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Sample records for 409m ferritic stainless

  1. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  2. A preliminary ferritic-martensitic stainless steel constitution diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, M.C.; Lippold, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary research to develop a constitution diagram that will more accurately predict the microstructure of ferritic and martensitic stainless steel weld deposits. A button melting technique was used to produce a wide range of compositions using mixtures of conventional ferritic and martensitic stainless steels, including types 403, 409, 410, 430, 439 and 444. These samples were prepared metallographically, and the vol-% ferrite and martensite was determined quantitatively. In addition, the hardness and ferrite number (FN) were measured. Using this data, a preliminary constitution diagram is proposed that provides a more accurate method for predicting the microstructures of arc welds in ferritic and martensitic stainless steels.

  3. Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

  4. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates...

  5. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Information The NRC published DG-1279 in the Federal Register on October 3, 2012 (77 FR 60479), for a 60-day... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.31, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.''...

  6. SELECTIVE SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    DOEpatents

    Beaver, R.J.; Cherubini, J.H.

    1963-05-14

    A process is described for separating uranium from a nuclear fuel element comprising a uranium-containing core and a ferritic stainless steel clad by heating said element in a non-carburizing atmosphere at a temperature in the range 850-1050 un. Concent 85% C, rapidly cooling the heated element through the temperature range 815 un. Concent 85% to 650 EC to avoid annealing said steel, and then contacting the cooled element with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to selectively dissolve the uranium. (AEC)

  7. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  8. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015 to 0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  9. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-12-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott-Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments. PMID:26501086

  10. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-12-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott-Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments.

  11. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott–Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments. PMID:26501086

  12. Development of nano-structured duplex and ferritic stainless steels by pulverisette planetary milling followed by pressureless sintering

    SciTech Connect

    R, Shashanka Chaira, D.

    2015-01-15

    Nano-structured duplex and ferritic stainless steel powders are prepared by planetary milling of elemental Fe, Cr and Ni powder for 40 h and then consolidated by conventional pressureless sintering. The progress of milling and the continuous refinement of stainless steel powders have been confirmed by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Activation energy for the formation of duplex and ferritic stainless steels is calculated by Kissinger method using differential scanning calorimetry and is found to be 159.24 and 90.17 KJ/mol respectively. Both duplex and ferritic stainless steel powders are consolidated at 1000, 1200 and 1400 °C in argon atmosphere to study microstructure, density and hardness. Maximum sintered density of 90% and Vickers microhardness of 550 HV are achieved for duplex stainless steel sintered at 1400 °C for 1 h. Similarly, 92% sintered density and 263 HV microhardness are achieved for ferritic stainless steel sintered at 1400 °C. - Highlights: • Synthesized duplex and ferritic stainless steels by pulverisette planetary milling • Calculated activation energy for the formation of duplex and ferritic stainless steels • Studied the effect of sintering temperature on density, hardness and microstructure • Duplex stainless steel exhibits 90% sintered density and microhardness of 550 HV. • Ferritic stainless steel shows 92% sintered density and 263 HV microhardness.

  13. The effects of laser welding parameters on the microstructure of ferritic and duplex stainless steels welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekkarinen, J.; Kujanpää, V.

    This study is focused to determine empirically, which microstructural changes occur in ferritic and duplex stainless steels when heat input is controlled by welding parameters. Test welds were done autogenously bead-on-plate without shielding gas using 5 kW fiber laser. For comparison, some gas tungsten arc welds were made. Used test material were 1.4016 (AISI 430) and 1.4003 (low-carbon ferritic) type steels in ferritic steels group and 1.4162 (low-alloyed duplex, LDX2101) and 1.4462 (AISI 2205) type steels in duplex steels group. Microstructural changes in welds were identified and examined using optical metallographic methods.

  14. Quantitative metallographic method for determining delta ferrite content in austenitic stainless steels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pressly, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    Delta ferrite is a magnetic form of iron and has a body centered cubic crystal structure. It is often present as a nonequilibrium phase in austenitic stainless steel welds, castings, and wrought materials. The ferrite content of austenitic stainless steel can directly affect its properties, especially weldability and formability. Therefore, it is highly desirable to be able to predict and/or measure the ferrite content accurately. Current magnetic ferrite measuring methods are not applicable when test materials are geometrically small (less than 2.54 mm thick and 6.35 mm wide). Therefore, a standard metallographic test method STM 00107-A was established to determine delta ferrite content in small weldments and base metals of austenitic stainless steel. This standard test method (STM 00107-A) was then performed on several exemplary metallographic specimens to illustrate its capabilities and applications. The results from the exemplary tests were compared and contrasted to metallographic manual point count measurements, Ferritescope measurements, and predicted values calculated from chemical analyses. By utilizing the manual metallographic point count data, an accuracy of +-16% and a precision of +-0.77% were determined for the standard test method. The comparison of Ferritescope data to standard test method revealed that the results obtained by the two methods are close at low (0 to 3%) ferrite contents and Ferritscope results are substantially greater at higher (6 to 10%) ferrite contents. The standard test method data compiled from the exemplary weld specimens was noted to be very similar to the predicted values calculated from chemical analyses. It was also shown that because the standard test method utilizes optics the morphology of the delta ferrite particles can be determined. This type of determination is possible only with metallographic methods.

  15. The effect of a tin barrier layer on the permeability of hydrogen through mild steel and ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bowker, J.; Piercy, G.R.

    1984-11-01

    Experiments were performed to measure the effectiveness of a commercially electroplated tin layer as a barrier to hydrogen, and to see how this altered when the tin layer was converted to FeSn. The authors measured the permeability of hydrogen through AISI 410 ferritic stainless steel and determined the effectiveness of tin as a surface barrier on it. The measured values for the permeability of hydrogen in iron and ferritic stainless steel are shown.

  16. Method for reducing formation of electrically resistive layer on ferritic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, James M.

    2013-09-10

    A method of reducing the formation of electrically resistive scale on a an article comprising a silicon-containing ferritic stainless subjected to oxidizing conditions in service includes, prior to placing the article in service, subjecting the article to conditions under which silica, which includes silicon derived from the steel, forms on a surface of the steel. Optionally, at least a portion of the silica is removed from the surface to placing the article in service. A ferritic stainless steel alloy having a reduced tendency to form silica on at least a surface thereof also is provided. The steel includes a near-surface region that has been depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the steel.

  17. Decomposition Kinetics of Ferrite in Isothermally Aged SAF 2507-Type Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berecz, Tibor; Fazakas, Éva; Mészáros, István; Sajó, István

    2015-12-01

    Decomposition of the ferritic phase is studied in isothermally aged SAF 2507 superduplex stainless steel (SDSS) by means of different examination methods. The ferritic phase ( δ) undergoes an eutectoid transformation into secondary austenite ( γ 2) and σ-phase between 650 and 1000 °C. Samples were treated at 900 °C because the incubation time of this transformation is the shortest at this temperature. In order to follow the microstructural changes, x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), applied magnetic investigation [vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM)], micro-hardness tests, and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were used. The results of XRD and EBSD methods for phase quantification showed nearly the same amounts for all three phases. The results of applied magnetic investigation for the fraction of ferritic phase were also in good agreement with the corresponding results of XRD and EBSD methods. Decomposition of ferrite is similarly well-traceable on EBSD phase maps where the coherent ferritic areas gradually broke into pieces with increasing time of heat treatment. According to the EBSD measurements the σ-phase grains appeared and started to grow after 2 min aging time in the ferritic-austenitic matrix, usually on the boundaries of ferritic and austenitic grains. After 15 min treating time, the microstructure consisted of mainly σ- and austenitic (primary and secondary) phases with negligible amount of ferrite. Chemical composition of the σ-phase was measured by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) at different aging times. Activation energies of σ-phase precipitation and α'-phase formation were determined by the Kissinger plot, through DTA measurements; they are 243 and 261 kJ/mol, respectively. Using the results of phase quantifications, the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation was fitted.

  18. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-08-08

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ~315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 1019 n/cm2 E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10-9 dpa/s was found to induce spinod,al decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. Lastly, The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.

  19. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-08-08

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ~315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 1019more » n/cm2 E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10-9 dpa/s was found to induce spinod,al decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. Lastly, The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.« less

  20. Ferrite Measurement in Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steel Castings - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Zhou, G.; Ruprecht, W.

    1999-08-01

    The ability to determine ferrite rapidly, accurately and directly on a finished casting, in the solution annealed condition, can enhance the acceptance, save on manufacturing costs and ultimately improve service performance of duplex stainless steel cast products. If the suitability of a non-destructive ferrite determination methodology can be demonstrated for standard industrial measurement instruments, the production of cast secondary standards for calibration of these instruments is a necessity. With these concepts in mind, a series of experiments were carried out to demonstrate, in a non-destructive manner, the proper methodology for determining ferrite content. The literature was reviewed, with regard to measurement techniques and vagaries, an industrial ferrite measurement round-robin was conducted, the effects of casting surface finish, preparation of the casting surface for accurate measurement and the evaluation of suitable means for the production of cast secondary standards for calibration were systematically investigated. The data obtained from this research program provide recommendations to ensure accurate, repeatable, and reproducible ferrite measurement and qualifies the Feritscope for field use on production castings.

  1. Ferrite Measurement in Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steel Castings - Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Zhou, G.; Ruprecht, W.

    1999-08-01

    The ability to determine ferrite rapidly, accurately and directly on a finished casting, in the solution annealed condition, can enhance the acceptance, save on manufacturing costs and ultimately improve service performance of duplex stainless steel cast products. If the suitability of a non-destructive ferrite determination methodology can be demonstrated for standard industrial measurement instruments, the production of cast secondary standards for calibration of these instruments is a necessity. With these concepts in mind, a series of experiments were carried out to demonstrate, in a non-destructive manner, the proper methodology for determining ferrite content. The literature was reviewed, with regard to measurement techniques and vagaries, an industrial ferrite measurement round-robin was conducted, the effects of casting surface finish, preparation of the casting surface for accurate measurement and the evaluation of suitable means for the production of cast secondary standards for calibration were systematically investigated. The data obtained from this research program provides recommendations to insure accurate, repeatable and reproducible ferrite measurement and qualifies the Feritscope for field use on production castings.

  2. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Effect of ZDDP Films on Sticking During Hot Rolling of Ferritic Stainless Steel Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang; Jiang, Zhengyi; Wei, Dongbin; Gong, Dianyao; Cheng, Xiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Luo, Suzhen; Jiang, Laizhu

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of zinc dialkyl dithio phosphate (ZDDP) films on sticking during hot rolling of a ferritic stainless steel strip. The surface characterization and crack propagation of the oxide scale are very important for understanding the mechanism of the sticking. The high-temperature oxidation of one typical ferritic stainless was conducted at 1373 K (1100 °C) for understanding its microstructure and surface morphology. Hot-rolling tests of a ferritic stainless steel strip show that no obvious cracks among the oxide scale were observed with the application of ZDDP. A finite element method model was constructed with taking into consideration different crack size ratios among the oxide scale, surface profile, and ZDDP films. The simulation results show that the width of the crack tends to be reduced with the introduction of ZDDP films, which is beneficial for improving sticking.

  3. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Effect of ZDDP Films on Sticking During Hot Rolling of Ferritic Stainless Steel Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang; Jiang, Zhengyi; Wei, Dongbin; Gong, Dianyao; Cheng, Xiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Luo, Suzhen; Jiang, Laizhu

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of zinc dialkyl dithio phosphate (ZDDP) films on sticking during hot rolling of a ferritic stainless steel strip. The surface characterization and crack propagation of the oxide scale are very important for understanding the mechanism of the sticking. The high-temperature oxidation of one typical ferritic stainless was conducted at 1373 K (1100 °C) for understanding its microstructure and surface morphology. Hot-rolling tests of a ferritic stainless steel strip show that no obvious cracks among the oxide scale were observed with the application of ZDDP. A finite element method model was constructed with taking into consideration different crack size ratios among the oxide scale, surface profile, and ZDDP films. The simulation results show that the width of the crack tends to be reduced with the introduction of ZDDP films, which is beneficial for improving sticking.

  4. Surface Treatments for Improved Performance of Spinel-coated AISI 441 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Riel, Eric M.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steels are promising candidates for IT-SOFC interconnect applications due to their low cost and resistance to oxidation at SOFC operating temperatures. However, steel candidates face several challenges; including long term oxidation under interconnect exposure conditions, which can lead to increased electrical resistance, surface instability, and poisoning of cathodes due to volatilization of Cr. To potentially extend interconnect lifetime and improve performance, a variety of surface treatments were performed on AISI 441 ferritic stainless steel coupons prior to application of a protective spinel coating. The coated coupons were then subjected to oxidation testing at 800 and 850°C in air, and electrical testing at 800°C in air. While all of the surface-treatments resulted in improved surface stability (i.e., increased spallation resistance) compared to untreated AISI 441, the greatest degree of improvement (through 20,000 hours of testing at 800°C and 14,000 hours of testing at 850°C) was achieved by surface blasting.

  5. Precipitation and mechanical properties of Nb-modified ferritic stainless steel during isothermal aging

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Haitao Bi Hongyun; Li Xin; Xu Zhou

    2009-03-15

    The influence of isothermal aging on precipitation behavior and mechanical properties of Nb-modified ferritic stainless steel was investigated using Thermo-calc software, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was observed that TiN, NbC and Fe{sub 2}Nb formed in the investigated steel and the experimental results agreed well with the results calculated by Thermo-calc software. During isothermal aging at 800 deg. C, the coarsening rate of Fe{sub 2}Nb is greater than that of NbC, and the calculated average sizes of NbC and Fe{sub 2}Nb of the aged specimen agreed with the experimental results. In addition, the tensile strength and micro-hardness of the ferritic stainless steel increased with increased aging time from 24 h to 48 h. But aging at 800 deg. C for 96 h caused the coarsening of the precipitation, which led to a decrease of tensile strength and micro-hardness.

  6. Effect of welding parameters on the heat-affected zone of AISI409 ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbarnodeh, Eslam; Hanke, Stefanie; Weiss, Sabine; Fischer, Alfons

    2012-10-01

    One of the main problems during the welding of ferritic stainless steels is severe grain growth within the heat-affected zone (HAZ). In the present study, the microstructural characteristics of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded AISI409 ferritic stainless steel were investigated by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), and the effects of welding parameters on the grain size, local misorientation, and low-angle grain boundaries were studied. A 3-D finite element model (FEM) was developed to predict the effects of welding parameters on the holding time of the HAZ above the critical temperature of grain growth. It is found that the base metal is not fully recrystallized. During the welding, complete recrystallization is followed by severe grain growth. A decrease in the number of low-angle grain boundaries is observed within the HAZ. FEM results show that the final state of residual strains is caused by competition between welding plastic strains and their release by recrystallization. Still, the decisive factor for grain growth is heat input.

  7. Technical Letter Report on the Cracking of Irradiated Cast Stainless Steels with Low Ferrite Content

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Alexandreanu, B.; Natesan, K.

    2014-11-01

    Crack growth rate and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were performed on CF-3 and CF-8 cast austenite stainless steels (CASS) with 13-14% of ferrite. The tests were conducted at ~320°C in either high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen or in simulated PWR water. The cyclic crack growth rates of CF-8 were higher than that of CF-3, and the differences between the aged and unaged specimens were small. No elevated SCC susceptibility was observed among these samples, and the SCC CGRs of these materials were comparable to those of CASS alloys with >23% ferrite. The fracture toughness values of unirradiated CF-3 were similar between unaged and aged specimens, and neutron irradiation decreased the fracture toughness significantly. The fracture toughness of CF-8 was reduced after thermal aging, and declined further after irradiation. It appears that while lowering ferrite content may help reduce the tendency of thermal aging embrittlement, it is not very effective to mitigate irradiation-induced embrittlement. Under a combined condition of thermal aging and irradiation, neutron irradiation plays a dominant role in causing embrittlement in CASS alloys.

  8. Investigation on the Behavior of Austenite and Ferrite Phases at Stagnation Region in the Turning of Duplex Stainless Steel Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomani, J.; Pramanik, A.; Hilditch, T.; Littlefair, G.

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the deformation mechanisms and plastic behavior of austenite and ferrite phases in duplex stainless steel alloys 2205 and 2507 under chip formation from a machine turning operation. SEM images and EBSD phase mapping of frozen chip root samples detected a build-up of ferrite bands in the stagnation region, and between 65 and 85 pct, more ferrite was identified in the stagnation region compared to austenite. SEM images detected micro-cracks developing in the ferrite phase, indicating ferritic build-up in the stagnation region as a potential triggering mechanism to the formation of built-up edge, as transgranular micro-cracks found in the stagnation region are similar to micro-cracks initiating built-up edge formation. Higher plasticity of austenite due to softening under high strain is seen responsible for the ferrite build-up. Flow lines indicate that austenite is plastically deforming at a greater rate into the chip, while ferrite shows to partition most of the strain during deformation. The loss of annealing twins and activation of multiple slip planes triggered at high strain may explain the highly plastic behavior shown by austenite.

  9. Characterization of Low Temperature Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Arc Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Babu, S S; Vitek, J M

    2003-08-20

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) has been used to identify a previously unobserved low temperature ferrite ({delta})/austenite({gamma}) phase transformation in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) welds. In this ''ferrite dip'' transformation, the ferrite transforms to austenite during heating to peak temperatures on the order of 750 C, and re-transforms to ferrite during cooling, resulting in a ferrite volume fraction equivalent to that in the base metal. Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) and laser dilatometry measurements during Gleeble{reg_sign} thermal simulations are performed in order to verify the existence of this low temperature phase transformation. Thermodynamic and kinetic models for phase transformations, including both local-equilibrium and para-equilibrium diffusion controlled growth, show that diffusion of substitutional alloying elements does not provide a reasonable explanation for the experimental observations. On the other hand, the diffusion of interstitial alloying elements may be rapid enough to explain this behavior. Based on both the experimental and modeling results, two mechanisms for the ''ferrite dip'' transformation, including the formation and decomposition of secondary austenite and an athermal martensitic-type transformation of ferrite to austenite, are considered.

  10. Innovative Powder Processing of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened ODS Ferritic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel; Anderson, Iver; Kramer, Matthew

    2011-04-01

    An innovative gas atomization reaction synthesis technique was employed as a viable method to dramatically lower the processing cost for precursor oxide dispersion forming ferritic stainless steel powders (i.e., Fe-Cr-(Hf,Ti)-Y). During this rapid solidification process the atomized powders were enveloped by a nano-metric Cr-enriched metastable oxide film. Elevated temperature heat treatment was used to dissociate this metastable oxide phase through oxygen exchange reactions with Y-(Hf,Ti) enriched intermetallic compound precipitates. These solid state reactions resulted in the formation of highly stable nano-metric mixed oxide dispersoids (i.e., Y-Ti-O or Y-Hf-O) throughout the alloy microstructure. Subsequent high temperature (1200 C) heat treatments were used to elucidate the thermal stability of each nano-metric oxide dispersoid phase. Transmission electron microscopy coupled with X-ray diffraction was used to evaluate phase evolution within the alloy microstructure.

  11. Investigation of AISI 441 Ferritic Stainless Steel and Development of Spinel Coatings for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guanguang; Wang, Chong M.; Nie, Zimin; Templeton, Joshua D.; Singh, Prabhakar; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2008-05-30

    As part of an effort to develop cost-effective ferritic stainless steel-based interconnects for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks, both bare and spinel coated AISI 441 were studied in terms of metallurgical characteristics, oxidation behavior, and electrical performance. The conventional melt metallurgy used for the bulk alloy fabrication leads to significant processing cost reduction and the alloy chemistry with the presence of minor alloying additions of Nb and Ti facilitate the strengthening by precipitation and formation of Laves phase both inside grains and along grain boundaries during exposure in the intermediate SOFC operating temperature range. The Laves phase formed along the grain boundaries also ties up Si and prevents the formation of an insulating silica layer at the scale/metal interface during prolonged exposure. The substantial increase in ASR during long term oxidation due to oxide scale growth suggested the need for a conductive protection layer, which could also minimize Cr evaporation. In particular, Mn1.5Co1.5O4 based surface coatings on planar coupons drastically improved the electrical performance of the 441, yielding stable ASR values at 800ºC for over 5,000 hours. Ce-modified spinel coatings retained the advantages of the unmodified spinel coatings, and also appeared to alter the scale growth behavior beneath the coating, leading to a more adherent scale. The spinel protection layers appeared also to improve the surface stability of 441 against the anomalous oxidation that has been observed for ferritic stainless steels exposed to dual atmosphere conditions similar to SOFC interconnect environments. Hence, it is anticipated that, compared to unmodified spinel coatings, the Ce-modified coatings may lead to superior structural stability and electrical performance.

  12. Chemical Compatibility of Barium-Calcium-Aluminosilicate Based Sealing Glasses with Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnect in SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2003-08-01

    In most planar SOFC stack designs, the interconnect, which is typically made from a ferritic stainless steel, is hermitically sealed to the ceramic PEN (Positive electrode-Electrolyte-Negative electrode) by a sealing glass. To maintain the structural stability and minimize degradation of the stack performance, the sealing glass must be chemically compatible with the stainless steel interconnect. In this study, a barium-calcium-aluminosilicate (BCAS) based glass-ceramic, specifically developed as a sealant in SOFC stacks, and a ferritic stainless steel (446) were selected as examples to increase the understanding the chemical compatibility issues in SOFC. Evaluation of the interfaces of coupon joints indicated that interactions between the BCAS glass-ceramic and the ferritic stainless steel was dependent on the exposure conditions. At the edges of joints, where oxygen or air was accessible, the interaction often led to the formation of BaCrO4, while in the interior of the joints, chromium or chromia dissolved into the glass to form a thin layer of chromium rich solid solution. It was also found that, in the interior of the joints, the interaction often resulted in the formation of pores aligned along the interface. It appears the pore formation along the interface can be avoided through a pre-heat treatment.

  13. TEM microscopical examination of the magnetic domain boundaries in a super duplex austenitic-ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Fourlaris, G.; Gladman, T.; Maylin, M.

    1996-12-31

    It has been demonstrated in an earlier publication that significant improvements in the coercivity, maximum induction and remanence values can be achieved, by using a 2205 type Duplex austenitic-ferritic stainless steel (DSS) instead of the low alloy medium carbon steels currently being used. These improvements are achieved in the as received 2205 material, and after small amounts of cold rolling have been applied, to increase the strength. In addition, the modification of the duplex austenitic-ferritic microstructure, via a heat treatment route, results in a finer austenite `island` dispersion in a ferritic matrix and provides an attractive option for further modification of the magnetic characteristics of the material. However, the 2205 type DSS exhibits {open_quotes}marginal{close_quotes} corrosion protection in a marine environment, so that a study has been undertaken to examine whether the beneficial effects exhibited by the 2205 DSS, are also present in a 2507 type super-DSS.

  14. Microstructural origin of the skeletal ferrite morphology of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J A; Williams, J C; Thompson, A W

    1982-04-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy was conducted on welds exhibiting a variety of skeletal, or vermicular ferrite morphologies in addition to one lathy ferrite morphology. These ferrite morphologies result from primary ferrite solidification followed by a solid state transformation upon cooling. During cooling, a large fraction of the ferrite transforms to austenite leaving a variety of ferrite morphologies. Comparison of composition profiles and alloy partitioning showed both the skeletal and lathy ferrite structures result from a diffusion controlled solid state transformation. However, the overall measured composition profiles of the weld structure are a result of partitioning during both solidification and the subsequent solid state transformation.

  15. Effect of Austenitic and Austeno-Ferritic Electrodes on 2205 Duplex and 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Dissimilar Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.

    2016-09-01

    This study addresses the effect of different types of austenitic and austeno-ferritic electrodes (E309L, E309LMo and E2209) on the relationship between weldability, microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of shielded metal arc welded duplex/austenitic (2205/316L) stainless steel dissimilar joints using the combined techniques of optical, scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive spectrometer and electrochemical. The results indicated that the change in electrode composition led to microstructural variations in the welds with the development of different complex phases such as vermicular ferrite, lathy ferrite, widmanstatten and intragranular austenite. Mechanical properties of welded joints were diverged based on compositions and solidification modes; it was observed that ferritic mode solidified weld dominated property wise. However, the pitting corrosion resistance of all welds showed different behavior in chloride solution; moreover, weld with E2209 was superior, whereas E309L exhibited lower resistance. Higher degree of sensitization was observed in E2209 weld, while lesser in E309L weld. Optimum ferrite content was achieved in all welds.

  16. Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry.

  17. Influence of combined thermomechanical treatment on impurity segregation in ferritic-martensitic and austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, A. M.; Neustroev, V. S.; Shamardin, V. K.; Shestakov, V. P.; Tazhibaeva, I. L.; Krivchenkoa, V. A.

    2000-12-01

    In this study 13Cr2MoVNb ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) and 16Cr15Ni3MoNb austenitic stainless steel (ASS) tensile specimens were subjected to standard heat treatments and divided into two groups. Specimens in group 1 (FMS only) were aged at 400°C in a stress free and in an elastically stressed state with a tensile load (100 MPa) then doped with hydrogen in an electrolytic cell. Specimens in group 2 were subjected to cold work (up to 10%) and exposed to short-time heating at 500° for 0.5 h. All specimens were fractured at room temperature in an Auger spectrometer and Auger analysis of the fracture surfaces was performed in situ after fracturing. A noticeable increase of N and P segregation levels and a widening of the depth distribution on the grain boundary facets were observed in the FMS after aging in the stressed state. Cold-worked FMS and ASS showed a ductile dimple mode of fracture, but relatively high levels of S, P and N were observed on the dimple surfaces. We consider the origin of such effects in terms of the stressed state and plastic-deformation-enhanced segregation.

  18. Thermo-mechanical fatigue properties of a ferritic stainless steel for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Yung-Tang; Lin, Chih-Kuang

    2012-12-01

    Thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) behavior of a newly developed ferritic stainless steel (Crofer 22 H) for planar solid oxide fuel cell (pSOFC) interconnect is investigated. TMF tests under various combinations of cyclic mechanical and thermal loadings are conducted in air at a temperature range of 25oC-800 °C. Experimental results show the number of cycles to failure for non-hold-time TMF loading is decreased with an increase in the minimum stress applied at 800 °C. There is very little effect of maximum stress applied at 25 °C on the number of cycles to failure. The non-hold-time TMF life is dominated by a fatigue mechanism involving cyclic high-temperature softening plastic deformation. A hold-time of 100 h for the minimum stress applied at 800 °C causes a significant drop of number of cycles to failure due to a synergistic action of fatigue and creep. Creep and creep-fatigue interaction mechanisms are the two primary contributors to the hold-time TMF damage. The creep damage ratio in the hold-time TMF damage is increased with a decrease in applied stress at 800 °C and an increase in number of cycles to failure.

  19. Effects of vanadium on polarization of 18% Cr ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, R.D. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering)

    1993-07-01

    Effects of alloying on the anodic polarization of a low interstitial, 18% chromium (Cr) ferritic stainless steel in sulfuric acid (H[sub 2]SO[sub 4]) were examined. Vanadium (V) from 1 to 4% was added alone and with up to 1.5% nickel (Ni), silicon (Si), copper (Cu), and molybdenum (MO). The carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) level varied from 84 to 168 ppm. The alloys were stabilized with titanium (Ti) or niobium (Nb). Increasing V had a variable effect on passivation in 1 N H[sub 2]SO[sub 4]. The critical current density for passivation lowered. The breakdown potential also lowered. Stabilization with Ti prevented lowering of the breakdown potential. Ni addition to Cr-V-Ti alloys broadened the passive region of the alloys and lowered the minimum current density for passivation. Mo and Cu were beneficial, but Si had little effect on passivation. The alloys did not appear to undergo intergranular corrosion in the modified Strauss test.

  20. The Performance of Ce Surface Treated Ferritic Stainless Steels for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-09-01

    This research deals with the effect of a Ce surface treatment on the behavior of Fe-Cr-Mn ferritic stainless steels which may have application in SOFC technology. This treatment consisted of applying a slurry of CeO2 and a halide activator to the surface of coupons. After the slurry dried the coupons were heated to 900C in a controlled atmosphere furnace for 12 hours. The effectiveness of the treatment on commercial (Type 409 (12Cr), Type 430 (18Cr), Crofer 22APU (22Cr), Type 446(26Cr)) and experimental (NETL F9 (12Cr) and NETL F5 (22Cr)) alloys as a function of Cr content will be presented. The oxidation behavior of the alloys was assessed by exposing coupons (untreated and treated) to moist air at 800C. Area specific resistance (ASR) was measured at 800C. In general, the rare earth treatment effectively reduced the oxidation rate, resulting in thinner oxide scales and less internal oxidation.

  1. High temperature corrosion of welded ferritic stainless steel in flowing CO2 gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariff, Nurul Atikah; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Jalar, Azman; Hamid, Muhammad Azmi Abdul; Rahman, Irman Abdul

    2013-05-01

    The high temperature corrosion of welded structure of Ferritic Stainless Steel (FSS) in flowing Ar-75%CO2 gas at 700°C has been investigated. The welded structure of FSS joint using ER 308L filler metal by GTAW. The soundness of welded joint has been clarified by X-Ray CT Scan. Prior the high temperature exposure, the welded FSS compulsory passed the standard of ASME. The welded structure of FSS was heated in flowing CO2 gas for 50 h at 1 atm. The morphology and microstructure of oxide formation on welded FSS alloy was characterized by using SEM. The result shows that the different oxide morphologies were observed on parent and fusion metal. The formation of different oxide and element properties at the interface were revealed by X-Ray Diffraction. The differences of the physical condition and morphology microstructure of welded and parent metal were observed to respond to different exposure times. This phenomenon perhaps explained due to the differences of the minor alloying elements on both parent and filler metals. The high temperature corrosion behaviour was discussed in details in this paper regarding on the physical properties, morphology and the microstructure.

  2. Study on the activated laser welding of ferritic stainless steel with rare earth elements yttrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    The ferritic stainless steel SUS430 was used in this work. Based on a multi-component activating flux, composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09 % CaCO3, 10.43 % CaO, and 27.49 % MgO, a series of modified activating fluxes with 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% of rare earth (RE) element yttrium (Y) respectively were produced, and their effects on the weld penetration (WP) and corrosion resistant (CR) property were studied. Results showed that RE element Y hardly had any effects on increasing the WP. In the FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment, the corrosion rates of almost all the samples cut from welded joints turned out to be greater than the parent metal (23.51 g/m2 h). However, there was an exception that the corrosion rate of the sample with 5% Y was only 21.96 g/m2 h, which was even better than parent metal. The further Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) test showed the existence of elements Zr, Ca, O, and Y in the molten slag near the weld seam while none of them were found in the weld metal, indicating the direct transition of element from activating fluxes to the welding seam did not exist. It was known that certain composition of activating fluxes effectively restrain the loss of Cr element in the process of laser welding, and as a result, the CR of welded joints was improved.

  3. Elevated-temperature tensile and creep properties of several ferritic stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The elevated-temperature mechanical properties of several ferritic stainless steels were determined. The alloys evaluated included Armco 18SR, GE 1541, and NASA-18T-A. Tensile and creep strength properties at 1073 and 1273 K and residual room temperature tensile properties after creep testing were measured. In addition, 1273 K tensile and creep tests and residual property testing were conducted with Armco 18SR and GE 1541 which were exposed for 200 hours to a severe oxidizing environment in automotive thermal reactors. Aside from the residual tensile properties for Armco 18SR, prior exposure did not affect the mechanical properties of either alloy. The 1273 K creep strength parallel to the sheet-rolling direction was similar for all three alloys. At 1073 K, NASA-18T-A had better creep strength than either Armco 18SR or GE 1541. NASA-18T-A possesses better residual properties after creep testing than either Armco 18SR or Ge 1541.

  4. Protective/conductive coatings for ferritic stainless steel interconnects used in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaigan, Nima

    Ferritic stainless steels are the most commonly used materials for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect application. Although these alloys may meet the criteria for interconnect application for short periods of service, their application is limited for long-term use (i.e., 40,000 h) due to poor oxidation behaviour that results in a rapid increase in contact resistance. In addition, volatile Cr species migrating from the chromia scale can poison the cathode resulting in a considerable drop in performance of the cell. Coatings and surface modifications have been developed in order to mitigate the abovementioned problems. In this study, composite electrodeposition of reactive element containing particles in a metal matrix was considered as a solution to the interconnect problems. Nickel and Co were used as the metal matrix and LaCrO3 particles as the reactive element containing particles. The role of the particles was to improve the oxidation resistance and oxide scale adhesion, while the role of Ni or Co was to provide a matrix for embedding of the particles. Also, oxidation of the Ni or Co matrix led to the formation of conductive oxides. Moreover, as another part of this study, the effect of substrate composition on performance of steel interconnects was investigated. Numerous experimental techniques were used to study and characterise the oxidation behaviour of the composite coatings, as well as the metal-oxide scale interface properties. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX), as well as surface analysis techniques including Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), were used for the purpose of characterization. The substrate used for coating was AISI-SAE 430 stainless steel that is considered as a typical, formerly used interconnect material. Also, for the purpose of the metal-oxide scale interfacial study, ZMG232 stainless steel that is a specially

  5. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Dissimilar Friction Stir Welds of 11Cr-Ferritic/Martensitic Steel to 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yutaka S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Hiromichi T.; Yano, Yasuhide; Sekio, Yoshihiro

    2015-12-01

    Dissimilar joints between ferritic and austenitic steels are of interest for selected applications in next generation fast reactors. In this study, dissimilar friction-stir welding of an 11 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic steel to a 316 austenitic stainless steel was attempted and the mechanical properties and microstructure of the resulting welds were examined. Friction-stir welding produces a stir zone without macroscopic weld-defects, but the two dissimilar steels are not intermixed. The two dissimilar steels are interleaved along a sharp zigzagging interface in the stir zone. During small-sized tensile testing of the stir zone, this sharp interface did not act as a fracture site. Furthermore, the microstructure of the stir zone was refined in both the ferritic/martensitic steel and the 316 stainless steel resulting in improved mechanical properties over the adjacent base material regions. This study demonstrates that friction-stir welding can produce welds between dissimilar steels that contain no macroscopic weld-defects and display suitable mechanical properties.

  6. Mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness of a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaxin; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1993-10-01

    The critical J-integrals of mode I (J{sub IC}), mixed-mode I/III (J{sub MC}), and mode III (J{sub IIIC}) were examined for a ferritic stainless steel (F-82H) at ambient temperature. A determination of J{sub MC} was made using modified compact-tension specimens. Different ratios of tension/shear stress were achieved by varying the principal axis of the crack plane between 0 and 55 degrees from the load line. Results showed that J{sub MC} and tearing modulus (T{sub M}) values varied with the crack angles and were lower than their mode I and mode III counterparts. Both the minimum J{sub MC} and T{sub M} values occurred at a crack angle between 40 and 50 degrees, where the load ratio of {sigma}{sub i}/{sigma}{sub iii} was 1.2 to 0.84. The J{sub min} was 240 Kj/M{sup 2}, and ratios of J{sub IC}/J{sub min} and J{sub IIIC}/J{sub min} were 2.1 and 1.9, respectively. The morphology of fracture surfaces was consistent with the change of J{sub MC} and T{sub M} values. While the upper shelf-fracture toughness of F-82H depends on loading mode, the J{sub min} remains very high. Other important considerations include the effect of mixed-mode loading on the DBT temperature, and effects of hydrogen and irradiation on J{sub min}.

  7. A review of recent progress in coatings, surface modifications and alloy developments for solid oxide fuel cell ferritic stainless steel interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaigan, Nima; Qu, Wei; Ivey, Douglas G.; Chen, Weixing

    Ferritic stainless steels have become the standard material for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnect applications. The use of commercially available ferritic stainless steels, not specifically designed for interconnect application, however, presents serious issues leading to premature degradation of the fuel cell stack, particularly on the cathode side. These problems include rapidly increasing contact resistance and volatilization of Cr from the oxide scales, resulting in cathode chromium poisoning and cell malfunction. To overcome these issues, a variety of conductive/protective coatings, surface treatments and modifications as well as alloy development have been suggested and studied over the past several years. This paper critically reviews the attempts performed thus far to mitigate the issues associated with the use of ferritic stainless steels on the cathode side. Different approaches are categorized and summarized and examples for each case are provided. Finally, directions and recommendations for the future studies are presented.

  8. Electron work functions of ferrite and austenite phases in a duplex stainless steel and their adhesive forces with AFM silicon probe

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liqiu; Hua, Guomin; Yang, Binjie; Lu, Hao; Qiao, Lijie; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang

    2016-01-01

    Local electron work function, adhesive force, modulus and deformation of ferrite and austenite phases in a duplex stainless steel were analyzed by scanning force microscopy. It is demonstrated that the austenite has a higher electron work function than the ferrite, corresponding to higher modulus, smaller deformation and larger adhesive force. Relevant first-principles calculations were conducted to elucidate the mechanism behind. It is demonstrated that the difference in the properties between austenite and ferrite is intrinsically related to their electron work functions. PMID:26868719

  9. Long-term oxidation behavior of spinel-coated ferritic stainless steel for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guanguang; Nie, Zimin; Templeton, Joshua D.

    2013-06-01

    Long-term tests (>8,000 hours) indicate that AISI 441 ferritic stainless steel coated with a Mn-Co spinel protection layer is a promising candidate material system for IT-SOFC interconnect applications. While uncoated AISI 441 showed a substantial increase in area-specific electrical resistance (ASR), spinel-coated AISI 441 exhibited much lower ASR values (11-13 mOhm-cm2). Formation of an insulating silica sublayer beneath the native chromia-based scale was not observed, and the spinel coatings reduced the oxide scale growth rate and blocked outward diffusion of Cr from the alloy substrate. The structure of the scale formed under the spinel coatings during the long term tests differed from that typically observed on ferritic stainless steels after short term oxidation tests. While short term tests typically indicate a dual layer scale structure consisting of a chromia layer covered by a layer of Mn-Cr spinel, the scale grown during the long term tests consisted of a chromia matrix with discrete regions of Mn-Cr spinel distributed throughout the matrix. The presence of Ti in the chromia scale matrix and/or the presence of regions of Mn-Cr spinel within the scale may have increased the scale electrical conductivity, which would explain the fact that the observed ASR in the tests was lower than would be expected if the scale consisted of pure chromia.

  10. Long term high temperature oxidation characteristics of La and Cu alloyed ferritic stainless steels for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Srinivasan; Lee, Young-Su; Kim, Dong-Ik

    2016-09-01

    To ensure the best performance of solid oxide fuel cell metallic interconnects, the Fe-22 wt.% Cr ferritic stainless steels with various La contents (0.006-0.6 wt.%) and Cu addition (1.57 wt.%), are developed. Long-term isothermal oxidation behavior of these steels is investigated in air at 800 °C, for 2700 h. Chemistry, morphology, and microstructure of the thermally grown oxide scale are examined using XPS, SEM-EDX, and XRD techniques. Broadly, all the steels show a double layer consisting of an inner Cr2O3 and outer (Mn, Cr)3O4. Distinctly, in the La-added steels, binary oxides of Cr, Mn and Ti are found at the oxide scale surface together with (Mn, Cr)3O4. Furthermore, all La-varied steels possess the metallic Fe protrusions along with discontinuous (Mn, Cr)3O4 spinel zones at the oxide scale/metal interface and isolated precipitates of Ti-oxides in the underlying matrix. Increase of La content to 0.6 wt.% is detrimental to the oxidation resistance. For the Cu-added steel, Cu is found to segregate strongly at the oxide scale/metal interface which inhibits the ingress of oxygen thereby suppressing the subscale formation of (Mn, Cr)3O4. Thus, Cu addition to the Fe-22Cr ferritic stainless steels benefits the oxidation resistance.

  11. Evaluation by the Double Loop Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation Test of Aged Ferritic Stainless Steel Intergranular Corrosion Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhom, H.; Amadou, T.; Braham, C.

    2010-12-01

    An experimental design method was used to determine the effect of factors that significantly affect the response of the double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test in controlling the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion (IGC) of UNS S43000 (AISI 430) ferritic stainless steel. The test response is expressed in terms of the reactivation/activation current ratio ( I r / I a pct). Test results analysed by the analysis of variance (ANOVA) method show that the molarity of the H2SO4 electrolyte and the potential scanning rate have a more significant effect on the DL-EPR test response than the temperature and the depassivator agent concentration. On the basis of these results, a study was conducted in order to determine the optimal operating conditions of the test as a nondestructive technique for evaluating IGC resistance of ferritic stainless steel components. Three different heat treatments are considered in this study: solution annealing (nonsensitized), aging during 3 hours at 773 K (500 °C) (slightly sensitized), and aging during 2 hours at 873 K (600 °C) (highly sensitized). The aim is to find the operating conditions that simultaneously ensure the selectivity of the attack (intergranular and chromium depleted zone) and are able to detect the effect of low dechromization. It is found that a potential scanning rate of 2.5 mV/s in an electrolyte composed of H2SO4 3 M solution without depassivator, at a temperature around 293 K (20 °C), is the optimal operating condition for the DL-EPR test. Using this condition, it is possible to assess the degree of sensitization (DOS) to the IGC of products manufactured in ferritic stainless steels rapidly, reliably, and quantitatively. A time-temperature-start of sensitization (TTS) diagram for the UNS S43000 (France Inox, Villepinte, France) stainless steel was obtained with acceptable accuracy by this method when the IGC sensitization criterion was set to I r / I a > 1 pct. This diagram is in

  12. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel

    2011-12-13

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from

  13. Characterization of perovskite film prepared by pulsed laser deposition on ferritic stainless steel using microscopic and optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durda, E.; Jaglarz, J.; Kąc, S.; Przybylski, K.; El Kouari, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The perovskite La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF48) film was deposited on Crofer 22 APU ferritic stainless steel by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Morphological studies of the sample were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Information about film thickness and surface topography of the film and the steel substrate were obtained using following optical methods: spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF) and total integrated reflectometry (TIS). In particular, the BRDF study, being complementary to atomic force microscopy, yielded information about surface topography. Using the previously mentioned methods, the following statistic surface parameters were determined: root-mean square (rms) roughness and autocorrelation length by determining the power spectral density (PSD) function of surface irregularities.

  14. Mn1.5Co1.5O4 Spinel Protection Layers on Ferritic Stainless Steels for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Xia, Gordon; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2005-01-26

    In intermediate solid oxide fuel cells, the use of cost effective chromia forming alloy interconnects such as ferritic stainless steels can lead to severe degradation in cell performance due to chromium migration into the cells at the cathode side. To protect cells from chromium poisoning and improve their performance, a Mn1.5Co1.5O4 spinel barrier layer has been developed and tested on the ferritic stainless steel Crofer22 APU. Thermal and electrical tests confirmed the effectiveness of the spinel protection layer as a means of stopping chromium migration and decreasing oxidation, while promoting electrical contact and minimizing cathode/interconnect interfacial resistance. The thermally grown spinel protection layer was well-bonded to the Crofer22 APU substrate and demonstrated stable performance under thermal cycling.

  15. Fracture toughness of the IEA heat of F82H ferritic/martensitic stainless steel as a function of loading mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaxin; Gelles, D.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1997-04-01

    Mode I and mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness tests were performed for the IEA heat of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel F82H at ambient temperature in order to provide comparison with previous measurements on a small heat given a different heat treatment. The results showed that heat to heat variations and heat treatment had negligible consequences on Mode I fracture toughness, but behavior during mixed-mode testing showed unexpected instabilities.

  16. Deposition and Evaluation of Protective PVD Coatings on Ferritic Stainless Steel SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Gannon, Paul; Deibert, Max; Smith, Richard J.; Kayani, Asghar N.; Kopczyk, M.; Van Vorous, D.; Yang, Z Gary; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Visco, s.; jacobson, c.; Kurokawa, H.; Sofie, Stephen W.

    2006-09-21

    Reduced operating temperatures (600-800°C) of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) may enable the use of inexpensive ferritic steels as interconnects. Due to the demanding SOFC interconnect operating environment, protective coatings are gaining attention to increase longterm stability. In this study, large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) and hybrid filtered arc assisted electron beam physical vapor deposition (FA-EBPVD) technologies were used for deposition of two-segment coatings with Cr-Co-Al-O-N based sublayer and Mn-Co-O top layer. Coatings were deposited on ferritic steel and subsequently annealed in air for various time intervals. Surface oxidation was investigated using RBS, SEM and EDS analyses. Cr volatilization was evaluated using a transpiration apparatus and ICP-MS analysis of the resultant condensate. Electrical conductivity (Area Specific Resistance) was studied as a function of time using the four-point technique with Ag electrodes. The oxidation behavior, Cr volatilization rate, and electrical conductivity of the coated and uncoated samples are reported. Transport mechanisms for various oxidizing species and coating diffusion barrier properties are discussed.

  17. Short-term in vitro responses of human peripheral blood monocytes to ferritic stainless steel fiber networks.

    PubMed

    Spear, Rose L; Brooks, Roger A; Markaki, Athina E

    2013-05-01

    Beneficial effects on bone-implant bonding may accrue from ferromagnetic fiber networks on implants which can deform in vivo inducing controlled levels of mechanical strain directly in growing bone. This approach requires ferromagnetic fibers that can be implanted in vivo without stimulating undue inflammatory cell responses or cytotoxicity. This study examines the short-term in vitro responses, including attachment, viability, and inflammatory stimulation, of human peripheral blood monocytes to 444 ferritic stainless steel fiber networks. Two types of 444 networks, differing in fiber cross section and thus surface area, were considered alongside austenitic stainless steel fiber networks, made of 316L, a widely established implant material. Similar high percent seeding efficiencies were measured by CyQuant® on all fiber networks after 48 h of cell culture. Extensive cell attachment was confirmed by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy, which showed round monocytes attached at various depths into the fiber networks. Medium concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were determined as indicators of viability and inflammatory responses, respectively. Percent LDH concentrations were similar for both 444 fiber networks at all time points, whereas significantly lower than those of 316L control networks at 24 h. All networks elicited low-level secretions of TNF-α, which were significantly lower than that of the positive control wells containing zymosan. Collectively, the results indicate that 444 networks produce comparable responses to medical implant grade 316L networks and are able to support human peripheral blood monocytes in short-term in vitro cultures without inducing significant inflammatory or cytotoxic effects.

  18. Microstructural Characteristics of Plasma Nitrided Layer on Hot-Rolled 304 Stainless Steel with a Small Amount of α-Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaolei; Yu, Zhiwei; Cui, Liying; Niu, Xinjun; Cai, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The hot-rolled 304 stainless steel with γ-austenite and approximately 5 pct α-ferrite elongated along the rolling direction was plasma-nitrided at a low temperature of 693 K (420 °C). X-ray diffraction results revealed that the nitrided layer was mainly composed of the supersaturated solid solution of nitrogen in austenite ( γ N). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations showed that the microstructure of the γ N phase exhibited "fracture factor contrast" reflective of the occurrence of fine pre-precipitations in γ N by the continuous precipitation. The occurrence of a diffuse scattering effect on the electron diffraction spots of γ N indicated that the pre-precipitation took place in γ N in the form of strongly bonded Cr-N clusters or pairs due to a strong attractive interaction of nitrogen with chromium. Scanning electron microscopy and TEM observations indicated that the discontinuous precipitation initiated from the γ/ α interfaces and grew from the austenite boundaries into austenite grains to form a lamellar structure consisting of CrN and ferrite. The orientation relationship between CrN and ferrite corresponded to a Baker-Nutting relationship: (100)CrN//(100) α ; [011]CrN//[001] α . A zigzag boundary line following the banded structure of alternating γ-austenite and elongated α-ferrite was presented between the nitrided layer and the substrate to form a continuous varying layer thickness, which resulted from the difference in diffusivities of nitrogen in α-ferrite and γ-austenite, along the γ/ α interfaces and through the lattice. Microstructural features similar to the γ N were also revealed in the ferrite of the nitrided layer by TEM. It was not excluded that a supersaturated solid solution of nitrogen in ferrite ( α N) formed in the nitrided layer.

  19. Investigation of iron-chromium-niobium-titanium ferritic stainless steel for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guan-Guang; Wang, Chong-Min; Nie, Zimin; Templeton, Joshua; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    As part of an effort to develop cost-effective ferritic stainless steel-based interconnects for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks, both bare AISI441 and AISI441 coated with (Mn,Co) 3O 4 protection layers were studied in terms of its metallurgical characteristics, oxidation behavior, and electrical performance. The addition of minor alloying elements, in particular Nb, led to formation of Laves phases both inside grains and along grain boundaries. In particular, the Laves phase which precipitated out along grain boundaries during exposure at intermediate SOFC operating temperatures was found to be rich in both Nb and Si. The capture of Si in the Laves phase minimized the Si activity in the alloy matrix and prevented formation of an insulating silica layer at the scale/metal interface, resulting in a reduction in area-specific electrical resistance (ASR). However, the relatively high oxidation rate of the steel, which leads to increasing ASR over time, and the need to prevent volatilization of chromium from the steel necessitates the application of a conductive protection layer on the steel. In particular, the application of a Mn 1.5Co 1.5O 4 spinel protection layer substantially improved the electrical performance of the 441 by reducing the oxidation rate.

  20. Microstructural evolution in a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel and its relation to high-temperature deformation and rupture models

    SciTech Connect

    DiMelfi, R.J.; Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The ferritic-martensitic stainless steel HT-9 exhibits an anomalously high creep strength in comparison to its high-temperature flow strength from tensile tests performed at moderate rates. A constitutive relation describing its high-temperature tensile behavior over a wide range of conditions has been developed. When applied to creep conditions the model predicts deformation rates orders of magnitude higher than observed. To account for the observed creep strength, a fine distribution of precipitates is postulated to evolve over time during creep. The precipitate density is calculated at each temperature and stress to give the observed creep rate. The apparent precipitation kinetics thereby extracted from this analysis is used in a model for the rupture-time kinetics that compares favorably with observation. Properly austenitized and tempered material was aged over times comparable to creep conditions, and in a way consistent with the precipitation kinetics from the model. Microstructural observations support the postulates and results of the model system. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Probing Formability Improvement of Ultra-thin Ferritic Stainless Steel Bipolar Plate of PEMFC in Non-conventional Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bong, Hyuk Jong; Barlat, Frédéric; Lee, Myoung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    Formability increase in non-conventional forming profiles programmed in the servo-press was investigated using finite element analysis. As an application, forming experiment on a 0.15-mm-thick ferritic stainless steel sheet for a bipolar plate, a primary component of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, was conducted. Four different forming profiles were considered to investigate the effects of forming profiles on formability and shape accuracy. The four motions included conventional V motion, holding motion, W motion, and oscillating motion. Among the four motions, the holding motion, in which the slide was held for a certain period at the bottom dead point, led to the best formability. Finite element simulations were conducted to validate the experimental results and to probe the formability improvement in the non-conventional forming profiles. A creep model to address stress relaxation effect along with tool elastic recovery was implemented using a user-material subroutine, CREEP in ABAQUS finite element software. The stress relaxation and variable contact conditions during the holding and oscillating profiles were found to be the main mechanism of formability improvement.

  2. Development of Advanced 9Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels and Austenitic Stainless Steels for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, Sam; Tan, Lizhen; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steel Grade 92, with or without thermomechanical treatment (TMT), and austenitic stainless steels HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine precipitate strengthening) and NF709 were selected as potential candidate structural materials in the U.S. Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) program. The objective is to develop advanced steels with improved properties as compared with reference materials such as Grade 91 and Type 316H steels that are currently in nuclear design codes. Composition modification and/or processing optimization (e.g., TMT and cold-work) were performed to improve properties such as resistance to thermal aging, creep, creep-fatigue, fracture, and sodium corrosion. Testings to characterize these properties for the advanced steels were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory, the Argonne National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the U.S. SFR program. This paper focuses on the resistance to thermal aging and creep of the advanced steels. The advanced steels exhibited up to two orders of magnitude increase in creep life compared to the reference materials. Preliminary results on the weldment performance of the advanced steels are also presented. The superior performance of the advanced steels would improve reactor design flexibility, safety margins and economics.

  3. Preparation and performances of Co-Mn spinel coating on a ferritic stainless steel interconnect material for solid oxide fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. H.; Zeng, C. L.

    2014-04-01

    Ferritic stainless steels have become the candidate materials for interconnects of intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The present issues to be solved urgently for the application of ferritic stainless steel interconnects are their rapid increase in contact resistance and Cr poisoning. In the present study, a chloride electrolyte suspension has been developed to electro-deposit a Co-Mn alloy on a type 430 stainless steel, followed by heat treatment at 750 °C in argon and at 800 °C in air to obtain Co-Mn spinel coatings. The experimental results indicate that an adhesive and compact Co-Mn alloy layer can be deposited in the chloride solution. After heat treatment, a complex coating composed of an external MnCo2O4 layer and an inner Cr-rich oxide layer has been formed on 430SS. The coating improves the oxidation resistance of the steel at 800 °C in air, especially in wet air, and inhibits the outward diffusion of Cr from the Cr-rich scale. Moreover, a low contact resistance has been achieved with the application of the spinel coatings.

  4. Comparison of Short-Term Oxidation Behavior of Model and Commercial Chromia-Forming Ferritic Stainless Steels in Air with Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Keiser, James R; More, Karren Leslie; Fayek, Mostafa; Walker, Larry R; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R

    2012-01-01

    A high-purity Fe-20Cr and commercial type 430 ferritic stainless steel were exposed at 700 and 800 C in dry air and air with 10% water vapor (wet air) and characterized by SEM, XRD, STEM, SIMS, and EPMA. The Fe-20Cr alloy formed a fast growing Fe-rich oxide scale at 700 C in wet air after 24 h exposure, but formed a thin chromia scale at 700 C in dry air and at 800 C in both dry air and wet air. In contrast, thin spinel + chromia base scales with a discontinuous silica subscale were formed on 430 stainless steel under all conditions studied. Extensive void formation was observed at the alloy-oxide interface for the Fe-20Cr in both dry and wet conditions, but not for the 430 stainless steel. The Fe-20Cr alloy was found to exhibit a greater relative extent of subsurface Cr depletion than the 430 stainless steel, despite the former's higher Cr content. Depletion of Cr in the Fe-20Cr after 24 h exposure was also greater at 700 C than 800 C. The relative differences in oxidation behavior are discussed in terms of the coarse alloy grain size of the high-purity Fe-20Cr material, and the effects of Mn, Si, and C on the oxide scale formed on the 430 stainless steel.

