Science.gov

Sample records for 4-year field experiment

  1. Microbiologically influenced corrosion of stainless steel weld and base metal -- 4 year field test results

    SciTech Connect

    Felder, C.M.; Stein, A.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the results obtained from a 4-year test program to determine the effects of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) on piping materials under service conditions representative of a fresh water cooling water system. The test was performed in a field installed test loop and was constructed to operate under four typical flow conditions: continuous flow at 4--6 fps (1.2--1.8 m/s), continuous flow at 0.5--1 fps (0.15--0.3 m/s), intermittent flow, and stagnant. Test materials consisted of pipe spools as well as coupons fabricated from Type 304, Type 316, Type 316L, and 6-percent molybdenum stainless steel, and titanium pipe. The pipe spools and coupons contained girth welds; the stainless steel girth welds were made with high and low heat inputs. Two types of bacterial colonization, bulbous nodules and shiny flat deposits, were observed in both weld metal and base metal of the Type 300 series materials, including Type 316L. Three different MIC morphologies were observed: pits with small openings and extensive tunneling, open pits, and shallow surface attack. A correlation was found to exist between the type of bacteria colonization, the MIC morphology, and the metallurgical characteristics of the materials. The MIC was not preferential to sensitized regions but was found to be related to residual cold work in the material.

  2. Effects of Diversity Experiences on Critical Thinking Skills over 4 Years of College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascarella, Ernest T.; Martin, Georgianna L.; Hanson, Jana M.; Trolian, Teniell L.; Gillig, Benjamin; Blaich, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of student engagement in diversity experiences on a range of college outcomes have been well documented. However, the potential influence of involvement in diversity experiences during college on the cognitive and intellectual outcomes of post-secondary education is only beginning to be understood. Gurin et al. (2002) made a…

  3. Changes in White college students' color-blind racial ideology over 4 years: do diversity experiences make a difference?

    PubMed

    Neville, Helen A; Poteat, V Paul; Lewis, Jioni A; Spanierman, Lisa B

    2014-04-01

    In this longitudinal study, we explored how White students' (N = 857) color-blind racial ideology (CBRI; i.e., beliefs that serve to deny, minimize, and/or distort the existence of racism) changed over time and the factors associated with these patterns of change. Specifically, we investigated whether gender, diversity attitudes (i.e., openness to diversity and interest in social issues), and college diversity experiences (i.e., diversity-related courses/activities and close interracial friendships) predicted patterns of CBRI change. Findings indicated that gender and diversity attitudes were related to initial levels of CBRI, such that women and students who were more open to diversity issues at the beginning of college were more likely to report lower levels of CBRI; gender was also related to a greater decrease in CBRI changes over the college experience. Furthermore, college diversity experiences predicted changes in CBRI over time, such that students who completed a greater number of diversity courses and activities and those who had a greater number of close Black friends showed a significantly greater decrease in CBRI over their 4 years in college; interestingly, students who reported having no Latino friends compared with having some close Latino friends showed a significantly greater decrease in CBRI over time.

  4. Exploring the Academic and Social Experiences of Latino Engineering Community College Transfer Students at a 4-Year Institution: A Qualitative Research Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagler, LaTesha R.

    As the number of historically underrepresented populations transfer from community college to university to pursue baccalaureate degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), little research exists about the challenges and successes Latino students experience as they transition from 2-year colleges to 4-year universities. Thus, institutions of higher education have limited insight to inform their policies, practices, and strategic planning in developing effective sources of support, services, and programs for underrepresented students in STEM disciplines. This qualitative research study explored the academic and social experiences of 14 Latino engineering community college transfer students at one university. Specifically, this study examined the lived experiences of minority community college transfer students' transition into and persistence at a 4-year institution. The conceptual framework applied to this study was Schlossberg's Transition Theory, which analyzed the participant's social and academic experiences that led to their successful transition from community college to university. Three themes emerged from the narrative data analysis: (a) Academic Experiences, (b) Social Experiences, and (c) Sources of Support. The findings indicate that engineering community college transfer students experience many challenges in their transition into and persistence at 4-year institutions. Some of the challenges include lack of academic preparedness, environmental challenges, lack of time management skills and faculty serving the role as institutional agents.

  5. '20 days protected learning' - students' experiences of an overseas nurses programme - 4 years on: a retrospective survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background From September 2005 the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) introduced new arrangements for the registration of non-EU overseas nurses which requires all applicants to undertake '20 days of protected learning' time in the UK and for some, a period of supervised practice. A survey was undertaken at Bournemouth University, which offers a '20 days protected learning only' programme, to elicit overseas nurses' demographic details, experiences in completing the programme and their 'final destinations' once registered. Methods An online survey was devised which contained a mixture of tick box and open ended questions which covered demographic details, views on the programme and final destinations This was uploaded to http://www.surveymonkey.com/ and sent out to nurses who had completed the Overseas Nurses Programme (ONP) with Bournemouth University (n = 1050). Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and the qualitative data were coded and analysed using content analysis. Results There were 251 respondents (27.7% response rate). The typical 'profile' of a nurse who responded to the survey was female, aged 25-40 years and had been qualified for more than 5 years with a bachelors degree. The majority came from Australia on a 2 year working holiday visa and the key final destination in the UK, on registration with the NMC, was working for an agency. There were five key findings regarding experience of the programme. Of those surveyed 61.2% did not feel it necessary to undergo an ONP; 71.6% felt that they should be able to complete the programme on-line in their own country; 64.2% that the ONP should only contain information about delivery of healthcare in UK and Legal and professional (NMC) issues; 57% that European nurses should also undergo the same programme and sit an IELTS test; and 68.2% that the programme was too theory orientated; and should have links to practice (21%). Conclusions The NMC set the admissions criteria for entry to the

  6. Wake field acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Where and how will wake field acceleration devices find use for other than, possibly, accelerators for high energy physics. I don't know that this can be responsibly answered at this time. What I can do is describe some recent results from an ongoing experimental program at Argonne which support the idea that wake field techniques and devices are potentially important for future accelerators. Perhaps this will spawn expanded interest and even new ideas for the use of this new technology. The Argonne program, and in particular the Advanced Accelerator Test Facility (AATF), has been reported in several fairly recent papers and reports. But because this is a substantially new audience for the subject, I will include a brief review of the program and the facility before describing experiments. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Developmental milestones record - 4 years

    MedlinePlus

    Normal childhood growth milestones - 4 years; Growth milestones for children - 4 years; Childhood growth milestones - 4 years ... care provider. PHYSICAL AND MOTOR During the fourth year, a child typically: Gains weight at the rate ...

  8. Is anastomotic urethroplasty is really superior than BMG augmented dorsal onlay urethroplasty in terms of outcomes and patient satisfaction: Our 4-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Anil Kumar; Jha, Nawal K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We analyzed the outcomes of augmented buccal mucosa graft (BMG) dorsal onlay urethroplasty and anastomotic urethroplasty in the management of urethral stricture. Methods: Patients having a stricture length more than 2 cm were treated by augmented BMG dorsal onlay urethroplasty; patients with a stricture length less than 2 cm were managed by excision and end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty. The postoperative retrograde urethrogram, micturating cystourethrogram, and uroflowmetry were compared to preoperative values. The postoperative subjective symptoms and complications were recorded and analyzed. Results: In total, 90 patients were included in this study. Forty-five patients had an average stricture length of 5.9 cm; they underwent BMG augmented dorsal onlay urethroplasty. Of these, 7 (15.55%) patients came with recurrence, while 38 (84.44%) were asymptomatic, in the average follow-up period of 32.8 months. The next 45 patients underwent excision of the stricture and end-to-end anastomosis. Of these, 6 (13.33%) failed on therapy and the remaining 39 (86.66%) were asymptomatic during the average follow-up period of 28.4 months. Conclusion: The technique of BMG dorsal onlay is easy to do, it is very reliable, has high success rate, less postoperative complications and better patient satisfaction compared to anastomotic urethroplasty. Our study has its limitations. Recurrent cases of urethroplasty and hypospadias were excluded from this study. Recurrent stricture cases were eliminated to overcome bias. Cases of hypospadias are still best treated by axial or random penile skin flap as BMG augmentation cannot create a long urethral tube. Based on our 4-year experience, we recommend BMG augmented urethroplasty long and short segment stricture of the urethra. PMID:25624962

  9. Baccalaureate and Beyond: A First Look at the Employment Experiences and Lives of College Graduates, 4 Years On (B&B:08/12). NCES 2014-141

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cataldi, Emily Forrest; Siegel, Peter; Shepherd, Bryan; Cooney, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This report presents initial findings about the employment outcomes of bachelor's degree recipients approximately 4 years after they completed their 2007-08 degrees. These findings are based on data from the second follow-up of the Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:08/12), a nationally representative longitudinal sample…

  10. Field test experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    As a part of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA), a field-test program was developed to obtain solar photovoltaic (PV) module performance and endurance data. These data are used to identify the specific characteristics of module designs under various environmental conditions. The information obtained from field testing is useful to all participants in the National Photovoltaics Program, from the research planner to the life-cycle cost analyst.

  11. Polar Magnetic Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the initial data reduction and analysis of the magnetic field measurements of the Polar spacecraft. At this writing data for the first three years of the mission have been processed and deposited in the key parameter database. These data are also available in a variety of time resolutions and coordinate systems via a webserver at UCLA that provides both plots and digital data. The flight software has twice been reprogrammed: once to remove a glitch in the data where there were rare collisions between commands in the central processing unit and once to provide burst mode data at 100 samples per second on a regular basis. The instrument continues to function as described in the instrument paper (1.1 in the bibliography attached below). The early observations were compared with observations on the same field lines at lower altitude. The polar magnetic measurements also proved to be most useful for testing the accuracy of MHD models. WE also made important contributions to study of waves and turbulence.

  12. Environmental Biology: A Field Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Jim

    1984-01-01

    Recounts experiences of an environmental biology class, highlighting the eight-day field trip that is the culmination of the course. Describes activities during the bus trip, a two-day canoe trip, and field work at the Ozark Underground Laboratory and Blanchard Springs Caverns. Also discusses the field journal and final examination. (JM)

  13. Family Oriented Geographic Field Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Karen Ann Lalk

    This paper describes a program of geographic education through field experience trips for family groups. Developed at Delta College in Michigan, the approach is unique because it emphasizes learning experiences for families rather than for individual students. The family is interpreted to include nuclear families, single-parent families with…

  14. Student-Designed Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Permaul, Jane S.

    1976-01-01

    Opportunities should be made available for students to design their own field experiences with the use of learning contracts. This approach affords the student flexibility, emphasizes initiative and involvement, and aids in the resolution of the problem of school-to-work transition. (Author/JDS)

  15. Mojave remote sensing field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, Raymond E.; Petroy, S. B.; Plaut, J. J.; Shepard, Michael K.; Evans, D.; Farr, T.; Greeley, Ronald; Gaddis, L.; Lancaster, N.

    1991-01-01

    The Mojave Remote Sensing Field Experiment (MFE), conducted in June 1988, involved acquisition of Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS); C, L, and P-band polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data; and simultaneous field observations at the Pisgah and Cima volcanic fields, and Lavic and Silver Lake Playas, Mojave Desert, California. A LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) scene is also included in the MFE archive. TM-based reflectance and TIMS-based emissivity surface spectra were extracted for selected surfaces. Radiative transfer procedures were used to model the atmosphere and surface simultaneously, with the constraint that the spectra must be consistent with field-based spectral observations. AIRSAR data were calibrated to backscatter cross sections using corner reflectors deployed at target sites. Analyses of MFE data focus on extraction of reflectance, emissivity, and cross section for lava flows of various ages and degradation states. Results have relevance for the evolution of volcanic plains on Venus and Mars.

  16. Nuclide-migration field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Erdal, B.R.; Wolfsberg, K.; Johnstone, J.K.; Erickson, K.L.; Friedman, A.M.; Fried, S.; Hines, J.J.

    1981-03-01

    When considering groundwater flow and radionuclide retention in the complex flow systems that can occur in geologic formations, one has a serious problem in determining if laboratory studies are being performed under conditions appropriate to natural systems. This document is the project plan for a program designed to begin to address these problems. The project is being carried out jointly by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Argonne National Laboratory. The work has three principal objectives: (1) to develop the experimental, instrumental, and safety techniques necessary to conduct controlled, small-scale radionuclide migration field experiments, including those involving actinides; (2) to use these techniques to define radionuclide migration through rock by performing generic, at-depth experiments under closely monitored conditions; and (3) to determine whether available lithologic, geochemical, and hydrologic properties together with existing or developing transport models are sufficient and appropriate to describe real field conditions.

  17. Field Experiments in Litter Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnie, William C.

    1973-01-01

    A series of urban and highway litter experiments in Richmond (Virginia), St. Louis, and Philadelphia indicated well-designed litter cans reduced littering about 15 percent along city streets and nearly 30 percent along highways. Also, the propensity to litter is critically affected by the characteristics of the individual and environmental…

  18. The Integration of Multimedia and Field Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, George

    A professor of science education at Florida State University shares his experiences with the growth of the field of environmental education and the problems inherent in trying to teach formal environmental education outdoors. Although field experience is best, it must be limited in most situations since logistics get in the way. Technology can…

  19. Family Oriented Field Experience in Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Karen A.

    A family-oriented geography field course about the southwestern United States was conducted in 1978 by a community college in Michigan (Delta College). Course activities took place in Colorado. The major purpose of the field experience was to offer learning experiences to family groups rather than to individual students. For purposes of the field…

  20. From theory to field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Bram

    2016-04-01

    Peter Raats' achievements in Haren (NL) 1986-1997 were based on a solid theoretical insight in hydrology and transport process in soil. However, Peter was also the driving force behind many experimental studies and applied research. This will be illustrated by a broad range of examples ranging from the dynamics of composting processes of organic material; modelling and monitoring nutrient leaching at field-scale; wind erosion; water and nutrient dynamics in horticultural production systems; oxygen diffusion in soils; and processes of water and nutrient uptake by plant roots. Peter's leadership led to may new approaches and the introduction of innovative measurement techniques in Dutch research; ranging from TDR to nutrient concentration measurements in closed fertigation systems. This presentation will give a brief overview how Peter's theoretical and mathematical insights accelerated this applied research.

  1. How to Thrive during Your Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Connie; Welsh, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Field experiences, also referred to as practicums or clinical experiences, are part of every accredited teacher preparation program. These pre-student teaching experiences place future teachers in a preK-12 classroom where they have the opportunity not just to observe, but also to learn about teaching by interacting with teachers and students. The…

  2. Indirect Reciprocity; A Field Experiment

    PubMed Central

    van Apeldoorn, Jacobien; Schram, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Indirect reciprocity involves cooperative acts towards strangers, either in response to their kindness to third parties (downstream) or after receiving kindness from others oneself (upstream). It is considered to be important for the evolution of cooperative behavior amongst humans. Though it has been widely studied theoretically, the empirical evidence of indirect reciprocity has thus far been limited and based solely on behavior in laboratory experiments. We provide evidence from an online environment where members can repeatedly ask and offer services to each other, free of charge. For the purpose of this study we created several new member profiles, which differ only in terms of their serving history. We then sent out a large number of service requests to different members from all over the world. We observe that a service request is more likely to be rewarded for those with a profile history of offering the service (to third parties) in the past. This provides clear evidence of (downstream) indirect reciprocity. We find no support for upstream indirect reciprocity (in this case, rewarding the service request after having previously received the service from third parties), however. Our evidence of downstream indirect reciprocity cannot be attributed to reputational effects concerning one’s trustworthiness as a service user. PMID:27043712

  3. 4-Year Cohort Graduation Rate: Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Federal law requires Pennsylvania, and all other states, to transition to a new calculation method for determining high school graduation rates. Beginning in 2012, using graduation data from the Classes of 2010 and 2011, the "4-Year Cohort Graduation Rate" calculation will replace the "4-Year Leaver Graduation Rate" calculation. The new…

  4. Overview of Field Experience - Degradation Rates & Lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Dirk; Kurtz, Sarah

    2015-09-14

    The way a PV module fails may depend not only on its design and the materials used in its construction, but also on the weather it experiences, the way it is mounted, and the quality control during its manufacture. This presentation gives an overview of Field Experience - what degradation rates and what lifetimes are being observed in various regions.

  5. A field work experience in mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Beardslee, G R

    1976-01-01

    A graduate student specializing in mental retardation found few pertinent electives as well as little opportunity for field work experience. A special arrangement was made for appropriate field work experiences in three types of settings--a large residential institution, school programs, and nursing care facilities. There was little time to view client changes, and rapport with patients and staff was difficult to develop. The advantages included more time with her supervisor, more exposure to organizational and administrative duties, and more exposure to a variety of settings and to the professional roles of numerous therapists. More such field work experiences should be developed to encourage new therapists to choose mental retardation as a specialty. PMID:984162

  6. Engaging Sacred Space: Experiments in the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    della Dora, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    This article reflects on the experience of theorizing sacred space through field practice as part of a fieldtrip to Barcelona. In particular, it focuses on the critical analysis of different approaches to sacred space as applied to various sites in the city. The article opens with a brief review of three mainstream approaches to sacred space: the…

  7. Teacher Knowledge Development in Early Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Casey; Jenkins, Jayne M.; Lux, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of physical education preservice teacher knowledge development has been primarily limited to study of a single semester of early field experience (EFE), with findings from these investigations driving EFE design. The purpose of this research was to investigate what types of knowledge develop and how knowledge evolves and interacts to…

  8. Laboratory and Field Experiments in Motor Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Robert N.; And Others

    This manual for research in motor learning was written for scientifically based physical educators, experimental psychologists, and others interested in the investigation of learning and performance phenomena associated with skill acquisition. Laboratory and field experiments are presented that can be run with or without the presence of a formal…

  9. The Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dale-Bannister, Mary A.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Guinness, Edward E.; Slavney, Susan H.; Stein, Thomas C.

    1991-01-01

    Field measurements for the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) were concentrated in the Lunar Lake area of Nevada. The GRSFE data are meant to be used in a variety of investigations, including tests of multispectral radiative transfer models for scattering and emission from planetary surfaces in support of the Earth Observing System (EOS), Mars Observer, and Magellan Missions. Studies will also be pursued to establish the neotectonic and paleoclimatic history of the arid southwestern United States. The data will also be used to support Mars Rover Sample Return (MRSR) simulation studies.

  10. Utilizing Urban Environments for Effective Field Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAvoy, S. E.; Knee, K.

    2014-12-01

    Research surveys suggest that students are demanding more applied field experiences from their undergraduate environmental science programs. For geoscience educators at liberal arts colleges without field camps, university vehicles, or even geology departments, getting students into the field is especially rewarding - and especially challenging. Here, we present strategies that we have used in courses ranging from introductory environmental science for non-majors, to upper level environmental methods and geology classes. Urban locations provide an opportunity for a different type of local "field-work" than would otherwise be available. In the upper-level undergraduate Environmental Methods class, we relied on a National Park area located a 10-minute walk from campus for most field exercises. Activities included soil analysis, measuring stream flow and water quality parameters, dendrochronology, and aquatic microbe metabolism. In the non-majors class, we make use of our urban location to contrast water quality in parks and highly channelized urban streams. Here we share detailed lesson plans and budgets for field activities that can be completed during a class period of 2.5 hours with a $75 course fee, show how these activities help students gain quantitative competency, and provide student feedback about the classes and activities.

  11. Early Field Experiences in Teacher Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huling, Leslie

    Quality teacher education programs provide candidates with many early field experiences in diverse settings. This Digest examines complexities and challenges of early field experiences, noting the nature and degree of early field experiences within teacher education programs. Through field experiences, teacher candidates observe and work with real…

  12. Across the Arctic Teachers Experience Field Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnick, W. K.; Warburton, J.; Wiggins, H. V.; Marshall, S. A.; Darby, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    From studying snow geese on the North Slope of Alaska to sediment coring aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy in the Arctic Ocean, K-12 teachers embark on scientific expeditions as part of a program that strives to make science in the Arctic a "virtual" reality. In the past two years, seventeen K-12 teachers have participated in Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating (TREC), a program that pairs teachers with researchers to improve science education through arctic field experiences. TREC builds on the scientific and cultural opportunities of the Arctic, linking research and education through topics that naturally engage students and the wider public. TREC includes expeditions as diverse as studying plants at Toolik Field Station, a research facility located 150 miles above the Arctic Circle; climate change studies in Norway's Svalbard archipelago; studying rivers in Siberia; or a trans-arctic expedition aboard the USCGC Healy collecting an integrated geophysical data set. Funded by the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs, TREC offers educators experiences in scientific inquiry while encouraging the public and students to become active participants in the scientific inquiry by engaging them virtually in arctic research. TREC uses online outreach elements to convey the research experience to a broad audience. While in remote field locations, teachers and researchers interact with students and the public through online seminars and live calls from the field, online journals with accompanying photos, and online bulletin boards. Since the program's inception in 2004, numerous visitors have posted questions or interacted with teachers, researchers, and students through the TREC website (http://www.arcus.org/trec). TREC teachers are required to transfer their experience of research and current science into their classroom through the development of relevant activities and resources. Teachers and researchers are encouraged to participate

  13. The impact of the DoH Commissioning for Quality and Innovation incentive on the success of venous thromboembolism risk assessment in hospitalised patients. A single institution experience in a quality outcome improvement over a 4-year cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Polly; Ali, Vernisha; Jones, Garth; Baker, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To i) demonstrate compliance with the Commissioning for Quality and Innovation for venous thromboembolism risk assessment ii) to undertake root cause analysis of Hospital Acquired Thrombosis and to investigate its impact on quality of care. Design Prospective monitoring of all admissions. Setting Imperial College Healthcare Hospitals, London. Participants All Hospital Provider Spells as defined on the NHS Data Model and Dictionary. Main outcome measures i) Percentage of patients undergoing Venous Thromboembolism Risk Assessment (VTE-RA) at and 24-hours after admission ii) root cause analysis of Hospital Acquired Thrombosis up to 90 days following discharge. Results Over a 48-month cycle 83% were overall VTE-RA assessed with 36% in the first 12 months but with significant improvement to ≥95% between April 2013 and April 2015, achieving compliance target since April 2012 involving a massive 633, 850 Spells over the 4 year period. We undertook root cause analysis of all VTE episodes from April 2013 to March 2014, to ascertain Hospital Acquired Thrombosis (HAT), we analysed 433, 174 inpatient days and found a HAT rate of 1 per 1000 with 23% and 24% for DVTs and PEs potentially avoidable respectively. We further analysed VTE risk stratification (n = 1000) and found 37.0% at high risk, 44.4% at medium risk and 18.6 % at low risk, indicating the need of thromboprophylaxis in 81.4% (high and medium) of whom 33.6% were excluded. Conclusions We achieved 95% RA compliance which has favourably impacted on our daily practice and improved the quality of the clinical care. PMID:27293773

  14. Magnetic Field Experiment Data Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, D. B.; Zanetti, L. J.; Suther, L. L.; Potemra, T. A.; Anderson, B. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Magnetic Field Experiment Data Analysis System (MFEDAS) has been developed to process and analyze satellite magnetic field experiment data from the TRIAD, MAGSAT, AMPTE/CCE, Viking, Polar BEAR, DMSP, HILAT, UARS, and Freja satellites. The MFEDAS provides extensive data management and analysis capabilities. The system is based on standard data structures and a standard user interface. The MFEDAS has two major elements: (1) a set of satellite unique telemetry processing programs for uniform and rapid conversion of the raw data to a standard format and (2) the program Magplot which has file handling, data analysis, and data display sections. This system is an example of software reuse, allowing new data sets and software extensions to be added in a cost effective and timely manner. Future additions to the system will include the addition of standard format file import routines, modification of the display routines to use a commercial graphics package based on X-Window protocols, and a generic utility for telemetry data access and conversion.

  15. Technology-Focused Early Field Experiences in Preservice Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lux, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Although a broad body of research exists on field experiences in teacher education, one specific area of inquiry lacking substantial current research is that of technology-focused early field experiences, or field experiences that occur prior to student teaching and more formal clinical experiences. To address this gap, I conducted this…

  16. FIFE, First ISLSCP Field Experiment - Results overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, F. G.; Markham, B. J.; Wang, J. R.; Huemmerich, F.; Sellers, P. J.; Strebel, D. E.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Kelly, Robert D.; Blad, Blaine L.

    1990-01-01

    Results of the analyses of the First International Satellite Land-Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment (FIFE) are described which relate to the mass and energy flux of a particular area. The extensive satellite and ground data are used to analyze the energy balance over the FIFE site, monitor the energy-budget components, study atmospheric effects on remote sensing, examine cloud cover, and investigate fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer. The results verify existing theories relating energy-balance components with surface biology and remote sensing, and satellites can be used to estimate surface-energy budgets. Some analyses provide data that contradict present theories regarding thermodynamic and biophysical methodologies for estimating surface-heat fluxes.

  17. Magnetic field experiment on the Freja Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freja Magnetic Field Experiment Team

    1994-11-01

    Freja is a Swedish scientific satellite mission to study fine scale auroral processes. Launch was October 6, 1992, piggyback on a Chinese Long March 2C, to the present 600×1750 km, 63° inclination orbit. The JHU/APL provided the Magnetic Field Experiment (MFE), which includes a custom APL-designed Forth, language microprocessor. This approach has led to a truly generic and flexible design with adaptability to differing mission requirements and has resulted in the transfer of significant ground analysis to on-board processing. Special attention has been paid to the analog electronic and digital processing design in an effort to lower system noise levels, verified by inflight data showing unprecedented system noise levels for near-Earth magnetic field measurements, approaching the fluxgate sensor levels. The full dynamic range measurements are of the 3-axis Earth's magnetic field taken at 128 vector samples s-1 and digitized to 16 bit, resolution, primarily used to evaluate currents and the main magnetic field of the Earth. Additional 3-axis ‘AC’ channels are bandpass filtered from 1.5 to 128 Hz to remove the main field spin signal, the range is±650 nT. These vector measurements cover Pc waves to ion gyrofrequency magnetic wave signals up to the oxygen gyrofrequency (˜40 Hz). A separate, seventh channel samples the spin axis sensor with a bandpass filter of 1.5 to 256 Hz, the signal of which is fed to a software FFT. This on-board FFT processing covers the local helium gyrofrequencies (˜160 Hz) and is plotted in the Freja Summary Plots (FSPs) along with disturbance fields. First data were received in the U.S. October 16 from Kiruna, Sweden via the Internet and SPAN e-mail networks, and were from an orbit a few hours earlier over Greenland and Sweden. Data files and data products, e.g., FSPs generated at the Kiruna ground station, are communicated in a similar manner through an automatic mail distribution system in Stockholm to PIs and various users

  18. Experiments with Low Voltage Field Emission EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournelle, J.; Cathey, H. E.

    2014-12-01

    We report results from 5-7 keV Field Emission EPMA experiments on selected natural minerals and synthetic materials to illustrate some strengths -- and pitfalls --of low keV FE-EPMA. In a silicate mineral in pseudotachylite from South Mountain, AZ (Goodwin, 1999), the spatial resolution (equation of Merlet & Llovet, 2012, with an 80 nm diameter beam) at 7 keV for Si Ka is calculated to be 588 nm, 391 nm for Ca Ka and 641 nm for Fe La. This pseudotachylite contains abundant 5-10 um sieve-textured crystals full of inclusions with low BSE intensity. Previous 15 keV work suggested the sieve phase was amphibole. At 7 keV, it is possible to identify the compositions of the submicron inclusions as SiO2 and a K-rich alumino-silicate phase; the host composition is epidote. The enhanced resolution of FE-EPMA reveals problems with some microanalytical standards. Vicenzi and Rose (2008) showed submicron inclusions in the Smithsonian Kakanui hornblende standard. Our 7 keV experiments show the ~400 nm inclusions consist of a silicate phase (glass?), Fe-Ti oxide and possibly a gas bubble, concentrated along planes or grain boundaries. SEM imaging of an inclusion analyzed with a focused FE beam shows radiating trails of debris on the hornblende host, consistent with residue from a popped vapor bubble in the inclusion. How should FE-EPMA handle standards that may have inclusions? Use a focused beam avoiding inclusions? Sometimes, perhaps. However, we used a defocused beam to "average" the phases. The results show little or no deviation from the published wet chemical analysis. Operation at reduced keV may require use of non-traditional X-ray lines (e.g. Gopon et al, 2013 for Fe Ll vs Fe La). Experiments at 5 keV were also performed upon a synthetic material enriched in Nd (Nd-Mg-Zn). Fischer & Baun (1967) demonstrated problems with the Ma/Mb lines of REE; we find that use of the Nd Mz line is necessary in order to achieve reasonable results in this material (98 wt% total, Nd 36 wt

  19. Extraterrestrial Virtual Field Experience: Water at Meridiani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan-Haas, D.; Million, C.; Sullivan, R. J., Jr.; Hayes, A. G., Jr.; Ross, R. M.; St Clair, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility (SPIF) at Cornell University, in collaboration with Million Concepts and the Paleontological Research Institute (PRI), has developed the Extraterrestrial Virtual Field Experience (EVFE), a web-based, game-like and inquiry-driven classroom activity targeted to middle school through undergraduate introductory Earth science classrooms. Students play the role of mission scientists for a NASA rover mission, tasked with targeting the rover's scientific instruments to investigate a specific scientific question about the landing site. As with the real mission, the student operators must optimize the efficient use of limited resources and time against the need to make observations to address working hypotheses. The activity uses only real--not artificial or simulated--mission data, and students are guided throughout by a "Mission Manager" who provides hints and advice about the scientific meaning of observations within the broader context of the mission objectives. The MER Opportunity EVFE is a pilot effort, the first of five EVFE modules planned a rate of one per year that will feature different NASA missions and scientific topics. The MER Opportunity EVFE has already been developed and focuses on the investigation of the history of water on Mars at the Meridiani landing site of the Opportunity rover. The module includes a teacher guide and is currently available to educators through the SPIF website.

  20. Habit versus planned behaviour: a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Verplanken, B; Aarts, H; van Knippenberg, A; Moonen, A

    1998-03-01

    A field experiment investigated the prediction and change in repeated behaviour in the domain of travel mode choices. Car use during seven days was predicted from habit strength (measured by self-reported frequency of past behaviour, as well as by a more covert measure based on personal scripts incorporating the behaviour), and antecedents of behaviour as conceptualized in the theory of planned behaviour (attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control and behavioural intention). Both habit measures predicted behaviour in addition to intention and perceived control. Significant habit x intention interactions indicated that intentions were only significantly related to behaviour when habit was weak, whereas no intention-behaviour relation existed when habit was strong. During the seven-day registration of behaviour, half of the respondents were asked to think about the circumstances under which the behaviour was executed. Compared to control participants, the behaviour of experimental participants was more strongly related to their previously expressed intentions. However, the habit-behaviour relation was unaffected. The results demonstrate that, although external incentives may increase the enactment of intentions, habits set boundary conditions for the applicability of the theory of planned behaviour. PMID:9554090

  1. Designing Effective Field Experiences for Nontraditional Preservice Special Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Michael S.; Jackson, Lewis; Yeh, Chyong-Hwa

    1996-01-01

    Five alternatives to traditional field experiences in special education are described and contrasted, including: infusion of experiences within content courses; traditional experiences offered during the summer session; working practica; roving practica; and specialized field-experiences. It is argued that these alternatives can provide…

  2. Methane Screening in JET Reverse Field Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan; B. Alper; G. Corrigan; S.K. Erents; C. Giroud; A. Korotkov; H. Leggate; G.F. Mathews; R.A. Pitts; M. Stamp; J. Spence

    2004-05-17

    JET plasmas with reverse magnetic field feature a different SOL flow than those with normal field. The observed carbon fueling efficiency from injecting methane gas was similar in reverse and normal field. EDGE2D modeling used an externally applied force to create the SOL flows, without specifying the origin of the force. The resulting flow agreed reasonably with the experimental values between the separatrix and 4 cm mid-plane depth in the SOL. The effect of the flow on the calculated carbon screening was 5 to 15% higher carbon fueling efficiency for the low flow velocity with reverse field.

  3. Exploring Group Cohesion in a Higher Education Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcarne, Brian Keith

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain understanding into the experience of group cohesion for university students participating in an academic field experience. A mixed methods approach was used following a two-phase, sequential research design to help provide a more complete explanation of how group cohesion was impacted by the field experience.…

  4. Field Trips as Valuable Learning Experiences in Geography Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krakowka, Amy Richmond

    2012-01-01

    Field trips have been acknowledged as valuable learning experiences in geography. This article uses Kolb's (1984) experiential learning model to discuss how students learn and how field trips can help enhance learning. Using Kolb's experiential learning theory as a guide in the design of field trips helps ensure that field trips contribute to…

  5. From community college to 4-year institutions: Latinas' successful completion of STEM baccalaureate degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamudio, Rocio

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the narrative of Latina graduates who successfully navigated through community college and 4-year institutions in the STEM fields. Rather than focus on what these students lack as much of the current research does, the study explored what assets these students bring that supports their success in STEM fields. Utilizing an ethnographic interview approach, participants who attained STEM baccalaureates in California were interviewed. Qualitative findings revealed various experiences, attitudes, and cultural influences that led to successful completion of a STEM degree. First, the study found that successful community college Latina STEM graduates exhibit grit, are resilient, determined, and have positive attitudes about their underrepresentation in STEM. Second, participants sought after peer, faculty, and staff relationships that helped them be successful. Lastly, participants had the support of their families and reported a high level of connectedness to their culture. Implications, recommendations for practice, and directions for future research are discussed.

  6. The JPL MSAT mobile laboratory and the pilot field experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berner, Jeff B.; Emerson, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    A Mobile Laboratory/Propagation Measurement Van (PMV) was developed to support the field experiments of the Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) Project. This van was designed to provide flexibility, self-sufficiency and data acquisition to allow for both measurement of equipment performance and the mobile environment. The design philosophy and implementation of the PMV are described. The Pilot Field Experiments and an overall description of the three experiments in which the PMV was used are described.

  7. Minimizing magnetic fields for precision experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Altarev, I.; Fierlinger, P.; Lins, T.; Marino, M. G.; Nießen, B.; Petzoldt, G.; Reisner, M.; Stuiber, S. Sturm, M.; Taggart Singh, J.; Taubenheim, B.; Rohrer, H. K.; Schläpfer, U.

    2015-06-21

    An increasing number of measurements in fundamental and applied physics rely on magnetically shielded environments with sub nano-Tesla residual magnetic fields. State of the art magnetically shielded rooms (MSRs) consist of up to seven layers of high permeability materials in combination with highly conductive shields. Proper magnetic equilibration is crucial to obtain such low magnetic fields with small gradients in any MSR. Here, we report on a scheme to magnetically equilibrate MSRs with a 10 times reduced duration of the magnetic equilibration sequence and a significantly lower magnetic field with improved homogeneity. For the search of the neutron's electric dipole moment, our finding corresponds to a 40% improvement of the statistical reach of the measurement. However, this versatile procedure can improve the performance of any MSR for any application.

  8. The Falklands war: Army field surgical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, D. S.; Batty, C. G.; Ryan, J. M.; McGregor, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    In the recent Falklands campaign four Army Field Surgical Teams were deployed in the two phases of the war. They functioned as Advanced Surgical Centres and operated on 233 casualties. There were 3 deaths. The patterns of wounding and the methods of casualty management are discussed and compared with other recent campaigns. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6614760

  9. Reexamining the Field Experience of Preservice Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Rita

    2003-01-01

    Investigated the teaching and learning responses of preservice teachers enrolled in a brief language arts field practicum prior to student teaching. Survey, observation, and journal data indicated that despite consistent efforts by university professors to help preservice teachers examine theory into practice during their practica, procedural…

  10. In situ combustion field experiences in Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Villalba, M.; Estrada, M.; Bolivar, J.

    1995-02-01

    A literature review of four in situ combustion projects: in Miga, Tia Juana, Melones and Morichal fields in Venezuela was made, and a summary of these projects is presented. Reservoir description and project performance data were analyzed. The behavior of the four in situ combustion field tests can be summarized as follows: The problems most often encountered were corrosion and high temperature producing wells. The direction in which the burning front moved was guided essentially by reservoir characteristics. The produced oil was upgraded by about 4{degrees} API, and viscosity was substantially reduced. For Mirochal and Miga fields, the analyses of available information from the combustion projects indicated that the process has been successful in the affected region. Conclusions from this review indicate that the two most frequent problems encountered were operational problems in producing wells and the direction of the burning front. The heterogeneous nature of the sands probably resulted in the burning front moving in a preferential direction, hence reducing areal sweep efficiency.

  11. Assisting Your Preservice Teacher to Be Successful during Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, Christine

    2006-01-01

    Field experience (junior practicum and student teaching) is considered by many to be the most influential part of a teacher preparation program (Cruickshank & Aramalin, 1986; Tannehill & Zakrajsek, 1988). During field experiences, preservice teachers (hereafter referred to as PSTs) are guided by a cooperating teacher (hereafter referred to as a…

  12. Characteristics of a Model Industrial Technology Education Field Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Phillip R.; Kozak, Michael R.

    1986-01-01

    This report contains selected findings from a research project that investigated field experiences in industrial technology education. Funded by the Texas Education Agency, the project addressed the identification of characteristics of a model field experience in industrial technology education. This was accomplished using the Delphi technique.…

  13. The Field Experience: Creating Successful Programs for New Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slick, Gloria Appelt, Ed.

    This is the first in a series of four books presenting a variety of field experience program models and philosophies that drive the programs provided to preservice teachers during their undergraduate teacher preparation. This publications focuses on developing and evaluating an effective field experience program. Several common themes emerge from…

  14. Concerns of Teacher Candidates in an Early Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Sau Hou

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the concerns of teacher candidates in an early field experience. Thirty-five teacher candidates completed the Teacher Concerns Checklist (TCC, Fuller & Borich, 2000) at the beginning, middle and end of their early field experiences. Results showed that teacher candidates ranked impact as the highest concern, self as the…

  15. Emerging Trends in Teacher Preparation: The Future of Field Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slick, Gloria Appelt, Ed.

    This is the fourth in a series of four books presenting a variety of field experience program models and philosophies that drive the programs provided to preservice teachers during their undergraduate teacher preparation. This book focuses on critical issues facing teaching education in the future, in particular field experiences. Major themes…

  16. Preparing Middle School Teachers: Using Collaborative Middle School Field Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramey, Linda K.

    Wright State University, Ohio, has developed an undergraduate degree in Middle Childhood Education with extensive content preparation and initial field experiences. Participants complete an undergraduate program in two specialized areas accompanied by 15 hours of teacher education professional coursework and field experiences in urban and suburban…

  17. Field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemon, R. E.; Chrien, R. E.; Hugrass, W. N.; Okada, S.; Rej, D. J.; Taggart, D. P.; Tuszewski, M.; Webster, R. B.; Wright, B. L.; Slough, J. T.

    FRCs with equilibrium separatrix radii up to 0.18 m have been formed and studied in FRX-C/LSM. For best formation conditions at low fill pressure, the particle confinement exceeds the predictions of LHD transport calculations by up to a factor of two; however, the inferred flux confinement is more anomalous than in smaller FRCs. Higher bias field produces axial shocks and degradation in confinement, while higher fill pressure results in gross fluting during formation. FRCs have been formed in TRX with s from 2 to 6. These relatively collisional FRCs exhibit flux lifetimes of 10 yields 20 kinetic growth times for the internal tilt mode. The coaxial slow source has produced annular FRCs in a coaxial coil geometry on slow time scales using low voltages.

  18. Classroom and Field Experiments for Florida's Environmental Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jim

    This booklet is intended to help teachers in Florida manage the growing interest in environmental education. Fourteen experiments are grouped into the environmental areas of the water cycle, groundwater, water pollution, waste and water treatment, air pollution, and field experiments. Experiments include demonstrations of the water cycle, the…

  19. The Ecology of Field Experience: Toward an Understanding of the Role of Field Experiences in Teacher Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeichner, Kenneth M.

    There continues to be a great deal of debate about the role that field experiences play in teacher development and about the relative contribution of various individual and institutional factors to the socialization process. Field experiences in teacher education entail a complex set of interactions among program features, settings, and people…

  20. Mod-2 wind turbine field operations experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    The three-machine, 7.5 MW Goodnoe Hills located near Goldendale, Washington and is now in a research/experimental operations phase that offers a unique opportunity to study the effects of single and multiple wind turbines interacting with each other, the power grid; and the environment. Following a brief description of the turbine and project history, this paper addresses major problem areas and research and development test results. Field operations, both routine and nonroutine, are discussed. Routine operation to date has produced over 13,379,000 KWh of electrical energy during 11,064 hr of rotation. Nonroutine operation includes suspended activities caused by a crack in the low speed shaft that necessitated a redesign and reinstallation of this assembly on all three turbines. With the world's largest cluster back in full operation, two of the turbines will be operated over the next years to determine their value as energy producer. The third unit will be used primarily for conducting research tests requiring configuration changes to better understand the wind turbine technology. Technical areas summarized pertain to system performance and enhancements. Specific research tests relating to acoustics, TV interference, and wake effects conclude the paper.

  1. A Gravitational Experiment Involving Inhomogeneous Electric Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, T.; Yin Ming; Vargas, Jose

    2004-02-04

    Unification of gravitation with other forms of interactions, particularly with electromagnetism, will have tremendous impacts on technology and our understanding of nature. The economic impact of such an achievement will also be unprecedented and far more extensive than the impact experienced in the past century due to the unification of electricity with magnetism and optics. Theoretical unification of gravitation with electromagnetism using classical differential geometry has been pursued since the late nineteen twenties, when Einstein and Cartan used teleparallelism for the task. Recently, Vargas and Torr have followed the same line of research with more powerful mathematics in a more general geometric framework, which allows for the presence of other interactions. Their approach also uses Kaehler generalization of Cartan's exterior calculus, which constitutes a language appropriate for both classical and quantum physics. Given the compelling nature of teleparallelism (path-independent equality of vectors at a distance) and the problems still existing with energy-momentum in general relativity, it is important to seek experimental evidence for such expectations. Such experimental programs are likely to provide quantitative guidance to the further development of current and future theories. We too, have undertaken an experimental search for potential electrically induced gravitational (EIG) effects. This presentation describes some of the practical concerns that relates to our investigation of electrical influences on laboratory size test masses. Preliminary results, appear to indicate a correlation between the application of a spatially inhomogeneous electric field and the appearance of an additional force on the test mass. If confirmed, the presence of such a force will be consistent with the predictions of Vargas-Torr. More importantly, proven results will shed new light and clearer understanding of the interactions between gravitational and electromagnetic

  2. A Gravitational Experiment Involving Inhomogeneous Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, T.; Yin, Ming; Vargas, Jose

    2004-02-01

    Unification of gravitation with other forms of interactions, particularly with electromagnetism, will have tremendous impacts on technology and our understanding of nature. The economic impact of such an achievement will also be unprecedented and far more extensive than the impact experienced in the past century due to the unification of electricity with magnetism and optics. Theoretical unification of gravitation with electromagnetism using classical differential geometry has been pursued since the late nineteen twenties, when Einstein and Cartan used teleparallelism for the task. Recently, Vargas and Torr have followed the same line of research with more powerful mathematics in a more general geometric framework, which allows for the presence of other interactions. Their approach also uses Kähler generalization of Cartan's exterior calculus, which constitutes a language appropriate for both classical and quantum physics. Given the compelling nature of teleparallelism (path-independent equality of vectors at a distance) and the problems still existing with energy-momentum in general relativity, it is important to seek experimental evidence for such expectations. Such experimental programs are likely to provide quantitative guidance to the further development of current and future theories. We too, have undertaken an experimental search for potential electrically induced gravitational (EIG) effects. This presentation describes some of the practical concerns that relates to our investigation of electrical influences on laboratory size test masses. Preliminary results, appear to indicate a correlation between the application of a spatially inhomogeneous electric field and the appearance of an additional force on the test mass. If confirmed, the presence of such a force will be consistent with the predictions of Vargas-Torr. More importantly, proven results will shed new light and clearer understanding of the interactions between gravitational and electromagnetic

  3. FIELD EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING AT CDG AIRPORTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaroson, R.

    2009-12-01

    Richard Ramaroson1,4, Klaus Schaefer2, Stefan Emeis2, Carsten Jahn2, Gregor Schürmann2, Maria Hoffmann2, Mikhael Zatevakhin3, Alexandre Ignatyev3. 1ONERA, Châtillon, France; 4SEAS, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA; 2FZK, Garmisch, Germany; (3)FSUE SPbAEP, St Petersburg, Russia. 2-month field campaigns have been organized at CDG airports in autumn 2004 and summer 2005. Air quality and ground air traffic emissions have been monitored continuously at terminals and taxi-runways, along with meteorological parameters onboard trucks and with a SODAR. This paper analyses the commercial engine emissions characteristics at airports and their effects on gas pollutants and airborne particles coupled to meteorology. LES model results for PM dispersion coupled to microphysics in the PBL are compared to measurements. Winds and temperature at the surface and their vertical profiles have been stored with turbulence. SODAR observations show the time-development of the mixing layer depth and turbulent mixing in summer up to 800m. Active low level jets and their regional extent have been observed and analyzed. PM number and mass size distribution, morphology and chemical contents are investigated. Formation of new ultra fine volatile (UFV) particles in the ambient plume downstream of running engines is observed. Soot particles are mostly observed at significant level at high power thrusts at take-off (TO) and on touch-down whereas at lower thrusts at taxi and aprons ultra the UFV PM emissions become higher. Ambient airborne PM1/2.5 is closely correlated to air traffic volume and shows a maximum beside runways. PM number distribution at airports is composed mainly by volatile UF PM abundant at apron. Ambient PM mass in autumn is higher than in summer. The expected differences between TO and taxi emissions are confirmed for NO, NO2, speciated VOC and CO. NO/NO2 emissions are larger at runways due to higher power. Reactive VOC and CO are more produced at low powers during idling at

  4. ALEXIS, the little satellite that could -- 4 years later

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, D.; Bloch, J.; Little, C.

    1997-10-01

    The 113-kg Array of Low Energy X-ray Imaging Sensors (ALEXIS) satellite was launched from the fourth flight of Pegasus on 25 April, 1993 into a 750 x 850 km, 70 degree inclination orbit. Due to damage sustained at the time of launch, ground controllers did not make contact with the satellite until late June. By late July, full satellite operations had been restored through the implementation of new procedures for attitude control. Science operations with the two onboard experiments began at that time. Now 4 years later is still collecting more than 100 MB of mission data per day. ALEXIS was originally designed to be a high risk, single string. {open_quotes}Smarter-Faster-Cheaper{close_quotes} satellite, with a 1 year nominal and a 3 year design limit. This paper will discuss how well the various satellite and experiment subsystems are surviving a variety of low and high radiation environments and what improvements have been made to make operations more autonomous. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. A "Medical Physics" Course Based Upon Hospital Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onn, David G.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a noncalculus, medical physics'' course with a basic element of direct hospital field experience. The course is intended primarily for premedical students but may be taken by nonscience majors. (Author/PR)

  6. Multidisciplinary Field Training in Undergraduate Physical Geography: Russian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasimov, Nikolay S.; Chalov, Sergey R.; Panin, Andrey V.

    2013-01-01

    Field training is seen as a central component of the discipline of Physical Geography and an essential part of the undergraduate curriculum. This paper explores the structure and relationships between fieldwork and theoretical courses and the abundant experiences of field training in the undergraduate curriculum of 37 Russian universities. It…

  7. The Influences of University-Based Coursework on Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeth, Michael E.; Adadan, Emine

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the influence of university-based teacher education courses on preservice teachers as they engaged in the field-based portion of their preparation. Forty-two preservice teachers contributed reflective writings about the successes and challenges they faced during field experiences in light of knowledge and skills learned during…

  8. Electric Dipole Moment Experiment Systematic from Electric Field Discharge Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, B.; Gould, Harvey

    2014-09-01

    A magnetic field, in the direction of the electric field and synchronous with the electric field reversal, will mimic an EDM signal. One might expect a discharge across the electric field plates to produce magnetic fields with only small or vanishing components parallel to the electric field, minimizing its systematic effect. Our experimental model, using simulated discharge currents, found otherwise: the discharge current may be at an angle to the normal, and thus generate a normal magnetic field. Comparison of data from the experimental model with the results from calculations will be presented, along with estimates of the time-averaged normal magnetic field seen by atoms in an electron EDM experiment using a fountain of laser-cooled francium, as a function of discharge current.

  9. Shared Viewing as an Approach to Transforming Early Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heafner, Tina; Plaisance, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Although early field experiences are touted as vital for providing a hands-on preview of how teaching unfolds in the classroom, these essential components of teacher preparation programs have consistently fallen short of the desired outcomes. In the spirit of Dewey, candidates need substantive experiences that transform their theoretical learning…

  10. The Impact of an International Field Experience on Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pence, Holly M.; Macgillivray, Ian K.

    2008-01-01

    This study addresses the question, "What is the impact of an international field experience on preservice teachers?" and corroborates many of the findings of a similar study by Willard-Holt [(2001). "The impact of a short-term international experience for preservice teachers." "Teaching and Teacher Education, 17," 505-517]. In May 2005, 15 teacher…

  11. On the design of experiments to study extreme field limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Chen, M.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Koga, J. K.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Chen, P.; Mur, V. D.; Narozhny, N. B.; Popov, V. S.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Korn, G.

    2012-12-01

    We propose experiments on the collision of high intensity electromagnetic pulses with electron bunches and on the collision of multiple electromagnetic pulses for studying extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves. The effects of nonlinear QED will be revealed in these laser plasma experiments.

  12. Modeling HEDLA magnetic field generation experiments on laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatenejad, M.; Bell, A. R.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Crowston, R.; Drake, R. P.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Krauland, C.; Lamb, D.; Lee, D.; Marques, J. R.; Meinecke, J.; Miniati, F.; Murphy, C. D.; Park, H.-S.; Pelka, A.; Ravasio, A.; Remington, B.; Reville, B.; Scopatz, A.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.; Woolsey, N.; Young, R.; Yurchak, R.

    2013-03-01

    The Flash Center is engaged in a collaboration to simulate laser driven experiments aimed at understanding the generation and amplification of cosmological magnetic fields using the FLASH code. In these experiments a laser illuminates a solid plastic or graphite target launching an asymmetric blast wave into a chamber which contains either Helium or Argon at millibar pressures. Induction coils placed several centimeters away from the target detect large scale magnetic fields on the order of tens to hundreds of Gauss. The time dependence of the magnetic field is consistent with generation via the Biermann battery mechanism near the blast wave. Attempts to perform simulations of these experiments using the FLASH code have uncovered previously unreported numerical difficulties in modeling the Biermann battery mechanism near shock waves which can lead to the production of large non-physical magnetic fields. We report on these difficulties and offer a potential solution.

  13. Influencing attitudes toward science through field experiences in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Deborah Mcintyre

    The purpose of this study was to determine how student attitudes toward science are influenced by field experiences in undergraduate biology courses. The study was conducted using two institutions of higher education including a 2-year lower-level and a 2-year upper-level institution. Data were collected through interviews with student participants, focus group discussions, students' journal entries, and field notes recorded by the researcher during the field activities. Photographs and video recordings were also used as documentation sources. Data were collected over a period of 34 weeks. Themes that emerged from the qualitative data included students' beliefs that field experiences (a) positively influence student motivation to learn, (b) increase student ability to learn the concepts being taught, and (c) provide opportunities for building relationships and for personal growth. The findings of the study reinforce the importance of offering field-study programs at the undergraduate level to allow undergraduate students the opportunity to experience science activities in a field setting. The research study was framed by the behavioral and developmental theories of attitude and experience including the Theory of Planned Behavior (Ajzen, 1991) and the Theory of Experiential Learning (Kolb, 1984).

