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Sample records for 40ar 39ar ages

  1. 39Ar- 40Ar ages of martian nakhlites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jisun; Garrison, Daniel H.; Bogard, Donald D.

    2009-04-01

    We report 39Ar- 40Ar ages of whole rock (WR) and plagioclase and pyroxene mineral separates of nakhlites MIL 03346 and Y-000593, and of WR samples of nakhlites NWA 998 and Nakhla. All age spectra are complex and indicate variable degrees of 39Ar recoil and variable amounts of trapped 40Ar in the samples. Thus, we examine possible Ar-Ar ages in several ways. From consideration of both limited plateau ages and isochron ages, we prefer Ar-Ar ages of NWA 998 = 1334 ± 11 Ma, MIL 03346 = 1368 ± 83 Ma (mesostasis) and 1334 ± 54 Ma (pyroxene), Y-000593 = 1367 ± 7 Ma, and Nakhla = 1357 ± 11 Ma, (2 σ errors). For NWA 998 and MIL 03346 the Ar-Ar ages are within uncertainties of preliminary Rb-Sr isochron ages reported in the literature. These Ar-Ar ages for Y-000593 and Nakhla are several Ma older than Sm-Nd ages reported in the literature. We conclude that the major factor in producing Ar-Ar ages slightly too old is the presence of small amounts of trapped martian or terrestrial 40Ar on weathered grain surfaces that was degassed along with the first several percent of 39Ar. A total K- 40Ar isochron for WR and mineral data from five nakhlites analyzed by us, plus Lafayette data in the literature, gives an isochron age of 1325 ± 18 Ma (2 σ). We emphasize the precision of this isochron over the value of the isochron age. Our Ar-Ar data are consistent with a common formation age for nakhlites. The cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) age for NWA 998 of ˜12 Ma is also similar to CRE ages for other nakhlites.

  2. 39Ar-40Ar "ages" and origin of excess 40Ar in Martian shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogard, Donald; Park, Jisun; Garrison, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    We report new 39Ar-40Ar measurements on 15 plagioclase, pyroxene, and/or whole rock samples of 8 Martian shergottites. All age spectra suggest ages older than the meteorite formation ages, as defined by Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isochrons. Employing isochron plots, only Los Angeles plagioclase and possibly Northwest Africa (NWA) 3171 plagioclase give ages in agreement with their formation ages. Isochrons for all shergottite samples reveal the presence of trapped Martian 40Ar (40Arxs), which exists in variable amounts in different lattice locations. Some 40Arxs is uniformly distributed throughout the lattice, resulting in a positive isochron intercept, and other 40Arxs occurs in association with K-bearing minerals and increases the isochron slope. These samples demonstrate situations where linear Ar isochrons give false ages that are too old. After subtracting 40Ar*that would accumulate by 40K decay since meteorite formation and small amounts of terrestrial 40Ar, all young age samples give similar 40Arxs concentrations of ˜1-2 × 10-6cm3/g, but a variation in K content by a factor of ˜80. Previously reported NASA Johnson Space Center data for Zagami, Shergotty, Yamato (Y-) 000097, Y-793605, and Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201 shergottites show similar concentrations of 40Arxs to the new meteorite data reported here. Similar 40Arxs in different minerals and meteorites cannot be explained as arising from Martian atmosphere carried in strongly shocked phases such as melt veins. We invoke the explanation given by Bogard and Park (2008) for Zagami, that this 40Arxs in shergottites was acquired from the magma. Similarity in 40Arxs among shergottites may reveal common magma sources and/or similar magma generation and emplacement processes.

  3. Interpretation of discordant 40Ar/39Ar age-spectra of mesozoic tholeiites from antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, R.J.; Sutter, J.F.; Elliot, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    Conventional K-Ar ages of tholeiitic basalts of the Ferrar Group in the central Transantarctic Mountains indicate significant loss of radiogenic 40Ar from this unit over much of its outcrop area. Argon loss varies inversely with amount of devitrified matrix in the basalts, which have not been thermally or tectonically disturbed since extrusion. 40Ar/19Ar age-spectra of these tholeiites are generally discordant and indicate significant inhomogeneity in the distribution of radiogenic 40Ar with respect to 39Ar, but are distinctly different from release patterns of thermally disturbed samples. Amounts of argon redistribution vary directly with amounts of devitrification and are reflected in progressive modification of the age spectra. A model of redistribution of radiogenic 40Ar by devitrification of originally glassy matrix is suggested that is consistent with disturbance of the conventional K-Ar systematics as well as the 40Ar/39Ar age-spectra. Samples with substantial redistribution but minor loss of radiogenic argon yield age spectra whose apparent ages decrease from low-temperature to high-temperature steps, similar to those reported for some lunar basalts, breccias, and soils. Modification of all the age spectra is attributed to redistribution of radiogenic 40Ar during progressive devitrification, although 39Ar-recoil effects suggested by Turner and Cadogan (1974) may be a factor in some cases. Where devitrification involves most potassium sites within the basalt, 40Ar/39Ar age-plateaux may be formed that have no geologic significance. ?? 1977.

  4. 40Ar/39Ar ages of the AD 79 eruption of Vesuvius, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, Marvin A.; Champion, Duane E.; Melluso, Leone; Morra, Vincenzo; Perrotta, Annamaria; Scarpati, Claudio; Tedesco, Dario; Calvert, Andrew T.

    2007-01-01

    The Italian volcano, Vesuvius, erupted explosively in AD 79. Sanidine from pumice collected at Casti Amanti in Pompeii and Villa Poppea in Oplontis yielded a weighted-mean 40Ar/39Ar age of 1925±66 years in 2004 (1σ uncertainty) from incremental-heating experiments of eight aliquants of sanidine. This is the calendar age of the eruption. Our results together with the work of Renne et al. (1997) and Renne and Min (1998) demonstrate the validity of the 40Ar/39Ar method to reconstruct the recent eruptive history of young, active volcanoes.

  5. 40Ar/39Ar ages of the AD 79 eruption of Vesuvius, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanphere, Marvin; Champion, Duane; Melluso, Leone; Morra, Vincenzo; Perrotta, Annamaria; Scarpati, Claudio; Tedesco, Dario; Calvert, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The Italian volcano, Vesuvius, erupted explosively in AD 79. Sanidine from pumice collected at Casti Amanti in Pompeii and Villa Poppea in Oplontis yielded a weighted-mean 40Ar/39Ar age of 1925±66 years in 2004 (1σ uncertainty) from incremental-heating experiments of eight aliquants of sanidine. This is the calendar age of the eruption. Our results together with the work of Renne et al. (1997) and Renne and Min (1998) demonstrate the validity of the 40Ar/39Ar method to reconstruct the recent eruptive history of young, active volcanoes.

  6. 40Ar/39Ar Ages of Carbonaceous Xenoliths in 2 HED Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turrin, B.; Lindsay, F. N.; Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III; Johnson, J.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    The generally young K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages of CM chondrites made us wonder whether carbonaceous xenoliths (CMX) entombed in Howardite–Eucrite–Diogenite (HED) meteorites might retain more radiogenic 40Ar than do ‘free-range’ CM-chondrites. To find out, we selected two HED breccias with carbonaceous inclusions in order to compare the 40Ar/39Ar release patterns and ages of the inclusions with those of nearby HED material. Carbonaceous inclusions (CMXs) in two HED meteorites lost a greater fraction of radiogenic 40Ar than did surrounding host material, but a smaller fraction of it than did free-range CM-chondrites such as Murchison or more heavily altered ones. Importantly, however, the siting of the CMXs in HED matrix did not prevent the 40Ar loss of about 40 percent of the radiogenic 40Ar, even from phases that degas at high laboratory temperatures. We infer that carbonaceous asteroids with perihelia of 1 astronomical unit probably experience losses of at least this size. The usefulness of 40Ar/39Ar dating for samples returned from C-type asteroids may hinge, therefore, on identifying and analyzing separately small quantities of the most retentive phases of carbonaceous chondrites.

