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Sample records for 405-nm diode laser

  1. Surgical effects on soft tissue produced by a 405-nm violet diode laser in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, H.; Kato, J.; Kawai, S.; Hatayama, H.; Uchida, K.; Otsuki, M.; Tagami, J.; Yokoo, S.

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluated the surgical performance of a 405-nm diode laser in vivo, using living rat liver tissue. Tissue was incised by irradiation with the laser at low output power ranging from 1 W (722 W/cm2) to 3 W (2165 W/cm2) on a manual control at a rate of 1 mm/s. As a control, incisions using a stainless scalpel were compared. Immediately after operation, the surface of the incisions was macroscopically observed and histopathologically evaluated by microscopy. Laser-ablated liver tissue was smooth with observable signs of remnant carbonization and easily acquired hemostasis. The thickness of the denatured layer increased in proportion to the output power; the coagulation layer did not thicken accordingly. Bleeding could not be stopped for tissues incised with the stainless scalpel. The 405-nm diode laser thus proved to be effective for ablating soft tissue with high hemostatic ability at low power.

  2. Characterization of AlInGaN-based 405nm distributed feedback laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masui, S.; Tsukayama, K.; Yanamoto, T.; Kozaki, T.; Nagahama, S.; Mukai, T.

    2008-02-01

    The first-order AlInGaN 405 nm distributed feed-back (DFB) laser diodes were grown on the low dislocation freestanding GaN substrates by a metal organic chemical vapor deposition method. The first-order diffractive grating whose period was 80 nm was formed into an n-type cladding layer. The fine tooth shape grating was obtained by the EB lithography and the dry etching. No additional threading dislocation could be found at the regrowth interface. As a result, we succeeded in demonstrating the first-order AlInGaN based 405 nm DFB laser diodes under cw operation. The threshold current and the slope efficiency were 22 mA and 1.44 W/A under continuous wave operation at 25 °C, respectively. The single longitudinal mode emission was maintained up to an output power of 60 mW. The fundamental transverse mode operation with a single longitudinal mode was observed in the temperature range from 15 °C to 85 °C at an output power of 30 mW. The lifetime was estimated to be 4000 h by the lifetime test which was carried out under the condition of a constant output power of 30mW at 25 °C for 1000 h. The single longitudinal mode emission was maintained for the life tested DFB laser diodes.

  3. Bleaching effect of a 405-nm diode laser irradiation used with titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, K.; Kato, J.; Nakazawa, T.; Hirai, Y.

    2007-09-01

    A 405-nm diode laser has recently been developed for soft tissue problems in dentistry. A new in-office bleaching agent consisting of a titanium dioxide photocatalyst and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide has proven to react well with light irradiated at a wavelength of around 400 nm. In this study, we evaluated the bleaching efficacy of a newly developed 405-nm diode laser on bovine teeth treated with a bleaching agent composed of titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide. Sixteen bovine incisors were randomly divided into two groups: Group A, irradiated by the 405-nm diode laser at 200 mW; Group B, irradiated by the 405-nm diode laser at 400 mW. The bleaching agent with titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide was applied to bovine enamel and irradiated for 1 min. The specimens were then washed and dried, and the same procedure was repeated nine more times. After irradiation, we assessed the effects of bleaching on the enamel by measuring the color of the specimens with a spectrophotometer and examining the enamel surfaces with a scanning electron microscope. L* rose to a high score, reaching a significantly higher post-treatment level in comparison to pretreatment. In a comparison of the color difference (Δ E) between Group A and Group B, the specimens in Group B showed significantly higher values after 10 min of irradiation for the post-treatment. No remarkable differences in the enamel surface morphology were found between the unbleached and bleached enamel. The use of a 405-nm diode laser in combination with a bleaching agent of titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide may be an effective method for bleaching teeth without the risk of tooth damage.

  4. Studies on 405nm blue-violet diode laser with external grating cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Gao, Jun; Zhao, Jun; Yu, Anlan; Luo, Shiwen; Xiong, Dongsheng; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo

    2016-03-01

    Spectroscopy applications of free-running laser diodes (LD) are greatly restricted as its broad band spectral emission. And the power of a single blue-violet LD is around several hundred milliwatts by far, it is of great importance to obtain stable and narrow line-width laser diodes with high efficiency. In this paper, a high efficiency external cavity diode laser (ECDL) with high output power and narrow band emission at 405 nm is presented. The ECDL is based on a commercially available LD with nominal output power of 110 mW at an injection current of 100 mA. The spectral width of the free-running LD is about 1 nm (FWHM). A reflective holographic grating which is installed on a home-made compact adjustable stage is utilized for optical feedback in Littrow configuration. In this configuration, narrow line-width operation is realized and the effects of grating groove density as well as the groove direction related to the beam polarization on the performances of the ECDL are experimentally investigated. In the case of grating with groove density of 3600 g/mm, the threshold is reduced from 21 mA to 18.3 mA or 15.6 mA and the tuning range is 3.95 nm or 6.01 nm respectively when the grating is orientated in TE or TM polarization. In addition, an output beam with a line-width of 30 pm and output power of 92.7 mW is achieved in TE polarization. With these narrow line-width and high efficiency, the ECDL is capable to serve as a light source for spectroscopy application such as Raman scattering and laser induced fluorescence.

  5. 405 nm diode laser, halogen lamp and LED device comparison in dental composites cure: an “in vitro” experimental trial

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, C.; Merigo, E.; Rocca, J-P.; Chiusano, M.; Cucinotta, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: A 405 nm diode laser is indicated for composite materials polymerizing, thanks to the recent evolution in their compositions, absorbing in blue part of the spectrum. The purpose of this research was to evaluate its performance on two different kinds of composite resins. Materials and methods: Two different composites were polymerized with a traditional halogen lamp, a LED device and a 405 nm diode laser. The depth of the cure, the volumetric shrinkage, and the degree of the conversion (DC%) of the double bond during the curing process were measured. One-way ANOVA test, Kruskal-Wallis tests, and Dunn comparison tests were used for statistic analysis. Results: Regarding the depth of polymerization, the laser had the worst performance on one composite while on the other, no significant difference with the other devices was observed. The volumetric shrinkage showed that laser produced the lowest change in both of the composites. The DC% measure confirmed these findings. Conclusions: Based on the results of this preliminary study, it is not possible to recommend the 405 nm diode laser for the polymerization of dental composites. PMID:26877591

  6. Optical Storage System for 0.4 mm Substrate Media Using 405 nm Laser Diode and Numerical Aperture 0.60/0.65 Objective Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jungwan; Park, In Sik; Yoon, Du-Seop; Chung, Chong-Sam; Kim, Yoon-Gi; Ro, Myong-Do; Doh, Tae-Yong; Shin, Dong-Ho

    2001-03-01

    The most important application of the blue-laser optical storage system is the recording high-definition digital broadcasting. For this application, the next-generation blue laser optical storage system requires a data capacity of at least 2 h of a digital broadcasting data stream with a data transfer rate of 23.5 megabits per second (Mbps). In addition to the capacity goal, system compatibility with the conventional digital versatile disc (DVD) system as well as the compact disc (CD) system is important. In order to satisfy the requirements of blue-laser optical storage, a system for media with a substrates thickness of 0.4 mm was proposed, and improved molding technology, crosstalk cancellation technology, dynamic tilt compensation technology and quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) modulated wobble addressing method were developed for the system. We confirm the feasibility of the proposed system for media with a 0.4 mm substrate using a 405 nm blue laser diode and objective lens with a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.6 (0.65 for rewritable system).

  7. A new non-vital tooth bleaching method using titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide with a 405-nm diode laser or a halogen lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suemori, T.; Kato, J.; Nakazawa, T.; Akashi, G.; Hirai, Y.

    2008-06-01

    To establish a safer and more effective bleaching method for discolored pulpless teeth, we examined bleaching from the pulpal dentin side using a 3.5% hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide. The twenty bovine blood-stained discolored enamel-dentin plates of 1.0 mm enamel thickness and 2.0 mm dentin thickness were used. The bleaching agent was applied to the dentin side that was then irradiated with a 405-nm diode laser (800 mW/cm2) or a halogen lamp (720 mW/cm2) for 15 minutes. The bleaching effect was assessed by spectrophotometric measurement of the color of the specimens from the dentin and enamel side for every 5 minutes, and then dentin or enamel surface was examined with a scanning electron microscope. The 3.5% hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide proved to have a strong bleaching effect. The color difference after laser irradiation was higher than that after halogen lamp irradiation, however, there was no significant difference between them. No changes in the enamel surface morphology were found and open dentinal tubules with no smear layer were clearly observed at the pulpal dentin surface in both groups.

  8. Effect of titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide with 405-nm diode laser irradiation on bonding of resin to pulp chamber dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, A.; Kato, J.; Kameyama, A.; Hirai, Y.; Oda, Y.

    2010-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of a 3.5% hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide on bonding of resin to pulp chamber dentin. Extracted bovine anterior teeth were allocated to three groups of ten teeth each. The coronal labial pulp chamber dentin was exposed and bleached with 3.5% hydrogen peroxide with titanium dioxide with 405-nm diode laser irradiation for 15 min (Group 1); 30% hydrogen peroxide with halogen lamp irradiation for 15 min (Group 2); and distilled water for 15 min (Group 3). After bleaching, the pulp chamber dentin was prepared for composite resin bonding and the interface between the resin and dentin was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and failure patterns were determined. The μTBS values (mean ± SD) were: 17.28 ± 5.79 MPa ( n = 36), 0 MPa, and 26.50 ± 9.83 MPa ( n = 36) in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The μTBS in Group 3 was significantly higher than that in Group 1 ( P < 0.05). Hybrid layers and resin tags were clearly observed at the interface in Groups 1 and 3, but not in Group 2. Adhesive failure was mainly observed in Group 1, whereas dentin failure was the main failure pattern in Group 3.

  9. The relative antimicrobial effect of blue 405 nm LED and blue 405 nm laser on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Masson-Meyers, Daniela Santos; Bumah, Violet Vakunseh; Biener, Gabriel; Raicu, Valerica; Enwemeka, Chukuka Samuel

    2015-12-01

    It has long been argued that light from a laser diode is superior to light from a light-emitting diode (LED) in terms of its effect on biological tissues. In order to shed light on this ongoing debate, we compared the antimicrobial effect of light emitted from a 405-nm LED with that of a 405-nm laser on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at comparable fluences. We cultured 5 × 10(6) CFU/ml MRSA on tryptic soy agar and then irradiated culture plates once, twice, or thrice with either LED or laser light using 40, 54, 81, or 121 J/cm(2) fluence at 15-, 30-, or 240-min time interval between irradiation. Cultures were incubated immediately after irradiation at 37 °C for 24 h before imaging and counting remnant bacterial colonies. Regardless of the device used, LED or laser, irradiation at each fluence resulted in statistically significant bacterial growth suppression compared to non-irradiated controls (p < 0.0001). The antimicrobial effect of both light sources, LED and laser, was not statistically different at each fluence in 35 of the 36 experimental trials. Bacterial growth suppression achieved with either source of light increased with repeated irradiation, particularly at the 15- or 30-min treatment time interval. Thus, we conclude that the antimicrobial effect of 405-nm laser and 405-nm LED on MRSA is similar; neither has a superior antimicrobial effect when compared to the other.

  10. Investigation of single-mode fiber output damage by 405nm CW laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonschior, C. P.; Landrock-Bill, E.; Klein, K.-F.; Sun, T.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2013-11-01

    In the past, the degradation of 405 nm fiber-coupled diode laser systems was investigated in detail with focus on the input end. The coupling and transmission loss of the laser light was associated to the growth of a periodic structure on the input surface. To reduce this damage, a short launch-fiber with a good surface quality was used on the input end surface. Thereby the power transmission was stabilized for at least one month. However, damage structures appeared on the output surface of the single-mode fiber. To investigate this effect, damaged samples were taken after different periods of time and examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Bulges with a submicron periodic structure were found in the core region, too. Additionally, measurements of spectral loss were performed, showing the formation of color centers in the deep UV along the length of the fiber.

  11. Investigation of single-mode fiber degradation by 405-nm continuous-wave laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonschior, Cornell P.; Klein, Karl-Friedrich; Menzel, Matthias; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2014-12-01

    The degradation of 405-nm fiber-coupled diode laser systems with more than 50 mW power was investigated in detail with focus on the effects occurring at the input end. The coupling and transmission loss of the laser light were associated with the growth of a projection and a periodic structure on the input surface. To avoid this degradation, a short launch fiber with a good surface quality was used at the input end. In this way, the power transmission was stabilized for at least one month. However, structural degradation was noticed on the output surface of the single-mode fiber. To investigate this effect, the damaged samples were measured after different periods of time and examined with a scanning electron microscope and with an atomic force microscope. Reproducible spherical projections with a submicron periodic structure were found in the core region. Additionally, the spectral loss of the fiber was measured, showing the formation of color centers in the deep ultraviolet along the length of the fiber. These investigations were accompanied by simulations of the growth of the structure on the output surface. The influence of the structure was mainly on the divergence angle of the emitted laser beam, reducing the beam quality for applications.

  12. Laser photolysis of caged compounds at 405 nm: photochemical advantages, localisation, phototoxicity and methods for calibration.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Federico F; Corrie, John E T; Ogden, David

    2009-05-30

    Rapid, localised photolytic release of neurotransmitters from caged precursors at synaptic regions in the extracellular space is greatly hampered at irradiation wavelengths in the near-UV, close to the wavelength of maximum absorption of the caged precursor, because of inner-filtering by strong absorption of light in the cage solution between the objective and cell. For this reason two-photon excitation is commonly used for photolysis, particularly at multiple points distributed over large fields; or, with near-UV, if combined with local perfusion of the cage. These methods each have problems: the small cross-sections of common cages with two-photon excitation require high cage concentrations and light intensities near the phototoxic limit, while local perfusion gives non-uniform cage concentrations over the field of view. Single-photon photolysis at 405 nm, although less efficient than at 330-350 nm, with present cages is more efficient than two-photon photolysis. The reduced light absorption in the bulk cage solution permits efficient wide-field uncaging at non-toxic intensities with uniform cage concentration. Full photolysis of MNI-glutamate with 100 micros pulses required intensities of 2 mW microm(-2) at the preparation, shown to be non-toxic with repeated exposures. Light scattering at 405 nm was estimated as 50% at 18 microm depth in 21-day rat cerebellum. Methods are described for: (1) varying the laser spot size; (2) photolysis calibration in the microscope with the caged fluorophore NPE-HPTS over the wavelength range 347-405 nm; and (3) determining the point-spread function of excitation. Furthermore, DM-Nitrophen photolysis at 405 nm was efficient for intracellular investigations of Ca2+-dependent processes.

  13. Efficacy of Pulsed 405-nm Light-Emitting Diodes for Antimicrobial Photodynamic Inactivation: Effects of Intensity, Frequency, and Duty Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Jonathan B.; Given, Martin J.; Wilson, Mark P.; Judd, Martin D.; Timoshkin, Igor V.; MacGregor, Scott J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study investigates possible advantages in pulsed over continuous 405-nm light-emitting diode (LED) light for bacterial inactivation and energy efficiency. Background: Alternative nonantibiotic methods of disinfection and infection control have become of significant interest. Recent studies have demonstrated the application of systems using 405-nm LEDs for continuous disinfection of the clinical environment, and also for potential treatment of contaminated wounds. Methods: Liquid suspensions of 103 colony-forming units/mL populations of Staphylococcus aureus were subject to pulsed 405-nm light of different frequencies, duty cycles, and intensities and for different lengths of time. Results: Pulsed exposures with the same average irradiance of 16 mW/cm2 and varying duty cycle (25%, 50%, 75%) showed very similar performance compared with continuous exposures, with 95–98% reduction of S. aureus achieved for all duty cycles. The pulsing frequency was varied in intervals from 100 Hz to 10 kHz and appeared to have little effect on antimicrobial efficacy. However, when comparing pulsed with continuous exposure, an improvement in inactivation per unit optical energy was achieved, with results showing an increase of approximately 83% in optical efficiency. Conclusions: These results suggest that under pulsed conditions, a lower energy consumption and lower perceived brightness could be achieved, thus potentially providing improved operating conditions for medical/infection control applications without compromising antimicrobial efficacy. PMID:27759498

  14. Efficacy of Pulsed 405-nm Light-Emitting Diodes for Antimicrobial Photodynamic Inactivation: Effects of Intensity, Frequency, and Duty Cycle.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Jonathan B; Maclean, Michelle; Given, Martin J; Wilson, Mark P; Judd, Martin D; Timoshkin, Igor V; MacGregor, Scott J

    2017-03-01

    This study investigates possible advantages in pulsed over continuous 405-nm light-emitting diode (LED) light for bacterial inactivation and energy efficiency. Alternative nonantibiotic methods of disinfection and infection control have become of significant interest. Recent studies have demonstrated the application of systems using 405-nm LEDs for continuous disinfection of the clinical environment, and also for potential treatment of contaminated wounds. Liquid suspensions of 10(3) colony-forming units/mL populations of Staphylococcus aureus were subject to pulsed 405-nm light of different frequencies, duty cycles, and intensities and for different lengths of time. Pulsed exposures with the same average irradiance of 16 mW/cm(2) and varying duty cycle (25%, 50%, 75%) showed very similar performance compared with continuous exposures, with 95-98% reduction of S. aureus achieved for all duty cycles. The pulsing frequency was varied in intervals from 100 Hz to 10 kHz and appeared to have little effect on antimicrobial efficacy. However, when comparing pulsed with continuous exposure, an improvement in inactivation per unit optical energy was achieved, with results showing an increase of approximately 83% in optical efficiency. These results suggest that under pulsed conditions, a lower energy consumption and lower perceived brightness could be achieved, thus potentially providing improved operating conditions for medical/infection control applications without compromising antimicrobial efficacy.

  15. Low-intensity LED (625 and 405 nm) and laser (805 nm) killing of Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchina, Elena S.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2009-02-01

    In the present work we have investigated in vitro sensitivity of microorganisms P. acnes and S. epidermidis to action of red (625 nm and 405 nm) and infrared (805 nm) radiations in combination with photosensitizes Methylene Blue and Indocyanine Green.

  16. Decreased Bone Volume and Bone Mineral Density in the Tibial Trabecular Bone Is Associated with Per2 Gene by 405 nm Laser Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yeong-Min; Lee, Myung-Han; Park, Ji Hyung; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Sangyeob; Jung, Byungjo; Kim, Han Sung; Bae, Kiho

    2015-11-16

    Low-level laser therapy/treatment (LLLT) using a minimally invasive laser needle system (MILNS) might enhance bone formation and suppress bone resorption. In this study, the use of 405 nm LLLT led to decreases in bone volume and bone mineral density (BMD) of tibial trabecular bone in wild-type (WT) and Per2 knockout (KO) mice. Bone volume and bone mineral density of tibial trabecular bone was decreased by 405 nm LLLT in Per2 KO compared to WT mice at two and four weeks. To determine the reduction in tibial bone, mRNA expressions of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Per2 were investigated at four weeks after 405 nm laser stimulation using MILNS. ALP gene expression was significantly reduced in the LLLT-stimulated right tibial bone of WT and Per2 KO mice compared to the non-irradiated left tibia (p < 0.001). Per2 mRNA expression in WT mice was significantly reduced in the LLLT-stimulated right tibial bone compared to the non-irradiated left tibia (p < 0.001). To identify the decrease in tibial bone mediated by the Per2 gene, levels of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and ALP mRNAs were determined in non-irradiated WT and Per2 KO mice. These results demonstrated significant downregulation of Runx2 and ALP mRNA levels in Per2 KO mice (p < 0.001). Therefore, the reduction in tibial trabecular bone resulting from 405 nm LLLT using MILNS might be associated with Per2 gene expression.

  17. Decreased Bone Volume and Bone Mineral Density in the Tibial Trabecular Bone Is Associated with Per2 Gene by 405 nm Laser Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yeong-Min; Lee, Myung-Han; Park, Ji Hyung; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Sangyeob; Jung, Byungjo; Kim, Han Sung; Bae, Kiho

    2015-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy/treatment (LLLT) using a minimally invasive laser needle system (MILNS) might enhance bone formation and suppress bone resorption. In this study, the use of 405 nm LLLT led to decreases in bone volume and bone mineral density (BMD) of tibial trabecular bone in wild-type (WT) and Per2 knockout (KO) mice. Bone volume and bone mineral density of tibial trabecular bone was decreased by 405 nm LLLT in Per2 KO compared to WT mice at two and four weeks. To determine the reduction in tibial bone, mRNA expressions of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Per2 were investigated at four weeks after 405 nm laser stimulation using MILNS. ALP gene expression was significantly reduced in the LLLT-stimulated right tibial bone of WT and Per2 KO mice compared to the non-irradiated left tibia (p < 0.001). Per2 mRNA expression in WT mice was significantly reduced in the LLLT-stimulated right tibial bone compared to the non-irradiated left tibia (p < 0.001). To identify the decrease in tibial bone mediated by the Per2 gene, levels of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and ALP mRNAs were determined in non-irradiated WT and Per2 KO mice. These results demonstrated significant downregulation of Runx2 and ALP mRNA levels in Per2 KO mice (p < 0.001). Therefore, the reduction in tibial trabecular bone resulting from 405 nm LLLT using MILNS might be associated with Per2 gene expression. PMID:26580614

  18. Trace Detection with Diode Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Richard W.

    1995-01-01

    Diode lasers were used to detect trace quantities of calcium, lead, chromium, cesium and rubidium. Extended -cavities were often employed for wavelength tuning and linewidth narrowing, and design considerations for the cavities are discussed. Calcium was detected under low pressure, Doppler-free conditions, and consequently the frequency stability of the laser's power spectrum was studied. The laser's frequency noise spectral density was measured and converted by calculation to the power spectrum. Examples of laser frequency noise densities with corresponding calculated power spectrums for free-running and frequency-locked conditions are given. An electronic feedback system to narrow a 657 nm wavelength diode laser's linewidth was constructed, and the resulting linewidth with respect to the locking cavity was measured to be approximately 500 Hz. Calcium atom concentrations of 0.35 x 10E-09 in water samples were measured by flame laser-enhanced ionization using a 423 nm wavelength frequency-doubled diode laser system. Analysis of the ionization signal and the noise was performed. Additional measurements of water samples with diode lasers demonstrated chromium detection at 25 x 10E-09, cesium at 0.25 x 10E -09, and rubidium at 0.25 x 10E-09. Lead was detected using a frequency-doubled diode system at a wavelength of 405 nm. The detection was by absorption from a metastable energy level; lead atoms in an argon vapor were excited into the metastable level by a radio-frequency discharge.

  19. Inhibition of enteric pathogens using integrated high intensity 405 nm LED on the surface of almonds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The disinfecting properties of 405 nm light were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and their non-pathogenic surrogates inoculated onto the surface of almonds. High intensity monochromatic light was generated from an array of narrow-band 405 nm light emitting diodes (LED). Al...

  20. Visible optical radiation generates bactericidal effect applicable for inactivation of health care associated germs demonstrated by inactivation of E. coli and B. subtilis using 405-nm and 460-nm light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönes, Katharina; Stangl, Felix; Sift, Michael; Hessling, Martin

    2015-07-01

    The Ulm University of Applied Sciences is investigating a technique using visible optical radiation (405 nm and 460 nm) to inactivate health-hazardous bacteria in water. A conceivable application could be point-of-use disinfection implementations in developing countries for safe drinking water supply. Another possible application field could be to provide sterile water in medical institutions like hospitals or dental surgeries where contaminated pipework or long-term disuse often results in higher germ concentrations. Optical radiation for disinfection is presently mostly used in UV wavelength ranges but the possibility of bacterial inactivation with visible light was so far generally disregarded. One of the advantages of visible light is, that instead of mercury arc lamps, light emitting diodes could be used, which are commercially available and therefore cost-efficient concerning the visible light spectrum. Furthermore they inherit a considerable longer life span than UV-C LEDs and are non-hazardous in contrast to mercury arc lamps. Above all there are specific germs, like Bacillus subtilis, which show an inactivation resistance to UV-C wavelengths. Due to the totally different deactivation mechanism even higher disinfection rates are reached, compared to Escherichia coli as a standard laboratory germ. By 460 nm a reduction of three log-levels appeared with Bacillus subtilis and a half log-level with Escherichia coli both at a dose of about 300 J/cm². By the more efficient wavelength of 405 nm four and a half log-levels are reached with Bacillus subtilis and one and a half log-level with Escherichia coli also both at a dose of about 300 J/cm². In addition the employed optical setup, which delivered a homogeneous illumination and skirts the need of a stirring technique to compensate irregularities, was an important improvement compared to previous published setups. Evaluated by optical simulation in ZEMAX® the designed optical element provided proven

  1. Inhibition of enteric pathogens and surrogates using integrated, high intensity 405nm led light on the surface of almonds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The disinfecting properties of 405 nm light were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and their non-pathogenic surrogate bacteria on the surface of almonds. High intensity monochromatic blue light (MBL) was generated from an array of narrow-band 405 nm light-emitting diodes (LE...

  2. A cesium bromide photocathode excited by 405 nm radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, J. R.; Cheng, Y. T.; Pianetta, P.; Pease, Fabian W.; Hesselink, L.

    2014-07-01

    In several applications, such as electron beam lithography and X-ray differential phase contrast imaging, there is a need for a free electron source with a current density at least 10 A/cm2 yet can be shaped with a resolution down to 20 nm and pulsed. Additional requirements are that the source must operate in a practical demountable vacuum (>1e-9 Torr) and be reasonably compact. In prior work, a photocathode comprising a film of CsBr on metal film on a sapphire substrate met the requirements except it was bulky because it required a beam (>10 W/cm2) of 257 nm radiation. Here, we describe an approach using a 405 nm laser which is far less bulky. The 405 nm laser, however, is not energetic enough to create color centers in CsBr films. The key to our approach is to bombard the CsBr film with a flood beam of about 1 keV electrons prior to operation. Photoelectron efficiencies in the range of 100-1000 nA/mW were demonstrated with lifetimes exceeding 50 h between electron bombardments. We suspect that the electron bombardment creates intraband color centers whence electrons can be excited by the 405 nm photons into the conduction band and thence into the vacuum.

  3. Header For Laser Diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.; Spadin, Paul L.

    1990-01-01

    Header designed to contain laser diode. Output combined incoherently with outputs of other laser diodes in grating laser-beam combiner in optical communication system. Provides electrical connections to laser diode, cooling to thermally stabilize laser operation, and optomechanical adjustments that steer and focus laser beam. Range of adjustments provides for correction of worst-case decentering and defocusing of laser beam encountered with laser diodes. Mechanical configuration made simple to promote stability and keep cost low.

  4. Study of timing properties of multi-pixel-photon-counter's illuminated by 630 nm and 405 nm PiLas laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, Anatoly; Demarteau, Marcel; Los, Sergey; Ramberg, Erik; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Timing measurements of Multy-Pixel-Photon Counters (MPPC's) at the picosecond level were performed at Fermilab. The core timing resolution of the amplifiers, discriminators and TAC/ADC combination to perform these measurements is approximately 2 picoseconds. The single photoelectron time resolution (SPTR) was measured for the signals coming from the MPPC's. An SPTR of about one hundred picoseconds was obtained for MPPC's illuminated by picosecond laser pulses. The SPTR depends on applied bias voltage and on the wavelength of the light. A simple model is proposed to explain the difference in the SPTR for blue and red light. Finally, requirements for the MPPC's temperature and bias voltage stability to maintain the time resolution are discussed.

  5. Photoporation and cell transfection using a violet diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, L.; Agate, B.; Comrie, M.; Ferguson, R.; Lake, T. K.; Morris, J. E.; Carruthers, A. E.; Brown, C. T. A.; Sibbett, W.; Bryant, P. E.; Gunn-Moore, F.; Riches, A. C.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2005-01-01

    The introduction and subsequent expression of foreign DNA inside living mammalian cells (transfection) is achieved by photoporation with a violet diode laser. We direct a compact 405 nm laser diode source into an inverted optical microscope configuration and expose cells to 0.3 mW for 40 ms. The localized optical power density of ~1200 MW/m2 is six orders of magnitude lower than that used in femtosecond photoporation (~104 TW/m2). The beam perforates the cell plasma membrane to allow uptake of plasmid DNA containing an antibiotic resistant gene as well as the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. Successfully transfected cells then expand into clonal groups which are used to create stable cell lines. The use of the violet diode laser offers a new and simple poration technique compatible with standard microscopes and is the simplest method of laser-assisted cell poration reported to date.

  6. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kass, William J.; Andrews, Larry A.; Boney, Craig M.; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, James W.; Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Williams, Randy J.; Hinkle, Lane R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) program at Sandia National Labs. One watt laser diodes have been characterized for use with a single explosive actuator. Extensive measurements of the effect of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses on the laser diode optical output have been made. Characterization of optical fiber and connectors over temperature has been done. Multiple laser diodes have been packaged to ignite multiple explosive devices and an eight element laser diode array has been recently tested by igniting eight explosive devices at predetermined 100 ms intervals.

  7. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kass, William J.; Andrews, Larry A.; Boney, Craig M.; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, James W.; Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Williams, Randy J.; Hinkle, Lane R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) program at Sandia National Labs. One watt laser diodes have been characterized for use with a single explosive actuator. Extensive measurements of the effect of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses on the laser diode optical output have been made. Characterization of optical fiber and connectors over temperature has been done. Multiple laser diodes have been packaged to ignite multiple explosive devices and an eight element laser diode array has been recently tested by igniting eight explosive devices at predetermined 100 ms intervals.

  8. Lighting with laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Chandrajit; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Roth, Bernhard

    2013-08-01

    Contemporary white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are much more efficient than compact fluorescent lamps and hence are rapidly capturing the market for general illumination. LEDs are also replacing halogen lamps or even newer xenon based lamps in automotive headlamps. Because laser diodes are inherently much brighter and often more efficient than corresponding LEDs, there is great research interest in developing laser diode based illumination systems. Operating at higher current densities and with smaller form factors, laser diodes may outperform LEDs in the future. This article reviews the possibilities and challenges in the integration of visible laser diodes in future illumination systems.

  9. Velocimetry with diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mul, F. F. M.; Jentink, H. W.; Koelink, M.; Greve, J.; Aarnoudse, J. G.

    The history of the application of diode lasers in velocimetry is reviewed. Some problems arising when using those lasers, e.g., mode hopping and wavelength shifts caused by temperature effects, are discussed, together with coherence effects encountered with diode lasers. The application in dual-beam velocimetry, in direct-contact velocimetry and in velocimetry using self-mixing will be discussed.

  10. Etalon laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, L.B.; Koenig, H.G.; Rice, R.R.

    1981-08-18

    A laser diode is disclosed that is suitable for integrated and fiber optic applications requiring single transverse and single longitudinal mode operation. The single transverse mode is provided by making a gallium arsenide double heterostructural laser diode with a narrow stripe width and a relatively long length. The single longitudinal mode operation is provided by cracking the diode transverse to the stripe at one or more locations to form internal etalons in the laser cavity.

  11. Diode Laser Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botez, Dan; Scifres, Don R.

    2005-11-01

    Contributors; 1. Monolithic phase-locked semiconductor laser arrays D. Botez; 2. High power coherent, semiconductor laser master oscillator power amplifiers and amplifier arrays D. F. Welch and D. G. Mehuys; 3. Microoptical components applied to incoherent and coherent laser arrays J. R. Leger; 4. Modeling of diode laser arrays G. R. Hadley; 5. Dynamics of coherent semiconductor laser arrays H. G. Winfuland and R. K. Defreez; 6. High average power semiconductor laser arrays and laser array packaging with an emphasis for pumping solid state lasers R. Solarz; 7. High power diode laser arrays and their reliability D. R. Scifres and H. H. Kung; 8. Strained layer quantum well heterostructure laser arrays J. J. Coleman; 9. Vertical cavity surface emitting laser arrays C. J. Chang-Hasnain; 10. Individually addressed arrays of diode lasers D. Carlin.

  12. Comparison of violet diode laser with CO II laser in surgical performance of soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatayama, H.; Kato, J.; Inoue, A.; Akashi, G.; Hirai, Y.

    2007-02-01

    The violet diode laser (405nm) has recently begun to be studied for surgical use and authors reported the soft tissue could be effectively incised by irradiation power of even less than 1W. The wavelength of this laser is highly absorbed by hemoglobin, myoglobin or melanin pigment. Cutting or ablating soft tissues by lower irradiation power might be preferable for wound healing. The CO II laser is known to be preferable for low invasive treatment of soft tissues and widely used. The CO II laser light (10.6μm) is highly absorbed by water and proper for effective ablation of soft tissues. In this paper, we report the comparison of the violet diode laser with the CO II laser in surgical performance of soft tissues. Tuna tissue was used as an experimental sample. In the case of the violet diode laser, extensive vaporization of tissue was observed after the expansion of coagulation. Carbonization of tissue was observed after the explosion. On the other hand, consecutive vaporization and carbonization were observed immediately after irradiation in the case of CO II laser. The violet diode laser could ablate tissue equivalently with the CO II laser and coagulate larger area than the CO II laser. Therefore the violet diode laser might be expectable as a surgical tool which has excellent hemostatis.

  13. Transient transfection of mammalian cells using a violet diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Mapa, Maria Leilani; Angus, Liselotte; Ploschner, Martin; Dholakia, Kishan; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate the first use of the violet diode laser for transient mammalian cell transfection. In contrast to previous studies, which showed the generation of stable cell lines over a few weeks, we develop a methodology to transiently transfect cells with an efficiency of up to ~40%. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells are exposed to a tightly focused 405-nm laser in the presence of plasmid DNA encoding for a mitochondrial targeted red fluorescent protein. We report transfection efficiencies as a function of laser power and exposure time for our system. We also show, for the first time, that a continuous wave laser source can be successfully applied to selective gene silencing experiments using small interfering RNA. This work is a major step towards an inexpensive and portable phototransfection system.

  14. Antimicrobial effect of pleomeleangustifolia pheophytin A activation with diode laser to streptococcus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfat Sunarko, Sinari; Ekasari, Wiwied; Dyah Astuti, Suryani

    2017-05-01

    The main purpose of this research is to identify potential of Pheophytin A. as photosensitizer a agent to inactivate Streptococcus muttans using laser diode of 405nm. Pheophytina is known as chlorophyll derivate that losses magnesium ion at the center of porphyrin ring structure. In this research, phrophytin was extracted from Suji leaf (Pleomeleangustifolia). To determine the antimicrobial effect of treatments on S. mutans, samples were divided into three groups as follows: (1) Groups A(treated with Pheophytin A. and laser 405 nm at varying energy density of 2.5; 5, 7.5; 10.0; 12.5; 15.0; 17.5 and 20.0 J/cm2), (2) Group C-(negative control, no treated), (3) Group C+ (treated only with pheophytin). The experiments were repeated at least three times for each group. The results were analyzed using analysis of variance and the Tukey test. A P value ≤0.05 was considered to indicate a statistically significant difference. The decrement of percentage of number of bacterial colonyes growth was defined as: | (Σ sample colony - Σ control colony)/ Σ control colony | x 100%. The result showed that the incubation of Pheophytin A. using irradiation from laser diode of 405nm have a significant effect towards the decrement in bacterial growth. The most decreased percentage colony of S. mutans occurred on the incubation of pheophytin a treatment and laser irradiation 405nm with density 20 J/cm2 is 61.9%. This showed that pheophytin a functions as a photosesitizer activator to inactivate S. mutans bacteria.

  15. Diode Pumped Fiber Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    d AFWU.-TR-83-niO 00 H CO CO iH <^ DIODE PUMPED FIBER LASER Edward L. Glnzton Laboratory Stanford University Stanford, California 94305...RECIPIf NT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE Cand Sub(i(/e; DIODE PUMPED FIBER LASER 5 TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Interim Report...external optical cavity made of two miniature flat mirrors, and end- pumped either at 514.5 nm (argon-ion laser ) or near 818 nm ( laser diode ). Coherent

  16. Note: Coupling of multiple laser diodes into a multi-mode fiber.

    PubMed

    Ivonyak, Y; Piechal, B; Mrozowicz, M; Bercha, A; Trzeciakowski, W

    2014-03-01

    Diode lasers are coupled to a multi-mode fiber (with 100-400 μm core) using a reflector in the form of a regular pyramid. The optimization of the optical setup allows to couple 60%-90% of light into the fiber. The demonstrator achieves 3.5 W in the 100/125 μm fiber with 8 violet (405 nm) diodes, 5.5 W in the 100/125 μm fiber with 8 blue (445 nm) diodes, and 3.3 W in the 200/250 μm fiber with red (638 nm) diodes. The device can work with lasers emitting at many different wavelengths, including green (532 nm) frequency-doubled lasers. Our work was motivated by potential medical applications of these laser sources.

  17. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civiš, S.; Cihelka, J.; Matulková, I.

    2010-12-01

    Three types of lasers (double-heterostructure 66 K InAsSb/InAsSbP laser diode, room temperature, multi quantum wells with distributed feedback (MQW with DFB) (GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb based) diode laser and vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) (GaSb based) have been characterized using Fourier transform emission spectroscopy and compared. The photoacoustic technique was employed to determine the detection limit of formaldehyde (less than 1 ppmV) for the strongest absorption line of the v3 + v5 band in the emission region of the GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb diode laser. The detection limit (less than 10 ppbV) of formaldehyde was achieved in the 2820 cm-1 spectral range in case of InAsSb/InAsSbP laser (fundamental bands of v1, v5). Laser sensitive detection (laser absorption together with high resolution Fourier transform infrared technique including direct laser linewidth measurement, infrared photoacoustic detection of neutral molecules (methane, form-aldehyde) is discussed. Additionally, very sensitive laser absorption techniques of such velocity modulation are discussed for case of laser application in laboratory research of molecular ions. Such sensitive techniques (originally developed for lasers) contributed very much in identifying laboratory microwave spectra of a series of anions (C6H-, C4H-, C2H-, CN-) and their discovery in the interstellar space (C6H-, C4H-).

  18. Absolute measurements of total peroxy nitrate mixing ratios by thermal dissociation blue diode laser cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Paul, Dipayan; Osthoff, Hans D

    2010-08-01

    Peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides (PANs) have long been recognized as important trace gas constituents of the troposphere. Here, we describe a blue diode laser thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectrometer for rapid and absolute measurements of total peroxyacyl nitrate (SigmaPAN) abundances at ambient concentration levels. The PANs are thermally dissociated and detected as NO2, whose mixing ratios are quantified by optical absorption at 405 nm relative to a reference channel kept at ambient temperature. The effective NO2 absorption cross-section at the diode laser emission wavelength was measured to be 6.1 x 10(-19) cm2 molecule(-1), in excellent agreement with a prediction based on a projection of a high-resolution literature absorption spectrum onto the laser line width. The performance, i.e., accuracy and precision of measurement and matrix effects, of the new 405 nm thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectrometer was evaluated and compared to that of a 532 nm thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectrometer using laboratory-generated air samples. The new 405 nm spectrometer was considerably more sensitive and compact than the previously constructed version. The key advantage of laser thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy is that the measurement can be considered absolute and does not need to rely on external calibration.

  19. Violet 405-nm light: a novel therapeutic agent against common pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Barneck, Mitchell D; Rhodes, Nathaniel L R; de la Presa, Martin; Allen, James P; Poursaid, Ahrash E; Nourian, Maziar M; Firpo, Matthew A; Langell, John T

    2016-12-01

    The increasing incidence of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and multidrug-resistant organisms demonstrate the need for innovative technological solutions. Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumonia, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in particular are common pathogens responsible for a large percentage of indwelling medical device-associated clinical infections. The bactericidal effects of visible light sterilization (VLS) using 405-nm is one potential therapeutic under investigation. Light-emitting diodes of 405-nm were used to treat varying concentrations of S aureus, S pneumonia, E coli, and P aeruginosa. Irradiance levels between 2.71 ± 0.20 to 9.27 ± 0.36 mW/cm(2) and radiant exposure levels up to 132.98 ± 6.68 J/cm(2) were assessed. Dose-dependent effects were observed in all species. Statistically significant reductions were seen in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. At the highest radiant exposure levels, bacterial log10 reductions were E coli-6.27 ± 0.54, S aureus-6.10 ± 0.60, P aeruginosa-5.20 ± 0.84, and S pneumoniae-6.01 ± 0.59. Statistically significant results (<0.001*) were found at each time point. We have successfully demonstrated high-efficacy bacterial reduction using 405-nm light sterilization. The VLS showed statistical significance against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative species with the given treatment times. The β-lactam antibiotic-resistant E coli was the most sensitive to VLS, suggesting light therapy could a suitable option for sterilization in drug-resistant bacterial species. This research illustrates the potential of using VLS in treating clinically relevant bacterial infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. High power fiber coupled diode lasers for display and lighting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drovs, Simon; Unger, Andreas; Dürsch, Sascha; Köhler, Bernd; Biesenbach, Jens

    2017-02-01

    The performance of diode lasers in the visible spectral range has been continuously improved within the last few years, which was mainly driven by the goal to replace arc lamps in cinema or home projectors. In addition, the availability of such high power visible diode lasers also enables new applications in the medical field, but also the usage as pump sources for other solid state lasers. This paper summarizes the latest developments of fiber coupled sources with output power from 1.4 W to 120 W coupled into 100 μm to 400 μm fibers in the spectral range around 405 nm and 640 nm. New developments also include the use of fiber coupled multi single emitter arrays at 450 nm, as well as very compact modules with multi-W output power.

  1. Blue diode laser: a new approach in oral surgery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Selleri, Stefano; Cucinotta, Annamaria

    2016-02-01

    The introduction of diode lasers in dentistry had several advantages, principally consisting on the reduced size, reduced cost and possibility to beam delivering by optical fibbers. Up today two diode wavelengths, 810 and 980 nm, were the most utilized in oral surgery but recently a new wavelength emitting in the blue had been proposed. The aim of this ex vivo study was to compare the efficacy of five laser wavelengths (450, 532, 808, 1064 and 1340 nm) for the ablation of soft tissues. Specimens were surgically collected from the dorsal surface of four bovine tongues and irradiated by the five different wavelengths. Thermal increase was measured by two thermocouples, the first at a depth of 0.5 mm, and the second at a depth of 2 mm while initial and final surface temperatures were recorded by IR thermometer. The quality of the incision was histologically evaluated by a pathologist by giving a score from 0 to 5. The time necessary to perform the excision varied between 215 seconds (1340 nm, 5W) and 292 seconds (808 nm, 3W). Surface temperature increase was highest for 1340 nm, 5W and lowest for 405 nm, 4 W. The most significant deep temperature increase was recorded by 1340 nm, 5 W and the lowest by 450 nm, 2 W. The quality of incision was better and the thermal elevation lower in the specimens obtained with shortest laser wavelength (450 nm).

  2. Enhanced inactivation of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes by exposure to 405 nm light under sub-lethal temperature, salt and acid stress conditions.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Karen; Maclean, Michelle; Timoshkin, Igor V; MacGregor, Scott J; Anderson, John G

    2014-01-17

    The antimicrobial effects of 405 nm light have generated interest in its use as an emerging disinfection technology with potential food-related applications. The aim of this study was to assess the bactericidal efficacy of 405 nm light for inactivation of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes under sub-lethally stressed environmental conditions. Bacteria were exposed to 405 nm light from a light emitting diode (LED) array under various temperature, salt (NaCl) and acid conditions to determine if bacterial susceptibility to 405 nm light inactivation is affected when exposed under these conditions. Non-stressed bacterial populations (10(5) CFU/mL) were exposed to increasing doses of 405 nm light (~70 mW/cm(2)) and the inactivation results were compared with those generated under stress conditions. Bacteria were held at various temperatures (4°C, 22°C and 45°C), acid concentrations (pH3, 3.5 and 7) and salt concentrations (0%, 0.8%, 10% and 15% NaCl), and simultaneously exposed to 405 nm light. Enhanced inactivation of both E. coli and L. monocytogenes was achieved when light exposure was combined with each of the sub-lethal stresses, with significantly increased inactivation rates compared to non-stressed populations (P≤0.05). One exception was with L. monocytogenes when light-exposed in the presence of 15% salt, as this combination reduced bacterial inactivation. The greatest enhancement of 405 nm light inactivation for both bacterial species was achieved when light exposure was combined with sub-lethal acid stress conditions at pH3. This was demonstrated by a 5-log10 reduction of E. coli following a 405 nm light dose of 84 J/cm(2) compared to 378 J/cm(2) for non-stressed populations (77% reduction in dose) and by a 5-log10 reduction of L. monocytogenes achieved with a dose of 42 J/cm(2) which corresponded to 50% of the dose required for the equivalent reduction of non-stressed populations. This acid-enhanced 405 nm light inactivation effect was

  3. Laser Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    structures, monolithic phased arrays, multiple stripe lasers which were made possible by improved manufacturing technologies su LPE and particular...mass production of single laser diodes in Japan, went a development in the U.S. which is aimed at the fabrication of powerful monolithic arrays. The...Significant progress has been made recently in developing the monolithic , linear laser diode array. Output power, slope efficiency, laser threshold and

  4. Enhanced vbasis laser diode package

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Chen, Diana; Bayramian, Andy; Freitas, Barry; Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-08-19

    A substrate having an upper surface and a lower surface is provided. The substrate includes a plurality of v-grooves formed in the upper surface. Each v-groove includes a first side and a second side perpendicular to the first side. A laser diode bar assembly is disposed within each of the v-grooves and attached to the first side. The laser diode bar assembly includes a first adhesion layer disposed on the first side of the v-groove, a metal plate attached to the first adhesion layer, a second adhesion layer disposed over the metal plate, and a laser diode bar attached to the second adhesion layer. The laser diode bar has a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) substantially similar to that of the metal plate.

  5. Holographic recording in a doubly doped lithium niobate crystal with two wavelengths: a blue laser diode and a green laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komori, Yuichi; Ishii, Yukihiro

    2010-08-01

    A doubly-doped LiNbO3 (LN) crystal has been well used as a nonvolatile two-wavelength recording material. By using two levels of the crystal, two-kind holograms can be recorded on one crystal; a hologram is recorded with a 405-nm blue laser diode (LD) for a deep Mn level, and another hologram is with a 532-nm green laser for a shallow Fe level. The recording capacity doubles. A 780-nm LD is non-volatile reconstructing source since the LD line is insensitive to both levels. Multiplexed reconstructed images are demonstrated by using a sharp angular selectivity of a volume LN crystal keeping Bragg condition with spherical reconstructions.

  6. Calibrated feedback for laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.G.

    1986-04-22

    A method is described of calibrating the feedback output from the feedback light detector of the laser diode of an optical disk drive of a laser light pen which consists of mounting a first and a second resistor in a laser light pen; connecting the first resistor between the feedback light detector and ground; connecting the second resistor between the feedback light detector and a feedback output; operating the laser diode to produce a predetermined light power output; adjusting the resistance of the first resistor to produce a predetermined voltage at the feedback output; and adjusting the resistance of the second resistor to produce a predetermined impedance at the feedback output.

  7. Diode laser array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Nils W. (Inventor); Evans, Gary A. (Inventor); Kaiser, Charlie J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A diode laser array comprises a substrate of a semiconductor material having first and second opposed surfaces. On the first surface is a plurality of spaced gain sections and a separate distributed Bragg reflector passive waveguide at each end of each gain section and optically connecting the gain sections. Each gain section includes a cavity therein wherein charge carriers are generated and recombine to generate light which is confined in the cavity. Also, the cavity, which is preferably a quantum well cavity, provides both a high differential gain and potentially large depth of loss modulation. Each waveguide has a wavelength which is preferably formed by an extension of the cavity of the gain sections and a grating. The grating has a period which provides a selective feedback of light into the gain sections to supporting lasing, which allows some of the light to be emitted from the waveguide normal to the surface of the substrate and which allows optical coupling of the gain sections. Also, the grating period provides an operating wavelength which is on the short wavelength side of the gain period of the gain sections required for laser oscillation. An RF pulse is applied so as to maximize the magnitude of the loss modulation and the differential gain in the gain sections. The array is operated by applying a DC bias to all the gain sections at a level just below the threshold of the gain sections to only one of the gain sections which raises the bias in all of the gain sections to a level that causes all of the gain sections to oscillate. Thus, a small bias can turn the array on and off.

  8. Diode laser and endoscopic laser surgery.

    PubMed

    Sullins, Kenneth E

    2002-05-01

    Two functionally important differences exist between the diode laser and the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (used more commonly in small animal surgery). Diode laser energy is delivered through a quartz fiber instead of being reflected through an articulated arm or waveguide. Quartz fibers are generally more flexible and resilient than waveguides and can be inserted through an endoscope for minimally invasive procedures. Laser-tissue interaction is the other significant difference. The CO2 laser is completely absorbed by water, which limits the effect to visible tissue. The diode wavelength is minimally absorbed by water and may affect tissue as deep as 10 mm below the surface in the free-beam mode. With proper respect for the tissue effect, these differences can be used to the advantage of the patient.

  9. Laser diode pumped solid state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.M.; Keirstead, M.S.

    1987-04-07

    This patent describes a high-efficiency, laser diode pumped array, frequency doubled, compact solid state laser, comprising: a rare earth doped birefringent solid laser rod selected from the group consisting of Nd:YLF, Nd:YALO having a front end and a back end, the rod producing a polarized output beam; a housing with means holding the laser rod in fixed position in the housing with its front end forward; a laser array having a predetermined wavelength pumping the laser rod, having a output frequency sufficiently matched to the laser rod to pump the laser rod, secured in the housing behind and in optical alignment with the rod; laser cavity means defining a laser cavity mounted in the housing with the laser rod positioned within the cavity, the laser cavity means further including within the cavity an output coupler means; a frequency doubler, positioned to receive a suitably polarized output beam from the laser rod and to halve its wavelength and double its frequency; a polarization means for polarizing the output beam of the laser rod and substantially maintaining a polarization which optimizes frequency doubling at the frequency doubler and means for matching a focused image of the laser diode with a lasing volume of the laser cavity.

  10. A Heterodyne Interferometer For Testing Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-11-01

    A heterodyne, Mach-Zehnder interferometer system has been developed for testing the wavefront quality of laser diode collimator pens. The testing system is described and the problems associated with testing laser diodes are discussed.

  11. New laser materials for laser diode pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenssen, H. P.

    1990-01-01

    The potential advantages of laser diode pumped solid state lasers are many with high overall efficiency being the most important. In order to realize these advantages, the solid state laser material needs to be optimized for diode laser pumping and for the particular application. In the case of the Nd laser, materials with a longer upper level radiative lifetime are desirable. This is because the laser diode is fundamentally a cw source, and to obtain high energy storage, a long integration time is necessary. Fluoride crystals are investigated as host materials for the Nd laser and also for IR laser transitions in other rare earths, such as the 2 micron Ho laser and the 3 micron Er laser. The approach is to investigate both known crystals, such as BaY2F8, as well as new crystals such as NaYF8. Emphasis is on the growth and spectroscopy of BaY2F8. These two efforts are parallel efforts. The growth effort is aimed at establishing conditions for obtaining large, high quality boules for laser samples. This requires numerous experimental growth runs; however, from these runs, samples suitable for spectroscopy become available.

  12. Quantum Noise in Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacobino, E.; Marin, F.; Bramati, A.; Jost, V.; Poizat, J. Ph.; Roch, J.-F.; Grangier, P.; Zhang, T.-C.

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the intensity noise of single mode laser diodes, either free-running or using different types of line narrowing techniques at room temperature. We have measured an intensity squeezing of 1.2 dB with grating-extended cavity lasers and 1.4 dB with injection locked lasers (respectively 1.6 dB and 2.3 dB inferred at the laser output). We have observed that the intensity noise of a free-running nominally single mode laser diode results from a cancellation effect between large anti-correlated fluctuations of the main mode and of weak longitudinal side modes. Reducing the side modes by line narrowing techniques results in intensity squeezing.

  13. High power, high reliability laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scifres, D. R.; Welch, D. F.; Craig, R. R.; Zucker, E.; Major, J. S.; Harnagel, G. L.; Sakamoto, M.; Haden, J. M.; Endriz, J. G.; Kung, H.

