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Sample records for 40-km time trial

  1. Effect of lactate supplementation and sodium bicarbonate on 40-km cycling time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Northgraves, Matthew J; Peart, Daniel J; Jordan, Christian A; Vince, Rebecca V

    2014-01-01

    The use of nutritional supplements to improve sporting performance and increase training adaptations is commonplace among athletes and is an expanding market in terms of product choice and availability. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 2 ergogenic aids with extracellular blood buffering potential, namely sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and a lactate supplement, during a 40-km cycling time trial. Seven recreationally active men (age, 22.3 ± 3.3 years; height, 182.5 ± 6.5 cm; body mass, 79.2 ± 6.3 kg) completed five 40-km cycling time trials, including a familiarization trial in a randomized, blind, double placebo-controlled design. Subjects ingested (a) 300 mg·kg-1 body mass NaHCO3 (BICARB), (b) 45 mg·kg-1 body mass sodium chloride (PL-BICARB) as the placebo for the NaHCO3 trial, (c) 1115 mg lactate (LACTATE), or (d) plain flour as the placebo for the lactate trial (PL-LACTATE) 60 minutes before exercise. There was no significant difference in performance between the 4 conditions (p > 0.05). Although NaHCO3 ingestion induced significant changes in all the acid-base variables (all p < 0.05), no significant change was seen following lactate ingestion (p > 0.05). Subjects in the LACTATE condition did have a significantly higher heart rate (p < 0.05) without experiencing any greater perceived exertion (p > 0.05) than the other 3 conditions. Neither NaHCO3 nor lactate supplementation seem to improve 40-km cycling time trial performance. However, the potential benefits following LACTATE regarding perceived exertion require further research.

  2. Ad-libitum drinking and performance during a 40-km cycling time trial in the heat.

    PubMed

    Berkulo, Meriam A R; Bol, Susan; Levels, Koen; Lamberts, Robert P; Daanen, Hein A M; Noakes, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if drinking ad-libitum can counteract potential negative effects of a hypohydrated start caused by fluid restriction during a 40-km time trial (TT) in the heat. Twelve trained males performed one 40-km cycling TT euhydrated (EU: no water during the TT) and two 40-km cycling TTs hypohydrated. During one hypohydrated trial no fluid was ingested (HYPO), during the other trial ad-libitum water ingestion was allowed (FLUID). Ambient temperature was 35.2 ± 0.2 °C, relative humidity 51 ± 3% and airflow 7 m·s(-1). Body mass (BM) was determined at the start of the test, and before and after the TT. During the TT, power output, heart rate (HR), gastrointestinal temperature, mean skin temperature, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), thermal sensation, thermal comfort and thirst sensation were measured. Prior to the start of the TT, BM was 1.2% lower in HYPO and FLUID compared to EU. During the TT, BM loss in FLUID was lower compared to EU and HYPO (1.0 ± 0.8%, 2.7 ± 0.2% and 2.6 ± 0.3%, respectively). Hydration status had no effect on power output (EU: 223 ± 32 W, HYPO: 217 ± 39 W, FLUID: 224 ± 35 W), HR, gastrointestinal temperature, mean skin temperature, RPE, thermal sensation and thermal comfort. Thirst sensation was higher in HYPO than in EU and FLUID. It was concluded that hypohydration did not adversely affect performance during a 40-km cycling TT in the heat. Therefore, whether or not participants consumed fluid during exercise did not influence their TT performance.

  3. Dose-related elevations in venous pH with citrate ingestion do not alter 40-km cycling time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Schabort, E J; Wilson, G; Noakes, T D

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to determine whether sodium citrate enhances endurance cycling performance and, if so, what dosage(s) produces this effect. Eight trained [peak power output: 362 (48) W; power:weight: 5.1 (0.4) W x kg(-1), mean (SD)] male cyclists were requested to complete four, 40-km time-trials, each separated by 3-7 days, on their own bicycles, mounted on a Kingcycle ergometer. To mimic the stochastic nature of cycle road races, the time-trials included four 500-m, four 1-km and two 2-km sprints. The experimental conditions involved the ingestion of three dosages of sodium citrate dissolved in 400 ml water: 0.2 g x kg(-1), 0.4 g x kg(-1) and 0.6 g x kg(-1) body mass (b.m.) and a placebo (calcium carbonate, 0.1 g x kg(-1) b.m.). Subjects were asked to complete both the sprints and total distance in the fastest time possible. Venous blood samples were collected before, as well as at 10-km intervals during the trials for the analysis of plasma lactate and glucose concentrations and for the measurement of blood pH and PCO2 levels. Immediately before, as well as during exercise, pH was significantly higher in the group ingesting the highest citrate dose (range 7.36-7.45) compared to the placebo (range 7.31-7.39) and the two lower citrate dosages. Despite this, no significant differences in power output (P = 0.886) or time taken to complete the 40 km (P = 0.754) were measured between the four trials. The average performance times (in min:s, with SD in parentheses) and average power output (in W) for the 40-km time-trials were: 58:46 (5:06) [265 (62) W], 60:24 (6:07) [251 (59) W], 61:47 (5:07) [243 (44) W] and 60:02 (5.05) [255 (55) W] for the 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 g x kg(-1) b.m. sodium citrate and placebo trials, respectively. There were also no significant differences measured between treatments in terms of time, power output, speed or heart rate during the 500-m, 1-km and 2-km sprints. The ingestion of increasing sodium citrate dosages before

  4. 40Km Into Lebanon,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    answer to the difficulties in Palestine, London organized a study of the problem under Lord Peel , a for- mer Secretary of State for India, who in 1937...issued the report of the Commission bearing his name. As Peel saw it, the only solution was to partition Palestine between the two communities. The...minority suggestions. The majority 22 40Km into Lebanon report recommended partition with an economic union, much as Peel had proposed in 1937. A

  5. Estimating worldwide solar radiation resources on a 40km grid

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, E.L.; George, R.L.; Brady, E.H.

    1996-11-01

    During 1995, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), initiated the Data Grid Task under the auspices of DOE`s Resource Assessment Program. A data grid is a framework of uniformly spaced locations (grid points) for which data are available. Estimates of monthly averages of direct normal, diffuse horizontal, and global horizontal daily-total solar radiation energy (kWh/m{sup 2}) are being made for each point on a grid covering the US, Mexico, the Caribbean, and southern Canada. The grid points are separated by approximately 40 km. Using interpolation methods, the digital data grid can be used to estimate solar resources at any location. The most encouraging result to date has been the location of sources providing worldwide data for most of the input parameters required for modeling daily total solar radiation. This is a multiyear task expected to continue through the rest of this century.

  6. Positive effect of lower body compression garments on subsequent 40-kM cycling time trial performance.

    PubMed

    de Glanville, Kieran M; Hamlin, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of wearing graduated compression garments during recovery on subsequent 40-km time trial performance. In a randomized single-blind crossover experiment, 14 trained multisport male athletes (mean ± SD: age 33.8 ± 6.8 years, 40-km time 66:11 ± 2:10 minutes:seconds) were given a graduated full-leg-length compressive garment (76% Meryl Elastane, 24% Lycra) or a similar-looking noncompressive placebo garment (92% Polyester, 8% Spandex) to wear continuously for 24 hours after performing an initial 40-km time trial in their normal cycling attire. After the 24-hour recovery period, the compression (or placebo) garments were removed, and a second 40-km time trial was then completed to gauge the effect of each garment on subsequent performance. One week later, the groups were reversed and testing procedures repeated. The participant's hydration status, nutritional intake, and training were similar before each set of trials. Performance time in the second time trial was substantially improved with compression compared with placebo garments (1.2 ± 0.4%, mean ± 90% confidence interval). This improvement resulted in a substantially higher average power output after wearing the compression garment compared with that after wearing the placebo garment (3.3 ± 1.1%). Differences in oxygen cost and rating of perceived exertion between groups were trivial or unclear. The wearing of graduated compressive garments during recovery is likely to be worthwhile and unlikely to be harmful for well-trained endurance athletes.

  7. A comparison of caffeine versus pseudoephedrine on cycling time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Spence, Angela L; Sim, Marc; Landers, Grant; Peeling, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Both caffeine (CAF) and pseudoephedrine (PSE) are proposed to be central nervous system stimulants. However, during competition, CAF is a permitted substance, whereas PSE is a banned substance at urinary levels >150 μg · ml(-1). As a result, this study aimed to compare the effect of CAF versus PSE use on cycling time trial (TT) performance to explore whether the legal stimulant was any less ergogenic than the banned substance. Here, 10 well-trained male cyclists or triathletes were recruited for participation. All athletes were required to attend the laboratory on four separate occasions--including a familiarization trial and three experimental trials, which required participants to complete a simulated 40 km (1,200 kJ) cycling TT after the ingestion of either 200 mg CAF, 180 mg PSE or a nonnutritive placebo (PLA). The results showed that the total time taken and the mean power produced during each TT was not significantly different (p > .05) between trials, despite a 1.3% faster overall time (~57 s) after CAF consumption. Interestingly, the time taken to complete the second half of the TT was significantly faster (p < .05) in CAF as compared with PSE (by 99 s), with magnitude based inferences suggesting a 91% beneficial effect of CAF during the second half of the TT. This investigation further confirms the ergogenic benefits of CAF use during TT performances and further suggests this legal CNS stimulant has a better influence than a supra-therapeutic dose of PSE.

  8. Ozone profile intercomparison based on simultaneous observations between 20 and 40 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aimedieu, P.; Krueger, A. J.; Robbins, D. E.; Simon, P. C.

    1983-01-01

    The vertical distribution of stratospheric ozone has been simultaneously measured by means of five different instruments carried on the same balloon payload. The launches were performed from Gap during the intercomparison campaign conducted in June 1981 in southern France. Data obtained between altitudes of 20 and 40 km are compared and discussed. Vertical profiles deduced from Electrochemical Concentration Cell sondes launched from the same location by small balloons and from short Umkehr measurements made at Mt Chiran (France) are also included in this comparison. Systematic differences of the order of 20 percent between ozone profiles deduced from solar u.v. absorption and in situ techniques are found.

  9. NCAR Global Climate Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation (CFDDA) Hourly 40 km Reanalysis: a high-resolution dynamically downscaled climatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, G. S.; Hou, C. Y.; Rife, D. L.; Dattore, R.

    2014-12-01

    Wind energy cost models incur inaccuracies from uncertainty in ambient wind measurements and estimates. This inhibits the best possible investment in wind energy infrastructure and management systems. High-resolution temporal and spatial wind data needed for wind availability analysis—usually created with regional-scale models—have traditionally been proprietary and costly to obtain. Freely available global model data suffers from either lower spatial or temporal resolution, or both. Low spatial resolution fails to realistically represent wind speeds in complex terrain. Low temporal resolution fails to capture the full diurnal cycle of wind behavior. The NCAR Global Climate Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation (CFDDA) Hourly 40 km Reanalysis was developed in 2009-2010 by the Research Applications Laboratory (RAL) to provide the most accurate boundary layer wind estimates available at that time. CFDDA used 28 sigma levels, with 19 between the surface and 700 hPa, a four-fold improvement over the contemporary NWP models. The dataset spans 21 years, 1985-2005, providing hourly atmospheric parameters, including winds, on 28 vertical levels on a global 40 km grid. This presentation will introduce the modeling and assimilation strategy, highlight the available data content including the parameter set, and review the data access options available from the RDA. CFDDA project partners, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), NCAR RAL and NCAR Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorology (MMM) divisions are offering this dataset to the public for free with minor restrictions. NCAR Research Data Archive (RDA), hosted by the Computational and Information Systems Laboratory, provides data support. It is available at http://rda.ucar.edu/datasets/ds604.0/

  10. A Painful Time: Tenure Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younger, Virginia C.

    2003-01-01

    The author had been teaching English at Pierce Community College in Tacoma, Washington, since 1973 when, in the early 1980s, their department was told that current laws demanded their hiring an American Indian to fill a full-time position that had opened. The search committee, she felt, made an excellent decision when they selected Dr. James…

  11. Full 40 km crustal reflection seismic datasets in several Indonesian basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinkelman, M. G.; Granath, J. W.; Christ, J. M.; Emmet, P. A.; Bird, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    sedimentary and burial metamorphosed sedimentary rock that we divide into two packages on the basis of seismic character. The upper is 8-15 km of undeformed late Precambrian sediments the top of which ties Eocambrian rocks in wells in offshore New Guinea. This package appears to correlate to the Wessel Group in northern Australia. The lower package is composed of 10-15 km of strongly bedded, presumably burial metamorphosed rocks that make up the bulk of the lower crust. These may equate to any of a number of northern Australian Mesoproterozoic basins. This lower package offlaps ‘pods’ of seismically transparent basement (?Paleoproterozoic or Archean) that make up at most the lowermost 15 km of the 40 km PSDM line. Both Precambrian packages appear to be craton-margin sedimentary wedges, the younger overlapping the older. The SE extent of the lowermost package is deformed in a thrust system which may mark the event that detached it from its original underlying oceanic or transitional crust during cratonization. The SPAN programs are important new data sets to clarify and in some cases solve outstanding problems in basin architecture and tectonic evolution.

  12. Pure Rotational Raman Lidar for Temperature Measurements from 5-40 Km Over Wuhan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yajuan; Song, Shalei; Yang, Yong; Li, Faquan; Cheng, Xuewu; Chen, Zhenwei; Liu, Linmei; McCormick, M. Patrick; Gong, Shunsheng

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a pure rotational Raman lidar (PRR) was established for the atmospheric temperature measurements from 5 km to 40 km over Wuhan, China (30.5°N, 114.5°E). To extract the expected PRR signals and simultaneously suppress the elastically backscattered light, a high-spectral resolution polychromator for light splitting and filtering was designed. Observational results revealed that the temperature difference measured by PRR lidar and the local radiosonde below 30 km was less than 3.0 K. The good agreement validated the reliability of the PRR lidar. With the 1-h integration and 150-m spatial resolution, the statistical temperature error for PRR lidar increases from 0.4 K at 10 km up to 4 K at altitudes of about 30 km. In addition, the whole night temperature profiles were obtained for study of the long-term observation of atmospheric fluctuations.

  13. Effects of power variation on cycle performance during simulated hilly time-trials.

    PubMed

    Wells, Marc S; Marwood, Simon

    2016-11-01

    It has previously been shown that cyclists are unable to maintain a constant power output during cycle time-trials on hilly courses. The purpose of the present study is therefore to quantify these effects of power variation using a mathematical model of cycling performance. A hypothetical cyclist (body mass: 70 kg, bicycle mass: 10 kg) was studied using a mathematical model of cycling, which included the effects of acceleration. Performance was modelled over three hypothetical 40-km courses, comprising repeated 2.5-km sections of uphill and downhill with gradients of 1%, 3%, and 6%, respectively. Amplitude (5-15%) and distance (0.31-20.00 km) of variation were modelled over a range of mean power outputs (200-600 W) and compared to sustaining a constant power. Power variation was typically detrimental to performance; these effects were augmented as the amplitude of variation and severity of gradient increased. Varying power every 1.25 km was most detrimental to performance; at a mean power of 200 W, performance was impaired by 43.90 s (±15% variation, 6% gradient). However at the steepest gradients, the effect of power variation was relatively independent of the distance of variation. In contrast, varying power in parallel with changes in gradient improved performance by 188.89 s (±15% variation, 6% gradient) at 200 W. The present data demonstrate that during hilly time-trials, power variation that does not occur in parallel with changes in gradient is detrimental to performance, especially at steeper gradients. These adverse effects are substantially larger than those previously observed during flat, windless time-trials.

  14. Physiological determinants of the cycling time trial.

    PubMed

    Støren, Øyvind; Ulevåg, Kåre; Larsen, Morten H; Støa, Eva M; Helgerud, Jan

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the physiological determinants of endurance cycling time trial (TT) performance in a heterogeneous group of competitive male road cyclists. About 15 male cyclists who had all competed in cycling the preceding season were tested for the anthropometric variables height, body weight, leg length, ankle circumference, and body fat percentage. They were also tested for maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), lactate threshold (LT), metabolic cost of cycling (CC), peak power output and average power output during a 30-second Wingate test, 1 repetition maximum and peak power in half squats, and a TT test on an ergometer. Heart rate and cadence (rounds per minute, RPM) were continuously measured during all cycle tests. Pearson Bivariate correlation tests and single linear regression tests were performed to obtain correlation coefficients (r), effect size (F), standard error of estimate (SEE), and 95% confidence interval. The single variable that correlated best with TT performance was power output at LT (r = 0.86, p < 0.01). Standard error of estimate was 7.5%. Lactate threshold expressed in %VO2max did not correlate significantly with TT performance. An equation representing both aerobic and anaerobic endurance capacity TT(w) = 0.95 ([VO2max/CC] TT%VO2max) + 0.05 (Wingate average) correlated strongly with TT laboratory performance (r = 0.93, p < 0.01, SEE = 5.7%). None of the strength, power, or anthropometric variables correlated significantly with TT laboratory performance.

  15. Beyond trial-by-trial adaptation: A quantification of the time scale of cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Aben, Bart; Verguts, Tom; Van den Bussche, Eva

    2017-03-01

    The idea that adaptation to stimulus or response conflict can operate over different time scales takes a prominent position in various theories and models of cognitive control. The mechanisms underlying temporal variations in control are nevertheless poorly understood, which is partly due to a lack of appropriate empirical measures. Inspired by reinforcement learning models, we developed a method to quantify the time scale of control behaviorally, by computing trial-by-trial effects that go beyond the preceding trial. Briefly, we extended the congruency sequence effect from 1 trial to multiple trials into the past and quantified the influence of previous trials on current-trial performance as a function of trial distance. The rate at which this influence changes across trials was taken as a measure of the time scale of control. We applied the method to a flanker task with different conflict frequencies and volatility. Results showed that the time scale of control was smaller in rare-conflict and volatile contexts, compared to frequent-conflict and neutral contexts. This is in agreement with theories differentiating transient from sustained control. The method offers new opportunities to reveal temporal differences in control modes and can easily be applied to various empirical paradigms. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Discovering New Global Climate Patterns: Curating a 21-Year High Temporal (Hourly) and Spatial (40km) Resolution Reanalysis Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, C. Y.; Dattore, R.; Peng, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research's Global Climate Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation (CFDDA) Hourly 40km Reanalysis dataset is a dynamically downscaled dataset with high temporal and spatial resolution. The dataset contains three-dimensional hourly analyses in netCDF format for the global atmospheric state from 1985 to 2005 on a 40km horizontal grid (0.4°grid increment) with 28 vertical levels, providing good representation of local forcing and diurnal variation of processes in the planetary boundary layer. This project aimed to make the dataset publicly available, accessible, and usable in order to provide a unique resource to allow and promote studies of new climate characteristics. When the curation project started, it had been five years since the data files were generated. Also, although the Principal Investigator (PI) had generated a user document at the end of the project in 2009, the document had not been maintained. Furthermore, the PI had moved to a new institution, and the remaining team members were reassigned to other projects. These factors made data curation in the areas of verifying data quality, harvest metadata descriptions, documenting provenance information especially challenging. As a result, the project's curation process found that: Data curator's skill and knowledge helped make decisions, such as file format and structure and workflow documentation, that had significant, positive impact on the ease of the dataset's management and long term preservation. Use of data curation tools, such as the Data Curation Profiles Toolkit's guidelines, revealed important information for promoting the data's usability and enhancing preservation planning. Involving data curators during each stage of the data curation life cycle instead of at the end could improve the curation process' efficiency. Overall, the project showed that proper resources invested in the curation process would give datasets the best chance to fulfill their potential to

  17. Anatomy of an ancient subduction interface at 40 km depth: Insights from P-T-t-d data, and geodynamic implications (Dent Blanche, Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angiboust, Samuel; Glodny, Johannes; Oncken, Onno; Chopin, Christian

    2014-05-01

    An exhumed metamorphic suture zone over 40 km long is exposed in the Dent Blanche Region of the Western Alps belt, along the Swiss-Italian border. In this region, the metasediment-bearing ophiolitic remnants of the Liguro-Piemontese ocean (Tsaté complex) are overthrusted by a continental, km-sized complex (Dent Blanche Tectonic System: DBTS) of Austro-Alpine affinity. The DBTS represents a strongly deformed composite terrane with independent tectonic slices of continental and oceanic origin. In order to better understand the nature and the geodynamic meaning of the shear zone at the base of the DBTS (Dent Blanche Thrust, DBT) we re-evaluated the pressure-temperature-time-deformation (P-T-t-d) history of these two units using modern thermobarometric tools, Rb/Sr deformation ages and field relationships. Our results show that the Tsaté complex is formed by a stack of km-thick calcschists-bearing tectonic slices, having experienced variable maximum burial temperatures of between 360°C and 490°C at depths of ca. 25-40 km, between 41 Ma and 37 Ma. The Arolla gneissic mylonites constituting the base of the DBTS experienced a continuous record of protracted high-pressure (12-14 kbar), top-to-NW D1 deformation at 450-500°C between 43 and 55 Ma. Some of these primary, peak metamorphic fabrics have been sheared (top-to-SE D2) and backfolded during exhumation and collisional overprint (20 km depth, 35-40 Ma) leading to the regional greenschist facies retrogression particularly prominent within Tsaté metasediments. The final juxtaposition of the DBTS with the Tsaté complex occurred between 350 and 500°C during this later, exhumation-related D2 event. Although some exhumation-related deformation partially reworked D1 primary features, we emphasize that the DBT can be viewed as a remnant of the Alpine early Eocene blueschist-facies subduction interface region. The DBT therefore constitutes the deeper equivalent of some shallower portions of the Alpine subduction

  18. Driving mechanisms for >40 km of exhumation during contraction and extension in a continental arc, Cascades core, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paterson, Scott R.; Miller, R.B.; Alsleben, H.; Whitney, D.L.; Valley, P.M.; Hurlow, H.

    2004-01-01

    In the NW North American Cordillera, the Cascades core region of the Coast Plutonic Complex underwent Late Cretaceous (>96 Ma to locally 73 Ma) SW-NE contraction and crustal thickening followed by dextral transpression (???73 to 55 Ma), then transtension (3 mm /yr) by local thrusting in regions undergoing crustal thickening. In the central part of the core (Chelan block), >40 km of exhumation occurred between 91 and 45 Ma, about half of which occurred during early contraction (driven by thrusting) and half during top-to-north, arc-oblique shear during reactivation of a midcrustal Cretaceous thrust, the Dinkelman decollement. The footwall of this thrust consists of the Swakane Biotite Gneiss, a Cretaceous, metaclastic assemblage with recorded pressures of 10-12 kbar, no arc-related magmatism, and structures dominated by pervasive top-to-north shearing. The hanging wall consists of the Napeequa Complex, an oceanic assemblage with recorded pressures of 6-12 kbar, voluminous arc-related magmatism, and complex structures indicating early top-to-WSW shearing, younger top-to-north shearing, and widespread folding. In the Napeequa, top-to-north shearing started by 73 Ma during melt-present conditions at pressures ???6 kbar. Top-to-north shearing in both hanging wall and footwall continued during exhumation (???1.6 mm/yr) and cooling to greenschist facies conditions during which slip became increasingly localized, eventually resulting in formation of pseudotachylite on discrete slip surfaces. We suggest that arc-oblique extension was driven by along-arc heterogeneity in displacements/ erosion, initially during transpression and underplating of continental sediments, and later during transtension. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Optimal timing for interim analyses in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Togo, Kanae; Iwasaki, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    In clinical trials, interim analyses are often performed before the completion of the trial. The intention is to possibly terminate the trial early or adjust the sample size. The time of conducting an interim analysis affects the probability of the early termination and the number of subjects enrolled until the interim analysis. This influences the expected total number of subjects. In this study, we examine the optimal time for conducting interim analyses with a view to minimizing the expected total sample size. It is found that regardless of the effect size, the optimal time of one interim analysis for the early termination is approximately two-thirds of the planned observations for the O'Brien-Fleming type of spending function and approximately half of the planned observations for the Pocock type when the subject enrollment is halted for the interim analysis. When the subject enrollment is continuous throughout the trial, the optimal time for the interim analysis varies according to the follow-up duration. We also consider the time for one interim analysis including the sample size adjustment in terms of minimizing the expected total sample size.

  20. Time Trials--An AP Physics Challenge Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David

    2009-01-01

    I have come to the conclusion that for high school physics classroom and laboratory experiences, simpler is better! In this paper I describe a very simple and effective lab experience that my AP students have thoroughly enjoyed year after year. I call this lab exercise "Time Trials." The experiment is simple in design and it is a lot of fun for…

  1. Effect of Overhydration on Time-Trial Swim Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maresh, Carl M.; Bergeron, Michael E.; Kenefick, Robert W.; Castellani, John W.; Hoffman, Jay R.; Armstrong, Lawrence E.

    2001-01-01

    Examined whether moderate overhydration would enhance the performance of otherwise euhydrated collegiate swimmers during two 183-meter time-trial swims held 3 days apart. Participants swam in alternate, randomized euhydrated, and overhydrated states. Results indicated that euhydration before an intense, short-duration swim was adequate for peak…

  2. Investigation of fiber dispersion impairment in 400GbE discrete multi-tone system for reach enhancement up to 40 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Ryo; Tanaka, Toshiki; Nishihara, Masato; Kai, Yutaka; Takahara, Tomoo; Chen, Hao; Yan, Weizhen; Tao, Zhenning; Rasmussen, Jens C.

    2015-01-01

    Discrete multi-tone (DMT) technology is an attractive modulation technique for short reach optical transmission system. One of the main factors that limit system performance is fiber dispersion, which is strongly influenced by the chirp characteristics of transmitters. We investigated the fiber dispersion impairment in a 400GbE (4 × 116.1-Gb/s) DMT system on LAN-WDM grid for reach enhancement up to 40 km through experiments and numerical simulations.

  3. Sodium Phosphate Supplementation and Time Trial Performance in Female Cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Christopher L.; Dawson, Brian; Guelfi, Kym J.; McNaughton, Lars; Wallman, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of three doses of sodium phosphate (SP) supplementation on cycling 500 kJ (119.5 Kcal) time trial (TT) performance in female cyclists. Thirteen cyclists participated in a randomised, Latin-square design study where they completed four separate trials after ingesting either a placebo, or one of three different doses (25, 50 or 75 mg·kg-1 fat free mass: FFM) of trisodium phosphate dodecahydrate which was split into four equal doses a day for six days. On the day after the loading phase, the TT was performed on a cycle ergometer. Serum phosphate blood samples were taken at rest both before and after each loading protocol, while a ~21 day washout period separated each loading phase. No significant differences in TT performance were observed between any of the supplementation protocols (p = 0.73) with average completion times for the 25, 50 or 75 mg·kg-1 FFM being, 42:21 ± 07:53, 40:55 ± 07:33 and 40:38 ± 07:20 min respectively, and 40:39 ± 07:51 min for the placebo. Likewise, average and peak power output did not significantly differ between trials (p = 0.06 and p = 0.46, respectively). Consequently, 500 kJ cycling TT performance was not different in any of the supplementation protocols in female cyclists. Key Points No significant benefit of a 25, 50 or 75 mg·kg-1 of FFM dose of sodium phosphate was found on 500 kJ (119.5 Kcal) TT cycle performance in female cyclists. Females of differing fitness levels responded similarly to sodium phosphate supplementation. Due to the possibility of individual responders to either the 50 or 75 mg·kg-1 of FFM loading protocols, competitive cyclists should trial these doses prior to competition. PMID:25177171

  4. The accuracy of simulated indoor time trials utilizing a CompuTrainer and GPS data.

    PubMed

    Peveler, Willard W

    2013-10-01

    The CompuTrainer is commonly used to measure cycling time trial performance in a laboratory setting. Previous research has demonstrated that the CompuTrainer tends toward underestimating power at higher workloads but provides reliable measures. The extent to which the CompuTrainer is capable of simulating outdoor time trials in a laboratory setting has yet to be examined. The purpose of this study was to examine the validity of replicating an outdoor time trial course indoors by comparing completion times between the actual time trial course and the replicated outdoor time trial course on the CompuTrainer. A global positioning system was used to collect data points along a local outdoor time trial course. Data were then downloaded and converted into a time trial course for the CompuTrainer. Eleven recreational to highly trained cyclists participated in this study. To participate in this study, subjects had to have completed a minimum of 2 of the local Cleves time trial races. Subjects completed 2 simulated indoor time trials on the CompuTrainer. Mean finishing times for the mean indoor performance trial (34.58 ± 8.63 minutes) were significantly slower in relation to the mean outdoor performance time (26.24 ± 3.23 minutes). Cyclists' finish times increased (performance decreased) by 24% on the indoor time trials in relation to the mean outdoor times. There were no significant differences between CompuTrainer trial 1 (34.77 ± 8.54 minutes) and CompuTrainer trial 1 (34.37 ± 8.76 minutes). Because of the significant differences in times between the indoor and outdoor time trials, meaningful comparisons of performance times cannot be made between the two. However, there were no significant differences found between the 2 CompuTrainer trials, and therefore the CompuTrainer can still be recommended for laboratory testing between trials.

  5. Dressing Wear Time after Breast Reconstruction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Luiz Francisley; Fonseca, Fernando Elias Martins; Cabral, Isaías Vieira; Pinto, Natália Lana Larcher; Juliano, Yara

    2016-01-01

    Background The evidence to support dressing standards for breast surgery wounds is empiric and scarce. Objective This two-arm randomized clinical trial was designed to assess the effect of dressing wear time on surgical site infection (SSI) rates, skin colonization and patient perceptions. Methods A total of 200 breast cancer patients undergoing breast reconstruction were prospectively enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated to group I (dressing removed on the first postoperative day, n = 100) or group II (dressing removed on the sixth postoperative day, n = 100). SSIs were defined and classified according to criteria from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Samples collected before placing the dressing and after 1 day (group I) and 6 days (both groups) were cultured for skin colonization assessments. Patients preferences and perceptions with regard to safety, comfort and convenience were recorded and analyzed. Results A total of 186 patients completed the follow-up. The global SSI rate was 4.5%. Six patients in group I and three in group II had SSI (p = 0.497). Before dressing, the groups were similar with regard to skin colonization. At the sixth day, there was a higher colonization by coagulase-negative staphylococci in group I (p<0.0001). Patients preferred to keep dressing for six days (p<0.0001), and considered this a safer choice (p<0.05). Conclusions Despite group I had a higher skin colonization by coagulase-negative staphylococci on the sixth postoperative day, there was no difference in SSI rates. Patients preferred keeping dressing for six days and considered it a safer choice. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01148823 PMID:27911904

  6. Alternative trial design in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis saves time and patients.

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, Geert Jan; Graf, Michael; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; van den Berg, Leonard H; Ludolph, Albert C

    2007-10-01

    A sequential trial design is an alternative for the classical trial design with a fixed sample size, that permits stopping a trial as soon as enough evidence for a treatment effect, or a lack thereof, is obtained. This study aimed to determine the difference in efficiency of time and patient number between a classical trial design and a sequential trial design. In this study we re-analysed a previously published classically designed clinical trial according to a sequential trial design. We subsequently determined the difference in total running time and patient number. We found that the sequential analysis offered a gain in time of 38%. We conclude that the sequential trial design may in certain situations be superior to the classical design.

  7. The timing of fluid intake during an Olympic distance triathlon.

    PubMed

    McMurray, Robert G; Williams, David K; Battaglini, Claudio L

    2006-12-01

    Seven highly trained male triathletes, aged 18 to 35 years, were tested during two simulated Olympic distance triathlons to determine whether run performance was enhanced when consuming 177 ml of water at 8, 16, 24, and 32 kilometers (Early Trials) compared to consumption at 10, 20, 30, and 40 kilometers (Late Trials), during the cycling segment of the triathlon. Swim times for 1500 m were similar between trials; 40-km cycling times were approximately 10 s faster during the Late Trials; however, 10-km run times were faster during the Early Trials (P < 0.02). No significant differences between run trials were found for the rating of perceived exertion, oxygen uptake, heart rate, and change in urine specific gravity. It was concluded that the consumption of fluids earlier in the cycle phase of the Olympic distance triathlon benefits the run and overall performance time.

  8. Influence of acetaminophen on performance during time trial cycling.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Alexis R; Jones, Andrew M; Williams, Craig A

    2010-01-01

    To establish whether acetaminophen improves performance of self-paced exercise through the reduction of perceived pain, 13 trained male cyclists performed a self-paced 10-mile (16.1 km) cycle time trial (TT) following the ingestion of either acetaminophen (ACT) or a placebo (PLA), administered in randomized double-blind design. TT were completed in a significantly faster time (t(12) = 2.55, P < 0.05) under the ACT condition (26 min 15 s +/- 1 min 36 s vs. 26 min 45 s +/- 2 min 2 s). Power output (PO) was higher during the middle section of the TT in the ACT condition, resulting in a higher mean PO (P < 0.05) (265 +/- 12 vs. 255 +/- 15 W). Blood lactate concentration (B[La]) and heart rate (HR) were higher in the ACT condition (B[La] = 6.1 +/- 2.9 mmol/l; HR = 87 +/- 7%max) than in the PLA condition (B[La] = 5.1 +/- 2.6 mmol/l; HR = 84 +/- 9%max) (P < 0.05). No significant difference in rating of perceived exertion (ACT = 15.5 +/- 0.2; PLA = 15.7 +/- 0.2) or perceived pain (ACT = 5.6 +/- 0.2; PLA = 5.5 +/- 0.2) (P > 0.05) was observed. Using acetaminophen, participants cycled at a higher mean PO, with an increased HR and B[La], but without changes in perceived pain or exertion. Consequently, completion time was significantly faster. These findings support the notion that exercise is regulated by pain perception, and increased pain tolerance can improve exercise capacity.

  9. Trial-to-trial Adaptation: Parsing out the Roles of Cerebellum and BG in Predictive Motor Timing.

    PubMed

    Lungu, Ovidiu V; Bares, Martin; Liu, Tao; Gomez, Christopher M; Cechova, Ivica; Ashe, James

    2016-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that predictive motor timing (i.e., timing requiring visuomotor coordination in anticipation of a future event, such as catching or batting a ball) is impaired in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) types 6 and 8 relative to healthy controls. Specifically, SCA patients had difficulties postponing their motor response while estimating the target kinematics. This behavioral difference relied on the activation of both cerebellum and striatum in healthy controls, but not in cerebellar patients, despite both groups activating certain parts of cerebellum during the task. However, the role of these two key structures in the dynamic adaptation of the motor timing to target kinematic properties remained unexplored. In the current paper, we analyzed these data with the aim of characterizing the trial-by-trial changes in brain activation. We found that in healthy controls alone, and in comparison with SCA patients, the activation in bilateral striatum was exclusively associated with past successes and that in the left putamen, with maintaining a successful performance across successive trials. In healthy controls, relative to SCA patients, a larger network was involved in maintaining a successful trial-by-trial strategy; this included cerebellum and fronto-parieto-temporo-occipital regions that are typically part of attentional network and action monitoring. Cerebellum was also part of a network of regions activated when healthy participants postponed their motor response from one trial to the next; SCA patients showed reduced activation relative to healthy controls in both cerebellum and striatum in the same contrast. These findings support the idea that cerebellum and striatum play complementary roles in the trial-by-trial adaptation in predictive motor timing. In addition to expanding our knowledge of brain structures involved in time processing, our results have implications for the understanding of BG disorders, such as Parkinson disease

  10. Age-related differences in the neural correlates of trial-to-trial variations of reaction time

    PubMed Central

    Adleman, Nancy E.; Chen, Gang; Reynolds, Richard C.; Frackman, Anna; Razdan, Varun; Weissman, Daniel H.; Pine, Daniel S.; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Intra-subject variation in reaction time (ISVRT) is a developmentally-important phenomenon that decreases from childhood through young adulthood in parallel with the development of executive functions and networks. Prior work has shown a significant association between trial-by-trial variations in reaction time (RT) and trial-by-trial variations in brain activity as measured by the blood-oxygenated level-dependent (BOLD) response in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. It remains unclear, however, whether such “RT-BOLD” relationships vary with age. Here, we determined whether such trial-by-trial relationships vary with age in a cross-sectional design. We observed an association between age and RT-BOLD relationships in 11 clusters located in visual/occipital regions, frontal and parietal association cortex, precentral/postcentral gyrus, and thalamus. Some of these relationships were negative, reflecting increased BOLD associated with decreased RT, manifesting around the time of stimulus presentation and positive several seconds later. Critically for present purposes, all RT-BOLD relationships increased with age. Thus, RT-BOLD relationships may reflect robust, measurable changes in the brain-behavior relationship across development. PMID:27239972

  11. Effects of music on work-rate distribution during a cycling time trial.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, G; Wilson, D; Eubank, M

    2004-11-01

    Previous research work on the ergogenic effects of music has mainly involved constant power tests to exhaustion as dependent variables. Time trials are more externally valid than constant power tests, may be more reliable and allow the distribution of self-selected work-rate to be explored. We examined whether music improved starting, finishing and/or overall power during a 10-km cycling time trial, and whether heart rate and subjective responses to this time trial were altered by music. Sixteen participants performed two 10-km time trials on a Cybex cycle ergometer with, and without, the presence of a form of dance music known as "trance" (tempo = 142 beats x min (-1), volume at ear = 87 dB). Participants also completed the Brunel music rating inventory (BMRI) after each time trial in the music condition. The mean +/- SD time to complete the time trial was 1030 +/- 79 s in the music condition compared to 1052 +/- 77 s without music (95 % CI of difference = 10 to 34 s, p = 0.001). Nevertheless, ratings of perceived exertion were consistently (0.8 units) higher throughout the time trial with music (p < 0.0005). The interaction between distance and condition was significant for cycling speed measured during the time trial (p = 0.007). The largest music-induced increases in cycling speed and heart rate were observed in the first 3 km of the time trial. After completion of the BMRI, participants rated the "tempo" and "rhythm" of the music as more motivating than the "harmony" and "melody" aspects. These results suggest that music improves cycling speed mostly in the first few minutes of a 10-km time trial. In contrast to the findings of previous research, which suggested that music lowers perceived exertion at a constant work-rate, the participants in our time trials selected higher work-rates with music, whilst at the same time perceived these work-rates as being harder than without music.

  12. Real-Time Enrollment Dashboard For Multisite Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, William A; Kelley, Robert R; Wiemken, Timothy L; Chariker, Julia H; Peyrani, Paula; Guinn, Brian E; Binford, Laura E; Buckner, Kimberley; Ramirez, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Objective Achieving patient recruitment goals are critical for the successful completion of a clinical trial. We designed and developed a web-based dashboard for assisting in the management of clinical trial screening and enrollment. Materials and Methods We use the dashboard to assist in the management of two observational studies of community-acquired pneumonia. Clinical research associates and managers using the dashboard were surveyed to determine its effectiveness as compared with traditional direct communication. Results The dashboard has been in use since it was first introduced in May of 2014. Of the 23 staff responding to the survey, 77% felt that it was easier or much easier to use the dashboard for communication than to use direct communication. Conclusion We have designed and implemented a visualization dashboard for managing multi-site clinical trial enrollment in two community acquired pneumonia studies. Information dashboards are a useful tool for clinical trial management. They can be used as a standalone trial information tool or included into a larger management system. PMID:26878068

  13. Physiological responses to 1000-m ergometer time-trial performance in outrigger canoeing.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Rebecca; Spinks, Warwick; Leicht, Anthony; Sinclair, Wade; Woodside, Louise

    2008-09-01

    Graded exercise tests are commonly used to assess peak physiological capacities of athletes. However, unlike time trials, these tests do not provide performance information. The aim of this study was to examine the peak physiological responses of female outrigger canoeists to a 1000-m ergometer time trial and compare the time-trial performance to two graded exercise tests performed at increments of 7.5 W each minute and 15 W each two minutes respectively. 17 trained female outrigger canoeists completed the time trial on an outrigger canoe ergometer with heart rate (HR), stroke rate, power output, and oxygen consumption (VO2) determined every 15 s. The mean (+/- s) time-trial time was 359 +/- 33 s, with a mean power output of 65 +/- 16 W and mean stroke rate of 56 +/- 4 strokes min(-1). Mean values for peak VO2, peak heart rate, and mean heart rate were 3.17 +/- 0.67 litres min(-1), 177 +/- 11 beats min(-1), and 164 +/- 12 beats min(-1) respectively. Compared with the graded exercise tests, the time-trial elicited similar values for peak heart rate, peak power output, peak blood lactate concentration, and peak VO2. As a time trial is sport-specific and can simultaneously quantify sprint performance and peak physiological responses in outrigger canoeing, it is suggested that a time trial be used by coaches for crew selection as it doubles as a reliable performance measure and a protocol for monitoring peak aerobic capacity of female outrigger canoeists.

  14. Clinical trials in pulmonary hypertension: Time for a consortium.

    PubMed

    Newman, John H; Elliott, Gregory C; Haworth, Glennis S; Zampaglione, Edio; Brar, Satjit; Gibbs, Simon J; Sandoval, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Current and past clinical trials in pulmonary hypertension, while valuable, are limited by the absence of mechanistic aims, by dissatisfaction with endpoints and the inability to share data. Clinical studies in pulmonary hypertension might be enhanced by a consortium approach that utilizes the expertise of academic medicine, the treatment initiatives of the pharmaceutical industry and study design from funding agencies interested in biological mechanisms. A meeting of interested parties, the Pulmonary Hypertension Academic Research Consortium (PHARC), was held from 30 April to 1 May 2012 in Bethesda, Maryland. Members at the conference were from the USA Federal Drug Administration (FDA); pharmaceutical industry (Pfizer, Novartis, Bayer and Gilead); USA National Institutes of Health (NHLBI); the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute (PVRI), a non-governmental organization (NGO); and research and clinical members of pulmonary hypertension programs of international scope. A recommendation to develop a clinical trials consortium was the product of the working group on academic standards in clinical trials. The working group concluded that clinical trials hold immense promise to move the field of pulmonary hypertension forward if the trials are designed by a consortium with input from multiple groups. This would result in study design, conduct and analysis determined by consortium members with a high degree of independent function. The components of a well-balanced consortium that give it scientific effectiveness are: (1) the consortium can work with multiple companies simultaneously; (2) sponsors with special interests, such as testing biological mechanisms, can add investigations to a study at lower cost than with present granting strategies; (3) data handling including archiving, analysis and future sharing would be improved; (4) ancillary studies supported by the collection and dissemination of tissues and fluids would generate a broader approach to discovery than

  15. Statistical Frequency-Dependent Analysis of Trial-to-Trial Variability in Single Time Series by Recurrence Plots

    PubMed Central

    Tošić, Tamara; Sellers, Kristin K.; Fröhlich, Flavio; Fedotenkova, Mariia; beim Graben, Peter; Hutt, Axel

    2016-01-01

    For decades, research in neuroscience has supported the hypothesis that brain dynamics exhibits recurrent metastable states connected by transients, which together encode fundamental neural information processing. To understand the system's dynamics it is important to detect such recurrence domains, but it is challenging to extract them from experimental neuroscience datasets due to the large trial-to-trial variability. The proposed methodology extracts recurrent metastable states in univariate time series by transforming datasets into their time-frequency representations and computing recurrence plots based on instantaneous spectral power values in various frequency bands. Additionally, a new statistical inference analysis compares different trial recurrence plots with corresponding surrogates to obtain statistically significant recurrent structures. This combination of methods is validated by applying it to two artificial datasets. In a final study of visually-evoked Local Field Potentials in partially anesthetized ferrets, the methodology is able to reveal recurrence structures of neural responses with trial-to-trial variability. Focusing on different frequency bands, the δ-band activity is much less recurrent than α-band activity. Moreover, α-activity is susceptible to pre-stimuli, while δ-activity is much less sensitive to pre-stimuli. This difference in recurrence structures in different frequency bands indicates diverse underlying information processing steps in the brain. PMID:26834580

  16. Impact of channel-spacing on next 400 Gb/s Ethernet 40-km PMD based on 16×25Gb/s WDM architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Ferrera, P.; Gutiérrez-Castrejón, R.

    2014-06-01

    The impact of fiber dispersion, system non-linearities and their interaction when varying the channel-spacing value, ranging from 200 to 800 GHz, on the performance of a WDM 16×25Gb/s architecture that has been proposed as next 400 Gb/s Ethernet (400 GbE) 40-km physical medium dependent (PMD) sublayer is numerically analyzed. It is shown through calculations of the Quality Factor that the gain modulation nonlinearity of the semiconductor optical pre-amplifier is the main phenomenon that degrades the system performance. Moreover, it is demonstrated that its impact becomes dependent on the channel-spacing of the WDM plan, provided that the chromatic dispersion of the fiber is enough to vary the bit-correlation level among channels at the pre-amplifier input. Despite the considerable channel count, the effect of carrier heating-induced four wave mixing (FWM) is found to be rather modest, while the impact of carrier density pulsation-induced FWM and fiber non-linear response resulted to be negligible. With respect to the analyzed phenomena, a wide channel plan, only limited by the gain bandwidth, should be preferred for the 400 GbE implementation, especially if a nanostructured, broad-bandwidth, SOA can be afforded.

  17. Time-Lag Bias in Trials of Pediatric Antidepressants: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Magdalena M.; Panza, Kaitlyn E.; Martin, Andres; Bloch, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is evidence of a time-lag bias in the publication of pediatric antidepressant trials. Method: We conducted a meta-analysis of published and unpublished randomized placebo-controlled trials of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) in subjects less than 18 years of age with major depressive disorder. Our main…

  18. No difference found in time to publication by statistical significance of trial results: a methodological review

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, L; Cooper, E; Hewitt, C; Torgerson, T; Cook, L; Tharmanathan, P; Cockayne, S; Torgerson, D

    2016-01-01

    Objective Time-lag from study completion to publication is a potential source of publication bias in randomised controlled trials. This study sought to update the evidence base by identifying the effect of the statistical significance of research findings on time to publication of trial results. Design Literature searches were carried out in four general medical journals from June 2013 to June 2014 inclusive (BMJ, JAMA, the Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine). Setting Methodological review of four general medical journals. Participants Original research articles presenting the primary analyses from phase 2, 3 and 4 parallel-group randomised controlled trials were included. Main outcome measures Time from trial completion to publication. Results The median time from trial completion to publication was 431 days (n = 208, interquartile range 278–618). A multivariable adjusted Cox model found no statistically significant difference in time to publication for trials reporting positive or negative results (hazard ratio: 0.86, 95% CI 0.64 to 1.16, p = 0.32). Conclusion In contrast to previous studies, this review did not demonstrate the presence of time-lag bias in time to publication. This may be a result of these articles being published in four high-impact general medical journals that may be more inclined to publish rapidly, whatever the findings. Further research is needed to explore the presence of time-lag bias in lower quality studies and lower impact journals. PMID:27757242

  19. Power Analysis for Trials with Discrete-Time Survival Endpoints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jozwiak, Katarzyna; Moerbeek, Mirjam

    2012-01-01

    Studies on event occurrence aim to investigate if and when subjects experience a particular event. The timing of events may be measured continuously using thin precise units or discretely using time periods. The latter metric of time is often used in social science research and the generalized linear model (GLM) is an appropriate model for data…

  20. Plutonism at Different Crustal Levels of an Arc: Insights From the 5 to 40 km (Paleodepth) North Cascades Crustal Section, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. B.; Paterson, S. R.; Matzel, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    The crystalline core of the North Cascades preserves a Cretaceous crustal section that facilitates evaluation of pluton construction, emplacement, geometry, composition, and deformation at widely variable crustal levels (~5 to 40 km paleodepth) in a thick (> 55 km) continental magmatic arc. The oldest and largest pulse of plutonism was focused between 96-89 Ma when fluxes were a minimum of 3.9x10-6km3/yr/km of arc length, but the coincidence with regional crustal thickening and underthrusting of a cool outboard terrane resulted in relatively low mid- to deep-crustal temperatures for an arc. A second, smaller peak of magmatism at 78-71 Ma (minimum of 8.2x10-7km3/yr/km of arc length) occurred during regional transpression. Tonalite dominates at all levels of the section. Intrusions range from large plutons to thin (< 50 m) dispersed sheets encased in metamorphic rocks that record less focused magmatism. The percentage of igneous rocks increases systematically from shallow to middle to deep levels; from approximately 37% to 55% to 65% of the total rock volume. Unfocused magmas comprise much higher percentages (approximately 19%) of the total plutonic rock at deep- and mid-crustal depths, but only 1% at shallower levels, whereas the largest intrusions were emplaced into shallow crust. Plutons have a range of shapes, including: asymmetric wedges to funnels; subhorizontal tabular sheets; steep-sided, blade-shaped bodies with high aspect ratios in map view; and steep-sided, vertically extensive (> 8 km) bodies shaped like thick disks and/or hockey pucks. Sheeted intrusions and gently dipping tabular bodies are more common with depth. Some of these plutons fit the model that most intrusions are subhorizontal and tabular, but many do not, reflecting the complex changes in lithology and rheology in arc crust undergoing regional shortening. The steep sheeted plutons partly represent magma transfer zones that fed the large shallow plutons, which were sites of intermittent

  1. Evaluating Protocol Lifecycle Time Intervals in HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Schouten, Jeffrey T.; Dixon, Dennis; Varghese, Suresh; Cope, Marie T.; Marci, Joe; Kagan, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying efficacious interventions for the prevention and treatment of human diseases depends on the efficient development and implementation of controlled clinical trials. Essential to reducing the time and burden of completing the clinical trial lifecycle is determining which aspects take the longest, delay other stages, and may lead to better resource utilization without diminishing scientific quality, safety, or the protection of human subjects. Purpose In this study we modeled time-to-event data to explore relationships between clinical trial protocol development and implementation times, as well as identify potential correlates of prolonged development and implementation. Methods We obtained time interval and participant accrual data from 111 interventional clinical trials initiated between 2006 and 2011 by NIH’s HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Networks. We determined the time (in days) required to complete defined phases of clinical trial protocol development and implementation. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used to assess the rates at which protocols reached specified terminal events, stratified by study purpose (therapeutic, prevention) and phase group (pilot/phase I, phase II, and phase III/ IV). We also examined several potential correlates to prolonged development and implementation intervals. Results Even though phase grouping did not determine development or implementation times of either therapeutic or prevention studies, overall we observed wide variation in protocol development times. Moreover, we detected a trend toward phase III/IV therapeutic protocols exhibiting longer developmental (median 2 ½ years) and implementation times (>3years). We also found that protocols exceeding the median number of days for completing the development interval had significantly longer implementation. Limitations The use of a relatively small set of protocols may have limited our ability to detect differences across phase groupings. Some timing effects

  2. The effect of a caffeinated mouth-rinse on endurance cycling time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Doering, Thomas M; Fell, James W; Leveritt, Michael D; Desbrow, Ben; Shing, Cecilia M

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if acute caffeine exposure via mouth-rinse improved endurance cycling time-trial performance in well-trained cyclists. It was hypothesized that caffeine exposure at the mouth would enhance endurance cycling time-trial performance. Ten well-trained male cyclists (mean ± SD: 32.9 ± 7.5 years, 74.7 ± 5.3 kg, 176.8 ± 5.1cm, VO₂peak = 59.8 ± 3.5 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) completed two experimental time-trials following 24 hr of dietary and exercise standardization. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design was employed whereby cyclists completed a time-trial in the fastest time possible, which was equivalent work to cycling at 75% of peak aerobic power output for 60 min. Cyclists were administered 25 ml mouth-rinses for 10 s containing either placebo or 35 mg of anhydrous caffeine eight times throughout the time-trial. Perceptual and physiological variables were recorded throughout. No significant improvement in time-trial performance was observed with caffeine (3918 ± 243 s) compared with placebo mouth-rinse (3940 ± 227 s). No elevation in plasma caffeine was detected due to the mouth-rinse conditions. Caffeine mouth-rinse had no significant effect on rating of perceived exertion, heart rate, rate of oxygen consumption or blood lactate concentration. Eight exposures of a 35 mg dose of caffeine at the buccal cavity for 10s does not significantly enhance endurance cycling time-trial performance, nor does it elevate plasma caffeine concentration.

  3. How many research nurses for how many clinical trials in an oncology setting? Definition of the Nursing Time Required by Clinical Trial-Assessment Tool (NTRCT-AT).

    PubMed

    Milani, Alessandra; Mazzocco, Ketti; Stucchi, Sara; Magon, Giorgio; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Passoni, Claudia; Ciccarelli, Chiara; Tonali, Alessandra; Profeta, Teresa; Saiani, Luisa

    2017-02-01

    Few resources are available to quantify clinical trial-associated workload, needed to guide staffing and budgetary planning. The aim of the study is to describe a tool to measure clinical trials nurses' workload expressed in time spent to complete core activities. Clinical trials nurses drew up a list of nursing core activities, integrating results from literature searches with personal experience. The final 30 core activities were timed for each research nurse by an outside observer during daily practice in May and June 2014. Average times spent by nurses for each activity were calculated. The "Nursing Time Required by Clinical Trial-Assessment Tool" was created as an electronic sheet that combines the average times per specified activities and mathematic functions to return the total estimated time required by a research nurse for each specific trial. The tool was tested retrospectively on 141 clinical trials. The increasing complexity of clinical research requires structured approaches to determine workforce requirements. This study provides a tool to describe the activities of a clinical trials nurse and to estimate the associated time required to deliver individual trials. The application of the proposed tool in clinical research practice could provide a consistent structure for clinical trials nursing workload estimation internationally.

  4. Multiple linear regression to estimate time-frequency electrophysiological responses in single trials.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Zhang, Z G; Mouraux, A; Iannetti, G D

    2015-05-01

    Transient sensory, motor or cognitive event elicit not only phase-locked event-related potentials (ERPs) in the ongoing electroencephalogram (EEG), but also induce non-phase-locked modulations of ongoing EEG oscillations. These modulations can be detected when single-trial waveforms are analysed in the time-frequency domain, and consist in stimulus-induced decreases (event-related desynchronization, ERD) or increases (event-related synchronization, ERS) of synchrony in the activity of the underlying neuronal populations. ERD and ERS reflect changes in the parameters that control oscillations in neuronal networks and, depending on the frequency at which they occur, represent neuronal mechanisms involved in cortical activation, inhibition and binding. ERD and ERS are commonly estimated by averaging the time-frequency decomposition of single trials. However, their trial-to-trial variability that can reflect physiologically-important information is lost by across-trial averaging. Here, we aim to (1) develop novel approaches to explore single-trial parameters (including latency, frequency and magnitude) of ERP/ERD/ERS; (2) disclose the relationship between estimated single-trial parameters and other experimental factors (e.g., perceived intensity). We found that (1) stimulus-elicited ERP/ERD/ERS can be correctly separated using principal component analysis (PCA) decomposition with Varimax rotation on the single-trial time-frequency distributions; (2) time-frequency multiple linear regression with dispersion term (TF-MLRd) enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of ERP/ERD/ERS in single trials, and provides an unbiased estimation of their latency, frequency, and magnitude at single-trial level; (3) these estimates can be meaningfully correlated with each other and with other experimental factors at single-trial level (e.g., perceived stimulus intensity and ERP magnitude). The methods described in this article allow exploring fully non-phase-locked stimulus-induced cortical

  5. Mental Toughness Moderates Social Loafing in Cycle Time-Trial Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugen, Tommy; Reinboth, Michael; Hetlelid, Ken J.; Peters, Derek M.; Høigaard, Rune

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if mental toughness moderated the occurrence of social loafing in cycle time-trial performance. Method: Twenty-seven men (M[subscript age] = 17.7 years, SD = 0.6) completed the Sport Mental Toughness Questionnaire prior to completing a 1-min cycling trial under 2 conditions: once with individual…

  6. Separation of time-based and trial-based accounts of the partial reinforcement extinction effect.

    PubMed

    Bouton, Mark E; Woods, Amanda M; Todd, Travis P

    2014-01-01

    Two appetitive conditioning experiments with rats examined time-based and trial-based accounts of the partial reinforcement extinction effect (PREE). In the PREE, the loss of responding that occurs in extinction is slower when the conditioned stimulus (CS) has been paired with a reinforcer on some of its presentations (partially reinforced) instead of every presentation (continuously reinforced). According to a time-based or "time-accumulation" view (e.g., Gallistel and Gibbon, 2000), the PREE occurs because the organism has learned in partial reinforcement to expect the reinforcer after a larger amount of time has accumulated in the CS over trials. In contrast, according to a trial-based view (e.g., Capaldi, 1967), the PREE occurs because the organism has learned in partial reinforcement to expect the reinforcer after a larger number of CS presentations. Experiment 1 used a procedure that equated partially and continuously reinforced groups on their expected times to reinforcement during conditioning. A PREE was still observed. Experiment 2 then used an extinction procedure that allowed time in the CS and the number of trials to accumulate differentially through extinction. The PREE was still evident when responding was examined as a function of expected time units to the reinforcer, but was eliminated when responding was examined as a function of expected trial units to the reinforcer. There was no evidence that the animal responded according to the ratio of time accumulated during the CS in extinction over the time in the CS expected before the reinforcer. The results thus favor a trial-based account over a time-based account of extinction and the PREE. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Associative and Temporal Learning.

  7. The effect of skin temperature on performance during a 7.5-km cycling time trial.

    PubMed

    Levels, Koen; de Koning, Jos J; Foster, Carl; Daanen, Hein A M

    2012-09-01

    Aerobic exercise performance is seriously compromised in the heat. Possibly, a high skin temperature causes a rating of perceived exertion (RPE)-mediated decrease in exercise intensity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of skin temperature on power output during a 7.5-km cycling time trial. Thirteen well-trained male subjects performed a 7.5-km cycling time trial at 15°C and 50% relative humidity (CONTROL), with radiative heat stress during the time trial, and with (PRECOOL) or without (HEAT) precooling. Heat stress was applied by infrared heaters positioned in front of the cycle ergometer between 1.5 and 6.0 km. Skin, rectal, and pill temperature, power output, heart rate, and RPE were measured during the trial. Despite the lower mean skin temperature at the start of the time trial for PRECOOL compared to HEAT (-2.1 ± 0.7°C; P < 0.01) and CONTROL (-1.8 ± 0.6°C; P < 0.05), and a greater increase in mean skin temperature during the heat stress period for PRECOOL (4.5 ± 1.0°C) and HEAT (3.9 ± 0.8°C) than for CONTROL (-0.3 ± 0.6°C; P < 0.01), no differences in power output were found between HEAT (273 ± 45 W) and CONTROL (284 ± 43 W; P = 0.11) and between HEAT and PRECOOL (266 ± 50 W; P = 0.47). Power output during the time trial was greater for CONTROL than for PRECOOL (P < 0.05). Additionally, no differences were observed in core temperature measures, HR, and RPE. Skin temperature does not affect the selection and modulation of exercise intensity in a 7.5-km cycling time trial.

  8. Eclogite Facies Relicts and Decompression Assemblages; Evidence for the Exhumation of a Large Coherent Metabasite Block From > 40 km Depth; Central Metamorphic Terrane, Eastern Klamath Mountains, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, W. M.; Fairhurst, R. J.; Metcalf, R. V.

    2007-12-01

    thermobarometer (Ernst and Lui, 1998) yields upper P-T estimates of ~600°C and > 1.5 GPa, consistent with hornblende eclogite facies. The dominant mineral assemblages and metamorphic fabrics indicate dynamic recrystallization of metabasites during declining P-T conditions through amphibolite - epidote amphibolite facies (ilmenite - titanite transition). Exhumation via extension along the Trinity fault is suggested by the coplanar relationship between metabasite decompression-related deformation fabrics and the Trinity fault. Present models call on the higher buoyancy of the sialic eclogites as the mechanism for exhumation and to explain the volumetric difference between the mafic and felsic eclogites exhumed. The exhumation of the CMt from depths > 40 km requires new models for the exhumation of subducted oceanic crust from eclogite facies conditions. We speculate that the CMt was exhumed from eclogite facies conditions by tectonic unroofing along the Trinity fault. However, the mechanism is still unclear and requires further investigation.

  9. Mouth rinsing with a carbohydrate solution does not influence cycle time trial performance in the heat.

    PubMed

    Watson, Phillip; Nichols, David; Cordery, Philip

    2014-09-01

    Ten endurance-trained males were recruited to examine the possible role of carbohydrate (CHO) receptors in the mouth influencing exercise performance in the heat. Volunteers completed an incremental test to exhaustion to determine peak oxygen uptake, a familiarisation trial, followed by 2 experimental trials. Trials consisted of a 1-h time trial undertaken in a climatic chamber maintained at 30 °C, 60% relative humidity. Immediately before, and at regular intervals throughout exercise, subjects ingested a bolus of water and then were provided with either a placebo (PLA) or a 6.4% glucose (CHO) solution to rinse in the mouth for 10 s before being expectorated. There was no difference in total work done between the PLA and CHO trials (758.8 ± 149.0 kJ; 762.6 ± 141.1 kJ; P = 0.951). Pacing was also similar, with no differences in power output apparent during the experimental trials (P = 0.546). Core temperature (P = 0.615), heart rate (P = 0.505), ratings of perceived exertion (P = 0.181), and perceived thermal stress (P = 0.416) were not influenced by the nature of the intervention. Blood glucose concentrations were similar during the CHO and PLA trials (P = 0.117). In contrast to the findings of several studies undertaken in temperate conditions, the present investigation failed to support role of oral sensing of CHO in influencing performance during prolonged exercise in warm conditions.

  10. Conductive and evaporative precooling lowers mean skin temperature and improves time trial performance in the heat.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, S H; Hupperets, M; Hodder, S G; Havenith, G

    2015-06-01

    Self-paced endurance performance is compromised by moderate-to-high ambient temperatures that are evident in many competitive settings. It has become common place to implement precooling prior to competition in an attempt to alleviate perceived thermal load and performance decline. The present study aimed to investigate precooling incorporating different cooling avenues via either evaporative cooling alone or in combination with conductive cooling on cycling time trial performance. Ten trained male cyclists completed a time trial on three occasions in hot (35 °C) ambient conditions with the cooling garment prepared by (a) immersion in water (COOL, evaporative); (b) immersion in water and frozen (COLD, evaporative and conductive); or (c) no precooling (CONT). COLD improved time trial performance by 5.8% and 2.6% vs CONT and COOL, respectively (both P < 0.05). Power output was 4.5% higher for COLD vs CONT (P < 0.05). Mean skin temperature was lower at the onset of the time trial following COLD compared with COOL and CONT (both P < 0.05) and lasted for the first 20% of the time trial. Thermal sensation was perceived cooler following COOL and COLD. The combination of evaporative and conductive cooling (COLD) had the greatest benefit to performance, which is suggested to be driven by reduced skin temperature following cooling.

  11. Micro-Randomized Trials: An Experimental Design for Developing Just-in-Time Adaptive Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Klasnja, Predrag; Hekler, Eric B.; Shiffman, Saul; Boruvka, Audrey; Almirall, Daniel; Tewari, Ambuj; Murphy, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This paper presents an experimental design, the micro-randomized trial, developed to support optimization of just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs). JITAIs are mHealth technologies that aim to deliver the right intervention components at the right times and locations to optimally support individuals’ health behaviors. Micro-randomized trials offer a way to optimize such interventions by enabling modeling of causal effects and time-varying effect moderation for individual intervention components within a JITAI. Methods The paper describes the micro-randomized trial design, enumerates research questions that this experimental design can help answer, and provides an overview of the data analyses that can be used to assess the causal effects of studied intervention components and investigate time-varying moderation of those effects. Results Micro-randomized trials enable causal modeling of proximal effects of the randomized intervention components and assessment of time-varying moderation of those effects. Conclusions Micro-randomized trials can help researchers understand whether their interventions are having intended effects, when and for whom they are effective, and what factors moderate the interventions’ effects, enabling creation of more effective JITAIs. PMID:26651463

  12. Dressing wear time after breast reconstruction: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the major risk variables for surgical site infection is wound management. Understanding infection risk factors for breast operations is essential in order to develop infection-prevention strategies and improve surgical outcomes. The aim of this trial is to assess the influence of dressing wear time on surgical site infection rates and skin colonization. Patients’ perception at self-assessment will also be analyzed. Methods/Design This is a two-arm randomized controlled trial. Two hundred breast cancer patients undergoing immediate or delayed breast reconstruction will be prospectively enrolled. Patients will be randomly allocated to group I (dressing removed on postoperative day one) or group II (dressing removed on postoperative day six). Surgical site infections will be defined by standard criteria from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Skin colonization will be assessed by culture of samples collected at predefined time points. Patients will score dressing wear time with regard to safety, comfort and convenience. Discussion The evidence to support dressing standards for breast surgery wounds is empiric and scarce. CDC recommends protecting, with a sterile dressing for 24 to 48 hours postoperatively, a primarily closed incision, but there is no recommendation to cover this kind of incision beyond 48 hours, or on the appropriate time to shower or bathe with an uncovered incision. The results of the ongoing trial may support standard recommendations regarding dressing wear time after breast reconstruction. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: http://NCT01148823. PMID:23432779

  13. Real-time monitoring for human clinical trials

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, Y.D.

    1995-11-01

    On August 3-4, 1994, an INEL team made measurements related to a real-time monitoring system for use on the epithermal beam facility at the BMRR. BNL has installed two fission chambers in front of the beam collimator, which are to monitor the beam coming from the reactor. These two monitors are located with one just above the 16-cm dia. front aperture and the other is just below. The fission chambers contain depleted uranium, but because of the small amount of U-235 present, they respond to thermal and near thermal neutrons rather than fast neutrons. This feature combined with their relatively small size (0.6 cm dia x 4 cm long) makes them very good monitors in the BMRR epithermal neutron beam. The INEL team worked with H.B. Lui (BNL) in performing initial tests of these monitors and established the settings to achieve stable operation. The main purpose of the measurement studies was to establish a basis for a monitoring method that tracks the dose the patient is receiving rather than the neutron fluence being delivered down the beam line.

  14. Effect of Time of Day on Performance, Hormonal and Metabolic Response during a 1000-M Cycling Time Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Alan Lins; Lopes-Silva, João Paulo; Bertuzzi, Rômulo; Casarini, Dulce Elena; Arita, Danielle Yuri; Bishop, David John; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of time of day on performance, pacing, and hormonal and metabolic responses during a 1000-m cycling time-trial. Nine male, recreational cyclists visited the laboratory four times. During the 1st visit the participants performed an incremental test and during the 2nd visit they performed a 1000-m cycling familiarization trial. On the 3rd and 4th visits, the participants performed a 1000-m TT at either 8 am or 6 pm, in randomized, repeated-measures, crossover design. The time to complete the time trial was lower in the evening than in the morning (88.2±8.7 versus 94.7±10.9 s, respectively, p<0.05), but there was no significant different in pacing. However, oxygen uptake and aerobic mechanical power output at 600 and 1000 m tended to be higher in the evening (p<0.07 and 0.09, respectively). There was also a main effect of time of day for insulin, cortisol, and total and free testosterone concentration, which were all higher in the morning (+60%, +26%, +31% and +22%, respectively, p<0.05). The growth hormone, was twofold higher in the evening (p<0.05). The plasma glucose was ∼11% lower in the morning (p<0.05). Glucagon, norepinephrine, epinephrine and lactate were similar for the morning and evening trials (p>0.05), but the norepinephrine response to the exercise was increased in the morning (+46%, p<0.05), and it was accompanied by a 5-fold increase in the response of glucose. Muscle recruitment, as measured by electromyography, was similar between morning and evening trials (p>0.05). Our findings suggest that performance was improved in the evening, and it was accompanied by an improved hormonal and metabolic milieu. PMID:25289885

  15. Field-measured drag area is a key correlate of level cycling time trial performance

    PubMed Central

    Peterman, James E.; Lim, Allen C.; Ignatz, Ryan I.; Edwards, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Drag area (Ad) is a primary factor determining aerodynamic resistance during level cycling and is therefore a key determinant of level time trial performance. However, Ad has traditionally been difficult to measure. Our purpose was to determine the value of adding field-measured Ad as a correlate of level cycling time trial performance. In the field, 19 male cyclists performed a level (22.1 km) time trial. Separately, field-determined Ad and rolling resistance were calculated for subjects along with projected frontal area assessed directly (AP) and indirectly (Est AP). Also, a graded exercise test was performed to determine \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\dot {V}{O}_{2}$\\end{document}V˙O2 peak, lactate threshold (LT), and economy. \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\dot {V}{O}_{2}$\\end{document}V˙O2 peak (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\mathrm{l}~\\min ^{-1}$\\end{document}lmin−1) and power at LT were significantly correlated to power measured during the time trial (r = 0.83 and 0.69, respectively) but were not significantly correlated to performance time (r = − 0.42 and −0.45). The correlation with performance time improved significantly (p < 0.05) when these variables were normalized to Ad. Of note, Ad alone was better correlated to performance time (r = 0.85, p < 0.001) than any combination of non-normalized physiological

  16. Likelihood of Null Effects of Large NHLBI Clinical Trials Has Increased over Time

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Robert M.; Irvin, Veronica L.

    2015-01-01

    Background We explore whether the number of null results in large National Heart Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) funded trials has increased over time. Methods We identified all large NHLBI supported RCTs between 1970 and 2012 evaluating drugs or dietary supplements for the treatment or prevention of cardiovascular disease. Trials were included if direct costs >$500,000/year, participants were adult humans, and the primary outcome was cardiovascular risk, disease or death. The 55 trials meeting these criteria were coded for whether they were published prior to or after the year 2000, whether they registered in clinicaltrials.gov prior to publication, used active or placebo comparator, and whether or not the trial had industry co-sponsorship. We tabulated whether the study reported a positive, negative, or null result on the primary outcome variable and for total mortality. Results 17 of 30 studies (57%) published prior to 2000 showed a significant benefit of intervention on the primary outcome in comparison to only 2 among the 25 (8%) trials published after 2000 (χ2=12.2,df= 1, p=0.0005). There has been no change in the proportion of trials that compared treatment to placebo versus active comparator. Industry co-sponsorship was unrelated to the probability of reporting a significant benefit. Pre-registration in clinical trials.gov was strongly associated with the trend toward null findings. Conclusions The number NHLBI trials reporting positive results declined after the year 2000. Prospective declaration of outcomes in RCTs, and the adoption of transparent reporting standards, as required by clinicaltrials.gov, may have contributed to the trend toward null findings. PMID:26244868

  17. Geochronological constraints on the age of a Permo-Triassic impact event: U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar results for the 40 km Araguainha structure of central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohver, E.; Lana, C.; Cawood, P. A.; Fletcher, I. R.; Jourdan, F.; Sherlock, S.; Rasmussen, B.; Trindade, R. I. F.; Yokoyama, E.; Souza Filho, C. R.; Marangoni, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Impact cratering has been a fundamental geological process in Earth history with major ramifications for the biosphere. The complexity of shocked and melted rocks within impact structures presents difficulties for accurate and precise radiogenic isotope age determination, hampering the assessment of the effects of an individual event in the geological record. We demonstrate the utility of a multi-chronometer approach in our study of samples from the 40 km diameter Araguainha impact structure of central Brazil. Samples of uplifted basement granite display abundant evidence of shock deformation, but U/Pb ages of shocked zircons and the 40Ar/39Ar ages of feldspar from the granite largely preserve the igneous crystallization and cooling history. Mixed results are obtained from in situ40Ar/39Ar spot analyses of shocked igneous biotites in the granite, with deformation along kink-bands resulting in highly localized, partial resetting in these grains. Likewise, spot analyses of perlitic glass from pseudotachylitic breccia samples reflect a combination of argon inheritance from wall rock material, the age of the glass itself, and post-impact devitrification. The timing of crater formation is better assessed using samples of impact-generated melt rock where isotopic resetting is associated with textural evidence of melting and in situ crystallization. Granular aggregates of neocrystallized zircon form a cluster of ten U-Pb ages that yield a “Concordia” age of 247.8 ± 3.8 Ma. The possibility of Pb loss from this population suggests that this is a minimum age for the impact event. The best evidence for the age of the impact comes from the U-Th-Pb dating of neocrystallized monazite and 40Ar/39Ar step heating of three separate populations of post-impact, inclusion-rich quartz grains that are derived from the infill of miarolitic cavities. The 206Pb/238U age of 254.5 ± 3.2 Ma (2σ error) and 208Pb/232Th age of 255.2 ± 4.8 Ma (2σ error) of monazite, together with the

  18. Does Timing of Colon Procedures Affect Outcomes in D-IBS Trials?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianmin; Sherrill, Beth; Hamm, Lynne A.; Mangel, Allen W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy is usually performed prior to enrollment into clinical trials of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Two main reasons are to rule out alternative diagnoses and to ensure that colitis is not present. However, the possible impact of a recent versus remote colon procedure on symptoms in IBS trials has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of timing of colon procedures on symptoms in IBS trials. Methods Post hoc analyses were conducted using placebo patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS in a phase 2 trial. Pain, frequency, consistency, and urgency were analyzed using repeated measures models during the first 7 days of treatment and over the entire 12-week treatment period. Results Fifty-two placebo patients were grouped by whether they had a colon exam performed between screening and randomization (Group 1) or had a normal colon procedure during the 3 years prior to screening for this trial (Group 2). Average screening symptom scores were comparable between the two groups. Evaluation of various symptoms showed that there were no consistent significant differences between the two groups in pain, frequency, consistency, or urgency. Conclusions After the required 3-day post-procedure recovery period, there was no evidence that colonoscopy timing affected subsequent IBS symptoms. PMID:27956995

  19. Mouth Rinsing with Maltodextrin Solutions Fails to Improve Time Trial Endurance Cycling Performance in Recreational Athletes.