  7. Metrologically-Calibrated 40Ar Concentrations and Ages of Mineral Standards Used in 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Davidheiser-Kroll, B.; Kuiper, K.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Mark, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    In geochronology, isotopic ages are determined from the ratio of parent and daughter nuclide concentrations in minerals. For dating of geological material using the K-Ar system, the simultaneous determination of 40Ar and 40K concentrations on the same aliquot is not possible. Therefore, a widely used variant, the 40Ar/39Ar technique, involves the production of 39Ar from 39K by neutron bombardment and the reliance on indirect natural calibrators of the neutron flux, referred to as "mineral standards." Many mineral standards still in use rely on decades-old determinations of 40Ar concentrations; resulting uncertainties, both systematic and analytical, impede the determination of higher accuracy ages using the K-Ar decay system. We present results for the 40Ar concentrations and ages of mineral standards determined based on a modern gas delivery system (Morgan et al. 2011), which delivers metrologically-traceable amounts of 40Ar and thus allows for the sensitivity calibration of noble gas mass spectrometers.

  8. Age and origin of carlsbad cavern and related caves from 40Ar/39Ar of alunite

    PubMed

    Polyak; McIntosh; Guven; Provencio

    1998-03-20

    40Ar/39Ar dating of fine-grained alunite that formed during cave genesis provides ages of formation for the Big Room level of Carlsbad Cavern [4.0 to 3.9 million years ago (Ma)], the upper level of Lechuguilla Cave (6.0 to 5.7 Ma), and three other hypogene caves (11.3 to 6.0 Ma) in the Guadalupe Mountains of New Mexico. Alunite ages increase and are strongly correlative with cave elevations, which indicates an 1100-meter decline in the water table, apparently related to tectonic uplift and tilting, from 11.3 Ma to the present. 40Ar/39Ar dating studies of the hypogene caves have the potential to help resolve late Cenozoic climatic, speleologic, and tectonic questions.

  9. ArArCALC—software for 40Ar/ 39Ar age calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, Anthony A. P.

    2002-06-01

    ArArCALC is a Microsoft Excel ® 97-2000-XP application for performing calculations in 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology. It is coded in Visual Basic for Applications and can be used under the Windows ® 95/98/NT/2000/ME/XP operating systems. ArArCALC provides an easy-to-use graphical interface for the calculation of age plateaus, total fusion ages and isochrons following the regression of 40Ar/ 39Ar mass spectrometry data. Results are stored in single Excel workbooks including nine different data tables and four different diagrams. Analytical, internal and external errors are calculated based on error propagation of all input parameters, analytical data and applied corrections. Finally, the age calculation results can be recalibrated with reference to the primary K-Ar standards (e.g. GA-1550, MMhb-1) in order to obtain more consistent absolute40Ar/ 39Ar age determinations. ArArCALC is distributed as freeware.

  10. Unveiling Turrialba (Costa Rica) volcano's latest geological evolution through new 40Ar/39Ar, ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Cubillo, P.; Turrin, B. D.; Soto, G. J.; Del Potro, R.; Gagnevin, D.; Gazel, E.; Mora Fernandez, M.; Carr, M. J.; Swisher, C. C.

    2010-12-01

    Step-heating 40Ar/39Ar dating experiments on whole rock matrix were performed on samples from eight key lava flow units from Turrialba, the easternmost volcano of the Central Volcanic Range of Costa Rica. Our results, together with available corrected 14C ages, recent mapping and new geochemical analyses, are part of a study to reconstruct Turrialba’s evolution. The project is being conducted as part of wider studies because of the increase in volcanic activity during the last three years. The geochemical compositions of the lava flow units span the range from basalts to dacites, and commonly have high K2O concentrations, making them good candidates for 40Ar/39Ar radiometric dating. The ages reported here correspond to the Paleo Turrialba (600-250 ka) and Neo Turrialba (< 250 ka) temporal stages. Sample TUR-38 (251 ± 4 ka) belongs to the latest unit of Paleo Turrialba stage, known as Finca Liebres volcano, while the remaining seven samples belong to Neo Turrialba: TUR-30 (99 ± 3 ka), TUR-19 (90 ± 4 ka), TUR-32 (62 ± 2 ka) TUR-33 (61 ± 2 ka), TUR-12 (25 ± 1.9 ka), TUR-36 (10 ± 3 ka) and TUR-08 (3 ± 3 ka). All the obtained ages in this study are in agreement with the local stratigraphy and prior 14C age determinations, adding robustness to our results. According to ages obtained and the areal distribution of the sampled units, the most important construction period of the massif was during the Neo-Turrialba stage which has passed through two important constructing episodes, around 100-60 ka and 10 ka-present. Although our results include some very young ages, all of them meet the established evaluation criteria used for plateau and isochron ages, commonly used for 40Ar/39Ar dating. Furthermore, we used a protocol that closely monitors the mass spectrometer mass discrimination during the measurements to provide additional control. Three of the eight 40Ar/39Ar ages reported here are remarkably young (25 ka or less). Two of those are the samples with the

  11. Unmixing 40Ar/39Ar Muscovite Ages Using Powder X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAleer, R. J.; Kunk, M. J.; Valley, P. M.; Walsh, G. J.; Bish, D. L.; Wintsch, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    Whole rock powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments from eight samples collected across a retrograde ductile shear zone in the Devonian Littleton Formation near Claremont, NH, exhibit broad and asymmetric to bimodal muscovite 00l reflections. These composite 00l reflections exhibit a systematic change in shape with increasing retrograde strain. Microtextural relationships, electron microprobe quantitative analyses, and element mapping indicate that the change in peak shape reflects progressive dissolution of metastable Na-rich muscovite and the precipitation of stable Na-poor muscovite. 40Ar/39Ar step heating experiments on muscovite concentrates from these samples show a decrease in total gas age from 274 to 258 Ma as the highest strain zone is approached, and steps within individual spectra range in age by ~20 m.y. The correlation between age and 00l peak shape suggests that the argon isotopic system also tracks the dissolution-precipitation process. Furthermore, the variation in age during step heating indicates that these populations exhibit different in-vacuo degassing behavior. Comparison of whole rock and muscovite concentrate XRD patterns from the same samples shows that the mineral separation process can fractionate these muscovite populations. With this knowledge, four muscovite concentrates were prepared from a single hand sample, analyzed by XRD, and dated. Combining modal estimates from XRD experiments with total gas ages, the four splits narrowly define a mixing line that resolves end-member ages of 250 and 300 Ma for the neocrystallized and earlier high grade populations of muscovite, respectively. These ages are consistent with age data from all other samples. The results show that, in some settings, powder XRD provides a powerful and time effective method to both identify the existence of and establish the proportions of multiple compositional populations of muscovite prior to 40Ar/39Ar analysis. This approach will be especially useful in

  12. A method for intercalibration of U-Th-Pb and 40Ar- 39Ar ages in the Phanerozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve, Mike; Sandeman, Hamish A.; Davis, William J.

    2000-12-01

    The increasing analytical precision of 40Ar- 39Ar geochronological data and its use in studies that combine U-Pb and 40Ar- 39Ar data has necessitated derivation of a means to intercalibrate ages between the two isotopic systems. The primary determinants inhibiting accurate cross calibration are uncertainty in decay constant values and uncertainty in 40Ar∗/ 40K (usually presented as apparent age) for 40Ar- 39Ar standards, notably those derived from the Fish Canyon Tuff. By utilizing a monazite- and biotite bearing Oligocene ash flow tuff (MAC-83) as the primary standard material, precise U-Th-Pb and 40Ar- 39Ar ages can be derived. Because both isotopic systems should reflect closure during the instantaneous eruption event, the 24.21 ± 0.10 Ma 207Pb/ 235U age should match the age resulting from 40Ar- 39Ar biotite analysis. This forced equivalence will partly offset the effects of decay constant uncertainty. Furthermore, by co-irradiating Fish Canyon Tuff sanidine with MAC-83 biotite, the apparent age for Fish Canyon Tuff sanidine is back-calculated to 27.98 ± 0.15 Ma, relative to the MAC-83 207Pb/ 235U age. Hence, intercalibration between the two isotopic systems in a relative sense can be accomplished, allowing for a direct and valid comparison of ages. It is also shown that forcing equivalence of the two isotopic systems minimizes the effect of decay constant uncertainty for samples of Phanerozoic age.