    1992-06-01

    Results are presented on catastrophic damage limits and life-test measurements for four types of high-power laser diodes operating at wavelengths between 980 nm and 690 nm. The laser diodes under consideration are CW multimode lasers, CW laser bars, quasi-CW bars/2D stacked arrays, and single transverse mode lasers.

  14. Development of an antimicrobial blended white LED system containing pulsed 405nm LEDs for decontamination applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Jonathan B.; Maclean, Michelle; Wilson, Mark P.; Given, Martin J.; MacGregor, Scott J.

    2017-03-01

    This study details the design, build and testing of a prototype antimicrobial blended white light unit containing pulsed red, yellow, green and 405nm LEDs. With a push for alternative methods of disinfection, optical methods have become a topic of interest. Ultra-violet (UV) light is widely known for its antimicrobial properties however; 405nm light has demonstrated significant antimicrobial properties against many common hospital acquired pathogens. In this study, a pulsed, blended, white-light prototype with a high content of 405 nm antimicrobial light, was designed, built and tested. Antimicrobial efficacy testing of the prototype was conducted using Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas. aeruginosa, two bacteria which are common causes of hospital acquired infections. These were exposure to 3 different light outputs from the prototype and the surviving bacteria enumerated. Results showed that the mixed light output provided a much better CRI and light output under which to work. Also, the light output containing 405 nm light provided an antimicrobial effect, with decontamination of 103 CFUml-1 populations of both bacterial species. The other light content (red, yellow, green) had no beneficial or adverse effects on the antimicrobial properties of the 405nm light. The results suggest that with further development, it could be possible to produce an antimicrobial blended white light containing pulsed 405nm light that could supplement or even replace standard white lighting in certain environments.

  15. Semiconductor Laser Diodes and the Design of a D.C. Powered Laser Diode Drive Unit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    i FILE c(OP!; NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California 00 ,, STAES THESIS SEMICONDUCTOR LASER DIODES AND THE DESIGN OF A D.C. POWERED LASER...the design of a laser diode modulation circuit is the determination of the input imped- ence and equivalent circuit of the laser diode and packag- ing...current source with a high internal impedance as compared to the input imped- ance of the laser. [Ref. l:p. 33] Summarizing the above, laser diodes

  16. High power diode and solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, H. J.; Fritsche, H.; Lux, O.; Strohmaier, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Diode lasers are now basic pump sources of crystal, glass fiber and other solid state lasers. Progress in the performance of all these lasers is related. Examples of recently developed diode pumped lasers and Raman frequency converters are described for applications in materials processing, Lidar and medical surgery.

  17. IC Fabrication Methods Improve Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M.; Pickhardt, V.

    1984-01-01

    Family of high-performance, tunable diode lasers developed for use as local oscillators in passive laser heterodyne spectrometer. Diodes fabricated using standard IC processes include photolithography, selective etching and vacuum deposition of metals and insulators. Packaging refinements improved thermal-cycling characteristics of diodes and increased room-temperature shelf life.

  18. Investigation of Diode Pumped Alkali Laser Atmospheric Transmission Using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    101 325 Pa = 760 Torr † NIST 2006 CODATA recommended values 98 Appendix B. Alkali Data Potassium Properties Table 3. Potassium (K) physical...INVESTIGATION OF DIODE PUMPED ALKALI LASER ATMOSPHERIC TRANSMISSION USING TUNABLE DIODE LASER ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY DISSERTATION Christopher A... ALKALI LASER ATMOSPHERIC TRANSMISSION USING TUNABLE DIODE LASER ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty Graduate School of

  19. Diode Pumped Fiber Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    molybdium oxide ( GMO ). The best diameter variations obtained so far are on the order of 1%. It is expected that these fibers should exhibit lower...that the absorbed pump power at threshold is given by "P:" hvp 6, 1Pth = (9) O-rf 21 J(0) where SJ 1(0) =J 1(0, 0, ) =ffj soI (x, y, z) ro(x, y, z) dv...epoxy, the argon laser bean ) was first aligned through a fiber at a low power level and then slowly increased. For preliminary tests the laser cavity

  20. Self-Injection Locking Of Diode Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1991-01-01

    Simple optical coupling scheme locks array of gain-guided diode lasers into oscillation in single mode and with single-lobed output beam. Selective feedback from thin etalon self-injection-locks array into desired mode. One application of new scheme for pumping of neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet lasers with diode-laser arrays.

  1. Self-Injection Locking Of Diode Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1991-01-01

    Simple optical coupling scheme locks array of gain-guided diode lasers into oscillation in single mode and with single-lobed output beam. Selective feedback from thin etalon self-injection-locks array into desired mode. One application of new scheme for pumping of neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet lasers with diode-laser arrays.

  2. Diode pumped tunable dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdukova, O.; Gorbunkov, M.; Petukhov, V.; Semenov, M.

    2017-03-01

    A wavelength-tunable dye laser pumped by blue laser diodes (λ =445 nm) in a 200 ns pulsed mode has been developed. We used a 3-mirror cavity with transverse excitation and total internal reflection of laser beam in the active element. Tuning curves for 8 dyes in benzyl alcohol were measured in the range of 506-700 nm. Four dyes have their tuning range more than 60 nm, which is comparable to the tuning ranges of other dye lasers pumped by more expensive sources. The output energy obtained at the generation maximum of both DCM and coumarin 540A dyes was approximately 130 nJ while the pump energy was 2400 nJ.

  3. Schlieren with a laser diode source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, A. W.; Franke, J. M.

    1981-10-01

    The use of a laser diode as a light source for a schlieren system designed to study phase objects such as a wind-tunnel flow is explored. A laser diode schlieren photograph and a white light schlieren photograph (zirconium arc source) are presented for comparison. The laser diode has increased sensitivity, compared with light schlieren, without appreciable image degradiation, and is an acceptable source for schlieren flow visualization.

  4. Diode Pumped Fiber Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    mounting fixture beeame soft and gradually come out of the fixture. S)me chemical reaction was takin- place between the epoxy and the dye solvent , which...loose. The solvent apparenlly did no)t affect the bonding agent used to attach the fibers inside the capillarie,. \\lthmigh individual capillarv tubes...pure solvent . was added to the cavity laser oscillation ceased, and was onlv re, ,t()red after readjuisting the orientation of the output coupler, as

  5. Effects of radiation on laser diodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, Carol Celeste

    2004-09-01

    The effects of ionizing and neutron radiation on the characteristics and performance of laser diodes are reviewed, and the formation mechanisms for nonradiative recombination centers, the primary type of radiation damage in laser diodes, are discussed. Additional topics include the detrimental effects of aluminum in the active (lasing) volume, the transient effects of high-dose-rate pulses of ionizing radiation, and a summary of ways to improve the radiation hardness of laser diodes. Radiation effects on laser diodes emitting in the wavelength region around 808 nm are emphasized.

  6. Advances in high power semiconductor diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoyu; Zhong, Li

    2008-03-01

    High power semiconductor lasers have broad applications in the fields of military and industry. Recent advances in high power semiconductor lasers are reviewed mainly in two aspects: improvements of diode lasers performance and optimization of packaging architectures of diode laser bars. Factors which determine the performance of diode lasers, such as power conversion efficiency, temperature of operation, reliability, wavelength stabilization etc., result from a combination of new semiconductor materials, new diode structures, careful material processing of bars. The latest progress of today's high-power diode lasers at home and abroad is briefly discussed and typical data are presented. The packaging process is of decisive importance for the applicability of high-power diode laser bars, not only technically but also economically. The packaging techniques include the material choosing and the structure optimizing of heat-sinks, the bonding between the array and the heat-sink, the cooling and the fiber coupling, etc. The status of packaging techniques is stressed. There are basically three different diode package architectural options according to the integration grade. Since the package design is dominated by the cooling aspect, different effective cooling techniques are promoted by different package architectures and specific demands. The benefit and utility of each package are strongly dependent upon the fundamental optoelectronic properties of the individual diode laser bars. Factors which influence these properties are outlined and comparisons of packaging approaches for these materials are made. Modularity of package for special application requirements is an important developing tendency for high power diode lasers.

  7. Excess noise in tunable diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    The method and the apparatus for identifying excess-noise regions in tunable diode lasers are described. These diode lasers exhibit regions of excess noise as their wavelength is tuned. If a tunable diode laser is to be used as a local oscillator in a superheterodyne optical receiver, these excess-noise regions severely degrade the performance of the receiver. Measurement results for several tunable diode lasers are given. These results indicate that excess noise is not necessarily associated with a particular wavelength, and that it is possible to select temperature and injection current such that the most ideal performance is achieved.

  8. Composite photopolymerization with diode laser.

    PubMed

    Knezevic, Alena; Ristic, Mira; Demoli, Nazif; Tarle, Zrinka; Music, Svetozar; Negovetic Mandic, Visnja

    2007-01-01

    Under clinical conditions, the time needed for the proper light curing of luting composites or the multi-incremental buildup of a large restoration with halogen curing units is quite extensive. Due to the development of high power curing devices, such as argon lasers and plasma arc lights and, in order to decrease curing time, halogen and LED devices have developed a high intensity polymerization mode. This study compared the degree of conversion using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) of two composite materials: Tetric Ceram and Tetric EvoCeram polymerized with three polymerization modes (high, low and soft mode) of a Bluephase 16i LED curing unit and blue diode laser intensity of 50 mW on the output of the laser beam and 35 mW/cm2 on the resin composite sample. Descriptive statistic, t-test, ANOVA, Pearson Correlation and Tukey Post hoc tests were used for statistical analyses. The results show a higher degree of conversion for the polymerization of composite samples with all photopolymerization modes of the LED curing unit. However, there is no significant difference in the degree of conversion between the LED unit and 50-second polymerization with the blue diode laser. Tetric EvoCeram shows a lower degree of conversion regardless of the polymerization mode (or light source) used.

  9. Laser diode array pumped continuous wave Rubidium vapor laser.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, B V; Stooke, A; Boyadjian, G; Voci, A; Knize, R J

    2008-01-21

    We have demonstrated continuous wave operation of a laser diode array pumped Rb laser with an output power of 8 Watts. A slope efficiency of 60% and a total optical efficiency of 45% were obtained with a pump power of 18 Watts. This laser can be scaled to higher powers by using multiple laser diode arrays or stacks of arrays.

  10. Rubidium vapor laser pumped by two laser diode arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Boris V; Stooke, Adam; Boyadjian, Gregory; Voci, Adam; Knize, R J

    2008-03-01

    Scaling of alkali lasers to higher powers requires using multiple diode lasers for pumping. The first (to our knowledge) results of a cw rubidium laser pumped by two laser diode arrays are presented. A slope efficiency of 53%, total optical efficiency of 46%, and output power of 17 W have been demonstrated.

  11. Laser diode package with enhanced cooling

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J [Pleasanton, CA; Kotovsky, Jack [Oakland, CA; Spadaccini, Christopher M [Oakland, CA

    2012-06-12

    A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

  12. Laser diode package with enhanced cooling

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J; Kotovsky, Jack; Spadaccini, Christopher M

    2012-06-26

    A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

  13. Laser diode package with enhanced cooling

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J [Pleasanton, CA; Kotovsky, Jack [Oakland, CA; Spadaccini, Christopher M [Oakland, CA

    2011-09-13

    A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

  14. Hermetic diode laser transmitter module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollila, Jyrki; Kautio, Kari; Vahakangas, Jouko; Hannula, Tapio; Kopola, Harri K.; Oikarinen, Jorma; Sivonen, Matti

    1999-04-01

    In very demanding optoelectronic sensor applications it is necessary to encapsulate semiconductor components hermetically in metal housings to ensure reliable operation of the sensor. In this paper we report on the development work to package a laser diode transmitter module for a time- off-light distance sensor application. The module consists of a lens, laser diode, electronic circuit and optomechanics. Specifications include high acceleration, -40....+75 degree(s)C temperature range, very low gas leakage and mass-production capability. We have applied solder glasses for sealing optical lenses and electrical leads hermetically into a metal case. The lens-metal case sealing has been made by using a special soldering glass preform preserving the optical quality of the lens. The metal housings are finally sealed in an inert atmosphere by welding. The assembly concept to retain excellent optical power and tight optical axis alignment specifications is described. The reliability of the laser modules manufactured has been extensively tested using different aging and environmental test procedures. Sealed packages achieve MIL- 883 standard requirements for gas leakage.

  15. Compact diode array laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtz, James Z.; Grove, Robert E.

    1995-04-01

    High pulse energy diode array laser systems have been constructed for therapeutic and diagnostic medical applications. Two systems are described. One system, constructed for therapeutic application in dermatology, uses 45 bars to generate > 10 joules of energy at approximately 800 nm in a 5-millisecond pulse. This system uses simple microlenses and non- imaging condensers to uniformly illuminate areas of 0.1 to 0.4 cm2 at fluences up to 40 joules per cm2. Cooling, power, and control electronics are housed within the control console, and the laser and condensing optics are housed in the handpiece connected to the control console by means of a two-meter umbilical. The complete system, including closed- cycle cooling, weighs under 14 kg and uses < 2 amps at 110 V. A second system, which is being developed as a burn diagnostic, utilizes a 15-bar diode laser array. The array generates over 3 joules of optical energy. The output light is homogenized and projected using microlenses, a non-imaging condenser, and projection optics. With this system an area of approximately 1000 cm2 can be uniformly illuminated at an intensity of one millijoule per square centimeter. The system, including receiving optics, can be battery-powered and packaged into a hand-held unit.

  16. Diode Lasers and Practical Trace Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imasaka, Totaro; Nobuhiko, Ishibashi

    1990-01-01

    Applications of lasers to molecular absorption spectrometry, molecular fluorescence spectrometry, visible semiconductor fluorometry, atomic absorption spectrometry, and atomic fluorescence spectrometry are discussed. Details of the use of the frequency-doubled diode laser are provided. (CW)

  17. Diode Lasers and Practical Trace Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imasaka, Totaro; Nobuhiko, Ishibashi

    1990-01-01

    Applications of lasers to molecular absorption spectrometry, molecular fluorescence spectrometry, visible semiconductor fluorometry, atomic absorption spectrometry, and atomic fluorescence spectrometry are discussed. Details of the use of the frequency-doubled diode laser are provided. (CW)

  18. Portable Diode Pumped Femtosecond Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Troshin, V. G. Shcherbitsky, N. V. Kuleshov, V. N. Matrosov , T. A. Matrosava, M. I. Kupchenko, F. Brunner, R. Paschotta, F. Morier-Genoud, and U. Keller...Tolstik, V. G. Shcherbitsky, N. V. Kuleshov, V. N. Matrosov , T. A. Matrosava, and M. I. Kupchenko. “Spectroscopy and continuous-wave diode-pumped laser...Denisov, A. E. Troshin, K. V. Yumashev, N. V. Kuleshov, V. N. Matrosov , T. A. Matrosova, and M. I. Kupchenko. “Yb3+-doped YVO4 crystal for efficient

  19. A blu-ray laser diode based dual-beam interference lithography for fabrication of diffraction gratings for surface encoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiangwen; Li, Xinghui; Zhou, Qian; Wang, Xiaohao; Ni, Kai

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents a dual-beam interference lithography technology for fabrication of diffraction gratings for surface encoders by using cost-effective 405 nm blu-ray laser diodes. In this system, an amplitude division interferometer system is employed. A laser beam raying from a blu-ray laser diode is collimated and then divided into two beams by a beam splitter. These two beams are changed their propagation directions and interfere with each other. Generated interference fringes are exposed on the photoresist coated substrate. Grating line spacing d can be adjusted by changing the incident angle between these two beams. Grating width Wc that determines the measurement of the surface encoder is decided by the coherence length Lc of the laser diode and the grating line spacing d. Calculation and simulation were carried out to decide the grating width. Lc was experimentally obtained. A fabrication system was constructed to verify the feasibility of this technology. Diffraction gratings with a 2.5 micron line spacing and a 2.5 mm width was obtained.

  20. Real-time vapor detection of nitroaromatic explosives by catalytic thermal dissociation blue diode laser cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Youssef M.; Odame-Ankrah, Charles A.; Osthoff, Hans D.

    2013-09-01

    A compact blue diode laser catalytic thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectrometer (cTD-CRDS) to detect vapors of nitroaromatic explosives is described. The instrument uses heated platinum(IV) oxide catalyst to convert nitroaromatic compounds to NO2, which is detected at 405 nm. Using the relatively volatile nitrobenzene as a test compound, we show by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) in off-line experiments that nitroaromatics can be quantitatively converted to NO2. The cTD-CRDS detection limit was 0.3 parts-per-billion by volume (ppbv) and sufficiently low to allow the detection of a room temperature sample of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) without sample preconcentration.

  1. Diode Laser Ear Piercing: A Novel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Suseela, Bibilash Babu; Babu, Preethitha; Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Mohapatra, Devi Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Earlobe piercing is a common office room procedure done by a plastic surgeon. Various methods of ear piercing have been described. In this article, we describe a novel method of laser ear piercing using the diode laser. An 18-year-old female patient underwent an ear piercing using a diode laser with a power of 2.0 W in continuous mode after topical local anaesthetic and pre-cooling. The diode laser was fast, safe, easy to use and highly effective way of ear piercing. The advantages we noticed while using the diode laser over conventional methods were more precision, minimal trauma with less chances of hypertrophy and keloids, no bleeding with coagulation effect of laser, less time taken compared to conventional method and less chance of infection due to thermal heat effect of laser. PMID:28163460

  2. Diode Laser Ear Piercing: A Novel Technique.

    PubMed

    Suseela, Bibilash Babu; Babu, Preethitha; Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Mohapatra, Devi Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Earlobe piercing is a common office room procedure done by a plastic surgeon. Various methods of ear piercing have been described. In this article, we describe a novel method of laser ear piercing using the diode laser. An 18-year-old female patient underwent an ear piercing using a diode laser with a power of 2.0 W in continuous mode after topical local anaesthetic and pre-cooling. The diode laser was fast, safe, easy to use and highly effective way of ear piercing. The advantages we noticed while using the diode laser over conventional methods were more precision, minimal trauma with less chances of hypertrophy and keloids, no bleeding with coagulation effect of laser, less time taken compared to conventional method and less chance of infection due to thermal heat effect of laser.

  3. Versatile subnanosecond laser diode driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żbik, Mateusz; Wieczorek, Piotr Z.

    2016-09-01

    This article presents a laser diode driver that provides a fast modulation of a laser beam. A pulsed current source was designed and built to test Infra-Red (I-R) receivers in the Time Domain (TD). The proposed solution allows to estimate pulse responses of various photodetectors, whereas the testing was performed with a PiN photodetector. The pulse response brings the information on the behavior of the device under test in a wide frequency range. In addition, an experimental application of the proposed method is presented too. System discussed in this paper has been fully designed and manufactured in Warsaw University of Technology (WUT) in Institute of Electronic Systems (ISE).

  4. Diode lasers: From laboratory to industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasim, Hira; Jamil, Yasir

    2014-03-01

    The invention of first laser in 1960 triggered the discovery of several new families of lasers. A rich interplay of different lasing materials resulted in a far better understanding of the phenomena particularly linked with atomic and molecular spectroscopy. Diode lasers have gone through tremendous developments on the forefront of applied physics that have shown novel ways to the researchers. Some interesting attributes of the diode lasers like cost effectiveness, miniature size, high reliability and relative simplicity of use make them good candidates for utilization in various practical applications. Diode lasers are being used by a variety of professionals and in several spectroscopic techniques covering many areas of pure and applied sciences. Diode lasers have revolutionized many fields like optical communication industry, medical science, trace gas monitoring, studies related to biology, analytical chemistry including elemental analysis, war fare studies etc. In this paper the diode laser based technologies and measurement techniques ranging from laboratory research to automated field and industry have been reviewed. The application specific developments of diode lasers and various methods of their utilization particularly during the last decade are discussed comprehensively. A detailed snapshot of the current state of the art diode laser applications is given along with a detailed discussion on the upcoming challenges.

  5. Frequency stabilization of diode-laser-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Sunlite program is to fly two diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers on the space shuttle and while doing so to perform a measurement of their frequency stability and temporal coherence. These measurements will be made by combining the outputs of the two lasers on an optical radiation detector and spectrally analyzing the beat note. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers have several characteristics that will make them useful in space borne experiments. First, this laser has high electrical efficiency. Second, it is of a technology that enables scaling to higher powers in the future. Third, the laser can be made extremely reliable, which is crucial for many space based applications. Fourth, they are frequency and amplitude stable and have high temporal coherence. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers are inherently efficient. Recent results have shown 59 percent slope efficiency for a diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser. As for reliability, the laser proposed should be capable of continuous operation. This is possible because the diode lasers can be remote from the solid state gain medium by coupling through optical fibers. Diode lasers are constructed with optical detectors for monitoring their output power built into their mounting case. A computer can actively monitor the output of each diode laser. If it sees any variation in the output power that might indicate a problem, the computer can turn off that diode laser and turn on a backup diode laser. As for stability requirements, it is now generally believed that any laser can be stabilized if the laser has a frequency actuator capable of tuning the laser frequency as far as it is likely to drift in a measurement time.

  6. Improved Thermoelectrically Cooled Laser-Diode Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glesne, Thomas R.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joe

    1994-01-01

    Cooling decreases wavelength and increases efficiency and lifetime. Two improved thermoelectrically cooled laser-diode assemblies incorporate commercial laser diodes providing combination of both high wavelength stability and broad wavelength tuning which are broadly tunable, highly stable devices for injection seeding of pulsed, high-power tunable alexandrite lasers used in lidar remote sensing of water vapor at wavelengths in vicinity of 727 nanometers. Provide temperature control needed to take advantage of tunability of commercial AlGaAs laser diodes in present injection-seeding application.

  7. Improved Thermoelectrically Cooled Laser-Diode Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glesne, Thomas R.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joe

    1994-01-01

    Cooling decreases wavelength and increases efficiency and lifetime. Two improved thermoelectrically cooled laser-diode assemblies incorporate commercial laser diodes providing combination of both high wavelength stability and broad wavelength tuning which are broadly tunable, highly stable devices for injection seeding of pulsed, high-power tunable alexandrite lasers used in lidar remote sensing of water vapor at wavelengths in vicinity of 727 nanometers. Provide temperature control needed to take advantage of tunability of commercial AlGaAs laser diodes in present injection-seeding application.

  8. Diode laser (980nm) cartilage reshaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kharbotly, A.; El Tayeb, T.; Mostafa, Y.; Hesham, I.

    2011-03-01

    Loss of facial or ear cartilage due to trauma or surgery is a major challenge to the otolaryngologists and plastic surgeons as the complicated geometric contours are difficult to be animated. Diode laser (980 nm) has been proven effective in reshaping and maintaining the new geometric shape achieved by laser. This study focused on determining the optimum laser parameters needed for cartilage reshaping with a controlled water cooling system. Harvested animal cartilages were angulated with different degrees and irradiated with different diode laser powers (980nm, 4x8mm spot size). The cartilage specimens were maintained in a deformation angle for two hours after irradiation then released for another two hours. They were serially measured and photographed. High-power Diode laser irradiation with water cooling is a cheep and effective method for reshaping the cartilage needed for reconstruction of difficult situations in otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Key words: cartilage,diode laser (980nm), reshaping.

  9. Diode-pumped laser altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welford, D.; Isyanova, Y.

    1993-01-01

    TEM(sub 00)-mode output energies up to 22.5 mJ with 23 percent slope efficiencies were generated at 1.064 microns in a diode-laser pumped Nd:YAG laser using a transverse-pumping geometry. 1.32-micron performance was equally impressive at 10.2 mJ output energy with 15 percent slope efficiency. The same pumping geometry was successfully carried forward to several complex Q-switched laser resonator designs with no noticeable degradation of beam quality. Output beam profiles were consistently shown to have greater than 90 percent correlation with the ideal TEM(sub 00)-order Gaussian profile. A comparison study on pulse-reflection-mode (PRM), pulse-transmission-mode (PTM), and passive Q-switching techniques was undertaken. The PRM Q-switched laser generated 8.3 mJ pulses with durations as short as 10 ns. The PTM Q-switch laser generated 5 mJ pulses with durations as short as 5 ns. The passively Q-switched laser generated 5 mJ pulses with durations as short as 2.4 ns. Frequency doubling of both 1.064 microns and 1.32 microns with conversion efficiencies of 56 percent in lithium triborate and 10 percent in rubidium titanyl arsenate, respectively, was shown. Sum-frequency generation of the 1.064 microns and 1.32 microns radiations was demonstrated in KTP to generate 1.1 mJ of 0.589 micron output with 11.5 percent conversion efficiency.

  10. Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, G.R.; Hohimer, J.P.; Owyoung, A.

    1991-02-19

    A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet. 18 figures.

  11. Integrated injection-locked semiconductor diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, G. Ronald; Hohimer, John P.; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1991-01-01

    A continuous wave integrated injection-locked high-power diode laser array is provided with an on-chip independently-controlled master laser. The integrated injection locked high-power diode laser array is capable of continuous wave lasing in a single near-diffraction limited output beam at single-facet power levels up to 125 mW (250 mW total). Electronic steering of the array emission over an angle of 0.5 degrees is obtained by varying current to the master laser. The master laser injects a laser beam into the slave array by reflection of a rear facet.

  12. A compact high brilliance diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bammer, F.; Holzinger, B.

    2006-02-01

    We explain some technical details regarding time-multiplexing of laser diodes, a method to improve the beam quality of diode lasers, which is still insufficient for many applications. Several pulsed laser diode beams are guided onto a common optical path to superpose the power of the laser diodes while maintaining the beam parameter product of a single laser diode. Pulsed operation of continuous wave laser diodes with average power equal to the specified cw-power of 4 W was tested for 150 hours without failure. We use a fast digital optical multiplexer built up by a cascade of binary optical switches. For the latter we use a Pockel's cell followed by a polarization filter, which allows addressing of two optical paths. Instead of direct on/off-switching we drive the crystals with a harmonic voltage course to avoid ringing caused by piezo-electricity. Up to now an optical power of 10.5 W was generated, 13 W are expected with some improvements. Furthermore we discuss the use of new 8 W laser diodes and the involved implications on driver technology.

  13. Laterally injected light-emitting diode and laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Mary A.; Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2015-06-16

    A p-type superlattice is used to laterally inject holes into an III-nitride multiple quantum well active layer, enabling efficient light extraction from the active area. Laterally-injected light-emitting diodes and laser diodes can enable brighter, more efficient devices that impact a wide range of wavelengths and applications. For UV wavelengths, applications include fluorescence-based biological sensing, epoxy curing, and water purification. For visible devices, applications include solid state lighting and projection systems.

  14. Percutaneous diode laser disc nucleoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchetti, P. P.; Longo, Leonardo

    2004-09-01

    The treatment of herniated disc disease (HNP) over the years involved different miniinvasive surgical options. The classical microsurgical approach has been substituted over the years both by endoscopic approach in which is possible to practice via endoscopy a laser thermo-discoplasty, both by percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. In the last ten years, the percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty have been done worldwide in more than 40000 cases of HNP. Because water is the major component of the intervertebral disc, and in HNP pain is caused by the disc protrusion pressing against the nerve root, a 980 nm Diode laser introduced via a 22G needle under X-ray guidance and local anesthesia, vaporizes a small amount of nucleous polposus with a disc shrinkage and a relief of pressure on nerve root. Most patients get off the table pain free and are back to work in 5 to 7 days. Material and method: to date, 130 patients (155 cases) suffering for relevant symptoms therapy-resistant 6 months on average before consulting our department, have been treated. Eightyfour (72%) males and 46 (28%) females had a percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. The average age of patients operated was 48 years (22 - 69). The level of disc removal was L3/L4 in 12 cases, L4/L5 in 87 cases and L5/S1 in 56 cases. Two different levels were treated at the same time in 25 patients. Results: the success rate at a minimum follow-up of 6 months was 88% with a complication rate of 0.5%.

  15. Advanced laser diodes for sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    VAWTER,GREGORY A.; MAR,ALAN; CHOW,WENG W.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-01-01

    The authors have developed diode lasers for short pulse duration and high peak pulse power in the 0.01--100.0 m pulsewidth regime. A primary goal of the program was producing up to 10 W while maintaining good far-field beam quality and ease of manufacturability for low cost. High peak power, 17 W, picosecond pulses have been achieved by gain switching of flared geometry waveguide lasers and amplifiers. Such high powers area world record for this type of diode laser. The light emission pattern from diode lasers is of critical importance for sensing systems such as range finding and chemical detection. They have developed a new integrated optical beam transformer producing rib-waveguide diode lasers with a symmetric, low divergence, output beam and increased upper power limits for irreversible facet damage.

  16. Bright diode laser light source.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Erkki; Hernberg, Rolf

    2006-05-20

    A simplified multiwavelength prototype of an axially symmetric diode laser device based on stacks made of single emitters has been made, and the performance of the device has been demonstrated experimentally. The results verify that kilowatt-level light power can be focused into a circular spot with a 1/e2 diameter of 360 microm, a focal length of 100 mm, and a numerical aperture of 0.24, thus producing an average power density in excess of 10 kW/mm2 and a brightness of 6x10(10) W m-2 sr-1. The experiments also predict that it will be possible to increase these values to more than 60 kW/mm2 and 3x10(11) W m-2 sr-1.

  17. High power diode lasers reliability experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guoguang; Xie, Shaofeng; Hao, Mingming; Huang, Yun; En, Yunfei

    2013-12-01

    In order to evaluate and obtain the actual lifetime data of high power laser diodes, an automated high power laser diodes reliability experiment was developed and reported in this paper. This computer controlled setup operates the laser diodes 24 hours a day, the parameters such as output power, wavelength were test once in one hour. The experiment has 60 work stations, the temperature control range is from 25°C to 70°C, and the output power of the aging device is beyond 20W.

  18. High power coherent polarization locked laser diode.

    PubMed

    Purnawirman; Phua, P B

    2011-03-14

    We have coherently combined a broad area laser diode array to obtain high power single-lobed output by using coherent polarization locking. The single-lobed coherent beam is achieved by spatially combining four diode emitters using walk-off crystals and waveplates while their phases are passively locked via polarization discrimination. While our previous work focused on coherent polarization locking of diode in Gaussian beams, we demonstrate in this paper, the feasibility of the same polarization discrimination for locking multimode beams from broad area diode lasers. The resonator is designed to mitigate the loss from smile effect by using retro-reflection feedback in the cavity. In a 980 nm diode array, we produced 7.2 W coherent output with M2 of 1.5x11.5. The brightness of the diode is improved by more than an order of magnitude.

  19. Laser diode initiated detonators for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewick, David W.; Graham, J. A.; Hawley, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Ensign Bickford Aerospace Company (EBAC) has over ten years of experience in the design and development of laser ordnance systems. Recent efforts have focused on the development of laser diode ordnance systems for space applications. Because the laser initiated detonators contain only insensitive secondary explosives, a high degree of system safety is achieved. Typical performance characteristics of a laser diode initiated detonator are described in this paper, including all-fire level, function time, and output. A finite difference model used at EBAC to predict detonator performance, is described and calculated results are compared to experimental data. Finally, the use of statistically designed experiments to evaluate performance of laser initiated detonators is discussed.

  20. Arbitrary waveform generator to improve laser diode driver performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fulkerson, Jr, Edward Steven

    2015-11-03

    An arbitrary waveform generator modifies the input signal to a laser diode driver circuit in order to reduce the overshoot/undershoot and provide a "flat-top" signal to the laser diode driver circuit. The input signal is modified based on the original received signal and the feedback from the laser diode by measuring the actual current flowing in the laser diode after the original signal is applied to the laser diode.

  1. Pump Diode Characterization for an Unstable Diode-Pumped Alkali Laser Resonator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    PUMP DIODE CHARACTERIZATION FOR AN UNSTABLE DIODE - PUMPED ALKALI LASER RESONATOR THESIS Chad T. Taguba, Master Sergeant, USAF AFIT-ENP-13-M-33...not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENP-13-M-33 PUMP DIODE CHARACTERIZATION FOR AN UNSTABLE DIODE - PUMPED ALKALI LASER ... DIODE CHARACTERIZATION FOR AN UNSTABLE DIODE - PUMPED ALKALI LASER RESONATOR Approved: Chad T. Taguba, BS Master Sergeant, USAF

  2. Analysis of phased-array diode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, A.; Streifer, W.

    1985-07-01

    An improved, more accurate analysis of phased-array diode lasers is presented, which yields results that differ both qualitatively and quantitatively from those previously employed. A numerical example indicating decreased splitting in array mode gains is included.

  3. Narrowband alexandrite laser injection seeded with frequency dithered diode laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary; Lee, H. S.; Prasad, Coorg

    1991-01-01

    Narrowband radiation is produced from a pulsed alexandrite laser when injection seeded with the output of a low power, tunable, continuous wave single mode diode laser. Injection seeded power oscillators are easier to frequency stabilize than etalon narrowed lasers, are more efficient and less prone to optical damage. AlGaAs diode lasers are available with wavelengths from 760 to 770 nm in the oxygen A band that can be used for differential absorption lidar remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature. Diodes with room temperature output at 740 nm may be cooled sufficiently to emit in the water vapor absorption band at 720-730 nm for humidity remote sensing. The diode laser linewidth of 200 MHz is sufficient to seed 2 or 3 longitudinal modes of the multi-transverse mode alexandrite laser, giving the pulsed laser a bandwidth of 0.007 to 0.014/cm.

  4. Microcollimated laser diode with low wavefront aberration

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, S.; Sekii, H.; Maeda, T.; Goto, H.; Yamashita, T.; Imanaka, K. )

    1989-11-01

    The authors developed microcollimated laser diode( MCLD) utilizing a 1 mm short focal length, phi, lc 0.5 mm small diameter micro Fresnel lens (MFL) for the first time as the collimating lens. The MCLD is assembled with a 780 nm quantum-well laser diode dice and an MFL in the smallest commercial available laser package. The radiated laser beam form the MCLD has higher than 2mW power at 50 mA driving current, narrow enough as a phi 2 mm beam diameter with nearly Gaussian intensity profile, and low wavefront aberration less than {lambda}14 (rms value) measured at 1 m distance.

  5. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  6. Spatial Dosimetry with Violet Diode Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Water-Equivalent Radio-Fluorogenic Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandwall, Peter A., II

    The following work describes investigations of spatial dosimetry using laser-induced fluorescence of a radio-fluorogenic detector embedded within water-equivalent media. The chemical composition of a gelatin-based coumarin-3-carboxylic acid detector was investigated and dose response characterized. Violet diode (405nm) excitation sources were explored and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) employed to obtain the pattern of fluorescent emission yielding images of the integrated spatial dose distribution. The design of a three-dimensional reader is proposed to provide a foundation for future work. Radio-fluorogenic processes create fluorescent products in response to ionizing radiation. Water radiolysis produced by ionizing radiation yields hydroxyl free radicals that readily hydroxylate coumarin-3-carboxylic acid to 7-hydroxy-coumarin-3-carboxylic acid, a derivative of umbelliferone. Umbelliferone is a known fluorophore, exhibiting peak excitation in the UV to near UV range of 365-405nm with a visible 445nm blue emission. Coumarin-3-carboxlyic acid has been studied in an aqueous gelatin matrix. The radio-fluorogenic coumarin-gelatin detector has been shown to respond to an absorbed dose of ionizing radiation in a measureable manner. The detector was studied with respect to concentration of gelatin and coumarin in the presence of pH buffers. Dose response of the detector was investigated with regard to ionizing radiation type, energy, and rate of irradiation. Results demonstrate a functional detector. Patterns of energy deposition were formed in response to ionizing radiation produced by a sealed-source of radioactive Ir-192 embedded in the gelatin matrix of the detector. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose were recorded and analyzed as a function of fluorescent emission. The distribution of energy deposition was imaged with LIF excitation by a divergent beam of 405nm light and determined by analysis of digital image pixel intensity values displaying the 445nm

  7. Picosecond pulsed diode ring laser gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Rosker, M.J.; Christian, W.R.; McMichael, I.C.

    1994-12-31

    An external ring cavity containing as its active medium a pair of InGaAsP diodes is modelocked to produce picosecond pulses. In such a laser, a small frequency difference proportional to the nonreciprocal phase shift (resulting from, e.g., the Sagnac effect) can be observed by beating together the counter propagating laser arms; the device therefore acts as a rotating sensor. In contrast to a conventional (cw) ring laser gyroscope, the pulsed gyroscope can avoid gain competition, thereby enabling the use of homogeneously broadened gain media like semiconductor diodes. Temporal separation of the pulses within the cavity also discriminates against frequency locking of the lasers. The picosecond pulsed diode ring laser gyroscope is reviewed. Both active and passive modelocking are discussed.

  8. Composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Chow, W.W.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-05-01

    The use of two coupled laser cavities has been employed in edge emitting semiconductor lasers for mode suppression and frequency stabilization. The incorporation of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. Composite resonators can be utilized to control spectral and temporal properties within the laser; previous studies of coupled cavity vertical cavity lasers have employed photopumped structures. The authors report the first composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode consisting of two optical cavities and three monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. Cavity coupling effects and two techniques for external modulation of the laser are described.

  9. Absolute distance interferometry using diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiners-Hagen, K.; Abou-Zeid, A.; Hartmann, L.

    2008-10-01

    An approach to a homodyne absolute distance interferometer (ADI) was previously presented which makes use of two extended cavity diode lasers (ECDL). The length measurement is performed by combining variable synthetic wavelength interferometry and two wavelength interferometry in one setup. In this contribution the ADI was compared to a counting HeNe laser interferometer up to a length of 10 m.

  10. Diode-side-pumped Alexandrite slab lasers.

    PubMed

    Damzen, M J; Thomas, G M; Minassian, A

    2017-05-15

    We present the investigation of diode-side-pumping of Alexandrite slab lasers in a range of designs using linear cavity and grazing-incidence bounce cavity configurations. An Alexandrite slab laser cavity with double-pass side pumping produces 23.4 mJ free-running energy at 100 Hz rate with slope efficiency ~40% with respect to absorbed pump energy. In a slab laser with single-bounce geometry output power of 12.2 W is produced, and in a double-bounce configuration 6.5 W multimode and 4.5 W output in TEM00 mode is produced. These first results of slab laser and amplifier designs in this paper highlight some of the potential strategies for power and energy scaling of Alexandrite using diode-side-pumped Alexandrite slab architectures with future availability of higher power red diode pumping.

  11. Visible to near IR luminescence spectrum of Radachlorin under excitation at 405 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belik, V. P.; Gadzhiev, I. M.; Petrenko, M. V.; Petrov, M. A.; Semenova, I. V.; Vasyutinskii, O. S.

    2016-11-01

    The luminescence spectrum of Radachlorin dissolved in water in the 600-1350 nm spectral range excited by 405 nm light has been recorded at the first time. The spectrum contains a wide band with peaks centered at 662, 715, 940, and 1274 nm. Relative contributions to the spectrum from different sources have been evaluated. Ratio of the singlet oxygen signal to the total signal intensity averaged over the 1240-1300 nm spectral range was determined to be 40%. Isolation of the singlet oxygen signal from the total signal at 1274 nm has been achieved by means of a spectral-resolved TCSPC detection technique.

  12. Qualification and Selection of Flight Diode Lasers for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Carl C.; Dillon, Robert P.; Gontijo, Ivair; Forouhar, Siamak; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Cooper, Mark S.; Meras, Patrick L.

    2010-01-01

    The reliability and lifetime of laser diodes is critical to space missions. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission includes a metrology system that is based upon laser diodes. An operational test facility has been developed to qualify and select, by mission standards, laser diodes that will survive the intended space environment and mission lifetime. The facility is situated in an electrostatic discharge (ESD) certified clean-room and consist of an enclosed temperature-controlled stage that can accommodate up to 20 laser diodes. The facility is designed to characterize a single laser diode, in addition to conducting laser lifetime testing on up to 20 laser diodes simultaneously. A standard laser current driver is used to drive a single laser diode. Laser diode current, voltage, power, and wavelength are measured for each laser diode, and a method of selecting the most adequate laser diodes for space deployment is implemented. The method consists of creating histograms of laser threshold currents, powers at a designated current, and wavelengths at designated power. From these histograms, the laser diodes that illustrate a performance that is outside the normal are rejected and the remaining lasers are considered spaceborne candidates. To perform laser lifetime testing, the facility is equipped with 20 custom laser drivers that were designed and built by California Institute of Technology specifically to drive NuSTAR metrology lasers. The laser drivers can be operated in constant-current mode or alternating-current mode. Situated inside the enclosure, in front of the laser diodes, are 20 power-meter heads to record laser power throughout the duration of lifetime testing. Prior to connecting a laser diode to the current source for characterization and lifetime testing, a background program is initiated to collect current, voltage, and resistance. This backstage data collection enables the operational test facility to have full laser diode

  13. Diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Tso Yee; Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    Recently, interest in diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers has increased due to their advantages over flashlamp-pumped solid-state lasers. A historical overview is presented of semiconductor diode-pumped solid-state lasers beginning with work in the early 1960s and continuing through recent work on wavelength extension of these devices by laser operation on new transitions. Modeling of these devices by rate equations to obtain expressions for threshold, slope efficiency, and figures of merit is also given.

  14. Diode-laser-based therapy device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udrea, Mircea V.; Nica, Adriana S.; Florian, Mariana; Poenaru, Daniela; Udrea, Gabriela; Lungeanu, Mihaela; Sporea, Dan G.; Vasiliu, Virgil V.; Vieru, Roxana

    2004-10-01

    A new therapy laser device is presented. The device consists of a central unit and different types of laser probes. The laser probe model SL7-650 delivers seven red (650 nm), 5 mW diode lasers convergent beams. The beams converge at about 30 cm in front of the laser probe and the irradiated area might be varied by simple displacement of the laser probe with respect to the target. The laser probe SL1-808 emits single infrared laser beam up to 500 mW. The efficiency of the use of this device in physiotherapy, and rheumatology, has been put into evidence after years of testing. Dermatology and microsurgery are users of infrared powerful laser probes. The device has successfully passed technical and clinical tests in order to be certified. The laser device design and some medical results are given.

  15. Rugged, Tunable Extended-Cavity Diode Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Donald; Brinza, David; Seidel, David; Klipstein, William; Choi, Dong Ho; Le, Lam; Zhang, Guangzhi; Iniguez, Roberto; Tang, Wade

    2007-01-01

    A rugged, tunable extended-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been developed to satisfy stringent requirements for frequency stability, notably including low sensitivity to vibration. This laser is designed specifically for use in an atomic-clock experiment to be performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Lasers of similar design would be suitable for use in terrestrial laboratories engaged in atomic-clock and atomic-physics research.

  16. Cover slip external cavity diode laser.

    PubMed

    Carr, Adra V; Sechrest, Yancey H; Waitukaitis, Scott R; Perreault, John D; Lonij, Vincent P A; Cronin, Alexander D

    2007-10-01

    A 671 nm diode laser with a mode-hop-free tuning range of 40 GHz is described. This long tuning range is achieved by simultaneously ramping the external cavity length with the laser injection current. The laser output pointing remains fixed, independent of its frequency because of the cover slip cavity design. This system is simple, economical, robust, and easy to use for spectroscopy, as we demonstrate with lithium vapor and lithium atom beam experiments.

  17. Phase Noise Reduction of Laser Diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T. C.; Poizat, J.-Ph.; Grelu, P.; Roch, J.-F.; Grangier, P.; Marin, F.; Bramati, A.; Jost, V.; Levenson, M. D.; Giacobino, E.

    1996-01-01

    Phase noise of single mode laser diodes, either free-running or using line narrowing technique at room temperature, namely injection-locking, has been investigated. It is shown that free-running diodes exhibit very large excess phase noise, typically more than 80 dB above shot-noise at 10 MHz, which can be significantly reduced by the above-mentioned technique.

  18. A compact and efficient hyper coherent light source of visible violet laser diode based on Pound-Drever-Hall technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Wakao; Yashiro, Hideyuki; Miura, Yukio; Mizutani, Kouki; Nakajima, Jun

    2007-09-01

    In the present work, we have developed an efficient and well stablized hyper coherent diode laser light source as compact as even portable using commercially available visible 400 nm band laser diodes. The attained coherence of the present system can always be controlled at the best condition indifferent to changes in its settled environmental conditions by applying Pound-Drever-Hall technique in which the frequency of a 160mW type 405nm GaN violet laser diode is locked to a reference Fabry-Perot cavity by negative electrical feedback for the injection current of the laser diode based on FM sideband technique. In addition to this frequency stabilization system, we have also realized a stability evaluation system that can measure the Allan variance of the frequency fluctuations of our frequency stabilized laser source in real-time basis by using simple devices of a portable computer and a digital signal processing unit. As a result, we have accomplished a compact and efficient hyper coherent laser system which can always perform its optimum conditions even if the environmental conditions around the laser are to be dynamically changed when used in a field basis. The attained values of power spectral density (PSD) of FM noise calculated from the error signals of our system under controlled condition were better by about 1~2 orders than typical values of free-running conditions in the fourier frequency domain from 100Hz to 300kHz. The best achieved value of PSD was about 2.56×10 7 [Hz2/Hz] in the fourier frequency domain from 100Hz to 1kHz, while as for the Allan variance as another measure of frequency stability, the achieved value of the minimum square root of Allan variance was 3.46×10 -11 in a 400nm type violet laser diode at integration time of 10 ms, which has been well comparable to the hyper coherent condition for the laser diode light sources.

  19. Stirling-Cycle Cooling For Tunable Diode Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durso, Santo S.; May, Randy D.; Tuchscherer, Matthew A.; Webster, Christopher R.

    1991-01-01

    Miniature Stirling-cycle cooler effective in continously cooling PbSnTe tunable diode laser to stable operating temperature near 80 K. Simplifies laboratory diode-laser spectroscopy and instruments for use aboard aircraft and balloons.

  20. Blue-emitting external cavity laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hong Man; Song, Hong Joo; Park, Jong Hwan; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Jung Ho

    2016-03-01

    An front facet anti-reflection coated solitary laser diode is operated in the external cavity diode laser (ECDL). For wavelength stabilization and narrow spectral width, the diffraction grating is used in a Littrow configuration. At an injection current of 280 mA, a output power of 35mW with a slope efficiency of 0.22 W/A and the bandwidth of 80 pm at a wavelength of 457 nm. In this paper, the tunable external cavity diode laser module is designed with an overall size of 18 mm x 24 mm x 14 mm. ECDL showed excellent wavelength locking behavior without a non-shift of the peak wavelength.

  1. The MVACS tunable diode laser spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Randy D.; Forouhar, Siamak; Crisp, David; Woodward, W. Stephen; Paige, David A.; Pathare, Asmin; Boynton, William V.

    2001-08-01

    Two independent tunable diode laser spectrometers are resident aboard the Mars Polar Lander as part of the Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor payload. One spectrometer is located on the meteorological mast for measurements of H2O and CO2 in the free atmosphere, and the other serves as the H2O and CO2 analyzer for the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer. Water vapor is measured using a tunable diode laser operating at 1.37 μm, while CO2 is measured using a second laser operating near 2.05 μm. The 2.05 μm laser also has isotopic analysis capability. In addition to the major CO2 isotopomer (12C16O16O), analyses of 13C16O16O and 12C18O16O in the atmosphere and in the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer are possible under certain conditions. The spectrometers were designed and built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and have their heritage in a series of tunable diode laser spectrometers developed for Earth atmospheric studies using high-altitude aircraft and balloon platforms. The 1.37 μm diode laser on the meteorological mast will provide the first in situ measurements of water vapor in the Martian boundary layer, with a detection sensitivity an order of magnitude greater than the water vapor abundances inferred from the remote-sensing observations by the Viking Orbiters.

  2. Diode pumped Nd:YAG laser development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reno, C. W.; Herzog, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    A low power Nd:YAG laser was constructed which employs GaAs injection lasers as a pump source. Power outputs of 125 mW TEM CW with the rod at 250 K and the pump at 180 K were achieved for 45 W input power to the pump source. Operation of the laser, with array and laser at a common heat sink temperature of 250 K, was inhibited by difficulties in constructing long-life GaAs LOC laser arrays. Tests verified pumping with output power of 20 to 30 mW with rod and pump at 250 K. Although life tests with single LOC GaAs diodes were somewhat encouraging (with single diodes operating as long as 9000 hours without degradation), failures of single diodes in arrays continue to occur, and 50 percent power is lost in a few hundred hours at 1 percent duty factor. Because of the large recent advances in the state of the art of CW room temperature AlGaAs diodes, their demonstrated lifetimes of greater than 5,000 hours, and their inherent advantages for this task, it is recommended that these sources be used for further CW YAG injection laser pumping work.

  3. Computer processing of tunable diode laser spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Randy D.

    1989-01-01

    A computer-controlled tunable diode laser spectrometer and spectral analysis software are described. The three-channel system records simultaneously the transmission of a subject gas, a temperature-stabilized etalon, and a calibration gas. The software routines are applied to diode laser spectra of HNO3 and NO2 to illustrate the procedures adopted for conversion of raw spectral data to useful transmission and harmonic spectra. Extraction of line positions, absorption intensities, collisional broadening coefficients, and gas concentrations from recorded spectra is also described.

  4. Optical tweezers using a diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Robert S.; Treacy, E. Brian

    1992-04-01

    Simple modifications were made to a commercial microscope to enable injection of light from a diode laser, and demonstrate optical tweezers action. The basic properties of microscope optics are presented together with discussion of principles to be followed in arranging the external optics for achieving useful tweezers. Procedures using a single-mode diode laser along with experimental results are presented in enough detail to permit readers to make their own system for trapping and manipulating single cells. It is surprisingly easy to demonstrate tweezers action once some basic concepts are understood.

  5. Design Considerations for the Diode-pumped Laser Ignition Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Design Considerations for the Diode - pumped Laser Ignition Project by Jeffrey O. White ARL-TN-0526 January 2013...Design Considerations for the Diode - pumped Laser Ignition Project Jeffrey O. White Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL...August 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Design Considerations for the Diode - pumped Laser Ignition Project 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  6. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  7. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  8. Cytotoxic responses to 405nm light exposure in mammalian and bacterial cells: Involvement of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Praveen; Maclean, Michelle; MacGregor, Scott J; Anderson, John G; Grant, M Helen

    2016-06-01

    Light at wavelength 405 nm is an effective bactericide. Previous studies showed that exposing mammalian cells to 405 nm light at 36 J/cm(2) (a bactericidal dose) had no significant effect on normal cell function, although at higher doses (54 J/cm(2)), mammalian cell death became evident. This research demonstrates that mammalian and bacterial cell toxicity induced by 405 nm light exposure is accompanied by reactive oxygen species production, as detected by generation of fluorescence from 6-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. As indicators of the resulting oxidative stress in mammalian cells, a decrease in intracellular reduced glutathione content and a corresponding increase in the efflux of oxidised glutathione were observed from 405 nm light treated cells. The mammalian cells were significantly protected from dying at 54 J/cm(2) in the presence of catalase, which detoxifies H2O2. Bacterial cells were significantly protected by sodium pyruvate (H2O2 scavenger) and by a combination of free radical scavengers (sodium pyruvate, dimethyl thiourea (OH scavenger) and catalase) at 162 and 324 J/cm(2). Results therefore suggested that the cytotoxic mechanism of 405 nm light in mammalian cells and bacteria could be oxidative stress involving predominantly H2O2 generation, with other ROS contributing to the damage.