    PubMed

    Kulaksız, Tuğba Nilay; Koşar, Şükran Nazan; Bulut, Suleyman; Güzel, Yasemin; Willems, Marcus Elisabeth Theodorus; Hazir, Tahir; Turnagöl, Hüseyin Hüsrev

    2016-05-09

    The carbohydrate (CHO) concentration of a mouth rinsing solution might influence the CHO sensing receptors in the mouth, with consequent activation of brain regions involved in reward, motivation and regulation of motor activity. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of maltodextrin mouth rinsing with different concentrations (3%, 6% and 12%) after an overnight fast on a 20 km cycling time trial performance. Nine recreationally active, healthy males (age: 24 ± 2 years; V ˙ O 2 m a x : 47 ± 5 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) participated in this study. A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized study was conducted. Participants mouth-rinsed every 2.5 km for 5 s. Maltodextrin mouth rinse with concentrations of 3%, 6% or 12% did not change time to complete the time trial and power output compared to placebo (p > 0.05). Time trial completion times were 40.2 ± 4.0, 40.1 ± 3.9, 40.1 ± 4.4, and 39.3 ± 4.2 min and power output 205 ± 22, 206 ± 25, 210 ± 24, and 205 ± 23 W for placebo, 3%, 6%, and 12% maltodextrin conditions, respectively. Heart rate, lactate, glucose, and rating of perceived exertion did not differ between trials (p > 0.05). In conclusion, mouth rinsing with different maltodextrin concentrations after an overnight fast did not affect the physiological responses and performance during a 20 km cycling time trial in recreationally active males.

  20. Flat and uphill climb time trial performance prediction in elite amateur cyclists.

    PubMed

    Antón, M M; Izquierdo, M; Ibáñez, J; Asiain, X; Mendiguchía, J; Gorostiaga, E M

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine physiological, anthropometric, biomechanical and hormonal variables related to road flat and uphill climb performance. Eighteen elite level amateur road cyclists (21.1 +/- 3.8 yrs), homogeneous with regard to time trial performance (coefficient of variation: 2.9-5.2 %), were measured for frontal area (FA), maximal strength, power, cross-sectional area of the quadriceps femoris muscle and basal serum concentrations of total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT) and cortisol (C). Maximal (W (max)) and submaximal workload were measured during a progressive discontinuous maximal cycling laboratory test, and two all-out time trial performance tests (duration range: 1049-1251 s) were also conducted outdoors on two separate days: a 14-km flat road (average gradient of 0.2 %) and a 6.7-km uphill climb (average gradient of 6 %). Significant negative correlations (p < 0.01-0.001) were observed between the individuals' 14-km flat time values and the individual values of W (max) (r = - 0.90) and FA (r = - 0.73). Regression analysis showed that the individual values of the 6.7-km uphill climb trial performance time correlated significantly (p < 0.05-0.001) with those of FT (r = - 0.75) and W (max) x kg (-1) (r = - 0.66). The present results suggest that flat time trial performance in highly elite amateur cyclists is mainly related to absolute maximal workload and anthropometric variables, whereas uphill climb time trial performance is associated with maximal workload normalized to body mass, as well as with an increased anabolic-androgenic activity.

  1. Mouth Rinsing with Maltodextrin Solutions Fails to Improve Time Trial Endurance Cycling Performance in Recreational Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Kulaksız, Tuğba Nilay; Koşar, Şükran Nazan; Bulut, Suleyman; Güzel, Yasemin; Willems, Marcus Elisabeth Theodorus; Hazir, Tahir; Turnagöl, Hüseyin Hüsrev

    2016-01-01

    The carbohydrate (CHO) concentration of a mouth rinsing solution might influence the CHO sensing receptors in the mouth, with consequent activation of brain regions involved in reward, motivation and regulation of motor activity. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of maltodextrin mouth rinsing with different concentrations (3%, 6% and 12%) after an overnight fast on a 20 km cycling time trial performance. Nine recreationally active, healthy males (age: 24 ± 2 years; V˙O2max: 47 ± 5 mL·kg−1·min−1) participated in this study. A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized study was conducted. Participants mouth-rinsed every 2.5 km for 5 s. Maltodextrin mouth rinse with concentrations of 3%, 6% or 12% did not change time to complete the time trial and power output compared to placebo (p > 0.05). Time trial completion times were 40.2 ± 4.0, 40.1 ± 3.9, 40.1 ± 4.4, and 39.3 ± 4.2 min and power output 205 ± 22, 206 ± 25, 210 ± 24, and 205 ± 23 W for placebo, 3%, 6%, and 12% maltodextrin conditions, respectively. Heart rate, lactate, glucose, and rating of perceived exertion did not differ between trials (p > 0.05). In conclusion, mouth rinsing with different maltodextrin concentrations after an overnight fast did not affect the physiological responses and performance during a 20 km cycling time trial in recreationally active males. PMID:27171108

  2. Effects of Time between Trials on Rats' and Pigeons' Choices with Probabilistic Delayed Reinforcers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, James E.; Biondi, Dawn R.

    2011-01-01

    Parallel experiments with rats and pigeons examined reasons for previous findings that in choices with probabilistic delayed reinforcers, rats' choices were affected by the time between trials whereas pigeons' choices were not. In both experiments, the animals chose between a standard alternative and an adjusting alternative. A choice of the…

  3. Syllable-Timed Speech Treatment for School-Age Children Who Stutter: A Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Cheryl; O'Brian, Sue; Harrison, Elisabeth; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Menzies, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This clinical trial determined the outcomes of a simple syllable-timed speech (STS) treatment for school-age children who stutter. Method: Participants were 10 children, ages 6-11 years, who stutter. Treatment involved training the children and their parents to use STS at near normal speech rates. The technique was practiced in the clinic…

  4. Single trial time-frequency domain analysis of error processing in post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Clemans, Zachary A; El-Baz, Ayman S; Hollifield, Michael; Sokhadze, Estate M

    2012-09-13

    Error processing studies in psychology and psychiatry are relatively common. Event-related potentials (ERPs) are often used as measures of error processing, two such response-locked ERPs being the error-related negativity (ERN) and the error-related positivity (Pe). The ERN and Pe occur following committed error in reaction time tasks as low frequency (4-8 Hz) electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations registered at the midline fronto-central sites. We created an alternative method for analyzing error processing using time-frequency analysis in the form of a wavelet transform. A study was conducted in which subjects with PTSD and healthy control completed a forced-choice task. Single trial EEG data from errors in the task were processed using a continuous wavelet transform. Coefficients from the transform that corresponded to the theta range were averaged to isolate a theta waveform in the time-frequency domain. Measures called the time-frequency ERN and Pe were obtained from these waveforms for five different channels and then averaged to obtain a single time-frequency ERN and Pe for each error trial. A comparison of the amplitude and latency for the time-frequency ERN and Pe between the PTSD and control group was performed. A significant group effect was found on the amplitude of both measures. These results indicate that the developed single trial time-frequency error analysis method is suitable for examining error processing in PTSD and possibly other psychiatric disorders.

  5. Time Regained: When People Stop a Physical Activity Program, How Does Their Time Use Change? A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gomersall, Sjaan; Maher, Carol; English, Coralie; Rowlands, Alex; Olds, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how previously inactive adults who had participated in a structured, partly supervised 6-week exercise program restructured their time budgets when the program ended. Using a randomised controlled trial design, 129 previously inactive adults were recruited and randomly allocated to one of three groups: a Moderate or Extensive six-week physical activity intervention (150 and 300 additional minutes of exercise per week, respectively) or a Control group. Additional physical activity was accumulated through both group and individual exercise sessions with a wide range of activities. Use of time and time spent in energy expenditure zones was measured using a computerised 24-h self-report recall instrument, the Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adults, and accelerometry at baseline, mid- and end-program and at 3- and 6-months follow up. At final follow up, all significant changes in time use domains had returned to within 20 minutes of baseline levels (Physical Activity 1-2 min/d, Active Transport 3-9 min/d, Self-Care 0-2 min/d, Television/Videogames 13-18 min/d in the Moderate and Extensive group, relative to Controls, respectively, p>0.05). Similarly, all significant changes in time spent in the moderate energy expenditure zone had returned to within 1-3 min/d baseline levels (p>0.05), however time spent in vigorous physical activity according to accelerometry estimates remained elevated, although the changes were small in magnitude (1 min/d in the Moderate and Extensive groups, relative to Controls, p=0.01). The results of this study demonstrate strong recidivist patterns in physical activity, but also in other aspects of time use. In designing and determining the effectiveness of exercise interventions, future studies would benefit from considering the whole profile of time use, rather than focusing on individual activities. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000248066 PMID

  6. Time to publication for publicly funded clinical trials in Australia: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Linn Beate; Clarke, Philip; Graves, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine the length of time between receiving funding and publishing the protocol and main paper for randomised controlled trials. Design An observational study using survival analysis. Setting Publicly funded health and medical research in Australia. Participants Randomised controlled trials funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia between 2008 and 2010. Main outcome measures Time from funding to the protocol paper and main results paper. Multiple variable survival models examining whether study characteristics predicted publication times. Results We found 77 studies with a total funding of $A59 million. The median time to publication of the protocol paper was 6.4 years after funding (95% CI 4.1 to 8.1). The proportion with a published protocol paper 8 years after funding was 0.61 (95% CI 0.48 to 0.74). The median time to publication of the main results paper was 7.1 years after funding (95% CI 6.3 to 7.6). The proportion with a published main results paper 8 years after funding was 0.72 (95% CI 0.56 to 0.87). The HRs for how study characteristics might influence timing were generally close to one with narrow CIs, the notable exception was that a longer study length lengthened the time to the main paper (HR=0.62 per extra study year, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.89). Conclusions Despite the widespread registration of clinical trials, there remain serious concerns of trial results not being published or being published with a long delay. We have found that these same concerns apply to protocol papers, which should be publishable soon after funding. Funding agencies could set a target of publishing the protocol paper within 18 months of funding. PMID:28336734

  7. Physiological and Anthropometrical Predictors of 15-Kilometer Time Trial Cycling Performance Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Frank R.; Manfredi, Thomas G.

    1987-01-01

    A study assessing the relationship between physiological and anthropometrical variables and cycling performance time found that anaerobic threshhold and body circumference ratio correlated highly with cycling performance time. (Author/CB)

  8. Carbohydrate-electrolyte feedings improve 1 h time trial cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Jeukendrup, A; Brouns, F; Wagenmakers, A J; Saris, W H

    1997-02-01

    Carbohydrate-electrolyte (CE) feedings have been shown to improve endurance performance at moderate intensities (60-75% VO2max) and or more than 2 h duration. The effects of CE feedings during high intensity exercise (i.e. > or = 80% VO2 max) of shorter duration (approximately 1 h) are less clear. Therefore the purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of the ingestion of a 7.6% CE solution during exercise on time trial cycling performance of approximately 1 h. This type of performance testing has been shown to be more reproducible (coefficient of variation 3.35%) than the traditional exercise test to exhaustion. On two occasions and in random order nineteen endurance trained cyclists completed an exercise test requiring the accomplishment of a set amount of work as fast as possible (time trial) under strictly standardized conditions. As the start and during the trials they drank in total 14 ml/kg of either a 7.6% CE solution or artificially flavored and colored water (placebo). Time to complete the set amount of work was significantly reduced and thus performance was significantly increase (p < 0.001) with the CE drink by 2.3%. Time to complete the set amount of work was 58.74 +/- 0.52 min with CE and 60.15 +/- 0.65 min with placebo (p < 0.001). Average workload during the time trials was 297.5 +/- 1.4W and 291.0 +/- 10.3 W, respectively. Subjects exercised at 76.4 +/- 0.7% of their maximal work rate (Wmax) with CE and at 74.8% Wmax with placebo (p < 0.001). It was concluded tht also in relative short term (1h) high intensity (75% Wmax) cycling exercise ingestion of a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution compared to placebo improves performance.

  9. Between-Trial Forgetting Due to Interference and Time in Motor Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungshin; Oh, Youngmin; Schweighofer, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Learning a motor task with temporally spaced presentations or with other tasks intermixed between presentations reduces performance during training, but can enhance retention post training. These two effects are known as the spacing and contextual interference effect, respectively. Here, we aimed at testing a unifying hypothesis of the spacing and contextual interference effects in visuomotor adaptation, according to which forgetting between trials due to either spaced presentations or interference by another task will promote between-trial forgetting, which will depress performance during acquisition, but will promote retention. We first performed an experiment with three visuomotor adaptation conditions: a short inter-trial-interval (ITI) condition (SHORT-ITI); a long ITI condition (LONG-ITI); and an alternating condition with two alternated opposite tasks (ALT), with the same single-task ITI as in LONG-ITI. In the SHORT-ITI condition, there was fastest increase in performance during training and largest immediate forgetting in the retention tests. In contrast, in the ALT condition, there was slowest increase in performance during training and little immediate forgetting in the retention tests. Compared to these two conditions, in the LONG-ITI, we found intermediate increase in performance during training and intermediate immediate forgetting. To account for these results, we fitted to the data six possible adaptation models with one or two time scales, and with interference in the fast, or in the slow, or in both time scales. Model comparison confirmed that two time scales and some degree of interferences in either time scale are needed to account for our experimental results. In summary, our results suggest that retention following adaptation is modulated by the degree of between-trial forgetting, which is due to time-based decay in single adaptation task and interferences in multiple adaptation tasks.

  10. Optimal design of clinical trials with biologics using dose-time-response models.

    PubMed

    Lange, Markus R; Schmidli, Heinz

    2014-12-30

    Biologics, in particular monoclonal antibodies, are important therapies in serious diseases such as cancer, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, or rheumatoid arthritis. While most conventional drugs are given daily, the effect of monoclonal antibodies often lasts for months, and hence, these biologics require less frequent dosing. A good understanding of the time-changing effect of the biologic for different doses is needed to determine both an adequate dose and an appropriate time-interval between doses. Clinical trials provide data to estimate the dose-time-response relationship with semi-mechanistic nonlinear regression models. We investigate how to best choose the doses and corresponding sample size allocations in such clinical trials, so that the nonlinear dose-time-response model can be precisely estimated. We consider both local and conservative Bayesian D-optimality criteria for the design of clinical trials with biologics. For determining the optimal designs, computer-intensive numerical methods are needed, and we focus here on the particle swarm optimization algorithm. This metaheuristic optimizer has been successfully used in various areas but has only recently been applied in the optimal design context. The equivalence theorem is used to verify the optimality of the designs. The methodology is illustrated based on results from a clinical study in patients with gout, treated by a monoclonal antibody.

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Per-Protocol Time-to-Event Treatment Efficacy in Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Peter B.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Hudgens, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Assessing per-protocol treatment effcacy on a time-to-event endpoint is a common objective of randomized clinical trials. The typical analysis uses the same method employed for the intention-to-treat analysis (e.g., standard survival analysis) applied to the subgroup meeting protocol adherence criteria. However, due to potential post-randomization selection bias, this analysis may mislead about treatment efficacy. Moreover, while there is extensive literature on methods for assessing causal treatment effects in compliers, these methods do not apply to a common class of trials where a) the primary objective compares survival curves, b) it is inconceivable to assign participants to be adherent and event-free before adherence is measured, and c) the exclusion restriction assumption fails to hold. HIV vaccine efficacy trials including the recent RV144 trial exemplify this class, because many primary endpoints (e.g., HIV infections) occur before adherence is measured, and nonadherent subjects who receive some of the planned immunizations may be partially protected. Therefore, we develop methods for assessing per-protocol treatment efficacy for this problem class, considering three causal estimands of interest. Because these estimands are not identifiable from the observable data, we develop nonparametric bounds and semiparametric sensitivity analysis methods that yield estimated ignorance and uncertainty intervals. The methods are applied to RV144. PMID:24187408

  12. Analysis of Time to Event Outcomes in Randomized Controlled Trials by Generalized Additive Models

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Unruh, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Randomized Controlled Trials almost invariably utilize the hazard ratio calculated with a Cox proportional hazard model as a treatment efficacy measure. Despite the widespread adoption of HRs, these provide a limited understanding of the treatment effect and may even provide a biased estimate when the assumption of proportional hazards in the Cox model is not verified by the trial data. Additional treatment effect measures on the survival probability or the time scale may be used to supplement HRs but a framework for the simultaneous generation of these measures is lacking. Methods By splitting follow-up time at the nodes of a Gauss Lobatto numerical quadrature rule, techniques for Poisson Generalized Additive Models (PGAM) can be adopted for flexible hazard modeling. Straightforward simulation post-estimation transforms PGAM estimates for the log hazard into estimates of the survival function. These in turn were used to calculate relative and absolute risks or even differences in restricted mean survival time between treatment arms. We illustrate our approach with extensive simulations and in two trials: IPASS (in which the proportionality of hazards was violated) and HEMO a long duration study conducted under evolving standards of care on a heterogeneous patient population. Findings PGAM can generate estimates of the survival function and the hazard ratio that are essentially identical to those obtained by Kaplan Meier curve analysis and the Cox model. PGAMs can simultaneously provide multiple measures of treatment efficacy after a single data pass. Furthermore, supported unadjusted (overall treatment effect) but also subgroup and adjusted analyses, while incorporating multiple time scales and accounting for non-proportional hazards in survival data. Conclusions By augmenting the HR conventionally reported, PGAMs have the potential to support the inferential goals of multiple stakeholders involved in the evaluation and appraisal of clinical trial

  13. The Role of Time-Limited Trials in Dialysis Decision Making in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Jennifer S; Holley, Jean L

    2016-02-05

    Technologic advances, such as continuous RRT, provide lifesaving therapy for many patients. AKI in the critically ill patient, a fatal diagnosis in the past, is now often a survivable condition. Dialysis decision making for the critically ill patient with AKI is complex. What was once a question solely of survival now is nuanced by an individual's definition of quality of life, personal values, and short- and long-term prognoses. Clinical evaluation of AKI in the critically ill is multifaceted. Treatment decision making requires consideration of the natural evolution of the patient's AKI within the context of the global prognosis. Situations are often marked by prognostic uncertainty and clinical unknowns. In the face of these uncertainties, establishment of patient-directed therapies is imperative. A time-limited trial of continuous RRT in this setting is often appropriate but difficult to execute. Using patient preferences as a clinical guide, a proper time-limited trial requires assessment of prognosis, elicitation of patient values, strong communication skills, clear documentation, and often, appropriate integration of palliative care services. A well conducted time-limited trial can avoid interprofessional conflict and provide support for the patient, family, and staff.

  14. Carbohydrate Mouth Rinsing Enhances High Intensity Time Trial Performance Following Prolonged Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Luden, Nicholas D.; Saunders, Michael J.; D’Lugos, Andrew C.; Pataky, Mark W.; Baur, Daniel A.; Vining, Caitlin B.; Schroer, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    There is good evidence that mouth rinsing with carbohydrate (CHO) solutions can enhance endurance performance (≥30 min). The impact of a CHO mouth rinse on sprint performance has been less consistent, suggesting that CHO may confer benefits in conditions of ‘metabolic strain’. To test this hypothesis, the current study examined the impact of late-exercise mouth rinsing on sprint performance. Secondly, we investigated the effects of a protein mouth rinse (PRO) on performance. Eight trained male cyclists participated in three trials consisting of 120 min of constant-load cycling (55% Wmax) followed by a 30 km computer-simulated time trial, during which only water was provided. Following 15 min of muscle function assessment, 10 min of constant-load cycling (3 min at 35% Wmax, 7 min at 55% Wmax) was performed. This was immediately followed by a 2 km time trial. Subjects rinsed with 25 mL of CHO, PRO, or placebo (PLA) at min 5:00 and 14:30 of the 15 min muscle function phase, and min 8:00 of the 10-min constant-load cycling. Magnitude-based inferential statistics were used to analyze the effects of the mouth rinse on 2-km time trial performance and the following physiological parameters: Maximum Voluntary Contract (MVC), Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE), Heart Rate (HR), and blood glucose levels. The primary finding was that CHO ‘likely’ enhanced performance vs. PLA (3.8%), whereas differences between PRO and PLA were unclear (0.4%). These data demonstrate that late-race performance is enhanced by a CHO rinse, but not PRO, under challenging metabolic conditions. More data should be acquired before this strategy is recommended for the later stages of cycling competition under more practical conditions, such as when carbohydrates are supplemented throughout the preceding minutes/hours of exercise. PMID:27657117

  15. Carbohydrate Mouth Rinsing Enhances High Intensity Time Trial Performance Following Prolonged Cycling.

    PubMed

    Luden, Nicholas D; Saunders, Michael J; D'Lugos, Andrew C; Pataky, Mark W; Baur, Daniel A; Vining, Caitlin B; Schroer, Adam B

    2016-09-20

    There is good evidence that mouth rinsing with carbohydrate (CHO) solutions can enhance endurance performance (≥30 min). The impact of a CHO mouth rinse on sprint performance has been less consistent, suggesting that CHO may confer benefits in conditions of 'metabolic strain'. To test this hypothesis, the current study examined the impact of late-exercise mouth rinsing on sprint performance. Secondly, we investigated the effects of a protein mouth rinse (PRO) on performance. Eight trained male cyclists participated in three trials consisting of 120 min of constant-load cycling (55% Wmax) followed by a 30 km computer-simulated time trial, during which only water was provided. Following 15 min of muscle function assessment, 10 min of constant-load cycling (3 min at 35% Wmax, 7 min at 55% Wmax) was performed. This was immediately followed by a 2 km time trial. Subjects rinsed with 25 mL of CHO, PRO, or placebo (PLA) at min 5:00 and 14:30 of the 15 min muscle function phase, and min 8:00 of the 10-min constant-load cycling. Magnitude-based inferential statistics were used to analyze the effects of the mouth rinse on 2-km time trial performance and the following physiological parameters: Maximum Voluntary Contract (MVC), Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE), Heart Rate (HR), and blood glucose levels. The primary finding was that CHO 'likely' enhanced performance vs. PLA (3.8%), whereas differences between PRO and PLA were unclear (0.4%). These data demonstrate that late-race performance is enhanced by a CHO rinse, but not PRO, under challenging metabolic conditions. More data should be acquired before this strategy is recommended for the later stages of cycling competition under more practical conditions, such as when carbohydrates are supplemented throughout the preceding minutes/hours of exercise.

  16. A causal model for longitudinal randomised trials with time-dependent non-compliance.

    PubMed

    Becque, Taeko; White, Ian R; Haggard, Mark

    2015-05-30

    In the presence of non-compliance, conventional analysis by intention-to-treat provides an unbiased comparison of treatment policies but typically under-estimates treatment efficacy. With all-or-nothing compliance, efficacy may be specified as the complier-average causal effect (CACE), where compliers are those who receive intervention if and only if randomised to it. We extend the CACE approach to model longitudinal data with time-dependent non-compliance, focusing on the situation in which those randomised to control may receive treatment and allowing treatment effects to vary arbitrarily over time. Defining compliance type to be the time of surgical intervention if randomised to control, so that compliers are patients who would not have received treatment at all if they had been randomised to control, we construct a causal model for the multivariate outcome conditional on compliance type and randomised arm. This model is applied to the trial of alternative regimens for glue ear treatment evaluating surgical interventions in childhood ear disease, where outcomes are measured over five time points, and receipt of surgical intervention in the control arm may occur at any time. We fit the models using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to obtain estimates of the CACE at successive times after receiving the intervention. In this trial, over a half of those randomised to control eventually receive intervention. We find that surgery is more beneficial than control at 6months, with a small but non-significant beneficial effect at 12months.

  17. The Effects of Caffeinated “Energy Shots” on Time Trial Performance

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Matthew Mark; Astorino, Todd Anthony; Azevedo, John Leal

    2013-01-01

    An emerging trend in sports nutrition is the consumption of energy drinks and “energy shots”. Energy shots may prove to be a viable pre-competition supplement for runners. Six male runners (mean ± SD age and VO2max: 22.5 ± 1.8 years and 69.1 ± 5.7 mL·kg−1·min−1) completed three trials [placebo (PLA; 0 mg caffeine), Guayakí Yerba Maté Organic Energy Shot™ (YM; 140 mg caffeine), or Red Bull Energy Shot™ (RB; 80 mg caffeine)]. Treatments were ingested following a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover design. Participants ran a five kilometer time trial on a treadmill. No differences (p > 0.05) in performance were detected with RB (17.55 ± 1.01 min) or YM ingestion (17.86 ± 1.59 min) compared to placebo (17.44 ± 1.25 min). Overall, energy shot ingestion did not improve time-trial running performance in trained runners. PMID:23743969

  18. Smartphone Mobile Application Delivering Personalized, Real-Time Sun Protection Advice: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Buller, David B.; Berwick, Marianne; Lantz, Kathy; Buller, Mary Klein; Shane, James; Kane, Ilima; Liu, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Importance Mobile smart phones are rapidly emerging as an effective means of communicating with many Americans. Using mobile applications, they can access remote databases, track time and location, and integrate user input to provide tailored health information. Objective A smart phone mobile application providing personalized, real-time sun protection advice was evaluated in a randomized trial. Design The trial was conducted in 2012 and had a randomized pretest-posttest controlled design with a 10-week follow-up. Setting Data was collected from a nationwide population-based survey panel. Participants The trial enrolled a sample of n=604 non-Hispanic and Hispanic adults from the Knowledge Panel® aged 18 or older who owned an Android smart phone. Intervention The mobile application provided advice on sun protection (i.e., protection practices and risk of sunburn) and alerts (to apply/reapply sunscreen and get out of the sun), hourly UV Index, and vitamin D production based on the forecast UV Index, phone's time and location, and user input. Main Outcomes and Measures Percent of days using sun protection and time spent outdoors (days and minutes) in the midday sun and number of sunburns in the past 3 months were collected. Results Individuals in the treatment group reported more shade use but less sunscreen use than controls. Those who used the mobile app reported spending less time in the sun and using all protection behaviors combined more. Conclusions and Relevance The mobile application improved some sun protection. Use of the mobile application was lower than expected but associated with increased sun protection. Providing personalized advice when and where people are in the sun may help reduce sun exposure. PMID:25629710

  19. The timing of exploratory decision-making revealed by single-trial topographic EEGanalyses.

    PubMed

    Tzovara, Athina; Murray, Micah M; Bourdaud, Nicolas; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Millán, José del R; De Lucia, Marzia

    2012-05-01

    Decision-making in an uncertain environment is driven by two major needs: exploring the environment to gather information or exploiting acquired knowledge to maximize reward. The neural processes underlying exploratory decision-making have been mainly studied by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging, overlooking any information about the time when decisions are made. Here, we carried out an electroencephalography (EEG) experiment, in order to detect the time when the brain generators responsible for these decisions have been sufficiently activated to lead to the next decision. Our analyses, based on a classification scheme, extract time-unlocked voltage topographies during reward presentation and use them to predict the type of decisions made on the subsequent trial. Classification accuracy, measured as the area under the Receiver Operator's Characteristic curve was on average 0.65 across 7 subjects. Classification accuracy was above chance levels already after 516 ms on average, across subjects. We speculate that decisions were already made before this critical period, as confirmed by a positive correlation with reaction times across subjects. On an individual subject basis, distributed source estimations were performed on the extracted topographies to statistically evaluate the neural correlates of decision-making. For trials leading to exploration, there was significantly higher activity in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the right supramarginal gyrus; areas responsible for modulating behavior under risk and deduction. No area was more active during exploitation. We show for the first time the temporal evolution of differential patterns of brain activation in an exploratory decision-making task on a single-trial basis.

  20. Participatory Workplace Interventions Can Reduce Sedentary Time for Office Workers—A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Sharon; Straker, Leon; Gilson, Nicholas D.; Smith, Anne J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Occupational sedentary behaviour is an important contributor to overall sedentary risk. There is limited evidence for effective workplace interventions to reduce occupational sedentary time and increase light activity during work hours. The purpose of the study was to determine if participatory workplace interventions could reduce total sedentary time, sustained sedentary time (bouts >30 minutes), increase the frequency of breaks in sedentary time and promote light intensity activity and moderate/vigorous activity (MVPA) during work hours. Methods A randomised controlled trial (ANZCTR number: ACTN12612000743864) was conducted using clerical, call centre and data processing workers (n = 62, aged 25–59 years) in 3 large government organisations in Perth, Australia. Three groups developed interventions with a participatory approach: ‘Active office’ (n = 19), ‘Active Workstation’ and promotion of incidental office activity; ‘Traditional physical activity’ (n = 14), pedometer challenge to increase activity between productive work time and ‘Office ergonomics’ (n = 29), computer workstation design and breaking up computer tasks. Accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X, 7 days) determined sedentary time, sustained sedentary time, breaks in sedentary time, light intensity activity and MVPA on work days and during work hours were measured before and following a 12 week intervention period. Results For all participants there was a significant reduction in sedentary time on work days (−1.6%, p = 0.006) and during work hours (−1.7%, p = 0.014) and a significant increase in number of breaks/sedentary hour on work days (0.64, p = 0.005) and during work hours (0.72, p = 0.015); there was a concurrent significant increase in light activity during work hours (1.5%, p = 0.012) and MVPA on work days (0.6%, p = 0.012). Conclusions This study explored novel ways to modify work practices to reduce occupational sedentary

  1. Single-trial prediction of reaction time variability from MEG brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Ohata, Ryu; Ogawa, Kenji; Imamizu, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Neural activity prior to movement onset contains essential information for predictive assistance for humans using brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs). Even though previous studies successfully predicted different goals for upcoming movements, it is unclear whether non-invasive recording signals contain the information to predict trial-by-trial behavioral variability under the same movement. In this paper, we examined the predictability of subsequent short or long reaction times (RTs) from magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in a delayed-reach task. The difference in RTs was classified significantly above chance from 550 ms before the go-signal onset using the cortical currents in the premotor cortex. Significantly above-chance classification was performed in the lateral prefrontal and the right inferior parietal cortices at the late stage of the delay period. Thus, inter-trial variability in RTs is predictable information. Our study provides a proof-of-concept of the future development of non-invasive BMIs to prevent delayed movements. PMID:27250872

  2. Analysis of clinical trials with biologics using dose-time-response models.

    PubMed

    Lange, Markus R; Schmidli, Heinz

    2015-09-30

    Biologics such as monoclonal antibodies are increasingly and successfully used for the treatment of many chronic diseases. Unlike conventional small drug molecules, which are commonly given as tablets once daily, biologics are typically injected at much longer time intervals, that is, weeks or months. Hence, both the dose and the time interval have to be optimized during the drug development process for biologics. To identify an adequate regimen for the investigated biologic, the dose-time-response relationship must be well characterized, based on clinical trial data. The proposed approach uses semi-mechanistic nonlinear regression models to describe and predict the time-changing response for complex dosing regimens. Both likelihood-based and Bayesian methods for inference and prediction are discussed. The methodology is illustrated with data from a clinical study in an auto-immune disease.

  3. Single-trial time-frequency analysis of electrocortical signals: baseline correction and beyond.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Xiao, P; Zhang, Z G; Mouraux, A; Iannetti, G D

    2014-01-01

    Event-related desynchronization (ERD) and synchronization (ERS) of electrocortical signals (e.g., electroencephalogram [EEG] and magnetoencephalogram) reflect important aspects of sensory, motor, and cognitive cortical processing. The detection of ERD and ERS relies on time-frequency decomposition of single-trial electrocortical signals, to identify significant stimulus-induced changes in power within specific frequency bands. Typically, these changes are quantified by expressing post-stimulus EEG power as a percentage of change relative to pre-stimulus EEG power. However, expressing post-stimulus EEG power relative to pre-stimulus EEG power entails two important and surprisingly neglected issues. First, it can introduce a significant bias in the estimation of ERD/ERS magnitude. Second, it confuses the contribution of pre- and post-stimulus EEG power. Taking the human electrocortical responses elicited by transient nociceptive stimuli as an example, we demonstrate that expressing ERD/ERS as the average percentage of change calculated at single-trial level introduces a positive bias, resulting in an overestimation of ERS and an underestimation of ERD. This bias can be avoided using a single-trial baseline subtraction approach. Furthermore, given that the variability in ERD/ERS is not only dependent on the variability in post-stimulus power but also on the variability in pre-stimulus power, an estimation of the respective contribution of pre- and post-stimulus EEG variability is needed. This can be achieved using a multivariate linear regression (MVLR) model, which could be optimally estimated using partial least square (PLS) regression, to dissect and quantify the relationship between behavioral variables and pre- and post-stimulus EEG activities. In summary, combining single-trial baseline subtraction approach with PLS regression can be used to achieve a correct detection and quantification of ERD/ERS.

  4. Effects of dietary nitrate, caffeine, and their combination on 20-km cycling time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Glaister, Mark; Pattison, John R; Muniz-Pumares, Daniel; Patterson, Stephen D; Foley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the acute supplementation effects of dietary nitrate, caffeine, and their combination on 20-km cycling time trial performance. Using a randomized, counterbalanced, double-blind Latin-square design, 14 competitive female cyclists (age: 31 ± 7 years; height: 1.69 ± 0.07 m; body mass: 61.6 ± 6.0 kg) completed four 20-km time trials on a racing bicycle fitted to a turbo trainer. Approximately 2.5 hours before each trial, subjects consumed a 70-ml dose of concentrated beetroot juice containing either 0.45 g of dietary nitrate or with the nitrate content removed (placebo). One hour before each trial, subjects consumed a capsule containing either 5 mg·kg of caffeine or maltodextrin (placebo). There was a significant effect of supplementation on power output (p = 0.001), with post hoc tests revealing higher power outputs in caffeine (205 ± 21 W) vs. nitrate (194 ± 22 W) and placebo (194 ± 25 W) trials only. Caffeine-induced improvements in power output corresponded with significantly higher measures of heart rate (caffeine: 166 ± 12 b·min vs. placebo: 159 ± 15 b·min; p = 0.02), blood lactate (caffeine: 6.54 ± 2.40 mmol·L vs. placebo: 4.50 ± 2.11 mmol·L; p < 0.001), and respiratory exchange ratio (caffeine: 0.95 ± 0.04 vs. placebo: 0.91 ± 0.05; p = 0.03). There were no effects (p ≥ 0.05) of supplementation on cycling cadence, rating of perceived exertion, (Equation is included in full-text article.), or integrated electromyographic activity. The results of this study support the well-established beneficial effects of caffeine supplementation on endurance performance. In contrast, acute supplementation with dietary nitrate seems to have no effect on endurance performance and adds nothing to the benefits afforded by caffeine supplementation.

  5. Practical neck cooling and time-trial running performance in a hot environment.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Christopher James; Wild, Perry; Sunderland, Caroline

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this two-part experiment was to investigate the effect of cooling the neck on time-trial performance in hot conditions (~30°C; 50% RH). In Study A, nine participants completed a 75-min submaximal (~60% V(O₂(max)) pre-load phase followed by a 15-min self-paced time-trial (TT) on three occasions: one with a cooling collar (CC(90)), one without a collar (NC(90)) and one with the collar uncooled (C(90)). In Study B, eight participants completed a 15-min TT twice: once with (CC(15)) and once without (NC(15)) a cooling collar. Time-trial performance was significantly improved in Study A in CC(90) (3,030 ± 485 m) compared to C(90) (2,741 ± 537 m; P = 0.008) and NC(90) (2,884 ± 571 m; P = 0.041). Fifteen-minute TT performance was unaffected by the collar in Study B (CC(15) = 3,239 ± 267 m; NC(15) = 3,180 ± 271 m; P = 0.351). The collar had no effect on rectal temperature, heart rate or RPE. There was no effect of cooling the neck on S100β, cortisol, prolactin, adrenaline, noradrenaline or dopamine concentrations in Study A. Cooling the neck via a cooling collar can improve exercise performance in a hot environment but it appears that there may be a thermal strain threshold which must be breached to gain a performance benefit from the collar.

  6. The effects of Red Bull energy drink compared with caffeine on cycling time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, Alannah; Irwin, Christopher; Grant, Gary D; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Sheilandra; Skinner, Tina; Leveritt, Michael; Desbrow, Ben

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the ergogenic effects of a commercial energy drink (Red Bull) or an equivalent dose of anhydrous caffeine in comparison with a noncaffeinated control beverage on cycling performance. Eleven trained male cyclists (31.7 ± 5.9 y 82.3 ± 6.1 kg, VO2max = 60.3 ± 7.8 mL · kg-1 · min-1) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover-design study involving 3 experimental conditions. Participants were randomly administered Red Bull (9.4 mL/kg body mass [BM] containing 3 mg/kg BM caffeine), anhydrous caffeine (3 mg/kg BM given in capsule form), or a placebo 90 min before commencing a time trial equivalent to 1 h cycling at 75% peak power output. Carbohydrate and fluid volumes were matched across all trials. Performance improved by 109 ± 153 s (2.8%, P = .039) after Red Bull compared with placebo and by 120 ± 172 s (3.1%, P = .043) after caffeine compared with placebo. No significant difference (P > .05) in performance time was detected between Red Bull and caffeine treatments. There was no significant difference (P > .05) in mean heart rate or rating of perceived exertion among the 3 treatments. This study demonstrated that a moderate dose of caffeine consumed as either Red Bull or in anhydrous form enhanced cycling time-trial performance. The ergogenic benefits of Red Bull energy drink are therefore most likely due to the effects of caffeine, with the other ingredients not likely to offer additional benefit.

  7. Operating Room Time Savings with the Use of Splint Packs: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Tyler A.; Bluman, Eric M.; Palms, David; Smith, Jeremy T.; Chiodo, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The most expensive variable in the operating room (OR) is time. Lean Process Management is being used in the medical field to improve efficiency in the OR. Streamlining individual processes within the OR is crucial to a comprehensive time saving and cost-cutting health care strategy. At our institution, one hour of OR time costs approximately $500, exclusive of supply and personnel costs. Commercially prepared splint packs (SP) contain all components necessary for plaster-of-Paris short-leg splint application and have the potential to decrease splint application time and overall costs by making it a more lean process. We conducted a randomized controlled trial comparing OR time savings between SP use and bulk supply (BS) splint application. Methods: Fifty consecutive adult operative patients on whom post-operative short-leg splint immobilization was indicated were randomized to either a control group using BS or an experimental group using SP. One orthopaedic surgeon (EMB) prepared and applied all of the splints in a standardized fashion. Retrieval time, preparation time, splint application time, and total splinting time for both groups were measured and statistically analyzed. Results: The retrieval time, preparation time and total splinting time were significantly less (p<0.001) in the SP group compared with the BS group. There was no significant difference in application time between the SP group and BS group. Conclusion: The use of SP made the process of splinting more lean. This has resulted in an average of 2 minutes 52 seconds saved in total splinting time compared to BS, making it an effective cost-cutting and time saving technique. For high volume ORs, use of splint packs may contribute to substantial time and cost savings without impacting patient safety. PMID:26894212

  8. The effect of music on 10-km cycle time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Jana; Foster, Carl; Rodríguez-Marroyo, Jose; de Koning, Jos J; Mikat, Richard P; Hendrix, Charles R; Porcari, John P

    2013-01-01

    Music is widely used as an ergogenic aid in sport, but there is little evidence of its effectiveness during closed-loop athletic events. In order to determine the effectiveness of music as an ergogenic aid, well-trained and task-habituated cyclists performed 10-km cycle time trials either while listening to self-selected motivational music or with auditory input blocked. There were no statistically significant differences in performance time or physiological or psychological markers related to music (time-trial duration17.75 ± 2.10 vs 17.81 ± 2.06 min, mean power output 222 ± 66 vs 220 ± 65 W, peak heart rate184 ± 9 vs 183 ± 8 beats/min, peak blood lactate12.1 ± 2.6 vs 11.9 ± 2.1 mmol/L, and final rating of perceived exertion 8.4 ± 1.5 vs 8.5 ± 1.6). It is concluded that during exercise at competitive intensity, there is no meaningful effect of music on either performance or physiology.

  9. The effects of the Bowen technique on hamstring flexibility over time: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Marr, Michelle; Baker, Julian; Lambon, Nicky; Perry, Jo

    2011-07-01

    The hamstring muscles are regularly implicated in recurrent injuries, movement dysfunction and low back pain. Links between limited flexibility and development of neuromusculoskeletal symptoms are frequently reported. The Bowen Technique is used to treat many conditions including lack of flexibility. The study set out to investigate the effect of the Bowen Technique on hamstring flexibility over time. An assessor-blind, prospective, randomised controlled trial was performed on 120 asymptomatic volunteers. Participants were randomly allocated into a control group or Bowen group. Three flexibility measurements occurred over one week, using an active knee extension test. The intervention group received a single Bowen treatment. A repeated measures univariate analysis of variance, across both groups for the three time periods, revealed significant within-subject and between-subject differences for the Bowen group. Continuing increases in flexibility levels were observed over one week. No significant change over time was noted for the control group.

  10. Just-in-Time Information Improved Decision-Making in Primary Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Jessie; Hogg, William; Campbell, Craig; Rowan, Margo

    2008-01-01

    Background The “Just-in-time Information” (JIT) librarian consultation service was designed to provide rapid information to answer primary care clinical questions during patient hours. This study evaluated whether information provided by librarians to answer clinical questions positively impacted time, decision-making, cost savings and satisfaction. Methods and Finding A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted between October 2005 and April 2006. A total of 1,889 questions were sent to the service by 88 participants. The object of the randomization was a clinical question. Each participant had clinical questions randomly allocated to both intervention (librarian information) and control (no librarian information) groups. Participants were trained to send clinical questions via a hand-held device. The impact of the information provided by the service (or not provided by the service), additional resources and time required for both groups was assessed using a survey sent 24 hours after a question was submitted. The average time for JIT librarians to respond to all questions was 13.68 minutes/question (95% CI, 13.38 to 13.98). The average time for participants to respond their control questions was 20.29 minutes/question (95% CI, 18.72 to 21.86). Using an impact assessment scale rating cognitive impact, participants rated 62.9% of information provided to intervention group questions as having a highly positive cognitive impact. They rated 14.8% of their own answers to control question as having a highly positive cognitive impact, 44.9% has having a negative cognitive impact, and 24.8% with no cognitive impact at all. In an exit survey measuring satisfaction, 86% (62/72 responses) of participants scored the service as having a positive impact on care and 72% (52/72) indicated that they would use the service frequently if it were continued. Conclusions In this study, providing timely information to clinical questions had a highly positive impact on decision

  11. Modeling Population Spike Trains with Specified Time-Varying Spike Rates, Trial-to-Trial Variability, and Pairwise Signal and Noise Correlations.

    PubMed

    Lyamzin, Dmitry R; Macke, Jakob H; Lesica, Nicholas A

    2010-01-01

    As multi-electrode and imaging technology begin to provide us with simultaneous recordings of large neuronal populations, new methods for modeling such data must also be developed. Here, we present a model for the type of data commonly recorded in early sensory pathways: responses to repeated trials of a sensory stimulus in which each neuron has it own time-varying spike rate (as described by its PSTH) and the dependencies between cells are characterized by both signal and noise correlations. This model is an extension of previous attempts to model population spike trains designed to control only the total correlation between cells. In our model, the response of each cell is represented as a binary vector given by the dichotomized sum of a deterministic "signal" that is repeated on each trial and a Gaussian random "noise" that is different on each trial. This model allows the simulation of population spike trains with PSTHs, trial-to-trial variability, and pairwise correlations that match those measured experimentally. Furthermore, the model also allows the noise correlations in the spike trains to be manipulated independently of the signal correlations and single-cell properties. To demonstrate the utility of the model, we use it to simulate and manipulate experimental responses from the mammalian auditory and visual systems. We also present a general form of the model in which both the signal and noise are Gaussian random processes, allowing the mean spike rate, trial-to-trial variability, and pairwise signal and noise correlations to be specified independently. Together, these methods for modeling spike trains comprise a potentially powerful set of tools for both theorists and experimentalists studying population responses in sensory systems.

  12. Pancreatitis of biliary origin, optimal timing of cholecystectomy (PONCHO trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background After an initial attack of biliary pancreatitis, cholecystectomy minimizes the risk of recurrent biliary pancreatitis and other gallstone-related complications. Guidelines advocate performing cholecystectomy within 2 to 4 weeks after discharge for mild biliary pancreatitis. During this waiting period, the patient is at risk of recurrent biliary events. In current clinical practice, surgeons usually postpone cholecystectomy for 6 weeks due to a perceived risk of a more difficult dissection in the early days following pancreatitis and for logistical reasons. We hypothesize that early laparoscopic cholecystectomy minimizes the risk of recurrent biliary pancreatitis or other complications of gallstone disease in patients with mild biliary pancreatitis without increasing the difficulty of dissection and the surgical complication rate compared with interval laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods/Design PONCHO is a randomized controlled, parallel-group, assessor-blinded, superiority multicenter trial. Patients are randomly allocated to undergo early laparoscopic cholecystectomy, within 72 hours after randomization, or interval laparoscopic cholecystectomy, 25 to 30 days after randomization. During a 30-month period, 266 patients will be enrolled from 18 hospitals of the Dutch Pancreatitis Study Group. The primary endpoint is a composite endpoint of mortality and acute re-admissions for biliary events (that is, recurrent biliary pancreatitis, acute cholecystitis, symptomatic/obstructive choledocholithiasis requiring endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography including cholangitis (with/without endoscopic sphincterotomy), and uncomplicated biliary colics) occurring within 6 months following randomization. Secondary endpoints include the individual endpoints of the composite endpoint, surgical and other complications, technical difficulty of cholecystectomy and costs. Discussion The PONCHO trial is designed to show that early laparoscopic cholecystectomy

  13. Cognitive Function Over Time in the Alzheimer's Disease Anti-inflammatory Prevention Trial (ADAPT)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Observational studies have shown reduced risk of Alzheimer dementia in users of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Objective To evaluate the effects of naproxen sodium and celecoxib on cognitive function in older adults. Design Randomized, double-masked chemoprevention trial. Setting Six US memory clinics. Participants Men and women aged 70 years and older with a family history of Alzheimer disease; 2117 of 2528 enrolled had follow-up cognitive assessment. Interventions Celecoxib (200 mg twice daily), naproxen sodium (220 mg twice daily), or placebo, randomly allocated in a ratio of 1:1:1.5, respectively. Main Outcome Measures Seven tests of cognitive function and a global summary score measured annually. Results Longitudinal analyses showed lower global summary scores over time for naproxen compared with placebo (−0.05 SDs; P=.02) and lower scores on the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination over time for both treatment groups compared with placebo (−0.33 points for celecoxib [P=.04] and −0.36 points for naproxen [P=.02]). Restriction of analyses to measures collected from persons without dementia attenuated the treatment group differences. Analyses limited to measures obtained while participants were being issued study drugs produced results similar to the intention-to-treat analyses. Conclusions Use of naproxen or celecoxib did not improve cognitive function. There was weak evidence for a detrimental effect of naproxen. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00007189 PMID:18474729

  14. Oral contraceptive cycle phase does not affect 200-m swim time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Rechichi, Claire; Dawson, Brian

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether swimming performance was affected by acute hormonal fluctuation within a monophasic oral contraceptive (OC) cycle. Six competitive swimmers and water polo players completed a 200-m time trial at 3 time points of a single OC cycle: during the consumption phase (CONS), early (WITH1), and late in the withdrawal phase (WITH2). Split times and stroke rate were recorded during the time trial, and heart rate, blood lactate, glucose, and pH were measured after each performance test. Resting endogenous serum estradiol and progesterone concentrations were also assessed. No significant differences were observed between phases for body composition, 200-m swim time, mean stroke rate, peak heart rate, or blood glucose (p > 0.05). The mean peak blood lactate was significantly lower during WITH2 (9.9 ± 3.0 mmol·L(-1)) compared with that of CONS (12.5 ± 3.0 mmol·L(-1)) and mean pH higher during WITH2 (7.183 ± 0.111) compared with that of CONS (7.144 ± 0.092). Serum estradiol levels were significantly greater during WITH2 compared with that during WITH1 and CONS, but there was no difference in serum progesterone levels. These results demonstrate that for monophasic OC users, cycle phase does not impact the 200-m swimming performance. There was a reduction in blood lactate and an increase in pH during the withdrawal phase, possibly because of an increase in fluid retention, plasma volume, and cellular alkalosis. Therefore, female 200-m swimmers taking a monophasic OC need not be concerned by the phase of their cycle with regard to competition and optimizing performance. However, coaches and scientists should exercise caution when interpreting blood lactate results obtained from swimming tests and consider controlling for cycle phase for athletes taking an OC.

  15. Changes in running mechanics and spring-mass behaviour during a 5-km time trial.

    PubMed

    Girard, O; Millet, G P; Slawinski, J; Racinais, S; Micallef, J P

    2013-09-01

    Research into the biomechanical manifestation of fatigue during exhaustive runs is increasingly popular but additional understanding of the adaptation of the spring-mass behaviour during the course of strenuous, self-paced exercises continues to be a challenge in order to develop optimized training and injury prevention programs. This study investigated continuous changes in running mechanics and spring-mass behaviour during a 5-km run. 12 competitive triathletes performed a 5-km running time trial (mean performance: ̴17 min 30 s) on a 200 m indoor track. Vertical and anterior-posterior ground reaction forces were measured every 200 m by a 5-m long force platform system, and used to determine spring-mass model characteristics. After a fast start, running velocity progressively decreased (- 11.6%; P<0.001) in the middle part of the race before an end spurt in the final 400-600 m. Stride length (- 7.4%; P<0.001) and frequency (- 4.1%; P=0.001) decreased over the 25 laps, while contact time (+ 8.9%; P<0.001) and total stride duration (+ 4.1%; P<0.001) progressively lengthened. Peak vertical forces (- 2.0%; P<0.01) and leg compression (- 4.3%; P<0.05), but not centre of mass vertical displacement (+ 3.2%; P>0.05), decreased with time. As a result, vertical stiffness decreased (- 6.0%; P<0.001) during the run, whereas leg stiffness changes were not significant (+ 1.3%; P>0.05). Spring-mass behaviour progressively changes during a 5-km time trial towards deteriorated vertical stiffness, which alters impact and force production characteristics.

  16. Single and combined effects of beetroot juice and caffeine supplementation on cycling time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Lane, Stephen C; Hawley, John A; Desbrow, Ben; Jones, Andrew M; Blackwell, James R; Ross, Megan L; Zemski, Adam J; Burke, Louise M

    2014-09-01

    Both caffeine and beetroot juice have ergogenic effects on endurance cycling performance. We investigated whether there is an additive effect of these supplements on the performance of a cycling time trial (TT) simulating the 2012 London Olympic Games course. Twelve male and 12 female competitive cyclists each completed 4 experimental trials in a double-blind Latin square design. Trials were undertaken with a caffeinated gum (CAFF) (3 mg·kg(-1) body mass (BM), 40 min prior to the TT), concentrated beetroot juice supplementation (BJ) (8.4 mmol of nitrate (NO3(-)), 2 h prior to the TT), caffeine plus beetroot juice (CAFF+BJ), or a control (CONT). Subjects completed the TT (females: 29.35 km; males: 43.83 km) on a laboratory cycle ergometer under conditions of best practice nutrition: following a carbohydrate-rich pre-event meal, with the ingestion of a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink and regular oral carbohydrate contact during the TT. Compared with CONT, power output was significantly enhanced after CAFF+BJ and CAFF (3.0% and 3.9%, respectively, p < 0.01). There was no effect of BJ supplementation when used alone (-0.4%, p = 0.6 compared with CONT) or when combined with caffeine (-0.9%, p = 0.4 compared with CAFF). We conclude that caffeine (3 mg·kg(-1) BM) administered in the form of a caffeinated gum increased cycling TT performance lasting ∼50-60 min by ∼3%-4% in both males and females. Beetroot juice supplementation was not ergogenic under the conditions of this study.

  17. Scanning Lidar Measurements of the Full-Scale RDD Field Trial Puff Plumes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoying; Roy, Gilles

    2016-05-01

    A vertically scanning lidar (light/radar) was used to measure the time evolution of clouds generated by a small explosive device. Vertical sweeps were performed at a downwind distance of 105 m from the detonation. The measured quantity obtained from the lidar was the light extinction coefficient. This quantity is directly proportional to the aerosol concentration. The background aerosol value was set to 0.0001 m (-1) (assuming a visibility of 40 km), and assuming the scattering properties of the explosively generated cloud is the same as the background aerosol, the authors found that the instantaneous maximal local concentration of aerosol in the cloud did not exceed 500 times the background aerosol value, and the instantaneous concentration was typically less than five times the background aerosol value. In the two trials that were done, the volumes of the clouds were reasonably close at 2,700 m(3) and 4,000 m(3), respectively.

  18. On the estimation of intracluster correlation for time-to-event outcomes in cluster randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Sumeet; Klar, Neil; Donner, Allan

    2016-12-30

    Cluster randomized trials (CRTs) involve the random assignment of intact social units rather than independent subjects to intervention groups. Time-to-event outcomes often are endpoints in CRTs. Analyses of such data need to account for the correlation among cluster members. The intracluster correlation coefficient (ICC) is used to assess the similarity among binary and continuous outcomes that belong to the same cluster. However, estimating the ICC in CRTs with time-to-event outcomes is a challenge because of the presence of censored observations. The literature suggests that the ICC may be estimated using either censoring indicators or observed event times. A simulation study explores the effect of administrative censoring on estimating the ICC. Results show that ICC estimators derived from censoring indicators or observed event times are negatively biased. Analytic work further supports these results. Observed event times are preferred to estimate the ICC under minimum frequency of administrative censoring. To our knowledge, the existing literature provides no practical guidance on the estimation of ICC when substantial amount of administrative censoring is present. The results from this study corroborate the need for further methodological research on estimating the ICC for correlated time-to-event outcomes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Time-dependent changes in learning audiovisual associations: a single-trial fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, D; Shallice, T; Dolan, R

    2000-03-01

    Functional imaging studies of learning and memory have primarily focused on stimulus material presented within a single modality (see review by Gabrieli, 1998, Annu. Rev. Psychol. 49: 87-115). In the present study we investigated mechanisms for learning material presented in visual and auditory modalities, using single-trial functional magnetic resonance imaging. We evaluated time-dependent learning effects under two conditions involving presentation of consistent (repeatedly paired in the same combination) or inconsistent (items presented randomly paired) pairs. We also evaluated time-dependent changes for bimodal (auditory and visual) presentations relative to a condition in which auditory stimuli were repeatedly presented alone. Using a time by condition analysis to compare neural responses to consistent versus inconsistent audiovisual pairs, we found significant time-dependent learning effects in medial parietal and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortices. In contrast, time-dependent effects were seen in left angular gyrus, bilateral anterior cingulate gyrus, and occipital areas bilaterally. A comparison of paired (bimodal) versus unpaired (unimodal) conditions was associated with time-dependent changes in posterior hippocampal and superior frontal regions for both consistent and inconsistent pairs. The results provide evidence that associative learning for stimuli presented in different sensory modalities is supported by neural mechanisms similar to those described for other kinds of memory processes. The involvement of posterior hippocampus and superior frontal gyrus in bimodal learning for both consistent and inconsistent pairs supports a putative function for these regions in associative learning independent of sensory modality.

  20. Time-related trends in variability of cIMT changes in statin trials

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Michael H.; Tomassini, Joanne E.; Jensen, Erin; Neff, David; Polis, Adam B.; Tershakovec, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    This brief article provides complementary data supporting the results reported in “Changing Characteristics of Statin-related cIMT Trials from 1988 to 2006” [1]. That article described time-related trends in baseline factors and study characteristics that may have influenced the variability of carotid intima media thickness (cIMT) endpoints (mean of mean and maximum common carotid artery [CCA]/cIMT) in published statin trials. In this brief report, additional details for the studies included in the analysis, and further supporting data, including mean of the maximum CCA/cIMT changes and subgroup data (mean and maximum CCA/cIMT) are provided. For the analysis, study-level data was extracted from 17 statin cIMT trials conducted during 1988–2006, selected on the basis of having at least one statin monotherapy arm in the absence of mixed therapy, and baseline- and study-end values for mean mean and mean maximum CCA/cIMT endpoints. The baseline mean CCA/cIMT, maximum mean CCA/cIMT and LDL-C levels, and annualized cIMT changes were estimated for the overall studies, those conducted before/after 2000, and in risk-based subgroups. Interestingly, all 8 studies conducted before 2000 were significant for cIMT change in which patients did not receive prior LLT; whereas after 2000, the results were more variable and in 4 of 6 trials that did not show a significant cIMT change, patients had received prior treatment. Baseline mean maximum cIMT and LDL-C levels, and annualized changes in studies conducted before 2000 were higher than those conducted after 2000, similar to the results reported in the original article for the mean mean cIMT endpoint. These findings were consistent across study populations of patients with CHD risk versus those without, and in studies with greater LDL-C reductions and with thickened baseline cIMT at study entry for both mean and maximum cIMT changes. Taken together, these results are consistent with trends in recent years toward greater use of

  1. Augmented case-only designs for randomized clinical trials with failure time endpoints

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Under suitable assumptions and by exploiting the independence between inherited genetic susceptibility and treatment assignment, the case-only design yields efficient estimates for subgroup treatment effects and gene-treatment interaction in a Cox model. However it cannot provide estimates of the genetic main effect and baseline hazards, that are necessary to compute the absolute disease risk. For two-arm, placebo-controlled trials with rare failure time endpoints, we consider augmenting the case-only design with random samples of controls from both arms, as in the classical case-cohort sampling scheme, or with a random sample of controls from the active treatment arm only. The latter design is motivated by vaccine trials for cost-effective use of resources and specimens so that host genetics and vaccine-induced immune responses can be studied simultaneously in a bigger set of participants. We show that these designs can identify all parameters in a Cox model and that the efficient case-only estimator can be incorporated in a two-step plug-in procedure. Results in simulations and a data example suggest that incorporating case-only estimators in the classical case-cohort design improves the precision of all estimated parameters; sampling controls only in the active treatment arm attains a similar level of efficiency. PMID:26347982

  2. Evaluation of Interval Times from Onset to Reperfusion in Patients Undergoing Endovascular Therapy in the IMS III Trial

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Mayank; Almekhlafi, Mohammed A; Fan, Liqiong; Menon, Bijoy K; Demchuk, Andrew M; Yeatts, Sharon D; Hill, Michael D; Tomsick, Thomas; Khatri, Pooja; Zaidat, Osama O; Jauch, Edward C; Eesa, Muneer; Jovin, Tudor G; Broderick, Joseph P

    2014-01-01

    Background Meaningful delays occurred in the IMS III trial. Analysis of the workflow will identify factors contributing to the in-hospital delays. Methods and Results In the endovascular arm of the IMS III trial, these time intervals were calculated: stroke onset to ED arrival; ED to CT; CT to IV tPA start; IV tPA start to randomization; randomization to groin puncture; groin puncture to thrombus identification; thrombus identification to start of endovascular therapy; start of endovascular therapy to reperfusion. The effects of enrollment time, CTA use, inter-hospital transfers, and intubation on workflow were evaluated. Delays notably occurred in the time intervals from IV tPA initiation to groin puncture (median 84 minutes) and start of endovascular therapy to reperfusion (median 85 minutes). The CT to groin puncture time was significantly shorter during working hours than after. Times from ED to reperfusion and groin puncture to reperfusion decreased over the trial period. Patients with CTA had shorter ED to reperfusion and onset to reperfusion times. Transfer of patients resulted in a longer onset to reperfusion time compared to those treated in the same center. Age, sex, NIHSS, and intubation did not impact delays. Conclusions Important delays were identified prior to reperfusion in the IMS III trial. Delays decreased as the trial progressed. Use of CTA and endovascular treatment in the same center were associated with time savings. These data may help in optimizing workflow in current and future endovascular trials. Clinical Trial Registration Information http://clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier: NCT00359424. PMID:24815501

  3. RARtool: A MATLAB Software Package for Designing Response-Adaptive Randomized Clinical Trials with Time-to-Event Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ryeznik, Yevgen; Sverdlov, Oleksandr; Wong, Weng Kee

    2015-08-01

    Response-adaptive randomization designs are becoming increasingly popular in clinical trial practice. In this paper, we present RARtool, a user interface software developed in MATLAB for designing response-adaptive randomized comparative clinical trials with censored time-to-event outcomes. The RARtool software can compute different types of optimal treatment allocation designs, and it can simulate response-adaptive randomization procedures targeting selected optimal allocations. Through simulations, an investigator can assess design characteristics under a variety of experimental scenarios and select the best procedure for practical implementation. We illustrate the utility of our RARtool software by redesigning a survival trial from the literature.

  4. Real-Time Predictions of Reservoir Size and Rebound Time during Antiretroviral Therapy Interruption Trials for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, Daniel I. S.; Goldstein, Edward; Hanhauser, Emily; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring the efficacy of novel reservoir-reducing treatments for HIV is challenging. The limited ability to sample and quantify latent infection means that supervised antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption studies are generally required. Here we introduce a set of mathematical and statistical modeling tools to aid in the design and interpretation of ART-interruption trials. We show how the likely size of the remaining reservoir can be updated in real-time as patients continue off treatment, by combining the output of laboratory assays with insights from models of reservoir dynamics and rebound. We design an optimal schedule for viral load sampling during interruption, whereby the frequency of follow-up can be decreased as patients continue off ART without rebound. While this scheme can minimize costs when the chance of rebound between visits is low, we find that the reservoir will be almost completely reseeded before rebound is detected unless sampling occurs at least every two weeks and the most sensitive viral load assays are used. We use simulated data to predict the clinical trial size needed to estimate treatment effects in the face of highly variable patient outcomes and imperfect reservoir assays. Our findings suggest that large numbers of patients—between 40 and 150—will be necessary to reliably estimate the reservoir-reducing potential of a new therapy and to compare this across interventions. As an example, we apply these methods to the two “Boston patients”, recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants who experienced large reductions in latent infection and underwent ART-interruption. We argue that the timing of viral rebound was not particularly surprising given the information available before treatment cessation. Additionally, we show how other clinical data can be used to estimate the relative contribution that remaining HIV+ cells in the recipient versus newly infected cells from the donor made to the residual reservoir

  5. Real-Time Predictions of Reservoir Size and Rebound Time during Antiretroviral Therapy Interruption Trials for HIV.

    PubMed

    Hill, Alison L; Rosenbloom, Daniel I S; Goldstein, Edward; Hanhauser, Emily; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Siliciano, Robert F; Henrich, Timothy J

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring the efficacy of novel reservoir-reducing treatments for HIV is challenging. The limited ability to sample and quantify latent infection means that supervised antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption studies are generally required. Here we introduce a set of mathematical and statistical modeling tools to aid in the design and interpretation of ART-interruption trials. We show how the likely size of the remaining reservoir can be updated in real-time as patients continue off treatment, by combining the output of laboratory assays with insights from models of reservoir dynamics and rebound. We design an optimal schedule for viral load sampling during interruption, whereby the frequency of follow-up can be decreased as patients continue off ART without rebound. While this scheme can minimize costs when the chance of rebound between visits is low, we find that the reservoir will be almost completely reseeded before rebound is detected unless sampling occurs at least every two weeks and the most sensitive viral load assays are used. We use simulated data to predict the clinical trial size needed to estimate treatment effects in the face of highly variable patient outcomes and imperfect reservoir assays. Our findings suggest that large numbers of patients-between 40 and 150-will be necessary to reliably estimate the reservoir-reducing potential of a new therapy and to compare this across interventions. As an example, we apply these methods to the two "Boston patients", recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants who experienced large reductions in latent infection and underwent ART-interruption. We argue that the timing of viral rebound was not particularly surprising given the information available before treatment cessation. Additionally, we show how other clinical data can be used to estimate the relative contribution that remaining HIV+ cells in the recipient versus newly infected cells from the donor made to the residual reservoir that

  6. The analysis and forecasting of male cycling time trial records established within England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Bryce; Hassani, Hossein; Shadi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    The format of cycling time trials in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, involves riders competing individually over several fixed race distances of 10-100 miles in length and using time constrained formats of 12 and 24 h in duration. Drawing on data provided by the national governing body that covers the regions of England and Wales, an analysis of six male competition record progressions was undertaken to illustrate its progression. Future forecasts are then projected through use of the Singular Spectrum Analysis technique. This method has not been applied to sport-based time series data before. All six records have seen a progressive improvement and are non-linear in nature. Five records saw their highest level of record change during the 1950-1969 period. Whilst new record frequency generally has reduced since this period, the magnitude of performance improvement has generally increased. The Singular Spectrum Analysis technique successfully provided forecasted projections in the short to medium term with a high level of fit to the time series data.

  7. Performance of Bordetella pertussis IS481 real-time PCR in a vaccine trial setting.

    PubMed

    Gullsby, Karolina; Hallander, Hans O; Bondeson, Kåre

    2007-12-01

    A real-time PCR method targeting the Bordetella pertussis IS481 gene fragment was evaluated in a vaccine trial setting in which real-time PCR results could be validated against culture and serology results. Two commonly used DNA extraction methods, Amplicor Respiratory Preparation kit and the QIAamp DNA Mini Kit, were compared. An approximately 50-fold higher sensitivity was achieved using the Amplicor kit. 89 of 276 aspirates analysed with the IS481 real-time PCR were positive. Interestingly, six of these were culture negative and came from serology-negative patients. Defining true positive cases either as culture-positive or as PCR-positive cases that had been confirmed with a serology-positive result or verified with a newly constructed recA PCR, the sensitivity and specificity of the IS481 real-time PCR were 89% and 98%, respectively. This study confirms the specificity and high diagnostic sensitivity of IS481-based PCR methods for diagnosis of B. pertussis.

  8. Sample size and robust marginal methods for cluster-randomized trials with censored event times.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yujie; Cook, Richard J

    2015-03-15

    In cluster-randomized trials, intervention effects are often formulated by specifying marginal models, fitting them under a working independence assumption, and using robust variance estimates to address the association in the responses within clusters. We develop sample size criteria within this framework, with analyses based on semiparametric Cox regression models fitted with event times subject to right censoring. At the design stage, copula models are specified to enable derivation of the asymptotic variance of estimators from a marginal Cox regression model and to compute the number of clusters necessary to satisfy power requirements. Simulation studies demonstrate the validity of the sample size formula in finite samples for a range of cluster sizes, censoring rates, and degrees of within-cluster association among event times. The power and relative efficiency implications of copula misspecification is studied, as well as the effect of within-cluster dependence in the censoring times. Sample size criteria and other design issues are also addressed for the setting where the event status is only ascertained at periodic assessments and times are interval censored.

  9. The effect of acute taurine ingestion on 4-km time trial performance in trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ryan; Bridge, Craig A; McNaughton, Lars R; Sparks, S Andy

    2016-11-01

    Taurine (TAU) has been shown to improve exercise time to exhaustion and 3-km running performance; however, no studies have considered the effect of acute TAU ingestion on short duration cycling time trial (TT) performance. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a single oral acute dose of 1000 mg of TAU on a laboratory simulated 4-km cycling TT. Eleven trained male cyclists performed three, 4-km TTs. The first of the trials was a familiarisation, followed by two subsequent trials which were performed two hours after the consumption of either 1000 mg of TAU or placebo (P), using a double-blind randomised crossover design. Capillary blood samples were obtained prior to the start and immediately after each TT for the measurement of lactate, pH and HCO3(-). There was no effect of TAU (p = 0.731, d = 0.151) on performance (390 ± 27 and 388 ± 21 s for TAU and P, respectively), nor were there any condition main effects for VO2, lactate, pH, or HCO3(-) (p > 0.05) despite post TT changes in lactate (7.3 ± 2.5 mmol l(-1), p < 0.001, d = 2.86, 7.6 ± 2.0 mmol l(-1) p < 0.001, d = 3.75); pH (-0.255 ± 0.1, p < 0.001, d = 2.62, -0.258 ± 0.09, p < 0.001, d = 2.87); HCO3(-) (-13.58 ± 2.7 mmol l(-1), p < 0.001, d = 5.04 vs. -13.36 ± 2.3, p < 0.001, d = 5.72 for TAU and P, respectively). The findings of this study suggest that a pre-exercise dose of 1000 mg TAU offers no performance advantage during 4-km TT nor does it alter the blood buffering responses in trained cyclists.

  10. Time-dependent approach for single trial classification of covert visuospatial attention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonin, L.; Leeb, R.; Millán, J. del R.

    2012-08-01

    Recently, several studies have started to explore covert visuospatial attention as a control signal for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Covert visuospatial attention represents the ability to change the focus of attention from one point in the space without overt eye movements. Nevertheless, the full potential and possible applications of this paradigm remain relatively unexplored. Voluntary covert visuospatial attention might allow a more natural and intuitive interaction with real environments as neither stimulation nor gazing is required. In order to identify brain correlates of covert visuospatial attention, classical approaches usually rely on the whole α-band over long time intervals. In this work, we propose a more detailed analysis in the frequency and time domains to enhance classification performance. In particular, we investigate the contribution of α sub-bands and the role of time intervals in carrying information about visual attention. Previous neurophysiological studies have already highlighted the role of temporal dynamics in attention mechanisms. However, these important aspects are not yet exploited in BCI. In this work, we studied different methods that explicitly cope with the natural brain dynamics during visuospatial attention tasks in order to enhance BCI robustness and classification performances. Results with ten healthy subjects demonstrate that our approach identifies spectro-temporal patterns that outperform the state-of-the-art classification method. On average, our time-dependent classification reaches 0.74 ± 0.03 of the area under the ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve (AUC) value with an increase of 12.3% with respect to standard methods (0.65 ± 0.4). In addition, the proposed approach allows faster classification (<1 instead of 3 s), without compromising performances. Finally, our analysis highlights the fact that discriminant patterns are not stable for the whole trial period but are changing over short time

  11. Design of clinical trials with failure-time endpoints and interim analyses: An update after fifteen years.

    PubMed

    He, Pei; Lai, Tze Leung; Su, Zheng

    2015-11-01

    Time to event is the clinically definitive endpoint in Phase III trials of new treatments of cancer, cardiovascular and many other diseases. Because these trials involve relatively long follow-up, their protocols usually incorporate periodic interim analyses of the data by a Data and Safety Monitoring Board/Committee. This paper gives a review of the major developments in the design of these trials in the 21st century, spurred by the need for better clinical trial designs to cope with the remarkable advances in cancer biology, genomics and imaging that can help predict patients' sensitivity or resistance to certain treatments. In addition to this overview and discussion of related issues and challenges, we also introduce a new approach to address some of these issues.