  13. An alternative hypothesis for high-T 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum discordance in polyphase extraterrestrial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, W. S.; Shuster, D. L.; Renne, P. R.; Weiss, B. P.

    2009-12-01

    A common feature observed in 40Ar/39Ar age spectra of extraterrestrial (ET) rocks is a conspicuous decrease in the ages of high temperature extractions relative to lower temperature steps and a correlated increase in Ca/K, often succeeded by a monotonic increase in ages. This feature is routinely attributed to recoil-implanted 39Ar from a potassium (K)-rich donor phase into a K-poor receptor phase (e.g., 1,2). While 39Ar recoil redistribution is undoubtedly manifested in many terrestrial and ET 40Ar/39Ar whole-rock age spectra, it cannot easily explain the magnitude of high release temperature 40Ar*/39ArK anomalies observed in Martian meteorites ALH 84001 and Nakhla, as well as other course-grained meteorites and lunar rocks. Depending on the aliquot and sample, 50 - 100% of the pyroxene release spectra in ALH 84001 and Nakhla appear strongly perturbed to lower ages. As the mean recoil distance of 39Ar ~0.1 µm, the recoil hypothesis demands that a high-K phase be ubiquitously distributed amongst sub-micron to micron sized pyroxene crystals to account for the observed pyroxene age spectra. However, in both Nakhla and ALH 84001, pyroxene is often completely isolated from high-K phases and individual grains commonly exceed 100 µm in diameter. 40Ar/39Ar analyses of pyroxene-bearing terrestrial basalts, wherein fine-grained pyroxene and plagioclase are intimately adjoined, show that recoil-implanted 39Ar into pyroxene produces much less precipitous anomalies in 40Ar*/39ArK, as predicted by the recoil lengthscale. An alternative hypothesis is that whole-rock age spectra of ET samples with anomalously low ages at high temperatures may reflect diffusive 40Ar distributions within considerably degassed pyroxene grains. Owing to apparent differences in activation energies between glass and/or plagioclase and pyroxene, 40Ar may diffuse more rapidly from pyroxene under certain high-temperature conditions (i.e., above the temperature at which the extrapolated Ar Arrhenius

  14. 40Ar/39Ar and cosmic ray exposure ages of plagioclase-rich lithic fragments from Apollo 17 regolith, 78461

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, J. P.; Baldwin, S. L.; Delano, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    Argon isotopic data is used to assess the potential of low-mass samples collected by sample return missions on planetary objects (e.g., Moon, Mars, asteroids), to reveal planetary surface processes. We report the first 40Ar/39Ar ages and 38Ar cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages, determined for eleven submillimeter-sized (ranging from 0.06 to 1.2 mg) plagioclase-rich lithic fragments from Apollo 17 regolith sample 78461 collected at the base of the Sculptured Hills. Total fusion analysis was used to outgas argon from the lithic fragments. Three different approaches were used to determine 40Ar/39Ar ages and illustrate the sensitivity of age determination to the choice of trapped (40Ar/36Ar)t. 40Ar/39Ar ages range from ~4.0 to 4.4 Ga with one exception (Plag#10). Surface CRE ages, based on 38Ar, range from ~1 to 24 Ma. The relatively young CRE ages suggest recent re-working of the upper few centimeters of the regolith. The CRE ages may result from the effect of downslope movement of materials to the base of the Sculptured Hills from higher elevations. The apparent 40Ar/39Ar age for Plag#10 is >5 Ga and yielded the oldest CRE age (i.e., ~24 Ma). We interpret this data to indicate the presence of parentless 40Ar in Plag#10, originating in the lunar atmosphere and implanted in lunar regolith by solar wind. Based on a chemical mixing model, plagioclase compositions, and 40Ar/39Ar ages, we conclude that lithic fragments originated from Mg-suite of highland rocks, and none were derived from the mare region.

  15. High-precision 40Ar/39Ar age for the Jehol Biota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S.; Zhang, H.; Renne, P. R.; Fang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Abundant fossils of the terrestrial Jehol Biota, including plants, insects, dinosaurs, birds, mammals and freshwater invertebrates, were discovered from the Yixian Formation and the overlying Jiufotang Formation in Inner Mongolia, Hebei Province and Liaoning Province, northeastern China. Because of the exceptional preservation of fossils, the Jehol Biota is one of the most important Mesozoic fossil outcrops and referred to as a "Mesozoic Pompeii". The Jehol Biota has provided a rare opportunity to address questions about the origin of birds, the evolution of feathers and flight, the early diversification of angiosperms and the timing of the radiation of placental mammals. The Tuchengzi Formation, which lies unconformably just below the Yixian Formation and consists mainly of variegated sandstones, is less fossiliferous than the two overlying formations. However, dinosaur tracks, silicified wood and compressed plants are found in this formation. A systematic 40Ar/39Ar dating of the Yixian and the Jiufotang formations was undertaken to provide a framework for understanding the timing and duration of the Jehol Biota and evolutionary events represented within it. Furthermore, determining the absolute age of the Tuchengzi Formation provides information to interpret abundant dinosaur tracks within and provide better age constrains for the beginning of the Jehol Biota. Here we present robust high-precision 40Ar/39Ar data for six tuff samples and two basalt samples collected from the Tuchengzi, the Yixian and the Jiufotang formations near the classic outcrops in western Liaoning, NE China. We obtain an age of 139.5 ± 1.0 Ma for the uppermost Tuchengzi Formation, an age of 129.7 ± 0.5 Ma for a basaltic lava from the bottom of the Yixian Formation and an age of 122.1 ± 0.3 Ma for a tuff from the base of the overlying Jiufotang Formation. Our data indicate that the Yixian Formation was deposited during the Early Cretaceous, the Barremian to early Aptian, within a time span

  16. Duration of sedimentation of Creede Formation from 40Ar/39Ar ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, Marvin A.

    2000-01-01

    The Oligocene Creede Formation was deposited in the moat of the Creede caldera, which formed as a result of eruption of ythe Snowshoe Mountains Tuff. The Creede Formation in the two moat drill holes contains ash layers that are considered fallout tuffs derived from Fisher Dacite volcanoes that were erupting during accumulation of the Creede Formation. The duration of sedimentation of the Creede Formation could hnot be determinted directly by measuring the ages of the ash layers because 40Ar/39Ar ages of biotite from the asj layers do not stack in the correct stratigraphic order, indicating that the ash layers have been contaminated by biotite from older units. The duration of sedimentation is constrained by the ages of volcanic unites that stratigraphically bracket the Creede Formation. Pooling all ages for the underlyinh Snowshoe Mountain Tuff yields an age of 26.92 ± 0.07 Ma for the unit. The age of the stratigraphically highest lavas of Fisher Dacite, which overlie the Creede Formation, is 26.26 ± 0.04 Ma. The two limits give a maximum duration for sedimentation of the Creede Formation of 0.66 m.y. Using the ages of older Fisher Dacite lavas, on which some beds of the Creede Formation were deposited, a more realistic maximum duration of 0.34 m.y. for sedimentation of the Creede Formation can be determined.

  17. (40)Ar/(39)Ar Age of Hornblende-Bearing R Chondrite LAP 04840

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Cosca, M.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrites have a complex chronology due to several variables affecting and operating on chondritic parent bodies such as radiogenic heating, pressure and temperature variation with depth, aqueous alteration, and shock or impact heating. Unbrecciated chondrites can record ages from 4.56 to 4.4 Ga that represent cooling in small parent bodies. Some brecciated chondrites exhibit younger ages (much less than 4 to 4.4 Ga) that may reflect the age of brecciation, disturbance, or shock and impact events (much less than 4 Ga). A unique R chondrite was recently found in the LaPaz Icefield of Antarctica - LAP 04840. This chondrite contains approximately 15% hornblende and trace amounts of biotite, making it the first of its kind. Studies have revealed an equigranular texture, mineral equilibria yielding equilibration near 650-700 C and 250-500 bars, hornblende that is dominantly OH-bearing (very little Cl or F), and high D/H ratios. To help gain a better understanding of the origin of this unique sample, we have measured the (40)Ar/(39)Ar age (LAP 04840 split 39).