  9. A Treatment of Amblyopia Using Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Di; Wang, Yi-Ding; Liu, Bing-Chun

    2000-04-01

    We propose the treatment of amblyopia using yellow-green laser diodes. There are amblyopia children in excess of fifty million in the world. Because the causative agent of amblyopia hasn't been well understood,only roughly considered to be concerned with visual sense cell, optic nerve network and function of nerve center, no appropriate treatment is found up to date. The vision of person is determined by the center hollow region of retina, where there are three kinds of cone cell. The corresponding peak wavelength in absorption spectrum locates 447nm (blue light), 532nm (green light) and 565nm (yellow light), respectively. When stimulated by white light, excited degree of three kinds of cone cell are identical,or yellow-green light, to which person eye is most sensitive, will significantly takes effects. Therefore the yellow-green laser diode is suitable for treating amblyopia. The weak laser, namely laser power less than mW order of magnitude, shows curative by stimulating bion tissue. When stimulating light power density is less than 0.001W/cm, the compounding speed of nucleic acid DNA is significantly increased. The growth rate of cell, activity of enzyme, content of hemoglobin and the growth of blood vessel, are all increased. However, it's key to control the dose of light. When the dose transcend some value, a inhibition will occur. The little dose of weak laser treatment can be accumulated with a parabolic characteristics, that is the weak laser generate bion response stengthening gradually versus time. Then it will weaken gradually after the peak. When the treatment duration is longer than a certain time, a inhibition also takes place. A suggested theraphy is characterized by little dose and short treatment course. In a conclusion, the yellow-green laser diode should be used for the treatment of amblyopia. The little dose and short treatment couse are to be adopted. Key words:treatment amblyopia laser diode

  10. Advances in laser diodes for pyrotechnic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Richard R.

    1993-01-01

    Background information concerning the use of laser diodes in pyrotechnic applications is provided in viewgraph form. The following topics are discussed: damage limits, temperature stability, fiber coupling issues, and small (100 micron) and large (400 micron) fiber results. The discussions concerning fiber results concentrate on the areas of package geometry and electro-optical properties.

  11. Monolithic resonant optical reflector laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, T.; Suehiro, M.; Maeda, M.; Hihara, M.; Hosomatsu, H.

    1991-10-01

    The first monolithic resonant optical reflector laser diode that has a waveguide directional coupler and two DBR reflectors integrated by compositional disordering of quantum-well heterostructures is described. A linewidth of 440 kHz was obtained, and this value is expected to be greatly decreased by reducing the propagation loss in the integrated waveguide.

  12. Diode Laser Sensor for Scramjet Inlets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-03

    separately mounted in a hollow box to a solid aluminum block with spaces milled out for the optical components. This reduces the number of additional...Society to perform tests at subsonic and transonic speeds in the DSTO transonic facility using O2 diode laser absorption spectroscopy. • The presentation

  13. Noninvasive blood glucose monitoring with laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiqin; Chen, Jianhong; Ooi, Ean Tat; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2006-02-01

    The non-invasive measurement of blood sugar level was studied by use of near infrared laser diodes. The in vitro and in vivo experiments were carried out using six laser diodes having wavelengths range from 1550 nm to 1750nm. Several volunteers were tested for OGTT (Oral Glucose Tolerance Test) experiment. We took blood from a fingertip and measured its concentration with a glucose meter while taking signal voltage from laser diodes system. The data of signal voltage were processed to do calibration and prediction; in this paper PLS (Partial Least Square) method was used to do modeling. For in vitro experiment, good linear relationship between predicted glucose concentration and real glucose concentration was obtained. For in vivo experiments, we got the blood sugar level distributions in Clarke error grid that is a reference for doctors to do diagnosis and treatment. In the Clarke error grid, 75% of all data was in area A and 25 % was in area B. From the in vitro and in vivo results we know that multiple laser diodes are suitable for non-invasive blood glucose monitoring.

  14. Diode Laser Excision of Oral Benign Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Ena; Sareen, Mohit; Dhaka, Payal; Baghla, Pallavi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lasers have made tremendous progress in the field of dentistry and have turned out to be crucial in oral surgery as collateral approach for soft tissue surgery. This rapid progress can be attributed to the fact that lasers allow efficient execution of soft tissue procedures with excellent hemostasis and field visibility. When matched to scalpel, electrocautery or high frequency devices, lasers offer maximum postoperative patient comfort. Methods: Four patients agreed to undergo surgical removal of benign lesions of the oral cavity. 810 nm diode lasers were used in continuous wave mode for excisional biopsy. The specimens were sent for histopathological examination and patients were assessed on intraoperative and postoperative complications. Results: Diode laser surgery was rapid, bloodless and well accepted by patients and led to complete resolution of the lesions. The excised specimen proved adequate for histopathological examination. Hemostasis was achieved immediately after the procedure with minimal postoperative problems, discomfort and scarring. Conclusion: We conclude that diode lasers are rapidly becoming the standard of care in contemporary dental practice and can be employed in procedures requiring excisional biopsy of oral soft tissue lesions with minimal problems in histopathological diagnosis. PMID:26464781

  15. Detection limits of 405 nm and 633 nm excited PpIX fluorescence for brain tumor detection during stereotactic biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwardt, Niklas; Götz, Marcus; Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Hollnburger, Bastian; Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert; Zelenkov, Petr; Rühm, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    5-aminolevulinic-acid-(5-ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence may be used to improve stereotactic brain tumor biopsies. In this study, the sensitivity of PpIX-based tumor detection has been investigated for two potential excitation wavelengths (405 nm, 633 nm). Using a 200 μm fiber in contact with semi-infinite optical phantoms containing ink and Lipovenös, PpIX detection limits of 4.0 nM and 200 nM (relating to 1 mW excitation power) were determined for 405 nm and 633 nm excitation, respectively. Hence, typical PpIX concentrations in glioblastomas of a few μM should be well detectable with both wavelengths. Additionally, blood layers of selected thicknesses were placed between fiber and phantom. Red excitation was shown to be considerably less affected by blood interference: A 50 μm blood layer, for instance, blocked the 405- nm-excited fluorescence completely, but reduced the 633-nm-excited signal by less than 50%. Ray tracing simulations demonstrated that - without blood layer - the sensitivity advantage of 405 nm rises for decreasing fluorescent volume from 50-fold to a maximum of 100-fold. However, at a tumor volume of 1 mm3, which is a typical biopsy sample size, the 633-nm-excited fluorescence signal is only reduced by about 10%. Further simulations revealed that with increasing fiber-tumor distance, the signal drops faster for 405 nm. This reduces the risk of detecting tumor tissue outside the needle's coverage, but diminishes the overlap between optically and mechanically sampled volumes. While 405 nm generally offers a higher sensitivity, 633 nm is more sensitive to distant tumors and considerably superior in case of blood-covered tumor tissue.

  16. Power semiconductor laser diode arrays characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeni, Luigi; Campopiano, Stefania; Cutolo, Antonello; D'Angelo, Giuseppe

    2003-09-01

    Nowadays, power semiconductor laser diode arrays are becoming a widespread source for a large variety of industrial applications. In particular, the availability of low-cost high-power laser diode arrays makes their use possible in the industrial context for material cutting, welding, diagnostics and processing. In the above applications, the exact control of the beam quality plays a very important role because it directly affects the reliability of the final result. In this paper, we present two different approaches useful for the characterization of the beam quality in laser diode arrays. The first one, starting from total intensity measurements on planes orthogonal to the beam propagation path, is able to deduce the working conditions of each laser setting up the array. The second one is aimed at the measurement of a global quality factor of the array itself; to this end, the empirical extension of the M2 concept to composite beams is presented along with some experimental results. As the first technique is especially intended for the non-destructive detection of design problems in the array itself and in the bias circuitry, the second one represents a powerful tool for the rapid on-line diagnostics of the laser beam during its use.

  17. Heterodyne applications of tunable semiconductor diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidney, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Infrared tunable diode lasers were developed in the 1960s and have been a valuable radiation source for high resolution laboratory and in situ spectroscopy. Use of Pb-salt Tunable Diode Lasers (TDL) in heterodyne applications impose stringent requirements on the TDL not normally required for laboratory spectroscopy. A review will be made of progress associated with TDLs in such heterodyne applications. Areas addressed will include such items as lifetime, operating temperature, and factors affecting excess noise. The review will emphasize the experience at Langley Research Center, but will include material from other users. The Langley information will include a description and current status of the Laser Heterodyne Spectrometer experiment and atmospheric solar absorption data obtained from a groundbased heterodyne system.

  18. Photodynamic action on microorganisms using iron oxide Fe2O3 nanoparticles and LED blue (405 nm) light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Pavel O.; Kulikova, Maria V.; Tuchina, Elena S.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2012-03-01

    The main goal was to study the sensitivity of microorganisms to combined action of LED blue (405 nm) light and Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The bacterial strains used in this study were Staphylococcus aureus 209 P, S. simulans, Dermabacter hominis (isolated from maxillary sinusitis). As blue light source LED with spectrum maxima at 405 nm was taken. The light exposure was ranged from 5 to 30 min. Fe2O3 nanoparticles with average size about 8 nm in concentration of 0.001% were used. It was shown that irradiation with blue light caused 20 to 90% decrease in the number of microorganisms treated with nanoparticles.

  19. Diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the consequences for solid-state lasers of novel diode laser-pumping technology. Diode laser-pumped neodymium lasers have operated at an electrical-to-optical efficiency of 10 percent in a single spatial mode, with linewidths of less than 10 kHz, and with a spectral power brightness sufficiently great to allow frequency extension by harmonic generation in nonlinear crystals; this has yielded green and blue sources of coherent radiation. Q-switched operation with kW peak powers and mode-locked operation with 10-picosec pulse widths have also been demonstrated. All-solid-state lasers at prices comparable to those of current flash-lamp-pumped laser systems are foreseen, as are power levels exceeding 1 kW, for coherent radar, global satellite sensing, and micromachining.

  20. Diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the consequences for solid-state lasers of novel diode laser-pumping technology. Diode laser-pumped neodymium lasers have operated at an electrical-to-optical efficiency of 10 percent in a single spatial mode, with linewidths of less than 10 kHz, and with a spectral power brightness sufficiently great to allow frequency extension by harmonic generation in nonlinear crystals; this has yielded green and blue sources of coherent radiation. Q-switched operation with kW peak powers and mode-locked operation with 10-picosec pulse widths have also been demonstrated. All-solid-state lasers at prices comparable to those of current flash-lamp-pumped laser systems are foreseen, as are power levels exceeding 1 kW, for coherent radar, global satellite sensing, and micromachining.

  1. Intensity Scaling for Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    unphased diode lasers is absorbed in the near IR by atomic potassium, rubidium , or cesium. The gain cell for a DPAL system using a heat pipe design is...demonstrated linear scaling of a rubidium laser to 32 times threshold.3 In our present work, we explore scaling to pump in- tensities of >100kW/cm2. The...of output power. Each alkali atom in the laser medium may be required to cycle as many as 1010 pump photons per second. We demonstrated a rubidium

  2. Mode stability of external cavity diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Sebastian D; Junker, Mark; Turner, Lincoln D; Scholten, Robert E

    2009-12-10

    Mode stability is an important performance characteristic of external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs). It has been well established that the continuous mode-hop-free tuning range of a grating-feedback ECDL can be optimized by rotating the grating about a specific pivot location. We show that similar results can be obtained for other more convenient pivot locations by choosing instead the cavity length and grating location. The relative importance of the temperature stability of the diode and of the external cavity is also evaluated. We show that mechanically simple ECDL designs, using mostly standard components, can readily achieve a 35 GHz mode-hop-free tuning range at 780 nm.

  3. Low level diode laser accelerates wound healing.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Munqith S; Salman, Saif Dawood

    2013-05-01

    The effect of wound illumination time by pulsed diode laser on the wound healing process was studied in this paper. For this purpose, the original electronic drive circuit of a 650-nm wavelength CW diode laser was reconstructed to give pulsed output laser of 50 % duty cycle and 1 MHz pulse repetition frequency. Twenty male mice, 3 months old were used to follow up the laser photobiostimulation effect on the wound healing progress. They were subdivided into two groups and then the wounds were made on the bilateral back sides of each mouse. Two sessions of pulsed laser therapy were carried along 15 days. Each mice group wounds were illuminated by this pulsed laser for 12 or 18 min per session during these 12 days. The results of this study were compared with the results of our previous wound healing therapy study by using the same type of laser. The mice wounds in that study received only 5 min of illumination time therapy in the first and second days of healing process. In this study, we found that the wounds, which were illuminated for 12 min/session healed in about 3 days earlier than those which were illuminated for 18 min/session. Both of them were healed earlier in about 10-11 days than the control group did.

  4. Diode pumped solid-state laser oscillators for spectroscopic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.; Basu, S.; Fan, T. Y.; Kozlovsky, W. J.; Nabors, C. D.; Nilsson, A.; Huber, G.

    1987-01-01

    The rapid improvement in diode laser pump sources has led to the recent progress in diode laser pumped solid state lasers. To date, electrical efficiencies of greater than 10 percent were demonstrated. As diode laser costs decrease with increased production volume, diode laser and diode laser array pumped solid state lasers will replace the traditional flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG laser sources. The use of laser diode array pumping of slab geometry lasers will allow efficient, high peak and average power solid state laser sources to be developed. Perhaps the greatest impact of diode laser pumped solid state lasers will be in spectroscopic applications of miniature, monolithic devices. Single-stripe diode-pumped operation of a continuous-wave 946 nm Nd:YAG laser with less than 10 m/w threshold was demonstrated. A slope efficiency of 16 percent near threshold was shown with a projected slope efficiency well above a threshold of 34 percent based on results under Rhodamine 6G dye-laser pumping. Nonlinear crystals for second-harmonic generation of this source were evaluated. The KNbO3 and periodically poled LiNbO3 appear to be the most promising.

  5. WDM Nanoscale Laser Diodes for Si Photonic Interconnects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-25

    mounting on silicon. The nanoscale VCSELs can achieve small optical modes and present a compact laser diode that is also robust. In this work we have used...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 25-07-2016 1-Feb-2012 31-Dec-2015 Final Report: WDM Nanoscale Laser Diodes for Si Photonic Interconnects The views...P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 VCSEL, optical interconnect, laser diode , semiconductor laser, microcavity REPORT DOCUMENTATION

  6. [Low level laser irradiation in the visible spectra induces HeLa cells proliferation].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong-qin; Wang, Yu-hua; Chen, Jiang-xu; Zheng, Li-qin; Xie, Shu-sen

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of low level laser irradiation on the proliferation of HeLa cells using 405 nm diode laser, 514 nm argon laser, 633 nm He-Ne laser, or 785 nm diode laser, The cells were seeded on 96-well microplates for 24 h in 5% fetal bovine serum containing medium, then irradiated with the laser at dose of 100 and 1 000 J x m(-2), respectively. At the time point of 24, 48, 72 h after irradiation, cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. The results show that 405, 633 and 785 nm laser irradiation induces wavelength-dependent and time-dependent proliferation. 633 nm laser irradiation results in a stimulatory proliferation effect that is most significant, whereas 514 nm laser irradiation produces little increase in cell proliferation. Low level laser irradiation increases cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. 1 000 J x m(-2) laser irradiation is more effective in increasing cell proliferation than 100 J x m(-2) laser irradiation using 405 nm diode laser, 633 nm He-Ne laser, or 785 nm diode laser, but not as effective as using 514 nm argon laser.

  7. Modeling the brain with laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAulay, Alastair D.

    2007-09-01

    The Wilson-Cowan mathematical model is popular for representing a neuron in the brain and may be viewed as two cross-coupled dynamical nonlinear neural networks, one excitatory and one inhibitory. This gives rise to two coupled first order equations. Varying an input parameter, the sum of input intensities from all other incoming neurons, causes the Wilson-Cowan neural oscillator to move through a supercritical Hopf bifurcation so as to switch its output from a stable-off when the input is below a firing threshold to a stable-oscillation (limit cycle) for signals above the threshold; the frequency of which depends on the level of input stimulation. The use of frequency to represent pulse rate makes the brain robust against electromagnetic interference and drift. We show that the laser diode rate equations for a single optically injected laser diode can also be modeled by two coupled first order equations that give rise to supercritical Hopf bifurcations. But the laser rate equations have a complex variable where that for the Wilson-Cowan model equations is real. By using the real part of the complex variable (a projection onto the real plane), the optically injected laser diode can exactly simulate the movement through supercritical Hopf bifurcation of the Wilson-Cowan equations by varying the amplitude and frequency of the optical injection.

  8. Integrated software package for laser diodes characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporea, Dan G.; Sporea, Radu A.

    2003-10-01

    The characteristics of laser diodes (wavelength of the emitted radiation, output optical power, embedded photodiode photocurrent, threshold current, serial resistance, external quantum efficiency) are strongly influenced by their driving circumstances (forward current, case temperature). In order to handle such a complex investigation in an efficient and objective manner, the operation of several instruments (a laser diode driver, a temperature controller, a wavelength meter, a power meter, and a laser beam analyzer) is synchronously controlled by a PC, through serial and GPIB communication. For each equipment, instruments drivers were designed using the industry standards graphical programming environment - LabVIEW from National Instruments. All the developed virtual instruments operate under the supervision of a managing virtual instrument, which sets the driving parameters for each unit under test. The manager virtual instrument scans as appropriate the driving current and case temperature values for the selected laser diode. The software enables data saving in Excel compatible files. In this way, sets of curves can be produced according to the testing cycle needs.

  9. Proton displacement damage in light-emitting and laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. H.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of proton displacement damage on light-emitting diodes and laser diodes are discussed, comparing the radiation sensitivity of current technology devices with older devices for which data exists in the literature.

  10. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica

    2011-05-01

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  11. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica

    2011-05-04

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  12. High power diode lasers for solid-state laser pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, Kurt J.; McDonnell, Patrick N.

    1994-02-01

    The development and commercial application of high power diode laser arrays for use as solid-state laser pumps is described. Such solid-state laser pumps are significantly more efficient and reliable than conventional flash-lamps. This paper describes the design and fabrication of diode lasers emitting in the 780 - 900 nm spectral region, and discusses their performance and reliability. Typical measured performance parameters include electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiencies of 50 percent, narrow-band spectral emission of 2 to 3 nm FWHM, pulsed output power levels of 50 watts/bar with reliability values of over 2 billion shots to date (tests to be terminated after 10 billion shots), and reliable operation to pulse lengths of 1 ms. Pulse lengths up to 5 ms have been demonstrated at derated power levels, and CW performance at various power levels has been evaluated in a 'bar-in-groove' laser package. These high-power 1-cm stacked-bar arrays are now being manufactured for OEM use. Individual diode laser bars, ready for package-mounting by OEM customers, are being sold as commodity items. Commercial and medical applications of these laser arrays include solid-state laser pumping for metal-working, cutting, industrial measurement and control, ranging, wind-shear/atmospheric turbulence detection, X-ray generation, materials surface cleaning, microsurgery, ophthalmology, dermatology, and dental procedures.

  13. High power diode lasers for solid-state laser pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, Kurt J.; Mcdonnell, Patrick N.

    1994-01-01

    The development and commercial application of high power diode laser arrays for use as solid-state laser pumps is described. Such solid-state laser pumps are significantly more efficient and reliable than conventional flash-lamps. This paper describes the design and fabrication of diode lasers emitting in the 780 - 900 nm spectral region, and discusses their performance and reliability. Typical measured performance parameters include electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiencies of 50 percent, narrow-band spectral emission of 2 to 3 nm FWHM, pulsed output power levels of 50 watts/bar with reliability values of over 2 billion shots to date (tests to be terminated after 10 billion shots), and reliable operation to pulse lengths of 1 ms. Pulse lengths up to 5 ms have been demonstrated at derated power levels, and CW performance at various power levels has been evaluated in a 'bar-in-groove' laser package. These high-power 1-cm stacked-bar arrays are now being manufactured for OEM use. Individual diode laser bars, ready for package-mounting by OEM customers, are being sold as commodity items. Commercial and medical applications of these laser arrays include solid-state laser pumping for metal-working, cutting, industrial measurement and control, ranging, wind-shear/atmospheric turbulence detection, X-ray generation, materials surface cleaning, microsurgery, ophthalmology, dermatology, and dental procedures.

  14. Diode laser welding of high yield steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisiecki, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    The following article describes results of investigations on influence of laser welding parameters on the weld shape, quality and mechanical properties of 2.5 mm thick butt joints of thermo-mechanically rolled, high yield strength steel for cold forming S420MC (according to EN 10149 - 3 and 060XLK according to ASTM) welded with high power diode laser HPDL ROFIN SINAR DL 020 with rectangular laser beam spot and 2.2 kW output power, and 808 nm wavelength. The investigations at the initial stage were focused on detailed analysis of influence of the basic laser welding parameters such as laser power and welding speed on the shape and quality of single bead produced during bead-on-plate welding. Then the optimal parameters were chosen for laser welding of 2.5 mm thick butt joints of the thermo-mechanically rolled, high yield strength steel sheets for cold forming S420MC. The test joints were prepared as single square groove and one-side laser welded without an additional material, at a flat position. Edges of steel sheets were melted in argon atmosphere by the laser beam focused on the top joint surface. The test welded joints were investigated by visual inspection, metallographic examinations, mechanical tests such as tensile tests and bending tests. It was found that the high power diode laser may be applied successfully for one-side welding of the S420MC steel butt joints. Additionally it was found that in the optimal range of laser welding parameters the high quality joint were produced.

  15. A new diode laser acupuncture therapy apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengwei; Huang, Zhen; Li, Dongyu; Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2006-06-01

    Since the first laser-needles acupuncture apparatus was introduced in therapy, this kind of apparatus has been well used in laser biomedicine as its non-invasive, pain- free, non-bacterium, and safetool. The laser acupuncture apparatus in this paper is based on single-chip microcomputer and associated by semiconductor laser technology. The function like traditional moxibustion including reinforcing and reducing is implemented by applying chaos method to control the duty cycle of moxibustion signal, and the traditional lifting and thrusting of acupuncture is implemented by changing power output of the diode laser. The radiator element of diode laser is made and the drive circuit is designed. And chaos mathematic model is used to produce deterministic class stochastic signal to avoid the body adaptability. This function covers the shortages of continuous irradiation or that of simple disciplinary stimulate signal, which is controlled by some simple electronic circuit and become easily adjusted by human body. The realization of reinforcing and reducing of moxibustion is technological innovation in traditional acupuncture coming true in engineering.

  16. Modeling of diode pumped nanoparticle gas laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Wang, Hongyan; Yang, Zining; Xu, Xiaojun

    2017-05-01

    The hybrid gas phase and solid state laser shows its inherent advantages in heat management and high efficiency and compactness, with DPAL becoming a perfect example. However, this kind of laser is limited by concern, for example, narrow absorption linewidth and a series of problems resulting from chemical reactions. As a matter of fact, Prof. Krupke proposed some hybrid gas phase and solid state lasers before DPAL, while they were chemically unfavored. As a newest type of hybrid gas phase and solid state laser, diode pumped nanoparticle gas laser (DPNGL) is a potential candidate in high power laser field. We put forward a rate equation model for Yb3+ doped nanoparticle gas laser, and scattering of nanoparticles at the nano scale is included in this model. In addition, modifications of fluorescence lifetime and laser emission and pump absorption cross section are coupled into this model. Some vital factors are simulated and discussed. The results obtained from the modeling show that the influence of scattering is weak, and the Yb3+ concentration is not necessarily high to achieve a good laser performance. The results are sufficiently positive for DPNGL to be a promising high power laser.

  17. Prototype laser-diode-pumped solid state laser transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, Thomas J.; Cheng, Emily A. P.; Wallace, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    Monolithic, diode-pumped Nd:YAG ring lasers can provide diffraction-limited, single-frequency, narrow-linewidth, tunable output which is adequate for use as a local oscillator in a coherent communication system. A laser was built which had a linewidth of about 2 kHz, a power of 5 milliwatts, and which was tunable over a range of 30 MHz in a few microseconds. This laser was phase-locked to a second, similar laser. This demonstrates that the powerful technique of heterodyne detection is possible with a diode-pumped laser used as the local oscillator. Laser diode pumping of monolithic Nd:YAG rings can lead to output powers of hundreds of milliwatts from a single laser. A laser was built with a single-mode output of 310 mW. Several lasers can be chained together to sum their power, while maintaining diffraction-limited, single frequency operation. This technique was demonstrated with two lasers, with a total output of 340 mW, and is expected to be practical for up to about ten lasers. Thus with lasers of 310 mW, output of up to 3 W is possible. The chaining technique, if properly engineered, results in redundancy. The technique of resonant external modulation and doubling is designed to efficiently convert the continuous wave, infrared output of our lasers into low duty-cycle pulsed green output. This technique was verified through both computer modeling and experimentation. Further work would be necessary to develop a deliverable system using this technique.

  18. Evaluation of 405nm CW visible blue light as a means of inactivating Tulane Virus on Blueberries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: Visible blue light (405nm) is effective against bacteria but its potential as a nonthermal intervention for viruses on foods, such as berries that are prone to norovirus contamination has not been evaluated. Tulane virus (TV) is now a common human norovirus surrogate that can be propa...

  19. InGaN-BASED Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shuji

    1998-08-01

    Continuous-wave operation of InGaN multi-quantum-well (MQW) structure laser diodes (LDs) has been demonstrated at room temperature with output power up to 50 mW, operating temperature up to 100oC, emission wavelength of 400-420 nm, and a lifetime up to 300 h. InGaN MQW LDs with a lifetime of more than 1000 h are expected soon. Commercialization will begin in 1998 if research on the bluish-purple InGaN-based laser diodes continues to progress. The stimulated emission of the InGaN-based LDs originates from localized energy states of 100-250 meV depth, which are equivalent to quantum dot energy states, probably arising from from InGaN composition fluctuation in the InGaN well layers.

  20. Interferometric investigation of a diode laser source

    SciTech Connect

    Creath, K.

    1985-05-01

    Diode lasers provide a coherent light source in the near IR. They have many desirable characteristics such as small size, high efficiency, a single-longitudinal mode output as large as 15 mW, and can be modulated at high pulse rates. An AlGaAs diode laser operating at 840 nm with an output of 5 mW was evaluated with a Smartt point diffraction interferometer. The wave front observed had astigmatism of approx.2 lambda present over the output beam divergence angle. In a modified Twyman-Green interferometer, the coherence length measured was >15 m with high visibility fringes. This source was found to be stable and highly linearly polarized. When used as an interferometric source, many possibilities for small scale interferometers and test equipment are now viable.

  1. Diode Laser Sensor for Scramjet Inlet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-11

    Conference’. 1.2 O’Byrne, S., Huynh, L., Wittig, S. M. and Smith, N. S. A. (2009), Non- intrusive water vapour absorp- tion measurements in a simulated...O’Byrne, L. Huynh, S. M. Wittig and N. S. A. Smith, “Non- intrusive Water Vapour Absorp- tion Measurements in a Simulated Helicopter Exhaust”, Proceedings...rather than at a surface. The measurement techniques used at these hypersonic flow conditions should also be non- intrusive . Tuneable diode laser

  2. Wavelength Beam-Combined Laser Diode Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    focal length f f f Diffraction grating Output...lead Water in/out Figure 3. Lincoln Laboratory-designed WBC “laser in a box.” To reduce the overall size of the WBC device, multiple folding mirrors were implemented between the diode array and the concave mirror . ...spatially merges multiple wave- length sources into a single high-inten- sity beam with an order-of-magnitude improvement in brightness compared

  3. Laser welding of polymers using high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Friedrich G.; Russek, Ulrich A.

    2002-06-01

    Laser welding of polymers using high power diode lasers offers specific process advantages over conventional technologies, such as short process times while providing optically and qualitatively valuable weld seams, contactless yielding of the joining energy, absence of process induced vibrations, imposing minimal thermal stress and avoiding particle generation. Furthermore, this method exhibits high integration capabilities and automatization potential. Moreover, because of the current favorable cost development within the high power diode laser market laser welding of polymers has become more and more an industrially accepted joining method. This novel technology permits both, reliable high quality joining of mechanically and electronically highly sensitive micro components and hermetic sealing of macro components. There are different welding strategies available, which are adaptable to the current application. Within the frame of this discourse scientific and also application oriented result concerning laser transmission welding of polymers using preferably diode lasers are presented. Besides the sue laser system the fundamental process strategies as well as decisive process parameters are illustrated. The importance of optical, thermal and mechanical properties is discussed. Applications at real technical components will be presented, demonstrating the industrial implementation capability and the advantages of a novel technology.

  4. Laser welding of polymers using high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Friedrich G.; Russek, Ulrich A.

    2003-09-01

    Laser welding of polymers using high power diode lasers offers specific process advantages over conventional technologies, such as short process times while providing optically and qualitatively valuable weld seams, contactless yielding of the joining energy, absence of process induced vibrations, imposing minimal thermal stress and avoiding particle generation. Furthermore this method exhibits high integration capabilities and automatization potential. Moreover, because of the current favorable cost development within the high power diode laser market laser welding of polymers has become more and more an industrially accepted joining method. This novel technology permits both, reliable high quality joining of mechanically and electronically highly sensitive micro components and hermetic sealing of macro components. There are different welding strategies available, which are adaptable to the current application. Within the frame of this discourse scientific and also application oriented results concerning laser transmission welding of polymers using preferably diode lasers are presented. Besides the used laser systems the fundamental process strategies as well as decisive process parameters are illustrated. The importance of optical, thermal and mechanical properties is discussed. Applications at real technical components will be presented, demonstrating the industrial implementation capability and the advantages of a novel technology.

  5. Optical communication with semiconductor laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Frederic; Sun, X.

    1989-01-01

    This interim report describes the progress in the construction of a 220 Mbps Q=4 PPM optical communication system that uses a semiconductor laser as the optical transmitter and an avalanche photodiode (APD) as the photodetector. The transmitter electronics have been completed and contain both GaAs and ECL III IC's. The circuit was able to operate at a source binary data rate from 75 Mbps to 290 Mbps with pulse rise and fall times of 400 ps. The pulse shapes of the laser diode and the response from the APD/preamplifier module were also measured.

  6. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  7. 405 nm light technology for the inactivation of pathogens and its potential role for environmental disinfection and infection control.

    PubMed

    Maclean, M; McKenzie, K; Anderson, J G; Gettinby, G; MacGregor, S J

    2014-09-01

    Although the germicidal properties of ultraviolet (UV) light have long been known, it is only comparatively recently that the antimicrobial properties of visible violet-blue 405 nm light have been discovered and used for environmental disinfection and infection control applications. To review the antimicrobial properties of 405 nm light and to describe its application as an environmental decontamination technology with particular reference to disinfection of the hospital environment. Extensive literature searches for relevant scientific papers and reports. A large body of scientific evidence is now available that provides underpinning knowledge of the 405 nm light-induced photodynamic inactivation process involved in the destruction of a wide range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial species, including resistant forms such as bacterial and fungal spores. For practical application, a high-intensity narrow-spectrum light environmental disinfection system (HINS-light EDS) has been developed and tested in hospital isolation rooms. The trial results have demonstrated that this 405 nm light system can provide continuous disinfection of air and exposed surfaces in occupied areas of the hospital, thereby substantially enhancing standard cleaning and infection control procedures. Violet-blue light, particularly 405 nm light, has significant antimicrobial properties against a wide range of bacterial and fungal pathogens and, although germicidal efficacy is lower than UV light, this limitation is offset by its facility for safe, continuous use in occupied environments. Promising results on disinfection efficacy have been obtained in hospital trials but the full impact of this technology on reduction of healthcare-associated infection has yet to be determined. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Scaling brilliance of high power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Harald; Grönninger, Guenther; Lauer, Christian; Reill, Wolfgang; Arzberger, Markus; Strauß, Uwe; Kissel, Heiko; Biesenbach, Jens; Kösters, Arnd; Malchus, Joerg; Krause, Volker K.

    2010-02-01

    New direct diode laser systems and fiber lasers require brilliant fiber coupled laser diodes for efficient operation. In the German funded project HEMILAS different laser bar designs are investigated with tailored beam parameter products adapted for efficient fiber coupling. In this paper we demonstrate results on 9xx and 1020nm bars suitable for coupling into 200μm fibers. With special facet technology and optimised epitaxial structure COD-free laser bars were fabricated with maximum efficiency above 66%. For short bars consisting of five 100μm wide emitters 75W CW maximum output power was reached. In QCW-mode up to 140W are demonstrated. The 10% fill factor bars with 4mm cavity are mounted with hard solder. Lifetime tests in long pulse mode with 35W output power exceed 5000 hours of testing without degradation or spontaneous failures. Slow axis divergence stays below 7° up to power levels of 40W and is suitable for simple fiber coupling into 200μm NA 0.22 fibers with SAC and FAC lenses. For fiber coupling based on beam rearrangement with step mirrors, bars with higher fill factor of 50% were fabricated and tested. The 4mm cavity short bars reach efficiencies above 60%. Lifetime tests at accelerated powers were performed. Finally fiber coupling results with output powers of up to 2.4 kW and beam quality of 30 mm mrad are demonstrated.

  9. Space Qualification of Laser Diode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troupaki, Elisavet; Kashem, Nasir B.; Allan, Graham R.; Vasilyev, Aleksey; Stephen, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Laser instruments have great potential in enabling a new generation of remote-sensing scientific instruments. NASA s desire to employ laser instruments aboard satellites, imposes stringent reliability requirements under severe conditions. As a result of these requirements, NASA has a research program to understand, quantify and reduce the risk of failure to these instruments when deployed on satellites. Most of NASA s proposed laser missions have base-lined diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers that generally use quasi-constant wave (QCW), 808 nm Laser Diode Arrays (LDAs). Our group has an on-going test program to measure the performance of these LDAs when operated in conditions replicating launch and orbit. In this paper, we report on the results of tests designed to measure the effect of vibration loads simulating launch into space and the radiation environment encountered on orbit. Our primary objective is to quantify the performance of the LDAs in conditions replicating those of a satellite instrument, determine their limitations and strengths which will enable better and more robust designs. To this end we have developed a systematic testing strategy to quantify the effect of environmental stresses on the optical and electrical properties of the LDA.

  10. Highly efficient multimode diode-pumped Yb:KYW laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. A.; Pivtsov, V. S.; Semenko, A. V.; Bagayev, S. N.

    2017-01-01

    Record high differential efficiency (53.2%) and full optical efficiency (48%) for a multimode diode-pumped Yb:KYW laser have been achieved. The characteristics of the laser and methods for improving its efficiency using a distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode laser (DBR TDL) are discussed.

  11. Low-cost laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, Barry L.; Skidmore, Jay A.

    1999-01-01

    A substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost laser diode array. A substrate is machined from an electrically insulative material that is thermally conductive, or two substrates can be bonded together in which the top substrate is electrically as well as thermally conductive. The substrate thickness is slightly longer than the cavity length, and the width of the groove is wide enough to contain a bar and spring (which secures the laser bar firmly along one face of the groove). The spring also provides electrical continuity from the backside of the bar to the adjacent metalization layer on the laser bar substrate. Arrays containing one or more bars can be formed by creating many grooves at various spacings. Along the groove, many bars can be adjoined at the edges to provide parallel electrical conduction. This architecture allows precise and predictable registration of an array of laser bars to a self-aligned microlens array at low cost.

  12. Low-cost laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, B.L.; Skidmore, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    A substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost laser diode array. A substrate is machined from an electrically insulative material that is thermally conductive, or two substrates can be bonded together in which the top substrate is electrically as well as thermally conductive. The substrate thickness is slightly longer than the cavity length, and the width of the groove is wide enough to contain a bar and spring (which secures the laser bar firmly along one face of the groove). The spring also provides electrical continuity from the backside of the bar to the adjacent metalization layer on the laser bar substrate. Arrays containing one or more bars can be formed by creating many grooves at various spacings. Along the groove, many bars can be adjoined at the edges to provide parallel electrical conduction. This architecture allows precise and predictable registration of an array of laser bars to a self-aligned microlens array at low cost. 19 figs.

  13. Oral cancer detection based on fluorescence polarization of blood plasma at excitation wavelength 405 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachaiappan, Rekha; Prakasarao, Aruna; Manoharan, Yuvaraj; Dornadula, Koteeswaran; Singaravelu, Ganesan

    2017-02-01

    During metabolism the metabolites such as hormones, proteins and enzymes were released in to the blood stream by the cells. These metabolites reflect any change that occurs due to any disturbances in normal metabolic function of the human system. This was well observed with the altered spectral signatures observed with fluorescence spectroscopic technique. Previously many have reported on the significance of native fluorescence spectroscopic method in the diagnosis of cancer. As fluorescence spectroscopy is sensitive and simple, it has complementary techniques such as excitation-emission matrix, synchronous and polarization. The fluorescence polarization measurement provides details about any association or binding reactions and denaturing effects that occurs due to change in the micro environment of cells and tissues. In this study, we have made an attempt in the diagnosis of oral cancer at 405 nm excitation using fluorescence polarization measurement. The fluorescence anisotropic values calculated from polarized fluorescence spectral data of normal and oral cancer subjects yielded a good accuracy when analyzed with linear discriminant analysis based artificial neural network. The results will be discussed in detail.

  14. Diode Laser Measurements of Concentration and Temperature in Microgravity Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Joel A.; Kane, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    Diode laser absorption spectroscopy provides a direct method of determinating species concentration and local gas temperature in combustion flames. Under microgravity conditions, diode lasers are particularly suitable, given their compact size, low mass and low power requirements. The development of diode laser-based sensors for gas detection in microgravity is presented, detailing measurements of molecular oxygen. Current progress of this work and future application possibilities for these methods on the International Space Station are discussed.

  15. A Modular Control Platform for a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    A Modular Control Platform for a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser Joshua Shapiro, Scott W. Teare New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, 801 Leroy...gain media, such as is done in diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), has been proposed and early experiments have shown promising results. However...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Modular Control Platform for a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser 5a

  16. High-power laser diodes at various wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Emanuel, M.A.

    1997-02-19

    High power laser diodes at various wavelengths are described. First, performance and reliability of an optimized large transverse mode diode structure at 808 and 941 nm are presented. Next, data are presented on a 9.5 kW peak power array at 900 nm having a narrow emission bandwidth suitable for pumping Yb:S-FAP laser materials. Finally, results on a fiber-coupled laser diode array at {approx}730 nm are presented.

  17. Diode laser potential in laser cleaning of stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimbeni, Renzo; Pini, Roberto; Siano, Salvatore; Bachmann, Friedrich G.; Meyer, Frank

    2001-10-01

    In this work we investigated for the first time the laser cleaning process of encrusted stones by employing a high power diode laser system. The test have been carried out using a Rofin-Sinar mod. DL025S emitting up to 2.5 kW CW power to clean various samples representing natural encrustation by pollution exposition and graffiti, typically encountered on historical monuments and buildings in urban environment.

  18. Use of a semiconductor diode laser in laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakr, Ghazi; Watson, Graham M.; Lawrence, William

    1996-05-01

    The gold standard surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Over the past few years, TURP has been challenged by laser prostatectomy, a technique that offered many advantages including minimal bleeding, short hospital stay, no fluid absorption, rapid learning curve and better change to preserve antegrade ejaculation. Laser prostatectomy can be done by vaporizing or coagulating prostatic tissue and more recently by using a combination of both: The hybrid technique Nd:YAG lasers have been used, (coupled with contact tips or with side firing or even bare fibers) to either coagulate or vaporize prostatic tissue. Recently semiconductor diode lasers have become available and offer certain advantages. They are compact portable units with no need for water cooling, yet they have sufficient power for tissue vaporization. Diomed (Cambridge, U.K.), produces a 60 W gallium aluminum arsenide semiconductor diode laser emitting at 810 nm. We report the first clinical experience using a semiconductor diode laser for prostates using a combination of contact tip and sidefiring.

  19. Diode Laser for Laryngeal Surgery: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Helena Hotz; Neri, Larissa; Fussuma, Carina Yuri; Imamura, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The diode laser has been frequently used in the management of laryngeal disorders. The portability and functional diversity of this tool make it a reasonable alternative to conventional lasers. However, whether diode laser has been applied in transoral laser microsurgery, the ideal parameters, outcomes, and adverse effects remain unclear. Objective The main objective of this systematic review is to provide a reliable evaluation of the use of diode laser in laryngeal diseases, trying to clarify its ideal parameters in the larynx, as well as its outcomes and complications. Data Synthesis We included eleven studies in the final analysis. From the included articles, we collected data on patient and lesion characteristics, treatment (diode laser's parameters used in surgery), and outcomes related to the laser surgery performed. Only two studies were prospective and there were no randomized controlled trials. Most of the evidence suggests that the diode laser can be a useful tool for treatment of different pathologies in the larynx. In this sense, the parameters must be set depending on the goal (vaporization, section, or coagulation) and the clinical problem. Conclusion: The literature lacks studies on the ideal parameters of the diode laser in laryngeal surgery. The available data indicate that diode laser is a useful tool that should be considered in laryngeal surgeries. Thus, large, well-designed studies correlated with diode compared with other lasers are needed to better estimate its effects. PMID:27096024

  20. Diode Laser for Laryngeal Surgery: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Helena Hotz; Neri, Larissa; Fussuma, Carina Yuri; Imamura, Rui

    2016-04-01

    Introduction The diode laser has been frequently used in the management of laryngeal disorders. The portability and functional diversity of this tool make it a reasonable alternative to conventional lasers. However, whether diode laser has been applied in transoral laser microsurgery, the ideal parameters, outcomes, and adverse effects remain unclear. Objective The main objective of this systematic review is to provide a reliable evaluation of the use of diode laser in laryngeal diseases, trying to clarify its ideal parameters in the larynx, as well as its outcomes and complications. Data Synthesis We included eleven studies in the final analysis. From the included articles, we collected data on patient and lesion characteristics, treatment (diode laser's parameters used in surgery), and outcomes related to the laser surgery performed. Only two studies were prospective and there were no randomized controlled trials. Most of the evidence suggests that the diode laser can be a useful tool for treatment of different pathologies in the larynx. In this sense, the parameters must be set depending on the goal (vaporization, section, or coagulation) and the clinical problem. The literature lacks studies on the ideal parameters of the diode laser in laryngeal surgery. The available data indicate that diode laser is a useful tool that should be considered in laryngeal surgeries. Thus, large, well-designed studies correlated with diode compared with other lasers are needed to better estimate its effects.

  1. Quasi-CW Laser Diode Bar Life Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Krainak, Michael A.; Dallas, Joseph L.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is developing technology for satellite-based, high peak power, LIDAR transmitters requiring 3-5 years of reliable operation. Semi-conductor laser diodes provide high efficiency pumping of solid state lasers with the promise of long-lived, reliable operation. 100-watt quasi- CW laser diode bars have been baselined for the next generation laser altimeters. Multi-billion shot lifetimes are required. The authors have monitored the performance of several diodes for billions of shots and investigated operational modes for improving diode lifetime.

  2. Long-Lifetime Laser Materials For Effective Diode Pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    1991-01-01

    Long quantum lifetimes reduce number of diodes required to pump. Pumping by laser diodes demonstrated with such common Nd laser materials as neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) and Nd:YLiF4, but such materials as Nd:LaF3, Nd:NaF.9YF3, and possibly Nd:YF3 more useful because of long lifetimes of their upper laser energy levels. Cost effectiveness primary advantage of solid-state laser materials having longer upper-laser-level lifetimes. Because cost of diodes outweighs cost of laser material by perhaps two orders of magnitude, cost reduced significantly.

  3. Diode Laser Application in Soft Tissue Oral Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Azma, Ehsan; Safavi, Nassimeh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Diode laser with wavelengths ranging from 810 to 980 nm in a continuous or pulsed mode was used as a possible instrument for soft tissue surgery in the oral cavity. Discussion: Diode laser is one of laser systems in which photons are produced by electric current with wavelengths of 810, 940 and 980nm. The application of diode laser in soft tissue oral surgery has been evaluated from a safety point of view, for facial pigmentation and vascular lesions and in oral surgery excision; for example frenectomy, epulis fissuratum and fibroma. The advantages of laser application are that it provides relatively bloodless surgical and post surgical courses with minimal swelling and scarring. We used diode laser for excisional biopsy of pyogenic granuloma and gingival pigmentation. Conclusion: The diode laser can be used as a modality for oral soft tissue surgery PMID:25606331

  4. Realization of high performance random laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S. F.

    2011-03-01

    For the past four decades, extensive studies have been concentrated on the understanding of the physics of random lasing phenomena in scattering media with optical gain. Although lasing modes can be excited from the mirrorless scattering media, the characteristics of high scattering loss, multiple-direction emission, as well as multiple-mode oscillation prohibited them to be used as practical laser cavities. Furthermore, due to the difficulty of achieving high optical gain under electrical excitation, electrical excitation of random lasing action was seldom reported. Hence, mirrorless random cavities have never been used to realize lasers for practical applications -- CD, DVD, pico-projector, etc. Nowadays, studies of random lasing are still limited to the scientific research. Recently, the difficulty of achieving `battery driven' random laser diodes has been overcome by using nano-structured ZnO as the random medium and the careful design of heterojunctions. This lead to the first demonstration of room-temperature electrically pumped random lasing action under continuity wave and pulsed operation. In this presentation, we proposed to realize an array of quasi-one dimensional ZnO random laser diodes. We can show that if the laser array can be manipulated in a way such that every individual random laser can be coupled laterally to and locked with a particular phase relationship to its adjacent neighbor, the laser array can obtain coherent addition of random modes. Hence, output power can be multiplied and one lasing mode will only be supported due to the repulsion characteristics of random modes. This work was supported by HK PolyU grant no. 1-ZV6X.

  5. Investigation of Diode Pumped Alkali Laser atmospheric transmission using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Christopher A.

    A field deployable ruggedized tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) device fiber coupled to a pair of 12.5" Ritchey-Chretien telescopes was used to study atmospheric propagation for open path lengths of 100 to 1,000 meters to estimate atmospheric transmission at key High Energy Laser (HEL) wavelengths. The potassium (K) version of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) operates in between two of the sharp oxygen rotational features in the PP and the PQ branches. The device can be used to observe rotational temperature, concentrations, and atmospheric pressure. Molecular oxygen absorption lines near the potassium, and water vapor absorption lines near the rubidium and cesium DPALs at wavelengths near 770 nm, 795 nm, and 895 nm, respectively, were investigated using the Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) with the High Energy Laser End-to-End Simulation (HELEEOS). A tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) device was used to anchor simulations to actual outdoor atmospheric open-path collections. The implications of different laser gain cell configurations in DPAL systems are discussed, including spectral lineshape and atmospheric transmittance and are compared to existing high power laser systems.

  6. Flight demonstration of laser diode initiated ordnance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boucher, Craig J.; Schulze, Norman R.

    1995-01-01

    A program has been initiated by NASA Headquarters to validate laser initiated ordnance in flight applications. The primary program goal is to bring together a team of government and industry members to develop a laser initiated ordnance system having the test and analysis pedigree to be flown on launch vehicles. The culmination of this effort was a flight of the Pegasus launch vehicle which had two fin rockets initiated by this laser system. In addition, a laser initiated ordnance squib was fired into a pressure bomb during thrusting flight. The complete ordnance system comprising a laser diode firing unit, fiber optic cable assembly, laser initiated detonator, and laser initiated squib was designed and built by The Ensign Bickford Company. The hardware was tested to the requirements of the Pegasus launch vehicle and integrated into the vehicle by The Ensign Bickford Company and the Orbital Sciences Corporation. Discussions include initial program concept, contract implementation, team member responsibilities, analysis results, vehicle integration, safing architecture, ordnance interfaces, mission timeline and telemetry data. A complete system description, summary of the analyses, the qualification test results, and the results of flight are included.

  7. Underwater Chaotic Lidar using Blue Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbaugh, Luke K.

    The thesis proposes and explores an underwater lidar system architecture based on chaotic modulation of recently introduced, commercially available, low cost blue laser diodes. This approach is experimentally shown to allow accurate underwater impulse response measurements while eliminating the need for several major components typically found in high-performance underwater lidar systems. The proposed approach is to: 1. Generate wideband, noise-like intensity modulation signals using optical chaotic modulation of blue-green laser diodes, and then 2. Use this signal source to develop an underwater chaotic lidar system that uses no electrical signal generator, no electro-optic modulator, no optical frequency doubler, and no large-aperture photodetector. The outcome of this thesis is the demonstration of a new underwater lidar system architecture that could allow high resolution ranging, imaging, and water profiling measurements in turbid water, at a reduced size, weight, power and cost relative to state-of-the-art high-performance underwater lidar sensors. This work also makes contributions to the state of the art in optics, nonlinear dynamics, and underwater sensing by demonstrating for the first time: 1. Wideband noise-like intensity modulation of a blue laser diode using no electrical signal generator or electro-optic modulator. Optical chaotic modulation of a 462 nm blue InGaN laser diode by self-feedback is explored for the first time. The usefulness of the signal to chaotic lidar is evaluated in terms of bandwidth, modulation depth, and autocorrelation peak-to-sidelobe-ratio (PSLR) using both computer and laboratory experiments. In laboratory experiments, the optical feedback technique is shown to be effective in generating wideband, noise-like chaotic signals with strong modulation depth when the diode is operated in an external-cavity dominated state. The modulation signal strength is shown to be limited by the onset of lasing within the diode's internal

  8. "Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers At 2 And 3 µm"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esterowitz, Leon

    1988-06-01

    The most attractive alternative to flashlamp pumping of solid state lasers is the diode laser. In the past two decades numerous laboratory devices have been assembled which incorporated single diode lasers, small laser diode arrays or LED's for pumping of Nd:YAG, Nd:glass and a host of other Nd lasers. The low power output, low packaging density, and extremely high cost of diode lasers prevented any serious applications for laser pumping in the past. The reason for the continued interest in this area stems from the potential dramatic increase in system efficiency and component lifetime, and reduction of thermal load of the solid-state laser material. The latter not only will reduce thereto-optic effects and therefore lead to better beam quality but also will enable an increase in pulse repetition frequency. The attractive operating parameters combined with low voltage operation and the compactness of an all solid-state laser system have a potential high payoff. The high pumping efficiency compared to flashlamps stems from the good spectral match between the laser diode emission and the rare earth activator absorption bands. A significant advantage of laser diode pumping compared to arc lamps is system lifetime and reliability. Laser diode arrays have exhibited lifetimes on the order of 10,000 hours in cw operation and 109 shots in the pulsed mode. Flashlamp life is on the order of 107 shots, and about 200 hours for cw operation. In addition, the high pump flux combined with a substantial UV content in lamp pumped systems causes material degradation in the pump cavity and in the coolant. Such problems are virtually eliminated with laser diode pump sources. The absence of high voltage pulses, high temperatures and UV radiation encountered with arc lamps leads to much more benign operating features for solid state laser systems employing laser diode pumps. Laser diode technology dates back to 1962 when laser action in GaAs diodes was first demonstrated. However, it

  9. Smart medical diode lasers: fantasy becoming reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltz, Barbara A.

    1995-05-01

    Design principles and rules are currently being formulated for building intelligent machines for `factories of the future'. The intelligent machine is one which has control functions that resemble the `brain', `eyes' and other anthropomorphic substitutes for the skilled expert. These skills are related to the expert's knowledge and abilities to plan complex actions and to detect errors with a continual upgrade of machine understanding. A craft related language enables a high level of communication between the system and the operator. These same capabilities can be embodied in a medical laser system. This paper will define the key characteristics of a smart medical laser and will describe the advantages of an intelligent system based on diode laser technology. System control functions and software architecture will be explained and the main subsystems highlighted.

  10. Mode-locked solid state lasers using diode laser excitation

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R [Boston, MA

    2012-03-06

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. An asymmetric cavity provides relatively large beam spot sizes in gain medium to permit efficient coupling to a volume pumped by a laser diode bar. The cavity can include a collimation region with a controlled beam spot size for insertion of a saturable absorber and dispersion components. Beam spot size is selected to provide stable mode locking based on Kerr lensing. Pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved in Yb:KGW.

  11. Using a Diode Laser for Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Yang; Whitten, J. E.

    2001-08-01

    The construction and use of a laser fluorimeter from a 635-nm red diode laser and an amplified photodiode detector are described. The low cost and monochromatic nature of diode lasers make them attractive as excitation sources for educational fluorescence experiments. Use of this type of fluorimeter is demonstrated by measuring fluorescence signals for various concentrations of Nile blue A dissolved in methanol; concentrations as low as 1 ppb are easily detected. The use of this instrument for monitoring the decomposition of a dye by an oxidizing agent is demonstrated by measuring the decay of fluorescence as a function of time for a 1 ppm Nile blue A solution after the addition of sodium hypochlorite.

  12. Efficiency of Nd laser materials with laser diode pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Cross, Patricia L.; Skolaut, Milton W., Jr.; Storm, Mark E.

    1990-01-01

    For pulsed laser-diode-pumped lasers, where efficiency is the most important issue, the choice of the Nd laser material makes a significant difference. The absorption efficiency, storage efficiency, and extraction efficiency for Nd:YAG, Nd:YLF, Nd:GSGG, Nd:BEL, Nd:YVO4, and Nd:glass are calculated. The materials are then compared under the assumption of equal quantum efficiency and damage threshold. Nd:YLF is found to be the best candidate for the application discussed here.