  14. Magnetic field experiment for Voyagers 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.; Aluna, M. H.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Ness, N. F.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetic field experiment to be carried on the Voyager 1 and 2 missions consists of dual low field (LFM) and high field magnetometer (HFM) systems. The dual systems provide greater reliability and, in the case of the LFM's, permit the separation of spacecraft magnetic fields from the ambient fields. Additional reliability is achieved through electronics redundancy. The wide dynamic ranges of plus or minus 0.5G for the LFM's and plus or minus 20G for the HFM's, low quantization uncertainty of plus or minus 0.002 gamma in the most sensitive (plus or minus 8 gamma) LFM range, low sensor RMS noise level of 0.006 gamma, and use of data compaction schemes to optimize the experiment information rate all combine to permit the study of a broad spectrum of phenomena during the mission. Planetary fields at Jupiter, Saturn, and possibly Uranus; satellites of these planets; solar wind and satellite interactions with the planetary fields; and the large-scale structure and microscale characteristics of the interplanetary magnetic field are studied. The interstellar field may also be measured.

  15. FLASH magnetohydrodynamic simulations of shock-generated magnetic field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Scopatz, A.; Weide, K.

    2012-12-01

    We report the results of benchmark FLASH magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of experiments conducted by the University of Oxford High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics group and its collaborators at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI). In these experiments, a long-pulse laser illuminates a target in a chamber filled with Argon gas, producing shock waves that generate magnetic fields via the Biermann battery mechanism. We first outline the implementation of 2D cylindrical geometry in the unsplit MHD solver in FLASH and present results of verification tests. We then describe the results of benchmark 2D cylindrical MHD simulations of the LULI experiments using FLASH that explore the impact of external fields along with the possibility of magnetic field amplification by turbulence that is associated with the shock waves and that is induced by a grid placed in the gas-filled chamber.

  16. NATO TG-25 joint field experiment in distributed sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, Brian; Vu, Hao; Srour, Nino

    2003-09-01

    NATO's Task Group (TG-25) on acoustic and seismic sensing is responsible for assessing the potential technologies that can be cooperatively developed and shared within NATO's countries to provide effective, robust and low-cost battlefield sensor systems. The primary applications will be detection and/or classification of ground troops, ground vehicles, airborne vehicles, artillery and sniper. TG-25 has 3 main objectives: (1) to establish acoustic and seismic standards and data exchange procedures, (2) to compare, analyze, exchange, and develop analytical techniques, computational models and signal processing algorithms, and (3) to plan and conduct joint field experiments. In this paper, we discuss participation in the joint NATO field experiment conducted in France in October 2002. The experiment's goal is to demonstrate interoperability of unattended ground sensors from various participating nations. Results of the experiments will be briefed and discussed. Keywords: TG-25, unattended ground sensor, vehicle tracking

  17. Multicomponent reactive transport modeling of uranium bioremediation field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yilin; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Morrison, Stan J.; Amonette, James E.; Long, Philip E.

    2009-10-15

    Biostimulation field experiments with acetate amendment are being performed at a former uranium mill tailings site in Rifle, Colorado, to investigate subsurface processes controlling in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater. An important part of the research is identifying and quantifying field-scale models of the principal terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs) during biostimulation and the consequent biogeochemical impacts to the subsurface receiving environment. Integrating abiotic chemistry with the microbially mediated TEAPs in the reaction network brings into play geochemical observations (e.g., pH, alkalinity, redox potential, major ions, and secondary minerals) that the reactive transport model must recognize. These additional constraints provide for a more systematic and mechanistic interpretation of the field behaviors during biostimulation. The reaction network specification developed for the 2002 biostimulation field experiment was successfully applied without additional calibration to the 2003 and 2007 field experiments. The robustness of the model specification is significant in that 1) the 2003 biostimulation field experiment was performed with 3 times higher acetate concentrations than the previous biostimulation in the same field plot (i.e., the 2002 experiment), and 2) the 2007 field experiment was performed in a new unperturbed plot on the same site. The biogeochemical reactive transport simulations accounted for four TEAPs, two distinct functional microbial populations, two pools of bioavailable Fe(III) minerals (iron oxides and phyllosilicate iron), uranium aqueous and surface complexation, mineral precipitation, and dissolution. The conceptual model for bioavailable iron reflects recent laboratory studies with sediments from the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site that demonstrated that the bulk (~90%) of Fe(III) bioreduction is associated with the phyllosilicates rather than the iron oxides

  18. Electron Bernstein Wave Experiments in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. K.; Cengher, M.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Forest, C. B.; Carter, M.; Harvey, R. W.; Pinsker, R. I.; Smirnov, A. P.

    2003-12-01

    A system to heat electrons in the Madison Symmetric Torus through the electron Bernstein wave is currently being developed. This is an attractive heating scheme for the overdense reversed field pinch plasma, where electron cyclotron heating and current drive are inaccessible. Low power experiments (˜ 1 watt) have shown that a significant fraction of launched electromagnetic power successfully couples to the electron Bernstein wave. Furthermore, these experiments have found an optimized launch with finite n⊥. Initial results from experiments at moderate power (˜ 150 kW for several milliseconds, driven by a pair of S-band traveling wave tube amplifiers) are presented.

  19. Dynamic field-frequency lock for tracking magnetic field fluctuations in electron spin resonance experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw, Abraham; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Lyon, Stephen

    Global magnetic field fluctuations present significant challenges to pulsed electron spin resonance experiments on systems with long spin coherence times. We will discuss results from experiments in which we follow instantaneous changes in magnetic field by locking to the free induction decay of a proton NMR signal using a phase-locked loop. We extend conventional field-frequency locking techniques used in NMR to follow slow magnetic field drifts by using a modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence in which the phase of the pi-pulses follows the phase of the proton spins at all times. Hence, we retain the ability of the CPMG pulse sequence to refocus local magnetic field inhomogeneities without refocusing global magnetic field fluctuations. In contrast with conventional field-frequency locking techniques, our experiments demonstrate the potential of this method to dynamically track global magnetic field fluctuations on timescales of about 2 seconds and with rates faster than a kHz. This frequency range covers the dominant noise frequencies in our electron spin resonance experiments as previously reported.

  20. An Experiment In Field-Based Elementary Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swann, Margaret H.

    The Experimental Program in Elementary Education (EXEL) at Shepherd College in West Virginia began in 1973 with authorization by the West Virginia State Department of Education. The program was developed with the hope of producing more confident and competent teachers. EXEL provides continuous field experience from the second semester of the…

  1. Field experiments on an intelligent towed vehicle ``Flying Fish``

    SciTech Connect

    Koterayama, W.; Yamaguchi, S.; Nakamura, M.

    1995-12-31

    A depth, pitch and roll controllable towed vehicle, ``Flying Fish`` is being developed to measure the ocean current, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, chlorophyll and total inorganic hydrocarbon. The first field experiments on its performance were carried out in the Japan sea last summer. The motion data of the ``Flying Fish`` are compared with those of numerical simulations.

  2. Experiments to investigate particulate materials in reduced gravity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, M.; Eden, H. F.; Felsenthal, P.; Glaser, P. E.; Wechsler, A. E.

    1967-01-01

    Study investigates agglomeration and macroscopic behavior in reduced gravity fields of particles of known properties by measuring and correlating thermal and acoustical properties of particulate materials. Experiment evaluations provide a basis for a particle behavior theory and measure bulk properties of particulate materials in reduced gravity.

  3. The spherical probe electric field and wave experiment. [Cluster mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafsson, G.; Aggson, T.; Bostrom, R.; Block, L. P.; Cattell, C.; Decreau, P. M. E.; Egeland, A.; Falthammar, C.-G.; Grard, R. J. L.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    The experiment is designed to measure the electric field and density fluctuations with sampling rates up to 40,000 samples/sec. The description includes Langmuir sweeps that can be made to determine the electron density and temperature, the study of nonlinear processes that result in acceleration of plasma, and the analysis of large scale phenomena where all four spacecraft are needed.

  4. Nonphysical Results with the Electric-Field Mapping Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayars, Eric

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the behavior of the current near the end of the paper in the electric-field mapping experiment and approaches to solving problems associated with this behavior. Presents programs that can be used to model the boundary condition computationally. (JRH)

  5. Rational Ignorance in Education: A Field Experiment in Student Plagiarism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dee, Thomas S.; Jacob, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    Plagiarism appears to be a common problem among college students, yet there is little evidence on the effectiveness of interventions designed to minimize plagiarism. This study presents the results of a field experiment that evaluated the effects of a web-based educational tutorial in reducing plagiarism. We found that assignment to the treatment…

  6. Field-Based Research Experience in Earth Science Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Michael L.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the pilot of a field-based research experience in earth science teacher education designed to produce well-prepared, scientifically and technologically literate earth science teachers through a teaching- and research-oriented partnership between in-service teachers and a university scientist-educator. Indicates that the pilot program was…

  7. Quality and Early Field Experiences: Partnering with Junior Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piro, Jody S.; Anderson, Gina; Fredrickson, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of preservice teacher candidates who participated in a pilot partnership between a public teacher education preparation program and Junior Achievement (JA). The partnership was grounded in the premise that providing early field experiences to preservice teacher candidates was a necessary requirement of quality…

  8. Conceptualizing Developmentally Responsive Teaching in Early Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Penny B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study was to examine case study as a pedagogical tool used to scaffold the conceptualization of developmentally responsive pedagogy for middle level preservice teachers in early field experiences. Child study projects (CSP) completed by middle level preservice candidates were analyzed to determine if…

  9. Creating Dissonance in Pre-Service Teachers' Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenhardt, Sara; Besnoy, Kevin; Steele, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The study is practical in nature and addresses the call for investigating effective aspects of field experiences in teacher preparation. The authors designed a framework of assignments requiring the pre-service teachers to collect data about two diverse elementary students in their assigned elementary classroom during the twelve weeks of their…

  10. Field Experiences Using iPads: Impact of Experience on Preservice Teachers' Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Jill A.; Bicheler, Rachel; Robinson, Callan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological case study was to investigate the lived experiences of preservice music teachers using iPads to engage secondary general music students in creating and performing music during field teaching experiences. Two questions guided this research study: (a) What are these preservice teachers' perceptions of their…

  11. Oscillations of a dipole in a magnetic field: An experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisquert, Juan; Hurtado, Emilia; Mafé, Salvador; Pina, José

    1990-09-01

    The small oscillations of a parallelepidal magnet along the axis of a circular coil carrying an electric current have been analyzed theoretically and experimentally. The study of this system (a particular case of a magnetic dipole in motion in a nonuniform magnetic field) involves basic ideas from both mechanics and electromagnetism, and the equipment used in the experiment is very common in an undergraduate laboratory. Comparison with the experiment shows that a very simple theoretical approach gives good results. It is also shown how the introduction of some refinements in the physical model can improve the agreement between theory and experiment, though the theoretical analysis becomes more involved in this case. The use of the principle of superposition to calculate magnetic fields is emphasized throughout the article.

  12. Electric field measurements during the Condor critical velocity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Pfaff, R. F.; Haerendel, G.

    1986-01-01

    The instrumentation of the Condor critical velocity Ba experiment (Wescott et al., 1986) for the measurements of the energetic particles and the electric field associated with a Ba explosion is described. The Ba explosion created a complex electric field pulse detected in situ by a single-axis double electric-field probe on a separate spacecraft. The measurements provide evidence of several important links in the critical-velocity chain, and are consistent with two hypotheses. The first hypothesis involves the creation of large polarization electric field due to charge separation; the second hypothesis implies a polarization of the beam by currents flowing across it. The chain of physical processes inferred from the observations is in agreement with most theories for the Alfven process.

  13. Social Context Effects in 2- and 4-Year-Olds' Selective versus Faithful Imitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Yue; Kushnir, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    This study asked whether children's tendency to imitate selectively (ignore causally unnecessary actions) versus faithfully ("overimitate" causally unnecessary actions) varies across ages and social contexts. In the first experiment, 2-year-olds and 4-year-olds were randomly assigned to play 1 of 3 prior games with a demonstrator: a…

  14. Applied magnetic field design for the field reversed configuration compression heating experiment.

    PubMed

    Domonkos, M T; Amdahl, D; Camacho, J F; Coffey, S K; Degnan, J H; Delaney, R; Frese, M; Gale, D; Grabowski, T C; Gribble, R; Intrator, T P; McCullough, J; Montano, N; Robinson, P R; Wurden, G

    2013-04-01

    Detailed calculations of the formation, guide, and mirror applied magnetic fields in the FRC compression-heating experiment (FRCHX) were conducted using a commercially available generalized finite element solver, COMSOL Multiphysics(®). In FRCHX, an applied magnetic field forms, translates, and finally captures the FRC in the liner region sufficiently long to enable compression. Large single turn coils generate the fast magnetic fields necessary for FRC formation. Solenoidal coils produce the magnetic field for translation and capture of the FRC prior to liner implosion. Due to the limited FRC lifetime, liner implosion is initiated before the FRC is injected, and the magnetic flux that diffuses into the liner is compressed. Two-dimensional axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations using MACH2 were used to specify optimal magnetic field characteristics, and this paper describes the simulations conducted to design magnetic field coils and compression hardware for FRCHX. This paper presents the vacuum solution for the magnetic field. PMID:23635196

  15. The Ecology of Field Experience: Toward an Understanding of the Role of Field Experiences in Teacher Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeichner, Kenneth M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper focuses on conceptual and methodological limitations which have been identified in relation to research on field experiences. A point of view is offered as to how research in this area can begin to provide the kinds of empirical data which will be more useful for policy decisions. (CB)

  16. High Field RMF FRC Experiments on STX-HF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreason, Samuel; Slough, John

    2001-10-01

    As part of the effort of the TCS program to explore the physics of RMF generated FRCs, a start-up experiment has been constructed to operate at much higher RMF and axial magnetic fields. It is hoped that with the RMF alone at higher power density , it will be possible to form plasmas with both high density, and high electron and ion temperatures. To this end the STX experiment with its 2 MW RMF supply was reconfigured to drive a smaller plasma volume (rp reduced from 18 to 6 cm). In addition an axially remote plasma source was used to supply plasma in a manner that limits neutral contamination and RMF field penetration issues. With axial fields in the kG range, plasma temperatures and densities in a more fusion relevant regime can be studied. Initial results at low RMF power (60 kW) have produced Te = Ti for the first time (T_tot 25 eV). As a result, both ions and electrons are magnetized (ωτ >> 1). Unlike previous experiments, the plasma is formed with a fully penetrated RMF field, producing a rigid rotor current profile. The plasma resistivity at low RMF power is consistent with classical ( 60 μohm-m). The particle confinement is found to be considerably enhanced by the RMF, with a confinement time several times classical. Results at higher power will be presented as well.

  17. NATO SET-093 joint field experiment at Bourges, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, C.; Bruel, F.; Prieur, D.; Naz, P.; Miller, L. S.

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the NATO Task Group SET-093/RTG53/MSE (referred to as TG-53 in this report) Acoustic Detection of Weapons Firing Joint Field Experiment II conducted at the Etablissement Technique de Bourges (ETBS), Bourges, France, during 16 to 27 June 2008. This field experiment is a follow-on to the NATO TG-53 Acoustic Detection of Weapons Firing Joint Field Experiment I conducted at the Yuma Proving Grounds (YPG), Yuma, Arizona, USA, during 31 October to 4 November 2005 [1]. The objectives of the joint experiment were: (i) to collect acoustic signatures of direct and indirect firings from weapons' such as small arms, mortars, artillery, rockets, and C4 explosives, (ii) to analyze the propagation effects of grassy, wooded, and urban terrains, (iii) to share signatures collected from a variety of acoustic sensors, on the ground and in the air, distributed over a wide area, and (iv) to demonstrate the interoperability of disparate sensors developed by the various nations involved. The participating NATO countries , including France, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States of America, and Israel as well as part of the Mediterranean dialogue countries, deployed nearly 90 sensors and sensor systems over the test range area.

  18. Intermittent magnetic field excitations in the Madison Dynamo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nornberg, M. D.; Spence, E. J.; Jacobson, C. M.; Parada, C. A.; Kendrick, R. D.; Forest, C. B.

    2006-10-01

    Determining the onset conditions for magnetic field growth in magnetohydrodynamics is fundamental to understanding how astrophysical dynamos such as the Earth, the Sun, and the galaxy self-generate magnetic fields. The role of turbulence in modifying these onset conditions is studied in the Madison Dynamo Experiment. A turbulent flow of liquid sodium, composed primarily of two counter-rotating helical vortices, is generated by impellers. Laser Doppler velocimetry measurements of the flow in an identical-scale water experiment demonstrate that the turbulence is isotropic, though not homogeneous, with particularly long-lived eddies in the shear layer between the two flow cells. The magnetic field induced when an axial field is applied shows intermittent periods of growth and has a spatial structure consistent with the fastest growing magnetic eigenmode predicted by a laminar kinematic dynamo model of the mean flow. Turbulent fluctuations of the velocity field change the flow geometry such that the eigenmode growth rate is temporarily positive, thus generating the magnetic bursts. It is found from ensemble averaging that the bursts gain strength and frequency with increased impeller rotation rate, though they become shorter so that each burst remains a rare, random event. Nornberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., in press (2006), physics/0606239.

  19. The Effectiveness of Alcohol Policies in 4-Year Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Gayle T.

    2010-01-01

    A problem facing American universities is heavy drinking by the student body which results in unintentional injuries and deaths, illegal offenses, sexual assault, altercations, and academic demise. The relationship between the type of alcohol policy enacted on campus and alcohol consumption among undergraduate students attending 4-year public…

  20. 20 CFR 210.4 - Year of service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Year of service. 210.4 Section 210.4 Employees... SERVICE § 210.4 Year of service. (a) A year of service is twelve months of reported or deemed service, consecutive or not consecutive. A fraction of a year of service is taken at its actual value. (b) The...

  1. 20 CFR 210.4 - Year of service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Year of service. 210.4 Section 210.4... RAILROAD SERVICE § 210.4 Year of service. (a) A year of service is twelve months of reported or deemed service, consecutive or not consecutive. A fraction of a year of service is taken at its actual value....

  2. 20 CFR 210.4 - Year of service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Year of service. 210.4 Section 210.4... RAILROAD SERVICE § 210.4 Year of service. (a) A year of service is twelve months of reported or deemed service, consecutive or not consecutive. A fraction of a year of service is taken at its actual value....

  3. 20 CFR 210.4 - Year of service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Year of service. 210.4 Section 210.4 Employees... SERVICE § 210.4 Year of service. (a) A year of service is twelve months of reported or deemed service, consecutive or not consecutive. A fraction of a year of service is taken at its actual value. (b) The...

  4. 20 CFR 210.4 - Year of service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Year of service. 210.4 Section 210.4... RAILROAD SERVICE § 210.4 Year of service. (a) A year of service is twelve months of reported or deemed service, consecutive or not consecutive. A fraction of a year of service is taken at its actual value....

  5. Head Start, 4 years After Completing the Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young-Joo

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of the Head Start program on children's achievements in reading and math tests during their first 4 years of schooling after completing the program. Using nationally representative data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, I found large measurement error in the parental reports of Head Start attendance,…

  6. Faculty Employment at 4-Year Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Liang; Liu, Xiangmin

    2010-01-01

    We examine the variation in employment levels of part-time faculty, full-time teaching faculty, and full-time professorial faculty across 4-year colleges and universities in the United States. Employment structures and practices in higher education institutions are determined by a variety of economic and institutional factors. For example, a 1%…

  7. Emerging Understanding of Patterning in 4-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittle-Johnson, Bethany; Fyfe, Emily R.; McLean, Laura E.; McEldoon, Katherine L.

    2013-01-01

    Young children have an impressive amount of mathematics knowledge, but past psychological research has focused primarily on their number knowledge. Preschoolers also spontaneously engage in a form of early algebraic thinking-patterning. In the current study, we assessed 4-year-old children's knowledge of repeating patterns on two occasions…

  8. Using a Field Experience to Build Understanding of Planetary Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higbie, M.; Treiman, A.; Kiefer, W.; Shipp, S.

    2004-12-01

    In the summer of 2004, the Lunar and Planetary Institute hosted 25 middle- and high-school teachers on a week-long field experience in Idaho and Montana. This workshop mixed field work with classroom experiences and provided educators and scientists the opportunity to interact. The educators investigated deposits associated with Glacial Lake Missoula floods and lava flows in the Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve. The participants applied what they learned about Earth-based processes to develop understanding of processes operating on Mars and the most recent results from NASA's missions to Mars. This was the most recent of five field-based experiences that used Earth-planet comparisons as a basis for experiential learning. These field experiences all are designed to strengthen content knowledge of geologic processes and planetary sciences. Learning geology through fieldwork enables participants to take ownership of the content through real-life experience; in essence, the teacher becomes the student. Establishing deeper knowledge of the content increases their confidence in facilitating inquiry-based science in their own classrooms. In addition to content, the educators are immersed in the process of science. Participants make observations, compile notes and illustrations, debate interpretations, draw conclusions, and communicate findings. Care was taken to separate observations and interpretations to help build an understanding of scientific reasoning. Discussions often involved questions without solutions, or with multiple solutions. While some participants expressed discomfort with these aspects of the nature of science, most were more comfortable with open-ended, inquiry based exploration by the close of the workshop. The field work is coupled with discussion and activities in the classroom. Participants reflected on the field sites and placed them in the context of the geologic history of the region. Observations and interpretations at

  9. Active experiments in the ionosphere and geomagnetic field variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivokon, V. P.; Cherneva, N. V.; Khomutov, S. Y.; Serovetnikov, A. S.

    2014-11-01

    Variations of ionospheric-magnetospheric relation energy, as one of the possible outer climatology factors, may be traced on the basis of analysis of natural geophysical phenomena such as ionosphere artificial radio radiation and magnetic storms. Experiments on active impact on the ionosphere have been carried out for quite a long time in Russia as well. The most modern heating stand is located in Alaska; it has been used within the HAARP Program. The possibility of this stand to affect geophysical fields, in particular, the geomagnetic field is of interest.

  10. Laboratory and Field Experiments on Expulsion of Selected Ions along Divergent Polar Geomagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, A. Y.; Deng, B.; Quon, B.; Wang, R.; Hartzell, J.; Rosenthal, G.; Hazelton, L. R.

    2007-12-01

    Laboratory and Field Experiments on Expulsion of Selected Ions along Divergent Polar Geomagnetic Fields. Laboratory experiments have shown significant gyro-resonance acceleration of minority ion species in a magnetized plasma. Field aligned elctron drifts can provide free energy needed to make this process efficient. The linear magnetized device has a uniform magnetic field linked to two adjustable mirrors at the ends. Outdoor experiments at HIPAS Facility Ak(1) ( 84 MW ERP ) are used to test this process in the earth's "chimneys" at the two poles. The divergent polar geomagnetic field converts the perpendicular ion velocity into an upward motion. Satellites and ground-based ELF receivers,supplemented by UHF radars, LIDARs and infrared diagnostics , will monitor low-frequency EM waves and upflows of ions. The upward transport of ions in the lower atmosphere by field-induced diffusion and convection and the coupling to the free energy in the auroral region will be discussed. Computer modeling and theoeries complement our experiments. 1. Wong, A.Y. et al. AIP CIP 96-27719, Chap 3, pp 41-75, 1997

  11. ITER Test Blanket Module Error Field Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, M. J.

    2010-11-01

    Recent experiments at DIII-D used an active-coil mock-up to investigate effects of magnetic error fields similar to those expected from two ferromagnetic Test Blanket Modules (TBMs) in one ITER equatorial port. The largest and most prevalent observed effect was plasma toroidal rotation slowing across the entire radial profile, up to 60% in H-mode when the mock-up local ripple at the plasma was ˜4 times the local ripple expected in front of ITER TBMs. Analysis showed the slowing to be consistent with non-resonant braking by the mock-up field. There was no evidence of strong electromagnetic braking by resonant harmonics. These results are consistent with the near absence of resonant helical harmonics in the TBM field. Global particle and energy confinement in H-mode decreased by <20% for the maximum mock-up ripple, but <5% at the local ripple expected in ITER. These confinement reductions may be linked with the large velocity reductions. TBM field effects were small in L-mode but increased with plasma beta. The L-H power threshold was unaffected within error bars. The mock-up field increased plasma sensitivity to mode locking by a known n=1 test field (n = toroidal harmonic number). In H-mode the increased locking sensitivity was from TBM torque slowing plasma rotation. At low beta, locked mode tolerance was fully recovered by re-optimizing the conventional DIII-D ``I-coils'' empirical compensation of n=1 errors in the presence of the TBM mock-up field. Empirical error compensation in H-mode should be addressed in future experiments. Global loss of injected neutral beam fast ions was within error bars, but 1 MeV fusion triton loss may have increased. The many DIII-D mock-up results provide important benchmarks for models needed to predict effects of TBMs in ITER.

  12. Acoustic experience shapes female mate choice in field crickets

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Nathan W; Zuk, Marlene

    2008-01-01

    Female choice can drive the evolution of extravagant male traits. In invertebrates, the influence of prior social experience on female choice has only recently been considered. To better understand the evolutionary implications of experience-mediated plasticity in female choice, we investigated the effect of acoustic experience during rearing on female responsiveness to male song in the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus. Acoustic experience has unique biological relevance in this species: a morphological mutation has rendered over 90 per cent of males on the Hawaiian island of Kauai silent in fewer than 20 generations, impeding females' abilities to locate potential mates. Females reared in silent conditions mimicking Kauai were less discriminating of male calling song and more responsive to playbacks, compared with females that experienced song during rearing. Our results to our knowledge, are the first demonstration of long-term effects of acoustic experience in an arthropod, and suggest that female T. oceanicus may be able to compensate for the reduced availability of long-range male sexual signals by increasing their responsiveness to the few remaining signallers. Understanding the adaptive significance of experience-mediated plasticity in female choice provides insight into processes that facilitate rapid evolutionary change and shape sexual selection pressure in natural populations. PMID:18700205

  13. An Integral, Multidisciplinary and Global Geophysical Field Experience for Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, O.; Carrillo, D. J.; Pérez-Campos, X.

    2007-05-01

    The udergraduate program of Geophysical Engineering at the School of Engineering, of the Univesidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), went through an update process that concluded in 2006. As part of the program, the student takes three geophysical prospecting courses (gravity and magnetics, electric, electromagnetics, and seismic methods). The older program required a three-week field experience for each course in order to gradute. The new program considers only one extended field experience. This work stresses the importance of international academic exchange, where undergraduate students could participate, such as the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE), and interaction with research programs, such as the MesoAmerican Subduction Experiment (MASE). Also, we propose a scheeme for this activity based on those examples; both of them have in common real geophysical problems, from which students could benefit. Our proposal covers academic and logistic aspects to be taken into account, enhancing the relevance of interaction between other academic institutions, industry, and UNAM, in order to obtain a broader view of geophysics.

  14. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  15. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implicationsmore » of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.« less

  16. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  17. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. Here. we demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  18. Inverse Simulation of Field Infiltration Experiment Counting Preferential Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumr, David; Snehota, Michal; Nemcova, Renata; Dohnal, Michal; Cislerova, Milena

    2010-05-01

    The field tension and ponded infiltration experiments were conducted to monitor and describe irregularities of moisture propagation and to estimate the soil hydraulic properties (Distric Cambisol, Korkusova Hut, Sumava). On these soils the preferential pathways have been observed in several scales with the use of dye tracers, MRI and CT imaging. Preferential behavior was detected also during laboratory infiltration experiments. The flow irregularities are credited to variable air entrapment at the beginning of infiltrations. The field infiltration experiment was carried out in a shallow pit for a period of one day. The upper boundary condition was controlled by the tension disk infiltrometer, the propagation of a water front was monitored by two tensiometers installed in two depths below the infiltration disk. The propagation of saline solution front during ponded infiltration was visualized with high resolution electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Infiltration experiments were monitored with TDR probes, tensiometers and ERT. Zones of preferential flow were determined through analyses of photographs taken during laboratory dye tracer infiltration experiments performed on undisturbed soil samples. Connectivity, volumetric ratio and spatial development of preferential pathways were evaluated as the necessary information for numerical simulations of flow using dual-permeability approach. 2D axisymetric numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate the results of the experiment. The parameter estimator PEST coupled with the simulation code S2D_DUAL (Vogel et al., 2000) were employed. Two different approaches were used: 1. Single-domain approach based on Richards' equation. 2. Dual-permeability approach based on two interacting water flow domains (matrix and preferential domains), each governed by one Richards' equation. Concerning the existence of preferential flow on investigated soil, the dual-permeability model gives a better picture of the flow regime. The

  19. Acute opercular syndrome in 4-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Pniewska, Anna; Pawłowska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Acute opercular syndrome is a rare described syndrome caused by a sudden damage of the cerebral cortex and subcortical white matter, located around the insula. A rare cause of this syndrome can be an infectious agent, particularly herpes simplex virus. Quick diagnosis and immediate initiation of treatment significantly reduce the risk of neurological consequences and mortality. We present a case of encephalitis of unknown etiology and severe course, with the symptoms of acute opercular syndrome in 4-year-old boy. PMID:27154445

  20. Massless scalar field and solar-system experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Formiga, J. B.

    2011-04-15

    The solution of Einstein's field equations with the energy-momentum tensor of a massless scalar field is known as the Fisher solution. It is well known that this solution has a naked singularity due to the ''charge''{Sigma} of the massless scalar field. Here I obtain the radial null geodesic of the Fisher solution and use it to confirm that there is no black hole. In addition, I use the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism to show that the Fisher spacetime predicts the same effects on solar-system experiments as the Schwarzschild one does, as long as we impose a limit on {Sigma}. I show that this limit is not a strong constraint and we can even take values of {Sigma} bigger than M. By using the exact formula of the redshift and some assumptions, I evaluate this limit for the experiment of Pound and Snider [Phys. Rev. 140, B788 (1965)]. It turns out that this limit is {Sigma}<5.8x10{sup 3} m.

  1. The TCS Rotating Magnetic Field FRC Current-Drive Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Alan J.; Guo, Houyang Y.; Slough, John T.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Schrank, Louis S.; Reass, William A.; Wurden, Glen A.

    2002-03-15

    Field-reversed configurations (FRCs) have extremely attractive reactor attributes because of their singly connected geometry. They have been created in theta-pinch devices, but being compact toroids and lacking a center hole, their toroidal current cannot be sustained by transformer action as in other toroidal configurations. A new device, the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment (TCS) facility has been constructed to use rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) to build up and sustain the flux of hot FRCs formed by the normal theta-pinch method. RMF formation and sustainment of similar, but cold, pure poloidal field configurations have been demonstrated in devices called rotamaks, and RMF formation, but not sustainment, has been achieved in a smaller FRC facility called the Star Thrust Experiment (STX). Initial formation and sustainment have now been achieved in TCS, albeit still with cold (T{sub e} {approx} 50 eV) plasmas. Both the formation and final steady-state conditions are found to agree with newly developed analytic and numerical models for RMF flux buildup and sustainment inside a standard cylindrical flux conserver. The required plasma conditions (mainly resistivity but also density) can now be determined for the planned hot FRC, RMF flux buildup experiments and for eventual reactor conditions.

  2. Large scale meteorological influence during the Geysers 1979 field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.

    1980-01-01

    A series of meteorological field measurements conducted during July 1979 near Cobb Mountain in Northern California reveals evidence of several scales of atmospheric circulation consistent with the climatic pattern of the area. The scales of influence are reflected in the structure of wind and temperature in vertically stratified layers at a given observation site. Large scale synoptic gradient flow dominates the wind field above about twice the height of the topographic ridge. Below that there is a mixture of effects with evidence of a diurnal sea breeze influence and a sublayer of katabatic winds. The July observations demonstrate that weak migratory circulations in the large scale synoptic meteorological pattern have a significant influence on the day-to-day gradient winds and must be accounted for in planning meteorological programs including tracer experiments.

  3. Equilibrium evolution in oscillating-field current-drive experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollam, K. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Blair, A. P.; Craig, D.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; O'Connell, R.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Stephens, H. D.; Stone, D. R.; Brower, D. L.; Deng, B. H.; Ding, W. X.

    2010-08-01

    Oscillating-field current drive (OFCD) is a proposed method of steady-state toroidal plasma sustainment in which ac poloidal and toroidal loop voltages are applied to produce a dc plasma current. OFCD is added to standard, inductively sustained reversed-field pinch plasmas in the Madison Symmetric Torus [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)]. Equilibrium profiles and fluctuations during a single cycle are measured and analyzed for different relative phases between the two OFCD voltages and for OFCD off. For OFCD phases leading to the most added plasma current, the measured energy confinement is slightly better than that for OFCD off. By contrast, the phase of the maximum OFCD helicity-injection rate also has the maximum decay rate, which is ascribed to transport losses during discrete magnetic-fluctuation events induced by OFCD. Resistive-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the experiments reproduce the observed phase dependence of the added current.

  4. SRNL RADIONUCLIDE FIELD LYSIMETER EXPERIMENT: BASELINE CONSTRUCTION AND IMPLEMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Bagwell, L.; Powell, B.; Almond, P.; Emerson, H.; Hixon, A.; Jablonski, J.; Buchanan, C.; Waterhouse, T.

    2012-10-17

    The purpose of this document is to compile information regarding experimental design, facility design, construction, radionuclide source preparation, and path forward for the ten year Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Radionuclide Field Lysimeter Experiment at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This is a collaborative effort by researchers at SRNL and Clemson University. The scientific objectives of this study are to: Study long-term radionuclide transport under conditions more representative of vadose zone conditions than laboratory experiments; Provide more realistic quantification of radionuclide transport and geochemistry in the vadose zone, providing better information pertinent to radioactive waste storage solutions than presently exists; Reduce uncertainty and improve justification for geochemical models such as those used in performance assessments and composite analyses.

  5. Experiments of cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhuowei; Zhou, Zhongyu; Zhang, Chunbo; Tang, Xiaosong; Tong, Yanjin; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei

    2015-09-01

    The high Explosive Magnetic Flux Implosion Compression Generator (EMFICG) is a kind of unique high energy density dynamic technique with characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising and could be suitable as a tool of cylindrical isentropic compression. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP) have developed EMFICG technique and realized cylindrical isentropic compression. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5-6 Tesla were built first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive. The inner free surface velocity of sample was measured by PDV. The isentropic compression of a copper sample was verified and the isentropic pressure is over 100 GPa. The cylindrical isentropic compression process has been numerical simulated by 1D MHD code and the simulation results were compared with the experiments. Compared with the transitional X-ray flash radiograph measurement, this method will probably promote the data accuracy.

  6. ASCOT 91 field experiment : PNL airsonde data summary.

    SciTech Connect

    JM Hubbe and KJ Allwine

    1991-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) participated in the Winter 1991 Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) field experiment conducted in the vicinity of the Rocky Flats Plant between Boulder and Denver, Colorado. This report contains a summary of operations and data associated with free-release-ball oon-borne atmospheric soundings made by PNL between January 29 and February 8, 1991. Given here are descriptions of the site and instrumentation, a brief summary of the soundings, and a description of the data post processing. The appendices contain a detailed summary of all soundings and ASCOT plots of completed soundings.

  7. Radiative transfer model validations during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert; Breon, Francois-Marie; Gautier, Catherine

    1990-01-01

    Two simple radiative transfer models, the 5S model based on Tanre et al. (1985, 1986) and the wide-band model of Morcrette (1984) are validated by comparing their outputs with results obtained during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment on concomitant radiosonde, aerosol turbidity, and radiation measurements and sky photographs. Results showed that the 5S model overestimates the short-wave irradiance by 13.2 W/sq m, whereas the Morcrette model underestimated the long-wave irradiance by 7.4 W/sq m.

  8. Cartoon music in a candy store: a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Le Guellec, Hélène; Guéguen, Nicolas; Jacob, Céline; Pascual, Alexandre

    2007-06-01

    An experiment on consumers' behavior was carried out in a new field context. According to a random assignment, 60 customers from ages 12 to 14 years who entered a candy store were exposed to Top Forty music which was usually played in this store, music from cartoons (Captain Flame, Candy, Olive & Tom, etc.), or no music. Analysis showed that customers spent significantly more time in the store when cartoon music was played, but the two styles of music were not related to the amount of money spent.

  9. The South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study: Nearshore Hydrodynamics Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, K. A.; Voulgaris, G.; Demir, H.; Work, P. A.; Hanes, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    As part of the South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study (SCCES) a nearshore field experiment was carried out for five days in December 2003 just north of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, providing measurements of the waves, currents and morphological evolution. This experiment occurred concurrently with an extensive field campaign several kilometers offshore which included measurements of the waves and currents on and near a significant sand shoal. The purpose of the nearshore experiment was to aid in the identification of the effect of the offshore shoal on the nearshore processes. The resulting dataset will be used for verification of numerical models being used to investigate the hydrodynamics of the region. The experiment was carried out from December 10 to December 15 and consisted of measurements of the waves and currents, extensive surveys of the bathymetry every day, grab samples of the sediments, and video imagery. The hydrodynamics were measured using two Sontek Triton downward-looking Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters and two Nortek AquaDopp profilers arranged in a cross-shore line from inside the swash to several surf zone widths past the breakers. The bathymetric surveying was accomplished using both a differential GPS system and a total station. Surveying was performed each day in order to capture the morphological changes. On the last day, seven sediment samples were taken along a single cross-section to determine the sediment characteristics across the beach. Additionally, a video camera was located on a balcony of the top floor of a nearby hotel providing an excellent field of view of the entire experimental area. Digital video was captured directly onto a computer during all daylight hours and many control points were surveyed in each day to facilitate rectification of the imagery. A variety of conditions were encountered during the experiment, including two storm fronts which passed through, generating wind speeds up to 15 m/s. The first storm generated

  10. Perlite exposure and 4-year change in lung function.

    PubMed

    Polatli, M; Erdinç, M; Erdinç, E; Okyay, E

    2001-07-01

    Perlite is a volcanic glass or amorphous aluminium silicate composed of 71-75% SiO(2). When heated to 800-1100 degrees C, it expands to form processed perlite, which has a low density, high surface area, and a low thermal conductivity. The objective was to determine the effect of perlite exposure on pulmonary function tests. Pulmonary function tests in conjunction with chest radiogram were carried out in 36 perlite-exposed workers and 22 unexposed office workers in 1992 and 1996. Respirable dust level exceeded permissible dust levels in work places in the 4 years under study. Transfer coefficient (K(CO)) decline was significant in nonsmoker perlite-exposed workers (n=9), and found to be 5.28+/-0.71 (predicted 4.32+/-0.11) and 3.84+/-0.96 (predicted 4.18+/-0.18) 1/min/mmHg, in 1992 and 1996, respectively (P<0.001). Both smoker perlite workers and office workers showed significant obstruction to airflow in small airways with respect to predicted values and 4-year change in transfer factor (T(L), CO) was significant. Although predicted, 12-year perlite exposure did not lead to a decrease in mean pulmonary function test parameters, there was a tendency to a decline in T(L), CO in the 4-year study period, which may be due to high perlite dust levels. As early effects of perlite dust exposure may not be detected by spirometric measurements alone, the transfer coefficient should be added to spirometry.

  11. Identifying Discrimination at Work: The Use of Field Experiments.

    PubMed

    Pager, Devah; Western, Bruce

    2012-06-01

    Antidiscrimination law offers protection to workers who have been treated unfairly on the basis of their race, gender, religion, or national origin. In order for these protections to be invoked, however, potential plaintiffs must be aware of and able to document discriminatory treatment. Given the subtlety of contemporary forms of discrimination, it is often difficult to identify discrimination when it has taken place. The methodology of field experiments offers one approach to measuring and detecting hiring discrimination, providing direct observation of discrimination in real-world settings. In this article, we discuss the findings of two recent field experiments measuring racial discrimination in low wage labor markets. This research provides several relevant findings for researchers and those interested in civil rights enforcement: (1) it produces estimates of the rate of discrimination at the point of hire; (2) it yields evidence about the interactions associated with discrimination (many of which reveal the subtlety with which contemporary discrimination is practiced); and (3) it provides a vehicle for both research on and enforcement of antidiscrimination law. PMID:24163481

  12. Identifying Discrimination at Work: The Use of Field Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Pager, Devah; Western, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Antidiscrimination law offers protection to workers who have been treated unfairly on the basis of their race, gender, religion, or national origin. In order for these protections to be invoked, however, potential plaintiffs must be aware of and able to document discriminatory treatment. Given the subtlety of contemporary forms of discrimination, it is often difficult to identify discrimination when it has taken place. The methodology of field experiments offers one approach to measuring and detecting hiring discrimination, providing direct observation of discrimination in real-world settings. In this article, we discuss the findings of two recent field experiments measuring racial discrimination in low wage labor markets. This research provides several relevant findings for researchers and those interested in civil rights enforcement: (1) it produces estimates of the rate of discrimination at the point of hire; (2) it yields evidence about the interactions associated with discrimination (many of which reveal the subtlety with which contemporary discrimination is practiced); and (3) it provides a vehicle for both research on and enforcement of antidiscrimination law. PMID:24163481

  13. Field Experiment Data Support at the Goddard DAAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrubiak, P. L.; Yang, R.; Ahmad, S.; Chiu, L.; Teng, W.; Liu, Z.; Serafino, G.; Rui, H.; Bonk, J.; Pollack, N.

    2001-12-01

    Historically, field experiment data support at the data center level has been sketchy, but in the last decade, because of rapid growth of electronic capabilities throughout the science community, the data center has become the resolution of choice to the problems of campaign data distribution and archival. Even so, field campaign data, being inherently non-uniform, require significant adaptation on the part of the archive. The participant complement for a campaign ranges widely-from one to three dozen investigators. Each has his/her own instrument, organizational affiliation, and funding. Many are academics with class schedules to consider, an office staff composed of graduate students and a correspondingly high turnover rate. Some are operating with very limited resources and lack the programming staff to tailor their data to archive specifications. Data delivery schedules, formatting and documentation are all driven by these factors. Planning for data volume also requires flexibility. Campaign data acquisition is sensitive to weather and a variety of logistical problems. Planning for campaign data volume is therefore a matter of determining thresholds. Since most campaign data sets tend to be small by data center standards, distribution is mainly from anonymous ftp sites front-ended by web sites. The Goddard DAAC opened its campaign archive in 1994 with data from the TRMM oriented TOGA-COARE campaign of 1992-93, and has most recently archived the TRMM global validation campaigns, designed to evaluate the physical assumptions made by TRMM rainfall algorithms, initialize and validate the cloud resolving models, test latent heating retrievals from TRMM measurements, and evaluate methods to estimate rainfall and latent heating from ground based radars. Launched by the TRMM Office in 1998, the TRMM campaigns were designed as a group so that specific measurements could be compared between experiments in order to gain insight into the regional dependence of any findings

  14. Fermi Large Area Telescope Operations: Progress Over 4 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Robert A.; /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was launched into orbit in June 2008, and is conducting a multi-year gamma-ray all-sky survey, using the main instrument on Fermi, the Large Area Telescope (LAT). Fermi began its science mission in August 2008, and has now been operating for almost 4 years. The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory hosts the LAT Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC), which supports the operation of the LAT in conjunction with the Mission Operations Center (MOC) and the Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC), both at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The LAT has a continuous output data rate of about 1.5 Mbits per second, and data from the LAT are stored on Fermi and transmitted to the ground through TDRS and the MOC to the ISOC about 10 times per day. Several hundred computers at SLAC are used to process LAT data to perform event reconstruction, and gamma-ray photon data are subsequently delivered to the FSSC for public release with a few hours of being detected by the LAT. We summarize the current status of the LAT, and the evolution of the data processing and monitoring performed by the ISOC during the first 4 years of the Fermi mission, together with future plans for further changes to detected event data processing and instrument operations and monitoring.

  15. Dimensioning IRGA gas sampling systems: laboratory and field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubinet, Marc; Joly, Lilian; Loustau, Denis; De Ligne, Anne; Chopin, Henri; Cousin, Julien; Chauvin, Nicolas; Decarpenterie, Thomas; Gross, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Both laboratory and field experiments were carried out in order to define suitable configuration ranges for the gas sampling systems (GSSs) of infrared gas analyzers (IRGAs) used in eddy covariance measurements.

    In the laboratory, an original dynamic calibration bench was developed in order to test the frequency attenuation and pressure drop generated by filters. In the field, three IRGAs of the same type equipped with different filters or different rain caps were installed and run and the real frequency response of the complete setup was tested. The main results are as follows. - Filters may have a strong impact on the pressure drop in the GSS and this impact increases with flow rate. - Conversely, no impact of the tested filters on cut-off frequency was found, GSSs with and without filters presenting similar cut-off frequencies. - The main limiting factor of cut-off frequency in the field was found to be the rain cap design. In addition, the impact of this design on pressure drop was also found to be noteworthy.

  16. [Runoff Pollution Experiments of Paddy Fields Under Different Irrigation Patterns].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing-wen; Su, Bao-lin; Huang, Ning-bo; Guan, Yu-tang; Zhao, Kun

    2016-03-15

    To study runoff and non-point source pollution of paddy fields and to provide a scientific basis for agricultural water management of paddy fields, paddy plots in the Jintan City and the Liyang City were chosen for experiments on non-point source pollution, and flood irrigation and intermittent irrigation patterns were adopted in this research. The surface water level and rainfall were observed during the growing season of paddies, and the runoff amount from paddy plots and loads of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) were calculated by different methods. The results showed that only five rain events of totally 27 rainfalls and one artificially drainage formed non-point source pollution from flood irrigated paddy plot, which resulted in a TN export coefficient of 49.4 kg · hm⁻² and a TP export coefficient of 1.0 kg · hm⁻². No any runoff event occurred from the paddy plot with intermittent irrigation even in the case of maximum rainfall of 95.1 mm. Runoff from paddy fields was affected by water demands of paddies and irrigation or drainage management, which was directly correlated to surface water level, rainfall amount and the lowest ridge height of outlets. Compared with the flood irrigation, intermittent irrigation could significantly reduce non-point source pollution caused by rainfall or artificial drainage. PMID:27337888

  17. Dimensioning IRGA gas sampling system : laboratory and field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubinet, Marc; Joly, Lilian; Loustau, Denis; De Ligne, Anne; Chopin, Henri; Cousin, Julien; De Carpenterie, Thomas; Gross, Patrick; Chauvin, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Both laboratory and field experiments were carried out in order to define suitable configuration ranges for the gas sampling systems (GSS) of infrared gas analyzers (IRGA) used in eddy covariance measurements. In the laboratory, an original dynamic calibration bench was developed in order to test the frequency attenuation and pressure drop generated by filters. In the field, three IRGAs of the same type equipped with different filters or different rain caps were installed and run and the real frequency response of the complete set-up was tested. The main results are that: - Filters may have a strong impact on the pressure drop in the GSS and this impact increases with flow rate. - On the contrary, no impact of the tested filters on cut off frequency was found, GSS with and without filters presenting similar cut off frequencies. - The main limiting factor of cut off frequency in the field was found to be the rain cap design. In addition, the impact of this design on pressure drop was also found noteworthy.

  18. Hemisphere-specific treatment of dyslexia subtypes: a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Bakker, D J; Bouma, A; Gardien, C J

    1990-01-01

    Evidence is discussed to show that so-called L- and P-type dyslexia result from deviations in the development of hemispheric subservience in learning to read. Investigations into the validity of the L/P classification are reviewed, as are laboratory experiments on the effects of so-called hemisphere-specific stimulation (HSS). In the present field experiment, 28 L-dyslexic children (mean chronological and reading age 10.6 and 7.5 years, respectively) received HSS of the right hemisphere by the presentation of words to the fingers of the left hand, and 26 P-dyslexic children (mean chronological and reading age 9.4 and 7.2 years, respectively) received HSS of the left hemisphere by the presentation of words to the fingers of the right hand. Control L and P subjects were treated according to the discretion of the remedial teacher. The results underscore the findings of previous laboratory experiments in that (a) HSS-treated L-dyslexics, relative to controls, tended to show larger improvement of accuracy in text reading; and (b) HSS-treated P-dyslexics, relative to controls, showed larger improvement of fluency in word reading. PMID:2398315

  19. Field experiments using SPEAR: a speech control system for UGVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhatpar, Siddharth R.; Blanco, Chris; Czerniak, Jeffrey; Hoffman, Orin; Juneja, Amit; Pruthi, Tarun; Liu, Dongqing; Karlsen, Robert; Brown, Jonathan

    2009-05-01

    This paper reports on a Field Experiment carried out by the Human Research and Engineering Directorate at Ft. Benning to evaluate the efficacy of using speech to control an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) concurrently with a handcontroller. The SPEAR system, developed by Think-A-Move, provides speech-control of UGVs. The system picks up user-speech in the ear canal with an in-ear microphone. This property allows it to work efficiently in high-noise environments, where traditional speech systems, employing external microphones, fail. It has been integrated with an iRobot PackBot 510 with EOD kit. The integrated system allows the hand-controller to be supplemented with speech for concurrent control. At Ft. Benning, the integrated system was tested by soldiers from the Officer Candidate School. The Experiment had dual focus: 1) Quantitative measurement of the time taken to complete each station and the cognitive load on users; 2) Qualitative evaluation of ease-of-use and ergonomics through soldier-feedback. Also of significant benefit to Think-A-Move was soldier-feedback on the speech-command vocabulary employed: What spoken commands are intuitive, and how the commands should be executed, e.g., limited-motion vs. unlimited-motion commands. Overall results from the Experiment are reported in the paper.

  20. Transverse dispersion: From laboratory experiments to field applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grathwohl, Peter; Rügner, Hermann

    2016-04-01

    Transverse dispersion is relevant for dilution of contaminant plumes in groundwater and in many cases controls the length of steady state plumes during natural attenuation. Also dissolution kinetics of NAPLs in porous media and mass transfer of vapor phase compounds across the capillary fringe (e.g. supply of oxygen) is limited by transverse dispersion. In bench scale laboratory experiments typically very small dispersion coefficients are observed. Transverse dispersivities determined in DNAPL pool dissolution experiments in coarse sands are less than 0.1 mm which agrees with results from lab experiments on dilution of tracers and transfer of oxygen across the capillary fringe. Such low dispersivities lead to long-term persistence of DNAPL pools of many decades to centuries which is confirmed e.g. for chlorinated solvents and coal tars by observations at contaminated sites. However, larger scale investigations, e.g. determination of the length of steady state plumes or reduction of mass fluxes of biodegradable compounds suggest that transverse dispersivities at field scale are up to 3 orders of magnitude higher (1 -10 cm). Reasons for this discrepancy are still unclear, but may be partly explained by processes enhancing transverse mixing such as flow focusing due to aquifer geometries or high permeability inclusions and helical groundwater flow induced by herringbone structures in sediments.

  1. Data management for interdisciplinary field experiments: OTTER project support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelici, Gary; Popovici, Lidia; Skiles, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of investigators of an interdisciplinary science project to properly manage the data that are collected during the experiment is critical to the effective conduct of science. When the project becomes large, possibly including several scenes of large-format remotely sensed imagery shared by many investigators requiring several services, the data management effort can involve extensive staff and computerized data inventories. The OTTER (Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research) project was supported by the PLDS (Pilot Land Data System) with several data management services, such as data inventory, certification, and publication. After a brief description of these services, experiences in providing them are compared with earlier data management efforts and some conclusions regarding data management in support of interdisciplinary science are discussed. In addition to providing these services, a major goal of this data management capability was to adopt characteristics of a pro-active attitude, such as flexibility and responsiveness, believed to be crucial for the effective conduct of active, interdisciplinary science. These are also itemized and compared with previous data management support activities. Identifying and improving these services and characteristics can lead to the design and implementation of optimal data management support capabilities, which can result in higher quality science and data products from future interdisciplinary field experiments.

  2. Electric Field Double Probe Measurements for Ionospheric Space Plasma Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.