  18. 40Ar/39Ar ages from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California: Age of the Cobb Mountain Normal-Polarity Subchron revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, Brent D.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Carter Hearn, B., Jr.

    1994-03-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California, indicate a 1.186 ±0.006 Ma age for the Cobb Mountain Normal-Polarity Subchron. The new age is statistically older (α = 0.05) than the previously reported K-Ar age (1.12 ±0.02 Ma) and agrees with the age suggested by the astronomical polarity time scale. Incomplete extraction of radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) from the sanidine is the most likely reason for the disparity between the 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages. Because the Cobb Mountain subchron is a worldwide, short-duration event, and because no widely used interlaboratory 40Ar/39Ar standard younger than 27 Ma exists, we propose that sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek be considered for use as a new Quaternary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standard.

  19. 40Ar/39Ar ages from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California: age of the Cobb Mountain normal-polarity subchron revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turrin, B.D.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Hearn, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California, indicate a 1.186 ?? 0.006 Ma age for the Cobb Mountain Normal-Polarity Subchron. The hew age is statistically older (?? = 0.05) than the previously reported K-Ar age (1.12 ?? 0.02 Ma) and agrees with the age suggested by the astronomical polarity time scale. Incomplete extraction of radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) from the sanidine is the most likely reason for the disparity between the 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages. Because the Cobb Mountain subchron is a worldwide, short-duration event, and because no widely used interlaboratory 40Ar/39Ar standard younger than 27 Ma exists, it is proposed that sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek be considered for use as a new Quaternary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standard. -Authors

  20. 40Ar-39Ar ages of H-chondrite impact melt breccias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Isachsen, C. E.; Weirich, J. R.; Kring, D. A.

    2009-07-01

    40Ar-39Ar analyses of a total of 26 samples from eight shock-darkened impact melt breccias of H-chondrite affinity (Gao-Guenie, LAP 02240, LAP 03922, LAP 031125, LAP 031173, LAP 031308, NWA 2058, and Ourique) are reported. These appear to record impacts ranging in time from 303 ± 56 Ma (Gao-Guenie) to 4360 ± 120 Ma (Ourique) ago. Three record impacts 300-400 Ma ago, while two others record impacts 3900-4000 Ma ago. Combining these with other impact ages from H chondrites in the literature, it appears that H chondrites record impacts in the first 100 Ma of solar system history, during the era of the “lunar cataclysm” and shortly thereafter (3500-4000 Ma ago), one or more impacts ˜300 Ma ago, and perhaps an impact ˜500 Ma ago (near the time of the L chondrite parent body disruption). Records of impacts on the H chondrite parent body are rare or absent between the era of planetary accretion and the “lunar cataclysm” (4400-4050 Ma), during the long stretch between heavy bombardment and recent breakup events (3500-1000 Ma), or at the time of final breakup into meteorite-sized bodies (<50 Ma).

  1. 40Ar-39Ar age of Northwest Africa 091: More evidence for a link between L chondrites and fossil meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, J. R.; Swindle, T. D.; Isachsen, C. E.

    2012-08-01

    Most 40Ar-39Ar ages of L chondrites record an event at approximately 500 Ma, indicating a large collisional impact at that time. However, there is a spread in ages from 400 to 600 Ma in these meteorites that is greater than the analytical uncertainty. Identification of, and correction for, trapped Ar in a few L chondrites has given an age of 470 ± 6 Ma. This age coincides with Ordivician fossil meteorites that fell to Earth at 467 ± 2 Ma. As these fossil meteorites were originally L chondrites, the apparent conclusion is that a large impact sent a flood of L chondrite material to Earth, while material that remained on the L chondrite parent body was strongly heated and reset. We have reduced 40Ar-39Ar data for Northwest Africa 091 using various techniques that appear in the literature, including identification and subtraction of trapped Ar. These techniques give a range of ages from 455 to 520 Ma, and show the importance of making accurate corrections. By using the most straightforward technique to identify and remove a trapped Ar component (which is neither terrestrial nor primordial), an 40Ar-39Ar age of 475 ± 6 Ma is found for Northwest Africa 091, showing a temporal link to fossil meteorites. In addition, high temperature releases of Northwest Africa 091 contain evidence for a second trapped component, and subtraction of this component indicates a possible second collisional impact at approximately 800 Ma. This earlier age coincides with 40Ar-39Ar ages of some H and L chondrites, and lunar samples.

  2. Single-crystal 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating reveals bimodal sanidine ages in the Bishop Tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, N. L.; Jicha, B. R.; Singer, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    The 650 km3 Bishop Tuff (BT) is among the most studied volcanic deposits because it is an extensive marker bed deposited just after the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary. Reconstructions of the vast BT magma reservoir from which high-silica rhyolite erupted have long influenced thinking about how large silicic magma systems are assembled, crystallized, and mixed. Yet, the longevity of the high silica rhyolitic melt and exact timing of the eruption remain controversial due to recent conflicting 40Ar/39Ar sanidine vs. SIMS and ID-TIMS U-Pb zircon dates. We have undertaken 21 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating ages on 2 mm BT sanidine crystals from pumice in 3 widely separated outcrops of early-erupted fall and flow units. Plateau ages yield a bimodal distribution: a younger group has a mean of 766 ka and an older group gives a range between 772 and 782 ka. The younger population is concordant with the youngest ID-TIMS and SIMS U-Pb zircon ages recently published, as well as the astronomical age of BT in marine sediment. Of 21 crystals, 17 yield older, non-plateau, steps likely affected by excess Ar that would bias traditional 40Ar/39Ar total crystal fusion ages. The small spread in older sanidine ages, together with 25+ kyr of pre-eruptive zircon growth, suggest that the older sanidines are not partially outgassed xenocrysts. A bimodal 40Ar/39Ar age distribution implies that some fraction of rhyolitic melt cooled below the Ar closure temperature at least 10 ky prior to eruption. We propose that rapid "thawing" of a crystalline mush layer released older crystals into rhyolitic melt from which sanidine also nucleated and grew immediately prior to the eruption. High precision 40Ar/39Ar dating can thus provide essential information on thermo-physical processes at the millenial time scale that are critical to interpreting U-Pb zircon age distributions that are complicated by large uncertainties associated with zircon-melt U-Th systematics.

  3. 40Ar/39Ar ages of lunar impact glasses: Relationships among Ar diffusivity, chemical composition, shape, and size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellner, N. E. B.; Delano, J. W.

    2015-07-01

    Lunar impact glasses, which are quenched melts produced during cratering events on the Moon, have the potential to provide not only compositional information about both the local and regional geology of the Moon but also information about the impact flux over time. We present in this paper the results of 73 new 40Ar/39Ar analyses of well-characterized, inclusion-free lunar impact glasses and demonstrate that size, shape, chemical composition, fraction of radiogenic 40Ar retained, and cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages are important for 40Ar/39Ar investigations of these samples. Specifically, analyses of lunar impact glasses from the Apollo 14, 16, and 17 landing sites indicate that retention of radiogenic 40Ar is a strong function of post-formation thermal history in the lunar regolith, size, and chemical composition. This is because the Ar diffusion coefficient (at a constant temperature) is estimated to decrease by ∼3-4 orders of magnitude with an increasing fraction of non-bridging oxygens, X(NBO), over the compositional range of most lunar impact glasses with compositions from feldspathic to basaltic. Based on these relationships, lunar impact glasses with compositions and sizes sufficient to have retained ∼90% of their radiogenic Ar during 750 Ma of cosmic ray exposure at time-integrated temperatures of up to 290 K have been identified and are likely to have yielded reliable 40Ar/39Ar ages of formation. Additionally, ∼50% of the identified impact glass spheres have formation ages of ⩽500 Ma, while ∼75% of the identified lunar impact glass shards and spheres have ages of formation ⩽2000 Ma. Higher thermal stresses in lunar impact glasses quenched from hyperliquidus temperatures are considered the likely cause of poor survival of impact glass spheres, as well as the decreasing frequency of lunar impact glasses in general with increasing age. The observed age-frequency distribution of lunar impact glasses may reflect two processes: (i) diminished