  13. Polarization methods for diode laser excitation of solid state lasers

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.

    2008-11-25

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. A Yb-doped gain medium can be used that absorbs light having a first polarization and emits light having a second polarization. Using such pumping with laser cavity dispersion control, pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved.

  14. Linear diode laser bar optical stretchers for cell deformation

    PubMed Central

    Sraj, Ihab; Marr, David W.M.; Eggleton, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the use of linear diode laser bars to optically stretch cells and measure their mechanical properties, we present numerical simulations using the immersed boundary method (IBM) coupled with classic ray optics. Cells are considered as three-dimensional (3D) spherical elastic capsules immersed in a fluid subjected to both optical and hydrodynamic forces in a periodic domain. We simulate cell deformation induced by both single and dual diode laser bar configurations and show that a single diode laser bar induces significant stretching but also induces cell translation of speed < 10 µm/sec for applied 6.6 mW/µm power in unconfined systems. The dual diode laser bar configuration, however, can be used to both stretch and optically trap cells at a fixed position. The net cell deformation was found to be a function of the total laser power and not the power distribution between single or dual diode laser bar configurations. PMID:21258483

  15. Semiconductor Laser Diode Pumps for Inertial Fusion Energy Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, R J

    2011-01-03

    Solid-state lasers have been demonstrated as attractive drivers for inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and at the Omega Facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) in Rochester, NY. For power plant applications, these lasers must be pumped by semiconductor diode lasers to achieve the required laser system efficiency, repetition rate, and lifetime. Inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants will require approximately 40-to-80 GW of peak pump power, and must operate efficiently and with high system availability for decades. These considerations lead to requirements on the efficiency, price, and production capacity of the semiconductor pump sources. This document provides a brief summary of these requirements, and how they can be met by a natural evolution of the current semiconductor laser industry. The detailed technical requirements described in this document flow down from a laser ampl9ifier design described elsewhere. In brief, laser amplifiers comprising multiple Nd:glass gain slabs are face-pumped by two planar diode arrays, each delivering 30 to 40 MW of peak power at 872 nm during a {approx} 200 {micro}s quasi-CW (QCW) pulse with a repetition rate in the range of 10 to 20 Hz. The baseline design of the diode array employs a 2D mosaic of submodules to facilitate manufacturing. As a baseline, they envision that each submodule is an array of vertically stacked, 1 cm wide, edge-emitting diode bars, an industry standard form factor. These stacks are mounted on a common backplane providing cooling and current drive. Stacks are conductively cooled to the backplane, to minimize both diode package cost and the number of fluid interconnects for improved reliability. While the baseline assessment in this document is based on edge-emitting devices, the amplifier design does not preclude future use of surface emitting diodes, which may offer appreciable future cost reductions and

  16. Qualification of Laser Diode Arrays for Mercury Laser Altimeter Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark; Vasilyev, Aleksey; Schafer, John; Allan, Graham R.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's requirements for high reliability, high performance satellite laser instruments have driven the investigation of many critical components; specifically, 808 nm laser diode array (LDA) pump devices. The MESSENGER mission is flying the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) which is a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser instrument designed to map the topography of Mercury. The environment imposed on the instrument by the orbital dynamics places special requirements on the laser diode arrays. In order to limit the radiative heating of the satellite from the surface of Mercury, the satellite is designed to have a highly elliptical orbit. The satellite will heat near perigee and cool near apogee. The laser power is cycled during these orbits so that the laser is on for only 30 minutes (perigee) in a 12 hour orbit. The laser heats 10 C while powered up and cools while powered down. In order to simulate these operational conditions, we designed a test to measure the LDA performance while being temperature and power cycled. Though the mission requirements are specific to NASA and performance requirements are derived from unique operating conditions, the results are general and widely applicable. We present results on the performance of twelve LDAs operating for several hundred million pulses. The arrays are 100 watt, quasi-CW, conductively-cooled, 808 nm devices. Prior to testing, we fully characterize each device to establish a baseline for individual array performance and status. Details of this characterization can be found in reference. Arrays are divided into four groups and subjected to the temperature and power cycling matrix are shown.

  17. Tunable Diode Laser Heterodyne Spectrophotometry of Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, P. F.; McElroy, C. T.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    Tunable diode laser heterodyne spectrophotometry (TDLHS) has been used to make extremely high resolution (less than 0.0005/ cm) solar spectra in the 9.6 micron ozone band. Observations have shown that a signal-to-noise ratio of 95 : 1 (35% of theoretical) for an integration time of 1/8 second can be achieved at a resolution of 0.0005 wavenumbers. The spectral data have been inverted to yield a total column amount of ozone, in good agreement with that. measured at the nearby National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ozone monitoring facility in Boulder, Colorado.

  18. Recent advances in antiguided diode laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawst, L. J.; Botez, D.; Jansen, M.; Roth, T. J.; Zmudzinski, C.; Tu, C.; Yun, J.

    1992-06-01

    The paper discusses features of advanced antiguided diode laser arrays optimized for single-spatial-mode operation to high output power. Twenty-element antiguided arrays have been fabricated to operate reproducibly to CW power levels of 0.5 W with 48-50 percent efficiency. These devices were also shown to exhibit thousands of hours of reliable operation. The paper gives special attention to modeling and optimization of multiclad antiguided arrays and presents experimental results on multiclad antiguided arrays fabricated by either of the two techniques, the conventional self-aligned stripe and the complementary self-aligned stripe.

  19. Rubidium dimer destruction by a diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, T.; Aumiler, D.; Pichler, G.

    2005-02-01

    We observed rubidium dimer destruction by excitation of rubidium vapor with diode laser light tuned across the Rb D{sub 2} resonance line in a 2400 GHz tuning interval. The destruction was measured for rubidium atom concentrations in the (1-9)x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} range, pump beam power up to 43 mW, and with a 5 Torr of the helium buffer gas. We discuss the physical mechanisms involved and specify the molecular pathways which may effectively lead to the observed dimer destruction.

  20. Broadband External-Cavity Diode Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    A broadband external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been invented for use in spectroscopic surveys preparatory to optical detection of gases. Heretofore, commercially available ECDLs have been designed, in conjunction with sophisticated tuning assemblies, for narrow- band (and, typically, single-frequency) operation, as needed for high sensitivity and high spectral resolution in some gas-detection applications. However, for preparatory spectroscopic surveys, high sensitivity and narrow-band operation are not needed; in such cases, the present broadband ECDL offers a simpler, less-expensive, more-compact alternative to a commercial narrowband ECDL.

  1. Multimode-diode-pumped gas (alkali-vapor) laser

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Beach, R J; Kanz, V K

    2005-08-22

    We report the first demonstration of a multimode-diode-pumped gas laser--Rb vapor operating on the 795 nm resonance transition. Peak output of {approx}1 Watt was obtained using a volume-Bragg-grating stabilized pump diode array. The laser's output radiance exceeded the pump radiance by a factor greater than 2000. Power scaling (by pumping with larger diode arrays) is therefore possible.

  2. Multimode-diode-pumped gas (alkali-vapor) laser.

    PubMed

    Page, Ralph H; Beach, Raymond J; Kanz, V Keith; Krupke, William F

    2006-02-01

    We report what we believe to be the first demonstration of a multimode-diode-pumped gas laser: Rb vapor operating on the 795 nm D1 resonance transition. Peak output of approximately 1 W was obtained using a volume-Bragg-grating stabilized pump diode array. The laser's output radiance exceeded the pump radiance by a factor greater than 2000. Power scaling (by pumping with larger diode arrays) is therefore possible.

  3. CO.sub.2 optically pumped distributed feedback diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    A diode laser optically pumped by a CO.sub.2 coherent source. Interference fringes generated by feeding the optical pumping beam against a second beam, periodically alter the reflectivity of the diode medium allowing frequency variation of the output signal by varying the impingent angle of the CO.sub.2 laser beams.

  4. Monitoring The Atmosphere By Diode-Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, Max; Podolske, James

    1988-01-01

    Report describes state of art of tunable-diode-laser second-harmonic spectroscopy applied to measurements of concentrations of trace constituents of atmosphere. Combination of temperature, composition, and drive-current tuning, wavelengths of tunable diode lasers varied over infrared range of 3 to 30 micrometer, containing spectral lines of many molecules of interest in atmospheric research.

  5. Circular polarization emission from an external cavity diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Zhang, Fan; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Pursel, Sean M.; Horn, Mark W.

    2008-08-01

    We construct an external cavity diode laser (ECDL) comprising structurally left-handed chiral sculptured-thin-film (STF) mirrors for pure circular-polarized (CP) emission, and observed single mode, left-handed CP lasing performance. The extinction ratio of CP output was found to increase rapidly near the threshold of the injection-current for the laser diodes.

  6. LEDs and laser diodes in schlieren optics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Pawliszyn, J.

    1987-02-01

    The pointing noise of light beams generated by light emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes are investigated and compared with the stability of the He--Ne laser and the incandescent lamp beam. LEDs have superior pointing noise characteristics compared to other light sources with their angular position drift of only about 50 nrad.

  7. Means for phase locking the outputs of a surface emitting laser diode array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, James R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An array of diode lasers, either a two-dimensional array of surface emitting lasers, or a linear array of stripe lasers, is phase locked by a diode laser through a hologram which focuses the output of the diode laser into a set of distinct, spatially separated beams, each one focused onto the back facet of a separate diode laser of the array. The outputs of the diode lasers thus form an emitted coherent beam out of the front of the array.

  8. A compact diode laser cavity ring-down spectrometer for atmospheric measurements of NO3 and N2O5 with automated zeroing and calibration.

    PubMed

    Odame-Ankrah, Charles A; Osthoff, Hans D

    2011-11-01

    A compact rack-mounted cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS) for simultaneous measurements of the nocturnal nitrogen oxides NO(3) and N(2)O(5) in ambient air is described. The instrument uses a red diode laser to quantify mixing ratios of NO(3) (at its absorption maximum at 662 nm) and of N(2)O(5) following its thermal dissociation to NO(3) in a second detection channel. The spectrometer is equipped with an automated zeroing and calibration setup to determine effective NO(3) absorption cross-sections and NO(3) and N(2)O(5) inlet transmission efficiencies. The instrument response was calibrated using simultaneous measurements of NO(2), generated by thermal dissociation of N(2)O(5) and/or by titration of NO(3) with excess NO, using blue diode laser CRDS at 405 nm. When measuring ambient air, the (2σ, 10 s) precision of the red diode CRDS varied between 5 and 8 parts-per-trillion by volume (pptv), which sufficed to quantify N(2)O(5) concentrations under moderately polluted conditions. Sample N(2)O(5) measurements made on a rooftop on the University of Calgary campus in August 2010 are presented. A maximum N(2)O(5) mixing ratio of 130 pptv was observed, corresponding to a steady-state lifetime of less than 50 min. The NO(3) mixing ratios were below the detection limit, consistent with their predicted values based on equilibrium calculations. During the measurement period, the instrument response for N(2)O(5) was 70% of the theoretical maximum, rationalized by a slight mismatch of the laser diode output with the NO(3) absorption line and a N(2)O(5) inlet transmission efficiency less than unity. Advantages and limitations of the instrument's compact design are discussed.

  9. Differential sensitivity of osteoblasts and bacterial pathogens to 405-nm light highlighting potential for decontamination applications in orthopedic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Praveen; Maclean, Michelle; MacGregor, Scott J.; Anderson, John G.; Grant, M. Helen

    2014-10-01

    Healthcare associated infections pose a major threat to patients admitted to hospitals and infection rates following orthopedic arthroplasty surgery are as high as 4%. A 405-nm high-intensity narrow spectrum light has been proven to reduce environmental contamination in hospital isolation rooms, and there is potential to develop this technology for application in arthroplasty surgery. Cultured rat osteoblasts were exposed to varying light intensities and it was found that exposures of up to a dose of 36 J/cm2 had no significant effect on cell viability [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay], function (alkaline phosphatase activity), and proliferation rate (BrdU cell proliferation assay). High irradiance exposures (54 J/cm2) significantly affected the cell viability indicating that the effects of 405-nm light on osteoblasts are dose dependent. Additionally, exposure of a variety of clinically related bacteria to a dose of 36 J/cm2 resulted in up to 100% kill. These results demonstrating the differential sensitivity of osteoblasts and bacteria to 405-nm light are an essential step toward developing the technique for decontamination in orthopedic surgery.

  10. Laser lipolysis: skin tightening in lipoplasty using a diode laser.

    PubMed

    Wolfenson, Moisés; Hochman, Bernardo; Ferreira, Lydia Massako

    2015-05-01

    New devices have been developed for surgical repair of deformities caused by localized fat deposits associated with skin laxity. The use of these devices requires the adoption of safety parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate skin tightening by laser lipolysis, using a dual-wavelength diode laser. This prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted between June of 2008 and July of 2010 with 41 consecutive patients who underwent laser lipolysis to correct contour deformities. Laser lipolysis was performed with a diode laser operating at two wavelengths (924 and 975 nm) controlled independently, and using three different tip lengths, allowing treatment of small, medium, and large areas of adipose tissue. The procedure was performed under local anesthesia in a surgical setting. To calculate the optimal cumulative energy, a total energy dose of 5 kJ/10 × 10-cm skin area was used as a safety parameter to prevent treatment complications. The circumferences of body regions were measured preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and 90 days later. Measurements were compared using the Wilcoxon test at a significance level of 0.05 (p < 0.05). A significant skin tightening was observed in all patients, regardless of the body site involved (i.e., face, breast, arms, or waist regions), and no complications occurred. Laser lipolysis results in progressive skin tightening over time. Therapeutic, IV.

  11. Diode lasers for interstitial laser coagulation of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschter, Rolf; Perlmutter, Aaron P.; Anson, K.; Jahnen, P.; Vargas Stuve, Juan C.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Sroka, Ronald; Hofstetter, Alfons G.; Vaughan, Darracott E., Jr.

    1995-05-01

    The concept of interstitial laser coagulation (ILC) of the prostate is the generation of intraprostatic lesions of large volumes, which secondarily are resorbed. In previously published experimental and clinical studies Nd:YAG lasers in combination with specially designed light guides were used. The aim of this study was to examine the suitability of diode lasers to be used in ILC. Diode lasers of various wavelengths (805 nm, 830 nm, 950 nm and 980 nm) with different interstitial applicators (predominantly diffusor tips) were tested in vitro (potatoes, turkey muscle, porcine liver) and in vivo (canine prostate). In vitro experiments were done with various powers and radiation times in order to evaluate the maximum lesion size achievable without tissue carbonization. This depended on the length of the applicator and could measure more than 20 mm. To get large lesion volumes with short radiation times, but to avoid charring, in vivo graded powers were favorable. These were optimized for some systems. In the canine prostate, lesion diameters of up to 15 mm were achieved. For clinical use, interstitial applicators were inserted into the bulky BPH transurethrally through a cystoscope under direct vision, either directly or aided by an introducer system. The number of fiber placements depended on the size and configuration of the gland and varied between 3 and 16. With the 980 nm diode laser and an applicator with conical beam pattern, irradiation was performed for 3 minutes per fiber placement using stepwise reduced power (20 W for 30 s, 15 W for 30 s, 10 W for 30 s and 7 W for 90 s). With the 830 nm diode laser and diffusor tip, the initial power of 10 W was reduced to 5 W within 4 minutes total radiation time. From 1993, 19 patients were treated with diode lasers (830 and 980 nm). Three months follow-up in 15 patients treated with 830 nm showed an AUA-score change from 18.9 to 5.9 and a peak flow rate change from 7.8 to 15.2 ml/s.

  12. New diode wavelengths for pumping solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, J.A.; Emanuel, M.A.; Beach, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    High-power laser-diode arrays have been demonstrated to be viable pump sources for solid-state lasers. The diode bars (fill factor of 0.7) were bonded to silicon microchannel heatsinks for high-average-power operation. Over 12 W of CW output power was achieved from a one cm AlGaInP tensile-strained single-quantum-well laser diode bar. At 690 nm, a compressively-strained single-quantum-well laser-diode array produced 360 W/cm{sup 2} per emitting aperture under CW operation, and 2.85 kW of pulsed power from a 3.8 cm{sup 2} emitting-aperture array. InGaAs strained single-quantum-well laser diodes emitting at 900 nm produced 2.8 kW pulsed power from a 4.4 cm{sup 2} emitting-aperture array.

  13. Multipass matrix systems for diode laser spectroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, Semen M.

    1996-02-01

    Several modifications of multipass matrix systems (MMS) with a large relative aperture have been developed to be applied in diode laser spectroscopy. In these systems the images are formed on the field mirrors as compact rectangular matrices with a controlled amount of lines and columns. The number of passes may reach 600-1000 for mirrors with high-reflectivity layers (in three- and four-objective systems, respectively). In four-objective systems the error arising in the position of the previous odd image is compensated each time when images with even numbers are formed in the matrix. Moreover, four-objective systems provide the double superimposition of images in the matrix, resulting in a longer path length. Having a simple construction matrix systems ensure high optical and performance parameters. To improve performance characteristics of a matrix system operating under high vibration conditions (systems installed on aircraft or helicopter, etc.) a new promising variation of a four-objective matrix system was developed. Exit images of this modification are totally insensitive to vibrations. Matrix systems with a large angular aperture were developed for special applications with high resolution IR diode laser spectrometers. In view of their capacities, matrix systems are the new generation multipass systems.

  14. Digital control of diode laser for atmospheric spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Rutledge, C. W. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A system is described for remote absorption spectroscopy of trace species using a diode laser tunable over a useful spectral region of 50 to 200 cm(-1) by control of diode laser temperature over range from 15 K to 100 K, and tunable over a smaller region of typically 0.1 to 10 cm(-1) by control of the diode laser current over a range from 0 to 2 amps. Diode laser temperature and current set points are transmitted to the instrument in digital form and stored in memory for retrieval under control of a microprocessor during measurements. The laser diode current is determined by a digital to analog converter through a field effect transistor for a high degree of ambient temperature stability, while the laser diode temperature is determined by set points entered into a digital to analog converter under control of the microprocessor. Temperature of the laser diode is sensed by a sensor diode to provide negative feedback to the temperature control circuit that responds to the temperature control digital to analog converter.

  15. The Effects of 405-nm Visible Light on the Survival of Campylobacter on Chicken Skin and Stainless Steel.

    PubMed

    Gunther, Nereus W; Phillips, John G; Sommers, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Campylobacter spp. are foodborne pathogens responsible for a significant portion of human cases of bacterial-mediated gastrointestinal disease. A primary method for the introduction of Campylobacter into the food supply is through poultry products. Reducing the number of Campylobacter on poultry products may reduce the incidence of human disease. Research has been conducted on the use of light to inactivate Campylobacter on poultry products and processing environments. More recently, the use of high intensity visible 405-nm light has been proposed for the elimination of pathogenic bacteria. This study investigated the ability of 405-nm light to reduce Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in poultry products. Campylobacter in chicken exudate were placed onto chicken skin or food-grade stainless steel before treatment with 405-nm light. A range of 405-nm light doses were applied to cocktails of six C. jejuni or six C. coli strains in exudate at 10°C to minimize thermal effects. Little difference was observed between inactivation of C. jejuni and C. coli on poultry skin with only minor average reductions of 1.7 logs and 2.1 logs, respectively, at the maximal dose of 184-186 J/cm(2). More noticeable differences were observed when the samples were placed on stainless steel and treated with a dose of 89 J/cm(2), producing an average reduction of 3.0 logs for C. coli but only 1.1 logs for C. jejuni. The maximal dose (181-183 J/cm(2)) applied to Campylobacter on stainless steel produced significant (p ≤ 0.05) reductions for C. jejuni and C. coli of 4.9 logs and 5.1 logs, respectively. However, significant 405-nm-mediated reductions in Campylobacter numbers required exposure times to achieve necessary dose levels that might be impractical under processing conditions. In addition, the most potent exposure times likely produced secondary thermal effects by raising sample surface temperatures above 48°C.

  16. Photoluminescence excitation measurements using pressure-tuned laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bercha, Artem; Ivonyak, Yurii; Mędryk, Radosław; Trzeciakowski, Witold A. Dybała, Filip; Piechal, Bernard

    2015-06-15

    Pressure-tuned laser diodes in external cavity were used as tunable sources for photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy. The method was demonstrated in the 720 nm-1070 nm spectral range using a few commercial laser diodes. The samples for PLE measurements were quantum-well structures grown on GaAs and on InP. The method is superior to standard PLE measurements using titanium sapphire laser because it can be extended to any spectral range where anti-reflection coated laser diodes are available.

  17. Industrial applications of high power diode lasers in materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Friedrich

    2003-03-01

    Diode lasers are widely used in communication, computer and consumer electronics technology. These applications are based on systems, which provide power in the milliwatt range. However, in the mean time high power diode lasers have reached the kilowatt power range. This became possible by special cooling and mounting as well as beam combination and beam forming technologies. Such units are nowadays used as a direct source for materials processing. High power diode lasers have entered the industrial manufacturing area [Proceedings of the Advanced Laser Technologies Conference 2001, Proc. SPIE, Constanta, Romania, 11-14 September 2001].

  18. Tunable diode lasers for 3-30 micron infrared operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    The tunable diode laser is now widely used in high resolution infrared spectroscopy studies, taking into account laboratory and industrial applications. The present investigation is concerned with advances related to laser performance and reliability. The advances are the result of improvements in materials and device technologies. Reliability data for broad-area Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Se lasers are considered along with performance improvements in stripe-geometry lasers, laser performance at wavelengths above 25 microns, and laser performance at wavelengths below 4 microns. Attention is given to tunable Pb-salt infrared diode lasers, mesa-stripe geometry lasers of Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Se and PbS(1-x)Se(x), and long wavelength diode laser emission observed in both Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te and Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Se.

  19. Laser diode ignition characteristics of Zirconium Potassium Perchlorate (ZPP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, Jerry D.; Tindol, Scot

    1993-01-01

    Hi-Shear Technology, Corp., (HSTC) has designed and built a Laser equivalent NASA Standard Initiator (LNSI). Langlie tests with a laser diode output initiating ZPP were conducted as a part of this effort. The test parameters include time to first pressure, laser power density requirements, and ignition time. The data from these laser tests on ZPP are presented.

  20. Computer-Assisted Experiments with a Laser Diode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2011-01-01

    A laser diode from an inexpensive laser pen (laser pointer) is used in simple experiments. The radiant output power and efficiency of the laser are measured, and polarization of the light beam is shown. The "h/e" ratio is available from the threshold of spontaneous emission. The lasing threshold is found using several methods. With a…

  1. Computer-Assisted Experiments with a Laser Diode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2011-01-01

    A laser diode from an inexpensive laser pen (laser pointer) is used in simple experiments. The radiant output power and efficiency of the laser are measured, and polarization of the light beam is shown. The "h/e" ratio is available from the threshold of spontaneous emission. The lasing threshold is found using several methods. With a…

  2. High power laser diodes for the NASA direct detection laser transceiver experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seery, Bernard D.; Holcomb, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    High-power semiconductor laser diodes selected for use in the NASA space laser communications experiments are discussed. The diode selection rationale is reviewed, and the laser structure is shown. The theory and design of the third mirror lasers used in the experiments are addressed.

  3. Design of drive circuit of laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Yingying; Huang, Xuegong; Xu, Xiaobin

    2016-10-01

    Aiming at the difficult problem of high precision frequency stabilization of semiconductor laser diode, the laser frequency control is realized through the design of the semiconductor drive system. Above all, the relationship between the emission frequency and the temperature of LD is derived theoretically. Then the temperature corresponding to the stable frequency is obtained. According to the desired temperature stability of LD, temperature control system is designed, which is composed of a temperature setting circuit, temperature gathering circuit, the temperature display circuit, analog PID control circuit and a semiconductor refrigerator control circuit module. By sampling technology, voltage of platinum resistance is acquired, and the converted temperature is display on liquid crystal display. PID analog control circuit controls speed stability and precision of temperature control. The constant current source circuit is designed to provide the reference voltage by a voltage stabilizing chip, which is buffered by an operational amplifier. It is connected with the MOSFET to drive the semiconductor laser to provide stable current for the semiconductor laser. PCB circuit board was finished and the experimental was justified. The experimental results show that: the design of the temperature control system could achieve the goal of temperature monitoring. Meanwhile, temperature can be stabilized at 40°C +/- 0.1°C. The output voltage of the constant current source is 2 V. The current is 35 mA.

  4. Diode-pumped 10 W continuous wave cesium laser.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Boris; Knize, R J

    2007-08-01

    An efficient cesium vapor laser pumped with a continuous wave laser diode array has been demonstrated. The linewidth of the pump source was narrowed using the external cavity to match it to the cesium absorption line. The output power of the continuous wave cesium laser was 10 W, which exceeds previous results by more than a factor of 10, and the slope efficiency was 68%. The overall optical efficiency was 62%, which is a factor of 6 higher than previous pulsed laser results for alkali lasers with diode laser array pumping.

  5. Diode-pumped continuous-wave Nd:glass laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlovsky, W. J.; Fan, T. Y.; Byer, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The paper reports on diode-laser pumping of monolithic Nd:glass laser oscillators. End pumping with a single-stripe diode laser, a threshold of 2.2 mW, and a slope efficiency of 42 percent were observed on a 2-mm-long oscillator with a mode radius of 35 microns. The oscillator generated 2.5 mW of single-ended output power in many axial modes.

  6. Comparative efficiency analysis of GaN-based light-emitting diodes and laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piprek, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Nobel laureate Shuji Nakamura predicted in 2014 that GaN-based laser diodes are the future of solid state lighting. However, blue GaN-lasers still exhibit less than 40% wall-plug efficiency, while some GaN-based blue light-emitting diodes exceed 80%. This paper investigates non-thermal reasons behind this difference. The inherently poor hole conductivity of the Mg-doped waveguide cladding layer of laser diodes is identified as main reason for their low electrical-to-optical energy conversion efficiency.

  7. Innovative Facet Passivation for High-Brightness Laser Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-05

    Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 high-power laser diodes, catastrophic optical damage, high energy lasers REPORT...factor bar) desired for military high energy lasers (HELs). COD of the front facet (laser mirror) is the main failure mechanism that constrains scaling... energy lasers (HELs). COD of the front facet (laser mirror) is the main failure mechanism that constrains scaling LD power by 10X over the SOA to 600 W

  8. Geometrical Transformation of Linear Diode-Laser Arrays for Longitudinal Pumping of Solid-State Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-26

    of Nd:YAG crystal vs incident power from the geometrically transformed laser - diode array. 24 12 TEM00 output power from Nd:YAG laser when pumped by n...MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LINCOLN LABORATORY GEOMETRICAL TRANSFORMATION OF LINEAR DIODE - LASER ARRAYS FOR LONGITUDINAL PUMPING OF SOLID-STATE...Photograph of pump spot at the lens focal plane. 22 10 Curvature of the laser - diode array emitting facet. 23 11 TEMOO output power from 1.06 pm transition

  9. High brightness diode lasers controlled by volume Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, Leonid

    2017-02-01

    Volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) recorded in photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass are holographic optical elements that are effective spectral and angular filters withstanding high power laser radiation. Reflecting VBGs are narrow-band spectral filters while transmitting VBGs are narrow-band angular filters. The use of these optical elements in external resonators of semiconductor lasers enables extremely resonant feedback that provides dramatic spectral and angular narrowing of laser diodes radiation without significant power and efficiency penalty. Spectral narrowing of laser diodes by reflecting VBGs demonstrated in wide spectral region from near UV to 3 μm. Commercially available VBGs have spectral width ranged from few nanometers to few tens of picometers. Efficient spectral locking was demonstrated for edge emitters (single diodes, bars, modules, and stacks), vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), grating coupled surface emitting lasers (GCSELs), and interband cascade lasers (ICLs). The use of multiplexed VBGs provides multiwavelength emission from a single emitter. Spectrally locked semiconductor lasers demonstrated CW power from milliwatts to a kilowatt. Angular narrowing by transmitting VBGs enables single transverse mode emission from wide aperture diode lasers having resonators with great Fresnel numbers. This feature provides close to diffraction limit divergence along a slow axis of wide stripe edge emitters. Radiation exchange between lasers by means of spatially profiled or multiplexed VBGs enables coherent combining of diode lasers. Sequence of VBGs or multiplexed VBGs enable spectral combining of spectrally narrowed diode lasers or laser modules. Thus the use of VBGs for diode lasers beam control provides dramatic increase of brightness.

  10. Diode-Laser Phase Conjugation 03-FS-030 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Beach, R J; Payne, S A; Holzrichter, J F

    2005-02-14

    Arrays of lasers are often considered when a need exists to increase laser optical output power, for a variety of purposes. Similarly, individual semiconductor laser-diodes, generating 0.01-1.0 W each, are commonly placed in arrays in order to increase total optical power onto targeted objects. Examples of such usage are diode-laser pump arrays for solid-slab heat-capacity lasers, laser arrays for heat-treating materials, and arrays for efficient solid state laser systems. The commercial and defense communities also use such arrays for many applications from laser range-finders, laser designators, to laser machining systems, etc. However, the arraying process does not automatically increase ''focusable'' light on target (i.e., intensity/steradian). For those applications requiring the highest focusability, it is necessary that the collective output beam from arrays of individual lasers be phase-coherent. Under this condition, the individual laser-element optical outputs are ''fused together'' into a larger area, phase coherent (i.e., all wavefronts are ''in step''), high-power combined beam. The process of joining multiple laser beams together to produce a single coherent wave, is in general very difficult and seldom accomplished. Thus joining together many hundreds to thousands of beams from individual laser-diodes, in large arrays, is still an unsolved problem. There are 2 major reasons for this. Firstly, the phase of each output laser beam (i.e. the wave-fronts) from each laser diode often fluctuates within nanosecond time periods, making a control loop with sufficient bandwidth difficult to build. In fact, phase fluctuations (related to laser linewidth) limit the size of an extended system of arrayed diodes because of speed-of-light restrictions on information flow. Secondly, the output power per prior laser diode has been low ( < 1W,) so that the size, expense, and complexity of control systems for correcting a multitude of output phases of the individual

  11. Modular package for cooling a laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Mundinger, David C.; Benett, William J.; Beach, Raymond J.

    1992-01-01

    A laser diode array is disclosed that includes a plurality of planar packages and active cooling. The laser diode array may be operated in a long duty cycle, or in continuous operation. A laser diode bar and a microchannel heat sink are thermally coupled in a compact, thin planar package having the laser diode bar located proximate to one edge. In an array, a number of such thin planar packages are secured together in a stacked configuration, in close proximity so that the laser diodes are spaced closely. The cooling means includes a microchannel heat sink that is attached proximate to the laser bar so that it absorbs heat generated by laser operation. To provide the coolant to the microchannels, each thin planar package comprises a thin inlet manifold and a thin outlet manifold connected to an inlet corridor and an outlet corridor. The inlet corridor comprises a hole extending through each of the packages in the array, and the outlet corridor comprises a hole extending through each of the packages in the array. The inlet and outlet corridors are connected to a conventional coolant circulation system. The laser diode array with active cooling has application as an optical pump for high power solid state lasers. Further, it can be incorporated in equipment such as communications devices and active sensors, and in military and space applications, and it can be useful in applications having space constraints and energy limitations.

  12. Continuous wave Cs diode pumped alkali laser pumped by single emitter narrowband laser diode.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, B V; Venus, G; Smirnov, V; Glebov, L; Knize, R J

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents results of cooperative efforts on development of a continuous wave Cs diode pumped alkali laser with moderate output power, which can be considered as a prototype of the commercial device. The developed system operates at 895 nm with output power about 4 W and slope efficiency 28%. Measured turn on time of this system from the standby mode is about a minute.

  13. Selective laser suture lysis with a compact, low-cost, red diode laser.

    PubMed

    Shein, Petr; Cilip, Christopher M; Quinto, Guilherme; Behrens, Ashley; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2008-01-01

    The argon (blue-green) laser is currently used for vaporization of sutures during ophthalmic surgery. However, previous studies have reported more effective laser suture lysis and a lower rate of complications using the krypton (red) laser. Red wavelengths are selectively absorbed by the nylon sutures, but are minimally absorbed by adjacent tissue, and not absorbed by hemoglobin, unlike the argon laser wavelengths. More compact and less expensive red diode lasers have recently become commercially available for surgical applications. This study explores the use of a compact, lowpower, red diode laser for selective laser suture lysis. A 225 mW, 660-nm diode laser was used to vaporize 10-0 nylon sutures in human cornea samples with a single laser pulse, pulse energy of 150 mJ, pulse duration of 100 ms, and spot diameter of 55 mum. The red diode laser may represent an inexpensive, compact, and safer alternative laser for use in laser suture lysis during ophthalmic surgery.

  14. Room-Temperature Spin Polariton Diode Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Aniruddha; Baten, Md Zunaid; Iorsh, Ivan; Frost, Thomas; Kavokin, Alexey; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2017-08-01

    A spin-polarized laser offers inherent control of the output circular polarization. We have investigated the output polarization characteristics of a bulk GaN-based microcavity polariton diode laser at room temperature with electrical injection of spin-polarized electrons via a FeCo /MgO spin injector. Polariton laser operation with a spin-polarized current is characterized by a threshold of ˜69 A / cm2 in the light-current characteristics, a significant reduction of the electroluminescence linewidth and blueshift of the emission peak. A degree of output circular polarization of ˜25 % is recorded under remanent magnetization. A second threshold, due to conventional photon lasing, is observed at an injection of ˜7.2 kA /cm2 . The variation of output circular and linear polarization with spin-polarized injection current has been analyzed with the carrier and exciton rate equations and the Gross-Pitaevskii equations for the condensate and there is good agreement between measured and calculated data.

  15. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock.

    PubMed

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed.

  16. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed.

  17. Improving Reliability of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping Solid State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Baggott, Renee S.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Most Lidar applications rely on moderate to high power solid state lasers to generate the required transmitted pulses. However, the reliability of solid state lasers, which can operate autonomously over long periods, is constrained by their laser diode pump arrays. Thermal cycling of the active regions is considered the primary reason for rapid degradation of the quasi-CW high power laser diode arrays, and the excessive temperature rise is the leading suspect in premature failure. The thermal issues of laser diode arrays are even more drastic for 2-micron solid state lasers which require considerably longer pump pulses compared to the more commonly used pump arrays for 1-micron lasers. This paper describes several advanced packaging techniques being employed for more efficient heat removal from the active regions of the laser diode bars. Experimental results for several high power laser diode array devices will be reported and their performance when operated at long pulsewidths of about 1msec will be described.

  18. Microlens frames for laser diode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Skidmore, J.A.; Freitas, B.L.

    1999-07-13

    Monolithic microlens frames enable the fabrication of monolithic laser diode arrays and are manufactured inexpensively with high registration, and with inherent focal length compensation for any lens diameter variation. A monolithic substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost microlens array. The substrate is wet-etched or sawed with a series of v-grooves. The v-grooves can be created by wet-etching, by exploiting the large etch-rate selectivity of different crystal planes. The v-grooves provide a support frame for either cylindrical or custom-shaped microlenses. Because the microlens frames are formed by photolithographic semiconductor batch-processing techniques, they can be formed inexpensively over large areas with precise lateral and vertical registration. The v-groove has an important advantage for preserving the correct focus for lenses of varying diameter. 12 figs.

  19. Microlens frames for laser diode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Skidmore, Jay A.; Freitas, Barry L.

    1999-01-01

    Monolithic microlens frames enable the fabrication of monolithic laser diode arrays and are manufactured inexpensively with high registration, and with inherent focal length compensation for any lens diameter variation. A monolithic substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost microlens array. The substrate is wet-etched or sawed with a series of v-grooves. The v-grooves can be created by wet-etching, by exploiting the large etch-rate selectivity of different crystal planes. The v-grooves provide a support frame for either cylindrical or custom-shaped microlenses. Because the microlens frames are formed by photolithographic semiconductor batch-processing techniques, they can be formed inexpensively over large areas with precise lateral and vertical registration. The v-groove has an important advantage for preserving the correct focus for lenses of varying diameter.

  20. Linewidth-tunable laser diode array for rubidium laser pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhiyong; Tan Rongqing; Xu Cheng; Li Lin

    2013-02-28

    To optimise the pump source for a high-power diodepumped rubidium vapour laser, we have designed a laser diode array (LDA) with a narrowed and tunable linewidth and an external cavity formed by two volume Bragg gratings (VBGs). Through controlling the temperature differences between the two VBGs, the LDA linewidth, which was 1.8 nm before mounting the two VBGs, was tunable from 100 pm to 0.2 nm, while the output power changed by no more than 4 %. By changing simultaneously the temperature in both VBGs, the centre wavelength in air of the linewidth-tunable LDA was tunable from 779.40 nm to 780.05 nm. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  1. An external cavity diode laser using a volume holographic grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Chang, Chang-Ray; Chen, Chun-Chia; Chang, Ming-Shien

    2012-10-01

    This study presents an external cavity diode laser (ECDL) system, utilizing a volume holographic grating (VHG) and a microfabricated silicon flexure as the VHG holder. The laser design is aimed for easy assembly, controllability, and better stability of the laser cavity. The laser frequency was stabilized to a D2 transition of rubidium at 780.247 nm, with a mode-hop-free tuning range of 16 GHz and 9.6 GHz with and without feed-forward on the diode injection current. The measured linewidth was 850 kHz in 500 s, qualified for laser cooling experiments.

  2. Short range laser obstacle detector. [for surface vehicles using laser diode array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriger, W. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A short range obstacle detector for surface vehicles is described which utilizes an array of laser diodes. The diodes operate one at a time, with one diode for each adjacent azimuth sector. A vibrating mirror a short distance above the surface provides continuous scanning in elevation for all azimuth sectors. A diode laser is synchronized with the vibrating mirror to enable one diode laser to be fired, by pulses from a clock pulse source, a number of times during each elevation scan cycle. The time for a given pulse of light to be reflected from an obstacle and received is detected as a measure of range to the obstacle.

  3. Transversely diode-pumped alkali metal vapour laser

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomenko, A I; Shalagin, A M

    2015-09-30

    We have studied theoretically the operation of a transversely diode-pumped alkali metal vapour laser. For the case of high-intensity laser radiation, we have obtained an analytical solution to a complex system of differential equations describing the laser. This solution allows one to exhaustively determine all the energy characteristics of the laser and to find optimal parameters of the working medium and pump radiation (temperature, buffer gas pressure, and intensity and width of the pump spectrum). (lasers)

  4. Multiple-Diode-Laser Gas-Detection Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Christopher R.; Beer, Reinhard; Sander, Stanley P.

    1988-01-01

    Small concentrations of selected gases measured automatically. Proposed multiple-laser-diode spectrometer part of system for measuring automatically concentrations of selected gases at part-per-billion level. Array of laser/photodetector pairs measure infrared absorption spectrum of atmosphere along probing laser beams. Adaptable to terrestrial uses as monitoring pollution or control of industrial processes.

  5. Multiple-Diode-Laser Gas-Detection Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Christopher R.; Beer, Reinhard; Sander, Stanley P.

    1988-01-01

    Small concentrations of selected gases measured automatically. Proposed multiple-laser-diode spectrometer part of system for measuring automatically concentrations of selected gases at part-per-billion level. Array of laser/photodetector pairs measure infrared absorption spectrum of atmosphere along probing laser beams. Adaptable to terrestrial uses as monitoring pollution or control of industrial processes.

  6. Applications of microlens-conditioned laser diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.J.; Emanuel, M.A.; Freitas, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    The ability to condition the radiance of laser diodes using shaped-fiber cylindrical-microlens technology has dramatically increased the number of applications that can be practically engaged by diode laser arrays. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has actively pursued optical efficiency and engineering improvements in this technology in an effort to supply large radiance-conditioned laser diode array sources for its own internal programs. This effort has centered on the development of a modular integrated laser diode packaging technology with the goal of enabling the simple and flexible construction of high average power, high density, two-dimensional arrays with integrated cylindrical microlenses. Within LLNL, the principal applications of microlens-conditioned laser diode arrays are as high intensity pump sources for diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSSLs). A simple end-pumping architecture has been developed and demonstrated that allows the radiation from microlens-conditioned, two-dimensional diode array apertures to be efficiently delivered to the end of rod lasers. To date, pump powers as high as 2.5 kW have been delivered to 3 mm diameter laser rods. Such high power levels are critical for pumping solid state lasers in which the terminal laser level is a Stark level lying in the ground state manifold. Previously, such systems have often required operation of the solid state gain medium at low temperature to freeze out the terminal laser Stark level population. The authors recently developed high intensity pump sources overcome this difficulty by effectively pumping to much higher inversion levels, allowing efficient operation at or near room temperature. Because the end-pumping technology is scalable in absolute power, the number of rare-earth ions and transitions that can be effectively accessed for use in practical DPSSL systems has grown tremendously.

  7. Diode laser absorption spectroscopy of lithium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, Ignacio E.; González, Iván A.

    2016-10-01

    We study Doppler-limited laser intensity absorption, in a thermal lithium vapor containing 7Li and 6Li atoms in a 9 to 1 ratio, using a narrow-linewidth single-longitudinal-mode tunable external cavity diode laser at the wavelength of 670.8 nm. The lithium vapor was embedded in helium or argon buffer gas. The spectral lineshapes were rigorously predicted for D_1 and D_2 for the lithium 6 and 7 isotope lines using reduced optical Bloch equations, specifically derived, from a density matrix analysis. Here, a detailed comparison is provided of the predicted lineshapes with the measured 7Li-D_2, 7Li-D_1, 6Li-D_2 and 6Li-D_1 lines, in the case of high vapor density and with intensity above the saturation intensity. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such detailed comparison is reported in the open literature. The calculations were also extended to saturated absorption spectra and compared to measured Doppler-free 7Li-D_2 and 6Li-D_2 hyperfine lines.

  8. Stable diode lasers for hydrogen precision spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnis, J.; Matveev, A.; Kolachevsky, N.; Wilken, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Hänsch, T. W.

    2008-10-01

    We report on an external cavity diode laser at 972 nmstabilized to a mid-plane mounted Fabry-Perot (FP) resonator with afinesse of 400000. The 0.5 Hz optical beat note line width betweentwo similar lasers (Allan deviation 2 × 10-15) is limitedby thermal noise properties of two independent FP resonators. Thelong term drift of the FP resonator and mirror substrates made fromUltra-Low-Expansion glass (ULE) is small and can be well predictedon time intervals up to many hours if the resonator is stabilized atthe zero thermal expansion temperature Tc. Using a Peltierelement in a vacuum chamber for temperature stabilization allowsstabilization of the FP cavity to Tc which is usually below theroom temperature. Beat note measurements with a femtosecond opticalfrequency comb referenced to a H-maser during 15 hours have shown awell defined linear drift of the FP resonance frequency of about 60 mHz/s with residual frequency excursions of less than ±20 Hz.

  9. Fault protection of broad-area laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, J. H.; Petr, R.; Jaspan, M. A.; Swartz, S. D.; Knapczyk, M. T.; Flusberg, A. M.; Chin, A. K.; Smilanski, I.

    2009-02-01

    Detailed reliability studies of high-power, CW, broad-area, GaAs-based laser- diodes were performed. Optical and electrical transients occurring prior to device failure by catastrophic optical-damage (COD) were observed. These transients were correlated with COD formation as observed in laser diodes with an optical window in the n-side electrode. In addition, custom electronics were designed to fault-protect the laser diodes during aging tests, i.e. each time a transient (fault) was detected, the operating current was temporarily cut off within 4μs of fault detection. The lifetime of fault-protected 808-nm laser-diode bars operated at a constant current of 120A (~130W) and 35°C exceeded similar unprotected devices by factors of 2.

  10. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock

    SciTech Connect

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-15

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser’s transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed.

  11. High efficiency >26 W diode end-pumped Alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Teppitaksak, Achaya; Minassian, Ara; Thomas, Gabrielle M; Damzen, Michael J

    2014-06-30

    We show for the first time that multi-ten Watt operation of an Alexandrite laser can be achieved with direct red diode-pumping and with high efficiency. An investigation of diode end-pumped Alexandrite rod lasers demonstrates continuous-wave output power in excess of 26W, more than an order of magnitude higher than previous diode end-pumping systems, and slope efficiency 49%, the highest reported for a diode-pumped Alexandrite laser. Wavelength tuning from 730 to 792nm is demonstrated using self-seeding feedback from an external grating. Q-switched laser operation based on polarization-switching to a lower gain axis of Alexandrite has produced ~mJ-pulse energy at 1kHz pulse rate in fundamental TEM(00) mode.

  12. Wavelength stabilized multi-kW diode laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Bernd; Unger, Andreas; Kindervater, Tobias; Drovs, Simon; Wolf, Paul; Hubrich, Ralf; Beczkowiak, Anna; Auch, Stefan; Müntz, Holger; Biesenbach, Jens

    2015-03-01

    We report on wavelength stabilized high-power diode laser systems with enhanced spectral brightness by means of Volume Holographic Gratings. High-power diode laser modules typically have a relatively broad spectral width of about 3 to 6 nm. In addition the center wavelength shifts by changing the temperature and the driving current, which is obstructive for pumping applications with small absorption bandwidths. Wavelength stabilization of high-power diode laser systems is an important method to increase the efficiency of diode pumped solid-state lasers. It also enables power scaling by dense wavelength multiplexing. To ensure a wide locking range and efficient wavelength stabilization the parameters of the Volume Holographic Grating and the parameters of the diode laser bar have to be adapted carefully. Important parameters are the reflectivity of the Volume Holographic Grating, the reflectivity of the diode laser bar as well as its angular and spectral emission characteristics. In this paper we present detailed data on wavelength stabilized diode laser systems with and without fiber coupling in the spectral range from 634 nm up to 1533 nm. The maximum output power of 2.7 kW was measured for a fiber coupled system (1000 μm, NA 0.22), which was stabilized at a wavelength of 969 nm with a spectral width of only 0.6 nm (90% value). Another example is a narrow line-width diode laser stack, which was stabilized at a wavelength of 1533 nm with a spectral bandwidth below 1 nm and an output power of 835 W.

  13. Diffraction Limited 3.15 Microns Cascade Diode Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    carriers recycling by the cascade pumping . The narrow ridge 6- m-wide waveguides were defined by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactive ion etching...diffraction limited, diode lasers, cascade pumping REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S...of GaSb-based type-I QW diode lasers by utilizing cascade pumping scheme4. The carriers were recycled with 100% efficiency between two gain stages

  14. Athermal diode-pumped laser designator modules for targeting application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepy, B.; Closse, G.; Da Cruz, J.; Sabourdy, D.; Montagne, J.; Nguyen, L.

    2012-10-01

    We report on the development and characteristics of athermal diode-pumped designator modules as Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) for targeting application. These modules are designed with the latest diode-pumped technology minimizing volume and power consumption. The core technology allows to address multi-platforms requirements such as land or airborne. Products are composed of a Laser Transmitter Unit (LTU) and Laser Electronic Unit (LEU) for modular approach.

  15. Sb-Based Mid-Infrared Diode Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    low as 121 A/cm2 reflecting the superior quality of our diode lasers, all values recorded at 280 K. A high characteristic temperature To of 179 K for...K temperature interval. Room temperature cw output powers exceeding 1.7 W have been demonstrated for broad area single element devices with high ...operating temperatures while maintaining high power efficiency. For the 2-3 pin wavelength interval, the conventional interband diode laser approach is

  16. Efficient potassium diode pumped alkali laser operating in pulsed mode.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Boris V; Rotondaro, Matthew D; Shaffer, Michael K; Knize, Randall J

    2014-07-14

    This paper presents the results of our experiments on the development of an efficient hydrocarbon free diode pumped alkali laser based on potassium vapor buffered by He gas at 600 Torr. A slope efficiency of more than 50% was demonstrated with a total optical conversion efficiency of 30%. This result was achieved by using a narrowband diode laser stack as the pump source. The stack was operated in pulsed mode to avoid limiting thermal effects and ionization.

  17. High-power passive-cooled diode laser device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonati, Guido F.; Hennig, Petra; Rollig, Ullrich; Lorenzen, Dirk

    2003-06-01

    In order to achieve a thermally stable diode laser system based on high power diode laser bars, actively cooled heatsinks in form of micro channel heat sinks (MCHS) are used to face the power loss density of 106 W/m2 while requiring a minimum device volume. At identical junction temperature, passively cooled diode lasers are usually lower in power and the device volume is much higher due to the heat flux spreading design of passive heatsinks. However, as a matter of principle, the cooling with MCHS sinks requires a sealing between the heat sink itself and the system around. This sealing is usually achieved by o-rings, what can never avoid the transfer of vapor from the cooling system into the vicinity of the diode laser. Extreme requirements on availability, which lead to corresponding lifetime requirements, like in telecom applications, already require passively cooled diode lasers without any water in the inner system boundaries. For applications not requiring the extreme compact design volume of actively cooled diode lasers but requiring extreme lifetime or a minimum outlay on the periphery, we started looking into passively cooled diode laser stacks. To achieve a minimized temperature rise in the junction, we already developed a new copper-based heat sink, spreading the power loss in an optimized manner. Based on this heatsink, we started developing a heat exchanger with a low thermal resistance while keeping the water out of the inner system boundaries. The thermal resistance is low enough to run up to 12 passively cooled diode lasers on a low ambient temperature with a minimum of periphery requirements.

  18. Laser diodes for sensing applications: adaptive cruise control and more

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerlein, Joerg; Morgott, Stefan; Ferstl, Christian

    2005-02-01

    Adaptive Cruise Controls (ACC) and pre-crash sensors require an intelligent eye which can recognize traffic situations and deliver a 3-dimensional view. Both microwave RADAR and "Light RADAR" (LIDAR) systems are well suited as sensors. In order to utilize the advantages of LIDARs -- such as lower cost, simpler assembly and high reliability -- the key component, the laser diode, is of primary importance. Here, we present laser diodes which meet the requirements of the automotive industry.

  19. Laser hazard analysis for various candidate diode lasers associated with the high resolution pulsed scanner.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2004-10-01

    A laser hazard analysis and safety assessment was performed for each various laser diode candidates associated with the High Resolution Pulse Scanner based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers. A theoretical laser hazard analysis model for this system was derived and an Excel{reg_sign} spreadsheet model was developed to answer the 'what if questions' associated with the various modes of operations for the various candidate diode lasers.

  20. Commercial applications of high-powered laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, David L.; Jacobs, Richard D.

    1995-04-01

    The development of high power laser diodes using surface emitting distributed feedback (SEDFB) techniques has matured to the point where serious marketing analyses have been conducted. While development of the base technology continues, the initiation of systems applications and manufacturing engineering has begun. This effort, in direct response to growing market demand, is the critical bridge between research and the development of viable products for commercial applications. This paper addresses the history of laser technology development, the current status of high powered laser diode development, the forces defining current and future markets and the role of `conventional wisdom' in laser technology and market development.

  1. Precision Spectroscopy, Diode Lasers, and Optical Frequency Measurement Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollberg, Leo (Editor); Fox, Richard (Editor); Waltman, Steve (Editor); Robinson, Hugh

    1998-01-01

    This compilation is a selected set of reprints from the Optical Frequency Measurement Group of the Time and Frequency Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and consists of work published between 1987 and 1997. The two main programs represented here are (1) development of tunable diode-laser technology for scientific applications and precision measurements, and (2) research toward the goal of realizing optical-frequency measurements and synthesis. The papers are organized chronologically in five, somewhat arbitrarily chosen categories: Diode Laser Technology, Tunable Laser Systems, Laser Spectroscopy, Optical Synthesis and Extended Wavelength Coverage, and Multi-Photon Interactions and Optical Coherences.

  2. Diode-pumped Alexandrite ring laser for lidar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munk, A.; Jungbluth, B.; Strotkamp, M.; Hoffmann, H.-D.; Poprawe, R.; Höffner, J.

    2016-03-01

    We present design and performance data of a diode-pumped Q-switched Alexandrite ring laser in the millijoule regime, which is longitudinally pumped by laser diode bar modules in the red spectral range. As a first step, a linear resonator was designed and characterized in qcw operation as well as in Q-switched operation. Based on these investigations, two separate linear cavities were set up, each with one Alexandrite crystal longitudinally pumped by one diode module. The two cavities are fused together and form a ring cavity which yields up to 6 mJ pulse burst energy in the qcw regime at 770 nm.