  5. Au/TiO2 supported on ferritic stainless steel monoliths as CO oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milt, V. G.; Ivanova, S.; Sanz, O.; Domínguez, M. I.; Corrales, A.; Odriozola, J. A.; Centeno, M. A.

    2013-04-01

    Metallic supported structured catalysts were obtained by washcoating AluchromYHf monoliths with an Au/TiO2 catalyst. The powder catalyst was synthesized by DAE (direct anionic exchange) method. Using this catalyst, a stable slurry was prepared and used to washcoat the monoliths. TEM and SEM studies revealed that gold nanoparticles in the Au/TiO2 powder catalyst had an average diameter of 3-4 nm, but during the preparation of the structured catalyst, aggregate Au particles of the slurry reached diameters of 9 nm. Before coating, Aluchrom YHf monoliths were thermally treated to generate a homogeneous and well-adhered oxide rough surface layer, mainly composed of α-Al2O3 whiskers, which favored the anchoring of the catalyst. The catalytic layer deposited was well attached and contained not only the Au/TiO2 catalyst but also metallic oxides formed from stainless steel components that diffused through the oxide scale. The structural characterization was performed by XRD, XRF, TEM, SEM, GD-OES and SBET. The catalytic activity of the powder and structured catalysts was tested in the oxidation of the CO reaction. Catalysts demonstrated to be active at room temperature. After a first activation run, and in spite of their larger gold particle size, the catalytic activities of the structured catalysts overcame those of the powder catalyst. This improvement is probably due to the segregation of the transition metal oxides toward the surface oxide scale.

  6. Influence of alloy content and a cerium surface treatment on the oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr ferritic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    The cost of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) can be significantly reduced by using interconnects made from ferritic stainless steels. In fact, several alloys have been developed specifically for this application (Crofer 22APU and Hitachi ZMG323). However, these steels lack environmental stability in SOFC environments, and as a result, degrade the performance of the SOFC. A steel interconnect can contribute to performance degradation through: (i) Cr poisoning of electrochemically active sites within the cathode; (ii) formation of non-conductive oxides, such as SiO2 or Al2O3 from residual or minor alloying elements, at the base metal-oxide scale interface; and/or (iii) excessive oxide scale growth, which may also retard electrical conductivity. Consequently, there has been considerable attention on developing coatings to protect steel interconnects in SOFC environments and controlling trace elements during alloy production. Recently, we have reported on the development of a Cerium surface treatment that improves the oxidation behavior of a variety alloys, including Crofer 22APU [1-5]. Initial results indicated that the treatment may improve the performance of Crofer 22APU for SOFC application by: (i) retarding scale growth resulting in a thinner oxide scale; and (ii) suppressing the formation of a deleterious continuous SiO2 layer that can form at the metal-oxide scale interface in materials with high residual Si content [5]. Crofer 22 APU contains Fe-22Cr-0.5Mn-0.1Ti (weight percent). Depending on current market prices and the purity of raw materials utilized for ingot production, Cr can contribute upwards of 90 percent of the raw materials cost. The present research was undertaken to determine the influence of Cr content and minor element additions, especially Ti, on the effectiveness of the Ce surface treatment. Particular emphasis is placed on the behavior of low Cr alloys.

  7. Effects of activating fluxes on the weld penetration and corrosion resistant property of laser welded joint of ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    This study was based on the ferritic stainless steel SUS430. Under the parallel welding conditions, the critical penetration power values (CPPV) of 3mm steel plates with different surface-coating activating fluxes were tested. Results showed that, after coating with activating fluxes, such as ZrO2, CaCO3, CaF2 and CaO, the CPPV could reduce 100~250 W, which indicating the increases of the weld penetrations (WP). Nevertheless, the variation range of WP with or without activating fluxes was less than 16.7%. Compared with single-component ones, a multi-component activating flux composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09% CaCO3, 10.43% CaO, and 27.49% MgO was testified to be much more efficient, the WP of which was about 2.3-fold of that without any activating fluxes. Furthermore, a FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment was carried out with samples cut from weld zone to test the effects of different activating fluxes on the corrosion resistant (CR) property of the laser welded joints. It was found that all kinds of activating fluxes could improve the CR of the welded joints. And, it was interesting to find that the effect of the mixed activating fluxes was inferior to those single-component ones. Among all the activating fluxes, the single-component of CaCO3 seemed to be the best in resisting corrosion. By means of Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) testing, it was found that the use of activating fluxes could effectively restrain the loss of Cr element of weld zone in the process of laser welding, thus greatly improving the CR of welded joints.

  8. Effects of Alloying Elements on High-Temperature Oxidation and Sticking Occurring During Hot Rolling of Modified Ferritic STS430J1L Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Dae Jin; Lee, Jong Seog; Kim, Nack J.; Lee, Sunghak

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, mechanisms of sticking that occurs during hot rolling of modified STS430J1L ferritic stainless steels were investigated by using a pilot-plant-scale rolling machine, and the effects of alloying elements on sticking were analyzed by the high-temperature oxidation behavior. The hot-rolling test results indicated that the Cr oxide layer formed in a heating furnace was broken off and infiltrated the steel, thereby forming Cr oxides on the rolled steel surface. Because the surface region without oxides underwent a reduction in hardness rather than the surface region with oxides, the thickness of the surface oxide layer favorably affected the resistance to sticking. The addition of Zr, Cu, and Ni to the ferritic stainless steels worked in favor of the decreased sticking, but the Si addition negatively affected the resistance to sticking. In the Si-rich steel, Si oxides were continuously formed along the interfacial area between the Cr oxide layer and the base steel, and interrupted the formation and growth of the Cr oxide layer. Because the Si addition played a role in increasing sticking, the reduction in Si content was desirable for preventing sticking.

  9. Investigation of the Kinetics of the Ferrite/Austenite Phase Transformation in the HAZ of a 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Weldment

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Wong, J; Babu, S S; Vitek, J M

    2002-03-14

    A semi-quantitative map based on a series of spatially resolved X-ray diffraction (SRXRD) scans shows the progression of the ferrite ({delta})/austenite ({gamma}) phase balance throughout the HAZ during GTA welding of a 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS). This map shows an unexpected decrease in the ferrite fraction on heating, followed by a recovery to the original ferrite fraction on cooling at locations within the HAZ. Even though such behavior is supported by thermodynamic calculations, it has not been confirmed by either experimental methods or have the kinetics been evaluated. Both Gleeble thermal simulations and time resolved x-ray diffraction measurements on spot welds in the 2205 DSS provide further evidence for this rather low-temperature transformation. On the other hand, calculations of the diffusion of alloying elements across the 6/y interface under a variety of conditions shed no further light on the driving force for this transformation. Further work on the mechanisms and driving forces for this transformation is on-going.

  10. Observations of Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Spot Welds Using Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T; Elmer, J; Babu, S

    2003-10-29

    Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) measurements are made in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) spot welds. Both the {gamma} {yields} {delta} and {delta} {yields} {gamma} transformations are monitored as a function of time during the rapid spot weld heating and cooling cycles. These observations are then correlated with calculated thermal cycles. Where the peak temperatures are highest ({approx}1342 C), the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation proceeds to completion, leaving a ferritic microstructure at the end of heating. With lower peak temperatures, the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation proceeds to only partial completion, resulting in a microstructure containing both transformed and untransformed austenite. Further analyses of the individual diffraction patterns show shifts in the peak positions and peak widths as a function of both time and temperature. In addition, these changes in the peak characteristics are correlated with measured changes in the ferrite volume fraction. Such changes in the peak positions and widths during the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation provide an indication of changes occurring in each phase. These changes in peak properties can be correlated with the diffusion of nitrogen and other substitutional alloying elements, which are recognized as the primary mechanisms for this transformation. Upon cooling, the {delta} {yields} {gamma} transformation is observed to proceed from both the completely and partially transformed microstructural regions in the TRXRD data. An examination of the resulting microstructures confirms the TRXRD observation as the evidence shows that austenite both nucleates and grows from the ferritic microstructure at locations closest to the fusion zone boundary and grows from untransformed austenite grains at locations further from this boundary.

  11. High-temperature in-situ TEM straining of the interaction with dislocations and particles for Cu-added ferritic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shuhei; Kaneko, Kenji; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Masao; Kanno, Norihiro; Hamada, Junichi

    2014-11-01

    IntroductionCu is always present in the matrix when ferritic steels were prepared from ferrous scrap. When the ferritic steels are aged thermally, Cu precipitates start appear and disperse finely and homogeneously [1], which may make the steels strengthened by precipitation hardening. In this study, the interaction between Cu precipitates and dislocations was exmined via high-temperature in-situ TEM straining. ExperimentalCu-added ferritic stainless steel (Fe-18.4%Cr-1.5%Cu) was used in the present study. Specimen was aged at1073 K for 360 ks. Samples for TEM observation were prepared by focused ion beam (FIB; Quanta 3D 200i) method. Microstructure of specimen was analyzed by JEM-3200FSK and high-temperature in-situ TEM straining was conducted using JEM-1300NEF. Results and discussionInteraction between Cu precipitates and dislocation is seen from consecutive TEM images acquired by in-situ TEM straining at 1073 K, as shown in Fig.1. The size of Cu precipitates was about 70 nm and several dislocations were present within the field of view. In particular, progressing dislocations contacted with the Cu precipitate at right angle, as indicated by arrows in Fig.1 (b) to (d). This result implies that there is an attractive interaction between dislocations and the Cu precipitate. This is attributed to the fact that Stress field of dislocations was easily relaxed in interface between the Cu precipitate and matrix because of lattice and interface diffusion as well as slip in the interface [2,3]. Furthermore, dislocations pass through the particle after contacting it, so that the interaction with dislocations and particles should be explained by Srolovitz mechanism [4].jmicro;63/suppl_1/i28/DFU083F1F1DFU083F1Fig. 1.TEM images foucused on interaction with dislocations and partticles.

  12. Effect of Laves Phase on High-Temperature Deformation and Microstructure Evolution in an 18Cr-2Mo-0.5Nb Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Ken-ichi; Yamoah, Nana Kwame Gyan; Reynolds, William T.; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Murayama, Mitsuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Niobium-containing ferritic stainless steels are finding new applications in automotive exhaust components because of their oxidation resistance, thermal fatigue resistance, and high-temperature strength. The mechanical behavior of Nb-containing ferritic steels at service temperatures of 973 K (700 °C) and higher results from the convolution of dynamic microstructural changes including precipitation, precipitate coarsening, strain hardening, recovery, and recrystallization. The relative contributions of these competing processes have yet to be clarified. In this study, the high-temperature flow strength of an 18Cr-2Mo-0.5Nb ferritic stainless steel (SUS 444) was correlated with microstructure under different strain and initial precipitate distributions to clarify the relative role of the strengthening and softening processes. High-temperature tensile tests at 1023 K (750 °C) of un-aged (initial microstructure is precipitate-free) and pre-aged (initial microstructure contains precipitates) samples were carried out and transmission electron microscopy was used to assess dislocation distributions and precipitate morphology. The difference in the stress-strain curves between un-aged and pre-aged samples was drastic; the yield strength of the un-aged sample was twice that of the pre-aged sample, and the un-aged sample exhibits a noticeable yield drop. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a Laves phase nucleated and grew during the high-temperature tensile test in the un-aged sample and the majority of the precipitates in the pre-aged sample were the same Laves phase. Furthermore, a strain effect on precipitate growth was recognized in un-aged and pre-aged conditions by comparing grip (no strain) and gage (strained) sections of tensile samples. The dominant strengthening contribution in un-aged samples is initially the precipitate shearing mechanism and it changes to Orowan strengthening beyond the ultimate tensile strength, whereas the dominant contribution in

  13. LaCrO 3-based coatings deposited by high-energy micro-arc alloying process on a ferritic stainless steel interconnect material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Z. J.; Zeng, C. L.

    Currently used ferritic stainless steel interconnects are unsuitable for practical applications in solid oxide fuel cells operated at intermediate temperatures due to chromium volatility, poisoning of the cathode material, rapidly decreasing electrical conductivity and a low oxidation resistance. To overcome these problems, a novel, simple and cost-effective high-energy micro-arc alloying (HEMAA) process is proposed to prepare LaCrO 3-based coatings for the type 430 stainless steel interconnects. However, it is much difficult to deposit an oxide coating by HEMAA than a metallic coating due to the high brittleness of oxide electrodes for deposition. Therefore, a Cr-alloying layer is firstly obtained on the alloy surface by HEMAA using a Cr electrode rod, followed by a LaCrO 3-based coating using an electrode rod of LaCrO 3-20 wt.%Ni, with a metallurgical bonding between the coating and the substrate. The preliminary oxidation tests at 850 °C in air indicate that the LaCrO 3-based coatings showed a three-layered microstructure with a NiFe 2O 4 outer layer, a thick LaCrO 3 sub-layer and a thin Cr 2O 3-rich inner layer, which thereby possesses an excellent protectiveness to the substrate alloy and a low electrical contact resistance.

  14. Oxidation behavior and electrical property of ferritic stainless steel interconnects with a Cr-La alloying layer by high-energy micro-arc alloying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Z. J.; Zeng, C. L.

    Chromium volatility, poisoning of the cathode material and rapidly decreasing electrical conductivity are the major problems associated with the application of ferritic stainless steel interconnects of solid oxide fuel cells operated at intermediate temperatures. Recently, a novel and simple high-energy micro-arc alloying (HEMAA) process is proposed to prepare LaCrO 3-based coatings for the type 430 stainless steel interconnects using a LaCrO 3-Ni rod as deposition electrode. In this work, a Cr-La alloying layer is firstly obtained on the alloy surface by HEMAA using Cr and La as deposition electrode, respectively, followed by oxidation treatment at 850 °C in air to form a thermally grown LaCrO 3 coating. With the formation of a protective scale composed of a thick LaCrO 3 outer layer incorporated with small amounts of Cr-rich oxides and a thin Cr 2O 3-rich sub-layer, the oxidation rate of the coated steel is reduced remarkably. A low and stable electrical contact resistance is achieved with the application of LaCrO 3-based coatings, with a value less than 40 mΩ cm 2 during exposure at 850 °C in air for up to 500 h.

  15. Oxidation behaviour of ferritic stainless steel grade Crofer 22 APU at 700 °C in flowing Ar-75%CO2-12%H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariff, Nurul Atikah; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Jalar, Azman

    2013-11-01

    The oxidation of Ferritic Stainless Steel (FSS) grade Crofer 22 APU has been investigated. FSS alloys were exposed to isothermal conditions in a horizontal tube furnace at a 700 °C in flowing Ar-75%CO2-12%H2O at a pressure of approximately 1 atm. The results showed that the growth of non protective Fe2O3 and spinel was observed after 50 h exposure in the presence of 12% H2O. The weight was increased significantly with time of exposure. The formation of different oxides is presented on the interface of the specimen such as MnCr2O4, Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 were revealed by X-ray diffraction and supported by EDAX analysis. FSS did not form a protective Cr2O3 layer due to water vapour accelerates the kinetics oxidation. Data of microstructure observation is presented and discussed in this paper in term of water vapour effects.

  16. Mn1.4Co1.4Cu0.2O4 spinel protective coating on ferritic stainless steels for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoyi; Xin, Xianshuang; Luo, Ting; Liu, Leimin; Zhou, Yuchun; Yuan, Chun; Lin, Chucheng; Zhan, Zhongliang; Wang, Shaorong

    2015-03-01

    In an attempt to reduce the oxidation and Cr evaporation rates of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), Mn1.4Co1.4Cu0.2O4 spinel coating is developed on the Crofer22 APU ferritic stainless steel substrate by a powder reduction technique. Doping of Cu into Mn-Co spinels improves electrical conductivity as well as thermal expansion match with the Crofer22 APU interconnect. Good adhesion between the coating and the alloy substrate is achieved by the reactive sintering process using the reduced powders. Long-term isothermal oxidation experiment and area specific resistance (ASR) measurement are investigated. The ASR is less than 4 mΩ cm2 even though the coated alloy undergoes oxidation at 800 °C for 530 h and four thermal cycles from 800 °C to room temperature. The Mn1.4Co1.4Cu0.2O4 spinel coatings demonstrate excellent anti-oxidation performance and long-term stability. It exhibits a promising prospect for the practical application of SOFC alloy interconnect.

  17. Development of Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 spinel coating on ferritic stainless steel for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, N.; Abbasi, M. H.; Karimzadeh, F.; Choi, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    To protect solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) from chromium poisoning and to improve area specific resistance (ASR), Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 is thermally grown on AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (FESEM-EDS) and 4-probe ASR tests. The results show that the coating not only decreases the ASR considerably, but also acts as a barrier to mitigate the sub-scale growth and to prevent chromium migration through the coating and the cathode. The EDS analysis reveals that a mixed spinel region is formed between the coating and oxide scale after 500 h oxidation at 750 °C causing a noticeable decrease in oxygen diffusivity through this layer and subsequent decline in sub-scale growth rate. The ASR of uncoated sample is measured to be 63.5 mΩ cm2 after 500 h oxidation, while the Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 spinel coated sample shows a value of 19.3 mΩ cm2 representing ∼70% reduction compared to the uncoated sample. It is proposed that the high electrical conductivity of Cu1.3Mn1.7O4 (140 S cm-1), reduction of oxide scale growth, and good bonding between the coating and substrate contribute to the substantial ASR reduction for the coated sample.

  18. Application of sol-gel technique to synthesis of copper-cobalt spinel on the ferritic stainless steel used for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paknahad, Pouyan; Askari, Masoud; Ghorbanzadeh, Milad

    2014-11-01

    The conductive CuCo2O4 spinel coating is applied on the surface of the AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel by the dip-coating sol-gel process and it is evaluated in terms of the microstructure, oxidation resistance and electrical conductivity. The results show that the CuCO2O4 coating forms a double-layer scale consisting of a Cr, Fe-rich subscale and Cu-Co spinel top layer after 500 h in air at 800 °C. This scale is protective, acts as an effective barrier against Cr migration into the outer oxide layer and alleviates the cathode Cr-poisoning. The oxidation resistance is significantly enhanced by the protective coating with a parabolic rate constant of 5.8 × 10-13 gr2 cm-4 s-1, meanwhile the electrical conductivity is considerably improved due to inhibited growth of resistive Cr2O3 oxide scale. The area specific resistance at temperatures between 550 and 800 °C is in the range of 11.5 and 22.2 mΩ cm2.

  19. Dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature for a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to investigate the dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature in the range of {minus}95{degrees}C to 25{degrees}C for a low activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel (F82-H). Mode I and mixed Mode I/III fracture toughnesses were investigated in the range of {minus}95 to 25{degree}C for a F82-H steel heat-treated in the following way; 1000{degree}C/20 h/air-cooled (AC), 1100{degree}C/7 min/AC, and 700{degree}C/2 h/AC. The results indicate that crack tip plasticity was increased by mixed mode loading, and suggest that at low temperature, mode I fracture toughness is the critical design parameter, but at temperatures above room temperature, expecially concerning fatigure and creep-fatigue crack growth rate, a mixed mode loading may be more harmful than a mode I loading for this steel because a mixed mode loading results in lower fracture toughness and higher crack tip plasticity (or dislocation activity).

  20. Electrodeposition of yttria/cobalt oxide and yttria/gold coatings onto ferritic stainless steel for SOFC interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondo, Elisabetta; Boniardi, Marco; Cannoletta, Donato; De Riccardis, Maria Federica; Bozzini, Benedetto

    Durability seems to be the single most critical issue for the widespread application of SOFCs. Among critical issues, the stability of interconnects - operating at high temperatures in aggressive gas environments - calls for the selection of cheap materials exhibiting high corrosion performance, accompanied by low surface contact resistance. Use of coated AISI 430 stainless steel is currently the state-of-the-art choice. In this paper we propose Y 2O 3, Y 2O 3/Co 3O 4 and Y 2O 3/Au composite films as innovative coatings for AISI 430 plates. These coatings were electrodeposited from chloride salts dissolved in hydroalcoholic solutions containing chitosan as binder. The evolution of the crystalline structure of the electrodeposits with heat-treatment conditions has been studied by XRD, their chemical composition has been evaluated by EDX analysis, their morphology has been observed by SEM and the adhesion has been measured by scratch testing. Coated samples were oxidised in air at 800 °C for times up to 500 h and the area-specific resistance (ASR) as a function of exposure time has been measured. All the coated samples developed ASR values below 100 mΩ cm 2, the target value for SOFC applications. The ASR was found to increase in the order: Y 2O 3/Au, Y 2O 3, and Y 2O 3/Co 3O 4.

  1. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  2. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  3. Effects of pre-oxidation on the microstructural and electrical properties of La0.67Sr0.33MnO3-δ coated ferritic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng; Liu, Chien-Kuo; Wu, Jin-Yu; Shong, Wei-Ja; Lee, Ruey-Yi; Sung, Chia-Chi

    2012-09-01

    LaxSr1-xMnO3 (LSM) is commonly used as a protective layer on the metallic interconnects of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to prevent surface oxidation and chromium poisoning. However, the volume shrinkage at elevated temperatures causes the LSM coatings to crack, resulting in chromium diffusion. Therefore, this paper investigates the effects of pre-oxidation on the microstructure and electrical properties of ferritic stainless steels coated with La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSM). Four ferritic stainless steels were selected for use as interconnect substrates: Crofer22APU, Crofer22H, ss441, and ZMG232L. The candidate materials were pre-oxidised at 850 °C for 25 and 50 h, respectively. After the pre-oxidation process, the LSM films with a thickness of 3-4 μm were deposited on the surface of samples by using Pulsed DC magnetron sputtering. After aging the coated specimens at elevated temperatures, the morphologies and crystalline structures were examined using SEM/EDX and XRD, respectively. The results indicated that the pre-oxidised layer, (Mn, Cr)3O4, could significantly suppress chromium penetration from the interior to the surface of the specimens. Moreover, the area specific resistance (ASR) values for the 25-h pre-oxidised specimens were 2.24, 12.21, 2.30, and 6.77 mΩ cm2 for Crofer22APU, Crofer22H, ss441, and ZMG232L, respectively, at 800 °C for 500 h in an air atmosphere.

  4. Enabling Inexpensive Metallic Alloys as SOFC Interconnects: An Investigation into Hybrid Coating Technologies to Deposit Nanocomposite Functional Coatings on Ferritic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, Paul; Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Deibert, Max; Smith, Richard J.; Kayani, Asghar N.; White, P T.; Sofie, Stephen W.; Yang, Z Gary; Mccready, David E.; Visco, S.; Jacobson, C.; Kurokawa, H.

    2007-11-01

    Reduced operating temperatures (600-800°C) of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) may enable the use of inexpensive ferritic steels as interconnects. Due to the demanding SOFC interconnect operating environment, protective coatings are required to increase long-term stability. In this study, large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) and hybrid filtered arc-assisted electron beam physical vapor deposition (FA-EBPVD) technologies were used to deposit two-segment coatings with Cr-Al-Y-O nanocomposite bottom segments and Mn-Co-O spinel-based top segments. Coatings were deposited on ferritic steels and subsequently annealed in air for various times. Surface oxidation was investigated using SEM/EDS, XRD and RBS analyses. Cr-volatilization was evaluated by transpiration and ICP-MS analysis of the resultant condensate. Time dependent Area Specific Resistance (ASR) was studied using the four-point technique. The oxidation behavior, Cr volatilization rate, and ASR of coated and uncoated samples are reported. Significant long-term (>1,000 hours) surface stability, low ASR, and dramatically reduced Cr-volatility were observed with the coated specimens. Improvement mechanisms, including the coating diffusion barrier properties and electrical conductivity are discussed.

  5. Screen-printed (La,Sr)CrO3 coatings on ferritic stainless steel interconnects for solid oxide fuel cells using nanopowders prepared by means of ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brylewski, Tomasz; Dabek, Jaroslaw; Przybylski, Kazimierz; Morgiel, Jerzy; Rekas, Mieczyslaw

    2012-06-01

    In order to protect the cathode from chromium poisoning and improve electrical resistance, a perovskite (La,Sr)CrO3 coating was deposited on the surface of a DIN 50049 ferritic stainless steel by means of the screen-printing method, using a paste composed of an ultra-fine powder prepared via ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. Investigations of the oxidation process of the coated steel in air and the Ar-H2-H2O gas mixture at 1073 K for times up to 820 h showed high compactness of the protective film, good adhesion to the metal substrate, as well as area specific resistance (ASR) at a level acceptable for metallic SOFC interconnect materials. The microstructure, nanostructure, phase composition of the thick film, and in particular the film/substrate interface, were examined via chemical analyses by means of SEM-EDS and TEM-SAD. It was shown that the (La,Sr)CrO3 coating interacts with the steel during long-term thermal oxidation in the afore-mentioned conditions and intermediate, chromia-rich and/or spinel multilayer interfacial zones are formed. Cr-vaporization tests showed that the (La,Sr)CrO3 coating may play the role of barriers that decrease the volatilization rate of chromia species.

  6. Oxidation behaviour of ferritic stainless steel grade Crofer 22 APU at 700 °C in flowing Ar−75%CO{sub 2}−12%H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    Shariff, Nurul Atikah; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Jalar, Azman

    2013-11-27

    The oxidation of Ferritic Stainless Steel (FSS) grade Crofer 22 APU has been investigated. FSS alloys were exposed to isothermal conditions in a horizontal tube furnace at a 700 °C in flowing Ar−75%CO{sub 2}−12%H{sub 2}O at a pressure of approximately 1 atm. The results showed that the growth of non protective Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and spinel was observed after 50 h exposure in the presence of 12% H{sub 2}O. The weight was increased significantly with time of exposure. The formation of different oxides is presented on the interface of the specimen such as MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were revealed by X-ray diffraction and supported by EDAX analysis. FSS did not form a protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer due to water vapour accelerates the kinetics oxidation. Data of microstructure observation is presented and discussed in this paper in term of water vapour effects.

  7. Irradiation effects in ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-08-01

    Since 1979 the Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance (ADIP) task funded by the US Department of Energy has been studying the 2-12Cr class of ferritic steels to establish the feasibility of using them in fusion reactor first wall/breeding blanket (FW/B) applications. The advantages of ferritic steels include superior swelling resistance, low thermal stresses compared to austenitic stainless steels, attractive mechanical properties up to 600°C. and service histories exceeding 100 000 h. These steels are commonly used in a range of microstructural conditions which include ferritic, martensitic. tempered martensitic, bainitic etc. Throughout this paper where the term "ferritic" is used it should be taken to mean any of these microstructures. The ADIP task is studying several candidate alloy systems including 12Cr-1MoWV (HT-9), modified 9Cr-1MoVNb, and dual-phased steels such as EM-12 and 2 {1}/{4}Cr-Mo. These materials are ferromagnetic (FM), body centered cubic (bcc), and contain chromium additions between 2 and 12 wt% and molybdenum additions usually below 2%. The perceived issues associated with the application of this class of steel to fusion reactors are the increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) with neutron damage, the compatibility of these steels with liquid metals and solid breeding materials, and their weldability. The ferromagnetic character of these steels can also be important in reactor design. It is the purpose of this paper to review the current understanding of these bcc steels and the effects of irradiation. The major points of discussion will be irradiation-induced or -enhanced dimensional changes such as swelling and creep, mechanical properties such as tensile strength and various measurements of toughness, and activation by neutron interactions with structural materials.

  8. Process for stabilizing dimensions of duplex stainless steels for service at elevated temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Frederick C.; Tobin, John C.

    1981-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel materials containing austenite plus delta ferrite, are dimensionally stabilized by heating the material to a reaction temperature between about 1050.degree.-1450.degree. F. (566.degree.-788.degree. C.), holding it at this temperature during transformation of delta ferrite to austenite plus sigma phase, and subsequently heating to a reversion temperature between about 1625.degree.-1750.degree. F. (885.degree.-954.degree. C.), whereby the sigma phase transforms back to ferrite, but the austenite remains dispersed in the ferrite phase. Final controlled cooling permits transformation of ferrite to austenite plus sigma and, later, precipitation of carbides.

  9. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  10. Hydrogen compatibility handbook for stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    This handbook compiles data on the effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of stainless steels and discusses this data within the context of current understanding of hydrogen compatibility of metals. All of the tabulated data derives from continuing studies of hydrogen effects on materials that have been conducted at the Savannah River Laboratory over the past fifteen years. Supplementary data from other sources are included in the discussion. Austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, and precipitation hardenable stainless steels have been studied. Damage caused by helium generated from decay of tritium is a distinctive effect that occurs in addition to the hydrogen isotopes protium and deuterium. The handbook defines the scope of our current knowledge of hydrogen effects in stainless steels and serves as a guide to selection of stainless steels for service in hydrogen.

  11. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1985-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast-duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Data from room-temperature Charpy-impact tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 450/sup 0/C are presented and compared with results from other studies. Microstructures of cast-duplex stainless steels subjected to long-term aging either in the laboratory or in reactor service have been characterized. The results indicate that at least two processes contribute to the low-temperature embrittleent of duplex stainless steels, viz., weakening of the ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitation and embrittlement of ferrite matrix by the formation of additional phases such as G-phase, Type X, or the ..cap alpha..' phase. Carbide precipitation has a significant effect on the onset of embrittlement of CF-8 and -8M grades of stainless steels aged at 400 or 450/sup 0/C. The existing correlations do not accurately represent the embrittlement behavior over the temperature range 300 to 450/sup 0/C. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  12. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  13. 60 Years of duplex stainless steel applications

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, J.; Liljas, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the history of wrought duplex stainless steel development and applications is described. Ferritic-austenitic stainless steels were introduced only a few decades after stainless steels were developed. The paper gives details from the first duplex stainless steels in the 1930`s to the super duplex stainless steel development during the 1980`s. During the years much effort has been devoted to production and welding metallurgy as well as corrosion research of the duplex stainless steels. Therefore, duplex stainless steels are to-day established in a wide product range. Numerous important applications are exemplified. In most cases the selection of a duplex steel has been a result of the combination high strength excellent corrosion resistance. In the pulp and paper industry the most interesting use is as vessel material in digesters. For chemical process industry, the duplex steels are currently used in heat exchangers. The largest application of duplex steels exists in the oil and gas/offshore industry. Hundreds of kms of pipelines are installed and are still being installed. An increased use of duplex steels is foreseen in areas where the strength is of prime importance.

  14. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  15. Microstructures of laser deposited 304L austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.

    2000-05-22

    Laser deposits fabricated from two different compositions of 304L stainless steel powder were characterized to determine the nature of the solidification and solid state transformations. One of the goals of this work was to determine to what extent novel microstructure consisting of single-phase austenite could be achieved with the thermal conditions of the LENS [Laser Engineered Net Shape] process. Although ferrite-free deposits were not obtained, structures with very low ferrite content were achieved. It appeared that, with slight changes in alloy composition, this goal could be met via two different solidification and transformation mechanisms.

  16. Magnetic characterisation of duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, I.

    2006-02-01

    Heat treatment-induced microstructural processes were studied by different non-destructive magnetic and mechanical material testing methods in the present work. A commercial SAF 2507 type superduplex stainless steel was investigated. This alloy contains about 40% metastable ferrite which can decompose to a sigma phase and secondary austenite due to heat treatment. All the mechanical, corrosion resistance and magnetic properties are strongly influenced by this microstructural changes. This study had two aims: to understand better the kinetics of the ferrite decomposition process and to study the application possibilities of the applied magnetic measurements. This paper presents an application possibility of the nonlinear harmonics analysis measurement and demonstrates the possibility to find a quantitative correlation between measured harmonics and mechanical properties obtained from destructive tests.

  17. Comparison of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Laser Machined and Milled 304 L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Kumar, Aniruddha; Nagpure, D. C.; Rai, S. K.; Singh, M. K.; Khooha, Ajay; Singh, A. K.; Singh, Amrendra; Tiwari, M. K.; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Singh, B.

    2016-07-01

    Machining of austenitic stainless steel components is known to introduce significant enhancement in their susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. The paper compares stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of laser machined 304 L stainless steel specimens with conventionally milled counterpart in chloride environment. With respect to conventionally milled specimens, laser machined specimens displayed more than 12 times longer crack initiation time in accelerated stress corrosion cracking test in boiling magnesium chloride as per ASTM G36. Reduced stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of laser machined surface is attributed to its predominantly ferritic duplex microstructure in which anodic ferrite phase was under compressive stress with respect to cathodic austenite.

  18. Wear-resistant and electromagnetic absorbing behaviors of oleic acid post-modified ferrite-filled epoxy resin composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zang, Chongguang; Jiao, Qingjie

    2015-03-01

    The post-modified Mn-Zn ferrite was prepared by grafting oleic acid on the surface of Mn-Zn ferrite to inhibit magnetic nanoparticle aggregation. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to characterize the particle surfaces. The friction and electromagnetic absorbing properties of a thin coating fabricated by dispersing ferrite into epoxy resin (EP) were investigated. The roughness of the coating and water contact angle were measured using the VEECO and water contact angle meter. Friction tests were conducted using a stainless-steel bearing ball and a Rockwell diamond tip, respectively. The complex permittivity and complex permeability of the composite coating were studied in the low frequency (10 MHz-1.5 GHz). Surface modified ferrites are found to improve magnetic particles dispersion in EP resulting in significant compatibility between inorganic and organic materials. Results also indicate that modified ferrite/EP coatings have a lower roughness average value and higher water contact angle than original ferrite/EP coatings. The enhanced tribological properties of the modified ferrite/EP coatings can be seen from the increased coefficient value. The composite coatings with modified ferrite are observed to exhibit better reflection loss compared with the coatings with original ferrite.

  19. Decomposition and Precipitation Process During Thermo-mechanical Fatigue of Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Anja; Kolmorgen, Roman; Kubena, Ivo; Kulawinski, Dirk; Kruml, Tomas; Biermann, Horst

    2016-05-01

    The so-called 748 K (475 °C) embrittlement is one of the main drawbacks for the application of ferritic-austenitic duplex stainless steels (DSS) at higher temperatures caused by a spinodal decomposition of the ferritic phase. Thermo-mechanical fatigue tests performed on a DSS in the temperature range between 623 K and 873 K (350 °C and 600 °C) revealed no negative influence on the fatigue lifetime. However, an intensive subgrain formation occurred in the ferritic phase, which was accompanied by formation of fine precipitates. In order to study the decomposition process of the ferritic grains due to TMF testing, detailed investigations using scanning and transmission electron microscopy are presented. The nature of the precipitates was determined as the cubic face centered G-phase, which is characterized by an enrichment of Si, Mo, and Ni. Furthermore, the formation of secondary austenite within ferritic grains was observed.

  20. Tritium Effects on Fracture Toughness of Stainless Steel Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    MORGAN, MICHAEL; CHAPMAN, G. K.; TOSTEN, M. H.; WEST, S. L.

    2005-05-12

    The effects of tritium on the fracture toughness properties of Type 304L and Type 21-6-9 stainless steel weldments were measured. Weldments were tritium-charged-and-aged and then tested in order to measure the effect of the increasing decay helium content on toughness. The results were compared to uncharged and hydrogen-charged samples. For unexposed weldments having 8-12 volume percent retained delta ferrite, fracture toughness was higher than base metal toughness. At higher levels of weld ferrite, the fracture toughness decreased to values below that of the base metal. Hydrogen-charged and tritium-charged weldments had lower toughness values than similarly charged base metals and toughness decreased further with increasing weld ferrite content. The effect of decay helium content was inconclusive because of tritium off-gassing losses during handling, storage and testing. Fracture modes were dominated by the dimpled rupture process in unexposed weldments. In hydrogen and tritium-exposed weldments, the fracture modes depended on the weld ferrite content. At high ferrite contents, hydrogen-induced transgranular fracture of the weld ferrite phase was observed.

  1. Precipitation of sigma and chi phases in δ-ferrite of Type 316FR weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Eun Joon; Baba, Hayato; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2013-12-15

    The decomposition behavior and kinetics of δ-ferrite are examined using aging treatments between 873 and 1073 K for Type 316FR stainless steel weld metals with different solidification modes (316FR AF, 316FR FA). The dominant precipitates are sigma, chi, and secondary austenite nucleated at δ-ferrite/austenite interfaces or in the interior of the ferrite grains. These precipitates consume all the ferrite during isothermal aging in both 316FR AF and FA weld metals. Differences in the precipitation behavior (precipitation initiation time and precipitation speed) between weld metals can be explained by i) the degree of Cr and Mo microsegregation within δ-ferrite or austenite near ferrite and ii) the nucleation sites induced due to the solidification mode (AF or FA), such as the ferrite amount. For both weld materials, a Johnson–Mehl-type equation can express the precipitation behavior of the sigma + chi phases and quantitatively predict the behavior at the service-exposure temperatures of a fast breed reactor. - Highlights: • Precipitation of σ and χ phase in Type 316FR welds (two solidification modes) • Different precipitation behaviors: precipitation initiation time and growth speed • Johnson-Mehl–type equation is the most applicable to the precipitation behaviors • Precipitation behaviors are predicted under service conditions of FBRs.

  2. Martensitic/ferritic steels as container materials for liquid mercury target of ESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y.

    1996-06-01

    In the previous report, the suitability of steels as the ESS liquid mercury target container material was discussed on the basis of the existing database on conventional austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels, especially on their representatives, solution annealed 316 stainless steel (SA 316) and Sandvik HT-9 martensitic steel (HT-9). Compared to solution annealed austenitic stainless steels, martensitic/ferritic steels have superior properties in terms of strength, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, mercury corrosion resistance, void swelling and irradiation creep resistance. The main limitation for conventional martensitic/ferritic steels (CMFS) is embrittlement after low temperature ({le}380{degrees}C) irradiation. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) can increase as much as 250 to 300{degrees}C and the upper-shelf energy (USE), at the same time, reduce more than 50%. This makes the application temperature range of CMFS is likely between 300{degrees}C to 500{degrees}C. For the present target design concept, the temperature at the container will be likely controlled in a temperature range between 180{degrees}C to 330{degrees}C. Hence, CMFS seem to be difficult to apply. However, solution annealed austenitic stainless steels are also difficult to apply as the maximum stress level at the container will be higher than the design stress. The solution to the problem is very likely to use advanced low-activation martensitic/ferritic steels (LAMS) developed by the fusion materials community though the present database on the materials is still very limited.

  3. Directional solidification studies of ternary austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Carder, K.H.

    1986-01-01

    The transformation of ferrite to austenite during the solidification of stainless steel welds and the subsequent tendencies toward microcracking are topics of considerable ''renewed'' interest. This revival of interest is due mainly to the use of high energy joining processes such as electron beam and laser welding into commercial practice. The rapid rates of solidification and cooling encountered in utilizing these processes have a significant effect on the amount of delta ferrite retained in the microstructure at room temperature. The present study is aimed at obtaining a correlation between solidification rates and microstructure. A directional solidification apparatus with controlled heat flows was designed and developed. This apparatus was used to determine the effect of velocity on the mode of solidification and the amount of ferrite retained in the microstructure at room temperature.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels in NaCl solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speidel, Markus O.

    1981-05-01

    The metallurgical influences on the stress corrosion resistance of many commercial stainless steels have been studied using the fracture mechanics approach. The straight-chromium ferritic stainless steels, two-phase ferritic-austenitic stainless steels and high-nickel solid solutions (like alloys 800 and 600) investigated are all fully resistant to stress corrosion cracking at stress intensity (K1) levels ≤ MN • m-3/2 in 22 pct NaCl solutions at 105 °C. Martensitic stainless steels, austenitic stainless steels and precipitation hardened superalloys, all with about 18 pct chromium, may be highly susceptible to stress corrosion cracking, depending on heat treatment and other alloying elements. Molybdenum additions improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of austenitic stainless steels significantly. The fracture mechanics approach to stress corrosion testing of stainless steels yields results which are consistent with both the service experience and the results from testing with smooth specimens. In particular, the well known “Copson curve” is reproduced by plotting the stress corrosion threshold stress intensity (ATISCC) vs the nickel content of stainless steels with about 18 pct chromium.

  5. Corrosion Performance of Ferritic Steel for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Jablonski, P.D.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-11-01

    Ferritic stainless steels have been identified as potential candidates for interconnects in planar-type solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) operating below 800ºC. Crofer 22 APU was selected for this study. It was studied under simulated SOFC-interconnect dual environment conditions with humidified air on one side of the sample and humidified hydrogen on the other side at 750ºC. The surfaces of the oxidized samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with microanalytical capabilities. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was also used in this study.

  6. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2016-02-01

    Cast stainless steels (CASSs) have been extensively used for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich α'-phase by Spinodal decomposition of δ-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to provide an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. An approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. These results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.

  7. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2015-11-12

    We used cast stainless steels (CASSs)for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich alpha-phase by Spinodal decomposition of delta-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to provide an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. Moreover, an approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. Our results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.

  8. Weldment for austenitic stainless steel and method

    DOEpatents

    Bagnall, Christopher; McBride, Marvin A.

    1985-01-01

    For making defect-free welds for joining two austenitic stainless steel mers, using gas tungsten-arc welding, a thin foil-like iron member is placed between the two steel members to be joined, prior to making the weld, with the foil-like iron member having a higher melting point than the stainless steel members. When the weld is formed, there results a weld nugget comprising melted and then solidified portions of the joined members with small portions of the foil-like iron member projecting into the solidified weld nugget. The portions of the weld nugget proximate the small portions of the foil-like iron member which project into the weld nugget are relatively rich in iron. This causes these iron-rich nugget portions to display substantial delta ferrite during solidification of the weld nugget which eliminates weld defects which could otherwise occur. This is especially useful for joining austenitic steel members which, when just below the solidus temperature, include at most only a very minor proportion of delta ferrite.

  9. Welding Behavior of Free Machining Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.

    2000-07-24

    The weld solidification and cracking behavior of sulfur bearing free machining austenitic stainless steel was investigated for both gas-tungsten arc (GTA) and pulsed laser beam weld processes. The GTA weld solidification was consistent with those predicted with existing solidification diagrams and the cracking response was controlled primarily by solidification mode. The solidification behavior of the pulsed laser welds was complex, and often contained regions of primary ferrite and primary austenite solidification, although in all cases the welds were found to be completely austenite at room temperature. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) pattern analysis indicated that the nature of the base metal at the time of solidification plays a primary role in initial solidification. The solid state transformation of austenite to ferrite at the fusion zone boundary, and ferrite to austenite on cooling may both be massive in nature. A range of alloy compositions that exhibited good resistance to solidification cracking and was compatible with both welding processes was identified. The compositional range is bounded by laser weldability at lower Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} ratios and by the GTA weldability at higher ratios. It was found with both processes that the limiting ratios were somewhat dependent upon sulfur content.

  10. Effect of manganese and nitrogen on the solidification mode in austenitic stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suutala, N.

    1982-12-01

    The macrostructures and microstructures of thirty different austenitic stainless welds alloyed with manganese and Jor nitrogen are analyzed. Comparison of the results with those obtained from normal welds of the AISIJAWS 300 series indicates that the solidification mode and Ferrite Number can be predicted adequately using chromium and nickel equivalents. The solidification mode in the normal and nitrogen-alloyed welds can be best described by the equivalents developed by Hammar and Svensson and the Ferrite Number by the conventional Schaeffler-DeLong diagram. Both of these descriptions are invalid at high manganese content values (5 to 8 pct), however, in which case Hull’s equivalents give a better correlation between the composition and the solidification mode or Ferrite Number. The complicated role of manganese and the austenite-favoring effect of nitrogen in austenitic stainless steels are discussed.

  11. Dissimilar Friction Stir Welding Between UNS S31603 Austenitic Stainless Steel and UNS S32750 Superduplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoro, Maria Claudia; Pereira, Victor Ferrinho; Mei, Paulo Roberto; Ramirez, Antonio Jose

    2015-02-01

    In order to verify the viability of dissimilar UNS S31603 austenitic and UNS S32750 superduplex stainless steels joined by friction stir welding, 6-mm-thick plates were welded using a PCBN-WRe tool. The welded joints were performed in position control mode at rotational speeds of 100 to 300 rpm and a feed rate of 100 mm/min. The joints performed with 150 and 200 rpm showed good appearance and no defects. The metallographic analysis of both joints showed no internal defects and that the material flow pattern is visible only in the stirred zone (SZ) of the superduplex steel. On the SZ top, these patterns are made of regions of different phases (ferrite and austenite), and on the bottom and central part of the SZ, these patterns are formed by alternated regions of different grain sizes. The ferrite grains in the superduplex steel are larger than those in the austenitic ones along the SZ and thermo-mechanically affected zone, explained by the difference between austenite and ferrite recrystallization kinetics. The amount of ferrite islands present on the austenitic steel base metal decreased near the SZ interface, caused by the dissolving of the ferrite in austenitic matrix. No other phases were found in both joints. The best weld parameters were found to be 200 rpm rotation speed, 100 mm/min feed rate, and tool position control.

  12. Effect of solution annealing temperature on precipitation in 2205 duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwar, A.; Vennela, N. Phani; Kamath, S.L.; Khatirkar, R.K.

    2012-12-15

    In the present study, effect of solution annealing temperature (1050 Degree-Sign C and 1100 Degree-Sign C) and isothermal ageing (700 Degree-Sign C: 15 min to 6 h) on the microstructural changes in 2205 duplex stainless steel has been investigated systematically. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were adopted to follow the microstructural evolution, while an energy dispersive spectrometer attached to scanning electron microscope was used to obtain localised chemical information of various phases. The ferritic matrix of the two phase 2205 duplex stainless steel ({approx} 45% ferrite and {approx} 55% austenite) undergoes a series of metallurgical transformations during ageing-formation of secondary austenite ({gamma}{sub 2}) and precipitation of Cr and Mo rich intermetallic (chi-{chi} and sigma-{sigma}) phases. For solution annealing at 1050 Degree-Sign C, significant amount of carbides were observed in the ferrite grains after 1 h of ageing at 700 Degree-Sign C. {chi} Phase precipitated after the precipitation of carbides-preferentially at the ferrite-ferrite and also at the ferrite-austenite boundaries. {sigma} Phase was not observed in significant quantity even after 6 h of ageing. The sequence of precipitation in samples solution annealed at 1050 Degree-Sign C was found to be carbides {yields} {chi} {yields} {sigma}. On the contrary, for samples solution annealed at 1100 Degree-Sign C, the precipitation of {chi} phase was negligible. {chi} Phase precipitated before {sigma} phase, preferentially along the ferrite-ferrite grain boundaries and was later consumed in the {sigma} phase precipitation. The {sigma} phase precipitated via the eutectoid transformation of ferrite to yield secondary austenite {gamma}{sub 2} and {sigma} phase in the ferrite and along the ferrite-austenite grain boundaries. An increase in the volume fraction of {gamma}{sub 2} and {sigma} phase with simultaneous decrease in the ferrite was evidenced with ageing. - Highlights

  13. Final Report, Volume 3, Guidance Document for the Evaluation of Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    Volume 3 comprises of the Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (A890-5A) which is equivalent to wrought 2507. The objective of this work was to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). The various tests which were carried out were ASTM A923 Test Method A, B and C (Sodium Hydroxide Etch Test, Charpy Impact Test and Ferric Chloride Corrosion Test), ferrite measurement using Feritscope{reg_sign}, ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method and X-Ray Diffraction, hardness measurement using Rockwell B and C and microstructural analysis using SEM and EDS.

  14. Final Report, Volume 3, Guidance Document for the Evaluation of Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    Volume 3 is comprised of the Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (A890-5A) which is equivalent to wrought 2507. The objective of this work was to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). The various tests which were carried out were ASTM A923 Test Method A, B and C (Sodium Hydroxide Etch Test, Charpy Impact Test and Ferric Chloride Corrosion Test), ferrite measurement using Feritscope®, ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method and X-Ray Diffraction, hardness measurement using Rockwell B and C and microstructural analysis using SEM and EDS.

  15. Constituent phases of the passive film formed on 2205 stainless steel by dynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xue-Qun; Li, Cheng-Tao; Dong, Chao-Fang; Li, Xiao-Gang

    2011-02-01

    The passive film formed on 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) in 0.5 M NaHCO3+0.5 M NaCl aqueous solution was characterized by electrochemical measurements, including potentiodynamic anodic polarization and dynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (DEIS). The results demonstrate that there is a great difference between the passive film evolutions of ferrite and austenite. The impedance values of ferrite are higher than those of austenite. The impedance peaks of ferritic and austenitic phases correspond to the potential of 0.15 and 0.25 V in the low potential range and correspond to 0.8 and 0.75 V in the high potential range. The evolutions of the capacitance of both phases are reverse compared to the evolutions of impedance. The thickness variations obtained from capacitance agree well with those of impedance analysis. The results can be used to explain why pitting corrosion occurs more easily in austenite phase than in ferrite phase.

  16. Evolution of microstructure and residual stress under various vibration modes in 304 stainless steel welds.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chih-Chun; Wang, Peng-Shuen; Wang, Jia-Siang; Wu, Weite

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous vibration welding of 304 stainless steel was carried out with an eccentric circulating vibrator and a magnetic telescopic vibrator at subresonant (362 Hz and 59.3 Hz) and resonant (376 Hz and 60.9 Hz) frequencies. The experimental results indicate that the temperature gradient can be increased, accelerating nucleation and causing grain refinement during this process. During simultaneous vibration welding primary δ -ferrite can be refined and the morphologies of retained δ-ferrite become discontinuous so that δ-ferrite contents decrease. The smallest content of δ-ferrite (5.5%) occurred using the eccentric circulating vibrator. The diffraction intensities decreased and the FWHM widened with both vibration and no vibration. A residual stress can obviously be increased, producing an excellent effect on stress relief at a resonant frequency. The stress relief effect with an eccentric circulating vibrator was better than that obtained using a magnetic telescopic vibrator.

  17. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  18. Fatigue crack propagation behavior of stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusko, Chad S.

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of austenitic and duplex stainless steel base and weld metals has been investigated using various fatigue crack growth test procedures, ferrite measurement techniques, light optical microscopy, stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. The compliance offset method has been incorporated to measure crack closure during testing in order to determine a stress ratio at which such closure is overcome. Based on this method, an empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been shown to be very successful in overcoming crack closure for all da/dN for gas metal arc and laser welds. This empirically-determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been applied to testing of stainless steel base metal and weld metal to understand the influence of microstructure. Regarding the base metal investigation, for 316L and AL6XN base metals, grain size and grain plus twin size have been shown to influence resulting crack growth behavior. The cyclic plastic zone size model has been applied to accurately model crack growth behavior for austenitic stainless steels when the average grain plus twin size is considered. Additionally, the effect of the tortuous crack paths observed for the larger grain size base metals can be explained by a literature model for crack deflection. Constant Delta K testing has been used to characterize the crack growth behavior across various regions of the gas metal arc and laser welds at the empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60. Despite an extensive range of stainless steel weld metal FN and delta-ferrite morphologies, neither delta-ferrite morphology significantly influence the room temperature crack growth behavior. However, variations in weld metal da/dN can be explained by local surface roughness resulting from large columnar grains and tortuous crack paths in the weld metal.

  19. High Mn austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy includes, in weight percent: >4 to 15 Mn; 8 to 15 Ni; 14 to 16 Cr; 2.4 to 3 Al; 0.4 to 1 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; 0.05 to 0.2 C; 0.01 to 0.02 B; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1W; up to 3 Cu; up to 1 Si; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, the particles including at least one of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure that is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  20. The fatigue evaluation method for a structural stainless steel using the magnetic sensor composed of three pancake coils

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, M.; Tsuchida, Y.; Enokizono, M.; Yakushiji, T.

    2011-06-23

    May metallic structural materials, such as stainless steels, are currently used in our surroundings. If external force is repeatedly added for many years, it is thought that fatigue damage accumulates in stainless steels. When excessive fatigue damage accumulates in these metals, there is a possibility that they are destroyed by fatigue damage accumulation. Therefore, it is important to know the amount of the fatigue damage they have suffered in order to prevent them from being destroyed. We are developing the fatigue evaluation method for stainless steels with a magnetic sensor composed of three pancake type coils. In this research, the inspection object is ferritic stainless steels such as SUS430. The method of fatigue evaluation for ferritic stainless steels uses the three coil type sensor, and shows a good correlation between the number of stress cycles and the output signal of the sensor, even though the correlation between the output signal and an added stress is not completely accurate. This paper describes the evaluation method of fatigue damage in ferritic stainless steel using a magnetic sensor composed of three pancake-type coils.

  1. Thermal treatment effects on laser surface remelting duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Alex M.; Ierardi, Maria Clara F.; Aparecida Pinto, M.; Tavares, Sérgio S. M.

    2008-10-01

    In this paper the microstructural changes and effects on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels UNS S32304 and UNS S32205, commonly used by the petroleum industry, were studied, following the execution of laser surface remelting (LSM) and post-thermal treatments (TT). In this way, data was obtained, which could then be compared with the starting condition of the alloys. In order to analyze the corrosion behaviour of the alloys in the as-received conditions, treated with laser and after post-thermal treatments, cyclic polarization tests were carried out. A solution of 3.5% NaCl (artificial sea water) was used, as duplex stainless steels are regularly used by the petroleum industry in offshore locations. The results obtained showed that when laser surface treated, due to rapid resolidification, the alloys became almost ferritic, and since the level of nitrogen in the composition of both alloys is superior to their solubility limit in ferrite, a precipitation of Cr2N (chromium nitrides) occurred in the ferritic matrix, causing loss of corrosion resistance, thus resulting in an increase in surface hardness. However, after the post-thermal treatment the alloys corrosion resistance was restored to values close to those of the as-received condition.

  2. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-08-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld metal.

  3. Processing and application of nanosized ferrite powders

    SciTech Connect

    Drofenik, M.; Rozman, M.

    1995-09-01

    Crystalline MnZn ferrite of nanosize was prepared by the hydrothermal synthesis. The pH value of the starting suspension was found to influence substantially the ferrite composition. The nanosized ferrite powder is very sensitive to oxidation and sinters to nearly theoretical density in nitrogen. The correlation between the eddy-current loss and microstructure is given.