  12. Can cycling performance in an early morning, laboratory-based cycle time-trial be improved by morning exercise the day before?

    PubMed

    Edwards, B J; Edwards, W; Waterhouse, J; Atkinson, G; Reilly, T

    2005-10-01

    The normal circadian rhythm in exercise performance may be altered by the habitual timing of training. We have investigated if morning time trial performance is affected by the time at which moderate exercise is performed on the previous day. Eight male cyclists undertook two separate exercise sessions of sub-maximal cycle ergometry (60% V.O2peak for 30 min) at 07:00 h and 12:00 h the day before a 16.1-km time trial at 07:00 h. Heart rate, power output, ratings of perceived exertion, and rectal temperature were measured at rest and every 5 min in the pre-time trial exercises, and every 1.61 km during the time trial. Blood samples were taken at rest and immediately after the time trial for the measurement of lactate concentration. The time trial performed the day after the 07:00 h sub-maximal exercise was completed in 1672+/-135 s, compared to 1706+/-159 s for the time trial performed the day after the noon pre-time trial exercise (p=0.027). The time trial after exercise the previous morning was associated with higher work-rates (p=0.031), a higher net lactate accumulation after the time trial (p=0.018), and a trend for higher heart rates (p=0.093) compared to the time trial after exercise the previous noon. These findings suggest that cycling performance in an early morning time trial is improved if an athlete participates in early-morning rather than noontime moderate exercise the day before. This finding cannot be attributed to the physiological responses to the exercise on the pre-time trial day or to environmental factors. It is suggested that it might partly reflect an advantage gained by performing exercise in the day(s) immediately beforehand at the same time as the competition.

  13. The effects of different doses of caffeine on endurance cycling time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Desbrow, Ben; Biddulph, Caren; Devlin, Brooke; Grant, Gary D; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; Leveritt, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of two different doses of caffeine on endurance cycle time trial performance in male athletes. Using a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study design, sixteen well-trained and familiarised male cyclists (Mean ± s: Age = 32.6 ± 8.3 years; Body mass = 78.5 ± 6.0 kg; Height = 180.9 ± 5.5 cm VO2(peak) = 60.4 ± 4.1 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) completed three experimental trials, following training and dietary standardisation. Participants ingested either a placebo, or 3 or 6 mg x kg(-1) body mass of caffeine 90 min prior to completing a set amount of work equivalent to 75% of peak sustainable power output for 60 min. Exercise performance was significantly (P < 0.05) improved with both caffeine treatments as compared to placebo (4.2% with 3 mg x kg(-1) body mass and 2.9% with 6 mg x kg(-1) body mass). The difference between the two caffeine doses was not statistically significant (P = 0.24). Caffeine ingestion at either dose resulted in significantly higher heart rate values than the placebo conditions (P < 0.05), but no statistically significant treatment effects in ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were observed (P = 0.39). A caffeine dose of 3 mg x kg(-1) body mass appears to improve cycling performance in well-trained and familiarised athletes. Doubling the dose to 6 mg x kg(-1) body mass does not confer any additional improvements in performance.

  14. Hubble trial: time to stick to basics for treatment of haemorrhoids?

    PubMed

    Brown, S R

    2017-01-01

    The results of the Hubble trial, a randomised controlled trial comparing haemorrhoidal artery ligation with rubber band ligation for early-grade prolapsing haemorrhoids, are discussed. The difficulties in defining treatment success are debated along with the trial design highlighting the pitfalls of previous research. A finding that haemorrhoidal artery ligation is not necessarily superior to cheap alternatives has implications for current practice and future commissioning of surgeons.

  15. Crushed Ice Ingestion Does Not Improve Female Cycling Time Trial Performance in the Heat.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Matthew; Landers, Grant Justin; Wallman, Karen Elizabeth

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the effects of precooling via ice ingestion on female cycling performance in hot, humid conditions. Ten female endurance athletes, mean age (28 ± 6 y), height (167.6 ± 6.5 cm) and body-mass (68.0 ± 11.5 kg) participated in the study. Participants completed an 800 kJ cycle time-trial in hot, humid conditions (34.9 ± 0.3 °C, 49.8 ± 3.5% RH). This was preceded by the consumption of 7 g∙kg(-1) of crushed ice (ICE) or water (CON). There was no difference in performance time (CON 3851 ± 449 s; ICE 3767 ± 465 s), oxygen consumption (CON 41.6 ± 7.0 ml∙kg∙min(-1); ICE 42.4 ± 6.0 ml∙kg∙min(-1)) or respiratory exchange ratio (CON 0.88 ± 0.05; ICE 0.90 ± 0.06) between conditions (p > .05, d < 0.5). Core and skin temperature following the precooling period were lower in ICE (Tc 36.4 ± 0.4 °C; Tsk 31.6 ± 1.2 °C) compared with CON (Tc 37.1 ± 0.4 °C; Tsk 32.4 ± 0.7 °C) and remained lower until the 100 kJ mark of the cycle time-trial (p < .05, d > 1.0). Sweat onset occurred earlier in CON (228 ± 113 s) compared with ICE (411 ± 156 s) (p < .05, d = 1.63). Mean thermal sensation (CON 1.8 ± 2.0; ICE 1.2 ± 2.5, p < .05, d = 2.51), perceived exertion (CON 15.3 ± 2.9; ICE 14.9 ± 3.0, p < .05, d = 0.38) and perceived thirst (CON 5.6 ± 2.2; ICE 4.6 ± 2.4, p < .05, d = 0.98) were lower in ICE compared with CON. Crushed ice ingestion did not improve cycling performance in females, although perceptual responses were reduced.

  16. Caffeine Alters Anaerobic Distribution and Pacing during a 4000-m Cycling Time Trial

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Ralmony de Alcantara; Kiss, Maria Augusta Peduti Dal Molin; Silva-Cavalcante, Marcos David; Correia-Oliveira, Carlos Rafaell; Bertuzzi, Romulo; Bishop, David John; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of caffeine ingestion on pacing strategy and energy expenditure during a 4000-m cycling time-trial (TT). Eight recreationally-trained male cyclists volunteered and performed a maximal incremental test and a familiarization test on their first and second visits, respectively. On the third and fourth visits, the participants performed a 4000-m cycling TT after ingesting capsules containing either caffeine (5 mg.kg−1 of body weight, CAF) or cellulose (PLA). The tests were applied in a double-blind, randomized, repeated-measures, cross-over design. When compared to PLA, CAF ingestion increased mean power output [219.1±18.6 vs. 232.8±21.4 W; effect size (ES)  = 0.60 (95% CI = 0.05 to 1.16), p = 0.034] and reduced the total time [419±13 vs. 409±12 s; ES = −0.71 (95% CI = −0.09 to −1.13), p = 0.026]. Furthermore, anaerobic contribution during the 2200-, 2400-, and 2600-m intervals was significantly greater in CAF than in PLA (p<0.05). However, the mean anaerobic [64.9±20.1 vs. 57.3±17.5 W] and aerobic [167.9±4.3 vs. 161.8±11.2 W] contributions were similar between conditions (p>0.05). Similarly, there were no significant differences between CAF and PLA for anaerobic work (26363±7361 vs. 23888±6795 J), aerobic work (68709±2118 vs. 67739±3912 J), or total work (95245±8593 vs. 91789±7709 J), respectively. There was no difference for integrated electromyography, blood lactate concentration, heart rate, and ratings of perceived exertion between the conditions. These results suggest that caffeine increases the anaerobic contribution in the middle of the time trial, resulting in enhanced overall performance. PMID:24058684

  17. Aerodynamics of cyclist posture, bicycle and helmet characteristics in time trial stage.

    PubMed

    Chabroux, Vincent; Barelle, Caroline; Favier, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    The present work is focused on the aerodynamic study of different parameters, including both the posture of a cyclist's upper limbs and the saddle position, in time trial (TT) stages. The aerodynamic influence of a TT helmet large visor is also quantified as a function of the helmet inclination. Experiments conducted in a wind tunnel on nine professional cyclists provided drag force and frontal area measurements to determine the drag force coefficient. Data statistical analysis clearly shows that the hands positioning on shifters and the elbows joined together are significantly reducing the cyclist drag force. Concerning the saddle position, the drag force is shown to be significantly increased (about 3%) when the saddle is raised. The usual helmet inclination appears to be the inclination value minimizing the drag force. Moreover, the addition of a large visor on the helmet is shown to provide a drag coefficient reduction as a function of the helmet inclination. Present results indicate that variations in the TT cyclist posture, the saddle position and the helmet visor can produce a significant gain in time (up to 2.2%) during stages.

  18. Rejection positivity predicts trial-to-trial reaction times in an auditory selective attention task: a computational analysis of inhibitory control

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sufen; Melara, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    A series of computer simulations using variants of a formal model of attention (Melara and Algom, 2003) probed the role of rejection positivity (RP), a slow-wave electroencephalographic (EEG) component, in the inhibitory control of distraction. Behavioral and EEG data were recorded as participants performed auditory selective attention tasks. Simulations that modulated processes of distractor inhibition accounted well for reaction-time (RT) performance, whereas those that modulated target excitation did not. A model that incorporated RP from actual EEG recordings in estimating distractor inhibition was superior in predicting changes in RT as a function of distractor salience across conditions. A model that additionally incorporated momentary fluctuations in EEG as the source of trial-to-trial variation in performance precisely predicted individual RTs within each condition. The results lend support to the linking proposition that RP controls the speed of responding to targets through the inhibitory control of distractors. PMID:25191244

  19. Covariate Adjustment Strategy Increases Power in the Randomized Controlled Trial With Discrete-Time Survival Endpoints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safarkhani, Maryam; Moerbeek, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    In a randomized controlled trial, a decision needs to be made about the total number of subjects for adequate statistical power. One way to increase the power of a trial is by including a predictive covariate in the model. In this article, the effects of various covariate adjustment strategies on increasing the power is studied for discrete-time…

  20. Sequentially updating the likelihood of success of a Phase 3 pivotal time-to-event trial based on interim analyses or external information.

    PubMed

    Rufibach, Kaspar; Jordan, Paul; Abt, Markus

    2016-01-01

    When performing a pivotal clinical trial, it may be of interest to assess the probability of success (PoS) of that trial. Initially evaluated when the trial is designed, PoS can be updated as the trial progresses and new information about the drug effect becomes available. Such information can be external to the trial, such as results from trials conducted in parallel, or internal, such as continuing after an interim analysis. We develop a framework to update PoS based on such internal and external information for a time-to-event endpoint and illustrate it using a realistic development program for a new molecule.

  1. Five-Kilometers Time Trial: Preliminary Validation of a Short Test for Cycling Performance Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Jose Luiz; Pereira, Gleber; Nakamura, Fabio Yuzo

    2015-01-01

    Background: The five-kilometer time trial (TT5km) has been used to assess aerobic endurance performance without further investigation of its validity. Objectives: This study aimed to perform a preliminary validation of the TT5km to rank well-trained cyclists based on aerobic endurance fitness and assess changes of the aerobic endurance performance. Materials and Methods: After the incremental test, 20 cyclists (age = 31.3 ± 7.9 years; body mass index = 22.7 ± 1.5 kg/m2; maximal aerobic power = 360.5 ± 49.5 W) performed the TT5km twice, collecting performance (time to complete, absolute and relative power output, average speed) and physiological responses (heart rate and electromyography activity). The validation criteria were pacing strategy, absolute and relative reliability, validity, and sensitivity. Sensitivity index was obtained from the ratio between the smallest worthwhile change and typical error. Results: The TT5km showed high absolute (coefficient of variation < 3%) and relative (intraclass coefficient correlation > 0.95) reliability of performance variables, whereas it presented low reliability of physiological responses. The TT5km performance variables were highly correlated with the aerobic endurance indices obtained from incremental test (r > 0.70). These variables showed adequate sensitivity index (> 1). Conclusions: TT5km is a valid test to rank the aerobic endurance fitness of well-trained cyclists and to differentiate changes on aerobic endurance performance. Coaches can detect performance changes through either absolute (± 17.7 W) or relative power output (± 0.3 W.kg-1), the time to complete the test (± 13.4 s) and the average speed (± 1.0 km.h-1). Furthermore, TT5km performance can also be used to rank the athletes according to their aerobic endurance fitness. PMID:26448846

  2. Effects of 6-Times-Weekly Versus 3-Times-Weekly Hemodialysis on Depressive Symptoms and Self-reported Mental Health: Frequent Hemodialysis Network (FHN) Trials

    PubMed Central

    Unruh, Mark L.; Larive, Brett; Chertow, Glenn M; Eggers, Paul W.; Garg, Amit X.; Gassman, Jennifer; Tarallo, Maria; Finkelstein, Fredric O.; Kimmel, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis frequently exhibit poor mental health. We studied the effects of frequent in-center and nocturnal hemodialysis on depressive symptoms and self-reported mental health. Study Design 1-year randomized-controlled clinical trials. Setting & Participants Hemodialysis centers in the United States and Canada. A total of 332 patients were randomized to frequent (six times per week) as compared with conventional (three times per week) hemodialysis in the Frequent Hemodialysis Network (FHN) Daily (n=245) and Nocturnal (n=87) Trials. Intervention Daily Trial was a trial of frequent (six times per week), as compared with conventional (three times per week) in-center hemodialysis. The Nocturnal Trial assigned patients to either frequent nocturnal hemodialysis (six times per week) or conventional hemodialysis (three times per week). Outcomes Self-reported depressive symptoms and mental health. Measurements Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the mental health composite (MHC) score and emotional subscale of the RAND 36-Item Health Survey at baseline, 4 and 12 months. The MHC score is derived by summarizing these domains of the RAND 36-Item Health Survey: emotional, role emotional, energy/fatigue, and social functioning scales. Results In the Daily Trial, subjects randomized to frequent as compared with conventional in-center hemodialysis demonstrated no significant change over 12 months in adjusted mean BDI (−1.9 ± 0.7 vs. −0.6 ± 0.7; p=0.2), but experienced clinically significant improvements in adjusted mean MHC (3.7 ± 0.9 vs. 0.2 ± 1.0; P<0.01) and the emotional subscale (5.2 ± 1.6 vs. −0.3 ± 1.7; p=0.01). In the Nocturnal Trial, there were no significant changes among subjects randomized to nocturnal as compared with conventional hemodialysis on the same metrics. Limitations The trial interventions were not blinded. Conclusions Frequent in-center hemodialysis, as compared with conventional in

  3. Optimal cycling time trial position models: aerodynamics versus power output and metabolic energy.

    PubMed

    Fintelman, D M; Sterling, M; Hemida, H; Li, F-X

    2014-06-03

    The aerodynamic drag of a cyclist in time trial (TT) position is strongly influenced by the torso angle. While decreasing the torso angle reduces the drag, it limits the physiological functioning of the cyclist. Therefore the aims of this study were to predict the optimal TT cycling position as function of the cycling speed and to determine at which speed the aerodynamic power losses start to dominate. Two models were developed to determine the optimal torso angle: a 'Metabolic Energy Model' and a 'Power Output Model'. The Metabolic Energy Model minimised the required cycling energy expenditure, while the Power Output Model maximised the cyclists׳ power output. The input parameters were experimentally collected from 19 TT cyclists at different torso angle positions (0-24°). The results showed that for both models, the optimal torso angle depends strongly on the cycling speed, with decreasing torso angles at increasing speeds. The aerodynamic losses outweigh the power losses at cycling speeds above 46km/h. However, a fully horizontal torso is not optimal. For speeds below 30km/h, it is beneficial to ride in a more upright TT position. The two model outputs were not completely similar, due to the different model approaches. The Metabolic Energy Model could be applied for endurance events, while the Power Output Model is more suitable in sprinting or in variable conditions (wind, undulating course, etc.). It is suggested that despite some limitations, the models give valuable information about improving the cycling performance by optimising the TT cycling position.

  4. Probiotic supplementation decreases intestinal transit time: Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E; Ouwehand, Arthur C

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the efficacy of probiotic supplementation on intestinal transit time (ITT) and to identify factors that influence these outcomes. METHODS: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of probiotic supplementation that measured ITT in adults was conducted by searching MEDLINE and EMBASE using relevant key word combinations. Main search limits included RCTs of probiotic supplementation in healthy or constipated adults that measured ITT. Study quality was assessed using the Jadad scale. A random effects meta-analysis was performed with standardized mean difference (SMD) of ITT between probiotic and control groups as the primary outcome. Meta-regression and subgroup analyses were conducted to examine the impact of moderator variables on ITT SMD. RESULTS: A total of 11 clinical trials with 13 treatment effects representing 464 subjects were included in this analysis. Probiotic supplementation was associated with decreased ITT in relation to controls, with an SMD of 0.40 (95%CI: 0.20-0.59, P < 0.001). Constipation (r2 = 39%, P = 0.01), higher mean age (r2 = 27%, P = 0.03), and higher percentage of female subjects (r2 = 23%, P < 0.05) were predictive of decreased ITT with probiotics in meta-regression. Subgroup analyses demonstrated statistically greater reductions in ITT with probiotics in subjects with vs without constipation and in older vs younger subjects [both SMD: 0.59 (95%CI: 0.39-0.79) vs 0.17 (95%CI: -0.08-0.42), P = 0.01]. Medium to large treatment effects were identified with Bifidobacterium Lactis (B. lactis) HN019 (SMD: 0.72, 95%CI: 0.27-1.18, P < 0.01) and B. lactis DN-173 010 (SMD: 0.54, 95%CI: 0.15-0.94, P < 0.01) while other single strains and combination products yielded small treatment effects. CONCLUSION: Overall, short-term probiotic supplementation decreases ITT with consistently greater treatment effects identified in constipated or older adults and with certain probiotic strains. PMID:23922468

  5. Time-restricted feeding in young men performing resistance training: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, Grant M; Forsse, Jeffrey S; Butler, Natalie K; Paoli, Antonio; Bane, Annie A; La Bounty, Paul M; Morgan, Grant B; Grandjean, Peter W

    2017-03-01

    A randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine eight weeks of resistance training (RT) with and without time-restricted feeding (TRF) in order to assess nutrient intake and changes in body composition and muscular strength in young recreationally active males. The TRF programme consisted of consuming all calories within a four-hour period of time for four days per week, but included no limitations on quantities or types of foods consumed. The RT programme was performed three days per week and consisted of alternating upper and lower body workouts. For each exercise, four sets leading to muscular failure between 8 and 12 repetitions were employed. Research visits were conducted at baseline, four, and eight weeks after study commencement. Measurements of total body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and muscle cross-sectional area by ultrasound were obtained. Upper and lower body strength and endurance were assessed, and four-day dietary records were collected. TRF reduced energy intake by ∼650 kcal per day of TRF, but did not affect total body composition within the duration of the study. Cross-sectional area of the biceps brachii and rectus femoris increased in both groups. Effect size data indicate a gain in lean soft tissue in the group that performed RT without TRF (+2.3 kg, d = 0.25). Upper and lower body strength and lower body muscular endurance increased in both groups, but effect sizes demonstrate greater improvements in the TRF group. Overall, TRF reduced energy intake and did not adversely affect lean mass retention or muscular improvements with short-term RT in young males.

  6. Effect of Heat and Heat Acclimatization on Cycling Time Trial Performance and Pacing

    PubMed Central

    RACINAIS, SEBASTIEN; PÉRIARD, JULIEN D.; KARLSEN, ANDERS; NYBO, LARS

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose This study aimed to determine the effects of heat acclimatization on performance and pacing during outdoor cycling time trials (TT, 43.4 km) in the heat. Methods Nine cyclists performed three TT in hot ambient conditions (TTH, approximately 37°C) on the first (TTH-1), sixth (TTH-2), and 14th (TTH-3) days of training in the heat. Data were compared with the average of two TT in cool condition (approximately 8°C) performed before and after heat acclimatization (TTC). Results TTH-1 (77 ± 6 min) was slower (P = 0.001) than TTH-2 (69 ± 5 min), and both were slower (P < 0.01) than TTC and TTH-3 (66 ± 3 and 66 ± 4 min, respectively), without differences between TTC and TTH-3 (P > 0.05). The cyclists initiated the first 20% of all TT at a similar power output, irrespective of climate and acclimatization status; however, during TTH-1, they subsequently had a marked decrease in power output, which was partly attenuated after 6 d of acclimatization and was further reduced after 14 d. HR was higher during the first 20% of TTH-1 than that in the other TT (P < 0.05), but there were no differences between conditions from 30% onward. Final rectal temperature was similar in all TTH (40.2°C ± 0.4°C, P = 1.000) and higher than that in TTC (38.5°C ± 0.6°C, P < 0.001). Conclusions After 2 wk of acclimatization, trained cyclists are capable of completing a prolonged TT in a similar time in the heat compared with cool conditions, whereas in the unacclimatized state, they experienced a marked decrease in power output during the TTH. PMID:24977692

  7. Improving time-lapse seismic repeatability: CO2CRC Otway site permanent geophone array field trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevzner, Roman; Dupuis, Christian; Shulakova, Valeriya; Urosevic, Milovan; Lumley, David

    2013-04-01

    The proposed Stage 2C of the CO2CRC Otway project involves injection of a small amount (around 15,000 tonnes) of CO2/CH4 gas mixture into saline acquifer (Paaratte formation) at the depth of ~1.5 km. The seismic time-lapse signal will depend largely on the formation properties and the injection scenario, but is likely to be relatively weak. In order to improve time-lapse seismic monitoring capabilities by decreasing the noise level, a buried receiver arrays can be used. A small-scale trial of such an array was conducted at Otway site in June 2012. A set of 25 geophones was installed in 3 m deep boreholes in parallel to the same number of surface geophones. In addition, four geophones were placed into boreholes of 1 to 12 m depth. In order to assess the gain in the signal-to-noise ratio and repeatability, both active and passive seismic surveys were carried out. The surveys were conducted in relatively poor weather conditions, with rain, strong wind and thunderstorms increasing the noise level. We found that noise level for buried geophones is on average 20 dB lower compared to the surface ones. Furthermore, the combination of active and passive experiments has allowed us to perform a detailed classification of various noise sources. Acknowledgement The authors acknowledge the funding provided by the Australian government through its CRC program to support this CO2CRC research project. We also acknowledge the CO2CRC's corporate sponsors and the financial assistance provided through Australian National Low Emissions Coal Research and Development (ANLEC R&D). ANLEC R&D is supported by Australian Coal Association Low Emissions Technology Limited and the Australian Government through the Clean Energy Initiative.

  8. The effect of exercise training with an additional inspiratory load on inspiratory muscle fatigue and time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    McEntire, Serina J; Smith, Joshua R; Ferguson, Christine S; Brown, Kelly R; Kurti, Stephanie P; Harms, Craig A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose was to determine the effect of moderate-intensity exercise training (ET) on inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) and if an additional inspiratory load during ET (ET+IL) would further improve inspiratory muscle strength, IMF, and time-trial performance. 15 subjects were randomly divided to ET (n=8) and ET+IL groups (n=7). All subjects completed six weeks of exercise training three days/week at ∼70%V̇O2peak for 30min. The ET+IL group breathed through an inspiratory muscle trainer (15% PImax) during exercise. 5-mile, and 30-min time-trials were performed pre-training, weeks three and six. Inspiratory muscle strength increased (p<0.05) for both groups to a similar (p>0.05) extent. ET and ET+IL groups improved (p<0.05) 5-mile time-trial performance (∼10% and ∼18%) and the ET+IL group was significantly faster than ET at week 6. ET and ET+IL groups experienced less (p<0.05) IMF compared to pre-training following the 5-mile time-trial. In conclusion, these data suggest ET leads to less IMF, ET+IL improves inspiratory muscle strength and IMF, but not different than ET alone.

  9. A Sense of Urgency: Evaluating the Link between Clinical Trial Development Time and the Accrual Performance of CTEP-Sponsored Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Steven K.; Dietrich, Mary S.; Finnigan, Shanda; Dilts, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Post-activation barriers to oncology clinical trial accruals are well documented; however, potential barriers prior to trial opening are not. We investigate one such barrier: trial development time. Experimental Design National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP)-sponsored trials for all therapeutic, non-pediatric Phase I, I/II, II, and III studies activated between 2000–2004 were investigated for an eight-year period (n=419). Successful trials were those achieving 100% of minimum accrual goal. Time to open a study was the calendar time from initial CTEP submission to trial activation. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to calculate unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios, controlling for study phase and size of expected accruals. Results 37.9 percent (n=221) of CTEP-approved oncology trials failed to attain the minimum accrual goals, with 70.8 percent (n=14) of Phase III trials resulting in poor accrual. A total of 16474 patients (42.5% of accruals) accrued to those studies that were unable to achieve the projected minimum accrual goal. Trials requiring less than 12 months development were significantly more likely to achieve accrual goals (odds ratio, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.29–3.57, P=0.003) than trials with the median development time of 12–18 months. Trials requiring a development time of greater than 24 months were significantly less likely of achieving accrual goals (odds ratio, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.20–0.78, P=0.011) than trials with the median development time. Conclusions A large percentage of oncology clinical trials do not achieve minimum projected accruals. Trial development time appears to be one important predictor of the likelihood of successfully achieving the minimum accrual goals. PMID:21062929

  10. Screen-time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH): A randomized controlled trial study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Approximately one third of New Zealand children and young people are overweight or obese. A similar proportion (33%) do not meet recommendations for physical activity, and 70% do not meet recommendations for screen time. Increased time being sedentary is positively associated with being overweight. There are few family-based interventions aimed at reducing sedentary behavior in children. The aim of this trial is to determine the effects of a 24 week home-based, family oriented intervention to reduce sedentary screen time on children's body composition, sedentary behavior, physical activity, and diet. Methods/Design The study design is a pragmatic two-arm parallel randomized controlled trial. Two hundred and seventy overweight children aged 9-12 years and primary caregivers are being recruited. Participants are randomized to intervention (family-based screen time intervention) or control (no change). At the end of the study, the control group is offered the intervention content. Data collection is undertaken at baseline and 24 weeks. The primary trial outcome is child body mass index (BMI) and standardized body mass index (zBMI). Secondary outcomes are change from baseline to 24 weeks in child percentage body fat; waist circumference; self-reported average daily time spent in physical and sedentary activities; dietary intake; and enjoyment of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Secondary outcomes for the primary caregiver include change in BMI and self-reported physical activity. Discussion This study provides an excellent example of a theory-based, pragmatic, community-based trial targeting sedentary behavior in overweight children. The study has been specifically designed to allow for estimation of the consistency of effects on body composition for Māori (indigenous), Pacific and non-Māori/non-Pacific ethnic groups. If effective, this intervention is imminently scalable and could be integrated within existing weight management programs. Trial

  11. The Reliability of Running Performance in a 5 km Time Trial on a Non-motorized Treadmill.

    PubMed

    Stevens, C J; Hacene, J; Sculley, D V; Taylor, L; Callister, R; Dascombe, B

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish the reliability of performance and physiological responses during a self-paced 5 km running time trial on a non-motorized treadmill. 17 male runners (age: 32±13 years, height: 177±7 cm, body mass: 71±9 kg, sum of 7 skinfolds: 55±21 mm) performed familiarization then 2 separate maximal 5 km running time trials on a non-motorized treadmill. Physiological responses measured included heart rate, oxygen uptake, expired air volume, blood lactate concentration, tissue saturation index and integrated electromyography. Running time (1,522±163 s vs. 1,519±162 s for trials 1 and 2, respectively) demonstrated a low CV of 1.2% and high ICC of 0.99. All physiological variables had CVs of less than 4% and ICCs of >0.92, with the exception of blood lactate concentration (7.0±2 mmol·L(-1) vs. 6.5±1.5 mmol·L(-1) for trials 1 and 2, respectively; CV: 12%, ICC: 0.83) and the electromyography measures (CV: 8-27%, ICC: 0.71-0.91). The data demonstrate that performance time in a 5 km running time trial on a non-motorized treadmill is a highly reliable test. Most physiological responses measured across the 5 km run also demonstrated good reliability.

  12. Analysis of Classical Time-Trial Performance and Technique-Specific Physiological Determinants in Elite Female Cross-Country Skiers

    PubMed Central

    Sandbakk, Øyvind; Losnegard, Thomas; Skattebo, Øyvind; Hegge, Ann M.; Tønnessen, Espen; Kocbach, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the contribution of performance on uphill, flat, and downhill sections to overall performance in an international 10-km classical time-trial in elite female cross-country skiers, as well as the relationships between performance on snow and laboratory-measured physiological variables in the double poling (DP) and diagonal (DIA) techniques. Ten elite female cross-country skiers were continuously measured by a global positioning system device during an international 10-km cross-country skiing time-trial in the classical technique. One month prior to the race, all skiers performed a 5-min submaximal and 3-min self-paced performance test while roller skiing on a treadmill, both in the DP and DIA techniques. The time spent on uphill (r = 0.98) and flat (r = 0.91) sections of the race correlated most strongly with the overall 10-km performance (both p < 0.05). Approximately 56% of the racing time was spent uphill, and stepwise multiple regression revealed that uphill time explained 95.5% of the variance in overall performance (p < 0.001). Distance covered during the 3-min roller-skiing test and body-mass normalized peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in both techniques showed the strongest correlations with overall time-trial performance (r = 0.66–0.78), with DP capacity tending to have greatest impact on the flat and DIA capacity on uphill terrain (all p < 0.05). Our present findings reveal that the time spent uphill most strongly determine classical time-trial performance, and that the major portion of the performance differences among elite female cross-country skiers can be explained by variations in technique-specific aerobic power. PMID:27536245

  13. Analysis of Classical Time-Trial Performance and Technique-Specific Physiological Determinants in Elite Female Cross-Country Skiers.

    PubMed

    Sandbakk, Øyvind; Losnegard, Thomas; Skattebo, Øyvind; Hegge, Ann M; Tønnessen, Espen; Kocbach, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the contribution of performance on uphill, flat, and downhill sections to overall performance in an international 10-km classical time-trial in elite female cross-country skiers, as well as the relationships between performance on snow and laboratory-measured physiological variables in the double poling (DP) and diagonal (DIA) techniques. Ten elite female cross-country skiers were continuously measured by a global positioning system device during an international 10-km cross-country skiing time-trial in the classical technique. One month prior to the race, all skiers performed a 5-min submaximal and 3-min self-paced performance test while roller skiing on a treadmill, both in the DP and DIA techniques. The time spent on uphill (r = 0.98) and flat (r = 0.91) sections of the race correlated most strongly with the overall 10-km performance (both p < 0.05). Approximately 56% of the racing time was spent uphill, and stepwise multiple regression revealed that uphill time explained 95.5% of the variance in overall performance (p < 0.001). Distance covered during the 3-min roller-skiing test and body-mass normalized peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in both techniques showed the strongest correlations with overall time-trial performance (r = 0.66-0.78), with DP capacity tending to have greatest impact on the flat and DIA capacity on uphill terrain (all p < 0.05). Our present findings reveal that the time spent uphill most strongly determine classical time-trial performance, and that the major portion of the performance differences among elite female cross-country skiers can be explained by variations in technique-specific aerobic power.

  14. METHODS AND BASELINE CARDIOVASCULAR DATA FROM THE EARLY VERSUS LATE INTERVENTION TRIAL WITH ESTRADIOL TESTING THE MENOPAUSAL HORMONE TIMING HYPOTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Hodis, Howard N.; Mack, Wendy J.; Shoupe, Donna; Azen, Stanley P.; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Hwang-Levine, Juliana; Budoff, Matthew J.; Henderson, Victor W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To present methods and baseline data from the Early versus Late Intervention Trial with Estradiol (ELITE), the only clinical trial designed to specifically test the timing hypothesis of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT). The timing hypothesis posits that HT effects depend on the temporal initiation of HT relative to time-since-menopause. Methods ELITE is a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial with a 2x2 factorial design. 643 healthy postmenopausal women without cardiovascular disease were randomized to oral estradiol or placebo for up to 6-7 years according to number of years-since-menopause, <6 years or ≥10 years. Carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT) and cardiac computed tomography were conducted to determine HT effects on subclinical atherosclerosis across menopause strata. Results Participants in the early and late postmenopausal strata were well-separated by mean age, 55.4 versus 65.4 years and median time-since-menopause, 3.5 versus 14.3 years, respectively. The expected risk factors were associated with CIMT at baseline in both strata (age, blood pressure and body mass index). In the early but not in the late postmenopausal group, there were significant associations between CIMT and factors that may play a role in responsiveness of atherosclerosis progression according to timing of HT initiation. These include LDL-C, HDLC, sex hormone binding globulin and serum total estradiol. Conclusion The ELITE randomized controlled trial is timely and unique. Baseline data indicate that ELITE is well-positioned to test the HT timing hypothesis in relation to atherosclerosis progression and coronary artery disease. (NCT00114517; www.clinicaltrials.gov) PMID:25380275

  15. US Black Women and HIV Prevention: Time for New Approaches to Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Adaora A, Adimora; Cole, Stephen R; Eron, Joseph J

    2017-04-05

    Black women bear the highest burden of HIV infection among US women. Tenofovir/emtricitabine HIV prevention trials among women in Africa have yielded varying results. Ideally, a randomized controlled trial (RCT) among US women would provide data for guidelines for US women's HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis use. However, even among US Black women at high risk for HIV infection, sample size requirements for an RCT with HIV incidence as its outcome are prohibitively high. We propose to circumvent this large sample size requirement by evaluating relationships between HIV incidence and drug concentrations measured among participants in traditional phase 3 trials in high incidence settings - and then applying these observations to drug concentrations measured among at risk individuals in lower incidence settings, such as US Black women. This strategy could strengthen the evidence base to enable Black women to fully benefit from prevention research advances and decrease racial disparities in HIV rates.

  16. "They should take time": disclosure of clinical trial results as part of a social relationship.

    PubMed

    Sarradon-Eck, Aline; Sakoyan, Juliette; Desclaux, Alice; Mancini, Julien; Genre, Dominique; Julian-Reynier, Claire

    2012-09-01

    Disclosing overall scientific results to clinical trial participants has become an ethical obligation. Here we studied how participants understand these results in view of their experience of clinical trials and illness in general and what modes of disclosure they preferred. Interviews were conducted with 29 breast cancer patients in France during 2009, using an in-depth qualitative approach. The findings obtained show that the "results" of research are understood quite differently by various patients depending on their expectations about clinical trials. Most of the women interviewed expected to receive personally tailored results at an individual encounter with their own clinical oncologist. Their preferred mode of disclosure was a consultation with their doctors because personal encounters promote mutual recognition and set up a symbolic process of exchange. The results of this study show that medical interventions should not be regarded solely from the technical point of view, but also in terms of the social relationships involved.

  17. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for malaria diagnosis and its use in malaria vaccine clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Laura; Andersen, Rikke F; Webster, Daniel; Dunachie, Susanna; Walther, R Michael; Bejon, Philip; Hunt-Cooke, Angela; Bergson, Gillian; Sanderson, Frances; Hill, Adrian V S; Gilbert, Sarah C

    2005-07-01

    The demand for an effective malaria vaccine is high, with millions of people being affected by the disease every year. A large variety of potential vaccines are under investigation worldwide, and when tested in clinical trials, researchers need to extract as much data as possible from every vaccinated and control volunteer. The use of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), carried out in real-time during the clinical trials of vaccines designed to act against the liver stage of the parasite's life cycle, provides more information than the gold standard method of microscopy alone and increases both safety and accuracy. PCR can detect malaria parasites in the blood up to 5 days before experienced microscopists see parasites on blood films, with a sensitivity of 20 parasites/mL blood. This PCR method has so far been used to follow 137 vaccinee and control volunteers in Phase IIa trials in Oxford and on 220 volunteer samples during a Phase IIb field trial in The Gambia.

  18. Rationale and study design for a randomised controlled trial to reduce sedentary time in adults at risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: project stand (Sedentary Time ANd diabetes)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The rising prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a major public health problem. There is an urgent need for effective lifestyle interventions to prevent the development of T2DM. Sedentary behaviour (sitting time) has recently been identified as a risk factor for diabetes, often independent of the time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Project STAND (Sedentary Time ANd Diabetes) is a study which aims to reduce sedentary behaviour in younger adults at high risk of T2DM. Methods/Design A reduction in sedentary time is targeted using theory driven group structured education. The STAND programme is subject to piloting and process evaluation in line with the MRC framework for complex interventions. Participants are encouraged to self-monitor and self-regulate their behaviour. The intervention is being assessed in a randomised controlled trial with 12 month follow up. Inclusion criteria are a) aged 18-40 years with a BMI in the obese range; b) 18-40 years with a BMI in the overweight range plus an additional risk factor for T2DM. Participants are randomised to the intervention (n = 89) or control (n = 89) arm. The primary outcome is a reduction in sedentary behaviour at 12 months as measured by an accelerometer (count < 100/min). Secondary outcomes include physical activity, sitting/lying time using the ActivPAL posture monitor, fasting and 2 h oral glucose tolerance test, lipids, inflammatory biomarkers, body weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, illness perceptions, and efficacy beliefs for behaviour change. Conclusions This is the first UK trial to address sedentary behaviour change in a population of younger adults at risk of T2DM. The results will provide a platform for the development of a range of future multidisciplinary interventions in this rapidly expanding high-risk population. Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN08434554, MRC project 91409. PMID:22151909

  19. Opposition of carbohydrate in a mouth-rinse solution to the detrimental effect of mouth rinsing during cycling time trials.

    PubMed

    Gam, Sharon; Guelfi, Kym J; Fournier, Paul A

    2013-02-01

    Studies have reported that rinsing the mouth with a carbohydrate (CHO) solution improves cycling time-trial performance compared with rinsing with a placebo solution. However, no studies have compared the effect of mouth rinsing with a no-mouth-rinse control condition. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a CHO mouth rinse with those of a placebo rinse and a no-rinse condition. Ten male cyclists completed three 1,000-kJ cycling time trials in a randomized, counterbalanced order. At every 12.5% of the time trial completed, participants were required to rinse their mouths for 5 s with either a 6.4% maltodextrin solution (CHO), water (WA), or no solution (CON). Heart rate and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded every 25% of the time trial completed. Time to completion was faster in both CHO (65.7 ± 11.07 min) and CON (67.6 ± 12.68 min) than in WA (69.4 ± 13.81 min; p = .013 and p = .042, respectively). The difference between CHO and CON approached significance (p = .086). There were no differences in heart rate or RPE between any conditions. In summary, repeated mouth rinsing with water results in decreased performance relative to not rinsing at all. Adding CHO to the rinse solution appears to oppose this fall in performance, possibly providing additional benefits to performance compared with not rinsing the mouth at all. This brings into question the magnitude of the effect of CHO mouth rinsing reported in previous studies that did not include a no-rinse condition.

  20. Improvements in Cycling but Not Handcycling 10 km Time Trial Performance in Habitual Caffeine Users.

    PubMed

    Graham-Paulson, Terri; Perret, Claudio; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria

    2016-06-25

    Caffeine supplementation during whole-/lower-body exercise is well-researched, yet evidence of its effect during upper-body exercise is equivocal. The current study explored the effects of caffeine on cycling/handcycling 10 km time trial (TT) performance in habitual caffeine users. Eleven recreationally trained males (mean (SD) age 24 (4) years, body mass 85.1 (14.6) kg, cycling/handcycling peak oxygen uptake ( V · peak) 42.9 (7.3)/27.6 (5.1) mL∙kg∙min(-1), 160 (168) mg/day caffeine consumption) completed two maximal incremental tests and two familiarization sessions. During four subsequent visits, participants cycled/handcycled for 30 min at 65% mode-specific V · peak (preload) followed by a 10 km TT following the ingestion of 4 mg∙kg(-1) caffeine (CAF) or placebo (PLA). Caffeine significantly improved cycling (2.0 (2.0)%; 16:35 vs. 16:56 min; p = 0.033) but not handcycling (1.8 (3.0)%; 24:10 vs. 24:36 min; p = 0.153) TT performance compared to PLA. The improvement during cycling can be attributed to the increased power output during the first and last 2 km during CAF. Higher blood lactate concentration (Bla) was reported during CAF compared to PLA (p < 0.007) and was evident 5 min post-TT during cycling (11.2 ± 2.6 and 8.8 ± 3.2 mmol/L; p = 0.001) and handcycling (10.6 ± 2.5 and 9.2 ± 2.9 mmol/L; p = 0.006). Lower overall ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were seen following CAF during the preload (p < 0.05) but not post-TT. Lower peripheral RPE were reported at 20 min during cycling and at 30 min during handcycling, and lower central RPE was seen at 30 min during cycling (p < 0.05). Caffeine improved cycling but not handcycling TT performance. The lack of improvement during handcycling may be due to the smaller active muscle mass, elevated (Bla) and/or participants' training status.

  1. Improvements in Cycling but Not Handcycling 10 km Time Trial Performance in Habitual Caffeine Users

    PubMed Central

    Graham-Paulson, Terri; Perret, Claudio; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine supplementation during whole-/lower-body exercise is well-researched, yet evidence of its effect during upper-body exercise is equivocal. The current study explored the effects of caffeine on cycling/handcycling 10 km time trial (TT) performance in habitual caffeine users. Eleven recreationally trained males (mean (SD) age 24 (4) years, body mass 85.1 (14.6) kg, cycling/handcycling peak oxygen uptake (V·peak) 42.9 (7.3)/27.6 (5.1) mL∙kg∙min−1, 160 (168) mg/day caffeine consumption) completed two maximal incremental tests and two familiarization sessions. During four subsequent visits, participants cycled/handcycled for 30 min at 65% mode-specific V·peak (preload) followed by a 10 km TT following the ingestion of 4 mg∙kg−1 caffeine (CAF) or placebo (PLA). Caffeine significantly improved cycling (2.0 (2.0)%; 16:35 vs. 16:56 min; p = 0.033) but not handcycling (1.8 (3.0)%; 24:10 vs. 24:36 min; p = 0.153) TT performance compared to PLA. The improvement during cycling can be attributed to the increased power output during the first and last 2 km during CAF. Higher blood lactate concentration (Bla) was reported during CAF compared to PLA (p < 0.007) and was evident 5 min post-TT during cycling (11.2 ± 2.6 and 8.8 ± 3.2 mmol/L; p = 0.001) and handcycling (10.6 ± 2.5 and 9.2 ± 2.9 mmol/L; p = 0.006). Lower overall ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were seen following CAF during the preload (p < 0.05) but not post-TT. Lower peripheral RPE were reported at 20 min during cycling and at 30 min during handcycling, and lower central RPE was seen at 30 min during cycling (p < 0.05). Caffeine improved cycling but not handcycling TT performance. The lack of improvement during handcycling may be due to the smaller active muscle mass, elevated (Bla) and/or participants’ training status. PMID:27348000

  2. “Watching time tick by…”: Decision making for Duchenne muscular dystrophy trials

    PubMed Central

    Peay, Holly L; Scharff, Hadar; Tibben, Aad; Wilfond, Benjamin; Bowie, Janice; Johnson, Joanna; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Escolar, Diana; Piacentino, Jonathan; Biesecker, Barbara B

    2015-01-01

    Objective This interview study explored clinicians’ perspectives and parents’ decision making about children’s participation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) clinical trials. Methods Data from semi-structured interviews conducted with clinicians and parents in U.S. or Canada were assessed using thematic analysis. Results Eleven clinicians involved in ten trials and fifteen parents involved in six trials were interviewed. Parents described benefit-risk assessments using information from advocacy, peers, professionals, and sponsors. Strong influence was attributed to the progressive nature of DMD. Most expected direct benefit. Few considered the possibility of trial failure. Most made decisions to participate before the informed consent (IC) process, but none-the-less perceived informed choice with little to lose for potential gain. Clinicians described more influence on parental decisions than attributed by parents. Clinicians felt responsible to facilitate IC while maintaining hope. Both clinicians and parents reported criticisms about the IC process and regulatory barriers. Conclusions The majority of parents described undertaking benefit-risk assessments that led to informed choices that offered psychological and potential disease benefits. Parents’ high expectations influenced their decisions while also reflecting optimism. Clinicians felt challenged in balancing parents’ expectations and likely outcomes. Prognosis-related pressures coupled with decision making prior to IC suggest an obligation to ensure educational materials are understandable and accurate, and to consider an expanded notion of IC timeframes. Anticipatory guidance about potential trial failure might facilitate parents’ deliberations while aiding clinicians in moderating overly-optimistic motivations. Regulators and industry should appreciate special challenges in progressive disorders, where doing nothing was equated with doing harm. PMID:26546066

  3. The EuroNet paediatric hodgkin network - modern imaging data management for real time central review in multicentre trials.

    PubMed

    Kurch, L; Mauz-Körholz, C; Bertling, S; Wallinder, M; Kaminska, M; Marwede, D; Tchavdarova, L; Georgi, T W; Elsner, A; Barthel, A; Stoevesandt, D; Hasenclever, D; Sattler, B; Sabri, O; Körholz, D; Kluge, R

    2013-11-01

    Since 2007, children and adolescents with Hodgkin lymphomas are treated in the Europe-wide EuroNet-PHL trials. A real time central review process for stratification of the patients enhances quality control and efficient therapy management. This process includes reading of all cross-sectional-images. Since reference evaluation is time critical, a fast, easy to handle and safe data transfer is important. In addition, immediate and constant access to all the data has to be guaranteed in case of queries and for regulatory reasons. To meet the mentioned requirements the EuroNet Paediatric Hodgkin Data Network (funded by the European Union - Project Number: 2007108) was established between 2008 and 2011. A respective tailored data protection plan was formulated. The aim of this article is to describe the networks' mode of operation and the advantages for multi-centre trials that include centralized image review.

  4. Static Stretching Alters Neuromuscular Function and Pacing Strategy, but Not Performance during a 3-Km Running Time-Trial

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Mayara V.; Duarte, Marcos; Pasqua, Leonardo A.; Lima-Silva, Adriano E.; MacIntosh, Brian R.; Bertuzzi, Rômulo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies report that static stretching (SS) impairs running economy. Assuming that pacing strategy relies on rate of energy use, this study aimed to determine whether SS would modify pacing strategy and performance in a 3-km running time-trial. Methods Eleven recreational distance runners performed a) a constant-speed running test without previous SS and a maximal incremental treadmill test; b) an anthropometric assessment and a constant-speed running test with previous SS; c) a 3-km time-trial familiarization on an outdoor 400-m track; d and e) two 3-km time-trials, one with SS (experimental situation) and another without (control situation) previous static stretching. The order of the sessions d and e were randomized in a counterbalanced fashion. Sit-and-reach and drop jump tests were performed before the 3-km running time-trial in the control situation and before and after stretching exercises in the SS. Running economy, stride parameters, and electromyographic activity (EMG) of vastus medialis (VM), biceps femoris (BF) and gastrocnemius medialis (GA) were measured during the constant-speed tests. Results The overall running time did not change with condition (SS 11:35±00:31 s; control 11:28±00:41 s, p = 0.304), but the first 100 m was completed at a significantly lower velocity after SS. Surprisingly, SS did not modify the running economy, but the iEMG for the BF (+22.6%, p = 0.031), stride duration (+2.1%, p = 0.053) and range of motion (+11.1%, p = 0.0001) were significantly modified. Drop jump height decreased following SS (−9.2%, p = 0.001). Conclusion Static stretch impaired neuromuscular function, resulting in a slow start during a 3-km running time-trial, thus demonstrating the fundamental role of the neuromuscular system in the self-selected speed during the initial phase of the race. PMID:24905918

  5. Is it time to advance the chemoprevention of environmental carcinogenesis with microdosing trials?

    PubMed

    Kensler, Thomas W; Groopman, John D

    2009-12-01

    This perspective on Jubert et al. (beginning on page [1015] in this issue of the journal) discusses the use of microdosing with environmental carcinogens to accelerate the evaluation and optimization of chemopreventive interventions. The need for chemoprevention of environmental carcinogenesis is considered, as are the structure of microdosing, or phase 0, trials, technologies required to conduct microdose studies in this context, and ethical concerns. We also reflect on what microdosing studies have taught us to date.

  6. Short-distance walking speed and timed walking distance: redundant measures for clinical trials?

    PubMed

    Dobkin, Bruce H

    2006-02-28

    The velocity of a 15-meter walk and walking endurance (distance covered in 6 minutes) are considered distinct outcomes in clinical trials of stroke rehabilitation. Comfortable velocities used for each task in 24 subjects with chronic hemiparesis were not significantly different, however. Although speed and endurance did not reflect different domains of efficacy in outpatients whose usual speed was >0.5 m/s, the fastest feasible 15-meter velocity augmented these measures.

  7. Effect of a carbohydrate mouth rinse on simulated cycling time-trial performance commenced in a fed or fasted state.

    PubMed

    Lane, Stephen C; Bird, Stephen R; Burke, Louise M; Hawley, John A

    2013-02-01

    It is presently unclear whether the reported ergogenic effect of a carbohydrate (CHO) mouth rinse on cycling time-trial performance is affected by the acute nutritional status of an individual. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a CHO mouth rinse on a 60-min simulated cycling time-trial performance commenced in a fed or fasted state. Twelve competitive male cyclists each completed 4 experimental trials using a double-blinded Latin square design. Two trials were commenced 2 h after a meal that contained 2.5 g·kg(-1) body mass of CHO (FED) and 2 after an overnight fast (FST). Prior to and after every 12.5% of total time during a performance ride, either a 10% maltodextrin (CHO) or a taste-matched placebo (PLB) solution was mouth rinsed for 10 s then immediately expectorated. There were significant main effects for both pre-ride nutritional status (FED vs. FST; p < 0.01) and CHO mouth rinse (CHO vs. PLB; p < 0.01) on power output with an interaction evident between the interventions (p < 0.05). The CHO mouth rinse improved mean power to a greater extent after an overnight fast (282 vs. 273 W, 3.4%; p < 0.01) compared with a fed state (286 vs. 281 W, 1.8%; p < 0.05). We concluded that a CHO mouth rinse improved performance to a greater extent in a fasted compared with a fed state; however, optimal performance was achieved in a fed state with the addition of a CHO mouth rinse.

  8. Single and Combined Effects of Beetroot Crystals and Sodium Bicarbonate on 4-km Cycling Time Trial Performance.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Marcus J; Parr, Evelyn B; Hawley, John A; Burke, Louise M

    2016-11-11

    When ingested alone, beetroot juice and sodium bicarbonate are ergogenic for high-intensity exercise performance. This study sought to determine the independent and combined effects of these supplements. Eight endurance trained (V̇O2max 65 mL·kg·min(-1)) male cyclists completed four x 4-km time trials (TT) in a double-blind Latin square design supplementing with beetroot crystals (BC) for 3 days (15 g.day(-1) + 15 g 1 h prior to TT, containing 300 mg nitrate per 15 g), bicarbonate (Bi 0.3 g·kg(-1) body mass [BM] in 5 doses every 15 min from 2.5 h prior to TT); BC+Bi or placebo (PLA). Subjects completed TTs on a Velotron cycle ergometer under standardized lab conditions. Plasma nitrite concentrations were significantly elevated only in the BC+Bi trial prior to the TT (1520 ± 786 nmol.L(-1)) compared to baseline (665 ± 535 nmol.L(-1), p = 0.02) and the Bi and PLA conditions (Bi: 593 ± 203 nmol.L(-1), p < 0.01; PLA: 543 ± 369 nmol.L(-1), p< 0.01). Plasma nitrite concentrations were not elevated in the BC trial prior to the TT (1102 ± 218 nmol.L(-1)) compared to baseline (975 ± 607 nmol.L(-1), p > 0.05). Blood bicarbonate concentrations were increased in the BC+Bi and Bi trials prior to the TT (BC+Bi: 30.9 ± 2.8 mmol.L(-1); Bi: 31.7 ± 1.1 mmol.L(-1)). There were no differences in mean power output (386 - 394 W) or the time taken to complete the TT (335.8 - 338.1 s) between any conditions. Under the conditions of this study, supplementation was not ergogenic for 4-km TT performance.

  9. Impact of Withholding Breastfeeding at the Time of Vaccination on the Immunogenicity of Oral Rotavirus Vaccine—A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Asad; Kazi, Abdul Momin; Cortese, Margaret M.; Fleming, Jessica A.; Moon, SungSil; Parashar, Umesh D.; Jiang, Baoming; McNeal, Monica M.; Steele, Duncan; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Zaidi, Anita K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast milk contains anti-rotavirus IgA antibodies and other innate immune factors that inhibit rotavirus replication in vitro. These factors could diminish the immunogenicity of oral rotavirus vaccines, particularly if breastfeeding occurs close to the time of vaccine administration. Methods Between April 2011 and November 2012, we conducted an open label, randomized trial to compare the immunogenicity of Rotarix (RV1) in infants whose breastfeeding was withheld one hour before through one hour after vaccination with that in infants breastfed at the time of vaccination. The trial was conducted in the peri-urban area of Ibrahim Hyderi in Karachi, Pakistan. Both groups received three doses of RV1 at 6, 10 and 14 weeks of age. Seroconversion (anti-rotavirus IgA antibodies ≥20 U/mL in subjects seronegative at 6 weeks of age) following three vaccine doses (6, 10 and 14 weeks) was determined at 18 weeks of age (primary objective) and seroconversion following two doses (6 and 10 weeks) was determined at 14 weeks of age (secondary objective). Results Four hundred eligible infants were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio between the withholding breastfeeding and immediate breastfeeding arms. Overall, 353 (88.3%) infants completed the study according to protocol; 181 in the withholding breastfeeding group and 172 in the immediate breastfeeding group. After three RV1 doses, anti-rotavirus IgA antibody seroconversion was 28.2% (95% CI: 22.1; 35.1) in the withholding arm and 37.8% (95% CI: 30.9; 45.2) in the immediate breastfeeding arm (difference: -9.6% [95% CI: -19.2; 0.2] p=0.07). After two doses of RV1, seroconversion was 16.6% (95% CI: 11.9; 22.7) in the withholding arm and 29.1% (95% CI: 22.8, 36.3) in the immediate breastfeeding arm (difference: -12.5% [95% CI: -21.2,-3.8] p=0.005). Conclusions Withholding breastfeeding around the time of RV1 vaccine administration did not lead to increased anti-rotavirus IgA seroconversion compared with that seen with a

  10. Preventive home visits postpone mortality – a controlled trial with time-limited results

    PubMed Central

    Sahlen, Klas-Göran; Dahlgren, Lars; Hellner, Britt Mari; Stenlund, Hans; Lindholm, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Background There is a debate on whether preventive home visits to older people have any impact. This study was undertaken to investigate whether preventive home visits by professional health workers to older persons can postpone mortality in a Swedish context. Method A controlled trial in a small community in the north of Sweden. Participants are healthy pensioners aged 75 years and over. 196 pensioners were selected as the intervention group and 346 as the control group. The intervention, two visits per year, lasted two years. Results During the intervention, mortality was 27 per 1000 in the intervention group and 48 per 1000 in the control group. The incidence rate ratio for the control group IR2000–2001 was 1,79 (95%CI = 0,94–3,40). Analysing the data with an "on treatment approach" gave a significant result, 2,31 (95%CI = 1,07–5,02) After the trial the difference between the groups disappeared. Conclusion Preventive home visits in a healthy older population can postpone mortality in a Swedish context if they are carried out by professional health-workers in a structured way. When the home visit programme ended the effect on mortality disappeared. These findings are dependent on contextual factors that make it difficult to form general policy recommendations. PMID:16945128

  11. Recovery from a cycling time trial is enhanced with carbohydrate-protein supplementation vs. isoenergetic carbohydrate supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Berardi, John M; Noreen, Eric E; Lemon, Peter WR

    2008-01-01

    Background In this study we assessed whether a liquid carbohydrate-protein (C+P) supplement (0.8 g/kg C; 0.4 g/kg P) ingested early during recovery from a cycling time trial could enhance a subsequent 60 min effort on the same day vs. an isoenergetic liquid carbohydrate (CHO) supplement (1.2 g/kg). Methods Two hours after a standardized breakfast, 15 trained male cyclists completed a time trial in which they cycled as far as they could in 60 min (AMex) using a Computrainer indoor trainer. Following AMex, subjects ingested either C+P, or CHO at 10, 60 and 120 min, followed by a standardized meal at 4 h post exercise. At 6 h post AMex subjects repeated the time trial (PMex). Results There was a significant reduction in performance for both groups in PMex versus AMex. However, performance and power decreases between PMex and AMex were significantly greater (p ≤ 0.05) with CHO (-1.05 ± 0.44 km and -16.50 ± 6.74 W) vs C+P (-0.30 ± 0.50 km and -3.86 ± 6.47 W). Fat oxidation estimated from RER values was significantly greater (p ≤ 0.05) in the C+P vs CHO during the PMex, despite a higher average workload in the C+P group. Conclusion Under these experimental conditions, liquid C+P ingestion immediately after exercise increases fat oxidation, increases recovery, and improves subsequent same day, 60 min efforts relative to isoenergetic CHO ingestion. PMID:19108717

  12. A logrank test-based method for sizing clinical trials with two co-primary time-to-event endpoints.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Tomoyuki; Sozu, Takashi; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Evans, Scott R

    2013-07-01

    We discuss sample size determination for clinical trials evaluating the joint effects of an intervention on two potentially correlated co-primary time-to-event endpoints. For illustration, we consider the most common case, a comparison of two randomized groups, and use typical copula families to model the bivariate endpoints. A correlation structure of the bivariate logrank statistic is specified to account for the correlation among the endpoints, although the between-group comparison is performed using the univariate logrank statistic. We propose methods to calculate the required sample size to compare the two groups and evaluate the performance of the methods and the behavior of required sample sizes via simulation.

  13. Despite law, fewer than one in eight completed studies of drugs and biologics are reported on time on ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Law, Michael R; Kawasumi, Yuko; Morgan, Steven G

    2011-12-01

    Clinical trial registries are public databases created to prospectively document the methods and measures of prescription drug studies and retrospectively collect a summary of results. In 2007 the US government began requiring that researchers register certain studies and report the results on ClinicalTrials.gov, a public database of federally and privately supported trials conducted in the United States and abroad. We found that although the mandate briefly increased trial registrations, 39 percent of trials were still registered late after the mandate's deadline, and only 12 percent of completed studies reported results within a year, as required by the mandate. This result is important because there is evidence of selective reporting even among registered trials. Furthermore, we found that trials funded by industry were more than three times as likely to report results than were trials funded by the National Institutes of Health. Thus, additional enforcement may be required to ensure disclosure of all trial results, leading to a better understanding of drug safety and efficacy. Congress should also reconsider the three-year delay in reporting results for products that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and are in use by patients.

  14. "You can save time if…"—A qualitative study on internal factors slowing down clinical trials in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Constanze; Limacher, Manuela; Burri, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Background The costs, complexity, legal requirements and number of amendments associated with clinical trials are rising constantly, which negatively affects the efficient conduct of trials. In Sub-Saharan Africa, this situation is exacerbated by capacity and funding limitations, which further increase the workload of clinical trialists. At the same time, trials are critically important for improving public health in these settings. The aim of this study was to identify the internal factors that slow down clinical trials in Sub-Saharan Africa. Here, factors are limited to those that exclusively relate to clinical trial teams and sponsors. These factors may be influenced independently of external conditions and may significantly increase trial efficiency if addressed by the respective teams. Methods We conducted sixty key informant interviews with clinical trial staff working in different positions in two clinical research centres in Kenya, Ghana, Burkina Faso and Senegal. The study covered English- and French-speaking, and Eastern and Western parts of Sub-Saharan Africa. We performed thematic analysis of the interview transcripts. Results We found various internal factors associated with slowing down clinical trials; these were summarised into two broad themes, “planning” and “site organisation”. These themes were consistently mentioned across positions and countries. “Planning” factors related to budget feasibility, clear project ideas, realistic deadlines, understanding of trial processes, adaptation to the local context and involvement of site staff in planning. “Site organisation” factors covered staff turnover, employment conditions, career paths, workload, delegation and management. Conclusions We found that internal factors slowing down clinical trials are of high importance to trial staff. Our data suggest that adequate and coherent planning, careful assessment of the setting, clear task allocation and management capacity strengthening may

  15. Challenges, successes and patterns of enrolment in the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) trial

    PubMed Central

    Rappoport, C; Engen, NW; Carey, C; Hudson, F; Denning, E; Sharma, S; Florence, E; Vjecha, MJ

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this report is to describe the challenges, successes and patterns of enrolment in the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study. Methods START is a collaboration of many partners with central coordination provided by the protocol team, the statistical and data management centre (SDMC), the International Network for Strategic Initiatives in Global HIV Trials (INSIGHT) network leadership, international coordinating centres and site coordinating centres. The SDMC prepared reports on study accrual, baseline characteristics and site performance that allowed monitoring of enrolment and data quality and helped to ensure the successful enrolment of this large international trial. We describe the pattern of enrolment and challenges faced during the enrolment period of the trial. Results An initial pilot phase began in April 2009 and established feasibility of accrual at 101 sites. In August 2010, funding approval for an expanded definitive phase led to the successful accrual of 4688 participants from 215 sites in 35 countries by December 2013. Challenges to accrual included regulatory delays (e.g. national/local ethics approval and drug importation approval) and logistical obstacles (e.g. execution of contracts with pharmaceutical companies, setting up of a central drug repository and translation of participant materials). The personal engagement of investigators, strong central study coordination, and frequent and transparent communication with site investigators, community members and participants were key contributing factors to this success. Conclusions Accrual into START was completed in a timely fashion despite multiple challenges. This success was attributable to the efforts of site investigators committed to maintaining study equipoise, transparent and responsive study coordination, and community involvement in problem‐solving. PMID:25711319

  16. Time to treatment response in first episode schizophrenia: should acute treatment trials last several months?

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Juan A.; Robinson, Delbert G.; Sevy, Serge M.; Napolitano, Barbara; McCormack, Joanne; Lesser, Martin L.; Kane, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Response patterns may differ between patients with first episode and multi-episode schizophrenia. This analysis explored trial duration with first episode patients and whether early limited improvement predicts ultimate lack of treatment response with first episode patients as it does with multi-episode patients. Methods 112 subjects (mean age=23.3 years [SD=5.1]) who presented between November 1998 and October 2004 with a first episode of psychosis and had a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizophreniform or schizoaffective disorder, were randomly assigned to treatment with olanzapine or risperidone for 16 weeks. Treatment response, the primary outcome measure, was defined as a rating of mild or better on all of the positive symptom items on the SADS-C + PD. Response rates were calculated for each study week. A logistic regression analysis examined the association between percent reduction in symptom severity scores from baseline values at weeks 2, 4 or 8 and response by week 16. Results The estimated cumulative response rate by week 8 was 39.59% (95% CI: 29.77% – 49.41%) and 65.19% (95% CI: 55.11% – 75.27%) by week 16. The confidence intervals for estimated response at weeks 10, 12, 14 and 16 were not distinct. Response rates increased approximately 5 to 6 percentage points each 2 week interval between week 10 and 16. Percent reduction in symptom severity score at week 4 (but not 2 or 8) was associated (Chi-square = 3.96; df = 1, p<0.05) with responder status at week 16 (odds ratio: 1.03; 95% CI: 1.00;1.05). However, receiver operating characteristic curves did not suggest any level of percent symptom reduction that would be clinically useful as a predictor of response by week 16. Conclusions Many first episode patients respond between weeks 8 and 16 of treatment with a single antipsychotic medication. Limited early symptom improvement does not identify with enough accuracy to be clinically useful those first episode patients who will not

  17. Real-Time Fatigue Reduction in Emergency Care Clinicians: The SleepTrackTXT Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, P. Daniel; Buysse, Daniel J.; Weaver, Matthew D.; Doman, Jack M.; Moore, Charity G.; Suffoletto, Brian P.; McManigle, Kyle L.; Callaway, Clifton W.; Yealy, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed performance characteristics and impact of a mobile phone text-message intervention for reducing intra-shift fatigue among emergency clinician shift workers. Methods We used a randomized controlled trial of 100 participants. All participants received text-message assessments at the start, every 4-hours during, and at end of scheduled shifts over a 90-day period. Text-message queries measured self-rated sleepiness, fatigue, and difficulty with concentration. Additional text-messages were sent to intervention participants to promote alertness. A performance measure of interest was compliance with answering text-messages. Results Ninety-nine participants documented 2,621 shifts and responded to 36,073 of 40,947 text-messages (88% compliance rate). Intervention participants reported lower mean fatigue and sleepiness at 4 hours, 8 hours, and at the end of 12-hour shifts compared to controls (p<0.05). Intervention participants reported better sleep quality at 90-days compared to baseline (p=0.01). Conclusions We showed feasibility and short-term efficacy of a text-message based assessment and intervention tool. PMID:26305869

  18. Interim analysis for binary outcome trials with a long fixed follow-up time and repeated outcome assessments at pre-specified times.

    PubMed

    Parpia, Sameer; Julian, Jim A; Gu, Chushu; Thabane, Lehana; Levine, Mark N

    2014-01-01

    In trials with binary outcomes, assessed repeatedly at pre-specified times and where the subject is considered to have experienced a failure at the first occurrence of the outcome, interim analyses are performed, generally, after half or more of the subjects have completed follow-up. Depending on the duration of accrual relative to the length of follow-up, this may be inefficient, since there is a possibility that the trial will have completed accrual prior to the interim analysis. An alternative is to plan the interim analysis after subjects have completed follow-up to a time that is less than the fixed full follow-up duration. Using simulations, we evaluated three methods to estimate the event proportion for the interim analysis in terms of type I and II errors and the probability of early stopping. We considered: 1) estimation of the event proportion based on subjects who have been followed for a pre-specified time (less than the full follow-up duration) or who experienced the outcome; 2) estimation of the event proportion based on data from all subjects that have been randomized by the time of the interim analysis; and 3) the Kaplan-Meier approach to estimate the event proportion at the time of the interim analysis. Our results show that all methods preserve and have comparable type I and II errors in certain scenarios. In these cases, we recommend using the Kaplan-Meier method because it incorporates all the available data and has greater probability of early stopping when the treatment effect exists.

  19. Measuring Time to Biochemical Failure in the TROG 96.01 Trial: When Should the Clock Start Ticking?

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, James W.; Steigler, Allison; Kumar, Mahesh; Lamb, David S.; Joseph, David; Spry, Nigel A.; Tai, Keen-Hun; Atkinson, Chris; Turner, Sandra FRANZCR; Greer, Peter B.; Gleeson, Paul S.; D'Este, Catherine

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: We sought to determine whether short-term neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (STAD) duration influences the optimal time point from which Phoenix fail (time to biochemical failure; TTBF) should be measured. Methods and Materials: In the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 96.01 trial, men with locally advanced prostate cancer were randomized to 3 or 6 months STAD before and during prostatic irradiation (XRT) or to XRT alone. The prognostic value of TTBF measured from the end of radiation (ERT) and randomization were compared using Cox models. Results: Between 1996 and 2000, 802 eligible patients were randomized. In 436 men with Phoenix failure, TTBF measured from randomization was a powerful predictor of prostate cancer-specific survival and marginally more accurate than TTBF measured from ERT in Cox models. Insufficient data were available to confirm that TTBF measured from testosterone recovery may also be a suitable option. Conclusions: TTBF measured from randomization (commencement of therapy) performed well in this trial dataset and will be a convenient option if this finding holds in other datasets that include long-term androgen deprivation data.

  20. Detrended fluctuation analysis and adaptive fractal analysis of stride time data in Parkinson's disease: stitching together short gait trials.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Marietta; Schubert, Patric; Liebherr, Magnus; Haas, Christian T

    2014-01-01

    Variability indicates motor control disturbances and is suitable to identify gait pathologies. It can be quantified by linear parameters (amplitude estimators) and more sophisticated nonlinear methods (structural information). Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) is one method to measure structural information, e.g., from stride time series. Recently, an improved method, Adaptive Fractal Analysis (AFA), has been proposed. This method has not been applied to gait data before. Fractal scaling methods (FS) require long stride-to-stride data to obtain valid results. However, in clinical studies, it is not usual to measure a large number of strides (e.g., [Formula: see text][Formula: see text] strides). Amongst others, clinical gait analysis is limited due to short walkways, thus, FS seem to be inapplicable. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate FS under clinical conditions. Stride time data of five self-paced walking trials ([Formula: see text] strides each) of subjects with PD and a healthy control group (CG) was measured. To generate longer time series, stride time sequences were stitched together. The coefficient of variation (CV), fractal scaling exponents [Formula: see text] (DFA) and [Formula: see text] (AFA) were calculated. Two surrogate tests were performed: A) the whole time series was randomly shuffled; B) the single trials were randomly shuffled separately and afterwards stitched together. CV did not discriminate between PD and CG. However, significant differences between PD and CG were found concerning [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. Surrogate version B yielded a higher mean squared error and empirical quantiles than version A. Hence, we conclude that the stitching procedure creates an artificial structure resulting in an overestimation of true [Formula: see text]. The method of stitching together sections of gait seems to be appropriate in order to distinguish between PD and CG with FS. It provides an approach to integrate FS as

  1. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis and Adaptive Fractal Analysis of Stride Time Data in Parkinson's Disease: Stitching Together Short Gait Trials

    PubMed Central

    Liebherr, Magnus; Haas, Christian T.

    2014-01-01

    Variability indicates motor control disturbances and is suitable to identify gait pathologies. It can be quantified by linear parameters (amplitude estimators) and more sophisticated nonlinear methods (structural information). Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) is one method to measure structural information, e.g., from stride time series. Recently, an improved method, Adaptive Fractal Analysis (AFA), has been proposed. This method has not been applied to gait data before. Fractal scaling methods (FS) require long stride-to-stride data to obtain valid results. However, in clinical studies, it is not usual to measure a large number of strides (e.g., strides). Amongst others, clinical gait analysis is limited due to short walkways, thus, FS seem to be inapplicable. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate FS under clinical conditions. Stride time data of five self-paced walking trials ( strides each) of subjects with PD and a healthy control group (CG) was measured. To generate longer time series, stride time sequences were stitched together. The coefficient of variation (CV), fractal scaling exponents (DFA) and (AFA) were calculated. Two surrogate tests were performed: A) the whole time series was randomly shuffled; B) the single trials were randomly shuffled separately and afterwards stitched together. CV did not discriminate between PD and CG. However, significant differences between PD and CG were found concerning and . Surrogate version B yielded a higher mean squared error and empirical quantiles than version A. Hence, we conclude that the stitching procedure creates an artificial structure resulting in an overestimation of true . The method of stitching together sections of gait seems to be appropriate in order to distinguish between PD and CG with FS. It provides an approach to integrate FS as standard in clinical gait analysis and to overcome limitations such as short walkways. PMID:24465708

  2. A Phase III Randomized Trial of the Timing of Meloxicam With Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita; Patil, Nikhilesh; Wallace, Kris; Borg, Jette; Zhou, David; Ma, Clement; Pond, Greg

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication is used to reduce prostate edema and urinary symptoms following prostate brachytherapy. We hypothesized that a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor regimen started 1 week prior to seed implant might diminish the inflammatory response, thus reducing edema, retention rates, and symptom severity. Methods and Materials: From March 2004 to February 2008, 316 men consented to an institutional review board-approved randomized study of a 4-week course of meloxicam, 7.5 mg orally twice per day, starting either on the day of implant or 1 week prior to implant. Brachytherapy was performed using iodine-125 seeds and was preplanned and performed under transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and fluoroscopic guidance. Prostate volume obtained by MR imaging at 1 month was compared to baseline prostate volume obtained by TRUS planimetry and expressed as an edema factor. The trial endpoints were prostate edema at 1 month, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire results at 1 and 3 months, and any need for catheterization. Results: Results for 300 men were analyzed. Median age was 61 (range, 45-79 years), and median TRUS prostate volume was 35.7 cc (range, 18.1-69.5 cc). Median IPSS at baseline was 5 (range, 0-24) and was 15 at 1 month, 16 at 3 months, and 10 at 6 months. Catheterization was required for 7% of patients (6.2% day 0 arm vs. 7.9% day -7 arm; p = 0.65). The median edema factor at 1 month was 1.02 (range, 0.73-1.7). 1.01 day 0 arm vs. 1.05 day -7 arm. Baseline prostate volume remained the primary predictor of postimplant urinary retention. Conclusions: Starting meloxicam 1 week prior to brachytherapy compared to starting immediately after the procedure did not reduce 1-month edema, improve IPSSs at 1 or 3 months, or reduce the need for catheterization.