  3. Direct diode-pumped Kerr Lens 13 fs Ti:sapphire ultrafast oscillator using a single blue laser diode

    DOE PAGES

    Backus, Sterling; Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO; Kirchner, Matt; ...

    2017-05-18

    We demonstrate a direct diode-pumped Kerr Lens Modelocked Ti:sapphire laser producing 13 fs pulses with 1.85 nJ energy at 78 MHz (145 mW) using a single laser diode pump. We also present a similar laser using three spectrally combined diodes, generating >300 mW output power with >50 nm bandwidth. We discuss the use of far-from TEM00 pump laser sources, and their effect on the Kerr lens modelocking process.

  4. Disruptive laser diode source for embedded LIDAR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, Celine; Laugustin, Arnaud; Kohl, Andreas; Rabot, Olivier

    2017-02-01

    Active imaging based on laser illumination is used in various fields such as medicine, security, defense, civil engineering and in the automotive sector. In this last domain, research and development to bring autonomous vehicles on the roads has been intensified these last years with an emphasis on lidar technology that is probably the key to achieve full automation level. Based on time-of-flight measurements, the profile of objects can be measured together with their location in various conditions, creating a 3D mapping of the environment. To be embedded on a vehicle as advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), these sensors require compactness, low-cost and reliability, as it is provided by a flash lidar. An attractive candidate, especially with respect to cost reduction, for the laser source integrated in these devices is certainly laser diodes as long as they can provide sufficiently short pulses with a high energy. A recent breakthrough in laser diode and diode driver technology made by Quantel (Les Ulis, France) now allows laser emission higher than 1 mJ with pulses as short as 12 ns in a footprint of 4x5 cm2 (including both the laser diode and driver) and an electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency of the whole laser diode source higher than 25% at this level of energy. The components used for the laser source presented here can all be manufactured at low cost. In particular, instead of having several individual laser diodes positioned side by side, the laser diodes are monolithically integrated on a single semiconductor chip. The chips are then integrated directly on the driver board in a single assembly step. These laser sources emit in the range of 800-1000 nm and their emission is considered to be eye safe when taking into account the high divergence of the output beam and the aperture of possible macro lenses so that they can be used for end consumer applications. Experimental characterization of these state-of-the-art pulsed laser diode sources

  5. Wavelength-Agile External-Cavity Diode Laser for DWDM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.

    2006-01-01

    A prototype external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been developed for communication systems utilizing dense wavelength- division multiplexing (DWDM). This ECDL is an updated version of the ECDL reported in Wavelength-Agile External- Cavity Diode Laser (LEW-17090), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 11 (November 2001), page 14a. To recapitulate: The wavelength-agile ECDL combines the stability of an external-cavity laser with the wavelength agility of a diode laser. Wavelength is modulated by modulating the injection current of the diode-laser gain element. The external cavity is a Littman-Metcalf resonator, in which the zeroth-order output from a diffraction grating is used as the laser output and the first-order-diffracted light is retro-reflected by a cavity feedback mirror, which establishes one end of the resonator. The other end of the resonator is the output surface of a Fabry-Perot resonator that constitutes the diode-laser gain element. Wavelength is selected by choosing the angle of the diffracted return beam, as determined by position of the feedback mirror. The present wavelength-agile ECDL is distinguished by design details that enable coverage of all 60 channels, separated by 100-GHz frequency intervals, that are specified in DWDM standards.

  6. Reliability of high power laser diodes with external optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonsendorf, Dennis; Schneider, Stephan; Meinschien, Jens; Tomm, Jens W.

    2016-03-01

    Direct diode laser systems gain importance in the fields of material processing and solid-state laser pumping. With increased output power, also the influence of strong optical feedback has to be considered. Uncontrolled optical feedback is known for its spectral and power fluctuation effects, as well as potential emitter damage. We found that even intended feedback by use of volume Bragg gratings (VBG) for spectral stabilization may result in emitter lifetime reduction. To provide stable and reliable laser systems design, guidelines and maximum feedback ratings have to be found. We present a model to estimate the optical feedback power coupled back into the laser diode waveguide. It includes several origins of optical feedback and wide range of optical elements. The failure thresholds of InGaAs and AlGaAs bars have been determined not only at standard operation mode but at various working points. The influence of several feedback levels to laser diode lifetime is investigated up to 4000h. The analysis of the semiconductor itself leads to a better understanding of the degradation process by defect spread. Facet microscopy, LBIC- and electroluminescence measurements deliver detailed information about semiconductor defects before and after aging tests. Laser diode protection systems can monitor optical feedback. With this improved understanding, the emergency shutdown threshold can be set low enough to ensure laser diode reliability but also high enough to provide better machine usability avoiding false alarms.

  7. Extended-cavity diode lasers with tracked resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiow, Sheng-Wey; Long, Quan; Vo, Christoph; Müller, Holger; Chu, Steven

    2007-11-01

    We present a painless, almost-free upgrade to present extended-cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) that improves the long-term mode-hop-free performance by stabilizing the resonance of the internal cavity to the external cavity. This stabilization is based on the observation that the frequency or amplitude noise of the ECDL is lowest at the optimum laser diode temperature or injection current. Thus, keeping the diode current at the level where the noise is lowest ensures mode-hop-free operation within one of the stable regions of the mode chart, even if these should drift due to external influences. This method can be applied directly to existing laser systems without modifying the optical setup. We demonstrate the method in two ECDLs stabilized to vapor cells at 852 and 895 nm wavelengths. We achieve long-term mode-hop-free operation and low noise at low power consumption, even with an inexpensive non-antireflection-coated diode.

  8. Extended-cavity diode lasers with tracked resonances.

    PubMed

    Chiow, Sheng-Wey; Long, Quan; Vo, Christoph; Müller, Holger; Chu, Steven

    2007-11-20

    We present a painless, almost-free upgrade to present extended-cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) that improves the long-term mode-hop-free performance by stabilizing the resonance of the internal cavity to the external cavity. This stabilization is based on the observation that the frequency or amplitude noise of the ECDL is lowest at the optimum laser diode temperature or injection current. Thus, keeping the diode current at the level where the noise is lowest ensures mode-hop-free operation within one of the stable regions of the mode chart, even if these should drift due to external influences. This method can be applied directly to existing laser systems without modifying the optical setup. We demonstrate the method in two ECDLs stabilized to vapor cells at 852 and 895 nm wavelengths. We achieve long-term mode-hop-free operation and low noise at low power consumption, even with an inexpensive non-antireflection-coated diode.

  9. Optical Feedback Stabilization of Laser Diodes for Passive Resonance Ring Laser Gyro Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    rugged optical rotation sensors are not far off. The main purpose of this research was to a construct narrow spectral linewidth semiconductor laser . In... Linewidth and Sensitivity Pssive Resonant Ring Laser Gyroscopes............. Frequency Noise and Laser Linewidth ............. 8.......... * Laser Diode... Linewidth Reduction by Optical F ee dbk........................... ck . . .. . . . 12 Semiconductor Laser Mode Behavior with Optical Feedback

  10. Optical communication with semiconductor laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.

    1987-01-01

    A 25 megabit/sec direct detection optical communication system that used Q=4 PPM signalling was constructed and its performance measured under laboratory conditions. The system used a single-mode AlGaAs laser diode transmitter and low noise silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) photodetector. Comparison of measured performance with the theoretical revealed that modeling the APD output as a Gaussian process under conditions of negligible background radiation and low (less than 10 to the -12 power A) APD bulk leakage currents leads to substantial underestimates of optimal APD gain to use and overestimates of system bit error probability. A procedure is given to numerically compute system performance which uses the more accurate Webb's Approximation of the exact Conradi distribution for the APD ouput signal that does not require excessive amounts of computer time (a few minutes of VAX 8600 CPU time per system operating point). Examples are given which illustrate the breakdown of the Gaussian approximation in assessing system performance. This system achieved a bit error probability of 10 to the -6 power at a received signal energy corresponding to an average of 60 absorbed photons/bit and optimal APD gain of 700.

  11. Tunable-diode laser absorption spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, H. I.

    1986-01-01

    Tunable-diode laser absorption spectrometry (TDLAS) affords a number of advantages for atmospheric measurements. It is a universal method, applicable, in principle, to all gases of atmospheric interest. Because of its extremely high spectral resolution it provides unequivocal identification of the target species, with no interferences from other gases. It provides real-time, in situ measurements with time resolutions better than 1 minute. The sensitivity of the current TDLAS system is marginally capable of measuring HO2. This species exists in the troposphere at concentrations which are up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those of HO and, in addition, is much less susceptible to removal by the surfaces of the instrument and its sampling system. HO2 is an important HO sub x species in its own right but can also give direct information on the HO concentration by virtue of the rapid partitioning between these two species. The addition of the high-frequency modulation technique to the TDLAS system would ensure its ability to measure HO2 under most atmospheric conditions. The ability of the TDLAS to measure hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the ambient atmosphere was also demonstrated. H2O2 measurements give a clear indication of HO sub x mixing ratios and are also important as a photolytic source of HO and as an important oxidant for other atmospheric consitituents such as SO2.

  12. Optical communication with semiconductor laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.

    1988-01-01

    Slot timing recovery in a direct detection optical PPM communication system can be achieved by processing the photodetector waveform with a nonlinear device whose output forms the input to a phase lock group. The choice of a simple transition detector as the nonlinearity is shown to give satisfactory synchronization performance. The rms phase error of the recovered slot clock and the effect of slot timing jitter on the bit error probability were directly measured. The experimental system consisted of an AlGaAs laser diode (lambda = 834 nm) and a silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) photodetector and used Q=4 PPM signaling operated at a source data rate of 25 megabits/second. The mathematical model developed to characterize system performance is shown to be in good agreement with actual performance measurements. The use of the recovered slot clock in the receiver resulted in no degradation in receiver sensitivity compared to a system with perfect slot timing. The system achieved a bit error probability of 10 to the minus 6 power at received signal energies corresponding to an average of less than 60 detected photons per information bit.

  13. 1047 nm laser diode master oscillator Nd:YLF power amplifier laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, A. W.; Krainak, M. A.; Unger, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    A master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser transmitter system at 1047 nm wavelength using a semiconductor laser diode and a diode pumped solid state (Nd:YLF) laser (DPSSL) amplifier is described. A small signal gain of 23 dB, a near diffraction limited beam, 1 Gbit/s modulation rates and greater than 0.6 W average power are achieved. This MOPA laser has the advantage of amplifying the modulation signal from the laser diode master oscillator (MO) with no signal degradation.

  14. 1047 nm laser diode master oscillator Nd:YLF power amplifier laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, A. W.; Krainak, M. A.; Unger, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    A master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser transmitter system at 1047 nm wavelength using a semiconductor laser diode and a diode pumped solid state (Nd:YLF) laser (DPSSL) amplifier is described. A small signal gain of 23 dB, a near diffraction limited beam, 1 Gbit/s modulation rates and greater than 0.6 W average power are achieved. This MOPA laser has the advantage of amplifying the modulation signal from the laser diode master oscillator (MO) with no signal degradation.

  15. Diode-Pumped, Q-Switched, Frequency-Doubling Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Lesh, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental Q-switched, diode-pumped, intracavity-frequency-doubling laser generates pulses of radiation at wavelength of 532 nm from excitation at 810 nm. Principal innovative feature distinguishing laser from others of its type: pulsed operation of laser at pulse-repetition frequencies higher than reported previously. Folded resonator keeps most of second-harmonic radiation away from Q-switcher, laser crystal, and laser diodes. Folding mirror highly reflective at fundamental laser wavelength and highly transmissive at second-harmonic laser wavelength. By virtue of difference of about 0.6 percent between reflectivities in two polarizations at fundamental wavelength, folding mirror favors polarized oscillation at fundamental wavelength. This characteristic desirable for doubling of frequency in some intracavity crystals.

  16. Respiratory complications after diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Miloš; Horn, Iris-Susanne; Quante, Mirja; Merkenschlager, Andreas; Schnoor, Jörg; Kaisers, Udo X; Dietz, Andreas; Kluba, Karsten

    2014-08-01

    Children with certain risk factors, such as comorbidities or severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are known to require extended postoperative monitoring after adenotonsillectomy. However, there are no recommendations available for diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy. A retrospective chart review of 96 children who underwent diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy (07/2011-06/2013) was performed. Data for general and sleep apnea history, power of the applied diode-laser (λ = 940 nm), anesthesia parameters, the presence of postoperative respiratory complications and postoperative healing were evaluated. After initially uncomplicated diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy, an adjustment of post-anesthesia care was necessary in 16 of 96 patients due to respiratory failure. Respiratory complications were more frequent in younger children (3.1 vs. 4.0 years, p = 0.049, 95 % CI -1.7952 to -0.0048) and in children who suffered from nocturnal apneas (OR = 5.00, p < 0.01, 95 % CI 1.4780-16.9152) or who suffered from relevant comorbidities (OR = 4.84, p < 0.01, 95 % CI 1.5202-15.4091). Moreover, a diode-laser power higher than 13 W could be identified as a risk factor for the occurrence of a postoperative oropharyngeal edema (OR = 3.45, p < 0.01, 95 % CI 1.3924-8.5602). Postoperative respiratory complications should not be underestimated in children with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Therefore, children with SDB, children with comorbidities or children younger than 3 years should be considered "at risk" and children with confirmed moderate to severe OSAS should be referred to a PICU following diode-laser-assisted tonsillotomy. We recommend a reduced diode-laser power (<13 W) to reduce oropharyngeal edema.

  17. Catastrophic Optical Damage in High-Power, Broad-Area Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Aland K.; Bertaska, Rick K.

    Catastrophic optical damage (COD) is semiconductor material within the optical cavity of laser diodes that is thermally damaged by the laser light. COD results in the failure of laser diodes. The phenomena of COD in high-power, broad-area laser diodes are described along with methods to eliminate it.

  18. Power blue and green laser diodes and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, Thomas; Strauß, Uwe; Eichler, Christoph; Vierheilig, Clemens; Tautz, Sönke; Brüderl, Georg; Stojetz, Bernhard; Wurm, Teresa; Avramescu, Adrian; Somers, André; Ristic, Jelena; Gerhard, Sven; Lell, Alfred; Morgott, Stefan; Mehl, Oliver

    2013-03-01

    InGaN based green laser diodes with output powers up to 50mW are now well established for variety of applications ranging from leveling to special lighting effects and mobile projection of 12lm brightness. In future the highest market potential for visible single mode profile lasers might be laser projection of 20lm. Therefore direct green single-mode laser diodes with higher power are required. We found that self heating was the limiting factor for higher current operation. We present power-current characteristics of improved R and D samples with up to 200mW in cw-operation. An optical output power of 100mW is reached at 215mA, a current level which is suitable for long term operation. Blue InGaN laser diodes are also the ideal source for phosphor based generation of green light sources of high luminance. We present a light engine based on LARP (Laser Activated Remote Phosphor) which can be used in business projectors of several thousand lumens on screen. We discuss the advantages of a laser based systems in comparison with LED light engines. LARP requires highly efficient blue power laser diodes with output power above 1W. Future market penetration of LARP will require lower costs. Therefore we studied new designs for higher powers levels. R and D chips with power-current characteristics up to 4W in continuous wave operation on C-mount at 25°C are presented.

  19. Broad-Area Laser Diode With Fiber-Optic Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazel, Geoffrey; Mead, Patricia; Davis, Christopher; Cornwell, Donald

    1992-01-01

    Fiber-optic injection-locked broad-area laser diode features single-mode output via fiber-optic injection and serves as compact, rugged, high-power near-infrared source. Useful in free-space and fiber-optic communication links, as communication-receiver preamplifier, and pump source for solid-state lasers.

  20. A tunable diode laser emitting orthogonally polarised radiation modes

    SciTech Connect

    Fadyushin, A B; Velichansky, Vladimir L; Senkov, N V; Lukin, M D; Scully, M O; Fleischauer, M

    2002-07-31

    A new scheme of the external cavity of a diode laser is described. The scheme provides emission of two closely spaced ({Delta}{lambda} < 10{sup -3} nm) orthogonally polarised modes, which can be tuned within the gain line, with the mode interval continuously changed. (lasers)

  1. Diode-pumped laser with improved pumping system

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.

    2004-03-09

    A laser wherein pump radiation from laser diodes is delivered to a pump chamber and into the lasing medium by quasi-three-dimensional compound parabolic concentrator light channels. The light channels have reflective side walls with a curved surface and reflective end walls with a curved surface. A flow tube between the lasing medium and the light channel has a roughened surface.

  2. High average power diode pumped solid state lasers for CALIOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Halpin, J.; Moran, B.

    1994-07-01

    Diode pumping of solid state media offers the opportunity for very low maintenance, high efficiency, and compact laser systems. For remote sensing, such lasers may be used to pump tunable non-linear sources, or if tunable themselves, act directly or through harmonic crystals as the probe. The needs of long range remote sensing missions require laser performance in the several watts to kilowatts range. At these power performance levels, more advanced thermal management technologies are required for the diode pumps. The solid state laser design must now address a variety of issues arising from the thermal loads, including fracture limits, induced lensing and aberrations, induced birefringence, and laser cavity optical component performance degradation with average power loading. In order to highlight the design trade-offs involved in addressing the above issues, a variety of existing average power laser systems are briefly described. Included are two systems based on Spectra Diode Laboratory`s water impingement cooled diode packages: a two times diffraction limited, 200 watt average power, 200 Hz multi-rod laser/amplifier by Fibertek, and TRW`s 100 watt, 100 Hz, phase conjugated amplifier. The authors also present two laser systems built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) based on their more aggressive diode bar cooling package, which uses microchannel cooler technology capable of 100% duty factor operation. They then present the design of LLNL`s first generation OPO pump laser for remote sensing. This system is specified to run at 100 Hz, 20 nsec pulses each with 300 mJ, less than two times diffraction limited, and with a stable single longitudinal mode. The performance of the first testbed version will be presented. The authors conclude with directions their group is pursuing to advance average power lasers. This includes average power electro-optics, low heat load lasing media, and heat capacity lasers.

  3. Effects of the space environment on laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, M.

    Laser diodes have been irradiated to investigate their behavior in the space environment. The InGaAsP/InP laser diodes used are manufactured by a technology projected to have high-output-power potential. The principal parameters of the devices, which included InP p-n junctions and double-heterostructure lasers with broad and narrow stripe-geometries, measured during 1 MeV electron irradiation, did not degrade appreciably. The partial annealing of irradiation-induced defects that takes place reduces the ultimate degradation induced by radiation.

  4. Computer Processing Of Tunable-Diode-Laser Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Randy D.

    1991-01-01

    Tunable-diode-laser spectrometer measuring transmission spectrum of gas operates under control of computer, which also processes measurement data. Measurements in three channels processed into spectra. Computer controls current supplied to tunable diode laser, stepping it through small increments of wavelength while processing spectral measurements at each step. Program includes library of routines for general manipulation and plotting of spectra, least-squares fitting of direct-transmission and harmonic-absorption spectra, and deconvolution for determination of laser linewidth and for removal of instrumental broadening of spectral lines.

  5. Novel diode laser-based sensors for gas sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittel, F. K.; Lancaster, D. G.; Richter, D.

    2000-01-01

    The development of compact spectroscopic gas sensors and their applications to environmental sensing will be described. These sensors employ mid-infrared difference-frequency generation (DFG) in periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystals pumped by two single-frequency solid state lasers such as diode lasers, diode-pumped solid state, and fiber lasers. Ultrasensitive, highly selective, and real-time measurements of several important atmospheric trace gases, including carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, formaldehyde [correction of formaldehye], and methane, have been demonstrated.

  6. Frequency narrowing of a 25 W broad area diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, J. F.; Miller, W.; Wright, D.; Zhdanov, B. V.; Knize, R. J.

    2009-02-01

    We report on the spectral narrowing of a high powered (25 W) broad area diode laser using an external cavity with a holographic diffraction grating. In a Littman-Metcalf configuration, the external cavity is able to reduce the linewidth of the diode laser to primarily a single longitudinal mode (1.8 MHz) for output powers of ≤10 W at 852 nm. Many physics applications could benefit from such high powered, narrow linewidth lasers; however both the frequency stability and the spatial profile of the output beam show room for improvement.

  7. Temperature Gradients In Diode-pumped Alkali Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-18

    radiation from bars or stacks of diode lasers is absorbed by atomic potassium, rubidium , or cesium. Collision-induced energy transfer populates the upper...laser level, and lasing is achieved in the near-IR on the D1 (pump) line. A rubidium laser pumped by a 1.28kW diode stack with a 0.35nm spectral band...negligible, offering the potential for low waste heat loads. However, cycling of atoms by the pump beam can be >109photons/ atom -s. The energy of the spin

  8. Diode-pumped solid state laser for inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Orth, C.D.

    1994-11-01

    The authors evaluate the prospect for development of a diode-pumped solid-state-laser driver in an inertial fusion energy power plant. Using a computer code, they predict that their 1 GWe design will offer electricity at 8.6 cents/kW {center_dot} hr with the laser operating at 8.6% efficiency and the recycled power level at 31%. The results of their initial subscale experimental testbed of a diode-pumped solid state laser are encouraging, demonstrating good efficiencies and robustness.

  9. Novel diode laser-based sensors for gas sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittel, F. K.; Lancaster, D. G.; Richter, D.

    2000-01-01

    The development of compact spectroscopic gas sensors and their applications to environmental sensing will be described. These sensors employ mid-infrared difference-frequency generation (DFG) in periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystals pumped by two single-frequency solid state lasers such as diode lasers, diode-pumped solid state, and fiber lasers. Ultrasensitive, highly selective, and real-time measurements of several important atmospheric trace gases, including carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, formaldehyde [correction of formaldehye], and methane, have been demonstrated.

  10. Thermally widely tunable laser diodes with distributed feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Todt, R.; Jacke, T.; Meyer, R.; Amann, M.-C.

    2005-07-11

    A thermally widely tunable buried heterostructure laser diode with distributed feedback (DFB) is demonstrated. This device requires only two tuning currents for wide quasicontinuous wavelength tuning, thereby facilitating easy and fast device calibration and control. Furthermore, being based on regular DFB laser fabrication technology, it is readily manufacturable. By using window structures instead of cleaved facets plus antireflection coatings, a regular tuning behavior has been achieved for a DFB-like widely tunable laser diode with only two tuning currents. The laser diode covers the wavelength range between 1552 and 1602 nm. Requiring side-mode suppression ratio and output power above 30 dB and 10 mW, respectively, a wavelength range of 43 nm is accessible.

  11. A Direct Diode Laser System Using a Planar Lightwave Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Kazuo; Matsubara, Hiroyuki; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Maeda, Mitsutoshi; Ito, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    In this paper we propose a direct diode laser (DDL) system consisting of laser diode (LD) bars, a planar lightwave circuit (PLC), and an optical fiber. We have developed a PLC as an optical power combiner and an LD mounting technology that is suitable for coupling to the PLC. A DDL system is presented that consists of six LD-PLC optical modules for the laser-welding of highly heat-resistant plastics. The total output power is in the 200 W class, with a spot diameter of 5.52 mm for the major axis and 5.00 mm for the minor axis at a focal length of 50 mm. The total output efficiency is 60.9% from the laser diode to the welding torch.

  12. Thermally widely tunable laser diodes with distributed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todt, R.; Jacke, T.; Meyer, R.; Amann, M.-C.

    2005-07-01

    A thermally widely tunable buried heterostructure laser diode with distributed feedback (DFB) is demonstrated. This device requires only two tuning currents for wide quasicontinuous wavelength tuning, thereby facilitating easy and fast device calibration and control. Furthermore, being based on regular DFB laser fabrication technology, it is readily manufacturable. By using window structures instead of cleaved facets plus antireflection coatings, a regular tuning behavior has been achieved for a DFB-like widely tunable laser diode with only two tuning currents. The laser diode covers the wavelength range between 1552 and 1602 nm. Requiring side-mode suppression ratio and output power above 30 dB and 10 mW, respectively, a wavelength range of 43 nm is accessible.

  13. Feasibility of supersonic diode pumped alkali lasers: Model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2013-04-08

    The feasibility of supersonic operation of diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) is studied for Cs and K atoms applying model calculations, based on a semi-analytical model previously used for studying static and subsonic flow DPALs. The operation of supersonic lasers is compared with that measured and modeled in subsonic lasers. The maximum power of supersonic Cs and K lasers is found to be higher than that of subsonic lasers with the same resonator and alkali density at the laser inlet by 25% and 70%, respectively. These results indicate that for scaling-up the power of DPALs, supersonic expansion should be considered.

  14. Advancement of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays For Space-based Laser Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, nathaniel R.; Baggott, Renee S.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Space-based laser and lidar instruments play an important role in NASA s plans for meeting its objectives in both Earth Science and Space Exploration areas. Almost all the lidar instrument concepts being considered by NASA scientist utilize moderate to high power diode-pumped solid state lasers as their transmitter source. Perhaps the most critical component of any solid state laser system is its pump laser diode array which essentially dictates instrument efficiency, reliability and lifetime. For this reason, premature failures and rapid degradation of high power laser diode arrays that have been experienced by laser system designers are of major concern to NASA. This work addresses these reliability and lifetime issues by attempting to eliminate the causes of failures and developing methods for screening laser diode arrays and qualifying them for operation in space.

  15. Construction of an Extended Cavity Tunable Diode Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveney, Edward; Metcalf, Harold; Noe, John

    2001-03-01

    A diverse and vast amount of experiments at the forefront of experimental physics typically use diode lasers as an integral part of their arrangement. However, researchers who use unmodified commercially available diode lasers run into several complications. The laser diode that is purchased is often not of the same wavelength as is advertised; thus the researcher’s desired wavelength is not met. Because the semiconductor has such a short external cavity, it is very sensitive to the injection current, changes in room temperature, and has a large linewidth making it harder to tune. To obtain a finely tuned diode laser, temperature and current controlling of the diode laser are used in conjunction with an extended semiconductor cavity. This is achieved by mounting the hermetically sealed assembly atop a thermoelectric cooler, which uses the Peltier effect. Furthermore, the variation of the injection current may be used as an additional control for the wavelength output of the diode. The power range of 70 mW as controlled by the injection current adjusts the wavelength by a span of only 4 nanometers. The extended cavity consists of a diffraction grating adhered to a mirror mount and is used for grating feedback. That in turn is used to reduce the linewidth sufficiently enough in order to provide much better tunability. In the next three weeks, the tunable diode laser will be specifically applied to research in the areas of Second Harmonic Generation in a PPLN Crystal and Saturated Rubidium Spectroscopy. This study was supported in part by NSF grant PHY99-12312.

  16. An auto-locked diode laser system for precision metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beica, H. C.; Carew, A.; Vorozcovs, A.; Dowling, P.; Pouliot, A.; Barron, B.; Kumarakrishnan, A.

    2017-05-01

    We present a unique external cavity diode laser system that can be auto-locked with reference to atomic and molecular spectra. The vacuum-sealed laser head design uses an interchangeable base-plate comprised of a laser diode and optical elements that can be selected for desired wavelength ranges. The feedback light to the laser diode is provided by a narrow-band interference filter, which can be tuned from outside the laser cavity to fineadjust the output wavelength in vacuum. To stabilize the laser frequency, the digital laser controller relies either on a pattern-matching algorithm stored in memory, or on first or third derivative feedback. We have used the laser systems to perform spectroscopic studies in rubidium at 780 nm, and in iodine at 633 nm. The linewidth of the 780-nm laser system was measured to be ˜500 kHz, and we present Allan deviation measurements of the beat note and the lock stability. Furthermore, we show that the laser system can be the basis for a new class of lidar transmitters in which a temperature-stabilized fiber-Bragg grating is used to generate frequency references for on-line points of the transmitter. We show that the fiber-Bragg grating spectra can be calibrated with reference to atomic transitions.

  17. 250W diode laser for low pressure Rb vapor pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podvyaznyy, A.; Venus, G.; Smirnov, V.; Mokhun, O.; Koulechov, V.; Hostutler, D.; Glebov, L.

    2010-02-01

    The diode pumped alkali vapor lasers operating at subatmospheric pressure require developing of a new generation of high-power laser diode sources with about 10 GHz wide emission spectrum. The latest achievements in the technology of volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) recorded in photo-thermo-refractive glass opened new opportunities for the design and fabrication of compact external cavity laser diodes, diode bars and stacks with reflecting VBGs as output couplers. We present a diode laser system providing up to 250 W output power and emission spectral width of 20 pm (FWHM) at the wavelength of 780 nm. The stability and position of an emission wavelength is determined by the resonant wavelength of a VBG which is controlled by temperature. Stability of an emitting wavelength is within 5 pm. Thermal tuning of the wavelength provides maximum overlapping of emitting line with absorption spectrum of a Rb (rubidium)- cell. The designed system consists of 7 modules tuned to the same wavelength corresponding to D2 spectral line of Rb87 or Rb85 and coupled to a single output fiber. Analogous systems could be used for other Rb isotopes spectral lines as well as for lasers based on other alkali metal vapors (Cs and K) or any agents with narrow absorption lines.

  18. Micropulsed diode laser therapy: evolution and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Sivaprasad, Sobha; Elagouz, Mohammed; McHugh, Dominic; Shona, Olajumoke; Dorin, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Many clinical trials have demonstrated the clinical efficacy of laser photocoagulation in the treatment of retinal vascular diseases, including diabetic retinopathy. There is, however, collateral iatrogenic retinal damage and functional loss after conventional laser treatment. Such side effects may occur even when the treatment is appropriately performed because of morphological damage caused by the visible endpoint, typically a whitening burn. The development of the diode laser with micropulsed emission has allowed subthreshold therapy without a visible burn endpoint. This greatly reduces the risk of structural and functional retinal damage, while retaining the therapeutic efficacy of conventional laser treatment. Studies using subthreshold micropulse laser protocols have reported successful outcomes for diabetic macular edema, central serous chorioretinopathy, macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion, and primary open angle glaucoma. The report includes the rationale and basic principles underlying micropulse diode laser therapy, together with a review of its current clinical applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Degradation mechanism of laser diodes for 880-nm band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DÄ browska, E.; Nakielska, M.; Kozłowska, A.; Teodorczyk, M.; KrzyŻak, K.; Sobczak, G.; Kalbarczyk, J.; MalÄ g, A.

    2013-01-01

    The laser diodes (LD) have numerous applications and promise to become key elements for next generation laser technologies. LD are usually operated under conditions of heavy thermal load. As a result, the devices are affected by aging processes leading to changes of the operation parameters, degradation and, eventually, complete failure. Degradation of high power semiconductor lasers remains a serious problem for practical application of these devices. We investigated the effect of mounting induced strain and defects on the performance of high power laser. In this paper measurements of the temperature distribution and the electroluminescence along the cavity of InGaAs quantum well lasers before and after accelerated aging processes are presented. The electro-optical parameters of the high output power laser diodes, such as emission wavelength, output power, threshold current, slope efficiency, and operating lifetime are presented too.

  20. Qualification of diode foil materials for excimer lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. G.; Shurter, R. P.; Rose, E. A.

    The Aurora facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory uses KrF excimer lasers to produce 248 nm light for inertial confinement fusion applications. Diodes in each amplifier produce relativistic electron beams to pump a Kr-F-Ar gas mixture. A foil is necessary to separate the vacuum diode from the laser gas. High tensile strength, high electron transmission, low ultraviolet reflectivity, and chemical compatibility with fluorine have been identified as requisite foil properties. Several different materials were acquired and tested for use as diode foils. Transmission and fluorine compatibility tests were performed using the Electron Gun Test Facility (EGTF) at Los Alamos. Off-line tests of tensile strength and reflectivity were performed. Titanium foil, which is commonly used as a diode foil, was found to generate solid and gaseous fluoride compounds, some of which are highly reactive in contact with water vapor.

  1. High-power external cavity CW red laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hong Joo; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Jiyeon; Park, Jong Hwan; Na, Hong Man; Park, Jung Ho

    2015-03-01

    An front facet-low reflection coated broad-area laser(BAL) diode with an emitter size of 50 μm x 1 μm and a chip length of 2000 μm is operated in the external cavity diode laser(ECDL). For wavelength stabilization and narrow spectral width, the diffraction grating is used in a Littrow configuration. At an injection current of 1.5 A, a output power of 0.65 W with a slop efficiency of 0.85 A/W, which is comparable to those of a solitary BAL diode, could be achieved with a spectral width of 120pm which is about 77 % narrower as compared to a solitary BAL diode. The peak wavelength stability below 10 pm was obtained in the wide range of output power up to 0.65 W.

  2. Welding of aluminum alloy with high power direct diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Nobuyuki; Morikawa, Atsuhito; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Maeda, Koichi; Namba, Keizo

    2003-06-01

    Characterized by high conversion efficiency, small size, light weight and a long lifetime, high power diode lasers are currently being developed for application to various types of metal fabrication, such as welding. In this report, a 4kW high power direct diode laser was used to weld aluminum alloys, which are the focus of increasing attention from the automobile industry because of their light weight, high formability and easy recyclability. The applicability of a direct diode laser to aluminum alloy bead-on plate, butt and lap-fillet welding was studied under various welding conditions. A sound bead without cracks was successfully obtained when 1 mm thick aluminum alloy was welded by bead-on welding at a speed of 12m/min. Moreover, the bead cross section was heat conduction welding type rather than the keyhole welding type of conventional laser welding. Investigation of the welding phenomena with a high-speed video camera showed no spattering or laser plasma, so there was no problem with laser plasma damaging the focusing lens despite the diode laser's short focusing distance.

  3. Violet Laser Diode Enables Lighting Communication.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yu-Chieh; Huang, Yu-Fang; Wu, Tsai-Chen; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Chen, Li-Yin; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2017-09-05

    Violet laser diode (VLD) based white-light source with high color rendering index (CRI) for lighting communication is implemented by covering with Y3Al5O12:Ce(3+) (YAG:Ce) or Lu3Al5O12:Ce(3+)/CaAlSiN3:Eu(2+) (LuAG:Ce/CASN:Eu) phosphorous diffuser plates. After passing the beam of VLD biased at 70 mA (~2I th ) through the YAG:Ce phosphorous diffuser, a daylight with a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5068 K and a CRI of 65 is acquired to provide a forward error correction (FEC) certified data rate of 4.4 Gbit/s. By using the VLD biased at 122 mA (~3.5I th ) to excite the LuAG:Ce/CASN:Eu phosphorous diffuser with 0.85-mm thickness, a warm white-light source with a CCT of 2700 K and a CRI of 87.9 is obtained at a cost of decreasing transmission capacity to 2.4 Gbit/s. Thinning the phosphor thickness to 0.75 mm effectively reduces the required bias current by 32 mA to achieve the same CCT for the delivered white light, which offers an enlarged CRI of 89.1 and an increased data rate of 4.4 Gbit/s. Further enlarging the bias current to 105 mA remains the white-light transmission capacity at 4.4 Gbit/s but reveals an increased CCT of 3023 K and an upgraded CRI of 91.5.

  4. A simplified 461-nm laser system using blue laser diodes and a hollow cathode lamp for laser cooling of Sr

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yosuke; Chida, Yuko; Ohtsubo, Nozomi; Aoki, Takatoshi; Takeuchi, Makoto; Kuga, Takahiro; Torii, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    We develop a simplified light source at 461 nm for laser cooling of Sr without frequency-doubling crystals but with blue laser diodes. An anti-reflection coated blue laser diode in an external cavity (Littrow) configuration provides an output power of 40 mW at 461 nm. Another blue laser diode is used to amplify the laser power up to 110 mW by injection locking. For frequency stabilization, we demonstrate modulation-free polarization spectroscopy of Sr in a hollow cathode lamp. The simplification of the laser system achieved in this work is of great importance for the construction of transportable optical lattice clocks. PMID:23822327

  5. A simplified 461-nm laser system using blue laser diodes and a hollow cathode lamp for laser cooling of Sr.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yosuke; Chida, Yuko; Ohtsubo, Nozomi; Aoki, Takatoshi; Takeuchi, Makoto; Kuga, Takahiro; Torii, Yoshio

    2013-06-01

    We develop a simplified light source at 461 nm for laser cooling of Sr without frequency-doubling crystals but with blue laser diodes. An anti-reflection coated blue laser diode in an external cavity (Littrow) configuration provides an output power of 40 mW at 461 nm. Another blue laser diode is used to amplify the laser power up to 110 mW by injection locking. For frequency stabilization, we demonstrate modulation-free polarization spectroscopy of Sr in a hollow cathode lamp. The simplification of the laser system achieved in this work is of great importance for the construction of transportable optical lattice clocks.

  6. Diode pumped alkali vapor lasers for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.; Komashko, A.

    2008-02-01

    General Atomics has been engaged in the development of diode pumped alkali vapor lasers. We have been examining the design space looking for designs that are both efficient and easily scalable to high powers. Computationally, we have looked at the effect of pump bandwidth on laser performance. We have also looked at different lasing species. We have used an alexandrite laser to study the relative merits of different designs. We report on the results of our experimental and computational studies.

  7. INITIAL EXPERIENCE WITH TRANSPUPILLARY DIODE LASER PHOTOCOAGULATION FOR RETINAL DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Uhumwangho, O M; Iyiriaro, Iao

    2014-01-01

    Lasers are an invaluable treatment modality for the management of some retinovascular diseases. One of these lasers is the diode laser which is easy to procure and maintain. To review the outcomes of diode laser photocoagulation in patients with a variety of retinal conditions. A retrospective case series of all patients who had retinal laser photocoagulation between July 2012 and June 2014 with the semiconductor infrared diode laser was performed. Demographic and clinical data collected included age, sex, eye involved, visual acuity, diagnosis, associated systemic and ocular diseases, intra and post treatment findings, laser treatment parameters and follow up. A total of 22 eyes of 15 patients had diode laser treatment during the period under review comprising 8(53.3%) males and 7(46.7%) females with a mean age at presentation of 53.4±8.9 years. The indications for treatment were proliferative diabetic retinopathy in 18(81.8%) eyes of 11 patients, retinal vein occlusion in 2(9.1%) eyes of 2 patients and retinal breaks with lattice in 2(9.1%) eyes of 2 patients with fellow eye retinal detachment. Visual acuity in eyes with diabetic retinopathy improved in 9(50%) eyes, worsened in 3(16.7%) eyes and was unchanged/ stable in 6(33.3%) eyes. Regression of neovascularization was achieved in 2(100%) eyes with retinal vein occlusion. The retina of the 2(100%) eyes with breaks following retinopexy remained attached during the follow up period. The follow up period ranged from 2 days to 2 years with a mean duration of 13.5±15.8 months. The diode laser is an effective and beneficial treatment modality in the management of proliferative retinopathies and some retinal diseases.

  8. Thermal compensator for closed-cycle helium refrigerator. [assuring constant temperature for an infrared laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Hillman, J. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    The wave length of an infrared, semiconductor laser diode having an output frequency that is dependent on the diode temperature is maintained substantially constant by maintaining the diode temperature constant. The diode is carried by a cold tip of a closed cycle helium refrigerator. The refrigerator has a tendency to cause the temperature of the cold tip to oscillate. A heater diode and a sensor diode are placed on a thermal heat sink that is the only highly conductive thermal path between the laser diode and the cold tip. The heat sink has a small volume and low thermal capacitance so that the sensing diode is at substantially the same temperature as the heater diode and substantially no thermal lag exists between them. The sensor diode is connected in a negative feedback circuit with the heater diode so that the tendency of the laser diode to thermally oscillate is virtually eliminated.

  9. High-Power Diode Laser Technology and Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, Martin

    Laser operation relies on two conditions, stimulated emission of the amplifying medium and feedback by an optical resonator. The threshold of laser operation is obtained if the gain in the resonator compensates for the overall losses, i.e., the propagation losses and the apparent losses due to the extraction of light [2.1]. Both common laser conditions are satisfied in diode lasers in another way than in typical gas or solid-state lasers. The resonator is given by the semiconductor structure itself using the crystal facets as mirrors. The gain in diode lasers involves a whole crystal structure and not only excited single atoms, ions, or molecules. Modern semiconductor lasers restrict the excited volume to reduce the threshold current by applying quantum wells or quantum dots. Technically, this is achieved by growing very thin layers consisting of different crystal compositions for quantum wells or by applying two-dimensional growth for quantum dots. A scheme of a diode laser is shown in Fig. 2.1. The following chapter takes a short tour through the excitation of high-power semiconductor lasers by examining the current injection of carriers, the optical gain, and appropriate resonator structures. More detailed descriptions of several aspects can be found in several textbooks [2.2, 2.3].

  10. Reliability of High Power Laser Diode Arrays Operating in Long Pulse Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Baker, Nathaniel R.

    2006-01-01

    Reliability and lifetime of quasi-CW laser diode arrays are greatly influenced by their thermal characteristics. This paper examines the thermal properties of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse duration regime.

  11. Optimized high-power diode laser, laser arrays, and bars for pump applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hülsewede, R.; Schulze, H.; Sebastian, J.; Schröder, D.; Meusel, J.; Wolf, J.; Hennig, P.

    2009-02-01

    Broad area diode laser and diode laser bars are the most efficient light sources. In comparison to solid state laser or gas laser systems the over all beam quality of the diode laser is poor. Thus most application of diode laser bars is high efficient pumping of solid state lasers converting the beam quality and scaling the power of laser systems within the kW range. The pump efficiency and the beam coupling efficiency of the diode laser pumped systems has to be increased to meet the increasing laser market demands for reduced costs. JENOPTIK Diode Lab GmbH (JDL) has optimized their high power brilliance bars to enable reliable high power operation especially, for the 9xx nm wavelength range and low far field divergences. Superior reliability with long operation time of 13,000 hours and high power operation of 200 W are demonstrated for high power bars high filling factor mounted on passively cooled heat sinks. Smaller far field divergence at high power levels requires longer cavity length and higher efficiencies in the beam coupling needs requires lower filling factors. The new high brilliance bars and arrays with 20% filling factor are showing high power operation up to 95 W and a slow axis beam divergence of less than 8° (95% power content).

  12. Direct laser diode welding system with anti-reflection unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayasu, Doukei; Wang, Jing-bo

    2003-11-01

    A high power laser diode system for welding is widely known. However, the reliability and the reasonability are required by an industrial market. Reliability, especially lifetime, mainly depends on the temperature of laser diode (LD) and it might be rise if LD would receive reflection from welding point. This paper conducted the measurement of the reflection during welding by applying 1/4 wavelength plate and PBS. Results indicated the reflection during welding was inevitable. We developed a prototype high power laser diode system, which equipped an anti-reflection unit, to improve the reliability. The system traveled 3m/min and its bead width was 1.2 mm for 1.5 mm Al (A5052) under the spot size 2.7 x 0.6 mm FWHM. Additionally, we started to develop fast and slow collimation lenses for LD to realize a reasonale price for system The brief evaluation of fast collimation lenses was also reported.

  13. Microchannel heatsinks for high average power laser diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.; Benett, B.; Freitas, B.; Ciarlo, D.; Sperry, V.; Comaskey, B.; Emanuel, M.; Solarz, R.; Mundinger, D.

    1992-01-01

    Detailed performance results and fabrication techniques for an efficient and low thermal impedance laser diode array heatsink are presented. High duty factor or even CW operation of fully filled laser diode arrays is enabled at high average power. Low thermal impedance is achieved using a liquid coolant and laminar flow through microchannels. The microchannels are fabricated in silicon using a photolithographic pattern definition procedure followed by anisotropic chemical etching. A modular rack-and-stack architecture is adopted for the heatsink design allowing arbitrarily large two-dimensional arrays to be fabricated and easily maintained. The excellent thermal control of the microchannel cooled heatsinks is ideally suited to pump array requirements for high average power crystalline lasers because of the stringent temperature demands that result from coupling the diode light to several nanometers wide absorption features characteristic of leasing ions in crystals.

  14. Microchannel cooled heatsinks for high average power laser diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, W.J.; Freitas, B.L.; Ciarlo, D.; Beach, R.; Sutton, S.; Emanuel, M.; Solarz, R.

    1993-01-15

    Detailed performance results for an efficient and low impedance laser diode array heatsink are presented. High duty factor and even cw operation of fully filled laser diode arrays at high stacking densities are enabled at high average power. Low thermal impedance is achieved using a liquid coolant and laminar flow through microchannels. The microchannels are fabricated in silicon using an anisotropic chemical etching process. A modular rack-and-stack architecture is adopted for heatsink design, allowing arbitrarily large two-dimensional arrays to be fabricated and easily maintained. The excellent thermal control of the microchannel heatsinks is ideally suited to pump army requirements for high average power crystalline laser because of the stringent temperature demands are required to efficiently couple diode light to several-nanometer-wide absorption features characteristic of lasing ions in crystals.

  15. External cavity diode laser setup with two interference filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Alexander; Baus, Patrick; Birkl, Gerhard

    2016-12-01

    We present an external cavity diode laser setup using two identical, commercially available interference filters operated in the blue wavelength range around 450 nm. The combination of the two filters decreases the transmission width, while increasing the edge steepness without a significant reduction in peak transmittance. Due to the broad spectral transmission of these interference filters compared to the internal mode spacing of blue laser diodes, an additional locking scheme, based on Hänsch-Couillaud locking to a cavity, has been added to improve the stability. The laser is stabilized to a line in the tellurium spectrum via saturation spectroscopy, and single-frequency operation for a duration of two days is demonstrated by monitoring the error signal of the lock and the piezo drive compensating the length change of the external resonator due to air pressure variations. Additionally, transmission curves of the filters and the spectra of a sample of diodes are given.

  16. Materials processing with a high power diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Lawrence, J.; Spencer, J.T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper reports on work exploring the feasibility of a range of materials processing applications using a Diomed 60W diode laser delivered through a 600{mu}m diameter optical fibre to a 3 axis CNC workstation. The applications studied include: marking/engraving natural stones (marble and granite), marking ceramic tiles, sealing tile grouts, cutting and marking glass, marking/engraving wood, stripping paint and lacquer, and welding metallic wires. The study shows that even at the present limited power level of diode lasers, many materials processing applications can be accomplished with satisfactory results. Through the study an initial understanding of interaction of high power diode laser (HPDL) beam with various materials has been gained. Also, within the paper basic beam characteristics, and current R&D activities in HPDL technology and materials processing applications are reviewed.

  17. Role of diode lasers in oro-facial pain management.

    PubMed

    Javed, F; Kellesarian, S V; Romanos, G E

    2017-01-01

    With the increasing use of low level laser therapy (LLLT) in clinical dentistry, the aim of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of diode lasers in the management of orofacial pain. Indexed databases were searched without language and time restrictions up to and including July 2016 using different combinations of the following key words: oral, low level laser therapy, dental, pain, diode lasers, discomfort and analgesia. From the literature reviewed it is evident that LLLT is effective compared to traditional procedures in the management of oro-facial pain associated to soft tissue and hard tissue conditions such as premalignant lesions, gingival conditions and dental extractions. However, it remains to be determined which particular wavelength will produce the more favorable and predictable outcome in terms of pain reduction. It is highly recommended that further randomized control trials with well-defined control groups should be performed to determine the precise wavelengths of the diode lasers for the management of oro-facial pain. Within the limits of the present review, it is concluded that diode lasers therapy is more effective in the management of oro-facial pain compared to traditional procedures.

  18. Comparative hazard evaluation of near-infrared diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Marshall, W J

    1994-05-01

    Hazard evaluation methods from various laser protection standards differ when applied to extended-source, near-infrared lasers. By way of example, various hazard analyses are applied to laser training systems, which incorporate diode lasers, specifically those that assist in training military or law enforcement personnel in the proper use of weapons by simulating actual firing by the substitution of a beam of near-infrared energy for bullets. A correct hazard evaluation of these lasers is necessary since simulators are designed to be directed toward personnel during normal use. The differences among laser standards are most apparent when determining the hazard class of a laser. Hazard classification is based on a comparison of the potential exposures with the maximum permissible exposures in the 1986 and 1993 versions of the American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers, Z136.1, and the accessible emission limits of the federal laser product performance standard. Necessary safety design features of a particular system depend on the hazard class. The ANSI Z136.1-1993 standard provides a simpler and more accurate hazard assessment of low-power, near-infrared, diode laser systems than the 1986 ANSI standard. Although a specific system is evaluated, the techniques described can be readily applied to other near-infrared lasers or laser training systems.

  19. Overview on new diode lasers for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukum, Joerg

    2012-11-01

    Diode lasers have a broad wavelength range, from the visible to beyond 2.2μm. This allows for various applications in the defense sector, ranging from classic pumping of DPSSL in range finders or target designators, up to pumping directed energy weapons in the 50+ kW range. Also direct diode applications for illumination above 1.55μm, or direct IR countermeasures are of interest. Here an overview is given on some new wavelengths and applications which are recently under discussion. In this overview the following aspects are reviewed: • High Power CW pumps at 808 / 880 / 940nm • Pumps for DPAL - Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers • High Power Diode Lasers in the range < 1.0 μm • Scalable Mini-Bar concept for high brightness fiber coupled modules • The Light Weight Fiber Coupled module based on the Mini-Bar concept Overall, High Power Diode Lasers offer many ways to be used in new applications in the defense market.

  20. Diode laser power module for beamed power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. H.; Williams, M. D.; Lee, J. H.; Conway, E. J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent progress with powerful, efficient, and coherent monolithic diode master-oscillator/power-amplifier (M-MOPA) systems is promising for the development of a space-based diode laser power station. A conceptual design of a 50-kW diode laser power module was made for space-based power stations capable of beaming coherent power to the moon, Martian rovers, or other satellites. The laser diode power module consists of a solar photovoltaic array or nuclear power source, diode laser arrays (LDAs), a phase controller, beam-steering optics, a thermal management unit, and a radiator. Thermal load management and other relevant aspects of the system (such as power requirements and system mass) are considered. The 50-kW power module described includes the highest available efficiency of LD M-MOPA system to date. However, the overall efficiency of three amplifier stages, including the coupling efficiency, turns out to be 55.5 percent. Though a chain of PA stages generates a high-power coherent beam, there is a penalty due to the coupling loss between stages. The specific power of the 50-kW module using solar power is 6.58 W/kg.

  1. Diode laser power module for beamed power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. H.; Williams, M. D.; Lee, J. H.; Conway, E. J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent progress with powerful, efficient, and coherent monolithic diode master-oscillator/power-amplifier (M-MOPA) systems is promising for the development of a space-based diode laser power station. A conceptual design of a 50-kW diode laser power module was made for space-based power stations capable of beaming coherent power to the moon, Martian rovers, or other satellites. The laser diode power module consists of a solar photovoltaic array or nuclear power source, diode laser arrays (LDAs), a phase controller, beam-steering optics, a thermal management unit, and a radiator. Thermal load management and other relevant aspects of the system (such as power requirements and system mass) are considered. The 50-kW power module described includes the highest available efficiency of LD M-MOPA system to date. However, the overall efficiency of three amplifier stages, including the coupling efficiency, turns out to be 55.5 percent. Though a chain of PA stages generates a high-power coherent beam, there is a penalty due to the coupling loss between stages. The specific power of the 50-kW module using solar power is 6.58 W/kg.

  2. Tunable continuous wave single-mode dye laser directly pumped by a diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanska, D.; Suski, M.; Furmann, B.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a tunable continuous wave single-mode ring dye laser (a modified version of Coherent model CR 699-21), directly optically pumped by an economy-class diode laser, has been set up. The laser was operated on Coumarin 498, and its generation profile covered part of the green spectral region not easily accessible in single-mode operation. The performance of the laser in both broad-band and single-mode operation regimes was studied. It was proved that optical pumping by diode lasers allows one to obtain single-mode operation of dye lasers that is sufficiently stable for high-resolution spectroscopy applications.

  3. Making transmission and reflection holograms using 650 nm laser diode from laser pointer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, Alexander; Brown, Eric; Martinez, Tracy; Panin, Dmitry

    2003-10-01

    We have made both transmission and reflection holograms using inexpensive set-up with a 5 mW, 650-nm diode InGaAlP laser (similar to lasers used in common red laser pointers and DVD players). The reflection holograms can be viewed both with laser sourses of light and with non-coherent moderately collimated natural sources (like Sun or light bulb). In the transmission holograms viewed with laser both real and virtual images can be seen. Our paper presents the description of experimental set-up of exposure and development techniques, and the discussion of controversial coherence length issue of laser diodes as it applies to holograms.