  4. 40Ar/39Ar dating of Pleistocene tuffs: an accurate age for the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic reversal (MBGR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, D. F.; Renne, P. R.; Morgan, L. E.; Deino, A.; Smith, V. C.; Ellis, B. S.; Pearce, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent recalibrations of the 40Ar/39Ar system [1,2] reveal inconsistencies with some previous ages inferred for the MBGR. An Ar/Ar age [3] for the Bishop Tuff (BT) (which post-dates the MBGR by at least 15.3 ± 2.2 ka [3]) recalculated [2] yields an age of 778.0 ± 3.8 ka (1σ, full systematic uncertainty). The age is c. 10 ka older than the BT zircon ID-TIMS U-Pb age [4] and places the MBGR at c. 793 ka, c. 13 and 20 ka older than astronomical ages for the MBGR of 780 ka [5] and 773 ka [6], respectively. To determine an accurate age for the MBGR, we have made a series of 40Ar/39Ar age determinations for Pleistocene tuffs from both Indonesia and North America that have direct relationships to the MBGR. Blind analyses were conducted at SUERC and BGC. We observed excellent inter-laboratory agreement and no systematic offset in data. Ar/Ar ages are reported relative to [2] (1σ, full systematic uncertainty). Drill cores from ODP Site 758 show the precise location of the MBGR. Below the MBGR are two distal tephra horizons that we have identified as products of two temporally distinct Old Toba Tuff (OTT) eruptions (layer d OTT1 and layer D OTT2). Continuous sedimentation between OTT1 (802.8 ± 0.7 ka, n = 100, MSWD 1.2) and OTT2 (796.2 ± 0.8 ka, n = 62, MSWD 1.3) allows for calculation of an accurate sedimentation rate and for extrapolation of an age from OTT2 to the MBGR. Data define an age for the MBGR of 795.2 ± 0.9 ka. Using tephra above the MBGR boundary, the Middle Toba Tuff (layer C) and Young Toba Tuff (layer A), extrapolation down core supports a MBGR age of c. 795 ka. Recent age data for BT sanidine reported relative to FCs at 28.172 Ma (767.4 ± 1.1 Ma) [7] oddly yielded an Ar/Ar age that was indistinguishable from the BT zircon U-Pb age [4], which is consistent with previous 40Ar/39Ar age measurements made relative to FCs at 28.02 Ma [3]. Thus we made a series of 40Ar/39Ar measurements on the exact same sample as used by Rivera et al. [7] and observed

  5. Astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar age for the Toba supereruption and global synchronization of late Quaternary records

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Michael; Roberts, Richard G.; Saidin, Mokhtar

    2012-01-01

    The Toba supereruption in Sumatra, ∼74 thousand years (ka) ago, was the largest terrestrial volcanic event of the Quaternary. Ash and sulfate aerosols were deposited in both hemispheres, forming a time-marker horizon that can be used to synchronize late Quaternary records globally. A precise numerical age for this event has proved elusive, with dating uncertainties larger than the millennial-scale climate cycles that characterized this period. We report an astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar age of 73.88 ± 0.32 ka (1σ, full external errors) for sanidine crystals extracted from Toba deposits in the Lenggong Valley, Malaysia, 350 km from the eruption source and 6 km from an archaeological site with stone artifacts buried by ash. If these artifacts were made by Homo sapiens, as has been suggested, then our age indicates that modern humans had reached Southeast Asia by ∼74 ka ago. Our 40Ar/39Ar age is an order-of-magnitude more precise than previous estimates, resolving the timing of the eruption to the middle of the cold interval between Dansgaard–Oeschger events 20 and 19, when a peak in sulfate concentration occurred as registered by Greenland ice cores. This peak is followed by a ∼10 °C drop in the Greenland surface temperature over ∼150 y, revealing the possible climatic impact of the eruption. Our 40Ar/39Ar age also provides a high-precision calibration point for other ice, marine, and terrestrial archives containing Toba sulfates and ash, facilitating their global synchronization at unprecedented resolution for a critical period in Earth and human history beyond the range of 14C dating. PMID:23112159

  6. Age and duration of magmatism on the Ontong Java Plateau: 40Ar-39Ar results from ODP Leg 192

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. M.; Pringle, M. S.; Fitton, J. G.

    2002-12-01

    Large igneous provinces represent some of the most voluminous outpourings of magma in the last 200 million years. With a size roughly equivalent to Alaska, the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) is the largest of these provinces. Prior to ODP Leg 192, basaltic basement was recovered from 3 ODP sites (803, 807 and 289) as well as obducted sections on the Solomon Islands. Published 40Ar-39Ar results suggest that the OJP formed in at least two discrete episodes at 122 and 90 Ma, while samples from the Soloman Islands also indicate igneous activity at 60 and 36 Ma. From this limited data set it has been suggested that the Ontong Java Plateau was periodically active every 30 m.y. beginning at 122 Ma. During Leg 192 another 5 drill sites (1183, 1185, 1186 and 1187) successfully reached basaltic basement, which comprised a thick sequence of basaltic pillow lavas. In contrast, a sequence of volcaniclastics was recovered from Site 1184. Initial shipboard biostratigraphy suggested that the basaltic basement forms part of the older proposed pulse of activity at 118 Ma, and the volcaniclastics from Site 1184 are from NP16 or 41-43 Ma. New whole rock 40Ar-39Ar analyses on the basaltic basement recovered during Leg 192 show that the OJP is no younger than 117 Ma (L. cabri zone). Significantly, the volcaniclastic rocks recovered at Site 1184 yielded minimum 40Ar-39Ar ages of 70-80 Ma, and are therefore not Eocene in age. Reanalysis of OJP samples from other ODP sites (e.g. Site 807) has shown that analysis of rocks with low K/Ca ratios, containing 5 total incremental-heating steps, does not always resolve problems of argon recoil and can yield artificial age plateaus. These apparent age plateaus can break down into the typical stepwise decreasing age pattern of argon recoil, and can therefore significantly alter the age of the rock. Apart from having implications for the proposed pulsed nature of magmatism on the OJP, it also shows that the normal acceptance criteria for 40Ar-39Ar ages in

  7. A model for meteoritic and lunar 40Ar/39Ar age spectra: Addressing the conundrum of multi-activation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnke, P.; Harrison, T. Mark; Heizler, M. T.; Warren, P. H.

    2016-11-01

    Results of whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar step-heating analyses of extra-terrestrial materials have been used to constrain the timing of impacts in the inner solar system, solidification of the lunar magma ocean, and development of planetary magnetic fields. Despite the importance of understanding these events, the samples we have in hand are non-ideal due to mixed provenance, isotopic disturbances from potentially multiple heating episodes, and laboratory artifacts such as nuclear recoil. Although models to quantitatively assess multi-domain, diffusive 40Ar* loss have long been applied to terrestrial samples, their use on extra-terrestrial materials has been limited. Here we introduce a multi-activation energy, multi-diffusion domain model and apply it to 40Ar/39Ar temperature-cycling, step-heating data for meteoritic and lunar samples. We show that age spectra of extra-terrestrial materials, the Jilin chondrite (K-4) and Apollo 16 lunar breccia (67514 , 43), yielding seemingly non-ideal behavior commonly interpreted as either laboratory artifacts or localized shock heating of pyroxene, are meaningful and can be understood in context of the presence of multi-diffusion domains containing multiple activation energies. Internally consistent results from both the meteoritic and lunar samples reveal high-temperature/short duration thermal episodes we interpret as due to moderate shock heating.

  8. 40Ar 39Ar Ages and tectonic setting of ophiolite from the Neyriz area, southeast Zagros Range, Iran

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; Pamic, J.