  3. Reducing office workers’ sitting time: rationale and study design for the Stand Up Victoria cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Excessive time spent in sedentary behaviours (sitting or lying with low energy expenditure) is associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. Desk-based office workers typically accumulate high amounts of daily sitting time, often in prolonged unbroken bouts. The Stand Up Victoria study aims to determine whether a 3-month multi-component intervention in the office setting reduces workplace sitting, particularly prolonged, unbroken sitting time, and results in improvements in cardio-metabolic biomarkers and work-related outcomes, compared to usual practice. Methods/Design A two-arm cluster-randomized controlled trial (RCT), with worksites as the unit of randomization, will be conducted in 16 worksites located in Victoria, Australia. Work units from one organisation (Department of Human Services, Australian Government) will be allocated to either the multi-component intervention (organisational, environmental [height-adjustable workstations], and individual behavioural strategies) or to a usual practice control group. The recruitment target is 160 participants (office-based workers aged 18–65 years and working at least 0.6 full time equivalent) per arm. At each assessment (0- [baseline], 3- [post intervention], and 12-months [follow-up]), objective measurement via the activPAL3 activity monitor will be used to assess workplace: sitting time (primary outcome); prolonged sitting time (sitting time accrued in bouts of ≥30 minutes); standing time; sit-to-stand transitions; and, moving time. Additional outcomes assessed will include: non-workplace activity; cardio-metabolic biomarkers and health indicators (including fasting glucose, lipids and insulin; anthropometric measures; blood pressure; and, musculoskeletal symptoms); and, work-related outcomes (presenteeism, absenteeism, productivity, work performance). Incremental cost-effectiveness and identification of both workplace and individual

  4. Deceptive Manipulation of Competitive Starting Strategies Influences Subsequent Pacing, Physiological Status, and Perceptual Responses during Cycling Time Trials.

    PubMed

    Williams, Emily L; Jones, Hollie S; Sparks, S Andy; Marchant, David C; Midgley, Adrian W; Bridge, Craig A; McNaughton, Lars R

    2016-01-01

    Little is currently known regarding competitor influence on pacing at the start of an event and in particular the subsequent effect on the remaining distance. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of starting pace on the physiological and psychological responses during cycling time trials (TT) utilizing an innovative approach allowing pace to be accurately and dynamically replicated, as well as deceptively manipulated. Ten competitive male cyclists completed five 16.1 km TT, two baseline trials performed alone (BLs), and three with a simulated, dynamic avatar of which they were to match the pace of for the initial 4 km. The avatar represented either the cyclist's fastest BL performance (NORM), 105% (FAST), or 95% (SLOW), of fastest BL performance (FBL). Physiological and psychological responses were measured every quartile of the TT. Despite manipulating a starting speed of ± 5% of fastest previous performance, there was no effect on overall 16.1 km TT performance. Manipulated starting strategies did however evoke different physiological and perceptual responses. Whole trial differences found that SLOW produced lower HR, VO2, BLa and RPE than FBL (p ≤ 0.03) and higher SE than FAST (p ≤ 0.03). Additionally, FAST had greater internal attention than NORM (p < 0.04). Over time all psychological and physiological variables had a significant condition × quartile interaction in the initial or second quartile mediated by the prescribed starting strategies. Furthermore, RPE, affect, and internal attention remained elevated throughout FAST despite an attenuation in pace during self-selection of pace. There were no differences in performance time when manipulating a 16.1 km cycling TT starting strategy. A slow start, encouraged greater positive perceptions, and less negative physiological consequences than a faster start, and produces no impairment to performance time. It would therefore be considered an advantage in a non-drafting event, not

  5. Deceptive Manipulation of Competitive Starting Strategies Influences Subsequent Pacing, Physiological Status, and Perceptual Responses during Cycling Time Trials

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Emily L.; Jones, Hollie S.; Sparks, S. Andy; Marchant, David C.; Midgley, Adrian W.; Bridge, Craig A.; McNaughton, Lars R.

    2016-01-01

    Little is currently known regarding competitor influence on pacing at the start of an event and in particular the subsequent effect on the remaining distance. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of starting pace on the physiological and psychological responses during cycling time trials (TT) utilizing an innovative approach allowing pace to be accurately and dynamically replicated, as well as deceptively manipulated. Ten competitive male cyclists completed five 16.1 km TT, two baseline trials performed alone (BLs), and three with a simulated, dynamic avatar of which they were to match the pace of for the initial 4 km. The avatar represented either the cyclist's fastest BL performance (NORM), 105% (FAST), or 95% (SLOW), of fastest BL performance (FBL). Physiological and psychological responses were measured every quartile of the TT. Despite manipulating a starting speed of ± 5% of fastest previous performance, there was no effect on overall 16.1 km TT performance. Manipulated starting strategies did however evoke different physiological and perceptual responses. Whole trial differences found that SLOW produced lower HR, VO2, BLa and RPE than FBL (p ≤ 0.03) and higher SE than FAST (p ≤ 0.03). Additionally, FAST had greater internal attention than NORM (p < 0.04). Over time all psychological and physiological variables had a significant condition × quartile interaction in the initial or second quartile mediated by the prescribed starting strategies. Furthermore, RPE, affect, and internal attention remained elevated throughout FAST despite an attenuation in pace during self-selection of pace. There were no differences in performance time when manipulating a 16.1 km cycling TT starting strategy. A slow start, encouraged greater positive perceptions, and less negative physiological consequences than a faster start, and produces no impairment to performance time. It would therefore be considered an advantage in a non-drafting event, not

  6. Subacute dietary toxicities of dicrotophos and dieldrin in time-replicated trials with young ring-necked pheasants and mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.; Lamb, D.W.; Kenaga, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    The dietary toxicities of (E)-phosphoric acid 3-(dimethylamino)-1-methyl-3-oxo-1-propenyl dimethyl ester (dicrotophos) and 3,4,5,6,9,9-hexachloro-1a,2,2a,3,6,6a,7,7a-octahydro-2,7:3,6-dimethanonaphth[2,3-b]oxirene (dieldrin) to 10-day-old ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) and 5-day-old mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were compared in five time-replicated trials. Toxicities were calculated as median lethal concentrations (LC50s) based on 5 days of ad libitum feeding on geometrically spaced concentrations of toxicant. The LC50s were more uniform for dieldrin than for dicrotophos with both species and more uniform for pheasants than for mallards with both compounds. The LC50s of dieldrin and dicrotophos averaged 59 [standard deviation (SD) = 4.4] and 45 ppm (SD = 5.0) for pheasants, and 156 (SD = 24.9) and 102 ppm (SD = 24.9) for mallards. Changes in LC50s between successive trials, although possibly haphazard, were nearly always in the same direction for both compounds with both species. Feeding rates at various concentrations of equivalent potency gave meaningful insight into the sensitivity and vulnerability of both species to these insecticides. Comparisons of 5 and 10-day-old mallards demonstrated the importance of age differences to interpretation of short-term subacute toxicity data. For example, at 5 days dicrotophos was 1.5 times more toxic than dieldrin, but at 10 days dieldrin was 2.6 times more toxic. These differences are explained.

  7. Online versus Face-to-Face Training of Critical Time Intervention: A Matching Cluster Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivet, Jeffrey; Zerger, Suzanne; Greene, R. Neil; Kenney, Rachael R.; Herman, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of online education to providers who serve people experiencing homelessness, comparing online and face-to-face training of Critical Time Intervention (CTI), an evidence-based case management model. The authors recruited 184 staff from nineteen homeless service agencies to participate in one of two training…

  8. Family-based interventions for reducing sedentary time in youth: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Marsh, S; Foley, L S; Wilks, D C; Maddison, R

    2014-02-01

    Family involvement in interventions to reduce sedentary time may help foster appropriate long-term screen-based habits in children. This review systematically synthesized evidence from randomized controlled trials of interventions with a family component that targeted reduction of sedentary time, including TV viewing, video games and computer use, in children. MEDLINE, PubMed, PsycInfo, CINAHL and Embase were searched from inception through March 2012. Seventeen articles were considered eligible and included in the review. Studies were judged to be at low-to-moderate risk of bias. Despite inconsistent study results, level of parental involvement, rather than the setting itself, appeared an important determinant of intervention success. Studies including a parental component of medium-to-high intensity were consistently associated with statistically significant changes in sedentary behaviours. Participant age was also identified as a determinant of intervention outcomes; all three studies conducted in pre-school children demonstrated significant decreases in sedentary time. Finally, TV exposure appeared to be related to changes in energy intake rather than physical activity. Future studies should assess the effects of greater parental involvement and child age on success of sedentary behaviour interventions. More research is required to better understand the relationship between screen time and health behaviours, particularly energy intake.

  9. Protocol for the CHEST Australia Trial: a phase II randomised controlled trial of an intervention to reduce time-to-consult with symptoms of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Sonya R; Murchie, Peter; Campbell, Neil; Walter, Fiona M; Mazza, Danielle; Habgood, Emily; Kutzer, Yvonne; Martin, Andrew; Goodall, Stephen; Barnes, David J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide, with 1.3 million new cases diagnosed every year. It has one of the lowest survival outcomes of any cancer because over two-thirds of patients are diagnosed when curative treatment is not possible. International research has focused on screening and community interventions to promote earlier presentation to a healthcare provider to improve early lung cancer detection. This paper describes the protocol for a phase II, multisite, randomised controlled trial, for patients at increased risk of lung cancer in the primary care setting, to facilitate early presentation with symptoms of lung cancer. Methods/analysis The intervention is based on a previous Scottish CHEST Trial that comprised of a primary-care nurse consultation to discuss and implement a self-help manual, followed by self-monitoring reminders to improve symptom appraisal and encourage help-seeking in patients at increased risk of lung cancer. We aim to recruit 550 patients from two Australian states: Western Australia and Victoria. Patients will be randomised to the Intervention (a health consultation involving a self-help manual, monthly prompts and spirometry) or Control (spirometry followed by usual care). Eligible participants are long-term smokers with at least 20 pack years, aged 55 and over, including ex-smokers if their cessation date was less than 15 years ago. The primary outcome is consultation rate for respiratory symptoms. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from The University of Western Australia's Human Research Ethics Committee (RA/4/1/6018) and The University of Melbourne Human Research Committee (1 441 433). A summary of the results will be disseminated to participants and we plan to publish the main trial outcomes in a single paper. Further publications are anticipated after further data analysis. Findings will be presented at national and international conferences from late 2016. Trial

  10. Positive Pacing Strategies Are Utilized by Elite Male and Female Para-cyclists in Short Time Trials in the Velodrome

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Rachel L.

    2016-01-01

    In para-cycling, competitors are classed based on functional impairment resulting in cyclists with neurological and locomotor impairments competing against each other. In Paralympic competition, classes are combined by using a factoring adjustment to race times to produce the overall medallists. Pacing in short-duration track cycling events is proposed to utilize an “all-out” strategy in able-bodied competition. However, pacing in para-cycling may vary depending on the level of impairment. Analysis of the pacing strategies employed by different classification groups may offer scope for optimal performance; therefore, this study investigated the pacing strategy adopted during the 1-km time trial (TT) and 500-m TT in elite C1 to C3 para-cyclists and able-bodied cyclists. Total times and intermediate split times (125-m intervals; measured to 0.001 s) were obtained from the C1-C3 men's 1-km TT (n = 28) and women's 500-m TT (n = 9) from the 2012 Paralympic Games and the men's 1-km TT (n = 19) and women's 500-m TT (n = 12) from the 2013 UCI World Track Championships from publically available video. Split times were expressed as actual time, factored time (for the para-cyclists) and as a percentage of total time. A two-way analysis of variance was used to investigate differences in split times between the different classifications and the able-bodied cyclists in the men's 1-km TT and between the para-cyclists and able-bodied cyclists in the women's 500-m TT. The importance of position at the first split was investigated with Kendall's Tau-b correlation. The first 125-m split time was the slowest for all cyclists, representing the acceleration phase from a standing start. C2 cyclists were slowest at this 125-m split, probably due to a combination of remaining seated in this acceleration phase and a high proportion of cyclists in this group being trans-femoral amputees. Not all cyclists used aero-bars, preferring to use drop, flat or bullhorn handlebars. Split times

  11. A First-Time-In-Human Phase I Clinical Trial of Bispecific Antibody-Targeted, Paclitaxel-Packaged Bacterial Minicells

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Mark; McArthur, Grant A.; Pattison, Scott T.; Pattison, Stacey L.; MacDiarmid, Jennifer; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu; Scott, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Background We have harnessed a novel biological system, the bacterial minicell, to deliver cancer therapeutics to cancer cells. Preclinical studies showed that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted, paclitaxel-loaded minicells (EGFRminicellsPac) have antitumor effects in xenograft models. To examine the safety of the minicell delivery system, we initiated a first-time-in-human, open-label, phase I clinical study of EGFRminicellsPac in patients with advanced solid tumors. Methodology Patients received 5 weekly infusions followed by a treatment free week. Seven dose levels (1x108, 1x109, 3x109, 1x1010, 1.5x1010, 2x1010, 5x1010) were evaluated using a 3+3 dose-escalation design. Primary objectives were safety, tolerability and determination of the maximum tolerated dose. Secondary objectives were assessment of immune/inflammatory responses and antitumor activity. Principal Findings Twenty eight patients were enrolled, 22 patients completed at least one cycle of EGFRminicellsPac; 6 patients did not complete a cycle due to rapidly progressive disease. A total of 236 doses was delivered over 42 cycles, with a maximum of 45 doses administered to a single patient. Most common treatment-related adverse events were rigors and pyrexia. No deaths resulted from treatment-related adverse events and the maximum tolerated dose was defined as 1x1010 EGFRminicellsPac. Surprisingly, only a mild self-limiting elevation in the inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-8 and TNFα and anti-inflammatory IL-10 was observed. Anti-LPS antibody titers peaked by dose 3 and were maintained at that level despite repeat dosing with the bacterially derived minicells. Ten patients (45%; n = 22) achieved stable disease as their best response. Conclusions/Significance This is the first study in humans of a novel biological system that can provide targeted delivery of a range of chemotherapeutic drugs to solid tumor cells. Bispecific antibody-targeted minicells, packaged with the chemotherapeutic

  12. Stress and Fatigue Management Using Balneotherapy in a Short-Time Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Razbadauskas, Artūras; Sąlyga, Jonas; Martinkėnas, Arvydas

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the influence of high-salinity geothermal mineral water on stress and fatigue. Method. 180 seamen were randomized into three groups: geothermal (65), music (50), and control (65). The geothermal group was administered 108 g/L salinity geothermal water bath for 2 weeks five times a week. Primary outcome was effect on stress and fatigue. Secondary outcomes were the effect on cognitive function, mood, and pain. Results. The improvements after balneotherapy were a reduction in the number and intensity of stress-related symptoms, a reduction in pain and general, physical, and mental fatigue, and an improvement in stress-related symptoms management, mood, activation, motivation, and cognitive functions with effect size from 0.8 to 2.3. In the music therapy group, there were significant positive changes in the number of stress symptoms, intensity, mood, pain, and activity with the effect size of 0.4 to 1.1. The researchers did not observe any significant positive changes in the control group. The comparison between the groups showed that balneotherapy was superior to music therapy and no treatment group. Conclusions. Balneotherapy is beneficial for stress and fatigue reduction in comparison with music or no therapy group. Geothermal water baths have a potential as an efficient approach to diminish stress caused by working or living conditions. PMID:27051455

  13. Dairy-based preexercise meal does not affect gut comfort or time-trial performance in female cyclists.

    PubMed

    Haakonssen, Eric C; Ross, Megan L; Cato, Louise E; Nana, Alisa; Knight, Emma J; Jenkins, David G; Martin, David T; Burke, Louise M

    2014-10-01

    Some athletes avoid dairy in the meal consumed before exercise due to fears about gastrointestinal discomfort. Regular exclusion of dairy foods may unnecessarily reduce intake of high quality proteins and calcium with possible implications for body composition and bone health. This study compared the effects of meals that included (Dairy) or excluded (Control) dairy foods on gastric comfort and subsequent cycling performance. Well-trained female cyclists (n = 32; mean ± SD; 24.3 ± 4.1 y; VO(2peak) 57.1 ± 4.9 ml/kg/min) completed two trials (randomized cross-over design) in which they consumed a meal (2 g/kg carbohydrate and 54 kJ/kg) 2 hr before a 90-min cycle session (80 min at 60% maximal aerobic power followed by a 10-min time trial; TT). The dairy meal contained 3 servings of dairy foods providing ~1350 mg calcium. Gut comfort and palatability were measured using questionnaires. Performance was measured as maximum mean power during the TT (MMP10(min)). There was no statistical or clinical evidence of an effect of meal type on MMP10(min) with a mean difference (Dairy - Control) of 4 W (95% CI [-2, 9]). There was no evidence of an association between pretrial gut comfort and meal type (p = .15) or between gut comfort delta scores and meal type postmeal (p = .31), preexercise (p = .17) or postexercise (p = .80). There was no statistical or clinical evidence of a difference in palatability between meal types. In summary, substantial amounts of dairy foods can be included in meals consumed before strenuous cycling without impairing either gut comfort or performance.

  14. Early biomarker activity in severe sepsis and septic shock and a contemporary review of immunotherapy trials: not a time to give up, but to give it earlier.

    PubMed

    Rivers, Emanuel P; Jaehne, Anja Kathrin; Nguyen, H Bryant; Papamatheakis, Demosthenes G; Singer, Daniel; Yang, James J; Brown, Samantha; Klausner, Howard

    2013-02-01

    Improving time to diagnosis and intervention has positively impacted outcomes in acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and trauma through elucidating the early pathogenesis of those diseases. This insight may partly explain the futility of time-insensitive immunotherapy trials for severe sepsis and septic shock. The aim of this study was to examine the early natural history of circulatory biomarker activity in sepsis, relative to previous animal and human outcome trials. We conducted a literature search using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar to identify outcome trials targeting biomarkers with emphasis on the timing of therapy. These findings were compared with the biomarker activity observed over the first 72 h of hospital presentation in a cohort of severe sepsis and septic shock patients. Biomarker levels in animal and human research models are elevated within 30 min after exposure to an inflammatory septic stimulus. Consistent with these findings, the biomarker cascade is activated at the most proximal point of hospital presentation in our patient cohort. These circulatory biomarkers overlap; some have bimodal patterns and generally peak between 3 and 36 h while diminishing over the subsequent 72 h of observation. When this is taken into account, prior outcome immunotherapy trials have generally enrolled patients after peak circulatory biomarker concentrations. In previous immunotherapy sepsis trials, intervention was delayed after the optimal window of peak biomarker activity. As a result, future studies need to recalibrate the timing of enrollment and administration of immunotherapy agents that still may hold great promise for this deadly disease.

  15. The effects of prolonged inspiratory time during one-lung ventilation: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, S M; Kim, W H; Ahn, H J; Kim, J A; Yang, M K; Lee, C H; Lee, J H; Kim, Y R; Choi, J W

    2013-09-01

    We evaluated the effects of a prolonged inspiratory time on gas exchange in subjects undergoing one-lung ventilation for thoracic surgery. One hundred patients were randomly assigned to Group I:E = 1:2 or Group I:E = 1:1. Arterial blood gas analysis and respiratory mechanics measurements were performed 10 min after anaesthesia induction, 30 and 60 min after initiation of one-lung ventilation, and 15 min after restoration of conventional two-lung ventilation. The mean (SD) ratio of the partial pressure of arterial oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen after 60 min of one-lung ventilation was significantly lower in Group I:E = 1:2 compared with Group I:E = 1:1 (27.7 (13.2) kPa vs 35.2 (22.1) kPa, respectively, p = 0.043). Mean (SD) physiological dead space-to-tidal volume ratio after 60 min of one-lung ventilation was significantly higher in Group I:E = 1:2 compared with Group I:E = 1:1 (0.46 (0.04) vs 0.43 (0.04), respectively, p = 0.008). Median (IQR [range]) peak inspiratory pressure was higher in Group I:E = 1:2 compared with Group I:E = 1:1 after 60 min of one-lung ventilation (23 (22-25 [18-29]) cmH2O vs 20 (18-21 [16-27]) cmH2O, respectively, p < 0.001) and median (IQR [range]) mean airway pressure was lower in Group I:E = 1:2 compared with Group I:E = 1:1 (10 (8-11 [5-15]) cmH2O vs 11 (10-13 [5-16]) cmH2O, respectively, p < 0.001). We conclude that, compared with an I:E ratio of 1:2, an I:E ratio of 1:1 resulted in a modest improvement in oxygenation and decreased shunt fraction during one-lung ventilation.

  16. Sildenafil does not improve steady state cardiovascular hemodynamics, peak power, or 15-km time trial cycling performance at simulated moderate or high altitudes in men and women.

    PubMed

    Kressler, Jochen; Stoutenberg, Mark; Roos, Bernard A; Friedlander, Anne L; Perry, Arlette C; Signorile, Joseph F; Jacobs, Kevin A

    2011-12-01

    Sildenafil improves oxygen delivery and maximal exercise capacity at very high altitudes (≥ 4,350 m), but it is unknown whether sildenafil improves these variables and longer-duration exercise performance at moderate and high altitudes where competitions are more common. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of sildenafil on cardiovascular hemodynamics, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)), peak exercise capacity (W (peak)), and 15-km time trial performance in endurance-trained subjects at simulated moderate (MA; ~2,100 m, 16.2% F(I)O(2)) and high (HA; ~3,900 m, 12.8% F(I)O(2)) altitudes. Eleven men and ten women completed two HA W (peak) trials after ingesting placebo or 50 mg sildenafil. Subjects then completed four exercise trials (30 min at 55% of altitude-specific W (peak) + 15-km time trial) at MA and HA after ingesting placebo or 50 mg sildenafil. All trials were performed in randomized, counterbalanced, and double-blind fashion. Sildenafil had little influence on cardiovascular hemodynamics at MA or HA, but did result in higher SaO(2) values (+3%, p < 0.05) compared to placebo during steady state and time trial exercise at HA. W (peak) at HA was 19% lower than SL (p < 0.001) and was not significantly affected by sildenafil. Similarly, the significantly slower time trial performance at MA (28.1 ± 0.5 min, p = 0.016) and HA (30.3 ± 0.6 min, p < 0.001) compared to SL (27.5 ± 0.6 min) was unaffected by sildenafil. We conclude that sildenafil is unlikely to exert beneficial effects at altitudes <4,000 m for a majority of the population.

  17. Tracking real-time neural activation of conceptual knowledge using single-trial event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Amsel, Ben D

    2011-04-01

    Empirically derived semantic feature norms categorized into different types of knowledge (e.g., visual, functional, auditory) can be summed to create number-of-feature counts per knowledge type. Initial evidence suggests several such knowledge types may be recruited during language comprehension. The present study provides a more detailed understanding of the timecourse and intensity of influence of several such knowledge types on real-time neural activity. A linear mixed-effects model was applied to single trial event-related potentials for 207 visually presented concrete words measured on total number of features (semantic richness), imageability, and number of visual motion, color, visual form, smell, taste, sound, and function features. Significant influences of multiple feature types occurred before 200ms, suggesting parallel neural computation of word form and conceptual knowledge during language comprehension. Function and visual motion features most prominently influenced neural activity, underscoring the importance of action-related knowledge in computing word meaning. The dynamic time courses and topographies of these effects are most consistent with a flexible conceptual system wherein temporally dynamic recruitment of representations in modal and supramodal cortex are a crucial element of the constellation of processes constituting word meaning computation in the brain.

  18. Metabolic consequences of β-alanine supplementation during exhaustive supramaximal cycling and 4000-m time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Phillip M; Minahan, Clare L

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated the effects of β-alanine supplementation on the resultant blood acidosis, lactate accumulation, and energy provision during supramaximal-intensity cycling, as well as the aerobic and anaerobic contribution to power output during a 4000-m cycling time trial (TT). Seventeen trained cyclists (maximal oxygen uptake = 4.47 ± 0.55 L·min(-1)) were administered 6.4 g of β-alanine (n = 9) or placebo (n = 8) daily for 4 weeks. Participants performed a supramaximal cycling test to exhaustion (equivalent to 120% maximal oxygen uptake) before (PreExh) and after (PostExh) the 4-week supplementation period, as well as an additional postsupplementation supramaximal cycling test identical in duration and power output to PreExh (PostMatch). Anaerobic capacity was quantified and blood pH, lactate, and bicarbonate concentrations were measured pre-, immediately post-, and 5 min postexercise. Subjects also performed a 4000-m cycling TT before and after supplementation while the aerobic and anaerobic contributions to power output were quantified. β-Alanine supplementation increased time to exhaustion (+12.8 ± 8.2 s; P = 0.041) and anaerobic capacity (+1.1 ± 0.7 kJ; P = 0.048) in PostExh compared with PreExh. Performance time in the 4000-m TT was reduced following β-alanine supplementation (-6.3 ± 4.6 s; P = 0.034) and the mean anaerobic power output was likely to be greater (+6.2 ± 4.5 W; P = 0.035). β-Alanine supplementation increased time to exhaustion concomitant with an augmented anaerobic capacity during supramaximal intensity cycling, which was also mirrored by a meaningful increase in the anaerobic contribution to power output during a 4000-m cycling TT, resulting in an enhanced overall performance.

  19. No Effect of Acute and 6-Day Nitrate Supplementation on VO2 and Time-Trial Performance in Highly Trained Cyclists.

    PubMed

    Nyakayiru, Jean M; Jonvik, Kristin L; Pinckaers, Philippe J M; Senden, Joan; van Loon, Luc J C; Verdijk, Lex B

    2017-02-01

    While the majority of studies reporting ergogenic effects of dietary nitrate have used a multiday supplementation protocol, some studies suggest that a single dose of dietary nitrate before exercise can also improve subsequent performance. We aimed to compare the impact of acute and 6-day sodium nitrate supplementation on oxygen uptake (V̇O2) and time-trial performance in trained cyclists. Using a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design, 17 male cyclists (25 ± 4 y, V̇O2peak 65 ± 4 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), Wmax 411 ± 35 W) were subjected to 3 different trials; 5 days placebo and 1 day sodium nitrate supplementation (1-DAY); 6 days sodium nitrate supplementation (6-DAY); 6 days placebo supplementation (PLA). Nitrate was administered as 1097 mg sodium nitrate providing 800 mg (~12.9 mmol) nitrate per day. Three hours after ingestion of the last supplemental bolus, indirect calorimetry was performed while subjects performed 30 min of exercise at 45% Wmax and 30 min at 65% Wmax on a cycle ergometer, followed by a 10 km time-trial. Immediately before exercise, plasma [nitrate] and [nitrite] increased to a similar extent during the 6-DAY and 1-DAY trial, but not with PLA (plasma nitrite: 501 ± 205, 553 ± 278, and 239 ± 74 nM, respectively; p < .001). No differences were observed between interventions in V̇O2 during submaximal exercise, or in time to complete the time-trial (6-DAY: 1004 ± 61, 1-DAY: 1022 ± 72, PLA: 1017 ± 71 s; p = .28). We conclude that both acute and 6-days of sodium nitrate supplementation do not alter V̇O2 during submaximal exercise or improve time-trial performance in highly trained cyclists, despite increasing plasma [nitrate] and [nitrite].

  20. Exploiting the intra-subject latency variability from single-trial event-related potentials in the P3 time range: A review and comparative evaluation of methods.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Guang; Hildebrandt, Andrea; Sommer, Werner; Zhou, Changsong

    2017-04-01

    The intra-subject variability (ISV) in brain responses during cognitive processing across experimental trials has been recognised as an important facet of neural functionality reflecting an intrinsic neurophysiological characteristic of the brain. In recent decades, ISV in behaviour has been found to be significantly associated with cognitive functioning varying across individuals, development, ages, and pathological conditions. Event-related potentials (ERPs) measured in single trials are important tools for characterizing ISV at the neural level. However, due to the overlapping spectra of noise and signals, the retrieval of information from single-trial ERPs related to cognitive processing has been a challenge. We review the major problems that researchers face in the estimation of ISV in single-trial ERPs. Then, we present an extensive evaluation of several methods of single-trial latency estimation based on both simulated and real data. The relationships of ISV in ERPs and reaction times are compared between the different single-trial methods to assess their relative efficiency in predicting task performance from neural signals. The pros and cons of the methods are discussed.

  1. Decoding a bistable percept with integrated time-frequency representation of single-trial local field potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhisong; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Liang, Hualou

    2008-12-01

    Bistable perception emerges when a stimulus under continuous view is perceived as the alternation of two mutually exclusive states. Such a stimulus provides a unique opportunity for understanding the neural basis of visual perception because it dissociates the perception from the visual input. In this paper we analyze the dynamic activity of local field potential (LFP), simultaneously collected from multiple channels in the middle temporal (MT) visual cortex of a macaque monkey, for decoding its bistable structure-from-motion (SFM) perception. Based on the observation that the discriminative information of neuronal population activity evolves and accumulates over time, we propose to select features from the integrated time-frequency representation of LFP using a relaxation (RELAX) algorithm and a sequential forward selection (SFS) algorithm with maximizing the Mahalanobis distance as the criterion function. The integrated-spectrogram based feature selection is much more robust and can achieve significantly better features than the instantaneous-spectrogram based feature selection. We exploit the support vector machines (SVM) classifier and the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier based on the selected features to decode the reported perception on a single trial basis. Our results demonstrate the excellent performance of the integrated-spectrogram based feature selection and suggest that the features in the gamma frequency band (30-100 Hz) of LFP within specific temporal windows carry the most discriminative information for decoding bistable perception. The proposed integrated-spectrogram based feature selection approach may have potential for a myriad of applications involving multivariable time series such as brain-computer interfaces (BCI).

  2. Are Reports of Randomized Controlled Trials Improving over Time? A Systematic Review of 284 Articles Published in High-Impact General and Specialized Medical Journals

    PubMed Central

    To, Matthew J.; Jones, Jennifer; Emara, Mohamed; Jadad, Alejandro R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Inadequate reporting undermines findings of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This study assessed and compared articles published in high-impact general medical and specialized journals. Methods Reports of RCTs published in high-impact general and specialized medical journals were identified through a search of MEDLINE from January to March of 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010. Articles that provided original data on adult patients diagnosed with chronic conditions were included in the study. Data on trial characteristics, reporting of allocation concealment, quality score, and the presence of a trial flow diagram were extracted independently by two reviewers, and discrepancies were resolved by consensus or independent adjudication. Descriptive statistics were used for quantitative variables. Comparisons between general medical and specialized journals, and trends over time were performed using Chi-square tests. Results Reports of 284 trials were analyzed. There was a significantly higher proportion of RCTs published with adequate reporting of allocation concealment (p = 0.003), presentation of a trial flow diagram (p<0.0001) and high quality scores (p = 0.038) over time. Trials published in general medical journals had higher quality scores than those in specialized journals (p = 0.001), reported adequate allocation concealment more often (p = 0.013), and presented a trial flow diagram more often (p<0.001). Interpretation We found significant improvements in reporting quality of RCTs published in high-impact factor journals over the last fifteen years. These improvements are likely attributed to concerted international efforts to improve reporting quality such as CONSORT. There is still much room for improvement, especially among specialized journals. PMID:24391973

  3. Clinical Trial Participation and Time to Treatment Among Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer: Does Age at Diagnosis or Insurance Make a Difference?

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Helen M.; Harlan, Linda C.; Seibel, Nita L.; Stevens, Jennifer L.; Keegan, Theresa H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Because adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer have experienced variable improvement in survival over the past two decades, enhancing the quality and timeliness of cancer care in this population has emerged as a priority area. To identify current trends in AYA care, we examined patterns of clinical trial participation, time to treatment, and provider characteristics in a population-based sample of AYA patients with cancer. Methods Using the National Cancer Institute Patterns of Care Study, we used multivariate logistic regression to evaluate demographic and provider characteristics associated with clinical trial enrollment and time to treatment among 1,358 AYA patients with cancer (age 15 to 39 years) identified through the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program. Results In our study, 14% of patients age 15 to 39 years had enrolled onto a clinical trial; participation varied by type of cancer, with the highest participation in those diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (37%) and sarcoma (32%). Multivariate analyses demonstrated that uninsured, older patients and those treated by nonpediatric oncologists were less likely to enroll onto clinical trials. Median time from pathologic confirmation to first treatment was 3 days, but this varied by race/ethnicity and cancer site. In multivariate analyses, advanced cancer stage and outpatient treatment alone were associated with longer time from pathologic confirmation to treatment. Conclusion Our study identified factors associated with low clinical trial participation in AYA patients with cancer. These findings support the continued need to improve access to clinical trials and innovative treatments for this population, which may ultimately translate into improved survival. PMID:21931022

  4. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Meditation for Work Stress, Anxiety and Depressed Mood in Full-Time Workers

    PubMed Central

    Manocha, R.; Black, D.; Sarris, J.; Stough, C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To assess the effect of meditation on work stress, anxiety and mood in full-time workers. Methods. 178 adult workers participated in an 8-week, 3-arm randomized controlled trial comparing a “mental silence” approach to meditation (n = 59) to a “relaxation” active control (n = 56) and a wait-list control (n = 63). Participants were assessed before and after using Psychological Strain Questionnaire (PSQ), a subscale of the larger Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI), the State component of the State/Trait Anxiety Inventory for Adults (STAI), and the depression-dejection (DD) subscale of the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Results. There was a significant improvement for the meditation group compared to both the relaxation control and the wait-list groups the PSQ (P = .026), and DD (P = .019). Conclusions. Mental silence-orientated meditation, in this case Sahaja Yoga meditation, is a safe and effective strategy for dealing with work stress and depressive feelings. The findings suggest that “thought reduction” or “mental silence” may have specific effects relevant to work stress and hence occupational health. PMID:21716708

  5. Preliminary clinical trial in percutaneous nephrolithotomy using a real-time navigation system for percutaneous kidney access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Pedro L.; Moreira, António H. J.; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Pinho, A. C. M.; Fonseca, Jaime C.; Lima, Estevão.; Vilaça, João. L.

    2014-03-01

    Background: Precise needle puncture of renal calyces is a challenging and essential step for successful percutaneous nephrolithotomy. This work tests and evaluates, through a clinical trial, a real-time navigation system to plan and guide percutaneous kidney puncture. Methods: A novel system, entitled i3DPuncture, was developed to aid surgeons in establishing the desired puncture site and the best virtual puncture trajectory, by gathering and processing data from a tracked needle with optical passive markers. In order to navigate and superimpose the needle to a preoperative volume, the patient, 3D image data and tracker system were previously registered intraoperatively using seven points that were strategically chosen based on rigid bone structures and nearby kidney area. In addition, relevant anatomical structures for surgical navigation were automatically segmented using a multi-organ segmentation algorithm that clusters volumes based on statistical properties and minimum description length criterion. For each cluster, a rendering transfer function enhanced the visualization of different organs and surrounding tissues. Results: One puncture attempt was sufficient to achieve a successful kidney puncture. The puncture took 265 seconds, and 32 seconds were necessary to plan the puncture trajectory. The virtual puncture path was followed correctively until the needle tip reached the desired kidney calyceal. Conclusions: This new solution provided spatial information regarding the needle inside the body and the possibility to visualize surrounding organs. It may offer a promising and innovative solution for percutaneous punctures.

  6. Beyond the futility argument: the fair process approach and time-limited trials for managing dialysis conflict.

    PubMed

    Rinehart, Ann

    2013-11-01

    Futility is an ancient concept arising from Greek mythology that was resurrected for its medical application in the 1980s with the proliferation of many lifesaving technologies, including dialysis and renal transplantation. By that time, the domineering medical paternalism that characterized the pre-1960s physician-patient relationship morphed into assertive patient autonomy, and some patients began to claim the right to demand aggressive, high-technology interventions, despite physician disapproval. To counter this power struggle, the establishment of a precise definition of futility offered hope for a futility policy that would allow physicians to justify withholding or withdrawing treatment, despite patient and family objections. This article reviews the various attempts made to define medical futility and describes their limited applicability to dialysis. When futility concerns arise, physicians should recognize the opportunity to address conflict, using best practice communication skills. Physicians would also benefit from understanding the ethical principles of respect for patient autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice, and professional integrity that underlie medical decision-making. Also reviewed is the use of a fair process approach or time-limited trial when conflict resolution cannot be achieved. These topics are addressed in the Renal Physician Association's clinical practice guideline Shared Decision-Making in the Appropriate Initiation and Withdrawal from Dialysis, with which nephrologists should be well versed. A case presentation of intractable calciphylaxis in a new dialysis patient illustrates the pitfalls of physicians not fully appreciating the ethics of medical decision-making and failing to use effective conflict management approaches in the clinical practice guideline.

  7. Demographic and HIV-specific characteristics of participants enrolled in the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment trial

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, S; Babiker, AG; Emery, S; Gordin, FM; Lundgren, JD; Neaton, JN; Bakowska, E; Schechter, M; Wiselka, MJ; Wolff, MJ

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The risks and benefits of initiating antiretroviral treatment (ART) at high CD4 cell counts have not been reliably quantified. The Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study is a randomised international clinical trial that compares immediate with deferred initiation of ART for HIV-positive individuals with CD4 cell counts above 500 cells/μL. We describe the demographics, HIV-specific characteristics and medical history of this cohort. Methods Data collected at baseline include demographics, HIV-specific laboratory values, prior medical diagnoses and concomitant medications. Baseline characteristics were compared by geographical region, gender, and age. Results START enrolled 4685 HIV-positive participants from 215 sites in 35 countries. The median age is 36 years (IQR: 29-44), 27% are female, 45% self-identify as white, 30% black, 14% Latino/Hispanic, 8% Asian and 3% other. HIV acquisition is reported as 55% men who have sex with men, 38% heterosexual sex, 1% injecting drug use, and 5% other/unknown. Median time since HIV diagnosis is 1.0 year (IQR: 0.4-3.0) and the median CD4 and HIV RNA values at study entry are 651 cells/μL (584-765) and 12,754 copies/mL (IQR: 3,014-43,607), respectively. Conclusion START has enrolled a diverse group of ART-naïve individuals with high CD4 cell counts who are comparable to the HIV-positive population from the regions they were enrolled. The information collected with this robust study design will provide a database to evaluate the risks and benefits of early ART use for many important outcomes. PMID:25711321

  8. Beyond the Futility Argument: The Fair Process Approach and Time-Limited Trials for Managing Dialysis Conflict

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Summary Futility is an ancient concept arising from Greek mythology that was resurrected for its medical application in the 1980s with the proliferation of many lifesaving technologies, including dialysis and renal transplantation. By that time, the domineering medical paternalism that characterized the pre-1960s physician–patient relationship morphed into assertive patient autonomy, and some patients began to claim the right to demand aggressive, high-technology interventions, despite physician disapproval. To counter this power struggle, the establishment of a precise definition of futility offered hope for a futility policy that would allow physicians to justify withholding or withdrawing treatment, despite patient and family objections. This article reviews the various attempts made to define medical futility and describes their limited applicability to dialysis. When futility concerns arise, physicians should recognize the opportunity to address conflict, using best practice communication skills. Physicians would also benefit from understanding the ethical principles of respect for patient autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice, and professional integrity that underlie medical decision-making. Also reviewed is the use of a fair process approach or time-limited trial when conflict resolution cannot be achieved. These topics are addressed in the Renal Physician Association’s clinical practice guideline Shared Decision-Making in the Appropriate Initiation and Withdrawal from Dialysis, with which nephrologists should be well versed. A case presentation of intractable calciphylaxis in a new dialysis patient illustrates the pitfalls of physicians not fully appreciating the ethics of medical decision-making and failing to use effective conflict management approaches in the clinical practice guideline. PMID:23868900

  9. Sex differences in atazanavir pharmacokinetics and associations with time to clinical events: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5202

    PubMed Central

    Venuto, Charles S.; Mollan, Katie; Ma, Qing; Daar, Eric S.; Sax, Paul E.; Fischl, Margaret; Collier, Ann C.; Smith, Kimberly Y.; Tierney, Camlin; Morse, Gene D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives It is uncertain whether HIV-1 antiretroviral exposure and clinical response varies between males and females or different race/ethnic groups. We describe ritonavir-enhanced atazanavir pharmacokinetics in relation to virological failure, safety and tolerability in treatment-naive individuals to investigate potential differences. Methods Plasma samples were collected from participants in AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5202 for measurement of antiretroviral concentrations. Individual estimates of apparent oral clearance of atazanavir (L/h) were calculated from a one-compartment model and divided into tertiles as slow (<7), middle (7 to <9; reference group) and fast (≥9). Associations between atazanavir clearance and clinical outcomes were estimated with a hazard ratio (HR) from Cox proportional hazards models. Interactions between atazanavir clearance and sex, race/ethnicity and NRTIs were investigated for each of the outcomes. Results Among 786 participants, average atazanavir clearance was slower in females (n = 131) than males (n = 655). Atazanavir clearance was associated with time to virological failure (P = 0.053) and this relationship differed significantly by sex (P = 0.003). Females in the fast atazanavir clearance group had shorter time to virological failure (HR 3.49; 95% CI 1.24–9.84) compared with the middle (reference) atazanavir clearance group. Among males, the slow atazanavir clearance group had a higher risk of virological failure (HR 2.10; 95% CI 1.16–3.77). Conclusions Atazanavir clearance differed by sex. Females with fast clearance and males with slow clearance had increased risk of virological failure. PMID:25159623

  10. Effect of Practical Precooling on Neuromuscular Function and 5-km Time-Trial Performance in Hot, Humid Conditions Among Well-Trained Male Runners.

    PubMed

    Randall, Carla A; Ross, Emma Z; Maxwell, Neil S

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated whether torso and thigh precooling during a warm-up effects neuromuscular function and 5-km time-trial performance in hot, humid conditions. Eight well-trained male runners completed 3 randomized time-trials in 32.2 ± 0.8° C and 48.6 ± 6.7% relative humidity. A 30-minute warm-up was completed with no cooling (Control), precooling by an ice vest (Vest), or ice packs covering the thighs (Packs). Before the warm-up and after the time-trial, supramaximal femoral nerve stimulation was delivered during and following maximal isometric contractions. Core and skin temperature, heart rate, and perceptual ratings were recorded before and during the warm-up and time-trial. Overall performance time was improved in Packs compared with Control (1,407 ± 80 seconds vs. 1,492 ± 88 seconds; p ≤ 0.05) but not in Vest (1,444 ± 71 seconds; p > 0.05). In Packs, a higher exercise intensity (p ≤ 0.05) and less cumulative time (p < 0.01) were evident during the last kilometer compared with Control. Maximum voluntary force, voluntary activation, muscle contractility, and membrane excitability were not different after exercise or between conditions. Ten minutes after the warm-up, skin temperature was lower in Vest and Packs compared with Control (p < 0.01). Thermal strain and body heat content change was lower in Vest and Packs, respectively (p ≤ 0.05). Findings indicate that torso and thigh precooling during a warm-up reduces thermoregulatory strain. However, thigh opposed to torso precooling provides greater performance improvements. Neuromuscular function did not aid performance, indicating that transient changes in afferent feedback and muscle recruitment may enhance endurance trial performance.

  11. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Benefits of a Multimedia Educational Program for First-Time Hearing Aid Users

    PubMed Central

    Brandreth, Marian; Brassington, William; Leighton, Paul; Wharrad, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to (1) develop a series of short interactive videos (or reusable learning objects [RLOs]) covering a broad range of practical and psychosocial issues relevant to the auditory rehabilitation for first-time hearing aid users; (2) establish the accessibility, take-up, acceptability and adherence of the RLOs; and (3) assess the benefits and cost-effectiveness of the RLOs. Design: The study was a single-center, prospective, randomized controlled trial with two arms. The intervention group (RLO+, n = 103) received the RLOs plus standard clinical service including hearing aid(s) and counseling, and the waitlist control group (RLO−, n = 100) received standard clinical service only. The effectiveness of the RLOs was assessed 6-weeks posthearing aid fitting. Seven RLOs (total duration 1 hr) were developed using a participatory, community of practice approach involving hearing aid users and audiologists. RLOs included video clips, illustrations, animations, photos, sounds and testimonials, and all were subtitled. RLOs were delivered through DVD for TV (50.6%) and PC (15.2%), or via the internet (32.9%). Results: RLO take-up was 78%. Adherence overall was at least 67%, and 97% in those who attended the 6-week follow-up. Half the participants watched the RLOs two or more times, suggesting self-management of their hearing loss, hearing aids, and communication. The RLOs were rated as highly useful and the majority of participants agreed the RLOs were enjoyable, improved their confidence and were preferable to written information. Postfitting, there was no significant between-group difference in the primary outcome measure, overall hearing aid use. However, there was significantly greater hearing aid use in the RLO+ group for suboptimal users. Furthermore, the RLO+ group had significantly better knowledge of practical and psychosocial issues, and significantly better practical hearing aid skills than the RLO− group. Conclusions: The RLOs

  12. Phase II clinical trials with time-to-event endpoints: optimal two-stage designs with one-sample log-rank test.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Minjung; Jung, Sin-Ho

    2014-05-30

    Phase II clinical trials are often conducted to determine whether a new treatment is sufficiently promising to warrant a major controlled clinical evaluation against a standard therapy. We consider single-arm phase II clinical trials with right censored survival time responses where the ordinary one-sample logrank test is commonly used for testing the treatment efficacy. For planning such clinical trials, this paper presents two-stage designs that are optimal in the sense that the expected sample size is minimized if the new regimen has low efficacy subject to constraints of the type I and type II errors. Two-stage designs, which minimize the maximal sample size, are also determined. Optimal and minimax designs for a range of design parameters are tabulated along with examples.

  13. Is a short anesthetic exposure in children safe? Time will tell: a focused commentary of the GAS and PANDA trials

    PubMed Central

    Chinn, Gregory A.; Sasaki Russell, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Early life exposure to general anesthesia in preclinical studies has consistently led to permanent cognitive deficits later in life. However, the extent to which this finding is translatable to humans is the subject of much debate as the results from clinical studies have been mixed. Recently two well-designed clinical trials have attempted to add clarity to our murky understanding. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) trial, was an international, prospective, randomized, multicenter, equivalence trial comparing infants undergoing herniorrhaphy receiving general anesthesia vs. neuraxial anesthesia. The results released are from a pre-determined secondary outcome of a behavioral/developmental assessment of 2 years old that found equivalence between the two groups. The Pediatric Anesthesia NeuroDevelopment Assessment (PANDA) trial was an ambi-directional cohort trial, comparing patients receiving general anesthesia for hernia repair before 3 years old vs. sibling-matched controls. The neuropsychological battery performed showed no difference between siblings. Taken together, there is cautious optimism that short anesthesia exposure may not lead to significant cognitive decline in humans, but one should also consider that the GAS trial has yet to release the primary endpoint, IQ testing at age 5, and the PANDA trial may not represent the general population given the high socioeconomic status and high control IQ scores. Furthermore, as seen in preclinical studies, the cognitive deficit might not be significant until later in life, and longer exposures to anesthesia may have a more deleterious effect on cognitive function. While these new studies greatly increase our understanding in humans, there are many more questions that need to be addressed. PMID:27867960

  14. Combined Evaluations of Competency to Stand Trial and Mental State at the Time of the Offense: An Overlooked Methodological Consideration?

    PubMed

    Kois, Lauren; Wellbeloved-Stone, James M; Chauhan, Preeti; Warren, Janet I

    2017-02-09

    Combined evaluations of competency to stand trial (CST; competency) and mental state at the time of the offense (MSO; sanity) frequently co-occur. However, most research examines the 2 as discrete constructs without considering 4 potential combined evaluation outcomes: competent-sane, incompetent-sane, competent-insane, and incompetent-insane. External validity can be improved if research more closely mirrored practice. It may be incorrect to assume incompetent defendants are similar across CST-only and combined evaluations, and insane defendants are similar across MSO-only and combined evaluations. Using a sample of 2,751 combined evaluations, we examined demographic, clinical, offense, evaluation, and psycholegal characteristics associated with evaluators' combined evaluation opinions. Multinomial regression analyses revealed older defendants were more likely to be opined incompetent-insane. Defendants with psychotic disorders were more often opined insane, regardless of competency status. Affective diagnoses predicted competent-insane opinions. Developmental disorders were closely related to incompetence, regardless of sanity status. Defendants with organic disorders tended to have global psycholegal impairment, in that they were more often opined incompetent-insane, incompetent-sane, or competent-insane, relative to competent-sane. Prior hospitalization predicted competent-insane relative to competent-sane opinions. Defendants not under the influence of a substance during the offense or with no prior convictions were more likely to be opined insane, regardless of competency status. We interpret these findings in light of psycholegal theory and provide recommendations for research and practice. Collectively, results suggest incorporation of combined evaluations into CST and MSO research is an important methodological consideration not to be overlooked. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. Quality of life assessment among HIV-positive persons entering the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment trial

    PubMed Central

    Lifson, Alan R.; Grandits, Greg; Gardner, Edward M.; Wolff, Marcelo; Pulik, Piotr; Williams, Ian; Burman, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives With HIV treatment prolonging survival and HIV managed as a chronic illness, quality of life (QOL) is important to evaluate in persons living with HIV (PLWH). We assessed QOL at study entry in the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment clinical trial of antiretroviral-naive PLWH with >500 CD4 cells/μL. Methods QOL was assessed with: 1) visual analogue scale (VAS) for self-assessment of overall current health; 2) SF-12V2 Health Survey®, summarised into eight individual QOL domains plus component summary scores for physical health (PCS) and mental health (MCS). The VAS and eight domain scores were scaled 0–100. Mean QOL measures were calculated overall and by demographic, clinical and behavioural factors. Results 4631 participants completed the VAS and 4119 the SF-12. Mean VAS score was 80.9 ±15.7. Mean SF-12 domain scores were lowest for vitality (66.3 ±26.4) and mental health (68.6 ±21.4), and highest for physical functioning (89.3 ±23.0) and bodily pain (88.0 ±21.4). Using multiple linear regression, PCS scores were lower (p<0.001) for Asians, North Americans, females, older age, less education, longer duration of known HIV, alcoholism/substance dependence, and body mass index ≥30 kg/m2. MCS scores were highest (p<0.001) for Africans, South Americans, and older age and lowest for females, current smokers, and alcoholism/ substance dependence. Conclusions In this primarily healthy population, QOL was mostly favorable, emphasising importance that HIV treatments do not negatively impact QOL. Self-assessed physical health was higher than mental health. Factors such as older age and geographic region have different influences on perceived physical and mental health. PMID:25711327

  16. Improvements in Cycling Time Trial Performance Are Not Sustained Following the Acute Provision of Challenging and Deceptive Feedback.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hollie S; Williams, Emily L; Marchant, David; Sparks, S Andy; Bridge, Craig A; Midgley, Adrian W; Mc Naughton, Lars R

    2016-01-01

    The provision of performance-related feedback during exercise is acknowledged as an influential external cue used to inform pacing decisions. The provision of this feedback in a challenging or deceptive context allows research to explore how feedback can be used to improve performance and influence perceptual responses. However, the effects of deception on both acute and residual responses have yet to be explored, despite potential application for performance enhancement. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of challenging and deceptive feedback on perceptual responses and performance in self-paced cycling time trials (TT) and explored whether changes in performance are sustained in a subsequent TT following the disclosure of the deception. Seventeen trained male cyclists were assigned to either an accurate or deceptive feedback group and performed four 16.1 km cycling TTs; (1 and 2) ride-alone baseline TTs where a fastest baseline (FBL) performance was identified, (3) a TT against a virtual avatar representing 102% of their FBL performance (PACER), and (4) a subsequent ride-alone TT (SUB). The deception group, however, were initially informed that the avatar accurately represented their FBL, but prior to SUB were correctly informed of the nature of the avatar. Affect, self-efficacy and RPE were measured every quartile. Both groups performed PACER faster than FBL and SUB (p < 0.05) and experienced lower affect (p = 0.016), lower self-efficacy (p = 0.011), and higher RPE (p < 0.001) in PACER than FBL. No significant differences were found between FBL and SUB for any variable. The presence of the pacer rather than the manipulation of performance beliefs acutely facilitates TT performance and perceptual responses. Revealing that athletes' performance beliefs were falsely negative due to deceptive feedback provision has no effect on subsequent perceptions or performance. A single experiential exposure may not be sufficient to produce meaningful changes in the

  17. Improvements in Cycling Time Trial Performance Are Not Sustained Following the Acute Provision of Challenging and Deceptive Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Hollie S.; Williams, Emily L.; Marchant, David; Sparks, S. Andy; Bridge, Craig A.; Midgley, Adrian W.; Mc Naughton, Lars R.

    2016-01-01

    The provision of performance-related feedback during exercise is acknowledged as an influential external cue used to inform pacing decisions. The provision of this feedback in a challenging or deceptive context allows research to explore how feedback can be used to improve performance and influence perceptual responses. However, the effects of deception on both acute and residual responses have yet to be explored, despite potential application for performance enhancement. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of challenging and deceptive feedback on perceptual responses and performance in self-paced cycling time trials (TT) and explored whether changes in performance are sustained in a subsequent TT following the disclosure of the deception. Seventeen trained male cyclists were assigned to either an accurate or deceptive feedback group and performed four 16.1 km cycling TTs; (1 and 2) ride-alone baseline TTs where a fastest baseline (FBL) performance was identified, (3) a TT against a virtual avatar representing 102% of their FBL performance (PACER), and (4) a subsequent ride-alone TT (SUB). The deception group, however, were initially informed that the avatar accurately represented their FBL, but prior to SUB were correctly informed of the nature of the avatar. Affect, self-efficacy and RPE were measured every quartile. Both groups performed PACER faster than FBL and SUB (p < 0.05) and experienced lower affect (p = 0.016), lower self-efficacy (p = 0.011), and higher RPE (p < 0.001) in PACER than FBL. No significant differences were found between FBL and SUB for any variable. The presence of the pacer rather than the manipulation of performance beliefs acutely facilitates TT performance and perceptual responses. Revealing that athletes' performance beliefs were falsely negative due to deceptive feedback provision has no effect on subsequent perceptions or performance. A single experiential exposure may not be sufficient to produce meaningful changes in the

  18. The Early External Cephalic Version (ECV) 2 Trial: an international multicentre randomised controlled trial of timing of ECV for breech pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, EK; Hannah, ME; Ross, SJ; Delisle, M-F; Carson, GD; Windrim, R; Ohlsson, A; Willan, AR; Gafni, A; Sylvestre, G; Natale, R; Barrett, Y; Pollard, JK; Dunn, MS; Turtle, P

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether initiating external cephalic version (ECV) earlier in pregnancy might increase the rate of successful ECV procedures, and be more effective in decreasing the rate of non-cephalic presentation at birth and of caesarean section. Design An unblinded multicentred randomised controlled trial. Setting A total of 1543 women were randomised from 68 centres in 21 countries. Population Women with a singleton breech fetus at a gestational age of 330/7 weeks (231 days) to 356/7 weeks (251 days) of gestation were included. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to having a first ECV procedure between the gestational ages of 340/7 (238 days) and 356/7 weeks of gestation (early ECV group) or at or after 370/7 (259 days) weeks of gestation (delayed ECV group). Main outcome measures The primary outcome was the rate of caesarean section; the secondary outcome was the rate of preterm birth. Results Fewer fetuses were in a non-cephalic presentation at birth in the early ECV group (314/765 [41.1%] versus 377/768 [49.1%] in the delayed ECV group; relative risk [RR] 0.84, 95% CI 0.75, 0.94, P = 0.002). There were no differences in rates of caesarean section (398/765 [52.0%] versus 430/768 [56.0%]; RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.85, 1.02, P = 0.12) or in risk of preterm birth (50/765 [6.5%] versus 34/768 [4.4%]; RR 1.48, 95% CI 0.97, 2.26, P = 0.07) between groups. Conclusion External cephalic version at 34–35 weeks versus 37 or more weeks of gestation increases the likelihood of cephalic presentation at birth but does not reduce the rate of caesarean section and may increase the rate of preterm birth. PMID:21291506

  19. A Randomized Trial Comparing Part-time Patching with Observation for Children 3–10 Years Old with Intermittent Exotropia

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Susan A.; Mohney, Brian G.; Chandler, Danielle L.; Holmes, Jonathan M.; Repka, Michael X.; Melia, Michele; Wallace, David K.; Beck, Roy W.; Birch, Eileen E.; Kraker, Raymond T.; Tamkins, Susanna M.; Miller, Aaron M.; Sala, Nicholas A.; Glaser, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the effectiveness of prescribed part-time patching for treatment of intermittent exotropia in children Design Multicenter, randomized clinical trial Participants Three hundred fifty-eight children aged 3 to < 11 years old with previously untreated (except for refractive correction) intermittent exotropia (IXT) and near stereoacuity of 400 arcsec or better were enrolled. Intermittent exotropia met the following criteria: 1) constant or intermittent exotropia at distance and either intermittent exotropia or exophoria at near; 2) exodeviation (tropia or phoria) of at least 15 prism diopters (Δ) at distance or near by prism and alternate cover test (PACT); and 3) exodeviation of at least 10Δ at distance by PACT. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to either observation (no treatment for 6 months) or patching for 3 hours per day for 5 months, with a 1-month washout period of no patching before the 6-month primary outcome exam. Main Outcome Measure The primary outcome was deterioration at either the 3-month or the 6-month follow-up visit, defined as: 1) constant exotropia measuring at least 10Δ at distance and near by simultaneous prism and cover test, and/or 2) near stereoacuity decreased by at least 2 octaves from baseline, both assessed by a masked examiner and confirmed by a retest. Participants who were prescribed any non-randomized treatment without first meeting either deterioration criteria were also counted as having deteriorated. Results Of the 324 (91%) participants completing the 6-month primary outcome exam, deterioration occurred in 10 (6.1%) of the 165 participants in the observation group (3 of these 10 started treatment without meeting deterioration criteria) and in 1 (0.6%) of the 159 participants in the part-time patching group (difference = 5.4%, lower limit of one-sided exact 95% confidence interval = 2.0%; p value from one-sided hypothesis test = 0.004). Conclusion Deterioration of previously untreated childhood IXT

  20. A Randomized Trial Comparing Part-time Patching with Observation for Intermittent Exotropia in Children 12 to 35 Months Old

    PubMed Central

    Mohney, Brian G.; Cotter, Susan A.; Chandler, Danielle L.; Holmes, Jonathan M.; Chen, Angela M.; Melia, Michele; Donahue, Sean P.; Wallace, David K.; Kraker, Raymond T.; Christian, Melanie L.; Suh, Donny W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the effectiveness of part-time patching for treating intermittent exotropia (IXT) in young children Design Multicenter, randomized clinical trial Participants Two hundred one children 12 to 35-months-old with untreated IXT meeting the following criteria: 1) IXT at distance OR constant exotropia at distance and either IXT or exophoria at near; 2) ≥15 prism diopter (Δ) exodeviation at distance or near by prism and alternate cover test (PACT) but at least 10Δ exodeviation at distance by PACT. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to either observation (no treatment for 6 months) or patching prescribed for 3 hours daily for 5 months, followed by 1 month of no patching. Main Outcome Measure The primary outcome was deterioration, defined as constant exotropia measuring at least 10Δ at distance and near or receipt of non-protocol treatment for IXT. Results Of the 177 participants (88%) completing the 6-month primary outcome examination, deterioration occurred in 4.6% (4 of 87) of the participants in the observation group and in 2.2% (2 of 90) of the participants in the patching group (difference = 2.4%; P = 0.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) = -3.8% to +9.4%). Motor deterioration occurred in 2.3% (2 of 87) of the observation group and in 2.2% (2 of 90) of the patching group (difference = 0.08%, P = 0.55, 95% CI = -5.8% to +6.1%). For the observation and patching groups respectively, 6-month mean PACT measurements were 27.9Δ versus 24.9Δ at distance (P = 0.02) and 19.3Δ versus 17.0Δ at near (P = 0.10); 6-month mean exotropia control scores were 2.8 vs. 2.3 points at distance (P = 0.02), and 1.4 vs. 1.1 points at near (P = 0.26). Conclusion Among children 12 to 35 months of age with previously untreated IXT, deterioration over 6 months was uncommon, with or without patching treatment. There was insufficient evidence to recommend part-time patching for the treatment of IXT in children in this age group. PMID:26072346

  1. No Influence of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Exercise-Induced Pain and 5-Km Cycling Time-Trial Performance

    PubMed Central

    Hibbert, Andrew W.; Billaut, François; Varley, Matthew C.; Polman, Remco C. J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Afferent information from exercising muscle contributes to the sensation of exercise-induced muscle pain. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) delivers low–voltage electrical currents to the skin, inhibiting nociceptive afferent information. The use of TENS in reducing perceptions of exercise-induced pain has not yet been fully explored. This study aimed to investigate the effect of TENS on exercise-induced muscle pain, pacing strategy, and performance during a 5-km cycling time trial (TT). Methods: On three separate occasions, in a single-blind, randomized, and cross-over design, 13 recreationally active participants underwent a 30-min TENS protocol, before performing a 5-km cycling TT. TENS was applied to the quadriceps prior to exercise under the following conditions; control (CONT), placebo with sham TENS application (PLAC), and an experimental condition with TENS application (TENS). Quadriceps fatigue was assessed with magnetic femoral nerve stimulation assessing changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force at baseline, pre and post exercise. Subjective scores of exertion, affect and pain were taken every 1-km. Results: During TTs, application of TENS did not influence pain perceptions (P = 0.68, ηp2 = 0.03). There was no significant change in mean power (P = 0.16, ηp2 = 0.16) or TT duration (P = 0.17, ηp2 = 0.14), although effect sizes were large for these two variables. Changes in power output were not significant but showed moderate effect sizes at 500-m (ηp2 = 0.10) and 750-m (ηp2 = 0.10). Muscle recruitment as inferred by electromyography data was not significant, but showed large effect sizes at 250-m (ηp2 = 0.16), 500-m (ηp2 = 0.15), and 750-m (ηp2 = 0.14). This indicates a possible effect for TENS influencing performance up to 1-km. Discussion: These findings do not support the use of TENS to improve 5-km TT performance. PMID:28223939

  2. No Influence of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Exercise-Induced Pain and 5-Km Cycling Time-Trial Performance.

    PubMed

    Hibbert, Andrew W; Billaut, François; Varley, Matthew C; Polman, Remco C J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Afferent information from exercising muscle contributes to the sensation of exercise-induced muscle pain. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) delivers low-voltage electrical currents to the skin, inhibiting nociceptive afferent information. The use of TENS in reducing perceptions of exercise-induced pain has not yet been fully explored. This study aimed to investigate the effect of TENS on exercise-induced muscle pain, pacing strategy, and performance during a 5-km cycling time trial (TT). Methods: On three separate occasions, in a single-blind, randomized, and cross-over design, 13 recreationally active participants underwent a 30-min TENS protocol, before performing a 5-km cycling TT. TENS was applied to the quadriceps prior to exercise under the following conditions; control (CONT), placebo with sham TENS application (PLAC), and an experimental condition with TENS application (TENS). Quadriceps fatigue was assessed with magnetic femoral nerve stimulation assessing changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force at baseline, pre and post exercise. Subjective scores of exertion, affect and pain were taken every 1-km. Results: During TTs, application of TENS did not influence pain perceptions (P = 0.68, [Formula: see text] = 0.03). There was no significant change in mean power (P = 0.16, [Formula: see text] = 0.16) or TT duration (P = 0.17, [Formula: see text] = 0.14), although effect sizes were large for these two variables. Changes in power output were not significant but showed moderate effect sizes at 500-m ([Formula: see text] = 0.10) and 750-m ([Formula: see text] = 0.10). Muscle recruitment as inferred by electromyography data was not significant, but showed large effect sizes at 250-m ([Formula: see text] = 0.16), 500-m ([Formula: see text] = 0.15), and 750-m ([Formula: see text] = 0.14). This indicates a possible effect for TENS influencing performance up to 1-km. Discussion: These findings do not support the use of TENS to

  3. Computerized patient identification for the EMBRACA clinical trial using real-time data from the PRAEGNANT network for metastatic breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hein, Alexander; Gass, Paul; Walter, Christina Barbara; Taran, Florin-Andrei; Hartkopf, Andreas; Overkamp, Friedrich; Kolberg, Hans-Christian; Hadji, Peyman; Tesch, Hans; Ettl, Johannes; Wuerstlein, Rachel; Lounsbury, Debra; Lux, Michael P; Lüftner, Diana; Wallwiener, Markus; Müller, Volkmar; Belleville, Erik; Janni, Wolfgang; Fehm, Tanja N; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Ganslandt, Thomas; Ruebner, Matthias; Beckmann, Matthias W; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Fasching, Peter A; Brucker, Sara Y

    2016-07-01

    As breast cancer is a diverse disease, clinical trials are becoming increasingly diversified and are consequently being conducted in very small subgroups of patients, making study recruitment increasingly difficult. The aim of this study was to assess the use of data from a remote data entry system that serves a large national registry for metastatic breast cancer. The PRAEGNANT network is a real-time registry with an integrated biomaterials bank that was designed as a scientific study and as a means of identifying patients who are eligible for clinical trials, based on clinical and molecular information. Here, we report on the automated use of the clinical data documented to identify patients for a clinical trial (EMBRACA) for patients with metastatic breast cancer. The patients' charts were assessed by two independent physicians involved in the clinical trial and also by a computer program that tested patients for eligibility using a structured query language script. In all, 326 patients from two study sites in the PRAEGNANT network were included in the analysis. Using expert assessment, 120 of the 326 patients (37 %) appeared to be eligible for inclusion in the EMBRACA study; with the computer algorithm assessment, a total of 129 appeared to be eligible. The sensitivity of the computer algorithm was 0.87 and its specificity was 0.88. Using computer-based identification of patients for clinical trials appears feasible. With the instrument's high specificity, its application in a large cohort of patients appears to be feasible, and the workload for reassessing the patients is limited.

  4. Effect of caffeine on RPE and perceptions of pain, arousal, and pleasure/displeasure during a cycling time trial in endurance trained and active men.

    PubMed

    Astorino, Todd A; Cottrell, Trisha; Talhami Lozano, Andrea; Aburto-Pratt, Kylan; Duhon, Jessica

    2012-05-15

    Caffeine has been reported to alter perceptions of exertion, muscle pain, and mood, yet the majority of existing data were obtained in resting volunteers or during steady-state exercise. The primary aim of this study was to examine the effects of caffeine on rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and perceptions of leg pain, arousal, and pleasure/displeasure during a simulated cycling time trial. Endurance-trained (n=8, VO(2)max=57.5±3.9 mL/kg/min) and active (n=8, VO(2)max=46.5±6.3 mL/kg/min) men initially completed two familiarization trials separated by at least 48 h. Over the next three trials, they completed a 10 km time trial preceded by ingestion of drinks containing caffeine (5 mg/kg ingested on 2 separate days) or placebo. Treatments were ingested using a single-blind, crossover design, and participants were deceived as to the content of all drinks. During exercise, RPE (6-20 scale), leg pain (0-10 scale), arousal (Felt Arousal Scale), and pleasure/displeasure (Feeling Scale) were recorded using various categorical scales. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to assess differences in all variables across time and treatments, with fitness level used as a between-subjects variable. Pleasure/displeasure was altered (p<0.05, partial eta-squared (η(2))=0.23) with caffeine compared to placebo, although leg pain, RPE, and arousal were similar (p>0.05) across treatments. Caffeine increased (p<0.05, η(2)=0.27) cycling performance by 0.3-2.0% versus placebo, with no effect (p>0.05) of fitness level. Only in trained men; however, was there a significant caffeine-mediated improvement in cycling performance, which was consequent with diminished mood in trained and improved mood in active individuals.

  5. Relationship of P3b single-trial latencies and response times in one, two, and three-stimulus oddball tasks.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Matthew M; Gunzelmann, Glenn; Anderson, John R

    2017-02-01

    The P300 is one of the most widely studied components of the human event-related potential. According to a longstanding view, the P300, and particularly its posterior subcomponent (i.e., the P3b), is driven by stimulus categorization. Whether the P3b relates to tactical processes involved in immediate responding or strategic processes that affect future behavior remains controversial, however. It is difficult to determine whether variability in P3b latencies relates to variability in response times because of limitations in the methods currently available to quantify the latency of the P3b during single trials. In this paper, we report results from the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), the Hitchcock Radar Task, and a 3-Stimulus Oddball Task. These represent variants of the one-, two-, and three-stimulus oddball paradigms commonly used to study the P3b. The PVT requires simple detection, whereas the Hitchcock Radar Task and the 3-Stimulus Task require detection and categorization. We apply a novel technique that combines hidden semi-Markov models and multi-voxel pattern analysis (HSMM-MVPA) to data from the three experiments. HSMM-MVPA revealed a processing stage in each task corresponding to the P3b. Trial-by-trial variability in the latency of the processing stage correlated with response times in the Hitchcock Radar Task and the 3-Stimulus Task, but not the PVT. These results indicate that the P3b reflects a stimulus categorization process, and that its latency is strongly associated with response times when the stimulus must be categorized before responding. In addition to those theoretical insights, the ability to detect the onset of the P3b and other components on a single-trial basis using HSMM-MVPA opens the door for new uses of mental chronometry in cognitive neuroscience.

  6. Results of an International Interlaboratory Trial to Determine Twelve Allergens Using Real-time PCR- and ELISA-based Assays.

    PubMed

    Köppel, René; Rentsch, Jürg; Ruf, Jürg; Eugster, Albert; Graf, Christoph; Felderer, Nora; Pietsch, Klaus; Ilg, Evelyn

    2014-10-01

    To elucidate the capability of laboratories to determine allergen contents, an international interlaboratory trial was conducted using meat products spiked with 12 allergens. The measurement uncertainty was calculated independent of the applied method simulating realistic situations when comparing analysis certificates from different laboratories. The measurement uncertainty was revealed to be in the best cases +/-100%, in the worst cases quantification exhibited a measurement uncertainty of higher than 200% making quantitative analysis impossible. The measurement uncertainty seemed to depend on the analyte and assays used.