  4. Tunable C- and L-band laser source based on colorless laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, P. C.; Jhang, J. J.; Peng, Y. W.; Bitew, M. A.; Chi, Y. C.; Wu, W. C.; Wang, H. Y.; Lin, G. R.; Li, C. Y.; Lu, H. H.

    2017-03-01

    In this letter, we propose and demonstrate a tunable laser source which covers C- and L-bands based on a colorless laser diode. The proposed laser source is tunable widely and it can tune single-wavelength, dual-wavelength, and triple-wavelength. Additionally, the optical side mode suppression ratio exceeds 30 dB. Since we combine the colorless laser diode with a tunable optical filter, the proposed tunable laser source stabilizes multi-wavelengths simultaneously. Our proposed tunable laser source is very useful for applications such as optical test instruments, optical communication systems, and optical fiber sensing systems.

  5. Novel high-brightness fiber coupled diode laser device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Matthias; Köhler, Bernd; Biesenbach, Jens; Brand, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    High brightness becomes more and more important in diode laser applications for fiber laser pumping and materials processing. For OEM customers fiber coupled devices have great advantages over direct beam modules: the fiber exit is a standardized interface, beam guiding is easy with nearly unlimited flexibility. In addition to the transport function the fiber serves as homogenizer: the beam profile of the laser radiation emitted from a fiber is symmetrical with highly repeatable beam quality and pointing stability. However, efficient fiber coupling requires an adaption of the slow-axis beam quality to the fiber requirements. Diode laser systems based on standard 10mm bars usually employ beam transformation systems to rearrange the highly asymmetrical beam of the laser bar or laser stack. These beam transformation systems (prism arrays, lens arrays, fiber bundles etc.) are expensive and become inefficient with increasing complexity. This is especially true for high power devices with small fiber diameters. On the other hand, systems based on single emitters are claimed to have good potential in cost reduction. Brightness of the inevitable fiber bundles, though, is limited due to inherent fill-factor losses. At DILAS a novel diode laser device has been developed combining the advantages of diode bars and single emitters: high brightness at high reliability with single emitter cost structure. Heart of the device is a specially tailored laser bar (T-Bar), which epitaxial and lateral structure was designed such that only standard fast- and slow-axis collimator lenses are required to couple the beam into a 200μm fiber. Up to 30 of these T-Bars of one wavelength can be combined to reach a total of > 500W ex fiber in the first step. Going to a power level of today's single emitter diodes even 1kW ex 200μm fiber can be expected.

  6. Preliminary experiences on diode laser welding in corneal transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menabuoni, Luca; Dragoni, B.; Pini, Roberto

    1996-12-01

    An experimental study on the applicability of diode laser welding to assist corneal transplantation is presented. Fusion of corneal tissue was accomplished by low power laser irradiation at 810 nm in association with Indocyanine Green (ICG) as the photoenhancing chromophore. Twenty freshly enucleated eyes obtained from young goats were used. In the preliminary experimental phase we examined the effects of laser welding on cuts produced by the scalpel on the cornea. Then we tried to design and test a novel diode laser- assisted corneal transplantation procedure. Our experimental results indicate that this procedure is affordable, but some technical aspects, as the application of ICG to the cut as well as the control of laser action are very critical issues.

  7. Thermal management, beam control, and packaging designs for high power diode laser arrays and pump cavity designs for diode laser array pumped rod shaped lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Te-Yuan

    Several novel techniques for controlling, managing and utilizing high power diode lasers are described. Low pressure water spray cooling for a high heat flux system is developed and proven to be an ideal cooling method for high power diode laser arrays. In order to enable better thermal and optical performance of diode laser arrays, a new and simple optical element, the beam control prism, is invented. It provides the ability to accomplish beam shaping and beam tilting at the same time. Several low thermal resistance diode packaging designs using beam control prisms are proposed, studied and produced. Two pump cavity designs using a diode laser array to uniformly pump rod shape gain media are also investigated.

  8. Battery-driven miniature LDA system with semiconductor laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damp, S.

    1988-06-01

    A one-component miniature system with dimensions of 11 by 4 by 4 cubic centimeters for laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) is described. As power supply a 12V battery or any other source with the capability to drive a current up to 200mA can be used. The system contains the whole electronics to drive the used laser diode is a safe way. The electronics to amplify and buffer the LDA-signal which is received by a PIN-diode is included. The output of the system can directly fit a filterbank for example. Possible applications in rough environments are mentioned. Measurements show the reliability of the system.

  9. Arrangement for damping the resonance in a laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.; Yariv, A.; Margalit, S. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An arrangement for damping the resonance in a laser diode is described. This arrangement includes an additional layer which together with the conventional laser diode form a structure (35) of a bipolar transistor. Therein, the additional layer serves as the collector, the cladding layer next to it as the base, and the active region and the other cladding layer as the emitter. A capacitor is connected across the base and the collector. It is chosen so that at any frequency above a certain selected frequency which is far below the resonance frequency the capacitor impedance is very low, effectively shorting the base to the collector.

  10. Gummy Smile Correction with Diode Laser: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Mahesh; Laju, S; Erali, Susil M; Erali, Sunil M; Fathima, Al Zainab; Gopinath, P V

    2015-01-01

    Beautification of smiles is becoming an everyday requirement in dental practice. Apart from teeth, gingiva also plays an important role in smile esthetics. Excessive visualization of gingiva is a common complaint among patients seeking esthetic treatment. A wide variety of procedures are available for correction of excessive gum display based on the cause of the condition. Soft tissue diode laser contouring of gingiva is a common procedure that can be undertaken in a routine dental setting with excellent patient satisfaction and minimal post-operative sequale. Two cases of esthetic crown lengthening with diode laser 810 nm are presented here. PMID:26668491

  11. Characteristic of laser diode beam propagation through a collimating lens.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiang; Han, Yiping; Cui, Zhiwei

    2010-01-20

    A mathematical model of a laser diode beam propagating through a collimating lens is presented. Wave propagation beyond the paraxial approximation is studied. The phase delay of the laser diode wave in passing through the lens is analyzed in detail. The propagation optical field after the lens is obtained from the diffraction integral by the stationary phase method. The model is employed to predict the light intensity at various beam cross sections, and the computed intensity distributions are in a good agreement with the corresponding measurements.

  12. A Modular Control Platform for a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, J.; Teare, S.

    Many of the difficulties of creating compact, high power laser systems can be overcome if the heat dissipating properties of chemical lasers can be combined with the efficiency of diode lasers. Recently, the novel idea of using solid state diode lasers to pump gaseous gain media, such as is done in diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), has been proposed and early experiments have shown promising results. However, a number of technical issues need to be overcome to realize high output power from these lasers. In order to achieve higher power, the efficiency of coupling between pump laser energy and the chemical cell must be increased, and eventually multiple high power diode pumps must be combined and synchronized so that their energy can pump the chemical cell. Additionally, an inter-cavity adaptive optics system may be a requirement to be able to propagate these lasers with high efficiency. DPAL systems are complex and require a significant amount of data fusion and active feedback to control and optimize their performance. There are a wide range of components including pump lasers, gain cells and monitoring points needed to study and refine the overall laser system. In support of this dynamic development environment, we have developed a hardware framework using commercial off the shelf (COTS) components which supports the rapid assembly of functional system blocks into a cohesive integrated system. Critical to this system are a simple communication protocol, industry standard communication pipes (USB, Bluetooth, etc), and flexible high level scripting. Simplifying the integration process has the benefit of allowing flexible "on the fly" modifications to adapt the system as needed and enhance available functionality. The modular nature of the architecture allows scalability and adaptability as more pieces are added to the system. Key components of this system are demonstrated for selected portions of a DPAL system using a USB backbone.

  13. A Theoretical Model Analysis of Absorption of a Three level Diode Pumped Alkali Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    A THEORETICAL MODEL ANALYSIS OF ABSORPTION OF A THREE LEVEL DIODE PUMPED ALKALI LASER ...States Government. AFIT/GAP/ENP/09-M07 A THEORETICAL MODEL ANALYSIS OF ABSORPTION OF A THREE LEVEL DIODE PUMPED ALKALI LASER THESIS...This paper models the absorption phenomena of light in a three level diode pumped alkali laser system. Specifically this model calculates for a user

  14. Superluminescent diode versus Fabry-Perot laser diode seeding in pulsed MOPA fiber laser systems for SBS suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, M.; Sousa, J. M.; Salcedo, J. R.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the use of a pulsed superluminescent diode (SLD) through direct current injection modulation as seeding source in a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration when compared to a Fabry-Perot (FP) laser diode in the same system. The performance limitations imposed by the use of the Fabry-Perot lasers, caused by the backward high peak power pulses triggered due to stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) are not observed in the case of the SLD. Compared to conventional Fabry-Perot laser diodes, the SLD provides a smooth and broad output spectrum which is independent of the input pulse parameters. Moreover, the spectrum can be sliced and tailored to the application. Thus, free SBS operation is shown when using the SLD seeder in the same system, allowing for a significant increase on the extractable power and energy.

  15. Blue laser diode (LD) and light emitting diode (LED) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergh, Arpad A.

    2004-09-01

    The family of blue LEDs, edge emitting and surface emitting lasers, enable a number of applications. Blue lasers are used in digital applications such as optical storage in high density DVDs. The resolution of the spot size and hence the storage density is diffraction limited and is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength of the laser. Other applications include printing, optical scanners, and high-resolution photo-lithography.As light emitters, blue LEDs are used for signaling and in direct view large area emissive displays. They are also making inroads into signage and LCD back-lighting, mobile platforms, and decorative accent lighting in curtains, furniture, etc.Blue LEDs produce white light either with phosphor wavelength converters or in combination with red and green LEDs. The full potential of LED light sources will require three devices to enable complete control over color and intensity.Sensing and medical/bio applications have a major impact on home security, on monitoring the environment, and on health care. New emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications will improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care.

  16. Further development of high-power pump laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Berthold; Lichtenstein, Norbert; Sverdlov, Boris; Matuschek, Nicolai; Mohrdiek, Stefan; Pliska, Tomas; Mueller, Juergen; Pawlik, Susanne; Arlt, Sebastian; Pfeiffer, Hans-Ulrich; Fily, Arnaud; Harder, Christoph

    2003-12-01

    AlGaAs/InGaAs based high power pump laser diodes with wavelength of around 980 nm are key products within erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA) for today's long haul and metro-communication networks, whereas InGaAsP/InP based laser diodes with 14xx nm emission wavelength are relevant for advanced, but not yet widely-used Raman amplifiers. Due to the changing industrial environment cost reduction becomes a crucial factor in the development of new, pump modules. Therefore, pump laser chips were aggressively optimized in terms of power conversion and thermal stability, which allows operation without active cooling at temperatures exceeding 70°C. In addition our submarine-reliable single mode technology was extended to high power multi-mode laser diodes. These light sources can be used in the field of optical amplifiers as well as for medical, printing and industrial applications. Improvements of pump laser diodes in terms of power conversion efficiency, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) locking performance of single mode devices, noise reduction and reliability will be presented.

  17. Using the diode laser in the lower labial frenum removal

    PubMed Central

    GARGARI, M.; AUTILI, N.; PETRONE, A.; PRETE, V.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Using the diode laser in the lower labial frenum removal. Objective The aim of this study is to assess the advantages of the use of diode laser to removal inferior labial frenum. Methods The treatment with the diode laser was proposed to a female patient of 32 years old in good general health having an abnormal inferior labial frenum that causes retracting of the gingival margin. The incision was carried out with diode laser at a wavelength of 940 nm and was removed the frenum mucosa and the deep tissue constitute of connective fiber and muscle fiber. Before the surgery wasn’t used the local anesthetic and after the cutting wasn’t necessary the use of suture. Results The wound had a good healing without scar. The patient didn’t have pain and bleeding during the healing and she didn’t report complications. It wasn’t necessary the use of antibiotic and anti-inflammatory. Conclusions The use of lasers has proved effective in the removal of labial frenum because it offers several advantages for the patient than traditional surgery. PMID:23285407

  18. Laser brackets debonding: Tm:YAP, Nd:YAG, and GaAs diode lasers evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostálová, Tat'jana; Jelínková, Helena; Šulc, Jan; Koranda, Petr; Němec, Michal; Ivanov, Ilja; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Iwai, Katsumasa

    2009-02-01

    The study demonstrates the possibility of using laser radiation for the ceramic bracket removing. Three laser radiations were examined for this effect and the removing possibility and velocity together with enamel and root damage were investigated. A diode pumped Tm:YAP microchip laser generating a wavelength 1.9 μm, diode pumped Nd:YAG laser with 1.44 μm wavelength, GaAs diode with 0.808 μm were used for the debonding purpose. The measurement of transmission and absorption of the basic element - bracket, adhesive resin, and enamel was also made with the goal to explain the source of the heat and bracket debonding. The explanation of the debonding effect is also presented. From the results it is possible to conclude that continuously running diode pumped microchip Tm:YAP laser having output power 1W can be a good candidate for ceramic bracket debonding procedure.

  19. Diode Laser Velocity Measurements by Modulated Filtered Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, J. J.; Varghese, P. L.; Jagodzinski, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    The ability of solid-state lasers to be tuned in operating frequency at MHz rates by input current modulation, while maintaining a relatively narrow line-width, has made them useful for spectroscopic measurements. Their other advantages include low cost, reliability, durability, compact size, and modest power requirements, making them a good choice for a laser source in micro-gravity experiments in drop-towers and in flight. For their size, they are also very bright. In a filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS) experiment, a diode laser can be used to scan across an atomic or molecular absorption line, generating large changes in transmission at the resonances for very small changes in frequency. The hyperfine structure components of atomic lines of alkali metal vapors are closely spaced and very strong, which makes such atomic filters excellent candidates for sensitive Doppler shift detection and therefore for high-resolution velocimetry. In the work we describe here we use a Rubidium vapor filter, and work with the strong D(sub 2) transitions at 780 nm that are conveniently accessed by near infrared diode lasers. The low power output of infrared laser diodes is their primary drawback relative to other laser systems commonly used for velocimetry. However, the capability to modulate the laser frequency rapidly and continuously helps mitigate this. Using modulation spectroscopy and a heterodyne detection scheme with a lock-in amplifier, one can extract sub-microvolt signals occurring at a specific frequency from a background that is orders of magnitude stronger. The diode laser modulation is simply achieved by adding a small current modulation to the laser bias current. It may also be swept repetitively in wavelength using an additional lower frequency current ramp.

  20. Diode Laser Velocity Measurements by Modulated Filtered Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, J. J.; Varghese, P. L.; Jagodzinski, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    The ability of solid-state lasers to be tuned in operating frequency at MHz rates by input current modulation, while maintaining a relatively narrow line-width, has made them useful for spectroscopic measurements. Their other advantages include low cost, reliability, durability, compact size, and modest power requirements, making them a good choice for a laser source in micro-gravity experiments in drop-towers and in flight. For their size, they are also very bright. In a filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS) experiment, a diode laser can be used to scan across an atomic or molecular absorption line, generating large changes in transmission at the resonances for very small changes in frequency. The hyperfine structure components of atomic lines of alkali metal vapors are closely spaced and very strong, which makes such atomic filters excellent candidates for sensitive Doppler shift detection and therefore for high-resolution velocimetry. In the work we describe here we use a Rubidium vapor filter, and work with the strong D(sub 2) transitions at 780 nm that are conveniently accessed by near infrared diode lasers. The low power output of infrared laser diodes is their primary drawback relative to other laser systems commonly used for velocimetry. However, the capability to modulate the laser frequency rapidly and continuously helps mitigate this. Using modulation spectroscopy and a heterodyne detection scheme with a lock-in amplifier, one can extract sub-microvolt signals occurring at a specific frequency from a background that is orders of magnitude stronger. The diode laser modulation is simply achieved by adding a small current modulation to the laser bias current. It may also be swept repetitively in wavelength using an additional lower frequency current ramp.

  1. Method and system for homogenizing diode laser pump arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, Andrew James

    2016-05-03

    An optical amplifier system includes a diode pump array including a plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars disposed in an array configuration and characterized by a periodic distance between adjacent semiconductor diode laser bars. The periodic distance is measured in a first direction perpendicular to each of the plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars. The diode pump array provides a pump output propagating along an optical path and characterized by a first intensity profile measured as a function of the first direction and having a variation greater than 10%. The optical amplifier system also includes a diffractive optic disposed along the optical path. The diffractive optic includes a photo-thermo-refractive glass member. The optical amplifier system further includes an amplifier slab having an input face and position along the optical path and separated from the diffractive optic by a predetermined distance. A second intensity profile measured at the input face of the amplifier slab as a function of the first direction has a variation less than 10%.

  2. Method and system for homogenizing diode laser pump arrays

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andy J

    2013-10-01

    An optical amplifier system includes a diode pump array including a plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars disposed in an array configuration and characterized by a periodic distance between adjacent semiconductor diode laser bars. The periodic distance is measured in a first direction perpendicular to each of the plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars. The diode pump array provides a pump output propagating along an optical path and characterized by a first intensity profile measured as a function of the first direction and having a variation greater than 10%. The optical amplifier system also includes a diffractive optic disposed along the optical path. The diffractive optic includes a photo-thermo-refractive glass member. The optical amplifier system further includes an amplifier slab having an input face and position along the optical path and separated from the diffractive optic by a predetermined distance. A second intensity profile measured at the input face of the amplifier slab as a function of the first direction has a variation less than 10%.

  3. Piezo-locking a diode laser with saturated absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Debs, J. E.; Robins, N. P.; Lance, A.; Kruger, M. B.; Close, J. D

    2008-10-01

    We demonstrate modulation-based frequency locking of an external cavity diode laser, utilizing a piezo-electrically actuated mirror, external to the laser cavity, to create an error signal from saturated absorption spectroscopy. With this method, a laser stabilized to a rubidium hyperfine transition has a FWHM of 130 kHz over seconds, making the locked laser suitable for experiments in atomic physics, such as creating and manipulating Bose-Einstein condensates. This technique combines the advantages of low-amplitude modulation, simplicity, performance, and price, factors that are usually considered to be mutually exclusive.

  4. Compact diode laser source for multiphoton biological imaging

    PubMed Central

    Niederriter, Robert D.; Ozbay, Baris N.; Futia, Gregory L.; Gibson, Emily A.; Gopinath, Juliet T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a compact, pulsed diode laser source suitable for multiphoton microscopy of biological samples. The center wavelength is 976 nm, near the peak of the two-photon cross section of common fluorescent markers such as genetically encoded green and yellow fluorescent proteins. The laser repetition rate is electrically tunable between 66.67 kHz and 10 MHz, with 2.3 ps pulse duration and peak powers >1 kW. The laser components are fiber-coupled and scalable to a compact package. We demonstrate >600 μm depth penetration in brain tissue, limited by laser power. PMID:28101420

  5. Diode laser treatment for osteal and osteoarticular panaritium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privalov, Valery A.; Krochek, Ivan V.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Poltavsky, Andrew N.; Antonov, Andrew A.

    2005-08-01

    Laser osteoperforation method, initially developed for treatment of osteomyelitis, was successfully applied to 66 patients with osteal and osteoarticular panaritium. The procedure consisted in perforation of the affected phalanx with diode laser radiation (wavelength 970nm; average power 10-12W; pulse mode 100/50 ms), delivered through quartz monofiber. Additional laser induced thermotherapy (power 2-3W; continuous mode) was fulfilled for persistent fistulas. In comparison with conventional surgery, laser osteoperforation provided faster pain relieve, edema dissipation, wound and fistula closure; good functional results; decreasing of disability cases number.

  6. Discretely tunable single-frequency fibre Bragg grating diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Lutts, G B; Nedelin, E T; Sumarokov, M A; Medvedkov, O I; Vasil'ev, S A

    2007-12-31

    The results of the development of discretely tunable single-frequency semiconductor lasers with the external cavity based on fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) written in a single-mode fibre are presented. It is shown, in particular, that, by using an external cavity semiconductor laser with the output mirror representing a superposition of several FBGs with different resonance wavelengths, it is possible to obtain lasing at one or several wavelengths simultaneously by varying the injection current and (or) the temperature of the active area of the laser diode. (lasers)

  7. Injection locking of a high power ultraviolet laser diode for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hosoya, Toshiyuki; Miranda, Martin; Inoue, Ryotaro; Kozuma, Mikio

    2015-07-15

    We developed a high-power laser system at a wavelength of 399 nm for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms with ultraviolet laser diodes. The system is composed of an external cavity laser diode providing frequency stabilized output at a power of 40 mW and another laser diode for amplifying the laser power up to 220 mW by injection locking. The systematic method for optimization of our injection locking can also be applied to high power light sources at any other wavelengths. Our system does not depend on complex nonlinear frequency-doubling and can be made compact, which will be useful for providing light sources for laser cooling experiments including transportable optical lattice clocks.

  8. Injection locking of a high power ultraviolet laser diode for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Toshiyuki; Miranda, Martin; Inoue, Ryotaro; Kozuma, Mikio

    2015-07-01

    We developed a high-power laser system at a wavelength of 399 nm for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms with ultraviolet laser diodes. The system is composed of an external cavity laser diode providing frequency stabilized output at a power of 40 mW and another laser diode for amplifying the laser power up to 220 mW by injection locking. The systematic method for optimization of our injection locking can also be applied to high power light sources at any other wavelengths. Our system does not depend on complex nonlinear frequency-doubling and can be made compact, which will be useful for providing light sources for laser cooling experiments including transportable optical lattice clocks.

  9. Effect of parameters in diode laser welding of steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujanpaeae, Veli; Maaranen, Petteri; Kostamo, Tapio

    2003-03-01

    Austenitic stainless steel sheets and ordinary cold-rolled carbon steel sheets with variable thickness were welded with 1 kW diode laser. Different weld joints were utilized. The optimal parameters for each case were determined. The joints were examined by metallography and mechanical testing. The results show that diode laser is an optimal tool for sheet metal welding, when a considerable narrow weld is aimed. The edges prepared by mechanical sheering are acceptable as the joint preparation. The tensile strength and ductility of all the joints were acceptable and on the same level or better than that of base metal. The shielding gas seems to play a much higher role than in conventional laser welding (CO2 or Nd:YAG laser welding). When using the non-oxidizing shielding gas (nitrogen or argon), the welding speed to be reached is much slower than when welding without any shielding gas. This is probably due to the increase of absorption by oxygen.

  10. AlGaAs diode pumped tunable chromium lasers

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, William F.; Payne, Stephen A.

    1992-01-01

    An all-solid-state laser system is disclosed wherein the laser is pumped in the longwave wing of the pump absorption band. By utilizing a laser material that will accept unusually high dopant concentrations without deleterious effects on the crystal lattice one is able to compensate for the decreased cross section in the wing of the absorption band, and the number of pump sources which can be used with such a material increases correspondingly. In a particular embodiment a chromium doped colquiriite-structure crystal such as Cr:LiSrAlF.sub.6 is the laser material. The invention avoids the problems associated with using AlGaInP diodes by doping the Cr:LiSrAlF.sub.6 heavily to enable efficient pumping in the longwave wing of the absorption band with more practical AlGaAs diodes.

  11. High brightness diode-pumped organic solid-state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhuang; Mhibik, Oussama; Nafa, Malik; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien

    2015-02-02

    High-power, diffraction-limited organic solid-state laser operation has been achieved in a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser (VECSOL), pumped by a low-cost compact blue laser diode. The diode-pumped VECSOLs were demonstrated with various dyes in a polymer matrix, leading to laser emissions from 540 nm to 660 nm. Optimization of both the pump pulse duration and output coupling leads to a pump slope efficiency of 11% for a DCM based VECSOLs. We report output pulse energy up to 280 nJ with 100 ns long pump pulses, leading to a peak power of 3.5 W in a circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam.

  12. Laser Diode Cooling For High Average Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundinger, David C.; Beach, Raymond J.; Benett, William J.; Solarz, Richard W.; Sperry, Verry

    1989-06-01

    Many applications for semiconductor lasers that require high average power are limited by the inability to remove the waste heat generated by the diode lasers. In order to reduce the cost and complexity of these applications a heat sink package has been developed which is based on water cooled silicon microstructures. Thermal resistivities of less than 0.025°C/01/cm2) have been measured which should be adequate for up to CW operation of diode laser arrays. This concept can easily be scaled to large areas and is ideal for high average power solid state laser pumping. Several packages which illustrate the essential features of this design have been fabricated and tested. The theory of operation will be briefly covered, and several conceptual designs will be described. Also the fabrication and assembly procedures and measured levels of performance will be discussed.

  13. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SEMICONDUCTOR INJECTION LASERS SELCO-87: Degradation phenomena in laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beister, G.; Krispin, P.; Maege, J.; Richter, G.; Weber, H.; Rechenberg, I.

    1988-11-01

    Accelerated tests on GaAlAs/GaAs double heterostructure laser diodes showed, in agreement with earlier results on light-emitting diodes, that ageing appeared in three distinct forms: initial and slow degradation stages, both obeying a logarithmic time dependence, and a superimposed "gradation" (enhancement of the output power). Measurements made by the method of deep level transient spectroscopy during the accelerated tests on these lasers, operated as light-emitting diodes, revealed the appearance right from the beginning of B levels attributed to the antisite GaAs defects. The B levels appeared again in diodes tested in the lasing mode. In the case of a group of 21 laser diodes the mean time-to-failure was 9000 h at 70°C for 5 mW (in accordance with the Weibull statistics of degradation rates).

  14. Polarization/Spatial Combining of Laser-Diode Pump Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelsinger, Paul; Liu, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    A breadboard version of an optical beam combiner is depicted which make it possible to use the outputs of any or all of four multimode laser diodes to pump a non-planar ring oscillator (NPRO) laser. The output of each laser diode has a single-mode profile in the meridional plane containing an axis denoted the 'fast' axis and a narrower multimode profile in the orthogonal meridional plane, which contains an axis denoted the 'slow' axis and a narrower multimode profile in the orthogonal meridional plane, which contains an axis denoted the 'slow' axis. One of the purposes served by the beam-combining optics is to reduce the fast-axis numerical aperture (NA) of the laser-diode output to match the NA of the optical fiber. Along the slow axis, the unmodified laser-diode NA is already well matched to the fiber optic NA, so no further slow-axis beam shaping is needed. In this beam combiner, the laser-diode outputs are collimated by aspherical lenses, then half-wave plates and polarizing beam splitters are used to combine the four collimated beams into two beams. Spatial combination of the two beams and coupling into the optical fiber is effected by use of anamorphic prisms, mirrors, and a focusing lens. The anamorphic prisms are critical elements in the NA-matching scheme, in that they reduce the fast-axis beam width to 1/6 of its original values. Inasmuch as no slow-axis beam shaping is needed, the collimating and focusing lenses are matched for 1:1 iumaging. Because these lenses are well corrected for infinite conjugates the combiner offers diffraction-limited performance along both the fast and slow axes.

  15. Progress in efficiency-optimized high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzak, A.; Hülsewede, R.; Zorn, M.; Hirsekorn, O.; Sebastian, J.; Meusel, J.; Hennig, P.; Crump, P.; Wenzel, H.; Knigge, S.; Maaßdorf, A.; Bugge, F.; Erbert, G.

    2013-10-01

    High-power diode lasers are highly efficient sources of optical energy for industrial and defense applications, either directly or as pump sources for solid state or fiber lasers. We review here how advances in diode laser design and device technology have enabled the performance to be continuously improved. An overview is presented of recent progress at JENOPTIK in the development of commercial diode lasers optimized for peak performance, robust high-yield manufacture and long lifetimes. These diode lasers are tailored to simultaneously operate with reduced vertical carrier leakage, low thermal and electrical resistance and low optical losses. In this way, the highest electro-optical efficiencies are sustained to high currents. For example, 940-nm bars with high fill factor are shown to deliver continuous wave (CW) output powers of 280 W with conversion efficiency of < 60%. These bars have a vertical far field angle with 95% power content of just 40°. In addition, 955-nm single emitters with 90μm stripe width deliver 12 W CW output with power conversion efficiency at the operating point of 69%. In parallel, the Ferdinand-Braun-Institut (FBH) is working to enable the next generation of high power diode lasers, by determining the key limitations to performance and by pioneering new technologies to address these limits. An overview of recent studies at the FBH will therefore also be presented. Examples will include structures with further reduced far field angles, higher lateral beam quality and increased peak power and efficiency. Prospects for further performance improvement will be discussed.

  16. Near-ultraviolet laser diodes for brilliant ultraviolet fluorophore excitation.

    PubMed

    Telford, William G

    2015-12-01

    Although multiple lasers are now standard equipment on most modern flow cytometers, ultraviolet (UV) lasers (325-365 nm) remain an uncommon excitation source for cytometry. Nd:YVO4 frequency-tripled diode pumped solid-state lasers emitting at 355 nm are now the primary means of providing UV excitation on multilaser flow cytometers. Although a number of UV excited fluorochromes are available for flow cytometry, the cost of solid-state UV lasers remains prohibitively high, limiting their use to all but the most sophisticated multilaser instruments. The recent introduction of the brilliant ultraviolet (BUV) series of fluorochromes for cell surface marker detection and their importance in increasing the number of simultaneous parameters for high-dimensional analysis has increased the urgency of including UV sources in cytometer designs; however, these lasers remain expensive. Near-UV laser diodes (NUVLDs), a direct diode laser source emitting in the 370-380 nm range, have been previously validated for flow cytometric analysis of most UV-excited probes, including quantum nanocrystals, the Hoechst dyes, and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. However, they remain a little-used laser source for cytometry, despite their significantly lower cost. In this study, the ability of NUVLDs to excite the BUV dyes was assessed, along with their compatibility with simultaneous brilliant violet (BV) labeling. A NUVLD emitting at 375 nm was found to excite most of the available BUV dyes at least as well as a UV 355 nm source. This slightly longer wavelength did produce some unwanted excitation of BV dyes, but at sufficiently low levels to require minimal additional compensation. NUVLDs are compact, relatively inexpensive lasers that have higher power levels than the newest generation of small 355 nm lasers. They can, therefore, make a useful, cost-effective substitute for traditional UV lasers in multicolor analysis involving the BUV and BV dyes. Published 2015 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on

  17. Monolithic laser diode structure for microwave generation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.; Weller, J.F.

    1990-03-06

    This patent describes an apparatus. It comprises: a semiconductor substrate; a semiconductor master laser and first and second semiconductor slave lasers fabricated adjacent to each other on the semiconductor substrate. The master laser generating an optical output at a frequency f{sub 0} and sidebands at multiples of {Delta}f, the first and second slave lasers being tuned to approximately coincide with first and second preselected sidebands of the master laser; and means for respectively injection-locking the first and second slave lasers to the first and second preselected sidebands.

  18. Improved characteristics of indium gallium nitride-based laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Monica Cecilia

    2001-10-01

    Many applications exist for short wavelength laser diodes (lambda ˜ 400--450 nm), such as optical storage, laser printing, displays, and lighting, as well as medical applications. The operating characteristics and lifetimes of InGaN-based laser diodes need be improved to provide the reliability required for these applications. These improvements require extensive work in the growth and design of the epitaxial layer structure, as well as the device design and fabrication. The epitaxial structure of the laser was investigated to enhance the operating characteristics. Optimization in the epitaxial design and growth conditions of the laser active region, claddings, and p-type layers was performed. The design of the quantum wells (QWs) and QW capping reduced the threshold current density of the laser and doubled the internal efficiency to 35%. The implementation of AlGaN/GaN strained-layer superlattices improved the structural properties of the cladding layers. Optimizing the Mg-doping in the laser reduces the resistivity of the p-type layers and the threshold voltage by 30%, thus reducing the heating of the lasers. The increased hole concentration with a reduced Mg-doping decreases the threshold current and increases the internal efficiency. The device design and fabrication was also addressed. Facet formation improvements were investigated to increase the facet reflectivity. Heat sinking was also investigated to provide heat extraction from the device. The devices were able to operate under a 10% duty cycle when the substrate was thinned and mounted on a copper heat sink, compared to 2% with no heat sinking. The threading dislocation (TD) density in the laser structure has a large impact on the threshold current density of laser diodes. The TDs act as nonradiative recombination centers, which will reduce the internal efficiency of the laser diode. Removing the dislocations by the lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) technique led to extraordinary improvements in device

  19. Improved atomic force microscope using a laser diode interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; Pax, Paul; Yi, Leon; Howells, Sam; Gallagher, Mark; Chen, Ting; Elings, Virgil; Bocek, Dan

    1992-08-01

    The performance of an atomic force microscope using a laser diode interferometer has been improved to the point where its resolution is comparable to that of laser beam deflection systems. We describe the structure of this microscope, present a model that takes into account the main parameters associated with its operation, and demonstrate its sensitivity by showing images of a small area scan with atomic resolution as well as a large area scan in a stand-alone configuration.

  20. Modeling of diode pumped metastable rare gas lasers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zining; Yu, Guangqi; Wang, Hongyan; Lu, Qisheng; Xu, Xiaojun

    2015-06-01

    As a new kind of optically pumped gaseous lasers, diode pumped metastable rare gas lasers (OPRGLs) show potential in high power operation. In this paper, a multi-level rate equation based model of OPRGL is established. A qualitative agreement between simulation and Rawlins et al.'s experimental result shows the validity of the model. The key parameters' influences and energy distribution characteristics are theoretically studied, which is useful for the optimized design of high efficient OPRGLs.

  1. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    DOEpatents

    Schneider, R.P.; Lott, J.A.

    1994-09-27

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors. 5 figs.

  2. Diode laser osteoperforation and its application to osteomyelitis treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privalov, Valeriy A.; Krochek, Igor V.; Lappa, Alexander V.

    2001-10-01

    Laser osteoperforation, previously studied in experiment in rabbits at treatment for acute purulent osteomyelitis (Privalov V. et.al., SPIE Proc., v.3565., pp. 72-79), was applied in clinic to 36 patients with chronic purulent osteomyelitis and to 6 patients (children) with acute haematogenic osteomyelitis. Diode lasers of 805 and 980 nm wavelength were used. There was achieved full recovery in all acute cases, and stable remission in chronic cases during all the observation period (1 - 2.5 years).

  3. Even Illumination from Fiber-Optic-Coupled Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    A method of equipping fiber-optic-coupled laser diodes to evenly illuminate specified fields of view has been proposed. The essence of the method is to shape the tips of the optical fibers into suitably designed diffractive optical elements. One of the main benefits afforded by the method would be more nearly complete utilization of the available light. Diffractive optics is a relatively new field of optics in which laser beams are shaped by use of diffraction instead of refraction.

  4. Fiber Coupled Laser Diodes with Even Illumination Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An optical fiber for evenly illuminating a target. The optical fiber is coupled to a laser emitting diode and receives laser light. The la ser light travels through the fiber optic and exits at an exit end. T he exit end has a diffractive optical pattern formed thereon via etch ing, molding or cutting, to reduce the Gaussian profile present in co nventional fiber optic cables The reduction of the Gaussian provides an even illumination from the fiber optic cable.

  5. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    DOEpatents

    Schneider, Richard P.; Lott, James A.

    1994-01-01

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors.

  6. Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia after diode laser oral surgery. An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Juan; González-Mosquera, Antonio; García-Martín, José-Manuel; García-Caballero, Lucía; Varela-Centelles, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Background To examine the process of epithelial reparation in a surgical wound caused by diode laser. Material and Methods An experimental study with 27 Sprage-Dawley rats was undertaken. The animals were randomly allocated to two experimental groups, whose individuals underwent glossectomy by means of a diode laser at different wattages, and a control group treated using a number 15 scalpel blade. The animals were slaughtered at the 2nd, 7th, and 14th day after glossectomy. The specimens were independently studied by two pathologists (blinded for the specimens’ group). Results At the 7th day, re-epithelisation was slightly faster for the control group (conventional scalpel) (p=0.011). At the 14th day, complete re-epithelization was observed for all groups. The experimental groups displayed a pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia. Conclusions It is concluded that, considering the limitations of this kind of experimental studies, early re-epithelisation occurs slightly faster when a conventional scalpel is used for incision, although re-epithelisation is completed in two weeks no matter the instrument used. In addition, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia is a potential event after oral mucosa surgery with diode laser. Knowledge about this phenomenon (not previously described) may prevent diagnostic mistakes and inadequate treatment approaches, particularly when dealing with potentially malignant oral lesions. Key words:Diode laser, animal model, oral biopsy, oral cancer, oral precancer, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia. PMID:26116841

  7. Low-threshold light-emitting-diode laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawrylo, F. Z.; Kressel, H.

    1976-01-01

    Technique, which consists of reducing bandgap change at heterojunction to 0.1 eV and avoiding deep-level impurities such as Si and Ge, produces low-threshold laser diodes which are made from (AlGa)As and emit in visible spectrum.

  8. Hypertrichosis lanuginosa congenita treated with diode laser epilation during infancy.

    PubMed

    Salas-Alanis, Julio C; Lopez-Cepeda, Larissa D; Elizondo-Rodriguez, Aurora; Morales-Barrera, Maria Enriqueta; Ramos-Garibay, Alberto R

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a girl with hypertrichosis lanuginosa congenita treated with diode laser depilation since the age of 9 months. The treatment was well tolerated, and neither general nor local anesthesia was needed. A reduction of approximately 80% of facial and body hair was noted, which improved her condition significantly.

  9. Time delays in lead-salt semiconductor diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadeer, A.; Reed, J.; Bryant, F. J.

    1984-03-01

    Time delays of typically 15 17μ have been measured directly for PbS1-xSex, Pb1-xSnxSe and Pb1-xSnxTe diode lasers at injection levels just above threshold in each case. The corresponding minority carrier lifetimes, as determined using the one-carrier injection model, were typically 2 4μ.

  10. Diode laser for the treatment of telangiectasias following hemangioma involution.

    PubMed

    Cerrati, Eric W; O, Teresa M; Chung, Hoyun; Waner, Milton

    2015-02-01

    Infantile hemangiomas are well known for their rapid growth during the first 6 to 9 months of life, followed by a spontaneous but slow involution. The standard of care is to treat these lesions at an early age with propranolol to expedite the involution process; however, surgery still remains an active component in the management. Medical treatment with propranolol or natural involution will often result in residual telangiectasias. We evaluated the efficacy of using a diode laser as a treatment for telangiectasias following cervicofacial infantile hemangioma involution. Case series with chart review. Tertiary care hospital and practice specializing in the care of vascular anomalies. Twenty patients, aged 4 months to 11 years (average 2.69 years), underwent treatment with a 532-nm diode laser to treat the residual telangiectasias following hemangioma involution. All procedures were performed in the operating room. To assess the efficacy, we independently evaluated pre- and posttreatment digital photographs and ranked them on a 0- to 4-point scale (0 = no change and 4 = complete response). Adverse reactions were also recorded. The telangiectasias showed considerable improvement following treatment. In more than half of the patients treated, the affected area demonstrated a complete response. No adverse reactions were noted. A 532-nm diode laser effectively treats the remaining telangiectasias following hemangioma involution. Whether used independently or in conjunction with other treatment modalities, the diode laser should be part of the surgical armamentarium when treating infantile hemangiomas. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  11. Iris retraction and retroflexion after transscleral contact diode laser photocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Sony, Parul; Sudan, Rajeev; Pangtey, Mayank S; Khokhar, Sudarshan; Kumar, Harsh

    2003-01-01

    A 9-year-old girl with refractory glaucoma with an anterior chamber intraocular lens underwent transscleral contact diode laser cyclophotocoagulation. Slit-lamp examination and ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed iris retraction and retroflexion at 2 weeks of follow-up. The probable cause of this complication is discussed.

  12. High Average Power Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers: Power Scaling With High Spectral and Spatial Coherence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-30

    TEM00 -mode, diode - laser - pumped , Nd:YAG miniature-slab laser ,” Opt. Lett...30-Sep-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER High Average Power Diode - Pumped Solid-State Lasers : Power DAAD19-02-1-0184 Scaling with High...documentation. 14. ABSTRACT The main program objective was the development ofa kilowatt class, cw Nd:YAG diode - laser - pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL)

  13. Chirped microlens arrays for diode laser circularization and beam expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Peter; Dannberg, Peter; Hoefer, Bernd; Beckert, Erik

    2005-08-01

    Single-mode diode lasers are well-established light sources for a huge number of applications but suffer from astigmatism, beam ellipticity and large manufacturing tolerances of beam parameters. To compensate for these shortcomings, various approaches like anamorphic prism pairs and cylindrical telescopes for circularization as well as variable beam expanders based on zoomed telescopes for precise adjustment of output beam parameters have been employed in the past. The presented new approach for both beam circularization and expansion is based on the use of microlens arrays with chirped focal length: Selection of lenslets of crossed cylindrical microlens arrays as part of an anamorphic telescope enables circularization, astigmatism correction and divergence tolerance compensation of diode lasers simultaneously. Another promising application of chirped spherical lens array telescopes is stepwise variable beam expansion for circular laser beams of fiber or solid-state lasers. In this article we describe design and manufacturing of beam shaping systems with chirped microlens arrays fabricated by polymer-on-glass replication of reflow lenses. A miniaturized diode laser module with beam circularization and astigmatism correction assembled on a structured ceramics motherboard and a modulated RGB laser-source for photofinishing applications equipped with both cylindrical and spherical chirped lens arrays demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed system design approach.

  14. 946 nm Diode Pumped Laser Produces 100mJ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axenson, Theresa J.; Barnes, Norman P.; Reichle, Donald J., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An innovative approach to obtaining high energy at 946 nm has yielded 101 mJ of laser energy with an optical-to-optical slope efficiency of 24.5%. A single gain module resonator was evaluated, yielding a maximum output energy of 50 mJ. In order to obtain higher energy a second gain module was incorporated into the resonator. This innovative approach produced un-surprised output energy of 101 mJ. This is of utmost importance since it demonstrates that the laser output energy scales directly with the number of gain modules. Therefore, higher energies can be realized by simply increasing the number of gain modules within the laser oscillator. The laser resonator incorporates two gain modules into a folded "M-shaped" resonator, allowing a quadruple pass gain within each rod. Each of these modules consists of a diode (stack of 30 microlensed 100 Watt diode array bars, each with its own fiber lens) end-pumping a Nd:YAG laser rod. The diode output is collected by a lens duct, which focuses the energy into a 2 mm diameter flat to flat octagonal pump area of the laser crystal. Special coatings have been developed to mitigate energy storage problems, including parasitic lasing and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), and encourage the resonator to operate at the lower gain transition at 946 nm.

  15. Active alignment and reliable pigtailing of laser diode transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhali, M.; Saktioto, .; Zainal, J.; Munajat, Y.; Ali, J.; Rahman, R.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we present theoretical and experimental analysis on Nd:YAG laser microwelding for pigtailing laser diode transmitter through two ball lenses that are employed for effectively matching the elliptical mode field of the laser diode with the circular on of the single mode fiber. The fiber attachment and the fixing of various coupling components have been performed in what is so called active alignment process. The system continues measuring the coupled power during the processes of alignment and attachment of various coupling components as well as the working distance and misalignment tolerances optimizations. Results of theoretical modeling of laser weld penetration depth agree with the experimentally measured results in the low laser pulse energy range. Moreover the laser pulse parameters such as, duration, energy, number of pulse shoots as well as the focusing position over the workpiece and angle of laser pulse incidence are found to have very significant effects on the weld yields and greatly affect the laser weld depth to width ratio. Optimization of all the mentioned parameters found to be necessary for achieving strong laser microwelds with more penetration and less width in the attachments of the sensitive optical components inside the packaged photonic devices modules.

  16. Mid-infrared high-power diode lasers and modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, Márc T.; Gilly, Juergen; Rattunde, Marcel; Wagner, Joachim; Ahlert, Sandra; Biesenbach, Jens

    2010-02-01

    High-power diode lasers in the mid-infrared wavelength range between 1.8μm and 2.3μm have emerged new possibilities for applications like processing and accelerated drying of materials, medical surgery, infrared countermeasures or for pumping of solid-state and semiconductor disc lasers. We will present results on MBE grown (AlGaIn)(AsSb) quantum-well diode laser single emitters with emitter widths between 90μm and 200μm. In addition laser bars with 20% or 30% fill factor have been processed. More than 30% maximum wall-plug efficiency in cw operation for single emitters and laser bars has been reached. Even at 2200nm more than 15W have been demonstrated with a 30% fill factor bar. Due to an increasing interest in pulsed operation modes for these mid-infrared lasers, we have investigated single emitters and laser bars at 1940nm for different pulse times and duty cycles. More than 9W have been measured at 30A with 500ns pulse time and 1% duty cycle without COMD for a single emitter. Most applications mentioned before need fiber coupled output power, therefore fiber coupled modules based on single emitters or laser bars have been developed. Single-emitter based modules show 600mW out of a 200μm core fiber with NA=0.22 at different wavelengths between 1870nm and 1940nm. At 2200nm an output power of 450mW ex fiber impressively demonstrates the potential of GaSb based diode lasers well beyond wavelengths of 2μm. Combining several laser bars, 20W out of a 600μm core fiber have been established at 1870nm. Finally for a 7 bar stack at 1870nm we have demonstrated more than 85W at 50A in qcw mode.

  17. High-power cw operation of diode laser transversely-pumped Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golla, Dirk; Knoke, S.; Schoene, Wolfram; Ernst, G.; Tuennermann, Andreas; Welling, Herbert

    1995-04-01

    We report on diode laser side-pumped, cw Nd:YAG rod lasers operating at pump powers up to 1 kW. With linear diode laser arrays as pump sources a pump power of 90 W/cm is realized. In multimode operation at 1064 nm, output powers of more than 300 W cw are observed. Applying a dynamically stable resonator design, an output power of more than 45 W in TEM00 mode operation is realized with an optical-to-optical efficiency of more than 11%. Higher pump powers up to several 100 W/cm can be achieved by using fiber-coupled diode lasers as pump sources. Laser performance, thermal properties and possible applications of these laser systems will be discussed.

  18. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy Verification Analysis for Use in the Combustion Optimization and Analysis Laser Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    5 Figure 4: Coherent Verdi -5 Nd:YAG laser........................................................................ 6 Figure 5: Cheetah Series...broadband dye laser also assembled by ISSI, the Verdi 5 Nd:YVO4 laser produced by Coherent, and 5 the DFB diode Laser produced by Cheetah...narrowband dye laser with frequency doubler 6 Figure 4: Coherent Verdi -5 Nd:YAG laser Figure 5: Cheetah Series DFB diode laser 1.4

  19. CrLiCaAlF6 Laser Pumped by Visible Laser Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    first demonstration of diode pumping was reported the polarization of the orthogonally polarized beams for alexandrite [1]. Recently a new Cr-doped...the fractional power of to perform as well as the more mature alexandrite laser. each that will be reflected by the second polarization beam For...gradually "dialed out" of higher than in alexandrite . These advantages, coupled the pump axis while the laser diode power was simulta- with highly

  20. Plasma formation in diode pumped alkali lasers sustained in Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markosyan, Aram H.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-11-01

    In diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), lasing action occurs on the resonant lines of alkali atoms following pumping by broadband semiconductor lasers. The goal is to convert the efficient but usually poor optical quality of inexpensive diode lasers into the high optical quality of atomic vapor lasers. Resonant excitation of alkali vapor leads to plasma formation through the excitation transfer from the 2P states to upper lying states, which then are photoionized by the pump and intracavity radiation. A first principles global model was developed to investigate the operation of the He/Cs DPAL system and the consequences of plasma formation on the efficiency of the laser. Over a range of pump powers, cell temperatures, excitation frequency, and mole fraction of the collision mixing agent (N2 or C2H6), we found that sufficient plasma formation can occur that the Cs vapor is depleted. Although N2 is not a favored collisional mixing agent due to large rates of quenching of the 2P states, we found a range of pump parameters where laser oscillation may occur. The poor performance of N2 buffered systems may be explained in part by plasma formation. We found that during the operation of the DPAL system with N2 as the collisional mixing agent, plasma formation is in excess of 1014-1015 cm-3, which can degrade laser output intensity by both depletion of the neutral vapor and electron collisional mixing of the laser levels.

  1. In-volume heating using high-power laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisenkov, Valentin S.; Kiyko, Vadim V.; Vdovin, Gleb V.

    2015-03-01

    High-power lasers are useful instruments suitable for applications in various fields; the most common industrial applications include cutting and welding. We propose a new application of high-power laser diodes as in-bulk heating source for food industry. Current heating processes use surface heating with different approaches to make the heat distribution more uniform and the process more efficient. High-power lasers can in theory provide in-bulk heating which can sufficiently increase the uniformity of heat distribution thus making the process more efficient. We chose two media (vegetable fat and glucose) for feasibility experiments. First, we checked if the media have necessary absorption coefficients on the wavelengths of commercially available laser diodes (940-980 nm). This was done using spectrophotometer at 700-1100 nm which provided the dependences of transmission from the wavelength. The results indicate that vegetable fat has noticeable transmission dip around 925 nm and glucose has sufficient dip at 990 nm. Then, after the feasibility check, we did numerical simulation of the heat distribution in bulk using finite elements method. Based on the results, optimal laser wavelength and illuminator configuration were selected. Finally, we carried out several pilot experiments with high-power diodes heating the chosen media.

  2. Mode control for high performance laser diode sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisher, Paul; Price, Kirk; Bashar, Shabbir; Bao, Ling; Huang, Hua; Wang, Jun; Wise, Damian; Zhang, Shiguo; Das, Suhit; DeFranza, Mark; Hodges, Aaron; Trifan, Utsu; Balsley, David; Dong, Weimin; Grimshaw, Mike; DeVito, Mark; Bell, Jake; Martinsen, Robert; Farmer, Jason; Crump, Paul; Patterson, Steve

    2008-04-01

    We report on recent progress in the control of optical modes toward the improvement of commercial high-performance diode laser modules. Control of the transverse mode has allowed scaling of the optical mode volume, increasing the peak output power of diode laser emitters by a factor of two. Commercially-available single emitter diodes operating at 885 nm now exhibit >25 W peak (12 W rated) at >60% conversion efficiency. In microchannel-cooled bar format, these lasers operate >120 W at 62% conversion efficiency. Designs of similar performance operating at 976 nm have shown >37,000 equivalent device hours with no failures. Advances in the control of lateral modes have enabled unprecedented brightness scaling in a fiber-coupled package format. Leveraging scalable arrays of single emitters, the conductively-cooled nLIGHT Pearl TM package now delivers >80 W peak (50 W rated) at >53% conversion efficiency measured from a 200-μm core fiber output and >45 W peak (35 W rated) at >52% conversion efficiency measured from a 100-μm fiber output. nLIGHT has also expanded its product portfolio to include wavelength locking by means of external volume Bragg gratings. By controlling the longitudinal modes of the laser, this technique is demonstrated to produce a narrow, temperature-stabilized spectrum, with minimal performance degradation relative to similar free-running lasers.

  3. Endoscopic diode laser therapy for chronic radiation proctitis.

    PubMed

    Polese, Lino; Marini, Lucia; Rizzato, Roberto; Picardi, Edgardo; Merigliano, Stefano

    2017-09-11

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of endoscopic diode laser therapy in patients presenting rectal bleeding due to chronic radiation proctitis (CRP). A retrospective analysis of CRP patients who underwent diode laser therapy in a single institution between 2010 and 2016 was carried out. The patients were treated by non-contact fibers without sedation in an outpatient setting. Fourteen patients (median age 77, range 73-87 years) diagnosed with CRP who had undergone high-dose radiotherapy for prostatic cancer and who presented with rectal bleeding were included. Six required blood transfusions. Antiplatelet (three patients) and anticoagulant (two patients) therapy was not suspended during the treatments. The patients underwent a median of two sessions; overall, a mean of 1684 J of laser energy per session was used. Bleeding was resolved in 10/14 (71%) patients, and other two patients showed improvement (93%). Only one patient, who did not complete the treatment, required blood transfusions after laser therapy; no complications were noted during or after the procedures. Study findings demonstrated that endoscopic non-contact diode laser treatment is safe and effective in CRP patients, even in those receiving antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant therapy.