    1999-01-01

    Double probes represent a well-proven technique for gathering high quality DC and AC electric field measurements in a variety of space plasma regimes including the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and mesosphere. Such experiments have been successfully flown on a variety of spacecraft including sounding rockets and satellites. Typical instrument designs involve a series of trades, depending on the science objectives, type of platform (e.g., spinning or 3-axis stabilized), expected plasma regime where the measurements will be made, available telemetry, budget, etc. In general, ionospheric DC electric field instruments that achieve accuracies of 0.1 mV/m or better, place spherical sensors at large distances (10m or more) from the spacecraft body in order to extend well beyond the spacecraft wake and sheath and to achieve large signal-to-noise ratios for DC and long wavelength measurements. Additional sets of sensors inboard of the primary, outermost sensors provide useful additional information, both for diagnostics of the plasma contact potentials, which particularly enhance the DC electric field measurements on non-spinning spacecraft, and for wavelength and phase velocity measurements that use the spaced receiver or "interferometer" technique. Accurate attitude knowledge enables B times V contributions to be subtracted from the measured potentials, and permits the measured components to be rotated into meaningful geophysical reference frames. We review the measurement technique for both DC and wave electric field measurements in the ionosphere discussing recent advances involving high resolution burst memories, multiple baseline double probes, new sensor surface materials, biasing techniques, and other considerations.

  3. Mercury's Gravity Field from BepiColombo MORE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marabucci, M.; Genova, A.; Iess, L.

    2012-04-01

    The Mercury Orbiter Radioscience Experiment (MORE) is one of the main instruments on board the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), designed to provide an accurate estimation of Mercury's gravity field by means of highly stable, multi-frequency radio links in X and Ka band. The state-of-the-art microwave equipment enables simultaneous two-way links in X/X (7.2 GHz uplink/8.4 GHz downlink), X/Ka (7.2/32.5 GHz) and Ka/Ka band (34/32.5 GHz), providing range rate accuracies of 3 micron/s (at 1000 s integration time) at nearly all elongation angles. Range observables accurate to 20 cm (two-way) will be attained using a novel, wideband (24 Mcps) ranging system, based upon a pseudo-noise modulation scheme. The multifrequency link, adopted for the first time by the Cassini mission to Saturn [1,2], allows a nearly complete cancellation of the plasma noise both in Doppler and range measurements and hence an accurate determination of Mercury's gravity field and ephemerides. The orbit determination of spacecraft in deep space is generally carried out by means of batch filters, for recovering the trajectory and the model parameters (i.e. gravity field coefficients). The complexity of Mercury's environment penalizes strongly the accuracy of the orbit determination because of the non-gravitational perturbations, such as the solar radiation pressure. Although the non-gravitational accelerations of the MPO will be measured by a highly sensitive accelerometer (the Italian Spring Accelerometer, ISA), a classical, global batch filter proved to be inadequate for precise orbit propagation due to numerical instabilities. Therefore, a different approach has been devised, where the information accumulated previously is exploited in a batch-sequential filter. This paper reports on a new set of numerical simulations carried out with this strategy. The simulation setup takes into account the latest changes in the spacecraft design, the mission profile and the tracking system. We

  4. Microwave Remote Sensing and the Cold Land Processes Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Cline, Don; Davis, Bert; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX) has been designed to advance our understanding of the terrestrial cryosphere. Developing a more complete understanding of fluxes, storage, and transformations of water and energy in cold land areas is a critical focus of the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Research Strategy, the NASA Global Water and Energy Cycle (GWEC) Initiative, the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX), and the GEWEX Americas Prediction Project (GAPP). The movement of water and energy through cold regions in turn plays a large role in ecological activity and biogeochemical cycles. Quantitative understanding of cold land processes over large areas will require synergistic advancements in 1) understanding how cold land processes, most comprehensively understood at local or hillslope scales, extend to larger scales, 2) improved representation of cold land processes in coupled and uncoupled land-surface models, and 3) a breakthrough in large-scale observation of hydrologic properties, including snow characteristics, soil moisture, the extent of frozen soils, and the transition between frozen and thawed soil conditions. The CLPX Plan has been developed through the efforts of over 60 interested scientists that have participated in the NASA Cold Land Processes Working Group (CLPWG). This group is charged with the task of assessing, planning and implementing the required background science, technology, and application infrastructure to support successful land surface hydrology remote sensing space missions. A major product of the experiment will be a comprehensive, legacy data set that will energize many aspects of cold land processes research. The CLPX will focus on developing the quantitative understanding, models, and measurements necessary to extend our local-scale understanding of water fluxes, storage, and transformations to regional and global scales. The experiment will particularly emphasize developing a strong synergism between process

  5. The strategic logic of costly punishment necessitates natural field experiments, and at least one such experiment exists.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tim

    2012-02-01

    Costly punishment's scarcity "in the wild" does not belie strong reciprocity theory as Guala claims. In the presence of strong reciprocators, strategic defectors will cooperate and sanctioning will not occur. Accordingly, natural field experiments are necessary to assess a "wide" reading of costly punishment experiments. One such field experiment exists, and it supports the hypothesis that costly punishment promotes cooperation.

  6. Multifocal tumoral calcinosis in a 4-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Sayar, Ilyas; Peker, Kemal; Kapısız, Alparslan; Bostancı, Isıl Esen; Gürbüzel, Mehmet; Isik, Arda; Peker, Necla Aydın

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 4 Final Diagnosis: Tumoral calcinosis Symptoms: Hard immobile mass Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Surgery Objective: Congenital defects Background: Tumoral calcinosis is an uncommon condition associated with the deposition of painless calcific masses. It is more common in childhood or early adolescence of African-American females. Case Report: We present a case of a 4-year-old girl with tumoral calcinosis treated surgically. The case is rather rare in terms of the age of the patient and the localization of the masses (gluteal site). In our patient, the biochemical findings were normal, except for hyperphosphatemia and elevated alkaline phosphatase. Conclusions: Total excision appears to lead to a good clinical outcome and a low incidence of local relapse. PMID:24644527

  7. Field experiment, anaerobic biodegradation of highly chlorinated aromatics

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, J.; Baek, N.; Coates, M.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of the field experiment is to evaluate the effectiveness of anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated benzenes and toluenes. Excavated soil from a chemical manufacturing site was saturated to maintain anaerobic conditions and treated with nutrients (butyrate, yeast extract, and glucose). One sample was treated with nutrients and microbial inoculation. Preliminary results for the first 24 weeks showed that higher chlorinated benzene concentrations are reduced with an increase of concentrations of lower halogenated species, resulting from deahalogenation. No significant change in the concentrations of chlorinated toluenes was observed during this period. This is consistent with earlier laboratory work in which benzene dehalogenation preceded toluene dehalogenation. Rapid consumption of butyrate and sulfate was also observed.

  8. Use of multitemporal SPOT data in first ISLSCP field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asrar, Ghassem; Murphy, R. E.; Hall, F. G.; Sellers, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    The use of multitemporal SPOT data in a coordinated field experiment is described with objectives to understand the processes that control the biosphere-atmosphere exchanges of heat, mass, momentum and radiation at a range of spatial and temporal scales; and quantify processes associated with these biosphere-atmosphere exchanges with the aid of multispectral and multitemporal remotely sensed data. The study was conducted in a 15 sq km area located in the tall grass prairie region of midwestern U.S. over a period of three years from 1987 through 1989. A combination of ground based, airborne and space based remotely sensed data were used in a variety of interdisciplinary investigations. An overview of the results from studies that used SPOT multispectral and multitemporal data is presented.

  9. Prosocial Behavior and Subjective Insecurity in Violent Contexts: Field Experiments.

    PubMed

    Vélez, María Alejandra; Trujillo, Carlos Andres; Moros, Lina; Forero, Clemente

    2016-01-01

    Subjective insecurity is a key determinant of different forms of prosocial behavior. In Study 1, we used field experiments with farmers in Colombian villages exposed to different levels of violence to investigate how individual perceptions of insecurity affect cooperation, trust, reciprocity and altruism. To do so, we developed a cognitive-affective measure of subjective insecurity. We found that subjective insecurity has a negative effect on cooperation but influences trust and altruism positively. In Study 2, carried out three years after Study 1, we repeated the initial design with additional measures of victimization. Our goal was to relate subjective insecurity with actual victimization. The findings of Study 2 support the initial results, and are robust and consistent for cooperative behavior and trust when including victimization as a mediator. Different indicators of victimization are positively correlated with subjective insecurity and an aggregate index of victimization has a negative effect on cooperation but exerts a positive influence on trust. PMID:27472437

  10. Prosocial Behavior and Subjective Insecurity in Violent Contexts: Field Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Vélez, María Alejandra; Trujillo, Carlos Andres; Moros, Lina; Forero, Clemente

    2016-01-01

    Subjective insecurity is a key determinant of different forms of prosocial behavior. In Study 1, we used field experiments with farmers in Colombian villages exposed to different levels of violence to investigate how individual perceptions of insecurity affect cooperation, trust, reciprocity and altruism. To do so, we developed a cognitive-affective measure of subjective insecurity. We found that subjective insecurity has a negative effect on cooperation but influences trust and altruism positively. In Study 2, carried out three years after Study 1, we repeated the initial design with additional measures of victimization. Our goal was to relate subjective insecurity with actual victimization. The findings of Study 2 support the initial results, and are robust and consistent for cooperative behavior and trust when including victimization as a mediator. Different indicators of victimization are positively correlated with subjective insecurity and an aggregate index of victimization has a negative effect on cooperation but exerts a positive influence on trust. PMID:27472437

  11. Soil response to chemicals used in a field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezierska-Tys, S.; Rutkowska, A.

    2013-03-01

    The effect of chemicals (Reglone 200 SL and Elastiq 550 EC) on soil microorganisms and their enzymatic activity was estimated. The study was conducted in a field experiment which was set up in the split-block design and comprised three treatments. Soil samples were taken six times, twice in each year of study. The results showed that the application of chemicals generally had no negative effect on the number of soil microorganisms. The application of Reglone 200 SL caused an increase of proteolytic and ureolytic activity and affected the activity of dehydrogenases, acid and alkaline phosphatases in the soil. The soil subjected of Elastiq 550 EC was characterized by lower activity of dehydrogenases, protease, urease and alkaline phosphatase.

  12. Frac-and-pack stimulation: Application, design, and field experience

    SciTech Connect

    Roodhart, L.P.; Fokker, P.A.; Davies, D.R.; Shlyapobersky, J.; Wong, G.K.

    1994-03-01

    This paper discusses the criteria for selecting wells to be frac-and-packed. The authors show how systematic study of the inflow performance can be used to assess the potential of frac-and-packed wells, to identify the controlling factors, and to optimize design parameters. They also show that fracture conductivity is often the key to successful treatment. This conductivity depends largely on proppant size; formation permeability damage around the created fracture has less effect. Appropriate allowance needs to be made for flow restrictions caused by the presence of the perforations, partial penetration, and non-Darcy effects. They describe the application of the overpressure-calibrated hydraulic fracture model in frac-and-pack treatment design, and discuss some operational considerations with reference to field examples. The full potential of this promising new completion method can be achieved only if the design is tailored to the individual well. This demands high-quality input data, which can be obtained only from a calibration test. This paper presents their strategy for frac-and-pack design, drawing on examples from field experience. They also point out several areas that the industry needs to address, such as the sizing of proppant in soft formations and the interaction between fracturing fluids and resin in resin-coated proppant.

  13. The field experiments on the HTO washout from the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, A.V.; Mavrin, S.V.; Golubeva, V.N.; Stengach, A.V.; Balashov, Y.S.; Kovalenko, V.P.; Solomatin, I.I.

    2015-03-15

    HTO (tritiated water) wash-out from the atmosphere is one of the key processes governing the HTO transport from the atmosphere into soil and plants. Experimental studies of the HTO interaction with water drops were carried out both in laboratories and in the field. In the course of experiments, the following rain characteristics were recorded: rain intensity, size distribution of drops, and falling velocities and their dependence on drop diameter. A laser optical device was designed and used to measure the distribution of the drop radius and velocities during the period of experiment. The tritium source was placed at a height of 30 m. Rainwater samples were collected in plastic bottles and their HTO activity was determined by liquid scintillation techniques. The data obtained for the experimental values of the scavenging rate are within the range from 4.12*10{sup -5} to 1.57*10{sup -4} s{sup -1} and correspond to the precipitation intensity from 0.3 to 1.26 mm/hour. These results are in sufficiently good agreement with the results of earlier papers.

  14. The National Airborne Field Experiment 2006 (NAFE'06) Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panciera, R.; Walker, J. P.; Merlin, O.; Kalma, J.; Kim, E.; Hacker, J.

    2007-05-01

    Remote sensing technology has a huge potential for improving hydrologic prediction through soil moisture measurement. This is particularly so given that the first dedicated soil moisture satellite, the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, is to be launched in late 2007. However, targeted field experiments must be undertaken and the data analysed prior to launch so that immediate use can be made of this data when it becomes available. Consequently, the National Airborne Field Experiment was conducted in the Murrumbidge catchment, located in south-eastern Australia, during November 2006 (NAFE'06). The intent of this experiment was to provide simulated SMOS observations supported by ground measurement of soil moisture and other relevant ground data for i) development of the SMOS retrieval algorithms, ii) developing approaches for downscaling the low resolution data from SMOS to 1km resolution, and iii) testing its assimilation into land surface models for root zone soil moisture retrieval. This paper describes the NAFE'06 data set. The SMOS-type data were collected using a Polarimetric L-band Multi-beam Radiometer (PLMR), together with supporting instruments (thermal imager, tri-spectral scanner, lidar and digital photograph). Flights included 1km resolution passive microwave data across the main 40km x 55km Yanco study area every 2-3 days, for simulation of a SMOS pixel, verification of downscaling techniques and assimilation, and a transect across the area twice a week to provide both 500m multi-angular passive microwave data for SMOS algorithm development and 50m resolution passive microwave data for algorithm verification. This was done alternatively at 6am and 6pm, so that both SMOS overpass times could be tested. A medium resolution flight (250m for PLMR) was also performed once per week across an irrigated portion of the Yanco study area to study the effect of standing water on microwave emission. The NDVI, lidar and aerial photo supporting

  15. An Oceanographic Decision Support System for Scientific Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maughan, T.; Das, J.; McCann, M. P.; Rajan, K.

    2011-12-01

    Thom Maughan, Jnaneshwar Das, Mike McCann, Danelle Cline, Mike Godin, Fred Bahr, Kevin Gomes, Tom O'Reilly, Frederic Py, Monique Messie, John Ryan, Francisco Chavez, Jim Bellingham, Maria Fox, Kanna Rajan Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute Moss Lading, California, United States Many of the coastal ocean processes we wish to observe in order to characterize marine ecosystems have large spatial extant (tens of square km) and are dynamic moving kilometers in a day with biological processes spanning anywhere from minutes to days. Some like harmful algal blooms generate toxins which can significantly impact human health and coastal economies. In order to obtain a viable understanding of the biogeochemical processes which define their dynamics and ecology, it is necessary to persistently observe, track and sample within and near the dynamic fields using augmented methods of observation such as autonomous platforms like AUVs, gliders and surface craft. Field experiments to plan, execute and manage such multitude of assets are challenging. To alleviate this problem the autonomous systems group with its collaborators at MBARI and USC designed, built and fielded a prototype Oceanographic Decision Support System (ODSS) that provides situational awareness and a single portal to visualize and plan deployments for the large scale October 2010 CANON field program as well as a series of 2 week field programs in 2011. The field programs were conducted in Monterey Bay, a known 'red tide' incubator, and varied from as many as twenty autonomous platforms, four ships and 2 manned airplanes to coordinated AUV operations, drifters and a single ship. The ODSS web-based portal was used to assimilate information from a collection of sources at sea, including AUVs, moorings, radar data as well as remote sensing products generated by partner organizations to provide a synthesis of views useful to predict the movement of a chlorophyll patch in the confines of the northern Monterey Bay

  16. Field experiments of nonlocal sediment transport on a steep hillslope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBiase, R.; Booth, A. M.; Ganti, V.; Scheingross, J. S.; Lamb, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Steep rocky hillslopes dominate the areal extent of rapidly uplifting mountain ranges, and pose a significant hazard to encroaching population centers. Existing models for hillslope sediment transport developed for soil-mantled landscapes are poorly suited to explain the evolution of steep hillslopes characterized by: (1) intermittent or patchy soil cover, (2) slopes that exceed the angle of repose, and (3) transport events that often involve long travel distances. Recently, nonlocal formulations of hillslope sediment transport laws that account for long travel distances have been proposed to overcome the limitations of traditional continuum-based models. However, their application to natural landscapes has been limited owing to few field constraints on key parameters, and computational difficulties expanding the framework to two-dimensions. To address this knowledge gap, we performed a series of field experiments on natural hillslopes to inform a simple particle-based model of hillslope sediment transport. We compiled the distribution of average velocity and transport distance for over 300 stones ranging in diameter from 2-10 cm using a video camera and laser range-finder. To characterize surface roughness, we used a tripod-based laser scanner to generate a 1 cm-resolution digital elevation model of each 30 m long hillslope. We find that hillslope travel distance follows a heavy-tailed distribution that varies systematically with the ratio of particle diameter to roughness height, in general agreement to published laboratory experiments. Mean particle velocity ranges from 1-3 m/s and scales weakly with distance traveled. Our modeling exercise reveals three key effects that should be included in any treatment of steep hillslope evolution: (1) there is a strong grain-size and surface roughness dependence on sediment transport distance, (2) sediment storage on slopes steeper than the angle of repose is possible due to vegetation or topographic roughness, and (3

  17. The effectiveness of alcohol policies in 4-year public universities.

    PubMed

    Walter, Gayle; Kowalczyk, John

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the type of alcohol policy in place in 4-year public universities against the odds of heavy drinking. Data was collected during the months of April-June 2010 using the Core Alcohol and Drug Survey. The participants included a random sample of undergraduate students from 4 public universities in the Midwest. Two of the universities had policies in place allowing the sale and use of alcohol on campus, and 2 universities had policies in place prohibiting the sale and use of alcohol. There were a total of 186 participants which included 63 males and 123 females. There was statistical significance in gender, age, and participation in sports against the odds of heavy drinking (P < .05). The type of policy in place was not significantly associated with the odds of heavy drinking. Even though there was an association between gender, age, and participation in sports with the odds of heavy drinking among college students in this sample, the type of alcohol policy (wet or dry) had no association. The results demonstrate the need for the implementation of alcohol prevention strategies, in addition to policy, to reduce the number of college students who drink heavily. It may be beneficial to target those alcohol intervention programs to the high risk groups such as males, over the age of 21, and those students who participate in sports.

  18. Status of SRNL radiological field lysimeter experiment-Year 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.; Roberts, K.; Bagwell, L.

    2013-10-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Radiological Field Lysimeter Experiment is a one-of-a-kind field facility designed to study radionuclide geochemical processes at a larger spatial scale (from grams to tens of kilograms sediment) and temporal scale (from months to 10 years) than is readily afforded through laboratory studies. The lysimeter facility is intended to capture the natural heterogeneity of moisture and temperature regimes in the vadose zone, the unsaturated subsurface region between the surface soil and the underlying aquifer. The 48 lysimeter columns, which contain various radionuclides (and stable iodine), were opened to rainfall infiltration on July 5, 2012. The objective of this report is to provide a status of the lysimeter facility operations and to compile data collected during FY13, including leachate volume, rainfall, and soil moisture and temperature in situ probe data. Radiological leachate data are not presented in this document but will be the subject of a separate document.1 Leachate samples were collected quarterly and shipped to Clemson University for radiological analyses. Rainfall, leachate volume, moisture and temperature probe data were collected continuously. During operations of the facility this year, there were four safety or technical concerns that required additional maintenance: 1) radioactivity was detected in one of the overflow bottles (captured water collected from the secondary containment that does not come in contact with the radiological source material); 2) rainwater accumulated within the sample-bottle storage sheds; 3) overflow containers collected more liquid than anticipated; and 4) significant spider infestation occurred in the sample-bottle storage sheds. To address the first three concerns, each of the lysimeter columns was re-plumbed to improve and to minimize the number of joint unions. To address the fourth concern regarding spiders, new sample-bottle water sheds were purchased and a pest control

  19. Idaho field experiment 1981. Volume 2: measurement data

    SciTech Connect

    Start, G E; Sagendorf, J F; Ackermann, G R; Cate, J H; Hukari, N F; Dickson, C R

    1984-04-01

    The 1981 Idaho Field Experiment was conducted in southeastern Idaho over the upper Snake River Plain. Nine test-day case studies were conducted between July 15 and 30, 1981. Releases of SF/sub 6/ gaseous tracer were made for 8-hour periods from 46m above ground. Tracer was sampled hourly, for 12 sequential hours, at about 100 locations within an area 24km square. Also, a single total integrated sample of about 30 hours duration was collected at approximately 100 sites within an area 48 by 72km square (using 6km spacings). Extensive tower profiles of meteorology at the release point were collected. RAWINSONDES, RABALS and PIBALS were collected at 3 to 5 sites. Horizontal, low-altitude winds were monitored using the INEL MESONET. SF/sub 6/ tracer plume releases were marked with co-located oil fog releases and bi-hourly sequential launches of tetroon pairs. Aerial LIDAR observations of the oil fog plume and airborne samples of SF/sub 6/ were collected. High altitude aerial photographs of daytime plumes were collected. Volume II lists the data in tabular form or cites the special supplemental reports by other participating contractors. While the primary user file and the data archive are maintained on 9 track/1600 cpi magnetic tapes, listings of the individual values are provided for the user who either cannot utilize the tapes or wishes to preview the data. The accuracies and quality of these data are described.

  20. Test plan for FY-94 digface characterization field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Josten, N.E.; Roybal, L.G.

    1994-08-01

    The digface characterization concept has been under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) since fiscal year (FY) 1992 through the support of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program. A digface characterization system conducts continuous subsurface characterization simultaneously with retrieval of hazardous and radioactive waste from buried waste sites. The system deploys multiple sensors at the retrieval operation digface and collects data that provide a basis for detecting, locating, and classifying buried materials and hazardous conditions before they are disturbed by the retrieval equipment. This test plan describes ongoing efforts to test the digface characterization concept at the INEL`s Cold Test Pit using a simplified prototype deployment apparatus and off-the-shelf sensors. FY-94 field experiments will explore problems in object detection and classification. Detection and classification of objects are fundamental to three of the four primary functions of digface characterization during overburden removal. This test plan establishes procedures for collecting and validating the digface characterization data sets. Analysis of these data will focus on testing and further developing analysis methods for object detection and classification during overburden removal.

  1. Beam extraction experiment with field-emission arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, H.; Watanabe, A.; Shiho, M.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental project aimed to develop FEL drivers using a field-emission array is under way. The subject covers design and fabrication of novel micro-emitters, operation of FEAs, beam formation and emittance diagnostics. So far the generation of a focused beam has been demonstrated with an array of double-gated microemitters. Active control of FEAs has greatly improved the stability of the emission current. Large FEAs with an emitting area of up to 2 x 2 cm{sup 2} have been fabricated for the production of high-current beams. DC beams (1 - 5 keV < 100 {mu}A) extracted from Spindt cathodes were propagated over 1 m and projected on a fluorescent screen. Separate images of FEA tips were observed and emittance measurement has been carried out. The cathode is going to be replaced by a double-gated FEA to improve the beam quality. Pulsed extraction of high currents will also be tested, employing a non-gated FEA as the cathode of a 1 MV induction linac. Results of these experiments will be presented and perspectives concerning the FEA gun will be discussed.

  2. A measurement system applicable for landslide experiments in the field.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen-Zhao; Xu, Xiang-Zhou; Wang, Wen-Long; Yang, Ji-Shan; Liu, Ya-Kun; Xu, Fei-Long

    2016-04-01

    Observation of gravity erosion in the field with strong sunshine and wind poses a challenge. Here, a novel topography meter together with a movable tent addresses the challenge. With the topography meter, a 3D geometric shape of the target surface can be digitally reconstructed. Before the commencement of a test, the laser generator position and the camera sightline should be adjusted with a sight calibrator. Typically, the topography meter can measure the gravity erosion on the slope with a gradient of 30°-70°. Two methods can be used to obtain a relatively clear video, despite the extreme steepness of the slopes. One method is to rotate the laser source away from the slope to ensure that the camera sightline remains perpendicular to the laser plane. Another way is to move the camera farther away from the slope in which the measured volume of the slope needs to be corrected; this method will reduce distortion of the image. In addition, installation of tent poles with concrete columns helps to surmount the altitude difference on steep slopes. Results observed by the topography meter in real landslide experiments are rational and reliable.

  3. A measurement system applicable for landslide experiments in the field.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen-Zhao; Xu, Xiang-Zhou; Wang, Wen-Long; Yang, Ji-Shan; Liu, Ya-Kun; Xu, Fei-Long

    2016-04-01

    Observation of gravity erosion in the field with strong sunshine and wind poses a challenge. Here, a novel topography meter together with a movable tent addresses the challenge. With the topography meter, a 3D geometric shape of the target surface can be digitally reconstructed. Before the commencement of a test, the laser generator position and the camera sightline should be adjusted with a sight calibrator. Typically, the topography meter can measure the gravity erosion on the slope with a gradient of 30°-70°. Two methods can be used to obtain a relatively clear video, despite the extreme steepness of the slopes. One method is to rotate the laser source away from the slope to ensure that the camera sightline remains perpendicular to the laser plane. Another way is to move the camera farther away from the slope in which the measured volume of the slope needs to be corrected; this method will reduce distortion of the image. In addition, installation of tent poles with concrete columns helps to surmount the altitude difference on steep slopes. Results observed by the topography meter in real landslide experiments are rational and reliable. PMID:27131688

  4. Field performance of the Walker Branch throughfall displacement experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P.J.; Todd, D.E.; Edwards, N.T.; Huston, M.A.

    1994-10-06

    The authors are conducting a large-scale manipulative field experiments in an upland oak forest on the Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee USA to identify important ecosystem responses that might result from future precipitation changes. The manipulation of soil moisture is being implemented by a gravity-driven transfer of throughfall precipitation from one treatment plot to another. Throughfall is intercepted in {approx} 2,000 subcanopy troughs (0.3 x 5 m) suspended above the forest floor of the dry plots ({approx} 33% of the ground area is covered) and transferred by gravity flow across an ambient plot for subsequent distribution onto the wet treatment plot. Percent soil water is being monitored with time domain reflectometers at 310 sampling locations across the site. The experimental system is able to produce statistically significant differences in soil water content in years having both extremely dry and extremely wet conditions. Furthermore, comparisons of pre- and post-installation soil temperature measurements have documented the ability of the experimental design to produce these changes without changing the microclimate of the forest understory.

  5. Micro-scale hydrological field experiments in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minea, Gabriel; Moroşanu, Gabriela A.

    2016-02-01

    The paper (communication) presents an overview of hydrologic field experiments at micro-scale in Romania. In order to experimentally investigate micro (plot)-scale hydrological impact of soil erosion, the National Institute of Hydrology and Water Management founded Voineşti Experimental Basin (VES) in 1964 and the Aldeni Experimental Basins (AEB) in 1984. AEB and VES are located in the Curvature Subcarpathians. Experimental plots are organized in a double systems and have an area of 80 m2 (runoff plots) at AEB and 300 m2 (water balance plots) at VES. Land use of plot: first plot "grass-land" is covered with perennial grass and second plot (control) consists in "bare soil". Over the latter one, the soil is hoeing, which results in a greater development of infiltration than in the first plot. Experimental investigations at micro-scale are aimed towards determining the parameters of the water balance equation, during natural and artificial rainfalls, researching of flows and soil erosion processes on experimental plots, extrapolating relations involving runoff coefficients from a small scale to medium scale. Nowadays, the latest evolutions in data acquisition and transmission equipment are represented by sensors (such as: sensors to determinate the soil moisture content). Exploitation and dissemination of hydrologic data is accomplished by research themes/projects, year-books of basic data and papers.

  6. Cooperation and conflict: field experiments in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Silva, Antonio S; Mace, Ruth

    2014-10-01

    The idea that cohesive groups, in which individuals help each other, have a competitive advantage over groups composed of selfish individuals has been widely suggested as an explanation for the evolution of cooperation in humans. Recent theoretical models propose the coevolution of parochial altruism and intergroup conflict, when in-group altruism and out-group hostility contribute to the group's success in these conflicts. However, the few empirical attempts to test this hypothesis do not use natural groups and conflate measures of in-group and unbiased cooperative behaviour. We conducted field experiments based on naturalistic measures of cooperation (school/charity donations and lost letters' returns) with two religious groups with an on-going history of conflict-Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland. Conflict was associated with reduced donations to out-group schools and the return of out-group letters, but we found no evidence that it influences in-group cooperation. Rather, socio-economic status was the major determinant of cooperative behaviour. Our study presents a challenge to dominant perspectives on the origins of human cooperation, and has implications for initiatives aiming to promote conflict resolution and social cohesion.

  7. Geothermal injection treatment: process chemistry, field experiences, and design options

    SciTech Connect

    Kindle, C.H.; Mercer, B.W.; Elmore, R.P.; Blair, S.C.; Myers, D.A.

    1984-09-01

    The successful development of geothermal reservoirs to generate electric power will require the injection disposal of approximately 700,000 gal/h (2.6 x 10/sup 6/ 1/h) of heat-depleted brine for every 50,000 kW of generating capacity. To maintain injectability, the spent brine must be compatible with the receiving formation. The factors that influence this brine/formation compatibility and tests to quantify them are discussed in this report. Some form of treatment will be necessary prior to injection for most situations; the process chemistry involved to avoid and/or accelerate the formation of precipitate particles is also discussed. The treatment processes, either avoidance or controlled precipitation approaches, are described in terms of their principles and demonstrated applications in the geothermal field and, when such experience is limited, in other industrial use. Monitoring techniques for tracking particulate growth, the effect of process parameters on corrosion and well injectability are presented. Examples of brine injection, preinjection treatment, and recovery from injectivity loss are examined and related to the aspects listed above.

  8. The National Practitioner Data Bank: the first 4 years.

    PubMed

    Oshel, R E; Croft, T; Rodak, J

    1995-01-01

    The National Practitioner Data Bank became operational September 1, 1990, as a flagging system to identify health care practitioners who may have been involved in incidents of medical incompetence. Query volumes have grown substantially over the Data Bank's first 4 years of operation. The greatest increase has come in the number of voluntary queries. By the end of 1994, the Data Bank had processed more than 4.5 million requests for information on practitioners, more than 1.5 million of which were received in 1994 alone. The proportion of queries for which the Data Bank contains information on the practitioner in question has grown as the Data Bank has come to contain more reports. During 1994, 7.9 percent of queries were matched. The Data Bank contained more than 97,500 reports at the end of 1994. More than 82 percent of the reports concerned malpractice payments. Licensure reports made up the bulk of the rest. Physicians predominate in reports, accounting for slightly more than 76 percent of the total. The remainder are related to dentists (16 percent) and all other types of practitioners (8 percent). Since reporting of adverse actions is mandatory only for physicians and dentists, the proportion of reports attributable to these types of practitioners is higher than it would be if adverse action reporting requirements were uniform for all practitioners. State malpractice payment rates and adverse action rates vary widely, but a State's rate in any given year is highly correlated with its rate in any other year. State malpractice rates are not strongly correlated with adverse action rates, neither are the rates for physicians strongly correlated with those for dentists. There is a weak tendency for States with smaller physician populations to have higher levels of licensure and privileging actions.

  9. The National Practitioner Data Bank: the first 4 years.

    PubMed Central

    Oshel, R E; Croft, T; Rodak, J

    1995-01-01

    The National Practitioner Data Bank became operational September 1, 1990, as a flagging system to identify health care practitioners who may have been involved in incidents of medical incompetence. Query volumes have grown substantially over the Data Bank's first 4 years of operation. The greatest increase has come in the number of voluntary queries. By the end of 1994, the Data Bank had processed more than 4.5 million requests for information on practitioners, more than 1.5 million of which were received in 1994 alone. The proportion of queries for which the Data Bank contains information on the practitioner in question has grown as the Data Bank has come to contain more reports. During 1994, 7.9 percent of queries were matched. The Data Bank contained more than 97,500 reports at the end of 1994. More than 82 percent of the reports concerned malpractice payments. Licensure reports made up the bulk of the rest. Physicians predominate in reports, accounting for slightly more than 76 percent of the total. The remainder are related to dentists (16 percent) and all other types of practitioners (8 percent). Since reporting of adverse actions is mandatory only for physicians and dentists, the proportion of reports attributable to these types of practitioners is higher than it would be if adverse action reporting requirements were uniform for all practitioners. State malpractice payment rates and adverse action rates vary widely, but a State's rate in any given year is highly correlated with its rate in any other year. State malpractice rates are not strongly correlated with adverse action rates, neither are the rates for physicians strongly correlated with those for dentists. There is a weak tendency for States with smaller physician populations to have higher levels of licensure and privileging actions. PMID:7638325

  10. Dynamics of hand preference in 4 year-old children.

    PubMed

    Rostoft, M S; Sigmundsson, H; Whiting, H T A; Ingvaldsen, R P

    2002-04-15

    Hand preference in groups of 4 year-old children towards either end of the skill continuum (as determined by the Movement ABC test) was explored by means of a catching task in which the 'direction of approach of the ball' was used as a control parameter within a dynamical systems framework. In Condition 1, the ball direction was systematically scaled in degrees from the right side of the subject to the left and vice versa. In Condition 2, the spatial location of the ball direction was varied randomly, rather than systematically, over the same range as for Condition 1. In both conditions, the two groups of children were shown to switch between hands (from left to right and vice versa) at well-defined positions on the scale. The different scale values obtained when ball direction was scaled from left to right compared with right to left were used to define hysteresis areas. These areas were more extensive and located more to the left of the midline for the group towards the less skilled end of the continuum than for those towards the more skilled end. Additionally, the less-skilled children were shown to use the right hand more to catch the balls delivered to the left side than did the more skilled children. In Condition 3, objects were placed on the table of the ball-delivery apparatus in order to make the catching action more complicated. The less skilled group were shown to use the right hand more than the left hand in all catching positions whereas the more skilled group showed an equal usage of both catching regimes.

  11. The Star Thrust Experiment, rotating magnetic field current drive in the field reversed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth Elric

    2001-11-01

    The Star Thrust Experiment (STX) has formed and sustained the Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) with a Rotating Magnetic Field (RMF) operated at a strength of 25 G and a frequency of 350 kHz. The RMF was generated with two IGBT switched solid state power supplies capable of delivering 2 MW each. Plasmas were typically 2 m long by 0.2m in radius and consisted of fully ionized deuterium at temperatures of 60 eV and peak densities of 5 × 1018m- 3. The primary diagnostic was an extremely small 24 channel berylia jacketed internal magnetic probe that was used to make measurements as a function of time, radius, and axial position. These measurements when combined with the FRC's unique geometry and equilibrium relationships determined many other important plasma parameters. Axial confining fields of 100 G maintained a true vacuum boundary around the plasma and allowed for the study of FRC RMF equilibrium interactions. Key findings are that the RMF maintained a near zero separatrix pressure, penetrated only partially, and drove strong radial and axial flows. Issues discussed include the importance of the RMF driving an axial current distribution consistent with that of the FRC, possible benefits of varying the average beta condition, and potential RMF antenna length limits set by the tendency of driven axial flows to screen the RMF from the plasma.

  12. Demographic consequences of inbreeding and outbreeding in Arnica montana: A field experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luijten, S.H.; Kery, M.; Oostermeijer, J.G.B.; Den, Nijs H.J.C.M.

    2002-01-01

    1. The genetic constitution of populations may significantly affect demography. Founder populations or isolated remnants may show inbreeding depression, while established populations can be strongly adapted to the local environment. Gene exchange between populations can lead to better performance if heterozygosity levels are restored (heterosis), or to reduced performance if coadapted gene complexes are disrupted (outbreeding depression). 2. Five populations of the self-incompatible perennial Arnica montana (Asteraceae) were analysed for the demographic consequences of inbreeding and of intra- and interpopulation outcrossing, using both small and large populations as donors for the latter. We analysed seed production and seed weight and monitored growth, survival and flowering of offspring introduced as seeds and as 4-week-old seedlings in a 4-year field experiment. 3. Reduced seed set after selfing was probably due to the self-incompatibility system rather than to inbreeding depression. There was a significant increase for seed set after interpopulation crosses, which resulted from the alleviation of low mate availability in one of the small populations. 4. Significant inbreeding depression was observed for growth rates of plants introduced as seedlings. We found significant heterosis for flowering probability of plants introduced as seeds, but for plants introduced as seedlings, heterosis for seedling size and flowering probability was only marginally significant. Outbreeding depression was not observed. 5. The results of this study are important for reinforcement measures in small, remnant populations. Significant differences among populations for all measured fitness components suggest that reinforcement is best achieved using material from several populations. 6. The observed higher survival of seedlings as compared with seeds suggests that it is better to plant individuals than to sow. Sowing, however, is easier and cheaper, and was more likely to eliminate

  13. High Magnetic field generation for laser-plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, B B; Froula, D H; Davis, P F; Ross, J S; Fulkerson, S; Bower, J; Satariano, J; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2006-05-01

    An electromagnetic solenoid was developed to study the effect of magnetic fields on electron thermal transport in laser plasmas. The solenoid, which is driven by a pulsed power system suppling 30 kJ, achieves magnetic fields of 13 T. The field strength was measured on the solenoid axis with a magnetic probe and optical Zeeman splitting. The measurements agree well with analytical estimates. A method for optimizing the solenoid design to achieve magnetic fields exceeding 20 T is presented.

  14. Experiments of Flow Field Influenced by Vegetation Distribution on Floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Fu; Wang, Shun-Chang; Chen, Su-Chin

    2015-04-01

    The vegetation on floodplain can block river flow, raise flood level, and scour riverbed downstream the vegetation region. However, it can also protect the dike, reduce flood velocity, and increase the stability of channel. This experiment analyzed the relationship between vegetation distribution and flow field. We designed three vegetation arrangement pattern of unilateral vegetation, unilateral interval vegetation and no vegetation, respectively. The unilateral vegetation was defined as a 4.9 m length and 0.5 m width with vegetative area in one side of the experiment flume. The unilateral interval vegetation was defined as the same dimension of vegetative area but inserted 2 gaps with 1 m interval, and the vegetative area was separated into 3 blocks. The model of a single plant was assembled with stem and frond. The stem was a woody cylinder with 10 cm height and 2.2 cm in diameter. The other part was plastic frond with 10 cm in height. The flume was 20 m length, 1 m width and 0.7 m height with 2 kinds of bed slopes in 0.001 and 0.002, and 3 different discharges in 0.2 m3/s, 0.145 m3/s and 0.0855 m3/s. The velocity was measured by 2-D electromagnetic velocimeter (ACM2-R2). In addition, water depth was measured by Vernier calipers. The velocity distribution showed that the current were divided into two parts. In the part of inside vegetation area, water level uplifted when flow entering the vegetation area, and it declined until the current leaving vegetation area. Compared with the current in the other half part of flume, the magnitudes of uplift were about 50% in both case of unilateral vegetation and unilateral interval vegetation. Downstream the vegetation area edge, the water level dropped immediately and violently. The water depth was shallower than that in the other half non-vegetation part, and the decline magnitude were 48% and 39% in cases of unilateral vegetation and unilateral interval vegetation, respectively. To explain this phenomenon, we measured

  15. Field Experiments Aimed To The Analysis of Flood Generation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriero, D.; Iacobellis, V.; Oliveto, G.; Romano, N.; Telesca, V.; Fiorentino, M.

    The study of the soil moisture dynamics and of the climate-soil-vegetation interac- tion is essential for the comprehension of possible climatic change phenomena, as well as for the analysis of occurrence of extreme hydrological events. In this trend the theoretically-based distribution of floods recently derived by Fiorentino and Ia- cobellis, [ŞNew insights about the climatic and geologic control on the probability distribution of floodsT, Water Resources Research, 2001, 37: 721-730] demonstrated, by an application in some Southern Italy basins, that processes at the hillslope scale strongly influence the basin response by means of the different mechanisms of runoff generation produced by various distributions of partial area contributing. This area is considered as a stochastic variable whose pdf position parameter showed strong de- pendence on the climate as it can seen in the studied basins behavior: in dry zones, where there is the prevalence of the infiltration excess (Horton) mechanism, the basin water loss parameter decreases as basin area increases and the flood peak source area depends on the permeability of soils; in humid zones, with the prevalence of satu- ration excess (Dunne) process, the loss parameter seems independent from the basin area and very sensitive to simple climatic index while only small portion of the area invested by the storm contributes to floods. The purpose of this work is to investigate the consistency of those interpretations by means of field experiments at the hillslope scale to establish a parameterization accounting for soil physical and hydraulic prop- erties, vegetation characteristics and land-use. The research site is the catchment of River Fiumarella di Corleto, which is located in Basilicata Region, Italy, and has a drainage area of approximately 32 km2. The environment has a rather dynamic geo- morphology and very interesting features from the soil-landscape modeling viewpoint [Santini A., A. Coppola, N. Romano, and

  16. Exploring the Role of Field Experience Context in Preservice Teachers' Development as Mathematics Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Sandi; Nesmith, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Although the importance of field experience is supported and attended to by teacher education programs across the United States, there have been numerous national reports and research findings stressing the need for major improvements in the preparation of teachers with an emphasis on more authentic experiences. Quality field experiences have the…

  17. The Examination of a Mentoring Relationship during a Metadiscrete Physical Education Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Glenna G.; Bonnett, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Universities strive to graduate well-rounded individuals with opportunities to gain knowledge in the classroom and experience in the "real world". Therefore, many colleges focus their attention to offering discrete field experiences. However, few universities offer metadiscrete field experiences, with students majoring in exercise science or…

  18. A Field Trip to Gettysburg: A Model Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olcott, Mark S.

    1987-01-01

    Using Gettysburg as an example, the author addresses the major components of a successful field trip, such as pre-teaching, memorizing, and the study of primary sources. Includes information on student participation and other factors of a successful field trip. (GEA)

  19. Social context effects in 2- and 4-year-olds' selective versus faithful imitation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Kushnir, Tamar

    2014-03-01

    This study asked whether children's tendency to imitate selectively (ignore causally unnecessary actions) versus faithfully (overimitate causally unnecessary actions) varies across ages and social contexts. In the first experiment, 2-year-olds and 4-year-olds were randomly assigned to play 1 of 3 prior games with a demonstrator: a mimicry game, an instrumental game, or a noninteractive control game. They then participated in a puzzle-box imitation task in which the demonstrator performed 1 causally necessary and 1 unnecessary action to retrieve an object. Whereas 4-year-olds imitated faithfully across all conditions, 2-year-olds were more likely to imitate faithfully after a mimicry game and to imitate selectively after an instrumental game. Experiment 2 showed no effect of playing a mimicry game with a different experimenter prior to the imitation trials, thus ruling out 2-year-olds' faithful imitation being the result of motor priming or training effects. The results are discussed in terms of children's social affiliation and social-cognitive inferences.

  20. Social context effects in 2- and 4-year-olds' selective versus faithful imitation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Kushnir, Tamar

    2014-03-01

    This study asked whether children's tendency to imitate selectively (ignore causally unnecessary actions) versus faithfully (overimitate causally unnecessary actions) varies across ages and social contexts. In the first experiment, 2-year-olds and 4-year-olds were randomly assigned to play 1 of 3 prior games with a demonstrator: a mimicry game, an instrumental game, or a noninteractive control game. They then participated in a puzzle-box imitation task in which the demonstrator performed 1 causally necessary and 1 unnecessary action to retrieve an object. Whereas 4-year-olds imitated faithfully across all conditions, 2-year-olds were more likely to imitate faithfully after a mimicry game and to imitate selectively after an instrumental game. Experiment 2 showed no effect of playing a mimicry game with a different experimenter prior to the imitation trials, thus ruling out 2-year-olds' faithful imitation being the result of motor priming or training effects. The results are discussed in terms of children's social affiliation and social-cognitive inferences. PMID:23978298

  1. Conditions for Successful Field Experiences: Perceptions of Cooperating Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    In this study I have profiled the background experiences, academic preparation and perceptions of a small number of cooperating teachers in a secondary Professional Development School site about their experiences in successful practice. The results indicate that cooperating teachers have a depth of understanding of their role in the process and…

  2. Sensitivity of 4-Year-Olds to Featural and Second-Order Relational Changes in Face Distinctiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKone, Elinor; Boyer, Barbara L.

    2006-01-01

    Sensitivity to adult ratings of facial distinctiveness (how much an individual stands out in a crowd) has been demonstrated previously in children age 5 years or older. Experiment 1 extended this result to 4-year-olds using a "choose the more distinctive face" task. Children's patterns of choice across item pairs also correlated well with those of…

  3. How Do Symbols Affect 3- to 4-Year-Olds' Executive Function? Evidence from a Reverse-Contingency Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apperly, Ian A.; Carroll, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    In two experiments, 330 3- to 4-year-olds competed for stickers in a game in which the optimal response strategy was to point to an empty box that their opponent would receive in order to obtain a baited box for themselves. When the baited box contained stickers, children showed a strong tendency to point at the baited box and therefore lose the…

  4. Integrating Research-Informed Teaching within an Undergraduate Level 4 (Year 1) Diagnostic Radiography Curriculum: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Robert; Hogg, Peter; Robinson, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the piloting and evaluation of the Research-informed Teaching experience (RiTe) project. The aim of RiTe was to link teaching and learning with research within an undergraduate diagnostic radiography curriculum. A preliminary pilot study of RiTe was undertaken with a group of level 4 (year 1) volunteer BSc (Hons) diagnostic…

  5. Changes in Health Care Spending and Quality 4 Years into Global Payment

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zirui; Rose, Sherri; Safran, Dana G.; Landon, Bruce E.; Day, Matthew P.; Chernew, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Spending and quality under global budgets remain unknown beyond 2 years. We evaluated spending and quality measures during the first 4 years of the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Alternative Quality Contract (AQC). METHODS We compared spending and quality among enrollees whose physician organizations entered the AQC from 2009 through 2012 with those among persons in control states. We studied spending changes according to year, category of service, site of care, experience managing risk contracts, and price versus utilization. We evaluated process and outcome quality. RESULTS In the 2009 AQC cohort, medical spending on claims grew an average of $62.21 per enrollee per quarter less than it did in the control cohort over the 4-year period (P<0.001). This amount is equivalent to a 6.8% savings when calculated as a proportion of the average post-AQC spending level in the 2009 AQC cohort. Analogously, the 2010, 2011, and 2012 cohorts had average savings of 8.8% (P<0.001), 9.1% (P<0.001), and 5.8% (P = 0.04), respectively, by the end of 2012. Claims savings were concentrated in the outpatient-facility setting and in procedures, imaging, and tests, explained by both reduced prices and reduced utilization. Claims savings were exceeded by incentive payments to providers during the period from 2009 through 2011 but exceeded incentive payments in 2012, generating net savings. Improvements in quality among AQC cohorts generally exceeded those seen elsewhere in New England and nationally. CONCLUSIONS As compared with similar populations in other states, Massachusetts AQC enrollees had lower spending growth and generally greater quality improvements after 4 years. Although other factors in Massachusetts may have contributed, particularly in the later part of the study period, global budget contracts with quality incentives may encourage changes in practice patterns that help reduce spending and improve quality. (Funded by the Commonwealth Fund and others

  6. Missile launch detection electric field perturbation experiment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, R.J.; Rynne, T.M.

    1993-04-28

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and SARA Inc. participated in the ATMD missile launch activities that occurred at WSMR during January 1993. LLNL and SARA deployed sensors for monitoring of basic phenomena. An attempt was made to measure perturbations of the earth geo-potential during the launch of a Lance missile. The occurrence of the perturbation is expected from the conducting body of the missile and the exhaust plume. A set of voltage-probe antennas were used to monitor the local electric field perturbation from the launch at ranges of approximately 1 km. Examination of the data acquired during the launch period failed to show identifiable correlation of the field variations with the launch event. Three reasons are ascribed to this lack of event data: (1) The electric field potential variations have a limited spatial correlation length - the fields measured in one region have little correlation to measurements made at distances of a kilometer away. The potential variations are related to localized atmospheric disturbances and are generally unpredictable. A value for the spatial correlation length is also not known. (2) The conductivity of the plume and missile body are not adequate to produce a field perturbation of adequate magnitude. Phenomena related to the exhaust plume and missile may exist and be outside of the collection range of the equipment employed for these measurements. (3) The presence of 60 Hz power line noise was of sufficient magnitude to irreversibly contaminate measurements.

  7. Taking Them into the Field: Mathematics Teacher Candidate Learning about Equity-Oriented Teaching Practices in a Mediated Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Sara Sunshine

    2012-01-01

    Teacher education programs have been criticized as too theoretical with university courses disconnected from the practical realities of classrooms. This single case study investigates a model of teacher education that worked to bridge the coursework-fieldwork gap in teacher education. The Mediated Field Experience (MFE) is a field experience…

  8. Near-field radiative thermal transport: From theory to experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bai Fiorino, Anthony; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2015-05-15

    Radiative thermal transport via the fluctuating electromagnetic near-field has recently attracted increasing attention due to its fundamental importance and its impact on a range of applications from data storage to thermal management and energy conversion. After a brief historical account of radiative thermal transport, we summarize the basics of fluctuational electrodynamics, a theoretical framework for the study of radiative heat transfer in terms of thermally excited propagating and evanescent electromagnetic waves. Various approaches to modeling near-field thermal transport are briefly discussed, together with key results and proposals for manipulation and utilization of radiative heat flow. Subsequently, we review the experimental advances in the characterization of both near-field heat flow and energy density. We conclude with remarks on the opportunities and challenges for future explorations of radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale.

  9. [Application of variable magnetic fields in medicine--15 years experience].

    PubMed

    Sieroń, Aleksander; Cieślar, Grzegorz

    2003-01-01

    The results of 15-year own experimental and clinical research on application of variable magnetic fields in medicine were presented. In experimental studies analgesic effect (related to endogenous opioid system and nitrogen oxide activity) and regenerative effect of variable magnetic fields with therapeutical parameters was observed. The influence of this fields on enzymatic and hormonal activity, free oxygen radicals, carbohydrates, protein and lipid metabolism, dielectric and rheological properties of blood as well as behavioural reactions and activity of central dopamine receptor in experimental animals was proved. In clinical studies high therapeutic efficacy of magnetotherapy and magnetostimulation in the treatment of osteoarthrosis, abnormal ossification, osteoporosis, nasosinusitis, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, spastic paresis, diabetic polyneuropathy and retinopathy, vegetative neurosis, peptic ulcers, colon irritable and trophic ulcers was confirmed. PMID:15049208

  10. Electromagnetic fields radiated from electrostatic discharges: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Perry F.; Ondrejka, Arthur R.; Ma, Mark T.; Ladbury, John M.

    1988-02-01

    The fields radiated by electrostatic discharges (ESD) are studied both theoretically and experimentally. The ESD spark is modeled theoretically as an electrically short, time dependent, linear dipole situated above an infinite ground plane. Experimentally, sparks of varying voltages are generated by a commercially available simulator and used to excite a number of targets including: (1) the extended inner conductor of a coaxial cable mounted in a ground plane, (2) direct discharges to a ground plane, (3) indirect radiation from a large metal plate, (4) a metal chair over a a ground plane, and (5) a metal trash can. Results show that relatively low-voltage sparks (2 to 4 kV) excite the strongest radiated fields. This suggests that the spark fields can pose a significant interference threat to electronic equipment into the gigahertz range.

  11. It is an Experience, Not a Lesson: The Nature of High School Students' Experiences at a Biological Field Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, Marc E.