  7. Stroke Team Remote Evaluation Using a Digital Observation Camera in Arizona (STRokE DOC AZ) - The Initial Mayo Clinic Experience (TIME) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Bobrow, Bentley J.; Raman, Rema; Kiernan, Terri-Ellen J.; Aguilar, Maria I.; Ingall, Timothy J.; Dodick, David W.; Ward, Michael P.; Richemont, Phillip C.; Brazdys, Karina; Koch, Tiffany C.; Miley, Madeline L.; Hoffman Snyder, Charlene R.; Corday, Doren A.; Meyer, Brett C.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Telemedicine techniques can be employed to address the rural-metropolitan disparity in acute stroke care. The STRokE DOC trial reported more accurate decision making for telemedicine consultations compared with telephone-only, and that the California based research network facilitated a high rate of thrombolysis use, improved data collection, low risk of complications, low technical complications, and favorable assessment times. The main objective of the STRokE DOC AZ TIME trial was to determine the feasibility of establishing, de novo, a single-hub, multi-rural spoke hospital telestroke research network across a large geographical area in Arizona by replicating the STRokE DOC protocol. Methods Prospective, single hub, two spoke, randomized, blinded, controlled trial of a 2-way, site independent, audiovisual telemedicine system designed for remote examination of adult patients with acute stroke versus telephone consultation to assess eligibility for treatment with intravenous thrombolysis. The primary outcome measure was whether the decision to give thrombolysis was correct. Secondary outcomes were rate of thrombolytic use, 90-day functional outcomes, incidence of intracerebral hemorrhages, and technical observations. Results From December 2007 to October 2008, 54 patients were assessed; 27 randomized to each arm. Mean National Institutes of Health stroke scale score at presentation was 7.3 (SD 6.2) points. No consultations were aborted, however technical problems (74%) were prevalent in the telemedicine arm. Overall, the correct treatment decision was established in 87% of the consultations. Both modalities, telephone (89% correct) and telemedicine (85% correct) performed well. Intravenous thrombolytic treatment was used in 30% of the telemedicine and telephone consultations. Good functional outcomes at 90 days were not significantly different. There were no statistically significant differences in mortality (4% in telemedicine and 11% in

  8. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sponsors Why Are They Important How Do They Work Who Can Participate What To Expect During Benefits and Risks How They Protect Participants Finding Clinical Trials Links Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites What Are Clinical ...

  9. Time to onset of neuropathic pain reduction: A retrospective analysis of data from nine controlled trials of pregabalin for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Uma; Griesing, Teresa; Emir, Birol; Young, James P

    2010-01-01

    These retrospective analyses of daily mean pain scores from nine placebo-controlled trials of pregabalin at 150, 300, or 600 mg/day (pregabalin, n = 1205; placebo, n = 772) examined time to significant reduction of pain during the first 2 weeks of treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia. Time to onset of reduction in pain-defined as the first day for which patients treated with pregabalin had significant reductions (P < 0.05) in mean pain score compared with the placebo group for that day and the subsequent day-was calculated for all treatment groups demonstrating statistically significant reduction in pain at trial end point. The time to a 1-point or greater improvement in mean pain score was measured for each patient who was a responder at end point (30% or greater improvement in mean pain score). In seven of the nine trials (representing 11 of 14 pregabalin arms), significant reduction in pain was achieved at end point. The time to onset for reduction in pain was treatment Day 1 or 2 in nine of these successful treatment arms. Individual responder analysis confirmed that responders in the pregabalin groups reported a 1-point or greater pain reduction earlier than responders in placebo groups (P < 0.0001). However, this analysis is not a direct estimate of the likelihood that an individual patient would experience noticeable pain relief by the end of the second day. Overall, for patients who will respond to pregabalin, statistically significant and sustained reduction of pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy and posttherapeutic neuralgia occurs early, usually by the end of 2 days of pregabalin treatment.

  10. Reducing bed rest time from five to three hours does not increase complications after cardiac catheterization: the THREE CATH Trial 1

    PubMed Central

    Matte, Roselene; Hilário, Thamires de Souza; Reich, Rejane; Aliti, Graziella Badin; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to compare the incidence of vascular complications in patients undergoing transfemoral cardiac catheterization with a 6F introducer sheath followed by 3-hour versus 5-hour rest. Methods: randomized clinical trial. Subjects in the intervention group (IG) ambulated 3 hours after sheath removal, versus 5 hours in the control group (CG). All patients remained in the catheterization laboratory for 5 hours and were assessed hourly, and were contacted 24, 48, and 72 h after hospital discharge. Results: the sample comprised 367 patients in the IG and 363 in the GC. During cath lab stay, hematoma was the most common complication in both groups, occurring in 12 (3%) IG and 13 (4%) CG subjects (P=0.87). Bleeding occurred in 4 (1%) IG and 6 (2%) CG subjects (P=0.51), and vasovagal reaction in 5 (1.4%) IG and 4 (1.1%) CG subjects (P=0.75). At 24-h, 48-h, and 72-h bruising was the most commonly reported complication in both groups. None of the comparisons revealed any significant between-group differences. Conclusion: the results of this trial show that reducing bed rest time to 3 hours after elective cardiac catheterization is safe and does not increase complications as compared with a 5-hour rest. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT-01740856 PMID:27463113

  11. The effect of foot reflexology on physiologic parameters and mechanical ventilation weaning time in patients undergoing open-heart surgery: A clinical trial study.

    PubMed

    Ebadi, Abbas; Kavei, Parastoo; Moradian, Seyyed Tayyeb; Saeid, Yaser

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of foot reflexology on physiological parameters and mechanical ventilation weaning time in patients undergoing open-heart surgery. This was a double blind three-group randomized controlled trial. Totally, 96 patients were recruited and randomly allocated to the experimental, placebo, and the control groups. Study groups respectively received foot reflexology, simple surface touching, and the routine care of the study setting. Physiological parameters (pulse rate, respiratory rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, mean arterial pressure, percutaneous oxygen saturation) and weaning time were measured. The study groups did not differ significantly in terms of physiological parameters (P value > 0.05). However, the length of weaning time in the experimental group was significantly shorter than the placebo and the control groups (P value < 0.05). The study findings demonstrated the efficiency of foot reflexology in shortening the length of weaning time.

  12. The effects of a cycling warm-up including high-intensity heavy-resistance conditioning contractions on subsequent 4 km time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Chorley, Alan; Lamb, Kevin L

    2017-03-25

    Prior exercise has been shown to improve subsequent performance via different mechanisms. Sport-specific conditioning contractions can be used to exploit the 'post-activation potentiation' (PAP) phenomenon to enhance performance although this has rarely been investigated in short endurance events. The aim of this study was to compare a cycling warm-up with PAP-inducing conditioning contractions (CW) with a moderate intensity warm-up (MW) on performance and physiological outcomes of 4 km time trial. Ten well-trained male endurance cyclists (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max 65.3 ± 5.6 ml·kg·min) performed two 4 km cycling time trials following a 5-minute recovery after a warm-up at 60% of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max for 6.5-minutes (MW), and a warm-up with conditioning contractions (CW) consisting of 5 minutes at 60% of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max then 3 x 10-seconds at 70% of peak power interspersed with 30-seconds recovery. Blood lactate concentrations were measured before and after time trial. Expired gases were analysed along with time, power output (PO), and peak forces over each 500 m split. Following CW, mean completion time was reduced (1.7 ± 3.5 s p > 0.05), PO increased (5.1 ± 10.5 W p > 0.05) as did peak force per pedal stroke (5.7 ± 11 N p > 0.05) when compared to MW. V[Combining Dot Above]O2 increased (1.4 ± 1.6 ml·kg·min p < 0.05) following CW, whilst RER decreased (0.05 ± 0.02 p < 0.05). Physiological and performance differences following CW were greatest over the first 1500 m of the trials. The results suggest a PAP-inducing warm-up alters V[Combining Dot Above]O2 kinetics and can lead to performance improvements in short endurance cycling but work and recovery durations should be optimised for each athlete.

  13. Beetroot Juice Improves On-Water 500 M Time-Trial Performance, and Laboratory-Based Paddling Economy in National and International-Level Kayak Athletes.

    PubMed

    Peeling, Peter; Cox, Gregory R; Bullock, Nicola; Burke, Louise M

    2015-06-01

    We assessed the ingestion of a beetroot juice supplement (BR) on 4-min laboratory-based kayak performance in national level male (n = 6) athletes (Study A), and on 500 m on-water kayak time-trial (TT) performance in international level female (n = 5) athletes (Study B). In Study A, participants completed three laboratory-based sessions on a kayak ergometer, including a 7 × 4 min step test, and two 4 min maximal effort performance trials. Two and a half hours before the warm-up of each 4 min performance trial, athletes received either a 70 ml BR shot containing ~4.8 mmol of nitrate, or a placebo equivalent (BRPLA). The distance covered over the 4 min TT was not different between conditions; however, the average VO2 over the 4 min period was significantly lower in BR (p = .04), resulting in an improved exercise economy (p = .05). In Study B, participants completed two field-based 500 m TTs, separated by 4 days. Two hours before each trial, athletes received either two 70 ml BR shots containing ~9.6 mmol of nitrate, or a placebo equivalent (BRPLA). BR supplementation significantly enhanced TT performance by 1.7% (p = .01). Our results show that in national-level male kayak athletes, commercially available BR shots (70 ml) containing ~4.8 mmol of nitrate improved exercise economy during laboratory-based tasks predominantly reliant on the aerobic energy system. Furthermore, greater volumes of BR (140 ml; ~9.6 mmol nitrate) provided to international-level female kayak athletes resulted in enhancements to TT performance in the field.

  14. Analysis of Workflow and Time to Treatment and the Effects on Outcome in Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke: Results from the SWIFT PRIME Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Mayank; Jadhav, Ashutosh P; Bonafe, Alain; Diener, Hans; Mendes Pereira, Vitor; Levy, Elad; Baxter, Blaise; Jovin, Tudor; Jahan, Reza; Menon, Bijoy K; Saver, Jeffrey L

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To study the relationship between functional independence and time to reperfusion in the Solitaire with the Intention for Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke (SWIFT PRIME) trial in patients with disabling acute ischemic stroke who underwent endovascular therapy plus intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration versus tPA administration alone and to investigate variables that affect time spent during discrete steps. Materials and Methods Data were analyzed from the SWIFT PRIME trial, a global, multicenter, prospective study in which outcomes were compared in patients treated with intravenous tPA alone or in combination with the Solitaire device (Covidien, Irvine, Calif). Between December 2012 and November 2014, 196 patients were enrolled. The relation between time from (a) symptom onset to reperfusion and (b) imaging to reperfusion and clinical outcome was analyzed, along with patient and health system characteristics that affect discrete steps in patient workflow. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess relationships between time and outcome; negative binomial regression was used to evaluate effects on workflow. The institutional review board at each site approved the trial. Patients provided written informed consent, or, at select sites, there was an exception from having to acquire explicit informed consent in emergency circumstances. Results In the stent retriever arm of the study, symptom onset to reperfusion time of 150 minutes led to 91% estimated probability of functional independence, which decreased by 10% over the next hour and by 20% with every subsequent hour of delay. Time from arrival at the emergency department to arterial access was 90 minutes (interquartile range, 69-120 minutes), and time to reperfusion was 129 minutes (interquartile range, 108-169 minutes). Patients who initially arrived at a referring facility had longer symptom onset to groin puncture times compared with

  15. Real-Time Ultrasound/MRI Fusion for Suprasacral Parallel Shift Approach to Lumbosacral Plexus Blockade and Analysis of Injectate Spread: An Exploratory Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Erik Morre; Al-Karradi, Sinan Naseer Hussain; Bendtsen, Mathias Alrø Fichtner; Bjørn, Siska; Dam, Mette; Daugaard, Morten; Hansen, Martin Sejr; Linnet, Katrine Danker; Søballe, Kjeld

    2017-01-01

    Fused real-time ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be used to improve the accuracy of advanced image guided procedures. However, its use in regional anesthesia is practically nonexistent. In this randomized controlled crossover trial, we aim to explore effectiveness, procedure-related outcomes, injectate spread analyzed by MRI, and safety of ultrasound/MRI fusion versus ultrasound guided Suprasacral Parallel Shift (SSPS) technique for lumbosacral plexus blockade. Twenty-six healthy subjects aged 21–36 years received two SSPS blocks (20 mL 2% lidocaine-epinephrine [1 : 200,000] added 1 mL diluted contrast) guided by ultrasound/MRI fusion versus ultrasound. Number (proportion) of subjects with motor blockade of the femoral and obturator nerves and the lumbosacral trunk was equal (ultrasound/MRI, 23/26 [88%]; ultrasound, 23/26 [88%]; p = 1.00). Median (interquartile range) preparation and procedure times (s) were longer for the ultrasound/MRI fusion guided technique (686 [552–1023] versus 196 [167–228], p < 0.001 and 333 [254–439] versus 216 [176–294], p = 0.001). Both techniques produced perineural spread and corresponding sensory analgesia from L2 to S1. Epidural spread and lidocaine pharmacokinetics were similar. Different compartmentalized patterns of injectate spread were observed. Ultrasound/MRI fusion guided SSPS was equally effective and safe but required prolonged time, compared to ultrasound guided SSPS. This trial is registered with EudraCT (2013-004013-41) and ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02593370).

  16. A practical simulation method to calculate sample size of group sequential trials for time-to-event data under exponential and Weibull distribution.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhiwei; Wang, Ling; Li, Chanjuan; Xia, Jielai; Jia, Hongxia

    2012-01-01

    Group sequential design has been widely applied in clinical trials in the past few decades. The sample size estimation is a vital concern of sponsors and investigators. Especially in the survival group sequential trials, it is a thorny question because of its ambiguous distributional form, censored data and different definition of information time. A practical and easy-to-use simulation-based method is proposed for multi-stage two-arm survival group sequential design in the article and its SAS program is available. Besides the exponential distribution, which is usually assumed for survival data, the Weibull distribution is considered here. The incorporation of the probability of discontinuation in the simulation leads to the more accurate estimate. The assessment indexes calculated in the simulation are helpful to the determination of number and timing of the interim analysis. The use of the method in the survival group sequential trials is illustrated and the effects of the varied shape parameter on the sample size under the Weibull distribution are explored by employing an example. According to the simulation results, a method to estimate the shape parameter of the Weibull distribution is proposed based on the median survival time of the test drug and the hazard ratio, which are prespecified by the investigators and other participants. 10+ simulations are recommended to achieve the robust estimate of the sample size. Furthermore, the method is still applicable in adaptive design if the strategy of sample size scheme determination is adopted when designing or the minor modifications on the program are made.

  17. Time-dependent effects of aspirin on blood pressure and morning platelet reactivity: a randomized cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Bonten, Tobias N; Snoep, Jaapjan D; Assendelft, Willem J J; Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; Eikenboom, Jeroen; Huisman, Menno V; Rosendaal, Frits R; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2015-04-01

    Aspirin is used for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention by millions of patients on a daily basis. Previous studies suggested that aspirin intake at bedtime reduces blood pressure compared with intake on awakening. This has never been studied in patients with CVD. Moreover, platelet reactivity and CVD incidence is highest during morning hours. Bedtime aspirin intake may attenuate morning platelet reactivity. This clinical trial examined the effect of bedtime aspirin intake compared with intake on awakening on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurement and morning platelet reactivity in patients using aspirin for CVD prevention. In this randomized open-label crossover trial, 290 patients were randomized to take 100 mg aspirin on awakening or at bedtime during 2 periods of 3 months. At the end of each period, 24-hour blood pressure and morning platelet reactivity were measured. The primary analysis population comprised 263 (blood pressure) and 133 (platelet reactivity) patients. Aspirin intake at bedtime did not reduce blood pressure compared with intake on awakening (difference systolic/diastolic: -0.1 [95% confidence interval, -1.0, 0.9]/-0.6 [95% confidence interval, -1.2, 0.0] mm Hg). Platelet reactivity during morning hours was reduced with bedtime aspirin intake (difference: -22 aspirin reaction units [95% confidence interval, -35, -9]). The intake of low-dose aspirin at bedtime compared with intake on awakening did not reduce blood pressure of patients with CVD. However, bedtime aspirin reduced morning platelet reactivity. Future studies are needed to assess the effect of this promising simple intervention on the excess of cardiovascular events during the high risk morning hours.

  18. Cycling Time Trial Performance 4 Hours After Glycogen-Lowering Exercise Is Similarly Enhanced by Recovery Nondairy Chocolate Beverages Versus Chocolate Milk.

    PubMed

    Upshaw, Adam U; Wong, Tiffany S; Bandegan, Arash; Lemon, Peter W

    2016-02-01

    Postexercise chocolate milk ingestion has been shown to enhance both glycogen resynthesis and subsequent exercise performance. To assess whether nondairy chocolate beverage ingestion post-glycogen-lowering exercise can enhance 20-km cycling time trial performance 4 hr later, eight healthy trained male cyclists (21.8 ± 2.3y, VO2max = 61.2 ± 1.4 ml·kg-1·min-1; M ± SD) completed a series of intense cycling intervals designed to lower muscle glycogen (Jentjens & Jeukendrup, 2003) followed by 4 hr of recovery and a subsequent 20-km cycling time trial. During the first 2 hr of recovery, participants ingested chocolate dairy milk (DAIRYCHOC), chocolate soy beverage (SOYCHOC), chocolate hemp beverage (HEMPCHOC), low-fat dairy milk (MILK), or a low-energy artificially sweetened, flavored beverage (PLACEBO) at 30-min intervals in a double-blind, counterbalanced repeated-measures design. All drinks, except the PLACEBO (247 kJ) were isoenergetic (2,107 kJ), and all chocolate-flavored drinks provided 1-g CHO·kg body mass-1·h-1. Fluid intake across treatments was equalized (2,262 ± 148 ml) by ingesting appropriate quantities of water based on drink intake. The CHO:PRO ratio was 4:1, 1.5:1, 4:1, and 6:1 for DAIRYCHOC, MILK, SOYCHOC, and HEMPCHOC, respectively. One-way analysis of variance with repeated measures showed time trial performance (DAIRYCHOC = 34.58 ± 2.5 min, SOYCHOC = 34.83 ± 2.2 min, HEMPCHOC = 34.88 ± 1.1 min, MILK = 34.47 ± 1.7 min) was enhanced similarly vs PLACEBO (37.85 ± 2.1) for all treatments (p = .019) These data suggest that postexercise macronutrient and total energy intake are more important for same-day 20-km cycling time trial performance after glycogen-lowering exercise than protein type or protein-to-carbohydrate ratio.

  19. Effects of aspirin on risk and severity of early recurrent stroke after transient ischaemic attack and ischaemic stroke: time-course analysis of randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Rothwell, Peter M; Algra, Ale; Chen, Zhengming; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Norrving, Bo; Mehta, Ziyah

    2017-01-01

    Background Aspirin is recommended for secondary prevention after transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and ischaemic stroke based on trials showing about a 13% reduction in long-term risk of recurrent stroke. However, the risk of major stroke is very high for only the first few days after TIA and minor ischaemic stroke and observational studies show substantially greater benefits of early medical treatment in the acute phase. We hypothesised that the short-term benefits of early aspirin have been underestimated. Methods Using individual patient data from all randomised trials of aspirin vs placebo in secondary prevention after TIA or ischaemic stroke, we studied the time-course of effects on risk and severity (modified Rankin score - mRS) of recurrent stroke and myocardial infarction. To more reliably determine the very early time-course of effect of aspirin on risk of recurrent ischaemic stroke, we also studied trials in treatment of acute stroke stratified by severity of baseline neurological deficit. To understand possible mechanisms of action, we also studied the time-course of the interaction between effects of aspirin and dipyridamole in secondary prevention of stroke. Results Among 15,778 patients in 12 trials of aspirin vs. control in secondary prevention, aspirin reduced the 6-week risk of major ischaemic vascular events by 70-80% (disabling or fatal ischaemic stroke - HR=0.29,0.20-0.43, p<0.0001; acute myocardial infarction - HR=0.22, 0.09-0.53, p=0.0008), with greatest benefit in patients with TIA or minor stroke (disabling or fatal ischaemic stroke: 0-2 weeks-HR=0.07,0.02-0.31,p=0.0004; 0-6 weeks-HR=0.19,0.11-0.34,p<0.0001). The effect of aspirin on early recurrent ischaemic stroke was due partly to a substantial reduction in severity (mRS shift analysis: OR=0.43,0.26-0.72,p=0.001). These effects were independent of dose, patient characteristics or aetiology of TIA or stroke. Some further reduction in risk of ischaemic stroke on aspirin only vs control

  20. Peer-mentoring for first-time mothers from areas of socio-economic disadvantage: A qualitative study within a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Christine A; Cupples, Margaret E; Percy, Andrew; Halliday, Henry L; Stewart, Moira C

    2008-01-01

    Background Non-professional involvement in delivering health and social care support in areas of socio-economic deprivation is considered important in attempting to reduce health inequalities. However, trials of peer mentoring programmes have yielded inconsistent evidence of benefit: difficulties in implementation have contributed to uncertainty regarding their efficacy. We aimed to explore difficulties encountered in conducting a randomised controlled trial of a peer-mentoring programme for first-time mothers in socially disadvantaged areas, in order to provide information relevant to future research and practice. This paper describes the experiences of lay-workers, women and health professionals involved in the trial. Methods Thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews with women (n = 11) who were offered peer mentor support, lay-workers (n = 11) who provided mentoring and midwives (n = 2) who supervised the programme, which provided support, from first hospital antenatal visit to one year postnatal. Planned frequency of contact was two-weekly (telephone or home visit) but was tailored to individuals' needs. Results Despite lay-workers living in the same locality, they experienced difficulty initiating contact with women and this affected their morale adversely. Despite researchers' attempts to ensure that the role of the mentor was understood clearly it appeared that this was not achieved for all participants. Mentors attempted to develop peer-mentor relationships by offering friendship and sharing personal experiences, which was appreciated by women. Mentors reported difficulties developing relationships with those who lacked interest in the programme. External influences, including family and friends, could prevent or facilitate mentoring. Time constraints in reconciling flexible mentoring arrangements with demands of other commitments posed major personal difficulties for lay-workers. Conclusion Difficulties in initiating contact, developing peer

  1. Molecular Evolution of the HIV-1 Thai Epidemic between the Time of RV144 Immunogen Selection to the Execution of the Vaccine Efficacy Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Eamsila, Chirapa; Kunasol, Prayura; Khamboonruang, Chirasak; Thongcharoen, Prasert; Namwat, Chawetsan; Premsri, Nakorn; Benenson, Michael; Morgan, Patricia; Bose, Meera; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Paris, Robert; Robb, Merlin L.; Birx, Deborah L.; De Souza, Mark S.; McCutchan, Francine E.; Michael, Nelson L.; Kim, Jerome H.

    2013-01-01

    The RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial (Thailand, 2003 to 2009), using immunogens genetically matched to the regional epidemic, demonstrated the first evidence of efficacy for an HIV-1 vaccine. Here we studied the molecular evolution of the HIV-1 epidemic from the time of immunogen selection to the execution of the efficacy trial. We studied HIV-1 genetic diversity among 390 volunteers who were deferred from enrollment in RV144 due to preexisting HIV-1 infection using a multiregion hybridization assay, full-genome sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses. The subtype distribution was 91.7% CRF01_AE, 3.5% subtype B, 4.3% B/CRF01_AE recombinants, and 0.5% dual infections. CRF01_AE strains were 31% more diverse than the ones from the 1990s Thai epidemic. Sixty-nine percent of subtype B strains clustered with the cosmopolitan Western B strains. Ninety-three percent of B/CRF01_AE recombinants were unique; recombination breakpoint analysis showed that these strains were highly embedded within the larger network that integrates recombinants from East/Southeast Asia. Compared to Thai sequences from the early 1990s, the distance to the RV144 immunogens increased 52% to 68% for CRF01_AE Env immunogens and 12% to 29% for subtype B immunogens. Forty-three percent to 48% of CRF01_AE sequences differed from the sequence of the vaccine insert in Env variable region 2 positions 169 and 181, which were implicated in vaccine sieve effects in RV144. In conclusion, compared to the molecular picture at the early stages of vaccine development, our results show an overall increase in the genetic complexity of viruses in the Thai epidemic and in the distance to vaccine immunogens, which should be considered at the time of the analysis of the trial results. PMID:23576510

  2. Effectiveness of a primary care-based intervention to reduce sitting time in overweight and obese patients (SEDESTACTIV): a randomized controlled trial; rationale and study design

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence suggesting that prolonged sitting has negative effects on people’s weight, chronic diseases and mortality. Interventions to reduce sedentary time can be an effective strategy to increase daily energy expenditure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a six-month primary care intervention to reduce daily of sitting time in overweight and mild obese sedentary patients. Method/Design The study is a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Professionals from thirteen primary health care centers (PHC) will randomly invite to participate mild obese or overweight patients of both gender, aged between 25 and 65 years old, who spend 6 hours at least daily sitting. A total of 232 subjects will be randomly allocated to an intervention (IG) and control group (CG) (116 individuals each group). In addition, 50 subjects with fibromyalgia will be included. Primary outcome is: (1) sitting time using the activPAL device and the Marshall questionnaire. The following parameters will be also assessed: (2) sitting time in work place (Occupational Sitting and Physical Activity Questionnaire), (3) health-related quality of life (EQ-5D), (4) evolution of stage of change (Prochaska and DiClemente's Stages of Change Model), (5) physical inactivity (catalan version of Brief Physical Activity Assessment Tool), (6) number of steps walked (pedometer and activPAL), (7) control based on analysis (triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, glycemia and, glycated haemoglobin in diabetic patients) and (8) blood pressure and anthropometric variables. All parameters will be assessed pre and post intervention and there will be a follow up three, six and twelve months after the intervention. A descriptive analysis of all variables and a multivariate analysis to assess differences among groups will be undertaken. Multivariate analysis will be carried out to assess time changes of dependent variables. All the analysis will be done under the

  3. Survival analysis and extrapolation modeling of time-to-event clinical trial data for economic evaluation: an alternative approach.

    PubMed

    Bagust, Adrian; Beale, Sophie

    2014-04-01

    A recent publication includes a review of survival extrapolation methods used in technology appraisals of treatments for advanced cancers. The author of the article also noted shortcomings and inconsistencies in the analytical methods used in appraisals. He then proposed a survival model selection process algorithm to guide modelers' choice of projective models for use in future appraisals. This article examines the proposed algorithm and highlights various shortcomings that involve questionable assumptions, including researchers' access to patient-level data, the relevance of proportional hazards modeling, and the appropriateness of standard probability functions for characterizing risk, which may mislead practitioners into employing biased structures for projecting limited data in decision models. An alternative paradigm is outlined. This paradigm is based on the primacy of the experimental data and adherence to the scientific method through hypothesis formulation and validation. Drawing on extensive experience of survival modeling and extrapolation in the United Kingdom, practical advice is presented on issues of importance when using data from clinical trials terminated without complete follow-up as a basis for survival extrapolation.

  4. Incorporating prognostic factors into causal estimators: a comparison of methods for randomised controlled trials with a time-to-event outcome.

    PubMed

    Hampson, Lisa V; Metcalfe, Chris

    2012-11-20

    In randomised controlled trials, the effect of treatment on those who comply with allocation to active treatment can be estimated by comparing their outcome to those in the comparison group who would have complied with active treatment had they been allocated to it. We compare three estimators of the causal effect of treatment on compliers when this is a parameter in a proportional hazards model and quantify the bias due to omitting baseline prognostic factors. Causal estimates are found directly by maximising a novel partial likelihood; based on a structural proportional hazards model; and based on a 'corrected dataset' derived after fitting a rank-preserving structural failure time model. Where necessary, we extend these methods to incorporate baseline covariates. Comparisons use simulated data and a real data example. Analysing the simulated data, we found that all three methods are accurate when an important covariate was included in the proportional hazards model (maximum bias 5.4%). However, failure to adjust for this prognostic factor meant that causal treatment effects were underestimated (maximum bias 11.4%), because estimators were based on a misspecified marginal proportional hazards model. Analysing the real data example, we found that adjusting causal estimators is important to correct for residual imbalances in prognostic factors present between trial arms after randomisation. Our results show that methods of estimating causal treatment effects for time-to-event outcomes should be extended to incorporate covariates, thus providing an informative compliment to the corresponding intention-to-treat analysis.

  5. On the quantization of time-varying phase synchrony patterns into distinct functional connectivity microstates (FCμstates) in a multi-trial visual ERP paradigm.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadis, S I; Laskaris, N A; Tzelepi, A

    2013-07-01

    The analysis of functional brain connectivity has been supported by various techniques encompassing spatiotemporal interactions between distinct areas and enabling the description of network organization. Different brain states are known to be associated with specific connectivity patterns. We introduce here the concept of functional connectivity microstates (FCμstates) as short lasting connectivity patterns resulting from the discretization of temporal variations in connectivity and mediating a parsimonious representation of coordinated activity in the brain. Modifying a well-established framework for mining brain dynamics, we show that a small sized repertoire of FCμstates can be derived so as to encapsulate both the inter-subject and inter-trial response variability and further provide novel insights into cognition. The main practical advantage of our approach lies in the fact that time-varying connectivity analysis can be simplified significantly by considering each FCμstate as prototypical connectivity pattern, and this is achieved without sacrificing the temporal aspects of dynamics. Multi-trial datasets from a visual ERP experiment were employed so as to provide a proof of concept, while phase synchrony was emphasized in the description of connectivity structure. The power of FCμstates in knowledge discovery is demonstrated through the application of network topology descriptors. Their time-evolution and association with event-related responses is explored.

  6. Night-time splinting after fasciectomy or dermo-fasciectomy for Dupuytren's contracture: a pragmatic, multi-centre, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dupuytren's disease is a progressive fibroproliferative disorder which can result in fixed flexion contractures of digits and impaired hand function. Standard treatment involves surgical release or excision followed by post-operative hand therapy and splinting, however the evidence supporting night splinting is of low quality and equivocal. Methods A multi-centre, pragmatic, open, randomised controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of night splinting on self-reported function, finger extension and satisfaction in patients undergoing fasciectomy or dermofasciectomy. 154 patients from 5 regional hospitals were randomised after surgery to receive hand therapy only (n = 77) or hand therapy with night-splinting (n = 77). Primary outcome was self-reported function using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. Secondary outcomes were finger range of motion and patient satisfaction. Primary analysis was by intention to treat. Results 148 (96%) patients completed follow-up at 12 months. No statistically significant differences were observed on the DASH questionnaire (0-100 scale: adjusted mean diff. 0.66, 95%CI - 2.79 to 4.11, p = 0.703), total extension deficit of operated digits (degrees: adjusted mean diff 5.11, 95%CI -2.33 to 12.55, p = 0.172) or patient satisfaction (0-10 numerical rating scale: adjusted mean diff -0.35, 95%CI -1.04 to 0.34, p = 0.315) at 1 year post surgery. Similarly, in a secondary per protocol analysis no statistically significant differences were observed between the groups in any of the outcomes. Conclusions No differences were observed in self-reported upper limb disability or active range of motion between a group of patients who were all routinely splinted after surgery and a group of patients receiving hand therapy and only splinted if and when contractures occurred. Given the added expense of therapists' time, thermoplastic materials and the potential inconvenience to patients having to

  7. Prior Low- or High-Intensity Exercise Alters Pacing Strategy, Energy System Contribution and Performance during a 4-km Cycling Time Trial

    PubMed Central

    Correia-Oliveira, Carlos Rafaell; Santos, Ralmony Alcantara; Silva-Cavalcante, Marcos David; Bertuzzi, Romulo; Kiss, Maria Augusta Peduti Dal’Molin; Bishop, David John; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the influence of prior exercise designed to reduce predominantly muscle glycogen in either type I or II fibers on pacing and performance during a 4-km cycling time trial (TT). After preliminary and familiarization trials, in a randomized, repeated-measures crossover design, ten amateur cyclists performed: 1) an exercise designed to reduce glycogen of type I muscle fibers, followed by a 4-km TT (EX-FIB I); 2) an exercise designed to reduce glycogen of type II muscle fibers, followed by a 4-km TT (EX-FIB II) and; 3) a 4-km TT, without the prior exercise (CONT). The muscle-glycogen-reducing exercise in both EX-FIB I and EX-FIB II was performed in the evening, ∼12 h before the 4-km TT. Performance time was increased and power output (PO) was reduced in EX-FIB I (432.8±8.3 s and 204.9±10.9 W) and EX-FIB II (428.7±6.7 s and 207.5±9.1 W) compared to CONT (420.8±6.4 s and 218.4±9.3 W; P<0.01), without a difference between EX-FIB I and EX-FIB II (P>0.05). The PO was lower in EX-FIB I than in CONT at the beginning and middle of the trial (P<0.05). The mean aerobic contribution during EX-FIB I was also significantly lower than in CONT (P<0.05), but there was no difference between CONT and EX-FIB II or between EX-FIB I and EX-FIB II (P>0.05). The integrated electromyography was unchanged between conditions (P>0.05). Performance may have been impaired in EX-FIB I due a more conservative pacing at the beginning and middle, which was associated with a reduced aerobic contribution. In turn, the PO profile adopted in EX-FIB II was also reduced throughout the trial, but the impairment in performance may be attributed to a reduced glycolytic contribution (i.e. reduced lactate accumulation). PMID:25330452

  8. Optimal blood sampling time windows for parameter estimation using a population approach: design of a phase II clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Chenel, Marylore; Ogungbenro, Kayode; Duval, Vincent; Laveille, Christian; Jochemsen, Roeline; Aarons, Leon

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to determine optimal blood sampling time windows for the estimation of pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters by a population approach within the clinical constraints. A population PK model was developed to describe a reference phase II PK dataset. Using this model and the parameter estimates, D-optimal sampling times were determined by optimising the determinant of the population Fisher information matrix (PFIM) using PFIM_ _M 1.2 and the modified Fedorov exchange algorithm. Optimal sampling time windows were then determined by allowing the D-optimal windows design to result in a specified level of efficiency when compared to the fixed-times D-optimal design. The best results were obtained when K(a) and IIV on K(a) were fixed. Windows were determined using this approach assuming 90% level of efficiency and uniform sample distribution. Four optimal sampling time windows were determined as follow: at trough between 22 h and new drug administration; between 2 and 4 h after dose for all patients; and for 1/3 of the patients only 2 sampling time windows between 4 and 10 h after dose, equal to [4 h-5 h 05] and [9 h 10-10 h]. This work permitted the determination of an optimal design, with suitable sampling time windows which was then evaluated by simulations. The sampling time windows will be used to define the sampling schedule in a prospective phase II study.

  9. Preliminary Comparison of Two-Way Satellite Time and Frequency Transfer and GPS Common-View Time Transfer During the INTELSAT Field Trial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John A.; Lewandowski, W.; DeYoung, James A.; Kirchner, Dieter; Hetzel, Peter; deJong, Gerrit; Soering, A.; Baumont, F.; Klepczynski, William; McKinley, Angela Davis; Parker, Thomas E.; Bartle, K. A.; Ressler, Hubert; Robnik, R.; Veenstra, L.

    1996-01-01

    For a decade and a half Global Positioning System (GPS) common-view time transfer has greatly served the needs of primary timing laboratories for regular intercomparisons of remote atomic clocks. However, GPS as a one-way technique has natural limits and may not meet all challenges of the comparison of the coming new generation of atomic clocks. Two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT) is a promising technique which may successfully complement GPS. For two years, regular TWSTFT's have been performed between eight laboratories situated in both Europe and North America, using INTELSAT satellites. This has enabled an extensive direct comparison to be made between these two high performance time transfer methods. The performance of the TWSTFT and GPS common view methods are compared over a number of time-transfer links. These links use a variety of time-transfer hardware and atomic clocks and have baselines of substantially different lengths. The relative merits of the two time-transfer systems are discussed.

  10. Exploring the performance reserve: Effect of different magnitudes of power output deception on 4,000 m cycling time-trial performance

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Mark R.; Thomas, Kevin; Wilkinson, Michael; Stevenson, Emma; St. Clair Gibson, Alan; Jones, Andrew M.; Thompson, Kevin G.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a magnitude of deception of 5% in power output would lead to a greater reduction in the amount of time taken for participants to complete a 4000 m cycling TT than a magnitude of deception of 2% in power output, which we have previously shown can lead to a small change in 4000 m cycling TT performance. Methods Ten trained male cyclists completed four, 4000 m cycling TTs. The first served as a habituation and the second as a baseline for future trials. During trials three and four participants raced against a pacer which was set, in a randomized order, at a mean power output equal to 2% (+2% TT) or 5% (+5% TT) higher than their baseline performance. However participants were misled into believing that the power output of the pacer was an accurate representation of their baseline performance on both occasions. Cardiorespiratory responses were recorded throughout each TT, and used to estimate energy contribution from aerobic and anaerobic metabolism. Results Participants were able to finish the +2% TT in a significantly shorter duration than at baseline (p = 0.01), with the difference in performance likely attributable to a greater anaerobic contribution to total power output (p = 0.06). There was no difference in performance between the +5% TT and +2% TT or baseline trials. Conclusions Results suggest that a performance reserve is conserved, involving anaerobic energy contribution, which can be utilised given a belief that the exercise will be sustainable however there is an upper limit to how much deception can be tolerated. These findings have implications for performance enhancement in athletes and for our understanding of the nature of fatigue during high-intensity exercise. PMID:28278174

  11. Two-Arm Randomized Pilot Intervention Trial to Decrease Sitting Time and Increase Sit-To-Stand Transitions in Working and Non-Working Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Jacqueline; Takemoto, Michelle; Bolling, Khalisa; Atkin, Andrew; Carlson, Jordan; Rosenberg, Dori; Crist, Katie; Godbole, Suneeta; Lewars, Brittany; Pena, Claudia; Merchant, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Background Excessive sitting has been linked to poor health. It is unknown whether reducing total sitting time or increasing brief sit-to-stand transitions is more beneficial. We conducted a randomized pilot study to assess whether it is feasible for working and non-working older adults to reduce these two different behavioral targets. Methods Thirty adults (15 workers and 15 non-workers) age 50–70 years were randomized to one of two conditions (a 2-hour reduction in daily sitting or accumulating 30 additional brief sit-to-stand transitions per day). Sitting time, standing time, sit-to-stand transitions and stepping were assessed by a thigh worn inclinometer (activPAL). Participants were assessed for 7 days at baseline and followed while the intervention was delivered (2 weeks). Mixed effects regression analyses adjusted for days within participants, device wear time, and employment status. Time by condition interactions were investigated. Results Recruitment, assessments, and intervention delivery were feasible. The ‘reduce sitting’ group reduced their sitting by two hours, the ‘increase sit-to-stand’ group had no change in sitting time (p < .001). The sit-to-stand transition group increased their sit-to-stand transitions, the sitting group did not (p < .001). Conclusions This study was the first to demonstrate the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of specific sedentary behavioral goals. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT02544867 PMID:26735919

  12. Does point of care prothrombin time measurement reduce the transfusion of fresh frozen plasma in patients undergoing major surgery? The POC-OP randomized-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Bleeding is a frequent complication during surgery. The intraoperative administration of blood products, including packed red blood cells, platelets and fresh frozen plasma (FFP), is often live saving. Complications of blood transfusions contribute considerably to perioperative costs and blood product resources are limited. Consequently, strategies to optimize the decision to transfuse are needed. Bleeding during surgery is a dynamic process and may result in major blood loss and coagulopathy due to dilution and consumption. The indication for transfusion should be based on reliable coagulation studies. While hemoglobin levels and platelet counts are available within 15 minutes, standard coagulation studies require one hour. Therefore, the decision to administer FFP has to be made in the absence of any data. Point of care testing of prothrombin time ensures that one major parameter of coagulation is available in the operation theatre within minutes. It is fast, easy to perform, inexpensive and may enable physicians to rationally determine the need for FFP. Methods/Design The objective of the POC-OP trial is to determine the effectiveness of point of care prothrombin time testing to reduce the administration of FFP. It is a patient and assessor blind, single center randomized controlled parallel group trial in 220 patients aged between 18 and 90 years undergoing major surgery (any type, except cardiac surgery and liver transplantation) with an estimated blood loss during surgery exceeding 20% of the calculated total blood volume or a requirement of FFP according to the judgment of the physicians in charge. Patients are randomized to usual care plus point of care prothrombin time testing or usual care alone without point of care testing. The primary outcome is the relative risk to receive any FFP perioperatively. The inclusion of 110 patients per group will yield more than 80% power to detect a clinically relevant relative risk of 0.60 to receive FFP of

  13. Effects of Cereal, Fruit and Vegetable Fibers on Human Fecal Weight and Transit Time: A Comprehensive Review of Intervention Trials.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jan; Birkett, Anne; Hulshof, Toine; Verbeke, Kristin; Gibes, Kernon

    2016-03-02

    Cereal fibers are known to increase fecal weight and speed transit time, but far less data are available on the effects of fruits and vegetable fibers on regularity. This study provides a comprehensive review of the impact of these three fiber sources on regularity in healthy humans. We identified English-language intervention studies on dietary fibers and regularity and performed weighted linear regression analyses for fecal weight and transit time. Cereal and vegetable fiber groups had comparable effects on fecal weight; both contributed to it more than fruit fibers. Less fermentable fibers increased fecal weight to a greater degree than more fermentable fibers. Dietary fiber did not change transit time in those with an initial time of <48 h. In those with an initial transit time ≥48 h, transit time was reduced by approximately 30 min per gram of cereal, fruit or vegetable fibers, regardless of fermentability. Cereal fibers have been studied more than any other kind in relation to regularity. This is the first comprehensive review comparing the effects of the three major food sources of fiber on bowel function and regularity since 1993.

  14. Effects of Cereal, Fruit and Vegetable Fibers on Human Fecal Weight and Transit Time: A Comprehensive Review of Intervention Trials

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Jan; Birkett, Anne; Hulshof, Toine; Verbeke, Kristin; Gibes, Kernon

    2016-01-01

    Cereal fibers are known to increase fecal weight and speed transit time, but far less data are available on the effects of fruits and vegetable fibers on regularity. This study provides a comprehensive review of the impact of these three fiber sources on regularity in healthy humans. We identified English-language intervention studies on dietary fibers and regularity and performed weighted linear regression analyses for fecal weight and transit time. Cereal and vegetable fiber groups had comparable effects on fecal weight; both contributed to it more than fruit fibers. Less fermentable fibers increased fecal weight to a greater degree than more fermentable fibers. Dietary fiber did not change transit time in those with an initial time of <48 h. In those with an initial transit time ≥48 h, transit time was reduced by approximately 30 min per gram of cereal, fruit or vegetable fibers, regardless of fermentability. Cereal fibers have been studied more than any other kind in relation to regularity. This is the first comprehensive review comparing the effects of the three major food sources of fiber on bowel function and regularity since 1993. PMID:26950143

  15. Collaborative trial validation studies of real-time PCR-based GMO screening methods for detection of the bar gene and the ctp2-cp4epsps construct.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, Lutz; Brünen-Nieweler, Claudia; Nemeth, Anne; Waiblinger, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-10-14

    Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)-based screening methods targeting genetic elements commonly used in genetically modified (GM) plants are important tools for the detection of GM materials in food, feed, and seed samples. To expand and harmonize the screening capability of enforcement laboratories, the German Federal Office of Consumer Protection and Food Safety conducted collaborative trials for interlaboratory validation of real-time PCR methods for detection of the phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (bar) gene from Streptomyces hygroscopicus and a construct containing the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase gene from Agrobacterium tumefaciens sp. strain CP4 (ctp2-cp4epsps), respectively. To assess the limit of detection, precision, and accuracy of the methods, laboratories had to analyze two sets of 18 coded genomic DNA samples of events LLRice62 and MS8 with the bar method and NK603 and GT73 with the ctp2-cp4epsps method at analyte levels of 0, 0.02, and 0.1% GM content, respectively. In addition, standard DNAs were provided to the laboratories to generate calibration curves for copy number quantification of the bar and ctp2-cp4epsps target sequences present in the test samples. The study design and the results obtained are discussed with respect to the difficult issue of developing general guidelines and concepts for the collaborative trial validation of qualitative PCR screening methods.

  16. The P600-as-P3 hypothesis revisited: single-trial analyses reveal that the late EEG positivity following linguistically deviant material is reaction time aligned.

    PubMed

    Sassenhagen, Jona; Schlesewsky, Matthias; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina

    2014-10-01

    The P600, a late positive ERP component following linguistically deviant stimuli, is commonly seen as indexing structural, high-level processes, e.g. of linguistic (re)analysis. It has also been identified with the P3 (P600-as-P3 hypothesis), which is thought to reflect a systemic neuromodulator release facilitating behavioural shifts and is usually response time aligned. We investigated single-trial alignment of the P600 to response, a critical prediction of the P600-as-P3 hypothesis. Participants heard sentences containing morphosyntactic and semantic violations and responded via a button press. The elicited P600 was perfectly response aligned, while an N400 following semantic deviations was stimulus aligned. This is, to our knowledge, the first single-trial analysis of language processing data using within-sentence behavioural responses as temporal covariates. Results support the P600-as-P3 perspective and thus constitute a step towards a neurophysiological grounding of language-related ERPs.

  17. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus: interlaboratory ring trial to evaluate real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction detection methods.

    PubMed

    Wernike, Kerstin; Bonilauri, Paolo; Dauber, Malte; Errington, Jane; LeBlanc, Neil; Revilla-Fernández, Sandra; Hjulsager, Charlotte; Isaksson, Mats; Stadejek, Tomasz; Beer, Martin; Hoffmann, Bernd

    2012-09-01

    To compare the real-time reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays used for the diagnosis of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a Europe-wide interlaboratory ring trial was conducted. A variety of PRRSV strains including North American (NA) and European (EU) genotype isolates were analyzed by the participants. Great differences regarding qualitative diagnostics as well as analytical sensitivity were observed between the individual RT-qPCR systems, especially when investigating strains from the EU genotype. None of the assays or commercial kits used in the ring trial could identify all different PRRSV strains with an optimal analytical and diagnostic sensitivity. The genetic variability of the PRRSV strains, which is supposed to hinder the diagnostic of the RT-PCR because of mutations at the primer binding sites, was also confirmed by sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic analysis. In summary, a major problem in PRRSV diagnostics by RT-qPCR is false-negative results. To achieve maximum safety in the molecular diagnosis of PRRSV, the combined usage of different assays or kits is highly recommended.

  18. Indicators of Early and Late Processing Reveal the Importance of Within-Trial-Time for Theories of Associative Learning

    PubMed Central

    Lachnit, Harald; Thorwart, Anna; Schultheis, Holger; Lotz, Anja; Koenig, Stephan; Uengoer, Metin

    2013-01-01

    In four human learning experiments (Pavlovian skin conductance, causal learning, speeded classification task), we evaluated several associative learning theories that assume either an elemental (modified unique cue model and Harris’ model) or a configural (Pearce’s configural theory and an extension of it) form of stimulus processing. The experiments used two modified patterning problems (A/B/C+, AB/BC/AC+ vs. ABC-; A+, BC+ vs. ABC-). Pearce’s configural theory successfully predicted all of our data reflecting early stimulus processing, while the predictions of the elemental theories were in accord with all of our data reflecting later stages of stimulus processing. Our results suggest that the form of stimulus representation depends on the amount of time available for stimulus processing. Our findings highlight the necessity to investigate stimulus processing during conditioning on a finer time scale than usually done in contemporary research. PMID:23826092

  19. Trial Watch

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Aranda, Fernando; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jérôme; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    In 1997, for the first time in history, a monoclonal antibody (mAb), i.e., the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of mAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has not stopped to expand, nowadays encompassing a stunning amount of 15 distinct molecules. This therapeutic armamentarium includes mAbs that target tumor-associated antigens, as well as molecules that interfere with tumor-stroma interactions or exert direct immunostimulatory effects. These three classes of mAbs exert antineoplastic activity via distinct mechanisms, which may or may not involve immune effectors other than the mAbs themselves. In previous issues of OncoImmunology, we provided a brief scientific background to the use of mAbs, all types confounded, in cancer therapy, and discussed the results of recent clinical trials investigating the safety and efficacy of this approach. Here, we focus on mAbs that primarily target malignant cells or their interactions with stromal components, as opposed to mAbs that mediate antineoplastic effects by activating the immune system. In particular, we discuss relevant clinical findings that have been published during the last 13 months as well as clinical trials that have been launched in the same period to investigate the therapeutic profile of hitherto investigational tumor-targeting mAbs. PMID:24605265

  20. International ring trial for the validation of an event-specific Golden Rice 2 quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction method.

    PubMed

    Jacchia, Sara; Nardini, Elena; Bassani, Niccolò; Savini, Christian; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Trijatmiko, Kurniawan; Kreysa, Joachim; Mazzara, Marco

    2015-05-27

    This article describes the international validation of the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection method for Golden Rice 2. The method consists of a taxon-specific assay amplifying a fragment of rice Phospholipase D α2 gene, and an event-specific assay designed on the 3' junction between transgenic insert and plant DNA. We validated the two assays independently, with absolute quantification, and in combination, with relative quantification, on DNA samples prepared in haploid genome equivalents. We assessed trueness, precision, efficiency, and linearity of the two assays, and the results demonstrate that both the assays independently assessed and the entire method fulfill European and international requirements for methods for genetically modified organism (GMO) testing, within the dynamic range tested. The homogeneity of the results of the collaborative trial between Europe and Asia is a good indicator of the robustness of the method.

  1. Organizational-Level Strategies With or Without an Activity Tracker to Reduce Office Workers’ Sitting Time: Rationale and Study Design of a Pilot Cluster-Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fjeldsoe, Brianna S; Young, Duncan C; Winkler, Elisabeth A H; Dunstan, David W; Straker, Leon M; Brakenridge, Christian J; Healy, Genevieve N

    2016-01-01

    Background The office workplace is a key setting in which to address excessive sitting time and inadequate physical activity. One major influence on workplace sitting is the organizational environment. However, the impact of organizational-level strategies on individual level activity change is unknown. Further, the emergence of sophisticated, consumer-targeted wearable activity trackers that facilitate real-time self-monitoring of activity, may be a useful adjunct to support organizational-level strategies, but to date have received little evaluation in this workplace setting. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of organizational-level strategies with or without an activity tracker on sitting, standing, and stepping in office workers in the short (3 months, primary aim) and long-term (12 months, secondary aim). Methods This study is a pilot, cluster-randomized trial (with work teams as the unit of clustering) of two interventions in office workers: organizational-level support strategies (eg, visible management support, emails) or organizational-level strategies plus the use of a waist-worn activity tracker (the LUMOback) that enables self-monitoring of sitting, standing, and stepping time and enables users to set sitting and posture alerts. The key intervention message is to ‘Stand Up, Sit Less, and Move More.’ Intervention elements will be implemented from within the organization by the Head of Workplace Wellbeing. Participants will be recruited via email and enrolled face-to-face. Assessments will occur at baseline, 3, and 12 months. Time spent sitting, sitting in prolonged (≥30 minute) bouts, standing, and stepping during work hours and across the day will be measured with activPAL3 activity monitors (7 days, 24 hours/day protocol), with total sitting time and sitting time during work hours the primary outcomes. Web-based questionnaires, LUMOback recorded data, telephone interviews, and focus

  2. The Effect of Timing and Frequency of Push Notifications on Usage of a Smartphone-Based Stress Management Intervention: An Exploratory Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hargood, Charlie; Pejovic, Veljko; Geraghty, Adam W. A.; Lloyd, Scott; Goodman, Natalie; Michaelides, Danius T.; Weston, Anna; Musolesi, Mirco; Weal, Mark J.; Yardley, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    Push notifications offer a promising strategy for enhancing engagement with smartphone-based health interventions. Intelligent sensor-driven machine learning models may improve the timeliness of notifications by adapting delivery to a user’s current context (e.g. location). This exploratory mixed-methods study examined the potential impact of timing and frequency on notification response and usage of Healthy Mind, a smartphone-based stress management intervention. 77 participants were randomised to use one of three versions of Healthy Mind that provided: intelligent notifications; daily notifications within pre-defined time frames; or occasional notifications within pre-defined time frames. Notification response and Healthy Mind usage were automatically recorded. Telephone interviews explored participants’ experiences of using Healthy Mind. Participants in the intelligent and daily conditions viewed (d = .47, .44 respectively) and actioned (d = .50, .43 respectively) more notifications compared to the occasional group. Notification group had no meaningful effects on percentage of notifications viewed or usage of Healthy Mind. No meaningful differences were indicated between the intelligent and non-intelligent groups. Our findings suggest that frequent notifications may encourage greater exposure to intervention content without deterring engagement, but adaptive tailoring of notification timing does not always enhance their use. Hypotheses generated from this study require testing in future work. Trial registration number: ISRCTN67177737 PMID:28046034

  3. Effects of Six versus Three Times per Week Hemodialysis on Physical Performance, Health, and Functioning: Frequent Hemodialysis Network (FHN) Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Larive, Brett; Painter, Patricia; Kaysen, George A.; Lindsay, Robert M.; Nissenson, Allen R.; Unruh, Mark L.; Rocco, Michael V.; Chertow, Glenn M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Relatively little is known about the effects of hemodialysis frequency on the disability of patients with ESRD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study examined changes in physical performance and self-reported physical health and functioning among subjects randomized to frequent (six times per week) compared with conventional (three times per week) hemodialysis in both the Frequent Hemodialysis Network daily (n=245) and nocturnal (n=87) trials. The main outcome measures were adjusted change in scores over 12 months on the short physical performance battery (SPPB), RAND 36-item health survey physical health composite (PHC), and physical functioning subscale (PF) based on the intention to treat principle. Results Overall scores for SPPB, PHC, and PF were poor relative to population norms and in line with other studies in ESRD. In the Daily Trial, subjects randomized to frequent compared with conventional in-center hemodialysis experienced no significant change in SPPB (adjusted mean change of −0.20±0.19 versus −0.41±0.21, P=0.45) but experienced significant improvement in PHC (3.4±0.8 versus 0.4±0.8, P=0.009) and a relatively large change in PF that did not reach statistical significance. In the Nocturnal Trial, there were no significant differences among subjects randomized to frequent compared with conventional hemodialysis in SPPB (adjusted mean change of −0.92±0.44 versus −0.41±0.43, P=0.41), PHC (2.7±1.4 versus 2.1±1.5, P=0.75), or PF (−3.1±3.5 versus 1.1±3.6, P=0.40). Conclusions Frequent in-center hemodialysis compared with conventional in-center hemodialysis improved self-reported physical health and functioning but had no significant effect on objective physical performance. There were no significant effects of frequent nocturnal hemodialysis on the same physical metrics. PMID:22422538

  4. A moderate dose of caffeine ingestion does not change energy expenditure but decreases sleep time in physically active males: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Júdice, Pedro B; Magalhães, João P; Santos, Diana A; Matias, Catarina N; Carita, Ana Isabel; Armada-Da-Silva, Paulo A S; Sardinha, Luís B; Silva, Analiza M

    2013-01-01

    Research on the effect of caffeine on energy expenditure (EE), physical activity (PA), and total sleep time (TST) during free-living conditions using objective measures is scarce. We aimed to determine the impact of a moderate dose of caffeine on TST, resting EE (REE), physical activity EE (PAEE), total EE (TEE), and daily time spent in sedentary, light, moderate, and vigorous intensity activities in a 4-day period and the acute effects on heart rate (HR) and EE in physically active males. Using a double-blind crossover trial (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01477294) with two conditions (4 days each with 3-day washout) randomly ordered as caffeine (5 mg/kg of body mass/day) and placebo (maltodextrin) administered twice per day (2.5 mg/kg), 30 nonsmoker males, low-caffeine users (<100 mg/day), aged 20-39, were followed. Body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. PA was assessed by accelerometry, while a combined HR and movement sensor estimated EE and HR on the second hour after the first administration dose. REE was assessed by indirect calorimetry, and PAEE was calculated as [TEE - (REE + 0.1TEE)]. TST and daily food records were obtained. Repeated measures ANOVA and ANCOVA were used. After a 4-day period, adjusting for fat-free mass, PAEE, and REE, TST was reduced (p = 0.022) under caffeine intake, while no differences were found between conditions for REE, PAEE, TEE, and PA patterns. Also, no acute effects on HR and EE were found between conditions. Though a large individual variability was observed, our findings revealed no acute or long-term effects of caffeine on EE and PA but decreased TST during free-living conditions in healthy males.

  5. Exploring time- and frequency- dependent functional connectivity and brain networks during deception with single-trial event-related potentials

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun-feng; Yang, Yong; Huang, Wen-tao; Lin, Pan; Ge, Sheng; Zheng, Hong-mei; Gu, Ling-yun; Zhou, Hui; Li, Chen-hong; Rao, Ni-ni

    2016-01-01

    To better characterize the cognitive processes and mechanisms that are associated with deception, wavelet coherence was employed to evaluate functional connectivity between different brain regions. Two groups of subjects were evaluated for this purpose: 32 participants were required to either tell the truth or to lie when facing certain stimuli, and their electroencephalogram signals on 12 electrodes were recorded. The experimental results revealed that deceptive responses elicited greater connectivity strength than truthful responses, particularly in the θ band on specific electrode pairs primarily involving connections between the prefrontal/frontal and central regions and between the prefrontal/frontal and left parietal regions. These results indicate that these brain regions play an important role in executing lying responses. Additionally, three time- and frequency-dependent functional connectivity networks were proposed to thoroughly reflect the functional coupling of brain regions that occurs during lying. Furthermore, the wavelet coherence values for the connections shown in the networks were extracted as features for support vector machine training. High classification accuracy suggested that the proposed network effectively characterized differences in functional connectivity between the two groups of subjects over a specific time-frequency area and hence could be a sensitive measurement for identifying deception. PMID:27833159

  6. To determine block establishment time of supraclavicular brachial plexus block using blunt versus short bevel needle: A prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, V; Thapa, D; Gombar, S; Dhiman, D

    2016-01-01

    Background: Unintentional intraneural injection under ultrasound guidance (USG) with fine caliber needles and lower success rate with large caliber Tuohy needles in supraclavicular brachial plexus block (SCB) have been reported. Materials and Methods: We undertook study to standardize the use of 20-gauge short versus blunt bevel needle for SCB. After approval of Institutional Ethics Committee and written informed consent, patients were randomized using computer-generated random number table to either of the two groups; blunt bevel needle group (n = 30): SCB under USG using 20-gauge Tuohy needle or short bevel needle group (n = 30): SCB under USG using 20-gauge short bevel needle. The primary outcome of the study was time to establishment of sensory and motor block of individual nerves, and secondary outcome was tolerability and any adverse effects. Results: The time to establishment of sensory and motor block in individual nerve territory was similar in both the groups. The complete sensory and motor anesthesia was achieved in 78.3% patients and complete sensory and motor anesthesia after supplementary block was achieved in 86.6% patients. Paresthesias during SCB were recorded in 15 patients. Out of these eight patients were of blunt bevel group and seven patients were of short bevel group. None of the patients experienced any neurological adverse effects. Conclusion: The establishment of sensory and motor blockade of individual nerves was similar to 20-gauge short and blunt bevel needle under ultrasound guide with no neurological adverse events. PMID:27375378

  7. The better the story, the bigger the serving: narrative transportation increases snacking during screen time in a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Watching television and playing video games increase energy intake, likely due to distraction from satiety cues. A study comparing one hour of watching TV, playing typical video games, or playing motion-controlled video games found a difference across groups in energy intake, but the reasons for this difference are not clear. As a secondary analysis, we investigated several types of distraction to determine potential psychosocial mechanisms which may account for greater energy intake observed during sedentary screen time as compared to motion-controlled video gaming. Methods Feelings of enjoyment, engagement (mental immersion), spatial presence (the feeling of being in the game), and transportation (immersion in a narrative) were investigated in 120 young adults aged 18 – 35 (60 female). Results Only narrative transportation was associated with total caloric intake (ρ = .205, P = .025). Transportation was also higher in the TV group than in the gaming groups (P = .002) and higher in males than in females (P = .003). Transportation mediated the relationship between motion-controlled gaming (as compared to TV watching) and square root transformed energy intake (indirect effect = −1.34, 95% confidence interval −3.57, −0.13). No other distraction-related variables were associated with intake. Conclusions These results suggest that different forms of distraction may differentially affect eating behavior during screen time, and that narrative appears to be a particularly strong distractor. Future studies should further investigate the effects of narrative on eating behavior. PMID:23680389

  8. Exploring time- and frequency- dependent functional connectivity and brain networks during deception with single-trial event-related potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun-Feng; Yang, Yong; Huang, Wen-Tao; Lin, Pan; Ge, Sheng; Zheng, Hong-Mei; Gu, Ling-Yun; Zhou, Hui; Li, Chen-Hong; Rao, Ni-Ni

    2016-11-01

    To better characterize the cognitive processes and mechanisms that are associated with deception, wavelet coherence was employed to evaluate functional connectivity between different brain regions. Two groups of subjects were evaluated for this purpose: 32 participants were required to either tell the truth or to lie when facing certain stimuli, and their electroencephalogram signals on 12 electrodes were recorded. The experimental results revealed that deceptive responses elicited greater connectivity strength than truthful responses, particularly in the θ band on specific electrode pairs primarily involving connections between the prefrontal/frontal and central regions and between the prefrontal/frontal and left parietal regions. These results indicate that these brain regions play an important role in executing lying responses. Additionally, three time- and frequency-dependent functional connectivity networks were proposed to thoroughly reflect the functional coupling of brain regions that occurs during lying. Furthermore, the wavelet coherence values for the connections shown in the networks were extracted as features for support vector machine training. High classification accuracy suggested that the proposed network effectively characterized differences in functional connectivity between the two groups of subjects over a specific time-frequency area and hence could be a sensitive measurement for identifying deception.

  9. Improving transparency of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dal-Ré, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    Recent data reveal that subtle selective publication affects critical aspects of trial reporting, in some cases altering the interpretation of results. Timely prospective registration could help deter selective reporting and clinical trial stakeholders from government authorities to journal editors should work together to foster prospective registration of trials.

  10. Implementing wait-time reductions under Ontario government benchmarks (Pay-for-Results): a Cluster Randomized Trial of the Effect of a Physician-Nurse Supplementary Triage Assistance team (MDRNSTAT) on emergency department patient wait times

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Internationally, emergency departments are struggling with crowding and its associated morbidity, mortality, and decreased patient and health-care worker satisfaction. The objective was to evaluate the addition of a MDRNSTAT (Physician (MD)-Nurse (RN) Supplementary Team At Triage) on emergency department patient flow and quality of care. Methods Pragmatic cluster randomized trial. From 131 weekday shifts (8:00–14:30) during a 26-week period, we randomized 65 days (3173 visits) to the intervention cluster with a MDRNSTAT presence, and 66 days (3163 visits) to the nurse-only triage control cluster. The primary outcome was emergency department length-of-stay (EDLOS) for patients managed and discharged only by the emergency department. Secondary outcomes included EDLOS for patients initially seen by the emergency department, and subsequently consulted and admitted, patients reaching government-mandated thresholds, time to initial physician assessment, left-without being seen rate, time to investigation, and measurement of harm. Results The intervention’s median EDLOS for discharged, non-consulted, high acuity patients was 4:05 [95th% CI: 3:58 to 4:15] versus 4:29 [95th% CI: 4:19–4:38] during comparator shifts. The intervention’s median EDLOS for discharged, non-consulted, low acuity patients was 1:55 [95th% CI: 1:48 to 2:05] versus 2:08 [95th% CI: 2:02–2:14]. The intervention’s median physician initial assessment time was 0:55 [95th% CI: 0:53 to 0:58] versus 1:21 [95th% CI: 1:18 to 1:25]. The intervention’s left-without-being-seen rate was 1.5% versus 2.2% for the control (p = 0.06). The MDRNSTAT subgroup analysis resulted in significant decreases in median EDLOS for discharged, non-consulted high (4:01 [95th% CI: 3:43–4:16]) and low acuity patients (1:10 95th% CI: 0:58–1:19]), as well as physician initial assessment time (0:25 [95th% CI: 0:23–0:26]). No patients returned to the emergency department after being discharged by the

  11. On board short-time high temperature heat treatment of ballast water: a field trial under operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Quilez-Badia, Gemma; McCollin, Tracy; Josefsen, Kjell D; Vourdachas, Anthony; Gill, Margaret E; Mesbahi, Ehsan; Frid, Chris L J

    2008-01-01

    A ballast water short-time high temperature heat treatment technique was applied on board a car-carrier during a voyage from Egypt to Belgium. Ballast water from three tanks was subjected for a few seconds to temperatures ranging from 55 degrees C to 80 degrees C. The water was heated using the vessel's heat exchanger steam and a second heat exchanger was used to pre-heat and cool down the water. The treatment was effective at causing mortality of bacteria, phytoplankton and zooplankton. The International Maritime Organization (IMO) standard was not agreed before this study was carried out, but comparing our results gives a broad indication that the IMO standard would have been met in some of the tests for the zooplankton, in all the tests for the phytoplankton; and probably on most occasions for the bacteria. Passing the water through the pump increased the kill rate but increasing the temperature above 55 degrees C did not improve the heat treatment's efficacy.

  12. Reported consent processes and demographics: a substudy of the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment trial

    PubMed Central

    Denning, Eileen; Sharma, Shweta; Smolskis, Mary; Touloumi, Giota; Walker, Sarah; Babiker, Abdel; Clewett, Megan; Emanuel, Ezekiel; Florence, Eric; Papadopoulos, Antonios; Sánchez, Adriana; Tavel, Jorge; Grady, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Efforts are needed to improve informed consent of participants in research. The Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Therapy (START) study provides a unique opportunity to study the effect of length and complexity of informed consent documents on understanding and satisfaction among geographically diverse participants. Methods Interested START sites were randomised to use either the standard consent form or the concise consent form for all of the site’s participants. Results A total of 4473 HIV-positive participants at 154 sites worldwide took part in the Informed Consent Substudy, with consent given in 11 primary languages. Most sites sent written information to potential participants in advance of clinic visits, usually including the consent form. At about half the sites, staff reported spending less than an hour per participant in the consent process. The vast majority of sites assessed participant understanding using informal nonspecific questions or clinical judgment. Conclusions These data reflect the interest of START research staff in evaluating the consent process and improving informed consent. The START Informed Consent Substudy is by far the largest study of informed consent intervention ever conducted. Its results have the potential to impact how consent forms are written around the world. PMID:25711320

  13. Tai chi qigong as a means to improve night-time sleep quality among older adults with cognitive impairment: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Aileen WK; Yu, Doris SF; Choi, KC; Lee, Diana TF; Sit, Janet WH; Chan, Helen YL

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Age-related cognitivee decline is a growing public health concern worldwide. More than a quarter of adults with cognitive impairment experience sleep disturbance. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the preliminary effects of tai chi qigong (TCQ) on improving the night-time sleep quality of older adults with cognitive impairment. Participants Older adults with cognitive impairment who complain of sleep disturbance. Methods A randomized controlled trial with two groups. Fifty-two subjects were recruited from two district elderly community centers and randomly assigned to either the TCQ group (n=27) or the control group (n=25). The intervention group received TCQ training consisting of two 60-minute sessions each week for 2 months. The control group was advised to maintain their usual activities. Sleep quality was measured by the Chinese Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Quality of life was measured by Short-form 12, cognitive functions measured by mini-mental state examination, and subjective memory deficits measured by the memory inventory for Chinese. Results Data were collected at baseline, 2 months, and 6 months. Significant results were noted at 6 months in the Chinese Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index global score (P=0.004), sleep duration (P=0.003), habitual sleep efficiency (P=0.002), and the Short-form 12 mental health component (P<0.001). The TCQ participants reported better sleep quality and a better (quality of life) mental health component than the control group. Conclusion TCQ can be considered a useful nonpharmacological approach for improving sleep quality in older adults with cognitive impairment. Clinical trial registration CUHK_CCT00448 (https://www2.ccrb.cuhk.edu.hk/registry/public/287). PMID:27698557

  14. Improved VO2max and time trial performance with more high aerobic intensity interval training and reduced training volume: a case study on an elite national cyclist.

    PubMed

    Støren, Øyvind; Bratland-Sanda, Solfrid; Haave, Marius; Helgerud, Jan

    2012-10-01

    The present study investigated to what extent more high aerobic intensity interval training (HAIT) and reduced training volume would influence maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and time trial (TT) performance in an elite national cyclist in the preseason period. The cyclist was tested for VO2max, cycling economy (C(c)), and TT performance on an ergometer cycle during 1 year. Training was continuously logged using heart rate monitor during the entire period. Total monthly training volume was reduced in the 2011 preseason compared with the 2010 preseason, and 2 HAIT blocks (14 sessions in 9 days and 15 sessions in 10 days) were performed as running. Between the HAIT blocks, 3 HAIT sessions per week were performed as cycling. From November 2010 to February 2011, the cyclist reduced total average monthly training volume by 18% and cycling training volume by 60%. The amount of training at 90-95% HRpeak increased by 41%. VO2max increased by 10.3% on ergometer cycle. TT performance improved by 14.9%. C(c) did not change. In conclusion, preseason reduced total training volume but increased amount of HAIT improved VO2max and TT performance without any changes in C(c). These improvements on cycling appeared despite that the HAIT blocks were performed as running. Reduced training time, and training transfer from running into improved cycling form, may be beneficial for cyclists living in cold climate areas.

  15. Sub-Nyquist field trial using time frequency packed DP-QPSK super-channel within fixed ITU-T grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potì, L.; Meloni, G.; Berrettini, G.; Fresi, F.; Foggi, T.; Secondini, M.; Giorgi, L.; Cavaliere, F.; Hackett, S.; Petronio, A.; Nibbs, P.; Forgan, R.; Leong, A.; Masciulli, R.; Pfander, C.

    2015-06-01

    Sub-Nyquist time frequency packing technique was demonstrated for the first time in a super channel field trial transmission over long-haul distances. The technique allows a limited spectral occupancy even with low order modulation formats. The transmission was successfully performed on a deployed Australian link between Sydney and Melbourne which included 995 km of uncompensated SMF with coexistent traffic. 40 and 100 Gb/s co-propagating channels were transmitted together with the super-channel in a 50 GHz ITU-T grid without additional penalty. The super-channel consisted of eight sub-channels with low-level modulation format, i.e. DP-QPSK, guaranteeing better OSNR robustness and reduced complexity with respect to higher order formats. At the receiver side, coherent detection was used together with iterative maximum-a-posteriori (MAP) detection and decoding. A 975 Gb/s DP-QPSK super-channel was successfully transmitted between Sydney and Melbourne within four 50GHz WSS channels (200 GHz). A maximum potential SE of 5.58 bit/s/Hz was achieved with an OSNR=15.8 dB, comparable to the OSNR of the installed 100 Gb/s channels. The system reliability was proven through long term measurements. In addition, by closing the link in a loop back configuration, a potential SE*d product of 9254 bit/s/Hz*km was achieved.