  4. The Effect of Constant and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Joint Properties of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel to 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neissi, R.; Shamanian, M.; Hajihashemi, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, dissimilar 316L austenitic stainless steel/2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) joints were fabricated by constant and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding process using ER2209 DSS as a filler metal. Microstructures and joint properties were characterized using optical and electron scanning microscopy, tensile, Charpy V-notch impact and micro-hardness tests, and cyclic polarization measurements. Microstructural observations confirmed the presence of chromium nitride and delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of DSS and 316L, respectively. In addition, there was some deviation in the austenite/ferrite ratio of the surface welding pass in comparison to the root welding pass. Besides having lower pitting potential, welded joints produced by constant current gas tungsten arc welding process, consisted of some brittle sigma phase precipitates, which resulted in some impact energy reduction. The tensile tests showed high tensile strength for the weld joints in which all the specimens were broken in 316L base metal.

  5. Electromagnetic non-destructive technique for duplex stainless steel characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, João Vicente; Camerini, Cesar; Pereira, Gabriela

    2016-02-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a two-phase (ferrite and austenite) material, which exhibits an attractive combination of mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance, being commonly employed for equipment of petrochemical plants, refining units and oil & gas platforms. The best properties of DSS are achieved when the phases are in equal proportions. However, exposition to high temperatures (e.g. welding process) may entail undesired consequences, such as deleterious phases precipitation (e.g. sigma, chi) and different proportion of the original phases, impairing dramatically the mechanical and corrosion properties of the material. A detailed study of the magnetic behavior of DSS microstructure with different ferrite austenite ratios and deleterious phases content was accomplished. The non destructive method evaluates the electromagnetic properties changes in the material and is capable to identify the presence of deleterious phases into DSS microstructure.

  6. High power ferrite microwave switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardash, I.; Roschak, N. K.

    1975-01-01

    A high power ferrite microwave switch was developed along with associated electronic driver circuits for operation in a spaceborne high power microwave transmitter in geostationary orbit. Three units were built and tested in a space environment to demonstrate conformance to the required performance characteristics. Each unit consisted of an input magic-tee hybrid, two non-reciprocal latching ferrite phase shifters, an out short-slot 3 db quadrature coupler, a dual driver electronic circuit, and input logic interface circuitry. The basic mode of operation of the high power ferrite microwave switch is identical to that of a four-port, differential phase shift, switchable circulator. By appropriately designing the phase shifters and electronic driver circuits to operate in the flux-transfer magnetization mode, power and temperature insensitive operation was achieved. A list of the realized characteristics of the developed units is given.

  7. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    DOE PAGES

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2015-11-12

    We used cast stainless steels (CASSs)for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich alpha-phase by Spinodal decomposition of delta-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to providemore » an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. Moreover, an approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. Our results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.« less

  8. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Joints Between AISI 316L Austenitic/UNS S32750 Dual-Phase Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanian, Morteza; Mohammadnezhad, Mahyar; Amini, Mahdi; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-08-01

    Stainless steels are among the most economical and highly practicable materials widely used in industrial areas due to their mechanical and corrosion resistances. In this study, a dissimilar weld joint consisting of an AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel (ASS) and a UNS S32750 dual-phase stainless steel was obtained under optimized welding conditions by gas tungsten arc welding technique using AWS A5.4:ER2594 filler metal. The effect of welding on the evolution of the microstructure, crystallographic texture, and micro-hardness distribution was also studied. The weld metal (WM) was found to be dual-phased; the microstructure is obtained by a fully ferritic solidification mode followed by austenite precipitation at both ferrite boundaries and ferrite grains through solid-state transformation. It is found that welding process can affect the ferrite content and grain growth phenomenon. The strong textures were found in the base metals for both steels. The AISI 316L ASS texture is composed of strong cube component. In the UNS S32750 dual-phase stainless steel, an important difference between the two phases can be seen in the texture evolution. Austenite phase is composed of a major cube component, whereas the ferrite texture mainly contains a major rotated cube component. The texture of the ferrite is stronger than that of austenite. In the WM, Kurdjumov-Sachs crystallographic orientation relationship is found in the solidification microstructure. The analysis of the Kernel average misorientation distribution shows that the residual strain is more concentrated in the austenite phase than in the other phase. The welding resulted in a significant hardness increase in the WM compared to initial ASS.

  9. RF cavities with transversely biased ferrite tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Smythe, W.R.; Brophy, T.G.; Carlini, R.D.; Friedrichs, C.C.; Grisham, D.L.; Spalek, G.; Wilkerson, L.C.

    1985-10-01

    Earley et al. suggested that ferrite tuned rf cavities have lower ferrite power dissipation if the ferrite bias field is perpendicular rather than parallel to the rf magnetic field. A 50-84 MHz cavity has been constructed in which ferrite can be biased either way. Low power measurements of six microwave ferrites show that the magnetic Q's of these ferrites under perpendicular bias are much higher than under parallel bias, and that the high Q region extends over a much wider range of rf permeability. TDK Y-5 ferrite was found to have a magnetic Q of 10,800, 4,800, 1,200 and 129 at rf permeabilities of 1.2, 2.4, 3.7 and 4.5, respectively. Measurements of perpendicularly biased ferrite at various power levels were made in a coaxial line cavity. The Q of Y-5 ferrite was found to decrease by less than a factor of 2 as the power density in the ferrite was increased to 1.3 W/cmT. A cavity design for a 6 GeV, high current, rapid cycling synchrotron using transversely biased ferrite tuning is described.

  10. Ultrasonic Attenuation Measurements in Thermally Degraded 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, A.; Ortiz, N.; Carreón, H.; Sánchez, A.

    2009-03-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation plays an important role in materials characterization of metal components. This paper present data and discuss ultrasonic attenuation variations in a 2205 duplex stainless steel aged isothermally at 700° C and 900° C for different time intervals. Attenuation measurements as function of frequency where performed using pulse-echo immersion method and broad band planar transducers. Evidence is found of changes in the attenuation coefficient as aging time increases. The corresponding microstructure of aged specimens was observed and impact toughness was measured. Comparison is made with measurements of ferrite content for the two temperatures and different aging times.

  11. Effect of silver on microstructure and antibacterial property of 2205 duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng-Min; Chen, Yi-Chun; Pan, Yeong-Tsuen; Lin, Dong-Yih

    2016-06-01

    In this study, 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) was employed to enhance the antibacterial properties of material through silver doping. The results demonstrated that silver-doped 2205 DSS produces an excellent bacteria-inhibiting effect against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The antibacterial rates were 100% and 99.5%, respectively. Because the mutual solubility of silver and iron is very low in both the solid and liquid states, a silver-rich compound solidified and dispersed at the ferrite/austenite interface and the ferrite, austenite, and secondary austenite phases in silver-doped 2205 DSS. Doping 2205 DSS with silver caused the Creq/Nieq ratio of ferrite to decrease; however, the lower Creq/Nieq ratio promoted the rapid nucleation of γ2-austenite from primary α-ferrite. After 12h of homogenisation treatment at 1200 °C, the solubility of silver in the γ-austenite and α-ferrite phases can be increased by 0.10% and 0.09%, respectively. Moreover, silver doping was found to accelerate the dissolution of secondary austenite in a ferrite matrix during homogenisation. PMID:27040232

  12. Hybrid Laser-arc Welding of 17-4 PH Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ma, Junjie; Atabaki, Mehdi Mazar; Pillai, Raju; Kumar, Biju; Vasudevan, Unnikrishnan; Sreshta, Harold; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2015-06-01

    17-4 PH stainless steel has wide applications in severe working conditions due to its combination of good corrosion resistance and high strength. The weldability of 17-4 PH stainless steel is challenging. In this work, hybrid laser-arc welding was developed to weld 17-4 PH stainless steel. This method was chosen based on its advantages, such as deep weld penetration, less filler materials, and high welding speed. The 17-4 PH stainless steel plates with a thickness of 19 mm were successfully welded in a single pass. During the hybrid welding, the 17-4 PH stainless steel was immensely susceptible to porosity and solidification cracking. The porosity was avoided by using nitrogen as the shielding gas. The nitrogen stabilized the keyhole and inhibited the formation of bubbles during welding. Solidification cracking easily occurred along the weld centerline at the root of the hybrid laser-arc welds. The microstructural evolution and the cracking susceptibility of 17-4 PH stainless steel were investigated to remove these centerline cracks. The results showed that the solidification mode of the material changed due to high cooling rate at the root of the weld. The rapid cooling rate caused the transformation from ferrite to austenite during the solidification stage. The solidification cracking was likely formed as a result of this cracking-susceptible microstructure and a high depth/width ratio that led to a high tensile stress concentration. Furthermore, the solidification cracking was prevented by preheating the base metal. It was found that the preheating slowed the cooling rate at the root of the weld, and the ferrite-to-austenite transformation during the solidification stage was suppressed. Delta ferrite formation was observed in the weld bead as well no solidification cracking occurred by optimizing the preheating temperature.

  13. Stainless steel 4003 in the transportation industry

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacs, H.; Stoeckl, M.

    1998-12-31

    The world today sees a dramatic increase in the number of people and the quantities of articles and products which are to be transported. This results in an ever-increasing demand in the steels used in the transportation industry. Key factors are environmental regulations, safety, and life expectancy and product cost in determining which types steel to use. Especially the ferritic 12% chromium stainless steels has seen a significant development and usage in recent years. Compared to typical carbon steels high strength/low alloy steels and structural steels the 12% chromium steels offers improvement in corrosion and wear resistance and weldability outlining advantages in light weight construction and an overall saving. The paper presents the chemical composition and mechanical properties of grade 4003 which is increasingly used worldwide in areas of public transportation, rail transportation, mining industry and sugar industry, among others. The impact of corrosion and abrasion of this stainless steel versus the standard carbon grades and cost efficiency are discussed.

  14. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; <0.3Ti+V; <0.03N; and, balance Fe, where the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure, the austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite free and essentially BCC-phase-free. A method of making austenitic stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

  15. Cellular Precipitation at a 17-7 PH Stainless Steel Interphase Interface During Low-Temperature Nitridation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Danqi; Ernst, Frank; Kahn, Harold; Heuer, Arthur H.

    2014-07-01

    Cellular precipitation of Cr-rich nitrides was observed at an austenite-ferrite interface in 17-7 PH stainless steel after low-temperature nitridation. Fine-scale lamellar rocksalt-structured nitride (MN1- x , M: randomly distributed Fe, Cr, and Al) was identified at the interfaces between austenite and ferrite by local-electrode atom-probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy. The small size and spacing of the nitride lamellae reflect the low mobility of substitutional atoms under the conditions of low-temperature nitridation. Nitrides of the same structure were formed within the ferrite grain as extremely small particles. The face-centered cubic nitride precipitates in the Bain orientation relationship with the ferrite.

  16. Microstructure and Low-Temperature Mechanical Properties of 304 Stainless Steel Joints by PAW + GTAW Combined Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Li, Yajiang; Wang, Juan

    2016-08-01

    The combined double-pass process of plasma arc welding (PAW) + gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) was performed on 304 austenitic stainless steel with the thickness of 12 mm. Results indicated that two different morphologies of ferrite (e.g., lathy δ-ferrite and skeletal δ-ferrite) were formed within the austenite matrix in PAW weld metal (PAW-WM). GTAW weld metal (GTAW-WM) was mainly composed of fine austenite and skeletal δ-ferrite. In transition zone between PAW-WM and GTAW-WM, epitaxial growth contributed to cellular dendritic crystals transforming into columnar crystals. The tensile strength of joint is about 700 MPa. The impact toughness of WM varied from 281 J (20 °C) to 122 (-196 °C), while the impact toughness of heat-affected zone (HAZ) varied from 205 J (20 °C) to 112 J (-196 °C).

  17. Microstructure and Low-Temperature Mechanical Properties of 304 Stainless Steel Joints by PAW + GTAW Combined Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Li, Yajiang; Wang, Juan

    2016-10-01

    The combined double-pass process of plasma arc welding (PAW) + gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) was performed on 304 austenitic stainless steel with the thickness of 12 mm. Results indicated that two different morphologies of ferrite (e.g., lathy δ-ferrite and skeletal δ-ferrite) were formed within the austenite matrix in PAW weld metal (PAW-WM). GTAW weld metal (GTAW-WM) was mainly composed of fine austenite and skeletal δ-ferrite. In transition zone between PAW-WM and GTAW-WM, epitaxial growth contributed to cellular dendritic crystals transforming into columnar crystals. The tensile strength of joint is about 700 MPa. The impact toughness of WM varied from 281 J (20 °C) to 122 (-196 °C), while the impact toughness of heat-affected zone (HAZ) varied from 205 J (20 °C) to 112 J (-196 °C).

  18. Cavitation Erosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitelea, Ion; Micu, Lavinia Mădălina; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Crăciunescu, Corneliu Marius

    2016-05-01

    During processing or use, duplex steels can be subjected to heating at high temperatures that can affect their behavior. This work aims to correlate the influence of the sensitization treatment on the ultrasonic cavitation erosion behavior of a UNS S31803 (X2CrNiMoN22-5-3) duplex stainless steel. Duplex stainless steels, formed as a result of rapid cooling after solution annealing, are sensitized at temperatures of 475 and 850 °C, respectively, leading to hardening and embrittlement due to the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite and the precipitation of secondary phases. The ultrasonic cavitation erosion experiments showed that the sensitization at 850 °C reduced the mean depth of erosion by about 11% and the mean depth of erosion rate by 28%. By contrast, the sensitization at 475 °C deteriorates the cavitation erosion resistance, increasing the erosion parameters by up to 22%, compared to the solution annealed state.

  19. Effect of Creep of Ferritic Interconnect on Long-Term Performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-08-01

    High-temperature ferritic alloys are potential candidates as interconnect (IC) materials and spacers due to their low cost and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) compatibility with other components for most of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) . However, creep deformation becomes relevant for a material when the operating temperature exceeds or even is less than half of its melting temperature (in degrees of Kelvin). The operating temperatures for most of the SOFCs under development are around 1,073 K. With around 1,800 K of the melting temperature for most stainless steel, possible creep deformation of ferritic IC under the typical cell operating temperature should not be neglected. In this paper, the effects of IC creep behavior on stack geometry change and the stress redistribution of different cell components are predicted and summarized. The goal of the study is to investigate the performance of the fuel cell stack by obtaining the changes in fuel- and air-channel geometry due to creep of the ferritic stainless steel IC, therefore indicating possible changes in SOFC performance under long-term operations. The ferritic IC creep model was incorporated into software SOFC-MP and Mentat-FC, and finite element analyses were performed to quantify the deformed configuration of the SOFC stack under the long-term steady-state operating temperature. It was found that the creep behavior of the ferritic stainless steel IC contributes to narrowing of both the fuel- and the air-flow channels. In addition, stress re-distribution of the cell components suggests the need for a compliant sealing material that also relaxes at operating temperature.

  20. Solidification behavior and microstructural analysis of austenitic stainless steel laser welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel laser welds has been investigated with a high-power laser system. The welds were made at speeds ranging from 13 to 60 mm/s. The welds sowed a wide variety of microstructural features. The ferrite content in the 13-mm/s weld varied from less than 1% at the root of the weld to about 10% at the crown. The duplex structure at the crown of the weld was much finer than the one observed in conventional weld metal. However, the welds made at 25 and 60 mm/s contained an austenitic structure with less than 1% ferrite throughout the weld. Microstructural analysis of these welds used optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and analytical electron microscopy. The austenitic stainless steel welds were free of any cracking, and the results are explained in terms of the rapid solidification conditions during laser welding.

  1. Optimization and testing results of Zr-bearing ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Tyburska-Puschel, Beata; Sridharan, K.

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels are important structural materials for nuclear reactors due to their advantages over other applicable materials like austenitic stainless steels, notably their resistance to void swelling, low thermal expansion coefficients, and higher thermal conductivity. However, traditional FM steels exhibit a noticeable yield strength reduction at elevated temperatures above ~500°C, which limits their applications in advanced nuclear reactors which target operating temperatures at 650°C or higher. Although oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels have shown excellent high-temperature performance, their extremely high cost, limited size and fabricability of products, as well as the great difficulty with welding and joining, have limited or precluded their commercial applications. Zirconium has shown many benefits to Fe-base alloys such as grain refinement, improved phase stability, and reduced radiation-induced segregation. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of a new generation of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys to be fabricated using conventional

  2. Internal friction study of decomposition kinetics of SAF 2507 type duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Smuk, O.; Smuk, S.; Hanninen, H.; Jagodzinski, Yu.; Tarasenko, O.

    1999-01-08

    During the last decade, super duplex stainless steels (DSSs) with increased nitrogen content have been an object of intensive studies. Present work is devoted to the study of the peculiarities of {delta}-ferrite decomposition in SAF 2507 type duplex steel, and redistribution of nitrogen between ferrite and austenite phases in a wide temperature range by means of internal fraction (IF). Unlike local methods of electron microscopy or engineering methods of hardness or impact toughness testing, which give basically information on the formation of brittle intermetallic phases, the internal friction technique allows to study the state of solid solution and kinetics of changes in the relative amounts of ferrite and austenite phases during thermal treatment.

  3. Comparison of the mechanical strength properties of several high-chromium ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, M.K.; Sikka, V.K.; Booker, B.L.P.

    1981-01-01

    A modified 9 Cr-1 Mo ferritic steel has been selected as an alternative material for breeder reactors. Different 9 Cr-1 Mo steels are already being used commercially in UK and USA and a 9 Cr-2 Mo steel (EM12) is being used commercially in France. The 12% Cr steel alloy HT9 is also often recommended for high-temperature service. Creep-rupture data for all six seels were analyzed to yield rupture life as a function of stress, temperature, and lot-to-lot variations. Yield and tensile strength data for the three 9 Cr-1 Mo materials were also examined. All results were compared with Type 304 stainless steel, and the tensile and creep properties of the modified and British 9 Cr-1 Mo materials were used to calculate allowable stress values S/sub 0/ per Section VIII, Division 1 and S/sub m/ per code Case N-47 to section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. these values were compared with code listings for American commercial 9 Cr-1 Mo steel, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, and Type 304 stainless steel. The conclusion is made that the modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel displays tensile and creep strengths superior to those of the other ferritic materials examined and is at least comparable to Type 304 stainless steel from room temperature to about 625/sup 0/C. 31 figures.

  4. Phase Transformations During the Low-Temperature Nitriding of AISI 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing; Gu, Tan; Qiu, Shaoyu; Wang, Jun; Xiong, Ji; Fan, Hongyuan

    2015-02-01

    Liquid nitriding of type AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel was conducted at 723 K (450 °C), using one type of novel low-temperature liquid chemical thermo-treatment. The transformation of the nitrided surface microstructure was systematically studied. Experimental results revealed that a nitrided layer formed on the sample surface with the thickness ranging from 3 to 28 μm, depending on nitriding time. After the 2205 duplex stainless steel was subjected to liquid nitriding 723 K (450 °C) for less than 8 hours, the pre-existing ferrite region on the surface transformed into the expanded austenite (S phase) by the infusion of nitrogen atoms, most of which stay in the interstitial sites. Generally, the dominant phase of the nitrided layer was the expanded austenite. When the nitriding time prolonged up to 16 hours, some pre-existing ferrite in expanded austenite was decomposed and ɛ-nitride precipitated subsequently. When the treatment time went up to 40 hours, large amount of ɛ-nitride and CrN precipitates were observed in the pre-existing ferritic region in the expanded austenite. Furthermore, many nitrides precipitated from the pre-austenite region. Acicular nitride was identified by transmission electron microscopy. The thickness of the nitrided layer increased with increasing nitriding time. The growth of the nitrided layer is mainly due to nitrogen diffusion in accordance with the expected parabolic rate law. Liquid nitriding effectively increased the surface hardness of 2205 duplex stainless steel by a factor of 3.

  5. Characterization of carbon ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Kai; Wang, Yibo; Li, Zhuguo; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steel 316L is ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluences of 1.2 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, 2.4 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, and 4.8 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}. The ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel is investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is evaluated by potentiodynamic test. It is found that the initial phase is austenite with a small amount of ferrite. After low fluence carbon ion implantation, an amorphous layer and ferrite phase enriched region underneath are formed. Nanophase particles precipitate from the amorphous layer due to energy minimization and irradiation at larger ion implantation fluence. The morphology of the precipitated nanophase particles changes from circular to dumbbell-like with increasing implantation fluence. The corrosion resistance of stainless steel is enhanced by the formation of amorphous layer and graphitic solid state carbon after carbon ion implantation. - Highlights: • Carbon implantation leads to phase transformation from austenite to ferrite. • The passive film on SS316L becomes thinner after carbon ion implantation. • An amorphous layer is formed by carbon ion implantation. • Nanophase precipitate from amorphous layer at higher ion implantation fluence. • Corrosion resistance of SS316L is improved by carbon implantation.

  6. Development of a monolithic ferrite memory array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H., Jr.; Bhiwandker, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the development and testing of ferrite monolithic memory arrays are presented. This development required the synthesis of ferrite materials having special magnetic and physical characteristics and the development of special processes; (1) for making flexible sheets (laminae) of the ferrite composition, (2) for embedding conductors in ferrite, and (3) bonding ferrite laminae together to form a monolithic structure. Major problems encountered in each of these areas and their solutions are discussed. Twenty-two full-size arrays were fabricated and fired during the development of these processes. The majority of these arrays were tested for their memory characteristics as well as for their physical characteristics and the results are presented. The arrays produced during this program meet the essential goals and demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating monolithic ferrite memory arrays by the processes developed.

  7. High-Q ferrite-tuned cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, L.M.; Thiessen, H.A.; Carlini, R.D.; Potter, J.M.

    1983-08-01

    Rapid-cycling proton synchrotrons, such as the proposed LAMPF II accelerator, require approximately 10 MV per turn rf with 17% tuning range near 50 MHz. The traditional approach to ferrite-tuned cavities uses a ferrite which is longitudinally biased (rf magnetic field parallel to bias field). This method leads to unacceptably high losses in the ferrite. At Los Alamos, we are developing a cavity with transverse bias (rf magnetic field perpendicular to the bias field) that makes use of the tensor permeability of the ferrite. Initial tests of a small (10-cm-diam) quarter-wave singly re-entrant cavity tuned by several different ferrites indicate that the losses in the ferrite can be made negligible compared with the losses due to the surface resistivity of the copper cavity.

  8. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kima, Jong Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae

    2014-10-01

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  9. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Kima, Jong Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae

    2014-10-06

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  10. Nitrogen containing shielding gases for GTAW duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Creffield, G.K.; Cole, M.H.; Paciej, R.; Huang, W.; Urmston, S.

    1993-12-31

    The duplex stainless steel are alloys characterized as consisting of two phases; austenite and ferrite. As such, they combine the benefits of both phases i.e. good ductility and general corrosion resistance of austenite, but with improved stress corrosion cracking resistance and strength associate with ferrite. Carefully controlled manufacturing techniques are employed to produce this combination in roughly equal proportions to ensure optimum properties. The range of duplex alloys studied in this work covered both the standard grade (2205) and the latest generation of super duplex (2507) alloys; typical compositions are shown in Table 1. Although the standard duplex is the most commonly available and widely used, super duplexes, which are characterized by higher chromium, nickel, molybdenum and nitrogen contents, have even better corrosion properties and are finding increasing applications in the offshore industry. To benefit from the superior properties of duplex, it is vital that these alloys can be welded effectively and that the properties of the welded joint match those of the parent weld. The objective of the current investigation was to study the effect of nitrogen, in both the shielding and purge gas, on the weld metal nitrogen content, microstructure and corrosion resistance, with the eventual aim of recommending an effective shielding gas mixture for duplex stainless steels.

  11. Sensitization of Laser-beam Welded Martensitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Rajendran, Kousika Dhasanur; Lindner, Stefan

    Ferritic and martensitic stainless steels are an attractive alternative in vehicle production due to their inherent corrosion resistance. By the opportunity of press hardening, their strength can be increased to up to 2000 MPa, making them competitors for unalloyed ultra-high strength steels. Welding, nevertheless, requires special care, especially when it comes to joining of high strength heat treated materials. With an adopted in-line heat treatment of the welds in as-rolled as well as press hardened condition, materials with sufficient fatigue strength and acceptable structural behavior can be produced. Because of microstructural transformations in the base material such as grain coarsening and forced carbide precipitation, the corrosion resistance of the weld zone may be locally impaired. Typically the material in the heat-affected zone becomes sensitive to intergranular cracking in the form of knife-edge corrosion besides the fusion line. The current study comprises of two text scenarios. By an alternating climate test, general response in a corroding environment is screened. In order to understand the corrosion mechanisms and to localize the sensitive zones, sensitisation tests were undertaken. Furthermore, the applicability of a standard test according to ASTM 763-83 was examined. It was found that the alternative climate test does not reveal any corrosion effects. Testing by the oxalic acid test revealed clearly the effect of welding, weld heat treatment and state of thermal processing. Also application of the standard which originally suited for testing ferritic stainless steels could have been justified.

  12. Multifunctionality of nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Atma; Thakur, Awalendra K.

    2016-05-01

    Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite has been synthesized by adopting modified Pechini route. No evidence of impurity or secondary phase has been detected up to the detection of error limit of X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction pattern reveals orthorhombic crystal system with space group Pnma (62).Crystallite size and lattice strain was found to be ˜42.8nm and 0.306% respectively. Optical band gap was found to be 2.109 eV, by UV-Visible diffused reflectance spectrum (DRS). Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area was found to be ˜3.45 m2/g. Magnetization-hysteresis (M-H) loop was recorded at room temperature (300K) reveals weak ferromagnetism in Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite. The weak ferromagnetism in lanthanum ferrite is due to the uncompensated antiferromagnetic spin ordering. Ferroelectric loop hysteresis observed at room temperature at 100Hz depicts the presence of ferroelectric ordering in LaFeO3.Simultanious presence of magnetic and ferroelectric ordering at room temperature makes it suitable candidate of Multiferroic family.

  13. Evaluation of aging of cast stainless steel components

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.

    1991-02-01

    Cast stainless steel is used extensively in nuclear reactors for primary-pressure-boundary components such as primary coolant pipes, elbows, valves, pumps, and safe ends. These components are, however, susceptible to thermal aging embrittlement in light water reactors because of the segregation of Cr atoms from Fe and Ni by spinodal decomposition in ferrite and the precipitation of Cr-rich carbides on ferrite/austenite boundaries. A recent advance in understanding the aging kinetics is presented. Aging kinetics are strongly influenced by the synergistic effects of other metallurgical reactions that occur in parallel with spinodal decomposition, i.e., clustering of Ni, Mo, and Si solute atoms and the nucleation and growth of G-phase precipitates in the ferrite phase. A number of methods are outlined for estimating aging embrittlement under end-of-life of life-extension conditions, depending on several factors such as degree of permissible conservatism, availability of component archive material, and methods of estimating and verifying the activation energy of aging. 33 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Corrosion behavior in high heat input welded heat-affected zone of Ni-free high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Joonoh Ha, Heon-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2013-08-15

    The pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion behaviors in high heat input welded heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a metastable high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel were explored through electrochemical tests. The HAZs were simulated using Gleeble simulator with high heat input welding condition of 300 kJ/cm and the peak temperature of the HAZs was changed from 1200 °C to 1350 °C, aiming to examine the effect of δ-ferrite formation on corrosion behavior. The electrochemical test results show that both pitting corrosion resistance and interphase corrosion resistance were seriously deteriorated by δ-ferrite formation in the HAZ and their aspects were different with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The pitting corrosion resistance was decreased by the formation of Cr-depleted zone along δ-ferrite/austenite (γ) interphase resulting from δ-ferrite formation; however it didn't depend on δ-ferrite fraction. The interphase corrosion resistance depends on the total amount of Cr-depleted zone as well as ferrite area and thus continuously decreased with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The different effects of δ-ferrite fraction on pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion were carefully discussed in terms of alloying elements partitioning in the HAZ based on thermodynamic consideration. - Highlights: • Corrosion behavior in the weld HAZ of high-nitrogen austenitic alloy was studied. • Cr{sub 2}N particle was not precipitated in high heat input welded HAZ of tested alloy. • Pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion show a different behavior. • Pitting corrosion resistance was affected by whether or not δ-ferrite forms. • Interphase corrosion resistance was affected by the total amount of δ-ferrite.

  15. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  16. Beam induced heating of ferrite magnets

    SciTech Connect

    van Asselt, W.K.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1991-01-01

    Alerted by impedance measurements of ferrite kicker magnets and by apparent beam induced pressure increase in the neighborhood of window frame kicker magnets, bench measurements of magnet heating have been done. They confirmed the necessity of interrupting the ferrite yoke. Another method, which can be applied for existing magnets, will be described. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  17. Exchange coupled ferrite nanocomposites through chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qilin; Patel, Ketan; Ren, Shenqiang

    2016-08-16

    Exchange coupling between magnetically hard and soft phases has the potential to yield a large gain in the energy product. In this work, we present a scalable chemical synthetic route to produce magnetic iron oxide based nanocomposites, consisting of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) and strontium ferrite (SrFe12O19) components. PMID:27476744

  18. Two-Phase Master Sintering Curve for 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Im Doo; Ha, Sangyul; Park, Seong Jin; Blaine, Deborah C.; Bollina, Ravi; German, Randall M.

    2016-11-01

    The sintering behavior of 17-4 PH stainless steel has been efficiently characterized by a two-phase master sintering curve model (MSC). The activation energy for the sintering of gas-atomized and water-atomized 17-4 PH powders is derived using the mean residual method, and the relative density of both powders is well predicted by the two-phase MSC model. The average error between dilatometry data and MSC model has been reduced by 68 pct for gas-atomized powder and by 45 pct for water-atomized powder through the consideration of phase transformation of 17-4 PH in MSC model. The effect of δ-ferrite is considered in the two-phase MSC model, leading to excellent explanation of the sintering behavior for 17-4 PH stainless steel. The suggested model is useful in predicting the densification and phase change phenomenon during sintering of 17-4 PH stainless steel.

  19. Two-Phase Master Sintering Curve for 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Im Doo; Ha, Sangyul; Park, Seong Jin; Blaine, Deborah C.; Bollina, Ravi; German, Randall M.

    2016-08-01

    The sintering behavior of 17-4 PH stainless steel has been efficiently characterized by a two-phase master sintering curve model (MSC). The activation energy for the sintering of gas-atomized and water-atomized 17-4 PH powders is derived using the mean residual method, and the relative density of both powders is well predicted by the two-phase MSC model. The average error between dilatometry data and MSC model has been reduced by 68 pct for gas-atomized powder and by 45 pct for water-atomized powder through the consideration of phase transformation of 17-4 PH in MSC model. The effect of δ-ferrite is considered in the two-phase MSC model, leading to excellent explanation of the sintering behavior for 17-4 PH stainless steel. The suggested model is useful in predicting the densification and phase change phenomenon during sintering of 17-4 PH stainless steel.

  20. Sensitization of stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the corrosion rates of 18-8 stainless steels that have been sensitized at various temperatures and to show the application of phase diagrams. The laboratory instructor will assign each student a temperature, ranging from 550 C to 1050 C, to which the sample will be heated. Further details of the experimental procedure are detailed.

  1. Welding of Stainless Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, H; Johnson, Lawrence

    1929-01-01

    It would appear that welds in some stainless steels, heat-treated in some practicable way, will probably be found to have all the resistance to corrosion that is required for aircraft. Certainly these structures are not subjected to the severe conditions that are found in chemical plants.

  2. A comparative study of the mechanical properties and the behavior of carbon and boron in stainless steel cladding tubes fabricated by PM HIP and traditional technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulga, A. V.

    2013-03-01

    The ring tensile test method was optimized and successfully used to obtain precise data for specimens of the cladding tubes of AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steels and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. The positive modifications in the tensile properties of the stainless steel cladding tubes fabricated by powder metallurgy and hot isostatic pressing of melt atomized powders (PM HIP) when compared with the cladding tubes produced by traditional technology were found. Presently, PM HIP is also used in the fabrication of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels. The high degree of homogeneity of the distribution of carbon and boron as well the high dispersivity of the phase-structure elements in the specimens manufactured via PM HIP were determined by direct autoradiography methods. These results correlate well with the increase of the tensile properties of the specimens produced by PM HIP technology.

  3. Effect of the Solution Annealing and Chemical Passivation Followed by Aging on the Corrosion of Shell Mold Cast CF8 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kuk-Jin; Ju, Heongkyu; Moon, Young-Dae; Hong, Jun Ho; Pak, Sung Joon

    2016-10-01

    The effects of solution annealing and passivation of shell mold cast CF8 stainless steels on Elbow pipe fittings with 2-month room temperature aging have been studied using a corrosion technique. The resistance of corrosion increased with 2-month room temperature aging combined with solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. The mode of corrosion was deeply related to the δ-ferrite content, permeability, and passivation. The corrosion probability decreased as both the δ-ferrite content and the permeability decreased. Therefore, it is considered that δ-ferrite content and passive film of Cr2O3 play an important role in corrosion resistance of CF8 Elbow pipe fittings due to the long-term aging with solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. This result shows that the corrosion resistance of CF8 fittings can be enhanced by the solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. Decreased ferrite phases and permeability improve IGC resistance in CF8 steel.

  4. Effects of long-term thermal aging on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of cast austenitic stainless steels in simulated PWR primary water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shilei; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Hui; Xin, Changsheng; Wang, Xitao

    2016-02-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of cast austenitic stainless steels of unaged and thermally aged at 400 °C for as long as 20,000 h were studied by using a slow strain rate testing (SSRT) system. Spinodal decomposition in ferrite during thermal aging leads to hardening in ferrite and embrittlement of the SSRT specimen. Plastic deformation and thermal aging degree have a great influence on the oxidation rate of the studied material in simulated PWR primary water environments. In the SCC regions of the aged SSRT specimen, the surface cracks, formed by the brittle fracture of ferrite phases, are the possible locations for SCC. In the non-SCC regions, brittle fracture of ferrite phases also occurs because of the effect of thermal aging embrittlement.

  5. Effect of the Solution Annealing and Chemical Passivation Followed by Aging on the Corrosion of Shell Mold Cast CF8 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kuk-Jin; Ju, Heongkyu; Moon, Young-Dae; Hong, Jun Ho; Pak, Sung Joon

    2016-07-01

    The effects of solution annealing and passivation of shell mold cast CF8 stainless steels on Elbow pipe fittings with 2-month room temperature aging have been studied using a corrosion technique. The resistance of corrosion increased with 2-month room temperature aging combined with solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. The mode of corrosion was deeply related to the δ-ferrite content, permeability, and passivation. The corrosion probability decreased as both the δ-ferrite content and the permeability decreased. Therefore, it is considered that δ-ferrite content and passive film of Cr2O3 play an important role in corrosion resistance of CF8 Elbow pipe fittings due to the long-term aging with solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. This result shows that the corrosion resistance of CF8 fittings can be enhanced by the solid solution annealing and chemical passivation. Decreased ferrite phases and permeability improve IGC resistance in CF8 steel.

  6. Compatibility Assessment of Advanced Stainless Steels in Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Type 316L stainless steel capsules containing commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS (austenitic, 14Cr-16Ni), NF-616 (ferritic/martensitic, 9Cr-2W-0.5Mo), or 316L (austenitic, 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo) stainless steel were exposed at 600 or 700 C for 100 and 400 h as a screening test for compatibility. Using weight change, tensile testing, and metallographic analysis, HT-UPS and 316L were found to be largely immune to changes resulting from sodium exposure, but NF-616 was found susceptible to substantial decarburization at 700 C. Subsequently, two thermal convection loops (TCLs) constructed of 316L and loaded with commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS and 316L were operated for 2000 h each one between 500 and 650 C, the other between 565 and 725 C at a flow rate of about 1.5 cm/s. Changes in specimen appearance, weight, and tensile properties were observed to be very minor in all cases, and there was no metallographic evidence of microstructure changes, composition gradients, or mass transfer resulting from prolonged exposure in a TCL. Thus, it appears that HT-UPS and 316L stainless steels are similarly compatible with commercially pure sodium under these exposure conditions.

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) with roughly equal amount of austenite and ferrite phases are being used in industries such as petrochemical, nuclear, pulp and paper mills, de-salination plants, marine environments, and others. However, many DSS grades have been reported to undergo corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in some aggressive environments such as chlorides and sulfide-containing caustic solutions. Although stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in chloride solution has been investigated and well documented in the literature but the SCC mechanisms for DSS in caustic solutions were not known. Microstructural changes during fabrication processes affect the overall SCC susceptibility of these steels in caustic solutions. Other environmental factors, like pH of the solution, temperature, and resulting electrochemical potential also influence the SCC susceptibility of duplex stainless steels. In this study, the role of material and environmental parameters on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions were investigated. Changes in the DSS microstructure by different annealing and aging treatments were characterized in terms of changes in the ratio of austenite and ferrite phases, phase morphology and intermetallic precipitation using optical micrography, SEM, EDS, XRD, nano-indentation and microhardness methods. These samples were then tested for general and localized corrosion susceptibility and SCC to understand the underlying mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in DSS in the above-mentioned environments. Results showed that the austenite phase in the DSS is more susceptible to crack initiation and propagation in caustic solutions, which is different from that in the low pH chloride environment where the ferrite phase is the more susceptible phase. This study also showed that microstructural changes in duplex stainless steels due to different heat treatments could affect their SCC

  8. In situ neutron diffraction study of the low cycle fatigue of the α-γ duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenčuš, Peter; Polák, Jaroslav; Lukáš, Petr; Muránsky, Ondrej

    2006-11-01

    In duplex stainless steels, significant thermal stresses are generated during the cooling from the homogenization temperature due to different thermal expansion coefficients of the austenitic and ferritic phases. The results of the in situ neutron diffraction examination of the evolution of the internal stresses during the low cycle fatigue in the SAF 2507 duplex stainless steel are reported. Stress response of both constituent components resulting from the load sharing between austenitic and ferritic grains was measured. It was found that the initial thermal residual stresses were relaxed rapidly at the beginning of the cyclic loading. Whereas initial hardening was identified in both phases, the subsequent fatigue softening was fully attributed to the austenitic phase.

  9. Structural analysis of emerging ferrite: Doped nickel zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajinder; Kumar, Hitanshu; Singh, Ragini Raj; Barman, P. B.

    2015-08-28

    Ni{sub 0.6-x}Zn{sub 0.4}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0, 0.033, 0.264) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method and annealed at 900°C. Structural properties of all prepared samples were examined with X-ray diffraction (XRD). The partial formation of hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) secondary phase with spinel phase cubic structure of undoped and cobalt doped nickel zinc ferrite was found by XRD peaks. The variation in crystallite size and other structural parameters with cobalt doping has been calculated for most prominent peak (113) of XRD and has been explained on the basis of cations ionic radii difference.

  10. The influence of composition and microstructure on the HAZ toughness of duplex stainless steels at [minus]20 C

    SciTech Connect

    Lippold, J.C. ); Varol, I.; Baeslack, W.A. III )

    1994-04-01

    The toughness of two commercial duplex stainless steels, Ferralium Alloy 255 and Alloy 2205, was evaluated over a range of cooling rates representative of conditions in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ). Both alloys exhibited a loss in toughness at the cooling rate extremes, 90 and 2 C/s, resulting from high ferrite content and larger prior ferrite grain size, respectively. Alloy 255 also showed a drop in toughness at an intermediate cooling rate of 50 C/s. This intermediate loss in toughness, not observed in Alloy 2205, results from the interrelationship between austenite and Cr-rich precipitate formation along ferrite grain boundaries. The precipitation mechanisms and their subsequent effect on toughness are described. The practical implications of HAZ microstructure control are also discussed.

  11. Annealing effects on the microstructure and magnetic domain structures of duplex stainless steel studied by in situ technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L. Q.; Zhao, X. M.; Li, M.; Zhang, W. J.; Bai, Y.; Qiao, L. J.

    2012-10-01

    The effects of annealing temperature on the microstructure and the magnetic domain structures of duplex stainless steel 2507 were investigated by the magnetic force microscopy (MFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The MFM and XRD results indicated that the volume fraction of ferrite phase increased with increasing annealing temperature, but the lattice constants kept constant. Moreover, with the rise of annealing temperature, the magnetic domain structure in the ferrite phase varied gradually, where the magnetic domain became thinner and the distribution turned more homogeneous. These results gave a direct evidence for the changes of microstructure and magnetic domain structure induced by the annealing treatment. EBSD analysis showed that the orientation of ferrite grains changed after annealing treatments, which coincided with the changes of the microstructure and the magnetic domain structures.

  12. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by super duplex filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-08-15

    In the present paper, microstructural changes across an as-welded dissimilar austenitic/duplex stainless steel couple welded by a super duplex stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process is characterized with optical microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction techniques. Accordingly, variations of microstructure, texture, and grain boundary character distribution of base metals, heat affected zones, and weld metal were investigated. The results showed that the weld metal, which was composed of Widmanstätten austenite side-plates and allotriomorphic grain boundary austenite morphologies, had the weakest texture and was dominated by low angle boundaries. The welding process increased the ferrite content but decreased the texture intensity at the heat affected zone of the super duplex stainless steel base metal. In addition, through partial ferritization, it changed the morphology of elongated grains of the rolled microstructure to twinned partially transformed austenite plateaus scattered between ferrite textured colonies. However, the texture of the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone was strengthened via encouraging recrystallization and formation of annealing twins. At both interfaces, an increase in the special character coincident site lattice boundaries of the primary phase as well as a strong texture with <100> orientation, mainly of Goss component, was observed. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Weld metal showed local orientation at microscale but random texture at macroscale. • Intensification of <100> orientated grains was observed adjacent to the fusion lines. • The austenite texture was weaker than that of the ferrite in all duplex regions. • Welding caused twinned partially transformed austenites to form at SDSS HAZ. • At both interfaces, the ratio of special CSL boundaries of the primary phase increased.

  13. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part I. The model

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, O.

    1999-11-01

    The present investigation is concerned with modeling of the microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steels under thermal conditions applicable to welding. The important reactions that have been modeled are the dissolution of austenite during heating, subsequent grain growth in the delta ferrite regime, and finally, the decomposition of the delta ferrite to austenite during cooling. As a starting point, a differential formulation of the underlying diffusion problem is presented, based on the internal-state variable approach. These solutions are later manipulated and expressed in terms of the Scheil integral in the cases where the evolution equation is separable or can be made separable by a simple change of variables. The models have then been applied to describe the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution during both thick-plate and thin-plate welding of three commercial duplex stainless steel grades: 2205, 2304, and 2507. The results may conveniently be presented in the form of novel process diagrams, which display contours of constant delta ferrite grain size along with information about dissolution and reprecipitation of austenite for different combinations of weld input energy and peak temperature. These diagrams are well suited for quantitative readings and illustrate, in a condensed manner, the competition between the different variables that lead to structural changes during welding of duplex stainless steels.

  14. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part I. the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, Ø.

    1999-11-01

    The present investigation is concerned with modeling of the microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steels under thermal conditions applicable to welding. The important reactions that have been modeled are the dissolution of austenite during heating, subsequent grain growth in the delta ferrite regime, and finally, the decomposition of the delta ferrite to austenite during cooling. As a starting point, a differential formulation of the underlying diffusion problem is presented, based on the internal-state variable approach. These solutions are later manipulated and expressed in terms of the Scheil integral in the cases where the evolution equation is separable or can be made separable by a simple change of variables. The models have then been applied to describe the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution during both thick-plate and thin-plate welding of three commercial duplex stainless steel grades: 2205, 2304, and 2507. The results may conveniently be presented in the form of novel process diagrams, which display contours of constant delta ferrite grain size along with information about dissolution and reprecipitation of austenite for different combinations of weld input energy and peak temperature. These diagrams are well suited for quantitative readings and illustrate, in a condensed manner, the competition between the different variables that lead to structural changes during welding of duplex stainless steels.

  15. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  16. Kinetics and mechanism of thermal aging embrittlement of duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.

    1987-06-01

    Microstructural characteristics of long-term-aged cast duplex stainless steel specimens from eight laboratory heats and an actual component from a commercial boiling water reactor have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) techniques. Three precipitate phases, i.e., Cr-rich ..cap alpha..' and the Ni- and Si-rich G phase, and ..gamma../sub 2/ austenite, have been identified in the ferrite matrix of the aged specimens. For CF-8 grade materials, M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ carbides were identified on the austenite-ferrite boundaries as well as in the ferrite matrix for aging at greater than or equal to 450/sup 0/C. It has been shown that Si, C, and Mo contents are important factors that influence the kinetics of the G-phase precipitation. However, TEM and APFIM analyses indicate that the embrittlement for less than or equal to400/sup 0/C aging is primarily associated with Fe and Cr segregation in ferrite by spinodal decomposition. For extended aging, e.g., 6 to 8 years at 350 to 400/sup 0/C, large platelike ..cap alpha..' formed by nucleation and growth from the structure produced by the spinodal decomposition. The Cr content appears to play an important role either to promote the platelike ..cap alpha..' (high Cr content) or to suppress the ..cap alpha..' in favor of ..gamma../sub 2/ precipitation (low Cr). Approximate TTT diagrams for the spinodal, ..cap alpha..', G, ..gamma../sub 2/, and the in-ferrite M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ have been constructed for 250 to 450/sup 0/C aging. Microstructural modifications associated with a 550/sup 0/C reannealing and a subsequent toughness restoration are also discussed. It is shown that the toughness restoration is associated primarily with the dissolution of the Cr-rich region in ferrite.

  17. Ferrite insertion at Recycler Flying Wire System

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2004-02-27

    Ferrite rods are installed inside the flying-wire cavity of the Recycler Ring and at entrance and exit beam pipes in order to absorb high-frequency electromagnetic waves excited by the beam. However, these rods may also deteriorate the vacuum pressure of the ring. An investigation is made to analyze the necessity of the ferrite rods at the entrance and exit beam pipes.

  18. Microstructure and tensile behavior of nitrogen-alloyed, dual-phase stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berns, H.; Kleff, J.; Krauss, G.; Foley, R. P.

    1996-07-01

    Two alloys of high-nitrogen stainless steel have been heat treated to produce dual-phase microstruc-tures. The first alloy, N10CrNiMol7 1, a Ni-containing stainless steel, was processed conventionally. The second alloy, N20CrMol7, a Ni-free stainless steel, was processed to obtain a higher nitrogen content by pressurized electroslag remelting. The martensite in N10CrNiMol7 1 was homogeneously distributed in the ferrite and obtained a near-constant volume fraction as a function of intercritical annealing temperature. Microprobe analysis and microhardness measurements of the martensite con-stituent suggested that up to 0.4 pct N was dissolved in the austenite before quenching. Austenite formation, martensite transformation, undissolved nitrides, and retained austenite were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Ni-containing alloy exhibited classic dual-phase tensile behavior in that continuous yielding was observed together with good combinations of ultimate tensile strength and total elongation. The martensite constituent in alloy N20CrMol7 was concen-trated within bands. Comparison of tensile properties of the two alloys at similar volume fractions and hardness levels of martensite and ferrite showed that the microstructure containing banded mar-tensite had inferior combinations of strength and ductility. The degradation of tensile ductility was accompanied by a fracture mode transition from microvoid coalescence to transgranular cleavage. The deformation and fracture behavior of both alloys were related to the microstructure.

  19. Heat treatment temperature influence on ASTM A890 GR 6A super duplex stainless steel microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Marcelo; E-mail: marcelo.martins@sulzer.com; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos

    2005-09-15

    Duplex and super duplex stainless steels are ferrous alloys with up to 26% chromium, 8% nickel, 5% molybdenum and 0.3% nitrogen, which are largely used in applications in media containing ions from the halogen family, mainly the chloride ion (Cl{sup -}). The emergence of this material aimed at substituting Copper-Nickel alloys (Cupro-Nickel) that despite presenting good corrosion resistance, has mechanical properties quite inferior to steel properties. The metallurgy of duplex and super duplex stainless steel is complex due to high sensitiveness to sigma phase precipitation that becomes apparent, due to the temperatures they are exposed on cooling from solidification as well as from heat treatment processes. The objective of this study was to verify the influence of heat treating temperatures on the microstructure and hardness of ASTM A890/A890M Gr 6A super duplex stainless steel type. Microstructure control is of extreme importance for castings, as the chemical composition and cooling during solidification inevitably provide conditions for precipitation of sigma phase. Higher hardness in these materials is directly associated to high sigma phase concentration in the microstructure, precipitated in the ferrite/austenite interface. While heat treatment temperature during solution treatment increases, the sigma phase content in the microstructure decreases and consequently, the material hardness diminishes. When the sigma phase was completely dissolved by the heat treatment, the material hardness was influenced only due to ferrite and austenite contents in the microstructure.

  20. Oxidation and electrical behavior of nickel/lanthanum chromite-coated stainless steel interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaigan, Nima; Ivey, Douglas G.; Chen, Weixing

    Solving the contact resistance and cathode-chromium-poisoning problems associated with the application of ferritic stainless steel as solid oxide fuel cell interconnects is the objective of numerous current research efforts. In this work, the application of electrodeposited Ni/LaCrO 3 composites for AISI 430 stainless steel as protective/conductive coatings has been studied, with emphasis on the oxidation behavior, scale structure and electronic conductivity of these coatings. The oxidation tests were performed at 800 °C in air for up to 2040 h. The results showed that the scale is a double layer consisting of a particle filled chromia-rich subscale and an outer Ni/Fe-rich spinel together with NiO. The addition of LaCrO 3 particles greatly enhances the high-temperature oxidation resistance of Ni-coated ferritic stainless steel. Cavities, which form beneath the scale for uncoated steels as a result of cation outward diffusion, reduce the actual contact area between the scale and the alloy resulting in a high area specific resistance (ASR) as well as scale spallation. Excellent, stable ASR (0.005 Ω cm 2 after 400 h) was achieved with the application of Ni/LaCrO 3 coatings.

  1. Development and application of ferrite materials for low temperature co-fired ceramic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huai-Wu; Li, Jie; Su, Hua; Zhou, Ting-Chuan; Long, Yang; Zheng, Zong-Liang

    2013-11-01

    Development and application of ferrite materials for low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology are discussed, specifically addressing several typical ferrite materials such as M-type barium ferrite, NiCuZn ferrite, YIG ferrite, and lithium ferrite. In order to permit co-firing with a silver internal electrode in LTCC process, the sintering temperature of ferrite materials should be less than 950 °C. These ferrite materials are research focuses and are applied in many ways in electronics.

  2. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K. )

    1991-06-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water rectors (LWRs) at 280--330{degrees}C (535--625{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known mineral in formation. Fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel is estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. The extent of thermal embrittlement is characterized by the room-temperature normalized'' Charpy-impact energy. A correlation for the extent of embrittlement at saturation,'' i.e., the minimum impact energy that would be achieved for the material after long-term aging, is given in terms of a material parameter, {Phi}, which is determined from the chemical composition. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained from correlations between room-temperature Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness parameters. Fracture toughness as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which is determined from chemical composition. A common lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels with unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given material specification, ferrite content, and temperature. Examples for estimating impact strength and fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are describes. 24 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Weld Properties of a Free Machining Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Brooks; S. H. Goods; C. V. Robino

    2000-08-01

    The all weld metal tensile properties from gas tungsten arc and electron beam welds in free machining austenitic stainless steels have been determined. Ten heats with sulfur contents from 0.04 to 0.4 wt.% and a wide range in Creq/Nieq ratios were studied. Tensile properties of welds with both processes were related to alloy composition and solidification microstructure. The yield and ultimate tensile strengths increased with increasing Creq/Nieq ratios and ferrite content, whereas the ductility measured by RA at fracture decreased with sulfur content. Nevertheless, a range in alloy compositions was identified that provided a good combination of both strength and ductility. The solidification cracking response for the same large range of compositions are discussed, and compositions identified that would be expected to provide good performance in welded applications.

  4. Evolution of Microstructure and Residual Stress under Various Vibration Modes in 304 Stainless Steel Welds

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng-Shuen; Wang, Jia-Siang

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous vibration welding of 304 stainless steel was carried out with an eccentric circulating vibrator and a magnetic telescopic vibrator at subresonant (362 Hz and 59.3 Hz) and resonant (376 Hz and 60.9 Hz) frequencies. The experimental results indicate that the temperature gradient can be increased, accelerating nucleation and causing grain refinement during this process. During simultaneous vibration welding primary δ-ferrite can be refined and the morphologies of retained δ-ferrite become discontinuous so that δ-ferrite contents decrease. The smallest content of δ-ferrite (5.5%) occurred using the eccentric circulating vibrator. The diffraction intensities decreased and the FWHM widened with both vibration and no vibration. A residual stress can obviously be increased, producing an excellent effect on stress relief at a resonant frequency. The stress relief effect with an eccentric circulating vibrator was better than that obtained using a magnetic telescopic vibrator. PMID:24605068

  5. Phase transformation and mechanical behavior in annealed 2205 duplex stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Badji, Riad Bouabdallah, Mabrouk; Bacroix, Brigitte; Kahloun, Charlie; Belkessa, Brahim; Maza, Halim

    2008-04-15

    The phase transformations and mechanical behaviour during welding and subsequent annealing treatment of 2205 duplex stainless steel have been investigated. Detailed microstructural examination showed the presence of higher ferrite amounts in the heat affected zone (HAZ), while higher amounts of austenite were recorded in the centre region of the weld metal. Annealing treatments in the temperature range of 800-1000 deg. C resulted in a precipitation of {sigma} phase and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} chromium carbides at the {gamma}/{delta} interfaces that were found to be preferential precipitation sites. Above 1050 deg. C, the volume fraction of {delta} ferrite increases with annealing temperature. The increase of {delta} ferrite occurs at a faster rate in the HAZ than in the base metal and fusion zone. Optimal mechanical properties and an acceptable ferrite/austenite ratio throughout the weld regions corresponds to annealing at 1050 deg. C. Fractographic examinations showed that the mode of failure changed from quasi-cleavage fracture to dimple rupture with an increase in the annealing temperature from 850 to 1050 deg. C.