  4. A comparative evaluation: Oral leukoplakia surgical management using diode laser, CO2 laser, and cryosurgery.

    PubMed

    Natekar, Madhukar; Raghuveer, Hosahallli-Puttaiah; Rayapati, Dilip-Kumar; Shobha, Eshwara-Singh; Prashanth, Nagesh-Tavane; Rangan, Vinod; Panicker, Archana G

    2017-06-01

    The comparatively evaluate the three surgical treatment modalities namely cryosurgery, diode and CO2 laser surgery in terms of healing outcomes on the day of surgery, first and second week post operatively and recurrence at the end of 18 months was assessed. Thirty selected patients were divided randomly into three groups. Each group comprising of ten patients were subjected to one of the three modalities of treatment namely cryosurgery, diode laser or CO2 laser surgery for ablation of OL. Obtained data was analyzed using mainly using Chi-square and Anova tests. Study showed statistical significant differences (p > 0.05) for evaluation parameters like pain, edema and scar. The parameters like infection, recurrence, bleeding showed no statistical significance. Pain was significantly higher in CO2 laser surgery group as compared with diode laser group. There was no recurrence observed at the end of the 6 months follow up period in all the three study groups. Observations from the study highlights that all three surgical modalities used in this study were effective for treatment of OL, and the overall summation of the results of the study showed that laser therapy (CO2 and Diode) seems to offer better clinically significant results than cryotherapy. Key words:Oral premalignant lesion, leukoplakia, cryosurgery, CO2 laser surgery, diode laser surgery.

  5. Compact laser diode drivers for military rangefinder applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, D.; Philippbar, J.

    2010-04-01

    Compact and high current laser diode drivers for pumping solid-state lasers have been developed and tested. Designed to operate from a single DL123 battery or equivalent, the OptiSwitch PLDD-150-1-1 delivers 150 A of peak current for 300 μs to a laser diode bar at a 1 Hz repetition rate. Measuring only 2.1 × 0.75 × 0.78 inches and weighing 15.2 g, the unit is suited for man-portable target designation, rangefinding, illumination, and remote sensing applications. This paper will discuss the design philosophy behind this class of drivers which offer peak currents up to 200 A plus lifetime testing of eight drivers all operating at elevated input voltage and temperature at 4.5 Hz for 10M shots without a single failure or degradation in performance. Lastly, temperature testing down to -40 degC will be discussed.

  6. Small core fiber coupled 60-W laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernie, Douglas P.; Mannonen, Ilkka; Raven, Anthony L.

    1995-05-01

    Semiconductor laser diodes are compact, efficient and reliable sources of laser light and 25 W fiber coupled systems developed by Diomed have been in clinical use for over three years. For certain applications, particularly in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia and flexible endoscopy, higher powers are desirable. In these applications the use of flexible optical fibers of no more than 600 micrometers core diameter is essential for compatibility with most commercial delivery fibers and instrumentation. A high power 60 W diode laser system for driving these small core fibers has been developed. The design requirements for medical applications are analyzed and system performance and results of use in gastroenterology and urology with small core fibers will be presented.

  7. Utilization of pulsed diode lasers to lidar remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penchev, S.; Pencheva, Vasilka H.; Naboko, Vassily N.; Naboko, Sergei V.; Simeonov, P.

    2001-04-01

    Investigation of new aspects of application of pulsed quantum well (In)GaAs/AlGaAs diode lasers to atmospheric spectroscopy and lidar remote sensing is reported. The presented method utilizing these powerful multichipstack diode lasers of broad radiation line is approved theoretically and experimentally for monitoring of atmospheric humidity. Molecular absorption of gas species in the investigated spectral band 0.85 - 0.9 micrometer implemented by laser technology initiates further development of prospective DIAL analysis. A mobile lidar system is realized, employing optimal photodetection based on computer-operated boxcar and adaptive digital filter processing of the lidar signal in the analytical system. Aerosol profile exhibiting cloud strata in open atmosphere by testing of the sensor is demonstrative of the efficiency and high sensitivity of long-range sounding.

  8. High-power diode lasers and their direct industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loosen, Peter; Treusch, Hans-Georg; Haas, C. R.; Gardenier, U.; Weck, Manfred; Sinnhoff, V.; Kasperowski, S.; vor dem Esche, R.

    1995-04-01

    The paper summarizes activities of the two Fraunhofer-Institutes ILT and IPT concerning the development of high-power laser-diode stacks and their direct industrial applications. With microchannel coolers in copper technology and ultra-precision machined micro-optics a stack of 330 - 400 W total power with a maximum intensity of the focused beam of 2 104 W/cm2 has been built and tested in first applications. By further improvements of the lens-fabrication and -alignment technology as well as increase of the number of stacked diodes an output power in the kW-range and intensities up to about 105 W/cm2 shall be achieved in the near future. Applications of such laser sources in surface technology, in the processing of plastics, in laser-assisted machining and in brazing are discussed.

  9. Circular polarization emission from an external cavity diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Xu, Jian; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Zhu, Ting; Pursel, Sean M.; Horn, Mark W.

    2008-03-01

    An external cavity diode laser (ECDL) containing a chiral sculptured-thin-film (STF) mirror for very pure circularly polarized (CP) emission was fabricated and its single-mode, left-handed CP lasing performance was observed. The extinction ratio of the CP output was found to increase rapidly near the threshold of the injection current for the laser diode. The Jones-matrix representation of a chiral STF mirror was used to calculate the eigenstates in the external cavity of the ECDL with the transfer matrix method, the results suggesting that the only resonant mode in the external cavity of the laser is CP with the same handedness as the structural handedness of the chiral STF mirror.

  10. Research and development for improved lead-salt diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    A substantial increase in output power levels for lead-salt diode lasers, through the development of improved fabrication methods, as demonstrated. The goal of 1 mW of CW, single-mode, single-ended power output, was achieved, with exceptional devices exhibiting values greater than 8 mW. It was found that the current tuning rate could be controlled by adjusting the p-n junction depth, allowing the tuning rate to be optimized for particular applications. An unexpected phenomenon was encountered when crystal composition was observed to be significantly altered by annealing at temperatures as low as 600 C; the composition was changed by transport of material through the vapor phase. This effect caused problems in obtaining diode lasers with the desired operating characteristics. It was discovered that the present packaging method introduces gross damaging effects in the laser crystal through pressure applied by the C-bend.

  11. Oxygen measurement by multimode diode lasers employing gas correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xiutao; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2009-02-10

    Multimode diode laser (MDL)-based correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC) was used to measure oxygen in ambient air, thereby employing a diode laser (DL) having an emission spectrum that overlaps the oxygen absorption lines of the A band. A sensitivity of 700 ppm m was achieved with good accuracy (2%) and linearity (R(2)=0.999). For comparison, measurements of ambient oxygen were also performed by tunable DL absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technique employing a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. We demonstrate that, despite slightly degraded sensitivity, the MDL-based COSPEC-based oxygen sensor has the advantages of high stability, low cost, ease-of-use, and relaxed requirements in component selection and instrument buildup compared with the TDLAS-based instrument.

  12. Quantity change in collagen following 830-nm diode laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; O'Callaghan, David; Rouy, Simone; Godlewski, Guilhem; Prudhomme, Michel

    1996-12-01

    The actual mechanism for production of laser welding of tissue is presently unknown, but collagen plays an important role is tissue welded after laser irradiance. The quantity change in collagen extracted from the abdominal aorta of Wistar rats after tissue welding using an 830 nm diode laser was investigated. The collagen contents following repeated pepsin digestion after acetic acid extraction were determined with Sircol collagen assay. Compared with untreated aorta, the collagen content of the treated vessel was obvious decreased immediately after laser irradiation and following an initial increase on day 3, there was a peak at day 10. The results suggest that a part of collagen molecules is denatured by the heat of laser. There is an effect of stimulating collagen synthesis after laser welding with parameters used in this study.

  13. Two-Pass, Diode-Pumped Nd:YAG Slab Laser Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry

    1992-01-01

    Neodymium/yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) ring-laser head designed for compactness, simplicity, and increased efficiency for side pumping by diode lasers. Laser head includes two linear arrays of diode lasers, two fused-silica collimating rods, and Nd:YAG slab. Slab mounted on finned copper block, providing good thermal dissipation.

  14. Infrared laser diode with visible illuminator for biomedical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strek, Wieslaw; Podbielska, Halina; Szafranski, C.; Kuzmin, Andrei N.; Ges, J. A.; Ryabtsev, Gennadii I.

    1995-02-01

    The special laser diode device (LDD) leasing in the near infrared region (IR) with two wavelengths: (lambda) 1 equals 850 nm and (lambda) 2 equals 1000 nm, designed for laser therapy, is presented. This device is characterized by a unique feature, namely a separate built-in illuminator, operating in 670 nm. The special construction of LDD and the illuminator enables the user to visualize exactly the surface irradiated by IR radiation. The exposure time and the output of laser power are also controlled and can be displayed on the LED monitor at the front panel. This new device, described here, is compact, low cost, and user friendly.

  15. Diode Laser Optically Injected by Resonance of a Monolithic Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yu; Zhao, Yang; Li, Ye; Yang, Tao; Cao, Jian-Ping; Fang, Zhan-Jun; Zang, Er-Jun

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate a self-injection locking extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) using resonant optical feedback from the p-polarization of a monolithic folded Fabry—Perot parallel cavity (MFC). The full width at half maximum of the MFC resonance is 31 MHz. With the help of a narrow-linewidth reference laser, the linewidth of the ECDL is measured to be about 7 kHz. The frequency of the laser could be tuned at 160 MHz with an amplitude of 40 V by a PZT mounted on the monolithic cavity and the voltage tuning coefficient is about 4 MHz/V.

  16. Polarization control in ridge-waveguide-laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, M.

    1987-04-20

    The polarization dependence of the gain/current relation and threshold current of quasi-index-guided laser diodes is analyzed for the case of lambda = 1.3 ..mu..m InGaAsP-InP ridge-waveguide lasers. Thereby it is shown that three different regimes for the stripe width and the lateral effective index discontinuity can be distinguished where one modal polarization (TE or TM) predominates. The significance of this finding on laser design and polarization control is discussed, and a comparison is performed on experimental results.

  17. Electrically pumped ultraviolet ZnO diode lasers on Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Sheng; Olmedo, Mario; Yang, Zheng; Kong, Jieying; Liu, Jianlin

    2008-11-01

    Electrically pumped ZnO quantum well diode lasers are reported. Sb-doped p-type ZnO/Ga-doped n-type ZnO with an MgZnO/ZnO/MgZnO quantum well embedded in the junction was grown on Si by molecular beam epitaxy. The diodes emit lasing at room temperature with a very low threshold injection current density of 10 A/cm2. The lasing mechanism is exciton-related recombination and the feedback is provided by close-loop scattering from closely packed nanocolumnar ZnO grains formed on Si.

  18. Laser diode feedback interferometer for stabilization and displacement measurements.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, T; Nara, M; Mnatzakanian, S; Lee, B S; Strand, T C

    1987-03-01

    Active laser diode interferometers in which the interference signal is fed back to the diode current are investigated for Twyman-Green and self-coupling interferometers. The Twyman-Green interferometer is stabilized with a stabilization factor of more than 100. By using the feedback signal of either type of interferometer, displacement is measured in a linear scale over a dynamic range of 8-9,microm with a precision of 10-60 nm. The feedback signal vs displacement shows hysteresis and multistable behavior, in accordance with theoretical results.

  19. Frequency-comb-referenced tunable diode laser spectroscopy and laser stabilization applied to laser cooling.

    PubMed

    Fordell, Thomas; Wallin, Anders E; Lindvall, Thomas; Vainio, Markku; Merimaa, Mikko

    2014-11-01

    Laser cooling of trapped atoms and ions in optical clocks demands stable light sources with precisely known absolute frequencies. Since a frequency comb is a vital part of any optical clock, the comb lines can be used for stabilizing tunable, user-friendly diode lasers. Here, a light source for laser cooling of trapped strontium ions is described. The megahertz-level stability and absolute frequency required are realized by stabilizing a distributed-feedback semiconductor laser to a frequency comb. Simple electronics is used to lock and scan the laser across the comb lines, and comb mode number ambiguities are resolved by using a separate, saturated absorption cell that exhibits easily distinguishable hyperfine absorption lines with known frequencies. Due to the simplicity, speed, and wide tuning range it offers, the employed technique could find wider use in precision spectroscopy.

  20. Treatment of Gingival Hyperpigmentation by Diode Laser for Esthetical Purposes

    PubMed Central

    El Shenawy, Hanaa M.; Nasry, Sherine A.; Zaky, Ahmed A.; Quriba, Mohamed A. A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gingival hyperpigmentation is a common esthetical concern in patients with gummy smile or excessive gingival display. Laser ablation has been recognized recently as the most effective, pleasant and reliable technique. It has the advantage of easy handling, short treatment time, hemostasis, decontamination, and sterilization effect. AIM: In the present study we wanted to explore the efficacy of a 980 nm wavelength diode laser in gingival depigmentation clinically by using both VAS and digital imaging method as means of assessment. METHODS: Diode laser ablation was done for 15 patients who requested cosmetic therapy for melanin pigmented gums. The laser beam delivered by fiberoptic with a diameter of 320 µm, the diode laser system has 980 nm wave lengths and 3 W irradiation powers, in a continuous contact mode in all cases, the entire surface of each pigmented maxillary and mandibular gingiva that required treatment was irradiated in a single session. Clinical examination and digital image analysis were done and the patients were followed up for 3 successive months. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant change in prevalence of bleeding after treatment, as none of the cases showed any signs of bleeding 1 week, 1 month and 3 months after ablation. No statistically significant change was observed in the prevalence of swelling after treatment The VAS evaluation demonstrated that only 4 patients complained of mild pain immediately after the procedure. No pain was perceived from the patients in the rest of the follow up period. There was no statistically significant change in prevalence of pain immediately after treatment compared to pain during treatment. There was a decrease in cases with mild pain after 1 week, 1 month as well as 3 months compared to pain during treatment and immediately after treatment. CONCLUSION: Within the limitations of this study, the use of diode laser was shown to be a safe and effective treatment modality that provides

  1. Treatment of Gingival Hyperpigmentation by Diode Laser for Esthetical Purposes.

    PubMed

    El Shenawy, Hanaa M; Nasry, Sherine A; Zaky, Ahmed A; Quriba, Mohamed A A

    2015-09-15

    Gingival hyperpigmentation is a common esthetical concern in patients with gummy smile or excessive gingival display. Laser ablation has been recognized recently as the most effective, pleasant and reliable technique. It has the advantage of easy handling, short treatment time, hemostasis, decontamination, and sterilization effect. In the present study we wanted to explore the efficacy of a 980 nm wavelength diode laser in gingival depigmentation clinically by using both VAS and digital imaging method as means of assessment. Diode laser ablation was done for 15 patients who requested cosmetic therapy for melanin pigmented gums. The laser beam delivered by fiberoptic with a diameter of 320 µm, the diode laser system has 980 nm wave lengths and 3 W irradiation powers, in a continuous contact mode in all cases, the entire surface of each pigmented maxillary and mandibular gingiva that required treatment was irradiated in a single session. Clinical examination and digital image analysis were done and the patients were followed up for 3 successive months. There was a statistically significant change in prevalence of bleeding after treatment, as none of the cases showed any signs of bleeding 1 week, 1 month and 3 months after ablation. No statistically significant change was observed in the prevalence of swelling after treatment The VAS evaluation demonstrated that only 4 patients complained of mild pain immediately after the procedure. No pain was perceived from the patients in the rest of the follow up period. There was no statistically significant change in prevalence of pain immediately after treatment compared to pain during treatment. There was a decrease in cases with mild pain after 1 week, 1 month as well as 3 months compared to pain during treatment and immediately after treatment. Within the limitations of this study, the use of diode laser was shown to be a safe and effective treatment modality that provides optimal aesthetics with minimal discomfort in

  2. Integration of mode-locked diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, A. Catrina; Hou, Lianping; Marsh, John H.

    2016-03-01

    Monolithic mode-locked semiconductor lasers are attractive sources of short optical pulses with advantages over more conventional sources in compactness, robustness, performance stability, power consumption, and cost savings. The use of quantum well intermixing (QWI) to integrate passive sections and surface etched distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) into monolithic laser cavity will be described. The performance of the devices will be presented.

  3. Acousto-optic modulation in diode pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabczynski, Jan K.; Zendzian, Waldemar; Kwiatkowski, Jacek

    2007-02-01

    The main properties of acousto-optic modulators (AOM) applied in laser technology are presented and discussed in the paper. The critical review of application of AOMs in several types of diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSSL) is given. The short description of few DPSSLs developed in our group is presented in the following chapters of the paper. The parameters of a simple AO-Q-switched Nd:YVO 4 laser (peak power up to 60 kW, pulse duration of 5-15 ns, repetition rate in the range 10-100 kHz, with average power above 5 W) are satisfactory for different application as follows: higher harmonic generation, pumping of 'eye-safe' OPOs etc. The achieved brightness of 10 17 W/m2/srd is comparable to the strongest technological Q-switched lasers of kW class of average power. The main aim of paper is to present novel type of lasers with acousto-optic modulation namely: AO-q-switched and mode locked (AO-QML) lasers. We have designed the 3.69-m long Z-type resonator of the frequency matched to the RF frequency of AOM. As a gain medium the Nd:YVO 4 crystal end pumped by 20 W laser diode was applied. The energy of envelope of QML pulse train was up to 130 μJ with sub-nanosecond mode locked pulse of maximum 30-μJ energy.

  4. Present state of applying diode laser in Toyota Motor Corp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Masaki; Nakamura, Hideo

    2003-03-01

    Since the mid-1980s, Toyota Motor Corporation has applied CO2 lasers and YAG lasers to machine (welding, piercing, cutting, surface modifying etc.) automobile parts. In recent years diode lasers, which are excellent in terms of cost performance, are now available on the market as a new type of oscillator and are expected to bring about a new age in laser technology. Two current problems with these lasers, however, are the lack of sufficient output and the difficulty in improving the focusing the beam, which is why it has not been easy to apply them to the machining of metal parts in the past. On the other hand, plastics can be joined with low energy because they have a lower melting point than metal and the rate of absorption of the laser is easy to control. Moreover, because the high degree of freedom in molding plastic parts results in many complex shapes that need to be welded, Toyota is looking into the use of diode lasers to weld plastic parts. This article will introduce the problems of plastics welding and the methods to solve them referring to actual examples.

  5. Diode laser: In treatment of recurrent verrucous leukoplakia.

    PubMed

    Giri, Debanti; Agarwal, Nitin; Sinha, Abhishek; Srivastava, Sunita; Mishra, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    Laser first came into light in 1960 and had been used extensively in various fields of medicine. Laser has been experimented in the various dental field, and its utility is being recognized and established well in the dentistry. Lasers are widely used for a number of procedures such as cavity preparation, scaling, and root planning, surgical procedures like excision of soft tissue growths, etc., Improved healing, hemostasis, and sutureless excisions are some of the many advantages of laser over conventional treatment modalities. It is because of these advantages that laser is becoming more and more popular as a treatment option in various aspects of dentistry. We hereby present a case report, where we have used diode laser for surgical management of a proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (PVL), because of its many advantages over conventional methods. It presents very specific characteristics, mainly a more aggressive biological behavior than other forms of leukoplakia expressed by: A tendency toward multifocality (field cancerization); a high prospect of recurrence; and a high rate of malignant transformation, which can range between 40% and 100% in a follow-up period of 4.4-11.6 years. In this case, we evaluated the advantages of diode laser for the treatment of verrucous leukoplakia, where the results that we obtained were excellent. The patient had come for evaluation till the time of complete healing.

  6. Diode Lasers used in Plastic Welding and Selective Laser Soldering - Applications and Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinl, S.

    Aside from conventional welding methods, laser welding of plastics has established itself as a proven bonding method. The component-conserving and clean process offers numerous advantages and enables welding of sensitive assemblies in automotive, electronic, medical, human care, food packaging and consumer electronics markets. Diode lasers are established since years within plastic welding applications. Also, soft soldering using laser radiation is becoming more and more significant in the field of direct diode laser applications. Fast power controllability combined with a contactless temperature measurement to minimize thermal damage make the diode laser an ideal tool for this application. These advantages come in to full effect when soldering of increasingly small parts in temperature sensitive environments is necessary.

  7. A tunable diode laser absorption system for long path atmospheric transmission and high energy laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Christopher A.; Perram, Glen

    2011-03-01

    An open-path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) system composed of narrow band (~300 kHz) diodes fiber coupled to a 12" Ritchey-Chrétien transmit telescope has been developed to study atmospheric transmission of key High Energy Laser wavelengths. The ruggedized system has been field deployed and tested for propagation distances of greater than 1 km. Initial experiments were performed in the vicinity of molecular oxygen X3Σ-g to b1Σ+gelectronic transition lines near 760 nm. The potassium version of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) operates in between two of the sharp oxygen rotational features in the PP and the PQ branches. By scanning across many laser free spectral ranges and monitoring the laser frequency with a very precise wavemeter, the full structure of the oxygen molecular feature is observed. The device can also be used to observe rotational temperatures, oxygen concentrations, and total atmospheric pressure.

  8. Ruggedized microchannel-cooled laser diode array with self-aligned microlens

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, Barry L.; Skidmore, Jay A.

    2003-11-11

    A microchannel-cooled, optically corrected, laser diode array is fabricated by mounting laser diode bars onto Si surfaces. This approach allows for the highest thermal impedance, in a ruggedized, low-cost assembly that includes passive microlens attachment without the need for lens frames. The microlensed laser diode array is usable in all solid-state laser systems that require efficient, directional, narrow bandwidth, high optical power density pump sources.

  9. Finite-Element Simulation for Electrothermal Characterization of High-Power Diode Laser Bars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-31

    New York, 2000. [5] J.S. Blakemore . Semiconductor Statistics . Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, New York, 2002. [6] SR Chinn, PS Zory, and AR Reisinger...Simulation of semiconductor diode laser performance involves interaction between multiple physics domains. This report presents the governing equations and...diode laser, semiconductor laser, simulation, high-power diode laser, finite-element simulation Weston T. Hobdy, Jordan M. Berg, Darryl James, Ayrton

  10. Highly reliable, high-brightness 915nm laser diodes for fiber laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zuntu; Gao, Wei; Cheng, Lisen; Luo, Kejian; Shen, Kun; Mastrovito, Andre

    2008-02-01

    High brightness, high power, and highly reliable 915nm InAlGaAs laser diodes with optimized design are reported in this paper. The laser diodes exhibit excellent performance, such as, high slope efficiency, low threshold current, low voltage, etc., which make them suitable for high brightness operation. The aging test data shows no failures during aging test and more than 220,000 hours estimated lifetime for 90um emitter laser diodes at 8W CW operation. The aging test with the same emitter size at higher stress conditions showed sudden failure that corresponds to catastrophic optical damage (COD) on the facet. A novel large optical cavity (LOC) epi-structure with flat-top near field intensity distribution was developed. The maximum output power is up to 23W under CW testing condition at 25 °C, which is highest level achieved so far. The output power is limited by thermal roll over and there is no COD occurring. This data shows Axcel's technologies can further increase the brightness to over 110mW per micron for 915nm laser diodes. This type of laser diodes is essential for pumping fiber lasers to replace CO2 lasers for industry applications.

  11. Performance of high-power laser diode arrays for spaceborne lasers.

    PubMed

    Durand, Yannig; Culoma, Alain; Meynart, Roland; Pinsard, Jean-Luc; Volluet, Gerard

    2006-08-01

    The adequacy of commercial quasi-continuous high-power laser diode arrays (HPLDAs) as pump sources for spaceborne lasers has been assessed by endurance tests up to 3 x 10(9) shots under various stress conditions, vacuum operation up to 0.36 x 10(9) shots, and proton radiation tests. Observations of the evolution of the electro-optic parameters and of the near-field patterns of the HPLDAs during endurance tests have revealed that some diode bars could reach the required lifetime of a multibillion shots, suggesting how to build long lifetime HPLDAs by proper selection of the diode bars. The robustness of the HPLDAs against the proton environment experienced in a typical low Earth orbit has been checked. Finally, high-power laser diode arrays have been operated under vacuum, showing a behavior similar to that of HPLDAs operating in atmospheric conditions.

  12. Optomechanical design of the grating laser beam combiner (GLBC) laser diode header

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.; Spadin, Paul L.

    1989-01-01

    A laser diode header has been fabricated for a grating laser beam combiner (GLBC). The laser diode header provides the thermal control, the drive electronics, and the optical system necessary for proper operation of the beam combiner. The diode header is required to provide diffraction limited optical performance while providing correction for worst case defocus aberration, 0.6 mrad excess divergence, and worst case decenter aberration, 1.0 mrad pointing error. The design of the header considered the mechanical design and the optical design together resulting in a small, self-contained header with 0.7 mrad range for focus correction and +/- 2.5 mrad of beam steering. The complete diode header is currently undergoing optical and mechanical performance testing.

  13. Collimation optics for high power blue laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, M.; Forrer, H.; Wuest, P.; Moser, H.; Forrer, M.

    2017-02-01

    Similar to the well-established high power laser diodes in the infrared wavelength range, the laser diodes in the blue wavelength range require tailored optics for beam shaping, to make the light usable for a variety of applications. High power laser diode arrays or single emitters require fast and slow axis optical collimation for further transport or photonics applications using high power laser radiation. With increasing requirements in higher brightness for slow axis collimation different engineering solutions exist. By using novel production technologies, e.g. precision molding, approaches that were considered too expensive for mass production become available to broad application fields. Here we report about the benefits of molded refractive, freeform slow axis collimation optics and compare them to the ubiquitous standard circular cylindrical, as well as acircular cylindrical slow axis collimation optics. By using refractive free form slow axis collimation optics it is possible to achieve significantly better brightness compared to circular cylindrical or acircular cylindrical slow axis collimation optics.

  14. [Endonasal and endocanalicular dacryocystorhinostomy by diode laser. Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Alañón Fernández, M A; Alañón Fernández, F J; Martínez Fernández, A; Cárdenas Lara, M; Rodríguez Domínguez, R; Ballesteros Navarro, J M; Sainz Quevedo, M

    2004-04-01

    To describe the surgical technique and to evaluate the clinical results after having performed the transcanalicular and endocanalicular dacryocystorhinostomies by diode laser, including the advantages and limits of this technique. 34 were performed by diode laser in patients with clinical history of epiphora, with or without mucopurulent secretion, for nasolacrimal duct obstruction. The study was prospective, interventional, non randomized and non comparative. Diode laser was used to realize vaporization of lacrimal sac, osteotomy and vaporization with coagulation of nasal mucosa. The mean of surgical time was 15 minutes (range 7 to 29 minutes). Bicanalicular intubation was performed with a silicone tube and prolene filament for two months in all cases. Postsurgical follow-up was between 4 and 11 months. The degree of epiphora was evaluated by the Munk scale and lacrimal permeability was evaluated by endoscopic functional staining test in all cases. Out of the 34 DCR-EDN+ENC that were performed, 32 cases (94.11%) remain asymptomatic. Two of them (5.88%) required endonasal dacryocystorhinostomies by drilling, because the bony perforation was impossible to achieve by laser fiber. Two cases (5.88%) presented fibrosis and lacrimal and lower canaliculi obstruction, without epiphora because the superior canaliculi was permeable. Endonasal and endocanalicular dacryocystorhinostomy technique performed by diode laser is a valid method. It does not cause cutaneous scarring, it decreases thermic canalicular damage, it respects the lacrimal pump, it minimizes pain and bleeding, it needs less surgical time and it has turned into an out-patient procedure with a minimal surgical and postsurgical morbility.

  15. Treatment of genital lesions with diode laser vaporization.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Mário Maciel; de Lima, Mário Maciel; Granja, Fabiana

    2015-05-08

    Genital warts caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection are the most common sexually transmitted disease leading to anogential lesions. Although the laser therapy has been shown to be effective in a number of conditions, the use of laser diode vaporization in urological applications and the understanding on its effectiveness as a treatment for various urological conditions is limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of diode laser vaporization as a treatment for genital lesions. Patients presenting with genital lesions at the urology outpatient clinic at Coronel Mota Hospital, between March 2008 and October 2014, were enrolled into the study. Data collected included age, gender, duration of the lesion, site of the lesion and numbers of the lesions, length of follow-up, recurrence of lesions after treatment and whether there were any complications. A total of 92 patients were enrolled in the study; 92.4% (n = 85) male; mean age (± SD) 27.92 ± 8.272 years. The patients presented with a total of 296 lesions, with a median of 3 lesions each, including penis (n = 78), urethra (n = 4) lesions, and scrotum (n = 2) lesions. Lesions ranged in size from 0.1 to 0.5 cm(2), most commonly 0.3 cm(2) (n = 38; 41.3%), 0.4 cm(2) (n = 21; 22.8%) or 0.5 cm(2) (n = 20; 21.7%). Patients most commonly reported that they had their lesions for a duration of 12 (n = 29; 31.5%) or 6 months (n = 23; 25.0%). Eighteen patients (19.6%) had a recurrence after their 1(st)/conventional treatment. There were no incidences of post-operative infection or complications from the laser diode vaporization. Laser diode vaporization can be considered as an alternative method for treating genital lesions in urology, with satisfactory results in terms of pain, aesthetic and minimal recurrence.

  16. Synergistic skin heat shock protein expression in response to combined laser treatment with a diode laser and ablative fractional lasers.

    PubMed

    Paasch, Uwe; Sonja, Grunewald; Haedersdal, Merete

    2014-06-01

    Diode laser-based skin heating has been shown to minimise scars by interfering with wound healing responses through the induction of heat shock proteins (HSP). HSP are also induced after ablative fractional laser (AFXL) wound healing. AFXL itself is highly recommended for scar treatment. Therefore, the sequential combination of both modalities may produce superior outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine the pretreatment effects of a diode laser before AFXL on wound healing responses in terms of HSP up-regulation in an in vitro model. Immediate responses and responses on days 1, 3 or 6 post-procedure were studied in an in vitro porcine skin model (n = 240). Untreated samples served as control. Immunohistochemical investigation (Hsp70) was performed in all untreated controls, diode laser-, AFXL-, and in diode laser + AFXL-treated samples. Hsp70 was shown to be up-regulated by all interventions between days 1 and 6 after interventions. The largest effect was caused by the combination of a diode laser and an AFXL procedure. Diode laser exposure induces a skin HSP response that can be further enhanced by sequential AFXL treatment. Clinical studies are necessary to investigate the dose response of HSP on scar formation and refine suitable laser exposure settings.

  17. Off-line-locked laser diode species monitor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jamine (Inventor); Goldstein, Neil (Inventor); Richtsmeier, Steven (Inventor); Bien, Fritz (Inventor); Gersh, Michael (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An off-line-locked laser diode species monitor system includes: reference means for including at least one known species having a first absorption wavelength; a laser source for irradiating the reference means and at least one sample species having a second absorption wavelength differing from the first absorption wavelength by a predetermined amount; means for locking the wavelength of the laser source to the first wavelength of the at least one known species in the reference means; a controller for defeating the means for locking and for displacing the laser source wavelength from said first absorption wavelength by said predetermined amount to the second absorption wavelength; and a sample detector device for determining laser radiation absorption at the second wavelength transmitted through the sample to detect the presence of the at least one sample species.

  18. Packaging of hard solder 500W QCW diode laser array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingwei; Hou, Dong; Nie, Zhiqiang; Liu, Xingsheng

    2016-03-01

    The package structure critically influences the major characteristics of diode laser, such as thermal behavior, output power, wavelength and smile effect. In this work, a novel micro channel cooler (MCC) for stack array laser with good heat dissipation capability and high reliability is presented. Numerical simulations of thermal management with different MCC structure are conducted and analyzed. Based on this new MCC packaging structure, a series of QCW 500W high power laser arrays with hard solder packaging technology has been fabricated. The performances of the laser arrays are characterized. A narrow spectrum of 3.12 nm and an excellent smile value are obtained. The lifetime of the laser array is more than 1.38×109 shots and still ongoing.

  19. New ytterbium-phosphate glass for diode-pumped lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Galagan, B I; Glushchenko, I N; Denker, B I; Sverchkov, S E; Kisel', V E; Kuril'chik, S V; Kuleshov, N V

    2009-10-31

    A new ytterbium laser glass based on an alumoborophosphate composition is developed. It is shown that the chemical and thermal stabilities of this glass are record-high for phosphate glasses and that its spectral and luminescent characteristics compare well with popular laser glasses. A mould of laser-quality glass doped with ytterbium with a concentration of 5x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} is synthesised. Active laser elements 5x5x2 mm in size are prepared from this glass for longitudinal diode pumping. These elements were used to fabricate a laser, whose output power in the cw regime reached 783 mW and maximum slope efficiency was 28.9%. Pulses with a duration of {approx}150 fs and a peak power of about 5 kW are obtained in the passive mode-locking regime. (active media)

  20. Preliminary experiences on diode laser welding of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reali, Umberto M.; Borgognoni, L.; Martini, L.; Chiarugi, C.; Gori, F.; Pini, Roberto; Toncelli, F.; Vanni, U.

    1994-12-01

    Dye enhanced laser welding has been recently proposed for skin closures to exploit the advantages of laser procedure (possible reduction of scar formation, no inflammatory reaction). In this preliminary study we used the diode laser-assisted technique to perform welding of rats' skin. In the pilot phase of the study we investigated the effect of the interaction between diode laser radiation and 20 full thickness skin wounds, performed on the shaved backs of 10 Wistar rats, using laser power in the range of 200 - 150 mW and, as the photoenhancing chromophore, Indocyanine Cardio-green (ICG) dye saturated solution in plasma. Ten wounds were sutured with 4.0 nylon thread, to provide a comparison with the traditional procedure. Wounds' samples were explanted on day 3 and 7 after the treatment, for histological evaluation. Clinical examination on the same days showed a high percentage of wounds dehiscence and presence of scales and crusts. Histologic examination demonstrated evidence of thermal injury and a heightened inflammation, superior to that of suture closures. In the second phase of the study, a lower laser power (150 - 80 mW), ICG-plasma-non saturated solution (ICG-sol) and ICG-plasma-saturated-sodium hyaluronate gel (ICG-gel), were used. Six wounds were filled with ICG-sol and six with ICG-gel, then irradiated at 150, 120 and 80 mW. Postoperative explants were performed on day 3 and 7. Clinical and histological results from this group were satisfactory: we recorded only one case of dehiscence, well healed wounds, no epidermal necrosis and a mild inflammatory reaction, reduced respect to that of traditional closure. We characterized the optimum range of parameters of diode laser-assisted technique to achieve an effective skin welding and the corresponding clinical and histologic pattern was described.

  1. Biostimulation with diode laser positively regulates cementoblast functions, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Serife Buket; Hakki, Erdogan E; Kayis, Seyit Ali; Dundar, Niyazi; Hakki, Sema S

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of diode laser biostimulation on cementoblasts (OCCM.30). A total of 40 root plates were obtained from healthy third molar teeth and assigned to the following two groups: (1) control group and (2) laser-treated group. Root plates were placed into the cell culture inserts, and OCCM.30 cells were seeded onto root plates. Cells were irradiated with a low level of diode laser (power: 0.3 W in continuous wave, 60 s/cm(2)). Proliferation and mineralized tissue-associated gene's and BMP's messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of cementoblasts were evaluated. Total RNAs were isolated on day 3 and integrin-binding sialoprotein (Ibsp), bone gamma-carboxyglutamate protein (Bglap), Type I collagen (Col1a1), osteoblastic transcription factor, runt-related transcription factor (Runx2), and Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP)-2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 mRNA expressions were determined using quantitative RT-PCR. von Kossa staining was performed to evaluate biomineralization of OCCM.30 cells. In the proliferation experiment, while there was no significant difference until 96 h, laser irradiation retarded the decrease in cell proliferation trend after 96 h compared to the untreated control group. Statistically significant increase in Ibsp, Bglap, and BMP-2,3,6,7 mRNA expressions were noted in the laser groups when compared to the untreated control group (p < 0.05). Laser irradiation induced mineralized nodule formation of cementoblasts. The results of this study reveal that the biostimulation setting of diode laser modulates the behavior of cementoblasts inducing mineralized tissue-associated gene's mRNA expressions and mineralization. Therefore, biostimulation can be used during regenerative periodontal therapies to trigger cells with periodontal attachment apparatus.

  2. Advances in tunable diode laser technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, W.

    1980-01-01

    The improvement of long-term reliability, the purification of mode properties, and the achievement of higher-temperature operation were examined. In reliability studies a slow increase in contact resistance during room temperature storage for lasers fabricated with In-Au or In-Pt contacts was observed. This increase is actually caused by the diffusion of In into the surface layer of laser crystals. By using a three layered structure of In-Au-Pt or In-Pt-Au, this mode of degradation was reduced. In characterizing the mode properties, it was found that the lasers emit in a highly localized, filamentary manner. For widestripe lasers the emission occurs near the corners of the junction. In order to achieve single-mode operation, stripe widths on the order of 8-10 micrometers are needed. Also, it was found that room temperature electroluminescence is possible near 4.6 micrometers.

  3. C. W. GaAs Diode Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    smooth but were wavy. The diffusion , however, was extremely irregular with the diffusion depth varying by a factor of two along the junction. The total...10. II. 12. 13. 14. IS. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. Titk Page Zinc- Diffused Single...threshold currents and high slope efficiencies. Previous work on 77° K CW lasers concentrated on diffused homostructure lasers.1 In this program, work

  4. Diode laser photocoagulation in PHACES syndrome hemangiomas: a case series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, U.; Russo, N.; Polimeni, A.; Favia, G.; Lacaita, M. G.; Limongelli, L.; Franco, S.

    2014-01-01

    PHACES syndrome is a pediatric syndrome with cutaneous and extra-cutaneous manifestations, such as Posterior fossa defects, Hemangiomas, Arterial lesions, Cardiac abnormalities/aortic coarctation, Eye abnormalities and Sternal cleft. Facial hemangiomas affect the 75% of patients and may arise on the oral mucosa or perioral cutaneous regions. In this study we treated 26 Intraoral Haemangiomas (IH) and 15 Perioral Haemangiomas (PH) with diode laser photocoagulation using a laser of 800+/-10nm of wavelength. For IH treatment an optical fiber of 320 μm was used, and the laser power was set ted at 4 W (t-on 200 ms / t-off 400ms; fluence: 995 J/cm2). For PH treatment an optical fiber of 400 μm at the power of 5 W was used (t-on 100 ms / t-off 300 ms; fluence: 398 J/cm2). IH healed after one session (31%), the other (69%) after two sessions of Laser therapy. In each session, only a limited area of the PH was treated, obtaining a progressive improvement of the lesion. Diode laser photocoagulation is an effective option of treatment for IH and PH in patients affected by PHACE because of its minimal invasiveness. Moreover laser photocoagulation doesn't have side effects and can be performed repeatedly without cumulative toxicity. Nevertheless, more studies are required to evaluate the effectiveness of the therapy in mid and long time period.

  5. 980nm diode laser pump modules operating at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Jenna; Semenic, Tadej; Leisher, Paul; Bhunia, Avijit; Mashanovitch, Milan; Renner, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Existing thermal management technologies for diode laser pumps place a significant load on the size, weight and power consumption of High Power Solid State and Fiber Laser systems, thus making current laser systems very large, heavy, and inefficient in many important practical applications. This problem is being addressed by the team formed by Freedom Photonics and Teledyne Scientific through the development of novel high power laser chip array architectures that can operate with high efficiency when cooled with coolants at temperatures higher than 50 degrees Celsius and also the development of an advanced thermal management system for efficient heat extraction from the laser chip array. This paper will present experimental results for the optical, electrical and thermal characteristics of 980 nm diode laser pump modules operating effectively with liquid coolant at temperatures above 50 degrees Celsius, showing a very small change in performance as the operating temperature increases from 20 to 50 degrees Celsius. These pump modules can achieve output power of many Watts per array lasing element with an operating Wall-Plug-Efficiency (WPE) of >55% at elevated coolant temperatures. The paper will also discuss the technical approach that has enabled this high level of pump module performance and opportunities for further improvement.

  6. Calibration of diode laser spectra using a confocal etalon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The dual-beam diode laser spectrometer described by Jennings (1980) is adapted to use a 50-cm confocal etalon for frequency calibration. The collimated radiation from the laser is split at a wedged ZnSe window, and the reference beam is then focused at the midpoint of the etalon length. After the etalon, the reference beam is recollimated and continues its regular path to the monochromator and detectors. An aperture is placed before the etalon in order to limit the entrance beam diameter to approximately 5 mm. Both ends of the etalon are furnished with two-axis adjustments. Initial alignment is achieved using an He-Ne laser, and final optimization involves adjustment of the cavity length as well as the etalon pitch and yaw. The 50-cm confocal etalon produces fringes separated by 150 MHz (0.005/cm). With the aid of a CO2 laser, it is found to have fringe widths (FWHM) of 2 MHz. The confocal etalon makes it possible to improve the accuracy of relative frequency measurements in diode laser spectra and to check the spectral purity and stability of the laser during the recording of spectra.

  7. Polarization competition in quasi-index-guided laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, M.; Stegmueller, B.

    1988-03-15

    The mechanism of polarization competition in laser diodes with a lateral quasi-index-guiding (QIG) structure is analyzed generally by way of the effective index approximation using a simplified QIG laser model. The influence of the relevant waveguide parameters on the polarization-dependent threshold current of QIG laser diodes is investigated in detail by example of lambda = 1.3-..mu..m ridge-waveguide lasers. Thereby, it is found that for intermediate values of the effective index step, the TM mode exhibits a higher gain and lower threshold current, whereas for pure gain guiding or strong index guiding, the TE mode prevails. This behavior, which compares excellently to published experimental results, is proven as a basic feature of the two-dimensional waveguiding mechanism in QIG devices. Accordingly, the effect of stress-induced anisotropy of the optical gain has been found to be of minor importance as the origin for TM-polarized QIG lasers made from lattice-matched heterostructures. It is further demonstrated that, for certain device parameters, the QIG lasers with a small effective index step exhibit somewhat higher threshold currents than the purely gain-guided devices of identical geometry.

  8. Optimization of rod diameter in solid state lasers side pumped with multiple laser diode arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Newton, Jr.; Chamblee, Christyl M.; Barnes, Norman P.; Lockard, George E.; Cross, Patricia L.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study to determine the optimum laser rod diameter for maximum output energy in a solid state neodymium laser transversely pumped with multiple laser diode arrays are reported here. Experiments were performed with 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm and 2.0 mm rod radii of both neodymium doped Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) and La2Be2O5 (Nd:BeL) pumped with laser diode arrays having a maximum combined energy of 10.5 mJ. Equations were derived which predict the optimum rod radius and corresponding output mirror reflectivity for a given laser material and total pump energy. Predictions of the equations agreed well with the experiments for each of the laser materials which possessed significantly different laser properties from one another.

  9. V-shaped resonators for addition of broad-area laser diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bo; Liu, Yun; Braiman, Yehuda Y.

    2012-12-25

    A system and method for addition of broad-area semiconductor laser diode arrays are described. The system can include an array of laser diodes, a V-shaped external cavity, and grating systems to provide feedback for phase-locking of the laser diode array. A V-shaped mirror used to couple the laser diode emissions along two optical paths can be a V-shaped prism mirror, a V-shaped stepped mirror or include multiple V-shaped micro-mirrors. The V-shaped external cavity can be a ring cavity. The system can include an external injection laser to further improve coherence and phase-locking.

  10. The study of laser beam riding guided system based on 980nm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhou; Xu, Haifeng; Sui, Xin; Yang, Kun

    2015-10-01

    With the development of science and technology, precision-strike weapons has been considered to be important for winning victory in military field. Laser guidance is a major method to execute precision-strike in modern warfare. At present, the problems of primary stage of Laser guidance has been solved with endeavors of countries. Several technical aspects of laser-beam riding guided system have been mature, such as atmosphere penetration of laser beam, clutter inhibition on ground, laser irradiator, encoding and decoding of laser beam. Further, laser beam quality, equal output power and atmospheric transmission properties are qualified for warfare situation. Riding guidance instrument is a crucial element of Laser-beam riding guided system, and is also a vital element of airborne, vehicle-mounted and individual weapon. The optical system mainly consist of sighting module and laser-beam guided module. Photoelectric detector is the most important sensing device of seeker, and also the key to acquire the coordinate information of target space. Currently, in consideration of the 1.06 u m of wavelength applied in all the semi-active laser guided weapons systems, lithium drifting silicon photodiode which is sensitive to 1.06 u m of wavelength is used in photoelectric detector. Compared to Solid and gas laser, diode laser has many merits such as small volume, simple construction, light weight, long life, low lost and easy modulation. This article introduced the composition and operating principle of Laser-beam riding guided system based on 980 nm diode laser, and made a analysis of key technology; for instance, laser irradiator, modulating disk of component, laser zooming system. Through the use of laser diode, Laser-beam riding guided system is likely to have smaller shape and very light.

  11. Diode laser vaporisation of the prostate vs. diode laser under cold irrigation: A randomised control trial.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Ravisankar G; Al Naieb, Ziad; Angamuthu, Stephen; Mundackal, Tintu

    2014-12-01

    To compare the perioperative morbidity and early follow-up after diode laser vaporisation of the prostate (LVP) and its modification, diode laser under cold irrigation (LUCI) in patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia, as the main disadvantages of LVP are the postoperative pain, dysuria and storage urinary symptoms. This was a single-centre prospective randomised control trial in which 100 patients were randomised to receive LVP (50) or LUCI (50) from June 2011 until July 2012. LUCI is similar to LVP except that it is done under normal irrigation with saline at 4 °C instead of saline at room temperature. The primary outcome measures were the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), IPSS-Dysuria, a pain scale (PS), maximum flow rate (Q max), a quality-of-life (QoL) score and the postvoid residual urine volume (PVR) after 1 month, then the IPSS, Q max, QoL, and PVR at 3 and 12 months. Secondary outcomes included intraoperative surgical variables, e.g., the decline in core temperature, bleeding, peri- and postoperative morbidity. The baseline characteristics of both groups were similar. For the primary outcome measures, there was a statistically significant difference between the groups in all variables except Q max after 1 month, in favour of LUCI. The mean (SD) IPSS at 1 month in the LVP group was 8.97 (1.68), statistically significantly different from that after LUCI, of 6.89 (1.5) (P < 0.05). The mean IPSS-Dysuria at 1 month was also significantly, at -2.32 (0.91) for LVP and 3.54 (1.07) for LUCI (P < 0.05). The respective mean PS at 1 month was 7.84 (2.92) and 5.7 (2.1) (P < 0.05). The QoL and PVR at 1 month were also significantly different. Within the first month 17% of patients in the LVP group and 4% in the LUCI group complained of transient urgency or stress incontinence, and this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). There was no significant bleeding in either group. The mean operative time or applied

  12. Laser diode self-mixing technique for liquid velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrova, A.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-09-01

    Using the self-mixing technique, or optical feedback interferometry, fluid velocity measurements of water seeded with titanium dioxide have been performed using a laser diode to measure the effect of the seeding particle concentration and also the pump speed of the flow. The velocimeter utilises commercially available laser diodes with a built-in photodiode for detection of the self-mixing effect. The device has demonstrated an accuracy better than 10% for liquid flow velocities up to 1.5 m/s with a concentration of scattering particles in the range of 0.8-0.03%. This is an improvement of one order of magnitude compared to previous experiments. The proposed velocimeter is to be developed further for application in gas-jet measurements.

  13. Diode laser based water vapor DIAL using modulated pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Phong Le Hoai; Abo, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a diode laser based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for measuring lower-tropospheric water vapor profile using the modulated pulse technique. The transmitter is based on single-mode diode laser and tapered semiconductor optical amplifier with a peak power of 10W around 800nm absorption band, and the receiver telescope diameter is 35cm. The selected wavelengths are compared to referenced wavelengths in terms of random error and systematic errors. The key component of modulated pulse technique, a macropulse, is generated with a repetition rate of 10 kHz, and the modulation within the macropulse is coded according to a pseudorandom sequence with 100ns chip width. As a result, we evaluate both single pulse modulation and pseudorandom coded pulse modulation technique. The water vapor profiles conducted from these modulation techniques are compared to the real observation data in summer in Japan.

  14. Use of laser diodes in cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zare, R.N.; Paldus, B.A.; Ma, Y.; Xie, J.

    1997-12-31

    We have demonstrated that cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), a highly sensitive absorption technique, is versatile enough to serve as a complete diagnostic for materials process control. In particular, we have used CRDS in the ultraviolet to determine the concentration profile of methyl radicals in a hot-filament diamond reactor; we have applied CRDS in the mid-infrared to detect 50 ppb of methane in a N{sub 2} environment; and, we have extended CRDS so that we can use continuous-wave diode laser sources. Using a laser diode at 810 nm, we were able to achieve a sensitivity of 2 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup -1}. Thus, CRDS can be used not only as an in situ diagnostic for investigating the chemistry of diamond film deposition, but it can also be used as a gas purity diagnostic for any chemical vapor deposition system.

  15. Tunable diode laser spectroscopy as a technique for combustion diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshov, M. A.; Kuritsyn, Yu. A.; Romanovskii, Yu. V.

    2015-04-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) has become a proven method of rapid gas diagnostics. In the present review an overview of the state of the art of TDL-based sensors and their applications for measurements of temperature, pressure, and species concentrations of gas components in harsh environments is given. In particular, the contemporary tunable diode laser systems, various methods of absorption detection (direct absorption measurements, wavelength modulation based phase sensitive detection), and relevant algorithms for data processing that improve accuracy and accelerate the diagnostics cycle are discussed in detail. The paper demonstrates how the recent developments of these methods and algorithms made it possible to extend the functionality of TDLAS in the tomographic imaging of combustion processes. Some prominent examples of applications of TDL-based sensors in a wide range of practical combustion aggregates, including scramjet engines and facilities, internal combustion engines, pulse detonation combustors, and coal gasifiers, are given in the final part of the review.

  16. Laser diode pumped 106 mW blue upconversion fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, S.; Waarts, R. G.; Mehuys, D. G.; Welch, D. F.

    1995-09-01

    A laser diode pumped Tm3+-doped ZBLAN fiber upconversion laser is demonstrated with blue output power levels up to 106 mW. Differential optical-to-optical conversion efficiencies up to 30% are measured with respect to pump power coupled into the upconversion fiber. A single spatial mode blue output beam is demonstrated, with an M2 value of 1.4.

  17. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SEMICONDUCTOR INJECTION LASERS SELCO-87: Surface effects in laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beister, G.; Maege, J.; Richter, G.

    1988-11-01

    Changes in the current-voltage characteristics below the threshold current were observed in gain-guided stripe laser diodes after preliminary lasing. This effect was not fully understood. Similar changes in the laser characteristics appeared as a result of etching in a gaseous medium. The observed changes were attributed tentatively to surface currents.

  18. High power, high efficiency, 2D laser diode arrays for pumping solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, A.; McShea, J.C.; Bogdan, A.R.; Petheram, J.C.; Rosen, A.

    1987-11-01

    This document reports the current performance of 2D laser diode arrays operating at 770 nm and 808 nm for pumping promethium and neodymium solid state lasers, respectively. Typical power densities are in excess of 2kw/cm/sup 2/ with overall efficiencies greater than 30%.

  19. A Comparative Study of Enamel Surface Roughness After Bleaching With Diode Laser and Nd: YAG Laser.

    PubMed

    Mirzaie, Mansoreh; Yassini, Esmaiel; Ganji, Saber; Moradi, Zohreh; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Bleaching process can affect surface roughness of enamel, which is a vital factor in esthetic and resistance of tooth. The aim of this study was to compare surface roughness of enamel in teeth bleached using Diode and Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd: YAG) lasers with those bleached using conventional method. Methods: In this study, 75 anterior human teeth from upper and lower jaws (These teeth extracted because of periodontal disease) were randomly divided into 5 groups. Group 1: Laser white gel (Biolase, USA) with 45% hydrogen peroxide concentration and GaAlAs Diode laser (CHEESE(TM), GIGAA, China), group 2: Heydent gel (JW, Germany) with 30% Hydrogen peroxide concentration and Diode laser, group 3: Laser white gel and Nd:YAG laser (FIDELIS(TM), Fotona, Slovenia), group 4: Heydent gel and Nd:YAG laser and group 5: The Iranian gel Kimia (Iran) with 35% hydrogen peroxide concentration were used. Surface roughness of the samples was measured using the Surface Roughness Tester system (TR 200 Time Group, Germany) before and after bleaching. In each group, one sample was randomly selected for SEM analysis. Results: The results showed that the mean surface roughness of the teeth before and after bleaching had a significant difference in all the study groups. It was indicated that after bleaching, the mean surface roughness had increased in all the study groups. The highest surface roughness was seen in the conventional bleaching group and the lowest surface roughness was reported in group 3 (laser white gel + diode laser), in which the average surface roughness increased by only 0.1 μm. Conclusion: It was concluded that using the Laser white gel and the diode laser for bleaching resulted in the least surface roughness compared to conventional method.