  16. Sub-Nyquist field trial using time frequency packed DP-QPSK super-channel within fixed ITU-T grid.

    PubMed

    Potì, L; Meloni, G; Berrettini, G; Fresi, F; Foggi, T; Secondini, M; Giorgi, L; Cavaliere, F; Hackett, S; Petronio, A; Nibbs, P; Forgan, R; Leong, A; Masciulli, R; Pfander, C

    2015-06-15

    Sub-Nyquist time frequency packing technique was demonstrated for the first time in a super-channel field trial transmission over long-haul distances. The technique allows a limited spectral occupancy even with low order modulation formats. The transmission was successfully performed on a deployed Australian link between Sydney and Melbourne which included 995 km of uncompensated SMF with coexistent traffic. 40 and 100 Gb/s co-propagating channels were transmitted together with the super-channel in a 50 GHz ITU-T grid without additional penalty. The super-channel consisted of eight sub-channels with low-level modulation format, i.e. DP-QPSK, guaranteeing better OSNR robustness and reduced complexity with respect to higher order formats. At the receiver side, coherent detection was used together with iterative maximum-a-posteriori (MAP) detection and decoding. A 975 Gb/s DP-QPSK super-channel was successfully transmitted between Sydney and Melbourne within four 50GHz WSS channels (200 GHz). A maximum potential SE of 5.58 bit/s/Hz was achieved with an OSNR = 15.8 dB, comparable to the OSNR of the installed 100 Gb/s channels. The system reliability was proven through long term measurements. In addition, by closing the link in a loop back configuration, a potential SE∙d product of 9254 bit/s/Hz·km was achieved.

  17. Motivating first-time, group O blood donors to return: Rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial of a post-donation telephone interview.

    PubMed

    France, Janis L; France, Christopher R; Carlson, Bruce W; Kessler, Debra A; Rebosa, Mark; Shaz, Beth H; Madden, Katrala; Carey, Patricia M

    2015-08-03

    First-time blood donors are essential to the US donor pool, providing nearly a third of all donations. Unfortunately, there are a wide variety of obstacles to repeat donation and new donors are extremely difficult to retain. Because each donor experiences a unique set of deterrents, we developed a post-donation interview based on motivational interview principles in order to flexibly address individual barriers. The primary aim of this randomized clinical trial is to examine retention of first-time, group O blood donors who are randomly assigned to receive either a telephone-delivered interview with motivational and action planning components or a standard-of-care control call approximately six weeks after their donation. Measures of donation attitude, perceived behavioral control, intention, and motivational autonomy will be measured before and after the telephone contact using online surveys, and donation attempts will be tracked for one year using blood center donor databases. We hypothesize that, compared to controls, donors who receive the telephone interview will be more likely to make a donation attempt over the following year. In addition, we will examine possible mechanisms of action of the interview using key predictors of donation behavior as described by Self Determination Theory (i.e., motivational autonomy) and the Theory of Planned Behavior (i.e., attitude, perceived behavioral control, and intention). Results of this intervention may help to support a novel strategy to enhance retention of selected blood donors in an effort to better meet the nation's blood supply needs.

  18. The effect of including a series of isometric conditioning contractions to the rowing warm-up on 1,000-m rowing ergometer time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Feros, Simon A; Young, Warren B; Rice, Anthony J; Talpey, Scott W

    2012-12-01

    Rowing requires strength, power, and strength-endurance for optimal performance. A rowing-based warm-up could be enhanced by exploiting the postactivation potentiation (PAP) phenomenon, acutely enhancing power output at the beginning of a race where it is needed most. Minimal research has investigated the effects of PAP on events of longer duration (i.e. 1,000-m rowing). The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of PAP on 1,000-m rowing ergometer performance through the use of 2 different warm-up procedures: (a) a rowing warm-up combined with a series of isometric conditioning contractions, known as the potentiated warm-up (PW), and (b) a rowing warm-up only (NW). The isometric conditioning contractions in the PW were performed by "pulling" an immovable handle on the rowing ergometer, consisting of 5 sets of 5 seconds (2 seconds at submaximal intensity, and 3 seconds at maximal intensity), with a 15-second recovery between sets. The 1,000-m rowing ergometer time trial was performed after each warm-up condition, whereby mean power output, mean stroke rate, and split time were assessed every 100 m. Ten Australian national level rowers served as the subjects and performed both conditions in a counterbalanced order on separate days. The PW reduced 1,000-m time by 0.8% (p > 0.05). The PW improved mean power output by 6.6% (p < 0.01) and mean stroke rate by 5.2% (p < 0.01) over the first 500 m; resulting in a reduction of 500-m time by 1.9% (p < 0.01), compared with the NW. It appears that the inclusion of isometric conditioning contractions to the rowing warm-up enhance short-term rowing ergometer performance (especially at the start of a race) to a greater extent than a rowing warm-up alone.

  19. Evaluation of a real-time virtual intervention to empower persons living with HIV to use therapy self-management: study protocol for an online randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Living with HIV makes considerable demands on a person in terms of self-management, especially as regards adherence to treatment and coping with adverse side-effects. The online HIV Treatment, Virtual Nursing Assistance and Education (Virus de I’immunodéficience Humaine–Traitement Assistance Virtuelle Infirmière et Enseignement; VIH-TAVIE™) intervention was developed to provide persons living with HIV (PLHIV) with personalized follow-up and real-time support in managing their medication intake on a daily basis. An online randomized controlled trial (RCT) will be conducted to evaluate the efficacy of this intervention primarily in optimizing adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy (ART) among PLHIV. Methods/design A convenience sample of 232 PLHIV will be split evenly and randomly between an experimental group that will use the web application, and a control group that will be handed a list of websites of interest. Participants must be aged 18 years or older, have been on ART for at least 6 months, and have internet access. The intervention is composed of four interactive computer sessions of 20 to 30 minutes hosted by a virtual nurse who engages the PLHIV in a skills-learning process aimed at improving self-management of medication intake. Adherence constitutes the principal outcome, and is defined as the intake of at least 95% of the prescribed tablets. The following intermediary measures will be assessed: self-efficacy and attitude towards antiretroviral medication, symptom-related discomfort, and emotional support. There will be three measurement times: baseline (T0), after 3 months (T3) and 6 months (T6) of baseline measurement. The principal analyses will focus on comparing the two groups in terms of treatment adherence at the end of follow-up at T6. An intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis will be carried out to evaluate the true value of the intervention in a real context. Discussion Carrying out this online RCT poses various

  20. Leisure-time physical activity, sedentary behaviors, sleep, and cardiometabolic risk factors at baseline in the PREDIMED-PLUS intervention trial: A cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Rosique-Esteban, Nuria; Díaz-López, Andrés; Martínez-González, Miguel A; Corella, Dolores; Goday, Albert; Martínez, J Alfredo; Romaguera, Dora; Vioque, Jesus; Arós, Fernando; Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Tinahones, Francisco; Estruch, Ramon; Fernández-García, José Carlos; Lapetra, José; Serra-Majem, Luís; Pinto, Xavier; Tur, Josep A; Bueno-Cavanillas, Aurora; Vidal, Josep; Delgado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Daimiel, Lidia; Vázquez, Clotilde; Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Ros, Emilio; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Limited data exists on the interrelationships between physical activity (PA), sedentary behaviors and sleep concerning cardiometabolic risk factors in aged adults at high cardiovascular disease risk. Our aim was to examine independent and joint associations between time spent in leisure-time PA, sedentary behaviors and sleep on the prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Mediterranean individuals at high cardiovascular risk. Cross-sectional analyses were performed on baseline data from 5776 Spanish adults (aged 55-75y in men; 60-75y in women) with overweight/obesity and MetS, from October 2013 to October 2016, in the PREDIMED-PLUS trial. Employing multivariable-adjusted Cox regression with robust variance and constant time (given the cross-sectional design), higher prevalence of obesity, T2D and abdominal obesity as component of the MetS were associated with greater time in TV-viewing (Relative Risk, RR: 1.02, 95%CI: 1.01, 1.03; RR:1.04, 95%CI: 1.02, 1.06 and RR: 1.01 95%CI: 1.00, 1.02; respectively, all P < .01). Conversely, greater time in moderate-vigorous PA (MVPA) was associated with lower prevalence of obesity, T2D, abdominal obesity and low HDL-cholesterol (RR: 0.95, 95%CI: 0.93, 0.97; RR: 0.94, 95%CI: 0.89, 0.99; RR: 0.97, 95%CI: 0.96, 0.98; and RR: 0.95, 95%CI: 0.91, 0.99, respectively, all P < .05). For these outcomes, theoretically substituting 1-h/day of MVPA for 1-h/day TV-viewing was also significantly associated with lower prevalence (RR 0.91 to 0.97, all P < .05). Similar lower RR in these outcomes was observed when substituting 1-h/day of MVPA for 1-h/day of sleeping. Longer time watching TV and not meeting MVPA recommendations were jointly associated with higher RR of the prevalence of obesity and T2D. We concluded that, in senior individuals at high cardiovascular risk, greater time spent on MVPA and fewer on sedentary behaviors was inversely associated with prevalence of obesity, T2D, and

  1. Leisure-time physical activity, sedentary behaviors, sleep, and cardiometabolic risk factors at baseline in the PREDIMED-PLUS intervention trial: A cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rosique-Esteban, Nuria; Díaz-López, Andrés; Martínez-González, Miguel A.; Corella, Dolores; Goday, Albert; Martínez, J. Alfredo; Romaguera, Dora; Vioque, Jesus; Arós, Fernando; Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Tinahones, Francisco; Estruch, Ramon; Fernández-García, José Carlos; Lapetra, José; Serra-Majem, Luís; Pinto, Xavier; Tur, Josep A.; Bueno-Cavanillas, Aurora; Vidal, Josep; Delgado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Daimiel, Lidia; Vázquez, Clotilde; Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Ros, Emilio; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Limited data exists on the interrelationships between physical activity (PA), sedentary behaviors and sleep concerning cardiometabolic risk factors in aged adults at high cardiovascular disease risk. Our aim was to examine independent and joint associations between time spent in leisure-time PA, sedentary behaviors and sleep on the prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in Mediterranean individuals at high cardiovascular risk. Cross-sectional analyses were performed on baseline data from 5776 Spanish adults (aged 55-75y in men; 60-75y in women) with overweight/obesity and MetS, from October 2013 to October 2016, in the PREDIMED-PLUS trial. Employing multivariable-adjusted Cox regression with robust variance and constant time (given the cross-sectional design), higher prevalence of obesity, T2D and abdominal obesity as component of the MetS were associated with greater time in TV-viewing (Relative Risk, RR: 1.02, 95%CI: 1.01, 1.03; RR:1.04, 95%CI: 1.02, 1.06 and RR: 1.01 95%CI: 1.00, 1.02; respectively, all P < .01). Conversely, greater time in moderate-vigorous PA (MVPA) was associated with lower prevalence of obesity, T2D, abdominal obesity and low HDL-cholesterol (RR: 0.95, 95%CI: 0.93, 0.97; RR: 0.94, 95%CI: 0.89, 0.99; RR: 0.97, 95%CI: 0.96, 0.98; and RR: 0.95, 95%CI: 0.91, 0.99, respectively, all P < .05). For these outcomes, theoretically substituting 1-h/day of MVPA for 1-h/day TV-viewing was also significantly associated with lower prevalence (RR 0.91 to 0.97, all P < .05). Similar lower RR in these outcomes was observed when substituting 1-h/day of MVPA for 1-h/day of sleeping. Longer time watching TV and not meeting MVPA recommendations were jointly associated with higher RR of the prevalence of obesity and T2D. We concluded that, in senior individuals at high cardiovascular risk, greater time spent on MVPA and fewer on sedentary behaviors was inversely associated with prevalence of obesity, T2D, and

  2. The GO-ACTIWE randomized controlled trial - An interdisciplinary study designed to investigate the health effects of active commuting and leisure time physical activity.

    PubMed

    Rosenkilde, Mads; Petersen, Martin Bæk; Gram, Anne Sofie; Quist, Jonas Salling; Winther, Jonas; Kamronn, Simon Due; Milling, Desirée Hornbæk; Larsen, Jakob Eg; Jespersen, Astrid Pernille; Stallknecht, Bente

    2017-02-01

    Regular physical activity is efficacious for improving metabolic health in overweight and obese individuals, yet, many adults lead sedentary lives. Most exercise interventions have targeted leisure time, but physical activity also takes place in other domains of everyday life. Active commuting represents a promising alternative to increase physical activity, but it has yet to be established whether active commuting conveys health benefits on par with leisure time physical activity (LTPA). A 6-month randomized controlled trial was designed to investigate the effects of increased physical activity in transport (bicycling) or leisure time domains (moderate or vigorous intensity endurance exercise). We included 188 overweight and class 1 obese sedentary women and men (20-45years) of which 130 were randomized to either sedentary controls (n=18), active commuting (n=35) or moderate (n=39) or vigorous (n=38) intensity LTPA. At baseline and after 3 and 6months, participants underwent a rigorous 3-day biomedical test regimen followed by free-living measurements. In a sub-sample, physical activity level and energy expenditure were monitored by means of personal assistive technology and the doubly labeled water technique. Additionally, the delivery, reception and routinization of the exercise regimens were investigated by ethnological fieldwork. One year after termination of the intervention, participants will be invited for a follow-up visit to investigate sustained health effects and continuous physical activity adherence. By combining biomedical, technological and humanistic approaches, we aim to understand the health benefits of physical activity in different domains of everyday life, as well as how to improve adherence to physical activity.

  3. Time to stabilization in single leg drop jump landings: an examination of calculation methods and assessment of differences in sample rate, filter settings and trial length on outcome values.

    PubMed

    Fransz, Duncan P; Huurnink, Arnold; de Boode, Vosse A; Kingma, Idsart; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-01-01

    Time to stabilization (TTS) is the time it takes for an individual to return to a baseline or stable state following a jump or hop landing. A large variety exists in methods to calculate the TTS. These methods can be described based on four aspects: (1) the input signal used (vertical, anteroposterior, or mediolateral ground reaction force) (2) signal processing (smoothed by sequential averaging, a moving root-mean-square window, or fitting an unbounded third order polynomial), (3) the stable state (threshold), and (4) the definition of when the (processed) signal is considered stable. Furthermore, differences exist with regard to the sample rate, filter settings and trial length. Twenty-five healthy volunteers performed ten 'single leg drop jump landing' trials. For each trial, TTS was calculated according to 18 previously reported methods. Additionally, the effects of sample rate (1000, 500, 200 and 100 samples/s), filter settings (no filter, 40, 15 and 10 Hz), and trial length (20, 14, 10, 7, 5 and 3s) were assessed. The TTS values varied considerably across the calculation methods. The maximum effect of alterations in the processing settings, averaged over calculation methods, were 2.8% (SD 3.3%) for sample rate, 8.8% (SD 7.7%) for filter settings, and 100.5% (SD 100.9%) for trial length. Differences in TTS calculation methods are affected differently by sample rate, filter settings and trial length. The effects of differences in sample rate and filter settings are generally small, while trial length has a large effect on TTS values.

  4. fatalityCMR: capture-recapture software to correct raw counts of wildlife fatalities using trial experiments for carcass detection probability and persistence time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peron, Guillaume; Hines, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Many industrial and agricultural activities involve wildlife fatalities by collision, poisoning or other involuntary harvest: wind turbines, highway network, utility network, tall structures, pesticides, etc. Impacted wildlife may benefit from official protection, including the requirement to monitor the impact. Carcass counts can often be conducted to quantify the number of fatalities, but they need to be corrected for carcass persistence time (removal by scavengers and decay) and detection probability (searcher efficiency). In this article we introduce a new piece of software that fits a superpopulation capture-recapture model to raw count data. It uses trial data to estimate detection and daily persistence probabilities. A recurrent issue is that fatalities of rare, protected species are infrequent, in which case the software offers the option to switch to an ‘evidence of absence’ mode, i.e., estimate the number of carcasses that may have been missed by field crews. The software allows distinguishing between different turbine types (e.g. different vegetation cover under turbines, or different technical properties), as well between two carcass age-classes or states, with transition between those classes (e.g, fresh and dry). There is a data simulation capacity that may be used at the planning stage to optimize sampling design. Resulting mortality estimates can be used 1) to quantify the required amount of compensation, 2) inform mortality projections for proposed development sites, and 3) inform decisions about management of existing sites.

  5. Effect of intermittent hypoxia on muscle and cerebral oxygenation during a 20-km time trial in elite athletes: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Hamlin, Michael J; Marshall, Helen C; Hellemans, John; Ainslie, Philip N

    2010-08-01

    The effects of intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE) on cerebral and muscle oxygenation, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), and respiratory gas exchange during a 20-km cycle time trial (20TT) were examined (n=9) in a placebo-controlled randomized design. IHE (7:3 min hypoxia to normoxia) involved 90-min sessions for 10 days, with SaO2 clamped at ~80%. Prior to, and 2 days after the intervention, a 20TT was performed. During the final minute of the 20TT, in the IHE group only, muscle oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) was elevated (mean+/-95% confidence interval 1.3+/-1.2 ΔmicroM, p=0.04), whereas cerebral oxy-Hb was reduced (-1.9%+/-1.0%, p<0.01) post intervention compared with baseline. The 20TT performance was unchanged between groups (p=0.7). In the IHE group, SaO2 was higher (1.0+/-0.7Δ%, p=0.006) and end-tidal PCO2 was lower (-1.2+/-0.1 mm Hg, p=0.01) during the final stage of the 20TT post intervention compared with baseline. In summary, reductions in muscle oxy-Hb and systemic SaO2 occurring at exercise intensities close to maximal at the end of a 20TT were offset by IHE, although this was not translated into improved performance.

  6. A randomised controlled trial of nurse-managed trial conclusion following early phase cancer trial participation.

    PubMed

    Cox, K; Wilson, E; Arthur, A; Elkan, R; Armstrong, S

    2005-07-11

    The effect of a nurse-managed intervention, for early phase cancer trial participants at trial conclusion, on psychosocial outcomes was evaluated at two cancer centres in the Midlands, England using a randomised controlled trial. It involved 117 patients who were participating in an early phase cancer clinical trial. It was a nurse-managed trial exit, which included a trial exit interview, trial feedback information leaflet and telephone follow-up compared with standard care at trial conclusion. Psychological distress at 1 week and 4-6 weeks post-trial conclusion, patient's knowledge and understanding and patient's satisfaction were assessed. The results showed there was no significant difference between the two groups regarding scores for anxiety and depression at time one and time two. There is some suggestion that the intervention reduced anxiety from trial conclusion to follow-up (P=0.27). Patients in both groups felt they had contributed to cancer research through trial participation. However, intervention patients were more likely to feel that they knew how the trial was going (P<0.001), knew how other people in the trial were doing (P=0.001), had all the feedback they needed about the trial they took part in (P<0.01) and knew how they would be followed up (P=0.02). Patient satisfaction with the intervention was high (median score=4.5 where 5 is greatest satisfaction). In conclusion, nurse-managed trial conclusion led to positive outcomes for patients who had recently completed a clinical trial.

  7. Trial Watch

    PubMed Central

    Pol, Jonathan; Bloy, Norma; Obrist, Florine; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jérôme; Hervé Fridman, Wolf; Cremer, Isabelle; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    During the past 2 decades, the possibility that preparations capable of eliciting tumor-specific immune responses would mediate robust therapeutic effects in cancer patients has received renovated interest. In this context, several approaches to vaccinate cancer patients against their own malignancies have been conceived, including the administration of DNA constructs coding for one or more tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Such DNA-based vaccines conceptually differ from other types of gene therapy in that they are not devised to directly kill cancer cells or sensitize them to the cytotoxic activity of a drug, but rather to elicit a tumor-specific immune response. In spite of an intense wave of preclinical development, the introduction of this immunotherapeutic paradigm into the clinical practice is facing difficulties. Indeed, while most DNA-based anticancer vaccines are well tolerated by cancer patients, they often fail to generate therapeutically relevant clinical responses. In this Trial Watch, we discuss the latest advances on the use of DNA-based vaccines in cancer therapy, discussing the literature that has been produced around this topic during the last 13 months as well as clinical studies that have been launched in the same time frame to assess the actual therapeutic potential of this intervention. PMID:24800178

  8. A Mobile Device App to Reduce Time to Drug Delivery and Medication Errors During Simulated Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Combescure, Christophe; Lacroix, Laurence; Haddad, Kevin; Sanchez, Oliver; Gervaix, Alain; Lovis, Christian; Manzano, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Background During pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), vasoactive drug preparation for continuous infusion is both complex and time-consuming, placing children at higher risk than adults for medication errors. Following an evidence-based ergonomic-driven approach, we developed a mobile device app called Pediatric Accurate Medication in Emergency Situations (PedAMINES), intended to guide caregivers step-by-step from preparation to delivery of drugs requiring continuous infusion. Objective The aim of our study was to determine whether the use of PedAMINES reduces drug preparation time (TDP) and time to delivery (TDD; primary outcome), as well as medication errors (secondary outcomes) when compared with conventional preparation methods. Methods The study was a randomized controlled crossover trial with 2 parallel groups comparing PedAMINES with a conventional and internationally used drugs infusion rate table in the preparation of continuous drug infusion. We used a simulation-based pediatric CPR cardiac arrest scenario with a high-fidelity manikin in the shock room of a tertiary care pediatric emergency department. After epinephrine-induced return of spontaneous circulation, pediatric emergency nurses were first asked to prepare a continuous infusion of dopamine, using either PedAMINES (intervention group) or the infusion table (control group), and second, a continuous infusion of norepinephrine by crossing the procedure. The primary outcome was the elapsed time in seconds, in each allocation group, from the oral prescription by the physician to TDD by the nurse. TDD included TDP. The secondary outcome was the medication dosage error rate during the sequence from drug preparation to drug injection. Results A total of 20 nurses were randomized into 2 groups. During the first study period, mean TDP while using PedAMINES and conventional preparation methods was 128.1 s (95% CI 102-154) and 308.1 s (95% CI 216-400), respectively (180 s reduction, P=.002). Mean

  9. A placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of Imedeen® Time Perfection® for improving the appearance of photodamaged skin

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Thomas J; Sigler, Monya L; Herndon, James H; Dispensa, Lisa; Le Moigne, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of Imedeen Time Perfection for improving the appearance and condition of photoaged skin in healthy women. Methods This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial enrolled healthy women, 35–60 years of age, with Fitzpatrick I–III and Glogau II–III skin types and mild-to-moderate facial fine lines/wrinkles. The eligible subjects were randomized to receive two tablets daily of either Imedeen Time Perfection (Imedeen) or a matching placebo for 12 weeks. Efficacy assessments included investigator rating of 16 photoaging parameters (ie, global facial appearance and 15 individual facial parameters and the average of all parameters), instrumentation (ie, ultrasound dermal density, moisture level of the stratum corneum, transepidermal water loss, cutometry), and subjects’ self-assessment. Differences in the mean change from baseline to week 12 values on these outcomes were compared between Imedeen and placebo using analysis of variance or a paired t-test. Results Seventy-four subjects with primarily Fitzpatrick skin type III (78%–79%) and Glogau type III (53%–58%) completed the study (Imedeen: n=36; placebo: n=38). The mean difference in change from baseline to week 12 for global facial assessment significantly favored Imedeen over placebo (−0.52; P=0.0017). Additionally, the mean differences in the average of all facial photoaging parameters (−0.29), mottled hyperpigmentation (−0.25), tactile laxity (−0.24), dullness (−0.47), and tactile roughness (−0.62) significantly favored Imedeen over placebo (P≤0.05). Significantly greater increases in ultrasound dermal density (+11% vs +1%; P≤0.05) and stratum corneum moisturization (+30% vs +6%; P≤0.05) were also observed for Imedeen than for placebo. There were no significant differences on other instrumental outcomes. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that Imedeen Time Perfection can positively affect the appearance of photoaged skin

  10. Once daily versus three times daily mesalazine granules in active ulcerative colitis: a double-blind, double-dummy, randomised, non-inferiority trial

    PubMed Central

    Kruis, W; Kiudelis, G; Rácz, I; Gorelov, I A; Pokrotnieks, J; Horynski, M; Batovsky, M; Kykal, J; Boehm, S; Greinwald, R; Mueller, R

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the therapeutic equivalence and safety of once daily (OD) versus three times daily (TID) dosing of a total daily dose of 3 g Salofalk (mesalazine) granules in patients with active ulcerative colitis. Design: A randomised, double-blind, double-dummy, parallel group, multicentre, international, phase III non-inferiority study. Setting: 54 centres in 13 countries. Patients: 380 patients with confirmed diagnosis of established or first attack of ulcerative colitis (clinical activity index (CAI)>4 and endoscopic index ⩾4 at baseline) were randomised and treated. Interventions: 8-week treatment with either 3 g OD or 1 g TID mesalazine granules. Main outcome measures: Clinical remission (CAI⩽4) at study end. Results: 380 patients were evaluable for efficacy and safety by intention-to-treat (ITT); 345 for per protocol (PP) analysis. In the ITT population, 79.1% in the OD group (n = 191) and 75.7% in the TID group (n = 189) achieved clinical remission (p<0.0001 for non-inferiority). Significantly more patients with proctosigmoiditis achieved clinical remission in the OD group (86%; n = 97) versus the TID group (73%; n = 100; p = 0.0298). About 70% of patients in both treatment groups achieved endoscopic remission, and 35% in the OD group and 41% in the TID group achieved histological remission. About 80% of all patients preferred OD dosing. Similar numbers of adverse events occurred in 55 patients (28.8%) in the OD group and in 61 patients (32.3%) in the TID group, indicating that the two dosing regimens were equally safe and well tolerated. Conclusions: OD 3 g mesalazine granules are as effective and safe as a TID 1 g schedule. With respect to the best possible adherence of patients to the treatment, OD dosing of mesalazine should be the preferred application mode in active ulcerative colitis. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00449722 PMID:18832520

  11. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphism predicts the time-course of blood pressure response to angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition in the AASK trial

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Vibha; O’Connor, Daniel T.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Salem, Rany M.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Rana, Brinda K.; Smith, Douglas W.; Bakris, George L.; Middleton, John P.; Norris, Keith C.; Wright, Jackson T.; Cheek, Deanna; Hiremath, Leena; Contreras, Gabriel; Appel, Lawrence J.; Lipkowitz, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective It has yet to be determined whether genotyping at the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) locus is predictive of blood pressure response to an ACE inhibitor. Methods Participants from the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension trial randomized to the ACE inhibitor ramipril (n = 347) were genotyped at three polymorphisms on ACE, just downstream from the ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism (Ins/Del): G12269A, C17888T, and G20037A. Time to reach target mean arterial pressure (≤ 107 mmHg) was analyzed by genotype and ACE haplotype using Kaplan–Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazard models. Results Individuals with a homozygous genotype at G12269A responded significantly faster than those with a heterozygous genotype; the adjusted (average number of medications and baseline mean arterial pressure) hazard ratio (homozygous compared to heterozygous genotype) was 1.86 (95% confidence limits 1.32–3.23; P < 0.001 for G12269A genotype). The adjusted hazard ratio for participants with homozygous ACE haplotypes compared to those heterozygous ACE haplotypes was 1.40 (1.13–1.75; P = 0.003 for haplotype). The ACE genotype effects were specific for ACE inhibition (i.e., not seen among those randomized to a calcium channel blocker), and were independent of population stratification. Conclusions African-Americans with a homozygous genotype at G12269A or homozygous ACE haplotypes responded to ramipril significantly faster than those with a heterozygous genotype or heterozygous haplotypes, suggesting that heterosis may be an important determinant of responsiveness to an ACE inhibitor. These associations may be a result of biological activity of this polymorphism, or of linkage disequilibrium with nearby variants such as the ACE Ins/Del, perhaps in the regulation of ACE splicing. PMID:17885551

  12. SU-E-QI-21: Iodinated Contrast Agent Time Course In Human Brain Metastasis: A Study For Stereotactic Synchrotron Radiotherapy Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Obeid, L; Esteve, F; Adam, J; Tessier, A; Balosso, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy (SSRT) is an innovative treatment combining the selective accumulation of heavy elements in tumors with stereotactic irradiations using monochromatic medium energy x-rays from a synchrotron source. Phase I/II clinical trials on brain metastasis are underway using venous infusion of iodinated contrast agents. The radiation dose enhancement depends on the amount of iodine in the tumor and its time course. In the present study, the reproducibility of iodine concentrations between the CT planning scan day (Day 0) and the treatment day (Day 10) was assessed in order to predict dose errors. Methods: For each of days 0 and 10, three patients received a biphasic intravenous injection of iodinated contrast agent (40 ml, 4 ml/s, followed by 160 ml, 0.5 ml/s) in order to ensure stable intra-tumoral amounts of iodine during the treatment. Two volumetric CT scans (before and after iodine injection) and a multi-slice dynamic CT of the brain were performed using conventional radiotherapy CT (Day 0) or quantitative synchrotron radiation CT (Day 10). A 3D rigid registration was processed between images. The absolute and relative differences of absolute iodine concentrations and their corresponding dose errors were evaluated in the GTV and PTV used for treatment planning. Results: The differences in iodine concentrations remained within the standard deviation limits. The 3D absolute differences followed a normal distribution centered at zero mg/ml with a variance (∼1 mg/ml) which is related to the image noise. Conclusion: The results suggest that dose errors depend only on the image noise. This study shows that stable amounts of iodine are achievable in brain metastasis for SSRT treatment in a 10 days interval.

  13. 'Mind the Gap'-The Impact of Variations in the Duration of the Treatment Gap and Overall Treatment Time in the First UK Anal Cancer Trial (ACT I)

    SciTech Connect

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Adams, Richard; McDonald, Alec; Gollins, Simon; James, Roger; Northover, John M.A.; Meadows, Helen M.; Jitlal, Mark

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The United Kingdom Coordinating Committee on Cancer Research anal cancer trial demonstrated the benefit of combined modality treatment (CMT) using radiotherapy (RT), infusional 5-fluorouracil, and mitomycin C over RT alone. The present study retrospectively examines the impact of the recommended 6-week treatment gap and local RT boost on long-term outcome. Methods and Materials: A total of 577 patients were randomly assigned RT alone or CMT. After a 6-week gap responders received a boost using either additional external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (15 Gy) or iridium-192 implant (25 Gy). The effect of boost, the gap between initial treatment (RT alone or CMT) and boost (Tgap), and overall treatment time (OTT) were examined for their impact on outcome. Results: Among the 490 good responders, 436 (89%) patients received a boost after initial treatment. For boosted patients, the risk of anal cancer death decreased by 38% (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.62, 99% CI 0.35-1.12; p = 0.04), but there was no evidence this was mediated via a reduction in locoregional failure (LRF) (HR: 0.90, 99% CI 0.48-1.68; p = 0.66). The difference in Tgap was only 1.4 days longer for EBRT boost, compared with implant (p = 0.51). OTT was longer by 6.1 days for EBRT (p = 0.006). Tgap and OTT were not associated with LRF. Radionecrosis was reported in 8% of boosted, compared with 0% in unboosted patients (p = 0.03). Conclusions: These results question the benefit of a radiotherapy boost after a 6-week gap. The higher doses of a boost may contribute more to an increased risk of late morbidity, rather than local control.

  14. Interventions to reduce colonisation and transmission of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in intensive care units: an interrupted time series study and cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Derde, Lennie P G; Cooper, Ben S; Goossens, Herman; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Willems, Rob J L; Gniadkowski, Marek; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Empel, Joanna; Dautzenberg, Mirjam J D; Annane, Djillali; Aragão, Irene; Chalfine, Annie; Dumpis, Uga; Esteves, Francisco; Giamarellou, Helen; Muzlovic, Igor; Nardi, Giuseppe; Petrikkos, George L; Tomic, Viktorija; Martí, Antonio Torres; Stammet, Pascal; Brun-Buisson, Christian; Bonten, Marc J M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Intensive care units (ICUs) are high-risk areas for transmission of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, but no controlled study has tested the effect of rapid screening and isolation of carriers on transmission in settings with best-standard precautions. We assessed interventions to reduce colonisation and transmission of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in European ICUs. Methods We did this study in three phases at 13 ICUs. After a 6 month baseline period (phase 1), we did an interrupted time series study of universal chlorhexidine body-washing combined with hand hygiene improvement for 6 months (phase 2), followed by a 12–15 month cluster randomised trial (phase 3). ICUs were randomly assigned by computer generated randomisation schedule to either conventional screening (chromogenic screening for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA] and vancomycin-resistant enterococci [VRE]) or rapid screening (PCR testing for MRSA and VRE and chromogenic screening for highly resistant Enterobacteriaceae [HRE]); with contact precautions for identified carriers. The primary outcome was acquisition of resistant bacteria per 100 patient-days at risk, for which we calculated step changes and changes in trends after the introduction of each intervention. We assessed acquisition by microbiological surveillance and analysed it with a multilevel Poisson segmented regression model. We compared screening groups with a likelihood ratio test that combined step changes and changes to trend. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00976638. Findings Seven ICUs were assigned to rapid screening and six to conventional screening. Mean hand hygiene compliance improved from 52% in phase 1 to 69% in phase 2, and 77% in phase 3. Median proportions of patients receiving chlorhexidine body-washing increased from 0% to 100% at the start of phase 2. For trends in acquisition of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, weekly incidence rate ratio (IRR) was 0

  15. Effectiveness of a nurse-led intensive home-visitation programme for first-time teenage mothers (Building Blocks): a pragmatic randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Robling, Michael; Bekkers, Marie-Jet; Bell, Kerry; Butler, Christopher C; Cannings-John, Rebecca; Channon, Sue; Martin, Belen Corbacho; Gregory, John W; Hood, Kerry; Kemp, Alison; Kenkre, Joyce; Montgomery, Alan A; Moody, Gwenllian; Owen-Jones, Eleri; Pickett, Kate; Richardson, Gerry; Roberts, Zoë E S; Ronaldson, Sarah; Sanders, Julia; Stamuli, Eugena; Torgerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Many countries now offer support to teenage mothers to help them to achieve long-term socioeconomic stability and to give a successful start to their children. The Family Nurse Partnership (FNP) is a licensed intensive home-visiting intervention developed in the USA and introduced into practice in England that involves up to 64 structured home visits from early pregnancy until the child's second birthday by specially recruited and trained family nurses. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of giving the programme to teenage first-time mothers on infant and maternal outcomes up to 24 months after birth. Methods We did a pragmatic, non-blinded, randomised controlled, parallel-group trial in community midwifery settings at 18 partnerships between local authorities and primary and secondary care organisations in England. Eligible participants were nulliparous and aged 19 years or younger, and were recruited at less than 25 weeks' gestation. Field-based researchers randomly allocated mothers (1:1) via remote randomisation (telephone and web) to FNP plus usual care (publicly funded health and social care) or to usual care alone. Allocation was stratified by site and minimised by gestation (<16 weeks vs ≥16 weeks), smoking status (yes vs no), and preferred language of data collection (English vs non-English). Mothers and assessors (local researchers at baseline and 24 months' follow-up) were not masked to group allocation, but telephone interviewers were blinded. Primary endpoints were biomarker-calibrated self-reported tobacco use by the mother at late pregnancy, birthweight of the baby, the proportion of women with a second pregnancy within 24 months post-partum, and emergency attendances and hospital admissions for the child within 24 months post-partum. Analyses were by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ISRCTN, number ISRCTN23019866. Findings Between June 16, 2009, and July 28, 2010, we screened 3251 women. After enrolment, 823

  16. B-MOBILE - A Smartphone-Based Intervention to Reduce Sedentary Time in Overweight/Obese Individuals: A Within-Subjects Experimental Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Dale S.; Thomas, J. Graham; Raynor, Hollie A.; Moon, Jon; Sieling, Jared; Trautvetter, Jennifer; Leblond, Tiffany; Wing, Rena R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Excessive sedentary time (SED) has been linked to obesity and other adverse health outcomes. However, few sedentary-reducing interventions exist and none have utilized smartphones to automate behavioral strategies to decrease SED. We tested a smartphone-based intervention to monitor and decrease SED in overweight/obese individuals, and compared 3 approaches to prompting physical activity (PA) breaks and delivering feedback on SED. Design and Methods Participants [N = 30; Age  = 47.5(13.5) years; 83% female; Body Mass Index (BMI) = 36.2(7.5) kg/m2] wore the SenseWear Mini Armband (SWA) to objectively measure SED for 7 days at baseline. Participants were then presented with 3 smartphone-based PA break conditions in counterbalanced order: (1) 3-min break after 30 SED min; (2) 6-min break after 60 SED min; and (3) 12-min break after 120 SED min. Participants followed each condition for 7 days and wore the SWA throughout. Results All PA break conditions yielded significant decreases in SED and increases in light (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) (p<0.005). Average % SED at baseline (72.2%) decreased by 5.9%, 5.6%, and 3.3% [i.e. by mean (95% CI) −47.2(−66.3, −28.2), −44.5(−65.2, −23.8), and −26.2(−40.7, −11.6) min/d] in the 3-, 6-, and 12-min conditions, respectively. Conversely, % LPA increased from 22.8% to 26.7%, 26.7%, and 24.7% [i.e. by 31.0(15.8, 46.2), 31.0(13.6, 48.4), and 15.3(3.9, 26.8) min/d], and % MVPA increased from 5.0% to 7.0%, 6.7%, and 6.3% (i.e. by 16.2(8.5, 24.0), 13.5(6.3, 20.6), and 10.8(4.2, 17.5) min/d] in the 3-, 6-, and 12-min conditions, respectively. Planned pairwise comparisons revealed the 3-min condition was superior to the 12-min condition in decreasing SED and increasing LPA (p<0.05). Conclusion The smartphone-based intervention significantly reduced SED. Prompting frequent short activity breaks may be the most effective way to decrease SED and increase PA in overweight/obese individuals

  17. Stroke Trials Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions Sponsors ... a clinical trial near you Welcome to the Stroke Trials Registry Our registry of clinical trials in ...

  18. Social Problem Solving and Depressive Symptoms over Time: A Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy, Brief Supportive Psychotherapy, and Pharmacotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Daniel N.; Leon, Andrew C.; Li, Chunshan; D'Zurilla, Thomas J.; Black, Sarah R.; Vivian, Dina; Dowling, Frank; Arnow, Bruce A.; Manber, Rachel; Markowitz, John C.; Kocsis, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Depression is associated with poor social problem solving, and psychotherapies that focus on problem-solving skills are efficacious in treating depression. We examined the associations between treatment, social problem solving, and depression in a randomized clinical trial testing the efficacy of psychotherapy augmentation for…

  19. Low-level night-time light therapy for age-related macular degeneration (ALight): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among older adults in the developed world. The only treatments currently available, such as ranibizumab injections, are for neovascular AMD, which accounts for only 10 to 15% of people with the condition. Hypoxia has been implicated as one of the primary causes of AMD, and is most acute at night when the retina is most metabolically active. By increasing light levels at night, the metabolic requirements of the retina and hence the hypoxia will be considerably reduced. This trial seeks to determine whether wearing a light mask that emits a dim, green light during the night can prevent the progression of early AMD. Methods/design ALight is a Phase I/IIa, multicentre, randomized controlled trial. Sixty participants (55 to 88 years old) with early AMD in one eye and neovascular AMD (nAMD) in the fellow eye will be recruited from nAMD clinics. They will be randomized (in the ratio 1:1), either to receive the intervention or to be in the untreated control group, stratified according to risk of disease progression. An additional 40 participants with healthy retinal appearance, or early AMD only, will be recruited for a baseline cross-sectional analysis. The intervention is an eye mask that emits a dim green light to illuminate the retina through closed eyelids at night. This is designed to reduce the metabolic activity of the retina, thereby reducing the potential risk of hypoxia. Participants will wear the mask every night for 12 months. Ophthalmologists carrying out monthly assessments will be masked to the treatment group, but participants will be aware of their treatment group. The primary outcome measure is the proportion of people who show disease progression during the trial period in the eye with early AMD. A co-primary outcome measure is the rate of retinal adaptation. As this is a trial of a CE-marked device for an off-label indication, a further main aim of this trial is to

  20. Critical power derived from a 3-min all-out test predicts 16.1-km road time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Black, Matthew I; Durant, Jacob; Jones, Andrew M; Vanhatalo, Anni

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that the critical power (CP) in cycling estimated using a novel 3-min all-out protocol is reliable and closely matches the CP derived from conventional procedures. The purpose of this study was to assess the predictive validity of the all-out test CP estimate. We hypothesised that the all-out test CP would be significantly correlated with 16.1-km road time-trial (TT) performance and more strongly correlated with performance than the gas exchange threshold (GET), respiratory compensation point (RCP) and VO2 max. Ten club-level male cyclists (mean±SD: age 33.8±8.2 y, body mass 73.8±4.3 kg, VO2 max 60±4 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) performed a 10-mile road TT, a ramp incremental test to exhaustion, and two 3-min all-out tests, the first of which served as familiarisation. The 16.1-km TT performance (27.1±1.2 min) was significantly correlated with the CP (309±34 W; r = -0.83, P<0.01) and total work done during the all-out test (70.9±6.5 kJ; r = -0.86, P<0.01), the ramp incremental test peak power (433±30 W; r = -0.75, P<0.05) and the RCP (315±29 W; r = -0.68, P<0.05), but not with GET (151±32 W; r = -0.21) or the VO2 max (4.41±0.25 L·min(-1); r = -0.60). These data provide evidence for the predictive validity and practical performance relevance of the 3-min all-out test. The 3-min all-out test CP may represent a useful addition to the battery of tests employed by applied sport physiologists or coaches to track fitness and predict performance in atheletes.

  1. The Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Jen

    2004-01-01

    Growing up in Flemington, New Jersey, put Jen Bryant in the heart of the lore behind the Lindbergh baby kidnapping. Family stories of the events of the day and extensive research led to "The Trial," a novel in verse. The first several parts of this novel are included here.

  2. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study answers scientific questions and tries to find better ways to prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a ... also compare a new treatment to a treatment that is already available. ...

  3. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... your information private 5. What happens when the study ends The Possible Risks and Benefits The trial may provide treatments or screenings, but there is no promise that your health will get better. The medicine, test, or treatment may not work for you. 6. The benefits of the treatments ...

  4. Bayesian Clinical Trials in Action

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. Jack; Chu, Caleb T.

    2012-01-01

    Although the frequentist paradigm has been the predominant approach to clinical trial design since the 1940s, it has several notable limitations. The alternative Bayesian paradigm has been greatly enhanced by advancements in computational algorithms and computer hardware. Compared to its frequentist counterpart, the Bayesian framework has several unique advantages, and its incorporation into clinical trial design is occurring more frequently. Using an extensive literature review to assess how Bayesian methods are used in clinical trials, we find them most commonly used for dose finding, efficacy monitoring, toxicity monitoring, diagnosis/decision making, and for studying pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics. The additional infrastructure required for implementing Bayesian methods in clinical trials may include specialized software programs to run the study design, simulation, and analysis, and Web-based applications, which are particularly useful for timely data entry and analysis. Trial success requires not only the development of proper tools but also timely and accurate execution of data entry, quality control, adaptive randomization, and Bayesian computation. The relative merit of the Bayesian and frequentist approaches continues to be the subject of debate in statistics. However, more evidence can be found showing the convergence of the two camps, at least at the practical level. Ultimately, better clinical trial methods lead to more efficient designs, lower sample sizes, more accurate conclusions, and better outcomes for patients enrolled in the trials. Bayesian methods offer attractive alternatives for better trials. More such trials should be designed and conducted to refine the approach and demonstrate its real benefit in action. PMID:22711340

  5. Bayesian clinical trials in action.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Jack; Chu, Caleb T

    2012-11-10

    Although the frequentist paradigm has been the predominant approach to clinical trial design since the 1940s, it has several notable limitations. Advancements in computational algorithms and computer hardware have greatly enhanced the alternative Bayesian paradigm. Compared with its frequentist counterpart, the Bayesian framework has several unique advantages, and its incorporation into clinical trial design is occurring more frequently. Using an extensive literature review to assess how Bayesian methods are used in clinical trials, we find them most commonly used for dose finding, efficacy monitoring, toxicity monitoring, diagnosis/decision making, and studying pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics. The additional infrastructure required for implementing Bayesian methods in clinical trials may include specialized software programs to run the study design, simulation and analysis, and web-based applications, all of which are particularly useful for timely data entry and analysis. Trial success requires not only the development of proper tools but also timely and accurate execution of data entry, quality control, adaptive randomization, and Bayesian computation. The relative merit of the Bayesian and frequentist approaches continues to be the subject of debate in statistics. However, more evidence can be found showing the convergence of the two camps, at least at the practical level. Ultimately, better clinical trial methods lead to more efficient designs, lower sample sizes, more accurate conclusions, and better outcomes for patients enrolled in the trials. Bayesian methods offer attractive alternatives for better trials. More Bayesian trials should be designed and conducted to refine the approach and demonstrate their real benefit in action.

  6. Timing of High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy With External Beam Radiotherapy in Intermediate and High-Risk Localized Prostate CAncer (THEPCA) Patients and Its Effects on Toxicity and Quality of Life: Protocol of a Randomized Feasibility Trial

    PubMed Central

    Palvai, Sreekanth; Harrison, Michael; Shibu Thomas, Sharon; Hayden, Karen; Green, James; Anderson, Oliver; Romero, Lavinia; Lodge, Richard; Burns, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in males in the UK and affects around 105 men for every 100,000. The role of radiotherapy in the management of prostate cancer significantly changed over the last few decades with developments in brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). One of the challenging factors of radiotherapy treatment of localized prostate cancer is the development of acute and late genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities. The recent European guidelines suggest that there is no consensus regarding the timing of high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and EBRT. The schedules vary in different institutions where an HDR boost can be given either before or after EBRT. Few centers deliver HDR in between the fractions of EBRT. Objective Assessment of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities at various time points to better understand if the order in which treatment modality is delivered (ie, HDR brachytherapy or EBRT first) has an effect on the toxicity profile. Methods Timing of HDR brachytherapy with EBRT in Prostate CAncer (THEPCA) is a single-center, open, randomized controlled feasibility trial in patients with intermediate and high-risk localized prostate cancer. A group of 50 patients aged 18 years old and over with histological diagnosis of prostate cancer (stages T1b-T3BNOMO), will be randomized to one of two treatment arms (ratio 1:1), following explanation of the study and informed consent. Patients in both arms of the study will be treated with HDR brachytherapy and EBRT, however, the order in which they receive the treatments will vary. In Arm A, patients will receive HDR brachytherapy before EBRT. In Arm B (control arm), patients will receive EBRT before HDR brachytherapy. Study outcomes will look at prospective assessment of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities. The primary endpoint will be grade 3 genitourinary toxicity

  7. Time to be BRAVE: is educating surgeons the key to unlocking the potential of randomised clinical trials in surgery? A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Well-designed randomised clinical trials (RCTs) provide the best evidence to inform decision-making and should be the default option for evaluating surgical procedures. Such trials can be challenging, and surgeons’ preferences may influence whether trials are initiated and successfully conducted and their results accepted. Preferences are particularly problematic when surgeons’ views play a key role in procedure selection and patient eligibility. The bases of such preferences have rarely been explored. Our aim in this qualitative study was to investigate surgeons’ preferences regarding the feasibility of surgical RCTs and their understanding of study design issues using breast reconstruction surgery as a case study. Methods Semistructured qualitative interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of 35 professionals practicing at 15 centres across the United Kingdom. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically using constant comparative techniques. Sampling, data collection and analysis were conducted concurrently and iteratively until data saturation was achieved. Results Surgeons often struggle with the concept of equipoise. We found that if surgeons did not feel ‘in equipoise’, they did not accept randomisation as a method of treatment allocation. The underlying reasons for limited equipoise were limited appreciation of the methodological weaknesses of data derived from nonrandomised studies and little understanding of pragmatic trial design. Their belief in the value of RCTs for generating high-quality data to change or inform practice was not widely held. Conclusion There is a need to help surgeons understand evidence, equipoise and bias. Current National Institute of Health Research/Medical Research Council investment into education and infrastructure for RCTs, combined with strong leadership, may begin to address these issues or more specific interventions may be required. PMID:24628821

  8. Results of the first-in-human clinical trial for MB-102, a novel fluorescent tracer agent for real-time measurement of glomerular filtration rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorshow, Richard B.; Debreczeny, Martin P.; Dowling, Thomas C.

    2015-03-01

    The fluorescent tracer agent 2,5-bis[N-(1-carboxy-2-hydroxy)]carbamoyl-3,6-diaminopyrazine, designated MB-102, has been developed with properties and attributes necessary for use as a direct measure of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Comparison to known standard exogenous GFR agents in animal models has demonstrated an excellent correlation. A clinical trial to demonstrate this same correlation in humans is in progress. This clinical trial is the first in a series of trials necessary to obtain regulatory clearance from the FDA. We report herein the comparison of plasma pharmacokinetics between MB-102 and the known standard exogenous GFR agent Iohexol in healthy subjects with normal renal function. Post simultaneous administration of both agents, blood samples over a period of 12 hours were collected from each subject to assess pharmacokinetic parameters including GFR. Urine samples were collected over this same period to assess percent injected dose recovered in the urine. Results indicate MB-102 is a GFR agent in humans from the comparison to the standard agent.

  9. Single-trial estimation of stimulus and spike-history effects on time-varying ensemble spiking activity of multiple neurons: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazaki, Hideaki

    2013-12-01

    Neurons in cortical circuits exhibit coordinated spiking activity, and can produce correlated synchronous spikes during behavior and cognition. We recently developed a method for estimating the dynamics of correlated ensemble activity by combining a model of simultaneous neuronal interactions (e.g., a spin-glass model) with a state-space method (Shimazaki et al. 2012 PLoS Comput Biol 8 e1002385). This method allows us to estimate stimulus-evoked dynamics of neuronal interactions which is reproducible in repeated trials under identical experimental conditions. However, the method may not be suitable for detecting stimulus responses if the neuronal dynamics exhibits significant variability across trials. In addition, the previous model does not include effects of past spiking activity of the neurons on the current state of ensemble activity. In this study, we develop a parametric method for simultaneously estimating the stimulus and spike-history effects on the ensemble activity from single-trial data even if the neurons exhibit dynamics that is largely unrelated to these effects. For this goal, we model ensemble neuronal activity as a latent process and include the stimulus and spike-history effects as exogenous inputs to the latent process. We develop an expectation-maximization algorithm that simultaneously achieves estimation of the latent process, stimulus responses, and spike-history effects. The proposed method is useful to analyze an interaction of internal cortical states and sensory evoked activity.

  10. Protocol for economic evaluation alongside a cluster-randomised controlled trial of a psychoeducational intervention for the primary prevention of postnatal mental health problems in first-time mothers

    PubMed Central

    Ride, Jemimah; Rowe, Heather; Wynter, Karen; Fisher, Jane; Lorgelly, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Postnatal mental health problems, which are an international public health priority, are a suitable target for preventive approaches. The financial burden of these disorders is borne across sectors in society, including health, early childhood, education, justice and the workforce. This paper describes the planned economic evaluation of What Were We Thinking, a psychoeducational intervention for the prevention of postnatal mental health problems in first-time mothers. Methods and analysis The evaluation will be conducted alongside a cluster-randomised controlled trial of its clinical effectiveness. Cost-effectiveness and costs-utility analyses will be conducted, resulting in estimates of cost per percentage point reduction in combined 30-day prevalence of depression, anxiety and adjustment disorders and cost per quality-adjusted life year gained. Uncertainty surrounding these estimates will be addressed using non-parametric bootstrapping and represented using cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Additional cost analyses relevant for implementation will also be conducted. Modelling will be employed to estimate longer term cost-effectiveness if the intervention is found to be clinically effective during the period of the trial. Ethics and dissemination Approval to conduct the study was granted by the Southern Health (now Monash Health) Human Research Ethics Committee (24 April 2013; 11388B). The study was registered with the Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee (30 April 2013; CF12/1022-2012000474). The Education and Policy Research Committee, Victorian Government Department of Education and Early Childhood Development approved the study (22 March 2012; 2012_001472). Use of the EuroQol was registered with the EuroQol Group; 16 August 2012. Trial registration number The trial was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry on 7 May 2012 (registration number ACTRN12613000506796). PMID:25280810

  11. Trial Watch

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vacchelli, Erika; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jerome; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Tartour, Eric; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of hybridoma technology, dating back to 1975, monoclonal antibodies have become an irreplaceable diagnostic and therapeutic tool for a wide array of human diseases. During the last 15 years, several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved by FDA for cancer therapy. These mAbs are designed to (1) activate the immune system against tumor cells, (2) inhibit cancer cell-intrinsic signaling pathways, (3) bring toxins in the close proximity of cancer cells, or (4) interfere with the tumor-stroma interaction. More recently, major efforts have been made for the development of immunostimulatory mAbs that either enhance cancer-directed immune responses or limit tumor- (or therapy-) driven immunosuppression. Some of these antibodies, which are thought to facilitate tumor eradication by initiating or sustaining a tumor-specific immune response, have already entered clinical trials. In this Trial Watch, we will review and discuss the clinical progress of the most important mAbs that are have entered clinical trials after January 2008. PMID:22720209

  12. Real-Time Pretreatment Review Limits Unacceptable Deviations on a Cooperative Group Radiation Therapy Technique Trial: Quality Assurance Results of RTOG 0933

    SciTech Connect

    Gondi, Vinai; Cui, Yunfeng; Mehta, Minesh P.; Manfredi, Denise; Xiao, Ying; Galvin, James M.; Rowley, Howard; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: RTOG 0933 was a phase II trial of hippocampal avoidance during whole brain radiation therapy for patients with brain metastases. The results demonstrated improvement in short-term memory decline, as compared with historical control individuals, and preservation of quality of life. Integral to the conduct of this trial were quality assurance processes inclusive of pre-enrollment credentialing and pretreatment centralized review of enrolled patients. Methods and Materials: Before enrolling patients, all treating physicians and sites were required to successfully complete a “dry-run” credentialing test. The treating physicians were credentialed based on accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging–computed tomography image fusion and hippocampal and normal tissue contouring, and the sites were credentialed based on protocol-specified dosimetric criteria. Using the same criteria, pretreatment centralized review of enrolled patients was conducted. Physicians enrolling 3 consecutive patients without unacceptable deviations were permitted to enroll further patients without pretreatment review, although their cases were reviewed after treatment. Results: In all, 113 physicians and 84 sites were credentialed. Eight physicians (6.8%) failed hippocampal contouring on the first attempt; 3 were approved on the second attempt. Eight sites (9.5%) failed intensity modulated radiation therapy planning on the first attempt; all were approved on the second attempt. One hundred thirteen patients were enrolled in RTOG 0933; 100 were analyzable. Eighty-seven cases were reviewed before treatment; 5 (5.7%) violated the eligibility criteria, and 21 (24%) had unacceptable deviations. With feedback, 18 cases were approved on the second attempt and 2 cases on the third attempt. One patient was treated off protocol. Twenty-two cases were reviewed after treatment; 1 (4.5%) violated the eligibility criteria, and 5 (23%) had unacceptable deviations. Conclusions: Although >95% of the

  13. 5 CFR 316.304 - Trial period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS TEMPORARY AND TERM EMPLOYMENT Term Employment § 316.304 Trial period. (a) The first year of service of a term employee is a trial...) The agency may terminate a term employee at any time during the trial period. The employee is...

  14. Validation of a real-time PCR based method for detection of Clostridium botulinum types C, D and their mosaic variants C-D and D-C in a multicenter collaborative trial.

    PubMed

    Woudstra, Cedric; Skarin, Hanna; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; De Medici, Dario; Bano, Luca; Drigo, Ilenia; Hansen, Trine; Löfström, Charlotta; Hamidjaja, Raditijo; van Rotterdam, Bart J; Koene, Miriam; Bäyon-Auboyer, Marie-Hélène; Buffereau, Jean-Philippe; Fach, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    Two real-time PCR arrays based on the GeneDisc(®) cycler platform (Pall-GeneDisc Technologies) were evaluated in a multicenter collaborative trial for their capacity to specifically detect and discriminate Clostridium botulinum types C, D and their mosaic variants C-D and D-C that are associated with avian and mammalian botulism. The GeneDisc(®) arrays developed as part of the DG Home funded European project 'AnibioThreat' were highly sensitive and specific when tested on pure isolates and naturally contaminated samples (mostly clinical specimen from avian origin). Results of the multicenter collaborative trial involving eight laboratories in five European Countries (two laboratories in France, Italy and The Netherlands, one laboratory in Denmark and Sweden), using DNA extracts issued from 33 pure isolates and 48 naturally contaminated samples associated with animal botulism cases, demonstrated the robustness of these tests. Results showed a concordance among the eight laboratories of 99.4%-100% for both arrays. The reproducibility of the tests was high with a relative standard deviation ranging from 1.1% to 7.1%. Considering the high level of agreement achieved between the laboratories these PCR arrays constitute robust and suitable tools for rapid detection of C. botulinum types C, D and mosaic types C-D and D-C. These are the first tests for C. botulinum C and D that have been evaluated in a European multicenter collaborative trial.

  15. Trial watch

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Senovilla, Laura; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    It is now clear that the immune system plays a critical role not only during oncogenesis and tumor progression, but also as established neoplastic lesions respond to therapy. Selected cytotoxic chemicals can indeed elicit immunogenic cell death, a functionally peculiar type of apoptosis that stimulates tumor-specific cognate immune responses. Such immunogenic chemotherapeutics include cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and oxaliplatin (which are approved by FDA for the treatment of various hematological and solid malignancies), mitoxantrone (which is currently employed both as an anticancer agent and against multiple sclerosis) and patupilone (a microtubular poison in clinical development). One year ago, in the second issue of OncoImmunology, we discussed the scientific rationale behind immunogenic chemotherapy and reviewed the status of recent clinical trials investigating the off-label use of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, oxaliplatin and mitoxantrone in cancer patients. Here, we summarize the latest developments in this area of clinical research, covering both high-impact studies that have been published during the last 13 months and clinical trials that have been initiated in the same period to assess the antineoplastic profile of immunogenic chemotherapeutics. PMID:23687621

  16. Trial Watch

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Fernando; Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jerome; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) exert antineoplastic effects by eliciting a novel or reinstating a pre-existing antitumor immune response. Most often, immunostimulatory mAbs activate T lymphocytes or natural killer (NK) cells by inhibiting immunosuppressive receptors, such as cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4) or programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1, best known as PD-1), or by engaging co-stimulatory receptors, like CD40, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 4 (TNFRSF4, best known as OX40) or TNFRSF18 (best known as GITR). The CTLA4-targeting mAb ipilimumab has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma in 2011. The therapeutic profile of ipilimumab other CTLA4-blocking mAbs, such as tremelimumab, is currently being assessed in subjects affected by a large panel of solid neoplasms. In the last few years, promising clinical results have also been obtained with nivolumab, a PD-1-targeting mAb formerly known as BMS-936558. Accordingly, the safety and efficacy of nivolumab and other PD-1-blocking molecules are being actively investigated. Finally, various clinical trials are underway to test the therapeutic potential of OX40- and GITR-activating mAbs. Here, we summarize recent findings on the therapeutic profile of immunostimulatory mAbs and discuss clinical trials that have been launched in the last 14 months to assess the therapeutic profile of these immunotherapeutic agents. PMID:24701370

  17. Trial Watch

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Fernando; Vacchelli, Erika; Obrist, Florine; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jérôme; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Cremer, Isabelle; Henrik ter Meulen, Jan; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are an evolutionarily conserved group of enzymatically inactive, single membrane-spanning proteins that recognize a wide panel of exogenous and endogenous danger signals. Besides constituting a crucial component of the innate immune response to bacterial and viral pathogens, TLRs appear to play a major role in anticancer immunosurveillance. In line with this notion, several natural and synthetic TLR ligands have been intensively investigated for their ability to boost tumor-targeting immune responses elicited by a variety of immunotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic interventions. Three of these agents are currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or equivalent regulatory agencies for use in cancer patients: the so-called bacillus Calmette-Guérin, monophosphoryl lipid A, and imiquimod. However, the number of clinical trials testing the therapeutic potential of both FDA-approved and experimental TLR agonists in cancer patients is stably decreasing, suggesting that drug developers and oncologists are refocusing their interest on alternative immunostimulatory agents. Here, we summarize recent findings on the use of TLR agonists in cancer patients and discuss how the clinical evaluation of FDA-approved and experimental TLR ligands has evolved since the publication of our first Trial Watch dealing with this topic. PMID:25083332

  18. The Impact of Curtin University's Activity, Food and Attitudes Program on Physical Activity, Sedentary Time and Fruit, Vegetable and Junk Food Consumption among Overweight and Obese Adolescents: A Waitlist Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Straker, Leon M.; Howie, Erin K.; Smith, Kyla L.; Fenner, Ashley A.; Kerr, Deborah A.; Olds, Tim S.; Abbott, Rebecca A.; Smith, Anne J.

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the effects of participation in Curtin University's Activity, Food and Attitudes Program (CAFAP), a community-based, family-centered behavioural intervention, on the physical activity, sedentary time, and healthy eating behaviours of overweight and obese adolescents. Methods In this waitlist controlled clinical trial in Western Australia, adolescents (n = 69, 71% female, mean age 14.1 (SD 1.6) years) and parents completed an 8-week intervention followed by 12 months of telephone and text message support. Assessments were completed at baseline, before beginning the intervention, immediately following the intervention, and at 3-, 6-, and 12- months follow-up. The primary outcomes were physical activity and sedentary time assessed by accelerometers and servings of fruit, vegetables and junk food assessed by 3-day food records. Results During the intensive 8-week intervention sedentary time decreased by −5.1 min/day/month (95% CI: −11.0, 0.8) which was significantly greater than the rate of change during the waitlist period (p = .014). Moderate physical activity increased by 1.8 min/day/month (95% CI: −0.04, 3.6) during the intervention period, which was significantly greater than the rate of change during the waitlist period (p = .041). Fruit consumption increased during the intervention period (monthly incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.3, 95% CI: 1.10, 1.56) and junk food consumption decreased (monthly IRR 0.8, 95% CI: 0.74, 0.94) and these changes were different to those seen during the waitlist period (p = .004 and p = .020 respectively). Conclusions Participating in CAFAP appeared to have a positive influence on the physical activity, sedentary and healthy eating behaviours of overweight and obese adolescents and many of these changes were maintained for one year following the intensive intervention. Trial Registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611001187932 PMID:25375109

  19. Timing of Chemotherapy After MammoSite Radiation Therapy System Breast Brachytherapy: Analysis of the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Haffty, Bruce G. Vicini, Frank A.; Beitsch, Peter; Quiet, Coral; Keleher, Angela; Garcia, Delia; Snider, Howard; Gittleman, Mark; Zannis, Victor; Kuerer, Henry; Whitacre, Eric; Whitworth, Pat; Fine, Richard; Keisch, Martin

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and radiation recall in the American Society of Breast Surgeons registry trial, as a function of the interval between accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and initiation of chemotherapy (CTX). Methods and Materials: A total of 1440 patients at 97 institutions participated in this trial. After lumpectomy for early-stage breast cancer, patients received APBI (34 Gy in 10 fractions) with MammoSite RTS brachytherapy. A total of 148 patients received CTX within 90 days of APBI. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated at each follow-up visit and dichotomized as excellent/good or fair/poor. Results: Chemotherapy was initiated at a mean of 3.9 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure and was administered {<=}3 weeks after APBI in 54 patients (36%) and >3 weeks after APBI in 94 patients (64%). The early and delayed groups were well balanced with respect to multiple factors that may impact on cosmetic outcome. There was a superior cosmetic outcome in those receiving chemotherapy >3 weeks after APBI (excellent/good in 72.2% at {<=}3 weeks vs. excellent/good in 93.8% at >3 weeks; p = 0.01). Radiation recall in those receiving CTX at {<=}3 weeks was 9 of 50 (18%), compared with 6 of 81(7.4%) in those receiving chemotherapy at >3 weeks (p = 0.09). Conclusion: The majority of patients receiving CTX after APBI have excellent/good cosmetic outcomes, with a low rate of radiation recall. Chemotherapy initiated >3 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure seems to be associated with a better cosmetic outcome and lower rate of radiation recall. An excellent/good cosmetic outcome in patients receiving CTX after 3 weeks was similar to the cosmetic outcome of the overall patient population who did not receive CTX.

  20. Adaptive clinical trial designs in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Yong; Lee, J. Jack

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive designs have become popular in clinical trial and drug development. Unlike traditional trial designs, adaptive designs use accumulating data to modify the ongoing trial without undermining the integrity and validity of the trial. As a result, adaptive designs provide a flexible and effective way to conduct clinical trials. The designs have potential advantages of improving the study power, reducing sample size and total cost, treating more patients with more effective treatments, identifying efficacious drugs for specific subgroups of patients based on their biomarker profiles, and shortening the time for drug development. In this article, we review adaptive designs commonly used in clinical trials and investigate several aspects of the designs, including the dose-finding scheme, interim analysis, adaptive randomization, biomarker-guided randomization, and seamless designs. For illustration, we provide examples of real trials conducted with adaptive designs. We also discuss practical issues from the perspective of using adaptive designs in oncology trials. PMID:25811018

  1. Trial watch

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Vitale, Ilio; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Fučíková, Jitka; Cremer, Isabelle; Galon, Jérôme; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) occupy a privileged position at the interface between innate and adaptive immunity, orchestrating a large panel of responses to both physiological and pathological cues. In particular, whereas the presentation of antigens by immature DCs generally results in the development of immunological tolerance, mature DCs are capable of priming robust, and hence therapeutically relevant, adaptive immune responses. In line with this notion, functional defects in the DC compartment have been shown to etiologically contribute to pathological conditions including (but perhaps not limited to) infectious diseases, allergic and autoimmune disorders, graft rejection and cancer. Thus, the possibility of harnessing the elevated immunological potential of DCs for anticancer therapy has attracted considerable interest from both researchers and clinicians over the last decade. Alongside, several methods have been developed not only to isolate DCs from cancer patients, expand them, load them with tumor-associated antigens and hence generate highly immunogenic clinical grade infusion products, but also to directly target DCs in vivo. This intense experimental effort has culminated in 2010 with the approval by the US FDA of a DC-based preparation (sipuleucel-T, Provenge®) for the treatment of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castration-refractory prostate cancer. As an update to the latest Trial Watch dealing with this exciting field of research (October 2012), here we summarize recent advances in DC-based anticancer regimens, covering both high-impact studies that have been published during the last 13 mo and clinical trials that have been launched in the same period to assess the antineoplastic potential of this variant of cellular immunotherapy. PMID:24286020

  2. Trial watch

    PubMed Central

    Senovilla, Laura; Vacchelli, Erika; Garcia, Pauline; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    The foundation of modern vaccinology dates back to the 1790s, when the English physician Edward Jenner uncovered the tremendous medical potential of prophylactic vaccination. Jenner’s work ignited a wave of nationwide vaccination campaigns abating the incidence of multiple life-threatening infectious diseases and culminating with the eradication of natural smallpox virus, which was definitively certified by the WHO in 1980. The possibility of using vaccines against cancer was first proposed at the end of the 19th century by Paul Ehrlich and William Coley. However, it was not until the 1990s that such a hypothesis began to be intensively investigated, following the realization that the immune system is not completely unresponsive to tumors and that neoplastic cells express immunogenic tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Nowadays, anticancer vaccines are rapidly moving from the bench to the bedside, and a few prophylactic and therapeutic preparations have already been approved by FDA for use in humans. In this setting, one interesting approach is constituted by DNA vaccines, i.e., TAA-encoding circularized DNA constructs, often of bacterial origin, that are delivered to patients as such or by means of specific vectors, including (but not limited to) liposomal preparations, nanoparticles, bacteria and viruses. The administration of DNA vaccines is most often performed via the intramuscular or subcutaneous route and is expected to cause (1) the endogenous synthesis of the TAA by myocytes and/or resident antigen-presenting cells; (2) the presentation of TAA-derived peptides on the cell surface, in association with MHC class I molecules; and (3) the activation of potentially therapeutic tumor-specific immune responses. In this Trial Watch, we will summarize the results of recent clinical trials that have evaluated/are evaluating DNA vaccines as therapeutic interventions against cancer. PMID:23734328

  3. Temporal variability of CO2 and N2O emissions in an agricultural long-term field trial regarding effects of different management practices and extreme weather effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koal, Philipp; Schilling, Rolf; Gerl, Georg; Pritsch, Karin; Munch, Jean Charles

    2016-04-01

    In order to achieve a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, modern agronomic management practices need to be established. Therefore, to assess the effect of different farming practices on greenhouse gas emissions, reliable data are required. The experiment covers and compares main aspects of agricultural management for a better implementation of sustainable land use. The focus lies on the determination and interpretation of greenhouse gas emissions, where the effects of diverse tillage systems and fertilisation practices of an integrated farming system as well as the impacts of extreme weather conditions are observed. In addition, with analysis of the alterable biological, physical and chemical soil properties a link between the impact of different management systems on greenhouse gas emissions and the observed cycle of matter in the soil, especially the nitrogen and carbon cycle, is enabled. Measurements have been carried out on long-term field trials at the Research Farm Scheyern located in a Tertiary hilly landscape approximately 40 km north of Munich (South Germany). The long-term integrated farming system trial was started in 1992. Since then parcels of land (each around 0.2-0.4 ha) with a particular interior plot set-up have been conducted with the same crop rotation, tillage and fertilisation practice referring to integrated farming management. Thus, the management impacts on the soil of more than 20 years have been examined. Fluxes of CH4, N2O and CO2 have been monitored since 2007 for the integrated farming system trial using an automated system which consists of chambers (0.4 m2 area) with a motor-driven lid, an automated gas sampling unit, an on-line gas chromatographic analysis system, and a control and data logging unit. Precipitation and temperature data have been observed for the experimental field to include weather effects. The main outcomes are the analysis of temporal and spatial dynamics of greenhouse gas emissions influenced by management

  4. A single-arm trial indirect comparison investigation: a proof-of-concept method to predict venous leg ulcer healing time for a new acellular synthetic matrix matched to standard care control.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Ronald; Nelson, Andrea

    2016-11-20

    To compare data on time to healing from two separate cohorts: one treated with a new acellular synthetic matrix plus standard care (SC) and one matched from four large UK pragmatic, randomised controlled trials [venous leg ulcer (VLU) evidence network]. We introduce a new proof-of-concept strategy to a VLU clinical evidence network, propensity score matching and sensitivity analysis to predict the feasibility of the new acellular synthetic matrix plus SC for success in future randomised, controlled clinical trials. Prospective data on chronic VLUs from a safety and effectiveness study on an acellular synthetic matrix conducted in one wound centre in the UK (17 patients) and three wound centres in Australia (36 patients) were compared retrospectively to propensity score-matched data from patients with comparable leg ulcer disease aetiology, age, baseline ulcer area, ulcer duration, multi-layer compression bandaging and majority of care completed in specialist wound centres (average of 1 visit per week), with the outcome measures at comparable follow-up periods from patients enrolled in four prospective, multicentre, pragmatic, randomised studies of venous ulcers in the UK (the comparison group; VLU evidence network). Analysis using Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed a mean healing time of 73·1 days for ASM plus SC (ASM) treated ulcers in comparison with 83·5 days for comparison group ulcers treated with SC alone (Log rank test, χ(2) 5·779, P = 0·016) within 12 weeks. Sensitivity analysis indicates that an unobserved covariate would have to change the odds of healing for SC by a factor of 1·1 to impact the baseline results. Results from this study predict a significant effect on healing time when using a new ASM as an adjunct to SC in the treatment of non-healing venous ulcers in the UK, but results are sensitive to unobserved covariates that may be important in healing time comparison.