  6. Automatic assessment of a two-phase structure in the duplex stainless-steel SAF 2205

    SciTech Connect

    Komenda, J. ); Sandstroem, R. )

    1993-10-01

    Automatic image analysis was used to study the effect of deformation on the size and distribution of the austenite and ferrite phases in the duplex stainless steel SAF 2205 (22Cr-5Ni-3Mo-15N). The main parameters used were the chord size to characterize the ferrite phase and Feret's diameter for the austenite phase. As the deformation increased, ferrite bands became more elongated and thinner, contributing to a pronounced banding. The amount of banding can be quantified by using a ratio between the slopes of the chord size distributions in the longitudinal and short transverse directions. According to a proposed model of the influence of deformation on the two-phase structure, the process of austenite elongation and subdivision of austenite islands (crushing) is described. The effect of deformation on the yield and tensile strength was expressed using a Hall-Petch type relationship where the grain size was represented by the average width of the ferrite bands. The observed anisotropy in strength properties is believed to be due to texture hardening. Because elongation at a given strength level is the same in both the longitudinal and transverse directions, the banding itself does not influence the ductility. Nor can the strength anisotropy be due to banding, because the strength is greater in the longitudinal than in the transverse direction.

  7. Effect of heavy ion irradiation on microstructural evolution in CF8 cast austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Ying; Li, Meimei; Kirk, Marquis A.; Baldo, Peter M.; Lian, Tiangan

    2016-04-01

    The microstructural evolution in ferrite and austenitic in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) CF8, as received or thermally aged at 400 °C for 10,000 h, was followed under TEM with in situ irradiation of 1 MeV Kr ions at 300 and 350 °C to a fluence of 1.9 × 1015 ions/cm2 (∼3 dpa) at the IVEM-Tandem Facility. For the unaged CF8, the irradiation-induced dislocation loops appeared at a much lower dose in the austenite than in the ferrite. At the end dose, the austenite formed a well-developed dislocation network microstructure, while the ferrite exhibited an extended dislocation structure as line segments. Compared to the unaged CF8, the aged specimen appeared to have lower rate of damage accumulation. The rate of microstructural evolution under irradiation in the ferrite was significantly lower in the aged specimen than in the unaged. This difference is attributed to the different initial microstructures in the unaged and aged specimens, which implies that thermal aging and irradiation are not independent but interconnected damage processes.

  8. Distinguishing between chi and sigma phases in duplex stainless steels using potentiostatic etching

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, E.M.L.E.M.; Visser, P.E. de . Physical Metallurgy Div.); Cornish, L.A. )

    1993-12-01

    A color interference film etching technique based on the principle of potentiostatic etching has been developed to distinguish, by optical metallography, between Cr-rich sigma and Mo-rich chi phases as well as with simultaneous identification of the ferrite and austenite phases in duplex stainless steels. The optical metallography results are confirmed by semiquantitative energy dispersive spectrometry analysis and back-scattered electron imaging. The technique is relatively simple and rapid, and makes use of low voltages and a hot etchant. Results have shown distinctively the sigma, chi, ferrite, and austenite phases, and enable observation of the microstructural development, morphology, and kinetics of formation of the phases in duplex alloys. The method, by giving excellent color contrast between sigma and chi, also facilitates quantitative image analysis of the sigma and chi volume fractions.

  9. Study of the formation and effects of sigma phase in 21-6-9 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Packard, C.L.; Mataya, M.C.; Edstrom, C.M.

    1981-11-07

    Work performed to date on the study of the formation and effects of sigma phase in 21-6-9 stainless steel is summarized in this report. Sigma phase was identified in forgings and as-rolled plate by color etching and microprobe analysis. In as-rolled plate sigma was found to start transforming from delta ferrite within 30 minutes at 1500/sup 0/F, with almost complete transformation after 24 hours at 1500/sup 0/F. The effect of sigma phase on room temperature mechanical properties was evaluated by tensile testing, Charpy impact testing, and impact shear testing. Sigma phase was found to severely reduce transverse ductility and longtudinal and transverse impact resistance. The greater the amount of sigma present, the greater was its effect on mechanical properties. Vendor contacts indicated that controlling delta ferrite to a minimum in the as-rolled plate is both possible and practical.

  10. Creep rupture strength of activated-TIG welded 316L(N) stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, T.; Vasudevan, M.; Laha, K.; Parameswaran, P.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Mathew, M. D.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2011-06-01

    316L(N) stainless steel plates were joined using activated-tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding and conventional TIG welding process. Creep rupture behavior of 316L(N) base metal, and weld joints made by A-TIG and conventional TIG welding process were investigated at 923 K over a stress range of 160-280 MPa. Creep test results showed that the enhancement in creep rupture strength of weld joint fabricated by A-TIG welding process over conventional TIG welding process. Both the weld joints fractured in the weld metal. Microstructural observation showed lower δ-ferrite content, alignment of columnar grain with δ-ferrite along applied stress direction and less strength disparity between columnar and equiaxed grains of weld metal in A-TIG joint than in MP-TIG joint. These had been attributed to initiate less creep cavitation in weld metal of A-TIG joint leading to improvement in creep rupture strength.

  11. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-04-18

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2/sup 0/K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2/sup 0/K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness.

  12. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-09-15

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  13. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Martinez, Raymond J; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-01-01

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  14. Thermal stability study for candidate stainless steels of GEN IV reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeg Veternikova, J.; Degmova, J.; Pekarcikova, M.; Simko, F.; Petriska, M.; Skarba, M.; Mikula, P.; Pupala, M.

    2016-11-01

    Candidate stainless steels for GEN IV reactors were investigated in term of thermal and corrosion stability at high temperatures. New austenitic steel (NF 709), austenitic ODS steel (ODS 316) and two ferritic ODS steels (MA 956 and MA 957) were exposed to around 1000 °C in inert argon atmosphere at pressure of ∼8 MPa. The steels were further studied in a light of vacancy defects presence by positron annihilation spectroscopy and their thermal resistance was confronted to classic AISI steels. The thermal strain supported a creation of oxide layers observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  15. EBSD investigation of the microstructure and texture characteristics of hot deformed duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Cizek, P; Wynne, B P; Rainforth, W M

    2006-05-01

    The microstructure and crystallographic texture characteristics were studied in a 22Cr-6Ni-3Mo duplex stainless steel subjected to plastic deformation in torsion at a temperature of 1000 degrees C using a strain rate of 1 s(-1). High-resolution EBSD was successfully used for precise phase and substructural characterization of this steel. The austenite/ferrite ratio and phase morphology as well as the crystallographic texture, subgrain size, misorientation angles and misorientation gradients corresponding to each phase were determined over large sample areas. The deformation mechanisms in each phase and the interrelationship between the two are discussed. PMID:16774517

  16. Reverse-Martensitic Hardening of Austenitic Stainless Steel upon Up-quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kiminori; Guo, Defeng; Li, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xiangyi

    2016-08-01

    Reverse-martensitic transformation utilizing up-quenching was demonstrated for austenitic stainless steel. Up-quenching was done following the stress-induced phase modification to martensite and then enrichment of the body-centered-cubic ferrite. Transmission-electron-microscopy observation and Vickers hardness test revealed that the reverse-martensitic transformation yields quench hardening owing to an introduction of highly-concentrated dislocation. It is furthermore found that Cr precipitation on grain boundaries caused by isothermal aging is largely suppressed in the present approach.

  17. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon-Jun

    2004-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as σ and χ can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (σ + χ) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, σ was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and χ by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by

  18. Welding tritium exposed stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Stainless steels that are exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to buildup of decay helium within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for tritium containment systems, methods for welding on tritium exposed material will become important for repair or modification of the systems. Solid-state resistance welding and low-penetration overlay welding have been shown to mitigate helium embrittlement cracking in tritium exposed 304 stainless steel. These processes can also be used on stainless steel containing helium from neutron irradiation, such as occurs in nuclear reactors.

  19. Observing the plasma response to applied non-axisymmetric fields in the presence of an adjustable ferritic wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    We report high-resolution detection of the time-evolving, three-dimensional (3D) plasma response to applied non-axisymmetric magnetic fields in a tokamak with an adjustable ferromagnetic wall and with a variably-shaped equilibrium. Ferritic tiles (5mm thick, saturated μ /μ0 ~ 8) have been added to the plasma-facing side of half of the in-vessel movable wall segments in the High Beta Tokamak - Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device in order to explore Ferromagnetic Resistive Wall Mode (FRWM) stability. Low-activation ferritic steels are a candidate for structural components of a fusion reactor, and these controlled experiments examine MHD stability of plasmas with nearby ferromagnetic material. Plasma-wall separation for alternating ferritic and non-ferritic wall segments can be adjusted between discharges without opening the vacuum vessel. Amplification of applied resonant fields is observed to increase when the ferromagnetic wall is close to plasma surface instead of the standard stainless steel wall. Experiments with rapidly rotating external kink modes show wall stabilization despite the presence of the close ferritic wall (b / a ~ 1 . 07), extending previous observations in JFT-2M. Plasmas are observed to have reduced wall stabilization when a biased electrode is used to slow the mode rotation. Resonant fields are also applied while the plasma evolves from circular limited cross-sections to shaped, single-null cross-sections in order to study the effects of shaping on multimode interactions. Multimode activity in diverted and limited plasmas is compared with DCON predictions. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  20. Rapid phase synthesis of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugavel, T.; Raj, S. Gokul; Rajarajan, G.; Kumar, G. Ramesh

    2014-04-24

    Synthesis of single phase nanocrystalline Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was achieved by single step autocombustion technique with the use of citric acid as a chelating agent in mono proportion with metal. Specimens prepared with this method showed significantly higher initial permeability's than with the conventional process. Single phase nanocrystalline cobalt ferrites were formed at very low temperature. Surface morphology identification were carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The average grain size and density at low temperature increased gradually with increasing the temperature. The single phase formation is confirmed through powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Magnetization measurements were obtained at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), which showed that the calcined samples exhibited typical magnetic behaviors. Temperature dependent magnetization results showed improved behavior for the nanocrystalline form of cobalt ferrite when compared to the bulk nature of materials synthesized by other methods.

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of type 304L stainless steel core shroud welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Sanecki, J. E.; Zaluzec, N. J.; Yu, M. S.; Yang, T. T.

    1999-10-26

    Microstructural analyses by advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on mockup welds and a cracked BWR core shroud weld fabricated from Type 304L stainless steel. heat-affected zones of the shroud weld and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds were free of grain-boundary carbide, martensite, delta ferrite, or Cr depletion near grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the welds were significantly contaminated by fluorine and oxygen which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination promotes fluorine contamination and suppresses classical thermal sensitization, even in Type 304 steels. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of Type 304L stainless steel core shroud welds.

  2. Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement on Austenitic Stainless Steels from Room Temperature to Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) on austenitic stainless steels SUS304, 304L, and 316L in the high pressure hydrogen gas was evaluated from ambient temperature to 20 K using a very simple mechanical properties testing procedure. In the method, the high- pressure hydrogen environment is produced just inside the hole in the specimen and the specimen is cooled in a cooled-alcohol dewar and a cryostat with a GM refrigerator. The effect of HEE was observed in tensile properties, especially at lower temperatures, and fatigue properties at higher stress level but almost no effect around the stress level of yield strength where almost no strain-induced martensite was produced. So, no effect of HEE on austenitic stainless steels unless the amount of the ferrite phase is small.

  3. Metallization of ferrite ceramic couplings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burden, J

    1992-06-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the optimum sputtering conditions for which the strongest metallization adherence could be achieved for the ferrite safing wheel assemblies. The conditions were varied through four separate test runs with a fifth verification run conducted using parameters selected from the first four runs. The parameters tested were the effects of etching, precleaning, chamber pressures, plating materials, plating thickness, soldering pressures, and cooling rates. The results increased the strength of the metallization to two pounds, well in excess of the required one pound minimum. It was also determined that the gold should be sputtered on and not thermally deposited, which caused cracking in the ferrite material.

  4. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  5. Brazing titanium to stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium and stainless-steel members are usually joined mechanically for lack of any other effective method. New approach using different brazing alloy and plating steel member with nickel resolves problem. Process must be carried out in inert atmosphere.

  6. The Effect of Microstructural Evolution on Hardening Behavior of 2205 Stainless Steel in Long-Term Aging at 500 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shukun; Ma, Guodong; Guo, Bo; Fang, Kuanjun; Wang, Jun

    2014-06-01

    The effect of microstructural evolution on hardening behavior of 2205 stainless steel in long-term aging at 500 °C was studied by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. The results showed that the hardness of ferrite phase in matrix steadily increased with the aging time at the first stage of 4 months, presented a peak of hardness at about 5 months, and showed a downward trend for the aging time from 6 to 8 months, while the hardness of the austenitic phase remained constant. Analysis showed that the iron-rich α phase and the Cr-rich α' phase generated by spinodal decomposition, Cr2N precipitations, and Fe2Mn (R-phase) were the main reasons for the generation of peak in hardness of ferrite phase. Further studies showed that some dislocation structure (changing with the aging time) in δ-ferrite of matrix is related to the microstructural evolution.

  7. Atomic engineering of mixed ferrite and core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Shannon A; Cahill, Christopher L; Carpenter, Everett E; Calvin, Scott; Harris, Vincent G

    2005-09-01

    Nanoparticulate ferrites such as manganese zinc ferrite and nickel zinc ferrite hold great promise for advanced applications in power electronics. The use of these materials in current applications requires fine control over the nanoparticle size as well as size distribution to maximize their packing density. While there are several techniques for the synthesis of ferrite nanoparticles, reverse micelle techniques provide the greatest flexibility and control over size, crystallinity, and magnetic properties. Recipes for the synthesis of manganese zinc ferrite, nickel zinc ferrite, and an enhanced ferrite are presented along with analysis of the crystalline and magnetic properties. Comparisons are made on the quality of nanoparticles produced using different surfactant systems. The importance of various reaction conditions is explored with a discussion on the corresponding effects on the magnetic properties, particle morphology, stoichiometry, crystallinity, and phase purity.

  8. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels in LWR (light water reactor) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1990-10-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting fracture toughness J-R curves and impact strength of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The saturation'' fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum fracture toughness that would ever be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the degree of embrittlement at saturation. Degree of embrittlement is characterized in terms of room-temperature Charpy-impact energy. The variation of the impact energy at saturation for different materials is described in terms of a material parameter {Phi}, which is determined from the chemical composition and ferrite morphology. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained from correlations between room-temperature Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness. Fracture toughness as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of embrittlement, which is determined from the chemical composition. Examples for estimating impact strength and fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are described. A common lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels with unknown chemical composition is also defined. 15 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Estimation of mechanical properties of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1991-10-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting Charpy- impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The ``saturation`` impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Mechanical properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from impact energy and flow stress of the unaged material and the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. The J{sub IC} values are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented. A common ``lower-bound`` J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature.

  10. Thermodynamic studies on lithium ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Rakshit, S.K.; Parida, S.C.; Naik, Y.P.; Chaudhary, Ziley Singh; Venugopal, V.

    2011-05-15

    Thermodynamic studies on ternary oxides of Li-Fe-O systems were carried out using differential scanning calorimetry, Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry, and solid-state electrochemical technique based on fluoride electrolyte. Heat capacities of LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8}(s) and LiFeO{sub 2}(s) were determined in the temperature range 127-861 K using differential scanning calorimetry. Gibbs energies of formation of LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8}(s) and LiFeO{sub 2}(s) were determined using Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry and solid-state galvanic cell technique. The combined least squares fits can be represented as {Delta}{sub f}G{sub m}{sup o}(LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8},s,T)/kJ mol{sup -1} ({+-}6)=-2341+0.6764(T/K) (588{<=}T/K{<=}971) {Delta}{sub f}G{sub m}{sup o}(LiFeO{sub 2},s,T)/kJ mol{sup -1} ({+-}3)=-708+0.1656(T/K) (569{<=}T/K{<=}1021) The temperature independent term of the above equations represents {Delta}{sub f}H{sup o}{sub m}(T{sub av}) and temperature dependent term represents negative change in entropy of the respective compounds. Thermodynamic analysis shows that LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8}(s) is more stable compared to LiFeO{sub 2}(s). -- Graphical abstract: Comparison of {Delta}{sub f}G{sub m}{sup o}(T) of lithium ferrites determined using different techniques. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} Thermodynamic studies on Li-Fe-O system using DSC, KEQMS and galvanic cell. {yields} Heat capacities of LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8}(s) and LiFeO{sub 2}(s) were determined using DSC 127-861 K. {yields} {Delta}{sub f}G{sup o}{sub m} of these compounds were determined and compared. {yields} Thermodynamic tables for LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8}(s) and LiFeO{sub 2}(s) were constructed.

  11. Tantalum modified ferritic iron base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.; Blankenship, C. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Strong ferritic alloys of the Fe-CR-Al type containing 0.4% to 2% tantalum were developed. These alloys have improved fabricability without sacrificing high temperature strength and oxidation resistance in the 800 C (1475 F) to 1040 C (1900 F) range.

  12. Detection of secondary phases in duplex stainless steel by magnetic force microscopy and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramírez-Salgado, J.; Domínguez-Aguilar, M.A.; Castro-Domínguez, B.; Hernández-Hernández, P.; Newman, R.C.

    2013-12-15

    The secondary phase transformations in a commercial super duplex stainless steel were investigated by micro-chemical analyses and high resolution scanning probe microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray and electron probe detected ferrite and austenite as well as secondary phases in unetched aged duplex stainless steel type 25Cr-7Ni-3Mo. Volta potential indicated that nitride and sigma appeared more active than ferrite, while secondary austenite and austenite presented a nobler potential. Reversal order in nobility is thought to be attributable to the potential ranking provided by oxide nature diversity as a result of secondary phase surface compositions on steel. After eutectoid transformation, secondary austenite was detected by electron probe microanalysis, whereas atomic force microscopy distinguished this phase from former austenite by image contrast. Magnetic force microscopy revealed a “ghosted” effect on the latter microstructure probably derived from metal memory reminiscence of mechanical polishing at passivity and long range magnetic forces of ferrite phase. - Highlights: • Nobility detection of secondary phases by SKPFM in DSS particles is not a straightforward procedure. • As Volta potential and contrast are not always consistent SKPFM surface oxides is thought played an important role in detection. • AFM distinguished secondary austenite from former austenite by image contrast though SEM required EPMA.

  13. Effect of rapid solidification on stainless steel weld metal microstructures and its implications on the Schaeffler diagram

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Reed, R.W.; Hebble, T.L.

    1987-09-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine the effect of rapid solidification on the weld metal microstructure of austenitic stainless steels and its implication on the ferrite constitution diagram. A wide variety of stainless steels were laser welded at different welding speeds and laser power levels. Results indicate that both weld pool cooling rate and the postsolidification solid state cooling rates have a profound effect on the microstructures. For the steels investigated, the microstructures ranged from duplex austenite (..gamma..) + ferrite (delta) to fully austenitic or fully ferritic. These microstructures were found to be sensitive to both cooling rates and composition. The observed results are rationalized based on rapid solidification theory. This investigation indicates that solidification rates and postsolidification cooling rates have a profound effect on the observed microstructures, thus making it impossible to predict the microstructures of rapidly cooled weld metal from the conventional constitution diagrams. The influence of the observations made in this investigation on the Schaeffler diagram is demonstrated, and possible corrections to the constitution diagram incorporating the cooling rate effects are proposed. 23 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Development of new ferritic steels as cladding material for metallic fuel fast breeder reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Horie, Masaaki; Kako, Kenji; Fujiwara, Masayuki

    1993-09-01

    The excellent thermal, chemical and neutronic properties of metallic fuel (U-Pu-Zr alloy) will lead to drastic improvements in fast reactor safety and the related fuel cycle economy. Some new high molybdenum 12Cr ferritic stainless steel candidate cladding alloys have been designed to achieve the mechanical properties required for high performance metallic fuel elements. These candidate claddings were irradiated by ion bombardment and tested to determine their strength and creep rupture properties. A 12Cr-8Mo and a 12Cr-8Mo-0.1Y 2O 3 steel were fabricated into cladding via a powder metallurgy process and by a mechanical alloying process, respectively. These claddings had two and three times the creep rupture strength (pressurized at 650°C for 10000 h) of a conventional 12Cr ferritic steel (HT-9). These two steels also showed no void formation up to 350 dpa by Ni 3+ irradiation. A zircaloy-2 lined steel cladding tube has also been fabricated for the purpose of reducing fuel-cladding interdiffusion and chemical interaction.

  15. Role of structural orientation on the susceptibility of 2205 duplex stainless steel to hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharrfeddin, A.; Musa, S. M.; Elshawesh, F. M.

    2012-09-01

    Relationship between the microstructure directionality of delta ferrite and austenite islands and the crack morphology, crack velocity and time to failure of the mechanically notched duplex stainless samples tested in hydrogen bearing environment was assessed in aqueous solution of 3.5% seawater. A number of UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel samples were mechanically notched in perpendicular and transverse directions with respect to the austenite and ferrite rolling direction were subjected to slow tensile strain at 21.2 nm/s while undergoing cathodic charging in aqueous solution of 3.5% seawater. In order to assess the role of hydrogen content on embrittlement the hydrogen charging was conducted at various cathodic potentials of -800 mV/SCE to -1300 mV/SCE at two different pH (6.7 and 3.5). Generally, the longitudinal samples showed lower susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement compared with the transverse samples. The results also confirm that long austenite island can act as an obstacle for propagated crack owing to its low diffusivity and high solubility to the hydrogen.

  16. Influence of PWHT on Toughness of High Chromium and Nickel Containing Martensitic Stainless Steel Weld Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Mahadevan, S.; Albert, S. K.; Pandian, R.; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-06-01

    Commonly used 12.5Cr-5Ni consumable specified for welding of martensitic stainless steels is compared with newly designed 14.5Cr-5Ni consumable in terms of their suitability for repair welding of 410 and 414 stainless steels by gas tungsten arc welding process. Changes in microstructure and austenite evolution were investigated using optical, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction techniques and Thermo-Calc studies. Microstructure of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed only lath martensite, whereas as-welded 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed delta-ferrite, retained austenite, and lath martensite. Toughness value of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal is found to be significantly higher (216 J) than that of the 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal (15 J). The welds were subjected to different PWHTs: one at 923 K (650 °C) for 1, 2, 4 hours (single-stage PWHT) and another one at 923 K (650 °C)/4 h followed by 873 K (600 °C)/2 h or 873 K (600 °C)/4 h (two-stage heat treatment). Hardness and impact toughness of the weld metals were measured for these weld metals and correlated with the microstructure. The study demonstrates the importance of avoiding formation of delta-ferrite in the weld metal.

  17. Precipitation of Chromium Nitrides in the Super Duplex Stainless Steel 2507

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersson, Niklas; Pettersson, Rachel F. A.; Wessman, Sten

    2015-03-01

    Precipitation of chromium nitrides during cooling from temperatures in the range 1373 K to 1523 K (1100 °C to 1250 °C) has been studied for the super duplex stainless steel 2507 (UNS S32750). Characterization with optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy was combined to quantify the precipitation process. Primarily Cr2N nitrides were found to precipitate with a high density in the interior of ferrite grains. An increased cooling rate and/or an increased austenite spacing clearly promoted nitride formation, resulting in precipitation within a higher fraction of the ferrite grains, and lager nitride particles. Furthermore, formation of the meta-stable CrN was induced by higher cooling rates. The toughness seemed unaffected by nitrides. A slight decrease in pitting resistance was, however, noticed for quenched samples with large amounts of precipitates. The limited adverse effect on pitting resistance is attributed to the small size (~200 nm) of most nitrides. Slower cooling of duplex stainless steels to allow nitrogen partitioning is suggested in order to avoid large nitrides, and thereby produce a size distribution with a smaller detrimental effect on pitting resistance.

  18. Microstructure and mechanical properties of duplex stainless steel subjected to hydrostatic extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Maj, P.; Adamczyk-Cieślak, B.; Mizera, J.; Pachla, W.; Kurzydłowski, K.J.

    2014-07-01

    The nanostructure and mechanical properties of ferritic-austenitic duplex stainless steel subjected to hydrostatic extrusion were examined. The refinement of the structure in the initial state and in the two deformation states (ε = 1.4 and ε = 3.8) was observed in an optical microscope (OM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results indicate that the structure evolved from microcrystalline with a grain size of about 4 μm to nanocrystalline with a grain size of about 150 nm in ferrite and 70 nm in austenite. The material was characterized mechanically by tensile tests performed in the two deformation states. The ultimate strength appeared to increase significantly compared to that in the initial deformation stages, which can be attributed to the grain refinement and plastic deformation. The heterogeneity observed in microregions results from the dual-phase structure of the steel. The results indicate that hydrostatic extrusion is a highly potential technology suitable for improving the properties of duplex steels. - Highlights: • Duplex stainless steel was hydro extruded to a total strain of 3.8 • After the last stage of deformation heterogeneous structure was obtained in the material • As a result of stresses non-diffusive transformation γ→α’ occurred in the material • Nanometric (sub)grains were obtained in the austenite regions.

  19. Manganese-Cobalt Mixed Spinel Oxides as Surface Modifiers for Stainless Steel Interconnects of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Gordon; Yang, Z Gary; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2006-11-06

    Ferritic stainless steels are promising candidates for interconnect applications in low- and mid-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A couple of issues however remain for the particular application, including the chromium poisoning due to chromia evaporation, and long-term surface and electrical stability of the scale grown on these steels. Application of a manganese colbaltite spinel protection layer on the steels appears to be an effective approach to solve the issues. For an optimized performance, Mn{sub 1+x}Co{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} (-1 {le} x {le} 2) spinels were investigated against properties relative for protection coating applications on ferritic SOFC interconnects. Overall it appears that the spinels with x around 0.5 demonstrate a good CTE match to ceramic cell components, a relative high electrical conductivity, and a good thermal stability up to 1,250 C. This was confirmed by a long-term test on the Mn{sub 1.5}Co{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} protection layer that was thermally grown on Crofer22 APU, indicating the spinel protection layer not only significantly decreased the contact resistance between a LSF cathode and the stainless steel interconnects, but also inhibited the sub-scale growth on the stainless steels.

  20. Mechanism of hot-rolling crack formation in lean duplex stainless steel 2101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhi-hui; Li, Jing-yuan; Wang, Yi-de

    2016-04-01

    The thermoplasticity of duplex stainless steel 2205 (DSS2205) is better than that of lean duplex steel 2101 (LDX2101), which undergoes severe cracking during hot rolling. The microstructure, microhardness, phase ratio, and recrystallization dependence of the deformation compatibility of LDX2101 and DSS2205 were investigated using optical microscopy (OM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), Thermo-Calc software, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that the phase-ratio transformations of LDX2101 and DSS2205 were almost equal under the condition of increasing solution temperature. Thus, the phase transformation was not the main cause for the hot plasticity difference of these two steels. The grain size of LDX2101 was substantially greater than that of DSS2205, and the microhardness difference of LDX2101 was larger than that of DSS2205. This difference hinders the transfer of strain from ferrite to austenite. In the rolling process, the ferrite grains of LDX2101 underwent continuous softening and were substantially refined. However, although little recrystallization occurred at the boundaries of austenite, serious deformation accumulated in the interior of austenite, leading to a substantial increase in hardness. The main cause of crack formation is the microhardness difference between ferrite and austenite.

  1. Synchrotron Based Observations of Sigma Phase Formation and Dissolution in Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J; Palmer, T; Specht, E

    2006-08-22

    The formation and growth of sigma ({sigma}) phase in 2205 duplex stainless steel was observed and measured in real time using synchrotron radiation during isothermal heat treating at temperatures between 700 C and 850 C. Synchrotron experiments were performed on this material at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) while isothermally holding the samples for times of up to 10 hr. During the isothermal hold, sigma formed in quantities up to 22% as the ferrite transformed to a mixture of sigma and austenite phases. In addition, sigma formed at 850 C was heated to 1000 C to observe its dissolution. The amounts of sigma that formed, and the dissolution temperature of sigma were compared to the results predicted by Thermocalc, showing differences between the calculated and measured values. The synchrotron data was further modeled using a modified Johnson-Mehl-Avrami analysis to determine kinetic parameters for sigma formation. The initial JMA exponent, n, at low fractions of sigma was found to be approximately 7.0, however, towards the end of the transformation, n decreased to values of approximately 0.75. Because of the variable value of n, it was not possible to determine reliable values for the activation energy and pre-exponential terms for the JMA equation. During cooling to room temperature, the high temperature austenite partially transformed to ferrite, substantially increasing the ferrite content while the sigma phase kept its high temperature value.

  2. Evolutions of Microstructure and Properties During Cold Rolling of 19Cr Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Qingxuan; Xu, Wanjian; Wu, Zhaoyu; Li, Jun; Xu, Yulai; Xiao, Xueshan; Hu, Jincheng; Jiang, Laizhu

    2016-07-01

    Evolutions of microstructure, mechanical, and corrosion properties of 19Cr (Fe-18.9Cr-10.1Mn-0.3Ni-0.261N-0.030C-0.5Si) duplex stainless steel have been investigated during cold rolling at room temperature. Dislocation slip dominated deformation mode of ferrite phase. However, deformation mechanism of austenite phase was different with the increasing cold-rolling reductions. Dislocation slip and strengthening effect of twin boundaries caused pile-up phenomenon at the initial deformation stage. When the amount of cold-rolling reduction attained greater than 50 pct, induced α'-martensite appeared in deformed austenite phase. Hardness of austenite phase was higher than that of the deformed ferrite because of its higher strengthening effect during cold-rolling process. Cold-rolling deformation caused deterioration of the pitting corrosion resistance in 3.5 wt pct NaCl aqueous solution. Pitting corrosion always initiated in the ferrite phase and the phase boundary in the solution-treated alloy. Additional pitting holes appeared in deformed austenite phase because of the decrease in corrosion resistance caused by dislocation accumulation and induced α'-martensite.

  3. Evolutions of Microstructure and Properties During Cold Rolling of 19Cr Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Qingxuan; Xu, Wanjian; Wu, Zhaoyu; Li, Jun; Xu, Yulai; Xiao, Xueshan; Hu, Jincheng; Jiang, Laizhu

    2016-10-01

    Evolutions of microstructure, mechanical, and corrosion properties of 19Cr (Fe-18.9Cr-10.1Mn-0.3Ni-0.261N-0.030C-0.5Si) duplex stainless steel have been investigated during cold rolling at room temperature. Dislocation slip dominated deformation mode of ferrite phase. However, deformation mechanism of austenite phase was different with the increasing cold-rolling reductions. Dislocation slip and strengthening effect of twin boundaries caused pile-up phenomenon at the initial deformation stage. When the amount of cold-rolling reduction attained greater than 50 pct, induced α'-martensite appeared in deformed austenite phase. Hardness of austenite phase was higher than that of the deformed ferrite because of its higher strengthening effect during cold-rolling process. Cold-rolling deformation caused deterioration of the pitting corrosion resistance in 3.5 wt pct NaCl aqueous solution. Pitting corrosion always initiated in the ferrite phase and the phase boundary in the solution-treated alloy. Additional pitting holes appeared in deformed austenite phase because of the decrease in corrosion resistance caused by dislocation accumulation and induced α'-martensite.

  4. Synchrotron Based Observations of Sigma Phase Formation and Dissolution in Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J. W.; Palmer, T. A.; Specht, Eliot D

    2007-01-01

    The formation and growth of sigma ({sigma}) phase in 2205 duplex stainless steel was observed and measured in real time using synchrotron radiation during isothermal heat treating at temperatures between 700 C and 850 C. Synchrotron experiments were performed on this material at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) while isothermally holding the samples for times of up to 10 hr. During the isothermal hold, sigma formed in quantities up to 22% as the ferrite transformed to a mixture of sigma and austenite phases. In addition, sigma formed at 850 C was heated to 1000 C to observe its dissolution. The amounts of sigma that formed, and the dissolution temperature of sigma were compared to the results predicted by Thermocalc, showing differences between the calculated and measured values. The synchrotron data was further modeled using a modified Johnson-Mehl-Avrami analysis to determine kinetic parameters for sigma formation. The initial JMA exponent, n, at low fractions of sigma was found to be approximately 7.0, however, towards the end of the transformation, n decreased to values of approximately 0.75. Because of the variable value of n, it was not possible to determine reliable values for the activation energy and pre-exponential terms for the JMA equation. During cooling to room temperature, the high temperature austenite partially transformed to ferrite, substantially increasing the ferrite content while the sigma phase kept its high temperature value.

  5. Mitigation and Prediction of Spallation of Oxide Scales on Ferritic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Xu, Zhijie; Xu, Wei; Koeppel, Brian J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2015-02-04

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program. The results indicate that application of physical surface modifications, such as surface blasting, prior to application of protective surface coatings can substantially increase oxide scale spallation resistance during long-term exposure to elevated temperatures (e.g., 800-850ºC). To better understand and predict the benefits of surface modification, an integrated modeling framework was developed and applied to the obtained experimental results.

  6. Oxidation behavior of a ferritic stainless steel Crofer22 APU with thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, MyoungYoup; Duong, Anh T.; Mumm, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Crofer22 APU specimens were prepared by grinding with grit 80 and 120 SiC grinding papers and were thermally cycled. The variation in oxidation behavior with thermal cycling was then investigated. Observation of microstructure, measurement of area specific resistance (ASR), analysis of the atomic percentages of the elements by EDX, and XRD analysis were performed. XRD patterns showed that the (Cr, Mn)3O4 spinel phase grew on the surface of the Crofer22 APU samples ground with grit 120. For the samples ground with grit 80, the ASR increased as the number of thermal cycles increased. Plots of ln (ASR/T) vs. 1/T for the samples ground with grit 80 after n = 4, 20 and 40 exhibited good linearity, and the apparent activation energies were between 63.7 kJ/mole and 76.3 kJ/mole.

  7. Hardness analysis of welded joints of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolska, S.

    2016-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in the modern world. The continuous increase in the use of stainless steels is caused by getting greater requirements relating the corrosion resistance of all types of devices. The main property of these steels is the ability to overlap a passive layer of an oxide on their surface. This layer causes that they become resistant to oxidation. One of types of corrosion-resistant steels is ferritic-austenitic steel of the duplex type, which has good strength properties. It is easily formable and weldable as well as resistant to erosion and abrasive wear. It has a low susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking, to stress corrosion, to intercrystalline one, to pitting one and to crevice one. For these reasons they are used, among others, in the construction of devices and facilities designed for chemicals transportation and for petroleum and natural gas extraction. The paper presents the results which shows that the particular specimens of the ][joint representing both heat affected zones (from the side of the 2205 steel and the 316L one) and the weld are characterized by higher hardness values than in the case of the same specimens for the 2Y joint. Probably this is caused by machining of edges of the sections of metal sheets before the welding process, which came to better mixing of native materials and the filler metal. After submerged arc welding the 2205 steel still retains the diphase, austenitic-ferritic structure and the 316L steel retains the austenitic structure with sparse bands of ferrite σ.

  8. Effect of annealing temperature on the pitting corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steel UNS S32750

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Hua; Jiang Yiming; Deng Bo; Sun Tao; Xu Juliang; Li Jin

    2009-09-15

    The pitting corrosion resistance of commercial super duplex stainless steels SAF2507 (UNS S32750) annealed at seven different temperatures ranging from 1030 deg. C to 1200 deg. C for 2 h has been investigated by means of potentiostatic critical pitting temperature. The microstructural evolution and pit morphologies of the specimens were studied through optical/scanning electron microscope. Increasing annealing temperature from 1030 deg. C to 1080 deg. C elevates the critical pitting temperature, whereas continuing to increase the annealing temperature to 1200 deg. C decreases the critical pitting temperature. The specimens annealed at 1080 deg. C for 2 h exhibit the best pitting corrosion resistance with the highest critical pitting temperature. The pit morphologies show that the pit initiation sites transfer from austenite phase to ferrite phase as the annealing temperature increases. The aforementioned results can be explained by the variation of pitting resistance equivalent number of ferrite and austenite phase as the annealing temperature changes.

  9. Design of ferrite-tuned accelerator cavities using perpendicular-biased high-Q ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Kaspar, K.

    1984-11-01

    Microwave ferrites with dc bias fields perpendicular to the rf fields exhibit magnetic and dielectric quality factors 1 order of magnitude above that of ferrites used in ferrite-tuned synchrotron accelerating cavities built in the past. For the LAMPF II project, these ferrites appear to allow the design of synchrotron cavities with high gap voltages and high efficiency. A simple coaxial quarter-wave-resonator geometry, first considered only as a model for preliminary studies, turned out to be a good basis for the solution of most technical problems such as generation of the bias field, cooling of the ferrites, and installation of a generous high-voltage gap design. Two quarter-wave resonators combined to form one accelerating unit of about 2.5-m length and 0.6-m diameter should be capable of delivering 120 kV of accelerating voltage in the tuning range 50-60 MHz, up to 200 kV in the range 59-60 MHz. The main advantage of the given resonator design is its full rotational symmetry, which allows calculation and optimization of all electrical properties with maximum reliability.

  10. Ferritization treatment of copper in soil by electrokinetic remediation.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tomoyuki; Takase, Ken-Ichi; Terui, Norifumi; Tanaka, Shunitz

    2007-05-17

    The usefulness of the combined use of the electrokinetic (EK) remediation and a ferrite treatment zone (FTZ) was demonstrated for a treatment of the contaminated soil with heavy metal ions. Copper ions in contaminated soil were transferred into the FTZ by the EK technology and were ferritized in this system. The distribution of copper in a migration chamber after EK treatment with FTZ for 48h showed the large difference in the total and eluted concentration of copper. This indicated that copper ions transferred by EK into the FTZ were ferritized there with ferrite reagent in soil alkalified by EK process. The copper-ferrite compound, which was not dissolved with diluted acid, was retained in the FTZ and accumulated there. The ratio of the ferritized amount of copper against total copper was 92% in the EK process with FTZ after 48 h. PMID:17374444

  11. The effects of aging for 50,000 hours at 343{degree}C on the mechanical properties of Type 308 stainless steel weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1995-12-01

    The effects of long-term aging at intermediate temperature on the mechanical properties of type 308 stainless steel weld metals have been studied. Three multipass shielded metal-arc welds with ferrite levels of 4, 8, or 12% were aged up to 50,000 h at 343{degrees}C. Tensile and Charpy V-notch specimens were used to determine the effects of aging on the mechanical properties of the weld metal. Aging had little effect on the yield strength of the weld metal, but did result in a slight increase (approximately 5%) in the ultimate tensile strength. The ferrite content had little effect on the yield strength of the materials, but the ultimate tensile strength increased slightly with higher ferrite content. In contrast to the small effect on the tensile properties, the impact properties were significantly degraded by aging. The extent of the degradation increased with increasing ferrite content and continued to increase with increasing aging time, Spinodal decomposition and the precipitation of G-phase particles in the ferrite phase are believed to be responsible for the degradation of the mechanical properties.

  12. Nature and evolution of the fusion boundary in ferritic-austenitic dissimilar weld metals. Part 1 -- Nucleation and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T.W.; Lippold, J.C.; Mills, M.J.

    1999-10-01

    A fundamental investigation of fusion boundary microstructure evolution in dissimilar-metal welds (DMWs) between ferritic base metals and a face-centered-cubic (FCC) filler metal was conducted. The objective of the work presented here was to characterize the nature and character of the elevated-temperature fusion boundary to determine the nucleation and growth characteristics of DMWs. Type 409 ferritic stainless steel and 1080 pearlitic steel were utilized as base metal substrates, and Monel (70Ni-30Cu) was used as the filler metal. The Type 409 base metal provided a fully ferritic or body-centered-cubic (BCC) substrate at elevated temperatures and exhibited no on-cooling phase transformations to mask or disguise the original character of the fusion boundary. The 1080 pearlitic steel was selected because it is austenitic at the solidus temperature, providing an austenite substrate at the fusion boundary. The weld microstructure generated with each of the base metals in combination with Monel was fully austenitic. In the Type 409/Monel system, there was no evidence of epitaxial nucleation and growth as normally observed in homogeneous weld metal combinations. The fusion boundary in this system exhibited random grain boundary misorientations between the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal grains. In the 1080/Monel system, evidence of normal epitaxial growth was observed at the fusion boundary, where solidification and HAZ grain boundaries converged. The fusion boundary morphologies are a result of the crystal structure present along the fusion boundary during the initial stages of solidification. Based on the results of this investigation, a model for heterogeneous nucleation along the fusion boundary is proposed when the base and weld metals exhibit ferritic (BCC) and FCC crystal structures, respectively.

  13. Cold worked ferritic alloys and components

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

  14. Substituted barium ferrites; sources of anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrish, A. H.; Zhou, X. Z.; Yang, Zheng; Zeng, Hua-Xian

    1994-12-01

    The substituted barium ferrites BaFe12-2 xCo x Sn x O19 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.4) and BaFe1-2xCo x O19 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.9) have been studied. The site occupancies, as determined from Mössbauer spectra, have been used to interpret the changes in the magnetization and in the crystalline anisotropy.

  15. Non linear effects in ferrite tuned cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.; Walling, L.; Enegren, T.; Hulsey, G. ); Yakoviev, V.; Petrov, V. )

    1993-05-01

    The phenomenon of dependence of the resonance shape and frequency on the RF power level in perpendicular biased ferrite-tuned cavities has been observed by G. Hulsey and C. Friedrichs in the SSC test cavity experiment. This paper presents a theoretical as well as numerical analysis of this phenomenon and compares the results with experimental data. The effect of this nonlinearity on the SSC low energy booster prototype cavity is discussed.

  16. Influence of Thermal Aging on the Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of Dual Phase Precipitation Hardened Powder Metallurgy Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    Increasing demand for high strength powder metallurgy (PM) steels has resulted in the development of dual phase PM steels. In this work, the effects of thermal aging on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of dual phase precipitation hardened powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steels of varying ferrite-martensite content were examined. Quantitative analyses of the inherent porosity and phase fractions were conducted on the steels and no significant differences were noted with respect to aging temperature. Tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation to fracture all increased with increasing aging temperature reaching maxima at 538°C in most cases. Increased strength and decreased ductility were observed in steels of higher martensite content. Nanoindentation of the individual microconstituents was employed to obtain a fundamental understanding of the strengthening contributions. Both the ferrite and martensite hardness values increased with aging temperature and exhibited similar maxima to the bulk tensile properties. Due to the complex non-uniform stresses and strains associated with conventional nanoindentation, micropillar compression has become an attractive method to probe local mechanical behavior while limiting strain gradients and contributions from surrounding features. In this study, micropillars of ferrite and martensite were fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) milling of dual phase precipitation hardened powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steels. Compression testing was conducted using a nanoindenter equipped with a flat punch indenter. The stress-strain curves of the individual microconstituents were calculated from the load-displacement curves less the extraneous displacements of the system. Using a rule of mixtures approach in conjunction with porosity corrections, the mechanical properties of ferrite and martensite were combined for comparison to tensile tests of the bulk material, and reasonable agreement was found for the ultimate tensile

  17. Corrosion of 316 stainless steel in high temperature molten Li2BeF4 (FLiBe) salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guiqiu; Kelleher, Brian; Cao, Guoping; Anderson, Mark; Allen, Todd; Sridharan, Kumar

    2015-06-01

    In support of structural material development for the fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR), corrosion tests of 316 stainless steel were performed in the potential primary coolant, molten Li2BeF4 (FLiBe) at 700 °C for an exposure duration up to 3000 h. Tests were performed in both 316 stainless steel and graphite capsules. Corrosion in both capsule materials occurred by the dissolution of chromium from the stainless steel into the salt which led to the depletion of chromium predominantly along the grain boundaries of the test samples. The samples tested in graphite capsules showed a factor of two greater depth of corrosion attack as measured in terms of chromium depletion, compared to those tested in 316 stainless steel capsules. The samples tested in graphite capsules showed the formation of Cr7C3 particulate phases throughout the depth of the corrosion layer. Samples tested in both types of capsule materials showed the formation of MoSi2 phase due to increased activity of Mo and Si as a result of Cr depletion, and furthermore corrosion promoted the formation of a α-ferrite phase in the near-surface regions of the 316 stainless steel. Based on the corrosion tests, the corrosion attack depth in FLiBe salt was predicted as 17.1 μm/year and 31.2 μm/year for 316 stainless steel tested in 316 stainless steel and in graphite capsules respectively. It is in an acceptable range compared to the Hastelloy-N corrosion in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel salt.

  18. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems-revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K

    1994-08-01

    This report presents a revision of the procedure and correlations presented earlier in NUREG/CR-4513, ANL-90/42 (June 1991) for predicting the change in mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water reactors at 280-330{degrees}C (535-625{degrees}F). The correlations presented in this report are based on an expanded data base and have been optimized with mechanical-property data on cast stainless steels aged up to {approx}58,000 h at 290-350{degrees}C (554-633{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve, tensile stress, and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known material information. Mechanical properties of a specific cast stainless steel are estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. Embrittlement of cast stainless steels is characterized in terms of room-temperature Charpy-impact energy. Charpy-impact energy as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which are also determined from the chemical composition. The initial impact energy of the unaged steel is required for these estimations. Initial tensile flow stress is needed for estimating the flow stress of the aged material. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained by correlating room-temperature Charpy-impact energy with fracture toughness parameters. The values of J{sub IC} are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. A common {open_quotes}predicted lower-bound{close_quotes} J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, range of ferrite content, and temperature. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented.

  19. Properties of ferrites important to their friction and wear behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Environmental, chemical and crystallographical effects on the fundamental nature on friction and wear of the ferrites in contact with metals, magnetic tapes and themselves are reviewed. The removal of adsorbed films from the surfaces of ferrites results in very strong interfacial adhesion and high friction in ferrite to metal and ferrite to magnetic tape contacts. The metal ferrite bond at the interface is primarily a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the large oxygen anions in the ferrite surface, and the strength of these bonds is related to the oxygen to metal bond strength in the metal oxide. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. Not only under adhesive conditions, but also under abrasive conditions the friction and wear properties of ferrites are related to the crystallographic orientation. With ferrite to ferrite contact the mating of highest atomic density (most closely packed) direction on matched crystallographic planes, that is, 110 directions on /110/planes, results in the lowest coefficient of friction.

  20. Tunable Dielectric Properties of Ferrite-Dielectric Based Metamaterial

    PubMed Central

    Bi, K.; Huang, K.; Zeng, L. Y.; Zhou, M. H.; Wang, Q. M.; Wang, Y. G.; Lei, M.

    2015-01-01

    A ferrite-dielectric metamaterial composed of dielectric and ferrite cuboids has been investigated by experiments and simulations. By interacting with the electromagnetic wave, the Mie resonance can take place in the dielectric cuboids and the ferromagnetic precession will appear in the ferrite cuboids. The magnetic field distributions show the electric Mie resonance of the dielectric cuboids can be influenced by the ferromagnetic precession of ferrite cuboids when a certain magnetic field is applied. The effective permittivity of the metamaterial can be tuned by modifying the applied magnetic field. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results is demonstrated, which confirms that these metamaterials can be used for tunable microwave devices. PMID:25993433

  1. Nanosized copper ferrite materials: Mechanochemical synthesis and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Manova, Elina; Tsoncheva, Tanya; Paneva, Daniela; Popova, Margarita; Velinov, Nikolay; Kunev, Boris; Tenchev, Krassimir; Mitov, Ivan

    2011-05-15

    Nanodimensional powders of cubic copper ferrite are synthesized by two-steps procedure of co-precipitation of copper and iron hydroxide carbonates, followed by mechanochemical treatment. X-ray powder diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy and temperature-programmed reduction are used for the characterization of the obtained materials. Their catalytic behavior is tested in methanol decomposition to hydrogen and CO and total oxidation of toluene. Formation of nanosized ferrite material is registered even after one hour of milling time. It is established that the prolonging of treatment procedure decreases the dispersion of the obtained product with the appearance of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. It is demonstrated that the catalytic behavior of the samples depends not only on their initial phase composition, but on the concomitant ferrite phase transformations by the influence of the reaction medium. -- Graphical abstract: It is demonstrated that the catalytic behavior of the obtained copper ferrites depends not only on their initial phase composition, but on the concomitant phase transformations by the influence of the reaction medium. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} Two-step co-precipitation-ball-milling procedure for copper ferrites preparation. {yields} The phase composition of ferrites depends on the milling duration. {yields} Ferrites transforms under the reaction medium, which affects their catalytic behavior. {yields} Ferrites decompose to magnetite and carbides during methanol decomposition. {yields} Agglomeration and further crystallization of ferrite occur during toluene oxidation.

  2. Ferrite microwave electronics Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, W. E.

    1980-07-01

    Research reports on single crystals, thin films, dielectrics, semiconductor devices, integrated circuits, phase shifters, and waveguide components are cited. Studies on the microwave properties of ferrites are included.

  3. Massive strontium ferrite ingestion without acute toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kirrane, Barbara M; Nelson, Lewis S; Hoffman, Robert S

    2006-11-01

    Ingestion of strontium ferrite is previously unreported. We document absorption of strontium without acute toxicity. A 22 year-old schizophrenic man was brought to hospital after he was witnessed to pulverize and ingest flexible adhesive magnets, which later were identified as strontium ferrite. Other than auditory hallucinations his vital signs, physical examination, ECG and routine laboratories were unremarkable. Abdominal radiographs revealed diffuse radiopaque material. He was treated with whole bowel irrigation with polyethylene glycol electrolyte lavage solution (PEG-ELS) until radiographically cleared. His initial blood and urine strontium levels were 2900 microg/l and 15,000 microg/l, respectively (reference range for urine: <240 microg/l, occupational threshold 800 microg/l). A repeat urine level one week later was 370 microg/l. His hospital course was complicated by bacteraemia secondary to a thrombophlebitis at the site of the intravenous catheter, and the patient was treated with intravenous and oral antibiotics. He remained otherwise asymptomatic and was discharged to a psychiatric unit approximately 3 weeks later. Although clearly absorbed, strontium ferrite does not appear to produce acute toxicity. Delayed, and or chronic toxicity cannot be excluded based on this report.

  4. Preferential spin canting in nanosize zinc ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Brajesh; Litterst, F. J.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E. M.

    2015-07-01

    Zinc ferrite nanoparticles powder with average size of 10.0±0.5 nm was synthesized by the citrate precursor route. We studied the structural and magnetic properties using X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction patterns show that the synthesized zinc ferrite possesses good spinel structure. Both Mössbauer and magnetization data indicate superparamagnetic ferrimagnetic particles at room temperature. The magnetic behavior is determined by a considerable degree of cation inversion with FeIII in tetrahedral A-sites. Mössbauer spectroscopy at low temperature and in high applied magnetic field reveals that A-site spins are aligned antiparallel to the applied field with some possible angular scatter whereas practically all octahedral B-site spins are canted contrasting some earlier reported partial B-site spin canting in nanosize zinc ferrite. Deviations from the antiferromagnetic arrangement of B-site spins are supposed to be caused by magnetic frustration effects.

  5. Ferritic steel melt and FLiBe/steel experiment : melting ferritic steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Smith, Brandon M.; Tanaka, Tina Joan

    2004-11-01

    In preparation for developing a Z-pinch IFE power plant, the interaction of ferritic steel with the coolant, FLiBe, must be explored. Sandia National Laboratories Fusion Technology Department was asked to drop molten ferritic steel and FLiBe in a vacuum system and determine the gas byproducts and ability to recycle the steel. We tried various methods of resistive heating of ferritic steel using available power supplies and easily obtained heaters. Although we could melt the steel, we could not cause a drop to fall. This report describes the various experiments that were performed and includes some suggestions and materials needed to be successful. Although the steel was easily melted, it was not possible to drip the molten steel into a FLiBe pool Levitation melting of the drop is likely to be more successful.

  6. Detailed Microstructural Characterization and Restoration Mechanisms of Duplex and Superduplex Stainless Steel Friction-Stir-Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, T. F. A.; Torres, E. A.; Lippold, J. C.; Ramirez, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Duplex stainless steels are successfully used in a wide variety of applications in areas such as the food industry, petrochemical installations, and sea water desalination plants, where high corrosion resistance and high mechanical strength are required. However, during fusion welding operations, there can be changes to the favorable microstructure of these materials that compromise their performance. Friction stir welding with a non-consumable pin enables welded joints to be obtained in the solid state, which avoids typical problems associated with solidification of the molten pool, such as segregation of alloying elements and the formation of solidification and liquefaction cracks. In the case of superduplex stainless steels, use of the technique can avoid unbalanced proportions of ferrite and austenite, formation of deleterious second phases, or growth of ferritic grains in the heat-affected zone. Consolidated joints with full penetration were obtained for 6-mm-thick plates of UNS S32101 and S32205 duplex stainless steels, and S32750 and S32760 superduplex steels. The welding heat cycles employed avoided the conditions required for formation of deleterious phases, except in the case of the welded joint of the S32760 steel, where SEM images indicated the formation of secondary phases, as corroborated by decreased mechanical performance. Analysis using EBSD and transmission electron microscopy revealed continuous dynamic recrystallization by the formation of cellular arrays of dislocations in the ferrite and discontinuous dynamic recrystallization in the austenite. Microtexture evaluation indicated the presence of fibers typical of shear in the thermomechanically affected zone. These fibers were not obviously present in the stir zone, probably due to the intensity of microstructural reformulation to which this region was subjected.

  7. Investigation of residual stresses in a multipass weld in 1 in. stainless steel plate

    SciTech Connect

    Spooner, S.; Fernandez Baca, J.A.; David, S.A.; Hubbard, C.R.; Holden, T.M.; Root, J.H.

    1994-06-01

    Residual stresses and strains were measured in two welded 25-mm thick plates of type 304 stainless steel by the neutron diffraction. The filler metal was type 308 stainless steel and the weld zone had a two phase microstructure in which the austenitic phase lattice parameter differs from the base metal. In these circumstances stain-free samples were taken from the weld zone area for analysis of the lattice parameters and ferrite content using neutron powder diffraction. Corrections for lattice parameter variation were applied permitting the calculation of residual strains and stresses in weld zone, heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal. One of the two welds was examined without stress relief and the other was given a stress relief treatment consisting of vibration at a frequency below the resonant condition dudng welding. In both plates the largest residual stress component (longitudinal) is found in the fusion zone near the boundary between the weld zone and the heat affected zone. This longitudinal component is 400 {plus_minus} 50 MPa in tension. The normal stresses are generally close to zero although large fluctuations are found in the weld zone. The transverse stresses are as high as 200 MPa in the weld zone and decrease to 50 MPa {plus_minus} 40 MPa. The lattice parameter variation was equivalent to 5 {times} l0{minus}4 compressive strain and the ferrite content approached 9 percent at the center of the weld zone. Variations in residual stresses with thickness through the base metal plate were small. The treated plate and untreated plate showed nearly identical patterns of stress distribution. Differences in the measured stresses between vibratory-stress-relief treated and untreated plates fall within error bars of the stress determination in these particular 25 mm thick 300-type stainless steel plates.