    The purpose of this case study was to describe the nature of high school students' experiences in the immersive four-day field experience at Stone Laboratory Biological Field Station including excursions to Kelley's Island and South Bass Island. Six tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grade students participated through interviews, photovoice, observations, and a survey. Pretrip semi-structured interviews were conducted to understand each participant student's relationship with science. Participants were given cameras to record their field trip experiences to relate what they found interesting, important, and exciting. Back at school after the field trip, the participants were asked to choose their five most meaningful photographs, and write a short essay to describe the significance of each image. A posttrip semi-structured interview explored each participant's experiences during the field trip. An unstructured interview was conducted to discuss each participant's full photograph gallery from the field trip. Interview transcripts were member checked with one minor wording change. Analysis consisted of open coding using apriori codes derived from the ecological framework and emergent codes derived from the data. Coding was duplicated through multiple readers. Significant findings included: 1) Prior experience, prior knowledge, and funds of knowledge added relevance and value to an experience, facilitating interest development; 2) Experiences appeared to be more meaningful when all the senses were stimulated; 3) Friends and peers were an essential part of a quality experience; 4) Quality experiences included a wow factor, or sudden awareness; 5) Teachers needed to be within the experience, not the focus of the experience, and needed to be available to answer questions, be enthusiastic when a discovery was made, and promote student reflection concerning their perceptions and discoveries; 6) A quality informal learning situation incorporated the cognitive/affective, physical

  12. International Field Experiences: The Impact of Class, Gender and Race on the Perceptions and Experiences of Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malewski, Erik; Phillion, JoAnn

    2009-01-01

    We explore ways class, gender and race complicate perceptions and experiences of preservice teachers during an international field experience in Honduras. Data were collected over 5 years through observations, group discussions, course assignments, and on-site focus group interviews and post-trip individual interviews. An inductive approach…

  13. Insights Gained From 4 Years of EOSDIS User Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, J.; Boquist, C. L.

    2007-12-01

    The Earth Observation System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is a large, complex data system currently supporting over 18 operational NASA satellite missions including the flagship EOS missions: Terra, Aqua, and Aura. A critical underpinning for management of EOSDIS is developing a thorough knowledge of the EOSDIS user community and how they use the EOSDIS products in their research. It is important to know whether the system is meeting the users' needs and expectations. Thus, in 2004 NASA commissioned a comprehensive survey to determine user satisfaction using the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) approach. NASA has continued to survey users yearly since. Users continue to rate EOSDIS systems and services highly as the EOSDIS ACSI score has outperformed both the averages for U.S. companies and for Federal Agencies. In addition, users' comments have provided valuable insight into the effect of data center processes on users' experiences. Although their satisfaction has remained high, their preferences have changed with the rapid advances in web-based services. We now have four years of data on user satisfaction from these surveys. The results of each survey highlight areas that, if improved, could lead to increased user satisfaction, including overall product quality, product documentation, and product selection and ordering processes. This paper will present the survey results and how they compare from year to year.

  14. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, W.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective eld theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering or current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral di*erences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  15. Focus on Geography--Team Themes and Field Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, John L.

    1990-01-01

    Describes an approach used by the Wayland, Massachusetts, middle school to organizing students into instructional teams. Explains that each instructional team is organized into a "house" named after a significant individual around whom the curriculum and theme for field trips is designed. Highlights the Rachel Carson House activities of learning…

  16. Early disaster response in Haiti: the Israeli field hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Kreiss, Yitshak; Merin, Ofer; Peleg, Kobi; Levy, Gad; Vinker, Shlomo; Sagi, Ram; Abargel, Avi; Bartal, Carmi; Lin, Guy; Bar, Ariel; Bar-On, Elhanan; Schwaber, Mitchell J; Ash, Nachman

    2010-07-01

    The earthquake that struck Haiti in January 2010 caused an estimated 230,000 deaths and injured approximately 250,000 people. The Israel Defense Forces Medical Corps Field Hospital was fully operational on site only 89 hours after the earthquake struck and was capable of providing sophisticated medical care. During the 10 days the hospital was operational, its staff treated 1111 patients, hospitalized 737 patients, and performed 244 operations on 203 patients. The field hospital also served as a referral center for medical teams from other countries that were deployed in the surrounding areas. The key factor that enabled rapid response during the early phase of the disaster from a distance of 6000 miles was a well-prepared and trained medical unit maintained on continuous alert. The prompt deployment of advanced-capability field hospitals is essential in disaster relief, especially in countries with minimal medical infrastructure. The changing medical requirements of people in an earthquake zone dictate that field hospitals be designed to operate with maximum flexibility and versatility regarding triage, staff positioning, treatment priorities, and hospitalization policies. Early coordination with local administrative bodies is indispensable.

  17. Pioneer 10 and 11 (Jupiter and Saturn) magnetic field experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Magnet field data obtained by the vector helium magnetometer (VHM) during the encounters of Jupiter (Pioneer 10 and 11) and Saturn (Pioneer 11) was analyzed and interpreted. The puzzling characteristics of the Jovian and Saturnian magnetospheric magnetic fields were studied. An apparent substorm (including thinning of the dayside tail current sheet) was observed at Jupiter, as well as evidence suggesting that at the magnetopause the cusp is at an abnormally low latitude. The characteristics of Saturn's ring current as observed by Pioneer 11 were dramatically different from those suggested by the Voyager observations. Most importantly, very strong perturbations in the azimuthal ring current magnetic field suggest that the plane of the ring was not in the dipole equatorial plane, being tilted 5 to 10 deg. relative to the dipole and undergoing significant changes during the encounter. When these changing currents were corrected for, an improved planetary field determination was obtained. In addition, the ring and azimuthal currents at Saturn displayed significantly different time dependences.

  18. The Field Trip Book: Study Travel Experiences in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ronald V.

    2010-01-01

    Looking for social studies adventures to help students find connections to democratic citizenship? Look no further! This book provides just the answer teachers need for engaging students in field trips as researching learners with emphasis on interdisciplinary social studies plus skills in collecting and reporting data gathered from field…

  19. Mechanisms of nitrogen retention in forest ecosystems - A field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitousek, P. M.; Matson, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    Intensive forest management led to elevated losses of nitrogen from a recently harvested loblolly pine plantation in North Carolina. Measurements of nitrogen-15 retention in the field demonstrated that microbial uptake of nitrogen during the decomposition of residual organic material was the most important process retaining nitrogen. Management practices that remove this material cause increased losses of nitrogen to aquatic ecosystems and the atmosphere.

  20. Early Field Experience in Career and Technical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smalley, Scott Walter

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the three studies in this dissertation was to enhance career and technical education in the area of agriculture, business, and family and consumer sciences. This dissertation contains three papers: (1) a Delphi study identifying the purpose, expected outcomes, and methods of documenting preservice teacher early field experience…

  1. Validation of microwave vegetation indices using field experiment data sets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation indices are valuable in many fields of geosciences. Conventional, visible-near infrared, indices are often limited by the effects of atmosphere, background soil conditions, and saturation at high levels of vegetation. A recent study established the theoretical basis for a new type of inde...

  2. Soil Science as a Field Discipline - Experiences in Iowa, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burras, C. Lee

    2015-04-01

    Effective field understanding of soils is crucial. This is true everywhere but especially so in Iowa, a 15 million hectare state in the central USA's "corn belt." Iowa is intensely farmed and almost exclusively privately owned. Many regions of Iowa have had over 90% of their land area in row crops for the past 60 years. In these regions two very common land management strategies are tile drainage (1.5 million km total) and high rates of fertilization (e.g., 200 kg N/ha-yr for cropland) Iowa also has problematic environmental issues including high rates of erosion, excessive sediment and nutrient pollution in water bodies and episodic catastrophic floods. Given the preceding the Agronomy, Environmental Science and Sustainable Agriculture programs at Iowa State University (ISU) offer a strong suite of soil science classes - undergraduate through graduate. The objective of this presentation is to review selected field based soil science courses offered by those programs. This review includes contrasting and comparing campus-based and immersion classes. Immersion classes include ones offered at Iowa Lakeside Laboratory, as "soil judging" and internationally. Findings over the past 20 years are consistent. Students at all levels gain soil science knowledge, competency and confidence proportional to the amount of time spent in field activities. Furthermore their professional skepticism is sharpened. They are also preferentially hired even in career postings that do not require fieldwork. In other words, field learning results in better soil science professionals who have highly functional and sought after knowledge.

  3. Global meteorological data facility for real-time field experiments support and guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipham, Mark C.; Shipley, Scott T.; Trepte, Charles R.

    1988-01-01

    A Global Meteorological Data Facility (GMDF) has been constructed to provide economical real-time meteorological support to atmospheric field experiments. After collection and analysis of meteorological data sets at a central station, tailored meteorological products are transmitted to experiment field sites using conventional ground link or satellite communication techniques. The GMDF supported the Global Tropospheric Experiment Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (GTE-ABLE II) based in Manaus, Brazil, during July and August 1985; an arctic airborne lidar survey mission for the Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSC) experiment during January 1986; and the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE) during January, February and March 1986. GMDF structure is similar to the UNIDATA concept, including meteorological data from the Zephyr Weather Transmission Service, a mode AAA GOES downlink, and dedicated processors for image manipulation, transmission and display. The GMDF improved field experiment operations in general, with the greatest benefits arising from the ability to communicate with field personnel in real time.

  4. Laboratory Experiment in Semiconductor Surface-Field Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, F. R.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    A laboratory instructional program involving metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) devices is described. In the first of a two-part experiment, students become familiar with the important parameters of a simple MIS device and learn measurement techniques; in the second part, device fabrication procedures are learned. (DT)

  5. Well-planning programs give students field-like experience

    SciTech Connect

    Sifferman, T.R.; Chapman, L.

    1983-01-01

    The University of Tulsa recently was given a package of computer well planning and drilling programs that will enable petroleum engineering students to gain valuable experience in designing well programs while still in school. Comprehensive homework assignments are now given in areas of drilling fluids programing, hydraulics, directional wells and surveying. Additional programs are scheduled for next semester.

  6. Coordinating Field Experience and Externships at the Rural University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donald, Ralph R.

    1998-01-01

    Examines two topics related to the mass media internship experience: realities and strategies related to internship coordination in the rural, isolated university setting; and the value and potential on broadcasting and mass communication curricula for the "externship" (a one-day activity in which a student "shadows" a media professional for a…

  7. International Field Experiences Promote Professional Development for Sustainability Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, R. Bruce; Kimmel, Courtney; Robertson, David P.; Mortimer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe, explain and evaluate a graduate education program that provides international project experiences and builds competencies related to collaborative problem-solving, cultural capacity to work globally and sustainable development. Design/methodology/approach: Qualitative analysis of survey data from 28 students…

  8. Visual access trumps gender in 3- and 4-year-old children's endorsement of testimony.

    PubMed

    Terrier, Nathalie; Bernard, Stéphane; Mercier, Hugo; Clément, Fabrice

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have investigated how preschoolers weigh social cues against epistemic cues when taking testimony into account. For instance, one study showed that 4- and 5-year-olds preferred to endorse the testimony of an informant who had the same gender as the children; by contrast, when the gender cue conflicted with an epistemic cue--past reliability--the latter trumped the former. None of the previous studies, however, has shown that 3-year-olds can prioritize an epistemic cue over a social cue. In Experiment 1, we offer the first demonstration that 3-year-olds favor testimony from a same-gender informant in the absence of other cues. In Experiments 2 and 3, an epistemic cue-visual access--was introduced. In those experiments, 3- and 4-year-olds endorsed the testimony of the informant with visual access regardless of whether it was a same-gender informant (Experiment 3) or a different-gender informant (Experiment 2). These results demonstrate that 3-year-olds are able to give more weight to an epistemic cue than to a social cue when evaluating testimony.

  9. Rocky 7 prototype Mars rover field geology experiments 1. Lavic Lake and sunshine volcanic field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arvidson, R. E.; Acton, C.; Blaney, D.; Bowman, J.; Kim, S.; Klingelhofer, G.; Marshall, J.; Niebur, C.; Plescia, J.; Saunders, R.S.; Ulmer, C.T.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments with the Rocky 7 rover were performed in the Mojave Desert to better understand how to conduct rover-based, long-distance (kilometers) geological traverses on Mars. The rover was equipped with stereo imaging systems for remote sensing science and hazard avoidance and 57Fe Mo??ssbauer and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers for in situ determination of mineralogy of unprepared rock and soil surfaces. Laboratory data were also obtained using the spectrometers and an X ray diffraction (XRD)/XRF instrument for unprepared samples collected from the rover sites. Simulated orbital and descent image data assembled for the test sites were found to be critical for assessing the geologic setting, formulating hypotheses to be tested with rover observations, planning traverses, locating the rover, and providing a regional context for interpretation of rover-based observations. Analyses of remote sensing and in situ observations acquired by the rover confirmed inferences made from orbital and simulated descent images that the Sunshine Volcanic Field is composed of basalt flows. Rover data confirmed the idea that Lavic Lake is a recharge playa and that an alluvial fan composed of sediments with felsic compositions has prograded onto the playa. Rover-based discoveries include the inference that the basalt flows are mantled with aeolian sediment and covered with a dense pavement of varnished basalt cobbles. Results demonstrate that the combination of rover remote sensing and in situ analytical observations will significantly increase our understanding of Mars and provide key connecting links between orbital and descent data and analyses of returned samples. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Field experiment of lignosulfonate preflushing for surfactant adsorption reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, S.A. ); Bae, J.H. )

    1990-11-01

    Lignosulfonate was field tested as a sacrificial adsorbate in conjunction with the ongoing Glenn Pool surfactant flood expansion project. A 2 wt% lignosulfonate solution was injected for 10 days as part of the preflush in this project. Results of the analyses of two observation well samples are interpreted for the effect of lignosulfonate on sulfonate absorption and process performance. Even though the evidence was ambiguous, the authors conclude that the low-cost lignosulfonate preflushing was beneficial to surfactant flooding.

  11. Difficult Airway Management in Field Conditions: Somalia Experience.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Ahmet Selim; Nasır, Serdar Nazif

    2015-10-01

    Difficult airway is defined as having the patient's mask ventilation or difficult tracheal intubation of an experienced anaesthesiologist. A number of reasons, such as congenital or acquired anatomical anomalies, can cause difficult intubation and difficult ventilation. Keeping all equipment ready for airway management of patients will reduce mortality and complications. In this case, it is intended that the submission of difficult airway management who encountered in mandibular reconstruction for mandible bone defect repairing with reconstruction plates before at the field conditions in Somalia.

  12. Overview of results from the MST reversed field pinch experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarff, J. S.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, J. K.; Borchardt, M.; Cappechi, W.; Carmody, D.; Caspary, K.; Chapman, B. E.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Duff, J.; Eilerman, S.; Falkowski, A.; Forest, C. B.; Galante, M.; Goetz, J. A.; Holly, D. J.; Koliner, J.; Kumar, S.; Lee, J. D.; Liu, D.; McCollam, K. J.; McGarry, M.; Mirnov, V. V.; Morton, L.; Munaretto, S.; Nornberg, M. D.; Nonn, P. D.; Oliva, S. P.; Parke, E.; Pueschel, M. J.; Reusch, J. A.; Sauppe, J.; Seltzman, A.; Sovinec, C. R.; Stone, D.; Theucks, D.; Thomas, M.; Triana, J.; Terry, P. W.; Waksman, J.; Whelan, G. C.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L.; Demers, D. R.; Fimognari, P.; Titus, J.; Auriemma, F.; Cappello, S.; Franz, P.; Innocente, P.; Lorenzini, R.; Martines, E.; Momo, B.; Piovesan, P.; Puiatti, M.; Spolaore, M.; Terranova, D.; Zanca, P.; Davydenko, V. I.; Deichuli, P.; Ivanov, A. A.; Polosatkin, S.; Stupishin, N. V.; Spong, D.; Craig, D.; Stephens, H.; Harvey, R. W.; Cianciosa, M.; Hanson, J. D.; Breizman, B. N.; Li, M.; Zheng, L. J.

    2015-10-01

    An overview of recent results from the MST reversed field pinch programme is presented. With neutral beam injection, bursty energetic particle (EP) modes are observed. The profiles of the magnetic and density fluctuations associated with these EP modes are measured using a far infrared interferometer-polarimeter. Equilibrium reconstructions of the quasi-single-helicity 3D helical state are provided by the V3FIT code that now incorporates several of MST's advanced diagnostics. The orientation of the helical structure is controlled using a new resonant magnetic perturbation technique. Gyrokinetic simulations based on experimental equilibria predict unstable trapped-electron modes (TEMs), and small-scale density fluctuations are detected in improved-confinement plasmas with TEM-like features. Upgraded pellet injection permits study of density and beta limits over MST's full range of operation, and an MST-record line-average density of 0.9 × 1020 m3 (n/nG = 1.4) has been obtained. Impurity ion temperature measurements reveal a charge-to-mass-ratio dependence in the rapid heating that occurs during a sawtooth crash. Runaway of NBI-born fast ions during the impulsive sawtooth event agrees with test-particle theory. Magnetic self-organization studies include measurements of the dynamo emf with an applied ac inductive electric field using oscillating field current drive.

  13. Vegetation and soils field research data base: Experiment summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biehl, L. L.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Understanding of the relationships between the optical, spectral characteristics and important biological-physical parameters of earth-surface features can best be obtained by carefully controlled studies over fields and plots where complete data describing the condition of targets are attainable and where frequent, timely spectral measurement can be obtained. Development of a vegetation and soils field research data base was initiated in 1972 at Purdue University's Laboratory for Applications of Remote Sensing and expanded in the fall of 1974 by NASA as part of LACIE. Since then, over 250,000 truck-mounted and helicopter-borne spectrometer/multiband radiometer observations have been obtained of more than 50 soil series and 20 species of crops, grasses, and trees. These data are supplemented by an extensive set of biophysical and meteorological data acquired during each mission. The field research data form one of the most complete and best-documented data sets acquired for agricultural remote sensing research. Thus, they are well-suited to serve as a data base for research to: (1) quantiatively determine the relationships of spectral and biophysical characteristics of vegetation, (2) define future sensor systems, and (3) develop advanced data analysis techniques.

  14. Field experiments of success-breeds-success dynamics

    PubMed Central

    van de Rijt, Arnout; Kang, Soong Moon; Restivo, Michael; Patil, Akshay

    2014-01-01

    Seemingly similar individuals often experience drastically different success trajectories, with some repeatedly failing and others consistently succeeding. One explanation is preexisting variability along unobserved fitness dimensions that is revealed gradually through differential achievement. Alternatively, positive feedback operating on arbitrary initial advantages may increasingly set apart winners from losers, producing runaway inequality. To identify social feedback in human reward systems, we conducted randomized experiments by intervening in live social environments across the domains of funding, status, endorsement, and reputation. In each system we consistently found that early success bestowed upon arbitrarily selected recipients produced significant improvements in subsequent rates of success compared with the control group of nonrecipients. However, success exhibited decreasing marginal returns, with larger initial advantages failing to produce much further differentiation. These findings suggest a lesser degree of vulnerability of reward systems to incidental or fabricated advantages and a more modest role for cumulative advantage in the explanation of social inequality than previously thought. PMID:24778230

  15. Field experiments of success-breeds-success dynamics.

    PubMed

    van de Rijt, Arnout; Kang, Soong Moon; Restivo, Michael; Patil, Akshay

    2014-05-13

    Seemingly similar individuals often experience drastically different success trajectories, with some repeatedly failing and others consistently succeeding. One explanation is preexisting variability along unobserved fitness dimensions that is revealed gradually through differential achievement. Alternatively, positive feedback operating on arbitrary initial advantages may increasingly set apart winners from losers, producing runaway inequality. To identify social feedback in human reward systems, we conducted randomized experiments by intervening in live social environments across the domains of funding, status, endorsement, and reputation. In each system we consistently found that early success bestowed upon arbitrarily selected recipients produced significant improvements in subsequent rates of success compared with the control group of nonrecipients. However, success exhibited decreasing marginal returns, with larger initial advantages failing to produce much further differentiation. These findings suggest a lesser degree of vulnerability of reward systems to incidental or fabricated advantages and a more modest role for cumulative advantage in the explanation of social inequality than previously thought. PMID:24778230

  16. Outdoor field experience with autonomous RPC based stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, L.; Assis, P.; Blanco, A.; Carolino, N.; Cerda, M. A.; Conceição, R.; Cunha, O.; Ferreira, M.; Fonte, P.; Luz, R.; Mendes, L.; Pereira, A.; Pimenta, M.; Sarmento, R.; Tomé, B.

    2016-09-01

    In the last two decades Resistive Plate Chambers were employed in the Cosmic Ray Experiments COVER-PLASTEX and ARGO/YBJ. In both experiments the detectors were housed indoors, likely owing to gas distribution requirements and the need to control environment variables that directly affect RPCs operational stability. But in experiments where Extended Air Shower (EAS) sampling is necessary, large area arrays composed by dispersed stations are deployed, rendering this kind of approach impossible. In this situation, it would be mandatory to have detectors that could be deployed in small standalone stations, with very rare opportunities for maintenance, and with good resilience to environmental conditions. Aiming to meet these requirements, we started some years ago the development of RPCs for Autonomous Stations. The results from indoor tests and measurements were very promising, both concerning performance and stability under very low gas flow rate, which is the main requirement for Autonomous Stations. In this work we update the indoor results and show the first ones concerning outdoor stable operation. In particular, a dynamic adjustment of the high voltage is applied to keep gas gain constant.

  17. The Dilemma of Field Experience Assessment: Enhancing Professional Development or Fulfilling a Gate-Keeping Function?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, May May-hung; Tang, Sylvia Yee-fan

    2008-01-01

    The field experience component in a teacher education programme serves both a gate-keeping function and a formative purpose that supports student teacher development. The authors were members of a research team which took care of the re-design of the assessment instrument for the field experience component of a teacher education programme, as well…

  18. Life on the Reservation: Cross-Cultural Field Experiences and Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Belinda Conrad; Dinkins, Elizabeth G.

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-first century classrooms are filled with increasingly diverse student populations. Effective teacher preparation programs must include explicit course work in culturally responsive pedagogies and field experiences that place educators in new sociocultural contexts. Field experiences in cross-cultural, place-based settings have the potential…

  19. The Influence of Technology-Rich Early Childhood Field Experiences on Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lux, Nicholas; Lux, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Despite a comprehensive body of research on field experiences in teacher education, technology-rich early field experiences in early childhood environments is one particular area of inquiry lacking substantive current research. Therefore, this study was conducted to better understand how preservice teachers' perceptions of global concepts related…

  20. Community-Based Field Experiences in Teacher Education: Possibilities for a Pedagogical Third Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallman, Heidi L.

    2012-01-01

    The present article discusses the importance of community-based field experiences as a feature of teacher education programs. Through a qualitative case study, prospective teachers' work with homeless youth in an after-school initiative is presented. Framing community-based field experiences in teacher education through "third space" theory, the…

  1. Which Field Experiences Best Prepare Future School Leaders? An Analysis of Kentucky's Principal Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodson, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of field experiences in preparing school principals for the exigencies of the job. Current school principals throughout Kentucky were surveyed regarding their perceptions of the utility and comparative effectiveness of field experiences in the principal preparation program (PPP) each attended. Surveys were…

  2. Using Field Experiments to Change the Template of How We Teach Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    List, John A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author explains why field experiments can improve what we teach and how we teach economics. Economists no longer operate as passive observers of economic phenomena. Instead, they participate actively in the research process by collecting data from field experiments to investigate the economics of everyday life. This change can…

  3. Examining the Content of Preservice Teachers' Reflections of Early Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an exploratory study that examined the content of preservice elementary teachers' reflections of their documented early field experiences of science teaching in authentic contexts. The study used an early field experience model that was focused on the objective of profiling an elementary science teacher as the practical…

  4. The Effects of Primary Sources and Field Trip Experience on the Knowledge Retention of Multicultural Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, James; Knapp, Doug; Benton, Gregory M.

    2007-01-01

    Although small in scope, this study attempted to analyze the impacts of primary sources and field trip experiences on multicultural education through first-hand narrative interviews, one year after the experience. In particular, it assessed the recollections of students who participated in a one-half-day field trip to George Washington Carver…

  5. Developing a Performance Base for Field Experiences: A Grass Roots Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritt, Daniel L.

    Following a brief investigation of the need for performance objectives specifying teacher behavior, this report develops a performance base for field experience. The purpose of performance objectives in field experiences and the relationship of these objectives to the student teacher, cooperating teacher, and university supervisor are discussed in…

  6. Impact of a Paid Urban Field Experience on Teacher Candidates' Willingness to Work in Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grande, Marya; Burns, Barbara; Schmidt, Raquel; Marable, Michele A.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a paid field experience designed to investigate teacher candidates' willingness to teach in urban schools. Seventy-three teacher candidates each participated in an urban field experience including 90 hours of tutoring and 12 hours of training. Data from pre and post surveys indicated no significant difference as the number…

  7. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R. P.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-04-08

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  8. Investigation of 4-year-old stabilised/solidified and accelerated carbonated contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Antemir, A; Hills, C D; Carey, P J; Magnié, M-C; Polettini, A

    2010-09-15

    The investigation of the pilot-scale application of two different stabilisation/solidification (S/S) techniques was carried out at a former fireworks and low explosives manufacturing site in SE England. Cores and granular samples were recovered from uncovered accelerated carbonated (ACT) and cement-treated soils (S/S) after 4 years to evaluate field-performance with time. Samples were prepared for microstructural examination and leaching testing. The results indicated that the cement-treated soil was progressively carbonated over time, whereas the mineralogy of the carbonated soil remained essentially unchanged. Distinct microstructures were developed in the two soils. Although Pb, Zn and Cu leached less from the carbonated soil, these metals were adequately immobilised by both treatments. Geochemical modeling of pH-dependent leaching data suggested that the retention of trace metals resulted from different immobilisation mechanisms operating in the two soils examined. PMID:20579807

  9. Investigation of 4-year-old stabilised/solidified and accelerated carbonated contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Antemir, A; Hills, C D; Carey, P J; Magnié, M-C; Polettini, A

    2010-09-15

    The investigation of the pilot-scale application of two different stabilisation/solidification (S/S) techniques was carried out at a former fireworks and low explosives manufacturing site in SE England. Cores and granular samples were recovered from uncovered accelerated carbonated (ACT) and cement-treated soils (S/S) after 4 years to evaluate field-performance with time. Samples were prepared for microstructural examination and leaching testing. The results indicated that the cement-treated soil was progressively carbonated over time, whereas the mineralogy of the carbonated soil remained essentially unchanged. Distinct microstructures were developed in the two soils. Although Pb, Zn and Cu leached less from the carbonated soil, these metals were adequately immobilised by both treatments. Geochemical modeling of pH-dependent leaching data suggested that the retention of trace metals resulted from different immobilisation mechanisms operating in the two soils examined.

  10. Stochastic analysis of a field-scale unsaturated transport experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severino, G.; Comegna, A.; Coppola, A.; Sommella, A.; Santini, A.

    2010-10-01

    Modelling of field-scale transport of chemicals is of deep interest to public as well as private sectors, and it represents an area of active theoretical research in many environmentally-based disciplines. However, the experimental data needed to validate field-scale transport models are very limited due to the numerous logistic difficulties that one faces out. In the present paper, the migration of a tracer (Cl -) was monitored during its movement in the unsaturated zone beneath the surface of 8 m × 50 m sandy soil. Under flux-controlled, steady-state water flow ( Jw = 10 mm/day) was achieved by bidaily sprinkler irrigation. A pulse of 105 g/m 2 KCl was applied uniformly to the surface, and subsequently leached downward by the same (chloride-free) flux Jw over the successive two months. Chloride concentration monitoring was carried out in seven measurement campaigns (each one corresponding to a given time) along seven (parallel) transects. The mass recovery was near 100%, therefore underlining the very good-quality of the concentration data-set. The chloride concentrations are used to test two field-scale models of unsaturated transport: (i) the Advection-Dispersion Equation (ADE), which models transport far from the zone of solute entry, and (ii) the Stochastic- Convective Log- normal (CLT) transfer function model, which instead accounts for transport near the release zone. Both the models provided an excellent representation of the solute spreading at z > 0.45 m (being z = 0.45 m the calibration depth). As a consequence, by the depth z ≈ 50 cm one can regard transport as Fickian. The ADE model dramatically underestimates solute spreading at shallow depths. This is due to the boundary effects which are not captured by the ADE. The CLT model appears to be a more robust tool to mimic transport at every depth.

  11. A full field, 3-D velocimeter for microgravity crystallization experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodkey, Robert S.; Russ, Keith M.

    1991-01-01

    The programming and algorithms needed for implementing a full-field, 3-D velocimeter for laminar flow systems and the appropriate hardware to fully implement this ultimate system are discussed. It appears that imaging using a synched pair of video cameras and digitizer boards with synched rails for camera motion will provide a viable solution to the laminar tracking problem. The algorithms given here are simple, which should speed processing. On a heavily loaded VAXstation 3100 the particle identification can take 15 to 30 seconds, with the tracking taking less than one second. It seeems reasonable to assume that four image pairs can thus be acquired and analyzed in under one minute.

  12. Difficult Airway Management in Field Conditions: Somalia Experience.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Ahmet Selim; Nasır, Serdar Nazif

    2015-10-01

    Difficult airway is defined as having the patient's mask ventilation or difficult tracheal intubation of an experienced anaesthesiologist. A number of reasons, such as congenital or acquired anatomical anomalies, can cause difficult intubation and difficult ventilation. Keeping all equipment ready for airway management of patients will reduce mortality and complications. In this case, it is intended that the submission of difficult airway management who encountered in mandibular reconstruction for mandible bone defect repairing with reconstruction plates before at the field conditions in Somalia. PMID:27366527

  13. Targeting the Poor: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Alatas, Vivi; Banerjee, Abhijit; Hanna, Rema; Olken, Benjamin A; Tobias, Julia

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports an experiment in 640 Indonesian villages on three approaches to target the poor: proxy-means tests (PMT), where assets are used to predict consumption; community targeting, where villagers rank everyone from richest to poorest; and a hybrid. Defining poverty based on PPP$2 per-capita consumption, community targeting and the hybrid perform somewhat worse in identifying the poor than PMT, though not by enough to significantly affect poverty outcomes for a typical program. Elite capture does not explain these results. Instead, communities appear to apply a different concept of poverty. Consistent with this finding, community targeting results in higher satisfaction. PMID:25197099

  14. Targeting the Poor: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Alatas, Vivi; Banerjee, Abhijit; Hanna, Rema; Olken, Benjamin A.; Tobias, Julia

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports an experiment in 640 Indonesian villages on three approaches to target the poor: proxy-means tests (PMT), where assets are used to predict consumption; community targeting, where villagers rank everyone from richest to poorest; and a hybrid. Defining poverty based on PPP$2 per-capita consumption, community targeting and the hybrid perform somewhat worse in identifying the poor than PMT, though not by enough to significantly affect poverty outcomes for a typical program. Elite capture does not explain these results. Instead, communities appear to apply a different concept of poverty. Consistent with this finding, community targeting results in higher satisfaction. PMID:25197099

  15. [Preclinical management of accidental methadone intoxication of a 4-year-old girl. Antagonist or intubation?].

    PubMed

    Hainer, C; Bernhard, M; Gries, A

    2004-10-01

    We report on the preclinical management of a 4-year-old child who was found in a comatose condition with respiratory failure after accidental ingestion of methadone. Emergency airway management was carried out with endotracheal intubation instead of administering the antagonist naloxone. The child could be extubated 12 h later and was released from hospital after 3 days with no neurological symptoms. The authors attempt to formulate an algorithm for the preclinical management of opioid intoxication with reference to the literature and own experience. Endotracheal intubation seems to be superior to the use of the antagonist naloxone, especially in a critical situation. This is the only way to ensure a rapid oxygenation with adequate airway protection and with the simultaneous avoidance of the side-effects of naloxone. A restrictive and critical administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone is recommended when there is suspicion of opioid ingestion but no signs of intoxication. PMID:15278196

  16. Two-Channel Rectangular Dielectric Wake Field Accelerator Structure Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sotnikov, G. V.; Marshall, T. C.; Shchelkunov, S. V.; Didenko, A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2009-01-22

    A design is presented for a two-channel 30-GHz rectangular dielectric wake field accelerator structure being built for experimental tests at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This structure allows for a transformer ratio T much greater than two, and permits continuous coupling of energy from drive bunches to accelerated bunches. It consists of three planar slabs of cordierite ceramic ({epsilon} = 4.7) supported within a rectangular copper block, forming a drive channel 12 mmx6 mm, and an accelerator channel 2 mmx6 mm. When driven by a 50 nC, 14 MeV single bunch available at ANL, theory predicts an acceleration field of 6 MeV/m, and T = 12.6. Inherent transverse wake forces introduce deflections and some distortion of bunch profiles during transit through the structure that are estimated to be tolerable. Additionally, a cylindrical two-channel DWFA is introduced which shares many advantages of the rectangular structure including high T, and the added virtue of axisymmetry that eliminates lowest-order transverse deflecting forces.

  17. The 1987 Federal field exercise: The DOE experience

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, M.V.; Gant, K.S.

    1989-06-01

    The second full-scale field exercise of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) was held at the Zion Nuclear Power Station, Zion, Illinois, in June 1987. The exercise incorporated the annual compliance exercise for the Zion plant and involved the operating utility, Commonwealth Edison Company, the states of Illinois and Wisconsin, local governments, volunteer groups, and representatives from 12 federal agencies. The 3-day exercise was played from many locations in the Zion area; Springfield, Illinois; Madison, Wisconsin; and Washington, DC. Approximately 1000 people participated in the exercise, which used a scenario in which an accident at the plant resulted in the release of radioactive material outside the plant boundary. The US Department of Energy (DOE) had major responsibilities during the planning, playing, and critiquing of the exercise; these functions are outlined in the report. This document describes the DOE participation in the planning and response during the exercise. During a radiological emergency, the FRERP gives DOE the responsibility for coordinating the federal radiological monitoring and assessment activities in support of the states and the cognizant federal agency. At Zion, a self-sufficient Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center was established by DOE at a nearby fairground in which over 200 people from DOE, the two states, and other federal agencies participated. Before the field exercise, a tabletop exercise and a dry run were held for training purposes. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Tools and Setups for Experiments with AC and Rotating Magnetic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponikvar, D.

    2010-01-01

    A rotating magnetic field is the basis for the transformation of electrical energy to mechanical energy. School experiments on the rotating magnetic field are rare since they require the use of specially prepared mechanical setups and/or relatively large, three-phase power supplies to achieve strong magnetic fields. This paper proposes several…

  19. Overview of C-2 Field Reversed Configuration Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Houyang; TAE Team

    2013-10-01

    The C-2 compact toroid merging (CT) facility was built to form and sustain high temperature Field Reversed Configurations (FRC) with extremely high beta (i.e., with the ratio of confined plasma to external total magnetic pressure approaching 100%). Significant progress has been made in C-2 on both technology and physics fronts, achieving stable plasmas up to 5 ms with a dramatic improvement in confinement, far beyond the prediction from the conventional FRC scaling. The key approaches to these exciting achievements are (1) dynamic FRC formation by collisional merging of super-Alfvénic CTs, (2) effective control of stability and transport by plasma guns and neutral beam injection, and (3) active wall conditioning. The emerging confinement scaling for this new plasma regime shows a strong dependence on temperature in contrast to the usually observed Bohm or gyro-Bohm scaling in other magnetic confinement systems. This presentation highlights these recent advances.

  20. Aircraft measurements and analysis of severe storms: 1975 field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, P. C.

    1976-01-01

    Three aircraft and instrumentation systems were acquired in support of the severe storm surveillance program. The data results indicate that the original concept of a highly mobile research aircraft capability for obtaining detailed measurements of wind, temperature, dew point, etc., near and within specifically designated severe storms is entirely feasible and has been demonstrated for the first time by this program. This program is unique in that it is designed to be highly mobile in order to move to and/or with the developing storm systems to obtain the necessary measurements. Previous programs have all been fixed to a particular location and therefore have had to wait for the storms to come within their network. The present research is designed around a highly mobile aircraft measurements group in order to maximize the storm cases during the field measurements program.

  1. A preliminary assessment of field transport experiments using encapsulated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Petrich, C.R.; Knaebel, D.B.; Ralston, D.R.; Crawford, R.L.; Stormo, K.E.

    1995-12-31

    Microencapsulation of nonindigenous degradative organisms is a technique that enhances microorganism survival. An intermediate-scale field tracer test was conducted to evaluate the transport of encapsulated-cell microbeads and other particles in a shallow, confined, heterogeneous aquifer consisting of unconsolidated silts, sands, and gravels under induced-gradient, uniform flow conditions. Tracers included bromide; 2-, 5-, and 15-{micro}m-diameter polystyrene microspheres; and encapsulated Flavobacterium microbeads ranging in diameter from approximately 2 to 80 {micro}m. Results suggest that aquifer heterogeneity was a dominant factor in bromide- and particle-transport patterns. Encapsulated-cell migration appeared to be retarded with respect to the bromide and microsphere tracers. Results of this study also indicate that encapsulated-cell particle sizes and encapsulation material characteristics may be important factors affecting the transport of encapsulated cells in a subsurface environment.

  2. Field Experience with 3-Sun Mirror Module Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fraas, Dr. Lewis; Avery, James E.; Huang, H,; Minkin, Leonid M; Fraas, J. X.; Maxey, L Curt; Gehl, Anthony C

    2008-01-01

    JX Crystals 3-sun PV mirror modules have now been operating in four separate systems in the field for up to 2 years. Two post-mounted 2-axis tracking arrays of 12 modules each were installed at the Shanghai Flower Park in April of 2006. Then 672 modules were installed in a 100 kW array on N-S horizontal beam trackers at the Shanghai Flower Port in November of 2006. Finally, sets of 4 modules were installed on azimuth-tracking carousels on buildings at the Oak Ridge National Lab and at the U. of Nevada in Las Vegas in late 2007. All of these modules in each of these systems are still operating at their initial power ratings. No degradation in performance has been observed. The benefit of these 3-sun PV mirror modules is that they use 1/3 of the silicon single-crystal cell material in comparison to traditional planar modules. Since aluminum mirrors are much cheaper than high-purity single-crystal silicon-cells, these modules and systems should be much lower in cost when manufactured in high volume.

  3. The lure of local SETI: Fifty years of field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ailleris, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    With the commemoration in October 2007 of the Sputnik launch, space exploration celebrated its 50th anniversary. Despite impressive technological and scientific achievements the fascination for space has weakened during the last decades. One contributing factor has been the gradual disappearance of mankind's hope of discovering extraterrestrial life within its close neighbourhood. In striking contrast and since the middle of the 20th century, a non-negligible proportion of the population have already concluded that intelligent beings from other worlds do exist and visit Earth through space vehicles popularly called Unidentified Flying Objects (UFOs). In light of the continuous public interest for the UFO enigma symbolized by the recent widely diffused media announcements on the release of French and English governmental files; and considering the approach of broadening the strategies of the "Active SETI" approach and the existence of a rich multi-disciplinary UFO documentation of potential interest for SETI; this paper describes some past scientific attempts to demonstrate the physical reality of the phenomena and potentially the presence on Earth of probes of extraterrestrial origin. Details of the different instrumented field studies deployed by scientists and organizations during the period 1950-1990 in the USA, Canada and Europe are provided. In conclusion it will be argued that while continuing the current radio/optical SETI searches, there is the necessity to maintain sustaining attention to the topic of anomalous aerospace phenomena and to develop new rigorous research approaches.

  4. Strategies to rationalize sepsis management--a review of 4 years' experience in Dundee.

    PubMed

    Nathwani, D; Davey, P

    1998-07-01

    Hospitals worldwide are facing an unprecedented crisis of rising cost of antibacterials due to the increasing rapid emergence and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant organisms, improper use of antibiotics and the use of broad spectrum parenteral agents. The last 25 years has seen the introduction of many measures to improve the quality of sepsis management, and specifically antimicrobial use. The present paper reviews the development, implementation and evaluation of some of the key strategies employed within the Dundee Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (DTHT) to enhance recognition and assessment of sepsis and to rationalize the early and often empiric antibiotic treatment of patients in hospital with infection. Particular emphasis is given to optimizing the use of expensive parenteral agents in conjunction with promotion of oral switch therapy where appropriate.

  5. Sensory ecology of water detection by bats: a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Russo, Danilo; Cistrone, Luca; Jones, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    Bats face a great risk of dehydration, so sensory mechanisms for water recognition are crucial for their survival. In the laboratory, bats recognized any smooth horizontal surface as water because these provide analogous reflections of echolocation calls. We tested whether bats also approach smooth horizontal surfaces other than water to drink in nature by partly covering watering troughs used by hundreds of bats with a Perspex layer mimicking water. We aimed 1) to confirm that under natural conditions too bats mistake any horizontal smooth surface for water by testing this on large numbers of individuals from a range of species and 2) to assess the occurrence of learning effects. Eleven bat species mistook Perspex for water relying chiefly on echoacoustic information. Using black instead of transparent Perspex did not deter bats from attempting to drink. In Barbastella barbastellus no echolocation differences occurred between bats approaching the water and the Perspex surfaces respectively, confirming that bats perceive water and Perspex to be acoustically similar. The drinking attempt rates at the fake surface were often lower than those recorded in the laboratory: bats then either left the site or moved to the control water surface. This suggests that bats modified their behaviour as soon as the lack of drinking reward had overridden the influence of echoacoustic information. Regardless of which of two adjoining surfaces was covered, bats preferentially approached and attempted to drink from the first surface encountered, probably because they followed a common route, involving spatial memory and perhaps social coordination. Overall, although acoustic recognition itself is stereotyped and its importance in the drinking process overwhelming, our findings point at the role of experience in increasing behavioural flexibility under natural conditions.

  6. Sensory Ecology of Water Detection by Bats: A Field Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Danilo; Cistrone, Luca; Jones, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    Bats face a great risk of dehydration, so sensory mechanisms for water recognition are crucial for their survival. In the laboratory, bats recognized any smooth horizontal surface as water because these provide analogous reflections of echolocation calls. We tested whether bats also approach smooth horizontal surfaces other than water to drink in nature by partly covering watering troughs used by hundreds of bats with a Perspex layer mimicking water. We aimed 1) to confirm that under natural conditions too bats mistake any horizontal smooth surface for water by testing this on large numbers of individuals from a range of species and 2) to assess the occurrence of learning effects. Eleven bat species mistook Perspex for water relying chiefly on echoacoustic information. Using black instead of transparent Perspex did not deter bats from attempting to drink. In Barbastella barbastellus no echolocation differences occurred between bats approaching the water and the Perspex surfaces respectively, confirming that bats perceive water and Perspex to be acoustically similar. The drinking attempt rates at the fake surface were often lower than those recorded in the laboratory: bats then either left the site or moved to the control water surface. This suggests that bats modified their behaviour as soon as the lack of drinking reward had overridden the influence of echoacoustic information. Regardless of which of two adjoining surfaces was covered, bats preferentially approached and attempted to drink from the first surface encountered, probably because they followed a common route, involving spatial memory and perhaps social coordination. Overall, although acoustic recognition itself is stereotyped and its importance in the drinking process overwhelming, our findings point at the role of experience in increasing behavioural flexibility under natural conditions. PMID:23133558

  7. Tools and setups for experiments with AC and rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponikvar, D.

    2010-09-01

    A rotating magnetic field is the basis for the transformation of electrical energy to mechanical energy. School experiments on the rotating magnetic field are rare since they require the use of specially prepared mechanical setups and/or relatively large, three-phase power supplies to achieve strong magnetic fields. This paper proposes several experiments and describes setups and tools which are easy to obtain and work with. Free software is offered to generate the required signals by a personal computer. The experiments can be implemented in introductory physics courses on electromagnetism for undergraduates or specialized courses at high schools.

  8. The Escompte Programme: An Overview of The Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, P.; Cros, B.; Peuch, V. H.; Kottmeier, C.; Saïd, F.; Perros, P.; Robin, D.

    The ESCOMPTE programme (http://medias.obs-mip.fr/escompte) is embedded in a long-term strategy whose aim is the improvement of air quality. In order to be able to take preventive measures to reduce the size and the effects of pollution events, we need to dispose of efficient tools of prediction of these events. Such tools, yet to be developed or improved, are, on the one hand, the inventory of the various pollu- tion sources (fixed and mobile), and, on the other hand, mathematical models able to accurately simulate the dynamical (diffusion and transport) and chemical (reactions) processes under which the various solid, liquid and gaseous species will evolve. The main objective of the ESCOMPTE programme is to gather a data set of some pollution events, involving the emissions of primary pollutants, as well as atmospheric dynam- ics and chemistry. This data set, acquired at the surface and in the lower troposphere, in a region located South-East of France, between June 4th and July 16th, 2001, will serve as a reference for qualifying the CTMs of atmospheric pollution, from local- to regional-scale. A 120km*120km area, around the "Marseille-Berre" site, in the South-eastern of France, has been selected to host the ESCOMPTE field campaign. This region presents a high occurrence of photochemical pollution, because it is one of the most sunny re- gions of France, with anticyclonic conditions prevailing during summer ; it involves the urbanized area of Marseille city (more than one million people), and the "Fos- Berre" industrial area (oil refineries, power plants, E), both being considerable sources of various pollutants ; it presents terrain characteristics (land-sea-breeze circulations ; numerous hills and mountain chains up to more than thousand meters high) acting as dynamical forcings on the transport of pollutants. Although the core domain of ESCOMPTE is a 100km*100km box, a hierarchy of chemistry and/or transport models is involved in the programme, and is able do

  9. Interior Vector Magnetic Field Monitoring for the SNS Neutron EDM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Nima; Plaster, Brad

    2014-09-01

    A concept has been developed which provides for a real-time determination of the spatial dependence of the vector components of the magnetic field (and, hence, the ∂Bi / ∂xj field gradients) within the interior fiducial volume of the SNS neutron EDM experiment solely from exterior measurements at fixed discrete locations. This technique will be especially important during the operation of the experiment, when direct measurements of the field gradients present within the fiducial volume will not be physically possible. Our method, which is based on the solution to the Laplace Equation, is completely general and does not require the field to possess any type of symmetry. We describe the concept and our systematic approach for optimizing the locations of these exterior measurements. We also present results from prototyping studies of a field monitoring system deployed within a half-scale prototype of the experiment's magnetic field environment. A concept has been developed which provides for a real-time determination of the spatial dependence of the vector components of the magnetic field (and, hence, the ∂Bi / ∂xj field gradients) within the interior fiducial volume of the SNS neutron EDM experiment solely from exterior measurements at fixed discrete locations. This technique will be especially important during the operation of the experiment, when direct measurements of the field gradients present within the fiducial volume will not be physically possible. Our method, which is based on the solution to the Laplace Equation, is completely general and does not require the field to possess any type of symmetry. We describe the concept and our systematic approach for optimizing the locations of these exterior measurements. We also present results from prototyping studies of a field monitoring system deployed within a half-scale prototype of the experiment's magnetic field environment. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of

  10. A case study of urban student and teacher experiences surrounding an outdoor environmental science field trip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preusch, Peggy L.

    2009-12-01

    Field trips provide opportunities for students to experience many different contexts beyond the classroom, and are a popular choice of K-12 teachers in the US. Recent interest in learning that occurs at informal science education centers such as museums, zoos and aquariums has stimulated studies of the relationship between learning in and outside of schools. Although many studies focus on the teachers, the contexts, and/or the students during the field trip, only a few look at the entire process of learning by including the classroom setting before and after the field trip. This study was designed to develop understandings of the student process of learning during and surrounding an environmental science field trip to an outdoor setting. John Dewey's extensive writings on the relationship between experience and learning informed the analysis, creating a focus on active and passive elements of the experience, continuity within and across contexts, the interactive nature of the experience and the importance of subject matter. An exploration of environmental education (EE), environmental science (ES), and nature study as content revealed the complexities of the subject matter of the field trip that make its presentation problematic. An urban school was chosen to contribute to the research literature about urban student learning in outdoor environments. During the field trip, the students' active engagement with each other and the environment supported meaningful remembrances of the field trip experiences during interviews after the field trip. The students accurately described plants and animals they had observed in different habitats during the field trip. They also made connections with their home life and prior experiences in the outdoors as they discussed the field trip and drew pictures that represented their experiences. One student integrated his outdoor experience with a language arts assignment as he reflected deeply on the field trip. One implication of this

  11. Changes in soil chemical and microbiological properties during 4 years of application of various organic residues.

    PubMed

    Odlare, M; Pell, M; Svensson, K

    2008-01-01

    A 4-year field trial was established in eastern Sweden to evaluate the effects of organic waste on soil chemical and microbiological variables. A simple crop rotation with barley and oats was treated with either compost from household waste, biogas residue from household waste, anaerobically treated sewage sludge, pig manure, cow manure or mineral fertilizer. All fertilizers were amended in rates corresponding to 100kgNha(-1)year(-1). The effects of the different types of organic waste were evaluated by subjecting soil samples, taken each autumn 4 weeks after harvest, to an extensive set of soil chemical (pH, Org-C, Tot-N, Tot-P, Tot-S, P-AL, P-Olsen, K-AL, and some metals) and microbiological (B-resp, SIR, microSIR active and dormant microorganisms, PDA, microPDA, PAO, Alk-P and N-min) analyses. Results show that compost increased pH, and that compost as well as sewage sludge increased plant available phosphorus; however, the chemical analysis showed few clear trends over the 4 years and few clear relations to plant yield or soil quality. Biogas residues increased substrate induced respiration (SIR) and, compared to the untreated control amendment of biogas residues as well as compost, led to a higher proportion of active microorganisms. In addition, biogas residues increased potential ammonia oxidation rate (PAO), nitrogen mineralization capacity (N-min) as well as the specific growth rate constant of denitrifiers (microPDA). Despite rather large concentrations of heavy metals in some of the waste products, no negative effects could be seen on either chemical or microbiological soil properties. Changes in soil microbial properties appeared to occur more rapidly than most chemical properties. This suggests that soil microbial processes can function as more sensitive indicators of short-term changes in soil properties due to amendment of organic wastes. PMID:17697770

  12. Electron electric-dipole-moment experiment using electric-field quantized slow cesium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, Jason M.; Munger, Charles T. Jr.; Gould, Harvey

    2007-06-15

    A proof-of-principle electron electric-dipole-moment (e-EDM) experiment using slow cesium atoms, nulled magnetic fields, and electric-field quantization has been performed. With the ambient magnetic fields seen by the atoms reduced to less than 200 pT, an electric field of 6 MV/m lifts the degeneracy between states of unequal |m{sub F}| and, along with the low ({approx_equal}3 m/s) velocity, suppresses the systematic effect from the motional magnetic field. The low velocity and small residual magnetic field have made it possible to induce transitions between states and to perform state preparation, analysis, and detection in regions free of applied static magnetic and electric fields. This experiment demonstrates techniques that may be used to improve the e-EDM limit by two orders of magnitude, but it is not in itself a sensitive e-EDM search, mostly due to limitations of the laser system.

  13. Exploring the Effectiveness of a Field Experience Program in a Pedagogical Laboratory: The Experience of Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Yuxin; Lai, Guolin; Williams, Doug; Prejean, Louise; Ford, Mary Jane

    2008-01-01

    Researchers argue that teachers' beliefs are the final barrier that prevents technology integration. To affect change in teacher candidates' beliefs of technology integration, we created a pedagogical laboratory as well as a field experience program that operates within the pedagogical laboratory. This article presents a qualitative study of…

  14. The effect of verbal reminders on memory reactivation in 2-, 3-, and 4-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Imuta, Kana; Scarf, Damian; Hayne, Harlene

    2013-06-01

    For adults, verbal reminders provide a powerful key to unlock our memories. For example, a simple question, such as "Do you remember your wedding day?" can reactivate rich memories of the past, allowing us to recall experiences that may have occurred days, weeks, and even decades earlier. The ability to use another person's language to access our memory of a prior experience is considered to be one of the hallmarks in human memory development, but surprisingly, little is known about the ontogeny of this fundamental ability. Prior research has shown that by 4 years of age, children can use a simple verbal reminder (e.g., "Do you remember coming here before?") to reactivate an otherwise inaccessible memory of a unique visual stimulus. Given that language comprehension precedes production, it has been hypothesized that the ability to use verbal reminders may emerge well before 4 years of age. In the present experiment, we tested this hypothesis by examining whether a verbal reminder reactivated memory in 2-, 3-, and 4-year-old children who were tested using the visual-paired comparison (VPC) paradigm. Our findings showed that the ability to exploit a simple verbal reminder emerges by at least 2 years of age. PMID:22822936

  15. The spherical probe Electric Field and Wave Experiment for the Cluster mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafsson, G.; Bostroem, R.; Holback, B.; Holmgren, G.; Stasiewicz, K.; Aggson, T.; Pfaff, R.; Block, L. P.; Faelthammar, C.-G.; Lindqvist, P.-A.