  5. Trial analytics--a tool for clinical trial management.

    PubMed

    Bose, Anindya; Das, Suman

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged timelines and large expenses associated with clinical trials have prompted a new focus on improving the operational efficiency of clinical trials by use of Clinical Trial Management Systems (CTMS) in order to improve managerial control in trial conduct. However, current CTMS systems are not able to meet the expectations due to various shortcomings like inability of timely reporting and trend visualization within/beyond an organization. To overcome these shortcomings of CTMS, clinical researchers can apply a business intelligence (BI) framework to create Clinical Research Intelligence (CLRI) for optimization of data collection and analytics. This paper proposes the usage of an innovative and collaborative visualization tool (CTA) as CTMS "add-on" to help overwhelm these deficiencies of traditional CTMS, with suitable examples.

  6. Trial watch

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jérôme; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    During the past 20 years, dozens—if not hundreds—of monoclonal antibodies have been developed and characterized for their capacity to mediate antineoplastic effects, either as they activate/enhance tumor-specific immune responses, either as they interrupt cancer cell-intrinsic signal transduction cascades, either as they specifically delivery toxins to malignant cells or as they block the tumor-stroma interaction. Such an intense research effort has lead to the approval by FDA of no less than 14 distinct molecules for use in humans affected by hematological or solid malignancies. In the inaugural issue of OncoImmunology, we briefly described the scientific rationale behind the use of monoclonal antibodies in cancer therapy and discussed recent, ongoing clinical studies investigating the safety and efficacy of this approach in patients. Here, we summarize the latest developments in this exciting area of clinical research, focusing on high impact studies that have been published during the last 15 months and clinical trials launched in the same period to investigate the therapeutic profile of promising, yet hitherto investigational, monoclonal antibodies. PMID:23482847

  7. Trial Watch

    PubMed Central

    Semeraro, Michaela; Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jerome; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Lenalidomide is a synthetic derivative of thalidomide currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in patients affected by multiple myeloma (in combination with dexamethasone) and low or intermediate-1 risk myelodysplastic syndromes that harbor 5q cytogenetic abnormalities. For illustrative purposes, the mechanism of action of lenalidomide can be subdivided into a cancer cell-intrinsic, a stromal, and an immunological component. Indeed, lenalidomide not only exerts direct cell cycle-arresting and pro-apoptotic effects on malignant cells, but also interferes with their physical and functional interaction with the tumor microenvironment and mediates a robust, pleiotropic immunostimulatory activity. In particular, lenalidomide has been shown to stimulate the cytotoxic functions of T lymphocytes and natural killer cells, to limit the immunosuppressive impact of regulatory T cells, and to modulate the secretion of a wide range of cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ as well as interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, and IL-12. Throughout the last decade, the antineoplastic and immunostimulatory potential of lenalidomide has been investigated in patients affected by a wide variety of hematological and solid malignancies. Here, we discuss the results of these studies and review the status of clinical trials currently assessing the safety and efficacy of this potent immunomodulatory drug in oncological indications. PMID:24482747

  8. Trial Watch

    PubMed Central

    Bloy, Norma; Pol, Jonathan; Manic, Gwenola; Vitale, Ilio; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jérôme; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    During the past two decades, it has become increasingly clear that the antineoplastic effects of radiation therapy do not simply reflect the ability of X-, β- and γ-rays to damage transformed cells and directly cause their permanent proliferative arrest or demise, but also involve cancer cell-extrinsic mechanisms. Indeed, among other activities, radiotherapy has been shown to favor the establishment of tumor-specific immune responses that operate systemically, underpinning the so-called ‘out-of-field’ or ‘abscopal’ effect. Thus, ionizing rays appear to elicit immunogenic cell death, a functionally peculiar variant of apoptosis associated with the emission of a particularly immunostimulatory combination of damage-associated molecular patterns. In line with this notion, radiation therapy fosters, and thus exacerbates, the antineoplastic effects of various treatment modalities, including surgery, chemotherapy and various immunotherapeutic agents. Here, we summarize recent advances in the use of ionizing rays as a means to induce or potentiate therapeutically relevant anticancer immune responses. In addition, we present clinical trials initiated during the past 12 months to test the actual benefit of radioimmunotherapy in cancer patients. PMID:25941606

  9. Trial Watch

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have long been known for their ability to initiate innate immune responses upon exposure to conserved microbial components such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and double-stranded RNA. More recently, this family of pattern recognition receptors has been attributed a critical role in the elicitation of anticancer immune responses, raising interest in the development of immunochemotherapeutic regimens based on natural or synthetic TLR agonists. In spite of such an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation, only three TLR agonists are currently licensed by FDA for use in cancer patients: bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis that operates as a mixed TLR2/TLR4 agonist; monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a derivative of Salmonella minnesota that functions as a potent agonist of TLR4; and imiquimod, a synthetic imidazoquinoline that activates TLR7. One year ago, in the August and September issues of OncoImmunology, we described the main biological features of TLRs and discussed the progress of clinical studies evaluating the safety and therapeutic potential of TLR agonists in cancer patients. Here, we summarize the latest developments in this exciting area of research, focusing on preclinical studies that have been published during the last 13 mo and clinical trials launched in the same period to investigate the antineoplastic activity of TLR agonists. PMID:24083080

  10. Assessment of the Effect of Intestinal Permeability Probes (Lactulose And Mannitol) and Other Liquids on Digesta Residence Times in Various Segments of the Gut Determined by Wireless Motility Capsule: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sequeira, Ivana R.; Lentle, Roger G.; Kruger, Marlena C.; Hurst, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    subjects generally precluded the identification of all but gross variation between treatments. The lack of any differences between treatments in either total small or large intestinal transit times indicates that the solutions administered in the lactulose mannitol test of permeability had no consistent influence on the temporal pattern of absorption. The negatively exponential profile and lack of any peaks in the frequency spectra of cyclic variation in gastric intraluminal pressure that were consistent with reported physiological frequencies of contractile activity profile suggests that the principal source of this variation is stochastic likely resulting from the effects of external events occasioned by normal daily activities on intra-abdominal pressure. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12615000596505 PMID:26629926

  11. Trial Watch

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Fernando; Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jerome; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the past 3 decades, along with the recognition that the immune system not only influences oncogenesis and tumor progression, but also determines how established neoplastic lesions respond therapy, renovated enthusiasm has gathered around the possibility of using vaccines as anticancer agents. Such an enthusiasm quickly tempered when it became clear that anticancer vaccines would have to be devised as therapeutic, rather than prophylactic, measures, and that malignant cells often fail to elicit (or actively suppress) innate and adaptive immune responses. Nonetheless, accumulating evidence indicates that a variety of anticancer vaccines, including cell-based, DNA-based, and purified component-based preparations, are capable of circumventing the poorly immunogenic and highly immunosuppressive nature of most tumors and elicit (at least under some circumstances) therapeutically relevant immune responses. Great efforts are currently being devoted to the identification of strategies that may provide anticancer vaccines with the capacity of breaking immunological tolerance and eliciting tumor-associated antigen-specific immunity in a majority of patients. In this sense, promising results have been obtained by combining anticancer vaccines with a relatively varied panels of adjuvants, including multiple immunostimulatory cytokines, Toll-like receptor agonists as well as inhibitors of immune checkpoints. One year ago, in the December issue of OncoImmunology, we discussed the biological mechanisms that underlie the antineoplastic effects of peptide-based vaccines and presented an abundant literature demonstrating the prominent clinical potential of such an approach. Here, we review the latest developments in this exciting area of research, focusing on high-profile studies that have been published during the last 13 mo and clinical trials launched in the same period to evaluate purified peptides or full-length proteins as therapeutic anticancer agents. PMID:24498550

  12. Changes in individual drug-independent system parameters during virtual paediatric pharmacokinetic trials: introducing time-varying physiology into a paediatric PBPK model.

    PubMed

    Abduljalil, Khaled; Jamei, Masoud; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Johnson, Trevor N

    2014-05-01

    Although both POPPK and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can account for age and other covariates within a paediatric population, they generally do not account for real-time growth and maturation of the individuals through the time course of drug exposure; this may be significant in prolonged neonatal studies. The major objective of this study was to introduce age progression into a paediatric PBPK model, to allow for continuous updating of anatomical, physiological and biological processes in each individual subject over time. The Simcyp paediatric PBPK model simulator system parameters were reanalysed to assess the impact of re-defining the individual over the study period. A schedule for re-defining parameters within the Simcyp paediatric simulator, for each subject, over a prolonged study period, was devised to allow seamless prediction of pharmacokinetics (PK). The model was applied to predict concentration-time data from multiday studies on sildenafil and phenytoin performed in neonates. Among PBPK system parameters, CYP3A4 abundance was one of the fastest changing covariates and a 1-h re-sampling schedule was needed for babies below age 3.5 days in order to seamlessly predict PK (<5% change in abundance) with subject maturation. The re-sampling frequency decreased as age increased, reaching biweekly by 6 months of age. The PK of both sildenafil and phenytoin were predicted better at the end of a prolonged study period using the time varying vs fixed PBPK models. Paediatric PBPK models which account for time-varying system parameters during prolonged studies may provide more mechanistic PK predictions in neonates and infants.

  13. Use of a Real-Time Training Software (Laerdal QCPR®) Compared to Instructor-Based Feedback for High-Quality Chest Compressions Acquisition in Secondary School Students: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Russotto, Vincenzo; Montalto, Francesca; Iozzo, Pasquale; Meschis, Roberta; Pugliesi, Marinella; Mariano, Dario; Benenati, Vincenzo; Raineri, Santi Maurizio; Gregoretti, Cesare; Giarratano, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    High-quality chest compressions are pivotal to improve survival from cardiac arrest. Basic life support training of school students is an international priority. The aim of this trial was to assess the effectiveness of a real-time training software (Laerdal QCPR®) compared to a standard instructor-based feedback for chest compressions acquisition in secondary school students. After an interactive frontal lesson about basic life support and high quality chest compressions, 144 students were randomized to two types of chest compressions training: 1) using Laerdal QCPR® (QCPR group– 72 students) for real-time feedback during chest compressions with the guide of an instructor who considered software data for students’ correction 2) based on standard instructor-based feedback (SF group– 72 students). Both groups had a minimum of a 2-minute chest compressions training session. Students were required to reach a minimum technical skill level before the evaluation. We evaluated all students at 7 days from the training with a 2-minute chest compressions session. The primary outcome was the compression score, which is an overall measure of chest compressions quality calculated by the software expressed as percentage. 125 students were present at the evaluation session (60 from QCPR group and 65 from SF group). Students in QCPR group had a significantly higher compression score (median 90%, IQR 81.9–96.0) compared to SF group (median 67%, IQR 27.7–87.5), p = 0.0003. Students in QCPR group performed significantly higher percentage of fully released chest compressions (71% [IQR 24.5–99.0] vs 24% [IQR 2.5–88.2]; p = 0.005) and better chest compression rate (117.5/min [IQR 106–123.5] vs 125/min [115–135.2]; p = 0.001). In secondary school students, a training for chest compressions based on a real-time feedback software (Laerdal QCPR®) guided by an instructor is superior to instructor-based feedback training in terms of chest compression technical skill

  14. Microphysical Model of the Venus clouds between 40km and 80km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGouldrick, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    I am continuing to adapt the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA) to successfully simulate the multi-layered clouds of Venus. The present version of the one-dimensional model now includes a simple parameterization of the photochemicial production of sulfuric acid around altitudes of 62km, and its thermochemical destruction below cloud base. Photochemical production in the model is limited by the availability of water vapor and insolation. Upper cloud particles are introduced into the model via binary homogeneous nucleation, while the lower and middle cloud particles are created via activation of involatile cloud condensation nuclei. Growth by condensation and coagulation and coalescence are also treated. Mass loadings and particle sizes compare favorably with the in situ observations by the Pioneer Venus Large Probe Particle Size Spectrometer, and mixing ratios of volatiles compare favorably with remotely sensed observations of water vapor and sulfuric acid vapor. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program, grant number NNX11AD79G.

  15. The Effect of Timing and Frequency of Push Notifications on Usage of a Smartphone-Based Stress Management Intervention: An Exploratory Trial.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Leanne G; Hargood, Charlie; Pejovic, Veljko; Geraghty, Adam W A; Lloyd, Scott; Goodman, Natalie; Michaelides, Danius T; Weston, Anna; Musolesi, Mirco; Weal, Mark J; Yardley, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    Push notifications offer a promising strategy for enhancing engagement with smartphone-based health interventions. Intelligent sensor-driven machine learning models may improve the timeliness of notifications by adapting delivery to a user's current context (e.g. location). This exploratory mixed-methods study examined the potential impact of timing and frequency on notification response and usage of Healthy Mind, a smartphone-based stress management intervention. 77 participants were randomised to use one of three versions of Healthy Mind that provided: intelligent notifications; daily notifications within pre-defined time frames; or occasional notifications within pre-defined time frames. Notification response and Healthy Mind usage were automatically recorded. Telephone interviews explored participants' experiences of using Healthy Mind. Participants in the intelligent and daily conditions viewed (d = .47, .44 respectively) and actioned (d = .50, .43 respectively) more notifications compared to the occasional group. Notification group had no meaningful effects on percentage of notifications viewed or usage of Healthy Mind. No meaningful differences were indicated between the intelligent and non-intelligent groups. Our findings suggest that frequent notifications may encourage greater exposure to intervention content without deterring engagement, but adaptive tailoring of notification timing does not always enhance their use. Hypotheses generated from this study require testing in future work.

  16. International Clinical Trial Day and clinical trials in Ethiopia and Africa.

    PubMed

    Fekadu, Abebaw; Teferra, Solomon; Hailu, Asrat; Gebre-Mariam, Tsige; Addissie, Adamu; Deressa, Wakgari; Yimer, Getnet; Reja, Ahmed

    2014-12-19

    Low income countries like Ethiopia are underrepresented in clinical research. As a major public commitment to clinical research, Ethiopia celebrated the International Clinical Trial Day (ICTD) for the first time on 20 May 2014 under the auspices of Addis Ababa University. The motto for the day was 'Clinical Trials for Excellence in Patient Care'. The celebration offered an opportunity to inform academic staff, researchers, students and the leadership about clinical trials being conducted and to discuss the future of clinical trials in the country. Although clear challenges to the conduct of trials abound, clinical trials registered from Ethiopia in trial registration databases is increasing. Cross-country collaborations, international funding support, motivation of academic staff to conduct clinical trials and the commitment and engagement of the leadership in research are all improving. The overall impact of clinical trials is also encouraging. For example, some of the trials conducted in Ethiopia have informed treatment guidelines. However, administrative capacity, research infrastructure as well as financial support remain weak. There is a need for enhanced university-industry linkage and translation of research findings into locally relevant evidence. Ethiopia, as well as the whole of Africa, has an unparalleled opportunity to lead the way in clinical trials, given its prospect of development and the need to have locally relevant evidence for its growing population. In this commentary we reflect on the celebration of ICTD, the status and opportunities for conducting clinical trials and the way forward for facilitating clinical trials in Ethiopia and Africa.

  17. High-intensity interval training improves VO(2peak), maximal lactate accumulation, time trial and competition performance in 9-11-year-old swimmers.

    PubMed

    Sperlich, Billy; Zinner, Christoph; Heilemann, Ilka; Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Mester, Joachim

    2010-11-01

    Training volume in swimming is usually very high when compared to the relatively short competition time. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has been demonstrated to improve performance in a relatively short training period. The main purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of a 5-week HIIT versus high-volume training (HVT) in 9-11-year-old swimmers on competition performance, 100 and 2,000 m time (T(100 m) and T(2,000 m)), VO(2peak) and rate of maximal lactate accumulation (Lac(max)). In a 5-week crossover study, 26 competitive swimmers with a mean (SD) age of 11.5 ± 1.4 years performed a training period of HIIT and HVT. Competition (P < 0.01; effect size = 0.48) and T(2,000 m) (P = 0.04; effect size = 0.21) performance increased following HIIT. No changes were found in T(100 m) (P = 0.20). Lac(max) increased following HIIT (P < 0.01; effect size = 0.43) and decreased after HVT (P < 0.01; effect size = 0.51). VO(2peak) increased following both interventions (P < 0.05; effect sizes = 0.46-0.57). The increases in competition performance, T(2,000 m), Lac(max) and VO(2peak) following HIIT were achieved in significantly less training time (~2 h/week).

  18. The 100-meter timed test: Normative data in healthy males and comparative pilot outcome data for use in Duchenne muscular dystrophy clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Lindsay N; Miller, Natalie F; Berry, Katherine M; Yin, Han; Rolf, Kimberly E; Flanigan, Kevin M; Mendell, Jerry R; Lowes, Linda P

    2017-02-17

    Timed walking tests are often used to measure function in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Our objective was to evaluate the 100 meter timed test (100m), a fixed distance test of maximal performance, for use in DMD. To this end, we sought to establish normative 100m performance in healthy controls, compare DMD performance to controls, and evaluate the reliability of 100m. Seventy-two boys with DMD (18 steroid-naïve, 54 on steroids) and 599 controls (4-14 years) completed the 100m as speedily as possible on a 25-meter track. Repeat testing was completed between 1 and 42 days later and again at 1 year in a subgroup of 96 control boys. Additionally 35 DMD boys were followed longitudinally (5-19 months). Descriptive statistics are presented by age and cohort. There was a significant difference in performance between groups (p < 0.01). Age and body mass index (BMI) significantly influenced 100m (p < 0.0001) in the control cohort. Test-retest reliability was excellent for both cohorts (ICC > 0.90, p < 0.001). Normative data can be used to determine percent-predicted 100m times to quantify the severity of running impairment in children with a motor deficit. Performance of 100m follows the natural history established by other outcome measures in DMD.

  19. How Do Clinical Trials Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work Who Can Participate What To Expect During Benefits and Risks How They Protect Participants Finding Clinical Trials Links Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites How Do Clinical Trials Work? If you take part in a clinical trial, ...

  20. A Clinical Trial of Optimal Time Interval Between Ablation and Diagnostic Activity When a Pretherapy RAI Scanning Is Performed on Patients With Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yafu; Mao, Qiufen; Chen, Song; Li, Na; Li, Xuena; Li, Yaming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article investigates the association of the time interval between the diagnostic dose and ablation with the stunning effect, when a 74 MBq 131I pretherapy scanning was performed on patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC); the patients who were diagnosed as DTC and would be performed radioiodine (RAI) ablation of thyroid remnants or metastases were recruited during January 2011 and May 2012 in our hospital. Thirty-seven patients with DTC who had the RAI ablation of thyroid remnants or metastases for the first time were recruited. All the patients received a dose of 1850 to 7400 MBq of 131I for ablation and a diagnostic scan was performed 24 hours after the administration of 74 MBq 131I before ablation. A posttherapy scan was performed 2 to 7 days after the ablation. The patients were broken down into 3 groups (G1, G2, and G3) according to the interval time between the diagnostic dose and therapy (1–3, 4–7, and >7 days). The fractional concentrations of 131I in remnants or functional metastases were quantified and expressed as therapeutic/diagnostic (Rx/Dx). The level of significance was set at 0.05. Sixty-seven foci were found both on pretherapy and posttherapy scans, the mean ratio of Rx/Dx was 0.43 ± 0.29, and the ratio of 49 foci (73.13%) was <0.6. The ratios in G1, G2, and G3 were 0.46 ± 0.29, 0.29 ± 0.18, and 0.55 ± 0.33, respectively. The differences between G1 and G2, and G2 and G3 were statistically significant (t = 2.40, P = 0.021 and t = 3.28, P = 0.002), whereas the difference between G1 and G3 was not significant (t = 1.01, P = 0.319). By a diagnostic scan of 74 MBq 131I, stunning prominently occurs with a time of 4 to 7 days between the diagnostic dose and ablation. We recommend that for less stunning effect, RAI ablation should be performed within 3 days or postponed until 1 week after the diagnostic dose administrated. PMID:26252311

  1. Extended Follow-up Confirms Early Vaccine-Enhanced Risk of HIV Acquisition and Demonstrates Waning Effect Over Time Among Participants in a Randomized Trial of Recombinant Adenovirus HIV Vaccine (Step Study)

    PubMed Central

    Duerr, Ann; Huang, Yunda; Buchbinder, Susan; Coombs, Robert W.; Sanchez, Jorge; del Rio, Carlos; Casapia, Martin; Santiago, Steven; Gilbert, Peter; Corey, Lawrence; Robertson, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The Step Study tested whether an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)–vectored human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine could prevent HIV acquisition and/or reduce viral load set-point after infection. At the first interim analysis, nonefficacy criteria were met. Vaccinations were halted; participants were unblinded. In post hoc analyses, more HIV infections occurred in vaccinees vs placebo recipients in men who had Ad5-neutralizing antibodies and/or were uncircumcised. Follow-up was extended to assess relative risk of HIV acquisition in vaccinees vs placebo recipients over time. Methods. We used Cox proportional hazard models for analyses of vaccine effect on HIV acquisition and vaccine effect modifiers, and nonparametric and semiparametric methods for analysis of constancy of relative risk over time. Results. One hundred seventy-two of 1836 men were infected. The adjusted vaccinees vs placebo recipients hazard ratio (HR) for all follow-up time was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03–1.92; P = .03). Vaccine effect differed by baseline Ad5 or circumcision status during first 18 months, but neither was significant for all follow-up time. The HR among uncircumcised and/or Ad5-seropositive men waned with time since vaccination. No significant vaccine-associated risk was seen among circumcised, Ad5-negative men (HR, 0.97; P = 1.0) over all follow-up time. Conclusions. The vaccine-associated risk seen in interim analysis was confirmed but waned with time from vaccination. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00095576. PMID:22561365

  2. Frequent interruptions of sedentary time modulates contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake pathways in muscle: Ancillary analysis from randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Bergouignan, Audrey; Latouche, Celine; Heywood, Sarah; Grace, Megan S.; Reddy-Luthmoodoo, Medini; Natoli, Alaina K.; Owen, Neville; Dunstan, David W.; Kingwell, Bronwyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have observed associations between frequent interruptions of sitting time with physical activity bouts and beneficial metabolic outcomes, even in individuals who regularly exercise. Frequent interruptions to prolonged sitting reduce postprandial plasma glucose. Here we studied potential skeletal muscle mechanisms accounting for this improved control of glycemia in overweight adults under conditions of one day uninterrupted sitting and sitting interrupted with light-intensity or moderate-intensity walking every 20-min (n = 8); and, after three days of either uninterrupted sitting or light-intensity walking interruptions (n = 5). Contraction- and insulin-mediated glucose uptake signaling pathways as well as changes in oxidative phosphorylation proteins were examined. We showed that 1) both interventions reduce postprandial glucose concentration, 2) acute interruptions to sitting over one day stimulate the contraction-mediated glucose uptake pathway, 3) both acute interruptions to sitting with moderate-intensity activity over one day and light-intensity activity over three days induce a transition to modulation of the insulin-signaling pathway, in association with increased capacity for glucose transport. Only the moderate-intensity interruptions resulted in greater capacity for glycogen synthesis and likely for ATP production. These observations contribute to a mechanistic explanation of improved postprandial glucose metabolism with regular interruptions to sitting time, a promising preventive strategy for metabolic diseases. PMID:27554943

  3. On Trial.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Joey

    2016-11-01

    Defense attorneys who represent physicians at the Texas Medical Board's (TMB's) informal settlement conferences (ISCs) say that over time the format of the hearings has become similar to that of an administrative hearing, without the guaranteed accompanying protections. In scathing written comments the Texas Medical Association submitted to TMB in response to the board's proposed ISC rules, TMA said ISCs have become "more and more formal, prescriptive, and regulated," without giving physicians a fair forum to defend themselves.

  4. Clinical trials of homoeopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Kleijnen, J; Knipschild, P; ter Riet, G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish whether there is evidence of the efficacy of homoeopathy from controlled trials in humans. DESIGN--Criteria based meta-analysis. Assessment of the methodological quality of 107 controlled trials in 96 published reports found after an extensive search. Trials were scored using a list of predefined criteria of good methodology, and the outcome of the trials was interpreted in relation to their quality. SETTING--Controlled trials published world wide. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Results of the trials with the best methodological quality. Trials of classical homoeopathy and several modern varieties were considered separately. RESULTS--In 14 trials some form of classical homoeopathy was tested and in 58 trials the same single homoeopathic treatment was given to patients with comparable conventional diagnosis. Combinations of several homoeopathic treatments were tested in 26 trials; isopathy was tested in nine trials. Most trials seemed to be of very low quality, but there were many exceptions. The results showed a positive trend regardless of the quality of the trial or the variety of homeopathy used. Overall, of the 105 trials with interpretable results, 81 trials indicated positive results whereas in 24 trials no positive effects of homoeopathy were found. The results of the review may be complicated by publication bias, especially in such a controversial subject as homoeopathy. CONCLUSIONS--At the moment the evidence of clinical trials is positive but not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions because most trials are of low methodological quality and because of the unknown role of publication bias. This indicates that there is a legitimate case for further evaluation of homoeopathy, but only by means of well performed trials. PMID:1825800

  5. Towards an international standard for detection and typing botulinum neurotoxin-producing Clostridia types A, B, E and F in food, feed and environmental samples: a European ring trial study to evaluate a real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Fenicia, Lucia; Fach, Patrick; van Rotterdam, Bart J; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Segerman, Bo; Auricchio, Bruna; Delibato, Elisabetta; Hamidjaja, Raditijo A; Wielinga, Peter R; Woudstra, Cedric; Agren, Joakim; De Medici, Dario; Knutsson, Rickard

    2011-03-01

    A real-time PCR method for detection and typing of BoNT-producing Clostridia types A, B, E, and F was developed on the framework of the European Research Project "Biotracer". A primary evaluation was carried out using 104 strains and 17 clinical and food samples linked to botulism cases. Results showed 100% relative accuracy, 100% relative sensitivity, 100% relative specificity, and 100% selectivity (inclusivity on 73 strains and exclusivity on 31 strains) of the real-time PCR against the reference cultural method combined with the standard mouse bioassay. Furthermore, a ring trial study performed at four different European laboratories in Italy, France, the Netherlands, and Sweden was carried out using 47 strains, and 30 clinical and food samples linked to botulism cases. Results showed a concordance of 95.7% among the four laboratories. The reproducibility generated a relative standard deviation in the range of 2.18% to 13.61%. Considering the high level of agreement achieved between the laboratories, this real-time PCR is a suitable method for rapid detection and typing of BoNT-producing Clostridia in clinical, food and environmental samples and thus support the use of it as an international standard method.

  6. Prevalence and risk factors for low bone mineral density in untreated HIV infection: a substudy of the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment trial

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Andrew; Grund, Birgit; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Schwartz, Ann; Bernardino, Jose I; White, David; Badel-Faesen, Sharlaa; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Ensrud, Kristine; Hoy, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV infection is associated with a higher prevalence of low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures than the general population. There are limited data in HIV-positive adults, naïve to antiretroviral therapy (ART), to estimate the relative contribution of untreated HIV to bone loss. Methods The START Bone Mineral Density substudy is a randomised comparison of the effect of immediate versus deferred initial ART on bone. We evaluated traditional, demographic, HIV-related, and immunological factors for their associations with baseline hip and lumbar spine BMD, measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, using multiple regression. Results A total of 424 ART-naïve participants were enrolled at 33 sites in six continents; mean (SD) age was 34 (10.1) years, 79.0% were nonwhite, 26.0% were women, and 12.5% had a body mass index (BMI) <20 kg/m2. Mean (SD) Z-scores were -0.41 (0.94) at the spine and -0.36 (0.88) for total hip; 1.9% had osteoporosis and 35.1% had low BMD (hip or spine T-score <-1.0). Factors independently associated with lower BMD at the hip and spine were female sex, Latino/Hispanic ethnicity, lower BMI and higher estimated glomerular filtration rate. Longer time since HIV diagnosis was associated with lower hip BMD. Current or nadir CD4 cell counts, and HIV viral load were not associated with BMD. Conclusions In this geographically and racially diverse population of ART-naïve adults with normal CD4 cell counts, low BMD was common, but osteoporosis was rare. Lower BMD was significantly associated with traditional risk factors but not with CD4 cell count or viral load. PMID:25711332

  7. Early Antiretroviral Therapy at High CD4 Counts Does Not Improve Arterial Elasticity: A Substudy of the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hullsiek, Katherine Huppler; Engen, Nicole Wyman; Nelson, Ray; Chetchotisakd, Ploenchan; Gerstoft, Jan; Jessen, Heiko; Losso, Marcelo; Markowitz, Norman; Munderi, Paula; Papadopoulos, Antonios; Shuter, Jonathan; Rappoport, Claire; Pearson, Mary T.; Finley, Elizabeth; Babiker, Abdel; Emery, Sean; Duprez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) may increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Vascular function assessments can be used to study CVD pathogenesis. We compared the effect of immediate versus deferred ART initiation at CD4 counts >500 cells/mm3 on small arterial elasticity (SAE) and large artery elasticity (LAE). Methods. Radial artery blood pressure waveforms were recorded noninvasively. Small arterial elasticity and LAE were derived from analysis of the diastolic pulse waveform. Randomized treatment groups were compared with linear models at each visit and longitudinal mixed models. Results. Study visits involved 332 participants in 8 countries: mean (standard deviation [SD]) age 35 (10), 70% male, 66% nonwhite, 30% smokers, and median CD4 count 625 cells/mm3 and 10-year Framingham risk score for CVD 1.7%. Mean (SD) SAE and LAE values at baseline were 7.3 (2.9) mL/mmHg × 100 and 16.6 (4.1) mL/mmHg × 10, respectively. Median time on ART was 47 and 12 months in the immediate and deferred ART groups, respectively. The treatment groups did not demonstrate significant within-person changes in SAE or LAE during the follow-up period, and there was no difference in mean change from baseline between treatment groups. The lack of significant differences persisted after adjustment, when restricted to early or late changes, after censoring participants in deferred group who started ART, and among subgroups defined by CVD and HIV risk factors. Conclusions. Among a diverse global population of HIV-positive persons with high CD4 counts, these randomized data suggest that ART treatment does not have a substantial influence on vascular function among younger HIV-positive individuals with preserved immunity. PMID:27942541

  8. Night-time sedating H1-antihistamine increases daytime somnolence but not treatment efficacy in chronic spontaneous urticaria: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Staevska, M; Gugutkova, M; Lazarova, C; Kralimarkova, T; Dimitrov, V; Zuberbier, T; Church, MK; Popov, TA

    2014-01-01

    Background Many physicians believe that the most effective way to treat chronic urticaria is to take a nonsedating second-generation H1-antihistamine in the morning and a sedating first-generation H1-antihistamine, usually hydroxyzine, at night to enhance sleep. But is this belief well founded? Objectives To test this belief by comparing the effectiveness and prevalence of unwanted sedative effects when treating patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) with levocetirizine 15 mg daily plus hydroxyzine 50 mg at night (levocetirizine plus hydroxyzine) vs. levocetirizine 20 mg daily (levocetirizine monotherapy). Methods In this randomized, double-blind, cross-over study, 24 patients with difficult-to-treat CSU took levocetirizine plus hydroxyzine or levocetirizine monotherapy for periods of 5 days each. At the end of each treatment period, assessments were made of quality of life (Chronic Urticaria Quality of Life Questionnaire, CU-Q2oL), severity of urticaria symptoms (Urticaria Activity Score, UAS), sleep disturbance during the night and daytime somnolence. Results Both treatments significantly decreased UAS, night-time sleep disturbances and CU-Q2oL scores (P < 0·001) without significant differences between the two. Compared with baseline, daytime somnolence was significantly reduced by levocetirizine monotherapy (P = 0·006) but not by levocetirizine plus hydroxyzine (P = 0·218). Direct comparison of the two treatment modalities in terms of daytime somnolence favoured levocetirizine monotherapy (P = 0·026). Conclusions The widespread belief that sleep is aided by the addition of a sedating first-generation H1-antihistamine, usually hydroxyzine, at night is not supported. These results are in line with the urticaria guidelines, which state that first-line treatment for urticaria should be new-generation, nonsedating H1-antihistamines only. PMID:24472058

  9. A Comparative Randomized Trial on the Optimal Timing of Dexamethasone for Pain Relief after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Gastric Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Jeung Hui; Lee, Hyuk; Min, Yang Won; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jun Haeng; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to compare the clinical effects of preoperative and postoperative dexamethasone on pain after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric neoplasm. Methods Forty patients with early gastric neoplasm who were scheduled for ESD were randomized into two groups according to the timing of steroid administration: preoperative (“pre”, n=20) and postoperative (“post”, n=20) steroid administration. The pre group received 0.15 mg/kg dexamethasone before ESD and placebo after, and the post group received pre-ESD placebo and post-ESD dexamethasone. The present pain intensity (PPI) index and the short-form McGill pain (SF-MP) questionnaire were evaluated. Results The primary outcome was PPI score at 6 hours after ESD. There was a greater reduction in 6-hour PPI in the pre group than in the post group (2.1±0.8 vs 3.0±1.1, respectively; p=0.006). The immediate PPI was also significantly lower in the pre group than in the post group (1.6±0.6 vs 2.9±0.6, respectively; p<0.001), and the total SF-MP scores were significantly lower in the pre group than in the post group both immediately and at 6 hours after the operation. Conclusions Preoperative administration of dexamethasone may produce a superior analgesic effect in patients who undergo ESD compared with the postoperative administration of dexamethasone. PMID:27114413

  10. Initial formal toxicity evaluation of APC-2, a novel fluorescent tracer agent for real-time measurement of glomerular filtration rate in preparation for a first-in-man clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaj, Joseph E.; Dorshow, Richard B.

    2014-03-01

    The fluorescent tracer agent 2,5-bis[N-(1-carboxy-2-hydroxy)]carbamoyl-3,6-diaminopyrazine, designated APC-2, has been developed with properties and attributes necessary for use as a direct measure of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Comparison to known standard exogenous GFR agents in animal models has demonstrated an excellent correlation. A clinical trial to demonstrate this same correlation in humans is in preparation. A battery of formal toxicity tests necessary for regulatory clearance to proceed with a clinical trial has been recently completed on this new fluorescent tracer agent. These include single dose toxicity studies in rats and dogs to determine overall toxicity and toxicokinetics of the compound. Blood compatibility, mutation assay, chromosomal aberration assay, and several other assays were also completed. Toxicity assessments were based on mortality, clinical signs, body weight, food consumption and anatomical pathology. Blood samples were collected to assess pharmacokinetic parameters including half-life, area under the curve, and clearance. Urine samples were collected to assess distribution. Doses of up to 200-300 times the estimated human dose were administered. No test-article related effects were noted on body weight, food consumption, ophthalmic observations and no abnormal pathology was seen in either macroscopic or microscopic evaluations of any organs or tissues. All animals survived to scheduled sacrifice. Transient discoloration of skin and urine was noted at the higher dose levels in both species as expected from a highly fluorescent compound and was not considered pathological. Thus initial toxicology studies of this new fluorescent tracer agent APC-2 have resulted in no demonstrable pathological test article concerns.

  11. Legislation for trial registration and data transparency.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Wu, Tai-Xiang

    2010-05-26

    Public confidence in clinical trials has been eroded by data suppression, misrepresentation and manipulation. Although various attempts have been made to achieve universal trial registration- e.g., Declaration of Helsinki, WHO clinical Trial Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP), the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors requirement- they have not succeeded, probably because they lack the enough power of enforcement.Legislation appears to be the most efficient and effective means to ensure that all researchers register their trials and disseminate their data accurately and in a timely manner. We propose that a global network be established. This could be accomplished in two steps. The first step is to legislate about trial registration and data transparency, such as USA's FDAAA Act 2007; and the second step to establish a global network to ensure uniform, international consistency in policy and enforcement of trial registration and data transparency.

  12. Vicarious trial and error

    PubMed Central

    Redish, A. David

    2016-01-01

    When rats come to a decision point, they sometimes pause and look back and forth as if deliberating over the choice; at other times, they proceed as if they have already made their decision. In the 1930s, this pause-and-look behaviour was termed ‘vicarious trial and error’ (VTE), with the implication that the rat was ‘thinking about the future’. The discovery in 2007 that the firing of hippocampal place cells gives rise to alternating representations of each of the potential path options in a serial manner during VTE suggested a possible neural mechanism that could underlie the representations of future outcomes. More-recent experiments examining VTE in rats suggest that there are direct parallels to human processes of deliberative decision making, working memory and mental time travel. PMID:26891625

  13. Effect of different agronomic management practices on greenhouse gas emissions and nutrient cycling in a long-term field trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koal, Philipp; Schilling, Rolf; Gerl, Georg; Pritsch, Karin; Munch, Jean Charles

    2015-04-01

    In order to achieve a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, modern agronomic management practices need to be established. Therefore, to assess the effect of different farming practices on greenhouse gas emissions, reliable data are required. The experiment covers and compares two main aspects of agricultural management for a better implementation of sustainable land use. The focus lies on the determination and interpretation of greenhouse gas emissions, however, regarding in each case a different agricultural management system, namely an organic farming system and an integrated farming system where the effect of diverse tillage systems and fertilisation practices are observed. In addition, with analysis of the alterable biological, physical and chemical soil properties a link between the impact of different management systems on greenhouse gas emissions and the observed cycle of matter in the soil, especially the nitrogen and carbon cycle, will be enabled. Measurements have been carried out on long-term field trials at the Research Farm Scheyern located in a Tertiary hilly landscape approximately 40 km north of Munich (South Germany). The long-term field trials of the organic and integrated farming system were started in 1992. Since then parcels of land (each around 0.2-0.4 ha) with a particular interior plot set-up have been conducted with the same crop rotation, tillage and fertilisation practice referring to organic and integrated farming management. Thus, the management impacts on the soil of more than 20 years are being examined. Fluxes of CH4, N2O and CO2 have been monitored since 2007 for the integrated farming system trial and since 2012 for the organic farming system trial using an automated system which consists of chambers (0.4 m2 area) with a motor-driven lid, an automated gas sampling unit, an on-line gas chromatographic analysis system, and a control and data logging unit. Precipitation and temperature data have been observed for each experimental

  14. The Quality of Registration of Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Viergever, Roderik F.; Ghersi, Davina

    2011-01-01

    Background Lack of transparency in clinical trial conduct, publication bias and selective reporting bias are still important problems in medical research. Through clinical trials registration, it should be possible to take steps towards resolving some of these problems. However, previous evaluations of registered records of clinical trials have shown that registered information is often incomplete and non-meaningful. If these studies are accurate, this negates the possible benefits of registration of clinical trials. Methods and Findings A 5% sample of records of clinical trials that were registered between 17 June 2008 and 17 June 2009 was taken from the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) database and assessed for the presence of contact information, the presence of intervention specifics in drug trials and the quality of primary and secondary outcome reporting. 731 records were included. More than half of the records were registered after recruitment of the first participant. The name of a contact person was available in 94.4% of records from non-industry funded trials and 53.7% of records from industry funded trials. Either an email address or a phone number was present in 76.5% of non-industry funded trial records and in 56.5% of industry funded trial records. Although a drug name or company serial number was almost always provided, other drug intervention specifics were often omitted from registration. Of 3643 reported outcomes, 34.9% were specific measures with a meaningful time frame. Conclusions Clinical trials registration has the potential to contribute substantially to improving clinical trial transparency and reducing publication bias and selective reporting. These potential benefits are currently undermined by deficiencies in the provision of information in key areas of registered records. PMID:21383991

  15. Does an L-glutamine-containing, Glucose-free, Oral Rehydration Solution Reduce Stool Output and Time to Rehydrate in Children with Acute Diarrhoea? A Double-blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Claudia; Villa, Sofía; Mota, Felipe R.; Calva, Juan J.

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed whether an oral rehydration solution (ORS) in which glucose is replaced by L-glutamine (L-glutamine ORS) is more effective than the standard glucose-based rehydration solution recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO-ORS) in reducing the stool volume and time to rehydrate in acute diarrhoea. In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial in a Mexican hospital, 147 dehydrated children, aged 1–60 month(s), were assigned either to the WHO-ORS (74 children), or to the L-glutamine ORS (73 children) and followed until successful rehydration. There were no significant differences between the groups in stool output during the first four hours, time to successful rehydration, volume of ORS required for rehydration, urinary output, and vomiting. This was independent of rotavirus-associated infection. An L-glutamine-containing glucose-free ORS seems not to offer greater clinical benefit than the standard WHO-ORS in mildly-to-moderately-dehydrated children with acute non-cholera diarrhoea. PMID:18330060

  16. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Cancer.gov

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  17. Teaching Drama Via Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansour, Wisam

    1998-01-01

    Suggests using a court trial as an activity for teaching drama to English-as-a-foreign-language (EFL) students. Describes use of a court trial for teaching Macbeth to EFL students in Jordan. (Author/VWL)

  18. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  19. Use of a Structured Mirrors Intervention Does Not Reduce Delirium Incidence But May Improve Factual Memory Encoding in Cardiac Surgical ICU Patients Aged Over 70 Years: A Pilot Time-Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Giraud, Kimberly; Pontin, Megan; Sharples, Linda D.; Fletcher, Paul; Dalgleish, Tim; Eden, Allaina; Jenkins, David P.; Vuylsteke, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Post-operative delirium remains a significant problem, particularly in the older surgical patient. Previous evidence suggests that the provision of supplementary visual feedback about ones environment via the use of a mirror may positively impact on mental status and attention (core delirium diagnostic domains). We aimed to explore whether use of an evidence-based mirrors intervention could be effective in reducing delirium and improving post-operative outcomes such as factual memory encoding of the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) environment in older cardiac surgical patients. Methods: This was a pilot time-cluster randomized controlled trial at a 32-bed ICU, enrolling 223 patients aged 70 years and over, admitted to ICU after elective or urgent cardiac surgery from October 29, 2012 to June 23, 2013. The Mirrors Group received a structured mirrors intervention at set times (e.g., following change in mental status). The Usual Care Group received the standard care without mirrors. Primary outcome was ICU delirium incidence; secondary outcomes were ICU delirium days, ICU days with altered mental status or inattention, total length of ICU stay, physical mobilization (balance confidence) at ICU discharge, recall of factual and delusional ICU memories at 12 weeks, Health-Related Quality of Life at 12 weeks, and acceptability of the intervention. Results: The intervention was not associated with a significant reduction in ICU delirium incidence [Mirrors: 20/115 (17%); Usual Care: 17/108 (16%)] or duration [Mirrors: 1 (1–3); Usual Care: 2 (1–8)]. Use of the intervention on ICU was predictive of significantly higher recall of factual (but not delusional) items at 12 weeks after surgery (p = 0.003) and acceptability was high, with clinicians using mirrors at 86% of all recorded hourly observations. The intervention did not significantly impact on other secondary outcomes. Conclusion: Use of a structured mirrors intervention on the post-operative ICU does not

  20. Sarcopenia: designing phase IIB trials.

    PubMed

    Chumlea, Wm C; Cesari, M; Evans, W J; Ferrucci, L; Fielding, R A; Pahor, M; Studenski, S; Vellas, B

    2011-06-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-related involuntary loss of skeletal muscle mass and functionality that can lead to the development of disability, frailty and increased health care costs. The development of interventions aimed at preventing and/or treating sarcopenia is complex, requiring the adoption of assumptions and standards that are not well established scientifically or clinically. A number of investigators and clinicians (both from academia and industry) met in Rome (Italy) in 2009 to develop a consensus definition of sarcopenia. Subsequently, in Albuquerque (New Mexico, USA) in 2010, the same group met again to consider the complex issues necessary for designing Phase II clinical trials for sarcopenia. Current clinical trial data indicate that fat-free mass (FFM) parameters are responsive to physical activity/nutritional treatment modalities over short time periods, but pharmacological trials of sarcopenia have yet to show significant efficacy. In order to conduct a clinical trial within a reasonable time frame, groups that model or display accelerated aging and loss of FFM are necessary. Few studies have used acceptable designs for testing treatment effects, sample sizes or primary outcomes that could provide interpretable findings or effects across studies. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the measure of choice for assessing FFM, but sufficient time is needed for changes to be detected accurately and reliably. A tool set that would allow clinical, basic and epidemiological research on sarcopenia to advance rapidly toward diagnosis and treatment phases should be those reflecting function and strength.

  1. Cholesterol trials and mortality.

    PubMed

    Warren, John B; Dimmitt, Simon B; Stampfer, Hans G

    2016-07-01

    An overview of clinical trials can reveal a class effect on mortality that is not apparent from individual trials. Most large trials of lipid pharmacotherapy are not powered to detect differences in mortality and instead assess efficacy with composite cardiovascular endpoints. We illustrate the importance of all-cause mortality data by comparing survival in three different sets of the larger controlled lipid trials that underpin meta-analyses. These trials are for fibrates and statins. Fibrate treatment in five of the six main trials was associated with a decrease in survival, one fibrate trial showed a non-significant reduction in mortality that can be explained by a different target population. In secondary prevention, statin treatment increased survival in all five of the main trials, absolute mean increase ranged from 0.43% to 3.33%, the median change was 1.75%, which occurred in the largest trial. In primary prevention, statin treatment increased survival in six of the seven main trials, absolute mean change in survival ranged from -0.09% to 0.89%, median 0.49%. Composite safety endpoints are rare in these trials. The failure to address composite safety endpoints in most lipid trials precludes a balanced summary of risk-benefit when a composite has been used for efficacy. Class effects on survival provide informative summaries of the risk-benefit of lipid pharmacotherapy. We consider that the presentation of key mortality/survival data adds to existing meta-analyses to aid personal treatment decisions.

  2. Salem Witch Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Benjamin

    2003-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan that focuses on the Salem (Massachusetts) witchcraft trials. Explains that the first section of the lesson has students learn about the trials as described in the court records. The second section asks students to interpret various images of the trials. (CMK)

  3. Paperless clinical trials: Myth or reality?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sandeep K.

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to expedite the time-to-market for new drugs and to make the approval process simpler. But clinical trials are a complex process and the increased complexity leads to decreased efficiency. Hence, pharmaceutical organizations want to move toward a more technology-driven clinical trial process for recording, analyzing, reporting, archiving, etc., In recent times, the progress has certainly been made in developing paperless systems that improve data capture and management. The adaptation of paperless processes may require major changes to existing procedures. But this is in the best interests of these organizations to remain competitive because a paperless clinical trial would lead to a consistent and streamlined framework. Moreover, all major regulatory authorities also advocate adoption of paperless trial. But challenges still remain toward implementation of paperless clinical trial process. PMID:26288464

  4. Importance of total ischemic time and preprocedural infarct-related artery blood flow in predicting infarct size in patients with anterior wall myocardial infarction (from the CRISP-AMI Trial).

    PubMed

    Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Zhou, Yi; Gutberlet, Matthias; Kumar, Arramraj Sreenivas; Mills, James S; Blaxill, Jonathan; Smalling, Richard; Ohman, Erik Magnus; Patel, Manesh R

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize determinants of infarct size in the multicenter randomized Counterpulsation to Reduce Infarct Size Pre-PCI Acute Myocardial Infarction (CRISP-AMI) trial. Contemporary determinants of infarct size in patients presenting with acute anterior myocardial infarction without shock and undergoing percutaneous revascularization have been incompletely characterized. In CRISP-AMI, 337 patients with acute anterior ST segment elevation myocardial infarction but without cardiogenic shock at 30 sites in 9 countries were randomized to initiation of intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation before primary percutaneous coronary intervention versus standard of care. The primary outcome was infarct size as measured by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging 3 to 5 days after percutaneous coronary intervention. Of 337 randomized patients, complete periprocedural and infarct size data were available in 250 patients (74%). After a comparison of baseline characteristics to ensure no significant differences, patients with missing data were excluded. Using multiple linear regression of 23 variables, time from symptom onset to first device (β = 0.022, p = 0.047) and preprocedural Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction flow 0/1 (β = 15.28, p <0.001) were independent predictors of infarct size. Infarct size increased by 0.43% per 30 minutes in early reperfusion and by 0.63% every 30 minutes in late reperfusion. In conclusion, in patients with acute anterior ST elevation myocardial infraction without cardiogenic shock, total ischemic time and preprocedural Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction flow 0/1 were associated with increased infarct size as determined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. These findings underscore the importance of systems of care aimed at reducing total ischemic time to open infarct arteries.

  5. How experimental trial context affects perceptual categorization.

    PubMed

    Palmeri, Thomas J; Mack, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    To understand object categorization, participants are tested in experiments often quite different from how people experience object categories in the real world. Learning and knowledge of categories is measured in discrete experimental trials, those trials may or may not provide feedback, trials appear one after another, after some fixed inter-trial interval, with hundreds of trials in a row, within experimental blocks with some structure dictated by the experimental design. In the real world, outside of certain educational and vocational contexts, opportunities to learn and use categories are intermixed over time with a whole multitude of intervening experiences. It is clear from any elementary understanding of human cognition that sequential effects matter, yet this understanding is often ignored, and categorization trials are often instead treated as independent events, immune to local trial context. In this perspective, we use some of our work to illustrate some of the consequences of the fact that categorization experiments have a particular trial structure. Experimental trial context can affect performance in category learning and categorization experiments in ways that can profoundly affect theoretical conclusions.

  6. Types of Treatment: Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trial Service: LLS provides personalized clinical trial navigation when appropriate. For more information, please contact an ... trial. We can also provide personalized clinical trial navigation when appropriate. Related Links For video clips answering ...

  7. Clinical Trials: Key to Medical Progress

    MedlinePlus

    ... all the time in nearly every area of medical research. To Find Out More To find out more ... widely available, or help others by contributing to medical research. The latest, most complete information about clinical trials ...

  8. Pulmonary function in an international sample of HIV-positive, treatment-naïve adults with CD4 counts >500 cells/μL: a substudy of the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment trial

    PubMed Central

    KUNISAKI, Ken M.; NIEWOEHNER, Dennis E.; COLLINS, Gary; NIXON, Daniel E.; TEDALDI, Ellen; AKOLO, Christopher; KITYO, Cissy; KLINKER, Hartwig; LA ROSA, Alberto; CONNETT, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe the prevalence and correlates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a multicentre international cohort of persons living with HIV (PLWH). Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of adult PLWH, naïve to HIV treatment, with baseline CD4 cell count >500 cells/μL enrolled in the Pulmonary Substudy of the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment trial. We collected standardised, quality-controlled spirometry. COPD was defined as forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio less than the lower limit of normal. Results Among 1026 participants from 80 sites and 20 countries, median (IQR) age was 36 (30, 44) years, 29% were female, and time since HIV diagnosis was 1.2 (0.4, 3.5) years. Baseline CD4 cell count was 648 (583, 767) cells/μL, viral load was 4.2 (3.5, 4.7) log10 copies/mL, and 10% had viral load ≤400 copies/mL despite lack of HIV treatment. Current/former/never smokers comprised 28%/11%/61% of the cohort, respectively. COPD was present in 6.8% of participants, and varied by age, smoking status, and region. 48% of those with COPD reported lifelong nonsmoking. In multivariable regression, age and pack-years of smoking had the strongest associations with FEV1/FVC ratio (p<0.0001). There were significant differences between the effect of region on FEV1/FVC ratio (p=0.010). Conclusions Our data suggest that among PLWH, naïve to HIV treatment and with CD4 cell count >500 cells/μL, smoking and age are important factors related to COPD. Smoking cessation should remain a high global priority for clinical care and research in PLWH. PMID:25711330

  9. A multicenter prospective trial to asses a new real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of Treponema pallidum, herpes simplex-1/2 and Haemophilus ducreyi in genital, anal and oropharyngeal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Glatz, M; Juricevic, N; Altwegg, M; Bruisten, S; Komericki, P; Lautenschlager, S; Weber, R; Bosshard, P P

    2014-12-01

    Treponema pallidum, herpes simplex virus types 1 or 2 (HSV-1/2) and Haemophilus ducreyi are sexually transmitted pathogens that can cause genital, anal and oropharyngeal ulcers. Laboratory evaluation of these pathogens in ulcers requires different types of specimens and tests, increasing the risk of improper specimen handling and time lapse until analysis. We sought to develop a new real-time PCR (TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR) to facilitate the detection of T. pallidum, HSV-1/2 and H. ducreyi in ulcers. The TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR was tested (i) in a retrospective study on 193 specimens of various clinical origin and (ii) in a prospective study on 36 patients with genital, anal or oropharyngeal ulcers (ClinicalTrials.gov # NCT01688258). The results of the TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR were compared with standard diagnostic methods (T. pallidum: serology, dark field microscopy; HSV-1/2: PCR; H. ducreyi: cultivation). Sensitivity and specificity of the TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR for T. pallidum were both 100%, for HSV-1 100% and 98%, and for HSV-2 100% and 98%, respectively. T. pallidum and HSV-1/2 were detected in 53% and 22% of patients in the prospective study; H. ducreyi was not detected. In the prospective study, 5/19 (26%) specimens were true positive for T. pallidum in the TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR but non-reactive in the VDRL. The TP-HD-HSV1/2 PCR is sensitive and specific for the detection of T. pallidum and HSV-1/2 in routine clinical practice and it appears superior to serology in early T. pallidum infections.

  10. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism A1298C (Glu429Ala) predicts decline in renal function over time in the African-American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) Trial and Veterans Affairs Hypertension Cohort (VAHC)

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Rany M.; Lipkowitz, Michael S.; Bhatnagar, Vibha; Pandey, Braj; Schork, Nicholas J.; O’Connor, Daniel T.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with increased venous thrombosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Mutations in the human methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene have been associated with increased homocysteine levels and risks of CVD in various populations including those with kidney disease. Here, we evaluated the influence of MTHFR variants on progressive loss of kidney function. Methods. We analyzed 821 subjects with hypertensive nephrosclerosis from the longitudinal National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases African-American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) Trial to determine whether decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) over ∼4.2 years was predicted by common genetic variation within MTHFR at non-synonymous positions C677T (Ala222Val) and A1298C (Glu429Ala) or by MTHFR haplotypes. The effect on GFR decline was then supported by a study of 1333 subjects from the San Diego Veterans Affairs Hypertension Cohort (VAHC), followed over ∼4.5 years. Linear effect models were utilized to determine both genotype [single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)] and genotype (SNP)-by-time interactions. Results. In AASK, the polymorphism at A1298C predicted the rate of GFR decline: A1298/A1298 major allele homozygosity resulted in a less pronounced decline of GFR, with a significant SNP-by-time interaction. An independent follow-up study in the San Diego VAHC subjects supports that A1298/A1298 homozygotes have the greatest estimated GFR throughout the study. Haplotype analysis with C677T yielded concurring results. Conclusion. We conclude that the MTHFR-coding polymorphism at A1298C is associated with renal decline in African-Americans with hypertensive nephrosclerosis and is supported by a veteran cohort with a primary care diagnosis of hypertension. Further investigation is needed to confirm such findings and to determine what molecular mechanism may contribute to this association. PMID:21613384

  11. From international to zonal trials: the origins of the Nuremberg medical trial.

    PubMed

    Weindling, P

    2000-01-01

    This article examines how plans to have a second International Military Tribunal led to the Medical Trial at Nuremberg. While the British opposed a second international trial because of their distrust of the Soviets, they supported a plan for a series of special zonal trials to be conducted by the American authorities at Nuremberg. In December 1945 the British became aware of the extent of medical war crimes committed by the Germans. Their investigation led to an eventual handover to the Americans of a group of German doctors for trial at Nuremberg. At the same time the British and French Supported an International Scientific Commission for the Investigation of Medical War Crimes.

  12. Marketing and clinical trials: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Francis, David; Roberts, Ian; Elbourne, Diana R; Shakur, Haleema; Knight, Rosemary C; Garcia, Jo; Snowdon, Claire; Entwistle, Vikki A; McDonald, Alison M; Grant, Adrian M; Campbell, Marion K

    2007-01-01

    Background Publicly funded clinical trials require a substantial commitment of time and money. To ensure that sufficient numbers of patients are recruited it is essential that they address important questions in a rigorous manner and are managed well, adopting effective marketing strategies. Methods Using methods of analysis drawn from management studies, this paper presents a structured assessment framework or reference model, derived from a case analysis of the MRC's CRASH trial, of 12 factors that may affect the success of the marketing and sales activities associated with clinical trials. Results The case study demonstrates that trials need various categories of people to buy in – hence, to be successful, trialists must embrace marketing strategies to some extent. Conclusion The performance of future clinical trials could be enhanced if trialists routinely considered these factors. PMID:18028537

  13. More outcomes than trials: a call for consistent data collection across stroke rehabilitation trials.

    PubMed

    Ali, M; English, C; Bernhardt, J; Sunnerhagen, K S; Brady, M

    2013-01-01

    Stroke survivors experience complex combinations of impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions. The essential components of stroke rehabilitation remain elusive. Determining efficacy in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is challenging; there is no commonly agreed primary outcome measure for rehabilitation trials. Clinical guidelines depend on proof of efficacy in RCTs and meta-analyses. However, diverse trial aims, differing methods, inconsistent data collection, and use of multiple assessment tools hinder comparability across trials. Consistent data collection in acute stroke trials has facilitated meta-analyses to inform trial design and clinical practice. With few exceptions, inconsistent data collection has hindered similar progress in stroke rehabilitation research. There is an urgent need for the routine collection of a core dataset of common variables in rehabilitation trials. The European Stroke Organisation Outcomes Working Group, the National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Common Data Elements project, and the Collaborative Stroke Audit and Research project have called for consistency in data collection in stroke trials. Standardizing data collection can decrease study start up times, facilitate data sharing, and inform clinical guidelines. Although achieving consensus on which outcome measures to use in stroke rehabilitation trials is a considerable task, perhaps a feasible starting point is to achieve consistency in the collection of data on demography, stroke severity, and stroke onset to inclusion times. Longer term goals could include the development of a consensus process to establish the core dataset. This should be endorsed by researchers, funders, and journal editors in order to facilitate sustainable change.

  14. [Phase I cancer trials methodology].

    PubMed

    Le Tourneau, Christophe; Faivre, Sandrine; Raymond, Eric; Diéras, Véronique

    2007-11-01

    The main objective of phase I cancer trials is to determine precisely the recommended dose of an anticancer agent as a single agent or in a context of combinations of anticancer agents (including cytotoxic agents, immunotherapy, radiotherapy...), that is administered for the first time in man, to further proceed clinical development with phase II and III trials. The recommended dose must have the greatest efficiency with acceptable toxicity. For the anticancer agents, the ratio risk/benefit is high, since toxicities associated with many cancer therapeutic agents are substantial and because the efficacy is often limited. Thus, phase I cancer trials present unique challenges in comparison to other therapeutic areas. Indeed, it is essential to minimize the numbers of patients treated at subefficient dose levels, and in the same time not to expose the patients to unacceptable toxicity. Historically, the first method that has been used is the Fibonacci escalation. The major problems raised with this method have been the lengths of the trials and the risk to treat substantial numbers of patients at nontherapeutix doses. Thus, novel methods have been then developed modifying the numbers of patients included at each dose level and the rapidity of dose escalation. These methods include pharmacologically guided dose escalation, escalation with overdose control and the continual reassessment method which are both statistically based dose escalation methods, and the accelerated titration designs. Concerning the targeted anticancer therapies, the therapeutic effect on the target, due to their higher specificity, can be obtained using doses that have few toxicity. Using the toxicity to determine the recommended dose for phase II trials, as it is the case for "classical > anticancer agents, does not seem to be sufficient. Alternatives to determine the optimal biological dose include measurement of target inhibition, pharmacokinetic analysis and functional imaging.

  15. [CLINICAL TRIAL DESIGN].

    PubMed

    Morita, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials/research are conducted to examine the clinical questions of practicing physicians. It is important to design trials appropriately in advance, taking their feasibility into account. A randomized, controlled trial is the ultimate design for treatment comparisons at the final confirmatory stage. However, randomized trials do not necessarily provide all answers to clinical questions. This article summarizes fundamental points of clinical trial design and the important role of randomization and contrasts superiority and noninferiority trials. In addition, it focuses on propensity score matching, a useful method to compare two treatment arms, especially in the context where randomization is infeasible. The propensity score-matching method is increasingly used in surgical clinical research.

  16. Design of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Rollo, David; Machado, Sanjay; Ceschin, Mauro

    2010-09-01

    Clinical trial design for nuclear medicine diagnostic imaging radiopharmaceuticals must include a design for preclinical safety studies. These studies should establish that the investigational product (IP) does not have a toxic effect. As a further requirement, radiopharmaceutical clinical trials include a human study (phase 1) that provides biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and radiation dosimetry information. These studies demonstrate to the Food and Drug Administration that the IP either meets or exceeds the toxicology and radiation exposure safety limits. Satisfying this requirement can result in the Food and Drug Administration approving the performance of late-phase (phase 2/3) clinical trials that are designed to validate the clinical efficacy of the diagnostic imaging agent in patients who have a confirmed diagnosis for the intended application. Emphasis is placed on the most typical trial design for diagnostic imaging agents that use a comparator to demonstrate that the new IP is similar in efficacy to an established standard comparator. Such trials are called equivalence, or noninferiority, trials that attempt to show that the new IP is not less effective than the comparator by more than a statistically defined amount. Importantly, the trial design must not inappropriately favor one diagnostic imaging agent over the other. Bias is avoided by the use of a core laboratory with expert physicians who are not involved in the trial for interpreting and objectively scoring the image sets obtained at the clinical trial sites. Clinical trial design must also follow Good Clinical Practice (GCP) guidelines. GCP stipulates the clinical trial process, including protocol and Case Report Form design, analyses planning, as well as analyzing and preparing interim and final clinical trial/study reports.

  17. Neuroprotection trials in Parkinson's disease: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hart, Robert G; Pearce, Lesly A; Ravina, Bernard M; Yaltho, Toby C; Marler, John R

    2009-04-15

    Treatments to slow the progression are a major unmet need in Parkinson's disease. Detailed assessment of randomized trials testing putative neuroprotective drugs was undertaken to inform the design, reporting, and interpretation of future studies. This study is a systematic review of trials testing neuroprotective drugs. Data were extracted independently by two coauthors. Fifteen completed, published trials involving 4,087 participants tested 13 different drugs in 18 double-blind comparisons with placebo. Seven comparisons involving 2,000 subjects assessed MAO-B inhibitors. The primary outcome was change in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score in eight trials and time to need for dopaminergic therapy in seven. Mean participant age was 62 years, 35% were women, the interval from diagnosis to entry averaged 11 months, and the number of participants averaged 272 (largest = 806). Follow-up averaged <16 months in all but two trials. Detailed randomization methods and success of double-blinding were reported in 20% and 13%, respectively. Based on the investigators' conclusions, six trials were interpreted as consistent with a neuroprotective effect, three as negative, and five as either confounded or not meeting criteria for futility. Neuroprotection trials have involved relatively uniform groups of participants early in the clinical disease course, with outcomes weighted heavily toward motor deterioration. Future trials should include participants with wider ranges of disease stages and assess broader neurological outcomes.

  18. Use of a Real-Time Training Software (Laerdal QCPR®) Compared to Instructor-Based Feedback for High-Quality Chest Compressions Acquisition in Secondary School Students: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Cortegiani, Andrea; Russotto, Vincenzo; Montalto, Francesca; Iozzo, Pasquale; Meschis, Roberta; Pugliesi, Marinella; Mariano, Dario; Benenati, Vincenzo; Raineri, Santi Maurizio; Gregoretti, Cesare; Giarratano, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    High-quality chest compressions are pivotal to improve survival from cardiac arrest. Basic life support training of school students is an international priority. The aim of this trial was to assess the effectiveness of a real-time training software (Laerdal QCPR®) compared to a standard instructor-based feedback for chest compressions acquisition in secondary school students. After an interactive frontal lesson about basic life support and high quality chest compressions, 144 students were randomized to two types of chest compressions training: 1) using Laerdal QCPR® (QCPR group- 72 students) for real-time feedback during chest compressions with the guide of an instructor who considered software data for students' correction 2) based on standard instructor-based feedback (SF group- 72 students). Both groups had a minimum of a 2-minute chest compressions training session. Students were required to reach a minimum technical skill level before the evaluation. We evaluated all students at 7 days from the training with a 2-minute chest compressions session. The primary outcome was the compression score, which is an overall measure of chest compressions quality calculated by the software expressed as percentage. 125 students were present at the evaluation session (60 from QCPR group and 65 from SF group). Students in QCPR group had a significantly higher compression score (median 90%, IQR 81.9-96.0) compared to SF group (median 67%, IQR 27.7-87.5), p = 0.0003. Students in QCPR group performed significantly higher percentage of fully released chest compressions (71% [IQR 24.5-99.0] vs 24% [IQR 2.5-88.2]; p = 0.005) and better chest compression rate (117.5/min [IQR 106-123.5] vs 125/min [115-135.2]; p = 0.001). In secondary school students, a training for chest compressions based on a real-time feedback software (Laerdal QCPR®) guided by an instructor is superior to instructor-based feedback training in terms of chest compression technical skill acquisition.

  19. Duration of First Off-Treatment Interval Is Prognostic for Time to Castration Resistance and Death in Men With Biochemical Relapse of Prostate Cancer Treated on a Prospective Trial of Intermittent Androgen Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Evan Y.; Gulati, Roman; Telesca, Donatello; Jiang, Peter; Tam, Stephen; Russell, Kenneth J.; Nelson, Peter S.; Etzioni, Ruth D.; Higano, Celestia S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This was an exploratory analysis of a trial of intermittent androgen deprivation (IAD) in men with biochemical relapse (BR) to establish first cycle characteristics prognostic for progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and death. Patients and Methods Men with BR of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy (RP) or radiation (RT) were treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) comprised of leuprolide and flutamide. After 9 months on treatment, ADT was stopped, and monthly prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were observed during the off-treatment interval. When the PSA reached a threshold value (1 ng/mL for RP, 4 ng/mL for RT), ADT was resumed in a new cycle. Patients were treated intermittently in this manner until CRPC, which was defined as ≥ two consecutive increasing PSA values while on ADT with castrate testosterone levels. Results Seventy-two of 100 patients enrolled onto the study met criteria for this analysis. The duration of the first off-treatment interval (≤ v > 40 weeks) was associated with shorter time to CRPC (hazard ratio = 2.9; 95% CI, 1.1 to 7.7; P = .03) and death (hazard ratio = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.1 to 13.6; P = .04) after adjusting for age, stage, grade, and PSA at diagnosis. Conclusion In patients who completed the first cycle of IAD, a duration of the first off-treatment interval of ≤ 40 weeks defines a subset of patients at higher risk of CRPC and death. Conversely, patients with an off-treatment interval of more than 40 weeks have a significantly better long-term prognosis. PMID:20421544

  20. Accurate Fiber Length Measurement Using Time-of-Flight Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, Osama; Hussein, Hatem

    2016-06-01

    Fiber artifacts of very well-measured length are required for the calibration of optical time domain reflectometers (OTDR). In this paper accurate length measurement of different fiber lengths using the time-of-flight technique is performed. A setup is proposed to measure accurately lengths from 1 to 40 km at 1,550 and 1,310 nm using high-speed electro-optic modulator and photodetector. This setup offers traceability to the SI unit of time, the second (and hence to meter by definition), by locking the time interval counter to the Global Positioning System (GPS)-disciplined quartz oscillator. Additionally, the length of a recirculating loop artifact is measured and compared with the measurement made for the same fiber by the National Physical Laboratory of United Kingdom (NPL). Finally, a method is proposed to relatively correct the fiber refractive index to allow accurate fiber length measurement.

  1. Clinical Trials For Cytoprotection In Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Labiche, Lise A.; Grotta, James C.

    2004-01-01

    Summary: To date, many cytoprotective drugs have reached the stage of pivotal phase 3 efficacy trials in acute stroke patients. (Table 1) Unfortunately, throughout the neuroprotective literature, the phrase “failure to demonstrate efficacy” prevails as a common thread among the many neutral or negative trials, despite the largely encouraging results encountered in preclinical studies. The reasons for this discrepancy are multiple, and have been discussed by Dr. Zivin in his review. Many of the recent trials have addressed deficiencies of the previous ones with more rigorous trial design, including more specific patient selection criteria (ensure homogeneity of stroke location and severity), stratified randomization algorithms (time-to-treat), narrowed therapeutic time-window and pharmacokinetic monitoring. Current trials have also incorporated biologic surrogate markers of toxicity and outcome such as drug levels and neuroimaging. Lastly, multi-modal therapies and coupled cytoprotection/reperfusion strategies are being investigated to optimize tissue salvage. This review will focus on individual therapeutic strategies and we will emphasize what we have learned from these trials both in terms of trial design and the biologic effect (or lack thereof) of these agents. PMID:15717007

  2. Clinical trial structures

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Most errors in clinical trials are a result of poor planning. Fancy statistical methods cannot rescue design flaws. Thus careful planning with clear foresight is crucial. The selection of a clinical trial design structure requires logic and creativity. Common structural designs are discussed. PMID:21423788

  3. Beyond the Randomized Controlled Trial: A Review of Alternatives in mHealth Clinical Trial Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wiljer, David; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have long been considered the primary research study design capable of eliciting causal relationships between health interventions and consequent outcomes. However, with a prolonged duration from recruitment to publication, high-cost trial implementation, and a rigid trial protocol, RCTs are perceived as an impractical evaluation methodology for most mHealth apps. Objective Given the recent development of alternative evaluation methodologies and tools to automate mHealth research, we sought to determine the breadth of these methods and the extent that they were being used in clinical trials. Methods We conducted a review of the ClinicalTrials.gov registry to identify and examine current clinical trials involving mHealth apps and retrieved relevant trials registered between November 2014 and November 2015. Results Of the 137 trials identified, 71 were found to meet inclusion criteria. The majority used a randomized controlled trial design (80%, 57/71). Study designs included 36 two-group pretest-posttest control group comparisons (51%, 36/71), 16 posttest-only control group comparisons (23%, 16/71), 7 one-group pretest-posttest designs (10%, 7/71), 2 one-shot case study designs (3%, 2/71), and 2 static-group comparisons (3%, 2/71). A total of 17 trials included a qualitative component to their methodology (24%, 17/71). Complete trial data collection required 20 months on average to complete (mean 21, SD 12). For trials with a total duration of 2 years or more (31%, 22/71), the average time from recruitment to complete data collection (mean 35 months, SD 10) was 2 years longer than the average time required to collect primary data (mean 11, SD 8). Trials had a moderate sample size of 112 participants. Two trials were conducted online (3%, 2/71) and 7 trials collected data continuously (10%, 7/68). Onsite study implementation was heavily favored (97%, 69/71). Trials with four data collection points had a longer study

  4. Strategy trials: the answer?

    PubMed

    James, J S

    1999-02-19

    Although a significant amount of promotional information on drugs was presented at the 6th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, very little of it was related to practical treatment strategy. Doctors and patients have many options but little guidance on selecting which combination of drugs will be most beneficial in long-term use. There is a growing call for "strategy trials" designed to answer those questions. Pharmaceutical companies traditionally have not done strategy trials; their testing is designed to promote their own products. Managing patients in strategy trials is also difficult because they have to fail a treatment before another combination of drugs is used. In addition, collecting valid data from a stragety trial takes longer than collecting data from a starting regimen trial.

  5. End points and clinical trial design in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Badesch, David B; Delcroix, Marion; Fleming, Thomas R; Gaine, Sean P; Galiè, Nazzareno; Gibbs, J Simon R; Kim, Nick H; Oudiz, Ronald J; Peacock, Andrew; Provencher, Steeve; Sitbon, Olivier; Tapson, Victor F; Seeger, Werner

    2009-06-30

    New and emerging therapies might provide benefit in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Their efficacy and safety will be compared with existing combination therapies in randomized clinical trials. Appropriate end points for these trials need to be identified: these will include exercise testing, the composite end point of time to clinical worsening, and hemodynamic markers, including advanced imaging modalities and biomarkers. Quality-of-life questionnaires are useful and important secondary end points; pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific questionnaires are currently being developed. Advantages and disadvantages of various trial designs, including placebo-controlled monotherapy or add-on trials, noninferiority studies, and withdrawal trials are also discussed.