    1983-01-01

    An ophiolite, considered to be an allochthonous fragment of Tethyan oceanic crust and mantle, crops out near Neyriz in the Zagros Range, Iran. 40Ar 39Ar ages ranging from 76.8 ?? 23.8 Ma to 105 ?? 23.3 Ma were measured on hornblende from five samples of plagiogranite and diabase from the ophiolite. The most precise ages are 85.9 ?? 3.8 Ma for a diabase and 83.6 ?? 8.4 Ma for a plagiogranite. The weighted mean age of hornblende from the five samples is 87.5 ?? 7.2 Ma which indicates that the igneous part of the Neyriz ophiolite formed during the early part of the Late Cretaceous. Pargasite from amphibolite below peridotite of the Neyriz ophiolite has a 40Ar 39Ar age of 94.9 ?? 7.6 Ma. The pargasite age agrees within analytical uncertainty with the ages measured on diabase and plagiogranite. Comparable ages have been measured on igneous rocks from the Samail ophiolite of Oman and on amphibolite below peridotite of the Samail ophiolite. ?? 1983.

  9. 40Ar/ 39Ar analyses of clinopyroxene inclusions in African diamonds: implications for source ages of detrital diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D.; Harris, J. W.; Kiviets, G. B.

    2004-01-01

    Clinopyroxene inclusions in diamond contain elevated potassium contents and can potentially be dated by 40Ar/ 39Ar techniques. Previous 40Ar/ 39Ar studies of clinopyroxene inclusions contained in cleaved diamonds have suggested that argon, produced from the decay of potassium prior to eruption of the host kimberlite magma, diffuses to the diamond/clinopyroxene interface under mantle conditions. After intrusion and cooling below the closure temperature for argon diffusion, radiogenic argon is retained by the clinopyroxene inclusions. This behaviour complicates efforts to date diamond crystallisation events; however, extraction of inclusions from their host diamond should induce loss of all interface argon, thus raising the possibility of determining kimberlite emplacement ages. This possibility has important implications for constraining the source localities of detrital diamond deposits worldwide, with concomitant benefits to diamond exploration. To investigate this premise, 40Ar/ 39Ar laser probe results are presented for single clinopyroxene inclusions extracted from a total of fifteen gem-quality diamonds from the Mbuji-Mayi kimberlite in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and the Jwaneng and Orapa kimberlites in Botswana. Initial fusion analyses of clinopyroxene inclusions from Mbuji-Mayi diamonds yielded ages older than the time of host kimberlite intrusion, indicating partial retention of extraneous argon by the clinopyroxene inclusions themselves. Step-heating analyses of clinopyroxene inclusions from Orapa and Jwaneng diamonds produced older apparent ages from lower temperature steps and the 'rim' fragment of one Orapa inclusion. High temperature (fusion) analyses yielded younger apparent ages, commonly approaching the times of host kimberlite eruption. Total-gas integrated 40Ar/ 39Ar ages are mostly intermediate between the times of inferred diamond crystallisation and kimberlite eruption. Ca/K ratios for each sample are uniform across step

  10. 40Ar/ 39Ar ages for the alkaline volcanism and the basement of Gorringe Bank, North Atlantic ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Féraud, Gilbert; Gastaud, Janine; Auzende, Jean-Marie; Olivet, Jean-Louis; Cornen, Guy

    1982-01-01

    Gorringe Bank is situated on the Europe-Africa plate boundary at the eastern end of the Azores-Gibraltar fracture zone. It has two summits, Gettysburg Bank to the Southwest and Ormonde Bank to the northeast. We applied the 40Ar/ 39Ar stepwise heating method to date six samples of the alkaline volcanic rocks, two gabbros from the Ormonde Bank and a dolerite from the Gettysburg Bank. The results that the alkaline volcanism lasted probably for less than 6 Ma(66-60 Ma). Although the nature of this volcanism precludes any subduction feature during its setting, the alkaline volcanism of Ormonde is probably linked to Upper Cretaceous/Eocene compressive tectonic events. The basement rocks of Gorringe Bank reveal distrubed 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectra. One plagioclase and one biotite from a gabbro give evidence for a thermic event whose age is tentatively estimated at about 75 Ma, and related to a variation in the direction of the relative movement between Europe and Africa. The more probable age given by a plagioclase of another gabbro and by a dolerite (110 Ma) corresponds to tilting northeastward of the Gorringe massif.

  11. Age of the youngest volcanism at Eagle Lake, northeastern California—40Ar/39Ar and paleomagnetic results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clynne, Michael A.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Champion, Duane E.; Muffler, L.J.P.; Sawlan, Michael G.; Downs, Drew T.

    2017-03-22

    The age of the youngest volcanism at Eagle Lake, California, was investigated using stratigraphic, paleomagnetic, and 40Ar/39Ar techniques. The three youngest volcanic lava flows at Eagle Lake yielded ages of 130.0±5.1, 127.5±3.2 and 123.6±18.7 ka, and are statistically indistinguishable. Paleomagnetic results demonstrate that two of the lava flows are very closely spaced in time, whereas the third is different by centuries to at most a few millennia. These results indicate that the basalt lava flows at Eagle Lake are not Holocene in age, and were erupted during an episode of volcanism at about 130–125 ka that is unlikely to have spanned more than a few thousand years. Thus, the short-term potential for subsequent volcanism at Eagle Lake is considered low. 

  12. sup 40 Ar/ sup 39 Ar ages of six Apollo 15 impact melt rocks by laser step heating

    SciTech Connect

    Dalrymple, G.B. ); Ryder, G. )

    1991-06-01

    The authors have obtained 15 high resolution (21-51 step) {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age spectra on six Apollo 15 impact melt rocks of different compositions using a continuous laser system on submilligram subsamples and on single crystal plagioclase clasts. Four of the six samples gave reproducible age spectra with well-defined intermediate temperature plateaus over 48% or more of the {sup 39}AR released; the plateaus are interpreted as crystallization ages. Samples 15304,7,69, 15294,6,21, and 15314,26,156 gave virtually identical plateau ages whose weighted mean is 3,870 {plus minus} 6 Ma. These three melt rocks differ in composition and likely formed in three separate impact events. Sample 15356,9 gave replicate plateau ages that average 3,836 {plus minus} 12 Ma and date a fourth and younger impact event. The age spectra for samples 15308,9 and 15414,3,36 increase with increasing increment temperature and may have been formed in or affected by impacts at about 2,700 Ma and 3,870 Ma, respectively. So far there continues to be no convincing evidence in the lunar record for impact melts older than about 3.9 Ga.

  13. Interpretation of 40Ar/39Ar Age-spectra in Low-grade Polymetamorphic Rocks: The Importance of Petrologic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunk, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar age-spectra of white micas from low-grade polymetamorphic terranes can be difficult to interpret, because these low-grade rocks frequently have multiple generations of cleavage-forming white mica that grew at temperatures below their closure for diffusion of argon (~350°C). Under such conditions, each generation of cleavage-forming white mica will retain its original growth age. In addition, rocks from metamorphic terranes can also contain populations of detrital and diagenetic white micas which also have distinct ages associated with them. A final complication, frequently found in these low-grade polymetamorphic samples is the presence of inseparable, intergrown chlorite and the problems with associated 39Ar recoil during irradiation of the samples, prior to sample analysis. The shapes of 40Ar/39Ar age spectra of white micas separated from such samples are frequently complex and are quite variable in shape. Some age spectra show a steady increase in age with increase in the temperature of release, while others have sigmoidal or saddle-shaped patterns. The age of most of the steps in such age spectra are mixtures of the various age populations of white mica in the sample, and as such are geologically meaningless. Nonetheless, useful constraints on the ages of at least some events recorded in these complex low-grade polymetamorphic rocks can be discerned with the help of petrographic observations, and by placing the results in a spatial context to test for reproducibility and/or the occurrence of meaningful patterns. If no chlorite is present and the sample contains no detrital white mica, an estimate of the maximum age of the youngest component and the minimum age of the oldest cleavage forming white mica populations can frequently be discerned. If the sample contains detrital white mica, a minimum age for its cooling or crystallization can be estimated. The presence of a small amount of intimately intergrown chlorite masks the age of the youngest white

  14. Rapid formation of the Small Isles Tertiary centre constrained by precise 40Ar/ 39Ar and U-Pb ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. M.; Pringle, M. S.; Parrish, R. R.