  20. Four-Pass Coupler for Laser-Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, Donald B.

    2008-01-01

    A four-pass optical coupler affords increased (in comparison with related prior two-pass optical couplers) utilization of light generated by a laser diode in side pumping of a solid-state laser slab. The original application for which this coupler was conceived involves a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) crystal slab, which, when pumped by a row of laser diodes at a wavelength of 809 nm, lases at a wavelength of 1,064 nm. Heretofore, typically, a thin laser slab has been pumped in two passes, the second pass occurring by virtue of reflection of pump light from a highly reflective thin film on the side opposite the side through which the pump light enters. In two-pass pumping, a Nd:YAG slab having a thickness of 2 mm (which is typical) absorbs about 84 percent of the 809-nm pump light power, leaving about 16 percent of the pump light power to travel back toward the laser diodes. This unused power can cause localized heating of the laser diodes, thereby reducing their lifetimes. Moreover, if the slab is thinner than 2 mm, then even more unused power travels back toward the laser diodes. The four-pass optical coupler captures most of this unused pump light and sends it back to the laser slab for two more passes. As a result, the slab absorbs more pump light, as though it were twice as thick. The gain and laser cavity beam quality of a smaller laser slab in conjunction with this optical coupler can thus be made comparable to those of a larger two-pass-pumped laser slab.

  1. A Comparative Study of Enamel Surface Roughness After Bleaching With Diode Laser and Nd: YAG Laser

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaie, Mansoreh; Yassini, Esmaiel; Ganji, Saber; Moradi, Zohreh; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Bleaching process can affect surface roughness of enamel, which is a vital factor in esthetic and resistance of tooth. The aim of this study was to compare surface roughness of enamel in teeth bleached using Diode and Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd: YAG) lasers with those bleached using conventional method. Methods: In this study, 75 anterior human teeth from upper and lower jaws (These teeth extracted because of periodontal disease) were randomly divided into 5 groups. Group 1: Laser white gel (Biolase, USA) with 45% hydrogen peroxide concentration and GaAlAs Diode laser (CHEESETM, GIGAA, China), group 2: Heydent gel (JW, Germany) with 30% Hydrogen peroxide concentration and Diode laser, group 3: Laser white gel and Nd:YAG laser (FIDELISTM, Fotona, Slovenia), group 4: Heydent gel and Nd:YAG laser and group 5: The Iranian gel Kimia (Iran) with 35% hydrogen peroxide concentration were used. Surface roughness of the samples was measured using the Surface Roughness Tester system (TR 200 Time Group, Germany) before and after bleaching. In each group, one sample was randomly selected for SEM analysis. Results: The results showed that the mean surface roughness of the teeth before and after bleaching had a significant difference in all the study groups. It was indicated that after bleaching, the mean surface roughness had increased in all the study groups. The highest surface roughness was seen in the conventional bleaching group and the lowest surface roughness was reported in group 3 (laser white gel + diode laser), in which the average surface roughness increased by only 0.1 μm. Conclusion: It was concluded that using the Laser white gel and the diode laser for bleaching resulted in the least surface roughness compared to conventional method. PMID:28144442

  2. Improving Lifetime of Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping 2-Micron Solid State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data on the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  3. High power continuous-wave diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golla, D.; Knoke, S.; Schöne, W.; Tünnermann, A.; Schmidt, H.

    1994-05-01

    We report on a diode-laser-pumped cw Nd: YAG laser operating at a power level of 150 W. By using a transverse pump geometry, the radiation of 54 diode lasers with an output power of 10 W each is coupled into a Nd:YAG rod. In multimode operation, an optical slope efficiency of 32% and an optical to optical efficiency of 29% are obtained. In TEM00 operation, an output power of more than 30 W is realized with an optical to optical efficiency of 10%.

  4. LASERS: Transversely diode-pumped passively Q-switched erbium glass laser emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, V. N.; Izyneev, A. A.; Sadovoi, A. G.; Sadovskii, P. I.; Sorokina, O. A.

    2008-03-01

    The properties of a laser diode array-pumped passively Q-switched ytterbium-erbium glass laser emitter are studied. It is found experimentally that the maximum output energy is achieved when the diameter of the TEM00 mode is 0.65-0.77 of the transverse size of the active element. By using two 100-W linear laser diode arrays with the output power not exceeding 70% of the maximum power, 5 mJ was achieved in a 50-ns diffraction-limited single pulse for the efficiency (with respect to the pump radiation energy) of 1.35%.

  5. Improving lifetime of quasi-CW laser diode arrays for pumping 2-micron solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-04-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data on the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  6. Low-cost laser scanning photoacoustic microscopy system with a pulsed laser diode excitation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfanzadeh, Mohsen; Zhu, Quing

    2017-03-01

    We present a low-cost laser scanning photoacoustic microscopy system with a pulsed laser diode as the excitation source. The system utilizes a 905 nm pulsed laser diode with 120 ns pulse width and 1 KHz repetition rate. No averaging is performed in data acquisition, resulting in a short image acquisition time. The maximum field of view is 4.6 mm × 3.7 mm and the lateral resolution is 71 μm. Images of human hairs and mouse ear are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the system in imaging biological tissue.

  7. Optical wireless transmission of 405 nm, 1.45 Gbit/s optical IM/DD-OFDM signals through a 4.8 m underwater channel.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Mizukoshi, Izumi; Hanawa, Masanori

    2015-01-26

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate wireless transmission of optical intensity modulation/direct detection-orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (IM/DD-OFDM) signals in an underwater channel using a field programmable gate array based real-time transmitter. The real-time transmission of a 405 nm 1.45 Gbit/s optical OFDM signal through a 4.8 m underwater channel with an error vector magnitude of approximately 10% was successfully achieved.

  8. Excision of Mucocele Using Diode Laser in Lower Lip

    PubMed Central

    Ramkumar, Subramaniam; Ramkumar, Lakshmi; Malathi, Narasimhan

    2016-01-01

    Mucoceles are nonneoplastic cystic lesions of major and minor salivary glands which result from the accumulation of mucus. These lesions are most commonly seen in children. Though usually these lesions can be treated by local surgical excision, in our case, to avoid intraoperative surgical complications like bleeding and edema and to enable better healing, excision was done using a diode laser in the wavelength of 940 nm. PMID:28097026

  9. Computer holography by means of the laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodin, Arthur N.; Ilchenko, Volodymyr; Malov, Alexander N.; Sychevskiy, Alexey V.

    2007-02-01

    A computer holography is the optical hologram recording on the CCD-matrix with digital reconstruction of the 2Dimages for the different volume object cross-sections. The possibility to use compact semiconductor laser diodes in the computer holography for 3D-scene registration is experimentally proved in the D. Gabor's scheme. For off axis hologram recording the S. Benton's scheme for holography using is suggested.

  10. Quasi-cw 808-nm 300-W laser diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezotosnyi, V. V.; Kozyrev, A. A.; Kondakova, N. S.; Kondakov, S. A.; Krokhin, O. N.; Mikaelyan, G. T.; Oleshchenko, V. A.; Popov, Yu. M.; Cheshev, E. A.

    2017-02-01

    Samples of 808-nm quasi-cw laser diode arrays (LDAs) with an output power exceeding 300 W, a pulse duration of 200 μs, and a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz are developed and fabricated. The main output parameters of a set of five LDAs, including light – current characteristics, current – voltage characteristics, and emission spectra are measured. Preliminary life tests show that the LDA power remains stable for 108 pulses.

  11. Compact scanning-force microscope using a laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; Iams, Doug; Weissenberger, Volker; Bell, L. Stephen

    1988-12-01

    The paper describes the operation of a compact scanning-force microscope in which the gradient of force acting on a vibrating tip is monitored by a diode laser and its integrated photodiode. The system does not require reflecting or focusing elements or complicated electronics. Experimental results using this system with magnetic domains on a magnetooptic storage medium attest to the feasibility of this concept.

  12. Diode Laser Diagnostics of High Speed Flows (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    high speed flows are required. Generally, wall measurements (e.g. pressure, temperature , and heat flux) dominate the instrumentation suite routinely...from 500 to 2000 psf. Unvitiated (cold) flows have also been studied. III. Experiment TDLAS employs single mode diode lasers that are temperature ...too high because it does not account for the entropy rise due to wall friction. Therefore, the pitot pressure and thermocouple temperature probe

  13. Active coherent beam combining of diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Shawn M; Creedon, Kevin J; Kansky, Jan E; Augst, Steven J; Missaggia, Leo J; Connors, Michael K; Huang, Robin K; Chann, Bien; Fan, Tso Yee; Turner, George W; Sanchez-Rubio, Antonio

    2011-03-15

    We have demonstrated active coherent beam combination (CBC) of up to 218 semiconductor amplifiers with 38.5 W cw output using up to eleven one-dimensional 21-element individually addressable diode amplifier arrays operating at 960 nm. The amplifier array elements are slab-coupled-optical-waveguide semiconductor amplifiers (SCOWAs) set up in a master-oscillator-power-amplifier configuration. Diffractive optical elements divide the master-oscillator beam to seed multiple arrays of SCOWAs. A SCOWA was phase actuated by adjusting the drive current to each element and controlled using a stochastic-parallel-gradient-descent (SPGD) algorithm for the active CBC. The SPGD is a hill-climbing algorithm that maximizes on-axis intensity in the far field, providing phase locking without needing a reference beam.

  14. Broadly tunable, longitudinally diode-pumped Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strotkamp, M.; Witte, U.; Munk, A.; Hartung, A.; Gausmann, S.; Hengesbach, S.; Traub, M.; Hoffmann, H.-D.; Hoeffner, J.; Jungbluth, B.

    2014-02-01

    We present design and first performance data of a broadly tunable Alexandrite laser longitudinally pumped by a newly developed high brightness single emitter diode laser module with output in the red spectral range. Replacing the flashlamps, which are usually used for pumping Alexandrite, will increase the efficiency and maintenance interval of the laser. The pump module is designed as an optical stack of seven single-emitter laser diodes. We selected an optomechanical concept for the tight overlay of the radiation using a minimal number of optical components for collimation, e.g. a FAC and a SAC lens, and focusing. The module provides optical output power of more than 14 W (peak pulse output in the focus) with a beam quality of M2 = 41 in the fast axis and M2 = 39 in the slow axis. The Alexandrite crystal is pumped from one end at a repetition rate of 35 Hz and 200μs long pump pulses. The temperature of the laser crystal can be tuned to between 30 °C and 190 °C using a thermostat. The diode-pumped Alexandrite laser reaches a maximum optical-optical efficiency of 20 % and a slope efficiency of more than 30 % in fundamental-mode operation (M2 < 1.10). When a Findlay-Clay analysis with four different output couplers is conducted, the round-trip loss of the cavity is determined to be around 1 %. The wavelength is tunable to between 755 and 788 nm via crystal temperature or between 745 and 805 nm via an additional Brewster prism.

  15. Coupled Resonator Vertical Cavity Laser Diode

    SciTech Connect

    CHOQUETTE, KENT D.; CHOW, WENG W.; FISCHER, ARTHUR J.; GEIB, KENT M.; HOU, HONG Q.

    1999-09-16

    We report the operation of an electrically injected monolithic coupled resonator vertical cavity laser which consists of an active cavity containing In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As quantum wells optically coupled to a passive GaAs cavity. This device demonstrates novel modulation characteristics arising from dynamic changes in the coupling between the active and passive cavities. A composite mode theory is used to model the output modulation of the coupled resonator vertical cavity laser. It is shown that the laser intensity can be modulated by either forward or reverse biasing the passive cavity. Under forward biasing, the modulation is due to carrier induced changes in the refractive index, while for reverse bias operation the modulation is caused by field dependent cavity enhanced absorption.

  16. Fungal testing of diode laser collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lourdes Quinta, Maria; Freitas, Jose C. A.; Rodrigues, Fernando C.; Silva, Jeronimo A.

    1991-03-01

    The utilization of laser systems in adverse environment conditions imposes several project restrictions. In our application, the design of laser collimators was developed according not only with the specified optical, mechanical and electronic parameters, but also, taking into account the specific environment characteristics in which the equipment was to be used, namely, climate, physical elements and biological agents. The utilization of several kinds of materials, like silicone, rubber, PVC, nitro-cellulose lacquers and oil varnishes, may facilitate the attack by fungi and in some special cases by bacteria in humid environments. In this paper the behavior of laser collimators after a severe essay with optimal conditions of humidity and temperature appropriated to growth of fungi is described.

  17. High-brightness, high-power 9xx-nm diode laser bars: developments at JENOPTIK diode lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, J.; Schulze, H.; Hülsewede, R.; Hennig, P.; Meusel, J.; Schröder, M.; Schröder, D.; Lorenzen, D.

    2007-02-01

    We report present advantages of high power 9xxnm diode laser bars for pumping of disc laser and especially for pumping fibre lasers and amplifiers. The strong demand for reduce system costs needs to have a good compromise in improved diode laser power, conversion efficiency, reliability and beam quality leading to simplified system designs. Basis of the new generation for the 9xxnm laser diode bars at JENOPTIK Diode Lab is a low loss wave guide AlGaAs - structure with low vertical far field angle of 27° (FWHM). Recently we demonstrate an output power in excess of 500W in CW operation from a diode laser bar with 50% filling factor and 3.0mm cavity length. This record was possible due to high power conversion efficiency of >68 %, optimised facet coating technology and an excellent active cooling. New results on conductive cooled high brightness laser bars of 20% filling factor with special emphasis to the needs of high efficiency fibre coupling will be presented. Lifetime tests under long pulse conditions have demonstrated a very high reliability for 120 W laser bars with 50 % filling factor and for 60 W laser bars with 20 % and 30 % filling factor.

  18. [Diode laser surgery in the endoscopic treatment of laryngeal paralysis].

    PubMed

    Ferri, E; García Purriños, F J

    2006-01-01

    Several surgical procedures have been proposed for the treatment of respiratory distress secondary to bilateral vocal cord paralysis. The aim of all surgical techniques used is to restore a glottic lumen sufficient to guarantee adequate breathing through the natural airway, without tracheotomy and preserving an acceptable phonatory quality. In this study we present our experience from 1998 to 2004 concerning the use of the diode contact laser for a modified Dennis-Kashima posterior endoscopic cordectomy (extended to the false homolateral chord in 3 cases and to the homolateral arytenoid vocal process in 6 cases). 18 patients (15 male, 3 female) were treated; the age range was 35-84 years. The etiology of paralysis varied: iatrogenic post-thyroidectomy and post-thoracic surgery in 5 cases (28%), post-traumatic in 2 cases (11%), secondary to a central lesion in 11 (61%). The operation was carried out with a diode contact laser (60W; 810 nm). Follow-up was 20 months. Dyspnea improved in all patients; the 9 tracheostomized patients were decannulated within 2 months after surgery. Final voice quality was subjectively good in 16 patients (88%). None of patients had any complications after surgery. In conclusion, the endoscopic posterior cordectomy performed by contact diode laser is an effective and reliable method for the treatment of dyspnea secondary to bilateral laryngeal paralysis, guaranteing a sufficient airway without impairing swallowing and maintaining acceptable voice quality.

  19. Efficient diffractive collimator for edge-emitting laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalik, Andrzej; Góra, Krzysztof; Adamkiewicz, Grażyna; Ziętek, Monika; Mikuła, Grzegorz; Kołodziejczyk, Andrzej; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew

    2006-04-01

    Compared with conventional optical systems, diffractive optical elements are more suitable to transform laser diode beams because they can form more complex wavefronts and better fulfill requirements of miniaturization. However, high numerical aperture needed to collimate the fast axis of edge-emitting laser diodes demands extremely high spatial frequency elements when single DOE is used. That involves complicated design methods based on rigorous diffraction theory and fabricating technology with sub-wavelength resolution and nanometer accuracy. To overcome these difficulties we propose a transmission DOE consisting of elliptical and cylindrical zone plates fabricated onto opposite sides of a substrate. The main advantage of such a solution lies in fact that each of the zone plates has smaller spatial frequency and can be made even as 8-phase-level element with theoretically 95% diffraction efficiency using available microlithographic technology. In result, monolithic collimating system that allows to compensate astigmatism and to convert an elliptical laser diode light beam to circular one can be achieved with NA higher than 0.5 and efficiency over 80%.

  20. Cultured Human Fibroblast Biostimulation Using a 940 nm Diode Laser.

    PubMed

    Illescas-Montes, Rebeca; Melguizo-Rodríguez, Lucía; Manzano-Moreno, Francisco Javier; García-Martínez, Olga; Ruiz, Concepción; Ramos-Torrecillas, Javier

    2017-07-13

    Fibroblasts are the main cells involved in regeneration during wound healing. The objective was to determine the effect of 940 nm diode laser on cultured human fibroblasts using different irradiation regimens. The CCD-1064Sk human epithelial fibroblast cell line was treated with a 940 nm diode laser at different energy doses (power: 0.2-1 W and energy density: 1-7 J/cm²) using different transmission modes (continuous or pulsed). The effect on cell growth at 24 and 72 h post-treatment was examined by measuring the proliferative capacity, the impact on the cell cycle, and the effect on cell differentiation. fibroblast proliferative capacity was increased at 24 and 72 h post-treatment as a function of the energy dose. The greatest increase was observed with a power of 0.2 or 0.5 W and energy density between 1 and 4 J/cm²; no difference was observed between continuous and pulsed modes. There were no significant differences in cell cycle between treated groups and controls. α-actin expression was increased by treatment, indicating enhanced cell differentiation. The 940 nm diode laser has biostimulating effects on fibroblasts, stimulating proliferative capacity and cell differentiation without altering the cell cycle. Further researches are necessary to explore its potential clinical usefulness in wound healing.

  1. Cultured Human Fibroblast Biostimulation Using a 940 nm Diode Laser

    PubMed Central

    Illescas-Montes, Rebeca; Melguizo-Rodríguez, Lucía; Manzano-Moreno, Francisco Javier; García-Martínez, Olga; Ruiz, Concepción

    2017-01-01

    Background: Fibroblasts are the main cells involved in regeneration during wound healing. The objective was to determine the effect of 940 nm diode laser on cultured human fibroblasts using different irradiation regimens. Methods: The CCD-1064Sk human epithelial fibroblast cell line was treated with a 940 nm diode laser at different energy doses (power: 0.2–1 W and energy density: 1–7 J/cm2) using different transmission modes (continuous or pulsed). The effect on cell growth at 24 and 72 h post-treatment was examined by measuring the proliferative capacity, the impact on the cell cycle, and the effect on cell differentiation. Results: fibroblast proliferative capacity was increased at 24 and 72 h post-treatment as a function of the energy dose. The greatest increase was observed with a power of 0.2 or 0.5 W and energy density between 1 and 4 J/cm2; no difference was observed between continuous and pulsed modes. There were no significant differences in cell cycle between treated groups and controls. α-actin expression was increased by treatment, indicating enhanced cell differentiation. Conclusion: The 940 nm diode laser has biostimulating effects on fibroblasts, stimulating proliferative capacity and cell differentiation without altering the cell cycle. Further researches are necessary to explore its potential clinical usefulness in wound healing. PMID:28773152

  2. 450 nm diode laser: A new help in oral surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, Carlo; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Merigo, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    AIM To describe the performance of 450 nm diode laser in oral surgery procedures. METHODS The case described consisted of the removal of a lower lip fibroma through a blue diode laser (λ = 450 nm). RESULTS The efficacy of this device, even at very low power (1W, CW), allows us to obtain very high intra and postoperative comfort for the patient, even with just topical anaesthesia and without needing suture. The healing process was completed in one week and, during the follow-up, the patient did not report any problems, pain or discomfort even without the consumption of any kind of drugs, such as painkillers and antibiotics. The histological examination performed by the pathologist showed a large area of fibrous connective tissue with some portions of epithelium-connective detachments and a regular incision with very scanty areas of carbonization. CONCLUSION The 450 nm diode laser proved of being very efficient in the oral soft tissue surgical procedures, with no side effects for the patients. PMID:27672639

  3. Industrial high-power diode lasers: reliability, power, and brightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmaier, Stephan; An, Haiyan; Vethake, Thilo

    2012-03-01

    High power semiconductor lasers, single emitters and bars are developing fast. During the last decade key parameters of diode lasers, such as beam quality, power, spatial and spectral brightness, efficiency as well as reliability have been greatly improved. However, often only individual parameters have been optimized, accepting an adverse effect in the other key parameters. For demanding industrial applications in most cases it is not sufficient to achieve a record value in one of the parameters, on the contrary it is necessary to optimize all the mentioned parameters simultaneously. To be able to achieve this objective it is highly advantageous to have insight in the whole process chain, from epitaxial device structure design and growth, wafer processing, mounting, heat sink design, product development and finally the customer needs your final product has to fulfill. In this publication an overview of recent advances in industrial diode lasers at TRUMPF will be highlighted enabling advanced applications for both high end pump sources as well as highest brightness direct diode.

  4. Inactivation of Salmonella spp., pathogenic Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus spp., or Listeria monocytogenes in chicken purge or skin using a 405-nm LED array.

    PubMed

    Sommers, Christopher; Gunther, Nereus W; Sheen, Shiowshuh

    2017-06-01

    Raw poultry are sometimes contaminated with foodborne pathogens, which can lead to illness in humans. In recent years research has focused on a variety of light technologies to decontaminate food and food contact surfaces during meat and poultry processing. In this study we evaluated the ability of 405-nm light generated from an LED array to inactivate multi-isolate cocktails of either Salmonella spp., pathogenic Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus spp., or Listeria monocytogenes suspended in chicken purge or skin. When exposed to 180 J/cm(2) 405-nm light at two separate light intensities (300 mW/cm(2)/s or 150 mW/cm(2)/s) the maximum pathogen reduction on chicken skin was ca. 0.4 log. When the pathogens were suspended in chicken purge the maximum log reductions ranged from 0.23 to 0.68 log (180 J/cm(2); 150 mW/cm(2)/s) versus 0.69 to 1.01 log (180 J/cm(2); 300 mW/cm(2)/s). Log reductions of each pathogen, when they were subjected to heat shock prior to 405-nm light treatment, were reduced, indicating that thermal effects accounted for much of the bacterial inactivation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Wave optics simulation of diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori; Nagaoka, Ryuji; Nagaoka, Hiroki; Nagai, Toru; Wani, Fumio

    2016-03-01

    A numerical simulation code for a diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) was developed. The code employs the Fresnel- Kirchhoff diffraction integral for both laser mode and pump light propagations. A three-dimensional rate equation set was developed to determine the local gain. The spectral divergence of the pump beam was represented by a series of monochromatic beams with different wavelengths. The calculated results showed an excellent agreements with relevant experimental results. It was found that the main channel of the pump power drain is the spontaneous emission from the upper level of the lasing transition.

  6. High-speed GaInNAs laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondow, Masahiko; Nakahara, Kouji; Fujisaki, S.; Tanaka, Shigehisa; Kudo, M.; Taniguchi, Tadashi; Terano, A.; Uchiyama, H.

    2004-05-01

    The explosive growth of Internet/intranet traffic has created a strong demand for cost-effective high-speed light-sources to be used in local access networks and data links. The frequency of relaxation oscillation (fr) is a major factor that restricts the high-speed operation of laser diodes. To achieve a high fr, the material of an active layer should have a large differential gain. By using GaInNAs, very deep quantum wells, especially in the conduction band can be formed. Deep quantum wells bring a large differential gain. In this paper, we show how GaInNAs lasers can be applied in this application

  7. Hundred-watt diode laser source by spectral beam combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Peng, Hangyu; Liu, Yun; Qin, Li; Cao, Junsheng; Shan, Xiaonan; Zeng, Yugang; Fu, Xihong; Tong, Cunzhu; Ning, Yongqiang; Wang, Lijun

    2014-12-01

    A diode laser source with a continuous wavelength (CW) power of 106 W and the beam quality M2 of 14.6 is demonstrated by spectrum beam combining (SBC) of three 800 nm LDAs. With the help of relay optics, a wavelength interval of 0.21 nm and a whole spectrum span of 13.9 nm are achieved, which is almost 10 times narrower than those of the structure without the relay optics. This presents a method to obtain a high power and high beam quality SBC laser source with a narrow spectrum.

  8. External cavity diode laser with very-low frequency drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Ikegami, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    An external cavity diode laser with significant mechanical robustness was installed in a housing that was sealed from outside for eliminating variations in the refractive index of air. Using the feedback signal for a frequency lock, it was found that the variation in the laser frequency under free running was suppressed to 275 MHz over one month and depended on the room temperature. Moreover, the upper limit of the linear frequency drift rate was evaluated as intrinsically 40 Hz/s. The frequency lock is expected to be sustainable for more than 110 days with temperature-controlled housing.

  9. GaSbBi/GaSb quantum well laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, O.; Cerutti, L.; Luna, E.; Narcy, G.; Trampert, A.; Tournié, E.; Rodriguez, J.-B.

    2017-05-01

    We report on the structural and optical properties of GaSbBi single layers and GaSbBi/GaSb quantum well heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaSb substrates. Excellent crystal quality and room-temperature photoluminescence are achieved in both cases. We demonstrate laser operation from laser diodes with an active zone composed of three GaSb0.885Bi0.115/GaSb quantum wells. These devices exhibit continuous-wave lasing at 2.5 μm at 80 K, and lasing under pulsed operation at room-temperature near 2.7 μm.

  10. Rubidium Spectroscopy with an External Cavity Diode Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Charity; Smith, R. Seth

    2014-03-01

    A homebuilt external cavity diode laser (ECDL) was used to provide a very narrow range of laser wavelengths near 780 nm in order to study the structure of rubidium (Rb). The absorption spectrum of Rb was measured. This spectrum was subject to Doppler-broadening of the spectral lines. A technique known as Saturated Absorption Spectroscopy was employed to eliminate the effects of Doppler-broadening and to obtain a high resolution spectrum for Rubidium. The setup, operation, and performance of this system will be described. Research made possible by a REAL grant from Francis Marion University.

  11. Ion-implanted planar-buried-heterostructure diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Hammons, Burrell E.; Myers, David R.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1991-01-01

    A Planar-Buried-Heterostructure, Graded-Index, Separate-Confinement-Heterostructure semiconductor diode laser 10 includes a single quantum well or multi-quantum well active stripe 12 disposed between a p-type compositionally graded Group III-V cladding layer 14 and an n-type compositionally graded Group III-V cladding layer 16. The laser 10 includes an ion implanted n-type region 28 within the p-type cladding layer 14 and further includes an ion implanted p-type region 26 within the n-type cladding layer 16. The ion implanted regions are disposed for defining a lateral extent of the active stripe.

  12. Airborne tunable diode laser system for trace gas measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, G. W.; Hill, G. F.; Hoell, J. M., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Sachse et al. (1976) have reported the development of an airborne tunable diode laser (TDL) system, named the Differential Absorption CO Monitor (DACOM). The absorption path was 10 m long and located in the free airstream along the fuselage of a C-54 aircraft. The present investigation is concerned with a modification of the DACOM instrument. Differences between the new instrument and the original one are related to a replacement of the external absorption path with a White cell. The instrument has the capability to suppress TDL excess noise. The laser refrigerator has been redesigned to permit an alternative method of cooling the TDL when electric power is not available.

  13. Beam propagation behavior in a quasi-stadium laser diode.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, T; Biellak, S; Sun, Y; Siegman, A

    1998-01-19

    The beam propagation behavior of a quasi-stadium laser diode is theoretically investigated. The resonator that we analyzed consists of one flat end-mirror, one convex curved end-mirror and two straight side wall mirrors. The cavity dimension is much larger than the oscillation wavelength. We derived one-dimensional Huygen's integral equations for this laser cavity and carried out eigenmode calculations using the Fox and Li mode calculation method taking into account the effect of the side wall reflections and visualized the propagation beams. Unique beam propagation behaviors were obtained. These results well agree with our previous experimental results.

  14. Quasi-stadium laser diodes with an unstable resonator condition.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Takehiro; Harayama, Takahisa; Davis, Peter; Vaccaro, Pablo O; Nishimura, Takehiro; Aida, Tahito

    2003-03-15

    We have observed lasing in a complicated eigenmode of a quasi-stadium laser diode with an unstable resonator consisting of two curved end mirrors obeying an unstable resonator condition and two straight sidewall mirrors. The laser was fabricated by application of a reactive-ion-etching technique to a molecular beam epitaxy-grown graded-index separate-confinement heterostructure single-quantum-well GaAs/AlGaAs structure. The far-field pattern shows that the lasing mode corresponds to the complicated lowest-loss mode obtained numerically by an extended Fox-Li method.

  15. [Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy system for trace ethylene detection].

    PubMed

    Pan, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Dai, Jing-Min; Song, Kai

    2012-10-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was characterized by ultra-narrow line width laser and wavelength modulation, which makes it possible to scan a single absorption line. TDLAS has an advantage in trace gas analysis for its high resolution, high sensitivity and quick response. The 1 626.8 nm absorption line of ethylene was selected for detecting by analyzing its absorption line characteristic. The TDLAS system was developed with a white type multi-pass cell, combined with wavelength modulation and harmonic detection. Ethylene concentration ranges from 20 to 1 200 ppmv were tested using this system. The estimated detection limit of the system is 10 ppmv.

  16. Generation of turquoise light by sum frequency mixing of a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in periodically poled KTP.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Sandra; Spiekermann, Stefan; Wang, Shunhua; Pasiskevicius, Valdas; Laurell, Fredrik; Ekvall, Katrin

    2004-10-04

    We report a simple and efficient method to achieve visible light by sum-frequency mixing radiation from a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in a periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal. Since high-power laser diodes are available at a wide range of wavelengths, it is thereby possible to obtain essentially any wavelength in the visible spectrum by appropriate choice of lasers. For demonstration we choose to construct a light source in the blue-green region. A turquoise output power of 4.0 mW was achieved.

  17. Generation of turquoise light by sum frequency mixing of a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in periodically poled KTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Sandra; Spiekermann, Stefan; Wang, Shunhua; Pasiskevicius, Valdas; Laurell, Fredrik; Ekvall, Katrin

    2004-10-01

    We report a simple and efficient method to achieve visible light by sum-frequency mixing radiation from a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in a periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal. Since high-power laser diodes are available at a wide range of wavelengths, it is thereby possible to obtain essentially any wavelength in the visible spectrum by appropriate choice of lasers. For demonstration we choose to construct a light source in the blue-green region. A turquoise output power of 4.0 mW was achieved.

  18. Calculation and comparison of thermal effect in laser diode pumped slab lasers with different pumping structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Feng; Jiang, Nan; Wang, Yuefeng; Dong, Wei; Niu, Yanxiong

    2008-03-01

    Laser diode (LD) pumped slab laser, as an important high average power solid-state laser, is a promising laser source in military and industrial fields. The different laser diode pumping structures lead to different thermal effect in the slab gain medium. The thermal and stress analysis of slab laser with different pumping structure are performed by finite element analysis (FEA) with the software program ANSYS. The calculation results show that the face pumped and cooled laser results in a near one-dimension temperature distribution and eliminates thermal stress induced depolarization. But the structure is low pump efficiency due to the small thickness of slabs and the requirement to cool and pump through the same faces. End-pumped slab laser is high pump efficiency and excellent mode match, but its pumping arrangement is fairly complicated. The edge-pumped face-cooling slab laser's pump efficiency is better than face-pumping, and its pumping structure is simpler than end-pumped laser, but the tensile stress on surfaces may initiate failure of the gain medium so it is important to design so that the stress is well below the stress fracture limit. The comparison of the thermal effects with different pumping structure shows that, the edge-pumped slab laser has engineering advantages in high power slab laser's application. Furthermore, the end-pumped slab laser tends to get the best beam quality, so it is fit for the application which has a special requirement on laser beam quality.

  19. Femtosecond Cr:LiSAF and Cr:LiCAF lasers pumped by tapered diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Demirbas, Umit; Schmalz, Michael; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Petrich, Gale S; Kolodziejski, Leslie A; Fujimoto, James G; Kärtner, Franz X; Leitenstorfer, Alfred

    2011-10-10

    We report compact, low-cost and efficient Cr:Colquiriite lasers that are pumped by high brightness tapered laser diodes. The tapered laser diodes provided 1 to 1.2 W of output power around 675 nm, at an electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency of about 30%. Using a single tapered diode laser as the pump source, we have demonstrated output powers of 500 mW and 410 mW together with slope efficiencies of 47% and 41% from continuous wave (cw) Cr:LiSAF and Cr:LiCAF lasers, respectively. In cw mode-locked operation, sub-100-fs pulse trains with average power between 200 mW and 250 mW were obtained at repetition rates around 100 MHz. Upon pumping the Cr:Colquiriite lasers with two tapered laser diodes (one from each side of the crystal), we have observed scaling of cw powers to 850 mW in Cr:LiSAF and to 650 mW in Cr:LiCAF. From the double side pumped Cr:LiCAF laser, we have also obtained ~220 fs long pulses with 5.4 nJ of pulse energy at 77 MHz repetition rate. These are the highest energy levels reported from Cr:Colquiriite so far at these repetition rates. Our findings indicate that tapered diodes in the red spectral region are likely to become the standard pump source for Cr:Colquiriite lasers in the near future. Moreover, the simplified pumping scheme might facilitate efficient commercialization of Cr:Colquiriite systems, bearing the potential to significantly boost applications of cw and femtosecond lasers in this spectral region (750-1000 nm).

  20. Acute Suppurative Parotitis Treatment by Diode Laser Combined with ER:YAG Laser

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jyuhn H.; Wang, Hong Lan

    2012-01-01

    Background and aim: The diode laser combined with Er:YAG laser is a new treatment modality for acute sialadenitis. A 78-year-old woman with acute suppurative parotitis was treated by traditional probe to the duct orifice with oral antibiotics for 2 weeks. The symptoms and signs did not subside after treatment. The Er:YAG laser was used to reduce severe infection and inflammation and low level laser therapy (LLLT) was applied to relieve pain sensation during incision and drainage. Less scar formation and obstruction was observed after the laser treatments. Results: Purulent secretions from the Stensen duct was noted after milking the parotid gland. The symptoms and signs were significantly relieved after combined laser treatments. The patient experienced no pain during the course of treatment. No recurrence of the symptoms and signs was noted after 1-year follow-up, and the prognosis was very good. Conclusion: The hemostatic properties of the diode laser enable better control of the surgical field and faster healing of the wound lesions. The bactericidal effect of Er:YAG lasers has been proved by many researchers, and has been shown to reduce infection and inflammation for better wound healing. The combined laser therapy of diode and Er:YAG lasers is recommended in treating acute sialadenitis. PMID:24610980

  1. Precision UV laser scribing for cleaving mirror facets of GaN-based laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, O.; Kang, J.-H.; Spevak, M.; Zeimer, U.; Einfeldt, S.

    2016-04-01

    Laser scribing with a nanosecond-pulsed UV laser operating at 355 nm was used to create precise perforation for die separation of GaN-based laser diodes. Machining depth of single- and multiple-pass scribing was investigated. For pulse energies between 1 and 45 µJ at a pulse repetition frequency of 20 kHz and single scan at 100 mm/min, scribe depths from 15 to 180 µm were obtained. Processing parameters were adjusted to minimize the formation of microcracks due to laser-induced local heating. By using the laser skip-and-scribe technique, the propagation of the cleavage plane could be controlled, irregular breaking could be minimized, and die yield could be improved. Smooth mirror facets with low density of terraces were formed by cleaving. In the vicinity of the laser-treated zone, no detrimental effects on the crystal quality of the multi-quantum wells could be detected by cathodoluminescence. The electro-optical characteristics of broad-area laser diodes fabricated by the laser-assisted process were similar to the ones fabricated using the conventional diamond-tip edge-scribing technique that suffers from low die yield. Our results demonstrate that nanosecond-pulsed UV laser scribing followed by cleaving is a powerful technique for the formation of mirror facets of GaN-based laser diodes.

  2. Cooling of silver bullet laser diode submodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhikh, I. V.; Polikarpov, S. S.; Frolov, S. V.; Volkov, A. S.; Privezentsev, V. V.

    2010-06-01

    The feasibility of using microfinned microchannel structures in copper heat exchangers designed for cooling semiconductor modules that pump powerful solid-state lasers is considered. Efficient heat exchangers are developed, and pumping modules with a continuous radiation power of 760 W are produced.

  3. Femtosecond diode-pumped mode-locked neodymium lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubeček, Václav; Jelínek, Michal; Čech, Miroslav; Vyhlídal, David; Su, Liangbi; Jiang, Dapeng; Ma, Fengkai; Qian, Xiaobo; Wang, Jingya; Xu, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Fluoride-type crystals (CaF2, SrF2) doped with neodymium Nd3+ and codoped with buffer ions for breaking clusters of active ions and increasing fluorescence efficiency, present interesting alternative as laser active media for the diode-pumped mode-locked lasers. In comparison with widely used materials as Nd:YAG or Nd:YVO4, they have broad emission spectra as well as longer fluorescence lifetime, in comparison with Nd:glass, SrF2 and CaF2 have better thermal conductivity. In spite of the fact, that this thermal conductivity decreases with Nd3+ doping concentration, these crystals are alternative for the Nd:glass in subpicosecond mode-locked laser systems. In this paper we review the basic results reported recently on these active materials and in the second part we present our results achieved in low power diode pumped passively mode locked lasers with Nd,La:CaF2 and Nd,Y:SrF2 crystals. The pulses as short as 258 fs at wavelength of 1057 nm were obtained in the first case, while 5 ps long pulses at 1065 nm were generated from the second laser system.

  4. Tunable, diode side-pumped Er:YAG laser

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, C.E.; Furu, L.H.

    1997-04-22

    A discrete-element Er:YAG laser, side pumped by a 220 Watt peak-power InGaAs diode array, generates >500 mWatts at 2.94 {micro}m, and is tunable over a 6 nm range near about 2.936 {micro}m. The oscillator is a plano-concave resonator consisting of a concave high reflector, a flat output coupler, a Er:YAG crystal and a YAG intracavity etalon, which serves as the tuning element. The cavity length is variable from 3 cm to 4 cm. The oscillator uses total internal reflection in the Er:YAG crystal to allow efficient coupling of the diode emission into the resonating modes of the oscillator. With the tuning element removed, the oscillator produces up to 1.3 Watts of average power at 2.94 {micro}m. The duty factor of the laser is 6.5% and the repetition rate is variable up to 1 kHz. This laser is useful for tuning to an atmospheric transmission window at 2.935 {micro}m (air wavelength). The laser is also useful as a spectroscopic tool because it can access several infrared water vapor transitions, as well as transitions in organic compounds. Other uses include medical applications (e.g., for tissue ablation and uses with fiber optic laser scalpels) and as part of industrial effluent monitoring systems. 4 figs.

  5. Tunable, diode side-pumped Er: YAG laser

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, Charles E.; Furu, Laurence H.

    1997-01-01

    A discrete-element Er:YAG laser, side pumped by a 220 Watt peak-power InGaAs diode array, generates >500 mWatts at 2.94 .mu.m, and is tunable over a 6 nm range near about 2.936 .mu.m. The oscillator is a plano-concave resonator consisting of a concave high reflector, a flat output coupler, a Er:YAG crystal and a YAG intracavity etalon, which serves as the tuning element. The cavity length is variable from 3 cm to 4 cm. The oscillator uses total internal reflection in the Er:YAG crystal to allow efficient coupling of the diode emission into the resonating modes of the oscillator. With the tuning element removed, the oscillator produces up to 1.3 Watts of average power at 2.94 .mu.m. The duty factor of the laser is 6.5% and the repetition rate is variable up to 1 kHz. This laser is useful for tuning to an atmospheric transmission window at 2.935 .mu.m (air wavelength). The laser is also useful as a spectroscopic tool because it can access several infrared water vapor transitions, as well as transitions in organic compounds. Other uses include medical applications (e.g., for tissue ablation and uses with fiber optic laser scalpels) and as part of industrial effluent monitoring systems.

  6. Characterization of High-power Quasi-cw Laser Diode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Vasilyev, Aleksey; Troupaki, Elisavet; Allan, Graham R.; Kashem, Nasir B.

    2005-01-01

    NASA s requirements for high reliability, high performance satellite laser instruments have driven the investigation of many critical components; specifically, 808 nm laser diode array (LDA) pump devices. Performance and comprehensive characterization data of Quasi-CW, High-power, laser diode arrays is presented.

  7. Diode Laser Assisted Filament Winding of Thermoplastic Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Quadrini, Fabrizio; Squeo, Erica Anna; Prosperi, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    A new consolidation method for the laser-assisted filament winding of thermoplastic prepregs is discussed: for the first time a diode laser is used, as well as long glass fiber reinforced polypropylene prepregs. A consolidation apparatus was built by means of a CNC motion table, a stepper motor and a simple tensioner. Preliminary tests were performed in a hoop winding configuration: only the winding speed was changed, and all the other process parameters (laser power, distance from the laser focus, consolidation force) were kept constant. Small wound rings with an internal diameter of 25 mm were produced and compression tests were carried out to evaluate the composite agglomeration in dependence of the winding speed. At lower winding speeds, a strong interpenetration of adjacent layers was observed.

  8. Evaluation of a satellite laser ranging technique using pseudonoise code modulated laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Carolyn Kay

    1987-01-01

    Several types of Satellite Laser Ranging systems exist, operating with pulsed, high-energy lasers. The distance between a ground point and an orbiting satellite can be determined to within a few centimeters. A new technique substitutes pseudonoise code modulated laser diodes, which are much more compact, reliable and less costly, for the lasers now used. Since laser diode technology is only now achieving sufficiently powerful lasers, the capabilities of the new technique are investigated. Also examined are the effects of using an avalanche photodiode detector instead of a photomultiplier tube. The influence of noise terms (including background radiation, detector dark and thermal noise and speckle) that limit the system range and performance is evaluated.

  9. Nd:GdVO4 ring laser pumped by laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, E. J.; Li, T.; Wang, Z. D.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-02-01

    The design and operation of a laser diode-pumped Nd:GdVO4 ring laser is described. A composite crystal (Nd:GdVO4/YVO4) with undoped ends is single-end pumped by a fiber-coupled laser diode (LD) at 808 nm. A four-mirror ring cavity is designed to keep the laser operating unidirectionally, which eliminates spatial hole burning in the standing-wave cavity. This laser can operate either as continuous wave (CW) or Q-switched. The single-frequency power obtained was 9.1 W at 1063 nm. Q-switched operation produced 0.23 mJ/pulse at 20 kHz in the fundamental laser.

  10. Laser cooling of beryllium ions using a frequency-doubled 626 nm diode laser.

    PubMed

    Cozijn, F M J; Biesheuvel, J; Flores, A S; Ubachs, W; Blume, G; Wicht, A; Paschke, K; Erbert, G; Koelemeij, J C J

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate laser cooling of trapped beryllium ions at 313 nm using a frequency-doubled extended cavity diode laser operated at 626 nm, obtained by cooling a ridge waveguide diode laser chip to -31°C. Up to 32 mW of narrowband 626 nm laser radiation is obtained. After passage through an optical isolator and beam shaping optics, 14 mW of 626 nm power remains of which 70% is coupled into an external enhancement cavity containing a nonlinear crystal for second-harmonic generation. We produce up to 35 μW of 313 nm radiation, which is subsequently used to laser cool and detect 6×10(2) beryllium ions, stored in a linear Paul trap, to a temperature of about 10 mK, as evidenced by the formation of Coulomb crystals. Our setup offers a simple and affordable alternative for Doppler cooling, optical pumping, and detection to presently used laser systems.

  11. Role of electron blocking layer in III-nitride laser diodes and light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yen-Kuang; Chang, Jih-Yuan; Chen, Mei-Ling

    2010-02-01

    A high energy bandgap electron blocking layer (EBL) just behind the active region is conventionally used in the nitride-based laser diodes (LDs) and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to improve the confinement capability of electrons within the quantum wells. Nevertheless, the EBL may also act as a potential barrier for the holes and cause non-uniform distribution of holes among quantum wells. A most recent study by Han et al. (Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 231123, 2009) reported that, because of the blocking effect for holes, the InGaN LED device without an EBL has slighter efficiency droop and higher light output at high level of current injection when compared with the LED device with an EBL. This result seems to contradict with the original intention of using the EBL. Furthermore, findings from our previous studies (IEEE J. Lightwave Technol. 26, 329, 2008; J. Appl. Phys. 103, 103115, 2008; Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 201118, 2007) indicated that the utilization of EBL is essential for the InGaN laser diodes. Thus, in this work, the optical properties of the InGaN LDs and LEDs are explored numerically with the LASTIP simulation program and APSYS simulation program, respectively. The analyses focus particularly on the light output power, energy band diagrams, recombination rates, distribution of electrons and holes in the active region, and electron overflow. This study will then conclude with a discussion of the effect of EBL on the optical properties of the InGaN LDs and LEDs.

  12. Optical communication with laser diode arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of a direct-detection optical communication system in which the laser transmitter sends short optical pulses of selected nonoverlapping center frequencies is analysed. This modulation format, in which a single light pulse is sent in one of M time slots at one of N optical center frequencies, is referred to as color coded optical pulse position modulation (CCPPM). The optimum energy-efficiency of this system, as measured by the channel capacity in nats per photon, exceeds that of ordinary optical pulse position modulation which uses a pulsed laser of fixed optical frequency. Reliable communication at optimal energy efficiency is easily achieved through the use of modest block length Reed-Solomon codes with the code words represented as CCPPM symbols.

  13. Case studies of industrial applications of high-power diode laser in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovikorpi, Jari; Jansson, Anssi; Salminen, Antti

    2003-06-01

    The high power diode laser is a new industrial tool. It has several advantages and disadvantages compared to the conventional industrially used CO2 and Nd:YAG laser. The most promising areas of application of diode laser have been considered to be thin sheet welding and hardening. Quite a few feasibility studies of the use of diode laser have been carried out in Finland. So far there has been some application in which diode laser is the most suitable laser. Typically, the HPDL is integrated to an industrial robot. The welding of stainless steel housing, car door lock and catalytic converters are typical examples of applications in which diode laser has technological as well as economical advantages over the conventional laser and welding techniques. The welding of these products requires good control over the heat input, short through put time and low investment. The weld cross-section of a diode laser weld is, because of conduction limited welding process, more suitable for these applications than the keyhole welding. Hardening of a large gear wheel presents also a good example of an application in which the diode laser makes it possible to economically produce structures that have not earlier been possible. Hardening requires a special form of heat delivery in order to ensure evenly hardened zone and acceptable quality. The application was performed with two high power diode lasers. The case studies of these four applications are presented and discussed in details in this paper.

  14. Packaging of complete indium-free high reliable and high power diode laser array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingwei; Li, Xiaoning; Feng, Feifei; Liu, Yalong; Hou, Dong; Liu, Xingsheng

    2015-02-01

    High power diode lasers have been widely used in many fields. For many applications, a diode laser needs to be robust under on-off power-cycling as well as environmental thermal cycling conditions. To meet the requirements, the conduction cooled single bar CS-packaged diode laser arrays must have high durability to withstand thermal fatigue and long lifetime. In this paper, a complete indium-free bonding technology is presented for packaging high power diode laser arrays. Numerical simulations on the thermal behavior of CS-packaged diode laser array with different packaging structure were conducted and analyzed. Based on the simulation results, the device structure and packaging process of complete indium-free CS-packaged diode laser array were optimized. A series of high power hard solder CS (HCS) diode laser arrays were fabricated and characterized. Under the harsh working condition of 90s on and 30s off, good lifetime was demonstrated on 825nm 60W single bar CS-packaged diode laser with a lifetime test of more than 6100hours achieved so far with less 5% power degradation and less 1.5nm wavelength shift. Additionally, the measurement results indicated that the lower smile of complete indium-free CS-packaged diode laser arrays were achieved by advanced packaging process.

  15. Research and Development of Laser Diode Based Instruments for Applications in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael; Abshire, James; Cornwell, Donald; Dragic, Peter; Duerksen, Gary; Switzer, Gregg

    1999-01-01

    Laser diode technology continues to advance at a very rapid rate due to commercial applications such as telecommunications and data storage. The advantages of laser diodes include, wide diversity of wavelengths, high efficiency, small size and weight and high reliability. Semiconductor and fiber optical-amplifiers permit efficient, high power master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) transmitter systems. Laser diode systems which incorporate monolithic or discrete (fiber optic) gratings permit single frequency operation. We describe experimental and theoretical results of laser diode based instruments currently under development at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center including miniature lidars for measuring clouds and aerosols, water vapor and wind for Earth and planetary (Mars Lander) use.

  16. Effect of interface layer on the performance of high power diode laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pu; Wang, Jingwei; Xiong, Lingling; Li, Xiaoning; Hou, Dong; Liu, Xingsheng

    2015-02-01

    Packaging is an important part of high power diode laser (HPLD) development and has become one of the key factors affecting the performance of high power diode lasers. In the package structure of HPLD, the interface layer of die bonding has significant effects on the thermal behavior of high power diode laser packages and most degradations and failures in high power diode laser packages are directly related to the interface layer. In this work, the effects of interface layer on the performance of high power diode laser array were studied numerically by modeling and experimentally. Firstly, numerical simulations using finite element method (FEM) were conducted to analyze the effects of voids in the interface layer on the temperature rise in active region of diode laser array. The correlation between junction temperature rise and voids was analyzed. According to the numerical simulation results, it was found that the local temperature rise of active region originated from the voids in the solder layer will lead to wavelength shift of some emitters. Secondly, the effects of solder interface layer on the spectrum properties of high power diode laser array were studied. It showed that the spectrum shape of diode laser array appeared "right shoulder" or "multi-peaks", which were related to the voids in the solder interface layer. Finally, "void-free" techniques were developed to minimize the voids in the solder interface layer and achieve high power diode lasers with better optical-electrical performances.

  17. Diode laser pumped blue-light source based on intracavity sum frequency generation

    SciTech Connect

    Risk, W.P.; Lenth, W.

    1989-02-27

    Sum frequency mixing in KTiOPO/sub 4/ of the 809 nm light from a GaAlAs laser diode and the 1064 nm light from a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser has been used to generate blue radiation at 459 nm. The specific problems associated with the use of high-power multimode GaAlAs diode lasers as the source of the 809 nm mixing radiation were investigated in detail. Rapid modulation of the blue output and generation of 5 ns pulses by direct modulation of the GaAlAs laser diode were demonstrated.

  18. Three Hundred Patients Treated with Ultrapulsed 980 nm Diode Laser for Skin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The use of lasers in skin diseases is quite common. In contrast to other laser types, medical literature about 980 nm ultrapulsed diode laser is sparse in dermatology. Herein, we report the use of ultrapulsed diode 980 nm laser in 300 patients with vascular lesions, cysts and pseudocysts, infectious disease, and malignant tumors. This laser is a versatile tool with excellent safety and efficacy in the hands of the experienced user. PMID:27688445

  19. High density, optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, v-groove monolithic laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    An optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser diode array achieves stacking pitches to 33 bars/cm by mounting laser diodes into V-shaped grooves. This design will deliver>4kW/cm2 of directional pulsed laser power. This optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser is usable in all solid state laser systems which require efficient, directional, narrow bandwidth, high optical power density pump sources.

  20. High density, optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, v-groove monolithic laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, B.L.

    1998-10-27

    An optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser diode array achieves stacking pitches to 33 bars/cm by mounting laser diodes into V-shaped grooves. This design will deliver > 4kW/cm{sup 2} of directional pulsed laser power. This optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser is usable in all solid state laser systems which require efficient, directional, narrow bandwidth, high optical power density pump sources. 13 figs.