    1993-01-01

    The Electric Field and Wave experiment (EFW) on Cluster, which is designed to measure the electric field and density fluctuations with sampling rates, on some occasions, up to 36,000 samples/s in two channels, is decribed. Langmuir sweeps can also be made to determine the electron density and temperature. Among the more interesting objectives of the experiment is to study nonlinear processes that result in acceleration of plasma. Large scale phenomena where all four spacecraft are needed are also studied.

  16. Supine Craniospinal Irradiation Using Intrafractional Junction Shifts and Field-in-Field Dose Shaping: Early Experience at Methodist Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    South, Michael C. Chiu, J. Kam; Teh, Bin S.; Bloch, Charles; Schroeder, Thomas M.; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To describe our preliminary experience with supine craniospinal irradiation. The advantages of the supine position for craniospinal irradiation include patient comfort, easier access to maintain an airway for anesthesia, and reduced variability of the head tilt in the face mask. Methods and Materials: The cranial fields were treated with near lateral fields and a table angle to match their divergence to the superior edge of the spinal field. The collimator was rotated to match the divergence from the superior spinal field. The spinal fields were treated using a source to surface distance (SSD) technique with the couch top at 100 cm. When a second spinal field was required, the table and collimator were rotated 90{sup o} to allow for the use of the multileaf collimator and so the gantry could be rotated to match the divergence of the superior spinal field. The multileaf collimator was used for daily dynamic featherings and field-in-field dose control. Results: With a median follow-up of 20.2 months, five documented failures and no cases of radiation myelitis occurred in 23 consecutive patients. No failures occurred in the junctions of the spine-spine or brain-spine fields. Two failures occurred in the primary site alone, two in the spinal axis alone, and one primary site failure plus distant metastasis. The median time to recurrence was 17 months. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that supine approach for delivering craniospinal irradiation is not associated with increased relapses at the field junctions. To date, no cases of radiation myelitis have developed.

  17. Data from TRMM Field Experiments at the Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) DISC DAAC Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Field Experiments (TRMM FEs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The basic objectives of TRMM Field Experiments (FEs) are to evaluate the physical assumptions made by TRMM. rainfall algorithms, initialize and validate the cloud resolving models, test latent heating retrievals from TRMM mea- surements, and evaluate methods to estimate rainfall and latent heating from ground-based radars. The field experiments were designed as a group, so that specific measure ments could be compared between experiments in order to gain insight into the regional dependence of any findings. The TExas FLorida UNderflight Experiments (TEFLUN) were designed to provide validation measurements for TRMM and for the enhancement of TRMM precipitation algorithms. TEFLUN-A focused on east Texas. TEFLUN-B was conducted in close coordination with the Third Convection And Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) in Florida. The TRMM-LBA was conducted in coordination with the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). The LBA objectives are to further our understanding of the climatological, ecological, bie geochemical, and hydrological processes in Amazonia and the impact of land use/land change on these processes. Specifically, TRMM-LBA addressed issues related to land precipitation algorithms. The Kwa jalein Experiment (KWAJEX), conducted on the Kwajalein Island in the Republic of Marshall Islands (RMI), was designed to address issues of TRMM products over the ocean. The purpose of the South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX) was to study the water and energy cycle of the Asian monsoon in order to provide better understanding and improve prediction. and instruments of the TRMM FEs. The platforms and instruments of the TRMM FEs are given.

  18. The electric field structure of auroral arcs as determined from barium plasma injection experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    Barium plasma injection experiments have revealed a number of features of electric fields in and near auroral forms extending from a few hundred to many thousands of km in altitude. There is evidence for V-type potential structures over some auroras, but not in others. For some auroral arcs, large E fields are found at ionospheric altitudes outside the arc but the E field inside the arc is near zero. In a few other auroras, most recently one investigated in an experiment conducted from Poker Flat on March 22, 1980, large, rapidly fluctuating E fields were detected by barium plasma near 600 km altitude. These E fields suggest that the motion of auroral rays can be an effect of low-altitude electric fields, or that V-type potential structures may be found at low altitudes.

  19. Career Field Experience: A Look at On-site Usage by High School Communication Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaye, Thomas

    The career field experience program at a midwestern high school places broadcasting students on location for observation of the profession and optional job training or work. In addition to radio and television stations, field locations include advertising agencies with production studios, corporate production facilities, recording studios, cable…

  20. A Field-Based Learning Experience for Introductory Level GIS Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Tom

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a pedagogic foundation for introducing a field-based geographic information systems (GIS) experience to the GIS curriculum at the university level and uses a dual evaluation methodology to monitor student learning and satisfaction. Students learned the basics of field-based global position systems (GPS) and GIS data…

  1. Factors That Influence Student's Satisfaction in an Environmental Field Day Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hui-Hui; Carlson, Stephan P.

    2011-01-01

    A field trip is a common strategy used by educators to bring out-of-school learning experience into schools. Many research studies suggest a field trip will not only bring an individual close to the real-world, but may also increase an individual's environmental knowledge and responsible behaviors. Program evaluations usually focus on the…

  2. Biological Effects of Static Magnetic Fields: Ideal Experiments for Introductory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendler, Barry S.; Grove, Patricia A.

    2005-01-01

    A serendipitous finding involving static magnetic fields can be used to design experiments suitable for both science and nonscience majors. It has been reported that organisms respond differently to high-gauss magnetic fields generated by north poles than they do to those generated by south poles. Experimental tests of this hypothesis are ideal…

  3. Smoking Patterns, Attitudes and Motives: Unique Characteristics among 2-Year versus 4-Year College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, C. J.; An, L. C.; Thomas, J. L.; Lust, K. A.; Sanem, J. R.; Swan, D. W.; Ahluwalia, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Given the previously documented higher rates of smoking among 2-year college students in comparison with 4-year university students, this study compares smoking patterns, attitudes and motives among 2-year and 4-year college students. Two thousand two hundred and sixty-five undergraduate students aged 18-25 years at a 2-year college and a 4-year…

  4. 26 CFR 1.702-3T - 4-Year spread (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false 4-Year spread (temporary). 1.702-3T Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Partners and Partnerships § 1.702-3T 4-Year spread (temporary). (a... taxable year for the first taxable year beginning after December 31, 1986 (partnership's year of...

  5. 26 CFR 1.702-3T - 4-Year spread (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false 4-Year spread (temporary). 1.702-3T Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Partners and Partnerships § 1.702-3T 4-Year spread (temporary). (a... taxable year for the first taxable year beginning after December 31, 1986 (partnership's year of...

  6. 26 CFR 1.702-3T - 4-Year spread (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 4-Year spread (temporary). 1.702-3T Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Partners and Partnerships § 1.702-3T 4-Year spread (temporary). (a) Applicability... year for the first taxable year beginning after December 31, 1986 (partnership's year of change);...

  7. 26 CFR 1.702-3T - 4-Year spread (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false 4-Year spread (temporary). 1.702-3T Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Partners and Partnerships § 1.702-3T 4-Year spread (temporary). (a... taxable year for the first taxable year beginning after December 31, 1986 (partnership's year of...

  8. Changes in Early Childhood: Public School Programs for 4-Year-Olds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, S. Dianne; Boals, Beverly M.

    Education programs for 4-year-olds may offer unique opportunities for the growth of services for young children. Currently, the role of state departments of education in preschool instruction is evolving; no single approach to public school programming for 4-year-olds exists. Approximately two-thirds of the 28 state and District of Columbia early…

  9. Should Community College Students Earn an Associate Degree before Transferring to a 4-Year Institution?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopko, Elizabeth M.; Crosta, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Using data on over 41,000 students in one state who entered community college before transferring to a 4-year institution, this study examines the following question: Are community college students who earn an associate degree before transferring to a 4-year college more likely to earn a bachelor's degree? Due to the causal nature surrounding this…

  10. 42 CFR 414.42 - Adjustment for first 4 years of practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adjustment for first 4 years of practice. 414.42 Section 414.42 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Other Practitioners § 414.42 Adjustment for first 4 years of practice. (a) General rule. For...

  11. 42 CFR 414.42 - Adjustment for first 4 years of practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjustment for first 4 years of practice. 414.42 Section 414.42 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Other Practitioners § 414.42 Adjustment for first 4 years of practice. (a) General rule. For...

  12. Institutional Characteristics Contributing to the Effectiveness of 4-Year Business Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Book-Ellard, Tracy Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Over $8 billion is spent yearly, on college education in one Southern U.S. state, yet the employment effectiveness of public and private 4-year undergraduate business degrees (effectiveness defined as obtaining employment or entering into a degree program requiring a 4-year business degree by the end of Year 1 and remaining employed or in a degree…

  13. The Maine Question: How Is 4-Year College Enrollment Affected by Mandatory College Entrance Exams?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurwitz, Michael; Smith, Jonathan; Niu, Sunny; Howell, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    We use a difference-in-differences analytic approach to estimate postsecondary consequences from Maine's mandate that all public school juniors take the SAT®. We find that, overall, the policy increased 4-year college-going rates by 2- to 3-percentage points and that 4-year college-going rates among induced students increased by 10-percentage…

  14. Developing Standards-Based Geography Curricular Materials from Overseas Field Experiences for K-12 Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberle, Alex; Palacios, Fabian Araya

    2012-01-01

    Overseas experiences provide educators with exceptional opportunities to incorporate field study, firsthand experiences, and tangible artifacts into the classroom. Despite this potential, teachers must consider curricular standards that direct how such international endeavors can be integrated. Furthermore, geography curriculum development is more…

  15. A University-Museum Partnership for Teacher Education Field Experiences in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinicola, Debra; Devlin-Scherer, Roberta

    2001-01-01

    Describes a unique field experience, an outgrowth of a partnership with Seton Hall University and The Liberty Science Center (New Jersey), that immerses K-12 teachers in innovative methods of learning and teaching science. Notes the program helps teachers gain firsthand experience, use interactive exhibits at a science center, and adopt the…

  16. Practical Applications for Using Peer Assessment in Physical Education Teacher Education Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Beth J.; Marty-Snyder, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Peer assessment (PA) occurs in many higher education programs. However, there is limited research examining PA in physical education teacher education (PETE) in regards to student teaching experiences. PA may be a method to better prepare PETE students to assess their future students. The field experience students assessed their fellow peers on…

  17. Understanding Field Experiences in Traditional Teacher Preparation Programs in Missouri. REL 2016-145

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of field experiences in traditional teacher preparation programs completed by first-year teachers in Missouri and how experiences vary by teaching certificate type. This descriptive study is based on data from a survey administered in early 2015 to first-year teachers in Missouri public…

  18. eSupervision: A Technology Framework for the 21st Century Field Experience in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alger, Christianna; Kopcha, Theodore J.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the complex emotional and interpersonal challenges inherent therein, credential students often comment that their student teaching experience had the greatest influence on their development as new teachers. An essential component of teacher education programs, the field experience serves many purposes. Although the theoretical potential…

  19. Being There: The Importance of a Field Experience in Teaching Native American Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Roberta

    2000-01-01

    A Native American literature professor's account of college students' cross-cultural field experience on two Indian reservations near the Grand Canyon shows how the experience enhanced student understanding of the Native American belief in the people and land as one, storytelling and a sense of the sacred, and the history and impact of…

  20. Myths and Realities: Field-Based Experiences in Preservice Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeichner, Kenneth M.

    1980-01-01

    Two myths concerning the value of preservice field-based experience are explored: (1) Practical school experience contributes to the development of better teachers; and (2) Teacher education's institutional structures are totally coercive and students passively conform to school bureaucracies' conservative norms. (JN)

  1. Beyond Book Learning: Cultivating the Pedagogy of Experience through Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakubowski, Lisa Marie

    2003-01-01

    A pedagogy of experience can be cultivated by using a critically responsive approach based on experience, critical thinking, reflection, and action. A service-learning field trip to Cuba illustrates how experiential learning can bring classroom and community together in a way that invites students to engage in meaningful, active forms of learning…

  2. An overview of the first International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, P. J.; Hall, F. G.; Asrar, G.; Strebel, D. E.; Murphy, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews the history and scientific background leading up to FIFE, the experiment design, the scientific teams and equipment involved, and the actual execution of the experiment. The experiment was tasked with exploring techniques for utilizing satellite data to quantify important biophysical states and rates for model input. During the intensive field campaigns the fluxes of moisture, heat, carbon dioxide and radiation were measured with airborne and surface equipment in coordination with measurements of atmospheric and surface parameters and satellite overpasses.

  3. Evaluating Experience-Based Geologic Field Instruction: Lessons Learned from A Large-Scale Eye-Tracking Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarduno, J. A.; Walders, K.; Bono, R. K.; Pelz, J.; Jacobs, R.

    2015-12-01

    A course centered on experience-based learning in field geology has been offered ten times at the University of Rochester. The centerpiece of the course is a 10-day field excursion to California featuring a broad cross-section of the geology of the state, from the San Andreas Fault to Death Valley. Here we describe results from a large-scale eye-tracking experiment aimed at understanding how experts and novices acquire visual geologic information. One ultimate goal of the project is to determine whether expert gaze patterns can be quantified to improve the instruction of beginning geology students. Another goal is to determine if aspects of the field experience can be transferred to the classroom/laboratory. Accordingly, ultra-high resolution segmented panoramic images have been collected at key sites visited during the field excursion. We have found that strict controls are needed in the field to obtain meaningful data; this often involves behavior atypical of geologists (e.g. limiting the field of view prior to data collection and placing time limits on scene viewing). Nevertheless some general conclusions can be made from a select data set. After an initial quick search, experts tend to exhibit scanning behavior that appears to support hypothesis testing. Novice fixations appear to define a scattered search pattern and/or one distracted by geologic noise in a scene. Noise sources include modern erosion features and vegetation. One way to quantify noise is through the use of saliency maps. With the caveat that our expert data set is small, our preliminary analysis suggests that experts tend to exhibit top-down behavior (indicating hypothesis driven responses) whereas novices show bottom-up gaze patterns, influenced by more salient features in a scene. We will present examples and discuss how these observations might be used to improve instruction.

  4. Field performance of the heat pulse flow meter: Experiences and recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busse, J.; Paillet, F. L.; Hossack, A.; Bringemeier, D.; Scheuermann, A.; Li, L.

    2016-03-01

    A large extent of groundwater flow in fractured aquifers follows fractures and cleats. The heat pulse flow meter allows the localisation and quantification of in- and outflow along borehole profiles through field measurements and subsequent inverse modelling. In this paper the method is presented and its feasibility is discussed based on the experiences gained from two different field sites. Field work was undertaken on two sites on the East Coast of Australia under different conditions leading to different outcomes. The experiences with the heat pulse flow meter method and concluding recommendations are reported to help improve the performance of the method.

  5. Physical barriers formed from gelling liquids: 1. numerical design of laboratory and field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Pruess, K.; Persoff, P.

    1994-01-01

    The emplacement of liquids under controlled viscosity conditions is investigated by means of numerical simulations. Design calculations are performed for a laboratory experiment on a decimeter scale, and a field experiment on a meter scale. The purpose of the laboratory experiment is to study the behavior of multiple gout plumes when injected in a porous medium. The calculations for the field trial aim at designing a grout injection test from a vertical well in order to create a grout plume of a significant extent in the subsurface.

  6. Two phase discharge of liquefied gases through pipes. Field experiments with ammonia and theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyren, K.; Winter, S.

    1984-01-01

    Field experiments with full scale releases of pressurized through siphon pipes from a storage tank were performed. It is found that the flow is a damped critical flow causing a violent turbulent spray jet. The pronounced atomization of the liquid and the quick air entrainment prevent rainout and no traces of land spills are observed. A theoretical model is also presented. Comparisons with the field experiments and laboratory experiments show that the model gives very good predictions of the mass flow rate and the jet determining parameters. The model is useful also for long pipe systems as it takes into account friction and other resistances.

  7. Magnetic field reversals: the geodynamo, laboratory experiments and models (Lewis Fry Richardson Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauve, S.

    2009-04-01

    I will first compare reversals of Earth's magnetic field known from palaeomagnetic data to the ones observed in a laboratory experiment for the magnetic field generated by a turbulent flow of liquid sodium (VKS experiment). Despite major differences between the flow in Earth's core and in the experiment, both systems display reversals that share a lot of similar properties. I will understand them using a simple model in the framework of low dynamical system theory. Finally, I will discuss what can be learnt from numerical simulations.

  8. Improved understanding of geologic CO{sub 2} storage processes requires risk-driven field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-06-01

    The need for risk-driven field experiments for CO{sub 2} geologic storage processes to complement ongoing pilot-scale demonstrations is discussed. These risk-driven field experiments would be aimed at understanding the circumstances under which things can go wrong with a CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) project and cause it to fail, as distinguished from accomplishing this end using demonstration and industrial scale sites. Such risk-driven tests would complement risk-assessment efforts that have already been carried out by providing opportunities to validate risk models. In addition to experimenting with high-risk scenarios, these controlled field experiments could help validate monitoring approaches to improve performance assessment and guide development of mitigation strategies.

  9. Outdoor transmission measurement at 26 GHz: Results of a 4 year trial in Prague

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorvaldsen, Per; Henne, Ingvar

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the results from a field trial that was performed during a 4 year period on a 5.5 km long radio link path operating at 26 GHz in Prague. The purpose was to investigate the amount of attenuation due to precipitation and its yearly variations. The attenuation of the radio link signal and the rain rate were measured. The measured attenuation results are compared to the models given by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). The propagation measurements show large yearly variations due to variability in rain rate from one year to another. The measured results are in agreement with the ITU long-term statistical rain attenuation model if the measured rain rate for the individual year is used. For the worst year the number of fades, the fade duration, the fade speed, the worst month statistics, and the polarization correlation are presented. The measurements presented will add to the current knowledge of fading due to precipitation, and some of the results, such as the fade duration distributions, are new knowledge.

  10. The MACHO Project: Preliminary Results from 4 years of LMC observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, K.; Alcock, C.; Alves, D.; Minniti, D.; Marshall, S.; Vandehei, T.; Griest, K.; Allsman, R.; Axelrod, T.; Freeman, K.; Peterson, B.; Rodgers, A.; Pratt, M.; Becker, A.; Stubbs, C.; Tomaney, A.; Lehner, M.; Bennett, D.; Nelson, C.; Quinn, P.; Sutherland, W.; Welch, D.

    1997-12-01

    The MACHO Project is a search for dark matter in the form of massive compact halo objects (MACHOs). Photometric monitoring of tens of millions of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), and Galactic bulge is used to search for gravitational microlensing events caused by these otherwise invisible objects. An analysis of 4 years of LMC data on 12.5 million stars is currently underway. We present preliminary results of this analysis which reveal about 15 candidate microlensing events. We also present our microlensing detection efficiency calculation pipeline. The accurate determination of our detection efficiency is key in estimating the MACHO contribution to the dark matter halo. The efficiency pipeline uses data from the MACHO Project's ground based survey and from HST observations of MACHO fields to determine the true color and luminosity distribution of LMC source stars. Artificial microlensing events are then inserted into the underlying source distribution, image sequences are created from a wide sample of real image conditions and detection efficiencies are determined using our standard reduction pipeline. The full calculation of our efficiencies requires the creation, reduction and analysis of 322 Gbytes of artificial image data and is currently underway. The MACHO Project dedicates this work to one of its key founders, Alex Rodgers.

  11. Smoking patterns, attitudes and motives: unique characteristics among 2-year versus 4-year college students.

    PubMed

    Berg, C J; An, L C; Thomas, J L; Lust, K A; Sanem, J R; Swan, D W; Ahluwalia, J S

    2011-08-01

    Given the previously documented higher rates of smoking among 2-year college students in comparison with 4-year university students, this study compares smoking patterns, attitudes and motives among 2-year and 4-year college students. Two thousand two hundred and sixty-five undergraduate students aged 18-25 years at a 2-year college and a 4-year university completed an online survey in 2008. Current (past 30-day) smoking was reported by 43.5% of 2-year and 31.9% of 4-year college students, and daily smoking was reported by 19.9% of 2-year and 8.3% of 4-year college students. Attending a 2-year college was associated with higher rates of current smoking [odds ratio (OR) = 1.72] and daily smoking (OR = 2.84), and with less negative attitudes regarding smoking, controlling for age, gender, ethnicity and parental education. Also, compared with 4-year college student smokers, 2-year college smokers had lower motivation to smoke for social reasons, but more motivation to smoke for affect regulation, after controlling for age, gender, ethnicity and parental education. Two- and 4-year college students report different smoking patterns, attitudes and motives. These distinctions might inform tobacco control messages and interventions targeting these groups of young adults.

  12. Magnetic shielding in a low temperature torsion pendulum experiment. [superconducting cylinders for attenuation earth field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    A new type of ether drift experiment searches for anomalous torques on a permanent magnet. A torsion pendulum is used at liquid helium temperature, so that superconducting cylinders can be used to shield magnetic fields. Lead shields attenuate the earth's field, while Nb-Sn shields fastened to the pendulum contain the fields of the magnet. The paper describes the technique by which the earth's field can be reduced below 0.0001 G while simultaneously the moment of the magnet can be reduced by a factor 7 x 10 to the 4th.

  13. The Current Situation of Field Experience in a Five-Year Science Teacher Education Program in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faikhamta, Chatree; Jantarakantee, Ekgapoom; Roadrangka, Vantipa

    2011-01-01

    This research explored the current situation in managing the field experience of a five-year science teacher education program in one university in Thailand. A number of methods were used to assess field experience situation: (1) a questionnaire on the perceptions of pre-service science teachers of field experience management; (2) participant…

  14. Lead uptake and translocation by willows in pot and field experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhivotovsky, Olena P; Kuzovkina, Yulia A; Schulthess, Cristian P; Morris, Tom; Pettinelli, Dawn

    2011-09-01

    Plant growth and lead (Pb) uptake by seven willow varieties were investigated in pot and field experiments to assess the suitability of willows for phytoremediation of Pb at heavily contaminated sites such as skeet ranges. Differences in uptake and translocation of Pb in Salix were observed between pot and field experiments. In the pot experiment, willows grown in Pb-contaminated field soil for 6 months showed tolerance to very high soil Pb concentration (21,360 mg kg(-1)), and with the addition of EDTA were able to take up and translocate more than 1000 mg kg(-1) Pb into above-ground tissues. In the field experiment, all willow varieties showed tolerance to heterogeneously high soil Pb concentrations. Plants were also able to take up and translocate Pb into above-ground tissues. However, after 4.5 months, the lead concentration in the above-ground tissues of willows grown in soil amended with EDTA was less than 200 mg kg(-1). The results from the pot experiment suggest that Salix varieties have the potential to take up and translocate significant amounts of Pb into above-ground tissues using EDTA. However, to verify the phytoextraction abilities of Salix in the field, additional research is needed.

  15. Self-generated Magnetic Fields in Blast-wave Driven Rayleigh-Taylor Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaig, Markus; Plewa, Tomasz

    2014-10-01

    We study the generation of magnetic fields via the Biermann battery effect in blast-wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor experiments. Previous estimates have shown that in a typical experiment, one should expect fields in the MG range to be generated, with the potential to influence the Rayleigh-Taylor morphology. We perform two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations, where we solve the extended set of MHD equations known as the Braginskii equations. The simulation parameters reflect the physical conditions in past experiments performed on the OMEGA laser and potential future experiments on the NIF laser facility. When neglecting the friction force between electrons and ions in the simulations, magnetic fields of the order of a few 0.1 MG (with a plasma smaller than 1000) are generated, and are found to be dynamically significant. However, it turns out that once the friction force is included, the magnetic fields become much smaller (with a plasma beta greater than 100000) which have negligible influence on the dynamics of the system. Our results therefore indicate that, contrary to previous speculations, it is highly unlikely that self-generated magnetic fields can influence the morphology of a typical blast-wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor experiment. M.F. and T.P. were supported by the DOE Grant DE-FG52- 09NA29548 and the NSF Grant AST-1109113. This research used resources of the National Energy Re.

  16. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R. P.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-04-08

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compressionmore » and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.« less

  17. The first ISLSCP field experiment (FIFE). [International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, P. J.; Hall, F. G.; Asrar, G.; Strebel, D. E.; Murphy, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The background and planning of the first International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) field experiment (FIFE) are discussed. In FIFE, the NOAA series of satellites and GOES will be used to provide a moderate-temporal resolution coarse-spatial resolution data set, with SPOT and aircraft data providing the high-spatial resolution pointable-instrument capability. The paper describes the experiment design, the measurement strategy, the configuration of the site of the experiment (which will be at and around the Konza prairie near Manhattan, Kansas), and the experiment's operations and execution.

  18. CSU FIRE 2 cirrus field experiment: Description of field deployment phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, S.; Beck, G.; Cornwall, C.; Davis, J.; Hein, P.; Lappen, C.; Song, R.; Withrow, J.; Wood, D.; Alvarez, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Colorado State University (CSU) surface observing systems are described. These systems were deployed at the Parsons, Kansas site during the FIRE 2 Cirrus Special Observing Period (SOP) from 13 Nov. - 7 Dec. 1991. The geographical coordinates of the site containing most of the CSU instrumentation are 37 deg. 18 min N. latitude and 96 deg. 30 min. W. longitude; site elevation was 269 meters. In addition, one surface meteorological and broadband flux observing site was maintained at the Tri City Airport which is approximately 18 miles due west of Parsons (37 deg. 20 min. N. latitude, 95 deg. 30 min. 30 sec. W. longitude). A map of the locations of the CSU deployment sites is presented. At the main Parsons site, the instrumentation was located directly adjacent to and north of a lake. Under most cirrus observing conditions, when the wing had a significant southernly component, the lake was upwind of the observing site. The measurements and observations collected during the experiment are listed. These measurements may be grouped into five categories: surface meteorology; infrared spectral and broadband measurements; solar spectral and broadband measurements; upper air measurements; and cloud measurements. A summary of observations collected at the Parsons site during the SOP are presented. The wind profiler, laser ceilometer, surface meteorology and surface broadband radiation instrumentation were operated on a continuous basis. All other systems were operated on an 'on demand' basis when cloud conditions merited the collection of data.

  19. Compositionality and Statistics in Adjective Acquisition: 4-Year-Olds Interpret "Tall" and "Short" Based on the Size Distributions of Novel Noun Referents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barner, David; Snedeker, Jesse

    2008-01-01

    Four experiments investigated 4-year-olds' understanding of adjective-noun compositionality and their sensitivity to statistics when interpreting scalar adjectives. In Experiments 1 and 2, children selected "tall" and "short" items from 9 novel objects called "pimwits" (1-9 in. in height) or from this array plus 4 taller or shorter distractor…

  20. Inverse Planned High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Cervical Cancer: 4-Year Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Tinkle, Christopher L.; Weinberg, Vivian; Chen, Lee-May; Littell, Ramey; Cunha, J. Adam M.; Sethi, Rajni A.; Chan, John K.; Hsu, I-Chow

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of image guided brachytherapy using inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From December 2003 through September 2009, 111 patients with primary cervical cancer were treated definitively with IPSA-planned HDRB boost (28 Gy in 4 fractions) after external radiation at our institution. We performed a retrospective review of our experience using image guided brachytherapy. Of the patients, 70% had a tumor size >4 cm, 38% had regional nodal disease, and 15% had clinically evident distant metastasis, including nonregional nodal disease, at the time of diagnosis. Surgical staging involving pelvic lymph node dissection was performed in 15% of patients, and 93% received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Toxicities are reported according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 guidelines. Results: With a median follow-up time of 42 months (range, 3-84 months), no acute or late toxicities of grade 4 or higher were observed, and grade 3 toxicities (both acute and late) developed in 8 patients (1 constitutional, 1 hematologic, 2 genitourinary, 4 gastrointestinal). The 4-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of late grade 3 toxicity was 8%. Local recurrence developed in 5 patients (4 to 9 months after HDRB), regional recurrence in 3 (6, 16, and 72 months after HDRB), and locoregional recurrence in 1 (4 months after HDR boost). The 4-year estimates of local, locoregional, and distant control of disease were 94.0%, 91.9%, and 69.1%, respectively. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 4 years were 64.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] of 54%-73%) and 61.0% (95% CI, 51%-70%), respectively. Conclusions: Definitive radiation by use of inverse planned HDRB boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is well tolerated and achieves excellent local control of disease. However, overall

  1. Effect of Biochar on Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Nitrogen Cycling in Laboratory and Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, Nikolas; Harter, Johannes; Kaldamukova, Radina; Ruser, Reiner; Graeff-Hönninger, Simone; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    The extensive use of nitrogen (N) fertilizers in agriculture is a major source of anthropogenic N2O emissions contributing 8% to global greenhouse gas emissions. Soil biochar amendment has been suggested as a means to reduce both CO2 and non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions. The reduction of N2O emissions by biochar has been demonstrated repeatedly in field and laboratory experiments. However, the mechanisms of the reduction remain unclear. Further it is not known how biochar field-weathering affects GHG emissions and how agro-chemicals, such as the nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP), that is often simultaneously applied together with commercial N-fertilizers, impact nitrogen transformation and N2O emissions from biochar amended soils. In order investigate the duration of the biochar effect on soil N2O emissions and its susceptibility to DMPP application we performed a microcosm and field study with a high-temperature (400 ° C) beech wood derived biochar (60 t ha-1 and 5 % (w/w) biochar in the field and microcosms, respectively). While the field site contained the biochar already for three years, soil and biochar were freshly mixed for the laboratory microcosm experiments. In both studies we quantified GHG emissions and soil nitrogen speciation (nitrate, nitrite, ammonium). While the field study was carried out over the whole vegetation period of the sunflower Helianthus annuus L., soil microcosm experiments were performed for up to 9 days at 28° C. In both experiments a N-fertilizer containing DMPP was applied either before planting of the sunflowers or at the beginning of soil microcosms incubation. Laboratory microcosm experiments were performed at 60% water filled pore space reflecting average field conditions. Our results show that biochar effectively reduced soil N2O emissions by up to 60 % in the field and in the soil microcosm experiments. No significant differences in N2O emission mitigation potential between field-aged and fresh

  2. Magnetic Field R&D for the neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammei, Russell R.

    2014-09-01

    The neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF aims to constrain the EDM with a precision of 1 ×10-27 e-cm by 2018. The experiment will use a spallation ultracold neutron (UCN) source employing superfluid helium coupled to a room-temperature EDM apparatus. In the previous best experiment, conducted at ILL, effects related to magnetic field homogeneity and instability were found to dominate the systematic error. This presentation will cover our R&D efforts on passive and active magnetic shielding, magnetic field generation within shielded volumes, and precision magnetometry. The neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF aims to constrain the EDM with a precision of 1 ×10-27 e-cm by 2018. The experiment will use a spallation ultracold neutron (UCN) source employing superfluid helium coupled to a room-temperature EDM apparatus. In the previous best experiment, conducted at ILL, effects related to magnetic field homogeneity and instability were found to dominate the systematic error. This presentation will cover our R&D efforts on passive and active magnetic shielding, magnetic field generation within shielded volumes, and precision magnetometry. Supported by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and the Canada Research Chairs program.

  3. Integration of Field Geophysics and Geology in an International Setting: Multidisciplinary Geoscience Field Experience at the University of Western Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenders, A. J.; Banerjee, N.; Pratt, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    The pedagogical value of the field experience is unequaled: students, teaching assistants, and professors alike return with a renewed sense of purpose, community, and the context in which to place classroom education. It is widely regarded as valuable to personal development, and is required by the Canadian Council of Professional Geoscientists for professional registration. As part of our ongoing International Geoscience Field Experience Initiative, Earth Sciences students at the University of Western Ontario have the opportunity to enhance their education through a study abroad program. The focus is on a residential field experience to world-class localities, offered with the collaboration of internationally recognized academic researchers, government survey personnel, and industry leaders. Recent trips have included the Sn-W mineralization in the Cornwall district of the U.K., the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) in Portugal and Spain, and the metallogenic belts of Western Turkey. The integration of geological knowledge with geophysical data was one of the key organizing principles of our recent field trips to the IPB and Western Turkey. This integration is a foundation of modern Earth Sciences, and common practice in industry, it is relatively rare in classroom settings. Lectures before departure and evening exercises during the field trip supplemented the core undergraduate curriculum in geophysics, reviewing gravity, DC resistivity, induced polarization (IP), and magnetotelluric methods, focusing on application to mineral exploration. During our trip to the IPB, partnership with industry allowed students the opportunity to work with state of the art geophysical data, acquired on an exploration prospect visited during the field trip. Multi-parameter geophysical inversions of the IP and MT data produced cross-sections in depth - results interpretable by the students in the complex geological environment of the Iberian Pyrite Belt. Although the students gained valuable

  4. FLASH Hydrodynamic Simulations of Experiments to Explore the Generation of Cosmological Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopatz, Anthony; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Gregori, Gianluca; Lamb, Don; Lee, Dongwook; Meineke, Jena; Tzeferacos, Petros; Weide, Klaus

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic fields are ubiquitous throughout the universe. However, the origin and strength of these fields are not fully understood. A promising mechanism for the origin of seed fields is the asymmetric shocks that occur in hierarchical structure formation when smaller halos merge to form galaxies and galaxies merge to form clusters of galaxies. The seed fields are generated by the Biermann battery mechanism. The COSMOLAB team are conducting experiments to investigate the generation of magnetic fields by asymmetric shocks. These experiments involve laser illumination of a foil target, driving a shock into a gas-filled chamber, and a variety of plasma and magnetic field diagnostics. Hydrodynamic-only simulations are useful because the shock-generated magnetic fields are not dynamically important. In this paper, we describe hydrodynamic simulations of the experiment conducted using the FLASH code. The scientific objective of these simulations is to explore the sensitivity of the properties of the jet-like shock to target composition, thickness, and lateral extent.

  5. FLASH Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Experiments to Explore the Generation of Cosmological Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, Petros; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Gregori, Gianluca; Lamb, Donald Q.; Lee, Dongwook; Meinecke, Jena; Scopatz, Anthony; Weide, Klaus

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic fields are ubiquitous throughout the universe. However, the origin and strength of these fields are not fully understood. A promising mechanism for the origin of seed fields is the asymmetric shocks that occur in hierarchical structure formation when smaller halos merge to form galaxies and galaxies merge to form clusters of galaxies. The seed fields are generated by the Biermann battery mechanism. The COSMOLAB team of the University of Oxford is conducting experiments to investigate the generation of magnetic fields by asymmetric shocks. These experiments involve the laser illumination of a foil target, driving a shock into a gas-filled chamber, and a variety of plasma and magnetic field diagnostics. In this paper, we describe magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the experiment carried out using the FLASH code. The scientific objective of these simulations is to explore the morphology and strength of the magnetic fields generated by ablation of target material by the laser, and by the jet-like shock that is produced on the opposite side of the target.

  6. Using Magnetic Field Gradients to Simulate Variable Gravity in Fluids and Materials Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan

    2006-01-01

    Fluid flow due to a gravitational field is caused by sedimentation, thermal buoyancy, or solutal buoyancy induced convection. During crystal growth, for example, these flows are undesirable and can lead to crystal imperfections. While crystallization in microgravity can approach diffusion limited growth conditions (no convection), terrestrially strong magnetic fields can be used to control fluid flow and sedimentation effects. In this work, a theory is presented on the stability of solutal convection of a magnetized fluid(weak1y paramagnetic) in the presence of a magnetic field. The requirements for stability are developed and compared to experiments performed within the bore of a superconducting magnet. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experiments. Extension of the technique can also be applied to study artificial gravity requirements for long duration exploration missions. Discussion of this application with preliminary experiments and application of the technique to crystal growth will be provided.

  7. Complete DIEP flap survival following pedicle resection, 4 years after its transfer. Clinical evidence of autonomization

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Benedetto; Laporta, Rosaria; Sorotos, Michail; Atzeni, Matteo; Santanelli di Pompeo, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report a case of complete DIEP flap survival, following venous congestion due to the excision of a local recurrence with main pedicle, 4 years after its transfer for breast reconstruction. PMID:27713917

  8. Megagauss field generation for high-energy-density plasma science experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Rovang, Dean Curtis; Struve, Kenneth William; Porter, John Larry Jr.

    2008-10-01

    There is a need to generate magnetic fields both above and below 1 megagauss (100 T) with compact generators for laser-plasma experiments in the Beamlet and Petawatt test chambers for focused research on fundamental properties of high energy density magnetic plasmas. Some of the important topics that could be addressed with such a capability are magnetic field diffusion, particle confinement, plasma instabilities, spectroscopic diagnostic development, material properties, flux compression, and alternate confinement schemes, all of which could directly support experiments on Z. This report summarizes a two-month study to develop preliminary designs of magnetic field generators for three design regimes. These are, (1) a design for a relatively low-field (10 to 50 T), compact generator for modest volumes (1 to 10 cm3), (2) a high-field (50 to 200 T) design for smaller volumes (10 to 100 mm3), and (3) an extreme field (greater than 600 T) design that uses flux compression. These designs rely on existing Sandia pulsed-power expertise and equipment, and address issues of magnetic field scaling with capacitor bank design and field inductance, vacuum interface, and trade-offs between inductance and coil designs.

  9. Preservice Science Teachers' Beliefs About Teaching and Learning: The Influence of K-12 Field Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Elizabeth S.; Gallard, Alejandro J.

    2004-08-01

    Teaching is a complex task shaped by many external and internal influences, including the beliefs held by individual teachers. This study sought an understanding of the impact of field experiences on the beliefs developed by preservice science teachers. The participants were students in an undergraduate science education methods course that involved observation and teaching experiences in K-12 classrooms. The data used in this qualitative study included drawings representing beliefs and in-depth interviews with selected participants. The findings indicate that beliefs focused on two key dualities: learning through experience and transmission and student-centered and teacher-centered instruction. The findings also suggest that field experiences both reinforce and challenge the beliefs held by preservice science teachers.

  10. Results of Lasagna process field experiment at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Athmer, C.J.; Ho, S.V.

    1995-12-31

    The Lasagna process is being developed to remediate clayey soils in-situ. Lasagna is a combination of electrokinetics and in-situ treatment taking place in installed treatment zones. The zones are formed in either horizontal or vertical orientation using modified existing geoengineering processes. A Lasagna field experiment combining electroosmosis with carbon adsorption in the vertical orientation has been conducted at a TCE contaminated DOE site in Paducah, KY. Carbon adsorption was chosen for this first field test so that a material balance could confirm the movement of TCE from the clay to the treatment zones. The results of this experiment are presented in this paper.

  11. Teacher Field Research Experiences: Building and Maintaining the Passion for K-12 Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunton, K.; Schonberg, S.

    2006-12-01

    Academic scientists and researchers are increasingly encouraged to develop connections with K-12 educators to promote scientific literacy and bring excitement into the classroom. Such partnerships carry long-term benefits to both teachers and researchers. Teachers gain the tools, confidence, and knowledge to develop research activities with their students that promote scientific inquiry, and researchers benefit from outreach activities that improve communication skills for sharing scientific knowledge with the public. Our K-12 programs have been field based under a theme of Classrooms Without Walls, to take advantage of our local marine environment and a long-term research program on the Alaskan Arctic coast. Our professional development programs for teachers have included the creation of an annual summer graduate level course (Application of Field Research Experiences for K-12 Science and Math Educators) as an introduction to scientific methodology, observation, and inquiry based learning. We provide graduate students as resources in classrooms and for field trip experiences and provide supplies and instrumentation to teachers for K-12 field projects. Finally, teachers have an opportunity to join our researchers to remote sites under various competitive programs that receive federal support (e.g. GK-12, ARMADA). We provide examples of our activities, which are based on recent needs assessment surveys of science teachers; these included development of content knowledge and providing students with opportunities to connect concepts with experiences. Our goal is to provide field experiences to teachers and students that enable them to relate science concepts to the real world.

  12. 1999 Marsokhod Field Experiment: A Simulation of a Mars Rover Science Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, C.; Cabrol, N.; Roush, T.; Gulick, V.; Hovde, G.; Moersch, J.

    1999-01-01

    A field experiment to simulate a rover mission to Mars was performed in February 1999. This experiment, the latest in a series of rover field experiments, was designed to demonstrate and validate technologies and investigation strategies for high-science, high-technology performance, and cost-effective planetary rover operations. Objectives: The experiment objectives were to: (1) train scientists in a mission configuration relevant to Surveyor program rover missions at a terrestrial analog field site simulating the criteria of high-priority candidate landing-sites on Mars; (2) develop optimal exploration strategies; (3) evaluate the effectiveness of imaging and spectroscopy in addressing science objectives; (4) assess the value and limitation of descent imaging in supporting rover operations; and (5) evaluate the ability of a science team to correctly interpret the geology of the field site using rover observations. A field site in the California Mojave Desert was chosen for its relevance to the criteria for landing site selection for the Mars Surveyor program. These criteria are: (1) evidence of past water activity; (2) presence of a mechanism to concentrate life; (3) presence of thermal energy sources; (4) evidence of rapid burial; and (5) excavation mechanisms that could expose traces of life.

  13. Remote Sensor Application Studies Progress Report, July L, 1968 to June 30, 1969. Controlled Field Experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, L.C.; Offield, T.W.; Watson, R.D.; Cannon, P.J.; Grolier, H.J.; Pohn, H.A.; Watson, Kenneth

    1970-01-01

    Field Sites have been selected for controlled experiments to analyze physical and chemical parameters affecting the response of electromagnetic radiation to geological materials. Considerations in the selection of the sites are the availability of good exposures of nearly monomineralic rocks, level of geologic understanding, and ease of access. Seven sites, where work is underway or planned, contain extensive outcrops of the following rocks: stanstone, limestone, dolomite, and gypsum. Field measurement of quartz have been conducted at four sites.

  14. 'The Real Classroom Is Outside—Get into It!' Teaching through Field Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passow, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Field-based experiences can be powerful influences on students of any age, from pre-college through grad school, as well as on the general public. Every place-based learning experience will be different because the combination of location, participant background, available resources, and other factors will be unique. But certain shared goals, necessities, and similarities can be recognized. Intended outcomes should be identified in advance to inform planning. Preparation for field experiences should involve the students along with other participants. More-experienced students can become role models for new-comers. Field experiences involve active learning, as participants are fully immersed in the sampling site and have all senses stimulated. Constantly-changing variables highlight interconnectedness of Earth processes and fosters Systems Thinking. Decisions about the most effective ways to communicate data and results will differ from what might be based on classroom or laboratory venues. Three examples of field-based learning will be provided. One involves collaboration between educational specialists at a scientific research institution, the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, with high school students enrolled in their school's Authentic Science Research program. The second describes orientation for beginning graduate students to the geology, geography, and history of their new home region through a tourist boat ride, the well-known Circle Ride around Manhattan. The third illustrates use of 'eco-hikes' to enhance environmental understanding for Open House and other visitors. These can serve as models for designing experience-based programs in other situations.

  15. The NASA Real Time Mission Monitor - A Situational Awareness Tool for Conducting Tropical Cyclone Field Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Michael; Blakeslee, Richard; Hall, John; Parker, Philip; He, Yubin

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Real Time Mission Monitor (RTMM) is a situational awareness tool that integrates satellite, aircraft state information, airborne and surface instruments, and weather state data in to a single visualization package for real time field experiment management. RTMM optimizes science and logistic decision-making during field experiments by presenting timely data and graphics to the users to improve real time situational awareness of the experiment's assets. The RTMM is proven in the field as it supported program managers, scientists, and aircraft personnel during the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (investigated African easterly waves and Tropical Storm Debby and Helene) during August-September 2006 in Cape Verde, the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling experiment during July-August 2007 in Costa Rica, and the Hurricane Aerosonde mission into Hurricane Noel in 2-3 November 2007. The integration and delivery of this information is made possible through data acquisition systems, network communication links, and network server resources built and managed by collaborators at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC). RTMM is evolving towards a more flexible and dynamic combination of sensor ingest, network computing, and decision-making activities through the use of a service oriented architecture based on community standards and protocols. Each field experiment presents unique challenges and opportunities for advancing the functionality of RTMM. A description of RTMM, the missions it has supported, and its new features that are under development will be presented.

  16. Field experience in science for fifth grade students---a mixed methods study of learning environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Barbara E.

    The purpose of this research is to compare students' perceptions of the learning environment in a traditional science classroom and a field study classroom. This mixed methods study used a sequential explanatory design. Phase one was the quantitative phase using two survey tools. A modified version of the "What is happening in this Classroom Survey" (WIHIC) (Fraser et al., 1996) and the "Test of Science Related Attitudes" (TOSRA) (Fraser, 1982) was administered to 60 fifth grade students from one school. Data was then disaggregated by socioeconomic class and ethnicity. Results from Phase one showed that students prefer the classroom for investigation and prefer the field environment for enjoyment of science. Differences in ethnicity and class were small but Hispanic students prefer the field for investigation and equity. Students that are low socio-economic class rank cooperation in the field higher than the classroom and students that do not qualify for free or reduced lunch prefer the field environment for enjoyment of science. Finally, there are strong correlations for the variables of cooperation, investigation, equity and enjoyment of science in both the classroom and the field environment. Questions raised from the analysis of the survey data were further explored through qualitative data collection methods in phase two. Student responses to three questions were coded using template analysis to provide answers to the "how and why" field experience effects students' attitudes toward science. Three themes emerged from the coding of the results. These results showed that students are physically engaged, develop a sense of place and learn skills in the field that reinforce concepts learned in the classroom. This information will help teachers in developing quality and meaningful experiences for all students. "Closing the gaps among minority groups while improving achievement of all students constitutes the dual goals of education in the nation" (Lee et al., 2004

  17. Vacuum magnetic linear birefringence using pulsed fields: status of the BMV experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadène, Agathe; Berceau, Paul; Fouché, Mathilde; Battesti, Rémy; Rizzo, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    We present the current status of the BMV experiment. Our apparatus is based on an up-to-date resonant optical cavity coupled to a transverse magnetic field. We detail our data acquisition and analysis procedure which takes into account the symmetry properties of the raw data with respect to the orientation of the magnetic field and the sign of the cavity birefringence. The measurement result of the vacuum magnetic linear birefringence k CM presented in this paper was obtained with about 200 magnetic pulses and a maximum field of 6.5 T, giving a noise floor of about 8 × 10-21 T-2 at 3 σ confidence level.

  18. Plot-scale field experiment of surface hydrologic processes with EOS implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Macari, Emir J.; Costes, Nicholas C.

    1992-01-01

    Plot-scale hydrologic field studies were initiated at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to a) investigate the spatial and temporal variability of surface and subsurface hydrologic processes, particularly as affected by vegetation, and b) develop experimental techniques and associated instrumentation methodology to study hydrologic processes at increasingly large spatial scales. About 150 instruments, most of which are remotely operated, have been installed at the field site to monitor ground atmospheric conditions, precipitation, interception, soil-water status, and energy flux. This paper describes the nature of the field experiment, instrumentation and sampling rationale, and presents preliminary findings.

  19. Experience-based Learning in Acadia National Park: a Successful, Long-running, Model Field Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connaughton, M.

    2015-12-01

    This two-week field course has been offered alternate summers since 2000 in Acadia National Park on Mount Desert Island, Maine and addresses the geological history, physical and biological oceanography and principles of community ecology applicable to terrestrial and/or marine communities of coastal Maine. The course is often transformative and deeply meaningful to the students, many of whom have limited travel experience. The essential components of experience-based learning are well represented in this class with multiple opportunities for abstract conceptualization, active experimentation, concrete hands-on experiences and reflective observation built into the course. Each day begins with a lecture introducing concepts, which are then made concrete though daily field trips (4-8 hours in duration) into the park that include rigorous hiking, some kayaking and one commercial nature cruise. Field trips include hands-on experience with lecture concepts, on-site lessons in field methods, and data collection for independent projects. Each field trip is tied to a specific independent project, which are generated by the instructor, but self-selected by the students. Every student is actively involved in data collection during each field trip, with one student in charge of the collection each day. Daily guided journaling in three parts (scientific, personal and creative) and evening discussions provide ample opportunity for the student to reflect on the scientific content of the course, examine their personal reactions to what they have experienced and to be creative, sharing prior experiences, prior learning and their personalities. The course includes two exams, each following a week of lecture and field experiences. Independent research projects include the production of a manuscript-formatted report complete with statistical analysis of the data and a literature-based discussion of the conclusions. The combination of experiential reinforcement of concepts, abundant

  20. Abiotic stress QTL in lettuce crop–wild hybrids: comparing greenhouse and field experiments

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Yorike; Hooftman, Danny A P; Uwimana, Brigitte; Schranz, M Eric; van de Wiel, Clemens C M; Smulders, Marinus J M; Visser, Richard G F; Michelmore, Richard W; van Tienderen, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    The development of stress-tolerant crops is an increasingly important goal of current crop breeding. A higher abiotic stress tolerance could increase the probability of introgression of genes from crops to wild relatives. This is particularly relevant to the discussion on the risks of new GM crops that may be engineered to increase abiotic stress resistance. We investigated abiotic stress QTL in greenhouse and field experiments in which we subjected recombinant inbred lines from a cross between cultivated Lactuca sativa cv. Salinas and its wild relative L. serriola to drought, low nutrients, salt stress, and aboveground competition. Aboveground biomass at the end of the rosette stage was used as a proxy for the performance of plants under a particular stress. We detected a mosaic of abiotic stress QTL over the entire genome with little overlap between QTL from different stresses. The two QTL clusters that were identified reflected general growth rather than specific stress responses and colocated with clusters found in earlier studies for leaf shape and flowering time. Genetic correlations across treatments were often higher among different stress treatments within the same experiment (greenhouse or field), than among the same type of stress applied in different experiments. Moreover, the effects of the field stress treatments were more correlated with those of the greenhouse competition treatments than to those of the other greenhouse stress experiments, suggesting that competition rather than abiotic stress is a major factor in the field. In conclusion, the introgression risk of stress tolerance (trans-)genes under field conditions cannot easily be predicted based on genomic background selection patterns from controlled QTL experiments in greenhouses, especially field data will be needed to assess potential (negative) ecological effects of introgression of these transgenes into wild relatives. PMID:25360276

  1. Porous media experience applicable to field evaluation for compressed air energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Gutknecht, P.J.

    1980-06-01

    A survey is presented of porous media field experience that may aid in the development of a compressed air energy storage field demonstration. Work done at PNL and experience of other groups and related industries is reviewed. An overall view of porous media experience in the underground storage of fluids is presented. CAES experience consists of site evaluation and selection processes used by groups in California, Kansas, and Indiana. Reservoir design and field evaluation of example sites are reported. The studies raised questions about compatibility with depleted oil and gas reservoirs, storage space rights, and compressed air regulations. Related experience embraces technologies of natural gas, thermal energy, and geothermal and hydrogen storage. Natural gas storage technology lends the most toward compressed air storage development, keeping in mind the respective differences between stored fluids, physical conditions, and cycling frequencies. Both fluids are injected under pressure into an aquifer to form a storage bubble confined between a suitable caprock structure and partially displaced ground water. State-of-the-art information is summarized as the necessary foundation material for field planning. Preliminary design criteria are given as recommendations for basic reservoir characteristics. These include geometric dimensions and storage matrix properties such as permeability. Suggested ranges are given for injection air temperature and reservoir pressure. The second step in developmental research is numerical modeling. Results have aided preliminary design by analyzing injection effects upon reservoir pressure, temperature and humidity profiles. Results are reported from laboratory experiments on candidate sandstones and caprocks. Conclusions are drawn, but further verification must be done in the field.

  2. Enabling Field Experiences in Introductory Geoscience Classes through the Use of Immersive Virtual Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moysey, S. M.; Smith, E.; Sellers, V.; Wyant, P.; Boyer, D. M.; Mobley, C.; Brame, S.