  8. Microstructural characterization in dissimilar friction stir welding between 304 stainless steel and st37 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jafarzadegan, M.; Feng, A.H.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Saeid, T.; Shen, J.; Assadi, H.

    2012-12-15

    In the present study, 3 mm-thick plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by friction stir welding at a welding speed of 50 mm/min and tool rotational speed of 400 and 800 rpm. X-ray diffraction test was carried out to study the phases which might be formed in the welds. Metallographic examinations, and tensile and microhardness tests were used to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Four different zones were found in the weld area except the base metals. In the stir zone of the 304 stainless steel, a refined grain structure with some features of dynamic recrystallization was evidenced. A thermomechanically-affected zone was characterized on the 304 steel side with features of dynamic recovery. In the other side of the stir zone, the hot deformation of the st37 steel in the austenite region produced small austenite grains and these grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite and some products of displacive transformations such as Widmanstatten ferrite and martensite by cooling the material after friction stir welding. The heat-affected zone in the st37 steel side showed partially and fully refined microstructures like fusion welding processes. The recrystallization in the 304 steel and the transformations in the st37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld area and therefore, improved the tensile properties of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW produced sound welds between st37 low carbon steel and 304 stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SZ of the st37 steel contained some products of allotropic transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The material in the SZ of the 304 steel showed features of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The finer microstructure in the SZ increased the hardness and tensile strength.

  9. Long-term aging of type 308 stainless steel welds: Effects on properties and microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1994-09-01

    Multipass gas tungsten arc welds with type 308 stainless steel filler metal in type 304L base plate have been aged at 400, 475, or 550{degrees}C for times up to 5,000 h. The changes in mechanical properties as a result of these agings have been followed with tensile, impact, and fracture toughness testing, using subsize tensile, half-size Charpy, and 0.45T compact specimens, respectively. The changes in the microstructure were evaluated with optical and transmission electron microscopy. Relatively little change was observed in the tensile properties for any of the aging treatments, but significant embrittlement was observed in the impact and fracture toughness testing. The transition temperatures increased rapidly for aging at 475 or 550{degrees}C, and more slowly for aging at 400{degrees}C. The upper-shelf energies and the fracture toughness showed similar responses, with only a small decrease for 400{degrees}C aging, but much greater and rapid decreases with aging at 475 or 550{degrees}C. Aging at 400 or 475{degrees}C resulted in the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite phase in the weld metal into iron-rich alpha and chromium-enriched alpha prime. In addition, at 475{degrees}C G-phase precipitates formed homogeneously in the ferrite and also at dislocations. At 550{degrees}C carbides formed and grew at the ferrite-austenite interfaces, and some ferrite transformed to sigma phase. These changes must all be considered in determining the effect of aging on the fracture properties.

  10. Preformed posterior stainless steel crowns: an update.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P

    1999-02-01

    For almost 50 years, dentists have used stainless steel crowns for primary and permanent posterior teeth. No other type of restoration offers the convenience, low cost, durability, and reliability of such crowns when interim full-coronal coverage is required. Preformed stainless steel crowns have improved over the years. Better luting cements have been developed and different methods of crown manipulation have evolved. This article reviews stainless steel crown procedures for primary and permanent posterior teeth. Step-by-step placement of a primary molar stainless steel crown is documented and permanent molar stainless steel crown restoration is described. A method for repairing a worn-through crown also is reviewed.

  11. Report on thermal aging effects on tensile properties of ferritic-martensitic steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Soppet, W.K.; Rink, D.L.; Listwan, J.T.; Natesan, K.

    2012-05-10

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of thermal-aging induced degradation of tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic steels. The report is the first deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030103), under the Work Package A-11AN040301, 'Advanced Alloy Testing' performed by Argonne National Laboratory, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing tensile data on aged alloys and a mechanistic model, validated by experiments, with a predictive capability on long-term performance. The scope of work is to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on the tensile properties of advanced alloys such as ferritic-martensitic steels, mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616, and advanced austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS. The aging experiments have been conducted over a temperature of 550-750 C for various time periods to simulate the microstructural changes in the alloys as a function of time at temperature. In addition, a mechanistic model based on thermodynamics and kinetics has been used to address the changes in microstructure of the alloys as a function of time and temperature, which is developed in the companion work package at ANL. The focus of this project is advanced alloy testing and understanding the effects of long-term thermal aging on the tensile properties. Advanced materials examined in this project include ferritic-martensitic steels mod.9Cr-1Mo and NF616, and austenitic steel, HT-UPS. The report summarizes the tensile testing results of thermally-aged mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 ferritic-martensitic steels. NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 experienced different thermal-mechanical treatments before thermal aging experiments. NF616 H1 was normalized and tempered, and NF616 H2 was normalized and tempered and cold-rolled. By examining these two heats, we evaluated the effects of thermal-mechanical treatments on material microstructures and

  12. In-Situ Observations of Sigma Phase Dissolution in 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Using Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J. W.; Palmer, T. A.; Specht, Eliot D

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation was used to directly observe the transformation of ferrite, austenite and sigma phases during heating and cooling of 2205 duplex stainless steel. Sigma formed during the initial stages of heating, dissolved as the temperature was increased, and reformed on cooling. The dissolution temperature of sigma was measured to be 985 2.8 C at a heating rate of 0.25 C/s, and the kinetics of sigma formation at 850 Cwas determined to be slower after dissolving at 1000 C than before.

  13. In-Situ Observations of Sigma Phase Dissolution in 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel using Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J; Palmer, T; Specht, E

    2006-08-08

    Synchrotron radiation was used to directly observe the transformation of ferrite, austenite and sigma phases during heating and cooling of 2205 duplex stainless steel. Sigma formed during the initial stages of heating, dissolved as the temperature was increased, and reformed on cooling. The dissolution temperature of sigma was measured to be 985 C {+-} 2.8 C at a heating rate of 0.25 C/s, and the kinetics of sigma formation at 850 C was determined to be slower after dissolving at 1000 C than before.

  14. Influence of a doping by Al stainless steel on kinetics and character of interaction with the metallic nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, S. N.; Shornikov, D. P.; Tarasov, B. A.; Baranov, V. G.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic nuclear fuel is a perspective kind of fuel for fast reactors. In this paper we conducted a study of the interaction between uranium-molybdenum alloy and ferritic- martensitic steels with additions of aluminum at a temperature of 700 ° C for 25 hours. The rate constants of the interaction layer growth at 700 °C is about 2.8.10-14 m2/s. It is established that doping Al stainless steel leads to decrease in interaction with uranium-molybdenum alloys. The phase composition of the interaction layer is determined.

  15. Surface-protein interactions on different stainless steel grades: effects of protein adsorption, surface changes and metal release.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Y; Wang, X; Hedberg, J; Lundin, M; Blomberg, E; Wallinder, I Odnevall

    2013-04-01

    Implantation using stainless steels (SS) is an example where an understanding of protein-induced metal release from SS is important when assessing potential toxicological risks. Here, the protein-induced metal release was investigated for austenitic (AISI 304, 310, and 316L), ferritic (AISI 430), and duplex (AISI 2205) grades in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) solution containing either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or lysozyme (LSZ). The results show that both BSA and LSZ induce a significant enrichment of chromium in the surface oxide of all stainless steel grades. Both proteins induced an enhanced extent of released iron, chromium, nickel and manganese, very significant in the case of BSA (up to 40-fold increase), whereas both proteins reduced the corrosion resistance of SS, with the reverse situation for iron metal (reduced corrosion rates and reduced metal release in the presence of proteins). A full monolayer coverage is necessary to induce the effects observed.

  16. Modeling non-saturated ferrite-based devices: Application to twin toroid ferrite phase shifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gouellec, A.; Vérissimo, G.; Laur, V.; Queffelec, P.; Albert, I.; Girard, T.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes a new set of tools developed to improve the conception and modeling of non-saturated ferrite-based devices such as twin toroid phase shifters. These new simulation tools benefit from a generalized permeability tensor model able to describe the permeability tensor of a ferrite sample whatever its magnetization state. This model is coupled to a homemade 3D multi-scale magnetostatic analysis program, which describes the evolution of the magnetization through the definition of a hysteresis loop in every mesh cell. These computed spectra are then integrated into 3D electromagnetic simulation software that retains the spatial variations of the ferrite properties by using freshly developed macro programming functions. This new approach allows the designers to accurately model complex ferrite devices such as twin toroid phase shifters. In particular, we demonstrated a good agreement between simulated and measured phase shifts as a function of applied current values with a predicted maximum phase shift of 0.96 times the measured value.

  17. Intragranular ferrite nucleation in medium-carbon vanadium steels

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Fusao; Takahashi, Toshihiko ); Ochi, Tatsurou . Muroran R D Lab.)

    1994-05-01

    In this study, the mechanism of intragranular ferrite nucleation is investigated. It is found that intragranular ferrite idiomorphs'' nucleate at vanadium nitrides which precipitate at manganese sulfide particles during cooling in the austenite region. It is observed that intragranular ferrite has the Baker-Nutting orientation relationship with vanadium nitride which precipitated at manganese sulfide. According to classical nucleation theory, the proeutectoid ferrite nucleation rate depends on the following factors: (1) the driving free energy for ferrite nucleation, (2) the diffusivity of carbon atoms in austenite, and (3) the increase in the interfacial energy associated with ferrite nucleation. In the Baker-Nutting orientation relationship, the lattice mismatch across the habit planes is likely to be very small. Depleted zones of solute atoms such as vanadium are assumed to be formed in the austenite matrix around precipitates. The effect of the depleted zones on factors (1) and (2) is estimated thermodynamically and it is proved that those effects are negligibly small. Thus, the authors conclude that the most important factor in nucleation kinetics of intragranular ferrite is the formation of precipitates which can develop coherent, low energy interfaces with ferrite.

  18. Adsorption of oxygen and 1-butene on magnesium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Samuilova, O.K.; Kozlova, M.M.; Yagodovskii, V.D.

    1986-08-01

    The kinetics of the adsorption of oxygen and 1-butene on magnesium ferrite was studied. Conductometry and thermal desorption methods were used to investigate the adsorption of oxygen on magnesium ferrite. Two forms of adsorbed oxygen were found. The formation of these forms affects the kinetics of the adsorption of 1-butene.

  19. Electrical transport behavior of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, S.; Sinha, M.; Meikap, A.K.; Pradhan, S.K.

    2010-08-15

    This paper presents the direct current conductivity, alternate current conductivity and dielectric properties of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite below room temperature. The frequency exponent (s) of conductivity shows an anomalous temperature dependency. The magnitude of the temperature exponent (n) of dielectric permittivity strongly depends on frequency and its value decreases with increasing frequency. The grain boundary contribution is dominating over the grain contribution in conduction process and the temperature dependence of resistance due to grain and grain boundary contribution exhibits two activation regions. The ferrite shows positive alternating current magnetoconductivity. The solid state processing technique was used for the preparation of nanocrystalline ferrite powder from oxides of magnesium, zinc and iron. The X-ray diffraction methods were used in determining the structure and composition of obtained ferrite, while multimeter, impedance analyzer, liquid nitrogen cryostat and electromagnet were used in the study of conducting and dielectric properties of ferrite.

  20. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V.; Errandonea, D.

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  1. Characterization of nitrogen effects in high energy density weldments of Nitronic 40 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeif, Erik Andrew

    cooling rates increased. Vermicular ferrite, lacy ferrite and intercellular ferrite were identified as predicted in prior research done on high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels. The resulting laser weld metal microstructures were analyzed with EBSD for grain size and ferrite content measurements, while grain boundary character was determined for a Hansen model used for multi-scale mechanical property measurements. It was found that the low angle grain boundaries were the predominant microstructural feature responsible for strengthening within the weld metal and that this contribution must be accounted for when predicting yield strength of the weld metal.

  2. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  3. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel core internal welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Ruther, W. E.; Sanecki, J. E.; Strain, R. V.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1999-04-14

    Microstructural analyses by several advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on austenitic stainless steel mockup and core shroud welds that had cracked in boiling water reactors. Contrary to previous beliefs, heat-affected zones of the cracked Type 304L, as well as 304 SS core shroud welds and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds, were free of grain-boundary carbides, which shows that core shroud failure cannot be explained by classical intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Neither martensite nor delta-ferrite films were present on the grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the core shroud welds were significantly contaminated by oxygen and fluorine, which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination seems to promote fluorine contamination and suppress thermal sensitization. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests also indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of core shroud welds.

  5. Eddy current techniques for super duplex stainless steel characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerini, C.; Sacramento, R.; Areiza, M. C.; Rocha, A.; Santos, R.; Rebello, J. M.; Pereira, G.

    2015-08-01

    Super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) is a two-phase material where the microstructure consists of grains of ferrite (δ) and austenite (γ). SDSS exhibit an attractive combination of properties, such as: strength, toughness and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Nevertheless, SDSS attain these properties after a controlled solution heat treatment, leading to a similar volumetric fraction of δ and γ. Any further heat treatment, welding operation for example, can change the balance of the original phases, or may also lead to precipitation of a deleterious phase, such as sigma (σ). For these situations, the material corrosion resistance is severely impaired. In the present study, several SDSS samples with low σ phase content and non-balanced microstructure were intentionally obtained by thermally treating SDSS specimens. Electromagnetic techniques, conventional Eddy Current Testing (ECT) and Saturated Low Frequency Eddy Current (SLOFEC), were employed to characterize the SDSS samples. The results showed that ECT and SLOFEC are reliable techniques to evaluate σ phase presence in SDSS and can provide an estimation of the δ content.

  6. TEM (transmission electron microscopy), APFIM (atom-probe field ion microscopy), and SANS (small-angle neutron scattering) examination of aged duplex stainless steel components from some decommissioned reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.

    1987-12-01

    The present investigation indicates that the primary embrittlement processes of the CF-8 grade cast stainless steel components during extended reactor service are spinodal decomposition of the ferrite phase and M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ carbide precipitation on the austenite-ferrite boundaries. The ferrite hardness measured for the Shippingport reactor valves appears to reflect the different extent of spinodal decomposition among the different valves which contain slightly different Cr contents. G-phase precipitation was minimal compared to that during accelerated aging of CF-8 steel in the laboratory (i.e., near 400/degree/C). This indicates that the activation energy may be strongly influenced by the synergism among the G-phase precipitation, carbide formation, and spinodal decomposition. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Soft ferrite cores characterization for integrated micro-inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Yen Mai; Bourrier, David; Charlot, Samuel; Valdez-Nava, Zarel; Bley, Vincent; Combettes, Céline; Lopez, Thomas; Laur, Jean-Pierre; Brunet, Magali

    2014-10-01

    Low-profile soft ferrite films constitute a competitive solution for the integration of micro-inductors on silicon in low-power medium frequency dc-dc conversion applications. The high resistivity of soft ferrites is indeed a major advantage for operating frequencies in the range of 5‒10 MHz. We have studied several soft ferrites, including commercial ferrite films and ferrites made in-house. Test inductors were fabricated at a wafer level using micro-machining and assembling techniques. The proposed process is based on a sintered ferrite core placed between thick electroplated copper windings. The low-profile ferrite cores of 1.2  ×  2.6  ×  0.1 mm3 were produced by two methods using green tape-cast films or ferrite powders. This article presents the magnetic characterization of the fabricated ferrite cores, cut and printed in a rectangular shape and sintered at different temperatures. Comparisons are made in order to find the best material for the core that can offer micro-inductors a high inductance in the range of 200-1000 nH at 6 MHz, and that generate the smallest losses. Thanks to a test inductor, it is demonstrated that with a commercial ferrite core, an inductance density of 215 nH mm-2 up to 6 MHz could be reached. Extracted losses at 6 MHz, under 10 mT are in the range of 0.7 to 2.5 W cm-3.

  8. Corrosion behavior of magnetic ferrite coating prepared by plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Wei, Shicheng Tong, Hui; Tian, Haoliang; Liu, Ming; Xu, Binshi

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g while the M{sub s} value of the ferrite powder is 71.916 emu/g. It can be seen that plasma spray process causes deterioration of the room temperature soft magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Spinel ferrite coatings have been prepared by plasma spraying. • The coating consists of nanocrystalline grains. • The saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g. • Corrosion behavior of the ferrite coating was examined in NaCl solution. - Abstract: In this study, spray dried spinel ferrite powders were deposited on the surface of mild steel substrate through plasma spraying. The structure and morphological studies on the ferrite coatings were carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. It was showed that spray dried process was an effective method to prepare thermal spraying powders. The coating showed spinel structure with a second phase of LaFeO{sub 3}. The magnetic property of the ferrite samples were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating was 34.417 emu/g. The corrosion behavior of coating samples was examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. EIS diagrams showed three corrosion processes as the coating immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results suggested that plasma spraying was a promising technology for the production of magnetic ferrite coatings.

  9. Nano-composite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Blue, Craig A.; Peter, William H.; Chen, Wei; Aprigliano, Louis F.

    2015-07-14

    A composite stainless steel composition is composed essentially of, in terms of wt. % ranges: 25 to 28 Cr; 11 to 13 Ni; 7 to 8 W; 3.5 to 4 Mo; 3 to 3.5 B; 2 to 2.5 Mn; 1 to 1.5 Si; 0.3 to 1.7 C; up to 2 O; balance Fe. The composition has an austenitic matrix phase and a particulate, crystalline dispersed phase.

  10. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  11. Phase transformation of strontium hexagonal ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilovol, V.; Martínez-García, R.

    2015-11-01

    The phase transformation of strontium hexagonal ferrite (SrFe12O19) to magnetite (Fe3O4) as main phase and strontium carbonate (SrCO3) as secondary phase is reported here. SrFe12O19 powder was obtained by a heat treatment at 250 °C under controlled oxygen flow. It was observed that the phase transformation occurred when the SrFe12O19 ferrite was heated up to 625 °C in confinement conditions. This transformation took place by a combination of three factors: the presence of stresses in the crystal lattice of SrFe12O19 due to a low synthesis temperature, the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ during the heating up to 625 °C, and the similarity of the coordination spheres of the iron atoms present in the S-block of SrFe12O19 and Fe3O4. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the existence of strain and crystal deformation in SrFe12O19 and the absence of them in the material after the phase transformation. Dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Fe57 Mössbauer spectroscopy provided evidences of the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ in the SrFe12O19 crystal.

  12. R-curve behavior in ferrite ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, E.K.; Monroe, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    The unusual dependence of the fracture mode of ferrite ceramics on the stress intensity factor in the subcritical crack growth regime was used to create flaws with different concentrations of crack-interface bridges. Flaws with numerous bridges were produced by indenting under dry silicone oil, while flaws with essentially no bridges were produced by indenting under water. Plots of log failure stress as a function of log indenter load for the two types of flaws reflect the differences in bridging. Those with extensive bridging showed pronounced R-curve behavior. The curve for those initially devoid of bridges showed no plateau but did show deviations from a {minus}1/3 slope that correspond to those predicted by Bennison and Lawn for this type of flaw. The ferrite studies was 62.4 Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} 26.6 MnO, 11.2nO, and .04 V{sub 2}O{sub 5}. 10 figs.

  13. Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippold, John C.; Kotecki, Damian J.

    2005-03-01

    Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels, the first book in over twenty years to address welding metallurgy and weldability issues associated with stainless steel, offers the most up-to-date and comprehensive treatment of these topics currently available. The authors emphasize fundamental metallurgical principles governing microstructure evolution and property development of stainless steels, including martensistic, ferric, austenitic, duplex, and precipitation hardening grades. They present a logical and well-organized look at the history, evolution, and primary uses of each stainless steel, including detailed descriptions of the associated weldability issues.

  14. Effect of oxygen on weld shape and crystallographic orientation of duplex stainless steel weld using advanced A-TIG (AA-TIG) welding method

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Ying Ueji, Rintaro; Fujii, Hidetoshi

    2014-05-01

    The double-shielded advanced A-TIG (AA-TIG) welding method was adopted in this study for the welding of the SUS329J4L duplex stainless steel with the shielding gases of different oxygen content levels. The oxygen content in the shielding gas was controlled by altering the oxygen content in the outer layer gas, while the inner layer remained pure argon to suppress oxidation on the tungsten electrode. As a result, a deep weld penetration was obtained due to the dissolution of oxygen into the weld metals. Additionally, the microstructure of the weld metal was changed by the dissolution of oxygen. The austenite phase at the ferrite grain boundary followed a Kurdjumov–Sachs (K–S) orientation relationship with the ferrite matrix phase at any oxide content. On the other hand, the orientation relationship between the intragranular austenite phase and the ferrite matrix phase exhibited different patterns under different oxygen content levels. When there was little oxide in the fusion zone, only a limited part of the intragranular austenite phase and the ferrite matrix phase followed the K–S orientation relationship. With the increase of the oxide, the correspondence of the K–S relationship increased and fit very well in the 2.5% O{sub 2} shielded sample. The investigation of this phenomenon was carried out along with the nucleation mechanisms of the intragranular austenite phases. - Highlights: • Weld penetration increased with the increase of the oxygen content. • Average diameter and number density of oxide were changed by the oxygen content. • K-S relationship of Widmanstätten austenite/ferrite wasn’t varied by oxide. • Orientation relationship of intragranular austenite/ferrite was varied by oxide.

  15. Mechanical Performance of Ferritic Martensitic Steels for High Dose Applications in Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderoglu, Osman; Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, Mychailo; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are considered for core applications and pressure vessels in Generation IV reactors as well as first walls and blankets for fusion reactors. There are significant scientific data on testing and industrial experience in making this class of alloys worldwide. This experience makes F/M steels an attractive candidate. In this article, tensile behavior, fracture toughness and impact property, and creep behavior of the F/M steels under neutron irradiations to high doses with a focus on high Cr content (8 to 12) are reviewed. Tensile properties are very sensitive to irradiation temperature. Increase in yield and tensile strength (hardening) is accompanied with a loss of ductility and starts at very low doses under irradiation. The degradation of mechanical properties is most pronounced at <0.3 T M ( T M is melting temperature) and up to 10 dpa (displacement per atom). Ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit a high fracture toughness after irradiation at all temperatures even below 673 K (400 °C), except when tested at room temperature after irradiations below 673 K (400 °C), which shows a significant reduction in fracture toughness. Creep studies showed that for the range of expected stresses in a reactor environment, the stress exponent is expected to be approximately one and the steady state creep rate in the absence of swelling is usually better than austenitic stainless steels both in terms of the creep rate and the temperature sensitivity of creep. In short, F/M steels show excellent promise for high dose applications in nuclear reactors.

  16. Effects of Cold Rolling and Strain-Induced Martensite Formation in a SAF 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breda, Marco; Brunelli, Katya; Grazzi, Francesco; Scherillo, Antonella; Calliari, Irene

    2015-02-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) are biphasic steels having a ferritic-austenitic microstructure that allows them to combine good mechanical and corrosion-resistance properties. However, these steels are sensitive to microstructural modifications, such as ferrite decomposition at high temperatures and the possibility of strain-induced martensite (SIM) formation from cold-worked austenite, which can significantly alter their interesting features. In the present work, the effects of cold rolling on the developed microstructural features in a cold-rolled SAF 2205 DSS and the onset of martensitic transformation are discussed. The material was deformed at room temperature from 3 to 85 pct thickness reduction, and several characterization techniques (scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, hardness measurements, and time-of-flight-neutron diffraction) were employed in order to fully describe the microstructural behavior of the steel. Despite the low stacking fault energy of DSS austenite, which contributed to SIM formation, the steel was found to be more stable than other stainless steel grades, such as AISI 304L. Rolling textures were similar to those pertaining to single-phase materials, but the presence of the biphasic (Duplex) microstructure imposed deformation constraints that affected the developed microstructural features, owing to phases interactions. Moreover, even if an intensification of the strain field in austenite was revealed, retarded SIM transformation kinetics and lower martensite amounts with respect to AISI 304L were observed.

  17. Fast ferrite tuner for the BNL synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Pivit, E. ); Hanna, S.M.; Keane, J. )

    1991-01-01

    A new type of ferrite tuner has been tested at the BNL. The ferrite tuner uses garnet slabs partially filling a stripline. One of the important features of the tuner is that the ferrite is perpendicularly biased for operation above FMR, thus reducing the magnetic losses. A unique design was adopted to achieve the efficient cooling. The principle of operation of the tuner as well as our preliminary results on tuning a 52 MHz cavity are reported. Optimized conditions under which we demonstrated linear tunability of 80 KHz are described. The tuner's losses and its effect on higher-order modes in the cavity are discussed. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Sensitization phenomena on aged SAF 2205 duplex stainless steel and their control using the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, E.; Benedetti, B. de; Maizza, G.; Rosalbino, F. . Dept. of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering)

    1999-06-01

    Microstructural changes and resulting properties were studied for SAF 2205 (UNS S31803) austeno-ferritic stainless steel (SS) aged between 700 C and 900 C for up to 2 weeks and then water-quenched. Quantitative metallography coupled with x-ray diffraction techniques were adopted to follow ferrite ([alpha]) transformation with subsequent formation of secondary austenite ([gamma][sub 2]) and sigma ([sigma]) phase. The kinetic model of a transformation was interpreted in the form of an Avrami-type expression. The electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) test was used to evaluate the degree of sensitization of the aged specimens. Results were compared with results from the corrosion test in boiling nitric acid (HNO[sub 3]). Influences of the transformation of ferrite into austenite, sigma phase, and of other microstructural variations such as chromium nitride (Cr[sub 2]N) precipitation on stability of the passive film were shown. The susceptibility to intergranular corrosion phenomena was caused by chromium depletion caused by sigma phase precipitation, while chromium nitrides appeared less harmful. Results were expressed as an isocharge line diagram that allowed concise identification of sensitization and desensitization ranges.

  19. Direct Observations of Sigma Phase Formation in Duplex Stainless Steels using In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Palmer, T A; Specht, E D

    2006-07-03

    The formation and growth of sigma phase in 2205 duplex stainless steel was observed and measured in real time using synchrotron radiation during 10 hr isothermal heat treatments at temperatures between 700 C and 850 C. Sigma formed in near-equilibrium quantities during the isothermal holds, starting from a microstructure which contained a balanced mixture of metastable ferrite and austenite. In situ synchrotron diffraction continuously monitored the transformation, and these results were compared to those predicted by thermodynamic calculations. Differences between the calculated and measured amounts of sigma, ferrite and austenite suggest that the thermodynamic calculations underpredict the sigma dissolution temperature by approximately 50 C. The data were further analyzed using a modified Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach to determine kinetic parameters for sigma formation over this temperature range. The initial JMA exponent, n, at low fractions of sigma was found to be approximately 7.0, however, towards the end of the transformation, n decreased to values of approximately 0.75. The change in the JMA exponent was attributed to a change in the transformation mechanism from discontinuous precipitation with increasing nucleation rate, to growth of the existing sigma phase after nucleation site saturation occurred. Because of this change in mechanism, it was not possible to determine reliable values for the activation energy and pre-exponential terms for the JMA equation. While cooling back to room temperature, the partial transformation of austenite resulted in a substantial increase in the ferrite content, but sigma retained its high temperature value to room temperature.

  20. Effects of thermal aging on microstructure and hardness of stainless steel weld-overlay claddings of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kakubo, Y.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nozawa, Y.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.; Katsuyama, J.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Onizawa, K.; Suzuki, M.

    2014-09-01

    The effects of thermal aging of stainless steel weld-overlay claddings of nuclear reactor pressure vessels on the microstructure and hardness of the claddings were investigated using atom probe tomography and nanoindentation testing. The claddings were aged at 400 °C for periods of 100-10,000 h. The fluctuation in Cr concentration in the δ-ferrite phase, which was caused by spinodal decomposition, progressed rapidly after aging for 100 h, and gradually for aging durations greater than 1000 h. On the other hand, NiSiMn clusters, initially formed after aging for less than 1000 h, had the highest number density after aging for 2000 h, and coarsened after aging for 10,000 h. The hardness of the δ-ferrite phase also increased rapidly for short period of aging, and saturated after aging for longer than 1000 h. This trend was similar to the observed Cr fluctuation concentration, but different from the trend seen in the formation of the NiSiMn clusters. These results strongly suggest that the primary factor responsible for the hardening of the δ-ferrite phase owing to thermal aging is Cr spinodal decomposition.

  1. Metallurgical and Corrosion Characterization of POST Weld Heat Treated Duplex Stainless Steel (uns S31803) Joints by Friction Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif M., Mohammed; Shrikrishna, Kulkarni Anup; Sathiya, P.

    2016-02-01

    The present study focuses on the metallurgical and corrosion characterization of post weld heat treated duplex stainless steel joints. After friction welding, it was confirmed that there is an increase in ferrite content at weld interface due to dynamic recrystallization. This caused the weldments prone to pitting corrosion attack. Hence the post weld heat treatments were performed at three temperatures 1080∘C, 1150∘C and 1200∘C with 15min of aging time. This was followed by water and oil quenching. The volume fraction of ferrite to austenite ratio was balanced and highest pit nucleation resistance were achieved after PWHT at 1080∘C followed by water quench and at 1150∘C followed by oil quench. This had happened exactly at parameter set containing heating pressure (HP):40 heating time (HT):4 upsetting pressure (UP):80 upsetting time (UP):2 (experiment no. 5). Dual phase presence and absence of precipitates were conformed through TEM which follow Kurdjumov-Sachs relationship. PREN of ferrite was decreasing with increase in temperature and that of austenite increased. The equilibrium temperature for water quenching was around 1100∘C and that for oil quenching was around 1140∘C. The pit depths were found to be in the range of 100nm and width of 1.5-2μm.

  2. Corrosion of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Weldment in Chloride Medium Containing Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony, P. J.; Singh Raman, R. K.; Kumar, Pradeep; Raman, R.

    2008-11-01

    Influence of changes in microstructure caused due to welding on microbiologically influenced corrosion of a duplex stainless steel was studied by exposing the weldment and parent metal to chloride medium containing sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Identically prepared coupons (same area and surface finish) exposed to sterile medium were used as the control. Etching-type attack was observed in the presence of SRB, which was predominant in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the weldment. The anodic polarization studies indicated an increase in current density for coupon exposed to SRB-containing medium as compared to that obtained for coupon exposed to sterile medium. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations after anodic polarization revealed that the attack was preferentially in the ferrite phase of HAZ of the weldment, whereas it was restricted to the austenite phase of the parent metal.

  3. Direct observations of sigma phase growth and dissolution in 2205 duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T.A.; Elmer, J.W.; Babu, S.S.; Specht, E.D.

    2007-10-10

    The formation and growth of sigma ({sigma}) phase in a 2205 duplex stainless steel is monitored during an 850 C isothermal heat treatment using an in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction technique. At this temperature, {sigma} phase is first observed within approximately 40 seconds of the start of the isothermal heat treatment and grows rapidly over the course of the 3600 second heat treatment to a volume fraction of approximately 13%. A simultaneous increase in the austenite ({gamma}) volume fraction and a decrease in the ferrite ({delta}) volume fraction are observed. The {sigma} phase formed at this temperature is rapidly dissolved within approximately 200 seconds when the temperature is increased to 1000 C. Accompanying this rapid dissolution of the {sigma} phase, the {delta} and {gamma} volume fractions both approach the balanced (50/50) level observed in the as-received material.

  4. Direct Observations of Sigma Phase Growth and Dissolution in 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T; Elmer, J; Babu, S; Specht, E

    2005-06-14

    The formation and growth of sigma ({sigma}) phase in a 2205 duplex stainless steel is monitored during an 850 C isothermal heat treatment using an in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction technique. At this temperature, {sigma} phase is first observed within approximately 40 seconds of the start of the isothermal heat treatment and grows rapidly over the course of the 3600 second heat treatment to a volume fraction of approximately 13%. A simultaneous increase in the austenite ({gamma}) volume fraction and a decrease in the ferrite ({delta}) volume fraction are observed. The {sigma} phase formed at this temperature is rapidly dissolved within approximately 200 seconds when the temperature is increased to 1000 C. Accompanying this rapid dissolution of the {sigma} phase, the {delta} and {gamma} volume fractions both approach the balanced (50/50) level observed in the as-received material.

  5. Brazing of Stainless Steels to Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) Using Silver -Base Brazes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Asthana, Rajiv

    2005-01-01

    Three silver-base brazes containing either noble metal palladium (Palcusil-10 and Palcusil-15) or active metal titanium (Ticusil) were evaluated for high-temperature oxidation resistance, and their effectiveness in joining yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to a corrosion-resistant ferritic stainless steel. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and optical- and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were used to evaluate the braze oxidation behavior and the structure and chemistry of the YSZ/braze/steel joints. The effect of the braze type and processing conditions on the interfacial microstructure and composition of the joint regions is discussed with reference to the chemical changes that occur at the interface. It was found that chemical interdiffusion of the constituents of YSZ, steel and the brazes led to compositional changes and/or interface reconstruction, and metallurgically sound joints.

  6. The microstructure and phase relationships in rapidly solidified type 304 stainless steel powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Richard N.; Flinn, John E.; Korth, Gary E.; Bae, Jung Chan; Kelly, Thomas F.

    1988-10-01

    The microstructure and relative amounts of fcc and bcc phases have been studied for rapidly solidified Type 304 stainless steel powders produced by vacuum gas atomization (VGA) and centrifugal atomization (CA). The VGA powder solidifies with a cellular microstructure while the CA powder has a dendritic microstructure. The volume fraction of fcc phase in the CA powder is found to increase from 40 Pct to 97 Pct with increasing particle size from 30 to 125 µm. In the VGA powder, the volume fraction of fcc phase is found to decrease from about 90 Pct to 77 Pct over the same range of particle sizes. The origins of the fcc and bcc phases in each powder are considered. It is concluded that bcc is present as both a primary crystallization phase in the smaller CA particles (<75 µm) and as compositionally stabilized eutectic ferrite at the cell walls of particles of both CA and VGA powders in which fcc was the primary crystallization phase.

  7. Influence of the grain size on deleterious phase precipitation in superduplex stainless steel UNS S32750

    SciTech Connect

    Pardal, J.M.

    2009-03-15

    In the present work, the effect of grain size on deleterious phase precipitation in a superduplex stainless steel was investigated. The materials studied were heat treated isothermally at 800 deg. C, 850 deg. C and 900 deg. C for times up to 120 min. Hardness tests, light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were carried out to detect sigma and other harmful precipitate phases. The ferritic and austenitic grain sizes in the solution treated condition of the two steels analyzed were measured by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). Cyclic polarization corrosion tests were performed to evaluate the effect of grain size on the corrosion resistance. The results presented show that the precipitation of deleterious phases such as {chi}, {sigma} and {gamma}{sub 2}, which can occur during welding and forming operations, is retarded by grain growth.

  8. Microstructure-strength relations in a hardenable stainless steel with 16 pct Cr, 1.5 pct Mo, and 5 pct Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobner, P. J.; Blšs, V.

    1984-07-01

    Metallographic studies have been conducted on a 0.024 pct C-16 pct Cr-1.5 pct Mo-5 pct Ni stainless steel to study the phase reactions associated with heat treatments and investigate the strengthening mechanisms of the steel. In the normalized condition, air cooled from 1010 °C, the microstructure consists of 20 pct ferrite and 80 pct martensite. Tempering in a temperature range between 500 and 600 °C results in a gradual transformation of martensite to a fine mixture of ferrite and austenite. At higher tempering temperatures, between 600 and 800 °C, progressively larger quantities of austenite form and are converted during cooling to proportionally increasing amounts of fresh martensite. The amount of retained austenite in the microstructure is reduced to zero at 800 °C, and the microstructure contains 65 pct re-formed martensite and 35 pct total ferrite. Chromium rich M23C6 carbides precipitate in the single tempered microstructures. The principal strengthening is produced by the presence of martensite in the microstructure. Additional strengthening is provided by a second tempering treatment at 400 °C due to the precipitation of ultrafine (Cr, Mo) (C,N) particles in the ferrite.

  9. Magnetooptical and crystalline properties of sputtered garnet ferrite film on spinel ferrite buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Akinori; Sasaki, Ai-ichiro; Morimura, Hiroki; Kagami, Osamu; Tanabe, Takaya

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide garnet films for volumetric magnetic holography. Volumetric magnetic holography usually employs an easily obtainable short-wavelength laser (visible light, not infrared light) with a large diffraction intensity. Bi-substituted garnet ferrite with a large Faraday rotation is promising for volumetric magnetic holography applications in the visible light region. However, a garnet film without a deteriorated layer must be obtained because a deteriorated layer (minute polycrystalline grains containing an amorphous phase) is formed during the initial deposition on a glass substrate. In particular, the required magnetooptical properties have not been obtained in a thin garnet film (100 nm or less) after annealing (1 h, 700 °C, oxygen atmosphere). Therefore, there is a need for excellent garnet films with the required magnetooptical (MO) properties even if the films are thin. By using a spinel ferrite buffer layer for garnet film deposition, we could obtain a thin garnet film with excellent MO properties. We determined the effect of the initial buffer layer on the crystallinity of the deposited garnet films by observing the film cross section. In addition, we undertook a qualitative estimation of the influence of the crystallinity and optical properties of the garnet film on a glass substrate with a spinel ferrite buffer layer.

  10. Irradiation creep in austenitic and ferritic steels irradiated in a tailored neutron spectrum to induce fusion reactor levels of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Gibson, L.T.; Jitsukawa, S.

    1996-04-01

    Six austenitic stainless steels and two ferritic alloys were irradiated sequentially in two research reactors where the neutron spectrum was tailored to produce a He production rate typical of a fusion device. Irradiation began in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor where an atomic displacement level of 7.4 dpa was achieved and was then transferred to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for the remainder of the irradiation to a total displacement level of 19 dpa. Temperatures of 60 and 330{degree}C are reported on. At 330{degree}C irradiation creep was found to be linear in stress and fluence with rates in the range of 1.7 - 5.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. Annealed and cold-worked materials exhibited similar creep rates. There is some indication that austenitic alloys with TiC or TiO precipitates had a slightly higher irradiation creep rate than those without. The ferritic alloys HT-9 and Fe-16Cr had irradiatoin creep rates about 0.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. No meaningful data could be obtained from the tubes irradiated at 60{degree}C because of damage to the tubes.

  11. Development of TRIP-Aided Lean Duplex Stainless Steel by Twin-Roll Strip Casting and Its Deformation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Weina; Liu, Xin; Liu, Zhenyu; Wang, Guodong

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, twin-roll strip casting was carried out to fabricate thin strip of a Mn-N alloyed lean duplex stainless steel with the composition of Fe-19Cr-6Mn-0.4N, in which internal pore defects had been effectively avoided as compared to conventional cast ingots. The solidification structure observed by optical microscope indicated that fine Widmannstatten structure and coarse-equiaxed crystals had been formed in the surface and center, respectively, with no columnar crystal structures through the surface to center of the cast strip. By applying hot rolling and cold rolling, thin sheets with the thickness of 0.5 mm were fabricated from the cast strips, and no edge cracks were formed during the rolling processes. With an annealing treatment at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 5 minutes after cold rolling, the volume fractions of ferrite and austenite were measured to be approximately equal, and the distribution of alloying elements in the strip was further homogenized. The cold-rolled and annealed sheet exhibited an excellent combination of strength and ductility, with the ultimate tensile strength and elongation having been measured to be 1000 MPa and 65 pct, respectively. The microstructural evolution during deformation was investigated by XRD, EBSD, and TEM, indicating that ferrite and austenite had different deformation mechanisms. The deformation of ferrite phase was dominated by dislocation slipping, and the deformation of austenite phase was mainly controlled by martensitic transformation in the sequence of γ→ɛ-martensite→α'-martensite, leading to the improvement of strength and plasticity by the so-called transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect. By contrast, lean duplex stainless steels of Fe-21Cr-6Mn-0.5N and Fe-23Cr-7Mn-0.6N fabricated by twin-roll strip casting did not show TRIP effects and exhibited lower strength and elongation as compared to Fe-19Cr-6Mn-0.4N.

  12. Microstructure and Properties of SAE 2205 Stainless Steel After Salt Bath Nitrocarburizing at 450 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuanhua; Gu, Tan; Zeng, Dezhi; Huang, Runbo; Ji, Xiong; Fan, Hongyuan

    2014-04-01

    Nitrocarburizing of the type SAE 2205 duplex stainless steel was conducted at 450 °C, using a type of salt bath chemical surface treatment, and the microstructure and properties of the nitrided surface were systematically researched. Experimental results revealed that a modified layer transformed on the surface of samples with the thickness ranging from 3 to 28 μm changed with the treatment time. After 2205 duplex stainless steel was subjected to salt bath nitriding at 450 °C for time less than 8 h, the preexisting ferrite zone in the surface transformed into austenite by active nitrogen diffusion. The main phase of the nitrided layer was the expanded austenite. When the treatment time was extended to 16 h, the preexisting ferrite zone in the expanded austenite was decomposed and transformed partially into ɛ-nitride precipitate. When the treatment time extended to 40 h, the preexisting ferrite zone in the expanded austenite was transformed into ɛ-nitride and CrN precipitate. Further, a large amount of nitride precipitated from preexisting austenite zone. The nitrided layer depth thickness changed intensively with the increasing nitriding time. The growth of the nitride layer takes place mainly by nitrogen diffusion according to the expected parabolic rate law. The salt bath nitriding can effectively improve the surface hardness. The maximum values measured from the treated surface are observed to be approximately 1400 HV0.1 after 8 h, which is about 3.5 times as hard as the untreated material (396 HV0.1). Low-temperature nitriding can improve the erosion/corrosion resistance. After nitriding for 4 h, the sample has the best corrosion resistance.

  13. METHOD FOR JOINING ALUMINUM TO STAINLESS STEEL

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, L.C.

    1960-05-24

    Aluminum may be joined to stainless steel without the use of flux by tinning the aluminum with a tin solder containing 1% silver and 1% lead, tinning the stainless steel with a 50% lead 50% tin solder, and then sweating the tinned surfaces together.

  14. Effects of tritium on corrosion of welded type 316L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bellanger, G.

    1995-01-01

    An attempt was undertaken to investigate the localized corrosion susceptibility of tritiated oxidized weldments of Type 316L austenitic stainless steel made by the tungsten inert gas process. For this, the distribution of tritium at the surface was determined using a scintillation spectrophotometer. Depending on the values, the amounts of tritium are high enough to degrade the oxide. The polarization curves show a corrosion potential lower than that of a nontritiated weld. This means that tritiated welds have a less {open_quotes}noble{close_quotes}behavior. It is observed by voltammetry that the reduction of corrosion products always occurs during the cathodic scans, meaning less passivity for tritiated welds. Using electro-chemical impedance spectroscopy, the values of electron and ionic diffusion within the passive oxide were deduced. The tritiated oxide layer is thinner, and a higher concentration of electron carriers is observed; this indicates a less insulating oxide. The difference in electron carriers may come from ionization and breakdowns of the oxide layer by tritium and the energy released. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examinations show a complex microstructure of the tritiated surface that could be attributed both to the welding process and a severe degradation by tritium and energy released from the decay. It is well known that the ferrite is formed in the austenite during welding; this currently leads to corrosion of ferrite/austenite surface borders. This corrosion may be facilitated by the presence of tritium trapped at these surface borders, and the microcracks would nucleate leading to no cohesion of austenite. This mechanism is difficult to verify by SEM for stainless steel highly degraded by tritium and the energy released, but the visual examinations would appear to well support the results obtained by electrochemical methods, where the oxide is damaged. 28 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Characterization of Irradiated Nanostructured Ferritic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, James; Hoelzer, David T; Tanigawa, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Odette, George R.

    2007-01-01

    The past decade has seen the development of a new class of mechanically alloyed (MA) ferritic steels with outstanding mechanical properties that come, at least in part, from the presence of high concentrations (>10{sup 23} m{sup -3}) of Ti-, Y-, and O-enriched nanoclusters (NC). From the outset, there has been much interest in their potential use for applications to fission and proposed fusion reactors, not only because of their attractive high-temperature strength, but also because the presence of NC may result in a highly radiation-resistant material by efficiently trapping point defects to enhance recombination. Of special interest for fusion applications is the potential of NC to trap transmutation-produced He in high concentrations of small cavities, rather than in fewer but larger cavities that lead to greater radiation-induced swelling and other degraded properties.

  16. High strength ferritic alloy-D53

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic alloy is described having from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight nickel, from about 2.5% to about 3.6% by weight chromium, from about 2.5% to about 3.5% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight vanadium, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight silicon, from about 0.1% to about 0.6% by weight manganese, from about 0.12% to about 0.20% by weight carbon, from about 0.02% to about 0.1% by weight boron, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, and the balance iron.

  17. Transport in Manganese-Zinc Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, David J.; Gupta, M.; Gupta, R.

    2002-03-01

    Density functional studies of the electronic and magnetic structure of the spinel ferrites ZnFe_2O4 and MnFe_2O4 are reported. Correct magnetic orderings are obtained. ZnFe_2O4 is predicted to be a small gap insulator in agreement with experiment. MnFe_2O4 is found to be a low carrier density half-metal in the fully ordered state. However, strong effects on the band structure near the band edges are found upon partial interchange of Fe and Mn atoms. These are above the criterion for disorder induced localization. This indicates that the insulating character may well be due to Anderson localization associated with the intersite Mn-Fe disorder in contrast to the usual picture of a Mott insulating ground state. This possibility is discussed in relation to experimental data.

  18. Ethanol sensor based on nanocrystallite cadmium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Gadkari, Ashok B.; Shinde, Tukaram J.; Vasambekar, Pramod N.

    2015-06-24

    The cadmium ferrite was synthesized by oxalate co-precipitation method. The crystal structure and surface morphology were examined by X-ray diffraction and SEM techniques, respectively. The nanocrystallite CdFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} sensor was tested for LPG, Cl{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH. The sensitivity was measured at various operating temperatures in the range of 100-400°C. The sensor shows highest sensitivity and selectivity to C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH at 350°C. The response and recovery time was measured at operating temperature of 350°C. The sensor exhibits a lower response and recovery time for LPG and Cl{sub 2} as compared to ethanol.

  19. Interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Dunwoody, John T; Mason, Richard E; Freibert, Franz J; Willson, Stephen P; Veirs, Douglas K; Worl, Laura A; Archuleta, Alonso; Conger, Donald J

    2010-01-01

    Long-term storage of excess plutonium is of great concern in the U.S. as well as abroad. The current accepted configuration involves intimate contact between the stored material and an iron-bearing container such as stainless steel. While many safety scenario studies have been conducted and used in the acceptance of stainless steel containers, little information is available on the physical interaction at elevated temperatures between certain forms of stored material and the container itself. The bulk of the safety studies has focused on the ability of a package to keep the primary stainless steel containment below the plutonium-iron eutectic temperature of approximately 410 C. However, the interactions of plutonium metal with stainless steel have been of continuing interest. This paper reports on a scoping study investigating the interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal in a pseudo diffusion couple at temperatures above the eutectic melt-point.

  20. The comparison of frictional resistance in titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets using stainless steel and TMA archwires: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Syed Altaf; Kumar, Vadivel; Jayaram, Prithviraj

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to compare the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA) archwires. Materials and Methods: We compared the frictional resistance in 0.018 slot and 0.022 slot of the three brackets – titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel – using stainless steel archwires and TMA archwires. An in vitro study of simulated canine retraction was undertaken to evaluate the difference in frictional resistance between titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires. Results and Conclusion: We compared the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires, with the help of Instron Universal Testing Machine. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student's “t” test, and post hoc multiple range test at level of <0.05 showed statistically significant difference in the mean values of all groups. Results demonstrated that the titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets of 0.018-inch and 0.022-inch slot had no significant variations in frictional résistance. The self-ligating bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the other groups. The titanium bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the stainless steel brackets. PMID:23066253

  1. TRITIUM AND DECAY HELIUM EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF STAINLESS STEEL WELDMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Scott West, S; Michael Tosten, M

    2007-08-31

    J-Integral fracture toughness tests were conducted on tritium-exposed-and-aged Types 304L and 21-6-9 stainless steel weldments in order to measure the combined effects of tritium and its decay product, helium-3 on the fracture toughness properties. Initially, weldments have fracture toughness values about three times higher than base-metal values. Delta-ferrite phase in the weld microstructure improved toughness provided no tritium was present in the microstructure. After a tritium-exposure-and-aging treatment that resulted in {approx}1400 atomic parts per million (appm) dissolved tritium, both weldments and base metals had their fracture toughness values reduced to about the same level. The tritium effect was greater in weldments (67 % reduction vs. 37% reduction) largely because the ductile discontinuous delta-ferrite interfaces were embrittled by tritium and decay helium. Fracture toughness values decreased for both base metals and weldments with increasing decay helium content in the range tested (50-200 appm).

  2. Characterization of a cold-rolled 2101 lean duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Bassani, Paola; Breda, Marco; Brunelli, Katya; Mészáros, Istvan; Passaretti, Francesca; Zanellato, Michela; Calliari, Irene

    2013-08-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) may be defined as a category of steels with a two-phase ferritic-austenitic microstructure, which combines good mechanical and corrosion properties. However, these steels can undergo significant microstructural modification as a consequence of either thermo-mechanical treatments (ferrite decomposition, which causes σ- and χ-phase formation and nitride precipitation) or plastic deformation at room temperature [austenite transformation into strain-induced martensite (SIM)]. These secondary phases noticeably affect the properties of DSS, and therefore are of huge industrial interest. In the present work, SIM formation was investigated in a 2101 lean DSS. The material was subjected to cold rolling at various degrees of deformation (from 10 to 80% thickness reduction) and the microstructure developed after plastic deformation was investigated by electron backscattered diffraction, X-ray diffraction measurements, and hardness and magnetic tests. It was observed that SIM formed as a consequence of deformations higher than ~20% and residual austenite was still observed at 80% of thickness reduction. Furthermore, a direct relationship was found between microstructure and magnetic properties. PMID:23721654

  3. Double-Sided Single-Pass Submerged Arc Welding for 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jian; Yuan, Yi; Wang, Xiaoming; Yao, Zongxiang

    2013-09-01

    The duplex stainless steel (DSS), which combines the characteristics of ferritic steel and austenitic steel, is used widely. The submerged arc welding (SAW) method is usually applied to join thick plates of DSS. However, an effective welding procedure is needed in order to obtain ideal DSS welds with an appropriate proportion of ferrite (δ) and austenite (γ) in the weld zone, particularly in the melted zone and heat-affected zone. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a high efficiency double-sided single-pass (DSSP) SAW joining method for thick DSS plates. The effectiveness of the converse welding procedure, characterizations of weld zone, and mechanical properties of welded joint are analyzed. The results show an increasing appearance and continuous distribution feature of the σ phase in the fusion zone of the leading welded seam. The converse welding procedure promotes the σ phase to precipitate in the fusion zone of leading welded side. The microhardness appears to significantly increase in the center of leading welded side. Ductile fracture mode is observed in the weld zone. A mixture fracture feature appears with a shear lip and tears in the fusion zone near the fusion line. The ductility, plasticity, and microhardness of the joints have a significant relationship with σ phase and heat treatment effect influenced by the converse welding step. An available heat input controlling technology of the DSSP formation method is discussed for SAW of thick DSS plates.

  4. Characterization of a cold-rolled 2101 lean duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Bassani, Paola; Breda, Marco; Brunelli, Katya; Mészáros, Istvan; Passaretti, Francesca; Zanellato, Michela; Calliari, Irene

    2013-08-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) may be defined as a category of steels with a two-phase ferritic-austenitic microstructure, which combines good mechanical and corrosion properties. However, these steels can undergo significant microstructural modification as a consequence of either thermo-mechanical treatments (ferrite decomposition, which causes σ- and χ-phase formation and nitride precipitation) or plastic deformation at room temperature [austenite transformation into strain-induced martensite (SIM)]. These secondary phases noticeably affect the properties of DSS, and therefore are of huge industrial interest. In the present work, SIM formation was investigated in a 2101 lean DSS. The material was subjected to cold rolling at various degrees of deformation (from 10 to 80% thickness reduction) and the microstructure developed after plastic deformation was investigated by electron backscattered diffraction, X-ray diffraction measurements, and hardness and magnetic tests. It was observed that SIM formed as a consequence of deformations higher than ~20% and residual austenite was still observed at 80% of thickness reduction. Furthermore, a direct relationship was found between microstructure and magnetic properties.

  5. Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    Boberg, R.E.; Lee, R.S.; Weingart, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto. 10 figs.

  6. Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Boberg, Ralph E.; Lee, Ronald S.; Weingart, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto.

  7. Dielectric investigations of polycrystalline samarium bismuth ferrite ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Palaimiene, E.; Macutkevic, J.; Banys, J.; Karpinsky, D. V.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2015-01-05

    Results of broadband dielectric investigations of samarium doped bismuth ferrite ceramics are presented in wide temperature range (20–800 K). At temperatures higher than 400 K, the dielectric properties of samarium bismuth ferrite ceramics are governed by Maxwell-Wagner relaxation and electrical conductivity. The DC conductivity increases and activation energy decreases with samarium concentration. In samarium doped bismuth ferrite, the ferroelectric phase transition temperature decreases with samarium concentration and finally no ferroelectric order is observed at x = 0.2. At lower temperatures, the dielectric properties of ferroelectric samarium doped bismuth ferrite are governed by ferroelectric domains dynamics. Ceramics with x = 0.2 exhibit the relaxor-like behaviour.

  8. Sustainable synthesis of monodispersed spinel nano-ferrites

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sustainable approach for the synthesis of various monodispersed spinel ferrite nanoparticles has been developed that occurs at water-toluene interface under both conventional and microwave hydrothermal conditions. This general synthesis procedure utilizes readily available and ...

  9. Controlled ferrite content improves weldability of corrosion-resistant steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, C. O.

    1967-01-01

    Corrosion-resistant steel that adds restrictions on chemical composition to ensure sufficient ferrite content decreases the tendency of CRES to develop cracks during welding. The equations restricting composition are based on the Schaeffler constitution diagram.