  6. The ethics of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Nardini, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have prevailed over clinical judgement, case reports, and observational studies and became the gold evidential standard in medicine. Furthermore, during the same time frame, RCTs became a crucial part of the regulatory process whereby a new therapeutic can gain access to the drug market. Today, clinical trials are large and tightly regulated enterprises that have to comply with ethical requirements while maintaining high epistemic standards, a balance that becomes increasingly difficult as the research questions become more sophisticated. In this review, the author will discuss some of the most important ethical issues surrounding RCTs, with an eye to the most recent debates and the context of oncological research in particular. PMID:24482672

  7. The Dynamo Clinical Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2016-04-01

    The Dynamo Clinical Trial evaluates long-term stellar magnetic health through periodic X-ray examinations (by the Chandra Observatory). So far, there are only three subjects enrolled in the DTC: Alpha Centauri A (a solar-like G dwarf), Alpha Cen B (an early K dwarf, more active than the Sun), and Alpha Canis Majoris A (Procyon, a mid-F subgiant similar in activity to the Sun). Of these, Procyon is a new candidate, so it is too early to judge how it will fare. Of the other two, Alpha Cen B has responded well, with a steady magnetic heartbeat of about 8 years duration. The sickest of the bunch, Alpha Cen A, was in magnetic cardiac arrest during 2005-2010, but has begun responding to treatment in recent years, and seems to be successfully cycling again, perhaps achieving a new peak of magnetic health in the 2016 time frame. If this is the case, it has been 20 years since A's last healthful peak, significantly longer than the middle-aged Sun's 11-year magnetic heartbeat, but perhaps in line with Alpha Cen A's more senescent state (in terms of "relative evolutionary age," apparently an important driver of activity). (By the way, don't miss the exciting movie of the Alpha Cen stars' 20-year X-ray dance.)

  8. Practical Issues when Planning for Field Trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Susanne; Andersson, Anna-Lena

    This chapter is written from a test site leader perspective and describes the role of planning and timing of field trials when testing technical solutions, which could enable people with dementia to live a more independent life. The chapter is based on experiences from setting up the first and second field trials in the three test sites of the COGKNOW project. The intention is to point out some key issues that are important in preparation and planning of a field trial. The chapter addresses issues in the preparatory, the actual and the post-test phase of the field trial in order to help achieve a high level of success both from a general perspective and with a special focus on people with dementia.

  9. Polyp Prevention Trial

    Cancer.gov

    The primary objective of the Polyp Prevention Trial (PPT) is to determine whether a low fat, high fiber, high vegetable and fruit eating plan will decrease the recurrence of adenomatous polyps of the large bowel.

  10. TrialNet

    MedlinePlus

    ... If you have T1D in your family, your participation can be the difference. A simple blood test ... through a TrialNet screening and explains how their participation can make a difference in type 1 diabetes ...

  11. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business Congressional Affairs Jobs Benefits Booklet Data & Statistics National ... Participation in any clinical trial is voluntary and choosing not to participate will not affect your VA ...

  12. Anchor Trial Launch

    Cancer.gov

    NCI has launched a multicenter phase III clinical trial called the ANCHOR Study -- Anal Cancer HSIL (High-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion) Outcomes Research Study -- to determine if treatment of HSIL in HIV-infected individuals can prevent anal canc

  13. What Are Clinical Trials?

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatments or to behave in particular ways. A famous example is the Framingham Heart Study. Since 1948, ... each phase have a different purpose and help scientists answer different questions: A Phase I trial tests ...

  14. Rare cancer trial design: lessons from FDA approvals.

    PubMed

    Gaddipati, Himabindu; Liu, Ke; Pariser, Anne; Pazdur, Richard

    2012-10-01

    A systematic analysis of clinical trials supporting rare cancer drug approvals may identify concepts and terms that can inform the effective design of prospective clinical trials for rare cancers. In this article, using annual incidence ≤6 of 100,000 individuals to define "rare cancer," we identified clinical trials for rare cancers, supporting U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) drug approvals for rare cancer indications between December 1987 and May 2011. We characterized each selected trial for study design, sample size, primary efficacy endpoints, and statistical comparisons. We also profiled trials with regard to type of submission, review designation, and approval type. Our results indicated that, of 99 trials that supported the approvals of 45 drugs for 68 rare cancer indications, one third of these trials were randomized; 69% of approvals relied on objective response rate as the primary efficacy endpoint; and 63% were based on a single trial. Drugs granted accelerated approval appeared more likely to be associated with postmarketing safety findings, relative to drugs approved under the regular approval. Data collected across clinical trials were robust: Use of different lower incidence rates in analyzing these trials did not have effects on trial characteristics. The absolute number of drug approvals for rare cancer indications increased markedly over time. We concluded that one third of clinical trials supporting drug approvals for rare cancer indications were randomized, affirming the feasibility and value of randomized trial design to evaluate drugs for rare cancers. Postmarketing safety data may relate to trial design and approval type. An operational definition of "rare cancer" can be useful for the analysis of trial data and for the path toward harmonizing the terminology in the area of clinical research on rare cancers.

  15. Strategies to improve retention in randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Brueton, Valerie C; Tierney, Jayne; Stenning, Sally; Harding, Seeromanie; Meredith, Sarah; Nazareth, Irwin; Rait, Greta

    2013-01-01

    severe symptoms do not return questionnaires or attend a follow-up visit, this will bias the findings of the trial. Many methods are used by researchers to keep people in trials. These encourage people to send back data by questionnaire, return to a clinic or hospital for trial-related tests, or be seen by a health or community care worker. Study characteristics This review identified methods that encouraged people to stay in trials. We searched scientific databases for randomised studies (where people are allocated to one of two or more possible treatments in a random manner) or quasi-randomised studies (where allocation is not really random, e.g. based on date of birth, order in which they attended clinic) that compared methods of increasing retention in trials. We included trials of participants from any age, gender, ethnic, cultural, language and geographic groups. Key results The methods that appeared to work were offering or giving a small amount of money for return of a completed questionnaire and enclosing a small amount of money with a questionnaire with the promise of a further small amount of money for return of a filled in questionnaire. The effect of other ways to keep people in trials is still not clear and more research is needed to see if these really do work. Such methods are shorter questionnaires, sending questionnaires by recorded delivery, using a trial design where people know which treatment they will receive, sending specially designed letters with a reply self addressed stamped envelope followed by a number of reminders, offering a donation to charity or entry into a prize draw, sending a reminder to the study site about participants to follow-up, sending questionnaires close to the time the patient was last followed-up, managing peoples' follow-up, conducting follow-up by telephone and changing the order of questionnaire questions. Quality of evidence The methods that we identified were tested in trials run in many different disease areas and

  16. Central coordination as an alternative for local coordination in a multicenter randomized controlled trial: the FAITH trial experience

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Surgeons in the Netherlands, Canada and the US participate in the FAITH trial (Fixation using Alternative Implants for the Treatment of Hip fractures). Dutch sites are managed and visited by a financed central trial coordinator, whereas most Canadian and US sites have local study coordinators and receive per patient payment. This study was aimed to assess how these different trial management strategies affected trial performance. Methods Details related to obtaining ethics approval, time to trial start-up, inclusion, and percentage completed follow-ups were collected for each trial site and compared. Pre-trial screening data were compared with actual inclusion rates. Results Median trial start-up ranged from 41 days (P25-P75 10-139) in the Netherlands to 232 days (P25-P75 98-423) in Canada (p = 0.027). The inclusion rate was highest in the Netherlands; median 1.03 patients (P25-P75 0.43-2.21) per site per month, representing 34.4% of the total eligible population. It was lowest in Canada; 0.14 inclusions (P25-P75 0.00-0.28), representing 3.9% of eligible patients (p < 0.001). The percentage completed follow-ups was 83% for Canadian and Dutch sites and 70% for US sites (p = 0.217). Conclusions In this trial, a central financed trial coordinator to manage all trial related tasks in participating sites resulted in better trial progression and a similar follow-up. It is therefore a suitable alternative for appointing these tasks to local research assistants. The central coordinator approach can enable smaller regional hospitals to participate in multicenter randomized controlled trials. Circumstances such as available budget, sample size, and geographical area should however be taken into account when choosing a management strategy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00761813 PMID:22225733

  17. UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network’s STOP GAP trial (a multicentre trial of prednisolone versus ciclosporin for pyoderma gangrenosum): protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare inflammatory skin disorder characterised by painful and rapidly progressing skin ulceration. PG can be extremely difficult to treat and patients often require systemic immunosuppression. Recurrent lesions of PG are common, but the relative rarity of this condition means that there is a lack of published evidence regarding its treatment. A systematic review published in 2005 found no randomised controlled trials (RCTs) relating to the treatment of PG. Since this time, one small RCT has been published comparing infliximab to placebo, but none of the commonly used systemic treatments for PG have been formally assessed. The UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network’s STOP GAP Trial has been designed to address this lack of trial evidence. Methods The objective is to assess whether oral ciclosporin is more effective than oral prednisolone for the treatment of PG. The trial design is a two-arm, observer-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial comparing ciclosporin (4 mg/kg/day) to prednisolone (0.75 mg/kg/day). A total of 140 participants are to be recruited over a period of 4 years, from up to 50 hospitals in the UK and Eire. Primary outcome of velocity of healing at 6 weeks is assessed blinded to treatment allocation (using digital images of the ulcers). Secondary outcomes include: (i) time to healing; (ii) global assessment of improvement; (iii) PG inflammation assessment scale score; (iv) self-reported pain; (v) health-related quality of life; (vi) time to recurrence; (vii) treatment failures; (viii) adverse reactions to study medications; and (ix) cost effectiveness/utility. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of PG (excluding granulomatous PG); measurable ulceration (that is, not pustular PG); and patients aged over 18 years old who are able to give informed consent are included in the trial. Randomisation is by computer generated code using permuted blocks of randomly varying size, stratified by

  18. Ethics and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Chassany, O; Duracinský, M

    1999-01-01

    The current reference guideline about ethics in clinical trials is the Declaration of Helsinki of human rights in medical research. Three major principles are emphasised: respect of the patient to accept or not to participate in a trial, the constraints and the presumed risks must be acceptable for patients included in a study, and vulnerable subjects should not participate in studies. The investigator is responsible for obtaining a free and well-informed consent from patients before their inclusion in a study. Where possible, a new drug should always first be compared to placebo in order to prove its superiority. Else, a small-sized trial comparing a new drug versus a reference treatment can lead to an erroneous conclusion of absence of difference. Moreover, good results or improvement are obtained in at least 30% of cases with placebo, whatever the disease. The use of placebo is unethical in life-threatening diseases and when an effective proved drug exists. The use of placebo is ethical in severe diseases with no efficient drug, in some severe diseases even when an active reference treatment is available, and in all moderate and functional diseases. In order to detect flawed studies, most journals now ask for any manuscript submitted and reporting results of a randomised clinical trial to join a checklist in order to verify the quality of the trial. Finally, it remains the responsibility of the doctor to decide whether or not a protocol is ethical, to participate or not and to include patients or not.

  19. Changes in heart rate recovery after high-intensity training in well-trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Lamberts, Robert P; Swart, Jeroen; Noakes, Timothy D; Lambert, Michael I

    2009-03-01

    Heart rate recovery (HRR) after submaximal exercise improves after training. However, it is unknown if this also occurs in already well-trained cyclists. Therefore, 14 well-trained cyclists (VO(2max) 60.3 +/- 7.2 ml kg(-1) min(-1); relative peak power output 5.2 +/- 0.6 W kg(-1)) participated in a high-intensity training programme (eight sessions in 4 weeks). Before and after high-intensity training, performance was assessed with a peak power output test including respiratory gas analysis (VO(2max)) and a 40-km time trial. HRR was measured after every high-intensity training session and 40-km time trial. After the training period peak power output, expressed as W kg(-1), improved by 4.7% (P = 0.000010) and 40-km time trial improved by 2.2% (P = 0.000007), whereas there was no change in VO(2max) (P = 0.066571). Both HRR after the high intensity training sessions (7 +/- 6 beats; P = 0.001302) and HRR after the 40-km time trials (6 +/- 3 beats; P = 0.023101) improved significantly after the training period. Good relationships were found between improvements in HRR(40-km) and improvements in peak power output (r = 0.73; P < 0.0001) and 40-km time trial time (r = 0.96; P < 0.0001). In conclusion, HRR is a sensitive marker which tracks changes in training status in already well-trained cyclists and has the potential to have an important role in monitoring and prescribing training.

  20. Economic advantage of pharmacogenomics - clinical trials with genetic information.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Wataru; Mizushima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the benefit and loss for the pharmaceutical companies when they adopt introducing pharmacogenomics in their clinical trials (in the following description, clinical trials by using pharmacogenomics is called "pgx clinical trial"), that is, when they use genetic information in their clinical trials. Particularly, the benefit for the pharmaceutical companies in terms of following two points is analyzed. 1. Development cost of new drug and period of clinical trial can be reduced because a clinical trial needs less subjects, 2. The new drug can be placed on the market earlier because the development period can be shortened. A survey conducted by Japan Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association revealed that the pharmaceutical companies in Japan are interested in "pgx clinical trial". Specifically, 95% of the member companies (n=19) of the Association replied that the establishment of a guideline for pgx clinical trial by regulatory authorities are highly desirable. However, 65% of them (n=13) also replied that pgx clinical trial is difficult for the time being. It can be concluded that the pharmaceutical companies are positive about pgx clinical trial, but they cannot take a step towards it for several reasons: some of them may be worried their sales for non-responders will be reduced, poor understanding of pgx among the concerned parties, and not matured methodology of pgx clinical trial. This study shows that the advantage of pgx clinical trial outweighs its disadvantage. The sales may decrease because the drug is not used for non-responders, however, the number of subjects necessary for a clinical trial can be reduced, study period can be shortened and the drug can be marketed earlier. Furthermore, adverse events (AE) and adverse drug reactions (ADR) during the clinical trial and post-marketing phase can be markedly reduced. This represents a great benefit for the patients, pharmaceutical companies and the society as a whole.

  1. A licence to vape: Is it time to trial of a nicotine licensing scheme to allow Australian adults controlled access to electronic cigarettes devices and refill solutions containing nicotine?

    PubMed

    Gartner, Coral; Hall, Wayne

    2015-06-01

    Australia has some of the most restrictive laws concerning use of nicotine in e-cigarettes. The only current legal option for Australians to legally possess and use nicotine for vaping is with a medical prescription and domestic supply is limited to compounding pharmacies that prepare medicines for specific patients. An alternative regulatory option that could be implemented under current drugs and poisons regulations is a 'nicotine licensing' scheme utilising current provisions for 'dangerous poisons'. This commentary discusses how such a scheme could be used to trial access to nicotine solutions for vaping outside of a 'medicines framework' in Australia.

  2. DRAW: Dynamic Routes for Arrivals in Weather: Concept and Trial Planning Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Chester

    2016-01-01

    Presentation for FAA sponsored meeting to discuss time-based metering trial planning. This presentation describes the Dynamic Routes for Arrivals in Weather (DRAW) concept and the associated trial planning functionality.

  3. Volunteering for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mirken, B

    1999-04-01

    HIV/AIDS researchers are finding it increasingly difficult to recruit volunteers for their studies, and are working on designing studies that are more broadly applicable and palatable to the volunteers. Studies offer both opportunities and risks for people who volunteer. This overview describes the basics of trial design and practice, with the purposes of each trial phase clearly described. Participation requires informed consent, and before entering a study patients should ask, among other things, what side effects they can expect, and who will manage their treatment.

  4. FDA guidance for ABSSSI trials: implications for conducting and interpreting clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Itani, Kamal M F; Shorr, Andrew F

    2014-01-01

    Recent guidance from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on the conduct of clinical trials for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) has changed the framework for clinical trial design and conduct. Notable changes included new disease state definitions, new primary endpoint definitions and the timing of assessments at these endpoints, and updated guidance on patient inclusion/exclusion criteria. Supportive evidence and statistical justification for the proposed noninferiority margins were described in detail. Although the updated guidelines are still considered drafts and have been adopted in some trials, they serve as the basis for study protocol discussions between pharmaceutical companies and the FDA in advancing the development of promising new agents. Not only will the new trial designs impact researchers and sponsors responsible for drug development programs, but they will also affect healthcare providers participating in clinical trials and the ways in which clinicians develop patient treatment plans based on the results of those trials. This review provides a summary of key changes that will impact future clinical trial design and outcomes.

  5. Application of Time Series Landsat Images to Examining Land-use/Land-cover Dynamic Change

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dengsheng; Hetrick, Scott; Moran, Emilio; Li, Guiying

    2013-01-01

    A hierarchical-based classification method was designed to develop time series land-use/land-cover datasets from Landsat images between 1977 and 2008 in Lucas do Rio Verde, Mato Grosso, Brazil. A post-classification comparison approach was used to examine land-use/land-cover change trajectories, which emphasis is on the conversions from vegetation or agropasture to impervious surface area, from vegetation to agropasture, and from agropasture to regenerating vegetation. Results of this research indicated that increase in impervious surface area mainly resulted from the loss of cerrado in the initial decade of the study period and from loss of agricultural lands in the last two decades. Increase in agropasture was mainly at the expense of losing cerrado in the first two decades and relatively evenly from the loss of primary forest and cerrado in the last decade. When impervious surface area was less than approximately 40 km2 before 1999, impervious surface area was negatively related to cerrado and forest, and positively related to agropasture areas, but after impervious surface area reached 40 km2 in 1999, no obvious relationship exists between them. PMID:25328256

  6. Advancing the educational and career pathway for clinical trials nurses.

    PubMed

    Scott, Kathleen; White, Kathryn; Roydhouse, Jessica K

    2013-04-01

    Clinical trials nurses play a pivotal role in the conduct of clinical research, but the educational and career pathway for these nurses remains unclear. This article reports findings from a survey of nurses working in cancer clinical trials research in Australia. Most participants held postgraduate qualifications (42 of 61); however, clinical trials education was primarily attained through short professional development courses. Interest in pursuing trial-specific postgraduate education was high, but barriers were identified, including cost, time, and unclear benefit for career advancement. Job titles varied substantially, which is indicative of an unclear employment pathway. These findings suggest that initiatives to improve the educational and career pathway for clinical trials nurses are needed and should include the following: formal educational preparation, greater consistency in employment status, and clearer career progression. These strategies should be underpinned by broad professional recognition of the clinical trials nurse as a specialized nursing role.

  7. 32 CFR 935.111 - New trial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS... motion made within a reasonable time after discovery by the moving party of matters constituting the grounds upon which the motion for new trial or vacation of judgment is made....

  8. 32 CFR 935.111 - New trial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS... motion made within a reasonable time after discovery by the moving party of matters constituting the grounds upon which the motion for new trial or vacation of judgment is made....

  9. TBCS/Chameleon Utility Trial Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    mission contexts, different mission tasks, different time pressures and different team roles . For example, the levels of detail to support planning before...predictive value of the results. • the low level of experience in the personnel who played combat team roles in the trial • a single participant at each

  10. Clinical Trials: CSDRG Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logemann, Jeri A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent importance placed upon efficacy research has spawned the development of the Communication Sciences and Disorders Clinical Trials Research Group (CSDRG). This group, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), was organized by the American Speech Language and Hearing Association to address the need for more treatment efficacy research…

  11. EEG activity represents the correctness of perceptual decisions trial-by-trial

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Vazquez, Jose L.; Padrón, Isabel; Fernández-Rey, José; Acuña, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Performance monitoring is an executive function, which we depend on for detecting and evaluating the consequences of our behavior. Although event related potentials (ERPs) have revealed the existence of differences after correct and incorrect decisions, it is not known whether there is a trial-by-trial representation of the accuracy of the decision. We recorded the electroencephalographic activity (EEG) while participants performed a perceptual discrimination task, with two levels of difficulty, in which they received immediate feedback. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analyses were used to reveal two components that convey trial-by-trial representations of the correctness of the decisions. Firstly, the performance monitoring-related negativity (PM-N), a negative deflection whose amplitude is higher (more negative) after incorrect trials. Secondly, the performance monitoring-related positivity (PM-P), a positive deflection whose amplitude is higher after incorrect trials. During the time periods corresponding to these components, trials can be accurately categorized as correct or incorrect by looking at the EEG activity; this categorization is more accurate when based on the PM-P. We further show that the difficulty of the discrimination task has a different effect on each component: after easy trials the latency of the PM-N is shorter and the amplitude of the PM-P is higher than after difficult trials. Consistent with previous interpretations of performance-related ERPs, these results suggest a functional differentiation between these components. The PM-N could be related to an automatic error detection system, responsible for fast behavioral corrections of ongoing actions, while the PM-P could reflect the difference between expected and actual outcomes and be related to long-term changes in the decision process. PMID:24734012

  12. Clinical Trials in Vision Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is a clinical trial? Clinical trials are medical research studies in which people volunteer to participate. A ... or treat an eye disease or disorder. Generally, medical research begins in laboratories. After a treatment shows promise ...

  13. Cooperative Group Trials in the Community Setting

    PubMed Central

    Wade, James Lloyd; Petrelli, Nicholas J.; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 40 years the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has created a vibrant public-private partnership for the implementation of NCI sponsored cooperative group (Network) clinical trials throughout the United States and Canada. Over these four decades, the cancer clinical trials process has become more complex more precise and more resource intensive. During this same time period, financial resources to support the NCI community research initiative have become more constrained. The newest manifestation of NCI sponsored community based cancer clinical trial research, known as the National Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) began initial operation August 1st, 2014. This paper describes several key strategies that community sites may use to not only be successful, but to thrive in this new financially austere research environment. PMID:26433550

  14. Clinical trials for stem cell therapies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, clinical trials with stem cells have taken the emerging field in many new directions. While numerous teams continue to refine and expand the role of bone marrow and cord blood stem cells for their vanguard uses in blood and immune disorders, many others are looking to expand the uses of the various types of stem cells found in bone marrow and cord blood, in particular mesenchymal stem cells, to uses beyond those that could be corrected by replacing cells in their own lineage. Early results from these trials have produced mixed results often showing minor or transitory improvements that may be attributed to extracellular factors. More research teams are accelerating the use of other types of adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells for diseases where beneficial outcome could result from either in-lineage cell replacement or extracellular factors. At the same time, the first three trials using cells derived from pluripotent cells have begun. PMID:21569277

  15. The Trial of Katherine Harrison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Walter W.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan in which the teacher and students participate in a mock trial of Katherine Harrison, who was accused of witchcraft in the seventeenth century. Provides background information about the trial, as well as primary sources of the testimonies given by witnesses during the trial. (CMK)

  16. Bibliography of Mock Trial Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Citizen Education in the Law, Washington, DC.

    This catalog lists general articles on mock trials, information for arranging mock trial competitions, mock trial problem sets, and video tapes. The problem sets contain introductory material, applicable law, statements of facts, witness statements, and documents. The cases include issues in family, consumer, criminal, and immigration law. Several…

  17. [PRIMER FOR SURGICAL CLINICAL TRIALS].

    PubMed

    Sakamaki, Kentaro; Yamanaka, Takeharu

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials are conducted based on the development of surgical technology and are designed to answer specific research questions. In planning clinical trials population, intervention, comparison, and outcome are important elements. Sample size calculation is also central to the design of clinical trials, especially randomized, controlled ones. This article outlines study phases, four important elements of design, and sample size calculation.

  18. PIPELINEs: Creating Comparable Clinical Knowledge Efficiently by Linking Trial Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Shrier, AA; Antonijevic, Z; Beckman, RA; Campbell, RK; Chen, C; Flaherty, KT; Loewy, J; Lacombe, D; Madhavan, S; Selker, HP; Esserman, LJ

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive, seamless, multisponsor, multitherapy clinical trial designs executed as large scale platforms, could create superior evidence more efficiently than single‐sponsor, single‐drug trials. These trial PIPELINEs also could diminish barriers to trial participation, increase the representation of real‐world populations, and create systematic evidence development for learning throughout a therapeutic life cycle, to continually refine its use. Comparable evidence could arise from multiarm design, shared comparator arms, and standardized endpoints—aiding sponsors in demonstrating the distinct value of their innovative medicines; facilitating providers and patients in selecting the most appropriate treatments; assisting regulators in efficacy and safety determinations; helping payers make coverage and reimbursement decisions; and spurring scientists with translational insights. Reduced trial times and costs could enable more indications, reduced development cycle times, and improved system financial sustainability. Challenges to overcome range from statistical to operational to collaborative governance and data exchange. PMID:27643536

  19. Evidence and Clinical Trials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Steven N.

    1989-11-01

    This dissertation explores the use of a mathematical measure of statistical evidence, the log likelihood ratio, in clinical trials. The methods and thinking behind the use of an evidential measure are contrasted with traditional methods of analyzing data, which depend primarily on a p-value as an estimate of the statistical strength of an observed data pattern. It is contended that neither the behavioral dictates of Neyman-Pearson hypothesis testing methods, nor the coherency dictates of Bayesian methods are realistic models on which to base inference. The use of the likelihood alone is applied to four aspects of trial design or conduct: the calculation of sample size, the monitoring of data, testing for the equivalence of two treatments, and meta-analysis--the combining of results from different trials. Finally, a more general model of statistical inference, using belief functions, is used to see if it is possible to separate the assessment of evidence from our background knowledge. It is shown that traditional and Bayesian methods can be modeled as two ends of a continuum of structured background knowledge, methods which summarize evidence at the point of maximum likelihood assuming no structure, and Bayesian methods assuming complete knowledge. Both schools are seen to be missing a concept of ignorance- -uncommitted belief. This concept provides the key to understanding the problem of sampling to a foregone conclusion and the role of frequency properties in statistical inference. The conclusion is that statistical evidence cannot be defined independently of background knowledge, and that frequency properties of an estimator are an indirect measure of uncommitted belief. Several likelihood summaries need to be used in clinical trials, with the quantitative disparity between summaries being an indirect measure of our ignorance. This conclusion is linked with parallel ideas in the philosophy of science and cognitive psychology.

  20. Innovative Clinical Trial Designs

    PubMed Central

    Lavori, Philip W.

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the 20th-century health care system sometimes seemed to be inhospitable to and unmoved by experimental research, its inefficiency and unaffordability have led to reforms that foreshadow a new health care system. We point out certain opportunities and transformational needs for innovations in study design offered by the 21st-century health care system, and describe some innovative clinical trial designs and novel design methods to address these needs and challenges. PMID:26140056

  1. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issues focuses on the following selection of drugs: 4'-Thio-ara-C, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate; ABT-089, AD-237, AF-37702, alvocidib hydrochloride, apricitabine, armodafinil, atrasentan, AVE-5883, avian influenza vaccine, azimilide hydrochloride; Banoxantrone, BIBF-1120; CD34+ cells, certolizumab pegol, CHIR-258, cilansetron, CoFactor, CX-3543, cystemustine; D-003, dexloxiglumide, DMXB-anabaseine; Ecogramostim, elcometrine, elcometrine/ethinylestradiol, etravirine; Fenretinide, fingolimod hydrochloride, fospropofol disodium; Gaboxadol, gestodene, glutamine; Human insulin, hyaluronic acid; Incyclinide, indacaterol, ispronicline, istradefylline; Labradimil, lamifiban, lapatinib, L-arginine hydrochloride, liposomal cisplatin, liposome encapsulated paclitaxel, LY-517717; Manidipine hydrochloride/delapril hydrochloride, maraviroc, MBP(82-98), MD-0727, MDX-214, melanotan I, MMR vaccine; Nacystelyn, nalfurafine hydrochloride, nibentan, nilotinib, NK-105; OBI-1, oblimersen sodium, olmesartan medoxomil, olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide, oregovomab; Pexelizumab, PG-116800, PG-CPT, PHA-794428, prasugrel; RC-3095, rDNA insulin, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, rhEndostatin, rhenium Re-186 etidronate, rhGM-CSF, roflumilast, romidepsin; Sarcosine, SGLU1, SGN-40, succinobucol; TAU, teduglutide, telatinib, tesofensine, tipifarnib, tirapazamine, TKA-731, tolvaptan, trabectedin; Vaccimel, vatalanib succinate, velafermin, vildagliptin, vinflunine; XP-19986; YM-155.

  2. Adaptive trial design: could we use this approach to improve clinical trials in the field of global health?

    PubMed

    Lang, Trudie

    2011-12-01

    We need more clinical trials in the world's poorest regions to evaluate new drugs and vaccines, and also to find better ways to manage health issues. Clinical trials are expensive, time consuming, and cumbersome. However, in wealthier regions these limiting factors are being addressed to make trials less administrative and improve the designs. A good example is adaptive trial design. This innovation is becoming accepted by the regulators and has been taken up by the pharmaceutical industry to reduce product development times and costs. If this approach makes trials easier and less expensive surely we should be implementing this approach in the field of tropical medicine and international health? As yet this has rarely been proposed and there are few examples. There is a need for raising the awareness of these design approaches because they could be used to make dramatic improvements to clinical research in developing countries.

  3. SMi's Conducting Clinical Trials in Europe.

    PubMed

    Jago, Charlotte

    2009-12-01

    The Conducting Clinical Trials in Europe meeting, held in London, included topics covering new developments in the field of clinical trials and recommendations on how to best conduct a trial. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the state of affairs of trials in Europe, conducting trials in emerging markets, strategies for improving trials, trial design options, peri-approval and pediatric trials, and the role of key players, such as physicians. Company perspectives from Pfizer Inc and Nycomed are also included.

  4. Ethical dilemmas in continuing a zidovudine trial after early termination of similar trials.

    PubMed

    Simberkoff, M S; Hartigan, P M; Hamilton, J D; Deykin, D; Gail, M; Bartlett, J G; Feorino, P; Redfield, R; Roberts, R; Collins, D

    1993-02-01

    Ethical dilemmas caused by external events and an interim subset analysis raised concerns about continuing a long-term VA clinical trial comparing early with later zidovudine therapy for symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The first external event was the early termination of other, apparently similar, trials conducted by the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) and the announced clear benefits for the zidovudine-treated patients. Interim analysis of the VA trial at this time did not show similar benefits. Subset analyses were performed to explore factors that might explain the different results. These suggested a difference in response to zidovudine in white and minority groups. The Data Monitoring Board and a special advisory panel reviewed these data and concluded that, since the VA results were neutral overall and the subset analyses based on small numbers, the trial should continue. By conference call, the study cochairmen and biostatistician discussed this decision with study personnel without revealing interim results, and study personnel passed the information on to patients at the participating centers. The second event was in March 1990, when the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved earlier use of zidovudine, which applied to patients still in the VA trial. Patients were asked to reaffirm their participation by signing a new informed consent that explained the findings reported by the ACTG, the FDA-approved revised recommendations, and the rationale for continuation of the VA trial. The consent form emphasized that continued masked therapy was optional and that unmasked treatment and follow-up would be provided to patients requesting it. Seventy-four percent of the participants chose to continue masked therapy. We conclude that when new external data are announced, informed participation in a long-term clinical trial may require a revised consent form and that it is ethical and practical to present this without disclosure of

  5. Systematic Review of Interventional Sickle Cell Trials Registered in Clinicaltrials.gov

    PubMed Central

    Lebensburger, Jeffrey D; Hilliard, Lee M; Pair, Lauren E; Oster, Robert; Howard, Thomas H; Cutter, Gary R

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The registry clinicaltrials.gov was created to provide investigators and patients an accessible database of relevant clinical trials. Methods To understand the state of sickle cell disease (SCD) clinical trials, a comprehensive review of all 174 “closed”, “interventional” sickle cell trials registered at clinicaltrials.gov was completed January 2015. Results The majority of registered SCD clinical trials listed an academic center as the primary sponsor and were an early phase trial. The primary outcome for SCD trials focused on pain (23%), bone marrow transplant (13%), hydroxyurea (8%), iron overload (8%), and pulmonary hypertension (8%). Fifty two trials were listed as terminated or withdrawn including 25 (14% of all trials) terminated for failure to enroll participants. At the time of this review, only 19 trials uploaded results and 29 trials uploaded a manuscript in the clinicaltrials.gov database. A systematic review of pubmed.gov revealed that only 35% of sickle cell studies completed prior to 2014 resulted in an identified manuscript. In comparison, of 80 thalassemia trials registered in clinicaltrials.gov four acknowledged failure to enroll participants as a reason for trial termination or withdrawal and 48 trials (60%) completed prior to 2014 resulted in a currently identified manuscript. Conclusion Clinicaltrials.gov can be an important database for investigators and patients with sickle cell disease to understand the current available research trials. To enhance the validity of the website, investigators must update their trial results and upload trial manuscripts into the database. This study, for the first time, quantifies outcomes of SCD trials and provides support to the belief that barriers exist to successful completion, publication, and dissemination of sickle cell trial results. PMID:26085544

  6. [Internet use in clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Refolo, P; Sacchini, D; Minacori, R; Spagnolo, A G

    2014-01-01

    Recruiting patients is a critical point of today's clinical research and, along the years, several solutions have been proposed, even if their efficacy seems to be doubtful. On the other hand, nowadays, Internet represents a great opportunity for improving clinical trial recruitments. Nevertheless, on-line recruitment services (e-recruitment) could ensure some advantages (such as facilitating interaction between supply and demand of clinical research, time and money savings/optimizations, data entry errors reduction), but also raise some issues (such as those related to sampling, information, consent, real identity of participants and risks for data breaches). The article debates on the difficulties to recruit patients for clinical research, in general, and e-recruitment particularly, discussing some ethical issues raised by internet enrolment.

  7. Non-publication of large randomized clinical trials: cross sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Handler, Lara; Crowell, Karen E; Keil, Lukas G; Weaver, Mark A; Platts-Mills, Timothy F

    2013-01-01

    Objective To estimate the frequency with which results of large randomized clinical trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov are not available to the public. Design Cross sectional analysis Setting Trials with at least 500 participants that were prospectively registered with ClinicalTrials.gov and completed prior to January 2009. Data sources PubMed, Google Scholar, and Embase were searched to identify published manuscripts containing trial results. The final literature search occurred in November 2012. Registry entries for unpublished trials were reviewed to determine whether results for these studies were available in the ClinicalTrials.gov results database. Main outcome measures The frequency of non-publication of trial results and, among unpublished studies, the frequency with which results are unavailable in the ClinicalTrials.gov database. Results Of 585 registered trials, 171 (29%) remained unpublished. These 171 unpublished trials had an estimated total enrollment of 299 763 study participants. The median time between study completion and the final literature search was 60 months for unpublished trials. Non-publication was more common among trials that received industry funding (150/468, 32%) than those that did not (21/117, 18%), P=0.003. Of the 171 unpublished trials, 133 (78%) had no results available in ClinicalTrials.gov. Conclusions Among this group of large clinical trials, non-publication of results was common and the availability of results in the ClinicalTrials.gov database was limited. A substantial number of study participants were exposed to the risks of trial participation without the societal benefits that accompany the dissemination of trial results. PMID:24169943

  8. Seismic model of Mars. 2. Free oscillations and travel times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudkova, Tamara; Lognonne, Philippe; Raevskiy, Sergey; Zharkov, Vladimir

    When constructing an interior structure model of a planet, it is common used method to describe the model by a restricted set of parameters: the thickness of the crust, the location of phase transitions, the core radius. The variation of these parameters originates from the uncertainties in temperature profile, composition, elastic and anelastic properties of relevant minerals. Water content should also be considered as a compositional variable in the mantle. Olivine and its high pressure phases, wadsleyite and ringwoodite are particularly important as they constitute about 60 wt% of the Martian mantle and have probably large capacity for water in the Martian mantle (Zharkov and Gudkova, 2014). At present Mars’ internal density distribution is constrained by the recent estimates of the moment of inertia and the Love number k _{2} (Konoplive et al., 2011). Below we use the data from Earth studies and laboratory data (Mao et al., 2010, 2011, 2012,extrapolated for P-T conditions in Mars, and show how the admixture of water in the main Martian minerals influences velocity drops at phase transition boundaries in Martian interiors and study the effects of hydration on the periods of free oscillations and travel times for P, PcP, S, ScS waves , which could serve as additional constraints, if upcoming seismic experiments are successful, as they can potentially constrain mantle composition and make more precise the location of transition zones. It is of importance to determine the depth of the phase transitions in the mantle, as it will fix the temperature profile in Mars. Our analysis is based on a trial seismic model M14_3 from (Zharkov et al., 2009). The crust is 50 km thick (with density of 2.9 g/cm (3) ), the molar ratio Fe/(Fe+Mg) in the mantle is 0.20, the Fe-Ni core contains 70 mol % H in addition to 14 wt % S with radius of 1800 km. The bulk Fe/Si ratio is close to chondritic 1.7. The upper mantle extends down to 1590 km depth. Olivine-wadsleite transition zone

  9. Problems with registration-directed clinical trials for lung cancer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Ikuo; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Saijo, Nagahiro; Tamura, Tomohide

    2007-09-01

    New anticancer agents against lung cancer are needed because efficacy of chemotherapy is limited. The long time required, low quality, and considerable costs of registration-directed clinical trials in Japan ("Chiken") have been pointed out. The quality of 24 phase I and 41 phase II trials of an anticancer drug for lung cancer were analyzed according to the approval year of the drug. The human resources and infrastructure to support oncology clinical practice and clinical trials were compared between Japan and the USA. A maximum tolerated dose was not defined in any of seven phase I trials before 1989, and was determined in two of six trials between 1989 and 1996 and in seven of 10 trials thereafter. Before 1989, 29 (20%) of 142 patients registered in two trials were ineligible, and the number of ineligible patients was not reported in the five trials. Sample size calculations were not performed in any of seven phase II trials before 1989 and were performed in only four of 10 trials between 1989 and 1996 and in all 23 trials conducted thereafter. The shortage of human resources, including medical oncologists, oncology nurse practitioners and clinical research coordinators, is serious and acute. The infrastructure to support clinical trials also remains insufficient in Japan. In conclusion, registration-directed clinical trials of anticancer agents have advanced significantly during last three decades but remain unsatisfactory. The development of infrastructure and human resources is an urgent task to ensure high-quality clinical trials without unnecessary delays.

  10. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Moral, M A; Tomillero, A

    2008-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131-I-Chlorotoxin, 423557; Abatacept, Ad.Egr.TNF.11D, Adalimumab, AE-941, Ambrisentan, AMR-001, Anacetrapib, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate; BAY-639044, Bazedoxifene acetate, Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam, Bucindolol hydrochloride; Carfilzomib, Carisbamate, CCX-282, CD20Bi, Ceftobiprole, Certolizumab pegol, CF-101, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Cypher; Darifenacin hydrobromide, Degarelix acetate, Denosumab, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dexlansoprazole, Dexverapamil, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Efalizumab, EPs-7630, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib; Fluticasone furoate, Fondaparinux sodium, Fospropofol disodium; Hexadecyloxypropyl-cidofovir, HIV gp120/NefTat/AS02A, HPV-6/11/16/18; INCB-18424, Incyclinide, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin detemir; KNS-760704, KW-0761; Lacosamide, Lenalidomide, Levetiracetam, Licofelone, Lidocaine/prilocaine; mAb 216, MEDI-528, Men ACWY, Meningococcal C-CRM197 vaccine, Methylnaltrexone bromide; Nemifitide ditriflutate, Nicotine conjugate vaccine, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate; Octaparin; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), Pegaptanib octasodium, Pitrakinra, Prasterone, Pregabalin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasagiline mesilate, Retigabine, Rimonabant, RTS,S/AS02D; Sarcosine, Sitaxentan sodium, Solifenacin succinate, Sunitinib malate; Taranabant, Taxus, Teduglutide, Teriparatide, Ticagrelor, Travoprost, TRU-015; USlipristal acetate, Urocortin 2; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate; YM-155, Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Zanolimumab, Zoledronic acid monohydrate, Zotarolimus

  11. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 5-Methyltetrahydrofolate, 9-aminocamptothecin; AdPEDF.11, AE-37, albumin interferon alfa, alicaforsen sodium, alvocidib hydrochloride, AMG-706, arginine butyrate, avanafil, axitinib, azimilide hydrochloride; BAY-579352, belagenpumatucel-L, beta-lapachone, BHT-3009, BIBW-2992, bremelanotide, BX-471; Casopitant mesylate, cediranib, certolizumab pegol, CH-1504, ChimeriVax-West Nile, clofazimine, CpG-7909, curcumin, Cypher; Dapoxetine hydrochloride, darusentan, diflomotecan, D-methionine, dnaJP1, D-serine, DTPw-HB Hib-MenAC, DTPw-HepB-Hib; E-7010, ecogramostim, edodekin alfa, EGFRvlll peptide vaccine, elcometrine, elcometrine/ethinylestradiol, elsilimomab, enrasentan, ertumaxomab, etalocib sodium, exisulind; Fenretinide, fesoterodine, fingolimod hydrochloride, fontolizumab; Gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, ghrelin (human), GV-1001; HTU-PA, human papillomavirus vaccine; Indacaterol, indiplon, interleukin-21, intranasal insulin, irinotecan hydrochloride/floxuridine, ISIS-301012, ispinesib mesylate, ixabepilone; K562/GM-CSF; Lapatinib, L-BLP-25, linezolid, liposome encapsulated paclitaxel, LY-2124275; MC-1, MC-1/lisinopril, MDX-066, melanoma vaccine, MMR-V, multivalent (ACYW) meningitis vaccine; Nilotinib, nobori, nociceptin; Oblimersen sodium, orbofiban acetate, ospemifene; Paliperidone, panitumumab, PEG-filgrastim, PEGylated interferon alfacon-1, perflubutane, pertuzumab, phenserine tartrate, phVEGF-A165, pleconaril, prasugrel, prednisolone sodium metasulfobenzoate; R-411, recombinant malaria vaccine, rhGM-CSF, roflumilast, romidepsin, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate; Sirolimus-eluting stent, SR-4554, St. John

  12. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Know- ledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABI-007, Ad.Egr.TNF.11D, adefovir dipivoxil, AdPEDF.11, AES-14, albumex, alefacept, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, alvimopan hydrate, aAminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anti-IL-12 MAb, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atrasentan, avanafil; Banoxantrone, BG-12, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, caspofungin acetate, CBT-1, ciclesonide, clofarabine, conivaptan hydrochloride, CpG-7909, C-Vax, Cypher; DA-8159, DAC:GLP-1, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin, duloxetine hydrochloride; Eculizumab, efalizumab, efaproxiral sodium, EGF vaccine, eletriptan, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, ETC-642, etoricoxib, everolimus, exenatide; Gefitinib, IV gamma-globulin; Human insulin, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium; IDN-6556, iguratimod, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, ixabepilone; Laquinimod, LB-80380, lidocaine/prilocaineliraglutide, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lucinactant; MAb-14.18, melatonin, MLN-591-DM1; NC-531, neridronic acid, nesiritide, neutrophil-inhibitory factor, niacin/lovastatin; Oblimersen sodium, olcegepant, oral Insulin, ORV-105; Palonosetron hydrochloride, PAmAb, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, pegvisomant, perifosine, pexelizumab, phenoxodiol, phenserine tartrate, pimecrolimus, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PRO-542, prostate cancer vaccine, PT-141; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rDNA insulin, reslizumab, rh-Lactoferrin, ribamidine hydrochloride, rosuvastatin calcium; S-8184l, SC-1, sorafenib, St. John's Wort extract, SU-11248; Taxus, telbivudine, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide

  13. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABX-IL-8, Acclaim, adalimumab, AGI-1067, alagebrium chloride, alemtuzumab, Alequel, Androgel, anti-IL-12 MAb, AOD-9604, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Biphasic insulin aspart, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, brivudine; Cantuzumab mertansine, CB-1954, CDB-4124, CEA-TRICOM, choriogonadotropin alfa, cilansetron, CpG-10101, CpG-7909, CTL-102, CTL-102/CB-1954; DAC:GRF, darbepoetin alfa, davanat-1, decitabine, del-1 Genemedicine, dexanabinol, dextofisopam, dnaJP1, dronedarone hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, eletriptan, emtricitabine, EPI-hNE-4, eplerenone, eplivanserin fumarate, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gepirone hydrochloride; HBV-ISS, HSV-2 theracine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, insulin glargine, ISAtx-247; L612 HuMAb, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine, LL-2113AD, lucinactant, LY-156735; Meclinertant, metelimumab, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide; Natalizumab, nimotuzumab, NX-1207, NYVAC-HIV C; Omalizumab, onercept, osanetant; PABA, palosuran sulfate, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PBI-1402, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, PINC, pregabalin; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride, RO-0098557, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Safinamide mesilate, SHL-749, sitaxsentan sodium, sparfosic acid, SprayGel, squalamine, St. John's Wort

  14. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen; Ad.muIFN-beta AD-237, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, agalsidase alfa, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, ALVAC vCP1452, alvimopan hydrate, ambrisentan, anakinra, anti-IFN-gamma MAb; Bimatoprost, BMS-188797, BMS-214662, bortezomib, bosentan, bovine lactoferrin; Caffeine, canertinib dihydrochloride, canfosfamide hydrochloride, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, cH36, ChimeriVax-JE, ciclesonide, cilansetron, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clopidogrel, CpG-7909, Cypher; Daptomycin, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, decitabine, denufosol tetrasodium, Dexamet, diindolemethane, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, DX-9065a; E-7010, edaravone, efalizumab, eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, elacridar, eletriptan, emtricitabine, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, ezetimibe; Fludarabine, fondaparinux sodium; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, gavestinel sodium, gefitinib, granisetron-Biochronomer; Human Albumin, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, interleukin-2 XL, isatoribine, ISS-1018, i.v. gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lanthanum carbonate, L-arginine hydrochloride, liposomal doxorubicin, LY-450139; Magnesium sulfate, melatonin, motexafin gadolinium, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, nesiritide, niacin/lovastatin; OGX-011, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ospemifene; PACAP38, panitumumab, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, patupilone, pegfilgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b

  15. Supporting patient screening to identify suitable clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bucur, Anca; Van Leeuwen, Jasper; Chen, Njin-Zu; Claerhout, Brecht; De Schepper, Kristof; Perez-Rey, David; Alonso-Calvo, Raul; Pugliano, Lina; Saini, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    To support the efficient execution of post-genomic multi-centric clinical trials in breast cancer we propose a solution that streamlines the assessment of the eligibility of patients for available trials. The assessment of the eligibility of a patient for a trial requires evaluating whether each eligibility criterion is satisfied and is often a time consuming and manual task. The main focus in the literature has been on proposing different methods for modelling and formalizing the eligibility criteria. However the current adoption of these approaches in clinical care is limited. Less effort has been dedicated to the automatic matching of criteria to the patient data managed in clinical care. We address both aspects and propose a scalable, efficient and pragmatic patient screening solution enabling automatic evaluation of eligibility of patients for a relevant set of trials. This covers the flexible formalization of criteria and of other relevant trial metadata and the efficient management of these representations.

  16. Reducing trial length in force platform posturographic sleep deprivation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsman, P.; Hæggström, E.; Wallin, A.

    2007-09-01

    Sleepiness correlates with sleep-related accidents, but convenient tests for sleepiness monitoring are scarce. The posturographic test is a method to assess balance, and this paper describes one phase of the development of a posturographic sleepiness monitoring method. We investigated the relationship between trial length and accuracy of the posturographic time-awake (TA) estimate. Twenty-one healthy adults were kept awake for 32 h and their balance was recorded, 16 times with 30 s trials, as a function of TA. The balance was analysed with regards to fractal dimension, most common sway amplitude and time interval for open-loop stance control. While a 30 s trial allows estimating the TA of individual subjects with better than 5 h accuracy, repeating the analysis using shorter trial lengths showed that 18 s sufficed to achieve the targeted 5 h accuracy. Moreover, it was found that with increasing TA, the posturographic parameters estimated the subjects' TA more accurately.

  17. Advances in designs for Alzheimer's disease clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Gould, Heath; Zhong, Kate

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify new treatments for the rapidly growing population of people with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Innovations in clinical trial designs many help to reduce development time, provide more definitive answers regarding drug efficacy, and facilitate prioritizing compounds to be advanced to Phase III clinical trials. Standard designs compare drug and placebo changes from baseline on a rating scale. Baysian adaptive clinical trials allow the use of data collected in the trial to modify doses, sample size, trial duration, and entry criteria in an ongoing way as the data are collected. Disease-modification is supported by findings on staggered start and delayed withdrawal designs. Futility designs can use historical controls and may shorten trial duration. Combination therapy designs may allow investigation of additive or synergistic treatment effects. Novel trial selection criteria allow investigation of treatment effects in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic, prodromal AD populations. The Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SOB) can be considered as a single trial outcome in early disease populations. Alternate forms of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Portion (ADAS-cog), computerized measures, and pharmacoeconomic scales provide new and relevant information on drug effects. Comparative dose strategies are used in trials of symptomatic agents, and novel methods including withdrawal designs, symptom emergence analyses, and sequential designs are being utilized to assess the efficacy of putative psychotropic agents. The choice of trial design is driven by the question to be answered by the clinical trial; an increasing number of design approaches are available and may be useful in accelerating and refining AD drug development.

  18. Advances in designs for Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Gould, Heath; Zhong, Kate

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify new treatments for the rapidly growing population of people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Innovations in clinical trial designs many help to reduce development time, provide more definitive answers regarding drug efficacy, and facilitate prioritizing compounds to be advanced to Phase III clinical trials. Standard designs compare drug and placebo changes from baseline on a rating scale. Baysian adaptive clinical trials allow the use of data collected in the trial to modify doses, sample size, trial duration, and entry criteria in an ongoing way as the data are collected. Disease-modification is supported by findings on staggered start and delayed withdrawal designs. Futility designs can use historical controls and may shorten trial duration. Combination therapy designs may allow investigation of additive or synergistic treatment effects. Novel trial selection criteria allow investigation of treatment effects in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic, prodromal AD populations. The Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SOB) can be considered as a single trial outcome in early disease populations. Alternate forms of the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Portion (ADAS-cog), computerized measures, and pharmacoeconomic scales provide new and relevant information on drug effects. Comparative dose strategies are used in trials of symptomatic agents, and novel methods including withdrawal designs, symptom emergence analyses, and sequential designs are being utilized to assess the efficacy of putative psychotropic agents. The choice of trial design is driven by the question to be answered by the clinical trial; an increasing number of design approaches are available and may be useful in accelerating and refining AD drug development. PMID:23383393

  19. A Model-Based Approach to Trial-By-Trial P300 Amplitude Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Kolossa, Antonio; Fingscheidt, Tim; Wessel, Karl; Kopp, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the amplitude of the P300 component of event-related brain potentials is sensitive to the degree to which eliciting stimuli are surprising to the observers (Donchin, 1981). While Squires et al. (1976) showed and modeled dependencies of P300 amplitudes from observed stimuli on various time scales, Mars et al. (2008) proposed a computational model keeping track of stimulus probabilities on a long-term time scale. We suggest here a computational model which integrates prior information with short-term, long-term, and alternation-based experiential influences on P300 amplitude fluctuations. To evaluate the new model, we measured trial-by-trial P300 amplitude fluctuations in a simple two-choice response time task, and tested the computational models of trial-by-trial P300 amplitudes using Bayesian model evaluation. The results reveal that the new digital filtering (DIF) model provides a superior account of the trial-by-trial P300 amplitudes when compared to both Squires et al.’s (1976) model, and Mars et al.’s (2008) model. We show that the P300-generating system can be described as two parallel first-order infinite impulse response (IIR) low-pass filters and an additional fourth-order finite impulse response (FIR) high-pass filter. Implications of the acquired data are discussed with regard to the neurobiological distinction between short-term, long-term, and working memory as well as from the point of view of predictive coding models and Bayesian learning theories of cortical function. PMID:23404628

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses, which has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the world's first drug discovery and development portal, providing information on study design, treatments, conclusions and references. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate; abciximab; abetimus sodium; adalimumab; aldesleukin; almotriptan; alteplase; amisulpride; amitriptyline hydrochloride; amoxicillin trihydrate; atenolol; atorvastatin calcium; atrasentan; Beclometasone dipropionate; bosentan; Captopril; ceftriaxone sodium; cerivastatin sodium; cetirizine hydrochloride; cisplatin; citalopram hydrobromide; Dalteparin sodium; darusentan; desirudin; digoxin; Efalizumab; enoxaparin sodium; ertapenem sodium; esomeprazole magnesium; estradiol; ezetimibe; Famotidine; farglitazar; fluorouracil; fluticasone propionate; fosamprenavir sodium; Glibenclamide; glucosamine sulfate; Heparin sodium; HSPPC-96; hydrochlorothiazide; Imatinib mesilate; implitapide; Lamivudine; lansoprazole; lisinopril; losartan potassium; l-Propionylcarnitine; Melagatran; metformin hydrochloride; methotrexate; methylsulfinylwarfarin; Nateglinide; norethisterone; Olmesartan medoxomil; omalizumab; omapatrilat; omeprazole; oseltamivir phosphate; oxatomide; Pantoprazole; piperacillin sodium; pravastatin sodium; Quetiapine hydrochloride; Rabeprazole sodium; raloxifene hydrochloride; ramosetron hydrochloride; ranolazine; rasburicase; reboxetine mesilate; recombinant somatropin; repaglinide; reteplase; rosiglitazone; rosiglitazone maleate; rosuvastatin calcium; Sertraline; simvastatin; sumatriptan succinate; Tazobactam sodium; tenecteplase; tibolone; tinidazole; tolterodine tartrate; troglitazone; Uniprost; Warfarin sodium; Ximelagatran.

  1. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-05-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables can be retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, abarelix, abciximab, acarbose, alefacept, alteplase, amisulpride, amoxicillin trihydrate, apomorphine hydrochloride, aprepitant, argatroban monohydrate, aspirin, atenolol; Betamethasone dipropionate, betamethasone valerate, bicalutamide, bleomycin sulfate; Calcium carbonate, candesartan cilexetil, celecoxib, cetirizine hydrochloride, cisplatin, clarithromycin, clavulanate potassium, clomethiazole edisilate, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, cyclophosphamide, chorionic gonadotropin (human); Dalteparin sodium, desloratadine, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, DPC-083; Efalizumab, efavirenz, enoxaparin sodium, eprosartan mesilate, etanercept, etoposide, ezetimibe; Faropenem daloxate, fenofibrate, fluocinolone acetonide, flutamide, fluvastatin sodium, follitropin beta, fondaparinux sodium; Gabapentin, glibenclamide, goserelin, granisetron hydrochloride; Haloperidol, hydrochlorothiazide; Imiquimod, interferon beta-1a, irbesartan, iseganan hydrochloride; L-758298, lamivudine, lanoteplase, leflunomide, leuprorelin acetate, loratadine, losartan potassium; Melagatran, metformin hydrochloride, methotrexate, metronidazole, micafungin sodium, mitoxantrone hydrochloride; Nelfinavir mesilate, neutral insulin injection, nizatidine; Olopatadine hydrochloride, omeprazole, ondansetron hydrochloride; Pamidronate sodium, paracetamol, paroxetine hydrochloride, perindopril, pimecrolimus, pioglitazone hydrochloride, piroxicam, pleconaril, pralmorelin, pravastatin sodium, prednisolone, prednisone, propofol; Raloxifene hydrochloride, ranpirnase, remifentanil hydrochloride, risedronate sodium, risperidone, rofecoxib, ropinirole

  2. The Styx field trial

    PubMed Central

    Gemmell, M. A.

    1968-01-01

    An assessment was made of the effectiveness of the generally accepted methods recommended for controlling hydatid disease during the course of a field-trial, initiated in 1943 in an isolated region of New Zealand. The results obtained during the first 21 years are described. Basically, the trial was an attempt to compare the effectiveness of a general public health educational programme and an anthelmintic programme using arecoline hydrobromide for treatment of dogs with that of a specific educational programme using this compound as a diagnostic agent. Arecoline hydrobromide was found to be too uncertain in its action to be of practical value as an anthelmintic. The development of diagnostic techniques, described in this paper, made it possible to use the compound for diagnostic purposes and thus for educational purposes, since each dog could be examined for tapeworms in the presence of the owner. Using changes in the annual prevalence rate in sheep of the cysts of E. granulosus and those of T. hydatigena as the principal indicators, the conclusion has been reached that the specific diagnostic approach achieved more success than the general educational and treatment programme. The principal reason for this appears to be that the former approach induced a greater awareness in owners of the need for strict management to prevent dogs gaining access to infective raw offal than that stimulated in the community when the dogs were dosed but not examined. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:5303843

  3. [Multinational clinical trial in Japan and Korea on detrusitol].

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Yukio

    2009-02-01

    A randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active comparator-controlled study was conducted in 69 centers to compare detrusitol and oxybutynin with placebo in Japanese and Korean patients with an overactive bladder (OAB). Detrusitol had similar efficacy but was better tolerated than oxybutynin in Japanese and Korean patients with OAB. The study result was acknowledged as pivotal data in the clinical data package when NDA was filed and successfully approved both in Japan and Korea. Some differences were found in the efficacy and safety of the drug between the Japanese and Korean data, though. We therefore investigated the differences through stratified analysis; however exact causes could not be identified. This study is positioned as a first multinational clinical trial conducted in East Asia. From the aspects of utilization of interoperable data obtained from such multinational clinical trials for NDA filing and earliest possible registration of drugs in the participating countries, we believe it is important to accumulate more experiences in conducting multinational clinical trials. At this time, it is our prime task to minimize the "drug lag" in Japan; I think improving the speed of clinical trials is one of the factors to solve the issue. Global clinical trials involving Western and Asian countries make it possible to use the study data effectively and commonly in many countries. Moreover, from the viewpoint of revitalization of clinical trials, conducting global clinical trials is critically important; so we intend to continue accumulation of our experiences in global clinical trials.

  4. Antiepileptic drug trials: the view from the clinic.

    PubMed

    Faught, Edward

    2012-06-01

    A golden age of antiepileptic drug development has yielded over a dozen useful new compounds, but the nature of clinical trials has made translation to practical use in the clinic difficult. Most clinical trials are designed for regulatory purposes and fail to answer critical clinical questions. These questions include: which drug is best as initial therapy, which drugs work as monotherapy, what are good drug combinations, what is the best starting dose and titration schedule, what is a reasonable target dose, what is the shape of the dose-response curve and does it vary significantly between patients, what is the true incidence of side effects, and what is the long-term efficacy of the drug? Most of these questions could be answered by changing trial designs, but many changes would entail additional time and money. There are encouraging signs that trials with procedures more directly applicable to the clinic are becoming common. These include direct comparative trials, longer trials with emphasis on seizure freedom, and trials with more flexible dosing schedules. In the past, funding of longer and more naturalistic trials has fallen to government agencies, but commercial funding has been obtained for several recent studies. Better quality control, innovative endpoints, structured searching for side effects, and standardisation of data collection are also promising topics for development.

  5. Clinical trial designs for therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Simon, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines have characteristics that require a new paradigm for phase I and phase II clinical development. Effective development plans may take advantage of some of the following observations: Dose ranging safety trials are not appropriate for many cancer vaccines. Dose ranging trials to establish an optimal biologic dose are often not practical. We have presented an efficient design of Korn et al. (4) to identify an immunogenic dose. Vaccine efficacy can be efficiently evaluated with tumor response as endpoint utilizing a two stage design with only 9 patients in the first stage. If no partial or complete responses are observed in the initial 9 patients, accrual to the trial is terminated. Optimization of vaccine delivery by comparing results of single arm phase II studies using immunological response as endpoint is problematic because of assay variation and potential non-comparability of patients in different studies. Randomized screening studies can be used to efficiently optimize vaccine immunogenicity. Efficiency in use of patients depends on having assay variation and inter-patient variability small relative to the difference in immunogenicity to be detected. Phase II studies using time to progression as endpoint are most interpretable if they employ randomized designs with a no-vaccine control group. Such designs may use an inflated type 1 error rate, and need not be prohibitively large if patients with rapidly progressive disease are studied. Interim monitoring plans may effectively limit the size of the trials by terminating accrual early when results are not consistent with the targeted improvement.

  6. Shoulder Arthroplasty Trials Are Infrequently Registered: A Systematic Review of Trials

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Zachary Carter; Herrington, James Murphy; Hensel, James Barrett; Henning, Nolan Michael; Scheckel, Caleb Josiah; Vassar, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With the intent of improving transparency in clinical research, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) established guidelines in 2005 regarding prospective clinical trial registration. This action worked to address bias related to selective outcome reporting in the medical literature. The objective of this study was to assess and characterize the quality of registration of clinical trials appearing in shoulder arthroplasty-related medical journals. Methods All randomized trials involving human subjects, pertaining to shoulder arthroplasty, published between July 1, 2005 and December 31, 2015, and indexed in either PubMed or SportDISCUS were analyzed. We assessed the prevalence of registration, the timing of registration relative to patient enrollment periods, and the variable rates of orthopedic journal compliance with ICMJE and Food and Drug Administration clinical registration standards for our study. Results Of the 382 articles identified, 345 (90.3%) were excluded due to failure to meet inclusion criteria. From the remaining 37, only 12 (32.4%) studies were found to be registered in a trial registry. Ten (10/12, 83.3%) of these provided their registration information within the body of the article. None of the included studies from ICMJE-recognized journals were registered. From 34 included studies from non-ICMJE recognized journals, 12 (35.3%) were registered. Conclusion The level of compliance with clinical trial registration guidelines in the decade since their release among shoulder arthroplasty trials in orthopedic journals is poor. Given the importance of the issue, the prevalence of the problem, and the fact that many other medical specialties have already made efforts to improve ICMJE compliance, further work on the part of orthopedic surgery journal authors and editors is needed to ensure the publication of unbiased results. Trial Registration UMIN000022487 PMID:27764210

  7. The challenges and opportunities of conducting a clinical trial in a low resource setting: the case of the Cameroon mobile phone SMS (CAMPS) trial, an investigator initiated trial.

    PubMed

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Thabane, Lehana; Ongolo-Zogo, Pierre; Lang, Trudie

    2011-06-09

    Conducting clinical trials in developing countries often presents significant ethical, organisational, cultural and infrastructural challenges to researchers, pharmaceutical companies, sponsors and regulatory bodies. Globally, these regions are under-represented in research, yet this population stands to gain more from research in these settings as the burdens on health are greater than those in developed resourceful countries. However, developing countries also offer an attractive setting for clinical trials because they often have larger treatment naive populations with higher incidence rates of disease and more advanced stages. These factors can present a reduction in costs and time required to recruit patients. So, balance needs to be found where research can be encouraged and supported in order to bring maximum public health benefits to these communities. The difficulties with such trials arise from problems with obtaining valid informed consent, ethical compensation mechanisms for extremely poor populations, poor health infrastructure and considerable socio-economic and cultural divides. Ethical concerns with trials in developing countries have received attention, even though many other non-ethical issues may arise. Local investigator initiated trials also face a variety of difficulties that have not been adequately reported in literature. This paper uses the example of the Cameroon Mobile Phone SMS trial to describe in detail, the specific difficulties encountered in an investigator-initiated trial in a developing country. It highlights administrative, ethical, financial and staff related issues, proposes solutions and gives a list of additional documentation to ease the organisational process.

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com.This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABT-263, AC-2307, Aclidinium bromide, Adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, Agatolimod sodium, Alefacept, Aliskiren fumarate, Aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Anakinra, Apaziquone, Aprepitant, Aripiprazole, ASM-8, Atiprimod hydrochloride, AVE-0277, AVE-1642, AVE-8062, Axitinib, Azacitidine, AZD-0530; Bazedoxifene acetate, Bevacizumab, Bexarotene, BI-2536, Biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-387032, BMS-663513, Bortezomib, BQ-123, Brivanib alaninate, BSI-201; Caspofungin acetate, CDX-110, Cetuximab, Ciclesonide, CR-011, Cypher; Daptomycin, Darbepoetin alfa, Dasatinib, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Denosumab, Dexlansoprazole, Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, DNA-Hsp65 vaccine, Dovitinib, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hibvaccine, DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Ecogramostim, Elacytarabine, Emtricitabine, Endothelin, Entecavir, Eplivanserin fumarate, Escitalopram oxalate, Everolimus, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Farletuzumab, Fesoterodine fumarate, Fibrin sealant (human), Fulvestrant; Gefitinib, Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, Glufosfamide, GSK-1562902A; Hib-TT; Imatinib mesylate, IMC-11F8, Imidazoacridinone, IMP-321, INCB-18424, Indiplon, Indisulam, INNO-406, Irinotecan hydrochloride/Floxuridine, ITF-2357, Ixabepilone; KRN-951; Lasofoxifene tartrate; Lenalidomide, LGD-4665, Lonafarnib, Lubiprostone, Lumiliximab; MDX-1100, Melan-A/MART-1/gp100/IFN-alfa, Methyl-CDDO, Metreleptin, MLN-2704, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Na-ASP-2, Naproxcinod, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate, NPI-2358; Oblimersen sodium, Odanacatib; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, PAN-811, Panobinostat, PBI-1402, PC-515, Peginterferon alfa

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131I-labetuzumab; Abacavir sulfate, abatacept, adalimumab, ademetionine, adjuvanted influenza vaccine, alefacept, alemtuzumab, amlodipine, amphotericin B, anakinra, aripiprazole, aspirin, axitinib; Betamethasone dipropionate, bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123; Calcium folinate, canertinib dihydrochloride, carboplatin, carmustine, cetirizine hydrochloride, cetuximab, cholecalciferol, ciclesonide, ciclosporin, cinacalcet hydrochloride, cisplatin, clarithromycin, clofazimine, cold-adapted influenza vaccine trivalent, CpG-7909; Darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, DB-289, desloratadine, Dexamet, dicycloverine hydrochloride, dimethyl fumarate, docetaxel, dolastatin 10, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, edotecarin, efaproxiral sodium, enalapril maleate, epoetin beta, epoprostenol sodium, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, estradiol, etanercept; Fluconazole, fludarabine phosphate, fluorouracil; Gefitinib, gemcitabine, Ghrelin (human), glibenclamide, glimepiride, GTI-2040; Haloperidol, human insulin, hydrocortisone probutate; Imatinib mesylate, indisulam, influenza vaccine, inhaled insulin, insulin aspart, insulin glulisine, insulin lispro, irinotecan, ispronicline; Lamivudine, lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, lapatinib, letrozole, levocetirizine, lomustine, lonafarnib, lumiracoxib;Magnesium sulfate, MD-1100, melphalan, metformin hydrochloride, methotrexate, metoclopramide hydrochloride, mitiglinide calcium hydrate, monophosphoryl lipid A, montelukast sodium, motexafin gadolinium

  10. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate; ACP-103, Ad.Egr.TNF.11 D, adalimumab, AF-IL 12, AIDSVAX gp120 B/B, alefacept, alemtuzumab, a-Galactosylceramide, ALVAC vCP 1452, alvimopan hydrate, alvocidib hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anidulafungin, antarelix, aprepitant, aripiprazole, arsenic sulfide, asoprisnil, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bimatoprost, BMS-184476, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BrachySil, brivudine; Caffeine, calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cannabidiol, capsaicin for injection, caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, cetuximab, CGP-36742, clofazimine, CpG-7909, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, dimethylfumarate, dronabinol/cannabidiol, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, efalizumab, eletriptan, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, eplerenone, esomeprazole magnesium, estradiol acetate, eszopiclone, etoricoxib, exenatide, ezetimibe, ezetimibe/simvastatin; Fampridine, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; Gefitinib, GPI-0100; hA 20, HTU-PA, human insulin, HuOKT 3 gamma 1(Ala 234-Ala 235), hyaluronic acid; Icatibant, imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, INKP-100, INKP-102, iodine (I131) tositumomab, istradefylline, IV gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lacosamide, landiolol, lanthanum carbonate, lasofoxifene tartrate, LB-80380, lenalidomide, lidocaine/tetracaine, linezolid, liposomal doxorubicin, liposomal vincristine sulfate, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan; Maribavir, morphine glucuronide, MVA-5 T

  11. Learning from recent trials and shaping the future of acute heart failure trials

    PubMed Central

    Mentz, Robert J.; Felker, Gary Michael; Ahmad, Tariq; Peacock, William Frank; Pitt, Bertram; Fiuzat, Mona; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Ando, Yuki; Pocock, Stuart J.; Zannad, Faiez; O’Connor, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    The last decade of acute heart failure (HF) research is characterized by disappointments in large phase 2 and 3 pharmacologic studies of therapeutics including calcium-sensitizing agents and antagonists of endothelin, vasopressin, and adenosine. As a result, pharmacologic management for acute HF has changed little in recent years, and adverse event rates remain higher than in chronic HF. Despite neutral results in many acute HF trials, recent studies including RELAX-AHF, ASTRONAUT, and PRONTO have highlighted the role of appropriate timing of patient enrollment, targeting the “right” patients, and selecting appropriate end points and sites. We describe lessons learned from recent trials in acute HF and outline strategies to improve the potential for success in future trials. This review is based on discussions between scientists, clinical trialists, and regulatory representatives at the 9th Global Cardio Vascular Clinical Trialists Forum in Paris, France, from November 30 to December 1, 2012. PMID:24093841

  12. The Internet and Clinical Trials: Background, Online Resources, Examples and Issues

    PubMed Central

    Seib, Rachael; Prescott, Todd

    2005-01-01

    Both the Internet and clinical trials were significant developments in the latter half of the twentieth century: the Internet revolutionized global communications and the randomized controlled trial provided a means to conduct an unbiased comparison of two or more treatments. Large multicenter trials are often burdened with an extensive development time and considerable expense, as well as significant challenges in obtaining, backing up and analyzing large amounts of data. Alongside the increasing complexities of the modern clinical trial has grown the power of the Internet to improve communications, centralize and secure data as well as to distribute information. As more and more clinical trials are required to coordinate multiple trial processes in real time, centers are turning to the Internet for the tools to manage the components of a clinical trial, either in whole or in part, to produce lower costs and faster results. This paper reviews the historical development of the Internet and the randomized controlled trial, describes the Internet resources available that can be used in a clinical trial, reviews some examples of online trials and describes the advantages and disadvantages of using the Internet to conduct a clinical trial. We also extract the characteristics of the 5 largest clinical trials conducted using the Internet to date, which together enrolled over 26000 patients. PMID:15829477

  13. The Internet and clinical trials: background, online resources, examples and issues.

    PubMed

    Paul, James; Seib, Rachael; Prescott, Todd

    2005-03-16

    Both the Internet and clinical trials were significant developments in the latter half of the twentieth century: the Internet revolutionized global communications and the randomized controlled trial provided a means to conduct an unbiased comparison of two or more treatments. Large multicenter trials are often burdened with an extensive development time and considerable expense, as well as significant challenges in obtaining, backing up and analyzing large amounts of data. Alongside the increasing complexities of the modern clinical trial has grown the power of the Internet to improve communications, centralize and secure data as well as to distribute information. As more and more clinical trials are required to coordinate multiple trial processes in real time, centers are turning to the Internet for the tools to manage the components of a clinical trial, either in whole or in part, to produce lower costs and faster results. This paper reviews the historical development of the Internet and the randomized controlled trial, describes the Internet resources available that can be used in a clinical trial, reviews some examples of online trials and describes the advantages and disadvantages of using the Internet to conduct a clinical trial. We also extract the characteristics of the 5 largest clinical trials conducted using the Internet to date, which together enrolled over 26000 patients.

  14. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Soluble biomarker assessments in clinical trials in osteoarthritis.