    2015-12-01

    Although field experiences are an important aspect of geoscience education, the opportunity to provide physical world experiences to large groups of introductory students is often limited by access, logistical, and financial constraints. Our project (NSF IUSE 1504619) is investigating the use of immersive virtual reality (VR) technologies as a surrogate for real field experiences in introductory geosciences classes. We are developing a toolbox that leverages innovations in the field of VR, including the Oculus Rift and Google Cardboard, to enable every student in an introductory geology classroom the opportunity to have a first-person virtual field experience in the Grand Canyon. We have opted to structure our VR experience as an interactive game where students must explore the Canyon to accomplish a series of tasks designed to emphasize key aspects of geoscience learning. So far we have produced two demo products for the virtual field trip. The first is a standalone "Rock Box" app developed for the iPhone, which allows students to select different rock samples, examine them in 3D, and obtain basic information about the properties of each sample. The app can act as a supplement to the traditional rock box used in physical geology labs. The second product is a fully functioning VR environment for the Grand Canyon developed using satellite-based topographic and imagery data to retain real geologic features within the experience. Players can freely navigate to explore anywhere they desire within the Canyon, but are guided to points of interest where they are able to complete exercises that will be aligned with specific learning goals. To this point we have integrated elements of the "Rock Box" app within the VR environment, allowing players to examine 3D details of rock samples they encounter within the Grand Canyon. We plan to provide demos of both products and obtain user feedback during our presentation.

  3. An Experimenting Field Approach for the Numerical Solution of Multiphase Flow in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Salama, Amgad; Sun, Shuyu; Bao, Kai

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we apply the experimenting pressure field technique to the problem of the flow of two or more immiscible phases in porous media. In this technique, a set of predefined pressure fields are introduced to the governing partial differential equations. This implies that the velocity vector field and the divergence at each cell of the solution mesh can be determined. However, since none of these fields is the true pressure field entailed by the boundary conditions and/or the source terms, the divergence at each cell will not be the correct one. Rather the residue which is the difference between the true divergence and the calculated one is obtained. These fields are designed such that these residuals are used to construct the matrix of coefficients of the pressure equation and the right-hand side. The experimenting pressure fields are generated in the solver routine and are fed to the different routines, which may be called physics routines, which return to the solver the elements of the matrix of coefficients. Therefore, this methodology separates the solver routines from the physics routines and therefore results in simpler, easy to construct, maintain, and update algorithms.

  4. Hydromagnetic Dynamics and Magnetic Field Enhancement in a Turbulent Spherical Couette Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Douglas; Adams, Matthew; Kara, Onur; Lathrop, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The University of Maryland Three Meter Geodynamo, a spherical Couette experiment filled with liquid sodium and geometrically similar to the earth's core, is used to study hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic phenomena in rapidly rotating turbulence. An external coil applies a magnetic field in order to study hydromagnetic effects relevant to the earth's outer core such as dynamo action, while an array of 31 external Hall sensors measures the Gauss coefficients of the resulting magnetic field. The flow state is strongly dependent on Rossby number, Ro = (ΩI -ΩO) /ΩO , where ΩI and ΩO are the inner and outer sphere rotation frequencies. The flow state is inferred from the torque required to drive the inner sphere. The generation of internal toroidal magnetic field through the Ω-effect is measured by a Hall probe inserted into the sodium. A self-sustaining dynamo has not yet been observed at rotation speeds up to ΩO=3 Hz, which is three-fourths of the design maximum of the experiment. However, continuous dipole amplification up to 12% of a small applied field has been observed at Ro=?17.7 while bursts of dipole field have been observed up to 15% of a large external applied field at Ro=+6.0 and up to 20% of a small applied field at Ro=+2.15.

  5. Self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Nilson, P. M.; Goncharov, V. N.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-06-01

    Electric and self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments on the OMEGA Laser Facility were investigated employing radiography with ˜10- to 60-MeV protons. The experiment used plastic-shell targets with imposed surface defects (glue spots, wires, and mount stalks), which enhance self-generated fields. The fields were measured during the 1-ns laser drive with an on-target intensity ˜1015 W/cm2. Proton radiographs show multiple ring-like structures produced by electric fields ˜107 V/cm and fine structures from surface defects, indicating self-generated fields up to ˜3 MG. These electric and magnetic fields show good agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations when the latter include the ∇Te × ∇ne source, Nernst convection, and anisotropic resistivity. The simulations predict that self-generated fields affect heat fluxes in the conduction zone and, through this, affect the growth of local perturbations.

  6. A Nimbus G pre-launch field experiment in the Gulf of Mexico, October 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderpiepen, H.

    1977-01-01

    A large scale field experiment, which was arranged in support of the Nimbus G - Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) project was studied. The experiment was to provide three air and two shipborne platforms simultaneously to members of the Nimbus G Experiment Team (NET) and to other scientists in order to collect data from common test sites. Besides establishing fundamental relations between the light in the sea and the biochemical properties of water, the data will be used mainly for the development of algorithms during the prelaunch phase of Nimbus G.

  7. Far ultraviolet wide field imaging with a SPARTAN /Experiment of Opportunity/ Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, G. R.; Heckathorn, H. M.; Opal, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    A wide-field electrographic Schmidt camera, sensitive in the far UV (1230-2000 A), has been developed and utilized in three sounding rocket flights. It is now being prepared for Shuttle flight as an Experiment of Opportunity Payload (EOP) (recently renamed as the SPARTAN program). In this paper, we discuss (1) design of the instrument and payload, particularly as influenced by our experience in rocket flights; (2) special problems of EOP in comparison to sounding rocket missions; (3) relationship of this experiment to, and special capabilities in comparison to, other space astronomy instruments such as Space Telescope; and (4) a tentative observing plan for an EOP mission.

  8. Self-generated magnetic fields in blast-wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaig, Markus; Plewa, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    We study the effect of self-generated magnetic fields in two-dimensional computer models of blast-wave driven high-energy density Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) experiments. Previous works [1,2] suggested that such fields have the potential to influence the RTI morphology and mixing. When neglecting the friction force between electrons and ions, we do indeed find that dynamically important (β≲103) magnetic fields are generated. However, in the more realistic case where the friction force is accounted for, the resulting fields are much weaker, β≳105 , and can no longer influence the dynamics of the system. Although we find no evidence for dynamically important magnetic fields being created in the two-dimensional case studied here, the situation might be different in a three-dimensional setup, which will be addressed in a future study.

  9. A 7 T Pulsed Magnetic Field Generator for Magnetized Laser Plasma Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guangyue; Liang, Yihan; Song, Falun; Yuan, Peng; Wang, Yulin; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2015-02-01

    A pulsed magnetic field generator was developed to study the effect of a magnetic field on the evolution of a laser-generated plasma. A 40 kV pulsed power system delivered a fast (~230 ns), 55 kA current pulse into a single-turn coil surrounding the laser target, using a capacitor bank of 200 nF, a laser-triggered switch and a low-impedance strip transmission line. A one-dimensional uniform 7 T pulsed magnetic field was created using a Helmholtz coil pair with a 6 mm diameter. The pulsed magnetic field was controlled to take effect synchronously with a nanosecond heating laser beam, a femtosecond probing laser beam and an optical Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) detector. The preliminary experiments demonstrate bifurcation and focusing of plasma expansion in a transverse magnetic field.

  10. Learning to perceive English /d/ versus /edh/: A comparison of French, English, and English-French bilingual 4-year-olds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundara, Megha; Polka, Linda; Campisi, Lisa; Genesee, Fred; Marcoux, Caroline

    2002-05-01

    Recent findings show that discrimination of the English /d-edh/ does not differ for English and French infants (6-8-month-olds and 10-12-month-olds), although English adults clearly outperform French adults on this contrast, which is not phonemic in French. With respect to age effects, English listeners' perception of /d-edh/ improves between infancy and adulthood, whereas French listeners' perception remains unchanged [Polka et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 2190-2200 (2001)]. In the present study, we tested monolingual English, monolingual French, and early English-French bilingual 4-year-olds on the same contrast using the same stimuli and procedures to clarify when facilitative effects of language experience emerge and whether they are affected by bilingualism. Four findings are reported. First, a language effect (English>French) is evident by 4 years of age. Second, among native (English) listeners facilitative effects are evident by 4-years of age (infants<4-year-olds4-year-olds=adults). Fourth, bilingual 4-year-olds' performance is virtually identical to that of their French-speaking peers, revealing a strong effect of bilingualism on the perception of this contrast. Several factors contributing to these findings will be discussed.

  11. Influence of a modulated bias field on dynamic conversion in a rotating gradient experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyenhuis, J. A.; Friedlaender, F. J.; Matsumoto, S.

    1984-03-01

    In the rotating gradient experiment, a magnetic bubble is in steady state circular motion. The modulation of the dc bias field by a small sinusoidal component, the tickle field, has been found effective in reducing the static coercivity, resulting in stable bubble motion. In this study, the influence of the tickle field on Bloch curve punch-through velocity is investigated. A bubble is circulated both in the presence and absence of the tickle field. For low amplitude tickle fields, Hzt≤0.25 Oe, the translational velocity at which punch-through occurs, ≂3.5 m/s, is the same both in the presence and absence of the tickle field. However, the minimum velocity at which a bubble can be propagated is lower in the presence of the tickle field. For larger Hzt, the punch-through velocity is reduced, with the extent of the reduction depending on the tickle field frequency. The amplitude and frequency of the tickle field affect the apparent dynamic coercivity.

  12. Drinking consequences and subsequent drinking in college students over 4 years.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Julia A; Sher, Kenneth J; Wood, Phillip K

    2014-12-01

    There is some evidence that college student drinkers may continue drinking in the face of adverse consequences. We examined 2 hypotheses: (a) that this seemingly pathological behavior is a phenomenon of university life, occurring with consistency throughout the entirety of college, and (b) that individuals accumulate these consequences over multiple semesters in college. A sample of 3,720 students from a large Midwestern university was asked to complete surveys the summer before college and every semester thereafter for 4 years. Results showed that certain drinking-related consequences (e.g., blackouts, regretted sexual experiences) consistently predicted continued frequent heavy drinking in the following semester, even after controlling for sex, race, age, and previous-semester frequent heavy drinking (range of odds ratio = 1.17 to 1.45 across semesters, p < .01). Such potent consequences may predict subsequent drinking for a number of possible reasons that may be examined and addressed as they would pertain to specific protective behavioral strategy-related and cognitive interventions. Furthermore, consequences were accumulated over multiple semesters by notable proportions of students. For example, 13.8% of students reported blacking out 5 time-points or more--describing a full half or more of their college careers. Experimental studies which aim to modify students' perceptions of norms associated with these consequences may aid in developing interventions to reduce the burden of harm to students. In the broader context, and given the prevalence of students' accumulation of consequences, future study might aim to determine how and in what ways these findings describe either pathological or normative processes.

  13. Engaging students in research learning experiences through hydrology field excursions and short films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewen, Tracy; Seibert, Jan

    2015-04-01

    One of the best ways to engage students and instill enthusiasm for hydrology is to expose them to hands-on learning. A focus on hydrology field research can be used to develop context-rich and active learning, and help solidify idealized learning where students are introduced to individual processes through textbook examples, often neglecting process interactions and an appreciation for the complexity of the system. We introduced a field course where hydrological measurement techniques are used to study processes such as snow hydrology and runoff generation, while also introducing students to field research and design of their own field project. Additionally, we produced short films of each of these research-based field excursions, with in-house film expertise. These films present a short overview of field methods applied in alpine regions and will be used for our larger introductory hydrology courses, exposing students to field research at an early stage, and for outreach activities, including for potential high school students curious about hydrology. In the field course, students design a low-budget experiment with the aim of going through the different steps of a 'real' scientific project, from formulating the research question to presenting their results. During the field excursions, students make discharge measurements in several alpine streams with a salt tracer to better understand the spatial characteristics of an alpine catchment, where source waters originate and how they contribute to runoff generation. Soil moisture measurements taken by students in this field excursion were used to analyze spatial soil moisture patterns in the alpine catchment and subsequently used in a publication. Another field excursion repeats a published experiment, where preferential soil flow paths are studied using a tracer and compared to previously collected data. For each field excursion, observational data collected by the students is uploaded to an online database we

  14. Teacher Candidates' Implementation of the Personal and Social Responsibility Model in Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Okseon

    2012-01-01

    With the teacher concerns theory (Fuller, 1969) as a theoretical framework, this study has set out to examine how physical education teacher candidates perceive their implementation of the Personal and Social Responsibility Model (Hellison, 2003) and how they actually implement it during field experience. Five teacher candidates (three female, two…

  15. ESL Field Trips: Maximizing the Experience Both in and out of the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Helen Elizabeth

    It is argued that field trips and related activities in and out of the classroom, especially when well-planned, have educational, social, and cultural value for students of English as a Second Language (ESL). They offer meaningful learning experiences, extra learning opportunities, and authentic language encounters with native English-speakers.…

  16. The Role of Homework in Student Learning Outcomes: Evidence from a Field Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grodner, Andrew; Rupp, Nicholas G.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a field experiment in the classroom where principles of micro-economics students are randomly assigned into homework-required and not-required groups. The authors find that homework plays an important role in student learning, especially so for students who initially perform poorly in the course. Students in…

  17. FLASH MHD simulations of experiments that study shock-generated magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Scopatz, A.; Weide, K.

    2015-12-01

    We summarize recent additions and improvements to the high energy density physics capabilities in FLASH, highlighting new non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) capabilities. We then describe 3D Cartesian and 2D cylindrical FLASH MHD simulations that have helped to design and analyze experiments conducted at the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a laser illuminates a carbon rod target placed in a gas-filled chamber. A magnetic field diagnostic (called a Bdot) employing three very small induction coils is used to measure all three components of the magnetic field at a chosen point in space. The simulations have revealed that many fascinating physical processes occur in the experiments. These include megagauss magnetic fields generated by the interaction of the laser with the target via the Biermann battery mechanism, which are advected outward by the vaporized target material but decrease in strength due to expansion and resistivity; magnetic fields generated by an outward expanding shock via the Biermann battery mechanism; and a breakout shock that overtakes the first wave, the contact discontinuity between the target material and the gas, and then the initial expanding shock. Finally, we discuss the validation and predictive science we have done for this experiment with FLASH.

  18. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "Information and College Access: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Information and College Access: Evidence From a Randomized Field Experiment" examined the impact of offering an online informational video and financial aid materials to high school students on: (1) their postsecondary aspirations, (2) the accuracy of their understanding of financial aid availability, and (3) the accuracy of their estimates of…

  19. Field Experience Supervision: A Comparison of Cooperating Teachers' and College Supervisors' Evaluations of Student Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunn, Lorie L.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored and compared the ways in which school-based cooperating teachers and college supervisors evaluate student teachers. The scores allocated to student teachers by school-based cooperating teachers and college supervisors in the final field experience evaluations of student teachers were analyzed. A mixed methods research design…

  20. Mind the Gap. Combining Theory and Practice in a Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turunen, Tuija A.; Tuovila, Seija

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we describe a collegial case study conducted in one Finnish university during the last field experience in a primary school teacher education program and discuss pedagogy of supervision from university supervisors' perspectives. The aim of the study was to clarify the role of university supervisors and try out a collegial…

  1. The Discourse and Reflections of Teacher Candidates during an Early Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, John E.; Dani, Danielle E.; Weade, Ginger

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the capacity of teacher candidates to facilitate and reflect on classroom discourse in the context of an early field experience. The classroom discourse and reflections of 10 teacher candidates were examined through interviews, audio and video recordings, and written reflections. The findings indicated…

  2. Reflecting on Field Studies in Teacher Education: Experiences of Student Teachers in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niklasson, Laila; Sandberg, Anette

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe how field studies can be useful in teacher education. While participating in a specialty area called "Play, learning and development," student teachers collected data about their own and young children's experience and perception of the outdoor environment. They observed, carried out interviews from a…

  3. Development of Preservice Teachers' Value Orientations during a Secondary Methods Course and Early Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sofo, Seidu; Curtner-Smith, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have examined the value orientations of physical education preservice teachers (PTs). The purposes of this study were to: (1) describe the extent to which one cohort of PTs' value orientations changed and developed during a secondary methods course and early field experience (EFE); and (2) determine why PTs' value orientations changed…

  4. Millimeter-Wave Measurement of Frozen Hydrometeors during the 2003 Wakasa Bay Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Chang, Dong-Eon; Weinman, James A.; Wang, J. R.; Tanelli, Simone; Roman, J.; Sekelsky, S.

    2004-01-01

    This study analyzes the millimeter-wave radiometric measurements of frozen hydrometeors during the field experiment that was held in Wakasa bay of Japan in January 29, 2003. The MM5 cloud simulation is employed to provide temperature and humidity profiles for the radiative transfer calculations.

  5. What Preservice Physical Educators Observe about Lessons in Progressive Field Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belka, David E.

    1988-01-01

    Freshmen through senior physical education majors' observation and interpretation of a videotaped soccer skill lesson indicated that over time they tended to observe the lesson more congruently with program goals and reflect the targeted teaching skills in the current field experience. The quality and clarity of responses improved as the subjects…

  6. A Three Parameter Model for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluating Human Services Field Experience. EDIC Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feringer, F. Richard; Jacobs, Edward

    A model for planning, monitoring, and evaluating human service internships and field experiences is described. The model is organized around work roles and can easily be adopted for general job evaluation beyond intern placements. Since the curriculum should contain the generalists' skills plus specialized skills representative of defined job…

  7. MODELING HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REDUCTION IN GROUND- WATER IN FIELD-SCALE TRANSPORT AND LABORATORY BATCH EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A plausible and consistent model is developed to obtain a quantitative description of the gradual disappearance of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from groundwater in a small-scale field tracer test and in batch kinetic experiments using aquifer sediments under similar chemical cond...

  8. More than "Just" Changing Diapers: The Experiences of Preservice Early Childhood Teachers in Infant Field Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Lisa Marie Powell

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that early childhood preservice teachers are typically being prepared to work with children from birth through age 8, preservice field experiences with infants continue to be largely missing in early childhood teacher preparation programs Since the education and care of infants often takes place in vastly different settings than…

  9. Reemployment Bonuses in the Unemployment Insurance System: Evidence from Three Field Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, Philip K., Ed.; Spiegelman, Robert G., Ed.

    This book contains eight papers examining the evidence from three field experiences in Illinois, Pennsylvania, and Washington that were conducted to identify the impact of reemployment bonuses on the following indicators characterizing the unemployment insurance (UI) program: weeks of UI receipt during the benefit year; dollars of UI received…

  10. Health Education Field Experience Stories: A Reflective, Digital, Performance-Based Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyde, Adrian R.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a reflective, systematic, performance-based project resulting in the development of a digital story about a community health education field experience. The project is designed for preservice health education students at the college/university level. The primary benefit of the project is that it challenges students to engage…

  11. Math Skills and Labor-Market Outcomes: Evidence from a Resume-Based Field Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedel, Cory; Tyhurst, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We examine the link between math skills and labor-market outcomes using a resume-based field experiment. Specifically, we send fictitious resumes in response to online job postings, randomly assigning some resumes to indicate stronger math skills, and measure employer responses. The resumes that are randomly assigned to indicate stronger math…

  12. The Impact of a Social Justice Service-Learning Field Experience in a Social Foundations Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinkler, Barri; hannah, c. lynne; Tinkler, Alan; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This interpretive study examines the outcomes of using a social justice service-learning field experience in a social foundations course to help illuminate for teacher candidates the often "invisible" institutionalized inequities of public schools. The findings demonstrate how social justice service-learning can be used as a field…

  13. Focusing on Reflective Practice: Reconsidering Field Experiences for Urban Teacher Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalchman, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    The traditional structure of field experiences poses a dilemma for urban teacher preparation. Research shows that teachers of low-income, urban students often have negative beliefs about, and attitudes towards, their students. Yet, large numbers of cooperating teachers are routinely utilized as mentors in urban classrooms. This practice…

  14. Innovative Field Experiences in Teacher Education: Student-Teachers and Mentors as Partners in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baeten, Marlies; Simons, Mathea

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates team teaching between student teachers and mentors during student teachers' field experiences. A systematic literature search was conducted, which resulted into a narrative review. Three team teaching models could be distinguished: (1) the co-planning and co-evaluation model, (2) the assistant teaching model, and (3) the…

  15. Providing Culturally Responsive Teaching in Field-Based and Student Teaching Experiences: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kea, Cathy D.; Trent, Stanley C.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed design study chronicles the yearlong outcomes of 27 undergraduate preservice teacher candidates' ability to design and deliver culturally responsive lesson plans during field-based experience lesson observations and student teaching settings after receiving instruction in a special education methods course. While components of…

  16. Field Biology Experiences of Undergraduate Students: The Impact of Novelty Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotton, Debby R. E.; Cotton, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Fieldwork is generally considered an essential aspect of teaching and learning about biology, at both school and university level. However, previous research suggests that the novelty of being in an unfamiliar field environment can negatively, as well as positively, impact on the student experience and learning. This research uses the framework of…

  17. Teachers Who Embrace Diversity: The Role of Reflection, Discourse, and Field Experiences in Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, Deborah S.; Forlenza-Bailey, Anna; Shaw, Stan F.

    1999-01-01

    Investigated beginning teachers' beliefs about diversity issues. Interviews with beginning teachers graduated from a program that emphasized the development of critical reflection and moral decision making indicated that the confluence of field experiences in professional development centers, seminar-related discourse, and critical reflection…

  18. Concerns of Preservice Physical Education Teachers Participating in an Early Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Shawna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of concerns by type (self, task, and impact) of preservice physical education teachers participating in an early field experience. Participants (n = 52) taught three physical education lessons in a junior high school. Following each teaching episode, participants wrote concerns in their…

  19. Field versus laboratory experiments to evaluate the fate of azoxystrobin in an amended vineyard soil.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Hernández, E; Marín-Benito, J M; Andrades, M S; Sánchez-Martín, M J; Rodríguez-Cruz, M S

    2015-11-01

    This study reports the effect that adding spent mushroom substrate (SMS) to a representative vineyard soil from La Rioja region (Spain) has on the behaviour of azoxystrobin in two different environmental scenarios. Field dissipation experiments were conducted on experimental plots amended at rates of 50 and 150 t ha(-1), and similar dissipation experiments were simultaneously conducted in the laboratory to identify differences under controlled conditions. Azoxystrobin dissipation followed biphasic kinetics in both scenarios, although the initial dissipation phase was much faster in the field than in the laboratory experiments, and the half-life (DT50) values obtained in the two experiments were 0.34-46.3 days and 89.2-148 days, respectively. Fungicide residues in the soil profile increased in the SMS amended soil and they were much higher in the top two layers (0-20 cm) than in deeper layers. The persistence of fungicide in the soil profile is consistent with changes in azoxystrobin adsorption by unamended and amended soils over time. Changes in the dehydrogenase activity (DHA) of soils under different treatments assayed in the field and in the laboratory indicated that SMS and the fungicide had a stimulatory effect on soil DHA. The results reveal that the laboratory studies usually reported in the literature to explain the fate of pesticides in amended soils are insufficient to explain azoxystrobin behaviour under real conditions. Field studies are necessary to set up efficient applications of SMS and fungicide, with a view to preventing the possible risk of water contamination.

  20. An Investigation into the Contents and Aspects of College Students' Reflective Thoughts during Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    Field experience makes a strong contribution to the learning of students. However, the procedure for conducting training sessions based on experiential teaching methods is relatively unclear, and the contents and aspects of students' reflections during such training are not well known. This study applied experiential teaching methods in a college…

  1. Do Employers Prefer Workers Who Attend For-Profit Colleges? Evidence from a Field Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darolia, Rajeev; Koedel, Cory; Martorell, Paco; Wilson, Katie; Perez-Arce, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports results from a resume-based field experiment designed to examine employer preferences for job applicants who attended for-profit colleges. For-profit colleges have seen sharp increases in enrollment in recent years despite alternatives, such as public community colleges, being much cheaper. We sent almost 9,000 fictitious…

  2. Rational Ignorance in Education: A Field Experiment in Student Plagiarism. NBER Working Paper No. 15672

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dee, Thomas S.; Jacob, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the concern that student plagiarism has become increasingly common, there is relatively little objective data on the prevalence or determinants of this illicit behavior. This study presents the results of a natural field experiment designed to address these questions. Over 1,200 papers were collected from the students in undergraduate…

  3. Demonstrating Pre-Service Teacher Learning through Engagement in Global Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Raymond W.

    2015-01-01

    Global opportunities for students to engage in teaching and learning have the potential to have a great impact on their professional knowledge base as a future teacher. However, little information is available about how global field experiences impact pre-service teachers' understanding due to substantial challenges in collecting and analyzing…

  4. Evaluation of the Persistent Issues in History Laboratory for Virtual Field Experience (PIH-LVFE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brush, Thomas; Saye, John; Kale, Ugur; Hur, Jung Won; Kohlmeier, Jada; Yerasimou, Theano; Guo, Lijiang; Symonette, Simone

    2009-01-01

    The Persistent Issues in History Laboratory for Virtual Field Experience (PIH-LVFE) combines a database of video cases of authentic classroom practices with multiple resources and tools to enable pre-service social studies teachers to virtually observe teachers implementing problem-based learning activities. In this paper, we present the results…

  5. Field Experiences in Teacher Education: The Perceptions and Qualities of Written Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulusoy, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the Pre-service Teachers' (PSTs') field experience-related perceptions and the qualities of their written reflections. Two thousand four hundred journal entries written by 75 teacher candidates were analyzed to classify their qualities. In addition, semi-structured interviews were conducted with all of the subjects.…

  6. Developing the Practice of Teacher Questioning through a K-2 Elementary Mathematics Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This article presents findings from research on a field experience designed to help elementary preservice teachers learn the practice of teacher questioning during formal and informal interviews to analyze student mathematical thinking in K-2 classrooms. The practice of teacher questioning is framed as choosing a mathematical goal, analyzing…

  7. Conducting Supervised Experiential Learning/Field Experiences for Students' Development and Career Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Jerome I.

    A major problem in the educational system of the United States is that a great number of students and graduates lack a career objective, and, therefore, many workers are unhappy. Offering a variety of supervised field experiences, paid or unpaid, in which students see workers in their occupations will help students identify career choices.…

  8. International Field Studies in Norwegian Teacher Training Courses: Perspectives and Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Odd Inge

    2009-01-01

    Little research has been done on instructing student teachers by means of field studies in developing countries. Herein, I argue that sending geography students on such expeditions provides them with valuable perspectives, connections and improved knowledge, especially if they experience personal involvement and participation in addition to…

  9. Effects of supervision on tax compliance: Evidence from a field experiment in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Gangl, Katharina; Torgler, Benno; Kirchler, Erich; Hofmann, Eva

    2014-01-01

    We conduct a field experiment on tax compliance, focusing on newly founded firms. As a novelty the effect of tax authorities’ supervision on timely tax payments is examined. Interestingly, results show no positive overall effect of close supervision on tax compliance. PMID:25843992

  10. Field Practicum Experiences of Bilingual Social Work Students Working with Limited English Proficiency Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engstrom, David W.; Min, Jong Won; Gamble, Lara

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the field internship experiences of bilingual graduate social work students who worked with limited English proficiency (LEP) clients. Data were collected via a Web-based survey from 55 bilingual social work students. Respondents reported that LEP clients required more time and work and generally had more complicated cases than…

  11. Agricultural Education Early Field Experience through the Lens of the EFE Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smalley, Scott W.; Retallick, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this national study was to describe agricultural teacher education early field experience (EFE) practices using the EFE model. The population for this study was all agricultural education teacher preparation programs (N = 83) listed in the AAAE Directory of University Faculty in Agricultural Education. Data were collected via an…

  12. From Isolation to Collaboration: Rethinking the Preservice Field Experience from a Community Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Laura A.; Klecka, Cari L.; Silva, Susan

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we report the action research that shaped the development of the Growing Career Educators project, a teacher-designed field experience for preservice teachers within a high school in the fifth-largest school district in the country. The research consisted of two cycles of action research, both of which focused on whether a…

  13. Applying "Best Practices" to Preparation of Future Educators Using Exemplary Field Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramey, Linda K.; Cole, Donna J.

    This paper provides an overview of the components of Wright State University's (WSU's) present teacher preparation program and addresses the changes envisioned with Ohio's recently approved licensure programs. The paper explains how WSU's current program offers field experiences in three phases. Student teachers have the opportunity to work under…

  14. Field Based Experience: A Study of Social Control and Student Teachers' Response to Institutional Constraints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Jesse

    An ethnographic study of 12 student teachers in an elementary school field-based program determined, through observation and interviews, how they reacted to the socializing process that is an integral factor in practicum experiences. Institutional and social forces that shaped these preservice teachers' behaviors and ideas were the elementary…

  15. "Doing Gender" at "Body Worlds": Embodying Field Trips as Affective Educational Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Joyce; Huff, Leah; Bridgen, Jen; Carolan, Andrea; Chang, Ashley; Ennis, Katherine; Loynes, Kathryn; Miller, Jen

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the background, experience and outcomes of an explicitly feminist field trip to Gunther von Hagen's "Body Worlds 2: The Anatomical Exhibition of Real Human Bodies". The cultural landscape of this exhibition materialized gendered geographies very powerfully, facilitating observation and analysis of embodied and emotional,…

  16. The Preservice Teachers Are Watching: Framing and Reframing the Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherff, Lisa; Singer, Nancy Robb

    2012-01-01

    In this article we employ Sizers' (1999) school- and classroom-based lenses for observation and apply them to the events and interactions that teacher education students see during school-based field experiences. Our data include online reflections and discussions among 33 students enrolled in a teacher education program at a large, public…

  17. Factors Influencing Teacher Candidates' Participation in a Paid Field Experience with Urban Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Barbara A.; Grande, Marya; Marable, Michele A.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports problems faced by urban schools as well as teacher education's attempts to remedy these problems, and explores one college's effort to understand the complexities of teacher candidates' decision to work in urban schools. A paid field experience in an urban school district allowed teacher candidates to explore their perceptions…

  18. Using Experiment and Computer Modeling to Determine the Off-Axis Magnetic Field of a Solenoid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lietor-Santos, Juan Jose

    2014-01-01

    The study of the ideal solenoid is a common topic among introductory-based physics textbooks and a typical current arrangement in laboratory hands-on experiences where the magnetic field inside a solenoid is determined at different currents and at different distances from its center using a magnetic probe. It additionally provides a very simple…

  19. Engineering and agronomy aspects of a long-term precision agriculture field experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much research has been conducted on specific precision agriculture tools and implementation strategies, but little has been reported on long-term evaluation of integrated precision agriculture field experiments. In 2004 our research team developed and initiated a multi-faceted “precision agriculture...

  20. A Descriptive Analysis of the Experience Based Training and Development Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Todd

    This article describes and analyzes the field of experience-based training and development (EBTD) in an attempt to determine its scope, goals, activities, participants, providers, and philosophical bases. EBTD is a process that uses hands-on challenge or adventure, usually in the outdoors, combined with review and feedback, to improve work place…

  1. Making the Difference for Teachers: The Field Experience in Actual Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slick, Gloria Appelt, Ed.

    This is the third in a series of four books presenting a variety of field experience program models and philosophies that drive the programs provided to preservice teachers during their undergraduate teacher preparation. This publication explores the internal workings of the relationships and events that have an impact on all the persons involved…

  2. Bioacoustic Field Research: A Primer to Acoustic Analyses and Playback Experiments With Primates

    PubMed Central

    FISCHER, JULIA; NOSER, RAHEL; HAMMERSCHMIDT, KURT

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic analyses of primate vocalizations as well as playback experiments are staple methods in primatology. Acoustic analyses have been used to investigate the influence of factors such as individuality, context, sex, age, and size on variation in calls. More recent studies have expanded our knowledge on the effects of phylogenetic relatedness and the structure of primate vocal repertoires in general. Complementary playback experiments allow direct testing of hypotheses regarding the attribution of meaning to calls, the cognitive mechanisms underpinning responses, and/or the adaptive value of primate behavior. After briefly touching on the historical background of this field of research, we first provide an introduction to recording primate vocalizations and discuss different approaches to describe primate calls in terms of their temporal and spectral properties. Second, we present a tutorial regarding the preparation, execution, and interpretation of field playback experiments, including a review of studies that have used such approaches to investigate the responses to acoustic variation in calls including the integration of contextual and acoustic information, recognition of kin and social relationships, and social knowledge. Based on the review of the literature and our own experience, we make a number of recommendations regarding the most common problems and pitfalls. The power of acoustic analyses typically hinges on the quality of the recordings and the number of individuals represented in the sample. Playback experiments require profound knowledge of the natural behavior of the animals for solid interpretation; experiments should be conducted sparingly, to avoid habituation of the subjects to the occurrence of the calls; experimenter-blind designs chosen whenever possible; and researchers should brace themselves for long periods of waiting times until the appropriate moments to do the experiment arise. If all these aspects are considered, acoustic analyses

  3. Sensitivity Reach of the Neutron EDM Experiment: The Electric Field Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Cooper, M.; Currie, S. A.; Makela, M. F.; Ramsey, J. C.; Tajima, S.; Womack, T. L.; Long, J. C.; Stanislaus, S.

    2010-08-04

    The search for an electric dipole moment of the neutron tests physics beyond the Standard Model such as new sources of CP-violation and Supersymmetry. The nEDM experiment aims to improve the sensitivity on the current limit of the electric dipole moment of the neutron to <10{sup -27} e{center_dot}cm. The experiment will use a flux of Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCNs) produced and stored in a bath of superfluid He-II. A change in precession frequency is expected for a non-zero EDM when an electric field is applied parallel and antiparallel to a magnetic field across the neutron storage cell. A dominant parameter in terms of reducing the statistical uncertainty of this measurement is the strength of the applied electric field. An experiment to measure if superfluid He-II can sustain up to 50 kV/cm for a volume and electrode spacings comparable to the nEDM experiment has been constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists in a large-area parallel plate capacitor immersed in a 200 liter central volume inside a suitable cryostat that in turn is connected to a dilution refrigerator unit. A description of test runs and the status of the experiment is presented.

  4. Interior Vector Magnetic Field Monitoring via External Measurements for the SNS Neutron EDM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Nima; Brown, Michael; Carr, Robert; Filippone, Bradley; Osthelder, Charles; Plaster, Bradley; Slutsky, Simon; Swank, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    A prototype of a magnetic field monitoring system designed to reconstruct the vector magnetic field components (and, hence, all nine of the ∂Bi / ∂xj field gradients) within the interior measurement fiducial volume solely from external measurements is under development for the SNS neutron EDM experiment. A first-generation room-temperature prototype array has already been tested. A second-generation prototype array consisting of 12 cryogenic-compatible fluxgate magnetometer probes will be deployed within the cold region of the experiment's 1 / 3 -scale cryogenic magnet testing apparatus. We will report progress towards the development of this second-generation prototype. This work was supported in part by the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Physics under Award No. DE-FG02-08ER41557.

  5. Evaluation of Fast-Time Wake Models Using Denver 2006 Field Experiment Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nash’at N.; Pruis, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducted a series of wake vortex field experiments at Denver in 2003, 2005, and 2006. This paper describes the lidar wake vortex measurements and associated meteorological data collected during the 2006 deployment, and includes results of recent reprocessing of the lidar data using a new wake vortex algorithm and estimates of the atmospheric turbulence using a new algorithm to estimate eddy dissipation rate from the lidar data. The configuration and set-up of the 2006 field experiment allowed out-of-ground effect vortices to be tracked in lateral transport further than any previous campaign and thereby provides an opportunity to study long-lived wake vortices in moderate to low crosswinds. An evaluation of NASA's fast-time wake vortex transport and decay models using the dataset shows similar performance as previous studies using other field data.

  6. Simulation of Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Fields for AMiBA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chan-Gyung; Park, Changbom

    2002-06-01

    We have made a topological study of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization maps by simulating the AMiBA experiment results. A ΛCDM CMB sky is adopted to make mock interferometric observations designed for the AMiBA experiment. CMB polarization fields are reconstructed from the AMiBA mock visibility data using the maximum entropy method. We have also considered effects of Galactic foregrounds on the CMB polarization fields. The genus statistic is calculated from the simulated Q and U polarization maps, where Q and U are Stokes parameters. Our study shows that the Galactic foreground emission, even at low Galactic latitude, is expected to have small effects on the CMB polarization field. Increasing survey area and integration time is essential to detect non-Gaussian signals of cosmological origin through genus measurement.

  7. Experience-dependent specialization of receptive field surround for selective coding of natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Pecka, Michael; Han, Yunyun; Sader, Elie; Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D

    2014-10-22

    At eye opening, neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) are selective for stimulus features, but circuits continue to refine in an experience-dependent manner for some weeks thereafter. How these changes contribute to the coding of visual features embedded in complex natural scenes remains unknown. Here we show that normal visual experience after eye opening is required for V1 neurons to develop a sensitivity for the statistical structure of natural stimuli extending beyond the boundaries of their receptive fields (RFs), which leads to improvements in coding efficiency for full-field natural scenes (increased selectivity and information rate). These improvements are mediated by an experience-dependent increase in the effectiveness of natural surround stimuli to hyperpolarize the membrane potential specifically during RF-stimulus epochs triggering action potentials. We suggest that neural circuits underlying surround modulation are shaped by the statistical structure of visual input, which leads to more selective coding of features in natural scenes. PMID:25263755

  8. Remediation of copper contaminated soil by using different particle sizes of apatite: a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jinfeng; Hu, Tiantian; Cang, Long; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    The particle size of apatite is one of the critical factors that influence the adsorption of heavy metals on apatite in the remediation of heavy metal contaminated soils using apatite. However, little research has been done evaluating the impact of different particle sizes of apatite on immobilization remediation of heavy metal polluted soils in field. In this study, the adsorption isothermal experiments of copper on three kinds of apatite was tested, and the field experiment by using different particle sizes apatite [nano-hydroxyapatite (NAP), micro-hydroxyapatite (MAP), ordinary particle apatite (OAP)] at a same dosage of 25.8 t/ha (1.16 %, W/W) was also conducted. Ryegrass was chosen as the test plant. The ryegrass biomass, the copper contents in ryegrass and the copper fractionations in soil were determined after field experiments. Results of adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption amounts of copper on OAP was the lowest among different particles. The adsorption amounts of copper on MAP was higher than NAP at high copper equilibrium concentration (>1 mmol L(-1)), an opposite trend was obtained at low copper concentration (<1 mmol L(-1)). In the field experiment, we found that the application of different apatites could effectively increase the soil pH, decrease the available copper concentration in soil, provide more nutrient phosphate and promote the growth of ryegrass. The ryegrass biomass and the copper accumulation in ryegrass were the highest in MAP among all treatments. The effective order of apatite in phytoremediation of copper contaminated field soil was MAP > NAP > OAP, which was attributed to the high adsorption capacity of copper and the strong releasing of phosphate by MAP. PMID:27512641

  9. Electron-Beam Heating Experiments on the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Matthew; Garate, Eusebio; Allfrey, Ian; Boyle, Daniel; Clary, Ryan; Douglass, Jon; Longman, Andrew; Patel, Vijay; Trask, Erik; Valentine, Travis; TAE Team

    2013-10-01

    The C-2 experiment seeks to study the evolution, heating and sustainment effects of neutral beam injection on field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. Electron-beam heating can potentially provide both general auxiliary heating and strong, short heat pulses for studying thermal transport. Electron-beam heating has a long history on mirror machines where the mechanism of plasma electron heating by beam-driven plasma waves is well understood. The open-field-line plasma surrounding the FRC can be heated the same way. Electron-beam injection into FRC plasmas also raises the novel possibility of trapping the high energy beam particles in the cusp-like fields at the ends of the FRC and, at sufficiently high beam energy, penetrating into the closed-field-line region of the plasma. We have conducted the first experiments with electron-beam heating in an FRC configuration using a short pulse (~ 6 μs), high power (<= 500 MW), 30 kV peak energy electron beam injected along field lines from the divertor. Early results show evidence of beam particle trapping as well as the generation of strong heat pulses in the open-field-line plasma surrounding the FRC.

  10. Urban Field Experiences for Undergraduate Liberal Arts Students: Using Compromised Environments as Living Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAvoy, S. E.; Knee, K.

    2015-12-01

    While urban environments may lack the beauty of relatively pristine field sites, they can be used to deliver an effective demonstration of actual environmental damage. Students demanding applied field experiences from their undergraduate environmental science programs can be well served in urban settings. Here, we present strategies for integrating degraded urban systems into the undergraduate field experience. Urban locations provide an opportunity for a different type of local "field-work" than would otherwise be available. In the upper-level undergraduate Environmental Methods class, we relied on a National Park area located a 10-minute walk from campus for most field exercises. Activities included soil analysis, measuring stream flow and water quality parameters, dendrochronology, and aquatic microbe metabolism. In the non-majors class, we make use of our urban location to contrast water quality in parks and highly channelized urban streams. Students spend labs immersed in streams and wetlands heavily impacted by the urban runoff their city generates. Here we share lesson plans and budgets for field activities that can be completed during a class period of 2.5 hours with a $75 course fee, show how these activities help students gain quantitative competency.

  11. Measurement and tricubic interpolation of the magnetic field for the OLYMPUS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernauer, J. C.; Diefenbach, J.; Elbakian, G.; Gavrilov, G.; Goerrissen, N.; Hasell, D. K.; Henderson, B. S.; Holler, Y.; Karyan, G.; Ludwig, J.; Marukyan, H.; Naryshkin, Y.; O'Connor, C.; Russell, R. L.; Schmidt, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Suvorov, K.; Veretennikov, D.

    2016-07-01

    The OLYMPUS experiment used a 0.3 T toroidal magnetic spectrometer to measure the momenta of outgoing charged particles. In order to accurately determine particle trajectories, knowledge of the magnetic field was needed throughout the spectrometer volume. For that purpose, the magnetic field was measured at over 36,000 positions using a three-dimensional Hall probe actuated by a system of translation tables. We used these field data to fit a numerical magnetic field model, which could be employed to calculate the magnetic field at any point in the spectrometer volume. Calculations with this model were computationally intensive; for analysis applications where speed was crucial, we pre-computed the magnetic field and its derivatives on an evenly spaced grid so that the field could be interpolated between grid points. We developed a spline-based interpolation scheme suitable for SIMD implementations, with a memory layout chosen to minimize space and optimize the cache behavior to quickly calculate field values. This scheme requires only one-eighth of the memory needed to store necessary coefficients compared with a previous scheme (Lekien and Marsden, 2005 [1]). This method was accurate for the vast majority of the spectrometer volume, though special fits and representations were needed to improve the accuracy close to the magnet coils and along the toroidal axis.

  12. Preliminary calibration plan for the Advanced Particles and Field Observatory (APAFO) magnetometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, C. V.; Langel, R. A.; Slavin, J.; Lancaster, E. R.; Jones, S.

    1991-01-01

    Prelaunch and postlaunch calibration plans for the APAFO magnetometer experiment are presented. A study of tradeoffs between boom length and spacecraft field is described; the results are summarized. The prelaunch plan includes: calibration of the Vector Fluxgate Magnetometer (VFM), Star Sensors, and Scalar Helium Magnetometer (SHM); optical bench integration; and acquisition of basic spacecraft field data. Postlaunch calibration has two phases. In phase one, SHM data are used to calibrate the VFM, total vector magnetic field data are used to calibrate a physical model of the spacecraft field, and both calibrations are refined by iteration. In phase two, corrected vector data are transformed into geocentric coordinates, previously undetected spacecraft fields are isolated, and initial geomagnetic field models are computed. Provided the SHM is accurate to the required 1.0 nT and can be used to calibrate the VFM to the required 3.0- nT accuracy, the tradeoff study indicates that a 12 m boom and a spacecraft field model uncertainty of 5 percent together allow the 1.0 nT spacecraft field error requirement to be met.

  13. The joys of mapping: qualitative insights into the student experience of a residential geoscience field course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Alison

    2010-05-01

    Using a mixed-format survey instrument, Boyle et al. (2007) identify significant effects in the affective domain resulting from participation in residential fieldwork. These findings are echoed by Stokes & Boyle (2009) in a separate, more detailed, study into the experiences of geoscience students when learning geologic mapping. While providing a quantifiable measure of changes in the students' attitudes and feelings, however, these survey data provide limited information about the experiences that have resulted in these changes, or of the factors likely to have influenced them. In order to gain a deeper insight into the students' affective responses, the quantitative data collected during this study were supplemented with qualitative data from in-situ and group interviews, open (free-text) survey questions, and direct observation of fieldwork activities. This provided a richness and depth of information that could not be achieved from quantitative data alone, and thus afforded a greater understanding of the students' experiences of this particular field activity. The survey findings showed that positive feelings and attitudes present at the start of the mapping field course became reinforced, but closer scrutiny of the data revealed that over half of the student cohort (57%) embarked on the fieldwork with some degree of worry, concern, or anxiety. The qualitative data enabled the source of these negative feelings to be identified, and provided evidence that these were overcome as a result of participating in the fieldwork. Thematic content analysis of the data resulted in the emergence of ten major themes; these provided a clear indication of factors significant to the student experience, and of specific aspects of the field course likely to generate either positive or negative affective responses. Further, these data highlighted the complexity of the learning process, and demonstrated the extent to which experiences varied between individual students. The social

  14. Experience with wavefront sensor and deformable mirror interfaces for wide-field adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, A. G.; Atkinson, D.; Bharmal, N. A.; Bitenc, U.; Brangier, M.; Buey, T.; Butterley, T.; Cano, D.; Chemla, F.; Clark, P.; Cohen, M.; Conan, J.-M.; de Cos, F. J.; Dickson, C.; Dipper, N. A.; Dunlop, C. N.; Feautrier, P.; Fusco, T.; Gach, J. L.; Gendron, E.; Geng, D.; Goodsell, S. J.; Gratadour, D.; Greenaway, A. H.; Guesalaga, A.; Guzman, C. D.; Henry, D.; Holck, D.; Hubert, Z.; Huet, J. M.; Kellerer, A.; Kulcsar, C.; Laporte, P.; Le Roux, B.; Looker, N.; Longmore, A. J.; Marteaud, M.; Martin, O.; Meimon, S.; Morel, C.; Morris, T. J.; Myers, R. M.; Osborn, J.; Perret, D.; Petit, C.; Raynaud, H.; Reeves, A. P.; Rousset, G.; Sanchez Lasheras, F.; Sanchez Rodriguez, M.; Santos, J. D.; Sevin, A.; Sivo, G.; Stadler, E.; Stobie, B.; Talbot, G.; Todd, S.; Vidal, F.; Younger, E. J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in adaptive optics (AO) have led to the implementation of wide field-of-view AO systems. A number of wide-field AO systems are also planned for the forthcoming Extremely Large Telescopes. Such systems have multiple wavefront sensors of different types, and usually multiple deformable mirrors (DMs). Here, we report on our experience integrating cameras and DMs with the real-time control systems of two wide-field AO systems. These are CANARY, which has been operating on-sky since 2010, and DRAGON, which is a laboratory AO real-time demonstrator instrument. We detail the issues and difficulties that arose, along with the solutions we developed. We also provide recommendations for consideration when developing future wide-field AO systems.

  15. Design of a dual sensor probe array for internal field measurement in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torusa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong-hun, Yang; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; An, YoungHwa; Jung, Bong Ki; Jo, Jong Gab; Hwang, Y. S.

    2012-10-01

    A dual sensor probe array is designed and constructed for internal magnetic field measurement at Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST) at the Seoul National University. Simultaneous use of Hall sensors and chip inductors allows cross-calibration among the measurements and compensation for each other's weaknesses while their small sizes are expected to cause only mild plasma perturbations. Calibration of the dual sensor probe array, using a Helmholtz coil, shows good sensitivity for the magnetic field measurement of the VEST. Prior to Ohmic start-up, the magnetic field structure inside the vacuum chamber is measured by using the calibrated probe array. The dual sensor probe array is expected to be useful in analyzing the temporal magnetic field structure change during the magnetic reconnection and in reconstruction of the current profile during the discharge of the VEST device.

  16. Design of a dual sensor probe array for internal field measurement in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus.

    PubMed

    Jeong-hun, Yang; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; An, YoungHwa; Jung, Bong Ki; Jo, Jong Gab; Hwang, Y S

    2012-10-01

    A dual sensor probe array is designed and constructed for internal magnetic field measurement at Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST) at the Seoul National University. Simultaneous use of Hall sensors and chip inductors allows cross-calibration among the measurements and compensation for each other's weaknesses while their small sizes are expected to cause only mild plasma perturbations. Calibration of the dual sensor probe array, using a Helmholtz coil, shows good sensitivity for the magnetic field measurement of the VEST. Prior to Ohmic start-up, the magnetic field structure inside the vacuum chamber is measured by using the calibrated probe array. The dual sensor probe array is expected to be useful in analyzing the temporal magnetic field structure change during the magnetic reconnection and in reconstruction of the current profile during the discharge of the VEST device.

  17. Laboratory Experiment of Magnetic Reconnection between Merging Flux Tubes with Strong Guide FIeld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomoto, M.; Kamio, S.; Kuwahata, A.; Ono, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection governs variety of energy release events in the universe, such as solar flares, geomagnetic substorms, and sawtooth crash in laboratory nuclear fusion experiments. Differently from the classical steady reconnection models, non-steady behavior of magnetic reconnection is often observed. In solar flares, intermittent enhancement of HXR emission is observed synchronously with multiple ejection of plammoids [1]. In laboratory reconnection experiments, the existence of the guide field, that is perpendicular to the reconnection field, makes significant changes on reconnection process. Generally the guide field will slow down the reconnection rate due to the increased magnetic pressure inside the current sheet. It also brings about asymmetric structure of the separatrices or effective particle acceleration in collisionless conditions. We have conducted laboratory experiments to study the behavior of the guide-field magnetic reconnection using plasma merging technique (push reconnection). Under substantial guide field even larger than the reconnection field, the reconnection generally exhibits non-steady feature which involves intermittent detachment of X-point and reconnection current center[2]. Transient enhancement of reconnection rate is observed simultaneously with the X-point motion[3]. We found two distinct phenomena associated with the guide-field non-steady reconnection. The one is the temporal and localized He II emission from X-point region, suggesting the production of energetic electrons which could excite the He ions in the vicinity of the X-point. The other is the excitation of large-amplitude electromagnetic waves which have similar properties with kinetic Alfven waves, whose amplitude show positive correlation with the enhancement of the reconnection electric field[4]. Electron beam instability caused by the energetic electrons accelerated to more than twice of the electron thermal velocity could be a potential driver of the

  18. The generation and amplification of intergalactic magnetic fields in analogue laboratory experiments with high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregori, G.; Reville, B.; Miniati, F.

    2015-11-01

    The advent of high-power laser facilities has, in the past two decades, opened a new field of research where astrophysical environments can be scaled down to laboratory dimensions, while preserving the essential physics. This is due to the invariance of the equations of magneto-hydrodynamics to a class of similarity transformations. Here we review the relevant scaling relations and their application in laboratory astrophysics experiments with a focus on the generation and amplification of magnetic fields in cosmic environment. The standard model for the origin of magnetic fields is a multi stage process whereby a vanishing magnetic seed is first generated by a rotational electric field and is then amplified by turbulent dynamo action to the characteristic values observed in astronomical bodies. We thus discuss the relevant seed generation mechanisms in cosmic environment including resistive mechanism, collision-less and fluid instabilities, as well as novel laboratory experiments using high power laser systems aimed at investigating the amplification of magnetic energy by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Future directions, including efforts to model in the laboratory the process of diffusive shock acceleration are also discussed, with an emphasis on the potential of laboratory experiments to further our understanding of plasma physics on cosmic scales.

  19. A field experiment of improved steam drive with in-situ foaming

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.; Malito, J.A.; Marcou, J.A.; Sanyal, S.K.

    1984-04-01

    This paper is a progress report on the design and execution of a field experiment on recovery of heavy oils by steam drive enhanced by additives. The goal of this project is to study the effect of injection of a commercial surfactant (Suntech IV) and nitrogen on the behavior of a conventional steam drive. The laboratory studies leading to the design and implementation of this field experiment have been referenced many times, consequently in this paper we will emphasize field data obtained in the following areas: reservoir definition, monitoring of the progress of the experiment, production evaluation in a heavy oil reservoir. Several standard and experimental analytical methods have been applied and their validity in the Kern River field test is discussed. Now in its third year, the project has seen the injection of three slugs of surfactant and nitrogen at different rates. The analysis of the results to date show a considerable improvement in oil recovery by steam drive caused by the addition of surfactant and nitrogen to the steam. The changes in production behavior of the reservoir caused by the additives are analyzed and discussed. The economics of this project are difficult to determine at this point but look promising.