  10. Development of New Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Robert F. Buck

    2005-08-30

    A new family of innovative martensitic stainless steels, 521-A, 521-B, and 521-C has been developed by Advanced Steel Technology, LLC (Trafford, PA) as high strength fastener (bolt) materials for use at moderate temperatures in turbine engines, including steam turbines, gas turbines, and aircraft engines. The primary objective of the development program was to create a martensitic stainless steel with high strength at moderate temperatures, and which could replace the expensive nickel-based superalloy IN 718 in some fasteners applications. A secondary objective was to replace conventional 12Cr steels such as AISI 422 used as blades, buckets and shafts that operate at intermediate temperatures in turbine engines with stronger steel. The composition of the new alloys was specifically designed to produce excellent mechanical properties while integrating heat treatment steps into production to reduce energy consumption during manufacturing. As a result, production costs and energy consumption during production of rolled bar products is significantly lower than conventional materials. Successful commercialization of the new alloys would permit the installed cost of certain turbine engines to be reduced without sacrificing high availability or operational flexibility, thereby enhancing the global competitiveness of U.S. turbine engine manufacturers. Moreover, the domestic specialty steel industry would also benefit through increased productivity and reduced operating costs, while increasing their share of the international market for turbine engine fasteners, blades, buckets and shafts.

  11. DARHT-II Injector Transients and the Ferrite Damper

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Will; Reginato, Lou; Chow, Ken; Houck, Tim; Henestroza, Enrique; Yu, Simon; Kang, Michael; Briggs, Richard

    2006-08-04

    This report summarizes the transient response of the DARHT-II Injector and the design of the ferrite damper. Initial commissioning of the injector revealed a rise time excited 7.8 MHz oscillation on the diode voltage and stalk current leading to a 7.8 MHz modulation of the beam current, position, and energy. Commissioning also revealed that the use of the crowbar to decrease the voltage fall time excited a spectrum of radio frequency modes which caused concern that there might be significant transient RF electric field stresses imposed on the high voltage column insulators. Based on the experience of damping the induction cell RF modes with ferrite, the concept of a ferrite damper was developed to address the crowbar-excited oscillations as well as the rise-time-excited 7.8 MHz oscillations. After the Project decided to discontinue the use of the crowbar, further development of the concept focused exclusively on damping the oscillations excited by the rise time. The design was completed and the ferrite damper was installed in the DARHT-II Injector in February 2006. The organization of this report is as follows. The suite of injector diagnostics are described in Section 2. The data and modeling of the injector transients excited on the rise-time and also by the crowbar are discussed in Section 3; the objective is a concise summary of the present state of understanding. The design of the ferrite damper, and the small scale circuit simulations used to evaluate the ferrite material options and select the key design parameters like the cross sectional area and the optimum gap width, are presented in Section 4. The details of the mechanical design and the installation of the ferrite damper are covered in Section 5. A brief summary of the performance of the ferrite damper following its installation in the injector is presented in Section 6.

  12. Epitaxial single crystalline ferrite films for high frequency applications

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.; Dover, R.B. van; Korenivski, V.; Werder, D.; Chen, C.H.; Felder, R.J.; Phillips, J.M.

    1996-11-01

    The successful growth of single crystal ferrites in thin film form is an important step towards their future incorporation into integrated circuits operating at microwave frequencies. The authors have successfully grown high quality single crystalline spinel ferrite thin films of (Mn,Zn)Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} on (100) and (110) SrTiO{sub 3} and MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} at low temperature. These ferrite films are buffered with spinel structure layers that are paramagnetic at room temperature. In contrast to ferrite films grown directly on the substrates, ferrite films grown on buffered substrates exhibit excellent crystallinity and bulk saturation magnetization values, thus indicating the importance of lattice match and structural similarity between the film and the immediately underlying layer. X-ray, RBS, AFM and TEM analysis provide a consistent picture of the structural properties of these ferrite films. The authors then use this technique to grow exchange-coupled bilayers of single crystalline CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and (Mn,Zn)Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. In these bilayers, they observe strong exchange coupling across the interface that is similar in strength to the exchange coupling in the individual layers.

  13. Exchange-spring mechanism of soft and hard ferrite nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Manjura Hoque, S.; Srivastava, C.; Kumar, V.; Venkatesh, N.; Das, H.N.; Saha, D.K.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Exchange-spring behaviour of soft and hard ferrites was studied. • XRD patterns indicated soft and hard ferrites as fcc and hcp structure. • Hysteresis loops indicate wide difference in coercivity of soft and hard phases. • Nanocomposites produced convex hysteresis loop characteristic of single-phase. - Abstract: The paper reports exchange-spring soft and hard ferrite nanocomposites synthesized by chemical co-precipitation with or without the application of ultrasonic vibration. The composites contained BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} as the hard phase and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} as the soft phase. X-ray diffraction patterns of the samples in the optimum calcined condition indicated the presence of soft ferrites as face-centred cubic (fcc) and hard ferrites as hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure respectively. Temperature dependence of magnetization in the range of 20–700 °C demonstrated distinct presence of soft and hard ferrites as magnetic phases which are characterized by wide difference in magnetic anisotropy and coercivity. Exchange-spring mechanism led these nanocomposite systems to exchange-coupled, which ultimately produced convex hysteresis loops characteristic of a single-phase permanent magnet. Fairly high value of coercivity and maximum energy product were observed for the samples in the optimum calcined conditions with a maximum applied field of 1600 kA/m (2 T)

  14. Kinetics of Ferrite Recrystallization and Austenite Formation During Intercritical Annealing of the Cold-Rolled Ferrite/Martensite Duplex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, Y.; Kermanpur, A.; Najafizadeh, A.; Kalashami, A. Ghatei

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafine-grained, dual-phase (UFG DP) steels were produced by a new route using an uncommon cold-rolling and subsequent intercritical annealing of ferrite/martensite duplex starting microstructures. The effects of processing parameters such as rolling reduction, intercritical annealing temperature, and time on the microstructural evaluations have been studied. UFG DP steels with an average grain size of about 1 to 2 μm were achieved by short intercritical annealing of the 80 pct cold-rolled duplex microstructures. The kinetics of ferrite recrystallization and austenite formation were studied based on the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model. The proposed model for describing the isothermal austenite formation kinetics was applied successfully to the nonisothermal conditions. It was found that complete recrystallization of ferrite before the austenite formation led to the formation of a large extent randomly distributed austenite in the ferrite matrix and a chain-networked structure.

  15. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK•CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bremaecker, Anne

    2012-09-01

    In the 1960s in the frame of the sodium-cooled fast breeders, SCK•CEN decided to develop claddings made with ferritic stainless materials because of their specific properties, namely a higher thermal conductivity, a lower thermal expansion, a lower tendency to He-embrittlement, and a lower swelling than the austenitic stainless steels. To enhance their lower creep resistance at 650-700 °C arose the idea to strengthen the microstructure by oxide dispersions. This was the starting point of an ambitious programme where both the matrix and the dispersions were optimized. A purely ferritic 13 wt% Cr matrix was selected and its mechanical strength was improved through addition of ferritizing elements. Results of tensile and stress-rupture tests showed that Ti and Mo were the most beneficial elements, partly because of the chi-phase precipitation. In 1973 the optimized matrix composition was Fe-13Cr-3.5Ti-2Mo. To reach creep properties similar to those of AISI 316, different dispersions and methods were tested: internal oxidation (that was not conclusive), and the direct mixing of metallic and oxide powders (Al2O3, MgO, ZrO2, TiO2, ZrSiO4) followed by pressing, sintering, and extrusion. The compression and extrusion parameters were determined: extrusion as hollow at 1050 °C, solution annealing at 1050 °C/15 min, cleaning, cold drawing to the final dimensions with intermediate annealings at 1050 °C, final annealing at 1050 °C, straightening and final aging at 800 °C. The choice of titania and yttria powders and their concentrations were finalized on the basis of their out-of-pile and in-pile creep and tensile strength. As soon as a resistance butt welding machine was developed and installed in a glove-box, fuel segments with PuO2 were loaded in the Belgian MTR BR2. The fabrication parameters were continuously optimized: milling and beating, lubrication, cold drawing (partial and final reduction rates, temperature, duration, atmosphere and furnace). Specific non

  16. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Luzginova, N.; Tanigawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe-Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7-9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe-8%Cr-2%W-TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe-9%Cr-1%W-TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx.

  17. Tritiated Water Interaction with Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-05-01

    Experiments conducted to study tritium permeation of stainless steel at ambient and elevated temperatures revealed that HT converts relatively quickly to HTO. Further, the HTO partial pressure contributes essentially equally with elemental tritium gas in driving permeation through the stainless steel. Such permeation appears to be due to dissociation of the water molecule on the hot stainless steel surface. There is an equilibrium concentration of HTO vapor above adsorbed gas on the walls of the experimental apparatus evident from freezing transients. The uptake process of tritium from the carrier gas involves both surface adsorption and isotopic exchange with surface bound water.

  18. Long-term aging of cast stainless steels: Mechanisms and resulting properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1987-09-01

    Mechanical property data are presented from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 450, 400, 350, 320, and 290/sup 0/C. The results indicate that thermal aging increases the tensile strength and decreases the impactenergy, J/sub IC/ and tearing modulus of the steels. Also, the ductile-to-brittle transition curve shifts to higher temperatures. The low-carbon CF-3 steels were the most resistant and the molybdenum-containing high-carbon CF-8M steels were the most susceptible to low-temperature embrittlement. The influence of nitrogen content and distribution of ferrite on loss of toughness are discussed. Data also indicate that existing correlations do not accurately represent the embrittlement behavior over the temperature range 280 to 450/sup 0/C, i.e., extrapolation of high-temperature data to reactor temperatures may not be valid for some compositions of cast stainless steels. 13 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Study of Aging Effects in 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Using Thermoelectric Power Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, N.; Ruiz, A.; Carreón, H.; Medina, A.; Sánchez, A.

    2010-02-01

    Thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements have been used as an effective method for evaluating the metallurgical state of various alloys. In the steel industry, some fabrication processes promote phase transformation and second phase precipitations which affect the material properties. Assessment of mechanical properties is critical in order to ensure quality of components. This work was conducted in order to evaluate the influence of the aging state of 2205 duplex stainless steel on TEP values. Commercial 2205 duplex steel was isothermally aged at 650 °C 700 °C and 900 °C at different aging times. TEP measurement technique was applied as a non destructive assessment technique to characterize the aging kinetics of the aged 2205 duplex stainless steel, hardness Rockwell (RC) and Charpy impact test were preformed to observe the effect of aging time on the specimens. Metallographic analysis was used to monitor phase transformation and sigma phase precipitation caused by the spinodal decomposition process of ferrite into secondary austenite and sigma phase. Results indicate that that the TEP is sensitive to gradual microstructural changes produced by the aging treatments.

  20. STUDY OF AGING EFFECTS IN 2205 DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL USING THERMOELECTRIC POWER MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Lara, N.; Ruiz, A.; Carreon, H.; Medina, A.; Sanchez, A.

    2010-02-22

    Thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements have been used as an effective method for evaluating the metallurgical state of various alloys. In the steel industry, some fabrication processes promote phase transformation and second phase precipitations which affect the material properties. Assessment of mechanical properties is critical in order to ensure quality of components. This work was conducted in order to evaluate the influence of the aging state of 2205 duplex stainless steel on TEP values. Commercial 2205 duplex steel was isothermally aged at 650 deg. C 700 deg. C and 900 deg. C at different aging times. TEP measurement technique was applied as a non destructive assessment technique to characterize the aging kinetics of the aged 2205 duplex stainless steel, hardness Rockwell (RC) and Charpy impact test were preformed to observe the effect of aging time on the specimens. Metallographic analysis was used to monitor phase transformation and sigma phase precipitation caused by the spinodal decomposition process of ferrite into secondary austenite and sigma phase. Results indicate that that the TEP is sensitive to gradual microstructural changes produced by the aging treatments.

  1. In-Situ Observations of Phase Transformations in the HAZ of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Wong, J

    2001-08-15

    Ferrite ({delta})/austenite ({gamma}) transformations in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of a gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld in 2205 duplex stainless steel are observed in real-time using spatially resolved X-ray diffraction (SRXRD) with high intensity synchrotron radiation. A map showing the locations of the {delta} and {gamma} phases with respect to the calculated weld pool dimensions has been constructed from a series of SRXRD scans. Regions of liquid, completely transformed {gamma}, a combination of partially transformed {gamma} with untransformed {delta}, and untransformed {delta}+{gamma} are identified. Analysis of each SRXRD pattern provides a semi-quantitative definition of both the {delta}/{gamma} phase balance and the extent of annealing which are mapped for the first time with respect to the calculated weld pool size and shape. A combination of these analyses provides a unique real-time description of the progression of phase transformations in the HAZ. Using these real-time observations, important kinetic information about the transformations occurring in duplex stainless steels during heating and cooling cycles typical of welding can be determined.

  2. Corrosion of type 316L stainless steel in a mercury thermal convection loop

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Pawel, S.J.

    1999-04-01

    Two thermal convection loops fabricated from 316L stainless steel containing mercury (Hg) and Hg with 1000 wppm gallium (Ga), respectively, were operated continuously for about 5000 h. In each case, the maximum loop temperature was constant at about 305 degrees C and the minimum temperature was constant at about 242 degrees C. Coupons in the hot leg of the Hg-loop developed a posous surface layer substantially depleted of nickel and chromium, which resulted in a transformation to ferrite. The coupon exposed at the top of the hot leg in the Hg-loop experienced the maximum degradation, exhibiting a surface layer extending an average of 9-10 mu m after almost 5000 h. Analysis of the corrosion rate data as a function of temperature (position) in the Hg-loop suggests wetting by the mer cury occurred only above about 255 degrees C and that the rate limiting step in the corrosion process above 255 degrees C is solute diffusion through the saturated liquid boundary layer adjacent to the corroding surface. The latter factor suggests that the corrosion of 316L stainless steel in a mercury loop may be velocity dependent. No wetting and no corrosion were observed on the coupons and wall specimens removed from the Hg/Ga loop after 5000 h of operation.

  3. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels during thermal cycling in alkali nitrate molten salts.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Goods, Steven Howard

    2001-09-01

    The corrosion behavior of three austenitic stainless steels was evaluated during thermal cycling in molten salt mixtures consisting of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3}. Corrosion tests were conducted with Types 316, 316L and 304 stainless steels for more than 4000 hours and 500 thermal cycles at a maximum temperature of 565 C. Corrosion rates were determined by chemically descaling coupons. Metal losses ranged from 5 to 16 microns and thermal cycling resulted in moderately higher corrosion rates compared to isothermal conditions. Type 316 SS was somewhat more corrosion resistant than Type 304 SS in these tests. The effect of carbon content on corrosion resistance was small, as 316L SS corroded only slightly slower than 316 SS. The corrosion rates increased as the dissolved chloride content of the molten salt mixtures increased. Chloride concentrations approximating 1 wt.%, coupled with thermal cycling, resulted in linear weight loss kinetics, rather than parabolic kinetics, which described corrosion rates for all other conditions. Optical microscopy and electron microprobe analysis revealed that the corrosion products consisted of iron-chromium spinel, magnetite, and sodium ferrite, organized as separate layers. Microanalysis of the elemental composition of the corrosion products further demonstrated that the chromium content of the iron-chromium spinel layer was relatively high for conditions in which parabolic kinetics were observed. However, linear kinetics were observed when the spinel layer contained relatively little chromium.

  4. Welding of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel with Activated Tungsten Inert Gas Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, E.; Ebrahimi, A. R.

    2015-02-01

    The use of activating flux in TIG welding process is one of the most notable techniques which are developed recently. This technique, known as A-TIG welding, increases the penetration depth and improves the productivity of the TIG welding. In the present study, four oxide fluxes (SiO2, TiO2, Cr2O3, and CaO) were used to investigate the effect of activating flux on the depth/width ratio and mechanical property of 316L austenitic stainless steel. The effect of coating density of activating flux on the weld pool shape and oxygen content in the weld after the welding process was studied systematically. Experimental results indicated that the maximum depth/width ratio of stainless steel activated TIG weld was obtained when the coating density was 2.6, 1.3, 2, and 7.8 mg/cm2 for SiO2, TiO2, Cr2O3, and CaO, respectively. The certain range of oxygen content dissolved in the weld, led to a significant increase in the penetration capability of TIG welds. TIG welding with active fluxes can increase the delta-ferrite content and improves the mechanical strength of the welded joint.

  5. Development of the Non-Destructive Evaluation System Using an Eddy Current Probe for Detection of Fatigue Damage in a Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, M.; Yakushiji, T.; Tsuchida, Y.; Enokizono, M.

    2006-03-01

    The non-destructive evaluation system which is developed using an eddy current probe to evaluate fatigue damage in an austenitic stainless steel is reported in this paper. This probe is composed of the ferrite core and two pick-up coils connected differentially. The eddy current induced by the excitation coil is disarranged by nonuniform distribution of electromagnetic characteristics due to fatigue damage. The structural function of the eddy current probe proposed, enable to detect the eddy current disarrangement by fatigue damage. This probe detects the change of electromagnetic characteristics in the direction of X. In this paper, SUS304, a austenitic stainless steel was used as the sample. The experimental results show that the output voltage of the probe clearly depends on the number of stress cycles.

  6. Development of the Non-Destructive Evaluation System Using an Eddy Current Probe for Detection of Fatigue Damage in a Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, M.; Yakushiji, T.; Tsuchida, Y.; Enokizono, M.

    2006-03-06

    The non-destructive evaluation system which is developed using an eddy current probe to evaluate fatigue damage in an austenitic stainless steel is reported in this paper. This probe is composed of the ferrite core and two pick-up coils connected differentially. The eddy current induced by the excitation coil is disarranged by nonuniform distribution of electromagnetic characteristics due to fatigue damage. The structural function of the eddy current probe proposed, enable to detect the eddy current disarrangement by fatigue damage. This probe detects the change of electromagnetic characteristics in the direction of X. In this paper, SUS304, a austenitic stainless steel was used as the sample. The experimental results show that the output voltage of the probe clearly depends on the number of stress cycles.

  7. Microstructural Evolution of an Al-Alloyed Duplex Stainless Steel During Tensile Deformation Between 77 K and 473 K (-196 °C and 200 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Reza; Ullrich, Christiane; Rafaja, David; Biermann, Horst; Mola, Javad

    2016-06-01

    Tensile deformation behavior of an Al-alloyed Fe-17Cr-6Mn-4Al-3Ni-0.45C (mass pct) duplex stainless steel containing approximately 20 vol pct ferrite was studied in the temperature range from 77 K to 473 K (-196 °C to 200 °C). While the elongation exhibited a maximum near room temperature, the yield strength continuously increased at lower tensile test temperatures. According to the microstructural examinations, the twinning-induced plasticity and the dislocation cell formation were the dominant deformation mechanisms in the austenite and ferrite, respectively. Reduction of the tensile ductility at T < 273 K (0 °C) was attributed to the ready material decohesion at the ferrite/austenite boundaries. Tensile testing at 473 K (200 °C) was associated with the serrated flow which was ascribed to the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect. Due to a rise in the stacking fault energy of austenite, the occurrence of mechanical twinning was impeded at higher tensile test temperatures. Furthermore, the evolution of microstructural constituents at room temperature was studied by interrupted tensile tests. The deformation in the austenite phase started with the formation of Taylor lattices followed by mechanical twinning at higher strains/stresses. In the ferrite phase, on the other hand, the formation of dislocation cells, cell refinement, and microbands formation occurred in sequence during deformation. Microhardness evolution of ferrite and austenite in the interrupted tensile test specimens implied a higher strain-hardening rate for the austenite as it clearly became the harder phase at higher tensile strain levels.

  8. Grain refinement of a nickel and manganese free austenitic stainless steel produced by pressurized solution nitriding

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh Akbari, Alireza

    2014-07-01

    Prolonged exposure at high temperatures during solution nitriding induces grain coarsening which deteriorates the mechanical properties of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels. In this study, grain refinement of nickel and manganese free Fe–22.75Cr–2.42Mo–1.17N high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel plates was investigated via a two-stage heat treatment procedure. Initially, the coarse-grained austenitic stainless steel samples were subjected to an isothermal heating at 700 °C to be decomposed into the ferrite + Cr{sub 2}N eutectoid structure and then re-austenitized at 1200 °C followed by water quenching. Microstructure and hardness of samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, optical and scanning electron microscopy, and micro-hardness testing. The results showed that the as-solution-nitrided steel decomposes non-uniformly to the colonies of ferrite and Cr{sub 2}N nitrides with strip like morphology after isothermal heat treatment at 700 °C. Additionally, the complete dissolution of the Cr{sub 2}N precipitates located in the sample edges during re-austenitizing requires longer times than 1 h. In order to avoid this problem an intermediate nitrogen homogenizing heat treatment cycle at 1200 °C for 10 h was applied before grain refinement process. As a result, the initial austenite was uniformly decomposed during the first stage, and a fine grained austenitic structure with average grain size of about 20 μm was successfully obtained by re-austenitizing for 10 min. - Highlights: • Successful grain refinement of Fe–22.75Cr–2.42Mo–1.17N steel by heat treatment • Using the γ → α + Cr{sub 2}N reaction for grain refinement of a Ni and Mn free HNASS • Obtaining a single phase austenitic structure with average grain size of ∼ 20 μm • Incomplete dissolution of Cr{sub 2}N during re-austenitizing at 1200 °C for long times • Reducing re-austenitizing time by homogenizing treatment before grain refinement.

  9. Stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluzny, J. A.; Grimm, C.; Passarelli, D.

    2015-12-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented. Operated by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. De-AC02-07CH11359 with the United States Department of Energy.

  10. Development of a carburizing stainless steel alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, D.E. )

    1994-06-01

    A new carburizing stainless steel alloy that resists corrosion, heat, and fatigue has been developed for bearing and gear applications. Pyrowear 675 Stainless alloy is vacuum induction melted and vacuum arc remelted (VIM/VAR) for aircraft-quality cleanliness. Test results show that it has corrosion resistance similar to that of AISI Type 440-C stainless, and its rolling fatigue resistance is superior to that of AISI M50 (UNS K88165). In contrast to alloy gear steels and Type 440C, Pyrowear 675 maintains case hardness of HRC 60 at operating temperatures up to 200 C (400 F). Impact and fracture toughness are superior to that of other stainless bearing steels, which typically are relatively brittle and can break under severe service. Toughness is also comparable or superior to conventional noncorrosion-resistant carburizing bearing steels, such as SAE Types 8620 and 9310.

  11. Precise carbon control of fabricated stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, R.J.

    1975-12-01

    A process is described for controlling the carbon content of fabricated stainless steel components including the steps of heat treating the component in hydrogen atmospheres of varying dewpoints and carbon potentials.

  12. Stainless Steel to Titanium Bimetallic Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaluzny, J. A.; Grimm, C.; Passarelli, D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented.

  13. Synthesis of Novel Ferrite Based Recyclable Catalyst Used to Clean Dye and Emerging Contaminates from Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herein, we describe synthesis of novel palladium, copper, cobalt and vanadium ferrites. The ferrites were synthesized by combustion method using polyvinyl alcohol. The particles phases were confirmed using X-ray diffraction and sizes were determined using particle size analyzer. ...

  14. Performance of ferrite fillers on electrical behavior of polymer nanocomposite electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Kamlesh; Mauli Dwivedi, Mrigank; Singh, Markandey; Agrawal, S. L.

    2011-04-01

    Dispersal of nanofillers in polymer electrolytes have shown to improve the ionic properties of Polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based polymer electrolytes in recent times. The effects of different nanoferrite fillers (i.e., Al-Zn ferrite, Mg-Zn ferrite, and Zn ferrite) on the electrical transport properties have been studied here on the composite polymer electrolyte system. The interaction of salt/filler with electrolyte has been investigated by XRD studies. SEM image and infrared spectral studies give an indication of nanocomposite formation. In conductivity studies, all electrolyte systems are seen to follow universal power law. Composition dependence (with ferrite filler) gives the maximum conductivity in [93PEO-7NH4SCN]: X ferrite (where X = 2% in Al-Zn ferrite, 1% Mg-Zn ferrite, and 1% Zn ferrite) system.

  15. A biosensor system using nickel ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Prachi; Rathore, Deepshikha

    2016-05-01

    NiFe2O4 ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method and the structural characteristics were investigated using X-ray diffraction technique, where single cubic phase formation of nanoparticles was confirmed. The average particle size of NiFe2O4 was found to be 4.9 nm. Nanoscale magnetic materials are an important source of labels for biosensing due to their strong magnetic properties which are not found in biological systems. This property of the material was exploited and the fabrication of the NiFe2O4 nanoparticle based biosensor was done in the form of a capacitor system, with NiFe2O4 as the dielectric material. The biosensor system was tested towards different biological materials with the help of electrochemical workstation and the same was analysed through Cole-Cole plot of NiFe2O4. The performance of the sensor was determined based on its sensitivity, response time and recovery time.

  16. Feedback controlled hybrid fast ferrite tuners

    SciTech Connect

    Remsen, D.B.; Phelps, D.A.; deGrassie, J.S.; Cary, W.P.; Pinsker, R.I.; Moeller, C.P.; Arnold, W.; Martin, S.; Pivit, E.

    1993-09-01

    A low power ANT-Bosch fast ferrite tuner (FFT) was successfully tested into (1) the lumped circuit equivalent of an antenna strap with dynamic plasma loading, and (2) a plasma loaded antenna strap in DIII-D. When the FFT accessible mismatch range was phase-shifted to encompass the plasma-induced variation in reflection coefficient, the 50 {Omega} source was matched (to within the desired 1.4 : 1 voltage standing wave ratio). The time required to achieve this match (i.e., the response time) was typically a few hundred milliseconds, mostly due to a relatively slow network analyzer-computer system. The response time for the active components of the FFT was 10 to 20 msec, or much faster than the present state-of-the-art for dynamic stub tuners. Future FFT tests are planned, that will utilize the DIII-D computer (capable of submillisecond feedback control), as well as several upgrades to the active control circuit, to produce a FFT feedback control system with a response time approaching 1 msec.

  17. Development of advanced barium ferrite tape media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Osamu; Oyanagi, Masahito; Morooka, Atsushi; Mori, Masahiko; Kurihashi, Yuich; Tada, Toshio; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Harasawa, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    We developed an advanced particulate magnetic tape using fine barium ferrite (BaFe) particles for magnetic-tape storage systems. The new tape showed a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that was 3.5 dB higher than that of the commercially available BaFe tape used for the Linear Tape Open generation 6 tape-storage system, at a linear density of 300 kfci measured with a giant magnetoresistive head with a reader width of 0.45 μm. Such significant increase in SNR was achieved by reducing the magnetic particle volume from 1950 to 1350 nm3, while maintaining a sufficiently high thermal stability, improving the perpendicular squareness ratio from 0.66 to 0.83, and improving the surface roughness from 2.5 to 2.0 nm when measured by atomic force microscopy and from 2.4 to 0.9 nm when measured by optical interferometry. This paper describes the characteristics of the new BaFe particles and media, which are expected to be employed for future high-capacity linear-tape systems.

  18. Tuning the magnetism of ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viñas, S. Liébana; Simeonidis, K.; Li, Z.-A.; Ma, Z.; Myrovali, E.; Makridis, A.; Sakellari, D.; Angelakeris, M.; Wiedwald, U.; Spasova, M.; Farle, M.

    2016-10-01

    The importance of magnetic interactions within an individual nanoparticle or between adjacent ones is crucial not only for the macroscopic collective magnetic behavior but for the AC magnetic heating efficiency as well. On this concept, single-(MFe2O4 where M=Fe, Co, Mn) and core-shell ferrite nanoparticles consisting of a magnetically softer (MnFe2O4) or magnetically harder (CoFe2O4) core and a magnetite (Fe3O4) shell with an overall size in the 10 nm range were synthesized and studied for their magnetic particle hyperthermia efficiency. Magnetic measurements indicate that the coating of the hard magnetic phase (CoFe2O4) by Fe3O4 provides a significant enhancement of hysteresis losses over the corresponding single-phase counterpart response, and thus results in a multiplication of the magnetic hyperthermia efficiency opening a novel pathway for high-performance, magnetic hyperthermia agents. At the same time, the existence of a biocompatible Fe3O4 outer shell, toxicologically renders these systems similar to iron-oxide ones with significantly milder side-effects.

  19. Must we use ferritic steel in TBM?

    SciTech Connect

    Salavy, Jean-Francois; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Chaudhuri, Paritosh; Cho, Seungyon; Enoeda, Mikio; Giancarli, Luciano; Kurtz, Richard J.; Luo, Tian Y.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Wong, Clement

    2010-12-13

    Mock-ups of DEMO breeding blankets, called Test Blanket Modules (TBMs), inserted and tested in ITER in dedicated equatorial ports directly facing the plasma, are expected to provide the first experimental answers on the necessary performance of the corresponding DEMO breeding blankets. Several DEMO breeding blanket designs have been studied and assessed in the last 20 years. At present, after considering various coolant and breeder combinations, all the TBM concepts proposed by the seven ITER Parties use Reduced-Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel as the structural material. In order to perform valuable tests in ITER, the TBMs are expected to use the same structural material as corresponding DEMO blankets. However, due to the fact that this family of steels is ferromagnetic, their presence in the ITER vacuum vessel will create perturbations of the ITER magnetic fields that could reduce the quality of the plasma confinement during H-mode. As a consequence, a legitimate question has been raised on the necessity of using RAFM steel for TBMs structural material in ITER. By giving a short description of the main TBM testing objectives in ITER and assessing the consequences of not using such a material, this paper gives a comprehensive answer to this question. According to the working group author of the study, the use of RAFM steel as structural material for TBM is judged mandatory.

  20. Energy of domain walls in ferrite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, M. E.; Prieto, P.; Mendoza, A.; Guzman, O.

    2007-03-01

    MnZn Ferrite films were deposited by RF sputtering on (001) single crystal MgO substrates. AFM images show an increment in grain size with the film thickness. Grains with diameter between φ ˜ 70 and 700 nm have been observed. The coercive field Hc as a function of the grain size reaches a maximum value of about 80 Oe for φc˜ 300 nm. The existence of a multidomain structure associated with a critical grain size was identified by Magneto-optical Kerr effect technique (MOKE). The transition of the one-domain regime to the two-domain regime was observed at a critical grain size of Dc˜ 530 nm. This value agree with values predicted previously. The Jiles-Atherton model (JAM) was used to discuss the experimental hysteresis loops. The k pinning parameter obtained from JAM shows a maximum value of k/μo = 67 Am^2 for grains with Lc˜ 529 nm. The total energy per unit area E was correlated with k and D. We found a simple phenomenological relationship given by E α kD; where D is the magnetic domain width.

  1. Quality control and assurance program for duplex stainless steels, field experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhjian, M.; Richard, D.; Nemzer, A.

    1994-12-31

    Duplex stainless steels have proven to be cost effective alternatives to more highly alloyed materials in chloride environments in which conventional 300 series austenitic stainless steels suffer from stress corrosion cracking. However, improper welding of these alloys can cause significant reduction in their corrosion resistance. Close monitoring of welding during fabrication and tight quality control is necessary to ensure that sound weld metal microstructure is obtained with optimum corrosion resistance. One of FMC`s primary applications for duplex stainless steels has been in large scrubbers units in chemical processing plants. In the fabrication of these scrubbers, training of the fabricators and welders was necessary as a part of the total quality control and assurance program. Corrosion testing was performed on coupons removed from each welding procedure qualification test plate and from run-off tabs removed from production welds. The corrosion tests were performed in ferric chloride. Although ferric chloride is not a realistic service environment for these alloys, it has been widely used for screening purposes and successfully indicates the presence of undesirable microstructures. Two deposited weld microstructures were identified as being most susceptible to pitting in the samples examined. These were areas with high ferrite containing precipitates and reheated areas of multiple pass welds with a high secondary austenite content. Field experience showed that relying only on monitoring and controlling the welding heat input, preheat and interpass temperatures, may not be sufficient for ensuring the corrosion resistance of the finished weldment and additional corrosion testing should be done. The materials tested were weldments of alloy 2205 (UNS S31803) and alloy 255 (LTNS S32550).

  2. A study of chromium carbide precipitation at interphase boundaries in stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, C.F.

    1990-04-01

    Sensitization is a deleterious process which can occur in stainless steels. It is caused by grain boundary or phase boundary precipitation of chromium carbides and the resulting formation of a chromium depleted zone adjacent to these boundaries. The carbides in question actually have the composition (Cr,Fe){sub 23}C{sub 6} (usually written M{sub 23}C{sub 6}), and precipitate in the temperature range 450--900{degree}C. Since a minimum chromium content is required to maintain the passive film necessary for resistance to electrochemical attack, the result of chromium depletion is that the steel becomes sensitized'' to possible intergranular corrosion. Sensitization often occurs as a result of welding operations. The material close to the fusion line reaches temperatures within the sensitization range. This region is called the heat affected zone (HAZ). Since many welds are multi-pass welds, the actual weld bead of one pass may lie in the heat affected zone of the next pass. The weld bead of the first pass might therefore be sensitized. Furthermore there are applications where welds will be exposed to sensitizing temperatures for very long periods of time, such as welded labels on retrievable nuclear waste containers. For these reasons the sensitization behavior of the actual weld-bead microstructures must be understood. It has been known for many years that duplex stainless steels (steels with both ferrite and austenite phases present at room temperature) have superior resistance to intergranular corrosion. A model has been proposed to explain the sensitization behavior of these alloys. This work will be concerned with testing the validity of aspects of this model using transmission electron microscopy and further understanding of the sensitization process in duplex stainless steel welds. 52 refs., 23 figs.

  3. Mechanical properties of thermally aged cast stainless steels from shippingport reactor components.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    1995-06-07

    Thermal embrittlement of static-cast CF-8 stainless steel components from the decommissioned Shippingport reactor has been characterized. Cast stainless steel materials were obtained from four cold-leg check valves, three hot-leg main shutoff valves, and two pump volutes. The actual time-at-temperature for the materials was {approx}13 y at {approx}281 C (538 F) for the hot-leg components and {approx}264 C (507 F) for the cold-leg components. Baseline mechanical properties for as-cast material were determined from tests on either recovery-annealed material, i.e., annealed for 1 h at 550 C and then water quenched, or material from the cooler region of the component. The Shippingport materials show modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength because of relatively low service temperatures and ferrite content of the steel. The procedure and correlations developed at Argonne National Laboratory for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly lower values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and JIC of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predicted the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y and the KRB reactor pump cover plate (CF-8) after {approx}8 y of service.

  4. Mechanical properties of thermally aged cast stainless steels from Shippingport reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-04-01

    Thermal embrittlement of static-cast CF-8 stainless steel components from the decommissioned Shippingport reactor has been characterized. Cast stainless steel materials were obtained from four cold-leg check valves, three hot-leg main shutoff valves, and two pump volutes. The actual time-at-temperature for the materials was {approximately}13 y at {approximately}281 C (538 F) for the hot-leg components and {approximately}264 C (507 F) for the cold-leg components. Baseline mechanical properties for as-cast material were determined from tests on either recovery-annealed material, i.e., annealed for 1 h at 550 C and then water quenched, or material from the cooler region of the component. The Shippingport materials show modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength because of relatively low service temperatures and ferrite content of the steel. The procedure and correlations developed at Argonne National Laboratory for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly lower values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predicted the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approximately} 15 y and the KRB reactor pump cover plate (CF-8) after {approximately} 8 y of service.

  5. Diffusion Bonding Beryllium to Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel: Development of Processes and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Ryan Matthew

    Only a few materials are suitable to act as armor layers against the thermal and particle loads produced by magnetically confined fusion. These candidates include beryllium, tungsten, and carbon fiber composites. The armor layers must be joined to the plasma facing components with high strength bonds that can withstand the thermal stresses resulting from differential thermal expansion. While specific joints have been developed for use in ITER (an experimental reactor in France), including beryllium to CuCrZr as well as tungsten to stainless steel interfaces, joints specific to commercially relevant fusion reactors are not as well established. Commercial first wall components will likely be constructed front Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel, which will need to be coating with one of the three candidate materials. Of the candidates, beryllium is particularly difficult to bond, because it reacts during bonding with most elements to form brittle intermetallic compounds. This brittleness is unacceptable, as it can lead to interface crack propagation and delamination of the armor layer. I have attempted to overcome the brittle behavior of beryllium bonds by developing a diffusion bonding process of beryllium to RAFM steel that achieves a higher degree of ductility. This process utilized two bonding aids to achieve a robust bond: a. copper interlayer to add ductility to the joint, and a titanium interlayer to prevent beryllium from forming unwanted Be-Cu intermetallics. In addition, I conducted a series of numerical simulations to predict the effect of these bonding aids on the residual stress in the interface. Lastly, I fabricated and characterized beryllium to ferritic steel diffusion bonds using various bonding parameters and bonding aids. Through the above research, I developed a process to diffusion bond beryllium to ferritic steel with a 150 M Pa tensile strength and 168 M Pa shear strength. This strength was achieved using a Hot Isostatic

  6. Chemical looping coal gasification with calcium ferrite and barium ferrite via solid--solid reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Ranjani; Tian, Hanjing; Richards, George

    2016-01-01

    Coal gasification to produce synthesis gas by chemical looping was investigated with two oxygen carriers, barium ferrite (BaFe2O4) and calcium ferrite (CaFe2O4). Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and fixed-bed flow reactor data indicated that a solid–solid interaction occurred between oxygen carriers and coal to produce synthesis gas. Both thermodynamic analysis and experimental data indicated that BaFe2O4 and CaFe2O4 have high reactivity with coal but have a low reactivity with synthesis gas, which makes them very attractive for the coal gasification process. Adding steam increased the production of hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO), but carbon dioxide (CO2) remained low because these oxygen carriers have minimal reactivity with H2 and CO. Therefore, the combined steam–oxygen carrier produced the highest quantity of synthesis gas. It appeared that neither the water–gas shift reaction nor the water splitting reaction promoted additional H2 formation with the oxygen carriers when steam was present. Wyodak coal, which is a sub-bituminous coal, had the best gasification yield with oxygen carrier–steam while Illinois #6 coal had the lowest. The rate of gasification and selectivity for synthesis gas production was significantly higher when these oxygen carriers were present during steam gasification of coal. The rates and synthesis gas yields during the temperature ramps of coal–steam with oxygen carriers were better than with gaseous oxygen.

  7. Strong and moldable cellulose magnets with high ferrite nanoparticle content.

    PubMed

    Galland, Sylvain; Andersson, Richard L; Ström, Valter; Olsson, Richard T; Berglund, Lars A

    2014-11-26

    A major limitation in the development of highly functional hybrid nanocomposites is brittleness and low tensile strength at high inorganic nanoparticle content. Herein, cellulose nanofibers were extracted from wood and individually decorated with cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles and then for the first time molded at low temperature (<120 °C) into magnetic nanocomposites with up to 93 wt % inorganic content. The material structure was characterized by TEM and FE-SEM and mechanically tested as compression molded samples. The obtained porous magnetic sheets were further impregnated with a thermosetting epoxy resin, which improved the load-bearing functions of ferrite and cellulose material. A nanocomposite with 70 wt % ferrite, 20 wt % cellulose nanofibers, and 10 wt % epoxy showed a modulus of 12.6 GPa, a tensile strength of 97 MPa, and a strain at failure of ca. 4%. Magnetic characterization was performed in a vibrating sample magnetometer, which showed that the coercivity was unaffected and that the saturation magnetization was in proportion with the ferrite content. The used ferrite, CoFe2O4, is a magnetically hard material, demonstrated by that the composite material behaved as a traditional permanent magnet. The presented processing route is easily adaptable to prepare millimeter-thick and moldable magnetic objects. This suggests that the processing method has the potential to be scaled-up for industrial use for the preparation of a new subcategory of magnetic, low-cost, and moldable objects based on cellulose nanofibers. PMID:25331121

  8. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates.

    PubMed

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T; Asta, Mark D; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E; Liaw, Peter K

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  9. Reducing ferrite tuner power loss by bias field rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Smythe, W.R.

    1983-08-01

    It has been suggested that ferrite tuners for rf cavities with the magnetic bias field perpendicular to the rf magnetic field would have greatly reduced rf losses. Recent measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory appear to confirm this effect. A simple model proposed here allows the calculation of tuning characteristics for a variety of bias schemes. The model shows that the perpendicular bias scheme mentioned above requires very much larger bias levels than does the parallel bias scheme in order to achieve the same tuning range with a particular ferrite tuner. However, further investigation with the model has led to the discovery that the use of perpendicular bias at low frequency and parallel bias at high frequency requires only a modest increase in the bias field. In effect, the ferrite is kept highly magnetized, reducing ferrite losses, and is tuned primarily by rotating the bias field direction with respect to the rf field direction. The resulting reduction in dissipation can significantly reduce the amount of ferrite required per cavity.

  10. Strong and moldable cellulose magnets with high ferrite nanoparticle content.

    PubMed

    Galland, Sylvain; Andersson, Richard L; Ström, Valter; Olsson, Richard T; Berglund, Lars A

    2014-11-26

    A major limitation in the development of highly functional hybrid nanocomposites is brittleness and low tensile strength at high inorganic nanoparticle content. Herein, cellulose nanofibers were extracted from wood and individually decorated with cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles and then for the first time molded at low temperature (<120 °C) into magnetic nanocomposites with up to 93 wt % inorganic content. The material structure was characterized by TEM and FE-SEM and mechanically tested as compression molded samples. The obtained porous magnetic sheets were further impregnated with a thermosetting epoxy resin, which improved the load-bearing functions of ferrite and cellulose material. A nanocomposite with 70 wt % ferrite, 20 wt % cellulose nanofibers, and 10 wt % epoxy showed a modulus of 12.6 GPa, a tensile strength of 97 MPa, and a strain at failure of ca. 4%. Magnetic characterization was performed in a vibrating sample magnetometer, which showed that the coercivity was unaffected and that the saturation magnetization was in proportion with the ferrite content. The used ferrite, CoFe2O4, is a magnetically hard material, demonstrated by that the composite material behaved as a traditional permanent magnet. The presented processing route is easily adaptable to prepare millimeter-thick and moldable magnetic objects. This suggests that the processing method has the potential to be scaled-up for industrial use for the preparation of a new subcategory of magnetic, low-cost, and moldable objects based on cellulose nanofibers.

  11. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  12. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; et al

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones.more » These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.« less

  13. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  14. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  15. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  19. Quantitative analysis of microstructure deformation in creep fenomena of ferritic SA-213 T22 and austenitic SA-213 TP304H material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyana, Cukup; Taufik, Ahmad; Gunawan, Agus Yodi; Siregar, Rustam Efendi

    2013-09-01

    The failure of critical component of fossil fired power plant that operated in creep range (high stress, high temperature and in the long term) depends on its microstructure characteristics. Ferritic low carbon steel (2.25Cr-1Mo) and Austenitic stainless alloy (18Cr-8Ni) are used as a boiler tube in the secondary superheater outlet header to deliver steam before entering the turbin. The tube failure is occurred in a form of rupture, resulting trip that disrupts the continuity of the electrical generation. The research in quantification of the microstructure deformation has been done in predicting the remaining life of the tube through interrupted accelerated creep test. For Austenitic Stainless Alloy (18Cr-8Ni), creep test was done in 550°C with the stress 424.5 MPa and for Ferritic Low Carbon Steel (2.25Cr-1Mo) in 570°C with the stress 189 MPa. The interrupted accelerated creep test was done by stopping the observation in condition 60%, 70%, 80% and 90% of remaining life, the creep test fracture was done before. Then the micro hardness test, photo micro, SEM and EDS were obtained from those samples. Refer to ASTM E122, microstructure parameters were calculated. The results indicated that there are a consistency of decreasing their grain diameters, increasing their grain size numbers, micro hardness, and the length of crack or void number per unit area with the decreasing of remaining life. While morphology of grain (stated in parameter α=LV/LH) relatively constant for austenitic. However, for ferritic the change of morphology revealed significantly. Fracture mode propagation of ferritic material is growth with voids transgranular and intergranular crack, and for austenitic material the fracture growth with intergranular creep fracture void and wedge crack. In this research, it was proposed a formulation of mathematical model for creep behavior corresponding their curve fitting resulted for the primary, secondary and tertiary in accelerated creep test. In

  20. Sol-gel coating of lithium zinc ferrite powders

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, K.G.; Amarakoon, V.R.W. )

    1991-04-01

    This paper reports on lithium zinc ferrite powders of composition Li{sub 0 {minus} 3} Zn{sup 0 {minus}4}Mn{sub 0.05}Fe{sub 2.25}O{sub 4} were prepared by solid-state synthesis. Liquid-phase borosilicate sintering additives were applied to the ferrite particle surfaces at room temperature via a sol-gel coating technique. Calcined and comminuted ferrite powder was dispersed in methanol with predetermined quantities of tetraethyl orthosilicate and triethyl borate. Hydrofluoric acid was used to catalyze the sol-gel reactions. Amorphous coatings of 10 to 20 nm thickness were observed on particle surfaces by TEM. Chemical bonding in the coatings was studied using diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy.

  1. Impedimetric detection of alcohol vapours using nanostructured zinc ferrite.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Padmanathan Karthick; Saraswathi, Ramiah

    2014-11-01

    A comparative study on the sensing characteristics of nanostructured zinc ferrite to three primary alcohols viz. methanol, ethanol and propanol has been carried out. The zinc ferrite has been prepared by a combustion method and characterized by XRD, FTIR, AFM and SEM. Impedance studies in the alcohol concentration range varying from 100 to 1000 ppm show definite variations in response to both the nature of the alcohol and its concentration. The nanostructured zinc ferrite shows the highest sensor response to methanol and least to propanol. Equivalent circuit modelling and calibration have been made for all the three alcohol sensors. The material shows a better selectivity to the alcohols compared to formaldehyde, ammonia and acetone vapours.

  2. The nature of temper brittleness of high-chromium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.; Golovin, I.S.; Mishin, V.M.; Kislyuk, I.V.

    1995-03-01

    The reasons for development of {open_quotes}475{degrees}C brittleness{close_quotes} of high-chromium ferritic steels are considered from the standpoint of fracture mechanics. It is shown that the general rise in the curve of temperature-dependent local flow stress has the decisive influence on the position of the ductile-to-brittle transformation temperature and the increase in it as the result of a hold at temperatures of development of brittleness. The established effect is related to the change in the parameters determining dislocation mobility, that is, the activation energy of dislocation movement in high-chromium ferrite and the resistance to microplastic deformation, both caused by processes of separation into layers of high-chromium ferrite and decomposition of the interstitial solid solution.

  3. Magnetic properties of manganese ferrite films grown at atomic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo Xu; Yang, Aria; Yoon, Soack-Dae; Christodoulides, Joe A.; Harris, Vincent G.; Vittoria, Carmine

    2005-05-15

    Manganese ferrite is a partial inverse spinel which, when prepared by conventional growth techniques, has {approx}20% of the Mn{sup 2+} ions on the octahedral sublattice. Here we describe a layer-by-layer growth scheme at atomic scale by which the percentage of Mn{sup 2+} ions on the octahedral sublattice can be artificially controlled. Manganese ferrite films grown by this technique exhibits different degrees of cation inversion when grown on {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}111{r_brace} MgO substrates. It was observed that saturation magnetization varied in a wide range of values depending on chemical composition and oxygen pressure. Although bulk manganese ferrite was low anisotropy magnetic material, uniaxial anisotropy was observed at room temperature in the films deposited on {l_brace}100{r_brace} MgO substrates, and its magnitude and direction sensitively depended on chemical composition and oxygen pressure during deposition.

  4. Magnetic Properties of Manganese Ferrite Films Grown at Atomic Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo,X.; Yang, A.; Yoon, S.; Christodoulides, I.; Harris, V.; Vittoria, C.

    2005-01-01

    Manganese ferrite is a partial inverse spinel which, when prepared by conventional growth techniques, has {approx}20% of the Mn{sup 2+} ions on the octahedral sublattice. Here we describe a layer-by-layer growth scheme at atomic scale by which the percentage of Mn{sup 2+} ions on the octahedral sublattice can be artificially controlled. Manganese ferrite films grown by this technique exhibits different degrees of cation inversion when grown on {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}111{r_brace} MgO substrates. It was observed that saturation magnetization varied in a wide range of values depending on chemical composition and oxygen pressure. Although bulk manganese ferrite was low anisotropy magnetic material, uniaxial anisotropy was observed at room temperature in the films deposited on {l_brace}100{r_brace} MgO substrates, and its magnitude and direction sensitively depended on chemical composition and oxygen pressure during deposition.

  5. Nanosized copper ferrite materials: Mechanochemical synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manova, Elina; Tsoncheva, Tanya; Paneva, Daniela; Popova, Margarita; Velinov, Nikolay; Kunev, Boris; Tenchev, Krassimir; Mitov, Ivan

    2011-05-01

    Nanodimensional powders of cubic copper ferrite are synthesized by two-steps procedure of co-precipitation of copper and iron hydroxide carbonates, followed by mechanochemical treatment. X-ray powder diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy and temperature-programmed reduction are used for the characterization of the obtained materials. Their catalytic behavior is tested in methanol decomposition to hydrogen and CO and total oxidation of toluene. Formation of nanosized ferrite material is registered even after one hour of milling time. It is established that the prolonging of treatment procedure decreases the dispersion of the obtained product with the appearance of Fe 2O 3. It is demonstrated that the catalytic behavior of the samples depends not only on their initial phase composition, but on the concomitant ferrite phase transformations by the influence of the reaction medium.

  6. Comparison of conventional and microwave sintering on Y-ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obulesu, K. Rama; James Raju, K. C.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we are comparing the results of the conventional and microwave sintered samples of Zn2-Y(Ba2Zn2Fe12O22) ferrite. Y ferrite sample was synthesized using the commercial solid-state reaction method. In CS process, the sample was sintered in muffle furnace at 1200°C for 6 h. In MS process, the sample was sintered at 1120 °C for 30 min in air at the rate of 10°C per min. X-ray powder diffraction revealed that a single phase rhombohedral structure with space group R3m (166) for both samples. The average grain size of CS sample is 1.5-2μm which is greater than MS sample. Magnetic properties also changed with the microwave sintering. These results demonstrate that the strong microwave method is an alternative way to synthesize high performance Y ferrite.

  7. CaO segregation in MnZn-ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, I.N.; Mishra, R.K.; Thomas, G.

    1982-06-01

    The reaction between CaO and MnZn ferrite is investigated by in-situ heating in a scanning electron microscope. The existence of an intermediate phase and a eutectic liquid at about 1300/sup 0/C is observed. The CaO segregation behavior of low loss MnZn ferrite is studies by in-situ heating in transmission electron microscope and Auger electron spectroscopy. The Ca is observed to stay at the grain boundaries in the form of amorphous intermediate phase at low temperatures and in a liquid phase at the sintering temperature. 5 figures.

  8. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Baltich, L.K.

    1987-02-23

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  9. Magnetodielectric effect of Mn-Zn ferrite at resonant frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pengfei, Pan; Ning, Zhang

    2016-10-01

    The dielectric properties and the magnetodielectric effect in Mn-Zn ferrite at resonant frequency have been studied in this paper. Dimensional-resonance-induced abnormal dielectric spectrum was observed at f≈1 MHz. The relatively large magnetodielectric ratio of 4500% in a magnetic field of 3.5 kOe was achieved from the Mn-Zn ferrite sample with the initial permeability of 15 K at resonant frequency at room temperature. Theoretical analysis suggests that the large MD effect at resonant frequency is attributed to the enhanced magnetostriction effect.

  10. Control of magnetization reversal in oriented strontium ferrite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Debangsu Anil Kumar, P. S.

    2014-02-21

    Oriented Strontium Ferrite films with the c axis orientation were deposited with varying oxygen partial pressure on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrate using Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. The angle dependent magnetic hysteresis, remanent coercivity, and temperature dependent coercivity had been employed to understand the magnetization reversal of these films. It was found that the Strontium Ferrite thin film grown at lower (higher) oxygen partial pressure shows Stoner-Wohlfarth type (Kondorsky like) reversal. The relative importance of pinning and nucleation processes during magnetization reversal is used to explain the type of the magnetization reversal with different oxygen partial pressure during growth.

  11. Nanoindentation studies of nickel zinc ferrite embedded mesoporous silica template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, S.; Hajra, P.; Mada, M. R.; Bandopadhyay, S.; Chakravorty, D.

    2013-02-01

    Nickel zinc ferrite (NZF) embedded mesoporous silica KIT-6 nanocomposite (NZFMS) was synthesized via impregnation method. The microstructure of the samples was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Nanoindentation (NI) studies were carried out on both mesoporous silica (MS) and the nanocomposite NZFMS. It was found that the young's modulus (E) and hardness (H) of the NZFMS were higher than that of the MS. From creep measurement it was observed that the creep-strain rate was greater for NZFMS compared to MS. This arose due to diffusion of Fe3+ ions from nickel zinc ferrite to the silica glass. The results indicate that the NZFMS material shows superplastic behaviour at room temperature.

  12. Gas atomization of cobalt ferrite-phosphate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; O'Handley, R. C.; Kalonji, G.

    1989-01-01

    XRD, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and EDXS have been used to characterize a rapidly-solidified (Co,Fe)3O4 spinel generated in a cobalt-iron-phosphate glass matrix by gas atomization of melts. Of the two compositions tested, that containing 20 mol pct P2O5 exhibited randomly-oriented ferrite crystallization whose growth appears to have been diffusion-controlled. Unlike the ferrite, in which the iron has both tetrahedral and octahedral coordination, the iron in the glassy matrix was primarily of distorted-octahedral coordination. Calculations indicate that the cooling rates obtained with oxide melts vary strongly with droplet size, but less strongly with melt temperature.

  13. Study of some Mg-based ferrites as humidity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezlescu, N.; Rezlescu, E.; Doroftei, C.; Popa, P. D.

    2005-01-01

    The micostructure and humidity sensitivity of MgFe2O4 + CaO, Mg0.5Cu0.5Fe1.8Ga0.2O4, Mg0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 + KCl and MgMn0.2Fe1.8O4 ferrites were investigated. We have found that the humidity sensitivity largely depends on composition, crystallite size, surface area and porosity. The best results concerning humidity sensitivity were obtained for MgMn0.2Fe1.8O4 ferrite.

  14. Electrical and optical properties of gadolinium doped bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, A. Banerjee, M. Basu, S.; Pal, M.

