaccines encoding Kexin and CD40L showed significantly higher anti-PC IgG titers as well as opsonic killing of PC compared with those vaccinated with Kexin alone. Moreover, CD4-depleted, Kexin-vaccinated mice showed a 3-log greater protection in a PC challenge model. Adoptive transfer of CD19+ cells or IgG to SCID mice conferred protection against PC challenge, indicating a role of humoral immunity in the protection. The results of these studies show promise for CD4-independent vaccination against HIV-related or other opportunistic pathogens. PMID:16308571

  15. Human CD4 T cell epitopes selective for Vaccinia versus Variola virus.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alicia; Besse, Aurore; Favry, Emmanuel; Imbert, Gilles; Tanchou, Valérie; Castelli, Florence Anne; Maillere, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    Due to the high degree of sequence identity between Orthopoxvirus species, the specific B and T cell responses raised against these viruses are largely cross-reactive and poorly selective. We therefore searched for CD4 T cell epitopes present in the conserved parts of the Vaccinia genome (VACV) but absent from Variola viruses (VARV), with a view to identifying immunogenic sequences selective for VACV. We identified three long peptide fragments from the B7R, B10R and E7R proteins by in silico comparisons of the poxvirus genomes, and evaluated the recognition of these fragments by VACV-specific T cell lines derived from healthy donors. For the 12 CD4 T cell epitopes identified, we assessed their binding to common HLA-DR allotypes and their capacity to induce peptide-specific CD4 T-cell lines. Four peptides from B7R and B10R displayed a broad binding specificity for HLA-DR molecules and induced multiple T cell lines from healthy donors. Besides their absence from VARV, the two B10R peptide sequences were mutated in the Cowpox virus and completely absent from the Monkeypox genome. This work contributes to the development of differential diagnosis of poxvirus infections.

  16. Expanding Roles for CD4 T Cells and Their Subpopulations in Tumor Immunity and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dobrzanski, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of CD4 T cells in orchestrating the immune system and their role in inducing effective T cell-mediated therapies for the treatment of patients with select established malignancies are undisputable. Through a complex and balanced array of direct and indirect mechanisms of cellular activation and regulation, this functionally diverse family of lymphocytes can potentially promote tumor eradication, long-term tumor immunity, and aid in establishing and/or rebalancing immune cell homeostasis through interaction with other immune cell populations within the highly dynamic tumor environment. However, recent studies have uncovered additional functions and roles for CD4 T cells, some of which are independent of other lymphocytes, that can not only influence and contribute to tumor immunity but paradoxically promote tumor growth and progression. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of the various CD4 T cell lineages and their signature cytokines in disease progression and/or regression. We discuss their direct and indirect mechanistic interplay among themselves and with other responding cells of the antitumor response, their potential roles and abilities for “plasticity” and memory cell generation within the hostile tumor environment, and their potentials in cancer treatment and immunotherapy. PMID:23533029

  17. Secretion of N- and O-linked Glycoproteins from 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Wai-Mei; Tan, Aik-Aun; Gopinath, Subash C.B.; Hashim, Onn H.; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers that affect women globally and accounts for ~23% of all cancers diagnosed in women. Breast cancer is also one of the leading causes of death primarily due to late stage diagnoses and a lack of effective treatments. Therefore, discovering protein expression biomarkers is mandatory for early detection and thus, critical for successful therapy. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-E) coupled with lectin-based analysis followed by mass spectrometry were applied to identify potential biomarkers in the secretions of a murine mammary carcinoma cell line. Comparisons of the protein profiles of the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma cell line and a normal murine MM3MG mammary cell line indicated that cadherin-1 (CDH), collagenase 3 (MMP-13), Viral envelope protein G7e (VEP), Gag protein (GAG) and Hypothetical protein LOC433182 (LOC) were uniquely expressed by the 4T1 cells, and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) was exclusively secreted by the MM3MG cells. Further analysis by a lectin-based study revealed that aberrant O-glycosylated CDH, N-glycosylated MMP-13 and LOC were present in the 4T1 medium. These differentially expressed N- and O-linked glycoprotein candidates, which were identified by combining lectin-based analysis with 2D-E, could serve as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers for breast cancer. PMID:27226773

  18. Immune activation induces immortalization of HTLV-1 LTR-Tax transgenic CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Swaims, Alison Y.; Khani, Francesca; Zhang, Yingyu; Roberts, Arthur I.; Devadas, Satish

    2010-01-01

    Infection with the human T-cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) results in a variety of diseases including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Although the pathogenesis of these disorders is poorly understood, it involves complex interactions with the host immune system. Activation of infected T cells may play an important role in disease pathogenesis through induction of the oncogenic HTLV-1 Tax transactivator protein. To test this hypothesis, we employed transgenic mice in which Tax is regulated by the HTLV-1 LTR. T-cell receptor stimulation of LTR-Tax CD4+ T cells induced Tax expression, hyper-proliferation, and immortalization in culture. The transition to cellular immortalization was accompanied by markedly increased expression of the antiapoptotic gene, mcl-1, previously implicated as important in T-cell survival. Immortalized cells exhibited a CD4+CD25+CD3− phenotype commonly observed in ATL. Engraftment of activated LTR-Tax CD4+ T cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγ null mice resulted in a leukemia-like phenotype with expansion and tissue infiltration of Tax+, CD4+ lymphocytes. We suggest that immune activation of infected CD4+ T cells plays an important role in the induction of Tax expression, T-cell proliferation, and pathogenesis of ATL in HTLV-1–infected individuals. PMID:20634377

  19. Migratory and lymphoid-resident dendritic cells cooperate to efficiently prime naive CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Allenspach, Eric J; Lemos, Maria P; Porrett, Paige M; Turka, Laurence A; Laufer, Terri M

    2008-11-14

    To initiate an adaptive immune response, rare antigen-specific naive CD4(+) T cells must interact with equally rare dendritic cells (DCs) bearing cognate peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes. Lymph nodes (LNs) draining the site of antigen entry are populated by lymphoid-resident DCs as well as DCs that have immigrated from tissues, although the requirement for each population in initiating the T cell response remains unclear. Here, we show that antigen processing and presentation by both lymphoid-resident and migratory DCs was required for clonal selection and expansion of CD4(+) T cells after subcutaneous immunization. Early antigen presentation by lymphoid-resident DCs initiated activation and trapping of antigen-specific T cells in the draining LN, without sufficing for clonal expansion. Migratory DCs, however, interacted with the CD4(+) T cells retained in the LN to induce proliferation. Therefore, distinct DC subsets cooperate to alert and trap the appropriate cell and then license its expansion and differentiation.

  20. Cytotoxic CD4 T Cells—Friend or Foe during Viral Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Juno, Jennifer A.; van Bockel, David; Kent, Stephen J.; Kelleher, Anthony D.; Zaunders, John J.; Munier, C. Mee Ling

    2017-01-01

    CD4 T cells with cytotoxic function were once thought to be an artifact due to long-term in vitro cultures but have in more recent years become accepted and reported in the literature in response to a number of viral infections. In this review, we focus on cytotoxic CD4 T cells in the context of human viral infections and in some infections that affect mice and non-human primates. We examine the effector mechanisms used by cytotoxic CD4 cells, the phenotypes that describe this population, and the transcription factors and pathways that lead to their induction following infection. We further consider the cells that are the predominant targets of this effector subset and describe the viral infections in which CD4 cytotoxic T lymphocytes have been shown to play a protective or pathologic role. Cytotoxic CD4 T cells are detected in the circulation at much higher levels than previously realized and are now recognized to have an important role in the immune response to viral infections. PMID:28167943