  20. Laboratory experiments investigating magnetic field production via the Weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, Channing; Fiuza, Frederico; Ross, James Steven; Zylstra, Alex; Pollock, Brad; Drake, R. Paul; Froula, Dustin; Gregori, Gianluca; Kugland, Nathan; Kuranz, Carolyn; Levy, Matthew; Li, Chikang; Meinecke, Jena; Petrasso, Richard; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Sakawa, Youichi; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Takabe, Hideke; Turnbull, David; Park, Hye-Sook

    2015-08-01

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are often associated with the presence of strong magnetic fields in a plasma flow. The magnetic fields required for shock formation may either be initially present, for example in supernova remnants or young galaxies, or they may be self-generated in systems such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In the case of GRB outflows, the intense magnetic fields are greater than those seeded by the GRB progenitor or produced by misaligned density and temperature gradients in the plasma flow (the Biermann-battery effect). The Weibel instability is one candidate mechanism for the generation of sufficiently strong fields to create a collisionless shock. Despite their crucial role in astrophysical systems, observation of the magnetic fields produced by Weibel instabilities in experiments has been challenging. Using a proton probe to directly image electromagnetic fields, we present evidence of Weibel-generated magnetic fields that grow in opposing, initially unmagnetized plasma flows from laser-driven laboratory experiments. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that the instability efficiently extracts energy from the plasma flows, and that the self-generated magnetic energy reaches a few percent of the total energy in the system. This result demonstrates an experimental platform suitable for the investigation of a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including collisionless shock formation in supernova remnants, large-scale magnetic field amplification, and the radiation signature from gamma-ray bursts.This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Design of Field Experiments for Adaptive Sampling of the Ocean with Autonomous Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Ooi, B. H.; Cho, W.; Dao, M. H.; Tkalich, P.; Patrikalakis, N. M.

    2010-05-01

    Due to the highly non-linear and dynamical nature of oceanic phenomena, the predictive capability of various ocean models depends on the availability of operational data. A practical method to improve the accuracy of the ocean forecast is to use a data assimilation methodology to combine in-situ measured and remotely acquired data with numerical forecast models of the physical environment. Autonomous surface and underwater vehicles with various sensors are economic and efficient tools for exploring and sampling the ocean for data assimilation; however there is an energy limitation to such vehicles, and thus effective resource allocation for adaptive sampling is required to optimize the efficiency of exploration. In this paper, we use physical oceanography forecasts of the coastal zone of Singapore for the design of a set of field experiments to acquire useful data for model calibration and data assimilation. The design process of our experiments relied on the oceanography forecast including the current speed, its gradient, and vorticity in a given region of interest for which permits for field experiments could be obtained and for time intervals that correspond to strong tidal currents. Based on these maps, resources available to our experimental team, including Autonomous Surface Craft (ASC) are allocated so as to capture the oceanic features that result from jets and vortices behind bluff bodies (e.g., islands) in the tidal current. Results are summarized from this resource allocation process and field experiments conducted in January 2009.

  2. LASE system upgrade and measurements from the NASA GRIP field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, S.; Ismail, S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, J. W.; Notari, A.; Collins, J. E.; Nehrir, A. R.; Butler, C. F.; Halverson, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) system has operated on the NASA ER-2, P-3, and DC-8 aircraft during the past 16 years and participated in 13 field experiments. This system provides vertical profiles of water vapor mixing ratio and aerosol and cloud backscattering. A brief overview is presented on the upgrade of LASE that included refurbishment of laser diode seeding, control and data system, and zenith receiver system. These developments have enhanced the operational reliability of the system and improved its performance. The LASE system was deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft recently for the NASA GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) field experiment, which was conducted during August and September 2010 from operational bases in Fort Lauderdale, FL and St. Croix, VI. Initial measurements from this field experiment are presented including distributions of water vapor, aerosol, and clouds. Temperature profiles from DC-8 dropsondes and nearby radiosondes are used to derive relative humidity profiles from the LASE water vapor mixing ratio profiles. Comparisons of LASE water vapor mixing ratio profiles with those measured by the new AVAPS-II dropsondes from the NASA DC-8 are also presented.

  3. The FIFE information system. [First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strebel, Donald E.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Ormsby, James P.; Hall, Forrest G.; Sellers, Piers J.

    1990-01-01

    A description is given of the FIFE (First ISLSCP Field Experiment) information system, which was developed to serve FIFE investigators as a tool for designing the experiment and for organizing and manipulating the complex data set. Fulfilling these functions on an experiment-driven timeline led to abandoning the classical sequential development paradigm of software engineering in favor of a more responsive and broadly based approach. The design, development, and operation of the information system supporting the experiment had to be flexible and under direct day-to-day control of scientist/users. Because of the organization around scientific requirements, the system was able to incorporate diverse data types in a systematic way as they became available, to add scientific rigor by identifying data gaps at an early stage, and to provide real-time quality assurance. These factors are important for designing and building future databases and long-term information systems to support interdisciplinary scientific research.

  4. Dynamics of CO2-exchange and C-budgets due to soil erosion: Insights from a 4 years observation period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Mathias; Albiac Borraz, Elisa; Garcia Alba, Juana; Augustin, Jürgen; Sommer, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Agriculture in the hummocky ground moraine landscape of NE-Germany is characterized by an increase in energy crop cultivation, like maize or sorghum. Both enhance lateral C fluxes by erosion and induce feedbacks on C dynamics of agroecosystems as a result of reduced wintertime plant cover and vigorous crop growth during summer. However, the actual impact of these phenomena on the CO2-sink/-source function of agricultural landscapes, is still not clear. Therefore, the interdisciplinary project "CarboZALF" was established in Dedelow/Prenzlau (NE-Germany) in 2009. Within the field experiment CarboZALF-D, CO2 fluxes for the soil-plant systems were monitored, covering typical landscape relevant soil states in respect to erosion and deposition, like Calcic Cutanic Luvisol and Endogleyic Colluvic Regosol. Automated chamber systems, each consisting of four transparent chambers (2.5 m height, basal area 2.25 m2), were placed along gradients at both measurement sites. Monitored CO2 fluxes were gap-filled on a high-temporal resolution by modelling ecosystem respiration (Reco), gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) based on parallel and continuous measurements of the CO2 exchange, soil and air temperatures as well as photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). Gap-filling was e.g. needed in case of chamber malfunctions and abrupt disturbances by farming practice. The monitored crop rotation was corn-winter wheat (2 a), sorghum-winter triticale and alfalfa (1.5 a). In our presentation we would like to show insights from a 4 years observation period, with prounounced differences between the eroded and the colluvial soil: The Endogleyic Colluvic Regosol showed higher flux rates for Reco, GPP and NEE compared to the Calcic Cutanic Luvisol. Site-specific NEE and C-balances were positively related to soil C-stocks as well as biomass production, and generated a minor C-sink in case of the Calcic Cutanic Luvisol and a highly variable C-source in case of the

  5. SU-E-J-233: A Facility for Radiobiological Experiments in a Large Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Carlone, M; Heaton, R; Keller, H; Wouters, B; Jaffray, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is considerable interest in developing medical linear accelerators with integrated image guidance by MRI. Less work has been done on the fundamental biology of cell survival in the presence of a strong magnetic field. The purpose of this work is to describe an experimental system capable of measuring cell survival response in the types of MRI-linac systems currently under development. Methods: We have integrated a cobalt irradiator with a solenoid magnet. The solenoid magnet has inner diameter of 10 cm. To enable measurement of the biological effects as a function of depth, we are utilizing the sliced gel technique, in which cells are embedded and fixed within a gelatin matrix. Irradiated cells at defined positions (sub mm resolution) can subsequently be recovered and assessed for cell survival or other biological effects. Results: The magnetic field profile in the solenoid has a peak magnetic field 36 cm below the top edge of the magnet bore and can be placed at and SAD of 100 cm. At a solenoid current of 35 A, the peak magnetic field is 0.25 T. The dose rate of the cobalt irradiator is 16 cGy/min at 100 cm SAD. EBT3 film was used to demonstrate the system functionality. It was irradiated at 1 cm depth at 100 cm SSD with a 4×4 field to 1.5 Gy in a 0.25 T magnetic field. The dose profile was similar between this film and the control exposure without magnetic field. Conclusion: Integrating a cobalt irradiator with a high field magnet is demonstrated. The magnetic field at the cobalt defining head was minimal and did not interfere with the functioning of this unit. Cell survival experiments can be reproduced exactly in the presence or absence of a magnetic field since a resistive magnet is used.

  6. Hydromagnetic Dynamics and Magnetic Field Enhancement in a Turbulent Spherical Couette Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, D. S.; Liu, Q.; Zimmerman, D. S.; Triana, S. A.; Nataf, H. C.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2014-11-01

    The University of Maryland Three Meter Geodynamo, a spherical Couette experiment filled with liquid sodium and geometrically similar to the earth's core, is used to study hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic phenomena in rapidly rotating turbulence. Turbulent flow is driven in the sodium by differential rotation of the inner and outer spherical shells, while an external coil applies a magnetic field in order to study hydromagnetic effects relevant to the earth's outer core such as dynamo action. An array of 31 external Hall sensors measures the Gauss coefficients of the resulting magnetic field. The flow state is strongly dependent on Rossby number Ro = (ΩI -ΩO) /ΩO , where ΩI and ΩO are the inner and outer sphere rotation frequencies. The flow state is inferred from the torque required to drive the inner sphere and the generation of internal toroidal magnetic field through the Ω-effect, which is measured by a Hall probe inserted into the sodium. A self-sustaining dynamo has not yet been observed at rotation speeds up to about half of the design maximum. However, continuous dipole amplification up to 12% of a small applied field has been observed at Ro = - 17 . 7 while bursts of dipole field have been observed up to 15% of a large external applied field at Ro = + 6 . 0 and up to 20% of a small applied field at Ro = + 2 . 15 .

  7. Females and STEM: Determining the K-12 Experiences that Influenced Women to Pursue STEM Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Anne Marie

    In the United States, careers in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) are increasing yet there are not enough trained personnel to meet this demand. In addition, of those that seek to pursue STEM fields in the United States, only 26% are female. In order to increase the number of women seeking STEM based bachelor's degrees, K-12 education must provide a foundation that prepares students for entry into these fields. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to determine the perceived K-12 experiences that influenced females to pursue a STEM field. Twelve college juniors or seniors seeking a degree in Biology, Mathematics, or Physics were interviewed concerning their K-12 experiences. These interviews were analyzed and six themes emerged. Teacher passion and classroom characteristics such as incorporating challenging activities played a significant role in the females' decisions to enter STEM fields. Extra-curricular activities such as volunteer and mentor opportunities and the females' need to benefit others also influenced females in their career choice. Both the formal (within the school) and informal (outside of the traditional classroom) pipeline opportunities that these students encountered helped develop a sense of self-efficacy in science and mathematics; this self-efficacy enabled them to persist in pursuing these career fields. Several participants cited barriers that they encountered in K-12 education, but these barriers were primarily internal as they struggled with overcoming self-imposed obstacles in learning and being competitive in the mathematics and science classrooms. The experiences from these female students can be used by K-12 educators to prepare and encourage current female students to enter STEM occupations.

  8. Two-Year Community: Cultivating the STEM Transfer Pathway and Capacity for Research: A Partnership between a Community College and a 4-Year College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Rachel A.; Bolduc, Gilles; Liotta, Louis; Packard, Becky Wai-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Summer research experiences have been identified as important vehicles for fostering the learning, skill development, and retention of undergraduates in the sciences. In this initiative, community college faculty and students partnered with private 4-year college colleagues on summer research in order to expand the capacity for research for…

  9. Recent (<4 year old) Leaf Litter is Not a Major Source of Microbial Carbon in a Temperate Forest Mineral Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Christiane; Trumbore, Susan E.; Froberg, Mats J.; Cisneros dozal, Luz Maria; Zhang, Dachun; Xu, Xiamei; Santos, Guaciara; Hanson, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    Microbial communities in soil A horizons derive their carbon from several potential sources: organic carbon (C) transported down from overlying litter and organic horizons, root-derived C, or soil organic matter. We took advantage of a multi-year experiment that manipulated the {sup 14}C isotope signature of surface leaf litter inputs in a temperate forest at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee, USA, to quantify the contribution of recent leaf litter C to microbial respiration and biomarkers in the underlying mineral soil. We observed no measurable difference (< {approx}40{per_thousand} given our current analytical methods) in the radiocarbon signatures of microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) isolated from the top 10 cm of mineral soil in plots that experienced 3 years of litterfall that differed in each year by {approx}750{per_thousand} between high-{sup 14}C and low-{sup 14}C treatments. Assuming any difference in {sup 14}C between the high- and low-{sup 14}C plots would reflect C derived from these manipulated litter additions, we estimate that <6% of the microbial C after 4 years was derived from the added 1-4-year-old surface litter. Large contributions of C from litter < 1 year (or >4 years) old (which fell after (or prior to) the manipulation and therefore did not differ between plots) are not supported because the {sup 14}C signatures of the PLFA compounds (averaging 200-220{per_thousand}) is much higher that of the 2004-5 leaf litter (115{per_thousand}) or pre-2000 litter. A mesocosm experiment further demonstrated that C leached from {sup 14}C-enriched surface litter or the O horizon was not a detectable C source in underlying mineral soil microbes during the first eight months after litter addition. Instead a decline in the {sup 14}C of PLFA over the mesocosm experiment likely reflected the loss of a pre-existing substrate not associated with added leaf litter. Measured PLFA {Delta}{sup 14}C signatures were higher than those measured in bulk

  10. Spatiotemporal properties of Sub-Rayleigh and supershear rupture velocity fields: Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Michael; Bhat, Harsha S.; Rosakis, Ares J.

    2016-08-01

    Fundamental spatiotemporal field properties and particle velocity waveform signatures of sub-Rayleigh and supershear ruptures were experimentally investigated through a series of laboratory earthquake experiments. We appeal to dynamic rupture theory to extract and highlight previously unnoticed aspects and results, which are of direct relevance to our new experiments. Kinematic relationships derived from both singular and non-singular solutions are applied to analyze and interpret various features observed in these experiments. A strong correspondence is demonstrated between particle velocity records obtained in lab experiments and synthetic particle velocity waveform profiles derived from theory. Predicted temporal profiles, sense of particle motion, and amplitude decay properties of sub-Rayleigh and supershear particle velocity waveforms are experimentally verified. In a particular set of supershear rupture experiments, the fault-normal (FN) and fault-parallel (FP) velocity waveforms were simultaneously recorded at fixed, off-fault field points as a shear Mach front swept these locations. Particle velocity records collected over a broad range of stable supershear rupture speeds validate the predicted scaling relationship δu˙1s / δu˙2s =√{Vr2 / Cs2-1 } =βs, between the FP (δu1ṡ) and the FN (δu2ṡ) velocity jumps propagated by a shear Mach front. Additional experimental findings include detailed rupture speed measurements of sub-Rayleigh and supershear ruptures and the observation of a supershear daughter crack with vanishing shear Mach front.

  11. NATO TG-53: acoustic detection of weapon firing joint field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Dale N.; Pham, Tien; Scanlon, Michael V.; Srour, Nassy; Reiff, Christian G.; Sim, Leng K.; Solomon, Latasha; Thompson, Dorothea F.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss the NATO Task Group 53 (TG-53) acoustic detection of weapon firing field joint experiment at Yuma Proving Ground during 31 October to 4 November 2005. The participating NATO countries include France, the Netherlands, UK and US. The objectives of the joint experiments are: (i) to collect acoustic signatures of direct and indirect firings from weapons such as sniper, mortar, artillery and C4 explosives and (ii) to share signatures among NATO partners from a variety of acoustic sensing platforms on the ground and in the air distributed over a wide area.

  12. FLASH hydrodynamic simulations of experiments to explore the generation of cosmological magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopatz, A.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Ravasio, A.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.; Yurchak, R.

    2013-03-01

    We report the results of FLASH hydrodynamic simulations of the experiments conducted by the University of Oxford High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics group and its collaborators at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation de Lasers Intenses (LULI). In these experiments, a long-pulse laser illuminates a target in a chamber filled with Argon gas, producing shock waves that generate magnetic fields via the Biermann battery mechanism. The simulations show that the result of the laser illuminating the target is a series of complex hydrodynamic phenomena.

  13. Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-08-01

    This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

  14. Universal SAT® Policy Boosts 4-Year College Enrollment. Info to Go™ 2015-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurwitz, Michael; Smith, Jonathan; Niu, Sunny; Howell, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Maine replaced its existing high school statewide assessment with the SAT® and administered the exam to almost all public high school juniors. A primary goal of this policy change was to increase 4-year college enrollment by public school students in Maine. This brief report provides an overview of the data, research methodology employed, as well…

  15. My Body. Developing an Early Interest in Science: A Preschool Science Curriculum. (4-Year-Olds).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summer, Gail L.; Giovannini, Kathleen

    This teaching guide on the body for 4-year-olds is based on a modification of the "Plan, Do, Review" approach to education devised by High Scope in Ypsilanti, Michigan. First implemented as an outreach early childhood program in North Carolina, the science activities described in this guide can be adapted to various early childhood environments.…

  16. Relations of Television Viewing and Reading: Findings from a 4-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennemoser, Marco; Schneider, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    This longitudinal study explored the long-term effects of television viewing on the development of children's reading competencies. Among 2 cohorts of German children (N[subscript 1] = 165, N[subscript 2] = 167), measures of television viewing were collected over 4 years, and tests of reading speed and reading comprehension were administered…

  17. Institutional Characteristics and Student Retention in Public 4-Year Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of specific student and institutional factors and characteristics on the retention of students at public, 4-year colleges and universities in the United States based on aggregate student cohort and institutional data. The overriding goal of this research was to identify any…

  18. Transfer between Community Colleges and 4-Year Colleges: The All-American Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Moon, Hye Sun; Cypers, Scott; Maxwell, William E.; Lester, Jaime

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors introduce a novel way, using the metaphor of a baseball game, to evaluate and measure community college student progress for those whose stated goal is to transfer to a 4-year institution and, ultimately, earn a bachelor's degree. The proposed framework of "the Transfer Game" is an outgrowth of the Transfer and…

  19. Through Another's Eyes: Elements in the Eyes of a 4-Year-Old

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Xuan

    2004-01-01

    My husband, who is a scientist, often brings home different scientific journals and magazines to read, and my 4-year-old son, Nicholas J. Hu, likes to flip through them. A recent issue of Chemical and Engineering News (September, 2003) caught his interest more than usual because there were stories of different elements. Nicholas has been able to…

  20. Creppy Crawlies. Developing an Early Interest in Science: A Preschool Science Curriculum. (4-Year-Olds).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summer, Gail L.; Giovannini, Kathleen

    This science teaching guide on insects and animals for 4-year-old children is based on a modification of the "Plan, Do, Review" approach to education devised by High Scope in Ypsilanti, Michigan. First implemented as an outreach early childhood program in North Carolina, the science activities described in this guide can be adapted to various…

  1. Vowel Confusion Patterns in Adults during Initial 4 Years of Implant Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaalimaa, Taina T.; Sorri, Martti J.; Laitakari, Jaakko; Sivonen, Ville; Muhli, Arto

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated adult cochlear implant users' (n == 39) vowel recognition and confusions by an open-set syllable test during 4 years of implant use, in a prospective repeated-measures design. Subjects' responses were coded for phoneme errors and estimated by the generalized mixed model. Improvement in overall vowel recognition was highest…

  2. Predictors of Funded Scholarly Activity at 4-Year, Non-Doctoral Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Maria Montoro

    2010-01-01

    This study seeks to develop a model of institutional supports necessary for faculty to succeed as funded scholars at 4-year non-doctoral colleges and universities. Research was conducted using secondary data analysis on a pre-existing, cross-sectional database from the 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty. Expectancy theory was used as the…

  3. A Gender Comparison of the Cooperation of 4-Year-Old Children in Classroom Activity Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Genan T.; Hilton, Sterling C.; Wouden-Miller, Melissa

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the proportion of cooperative play in 4-year-old children across centers (housekeeping, block, manipulative, and computer) and gender in a natural classroom setting. Eighty-four white, middle-income children (41 boys and 43 girls, mean age = 55 months) were videotaped during free-play for 30 minutes per day for four weeks in…

  4. Measuring Implicit Attitudes of 4-Year-Olds: The Preschool Implicit Association Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cvencek, Dario; Greenwald, Anthony G.; Meltzoff, Andrew N.

    2011-01-01

    The Preschool Implicit Association Test (PSIAT) is an adaptation of an established social cognition measure (IAT) for use with preschool children. Two studies with 4-year-olds found that the PSIAT was effective in evaluating (a) attitudes toward commonly liked objects ("flowers"="good") and (b) gender attitudes ("girl"="good" or "boy"="good"). The…

  5. Preventing and Responding to Bullying: An Elementary School's 4-Year Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormac, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Bullying continues to be a pervasive problem in schools and requires a schoolwide approach. This article describes the action research process used to examine the impact of a 4-year, K-5 school bullying prevention and intervention. The school counselors collaborated with students, staff, and parents to implement the program, and collected and…

  6. Collaboration between 3- and 4-Year-Olds in Self-Initiated Play on Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Susan

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a study of collaborative music-making on instruments among 3- and 4-year-old children. An area equipped with musical instruments was provided as a free-choice play option in an early childhood setting and a fixed camera recorded the children's play continuously during a number of visits. From the total 17 h of data five…

  7. Examining the Role of Advanced Placement[R] Exam Participation in 4-Year College Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chajewski, Michael; Mattern, Krista D.; Shaw, Emily J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between Advanced Placement (AP) exam participation and enrollment in a 4-year postsecondary institution. A positive relationship was expected given that the primary purpose of offering AP courses is to allow students to engage in college-level academic work while in high school, and…

  8. Transfer Rates of Texas Hispanic Community College Students to 4-Year Institutions: Selected Institutional Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klement, Emily Conrady

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this non-experimental, quantitative study was to determine how well selected institutional characteristics explain the variance in Hispanic community college students' transfer rates to 4-year institutions. Due to the rapidly growing Texas Hispanic population, understanding challenges to their educational attainment has become…

  9. Leading Indicators: Increasing Statewide Bachelor's Degree Completion Rates at 4-Year Public Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Jeffrey Cody

    2014-01-01

    For the United States to maintain national and global economic stability, colleges must graduate more students. Four-year completion rates have declined and less than one-third of full-time, degree-seeking students graduate in 4 years. Some researchers and policymakers have suggested "leading indicators" to track postsecondary…

  10. [Multiloculated mesenteric and retroperitoneal tumour - lymphatic malformation - in a 4-year-old girl].

    PubMed

    Obuchowicz, Anna; Łoboda, Magdalena; Madziara, Wojciech; Jarecka, Beata

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare and mostly benign abdominal tumours in children. Majority of them are lymphangiomas (lymphatic malformations). We diagnosed a broad, multiloculated mesenteric and retroperitoneal cyst, associated with intensive inflammation, in a 4-year-old girl. Surgical therapy was fully successful.

  11. Overweight among Low-Income Texas Preschoolers Aged 2 to 4 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Kayan L.; Castrucci, Brian C.; Gossman, Ginger; Mirchandani, Gita; Sayegh, M. Aaron; Moehlman, Clint; Van Eck, Mary; Petrilli, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Determine child/maternal factors associated with overweight among 2- to 4-year-olds enrolled in the Texas Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Design: Matched child and maternal data collected by self-report of the mother during WIC certification. These data were extracted from existing…

  12. Preparing the Workforce: Early Childhood Teacher Preparation at 2- and 4-year Institutions of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Early, Diane M.; Winton, Pamela J.

    2001-01-01

    Details investigation of characteristics of early childhood teacher preparation programs at 2- and 4-year institutions through a survey of program chairs or directors. Presents findings on faculty characteristics, including racial makeup; course and practica requirements; comparisons between early childhood programs and the institutions as whole…

  13. Markers for Persistent Specific Expressive Language Delay in 3-4-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everitt, Andrea; Hannaford, Philip; Conti-Ramsden, Gina

    2013-01-01

    Background: Identifying 3-4-year-olds who are most at risk of persisting language difficulties, and possibly specific language impairment (SLI), is difficult due to the natural variation of language in young children. In older children, markers for SLI have been identified that differentiate between children with and without SLI. It is not known…

  14. Modeling of coherent ultrafast magneto-optical experiments: Light-induced molecular mean-field model

    SciTech Connect

    Hinschberger, Y.; Hervieux, P.-A.

    2015-12-28

    We present calculations which aim to describe coherent ultrafast magneto-optical effects observed in time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Our approach is based on a nonlinear semi-classical Drude-Voigt model and is used to interpret experiments performed on nickel ferromagnetic thin film. Within this framework, a phenomenological light-induced coherent molecular mean-field depending on the polarizations of the pump and probe pulses is proposed whose microscopic origin is related to a spin-orbit coupling involving the electron spins of the material sample and the electric field of the laser pulses. Theoretical predictions are compared to available experimental data. The model successfully reproduces the observed experimental trends and gives meaningful insight into the understanding of magneto-optical rotation behavior in the ultrafast regime. Theoretical predictions for further experimental studies are also proposed.

  15. Fate of Methane and Ethanol-Blended Fuels in Soil: Laboratory and Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, D. M.; de Sieyes, N. R.; Peng, J.; Schmidt, R.; Buelow, M. C.; Felice, M.

    2015-12-01

    Our research site is within the UC Davis Putah Creek Riparian Reserve in Davis, CA; climate is semi-arid and soils are sandy loams and silts. We are conducting three types of controlled release experiments in the field: 1) Gas mixture, a continuous release of methane, sometimes with other gases included, with the composition and release rate changing over time to allow examination of various hypotheses, 2) E10 (gasoline with 10% ethanol): a continuous release of E10 NAPL at rate equal to documented low rate releases from underground storage tanks (USTs) that are difficult or impossible to detect with current practical approaches (<0.04 gallons per day); 3) E85: release at same rate as the E10 release. In the field experiments, gas or NAPL is released from a stainless steel drive point with 0.5 cm slotted section at 1 m bgs; we monitor temperature, pressure, moisture content, and soil gas composition in the soil, and efflux of carbon dioxide, methane, oxygen, water vapor, and other species to/ from soil to atmosphere. Periodic coring allows examination of the microbial community composition with depth. Laboratory microcosm and column tests assisted in planning the E10 and E85 field experiments above, evaluated the effect of moisture content on methane oxidation, and allowed testing and refinement of the monitoring approaches in the field We found that up to 40% of the methane released can be accounted for by efflux from soil to the atmosphere. The percentage in the efflux depends on the rate of release, and, based on literature and our microcosms with methane-spiked PCRR soils, we hypothesize that the very low moisture content of the soils in this drought year limits in situ methane oxidation. Efflux of carbon dioxide accounted for up to 20% of the E10 release rate under our lab column conditions, which we believe were oxygen-limited compared to the field conditions. We also detected low molecular weight hydrocarbons in the column efflux, though the concentrations

  16. Observed chlorine concentrations during Jack Rabbit I and Lyme Bay field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Steven; Chang, Joseph; Huq, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    As part of planning for a series of field experiments where large quantities (up to 20 tons) of pressurized liquefied chlorine will be released, observations from previous chlorine field experiments are analyzed to estimate the ranges of chlorine concentrations expected at various downwind distances. In five field experiment days during the summer 2010 Jack Rabbit I (JR I) field trials, up to two tons of chlorine were released and concentrations were observed at distances, x, from 25 to 500 m. In the 1927 Lyme Bay (LB) experiments, there were four days of trials, where 3-10 tons of chlorine were released in about 15 min from the back of a ship. Concentrations were sampled at LB from four ships sailing across the cloud path at downwind distances in the range from about 350 to 3000 m. Thus, the distances from which JR I concentrations were available slightly overlapped the LB distances. One-minute arc-maximum chlorine concentrations, C (g/m3), were analyzed from four JR I trials and two LB trials. Normalized concentrations (Cu/Q) were plotted versus x (m), where u (m/s) is measured wind speed at heights of 2-10 m and Q (g/s) is continuous mass release rate. It is found that the JR I and LB Cu/Q observations smoothly merge with each other and fall along a line with approximate slope of -2 at distances beyond about 200 m (i.e., Cu/Q is proportional to x-2). At x < 200 m, where dense gas effects are more important, the slope is less (about -1.5). Most of the data points are within a factor of two of the "best-fit" line.

  17. Vertical sampling flights in support of the 1981 ASCOT cooling tower experiments: field effort and data

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, G.T.

    1982-03-01

    During the month of August 1981, three nights of experimental sampling of tracers released into the cooling tower plume of a geothermal power plant were conducted. In these experiments a tethered balloon was used to lift a payload so as to obtain vertical profiles of the cooling tower plume and the entrained tracers. A description of the equipment used, the field effort and the data acquired are presented here.

  18. Experiences of using mobile technologies and virtual field tours in Physical Geography: implications for hydrology education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingston, D. G.; Eastwood, W. J.; Jones, P. I.; Johnson, R.; Marshall, S.; Hannah, D. M.

    2012-05-01

    Education in hydrology is changing rapidly due to diversification of students, emergent major scientific and practical challenges that our discipline must engage with, shifting pedagogic ideas and higher education environments, the need for students to develop new discipline specific and transferrable skills, and the advent of innovative technologies for learning and teaching. This paper focuses on new technologies in the context of learning and teaching in Physical Geography and reflects on the implications of our experiences for education in hydrology. We evaluate the experience of designing and trialling novel mobile technology-based field exercises and a virtual field tour for a Year 1 undergraduate Physical Geography module at a UK university. The new exercises are based on using and obtaining spatial data, operation of meteorological equipment (explained using an interactive DVD), and include introductions to global positioning systems (GPS) and geographical information systems (GIS). The technology and exercises were well received in a pilot study and subsequent rolling-out to the full student cohort (∼150 students). A statistically significant improvement in marks was observed following the redesign. Although the students enjoyed using mobile technology, the increased interactivity and opportunity for peer learning were considered to be the primary benefits by students. This is reinforced further by student preference for the new interactive virtual field tour over the previous "show-and-tell" field exercise. Despite the new exercises having many advantages, exercise development was not trivial due to the high start-up costs, the need for provision of sufficient technical support and the relative difficulty of making year-to-year changes (to the virtual field tour in particular). Our experiences are highly relevant to the implementation of novel learning and teaching technologies in hydrology education.

  19. ITER test blanket module error field simulation experiments at DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, M. J.; Snipes, J. A.; Gohil, P.; de Vries, P.; Evans, T. E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Gao, X.; Garofalo, A. M.; Gates, D. A.; Greenfield, C. M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Kramer, G. J.; La Haye, R. J.; Liu, S.; Loarte, A.; Nave, M. F. F.; Osborne, T. H.; Oyama, N.; Park, J.-K.; Ramasubramanian, N.; Reimerdes, H.; Saibene, G.; Salmi, A.; Shinohara, K.; Spong, D. A.; Solomon, W. M.; Tala, T.; Zhu, Y. B.; Boedo, J. A.; Chuyanov, V.; Doyle, E. J.; Jakubowski, M.; Jhang, H.; Nazikian, R. M.; Pustovitov, V. D.; Schmitz, O.; Srinivasan, R.; Taylor, T. S.; Wade, M. R.; You, K.-I.; Zeng, L.; DIII-D Team

    2011-10-01

    Experiments at DIII-D investigated the effects of magnetic error fields similar to those expected from proposed ITER test blanket modules (TBMs) containing ferromagnetic material. Studied were effects on: plasma rotation and locking, confinement, L-H transition, the H-mode pedestal, edge localized modes (ELMs) and ELM suppression by resonant magnetic perturbations, energetic particle losses, and more. The experiments used a purpose-built three-coil mock-up of two magnetized ITER TBMs in one ITER equatorial port. The largest effect was a reduction in plasma toroidal rotation velocity v across the entire radial profile by as much as Δv/v ~ 60% via non-resonant braking. Changes to global Δn/n, Δβ/β and ΔH98/H98 were ~3 times smaller. These effects are stronger at higher β. Other effects were smaller. The TBM field increased sensitivity to locking by an applied known n = 1 test field in both L- and H-mode plasmas. Locked mode tolerance was completely restored in L-mode by re-adjusting the DIII-D n = 1 error field compensation system. Numerical modelling by IPEC reproduces the rotation braking and locking semi-quantitatively, and identifies plasma amplification of a few n = 1 Fourier harmonics as the main cause of braking. IPEC predicts that TBM braking in H-mode may be reduced by n = 1 control. Although extrapolation from DIII-D to ITER is still an open issue, these experiments suggest that a TBM-like error field will produce only a few potentially troublesome problems, and that they might be made acceptably small.

  20. ITER Test Blanket Module Error Field Simulation Experiments at DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, M. J.; Testa, D.; Snipes, J. A.; Gohil, P.; De Vries, P.; Evans, T. E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Gao, X.; Garofalo, A.; Gates, D.A.; Greenfield, C. M.; Heidbrink, W.; La Haye, R.; Liu, S.; Loarte, A.; Nave, M. F. F.; Oyama, N.; Osakabe, M.; Park, J. K.; Ramasubramanian, N.; Reimerdes, H.; Saibene, G.; Saimi, A.; Shinohara, K.; Spong, Donald A; Solomon, W. M.; Tala, T.; Zhu, Y. B.; Zhai, K.; Boedo, J.; Chuyanov, V.; Doyle, E. J.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Jhang, H.; Nazikian, Raffi; Pustovitov, V. D.; Schmitz, O.; Sanchez, Raul; Srinivasan, R.; Taylor, T. S.; Wade, M.; You, K. I.; Zeng, L.

    2011-01-01

    Experiments at DIII-D investigated the effects of magnetic error fields similar to those expected from proposed ITER test blanket modules (TBMs) containing ferromagnetic material. Studied were effects on: plasma rotation and locking, confinement, L-H transition, the H-mode pedestal, edge localized modes (ELMs) and ELM suppression by resonant magnetic perturbations, energetic particle losses, and more. The experiments used a purpose-built three-coil mock-up of two magnetized ITER TBMs in one ITER equatorial port. The largest effect was a reduction in plasma toroidal rotation velocity v across the entire radial profile by as much as Delta upsilon/upsilon similar to 60% via non-resonant braking. Changes to global Delta n/n, Delta beta/beta and Delta H(98)/H(98) were similar to 3 times smaller. These effects are stronger at higher beta. Other effects were smaller. The TBM field increased sensitivity to locking by an applied known n = 1 test field in both L-and H-mode plasmas. Locked mode tolerance was completely restored in L-mode by re-adjusting the DIII-D n = 1 error field compensation system. Numerical modelling by IPEC reproduces the rotation braking and locking semi-quantitatively, and identifies plasma amplification of a few n = 1 Fourier harmonics as the main cause of braking. IPEC predicts that TBM braking in H-mode may be reduced by n = 1 control. Although extrapolation from DIII-D to ITER is still an open issue, these experiments suggest that a TBM-like error field will produce only a few potentially troublesome problems, and that they might be made acceptably small.

  1. Survey of academic field experiences (SAFE): trainees report harassment and assault.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Kathryn B H; Nelson, Robin G; Rutherford, Julienne N; Hinde, Katie

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the climate of the scientific fieldwork setting as it relates to gendered experiences, sexual harassment, and sexual assault. We conducted an internet-based survey of field scientists (N = 666) to characterize these experiences. Codes of conduct and sexual harassment policies were not regularly encountered by respondents, while harassment and assault were commonly experienced by respondents during trainee career stages. Women trainees were the primary targets; their perpetrators were predominantly senior to them professionally within the research team. Male trainees were more often targeted by their peers at the research site. Few respondents were aware of mechanisms to report incidents; most who did report were unsatisfied with the outcome. These findings suggest that policies emphasizing safety, inclusivity, and collegiality have the potential to improve field experiences of a diversity of researchers, especially during early career stages. These include better awareness of mechanisms for direct and oblique reporting of harassment and assault and, the implementation of productive response mechanisms when such behaviors are reported. Principal investigators are particularly well positioned to influence workplace culture at their field sites. PMID:25028932

  2. Survey of Academic Field Experiences (SAFE): Trainees Report Harassment and Assault

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, Kathryn B. H.; Nelson, Robin G.; Rutherford, Julienne N.; Hinde, Katie

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the climate of the scientific fieldwork setting as it relates to gendered experiences, sexual harassment, and sexual assault. We conducted an internet-based survey of field scientists (N = 666) to characterize these experiences. Codes of conduct and sexual harassment policies were not regularly encountered by respondents, while harassment and assault were commonly experienced by respondents during trainee career stages. Women trainees were the primary targets; their perpetrators were predominantly senior to them professionally within the research team. Male trainees were more often targeted by their peers at the research site. Few respondents were aware of mechanisms to report incidents; most who did report were unsatisfied with the outcome. These findings suggest that policies emphasizing safety, inclusivity, and collegiality have the potential to improve field experiences of a diversity of researchers, especially during early career stages. These include better awareness of mechanisms for direct and oblique reporting of harassment and assault and, the implementation of productive response mechanisms when such behaviors are reported. Principal investigators are particularly well positioned to influence workplace culture at their field sites. PMID:25028932

  3. Models of the uniformity of electro-magnetic fields generated for biological experiments by Merritt coils.

    PubMed

    Vesper, D N; Swez, J A; Nindl, G; Fox, M T; Sandrey, M A; Balcavage, W X

    2000-01-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) producing wire coils were described by Merritt et al, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 54 (7), 1983. Merritt coils produce large volume EMFs in which statistical numbers of biological experiments are performed. We build and use Merritt coils for cell/animal studies and are developing therapeutic EMF systems. Here we present models illustrating the EMFs produced by our coils and discuss the criteria that should be applied to the use of Merritt and other coils to achieve valid experimental results. In a companion paper at this meeting Nindl et al, describe biological experiments, using these Merritt coils, showing that EMFs may be useful in treating many inflammatory disease states. Although the large-volume EMFs produced by Merritt coils are convenient for biological experiments the EMFs are not perfectly uniform and the deviations can be a significant source of experimental error. The orientation and size of experimental objects are key contributors to these deviations. To evaluate our Merritt coils we solved the Biot-Savart law explicitly for ideal 3-coil and 4-coil Merritt systems and compared these theoretical EMFs with those of our systems. We present a detailed examination of deviations in magnetic field amplitude, as well as magnetic field direction, as a function of location within the coils. We find that spherically shaped experimental sets minimize these deviations. We developed simple formulae for accurately predicting deviations associated with Merritt coils. PMID:10834267

  4. L = 1.24 conjugate magnetic field line tracing experiments with barium shaped charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Peek, H. M.; Bottoms, P. J.; Rieger, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    Description of three experiments involving the injection of barium ions into magnetic flux tubes with the aid of high-explosive shaped charges with hollow conical liners of barium metal. In these experiments (called Alco, Bubia, and Loro, respectively) the explosive charges were detonated at altitudes above 500 km, producing jets of barium plasma with initial velocities ranging from 8 to 20 km/sec. The most interesting result of the experiments, which were carried out near L = 1.24 and were successful in tracing an entire field line some 7000 km to the conjugate ionosphere, was the observation that for Loro and probably Alco the direction and rate of drift of the two ends of the field line were identical, whereas those for Bubia differed significantly. In the case of the Bubia event significant differences in magnitude and direction at the conjugate points are noted, which lead to the conclusion that the field line could not have been equipotential during the interval of observation.

  5. Survey of academic field experiences (SAFE): trainees report harassment and assault.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Kathryn B H; Nelson, Robin G; Rutherford, Julienne N; Hinde, Katie

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the climate of the scientific fieldwork setting as it relates to gendered experiences, sexual harassment, and sexual assault. We conducted an internet-based survey of field scientists (N = 666) to characterize these experiences. Codes of conduct and sexual harassment policies were not regularly encountered by respondents, while harassment and assault were commonly experienced by respondents during trainee career stages. Women trainees were the primary targets; their perpetrators were predominantly senior to them professionally within the research team. Male trainees were more often targeted by their peers at the research site. Few respondents were aware of mechanisms to report incidents; most who did report were unsatisfied with the outcome. These findings suggest that policies emphasizing safety, inclusivity, and collegiality have the potential to improve field experiences of a diversity of researchers, especially during early career stages. These include better awareness of mechanisms for direct and oblique reporting of harassment and assault and, the implementation of productive response mechanisms when such behaviors are reported. Principal investigators are particularly well positioned to influence workplace culture at their field sites.

  6. Effects of resistive magnetic field on fast electron divergence measured in experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. H.; Zhuo, H. B.; Ma, Y. Y.; Xu, H.; Yu, T. P.; Zou, D. B.; Ge, Z. Y.; Xu, B. B.; Zhu, Q. J.; Shao, F. Q.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-02-01

    Transport of fast electrons driven by an ultraintense laser through a tracer layer buried in solid targets is studied by particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that intense resistive magnetic fields, having a magnitude of several thousand Tesla, are generated at the interfaces of the materials due to the steep resistivity gradient between the target and tracer layer. Such magnetic fields can significantly inhibit the fast electron propagation. The electrons that can penetrate the first interface are mostly confined in the buried layer by the magnetic fields and cause heating of the tracer layer. The lateral extent of the heated region can be significantly larger than that of the relativistic electron beam. This finding suggests that the relativistic electron divergence inferred from Kα x-ray emission in experiments might be overestimated.

  7. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments of colliding jets: Turbulent amplification of seed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, Petros; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Graziani, Carlo; Gregori, Gianluca; Lamb, Donald; Lee, Dongwook; Meinecke, Jena; Scopatz, Anthony; Weide, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    In this study we present high-resolution numerical simulations of laboratory experiments that study the turbulent amplification of magnetic fields generated by laser-driven colliding jets. The radiative magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations discussed here were performed with the FLASH code and have assisted in the analysis of the experimental results obtained from the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a pair of thin Carbon foils is placed in an Argon-filled chamber and is illuminated to create counter-propagating jets. The jets carry magnetic fields generated by the Biermann battery mechanism and collide to form a highly turbulent region. The interaction is probed using a wealth of diagnostics, including induction coils that are capable of providing the field strength and directionality at a specific point in space. The latter have revealed a significant increase in the field's strength due to turbulent amplification. Our FLASH simulations have allowed us to reproduce the experimental findings and to disentangle the complex processes and dynamics involved in the colliding flows. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by DOE NNSA ASC.

  8. ADX: a high field, high power density, Advanced Divertor test eXperiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, R.; Labombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, J.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; ADX Team

    2014-10-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment (ADX) - a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research program on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. This high field (6.5 tesla, 1.5 MA), high power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) facility would utilize Alcator magnet technology to test innovative divertor concepts for next-step DT fusion devices (FNSF, DEMO) at reactor-level boundary plasma pressures and parallel heat flux densities while producing high performance core plasma conditions. The experimental platform would also test advanced lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ion-cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) actuators and wave physics at the plasma densities and magnetic field strengths of a DEMO, with the unique ability to deploy launcher structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-field side - a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and wave physics is most favorable for efficient current drive, heating and flow drive. This innovative experiment would perform plasma science and technology R&D necessary to inform the conceptual development and accelerate the readiness-for-deployment of FNSF/DEMO - in a timely manner, on a cost-effective research platform. Supported by DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  9. Wow, My Science Teacher Does Real Research! Engaging and Motivating Students Using Experiences from the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, C.

    2013-12-01

    Students respond to personal connections. When K-12 science teachers are able to participate as field assistants on research projects, their students can benefit greatly from the stories, pictures, and video transmitted or brought back from the field. Teachers can translate and tailor their learning while in the field to the level of their students. Students are ';hooked' into science content by seeing their own teacher out there actually ';doing' science. The teacher is able to provide a direct content connection for the student, an avenue for understanding why ';learning this' is relevant and important. This presentation provides a case for why science teachers and researchers should collaborate as much as possible. The NSF funded PolarTREC program (Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating) is an excellent example of how to make this collaboration work. The presentation will also provide a look into how teachers can make an effective connection for their students between field science and classroom learning. Alaskan secondary science teacher Carol Scott spent a month at the Kevo Research Station in northern Finland in May/June 2013 as a PolarTREC teacher, and is translating this experience for students. She has also worked on an NSF Research Experience for Teachers grant in Prince William Sound, AK, and has successfully used this work to engage students in the classroom.

  10. HT to HTO conversion and field experiments near Darlington Nuclear Power Generating Station (DNPGS) site.

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Stuart, M; Bredlaw, M; Festarini, A; Beaton, D

    2014-06-01

    The Canadian input parameters related to tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) used in tritium dose models are currently based on experiments performed at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site in 1986, 1987 and 1994. There is uncertainty in how well other sites experiencing atmospheric HT releases are represented by these data. In order to address this uncertainty, HT to HTO conversion factors were evaluated at different locations near the Darlington Nuclear Power Generating Station (DNPGS) site using various experimental approaches. These were D2 gas exposure chamber experiments, atmospheric tritium measurements, and HTO and OBT measurements in vegetation and soil. In addition to these field experiments, chamber experiments were conducted using HT gas on field soil samples. The suggested Canadian input parameters for atmospheric tritium releases estimate the total fraction of HT oxidized in air and in soil, at the site, to be up to a maximum of 2.4%. Based on the more limited data obtained near DNPGS in early spring, this fraction would likely be closer to 0.5%. The result suggests that current parameters provide a conservative estimate for the DNPGS site.

  11. The Multi-Well Experiment: a field laboratory for tight gas sands research

    SciTech Connect

    Sattler, A.R.

    1982-08-01

    The Multi-Well Experiment (MWX) is a research oriented field laboratory whose objective is developing the understanding and technology to allow economic production of the over 200 trillion cubic feet of natural gas estimated to lie within the low permeability, lenticular gas sands in the western United States. Experiment activities include: close-spaced (100-200 ft) wells, comprehensive core and logging programs, extensive in situ stress measurements, geophysical surveys to determine sand body configurations, diagnostic measurements for hydraulic fracture characterization, and a series of stimulation experiments. Analysis of data from these activities will yield improved geologic, reservoir, and stimulation models and improved log interpretation methods for lenticular, tight gas sands. To date, two 8350 ft wells, 135 ft apart, have been drilled in the Piceance Basin at a site near Rifle, Colorado, where the Mesaverde, the formation of interest, lies at a depth of 3900-8300 ft. Preliminary core, log, and well data have provided an initial characterization of the site. Four years of stimulation experiments are planned for this field laboratory.

  12. Multi-Well Experiment: a field laboratory for tight-gas-sands research

    SciTech Connect

    Northrop, D.A.; Sattler, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Multi-Well Experiment (MWX) is a research-oriented field laboratory whose objective is developing the understanding and technology to allow economic production of the over 200 trillion cubic feet of natural gas estimated to lie within the low permeability, lenticular gas sands in the western United States. Experiment activities include: (1) close-spaced (100 to 200 ft) wells; (2) comprehensive core and logging programs; (3) extensive in situ stress measurements; (4) geophysical surveys to determine sand body configurations; (5) diagnostic measurements for hydraulic fracture characterization; and (6) a series of stimulation experiments. Analysis of data from these activities will yield improved geologic, reservoir, and stimulation models and improved log interpretation methods for lenticular, tight gas sands. To date, two 8350 ft wells, 135 ft apart, have been drilled in the Piceance Basin at a site near Rifle, Colorado, where the Mesaverde, the formation of interest, lies at a depth of 3900 to 8300 ft. Preliminary core, log, and well data have provided an initial characterization of the site. Four years of stimulation experiments are planned for this field laboratory. 4 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Sensitivity Enhancement of Separated Local Field Experiments: Application to Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, T.; Verardi, Raffaello; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2010-01-01

    Separated local field (SLF) experiments have been used for almost three decades to obtain structural information in solid-state NMR. These experiments resolve chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) from dipole-dipole interactions (dipolar couplings, DC) in isolated spin systems. Both CSA and DC data can be converted into orientational constraints to elucidate the secondary structure and topology of membrane proteins in oriented lipid bilayers. Here, we propose a new suite of sensitivity enhanced SLF pulse sequences to measure CSA and DC for aligned membrane proteins and liquid crystalline molecules that will decrease the time needed for data acquisition. We demonstrate the efficacy of these new sensitivity enhanced experiments using both a single crystal of N-acetyl leucine and a single pass membrane protein sarcolipin reconstituted in aligned lipid bicelles. These results lay the groundwork for the routine application of these methods for studying the structure and topology of membrane proteins. PMID:20349983

  14. A replicated climate change field experiment reveals rapid evolutionary response in an ecologically important soil invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Bataillon, Thomas; Galtier, Nicolas; Bernard, Aurelien; Cryer, Nicolai; Faivre, Nicolas; Santoni, Sylvain; Severac, Dany; Mikkelsen, Teis N; Larsen, Klaus S; Beier, Claus; Sørensen, Jesper G; Holmstrup, Martin; Ehlers, Bodil K

    2016-07-01

    Whether species can respond evolutionarily to current climate change is crucial for the persistence of many species. Yet, very few studies have examined genetic responses to climate change in manipulated experiments carried out in natural field conditions. We examined the evolutionary response to climate change in a common annelid worm using a controlled replicated experiment where climatic conditions were manipulated in a natural setting. Analyzing the transcribed genome of 15 local populations, we found that about 12% of the genetic polymorphisms exhibit differences in allele frequencies associated to changes in soil temperature and soil moisture. This shows an evolutionary response to realistic climate change happening over short-time scale, and calls for incorporating evolution into models predicting future response of species to climate change. It also shows that designed climate change experiments coupled with genome sequencing offer great potential to test for the occurrence (or lack) of an evolutionary response. PMID:27109012

  15. Remedial self-fulfilling prophecy: two field experiments to prevent Golem effects among disadvantaged women.

    PubMed

    Davidson, O B; Eden, D

    2000-06-01

    The Pygmalion effect is a self-fulfilling prophecy (SFP) in which raising leader expectations boosts subordinate performance. Although attempts to produce Pygmalion effects have been successful repeatedly among men, attempts to produce Pygmalion effects with female leaders have yielded null results. Also, only 1 experiment has demonstrated the Golem effect (i.e., negative SFP in which low leader expectations impair subordinate performance). In 2 field experiments testing the SFP hypothesis among women leading disadvantaged women, experimental leaders were led to believe that their trainees had higher than usual potential. In reality, the trainees had been assigned randomly. Manipulation checks confirmed that the treatment raised leader expectations toward experimental trainees. Analysis of variance of performance detected the predicted SFP effects in both experiments. These were the first-ever experimental confirmations of SFP among women as leaders. PMID:10900813

  16. Quantitative genetics of response to competitors in Nemophila menziesii: a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Shaw, R G; Platenkamp, G A; Shaw, F H; Podolsky, R H

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigations of evolution in heterogeneous environments have begun to accommodate genetic and environmental complexity typical of natural populations. Theoretical studies demonstrate that evolution of polygenic characters depends heavily on the genetic interdependence of the expression of traits in the different environments in which selection occurs, but information concerning this issue is scarce. We conducted a field experiment to assess the genetic variability of the annual plant Nemophila menziesii in five biotic regimes differing in plant density and composition. Significant, though modest, additive genetic variance in plant size was expressed in particular treatments. Evidence of additive genetic tradeoffs between interspecific and intraspecific competitive performance was found, but this result was not consistent throughout the experiment. Two aspects of experimental design may tend to obscure genetically based tradeoffs across environments in many previously published experiments: (1) inability to isolate additive genetic from other sources of variation and (2) use of novel (e.g., laboratory) environments. PMID:7705640

  17. Quantitative Genetics of Response to Competitors in Nemophila Menziesii: A Field Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, R. G.; Platenkamp, GAJ.; Shaw, F. H.; Podolsky, R. H.