    2014-04-24

    Multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) and gadolinium (Gd) doped bismuth ferrite had been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Particle size had been estimated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found to decrease with Gd doping. We studied the temperature and frequency dependence of impedance and electric modulus and calculated the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance of the investigated samples. We observed that electrical activation energy increases for all the doped samples. Optical band gap also increases for the doped samples which can be used in photocatalytic application of BFO.

  15. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1989-05-02

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  16. Modeling ferrite electromagnetic response in the time domain

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.; DeFord, J.F.; Craig, G.D.

    1989-04-06

    The behavior of ferrite loads commonly found in induction accelertors has important consequences for the performance of these accelerators. Previous work by the authors on modeling the electromagnetic fields in induction cavities has focussed upon use of a simple, phenomenological model for the process of magnetization reversal in these ferrite loads. In this paper we consider a model for magnetization reversal which is more deeply rooted in theory, and present a simulation of the reversal process based upon this model for an idealized set of boundary conditions. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Baltich, L.K.; Berggren, M.H.

    1987-05-18

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  18. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Silaban, A.; Harrison, D.P. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1989-05-02

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such as size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  19. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1988-11-14

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  20. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Baltich, L.K.; Berggren, M.H.

    1987-08-28

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  1. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1988-08-19

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  2. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1989-03-06

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  3. Connection between micro and macro hardness pearlitic-ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duka, Edlira; Oettel, Heinrich; Dilo, Teuta

    2012-09-01

    Many physical and mechanical properties of materials are closely related to their microstructure, technologies to control the microstructure of materials have been well developed to obtain suitable properties. We measured the volume fraction of perlite and ferrite, micro Vickers hardness in pearlite and ferrite and macro hardness using different sample with different carbon content. The volume fraction of pearlite increases by increasing carbon content. By increasing carbon content, micro and macro hardness increase. We can conclude that for those conditional the mixing rule can't be use.

  4. Effect of gadolinium addition on the corrosion, wear, and neutron absorbing behaviors of duplex stainless steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Youl; Choi, Yong; Moon, Byung M.; Sohn, Dong S.; Bogdanov, S. G.; Pirogov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    In order to develop the neutron absorbing and shield materials, a hot-rolled 0.02%-Gd duplex stainless steel was prepared with 55 vol. % of ferrite and 45 vol. % of austenite. The σ phase with an average grain size of 9-11 μm in austenitic (γ) grains tended to be elongated parallel to the rolling direction, with (100) poles concentrated towards the normal direction, and (110) poles located between the normal and radial directions (ND and RD, respectively). Most of the gadolinium existed as sub-micro-meter-sized Gd2O3 and GdCrO3 precipitates. The yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, elongation, and microhardness of the 0.02%-Gd duplex stainless steel were 522.8 MPa, 700.2 MPa, 38.1%, and 258.5-314.7 HV, respectively. The friction coefficient and wear resistance were 3.11 and 0.004 mg/kg/cycle, respectively. The corrosion potential and corrosion rate of the 0.02%-Gd duplex stainless steel were-0.448 V SHE and 1.263 × 10-3 A/cm2 for 1M-HCl,-0.544 V SHE and 2.619 × 10-3 A/cm2 for 1M-NaCl,-0.299 V SHE and 1.469 × 10-3 A/cm2 for 1M-H2SO4, and-0.607 V SHE and 2.295 × 10-3 A/cm2 for synthetic water, respectively. The coefficient of neutron transmission for the 0.02%-Gd duplex stainless steel sheet of 2 mm thickness at neutron beam wavelength of 0.48 nm was 0.6.

  5. Cobalt ferrite based magnetostrictive materials for magnetic stress sensor and actuator applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiles, David C. (Inventor); Paulsen, Jason A. (Inventor); Snyder, John E. (Inventor); Lo, Chester C. H. (Inventor); Ring, Andrew P. (Inventor); Bormann, Keith A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Magnetostrictive material based on cobalt ferrite is described. The cobalt ferrite is substituted with transition metals (such manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) or mixtures thereof) by substituting the transition metals for iron or cobalt to form substituted cobalt ferrite that provides mechanical properties that make the substituted cobalt ferrite material effective for use as sensors and actuators. The substitution of transition metals lowers the Curie temperature of the material (as compared to cobalt ferrite) while maintaining a suitable magnetostriction for stress sensing applications.

  6. A study on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in hot alkaline-sulfide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasse, Kevin Robert

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) generally have superior strength and corrosion resistance as compared to most standard austenitic and ferritic stainless grades owing to a balanced microstructure of austenite and ferrite. As a result of having favorable properties, DSS have been selected for the construction of equipment in pulp and paper, chemical processing, nuclear, oil and gas as well as other industries. The use of DSS has been restricted in some cases because of stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which can initiate and grow in either the ferrite or austenite phase depending on the environment. Thorough understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in chloride- and hydrogen sulfide-containing solutions has been useful for material selection in many environments. However, understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in sulfide-containing caustic solutions is limited, which has restricted the capacity to optimize process and equipment design in pulp and paper environments. Process environments may contain different concentrations of hydroxide, sulfide, and chloride, altering corrosion and SCC susceptibility of each phase. Crack initiation and growth behavior will also change depending on the relative phase distribution and properties of austenite and ferrite. The role of microstructure and environment on the SCC of standard grade UNS S32205 and lean grade UNS S32101 in hot alkaline-sulfide solution were evaluated in this work using electrochemical, film characterization, mechanical testing, X-ray diffraction, and microscopy techniques. Microstructural aspects, which included residual stress state, phase distribution, phase ratio, and microhardness, were related to the propensity for SCC crack initiation in different simulated alkaline pulping liquors at 170 °C. Other grades of DSS and reference austenitic and superferritic grades of stainless steel were studied using exposure coupons for comparison to understand compositional effects and individual phase susceptibility

  7. Superplastic forming of stainless steel automotive components

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, B.; Elmer, J.; Carol, L.

    1997-02-06

    Exhaust emission standards are governmentally controlled standards, which are increasingly stringent, forcing alternate strategies to meet these standards. One approach to improve the efficiency of the exhaust emission equipment is to decrease the time required to get the catalytic converter to optimum operating temperature. To accomplish this, automotive manufacturers are using double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds to reduce heat loss of the exhaust gases to the converter. The current method to manufacture double wall stainless steel exhaust components is to use a low-cost alloy with good forming properties and extensively form, cut, assemble, and weld the pieces. Superplastic forming (SPF) technology along with alloy improvements has potential at making this process more cost effective. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and USCAR Low Emission Partnership (LEP) worked under a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) to evaluate material properties, SPF behavior, and welding behavior of duplex stainless steel alloy for automotive component manufacturing. Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has a separate CRADA with the LEP to use SPF technology to manufacture a double wall stainless steel exhaust component. As a team these CRADAs developed and demonstrated a technical plan to accomplish making double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds.

  8. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, O.; Hertz, D.; Lebrun, J.P.; Michel, H.

    1995-12-31

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors.

  9. Recent advances in nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite magnetic fluid hyperthermia for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei; Huang, Junxing; Sha, Min

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent research and development of nanosized manganese zinc (Mn-Zn) ferrite magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) for cancer treatment. Mn-Zn ferrite MFH, which has a targeted positioning function that only the temperature of tumor tissue with magnetic nanoparticles can rise, while normal tissue without magnetic nanoparticles is not subject to thermal damage, is a promising therapy for cancer. We introduce briefly the composition and properties of magnetic fluid, the concept of MFH, and features of Mn-Zn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles for MFH such as thermal bystander effect, universality, high specific absorption rate, the targeting effect of small size, uniformity of hyperthermia temperature, and automatic temperature control and constant temperature effect. Next, preparation methods of Mn-Zn ferrite magnetic fluid are discussed, and biocompatibility and biosecurity of Mn-Zn ferrite magnetic fluid are analyzed. Then the applications of nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH in cancer are highlighted, including nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH alone, nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH combined with As2O3 chemotherapy, and nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH combined with radiotherapy. Finally, the combination application of nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH and gene-therapy is conceived, and the challenges and perspectives for the future of nanosized Mn-Zn ferrite MFH for oncotherapy are discussed.

  10. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding of 10-mm-Thick Cast Martensitic Stainless Steel CA6NM: As-Welded Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh; Cao, Xinjin; Pham, Xuan-Tan; Wanjara, Priti; Fihey, Jean-Luc

    2016-07-01

    Cast CA6NM martensitic stainless steel plates, 10 mm in thickness, were welded using hybrid laser-arc welding. The effect of different welding speeds on the as-welded joint integrity was characterized in terms of the weld bead geometry, defects, microstructure, hardness, ultimate tensile strength, and impact energy. Significant defects such as porosity, root humping, underfill, and excessive penetration were observed at a low welding speed (0.5 m/min). However, the underfill depth and excessive penetration in the joints manufactured at welding speeds above 0.75 m/min met the specifications of ISO 12932. Characterization of the as-welded microstructure revealed untempered martensite and residual delta ferrite dispersed at prior-austenite grain boundaries in the fusion zone. In addition, four different heat-affected zones in the weldments were differentiated through hardness mapping and inference from the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary phase diagram. The tensile fracture occurred in the base metal for all the samples and fractographic analysis showed that the crack path is within the martensite matrix, along primary delta ferrite-martensite interfaces and within the primary delta ferrite. Additionally, Charpy impact testing demonstrated slightly higher fracture energy values and deeper dimples on the fracture surface of the welds manufactured at higher welding speeds due to grain refinement and/or lower porosity.

  11. Microwave characterization of (Co,Zn) 2W barium hexagonal ferrite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Y.; He, H. H.; Feng, Z. K.; Zhang, X. C.; Cheng, X. M.

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents the static magnetic and microwave characterization of hexagonal ferrite BaZn 1.1Co 0.9Fe 16O 27 particles for application in a microwave absorber. The hexagonal ferrite particles have been developed through conventional ceramic processes. Ferrite particles were examined via scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometry. The complex permeability and permittivity of ferrite-wax composites were measured over the frequency range of 2-8 GHz. The microwave intrinsic permeability and permittivity spectra have been presented, which were calculated on the basis of the measurement data of the ferrite-wax mixtures using the Bruggeman equation. The microwave absorption properties of these ferrite particles have also been discussed. The results indicate that these ferrites have good potential to be used as a broad band microwave absorber.

  12. Surface modification of 2205 duplex stainless steel by low temperature salt bath nitrocarburizing at 430 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Runbo; Wang, Jun; Zhong, Si; Li, Mingxing; Xiong, Ji; Fan, Hongyuan

    2013-04-01

    2205 stainless steel was modified by salt bath nitrocarburizing at 430 °C in this study. The microstructure, surface hardness and erosion-corrosion resistance were systematically evaluated. Salt bath nitrocarburizing at 430 °C can form a nitrocarburized layer, and with the treated time prolong, the thickness of the layer increased. By nitrocarburizing within 8 h, only expanded austenite (S phase) formed. With treated time increased, CrN gradually diffused from the places where there were ferrite grains in the layer before nitrocarburizing. Besides, the depth increased with the nitrocarburized time and the layer grew approximately conforms to the parabolic rate law. Salt bath nitrocarburizing can effectively improve the surface hardness of 2205 DSS. The erosion-corrosion resistance was improved by salt bath nitrocarburizing and the 16 h treated sample had the best erosion-corrosion behavior.

  13. Brazing of Stainless Steel to Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Using Gold-Based Brazes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, T. P.; Asthana, R.

    2007-01-01

    Two gold-base active metal brazes (gold-ABA and gold-ABA-V) were evaluated for oxidation resistance to 850 C, and used to join yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to a corrosion-resistant ferritic stainless steel for possible use in solid oxide fuel cells. Thermogravimetric analysis and optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to evaluate the braze oxidation behavior, and microstructure and composition of the YSZ/braze/steel joints. Both gold-ABA and gold-ABA-V exhibited nearly linear oxidation kinetics at 850 C, with gold-ABA-V showing faster oxidation than gold-ABA. Both brazes produced metallurgically sound YSZ/steel joints due to chemical interactions of Ti and V with the YSZ and steel substrates.

  14. Modeling phase transformation behavior during thermal cycling in the heat-affected zone of stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; Iskander, Y.S.; David, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    An implicit finite-difference analysis was used to model the diffusion-controlled transformation behavior in a ternary system. The present analysis extends earlier work by examining the transformation behavior under the influence of multiple thermal cycles. The analysis was applied to the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary system to simulate the microstructural development in austenitic stainless steel welds. The ferrite-to-austenite transformation was studied in an effort to model the response of the heat-affected zone to multiple thermal cycles experienced during multipass welding. Results show that under some conditions, a transformation ``inertia`` exists that delays the system`s response when changing from cooling to heating. Conditions under which this ``inertia`` is most influential were examined. It was also found that under some conditions, the transformation behavior does not follow the equilibrium behavior as a function of temperature. Results also provide some insight into effect of composition distribution on transformation behavior.

  15. A guide for the ASME code for austenitic stainless steel containment vessels for high-level radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Raske, D.T.

    1995-06-01

    The design and fabrication criteria recommended by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for high-level radioactive materials containment vessels used in packaging is found in Section III, Division 1, Subsection NB of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. This Code provides material, design, fabrication, examination, and testing specifications for nuclear power plant components. However, many of the requirements listed in the Code are not applicable to containment vessels made from austenitic stainless steel with austenitic or ferritic steel bolting. Most packaging designers, engineers, and fabricators are intimidated by the sheer volume of requirements contained in the Code; consequently, the Code is not always followed and many requirements that do apply are often overlooked during preparation of the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) that constitutes the basis to evaluate the packaging for certification.

  16. Casting Stainless-Steel Models Around Pressure Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter; Micol, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Survivability of thin-wall stainless-steel tubing increased to nearly 100 percent. Improves state of art in pressure-model castings and reduces cost associated with machining complete model from stainless-steel blank.

  17. 79 FR 60188 - Nonmetallic Thermal Insulation for Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2014-10-06

    ... COMMISSION Nonmetallic Thermal Insulation for Austenitic Stainless Steel AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... of the NRC considers acceptable when selecting and using nonmetallic thermal insulation in the..., ``Nonmetallic Thermal Insulation for Austenitic Stainless Steel,'' is temporarily identified by its task...

  18. Magnetoabsorption and magnetic hysteresis in Ni ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Gómez, P.; Muñoz, J. M.; Valente, M. A.; Torres, C.; de Francisco, C.

    2013-01-01

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles were prepared by a modified sol-gel technique employing coconut oil, and then annealed at different temperatures in 400-1200 °C range. This route of preparation has revealed to be one efficient and cheap technique to obtain high quality nickel ferrite nanosized powder. Sample particles sizes obtained with XRD data and Scherrer's formula lie in 13 nm to 138 nm, with increased size with annealing temperature. Hysteresis loops have been obtained at room temperature with an inductive method. Magnetic field induced microwave absorption in nanoscale ferrites is a recent an active area of research, in order to characterize and explore potential novel applications. In the present work microwave magnetoabsorption data of the annealed nickel ferrite nanoparticles are presented. These data have been obtained with a system based on a network analyzer that operates in the frequency range 0 - 8.5 GHz. At fields up to 400 mT we can observe a peak according to ferromagnetic resonance theory. Sample annealed at higher temperature exhibits different absorption, coercivity and saturation magnetization figures, revealing its multidomain character.

  19. Tuning of magnetic properties in cobalt ferrite nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedeño-Mattei, Y.; Perales-Perez, O.; Tomar, M. S.; Roman, F.; Voyles, P. M.; Stratton, W. G.

    2008-04-01

    Cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) possesses excellent chemical stability, good mechanical hardness, and a large positive first order crystalline anisotropy constant, making it a promising candidate for magneto-optical recording media. In addition to precise control of the composition and structure of CoFe2O4, its practical application will require the capability to control particle size at the nanoscale. The results of a synthesis approach in which size control is achieved by modifying the oversaturation conditions during ferrite formation in water through a modified coprecipitation approach are reported. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) diffraction, and TEM energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analyses confirmed the formation of the nanoscale cobalt ferrite. M-H measurements verified the strong influence of synthesis conditions on crystal size and hence, on the magnetic properties of ferrite nanocrystals. The room-temperature coercivity values increased from 460 up to 4626Oe under optimum synthesis conditions determined from a 23 factorial design.

  20. Effect of rare earth substitution in cobalt ferrite bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulai, G.; Diamandescu, L.; Dumitru, I.; Gurlui, S.; Feder, M.; Caltun, O. F.

    2015-09-01

    The study was focused on the influence of small amounts of rare earth (RE=La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) addition on the microstructure, phase content and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite bulk materials. The X-Ray diffraction measurements confirmed the formation of the spinel structure but also the presence of secondary phases of RE oxides or orthoferrite in small percentages (up to 3%). Density measurements obtained by Archimedes method revealed a ~1 g cm-3 decrease for the RE doped cobalt ferrite samples compared with stoichiometric one. Both the Mössbauer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrocopy analysis results confirmed the formation of the spinel phase. The saturation magnetization and coercive field values of the doped samples obtained by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry were close to those of the pure cobalt ferrite. For magnetostrictive property studies the samples were analyzed using the strain gauge method. Higher maximum magnetostriction coefficients were found for the Ho, Ce, Sm and Yb doped cobalt ferrite bulk materials as related to the stoichiometric CoFe2O4 sample. Moreover, improved strain derivative was observed for these samples but at higher magnetic fields due to the low increase of the coercive field values for doped samples.

  1. Magnetic properties of bio-synthesized zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Yeary, Lucas W; Moon, Ji Won; Rawn, Claudia J; Love, Lonnie J; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Thompson, James R; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic properties of zinc ferrite (Zn-substituted magnetite, Zn{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) formed by a microbial process compared favorably with chemically synthesized materials. A metal reducing bacterium, Thermoanaerobacter, strain TOR-39 was incubated with Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x}OOH (x=0.01, 0.1, and 0.15) precursors and produced nanoparticulate zinc ferrites. Composition and crystalline structure of the resulting zinc ferrites were verified using X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and neutron diffraction. The average composition from triplicates gave a value for y of 0.02, 0.23, and 0.30 with the greatest standard deviation of 0.02. Average crystallite sizes were determined to be 67, 49, and 25 nm, respectively. While crystallite size decreased with more Zn substitution, the lattice parameter and the unit cell volume showed a gradual increase in agreement with previous literature values. The magnetic properties were characterized using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer and were compared with values for the saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) reported in the literature. The averaged M{sub s} values for the triplicates with the largest amount of zinc (y=0.30) gave values of 100.1, 96.5, and 69.7 emu/g at temperatures of 5, 80, and 300 K, respectively indicating increased magnetic properties of the bacterially synthesized zinc ferrites.

  2. Tuning of magnetic properties in cobalt ferrite nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Cedeno-Mattei, Y.; Roman, F.; Perales-Perez, O.; Tomar, M. S.; Voyles, P. M.; Stratton, W. G.

    2008-04-01

    Cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) possesses excellent chemical stability, good mechanical hardness, and a large positive first order crystalline anisotropy constant, making it a promising candidate for magneto-optical recording media. In addition to precise control of the composition and structure of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, its practical application will require the capability to control particle size at the nanoscale. The results of a synthesis approach in which size control is achieved by modifying the oversaturation conditions during ferrite formation in water through a modified coprecipitation approach are reported. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) diffraction, and TEM energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analyses confirmed the formation of the nanoscale cobalt ferrite. M-H measurements verified the strong influence of synthesis conditions on crystal size and hence, on the magnetic properties of ferrite nanocrystals. The room-temperature coercivity values increased from 460 up to 4626 Oe under optimum synthesis conditions determined from a 2{sup 3} factorial design.

  3. Ferritic Fe-Mn alloy for cryogenic applications

    DOEpatents

    Hwang, Sun-Keun; Morris, Jr., John W.

    1979-01-01

    A ferritic, nickel-free alloy steel composition, suitable for cryogenic applications, which consists essentially of about 10-13% manganese, 0.002-0.01% boron, 0.1-0.5% titanium, 0-0.05% aluminum, and the remainder iron and incidental impurities normally associated therewith.

  4. Dielectric behavior of Cu—Zn ferrites with Si additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzma, G.

    2014-05-01

    Since ferrites are highly sensitive to the additives present in or added to them, extensive work, to improve the properties of basic ferrites, has been carried out on these aspects. The present paper reports the effects of composition, frequency, and temperature on the dielectric behavior of a series of CuxZn1—xFe2O4 ferrite samples prepared by the usual ceramic technique. In order to improve the properties of the samples, low cost Fe2O3 having 0.5 wt.% Si as an additive is selected to introduce into the system. The dielectric constant increases by increasing the Cu content, as the electron exchange of Cu2+ <=> Cu+ is responsible for the conduction and the polarization. However, the addition of Si could decrease the dielectric constant as it suppresses the ceramic grain growth and promotes the quality factor at higher frequencies. Dielectric constant ɛ' and loss tangent tan δ of the mixed Cu—Zn ferrite decrease with increasing frequency, attributed to the Maxwell—Wagner polarization, which increases as the temperature increases.

  5. Ultrasonic Spectroscopy of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgriff, Laura M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Hebsur, Mohan G.; Baaklini, George Y.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    Enhanced, lightweight material systems, such as 17-4PH stainless steel sandwich panels are being developed for use as fan blades and fan containment material systems for next generation engines. In order to improve the production for these systems, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, such as ultrasonic spectroscopy, are being utilized to evaluate the brazing quality between the 17-4PH stainless steel face plates and the 17-4PH stainless steel foam core. Based on NDE data, shear tests are performed on sections representing various levels of brazing quality from an initial batch of these sandwich structures. Metallographic characterization of brazing is done to corroborate NDE findings and the observed shear failure mechanisms.

  6. Stainless Steel Microstructure and Mechanical Properties Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan T

    2010-06-01

    A nitrogen strengthened 21-6-9 stainless steel plate was spinformed into hemispherical test shapes. A battery of laboratory tests was used to characterize the hemispheres. The laboratory tests show that near the pole (axis) of a spinformed hemisphere the yield strength is the lowest because this area endures the least “cold-work” strengthening, i.e., the least deformation. The characterization indicated that stress-relief annealing spinformed stainless steel hemispheres does not degrade mechanical properties. Stress-relief annealing reduces residual stresses while maintaining relatively high mechanical properties. Full annealing completely eliminates residual stresses, but reduces yield strength by about 30%.

  7. Friction Drilling of Stainless Steels Pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, A.; Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.; Lamikiz, A.

    2011-01-17

    This work describes the experimental study of the friction drilling process in stainless steel by means of an optimization of the machining conditions. For such purpose austenitic stainless steel with different thicknesses were analyzed through controlled tests at different rotation speeds and feed rates. On one hand, the torque and the thrust force were computed and monitorized. On the other hand, the dimensional tolerances of the holes were evaluated, mainly the accuracy of the hole diameter and the burr thickness at different depths. Another topic of interest inherent to this special technique is the temperature level reached during the friction process which is crucial when it comes to development of microstructural transformations.

  8. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  12. Direct Observations of Sigma Phase Formation in Duplex Stainless Steels Using In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J. W.; Palmer, T. A.; Specht, Eliot D

    2007-01-01

    The formation and growth of sigma ( ) phase in 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) was observed and measured in real time using synchrotron radiation during 10 hour isothermal heat treatments at temperatures between 700 C and 850 C. Sigma formed in near-equilibrium quantities during the isothermal holds, starting from a microstructure which contained a balanced mixture of metastable ferrite and austenite. In-situ synchrotron diffraction continuously monitored the transformation, and these results were compared to those predicted by thermodynamic calculations. The data were further analyzed using a modified Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogrov (JMAK) approach to determine kinetic parameters for sigma formation over this temperature range. The initial JMAK exponent, n, at low fractions of sigma was found to be approximately 7.0; however, toward the end of the transformation, n decreased to values of approximately 0.75. The change in the JMAK exponent was attributed to a change in the transformation mechanism from discontinuous precipitation with increasing nucleation rate, to growth of the existing sigma phase after nucleation site saturation occurred. Because of this change in mechanism, it was not possible to determine reliable values for the activation energy and pre-exponential terms for the JMAK equation. While cooling back to room temperature, the partial transformation of austenite resulted in a substantial increase in the ferrite content, but sigma retained its high-temperature value to room temperature.

  13. Microstructural evolution in a 17-4 PH stainless steel after aging at 400 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, M.; Hono, K.; Katayama, Y.

    1999-02-01

    The microstructure of 17-4 PH stainless steel at various stages of heat treatment, i.e., after solution heat treatment, tempering at 580 °C, and long-term aging at 400 °C, have been studied by atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The solution-treated specimen consists largely of martensite with a small fraction of δ-ferrite. No precipitates are present in the martensite phase, while spherical fcc-Cu particles are present in the δ-ferrite. After tempering for 4 hours at 580 °C, coherent Cu particles precipitate in the martensite phase. At this stage, the Cr concentration in the martensite phase is still uniform. After 5000 hours aging at 400 °C, the martensite spinodaly decomposes into Fe-rich α and Cr-enriched α‧. In addition, fine particles of the G-phase (structure type D8 a , space group Fmbar 3m) enriched in Si, Ni, and Mn have been found in intimate contact with the Cu precipitates. Following spinodal decomposition of the martensite phase, G-phase precipitation occurs after long-term aging.

  14. Effects of strain-induced martensite and its reversion on the magnetic properties of AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza Filho, I. R.; Sandim, M. J. R.; Cohen, R.; Nagamine, L. C. C. M.; Hoffmann, J.; Bolmaro, R. E.; Sandim, H. R. Z.

    2016-12-01

    Strain-induced martensite (SIM) and its reversion in a cold-rolled AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel was studied by means of magnetic properties, light optical (LOM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), texture measurements, and Vickers microhardness testing. According to Thermo-calc© predictions, the BCC phase (residual δ-ferrite and SIM) is expected to be stable until 600 °C. The current material was cold rolled up to 60% thickness reduction and submitted to both isothermal and stepwise annealing up to 800 °C. Magnetic measurements were taken during annealing (in situ) of the samples and also for their post mortem conditions. The Curie temperatures (Tc) of residual δ-ferrite and SIM have similar values between 550 and 600 °C. Besides Tc, the focused magnetic parameters were saturation magnetization (Ms), remanent magnetization (MR), and coercive field (Hc). SIM reversion was found to occur in the range of 600-700 °C in good agreement with Thermo-calc© predictions. The microstructures of the material, annealed at 600 and 700 °C for 1 h, were investigated via EBSD. Microtexture measurements for these samples revealed that the texture components were mainly those found for the 60% cold rolled material. This is an evidence that the SIM reversion occurred by an athermal mechanism.

  15. Metallographic examinations of Type 304 stainless steel (heat 9T2796) tested in high-temperature uniaxial and multiaxial experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Houck, C.W.

    1984-03-01

    The results obtained from a number of metallographic examinations of Type 304 stainless steel specimens were compiled. Samples were obtained from uniaxial and multiaxial tests covering a very broad span of temperatures and times. Special emphasis was on the identification of failure modes, cracking patterns, grain distortion, and grain-boundary microstructures. Uniaxial specimens exhibited the following sequence of failure modes with increasing temperature and time: ductile plastic tearing, ductile plastic shear, wedge cracking, and microvoid cracking. Over most of the temperature range examined (482 to 871/sup 0/C), M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ precipitated on grain boundaries at long times. Sigma phase and possibly ferrite were often present in the stressed areas at temperatures as low as 482/sup 0/C (900/sup 0/F). These metallurgical features promoted a severe loss in creep ductility at long times and low temperatures. Most multiaxial tests were performed under conditions that promoted wedge cracking. Stress gradients also favored surface crack initiation rather than bulk damage. Testing times for multiaxial tests were less than 10,000 h; hence, there was insufficient time for the development of embrittling features such as microvoids, sigma, and ferrite. Long-time multiaxial tests to failure are recommended.

  16. Real Time Imaging of Deuterium in a Duplex Stainless Steel Microstructure by Time-of-Flight SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, O.; Straub, F.; Wirth, Th.; Holzlechner, G.; Boellinghaus, Th.; Unger, W. E. S.

    2016-02-01

    For more than one century, hydrogen assisted degradation of metallic microstructures has been identified as origin for severe technical component failures but the mechanisms behind have not yet been completely understood so far. Any in-situ observation of hydrogen transport phenomena in microstructures will provide more details for further elucidation of these degradation mechanisms. A novel experiment is presented which is designed to elucidate the permeation behaviour of deuterium in a microstructure of duplex stainless steel (DSS). A hydrogen permeation cell within a TOF-SIMS instrument enables electrochemical charging with deuterium through the inner surface of the cell made from DSS. The outer surface of the DSS permeation cell exposed to the vacuum has been imaged by TOF-SIMS vs. increasing time of charging with subsequent chemometric treatment of image data. This in-situ experiment showed evidently that deuterium is permeating much faster through the ferrite phase than through the austenite phase. Moreover, a direct proof for deuterium enrichment at the austenite-ferrite interface has been found.

  17. Real Time Imaging of Deuterium in a Duplex Stainless Steel Microstructure by Time-of-Flight SIMS

    PubMed Central

    Sobol, O.; Straub, F.; Wirth, Th.; Holzlechner, G.; Boellinghaus, Th.; Unger, W. E. S.

    2016-01-01

    For more than one century, hydrogen assisted degradation of metallic microstructures has been identified as origin for severe technical component failures but the mechanisms behind have not yet been completely understood so far. Any in-situ observation of hydrogen transport phenomena in microstructures will provide more details for further elucidation of these degradation mechanisms. A novel experiment is presented which is designed to elucidate the permeation behaviour of deuterium in a microstructure of duplex stainless steel (DSS). A hydrogen permeation cell within a TOF-SIMS instrument enables electrochemical charging with deuterium through the inner surface of the cell made from DSS. The outer surface of the DSS permeation cell exposed to the vacuum has been imaged by TOF-SIMS vs. increasing time of charging with subsequent chemometric treatment of image data. This in-situ experiment showed evidently that deuterium is permeating much faster through the ferrite phase than through the austenite phase. Moreover, a direct proof for deuterium enrichment at the austenite-ferrite interface has been found. PMID:26832311

  18. Effect of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Parameters on Hydrogen-Assisted Cracking of Type 321 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenak, Paul; Unigovski, Yaakov; Shneck, Roni

    2016-05-01

    The susceptibility of AISI type 321 stainless steel welded by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process to hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC) was studied in a tensile test combined with in situ cathodic charging. Specimen charging causes a decrease in ductility of both the as-received and welded specimens. The mechanical properties of welds depend on welding parameters. For example, the ultimate tensile strength and ductility increase with growing shielding gas (argon) rate. More severe decrease in the ductility was obtained after post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). In welded steels, in addition to discontinuous grain boundary carbides (M23C6) and dense distribution of metal carbides MC ((Ti, Nb)C) precipitated in the matrix, the appearance of delta-ferrite phase was observed. The fracture of sensitized specimens was predominantly intergranular, whereas the as-welded specimens exhibited mainly transgranular regions. High-dislocation density regions and stacking faults were found in delta-ferrite formed after welding. Besides, thin stacking fault plates and epsilon-martensite were found in the austenitic matrix after the cathodic charging.

  19. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron backscatter diffraction analysis of isothermally aged SAF 2507 type superduplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobranszky, J.; Szabo, P. J.; Berecz, T.; Hrotko, V.; Portko, M.

    2004-10-01

    Due to thermal effects, several precipitation and segregation processes are known in duplex stainless steels. These microstructural changes influence both of the original phases, but in different ways. Isothermal ageing in a large range of temperature was performed on SAF 2507 type steel. The temperature range was 300-1000 °C, the ageing time was between 100 s and 24 h. This paper discusses the results of ageing at 900 °C. Microstructural changes were investigated by electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron backscattered diffraction analysis. This technique allowed the determination of the microstructure of the secondary austenite and sigma phase and their mutual orientation properties. Beside this, thermoelectric power measurements were also performed, which gave information about the kinetics of the precipitation process. Results showed that sigma-phase precipitation started right after 200 s in the case of annealed steel, and faster than 100 s in the cold-rolled state. After 5000 s, the delta-ferrite disappeared. Chemical composition of sigma phase was independent on the ageing time. A small decrease in nickel content was observed with a slight increase of Cr content. Small amount of chi phase had also been observed on the ferrite-ferrite boundaries, but later they changed into sigma phase. Similarly to sigma phase, chi phase showed significant phosphorus enrichment. During ageing, small chrome nitride precipitates developed, which amount increased in time, and some vanadium could be measured in them. The orientation relationship between austenite and sigma phase deviated from Nenno-orientationship with about 24°, and seems to form a [110]‖[310] relationship, which was characteristic right from the beginning of the process, and remains more or less constant.

  20. HIGH TEMPERATURE BRAZING ALLOY FOR JOINT Fe-Cr-Al MATERIALS AND AUSTENITIC AND FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    DOEpatents

    Cost, R.C.

    1958-07-15

    A new high temperature brazing alloy is described that is particularly suitable for brazing iron-chromiumaluminum alloys. It consists of approximately 20% Cr, 6% Al, 10% Si, and from 1.5 to 5% phosphorus, the balance being iron.

  1. Variation with thermal cycling in microstructure and area specific resistance of a ferritic stainless steel having rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Myoung Youp; Mumm, Daniel R.; Song, Jiunn

    2013-03-01

    Crofer22 APU specimens were prepared by grinding with grit 120 and 400 SiC grinding papers, and were then thermally cycled. The variation in oxidation behavior with thermal cycling was then investigated. Observation of microstructures, measurement of area-specific resistance (ASR), analysis of the atomic percentages of the elements by EDX, and XRD analysis were performed. XRD patterns showed that the (Cr, Mn)3O4 spinel phase grew on the surface of the Crofer22 APU samples ground using grit 120. For the samples ground with grit 400, ASR increased as the number of thermal cycles ( n) increased. Plots of ln (ASR/T) vs. 1/ T for the samples ground with grit 400 after n = 4, 20, and 40 exhibited good linearity, and the apparent activation energies were between 73.4 kJ/mole and 82.5 kJ/mole.

  2. Comparison of fracture behavior for low-swelling ferritic and austenitic alloys irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to 180 DPA

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, F.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted to investigate the radiation embrittlement of high-nickel superalloys, modified austenitic steels and ferritic steels. These materials have been experimentally proven to possess excellent resistance to void swelling after high neutron exposures. In addition to swelling resistance, post-irradiation fracture resistance is another important criterion for reactor material selection. By means of fracture mechanics techniques the fracture behavior of those highly irradiated alloys was characterized in terms of irradiation and test conditions. Precipitation-strengthened alloys failed by channel fracture with very low postirradiation ductility. The fracture toughness of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel D9 deteriorates with increasing fluence to about 100 displacement per atom (dpa), the fluence level at which brittle fracture appears to occur. Ferritic steels such as HT9 are the most promising candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. The upper-shelf fracture toughness of alloy HT9 remained adequate after irradiation to 180 dpa although its ductile- brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift by low temperature irradiation rendered the material susceptible to brittle fracture at room temperature. Understanding the fracture characteristics under various irradiation and test conditions helps reduce the potential for brittle fracture by permitting appropriate measure to be taken.

  3. Final Report, Volume 4, The Develpoment of Qualification Standards forCast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of the program is to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). Different tests were carried out on the materials procured from various steel foundries as stated in the ASTM A923. The foundries were designated as Foundry A, B, C and D. All the materials were foundry solution annealed. Materials from Foundry D were solution heat treated at The University of Tennessee also and then they were subjected to heat treatment schedule which was derived from the testing of wrought DSS to establish the A923 specification. This was possible because the material from the same heat was sufficient for conducting the full scope of heat treatment. This was done prior to carrying out various other tests. Charpy samples were machined. The Ferrite content was measured in all the Charpy samples using Feritscope{reg_sign} and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method. After the ferrite content was measured the samples were sent to AMC-Vulcan, Inc. in Alabama to conduct the Charpy impact test based on ASTM A923 Test Method B. This was followed by etch testing and corrosion analysis based on ASTM A923 Test Methods A and C respectively at University of Tennessee. Hardness testing using Rockwell B and C was also carried out on these samples. A correlation was derived between all the three test methods and the best method for evaluating the presence of intermetallic in the material was determined. The ferrite content was correlated with the toughness values. Microstructural analysis was carried out on the etch test samples using Scanning Electron Microscopy in order to determine if intermetallic phases were present. The fracture surfaces from Charpy test specimens were also observed under SEM in order to determine the presence of any cracks and whether it was a brittle or a ductile fracture. A correlation

  4. Final Report, Volume 4, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of the program is to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). Different tests were carried out on the materials procured from various steel foundries as stated in the ASTM A923. The foundries were designated as Foundry A, B, C and D. All the materials were foundry solution annealed. Materials from Foundry D were solution heat treated at The University of Tennessee also and then they were subjected to heat treatment schedule which was derived from the testing of wrought DSS to establish the A923 specification. This was possible because the material from the same heat was sufficient for conducting the full scope of heat treatment. This was done prior to carrying out various other tests. Charpy samples were machined. The Ferrite content was measured in all the Charpy samples using Feritscope® and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method. After the ferrite content was measured the samples were sent to AMC-Vulcan, Inc. in Alabama to conduct the Charpy impact test based on ASTM A923 Test Method B. This was followed by etch testing and corrosion analysis based on ASTM A923 Test Methods A and C respectively at University of Tennessee. Hardness testing using Rockwell B and C was also carried out on these samples. A correlation was derived between all the three test methods and the best method for evaluating the presence of intermetallic in the material was determined. The ferrite content was correlated with the toughness values. Microstructural analysis was carried out on the etch test samples using Scanning Electron Microscopy in order to determine if intermetallic phases were present. The fracture surfaces from Charpy test specimens were also observed under SEM in order to determine the presence of any cracks and whether it was a brittle or a ductile fracture. A correlation was

  5. Bondable Stainless Surface Coats Protect Against Rust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. D.; Shaffer, D. K.; Clearfield, H. M.; Nagle, D.; Groff, G.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes tests conducted to assess use of bondable stainless surface (BOSS) coating materials to protect steel cases of solid-fuel rocket motors against corrosion and to provide surface microstructure and chemistry suitable for bonding to insulating material. Eliminates need to cover cases with grease to prevent corrosion and degreasing immediately prior to use.

  6. Forming "dynamic" membranes on stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, C. A.; Gaddis, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    "Dynamic" zirconium polyacrylic membrane is formed directly on stainless steel substrate without excessive corrosion of steel. Membrane is potentially useful in removal of contaminated chemicals from solution through reversed osmosis. Application includes use in filtration and desalination equipment, and in textile industry for separation of dyes from aqueous solvents.

  7. Stabilizing stainless steel components for cryogenic service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, C. F.

    1967-01-01

    Warpage and creep in stainless steel valve components are decreased by a procedure in which components are machined to a semifinish and then cold soaked in a bath of cryogenic liquid. After the treatment they are returned to ambient temperature and machine finished to the final drawing dimensions.

  8. Proof Testing Of Stainless-Steel Bolts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Cheng H.; Hendrickson, James A.; Bamford, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of development of method for nondestructive proof testing of bolts made of A286 stainless steel. Based on concept that the higher load bolt survives, the smaller the largest flaw and, therefore, the longer its fatigue life after test. Calculations and experiments increase confidence in nondestructive proof tests.

  9. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-09-19

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K.

  10. Materials data handbooks on stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Two handbooks which summarize latest available data have been published. Two types of stainless steels, alloy A-286 and Type 301, are described. Each handbook is divided into twelve chapters. Scope of information presented includes physical- and mechanical-property data at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures.

  11. Materials data handbook: Stainless steel type 301

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for stainless steel type 301 is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and bonding is developed.

  12. Final Report, Volume 2, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Steven, W.; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    The scope of testing cast Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) required testing to several ASTM specifications, while formulating and conducting industry round robin tests to verify and study the reproducibility of the results. ASTM E562 (Standard Test Method for Determining Volume Fraction by Systematic manual Point Count) and ASTM A923 (Standard Test Methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic/Ferritic Stainless Steels) were the specifications utilized in conducting this work. An ASTM E562 industry round robin, ASTM A923 applicability study, ASTM A923 industry round robin, and an ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases were implemented. In the ASTM E562 study, 5 samples were extracted from various cast austenitic and DSS in order to have varying amounts of ferrite. Each sample was metallographically prepared by UT and sent to each of 8 participants for volume fraction of ferrite measurements. Volume fraction of ferrite was measured using manual point count per ASTM E562. FN was measured from the Feritescope{reg_sign} and converted to volume fraction of ferrite. Results indicate that ASTM E562 is applicable to DSS and the results have excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility. Also, volume fraction of ferrite conversions from the FN measured by the Feritescope{reg_sign} were similar to volume fraction of ferrite measured per ASTM E562. In the ASTM A923 applicability to cast DSS study, 8 different heat treatments were performed on 3 lots of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) castings and 1 lot of 2205 wrought DSS. The heat treatments were selected to produce a wide range of cooling rates and hold times in order to study the suitability of ASTM A923 to the response of varying amounts on intermetallic phases [117]. The test parameters were identical to those used to develop ASTM A923 for wrought DSS. Charpy V-notch impact samples were extracted from the

  13. Final Report, Volume 2, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Steven, W.; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    The scope of testing cast Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) required testing to several ASTM specifications, while formulating and conducting industry round robin tests to verify and study the reproducibility of the results. ASTM E562 (Standard Test Method for Determining Volume Fraction by Systematic manual Point Count) and ASTM A923 (Standard Test Methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic/Ferritic Stainless Steels) were the specifications utilized in conducting this work. An ASTM E562 industry round robin, ASTM A923 applicability study, ASTM A923 industry round robin, and an ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases were implemented. In the ASTM E562 study, 5 samples were extracted from various cast austenitic and DSS in order to have varying amounts of ferrite. Each sample was metallographically prepared by UT and sent to each of 8 participants for volume fraction of ferrite measurements. Volume fraction of ferrite was measured using manual point count per ASTM E562. FN was measured from the Feritescope® and converted to volume fraction of ferrite. Results indicate that ASTM E562 is applicable to DSS and the results have excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility. Also, volume fraction of ferrite conversions from the FN measured by the Feritescope® were similar to volume fraction of ferrite measured per ASTM E562. In the ASTM A923 applicability to cast DSS study, 8 different heat treatments were performed on 3 lots of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) castings and 1 lot of 2205 wrought DSS. The heat treatments were selected to produce a wide range of cooling rates and hold times in order to study the suitability of ASTM A923 to the response of varying amounts on intermetallic phases [117]. The test parameters were identical to those used to develop ASTM A923 for wrought DSS. Charpy V-notch impact samples were extracted from the castings and wrought

  14. Influence of ferrite phase in alite-calcium sulfoaluminate cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvallet, Tristana Yvonne Francoise

    Since the energy crisis in 1970's, research on low energy cements with low CO2- emissions has been increasing. Numerous solutions have been investigated, and the goal of this original research is to create a viable hybrid cement with the components of both Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSAC), by forming a material that contains both alite and calcium sulfoaluminate clinker phases. Furthermore, this research focuses on keeping the cost of this material reasonable by reducing aluminum requirements through its substitution with iron. The aim of this work would produce a cement that can use large amounts of red mud, which is a plentiful waste material, in place of bauxite known as an expensive raw material. Modified Bogue equations were established and tested to formulate this novel cement with different amounts of ferrite, from 5% to 45% by weight. This was followed by the production of cement from reagent chemicals, and from industrial by-products as feedstocks (fly ash, red mud and slag). Hydration processes, as well as the mechanical properties, of these clinker compositions were studied, along with the addition of gypsum and the impact of a ferric iron complexing additive triisopropanolamine (TIPA). To summarize this research, the influence of the addition of 5-45% by weight of ferrite phase, was examined with the goal of introducing as much red mud as possible in the process without negatively attenuate the cement properties. Based on this PhD dissertation, the production of high-iron alite-calcium sulfoaluminateferrite cements was proven possible from the two sources of raw materials. The hydration processes and the mechanical properties seemed negatively affected by the addition of ferrite, as this phase was not hydrated entirely, even after 6 months of curing. The usage of TIPA counteracted this decline in strength by improving the ferrite hydration and increasing the optimum amount of gypsum required in each composition

  15. Thick-section Laser and Hybrid Welding of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujanpää, Veli

    Austenitic stainless steels are generally known to have very good laser weldability, when ordinary grades of sheets are concerned. But it is not necessarily the case, if special grades of fully austenitic structures with e.g. high molybdenum, or thick-section are used. It is also known that hot cracking susceptibility is strictly controlled by composition and welding parameters. If solidification is primary ferritic, hot cracking resistance is dramatically increased. It is also well known that laser welding needs a careful control of weld edge preparation and air gap between the edges. The dependence on edge quality can be decreased by using filler metal, either cold wire, hot wire or hybrid laser-arc welding. An additional role is high molybdenum contents where micro segregation can cause low local contents in weld which can decrease the corrosion properties, if filler metal is not used. Another feature in laser welding is its incomplete mixing, especially in thick section applications. It causes inhomogeneity, which can make uneven microstructure, as well as uneven mechanical and corrosion properties In this presentation the features of laser welding of thick section austenitic stainless steels are highlighted. Thick section (up to 60 mm) can be made by multi-pass laser or laser hybrid welding. In addition to using filler metal, it requires careful joint figure planning, laser head planning, weld parameter planning, weld filler metal selection, non-destructive and destructive testing and metallography to guarantee high-quality welds in practice. In addition some tests with micro segregation is presented. Also some examples of incomplete mixing is presented.

  16. RESULTS OF CHARACTERIZATION TESTS OF THE SURFACES OF A COMMERCIALLY CARBURIZED AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K

    2004-01-07

    A commercial surface carburization treatment that shows promise for hardening the surfaces of the stainless steel target vessel of the Spallation Neutron Source against cavitation erosion and pitting caused by the action of pulsed pressure waves in the liquid mercury target has been investigated. To verify promotional claims for the treatment and to uncover any factors that might be of concern for the integrity of a carburized target vessel, some characterization tests of the nature of the surface layers of carburized austenitic 316LN stainless steel were conducted. The findings support most of the claims. The carburized layer is about 35 {micro}m thick. Its indentation hardness is about five times larger than that of the substrate steel and declines rapidly with depth into the layer. The surface is distorted by the treatment, and the austenite lattice is enlarged. The corrosion resistance of the carburized layer in an acid medium is greater than that for untreated austenite. The layer is not brittle; it is plastically deformable and is quite resistant to cracking during straining. Contrary to the provider's assertations, the maximum carbon content of the layer is much less than 6-7 wt% carbon, and the carbon is not simply contained in supersaturated solid solution; some of it is present in a previously unreported iron carbide phase located at the very surface. Large variations were found in the thickness of the layer, and they signify that controls may be needed to ensure a uniform thickness for treatment of the SNS target vessel. Inclusion stringers and {delta}-ferrite phase embraced in the treated layer are less resistant to chemical attack than the treated austenite. From a cavitation pitting perspective under SNS bombardment, such non-austenitic phases may provide preferential sites for pitting. The shallow depth of the hardened layer will require use of protection measures to avoid mishandling damage to the layer during assembly and installation of a target

  17. Chemical banding revealed by chemical etching in a cold-rolled metastable stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Celada, C.; Toda-Caraballo, I.; Kim, B.; San Martín, D.

    2013-10-15

    The current work describes the metallographic characterization of the initial microstructure of a cold rolled precipitation hardening semi-austenitic stainless steel (12Cr–9Ni–4Mo–2Cu–1Ti, in wt.%). The use of the Lichtenegger and Blöch (L–B) color etching solution has been shown to reveal not only the phases present in the microstructure, but also the existence of chemical banding along the rolling direction. The L–B reagent has been found to color the microstructure in bands depending on what alloying elements have segregated to each band. Two-dimensional electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) maps have shown that Ni, Cu and Ti segregate together in the bands, while Cr has an opposite behavior. Mo has a mixed segregation behavior although much weaker than the other elements and more prompt to segregate like Ni does. A direct comparison of light optical micrographs with the EPMA maps of the same area of the microstructure has enable to establish a direct relationship between the alloying element band concentration and the resulting etching color contrast obtained with the L–B reagent. Thermodynamic calculations predict that solidification in this steel takes place with ferrite as the primary phase. Equilibrium partitioning coefficient calculations seem to support the observed segregation patterns. - Highlights: • A cold rolled metastable stainless steel has been characterized thoroughly. • EPMA shows that Ni, Cu and Ti segregate together; Cr in an opposite way. • L–B color etching is sensitive to the segregation of these chemical elements. • This chemical banding has been reduced by applying a homogenization heat treatment. • Partitioning coefficient calculations agree with the observed segregation patterns.

  18. Effects of heat treatment and testing temperature on fracture mechanics behavior of low-Si CA-15 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Cheng-Hsun; Lee, Shen-Chih; Teng, Hwei-Yuan

    2004-02-01

    This research studied the effects of heat treatment and testing temperature on fracture mechanics behavior of Si-modified CA-15 martensitic stainless steel (MSS), which is similar to AISI 403 grade stainless steel, which has been widely used in wall and blanket structures and in the pipe of nuclear power plant reactors, turbine blades, and nozzles. The results indicated that fracture toughness of low-Si CA-15 MSS is better than that of AISI 403. The specimens of the low-Si CA-15 MSS after austenitization at 1010 °C and then tempering at 300 °C have higher plane-strain fracture toughness (K IC ) values for both 25 °C and -150 °C testing temperatures. However, the specimens tested at 150 °C cannot satisfy the plane-strain fracture toughness criteria. The fatigue crack growth rate is the slowest after austenitization at 1010 °C for 2 hours and tempering at 400 °C. Observing the crack propagation paths using a metallographic test, it was found that the cracking paths preferred orientation and branched along ferrite phase, owing to martensite-phase strengthening and grain-boundary-carbide retarding after 300 °C to 400 °C tempering. Also, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed to correlate the properties attained to the microstructural observation.

  19. Intergranular Corrosion Behavior of 304LN Stainless Steel Heat Treated at 623 K (350 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raghuvir; Kumar, Mukesh; Ghosh, Mainak; Das, Gautam; Singh, P. K.; Chattoraj, I.

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature sensitization of 304LN stainless steel from the two pipes, differing slightly in chemical composition, has been investigated; specimens were aged at 623 K (350 °C) for 20,000 hours and evaluated for intergranular corrosion and degree of sensitization. The base and heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the 304LN-1 appear resistant to sensitization, while 304LN-2 revealed a "dual" type microstructure at the transverse section and HAZ. The microstructure at 5.0-mm distance from the fusion line indicates qualitatively less sensitization as compared to that at 2.0 mm. The 304LN-2 base alloy shows overall lower degree of sensitization values as compared to the 304LN-1. A similar trend of degree of sensitization was observed in the HAZ where it was higher in the 304LN-1 as compared to the 304LN-2. The weld zone of both the stainless steels suffered from cracking during ASTM A262 practice E, while the parent metals and HAZs did not show such fissures. A mottled image within the ferrite lamella showed spinodal decomposition. The practice E test and transmission electron microscopy results indicate that the interdendritic regions may suffer from failure due to carbide precipitation and due to the evolution of brittle phase from spinodal decomposition.

  20. Co/LaCrO 3 composite coatings for AISI 430 stainless steel solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaigan, Nima; Ivey, Douglas G.; Chen, Weixing

    Rapidly decreasing electronic conductivity, chromium volatility and poisoning of the cathode material are the major problems associated with inevitable growth of chromia on ferritic stainless steel interconnects of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). This work evaluates the performance of a novel, electrodeposited composite Co/LaCrO 3 coating for AISI 430 stainless steel. The oxidation behaviour of the Co/LaCrO 3-coated AISI 430 substrates is studied in terms of scale microstructure and growth kinetics. Area-specific resistance (ASR) of the coated substrates has also been tested. The results showed that the Co/LaCrO 3 coating forms a triple-layer scale consisting of a chromia-rich subscale, a Co-Fe spinel mid-layer and a Co 3O 4 spinel top layer at 800 °C in air. This scale is protective, acts as an effective barrier against chromium migration into the outer oxide layer and exhibits a low, stable ASR of ∼0.02 Ω cm 2 after 900 h at 800 °C in air.

  1. Magnetic materials based on manganese zinc ferrite with surface-organized polyaniline coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantseva, N. E.; Bespyatykh, Yu. I.; Sapurina, I.; Stejskal, J.; Vilčáková, J.; Sáha, P.

    2006-06-01

    Core-shell composites of manganese-zinc (MnZn) ferrite and polyaniline (PANI) have been prepared by the oxidation of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate in the presence of ferrite. The various reaction conditions allowed controlling the thickness of PANI coating, 50-250 nm. Complex magnetic permeability spectra of MnZn ferrite of various particles sizes, 25-250 μm, and of their composites with PANI, have been studied in the frequency range 1 MHz-10 GHz. The formation of a polymer p-semiconducting nanolayer on the surface of a MnZn ferrite particle changes the character of the frequency dispersion of the permeability. The interfacial effects between MnZn ferrite and PANI nanofilm are responsible for the shifts of resonance frequency from MHz closer to GHz. This effect strongly depends on the specific area of the ferrite-PANI interface and, moreover, on the properties of the PANI overlayer.

  2. Field-dependent neutron depolarization study of the ferrite formation in medium-carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Te Velthuis, S.G.E.; Van Dijk, N.H.; Rekveldt, M.T.; Sietsma, J.; Van Der Zwaag, S.

    2000-03-14

    Neutron depolarization experiments have been performed on the ferrite and pearlite phase transformations of the medium-carbon C60 and C35 steels. The interaction of the polarized neutron beam with the ferromagnetic ferrite grains gives information on the mean magnetization and the magnetic correlation length. From these parameters the ferrite fraction and the mean ferrite grain size are determined in situ as a function of time and temperature during the phase transformation. The applied magnetic field was varied periodically in order to record a full hysteresis curve of the magnetization, which gives essential information on the microstructure of the ferromagnetic ferrite grains. The field dependence of the mean particle size during the early stages of the pearlite formation is a strong indication of multi-domain behavior, which is absent in the austenite-ferrite transformation and at the end of the pearlite formation.

  3. On the nucleation of cementite on bainitic ferrite-austenite interphase boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadian, Raheleh; Purdy, Gary R.