    2005-02-01

    The relative chronology of magmatic and tectonic events is key to an understanding of the influence of the Iceland plume on the North Atlantic. In particular, the location and duration of magmatism is of fundamental importance. Initial widespread flood basalt formation occurred in Baffin Island, Greenland, and Britain before complete plate break up at 56 Ma after which time magmatism became concentrated in the active rift zone. Historically the British Tertiary Igneous Province (BTIP) has been instrumental in advancing many concepts of igneous petrology. However, the absolute age and duration of the province remains unresolved. Here, we present new internally consistent 40Ar/ 39Ar ages that help to constrain the volcanic activity in the Small Isles centre to within 2 my. This short duration has implications for the onset of magmatism in the larger North Atlantic province, the rapid unroofing of the Rum volcano, and more significantly, some of the evidence used to propose pulsing of the Iceland plume.

  15. 40Ar/39Ar laser probe evidence concerning the age and associated hazards of the Lake Nyos Maar, Cameroon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Lockwood, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    The waters of Lake Nyos are impounded by a fragile natural dam composed of pyroclastic rocks ejected during the formation of the lake crater (maar). Lateral erosion of this dam has reduced its width from over 500 m to only 45 m. Published whole-rock K-Ar ages of about 100 ka on juvenile basalt from the dam suggests that erosion has been slow and that the dam poses no imminent threat. New apparent 40Ar/39Ar ages of 1.4 to 232 Ma on xenocrystic K-feldspar contained in the basalt show that the xenocrysts, whose source is the 528-Ma crystalline basement, are carriers of inherited radiogenic 40Ar and would cause the whole-rock K-Ar ages to be too old. The best estimate for the age of the maar is provided by a 14C age of 400 ?? 100 yr BP on charcoal from the base of the dam. This young age indicates that the dam is eroding at a relatively rapid rate; its failure, perhaps within a few decades, would result in a major flood and imperil thousands of people living downstream in Cameroon and eastern Nigeria. ?? 1990 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  16. A new approach to cosmogenic corrections in 40Ar/39Ar chronometry: Implications for the ages of Martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, W. S.; Borg, L. E.

    2016-08-01

    Anomalously old 40Ar/39Ar ages are commonly obtained from Shergottites and are generally attributed to uncertainties regarding the isotopic composition of the trapped component and/or the presence of excess 40Ar. Old ages can also be obtained if inaccurate corrections for cosmogenic 36Ar are applied. Current methods for making the cosmogenic correction require simplifying assumptions regarding the spatial homogeneity of target elements for cosmogenic production and the distribution of cosmogenic nuclides relative to trapped and reactor-derived Ar isotopes. To mitigate uncertainties arising from these assumptions, a new cosmogenic correction approach utilizing the exposure age determined on an un-irradiated aliquot and step-wise production rate estimates that account for spatial variations in Ca and K is described. Data obtained from NWA 4468 and an unofficial pairing of NWA 2975, which yield anomalously old ages when corrected for cosmogenic 36Ar using conventional techniques, are used to illustrate the efficacy of this new approach. For these samples, anomalous age determinations are rectified solely by the improved cosmogenic correction technique described herein. Ages of 188 ± 17 and 184 ± 17 Ma are obtained for NWA 4468 and NWA 2975, respectively, both of which are indistinguishable from ages obtained by other radioisotopic systems. For other Shergottites that have multiple trapped components, have experienced diffusive loss of Ar, or contain excess Ar, more accurate cosmogenic corrections may aid in the interpretation of anomalous ages. The trapped 40Ar/36Ar ratios inferred from inverse isochron diagrams obtained from NWA 4468 and NWA 2975 are significantly lower than the Martian atmospheric value, and may represent upper mantle or crustal components.

  17. 40Ar/ 39Ar mineral age constraints for the tectonothermal evolution of a Variscan suture in southwest Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallmeyer, R. D.; Fonseca, P. E.; Quesada, C.; Ribeiro, A.

    1993-06-01

    Dallmeyer, R.D., Fonseca, P.E., Quesada, C. and Ribeiro, A., 1993. 40Ar/ 39Ar mineral age constraints for the tectonothermal evolution of a Variscan suture in southwest Iberia. Tectonophysics, 222: 177-194. Mafic units interpreted to represent an internally disrupted ophiolite succession are exposed along a Variscan suture situated between the South Portuguese and Ossa-Morena zones in southern Iberia. Structural characteristics of various units adjacent to the suture zone suggest maintainence of an oblique (transpressional), sinistral tectonic regime during late Paleozoic plate convergence. This involved initial, limited, north-directed subduction beneath the Ossa-Morena zone, and was followed by oblique collision of the South Portuguese Terrane. Metamorphic evolution of rocks adjacent to the suture occurred during maintainence of a moderately high geothermal regime. Five samples of amphibolite were collected within the hanging wall of the suture. These included samples from the ophiolitic terrane and from the Ossa-Morena zone. Two samples were also collected within the post-kinematic Beja Gabbro which intruded the other two tectonic units following their structural juxtaposition and penetrative ductile deformation. Hornblende concentrates from these seven samples record well-defined 40Ar/ 39Ar plateau ages which range between c. 342 and 335 Ma. These results imply that the regional tectonostratigraphic units were maintained at moderate crustal levels until the Visean, and that their juxtaposition and internal ductile deformation occurred in the late Devonian. Subsequent cooling was probably effected by transpressional uplift during oblique collision following closure of intervening oceanic elements.

  18. 40Ar/39Ar ages in deformed potassium feldspar: evidence of microstructural control on Ar isotope systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Steven M.; Potts, Graham J.; Kelley, Simon P.

    2001-05-01

    Detailed field and microstructural studies have been combined with high spatial resolution ultraviolet laser 40Ar/39Ar dating of naturally deformed K-feldspar to investigate the direct relationship between deformation-related microstructure and Ar isotope systematics. The sample studied is a ~1,000 Ma Torridonian arkose from Skye, Scotland, that contains detrital feldspars previously metamorphosed at amphibolite-facies conditions ~1,700 Ma. The sample was subsequently deformed ~430 Ma ago during Caledonian orogenesis. The form and distribution of deformation-induced microstructures within three different feldspar clasts has been mapped using atomic number contrast and orientation contrast imaging, at a range of scales, to identify intragrain variations in composition and lattice orientation. These variations have been related to thin section and regional structural data to provide a well-constrained deformation history for the feldspar clasts. One hundred and forty-three in-situ 40Ar/39Ar analyses measured using ultraviolet laser ablation record a range of apparent ages (317-1030 Ma). The K-feldspar showing the least strain records the greatest range of apparent ages from 420-1,030 Ma, with the oldest apparent ages being found close to the centre of the feldspar away from fractures and the detrital grain boundary. The most deformed K-feldspar yields the youngest apparent ages (317-453 Ma) but there is no spatial relationship between apparent age and the detrital grain boundary. Within this feldspar, the oldest apparent ages are recorded from orientation domain boundaries and fracture surfaces where an excess or trapped 40Ar component resides. Orientation contrast images at a similar scale to the Ar analyses illustrate a significant deformation-related microstructural difference between the feldspars and we conclude that deformation plays a significant role in controlling Ar systematics of feldspars at both the inter- and intragrain scales even at relatively low

  19. 40Ar/39Ar Dating of Volcanic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Renne, P. R.; Watkins, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    Application of the 40Ar/39Ar method to volcanic glasses has been somewhat stigmatized following several studies demonstrating secondary mobility of K and Ar. Much of the stigma is unwarranted, however, since most studies only impugned the reliability of the K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar techniques when applied to glass shards rather than obsidian clasts with low surface area to volume ratios. We provide further evidence for problematic K loss and/or 39Ar recoil ejection from glass shards in 40Ar/39Ar step heating results for comagmatic feldspars and shards. In an extreme case, the plateau age of the feldspars (0.17 ± 0.03 Ma at 2σ) is significantly younger than the plateau age of the glass (0.85 ± 0.05 Ma at 2σ). If the feldspar age is reasonably interpreted as the eruption age of the ash, it is likely that the glass shards experienced K and/or 39Ar loss. Electron microprobe analyses of the glass shards have low totals (~93%) and no systematic lateral variability (i.e., diffusion gradients) in K, suggesting that the lengthscale of the glass shards is smaller than the lengthscale of K diffusion. Obsidian clasts should not be as susceptible to K loss since any hydrated (K-depleted) volume represents a small fraction of the total material and can often be physically removed prior to analysis. Samples described here are detrital obsidian clasts from the Afar region of Ethiopia. Evidence from Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and previous work by Anovitz (1999), confirm that the scale of water and potassium mobility are often small in comparison to the size of obsidian clasts but large enough to effect the bulk composition of glass shards. This expectation is confirmed in another tuff wherein comagmatic obsidian clasts and sanidine phenocrysts yield indistinguishable 40Ar/39Ar ages of 4.4 Ma High abundances of non-radiogenic 40Ar, and kinetic fractionation of Ar isotopes during quenching and/or laboratory degassing resulting in incomplete equilibration between

  20. Ultra-high precision 40Ar/39Ar ages for Fish Canyon Tuff and Alder Creek Rhyolite sanidine: New dating standards required?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D.; Matchan, E. L.