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigations of evolution in heterogeneous environments have begun to accommodate genetic and environmental complexity typical of natural populations. Theoretical studies demonstrate that evolution of polygenic characters depends heavily on the genetic interdependence of the expression of traits in the different environments in which selection occurs, but information concerning this issue is scarce. We conducted a field experiment to assess the genetic variability of the annual plant Nemophila menziesii in five biotic regimes differing in plant density and composition. Significant, though modest, additive genetic variance in plant size was expressed in particular treatments. Evidence of additive genetic tradeoffs between interspecific and intraspecific competitive performance was found, but this result was not consistent throughout the experiment. Two aspects of experimental design may tend to obscure genetically based tradeoffs across environments in many previously published experiments: (1) inability to isolate additive genetic from other sources of variation and (2) use of novel (e.g., laboratory) environments. PMID:7705640

  18. What's Life Got to Do with It? The Role of Life Experiences in Shaping Female Community College Students' Transfer Intent in STEM Fields of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickersham, Kelly; Wang, Xueli

    2016-01-01

    Transfer in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields from community colleges to 4-year institutions holds great policy significance in alleviating the female underrepresentation in the STEM pipeline, with proportionately more female students attending community colleges. Considering the knowledge gap on this often overlooked topic,…

  19. Scaling methane oxidation: From laboratory incubation experiments to landfill cover field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Abichou, Tarek; Mahieu, Koenraad; Chanton, Jeff; Romdhane, Mehrez; Mansouri, Imane

    2011-05-15

    Evaluating field-scale methane oxidation in landfill cover soils using numerical models is gaining interest in the solid waste industry as research has made it clear that methane oxidation in the field is a complex function of climatic conditions, soil type, cover design, and incoming flux of landfill gas from the waste mass. Numerical models can account for these parameters as they change with time and space under field conditions. In this study, we developed temperature, and water content correction factors for methane oxidation parameters. We also introduced a possible correction to account for the different soil structure under field conditions. These parameters were defined in laboratory incubation experiments performed on homogenized soil specimens and were used to predict the actual methane oxidation rates to be expected under field conditions. Water content and temperature corrections factors were obtained for the methane oxidation rate parameter to be used when modeling methane oxidation in the field. To predict in situ measured rates of methane with the model it was necessary to set the half saturation constant of methane and oxygen, K{sub m}, to 5%, approximately five times larger than laboratory measured values. We hypothesize that this discrepancy reflects differences in soil structure between homogenized soil conditions in the lab and actual aggregated soil structure in the field. When all of these correction factors were re-introduced into the oxidation module of our model, it was able to reproduce surface emissions (as measured by static flux chambers) and percent oxidation (as measured by stable isotope techniques) within the range measured in the field.

  20. Complex magnetic field exposure system for in vitro experiments at intermediate frequencies.

    PubMed

    Lodato, Rossella; Merla, Caterina; Pinto, Rosanna; Mancini, Sergio; Lopresto, Vanni; Lovisolo, Giorgio A

    2013-04-01

    In occupational environments, an increasing number of electromagnetic sources emitting complex magnetic field waveforms in the range of intermediate frequencies is present, requiring an accurate exposure risk assessment with both in vitro and in vivo experiments. In this article, an in vitro exposure system able to generate complex magnetic flux density B-fields, reproducing signals from actual intermediate frequency sources such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, for instance, is developed and validated. The system consists of a magnetic field generation system and an exposure apparatus realized with a couple of square coils. A wide homogeneity (99.9%) volume of 210 × 210 × 110 mm(3) was obtained within the coils, with the possibility of simultaneous exposure of a large number of standard Petri dishes. The system is able to process any numerical input sequence through a filtering technique aimed at compensating the coils' impedance effect. The B-field, measured in proximity to a 1.5 T MRI bore during a typical examination, was excellently reproduced (cross-correlation index of 0.99). Thus, it confirms the ability of the proposed setup to accurately simulate complex waveforms in the intermediate frequency band. Suitable field levels were also attained. Moreover, a dosimetry index based on the weighted-peak method was evaluated considering the induced E-field on a Petri dish exposed to the reproduced complex B-field. The weighted-peak index was equal to 0.028 for the induced E-field, indicating an exposure level compliant with the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Bioelectromagnetics 34:211-219, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23060274

  1. Complex magnetic field exposure system for in vitro experiments at intermediate frequencies.

    PubMed

    Lodato, Rossella; Merla, Caterina; Pinto, Rosanna; Mancini, Sergio; Lopresto, Vanni; Lovisolo, Giorgio A

    2013-04-01

    In occupational environments, an increasing number of electromagnetic sources emitting complex magnetic field waveforms in the range of intermediate frequencies is present, requiring an accurate exposure risk assessment with both in vitro and in vivo experiments. In this article, an in vitro exposure system able to generate complex magnetic flux density B-fields, reproducing signals from actual intermediate frequency sources such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, for instance, is developed and validated. The system consists of a magnetic field generation system and an exposure apparatus realized with a couple of square coils. A wide homogeneity (99.9%) volume of 210 × 210 × 110 mm(3) was obtained within the coils, with the possibility of simultaneous exposure of a large number of standard Petri dishes. The system is able to process any numerical input sequence through a filtering technique aimed at compensating the coils' impedance effect. The B-field, measured in proximity to a 1.5 T MRI bore during a typical examination, was excellently reproduced (cross-correlation index of 0.99). Thus, it confirms the ability of the proposed setup to accurately simulate complex waveforms in the intermediate frequency band. Suitable field levels were also attained. Moreover, a dosimetry index based on the weighted-peak method was evaluated considering the induced E-field on a Petri dish exposed to the reproduced complex B-field. The weighted-peak index was equal to 0.028 for the induced E-field, indicating an exposure level compliant with the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Bioelectromagnetics 34:211-219, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Field experiments of multi-channel oceanographic fluorescence lidar for oil spill and chlorophyll- a detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaolong; Zhao, Chaofang; Ma, Youjun; Liu, Zhishen

    2014-08-01

    A Multi-channel Oceanographic Fluorescence Lidar (MOFL), with a UV excitation at 355 nm and multiple receiving channels at typical wavelengths of fluorescence from oil spills and chlorophyll- a (Chl- a), has been developed using the Laser-induced Fluorescence (LIF) technique. The sketch of the MOFL system equipped with a compact multi-channel photomultiplier tube (MPMT) is introduced in the paper. The methods of differentiating the oil fluorescence from the background water fluorescence and evaluating the Chl- a concentration are described. Two field experiments were carried out to investigate the field performance of the system, i.e., an experiment in coastal areas for oil pollution detection and an experiment over the Yellow Sea for Chl- a monitoring. In the coastal experiment, several oil samples and other fluorescence substances were used to analyze the fluorescence spectral characteristics for oil identification, and to estimate the thickness of oil films at the water surface. The experiment shows that both the spectral shape of fluorescence induced from surface water and the intensity ratio of two channels ( I 495/ I 405) are essential to determine oil-spill occurrence. In the airborne experiment, MOFL was applied to measure relative Chl- a concentrations in the upper layer of the ocean. A comparison of relative Chl- a concentration measurements by MOFL and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) indicates that the two datasets are in good agreement. The results show that the MOFL system is capable of monitoring oil spills and Chl- a in the upper layer of ocean water.

  3. U.S. Army RDECOM-ARDEC's results of the TG-53 experiment and field test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Sachi V.; Morcos, Amir

    2009-05-01

    Herein is described the U.S. Army RDECOM-ARDEC's purpose and series of activities conducted at the 2008 NATO SET-093 TG-53 experiment and field test. The overall purpose of the field test as stated by SET-093 panel was to provide a baseline test capable of providing relevant scenarios and data regarding a variety of impulsive generated acoustic events. As organized, the field experiment also allowed the room o study sensor interoperability across multiple platforms and multi-national users via the spider communication framework/reporting structure. This multinational network maintained by the host ETBS with a standardized messaging format with specific goals for each participating organization. ARDEC's role and purpose for the test was to provide situational awareness via the Spider and associated messaging format to the ETBS command center while continuing to gather unique acoustic data from various vantage points. ARDEC had several deliverables for the TG-53 field experiment derived from the mission and spirit of the field test. The most relevant deliverable was to demonstrate sensor interoperability via the Spider network and provide situational awareness by describing the said mortar/artillery events. The second purpose revolved around a relevant environment algorithm validation of the muzzle blast discrimination for future UGS transition in particular the UTAMS II. The algorithm validation information remained internal to the specific data acquisition system and not broadcasted out on the Spider network. The TG-53 field experiments provided the added opportunity to further test and refine the algorithm based on the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and multiresolution analysis. These techniques are used to classify and reliably discriminates between launch and impact artillery and/or mortar events via acoustic signals produced during detonation. Distinct characteristics are found within the acoustic signatures since impact events emphasize concussive and

  4. Lessons in collaboration and effective field research from the Appalachian Headwaters Research Experience for Undergraduates Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. L.; Fox, J.; Wilder, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    In the summer of 2009, the authors launched year one of a three-year National Science Foundation-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates entitled "Carbon Storage and Headwater Health in the Appalachian Headwaters." Eight undergraduates selected from a nationally competitive field of more than 60 applicants participated in the ten-week field- and laboratory-based program along with three middle- and high-school teachers. Each student developed and completed an independent research project related to coal mining’s impact on soil organic carbon and sediment transport processes. Specifically, they used isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure the carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic signature of soils and sediments in the Appalachian headwater landscapes and first order streams of Kentucky's southeastern coalfields. Among the program's innovative features was its fundamentally collaborative nature--which was represented in several ways. First, the background of the three program leaders was very different: an environmental planner with an academic background in land use planning and administration (Jones); a civil engineer trained in biogeochemistry and watershed modeling (Fox); and an environmental educator experienced in both formal and nonformal educator training and certification (Wilder). The program was also a collaboration between a Carnegie 1 research-oriented institution and an undergraduate/ teaching -focused regional comprehensive university. Finally, the participants themselves represented a diversity of disciplines and institutional backgrounds--including biology, geology, chemistry, environmental science and civil engineering. The Research Experience for Teachers component was another innovative program element. The teachers participated in all field and laboratory research activities during the first six weeks, then developed a unit of study for their own classrooms to be implemented during the current school year. In addition to the six

  5. Magnetic Field Observations from the Dynamic Ionosphere CubeSat Experiment (DICE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilinski, M.; Wilder, F. D.; Crowley, G.; Azeem, S. I.; Swenson, C.; Fish, C. S.; Neilsen, T. L.; Barjatya, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Dynamic Ionosphere CubeSat Experiment (DICE) was launched on October 28, 2011 with the primary mission objective to study and characterize ionospheric Storm Enhanced Density (SED) bulges and plumes. The mission consists of two spacecraft, each containing two Langmuir probes to measure ionospheric in-situ plasma densities, as well as electric field probes and a magnetometer to measure AC and DC electromagnetic fields. The mission is still in the commissioning and engineering check-out phase, but all instruments appear to be healthy. The Langmuir Probes are fully deployed, and data has been collected from them as well as from the science magnetometer. The final commissioning task is the deployment of the electric field booms. This work presents data from the on-board magnetometers. Background geomagnetic field values are subtracted to investigate magnetic perturbations at high latitudes due to Field Aligned Currents (FACs). These perturbations are compared to AMPERE fitted magnetic residuals. DICE Langmuir probe measurements are also compared with the magnetic residuals to investigate the effect of FACs and particle precipitation on the overall electron density in the ionosphere.

  6. Assessing Teaching Practices of Secondary Mathematics Student Teachers: An Exploratory Cross Case Analysis of Voluntary Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClintock, Edwin; O'Brien, George; Jiang, Zhonghong

    2005-01-01

    Analyses of the impact of reform-based teaching practices in Florida International University's program have been previously reported. However, the impact of the field experiences "per se" has not been assessed. Using a cross-case analysis approach, the authors assess the impact of voluntary field experiences with teachers who practice innovative…

  7. How Teacher Candidates' Perceptions of Urban Students Are Influenced by Field Experiences: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    del Prado Hill, Pixita; Friedland, Ellen S.; Phelps, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Field experiences hold great promise for preparing candidates for effective urban teaching. This article reviews the research investigating the influence of field experiences on teacher candidates' perceptions of urban students from 1995 to 2010. The 36 articles that met the authors' criteria were organized into three general categories: studies…

  8. Heat tracer test in an alluvial aquifer: Field experiment and inverse modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepikova, Maria; Wildemeersch, Samuel; Hermans, Thomas; Jamin, Pierre; Orban, Philippe; Nguyen, Frédéric; Brouyère, Serge; Dassargues, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Using heat as an active tracer for aquifer characterization is a topic of increasing interest. In this study, we investigate the potential of using heat tracer tests for characterization of a shallow alluvial aquifer. A thermal tracer test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer of the Meuse River, Belgium. The tracing experiment consisted in simultaneously injecting heated water and a dye tracer in an injection well and monitoring the evolution of groundwater temperature and tracer concentration in the pumping well and in measurement intervals. To get insights in the 3D characteristics of the heat transport mechanisms, temperature data from a large number of observation wells closely spaced along three transects were used. Temperature breakthrough curves in observation wells are contrasted with what would be expected in an ideal layered aquifer. They reveal strongly unequal lateral and vertical components of the transport mechanisms. The observed complex behavior of the heat plume is explained by the groundwater flow gradient on the site and heterogeneities in the hydraulic conductivity field. Moreover, due to high injection temperatures during the field experiment a temperature-induced fluid density effect on heat transport occurred. By using a flow and heat transport numerical model with variable density coupled with a pilot point approach for inversion of the hydraulic conductivity field, the main preferential flow paths were delineated. The successful application of a field heat tracer test at this site suggests that heat tracer tests is a promising approach to image hydraulic conductivity field. This methodology could be applied in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) projects for assessing future efficiency that is strongly linked to the hydraulic conductivity variability in the considered aquifer.

  9. Glasshouse vs field experiments: do they yield ecologically similar results for assessing N impacts on peat mosses?

    PubMed

    Limpens, J; Granath, G; Aerts, R; Heijmans, M M P D; Sheppard, L J; Bragazza, L; Williams, B L; Rydin, H; Bubier, J; Moore, T; Rochefort, L; Mitchell, E A D; Buttler, A; van den Berg, L J L; Gunnarsson, U; Francez, A-J; Gerdol, R; Thormann, M; Grosvernier, P; Wiedermann, M M; Nilsson, M B; Hoosbeek, M R; Bayley, S; Nordbakken, J-F; Paulissen, M P C P; Hotes, S; Breeuwer, A; Ilomets, M; Tomassen, H B M; Leith, I; Xu, B

    2012-07-01

    • Peat bogs have accumulated more atmospheric carbon (C) than any other terrestrial ecosystem today. Most of this C is associated with peat moss (Sphagnum) litter. Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition can decrease Sphagnum production, compromising the C sequestration capacity of peat bogs. The mechanisms underlying the reduced production are uncertain, necessitating multifactorial experiments. • We investigated whether glasshouse experiments are reliable proxies for field experiments for assessing interactions between N deposition and environment as controls on Sphagnum N concentration and production. We performed a meta-analysis over 115 glasshouse experiments and 107 field experiments. • We found that glasshouse and field experiments gave similar qualitative and quantitative estimates of changes in Sphagnum N concentration in response to N application. However, glasshouse-based estimates of changes in production--even qualitative assessments-- diverged from field experiments owing to a stronger N effect on production response in absence of vascular plants in the glasshouse, and a weaker N effect on production response in presence of vascular plants compared to field experiments. • Thus, although we need glasshouse experiments to study how interacting environmental factors affect the response of Sphagnum to increased N deposition, we need field experiments to properly quantify these effects. PMID:22537052

  10. Prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with gastroesophageal reflux disease: 4-year followup.

    PubMed

    Okida, Ricardo Coelho; Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Vechiato Filho, Aljomar José; Andreotti, Agda Marobo; de Medeiros, Rodrigo Antonio; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2014-01-01

    The gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the main causes of dental erosion. The aim of this case presented is to describe the prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with GERD after 4 years of followup. A 33-year-old male patient complained about tooth sensitivity. The lingual surface of the maxillary anterior teeth and the cusps of the upper and lower posterior teeth presented wear. It was suspected that the feeling of heartburn reported by the patient associated with the intake of sports supplements (isotonics) was causing gastroesophageal changes. The patient was referred to a gastroenterologist and was diagnosed with GERD. Dental treatment was performed with metal-free crowns and porcelain veneers after medical treatment of the disease. With the change in eating habits, the treatment of GERD and lithium disilicate ceramics provided excellent cosmetic results after 4 years and the patient reported satisfaction with the treatment.

  11. Conjunctival lymphangioma in a 4-year-old girl revealed tuberous sclerosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Freiberg, Florentina Joyce; Kunstmann, Erdmute; König, Thomas; Matlach, Juliane; Kampik, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background: To present a case of conjunctival lymphangioma in a 4-year-old girl with tuberous sclerosis complex. Methods/results: A 4-year-old girl presented with a relapsing cystic lesion of the bulbar conjunctiva in the right eye with string-of-pearl-like dilation of lymphatic vessels and right-sided facial swelling with mild pain. Best-corrected vision was not impaired. Examination of the skin revealed three hypomelanotic macules and a lumbal Shagreen patch. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings displayed minimal enhancement of buccal fat on the right side. Cranial and orbital MRI showed signal enhancement in the right cortical and subcortical areas. Genetic analysis revealed a heterozygous deletion encompassing exon 1 and 2 of the TSC1 gene (tuberous sclerosis complex 1 gene), confirming the diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis complex. Conclusion: In conjunctival lymphangioma, tuberous sclerosis complex should be considered as the primary disease. PMID:27703871

  12. Chemical analysis of post explosion samples obtained as a result of model field experiments.

    PubMed

    Borusiewicz, Rafal; Zadora, Grzegorz; Zieba-Palus, Janina

    2013-11-15

    Five different explosives were detonated in a series of field experiments. Each experiment (detonation of the charge of each specific explosive) was repeated three times. The experiments were conducted under controlled conditions, exceeding those of research published so far. Detonated charges were uniform in size and, as far as possible, in shape. The explosives used originated from the same batch. Additionally, the same kind of electric detonators were used. Witness plates (sheets of galvanised steel 100 cm × 90 cm × 0.5 mm) were used to collect post-blast residues in a reproducible way. They were placed relatively close to the charge to minimise the influence of the wind. Samples were collected by systematic swabbing of the surface of the plate by acetone moistened cotton swabs. Samples were packed tight, transferred to the laboratory, and extracted with methanol. Extracts were concentrated by solvent evaporation, cleaned by centrifugation, and analysed using HPLC-DAD. Each extract was analysed three times and the mean value of the amount of the given explosive within the extract was calculated. For each of the explosive materials used the results of the repetition of the experiments proved them to be irreproducible. After each detonation of a specific charge different amounts of given explosives were found in post-blast samples. Also, the intuitively expected relationship between the distance from the charge and amount of post-blast residues were not observed. These results are consistent with previously published results of field experiments. The lack of reproducibility may be explained by differences in efficiency of detonation. The efficiency of a detonation may be influenced even by small differences in the shape of the charge as well as by the position and properties of the detonator. The lack of dependency between the amount of the explosive in the post-blast samples and the distance from the charge may be explained by the fact that during detonation

  13. Variably saturated flow and multicomponent biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a uranium bioremediation field experiment.

    PubMed

    Yabusaki, Steven B; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H; Murray, Christopher J; Ward, Andy L; Dayvault, Richard D; Waichler, Scott R; Newcomer, Darrell R; Spane, Frank A; Long, Philip E

    2011-11-01

    Three-dimensional, coupled variably saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a 2008 in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment is used to better understand the interplay of transport and biogeochemical reactions controlling uranium behavior under pulsed acetate amendment, seasonal water table variation, spatially variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. While the simulation of the 2008 Big Rusty acetate biostimulation field experiment in Rifle, Colorado was generally consistent with behaviors identified in previous field experiments at the Rifle IFRC site, the additional process and property detail provided several new insights. A principal conclusion from this work is that uranium bioreduction is most effective when acetate, in excess of the sulfate-reducing bacteria demand, is available to the metal-reducing bacteria. The inclusion of an initially small population of slow growing sulfate-reducing bacteria identified in proteomic analyses led to an additional source of Fe(II) from the dissolution of Fe(III) minerals promoted by biogenic sulfide. The falling water table during the experiment significantly reduced the saturated thickness of the aquifer and resulted in reactants and products, as well as unmitigated uranium, in the newly unsaturated vadose zone. High permeability sandy gravel structures resulted in locally high flow rates in the vicinity of injection wells that increased acetate dilution. In downgradient locations, these structures created preferential flow paths for acetate delivery that enhanced local zones of TEAP reactivity and subsidiary reactions. Conversely, smaller transport rates associated with the lower permeability lithofacies (e.g., fine) and vadose zone were shown to limit acetate access and reaction. Once accessed by acetate, however, these same zones limited subsequent acetate dilution and provided longer residence times that resulted

  14. Variably saturated flow and multicomponent biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a uranium bioremediation field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H.; Murray, Christopher J.; Ward, Andy L.; Dayvault, Richard D.; Waichler, Scott R.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Spane, Frank A.; Long, Philip E.

    2011-11-01

    Three-dimensional, coupled variably saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling of a 2008 in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment is used to better understand the interplay of transport and biogeochemical reactions controlling uranium behavior under pulsed acetate amendment, seasonal water table variation, spatially variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. While the simulation of the 2008 Big Rusty acetate biostimulation field experiment in Rifle, Colorado was generally consistent with behaviors identified in previous field experiments at the Rifle IFRC site, the additional process and property detail provided several new insights. A principal conclusion from this work is that uranium bioreduction is most effective when acetate, in excess of the sulfate-reducing bacteria demand, is available to the metal-reducing bacteria. The inclusion of an initially small population of slow growing sulfate-reducing bacteria identified in proteomic analyses led to an additional source of Fe(II) from the dissolution of Fe(III) minerals promoted by biogenic sulfide. The falling water table during the experiment significantly reduced the saturated thickness of the aquifer and resulted in reactants and products, as well as unmitigated uranium, in the newly unsaturated vadose zone. High permeability sandy gravel structures resulted in locally high flow rates in the vicinity of injection wells that increased acetate dilution. In downgradient locations, these structures created preferential flow paths for acetate delivery that enhanced local zones of TEAP reactivity and subsidiary reactions. Conversely, smaller transport rates associated with the lower permeability lithofacies (e.g., fine) and vadose zone were shown to limit acetate access and reaction. Once accessed by acetate, however, these same zones limited subsequent acetate dilution and provided longer residence times that resulted

  15. High School and Undergraduate Participation in Field Experiments as a Means of Teaching Global Change Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiariello, N. R.; Gomez, W.; Field, C. B.

    2004-12-01

    Field experiments offer unique opportunities to teach undergraduates and high school students many of the principles and methods of global change science. The Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment (JRGCE) studies the response of California grassland to four environmental factors changing globally, and has emphasized a tiered program of outreach that combines curriculum supplements, demonstration tours, sample data sets, and internship opportunities. The program emphasizes translating a complex environmental question into an experiment. High school outreach by the JRGCE has focused on the environmental studies classes at a nearby public high school. Students begin with background material via a website and in-class sessions that focus on global and regional changes in the four environmental factors incorporated in the experiment: warming, elevated CO2, increased precipitation, and nitrogen deposition. Each class also visits the experiment to see and discuss many aspects of experimental design: environmental heterogeneity, the importance of replication and randomization, the role of experimental controls, the possibility of experimental artifacts, the importance of minimally disruptive measurements, and the complexity of ecosystems and their responses to experimental treatments. These demonstration tours also emphasize hands-on measurements to illustrate how ecosystem responses to global change are quantified across a wide range of mechanisms. Finally, students use data from the experiment to test for effects of the treatments. For undergraduate classes, outreach focuses on either broad-based or more specialized demonstration tours to support their already well-developed curriculum. A few strongly interested high school students and undergraduates also conduct studies within the JRGCE under the supervision of a graduate student, postdoc, or professor. These educational activities depend crucially on three factors: 1) involvement of many members of the experiment team

  16. Intentional replantation of a maxillary molar. A 4-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, A Y

    1982-12-01

    A 4-year follow-up of a case treated by intentional replantation has been presented. A maxillary molar with a metal core was diagnosed as having acute apical periodontitis, endodontic treatment was determined to be impractical, and the tooth was extracted. Three roots canals which could not be detected roentgenologically were discovered and, after apicoectomy and reversed amalgam filling, the tooth was replanted in its socket. The follow-up reveals periapical repair with no signs of root resorption or ankylosis.

  17. Canadian Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for the Early Years (aged 0-4 years).

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Mark S; Leblanc, Allana G; Carson, Valerie; Choquette, Louise; Connor Gorber, Sarah; Dillman, Carrie; Duggan, Mary; Gordon, Mary Jane; Hicks, Audrey; Janssen, Ian; Kho, Michelle E; Latimer-Cheung, Amy E; Leblanc, Claire; Murumets, Kelly; Okely, Anthony D; Reilly, John J; Stearns, Jodie A; Timmons, Brian W; Spence, John C

    2012-04-01

    The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP), with assistance from multiple partners, stakeholders, and researchers, developed the first Canadian Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for the Early Years (aged 0-4 years). These national guidelines are in response to a call from health and health care professionals, child care providers, and fitness practitioners for guidance on sedentary behaviour in the early years. The guideline development process followed the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation (AGREE) II framework. The recommendations are informed by evidence from a systematic review that examined the relationships between sedentary behaviour (predominantly screen time) and health indicators (healthy body weight, bone and skeletal health, motor skill development, psychosocial health, cognitive development, and cardio-metabolic disease risk factors) for three age groups (infants aged <1 year; toddlers aged 1-2 years; preschoolers aged 3-4 years). Evidence from the review was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. The new guidelines include a preamble to provide context, followed by the specific recommendations. The final guidelines benefitted from extensive on-line consultations with input from >900 domestic and international stakeholders, end-users, and key informants. The final guidelines state: for healthy growth and development, caregivers should minimize the time infants (aged <1 year), toddlers (aged 1-2 years), and preschoolers (aged 3-4 years) spend being sedentary during waking hours. This includes prolonged sitting or being restrained (e.g., stroller, high chair) for more than 1 h at a time. For those under 2 years, screen time (e.g., TV, computer, electronic games) is not recommended. For children 2-4 years, screen time should be limited to under 1 h per day; less is better.

  18. Effects of a Full-Day Preschool Program on 4-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herry, Yves; Maltais, Claire; Thompson, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    This study explored the effects of a full-day preschool program on 4-year-old children. The study compared the development of a group of children (N = 403) who attended the preschool program on a half-day basis during the 1999-2000 school year (the last year the half-day program was in place) with the development of a group of children (N = 418)…

  19. Efficacy and safety of continuous 4-year telbivudine treatment in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Thongsawat, S; Gane, E J; Liaw, Y-F; Jia, J; Hou, J; Chan, H L Y; Papatheodoridis, G; Wan, M; Niu, J; Bao, W; Trylesinski, A; Naoumov, N V

    2013-01-01

    In the phase-III GLOBE/015 studies, telbivudine demonstrated superior efficacy vs lamivudine during 2-year treatment in HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B (CHB). After completion, 847 patients had an option to continue telbivudine treatment for further 2 years. A total of 596 (70%) of telbivudine-treated patients, who were serum HBV DNA positive or negative and without genotypic resistance to telbivudine at the end of the GLOBE/015 trials, were enrolled into a further 2-year extension study. A group of 502 patients completed 4 years of continuous telbivudine treatment and were included in the telbivudine per-protocol population. Amongst 293 HBeAg-positive patients, 76.2% had undetectable serum HBV DNA and 86.0% had normal serum ALT at the end of 4 years. Notably, the cumulative rate of HBeAg seroconversion was 53.2%. Amongst 209 HBeAg-negative patients, 86.4% had undetectable HBV DNA and 89.6% had normal serum ALT. In patients who had discontinued telbivudine treatment due to HBeAg seroconversion, the HBeAg response was durable in 82% of patients (median 111 weeks of off-treatment follow-up). The cumulative 4-year resistance rate was 10.6% for HBeAg-positive and 10.0% for HBeAg-negative patients. Most adverse events were mild or moderate in severity and transient. Renal function measured by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) increased by 14.9 mL/min/1.73 m2 (16.6%) from baseline to 4 years (P < 0.0001). In conclusion, in HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative CHB patients without resistance after 2 years, two additional years of telbivudine treatment continued to provide effective viral suppression with a favourable safety profile. Moreover, telbivudine achieved 53% of HBeAg seroconversion in HBeAg-positive patients. PMID:23490388

  20. Mineral dissolution rates in plot-scale field and laboratory experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Swoboda-Colberg, N.G.; Drever, J.I.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, much research has been focused on the mechanisms by which acid deposition from the atmosphere is neutralized as it passes through soil. Although there are several short-term mechanisms of acid buffering, the dominant long-term mechanism is mineral weathering. Understanding the rates at which minerals weather in the soil is thus essential for predicting the long-term effects of acid deposition on surface-water chemistry. Mineral dissolution rates were measured on identical mineral material in field and laboratory experiments. Field dissolution rates were measured in 6 small (2 sq m) plots on a spodosol in eastern Maine, USA. The plots were irrigated with HCl at pH's 2, 2.5 and 3; soil solutions were collected by tension lysimeters at 25-cm depth. The composition of the soil solutions, together with the grain-size distribution and mineralogy of the soil, were used to calculate mineral dissolution rates. Laboratory dissolution experiments were performed on the 75-150 micrometer size fraction of soil from the site in flow-through reactors at pH-values corresponding to the pH of the bulk soil solution. The use of small plots and 'untreated' minerals from the same plots eliminates many of the uncertainties encountered in previous field-laboratory comparisons.

  1. An Undergraduate Field Experiment for Measuring Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke in Indoor Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsella, Adam M.; Huang, Jiping; Ellis, David A.; Mabury, Scott A.

    1999-12-01

    An undergraduate field experiment is described for the measurement of nicotine and various carbonyl compounds arising from environmental tobacco smoke. Students are introduced to practical techniques in HPLC-UV and GC-NPD. Also introduced are current methods in personal air sampling using small and portable field sampling pumps. Carbonyls (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and acetone) are sampled with silica solid-phase extraction cartridges impregnated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, eluted, and analyzed by HPLC-UV (360-380 nm). Nicotine is sampled using XAD-2 cartridges, extracted, and analyzed by GC-NPD. Students gain an appreciation for the problems associated with measuring ubiquitous pollutants such as formaldehyde, as well as the issue of chromatographic peak resolution when trying to resolve closely eluting peaks. By allowing the students to formulate their own hypothesis and sampling scheme, critical thinking and problem solving are developed in addition to analysis skills. As an experiment in analytical environmental chemistry, this laboratory introduces the application of field sampling and analysis techniques to the undergraduate lab.

  2. Vegetation Water Content Mapping in a Diverse Agricultural Landscape: National Airborne Field Experiment 2006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosh, Michael H.; Jing Tao; Jackson, Thomas J.; McKee, Lynn; O'Neill, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    Mapping land cover and vegetation characteristics on a regional scale is critical to soil moisture retrieval using microwave remote sensing. In aircraft-based experiments such as the National Airborne Field Experiment 2006 (NAFE 06), it is challenging to provide accurate high resolution vegetation information, especially on a daily basis. A technique proposed in previous studies was adapted here to the heterogenous conditions encountered in NAFE 06, which included a hydrologically complex landscape consisting of both irrigated and dryland agriculture. Using field vegetation sampling and ground-based reflectance measurements, the knowledge base for relating the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and the vegetation water content was extended to a greater diversity of agricultural crops, which included dryland and irrigated wheat, alfalfa, and canola. Critical to the generation of vegetation water content maps, the land cover for this region was determined from satellite visible/infrared imagery and ground surveys with an accuracy of 95.5% and a kappa coefficient of 0.95. The vegetation water content was estimated with a root mean square error of 0.33 kg/sq m. The results of this investigation contribute to a more robust database of global vegetation water content observations and demonstrate that the approach can be applied with high accuracy. Keywords: Vegetation, field experimentation, thematic mapper, NDWI, agriculture.

  3. Magnetic Systems in Megagauss Magnetic Fields:. Results of Dirac and Kapitsa Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsenko, O. M.; Selemir, V. D.

    2004-11-01

    The paper discusses the experimental series of Dirac-II and Kapitsa to explore material properties in ultra-high magnetic fields. A set of Dirac experiments was performed in June 1996 at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Scientists from six countries and eight Universities tested more than 60 samples in five explosive experiments using magnetocumulative generators of ultra-high magnetic fields. Test measurements were made using a 50 Tesla magnet of the NHMFL user facility ot LANL. The first scientific and practical workshop, Kapitsa, was performed in 1997 at the Russian Nuclear Federal Center (Sarov). More than 15 samples were tested during three shots. The Kapitsa series is planned to be performed annually. In the Kapitsa and Dirac experiments we explored magnetization of high-spin clusters Mn12Ac, Mn6, Fe8, fulleren C60, metamagnetic transitions in ScCo2, valence transitions in EuNi2(Si1-xGex)2 and the transition semiconductor-metal in FeSi.

  4. Colloid Facilitated Transport of Radioactive Cations in the Vadose Zone: Field Experiments Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    James E. Saiers

    2012-09-20

    The overarching goal of this study was to improve understanding of colloid-facilitated transport of radioactive cations through unsaturated soils and sediments. We conducted a suite of laboratory experiments and field experiments on the vadose-zone transport of colloids, organic matter, and associated contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The laboratory and field experiments, together with transport modeling, were designed to accomplish the following detailed objectives: 1. Evaluation of the relative importance of inorganic colloids and organic matter to the facilitation of radioactive cation transport in the vadose zone; 2. Assessment of the role of adsorption and desorption kinetics in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 3. Examination of the effects of rainfall and infiltration dynamics and in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations through the vadose zone; 4. Exploration of the role of soil heterogeneity and preferential flow paths (e.g., macropores) on the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 5. Development of a mathematical model of facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone that accurately incorporates pore-scale and column-scale processes with the practicality of predicting transport with readily available parameters.

  5. Street canyon flow patterns in a horizontal plane : measurements from the Joint URBAN 2003 field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. J.; Khalsa, H. S.; Nelson, M. A.; Boswell, D.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the larger Joint URBAN 2003 tracer field experiment performed in Oklahoma City from June 29 to July 30, 2003, a collaborative team of government and university researchers instrumented a downtown street canyon with a high density of wind sensor instrumentation (Brown et al., 2003). The goal of the Park Avenue street canyon experiment was to garner flow field information in order to better understand the transport and dispersion of tracers released in the street canyon and to test and improve the next generation of urban dispersion models. In this paper, we focus on describing the mean flow patterns that developed in the street canyon in a horizontal plane near the surface. We look at the patterns that develop over entire Intensive Operating Periods (IOP's) lasting from 6-9 hours in length, and as a function of inflow wind direction. Most prior street canyon experiments have generally focused on the vertical structure of the flow; this work contributes to the understanding of the horizontal nature of the flow.

  6. Computer Simulation and Field Experiment for Downlink Multiuser MIMO in Mobile WiMAX System.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Nagahashi, Takaharu; Akiyama, Takuya; Matsue, Hideaki; Uekado, Kunio; Namera, Takakazu; Fukui, Hiroshi; Nanamatsu, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The transmission performance for a downlink mobile WiMAX system with multiuser multiple-input multiple-output (MU-MIMO) systems in a computer simulation and field experiment is described. In computer simulation, a MU-MIMO transmission system can be realized by using the block diagonalization (BD) algorithm, and each user can receive signals without any signal interference from other users. The bit error rate (BER) performance and channel capacity in accordance with modulation schemes and the number of streams were simulated in a spatially correlated multipath fading environment. Furthermore, we propose a method for evaluating the transmission performance for this downlink mobile WiMAX system in this environment by using the computer simulation. In the field experiment, the received power and downlink throughput in the UDP layer were measured on an experimental mobile WiMAX system developed in Azumino City in Japan. In comparison with the simulated and experimented results, the measured maximum throughput performance in the downlink had almost the same performance as the simulated throughput. It was confirmed that the experimental mobile WiMAX system for MU-MIMO transmission successfully increased the total channel capacity of the system. PMID:26421311

  7. Computer Simulation and Field Experiment for Downlink Multiuser MIMO in Mobile WiMAX System

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Nagahashi, Takaharu; Akiyama, Takuya; Matsue, Hideaki; Uekado, Kunio; Namera, Takakazu; Fukui, Hiroshi; Nanamatsu, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The transmission performance for a downlink mobile WiMAX system with multiuser multiple-input multiple-output (MU-MIMO) systems in a computer simulation and field experiment is described. In computer simulation, a MU-MIMO transmission system can be realized by using the block diagonalization (BD) algorithm, and each user can receive signals without any signal interference from other users. The bit error rate (BER) performance and channel capacity in accordance with modulation schemes and the number of streams were simulated in a spatially correlated multipath fading environment. Furthermore, we propose a method for evaluating the transmission performance for this downlink mobile WiMAX system in this environment by using the computer simulation. In the field experiment, the received power and downlink throughput in the UDP layer were measured on an experimental mobile WiMAX system developed in Azumino City in Japan. In comparison with the simulated and experimented results, the measured maximum throughput performance in the downlink had almost the same performance as the simulated throughput. It was confirmed that the experimental mobile WiMAX system for MU-MIMO transmission successfully increased the total channel capacity of the system. PMID:26421311

  8. Computer Simulation and Field Experiment for Downlink Multiuser MIMO in Mobile WiMAX System.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Nagahashi, Takaharu; Akiyama, Takuya; Matsue, Hideaki; Uekado, Kunio; Namera, Takakazu; Fukui, Hiroshi; Nanamatsu, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The transmission performance for a downlink mobile WiMAX system with multiuser multiple-input multiple-output (MU-MIMO) systems in a computer simulation and field experiment is described. In computer simulation, a MU-MIMO transmission system can be realized by using the block diagonalization (BD) algorithm, and each user can receive signals without any signal interference from other users. The bit error rate (BER) performance and channel capacity in accordance with modulation schemes and the number of streams were simulated in a spatially correlated multipath fading environment. Furthermore, we propose a method for evaluating the transmission performance for this downlink mobile WiMAX system in this environment by using the computer simulation. In the field experiment, the received power and downlink throughput in the UDP layer were measured on an experimental mobile WiMAX system developed in Azumino City in Japan. In comparison with the simulated and experimented results, the measured maximum throughput performance in the downlink had almost the same performance as the simulated throughput. It was confirmed that the experimental mobile WiMAX system for MU-MIMO transmission successfully increased the total channel capacity of the system.

  9. Experience-Dependent Specialization of Receptive Field Surround for Selective Coding of Natural Scenes

    PubMed Central

    Pecka, Michael; Han, Yunyun; Sader, Elie; Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary At eye opening, neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) are selective for stimulus features, but circuits continue to refine in an experience-dependent manner for some weeks thereafter. How these changes contribute to the coding of visual features embedded in complex natural scenes remains unknown. Here we show that normal visual experience after eye opening is required for V1 neurons to develop a sensitivity for the statistical structure of natural stimuli extending beyond the boundaries of their receptive fields (RFs), which leads to improvements in coding efficiency for full-field natural scenes (increased selectivity and information rate). These improvements are mediated by an experience-dependent increase in the effectiveness of natural surround stimuli to hyperpolarize the membrane potential specifically during RF-stimulus epochs triggering action potentials. We suggest that neural circuits underlying surround modulation are shaped by the statistical structure of visual input, which leads to more selective coding of features in natural scenes. PMID:25263755

  10. Early Pottery Making in Northern Coastal Peru. Part II: Field Firing Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, I.; Goldstein, D.; Sosa, J.; Wagner, U.

    2003-09-01

    We present data from three seasons of experimental field work designed to recreate ancient Andean coastal ceramic firing techniques. Based on the recent discovery of two different archaeological ceramic production sites in the La Leche river valley of northern coastal Peru, the opportunity arose to apply Mössbauer spectroscopy and other analytical methods to reconstruct ancient firing procedures. Two sets of firings took place in 1993 and 1997 in Batán Grande using a partially restored Formative kiln from about 800 BC, local hardwood and cow dung as fuel. A third experiment followed in 2000 after the discovery of a Middle Sicán ceramics workshop in use between ca. AD 950 and 1050 at Huaca Sialupe, where an exact replica of an ancient kiln was built from local clay, and fired with local wood and cow dung. Additionally, inverted urns found at Huaca Sialupe were tested for their potential use as furnaces for metal working. Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to compare the physical and chemical state of specimens produced in the field experiments with ancient ceramics and with specimens produced in controlled laboratory experiments.

  11. Summary of Past Microgravity Experiment in Japanese Microgravity Science Field and Future Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, S.; Yoda, S.

    2002-01-01

    strategic plan for the early years of the 21st century is described experiments were carried out onboard various flight platforms such as airplanes, sounding rockets, free-flyers, and space shuttles. In Japan, microgravity experiments started with Skylab in 1973. In this first set of experiments, the results were scrutinized with keen interest and the usefulness of microgravity environment was evidenced. In the 1980's, the Japanese sounding rocket TT-500A, which provided microgravity conditions for several minutes, was used to verify the experimental facilities and the operations before long duration microgravity experiments were carried out. With the First International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) and the First Material Processing Test (FMPT) projects, the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) had the opportunity to perform sustained and genuine microgravity experiments. With the twenty-two experiments carried out in the FPMT, the Japanese microgravity community made rapid progress. Following this, space missions such as the Second International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2) and the First Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL-1) were performed. In addition, a series of seven sounding rockets TR-IA were launched to investigate scientific problems and to help develop technologies. Through these flight experiments, material sciences (Electrostatic Levitation Furnace; the diffusion coefficient measurement by shear-cell method; in-situ simultaneous observation of temperature and concentration field by two wavelength Mach-Zehnder microscope Interferometer) became at the forefront of science and technology in the world. measurement, and cell biology, are being carried out as phase C of NASDA strategic research. Research solicitation in microgravity sciences, among other fields, has seen substantial progress since its initiation in 1997. It is hoped that grant awardees will be the potential applicants of ISS flight experiments in the future. The science

  12. Short-Term Effects of Field Programme on Students' Knowledge and Attitude toward Biology: A Slovak Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokop, Pavol; Tuncer, Gaye; Kvasnicak, Radoslav

    2007-01-01

    Field trips are ideal for increasing students' experience and perceptions of various organisms and their relationship between the original habitat. However, in general field trips are greatly neglected by teachers and their short-term effects are thought to be questionable. Therefore, we conducted a one-day field trip for both improving students'…

  13. Electromagnetic Emissions During Rock-fracturing Experiments Inside Magnetic Field Free Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, T.; Jin, H.

    2012-12-01

    Abnormal electromagnetic emission (EME) signal is one type of the most important precursors before earthquake, which has been widely observed and recorded before large earthquake, but the physical mechanism underlying the phenomenon is unclear and under controversy. Monitoring the EME signals during rock-fracturing experiments in laboratory is an effective way to study the phenomena and their underlying mechanism. Electromagnetic noise is everywhere because industrial and civilian electrical equipments have been widely used, which make difficulties to the in-lab experiments and field monitoring. To avoid the interference from electromagnetic noise, electromagnetic experiments must be carried out inside shielded space. Magnetic Field Free Space (MFFS) was constructed by Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration in 1980s. MFFS is a near-spherical polyhedron 'space' with 26 faces and inside diameter about 2.3 m. It is enclosed by 8-layer permalloy 1J85 for shielding magnetic field and 2-layer purified aluminium for shielding electric field. MFFS mainly shields static magnetic field by a factor of 160-4000 for the magnetic signals with the frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz. The intensity of magnetic field inside the space is less than 20 nT and its fluctuation is less than 0.3 nT in 90 hours. MFFS can dramatically shield EME signals in the frequency range of EME antennas utilized in our experiments, (several to ~320) kHz, by at least 90%, based on observation. Rock specimens (granite, marble) were fractured by two ways inside MFFS. 1) Cuboid bulk specimens were drilled, filled with static cracking agent, and then dilated from inside until fracture. 2) Cylindrical rock specimens were stressed until fracture by using a non-magnetic rock testing machine with the maximum testing force 300kN. EME, acoustic emission (AE) and strain signals were collected synchronously by the same data acquisitor, Acoustic Emission Workstation made by Physical Acoustics

  14. Short-time electrical effects during volcanic eruption: Experiments and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttner, Ralf; Zimanowski, Bernd; Röder, Helmut

    2000-02-01

    Laboratory experiments on the fragmentation and expansion of magmatic melt have been performed using remelted volcanic rock at magmatic temperatures as magma simulant. A specially designed dc amplifier in combination with high speed data recording was used to detect short-time electrostatic field effects related to the fragmentation and expansion history of the experimental system, as documented by simultaneous force and pressure recording, as well as by high-speed cinematography. It was found that (1) the voltage-time ratio of electrostatic field gradients (100 to 104 V/s) reflects different physical mechanisms of fragmentation and expansion and (2) the maximum voltage measured in 1 m distance (-0.1 to -180 V) can be correlated with the intensity of the respective processes. Based on these experimental results, a field method was developed and tested at Stromboli volcano in Italy. A 0.8 m rod antenna was used to detect the dc voltage against local ground (i.e., the electrostatic field gradient), at a distance of 60 to 260 m from the respective vent. Upwind position of the detection site was chosen to prevent interference caused by contact of charged ash particles with the antenna. A standard 8 Hz geophone was used to detect the accompanying seismicity. Three types of volcanic activity occurred during the surveillance operation; two of these could be clearly related to specific electrical and seismical signals. A typical delay time was found between the electrical and the seismical signal, corresponding to the seismic velocity within the crater deposits. Using a simple first-order electrostatic model, the field measurements were recalibrated to the laboratory scale. Comparison of field and laboratory data at first approximation revealed striking similarities, thus encouraging the further development of this technique for real-time surveillance operation at active volcanoes.

  15. The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. Gaia South Ecliptic Pole Field as Seen by OGLE-IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soszyński, I.; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Ulaczyk, K.; Skowron, J.

    2012-09-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the Gaia South Ecliptic Pole (GSEP) field, 5.3 square degrees area around the South Ecliptic Pole on the outskirts of the LMC, based on the data collected during the fourth phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment, OGLE-IV. The GSEP field will be observed during the commissioning phase of the ESA Gaia space mission for testing and calibrating the Gaia instruments. We provide the photometric maps of the GSEP region containing the mean VI photometry of all detected stellar objects and their equatorial coordinates. We show the quality and completeness of the OGLE-IV photometry and color-magnitude diagrams of this region. We conducted an extensive search for variable stars in the GSEP field leading to the discovery of 6789 variable stars. In this sample we found 132 classical Cepheids, 686 RR Lyr type stars, 2819 long-period, and 1377 eclipsing variables. Several objects deserving special attention were also selected, including a new classical Cepheid in a binary eclipsing system. To provide empirical data for the Gaia Science Alert system we also conducted a search for optical transients. We discovered two firm type Ia supernovae and nine additional supernova candidates. To facilitate future Gaia supernovae detections we prepared a list of more than 1900 galaxies to redshift about 0.1 located in the GSEP field. Finally, we present the results of astrometric study of the GSEP field. With the 26 months time base of the presented here OGLE-IV data, proper motions of stars could be detected with the accuracy reaching 2 mas/yr. Astrometry allowed to distinguish galactic foreground variable stars detected in the GSEP field from LMC objects and to discover about 50 high proper motion stars (proper motion ≥ 100 mas/yr). Among them three new nearby white dwarfs were found. All data presented in this paper are available to the astronomical community from the OGLE Internet archive.

  16. The Role of Field Experience in Elementary Preservice Teachers' Self-Efficacy and Ability to Connect Research to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnough, Jacqueline T.; Matkins, Juanita Jo

    2010-01-01

    Though the importance of including practicum experiences in programs for the preparation of elementary preservice teachers is generally accepted, the nature of these experiences on the development of skills in teaching science can vary greatly. This study compares the effect of variations in field experiences at two institutions, one which…

  17. Overview of the Field Phase of the NASA Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP)Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Zipser, Edward; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Kakar, Ramesh; Halverson Jeffery; Rogers, Robert; Black, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes experiment is sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to investigate characteristics of tropical cyclone genesis, rapid intensification and rainfall using a three-pronged approach that emphasizes satellite information, suborbital observations and numerical model simulations. Research goals include demonstration and assessment of new technology, improvements to numerical model parameterizations, and advancements in data assimilation techniques. The field phase of the experiment was based in Costa Rica during July 2005. A fully instrumented NASA ER-2 high altitude airplane was deployed with Doppler radar, passive microwave instrumentation, lightning and electric field sensors and an airborne simulator of visible and infrared satellite sensors. Other assets brought to TCSP were a low flying uninhabited aerial vehicle, and a surface-based radiosonde network. In partnership with the Intensity Forecasting Experiment of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Hurricane Research Division, two NOAA P-3 aircraft instrumented with radar, passive microwave, microphysical, and dropsonde instrumentation were also deployed to Costa Rica. The field phase of TCSP was conducted in Costa Rica to take advantage of the geographically compact tropical cyclone genesis region of the Eastern Pacific Ocean near Central America. However, the unusual 2005 hurricane season provided numerous opportunities to sample tropical cyclone development and intensification in the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico as well. Development of Hurricane Dennis and Tropical Storm Gert were each investigated over several days in addition to Hurricane Emily as it was close to Saffir-Simpson Category 5 intensity. An overview of the characteristics of these storms along with the pregenesis environment of Tropical Storm Eugene in the Eastern Pacific will be presented.

  18. Field experiments on solar geoengineering: report of a workshop exploring a representative research portfolio.

    PubMed

    Keith, David W; Duren, Riley; MacMartin, Douglas G

    2014-12-28

    We summarize a portfolio of possible field experiments on solar radiation management (SRM) and related technologies. The portfolio is intended to support analysis of potential field research related to SRM including discussions about the overall merit and risk of such research as well as mechanisms for governing such research and assessments of observational needs. The proposals were generated with contributions from leading researchers at a workshop held in March 2014 at which the proposals were critically reviewed. The proposed research dealt with three major classes of SRM proposals: marine cloud brightening, stratospheric aerosols and cirrus cloud manipulation. The proposals are summarized here along with an analysis exploring variables such as space and time scale, risk and radiative forcing. Possible gaps, biases and cross-cutting considerations are discussed. Finally, suggestions for plausible next steps in the development of a systematic research programme are presented.

  19. Interaction between Japanese flowering cherry trees and some wild animals observed during physiological experiment in fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Teruko

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the weeping habit of Japanese flowering cherry tree in the field of Tama Forest Science Garden, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute at the foot of Mt. Takao. Since cherry trees at various age were the materials for our plant physiology experiments, our studies were conducted in the fields where we experienced certain difficulties. Even under such difficult environment that was rather unexpected and uncontrollable, we could obtain fruitful results on the growth of cherry tree, and found them scientifically significant, especially in terms of biological effects of gravity on earth. Moreover, a lot of interesting interactions of cherry trees with various kinds of animals were observed in parallel to the plant physiology.

  20. S-band transponder experiment. [measurement of lunar gravitational field during orbit of Apollo 17 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjogren, W. L.; Wollenhaupt, W. R.; Wimberly, R. N.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to measure the variations in the lunar gravitational field near the trajectory of orbiting space vehicles (the command and service module (CSM) and the small particles and fields subsatellites ejected from the Apollo 15 and 16 spacecraft). New information has been obtained from all Apollo orbiting spacecraft; however, this report shall be limited to the results from the Apollo 17 CSM and the Apollo 16 subsatellite. The data acquired are precise speed measurements of the orbiting spacecraft from which accelerations or gravity profiles may be inferred. Feature resolution is controlled by the spacecraft altitude and is almost a direct relationship (i.e., data taken from a 50-km altitude will resolve approximately a 50-km feature). Therefore, revolutions 3 to 12, when the CSM was in the low-altitude orbits, provided the clearest information.