    2014-08-01

    Among all possible variants of the Isaichev orientation relationship between cementite and ferrite, a single major cementite variant has been observed to appear in bainite. Interphase boundary nucleation of cementite on ferrite-austenite semi-coherent interfaces is considered a plausible reason for this observation. With the aid of known crystallographic relations and habit planes of the ferrite-cementite, ferrite-austenite and austenite-cementite phases, a model for cementite nucleation has been proposed. The interphase-boundary nucleus is assumed to form on a semi-coherent ferrite-austenite interface and to possess ferrite-cementite and austenite-cementite habits as two main facets of the nucleus. It is shown that interphase cementite nucleation will be viable if the energies of all facets of the nucleus are in the semi-coherent range.

  4. The effect of chloride ions on the corroded surface layer of 00Cr22Ni5Mo3N duplex stainless steel under cavitation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Tong; Xiao, Ning; Shen, Hanjie; Yong, Xingyue

    2016-11-01

    The effects of Cl(-) on the corroded surface layer of 00Cr22Ni5Mo3N duplex stainless steel under cavitation in chloride solutions were investigated using nanoindentation in conjunction with XRD and XPS. The results demonstrate that Cl(-) had a strong effect on the nano-mechanical properties of the corroded surface layer under cavitation, and there was a threshold Cl(-) concentration. Furthermore, a close relationship between the nano-mechanical properties and the cavitation corrosion resistance of 00Cr22Ni5Mo3N duplex stainless steel was observed. The degradation of the nano-mechanical properties of the corroded surface layer was accelerated by the synergistic effect between cavitation erosion and corrosion. A key factor was the adsorption of Cl(-), which caused a preferential dissolution of the ferrous oxides in the passive film layer on the corroded surface layer. Cavitation further promoted the preferential dissolution of the ferrous oxides in the passive film layer. Simultaneously, cavitation accelerated the erosion of the ferrite in the corroded surface layer, resulting in the degradation of the nano-mechanical properties of the corroded surface layer on 00Cr22Ni5Mo3N duplex stainless steel under cavitation. PMID:27245950

  5. Influence of volumic heat treatments upon cavitation erosion resistance of duplex X2CrNiMoN 22-5-3 stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micu, L. M.; Bordeasu, I.; Popoviciu, M. O.; Popescu, M.; Bordeaşu, D.; Salcianu, L. C.

    2015-06-01

    The stainless steels Duplex 2205 with austenite and ferrite structure have mechanical characteristics close to those of martensite stainless steels but a better corrosion resistance; these steels are very sensitive on the heat treatments. Present work studies the cavitation erosion for those steels for three different heat treatments: simply quenched, annealed at 475°C post quenching and annealed at 875°C. The researches were undertaken at Timisoara “Politehnica” University in the Laboratory of Material Science and the Laboratory of Cavitation, using the T2 facility which integrally respects the recommendation of ASTM G32- 10 Standard. The best results were obtained with the specimens annealed at 875°C. In comparison with the stainless steel 41Cr4, with very good cavitation erosion qualities, all tested steels presented also good erosion resistance. So, Duplex 2205 steels can be used for details subjected to cavitation. The best results are obtained by increasing both the hardness and the quantity of the structure constituent with better cavitation erosion resistance, in our case the alloyed austenite.

  6. Dye removal using modified copper ferrite nanoparticle and RSM analysis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Niyaz Mohammad; Soltani-Gordefaramarzi, Sajjad; Sadeghi-Kiakhani, Moosa

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, copper ferrite nanoparticle (CFN) was synthesized, modified by cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, and characterized. Dye removal ability of the surface modified copper ferrite nanoparticle (SMCFN) from single system was investigated. The physical characteristics of SMCFN were studied using Fourier transform infrared, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Acid Blue 92, Direct Green 6, Direct Red 23, and Direct Red 80 were used as model compounds. The effect of operational parameters (surfactant concentration, adsorbent dosage, dye concentration, and pH) on dye removal was evaluated. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used for the analysis of the dye removal data. The experimental checking in these optimal conditions confirms good agreements with RSM results. The results showed that the SMCFN being a magnetic adsorbent might be a suitable alternative to remove dyes from colored aqueous solutions. PMID:23852534

  7. Stress insensitive multilayer chip inductor with ferrite core

    SciTech Connect

    Vishwas, B.; Madhuri, W. Rao, N. Madhusudan; Kaleemulla, S.

    2015-06-24

    Mg{sub 0.25}Cu{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is synthesized by sol gel auto combustion technique. The obtained ferrite powder is finally sintered in a microwave furnace at 850°C. Multilayer chip inductor (MLCI) of two layers is prepared by screen printing technique. The sintered ferrite is characterized by X-ray diffraction. The frequency response of dielectric constant is studied in the frequency range of 100Hz to 5MHz. Dielectric polarization is discussed in the light of Maxwell-Wagner interfacial polarization. The prepared MLCI is studied for stress sensitivity in the range of 0 to 8 MPa.

  8. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Froes, F.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1998-03-01

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with high temperature strength has been developed in line with low activation criteria for application in fusion power systems. The composition Fe-13.5Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.25Y{sub 2}O{sup 3} was chosen to provide a minimum chromium content to insure fully delta-ferrite stability. High temperature strength has been demonstrated by measuring creep response of the ODS alloy in uniaxial tension at 650 and 900 C in an inert atmosphere chamber. Results of tests at 900 C demonstrate that this alloy has creep properties similar to other alloys of similar design and can be considered for use in high temperature fusion power system designs. The alloy selection process, materials production, microstructural evaluation and creep testing are described.

  9. Studies on structural properties of clay magnesium ferrite nano composite

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Manpreet Singh, Mandeep; Jeet, Kiran Kaur, Rajdeep

    2015-08-28

    Magnesium ferrite-bentonite clay composite was prepared by sol-gel combustion method employing citric acid as complexing agent and fuel. The effect of clay on the structural properties was studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM- Energy dispersive Spectroscope (EDS) and BET surface area analyzer. Decrease in particle size and density was observed on addition of bentonite clay. The BET surface area of nano composite containing just 5 percent clay was 74.86 m{sup 2}/g. Whereas porosity increased from 40.5 per cent for the pure magnesium ferrite to 81.0 percent in the composite showing that nano-composite has potential application as an adsorbent.

  10. Chemisorption of cyanogen chloride by spinel ferrite magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Glover, T Grant; DeCoste, Jared B; Sabo, Daniel; Zhang, Z John

    2013-05-01

    Spinel ferrite magnetic nanoparticles, MnFe2O4, NiFe2O4, and CoFe2O4, were synthesized and used as gas-phase adsorbents for the removal of cyanogen chloride from dry air. Fixed-bed adsorption breakthrough experiments show adsorption wave behavior at the leading edge of the breakthrough curve that is not typical of physically adsorbed species. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results indicate that CK is reacting with the spinel ferrite surface and forming a carbamate species. The reaction is shown to be a function of the hydroxyl groups and adsorbed water on the surface of the particles as well as the metallic composition of the particles. The surface reaction decreases the remnant and saturation magnetism of the MnFe2O4 and CoFe2O4 particles by approximately 25%.

  11. Electromagnetic properties of manganese-zinc ferrite with lithium substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Fazio, E.; Bercoff, P. G.; Jacobo, S. E.

    2011-11-01

    Polycrystalline manganese-zinc ferrite with lithium substitution of composition Li 0.5 xMn 0.4Zn 0.6- xFe 2+0.5 xO 4 (0.0≤ x≤0.4) was prepared by the usual ceramic method. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that the samples have a spinel structure and are of single phase for some values of Li content. Lithium doping considerably modifies saturation magnetization since its value increases from 57.5 emu/g for x=0.0 to 82.9 emu/g for x=0.4. Lithium inclusion increases the real permeability (over 1 MHz) while the natural resonance frequency shifts to lower values as the fraction of Li increases. These ferrites show good electromagnetic properties as absorbers in the microwave range of 1 MHz - 1 GHz.

  12. Development of ferrite logic devices for an arithmetic processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A number of fundamentally ultra-reliable, all-magnetic logic circuits are developed using as a basis a single element ferrite structure wired as a logic delay element. By making minor additions or changes to the basic wiring pattern of the delay element other logic functions such as OR, AND, NEGATION, MAJORITY, EXCLUSIVE-OR, and FAN-OUT are developed. These logic functions are then used in the design of a full-adder, a set/reset flip-flop, and an edge detector. As a demonstration of the utility of all the developed devices, an 8-bit, all-magnetic, logic arithmetic unit capable of controlled addition, subtraction, and multiplication is designed. A new basic ferrite logic element and associated complementary logic scheme with the potential of improved performance is also described. Finally, an improved batch process for fabricating joint-free power drive and logic interconnect conductors for this basic class of all-magnetic logic is presented.

  13. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1987-10-27

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for improving the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hog coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. The reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point in a bench-scale fixed-bed reactor. The durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain its reactivity and other important physical characteristics such as size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and regeneration. Two base case sorbents, spherical pellets and cylindrical extrudes used in related METC sponsored projects, are being used to provide a basis for the comparison of physical characteristics and chemical reactivity.

  14. New design concepts for ferrite-tuned low-energy-booster cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, G.

    1991-05-01

    The design concepts for ferrite-tuned accelerating cavities discussed in this paper differ from conventional solutions using thick ferrite toroids for frequency tuning. Instead, tuners consisting of an array of ferrite-loaded striplines are investigated. These promise more efficient cooling and higher operational reliability. Layout examples for the SSC-LEB rf system are presented (tuning range 47.5 to 59.8 MHz, repetition frequency 10 Hz). 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Effect of aluminizing of Cr-containing ferritic alloys on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell sealing glass

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2008-12-01

    A novel high-temperature alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two metallic coupons of Cr-containing ferritic stainless steel for seal strength evaluation. In previous work, SrCrO4 was found to form along the glass/steel interface, which led to severe strength degradation. In the present study, aluminization of the steel surface was investigated as a remedy to minimize or prevent the strontium chromate formation. Three different processes for aluminization were evaluated with Crofer22APU stainless steel: pack cementation, vapor phase deposition, and aerosol spraying. It was found that pack cementation resulted in a rough surface with occasional cracks in the Al-diffused region. Vapor phase deposition yielded a smoother surface, but the resulting high Al content increased the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), resulting in failure of joined coupons. Aerosol spraying of an Al-containing salt resulted in formation of a thin aluminum oxide layer without any surface damage. The room temperature seal strength was evaluated in the as-fired state and in environmentally aged conditions. In contrast to earlier results with uncoated Crofer22APU, the aluminized samples showed no strength degradation even for samples aged in air. Interfacial and chemical compatibility was also investigated. The results showed aluminization to be a viable candidate approach to minimize undesirable chromate formation between alkaline earth silicate sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloys for SOFC applications.

  16. Growth of Ferrite Needles in Compacted Graphite Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán, G. A.; Perez, T.; Gregorutti, R. W.; Mercader, R. C.; Desimoni, J.

    2005-04-01

    The austempering kinetics transformation of compacted graphite cast irons austempered at 623K is studied. The length (l) and the number per unit volume (N) of ferrite needles were followed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), while Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) was used to determine the austenite relative areas. The SEM results are compared with theoretical calculations available in the literature and indicate that the diffusion of C atoms in austenite controls the transformation, confirming the indirect MS determinations.

  17. Growth of Ferrite Needles in Compacted Graphite Cast Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, G.A.; Mercader, R.C.; Desimoni, J.; Perez, T.; Gregorutti, R.W.

    2005-04-26

    The austempering kinetics transformation of compacted graphite cast irons austempered at 623K is studied. The length (l) and the number per unit volume (N) of ferrite needles were followed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), while Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) was used to determine the austenite relative areas. The SEM results are compared with theoretical calculations available in the literature and indicate that the diffusion of C atoms in austenite controls the transformation, confirming the indirect MS determinations.

  18. Material for magnetostrictive sensors and other applications based on ferrite materials

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R. William; Snyder, John E.; Dennis, Kevin W.; Schwichtenberg, Carl R.; Jiles, David C.

    2000-07-25

    The present invention provides magnetostrictive compositions that include an oxide ferrite which provides mechanical properties that make the magnetostrictive compositions effective for use as sensors and actuators.

  19. Method for making conductors for ferrite memory arrays. [from pre-formed metal conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H.; Baba, P. D.; Bhiwandker, N. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The ferrite memory arrays are made from pre-formed metal conductors for the ferrite arrays. The conductors are made by forming a thin sheet of a metallizing paste of metal alloy powder, drying the paste layer, bisque firing the dried sheet at a first temperature, and then punching the conductors from the fired sheet. During the bisque firing, the conductor sheet shrinks to 58 percent of its pre-fired volume and the alloy particles sinter together. The conductors are embedded in ferrite sheet material and finally fired at a second higher temperature during which firing the conductors shrink approximately the same degree as the ferrite material.

  20. Effect of ferrite powder fineness on the structure and properties of ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pashchenko, V.P.; Nesterov, A.M.; Litvinova, O.G.

    1995-03-01

    Comprehensive study of the structure and properties of ferrite materials prepared from powders with different specific surface (0.4 M{sup 2}/g < S{sub sp} < 1.2 m{sub 2/g}) shows that the optimum specific surface of manganese-zinc ferrite powders is about 0.6 m{sup 2}1/g. With an increase in the specific surface of nickel-zinc and barium ferrite powders the porous crystalline structure of sintered specimens and most of the main electromagnetic properties of ferrite articles are improved.

  1. Investigation of structural, dielectric, and magnetic properties of hard and soft mixed ferrite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotnala, R. K.; Ahmad, Shahab; Ahmed, Arham S.; Shah, Jyoti; Azam, Ameer

    2012-09-01

    Barium ferrite (hard ferrite) and manganese nickel zinc ferrite (soft ferrite) were successfully synthesized by citrate gel combustion technique. They were used to form the composites by mixing them properly in required compositions (x)BaFe12O19-(1-x)Mn0.2Ni0.4Zn0.4Fe2O4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were utilized to investigate the different structural and morphological parameters of pure and mixed ferrite composites. XRD and SEM results confirmed the coexistence of both phases in the composite material. Moreover, it has been observed that the composites were constituted by nanosized particles. Structure of pure soft ferrite was found to be cubic and that of pure hard ferrite was hexagonal. Dielectric constant (ɛ' and ɛ″) and dielectric loss (tan δ) were analyzed as a function of frequency and composition and the behaviour is explained on the basis of Maxwell-Wagner model. It was observed that the dielectric loss decreases with the increase of hard ferrite content in the composite material. Magnetic measurements suggest the exchange coupling between the magnetizations of soft and hard ferrite grains. It has been observed that the coercivity increases with the increase of the volume of the hard phase in the composite material after an optimal value.

  2. Suitability of cation substituted cobalt ferrite materials for magnetoelastic sensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nlebedim, Ikenna Catjetan; Jiles, David C

    2015-02-01

    The results of a study on the suitability of materials derived from cobalt ferrite for sensor and actuator applications are presented. The mechanism responsible for the superior sensor properties of Ge-substituted cobalt ferrite compared with Ti and other cation substituted cobalt ferrite materials is believed to be due to the tetrahedral site preference of Ge4+ and its co-substitution with Co2+. Results also showed that the higher strain derivative of Ge-substituted cobalt ferrite compared with Ti-substitution is due to a higher magnetostrictive coupling in response to applied field in the material.

  3. Effect of heat input on the microstructure, residual stresses and corrosion resistance of 304L austenitic stainless steel weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Unnikrishnan, Rahul; Idury, K.S.N. Satish; Ismail, T.P.; Bhadauria, Alok; Shekhawat, S.K.; Khatirkar, Rajesh K.; Sapate, Sanjay G.

    2014-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in high performance pressure vessels, nuclear, chemical, process and medical industry due to their very good corrosion resistance and superior mechanical properties. However, austenitic stainless steels are prone to sensitization when subjected to higher temperatures (673 K to 1173 K) during the manufacturing process (e.g. welding) and/or certain applications (e.g. pressure vessels). During sensitization, chromium in the matrix precipitates out as carbides and intermetallic compounds (sigma, chi and Laves phases) decreasing the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the present investigation, 304L austenitic stainless steel was subjected to different heat inputs by shielded metal arc welding process using a standard 308L electrode. The microstructural developments were characterized by using optical microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction, while the residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction using the sin{sup 2}ψ method. It was observed that even at the highest heat input, shielded metal arc welding process does not result in significant precipitation of carbides or intermetallic phases. The ferrite content and grain size increased with increase in heat input. The grain size variation in the fusion zone/heat affected zone was not effectively captured by optical microscopy. This study shows that electron backscattered diffraction is necessary to bring out changes in the grain size quantitatively in the fusion zone/heat affected zone as it can consider twin boundaries as a part of grain in the calculation of grain size. The residual stresses were compressive in nature for the lowest heat input, while they were tensile at the highest heat input near the weld bead. The significant feature of the welded region and the base metal was the presence of a very strong texture. The texture in the heat affected zone was almost random. - Highlights: • Effect of heat input on microstructure, residual

  4. Microstructure and magnetic properties of MnZn-ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, I.N.

    1982-12-01

    Grain boundaries in MnZn-ferrites have been characterized and their effects on the magnetic and electrical properties have been investigated. Addition of CaO into MnZn-ferrite materials leads to the formation of secondary phases along the grain boundaries. It is concluded that the Ca addition does not produce beneficial effects on the electrical properties but only leads to a detrimental influence on the magnetic properties. Other microstructural features such as secondary phases and stacking faults will also affect the domain wall dynanics. They not only retard the domain wall motion but can also act as nucleation sites for domains of reverse magnetization. Controlled-atmosphere annealing improves drastically the apparent resistivity of the sintered MnZn-ferrites through the reduction of ferrous ions content but degrades the magnetic permeability. Control of the oxygen partial pressure at an earlier stage of processing rather than post fabrication annealing is needed in order to raise the intrinsic electrical resistivity of the bulk materials by reducing ferrous ion concentration without affecting the magnetic permeability detrimentally. 145 references, 20 figures.

  5. Impedance spectroscopic characterization of gadolinium substituted cobalt ferrite ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Md. T. Ramana, C. V.

    2014-10-28

    Gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2−x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4}, referred to CFGO) with variable Gd content (x = 0.0–0.4) have been synthesized by solid state ceramic method. The crystal structure and impedance properties of CFGO compounds have been evaluated. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that CFGO crystallize in the inverse spinel phase. The CFGO compounds exhibit lattice expansion due to substitution of larger Gd ions into the crystal lattice. Impedance spectroscopy analysis was performed under a wide range of frequency (f = 20 Hz–1 MHz) and temperature (T = 303–573 K). Electrical properties of Gd incorporated Co ferrite ceramics are enhanced compared to pure CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} due to the lattice distortion. Impedance spectroscopic analysis illustrates the variation of bulk grain and grain-boundary contributions towards the electrical resistance and capacitance of CFGO materials with temperature. A two-layer heterogeneous model consisting of moderately conducting grain interior (ferrite-phase) regions separated by insulating grain boundaries (resistive-phase) accurately account for the observed temperature and frequency dependent electrical characteristic of CFGO ceramics.

  6. Lattice strain induced magnetism in substituted nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajnish; Kar, Manoranjan

    2016-10-01

    Strontium (Sr) substituted cobalt ferrite i.e. Co1-xSrxFe2O4 (x=0.00, 0.01, 0.015, 0.02, 0.05, 0.1) have been synthesized by the citric acid modified sol-gel method. Crystal structure and phase purity have been studied by the X-ray powder diffraction technique. The Rietveld refinement of XRD pattern using the space group Fd 3 bar m shows monotonically increasing of lattice parameter with the increase in Sr concentration. Magnetic hysteresis loops measurement has been carried out at room temperature using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) over a field range of ±1.5 T. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant were calculated by employing the Law of Approach (LA) to the saturation. It is observed that magnetocrystalline anisotropy has anomaly for x=0.01 (Co0.99Sr0.01Fe2O4) sample. Strain mediated modification of magnetic properties in Sr substituted cobalt ferrite has been observed. The saturation magnetization for doping concentration i.e. x=0.01 abruptly increase while for x>0.01 decreases with the increase in Sr concentration. A correlation between lattice strain and magnetic behavior in non-magnetic Sr- substituted nano-crystalline cobalt ferrite has been reported.

  7. Isomorphism of actinides and REE in synthetic ferrite garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livshits, T. S.

    2010-02-01

    The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is accompanied by the formation of liquid high-level radioactive waste (HLW). To increase the safety of handling HLW, it is proposed to extract actinide isotopes (An) and REE from them. These elements may be incorporated into crystalline matrices, e.g., based on ferrites with garnet structure, and then disposed in a geologic repository. The actinide-REE fraction is characterized by a complex composition. In addition to major components (An and REE), Al, Si, Na, and Sn occur therein in small amounts (a few wt %). Possible incorporation of the admixtures into ferrite garnets, as well as their effect on the phase composition of matrices and Th, Ce, Gd, and La contents were studied. It was shown that admixtures enter into garnet by means of isomorphic replacement. The properties of samples change only when admixtures are added in amounts exceeding their concentrations in HLW. The ability of ferrite garnets to accumulate significant amounts of An, REE, and admixture elements makes them suitable for use as matrices in immobilizing actinide-REE HLW of complex composition.

  8. Evidence of domain wall pinning in aluminum substituted cobalt ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, J. C.; Janrao, P. S.; Datar, A. A.; Kanhe, N. S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.

    2016-08-01

    In the present work spinel structured cobalt ferrites with aluminum substitution having composition CoAlxFe2-xO4 (x=0.0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3) have been synthesized using chemical co-precipitation method. Their microstructural, magnetic, magnetostriction and magnetoimpedance properties have been investigated. The piezomagnetic coefficient (dλ/dH) obtained from magnetostriction data is found to enhance with 0.1 Al substitutions in place of iron which decreases with further increase of Al content. It is noticed that 0.3 Al substitutions in place of Fe introduces domain wall pinning as evidenced from magnetostriction, magnetoimpedance and dc magnetization data. It is noted that ferrites so prepared using a simple procedure are magnetostrictive in good measure and with the addition of very small amount of non-magnetic aluminum their magnetostriction has shown saturation at relatively low magnetic fields. Such magnetostrictive ferrites find their applications in magnetic sensors and actuators.

  9. Magnetic and magnetostrictive properties of Cu substituted Co-ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra Sekhar, B.; Rao, G. S. N.; Caltun, O. F.; Dhana Lakshmi, B.; Parvatheeswara Rao, B.; Subba Rao, P. S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Copper substituted cobalt ferrite, Co1-xCuxFe2O4 (x=0.00-0.25), nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel autocombustion method. X-ray diffraction analysis on the samples was done to confirm the cubic spinel structures and Scherrer equation was used to estimate the mean crystallite size as 40 nm. Using the obtained nanoparticles, fabrication of the sintered pellets was done by standard ceramic technique. Magnetic and magnetostrictive measurements on the samples were made by strain gauge and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques, respectively. Maximum magnetostriction and strain derivative values were deduced from the field dependent magnetostriction curves while the magnetic parameters such as saturation magnetization (51.7-61.9 emu/g) and coercivity (1045-1629 Oe) on the samples were estimated from the obtained magnetic hysteresis loops. Curie temperature values (457-315 °C) were measured by a built in laboratory set-up. Copper substituted cobalt ferrites have shown improved strain derivative values as compared to the pure cobalt ferrite and thus making them suitable for stress sensing applications. The results have been explained on the basis of cationic distributions, strength of exchange interactions and net decreased anisotropic contributions due to the increased presence of Co2+ ions in B-sites as a result of Cu substitutions.

  10. Magnetic Phase-Transition Studies of Novel Hexagonal Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Marjorie Letitia; Ravi, Natarajan

    2002-03-01

    Ferrites, a unique class of compounds, have been widely used in a variety of technological applications due to interesting electrical and magnetic properties. A study of the magnetic properties of spinel ferrites with general formula AB_2O4 and perovskites with general formula ABO3 (where A and B represent different cations) has been initiated in our laboratory. The orthorhombic space group and the unit cell dimensions for CaFe_2O4 as determined by the X-ray diffraction data indicate the purity of the compound. In addition, room temperature ^57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopic measurements show a quadrupole doublet in agreement with the literature. A phase transition study of the hexagonal antiferromagnetic compounds such as CaBaFe_(1-x)4Al_xO8 is planned. Preparation, characterization by X-ray, and Mössbauer spectroscopy of these hexagonal ferrites are currently underway. For the Al^3+ substituted systems, distribution of internal magnetic field at the nucleus is modeled by using a binomial distribution. The preparation procedure (both ceramic and wet methods), detailed analysis of the spectroscopic data, and modeling aspects will be presented.

  11. Antimicrobial Lemongrass Essential Oil-Copper Ferrite Cellulose Acetate Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Abdellatif, Mohamed H; Innocenti, Claudia; Scarpellini, Alice; Carzino, Riccardo; Brunetti, Virgilio; Marras, Sergio; Brescia, Rosaria; Drago, Filippo; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose acetate (CA) nanoparticles were combined with two antimicrobial agents, namely lemongrass (LG) essential oil and Cu-ferrite nanoparticles. The preparation method of CA nanocapsules (NCs), with the two antimicrobial agents, was based on the nanoprecipitation method using the solvent/anti-solvent technique. Several physical and chemical analyses were performed to characterize the resulting NCs and to study their formation mechanism. The size of the combined antimicrobial NCs was found to be ca. 220 nm. The presence of Cu-ferrites enhanced the attachment of LG essential oil into the CA matrix. The magnetic properties of the combined construct were weak, due to the shielding of Cu-ferrites from the polymeric matrix, making them available for drug delivery applications where spontaneous magnetization effects should be avoided. The antimicrobial properties of the NCs were significantly enhanced with respect to CA/LG only. This work opens novel routes for the development of organic/inorganic nanoparticles with exceptional antimicrobial activities. PMID:27104514

  12. Mechanical alloying of lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somayeh Paseban; Indrajit Charit; Yaqiao Q. Wu; Jatuporn Burns; Kerry N. Allahar; Darryl P. Butt; James I. Cole

    2013-09-01

    A novel nanostructured ferritic steel powder with the nominal composition Fe–14Cr–1Ti–0.3Mo–0.5La2O3 (wt.%) was developed via high energy ball milling. La2O3 was added to this alloy instead of the traditionally used Y2O3. The effects of varying the ball milling parameters, such as milling time, steel ball size and ball to powder ratio, on the mechanical properties and micro structural characteristics of the as-milled powder were investigated. Nanocrystallites of a body-centered cubic ferritic solid solution matrix with a mean size of approximately 20 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Nanoscale characterization of the as-milled powder by local electrode atom probe tomography revealed the formation of Cr–Ti–La–O-enriched nanoclusters during mechanical alloying. The Cr:Ti:La:O ratio is considered “non-stoichiometric”. The average size (radius) of the nanoclusters was about 1 nm, with number density of 3.7 1024 m3. The mechanism for formation of nanoclusters in the as-milled powder is discussed. La2O3 appears to be a promising alternative rare earth oxide for future nanostructured ferritic steels.

  13. Magnetoelectric interactions in single crystal ferrite-piezoelectric bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, G.; Petrov, V. M.; Zhai, J.

    2005-03-01

    The nature of low-frequency (10-2 - 10^4 Hz) magnetoelectric (ME) coupling has been investigated in bilayers of single crystal Ni-Zn ferrites and polycrystalline lead zirconate titanate or single crystal lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate. Important observations are as follows. (i) The ME coupling in the bilayers is found to be stronger than in polycrystalline multilayers [1]. (ii) Zn substitution in ferrite is found to enhance the strength of ME interactions. (iii) ME voltage coefficients show significant variation with the orientation of the bias magnetic field. (iv) Data analysis using our model reveals that superior magneto-mechanical coupling in the ferrites is the cause of strong ME interactions [2]. 1. G. Srinivasan, E. T. Rasmussen, and R. Hayes Phys. Rev. B. 67, 014418 (2003). 2. M. I. Bichurin, V. M. Petrov and G. Srinivasan. Phys. Rev. B. 68, 054402 (2003). - supported by grants from the the National Science Foundation (DMR-0302254), Russian Ministry of Education (Å02-3.4-278), and the Universities of Russia Foundation (UNR 01.01.026).

  14. Perpendicular Biased Ferrite Tuned Cavities for the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Awida, Mohamed; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Pellico, William; Tan, Cheng-Yang; Terechkine, Iouri; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-07-01

    The aging Fermilab Booster RF system needs an upgrade to support future experimental program. The important feature of the upgrade is substantial enhancement of the requirements for the accelerating cavities. The new requirements include enlargement of the cavity beam pipe aperture, increase of the cavity voltage and increase in the repetition rate. The modification of the present traditional parallel biased ferrite cavities is rather challenging. An alternative to rebuilding the present Fermilab Booster RF cavities is to design and construct new perpendicular biased RF cavities, which potentially offer a number of advantages. An evaluation and a preliminary design of the perpendicular biased ferrite tuned cavities for the Fermilab Booster upgrade is described in the paper. Also it is desirable for better Booster performance to improve the capture of beam in the Booster during injection and at the start of the ramp. One possible way to do that is to flatten the bucket by introducing second harmonic cavities into the Booster. This paper also looks into the option of using perpendicularly biased ferrite tuners for the second harmonic cavities.

  15. Study of Zn-Cu Ferrite Nanoparticles for LPG Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anuj; Baranwal, Ravi Kant; Bharti, Ajaya; Vakil, Z.; Prajapati, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured zinc-copper mixed ferrite was synthesized using sol-gel method. XRD patterns of different compositions of zinc-copper ferrite, Zn(1−x)CuxFe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75), revealed single phase inverse spinel ferrite in all the samples synthesized. With increasing copper concentration, the crystallite size was found to be increased from 28 nm to 47 nm. The surface morphology of all the samples studied by the Scanning Electron Microscopy there exhibits porous structure of particles throughout the samples. The pellets of the samples are prepared for LPG sensing characteristics. The sensing is carried out at different operating temperatures (200, 225, and 250°C) with the variation of LPG concentrations (0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 vol%). The maximum sensitivity of 55.33% is observed at 250°C operating for the 0.6 vol% LPG. PMID:23864833

  16. Effect of Austenization Temperature on the Microstructure and Strength of 9% and 12% Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Terry C. Totemeier

    2004-10-01

    The effect of reduced-temperature austenization on the microstructure and strength of two ferritic-martensitic steels was studied. Prototypic 9% and 12% Cr steels, grade 91 (9Cr-1MoVNb) and type 422 stainless (12Cr-1MoVW), respectively, were austenized at 925°C and 1050°C and tempered at 760°C. The reduced austenization temperature was intended to simulate potential inadequate austenization during field construction of large structures and also the thermal cycle experienced in the Type IV region of weld heat affected zones (HAZ). The microstructure, tensile behavior, and creep strength were characterized for both steels treated at each condition. The reduced austenization temperature resulted in general coarsening of carbides in both steels and polygonization of the tempered martensite structure in type 422. For this steel, a marked reduction in microhardness was observed, while there was little change in microhardness for grade 91. Slight reductions in tensile strength were observed for both steels at room temperature and elevated temperatures of 450 and 550°C. The strength reduction was greater for type 422 than for grade 91. At 650°C the tensile strength reduction was minimal for both steels. Marked reductions in creep rupture lives were observed for both steels at 650°C; the reductions were less at 600°C and minimal at 550°C. Overall, the higher Cr content steel was observed to be more sensitive to variations in heat treatment conditions.

  17. Phase Transformation in Cast Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Phillips, Nathaniel Steven

    2006-01-01

    Superaustenitic stainless steels constitute a group of Fe-based alloys that are compositionally balanced to have a purely austenitic matrix and exhibit favorable pitting and crevice corrosion resistant properties and mechanical strength. However, intermetallic precipitates such as sigma and Laves can form during casting or exposure to high-temperature processing, which degrade the corrosion and mechanical properties of the material. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the solid-solid phase transformations seen in cast superaustenitic stainless steels. Heat treatments were performed to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formations in alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, WDS). The equilibrium microstructures, composed primarily of sigma and Laves within purely austenitic matrices, showed slow transformation kinetics. Factors that determine the extent of transformation, including diffusion, nucleation, and growth, are discussed.

  18. Microleakage of cements for stainless steel crowns.

    PubMed

    Shiflett, K; White, S N

    1997-01-01

    Microleakage is related to recurrent decay, inflammation of vital pulps, and reinfection of previously treated root canals. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the abilities of new adhesive cements and conventional nonadhesive controls to prevent microleakage under stainless steel crowns on primary anterior teeth. Standardized preparations were made, and stainless steel crowns were adapted. Specimens were assigned randomly to cement groups: zinc phosphate (ZP), polycarboxylate (PC), glass-ionomer (GI), resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI), RMGI with a dentin bonding agent (RMGI + DBA), adhesive composite resin (ACR) and zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE). Specimens were stored in water, aged artificially, stained, embedded, and sectioned, and the microleakage was measured. Group means and standard errors were calculated. ANOVA discerned differences among groups (P < 0.0001), and Turkey's multiple comparisons testing (P < 0.05) ranked the groups from least to most microleakage as follows: [RMGI + DBA, RMGI, ACR, GI], [ZP], and [PC, ZOE]. The adhesive cements significantly reduced microleakage.

  19. Tritium Depth Profiles in 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torikai, Yuji; Murata, Daiju; Penzhorn, Ralf-Dieter; Akaishi, Kenya; Watanabe, Kuniaki; Matsuyama, Masao

    To investigate the behavior of hydrogen uptake and release by 316 stainless steel (SS316), as-received and finely polished stainless steel specimens were exposed at 573 K to tritium gas diluted with hydrogen. Then tritium concentration in the exposed specimens was measured as a function of depth using a chemical etching method. All the tritium concentration profiles showed a sharp drop in the range of 10 μm from the top surface up to the bulk. The amount of tritium absorbed into the polished specimens was three times larger than that into the as-received specimen. However, the polishing effects disappeared by exposing to the air for a long time.

  20. Weldability of Additive Manufactured Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matilainen, Ville-Pekka; Pekkarinen, Joonas; Salminen, Antti

    Part size in additive manufacturing is limited by the size of building area of AM equipment. Occasionally, larger constructions that AM machines are able to produce, are needed, and this creates demand for welding AM parts together. However there is very little information on welding of additive manufactured stainless steels. The aim of this study was to investigate the weldability aspects of AM material. In this study, comparison of the bead on plate welds between AM parts and sheet metal parts is done. Used material was 316L stainless steel, AM and sheet metal, and parts were welded with laser welding. Weld quality was evaluated visually from macroscopic images. Results show that there are certain differences in the welds in AM parts compared to the welds in sheet metal parts. Differences were found in penetration depths and in type of welding defects. Nevertheless, this study presents that laser welding is suitable process for welding AM parts.

  1. Electrodeposition of Mn-Co Alloys on Stainless Steels for SOFC Interconnect Application

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Jiang, Y.; Johnson, C.; Gong, M.; Liu, X.

    2007-09-01

    Chromium-containing ferritic stainless steels are the most popular materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnect applications because of its oxidation resistance and easy fabrication process. However, excessive scale growth and chromium evaporation will degrade the cell performance. Highly conductive coatings that resist oxide scale growth and chromium evaporation may prevent both of these problems. Mn1.5Co1.5O4 spinel is one of the most promising coatings for interconnect application because of its high conducitivy, good chromium retention capability, as well as good CTE match. Electroplating of alloys or thin film multilayers followed by controlled oxidation to the desired spinel phase offers an additional deposition option. In the present study binary Mn/Co alloys was fabricated by electrodeposition, and polarization curves were used to characterize the cathodic reactions on substrate surface. By controlling the current density precisely, coatings with Mn/Co around 1:1 has been successfully deposited in Mn/Co =10 solutions, SEM and EDX was used to characterize the surface morphology and composition.

  2. The influence of Si content on the oxidation behavior of Type 430 stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-09-01

    Trace “alloying” elements can significantly affect alloy performance. One example is the effect of residual Si content on the oxidation behavior of stainless steels. Small amounts of Si can form a continuous SiO2 layer at the metal-oxide scale interface. This is beneficial for enhancing oxidation resistance; however it is detrimental for fuel cell interconnect application, as SiO2 is an electrical insulator. In order to assess the effect of SiO2 on the performance of Type 430 ferritic steel, a potential interconnect alloy, a series of custom 430 alloys were melted and reduced to sheet with controlled Si contents (ranging from <0.01 to 0.1 wt% Si). Oxidation tests were conducted at 800oC in moist air. The behavior was compared to a commercial Type 430 alloy (with 0.4 wt%Si) and Crofer 22APU. It was found that for the 430 alloys, the oxidation rate increased with decreasing Si content. However, after 4000 hour of exposure, the mass gain for the low Si 430 alloys was comparable to Crofer 22APU.

  3. Mechanical Properties of Super Duplex Stainless Steel 2507 after Gas Phase Thermal Precharging with Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Marchi, C.; Somerday, B. P.; Zelinski, J.; Tang, X.; Schiroky, G. H.

    2007-11-01

    Thermal precharging of super duplex stainless steel 2507 with 125 wppm hydrogen significantly reduced tensile ductility and fracture toughness. Strain-hardened 2507 exhibited more severe ductility loss compared to the annealed microstructure. The reduction of area (RA) was between 80 and 85 pct for both microstructures in the noncharged condition, while reductions of area were 25 and 46 pct for the strain-hardened and annealed microstructures, respectively, after hydrogen precharging. Similar to the effect of internal hydrogen on tensile ductility, fracture toughness of strain-hardened 2507 was lowered from nearly 300 MPa m1/2 in the noncharged condition to less than 60 MPa m1/2 in the hydrogen-precharged condition. While precharging 2507 with hydrogen results in a considerable reduction in ductility and toughness, the absolute values are similar to high-strength austenitic steels that have been tested under the same conditions, and which are generally considered acceptable for high-pressure hydrogen gas systems. The fracture mode in hydrogen-precharged 2507 involved cleavage cracking of the ferrite phase and ductile fracture along oblique planes in the austenite phase, compared to 100 pct microvoid coalescence in the absence of hydrogen. Predictions from a strain-based micromechanical fracture toughness model were in good agreement with the measured fracture toughness of hydrogen-precharged 2507, implying a governing role of austenite for resistance to hydrogen-assisted fracture.

  4. Previous heat treatment inducing different plasma nitriding behaviors in martensitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, C. A.; Alvarez, F.; Mitchell, D. R. G.; Collins, G. A.; Short, K. T.

    2006-09-15

    In this work we report a study of the induced changes in structure and corrosion behavior of martensitic stainless steels nitrided by plasma immersion ion implantation (PI{sup 3}) at different previous heat treatments. The samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction and glancing angle x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic measurements. Depending on the proportion of retained austenite in the unimplanted material, different phase transformations are obtained at lower and intermediate temperatures of nitrogen implantation. At higher temperatures, the great mobility of the chromium yields CrN segregations like spots in random distribution, and the {alpha}{sup '}-martensite is degraded to{alpha}-Fe (ferrite). The nitrided layer thickness follows a fairly linear relationship with the temperature and a parabolic law with the process time. The corrosion resistance depends strongly on chromium segregation from the martensitic matrix, as a result of the formation of CrN during the nitrogen implantation process and the formation of Cr{sub x}C during the heat treatment process. Briefly speaking, the best results are obtained using low tempering temperature and low implantation temperature (below 375 deg. ) due to the increment of the corrosion resistance and nitrogen dissolution in the structure with not too high diffusion depths (about 5-10 {mu}m)

  5. Thin films with chemically graded functionality based on fluorine polymers and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Piedade, A P; Nunes, J; Vieira, M T

    2008-07-01

    Thin films of stainless steel and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) were co-deposited, by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering, in an inert atmosphere in order to produce a functionally graded material as a coating on a traditional biomaterial, where non-ferromagnetic characteristics and improved wettability must be ensured. These thin films are intended to modify the surface of SS316L used in stents, where the bulk/thin film couple should be regarded as a single material. This requires excellent adhesion of the coating to the substrate. All coatings were deposited with an average thickness of 500 nm. The chemical and phase characterization of the surface revealed that, with the increase in F content, the thin film evolves from a ferritic phase (alpha) to an amorphous phase with dispersion of a new crystalline ceramic phase (FeF(2)). For intermediate F content values, an austenitic (111) phase (gamma) was present. Bearing in mind the envisaged application, the best results were attained for thin films with a fluorine content between 10 and 20 at.%.

  6. Residual stresses in oxide scale formed on Fe-17Cr stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Xiao, Ji; Prud'homme, Nathalie; Chen, Zhe; Ji, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate residual stresses in the oxide scale formed on ferritic stainless steel, which is proposed to be used as interconnector in the planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The oxidation of the alloy has been conducted at 700 °C, 800 °C and 900 °C for 12-96 h by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) system. The oxide surface morphology, cross-section microstructure and the chemical composition of the oxide scale were studied after oxidation, and the residual stresses distribution of the oxide scale were determined at room temperature. It has been found that the oxide scale composed of an inner Cr2O3 layer and an outer Mn1.5Cr1.5O4 spinel layer, the residual stresses in both oxide layers are compressive and the growth stresses plays an important role. The competition of the stresses generation and relaxation during oxidation and cooling affects the residual stresses level. The evolution of residual stresses in the two layers is different according to the oxidation temperature, and the stresses in the two layers are interactional.

  7. Cracking behavior of thermally aged and irradiated CF-8 cast austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Alexandreanu, B.; Chen, W.-Y.; Natesan, K.; Li, Z.; Yang, Y.; Rao, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    To assess the combined effect of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the cracking behavior of CF-8 cast austenitic stainless steel, crack growth rate (CGR) and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were carried out on compact-tension specimens in high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen. Both unaged and thermally aged specimens were irradiated at ∼320 °C to 0.08 dpa. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h apparently had no effect on the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking behavior in the test environment. The cracking susceptibility of CF-8 was not elevated significantly by neutron irradiation at 0.08 dpa. Transgranular cleavage-like cracking was the main fracture mode during the CGR tests, and a brittle morphology of delta ferrite was often seen on the fracture surfaces at the end of CGR tests. The fracture toughness J-R curve tests showed that both thermal aging and neutron irradiation can induce significant embrittlement. The loss of fracture toughness due to neutron irradiation was more pronounced in the unaged than aged specimens. After neutron irradiation, the fracture toughness values of the unaged and aged specimens were reduced to a similar level. G-phase precipitates were observed in the aged and irradiated specimens with or without prior aging. The similar microstructural changes resulting from thermal aging and irradiation suggest a common microstructural mechanism of inducing embrittlement in CF-8.

  8. Precipitation and Phase Transformations in 2101 Lean Duplex Stainless Steel During Isothermal Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maetz, Jean-Yves; Cazottes, Sophie; Verdu, Catherine; Kleber, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The effect of isothermal aging at 963 K (690 °C) on the microstructure of a 2101 lean duplex stainless steel, with the composition Fe-21.5Cr-5Mn-1.6Ni-0.22N-0.3Mo, was investigated using a multi-technique and multi-scale approach. The kinetics of phase transformation and precipitation was followed from a few minutes to thousands of hours using thermoelectric power measurements; based on these results, certain aging states were selected for electron microscopy characterization. Scanning electron microscopy, electron back-scattered diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy were used to quantitatively describe the microstructural evolution through crystallographic analysis, chemical analysis, and volume fraction measurements from the macroscopic scale down to the nanometric scale. During aging, the precipitation of M23C6 carbides, Cr2N nitrides, and σ phase as well as the transformation of ferrite into austenite and austenite into martensite was observed. These complex microstructural changes are controlled by Cr volume diffusion. The precipitation and phase transformation mechanisms are described.

  9. The Effect of Silicon and Aluminum Additions on the Oxidation Resistance of Lean Chromium Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, J.S.; Alman, D.E.; Rawers, J.C.

    2001-09-01

    The effect of Si and Al additions on the oxidation of lean chromium austenitic stainless steels has been studied. A baseline composition of Fe-16Cr-16Ni-2Mn-1Mo was selected to allow combined Si and Al additions of up to 5 wt. pct. in a fully austenitic alloy. The baseline composition was selected using a net Cr equivalent equation to predict the onset of G-ferrite formation in austenite. Cyclic oxidation tests in air for 1000 hours were carried out on alloys with Si only or combined Si and Al additions in the temperature range 700 C to 800 C. Oxidation resistance of alloys with Si only additions were outstanding, particularly at 800 C. It was evident that different rate controlling mechanisms for oxidation were operative at 700 C and 800 C in the Si alloys. In addition, Si alloys pre-oxidized at 800 C, showed a zero weight gain in subsequent testing for 1000 hours at 700 C. The rate controlling mechanism in alloys with combined Si and Al addition for oxidation at 800 C was also different than alloys with Si only. SEM and ESCA analysis of the oxide films and base material at the oxide/base metal interface were conducted to study potential rate controlling mechanisms.

  10. High Nb, Ta, and Al creep- and oxidation-resistant austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel HTUPS alloy includes, in weight percent: 15 to 30 Ni; 10 to 15 Cr; 2 to 5 Al; 0.6 to 5 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1 W; up to 0.5 Cu; up to 4 Mn; up to 1 Si; 0.05 to 0.15 C; up to 0.15 B; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni wherein said alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, said particles comprising at least one composition selected from the group consisting of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure, said austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  11. Strengthening of σ phase in a Fe20Cr9Ni cast austenite stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.Q.; Han, J.; Yang, B.; Wang, X.T.

    2013-10-15

    The strengthening mechanism of σ phase in a Fe20Cr9Ni cast austenite stainless steel used for primary coolant pipes of nuclear power plants has been investigated. The yield and ultimate tensile strengths of aged specimens increased comparing with those of the unaged ones. It was found that the increase of strengths is due to the hard and brittle (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure which decomposed from α phase in the steel. Fracture surfaces of specimens after in situ tensile test showed that the inhibition of (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure on the dislocation movements was more significant than ferrite although cracks started predominately at σ/γ{sub 2} interfaces. The (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure behaves like a fiber reinforced composite material. - Highlights: • The strengthening mechanism of σ phase in a Fe20Cr9Ni CASS is investigated. • The yield and ultimate tensile strengths increase with increasing of σ phase. • The increase of strengths is due to hard and brittle (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure. • The (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure in CASS behaves like a fibre reinforced composite material. • The σ/γ{sub 2} and α/σ/γ{sub 2} boundaries hinder the movement of dislocation.

  12. Influence of nitrogen in the shielding gas on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, R. B.; Kamat, H. S.; Ghosal, S. K.; de, P. K.

    1999-10-01

    The influence of nitrogen in shielding gas on the corrosion resistance of welds of a duplex stainless steel (grade U-50), obtained by gas tungsten arc (GTA) with filler wire, autogenous GTA (bead-on-plate), electron beam welding (EBW), and microplasma techniques, has been evaluated in chloride solutions at 30 °C. Pitting attack has been observed in GTA, electron beam welding, and microplasma welds when welding has been carried out using pure argon as the shielding gas. Gas tungsten arc welding with 5 to 10% nitrogen and 90 to 95% argon, as the shielding gas, has been found to result in an improved pitting corrosion resistance of the weldments of this steel. However, the resistance to pitting of autogenous welds (bead-on-plate) obtained in pure argon as the shielding gas has been observed to remain unaffected. Microscopic examination, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and x-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the presence of nitrogen in the shielding gas in the GTA welds not only modifies the microstructure and the austenite to ferrite ratio but also results in a nearly uniform distribution of the various alloying elements, for example, chromium, nickel, and molybdenum among the constitutent phases, which are responsible for improved resistance to pitting corrosion.

  13. Effect of alloying elements and residuals on corrosion resistance of type 444 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, N.J.E.; Kim, Y.H.; Ahn, S.K.; Lee, Y.D.

    1999-02-01

    The principal criteria for the corrosion resistance of intermediate-grade ferritic stainless steels (SS) were examined in a neutral chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}) solution. The effect of increasing quantities of chromium and molybdenum was estimated for several heats in terms of the breakdown potential (E{sub b}). The effect of inclusions (particularly the oxide-sulfide type) in type 444 SS ([UNS S44400] 19% Cr-2% Mo-Nb or 19% Cr-2% Mo alloy), combined with the alloying element trend, permitted derivation of an expression that integrated both phenomena. The expression represents the mutually opposing effects of the chromium/molybdenum passive film reinforcement as represented by the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN), as well as incorporating the deleterious contribution of the inclusion density ({Psi}/mm{sup 2}). Aluminum reduced the total inclusion content, which was associated with an increase in E{sub b}. Since no aluminum was detected in the passive film of high aluminum steels, it appeared likely that the prime effect of this element on corrosion resistance was via inclusion suppression. Corrosion studies of welded type 444 SS demonstrated that dual stabilization with low individual concentrations of titanium and niobium provided optimum corrosion resistance. This apparent synergism of niobium and titanium was independent of the surface of the welded materials, which were examined in the as-received, pickled, or polished states. The effect of the surface state in all cases was shown to exercise a critical effect on passive behavior.

  14. Complete and Incomplete Wetting of Ferrite Grain Boundaries by Austenite in the Low-Alloyed Ferritic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straumal, B. B.; Kucheev, Y. O.; Efron, L. I.; Petelin, A. L.; Majumdar, J. Dutta; Manna, I.

    2012-05-01

    Low-carbon low-alloyed ferritic steels are the main material for the production of high-strength pipes for the transportation of oil and gas. The formation of brittle carbide network during the lifetime of a pipeline could be a reason for a catastrophic failure. Among other reasons, it can be controlled by the morphology of grain boundary (GB) carbides. The microstructure of a low-alloyed ferritic steel containing 0.09 at.% C and small amounts of Si, Mn, Nb, Cu, Al, Ni, and Cr was studied between 300 and 900 °C. The samples were annealed very long time (700 to 4000 h) in order to produce the equilibrium morphology of phases. The (α-Fe)/(α-Fe) GBs can be either completely or incompletely wetted (covered) by the γ-Fe (austenite) above the temperature of eutectoid transition. The portion of (α-Fe)/(α-Fe) GBs completely wetted by γ-Fe is around 90% and does not change much between 750 and 900 °C. The (α-Fe)/(α-Fe) GBs can be either completely or incompletely wetted (covered) by the Fe3C (cementite) below the temperature of eutectoid transition. The portion of (α-Fe)/(α-Fe) GBs completely wetted by Fe3C changes below 680 °C between 67 and 77%. The formation of the network of brittle cementite layers between ductile ferrite grains can explain the catastrophic failure of gas- and oil-pipelines after a certain lifetime.

  15. Softened-Stainless-Steel O-Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquis, G. A.; Waters, William I.

    1993-01-01

    In fabrication of O-ring of new type, tube of 304 stainless steel bent around mandril into circle and welded closed into ring. Ring annealed in furnace to make it soft and highly ductile. In this condition, used as crushable, deformable O-ring seal. O-ring replacements used in variety of atmospheres and temperatures, relatively inexpensive, fabricated with minimum amount of work, amenable to one-of-a-kind production, reusable, and environmentally benign.

  16. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  17. Properties of cryogenically worked metals. [stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzberg, F. R.; Kiefer, T. F.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine whether the mechanical properties of cryogenically worked 17-7PH stainless steel are suitable for service from ambient to cryogenic temperatures. It was determined that the stress corrosion resistance of the cryo-worked material is quite adequate for structural service. The tensile properties and fracture toughness at room temperature were comparable to titanium alloy 6Al-4V. However, at cryogenic temperatures, the properties were not sufficient to recommend consideration for structural service.

  18. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; T. E. Rahl; S. D. Snow

    2005-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates (10 to 200 per second) during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these materials under dynamic (impact) loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. The goal of the work presented in this paper was to improve understanding of moderate strain rate phenomena on these materials. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and relatively large test specimens (1/2-inch thick), initial test efforts focused on the tensile behavior of specific stainless steel materials during impact loading. Impact tests of 304L and 316L stainless steel test specimens at two different strain rates, 25 per second (304L and 316L material) and 50 per second (304L material) were performed for comparison to their quasi-static tensile test properties. Elevated strain rate stress-strain curves for the two materials were determined using the impact test machine and a “total impact energy” approach. This approach considered the deformation energy required to strain the specimens at a given strain rate. The material data developed was then utilized in analytical simulations to validate the final elevated stress-strain curves. The procedures used during testing and the results obtained are described in this paper.

  19. SRS stainless steel beneficial reuse program

    SciTech Connect

    Boettinger, W.L.

    1997-02-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) has thousands of tons of stainless steel radioactive scrap metal (RSNI). Much of the metal is volumetrically contaminated. There is no {open_quotes}de minimis{close_quotes} free release level for volumetric material, and therefore no way to recycle the metal into the normal commercial market. If declared waste, the metal would qualify as low level radioactive waste (LLW) and ultimately be dispositioned through shallow land buried at a cost of millions of dollars. The metal however could be recycled in a {open_quotes}controlled release{close_quote} manner, in the form of containers to hold other types of radioactive waste. This form of recycle is generally referred to as {open_quotes}Beneficial Reuse{close_quotes}. Beneficial reuse reduces the amount of disposal space needed and reduces the need for virgin containers which would themselves become contaminated. Stainless steel is particularly suited for long term storage because of its resistance to corrosion. To assess the practicality of stainless steel RSM recycle the SRS Benficial Reuse Program began a demonstration in 1994, funded by the DOE Office of Science and Technology. This paper discusses the experiences gained in this program.

  20. Antimicrobial Cu-bearing stainless steel scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Ren, Ling; Li, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Shuyuan; Sercombe, Timothy B; Yang, Ke

    2016-11-01

    Copper-bearing stainless steel scaffolds with two different structures (Body Centered Cubic and Gyroid labyrinth) at two solid fractions (25% and 40%) were fabricated from both 316L powder and a mixture of 316L and elemental Cu powder using selective laser melting, and relative 316L scaffolds were served as control group. After processing, the antimicrobial testing demonstrated that the 316L-Cu scaffolds presented excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and the cell viability assay indicated that there was no cytotoxic effect of 316L-Cu scaffolds on rat marrow mesenchymal stem cells. As such, these have the potential to reduce implant-associated infections. The Cu was also found to homogeneously distribute within the microstructure by scanning electronic microcopy. The addition of Cu would not significantly affect its strength and stiffness compared to 316L scaffold, and the stiffness of all the scaffolds (3-20GPa) is similar to that of bone and much less than that of bulk stainless steel. Consequently, fabrication of such low stiffness porous structures, especially coupled with the addition of antimicrobial Cu, may provide a new direction for medical stainless steels. PMID:27524049