    2013-11-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar dating technique is a high precision (<0.1%) method with wide application to geological samples. However, the method is predicated on the availability of natural mineral standards of known age. Widely used 40Ar/39Ar standards include sanidine from the (ca. 28 Ma) Fish Canyon Tuff (FCT) and the (ca. 1.2 Ma) Alder Creek Rhyolite (ACR). Despite common usage, the ages of FCT and ACR sanidine have proven contentious, with reported values varying by >2%; well outside the ±0.1% aspiration of EARTHTIME (http://www.earth-time.org).

  1. An 40Ar/39Ar age for Geomagnetic Instability Recorded at the Albuquerque Volcanoes and Pringle Falls, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.; Jicha, B. R.; Kirby, B. T.; Zhang, X.; Geissman, J. W.; Herrero-Bervera, E.

    2005-12-01

    The timing and frequency of short-lived geomagnetic events, including excursions and aborted reversal attempts, provide important observational constraints on models of geodynamo behavior as well as calibration points for stratigraphic and paleoclimatic age models derived from marine sediments. The number of potential geomagnetic events during the Quaternary period has proliferated as more detailed paleodirectional and paleointensity data have emerged from sediments worldwide. Yet, determining ages for these events remains a challenge because astronomical dating of sediment cores is subject to assumptions and non-systematic errors that are difficult to quantify and vary from core to core. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology applied to lava flows or ash falls that record geomagnetic excursions can yield radioisotopic ages sufficiently precise to verify individual events, test correlations among seemingly disparate events, and quantify periods between events. Seventeen furnace incremental heating experiments on 100-200 mg groundmass samples from six sites in the transitionally magnetized basalt of the Albuquerque Volcanoes yield an isochron of 211 ± 22 ka* that is within error of previous K-Ar (155 ± 94 ka) and U-Th isochron (156 ± 58 ka) age determinations, but is 3 to 4 times more precise. At Pringle Falls, Oregon, Ash D was deposited during the onset of an excursion recorded by a lacustrine sediment sequence. Sixteen laser incremental heating experiments on 20-40 mg samples of plagioclase crystals from Ash D gave 64 concordant plateau age points that define an 40Ar/39Ar isochron of 211 ± 13 ka which is an order of magnitude more precise than the isochron (198 ± 118 ka) associated with the published plateau age from a single plagioclase age spectrum (221 ± 20 ka). Although the Virtual Geomagnetic Pole (VGP) recorded by the Albuquerque Volcanoes lies near, bot not on, the VGP path of the Pringle Falls excursion, these two sites are 15 arc degrees apart and need not record

  2. Precise K-Ar, 40Ar/39Ar, Rb-Sr and U/Pb mineral ages from the 27.5 Ma fish canyon tuff reference standard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; Baadsgaard, H.

    2001-01-01

    The accuracy of ages measured using the 40Ar/39Ar technique is affected by uncertainties in the age of radiation fluence-monitor minerals. At present, there is lack of agreement about the ages of certain minerals used as fluence monitors. The accuracy of the age of a standard may be improved if the age can be measured using different decay schemes. This has been done by measuring ages on minerals from the Oligocene Fish Canyon Tuff (FCT) using the K-Ar, 40Ar/39Ar. Rb-Sr and U/Pb methods. K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar total fusion ages of sanidine, biotite and hornblende yielded a mean age of 27.57 ?? 0.36 Ma. The weighted mean 40Ar/39Ar plateau age of sanidine and biotite is 27.57 ?? 0.18 Ma. A biotite-feldspar Rb-Sr isochron yielded an age of 27.44 ?? 0.16 Ma. The U-Pb data for zircon are complex because of the presence of Precambrian zircons and inheritance of radiogenic Pb. Zircons with 207Pb/235U < 0.4 yielded a discordia line with a lower concordia intercept of 27.52 ?? 0.09 Ma. Evaluation of the combined data suggests that the best age for FCT is 27.51 Ma. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. 40Ar-39Ar Age Constraints on Volcanism and Tectonism in the Terror Rift of the Ross Sea, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2007-01-01

    Volcanic sills and dikes inferred from seismic reflection profiles and geophysical studies of the Ross Sea are thought to be related to the rift basins in the region, and their emplacement to be coeval with extension. However, lack of precise geochronology in the Terror Rift of the Ross Sea region has left these inferred relationships poorly constrained and has hindered neotectonic studies, because of the large temporal gaps between seismic reflectors of known ages. New 40Ar/39Ar geochronology presented here for submarine volcanic rocks provides better age constraints for neotectonic interpretations within the Terror Rift. Several samples from seamounts yielded young ages between 156 ± 21 and 122 ± 26 Ka. These ages support interpretations that extension within the Terror Rift was active at least through the Pleistocene. Three evenly spaced samples from the lowermost 100 m of Franklin Island range in age from 3.28 ± 0.04 to 3.73 ± 0.05 Ma. These age determinations demonstrate that construction of a small volcanic edifice such as Franklin Island took at least several hundred thousand years, and therefore that much larger ones in the Erebus Volcanic Province are likely to have taken considerably longer than previously inferred. This warrants caution in applying a limited number of age determinations to define the absolute ages of events in the Ross Sea region

  4. The tectonic evolution of Cenozoic extensional basins, northeast Brazil: Geochronological constraints from continental basalt 40Ar/39Ar ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Zorano Sérgio; Vasconcelos, Paulo Marcos; Knesel, Kurt Michael; da Silveira Dias, Luiz Gustavo; Roesner, Eduardo Henrique; Cordeiro de Farias, Paulo Roberto; de Morais Neto, João Marinho

    2013-12-01

    The Boa Vista and Cubati Basins, Paraíba, Brazil, are NW-SE extension-related intracratonic basins that resulted from tectonic stresses after the opening of the South Atlantic. These basins contain lacustrine fossiliferous sediments, bentonite beds, and basalt flows that preserve Cenozoic continental records. 40Ar/39Ar ages for six whole-rocks from two distinct basaltic flows underlying the sediments in the Boa Vista basin are 27.3 ± 0.8 and 25.4 ± 1.3 Ma, while three grains from a basaltic flow overlying the sediments yield 22.0 ± 0.2 Ma. The sediments at the nearby Cubati Basin are overlain by a basalt flow with ages of ˜25.4 Ma. Three whole-rocks from an NE-SW-trending trachytic dyke cross cutting the sediments at the Boa Vista Basin yield 40Ar/39Ar ages of ˜12.45 ± 0.06, 12.59 ± 0.07, and 12.58 ± 0.07 Ma. Three whole-rocks from a nearby volcanic plug (Chupador) yield an age of 23.4 ± 0.1 Ma. The geochronological results combined with stratigraphic correlations between the two basins allow bracketing the age of the main sedimentary and bentonic units within the Boa Vista and Cubati Basins between 25.5 ± 1.3 and 24.9 ± 0.1 Ma. The ages, combined with field observations reveal that the formation of the Boa Vista and Cubati basins is associated with mantle-derived magmas channelled through reactivated Precambrian shear zones. Our geochronological results suggest that a temporal link with the Fernando de Noronha and Saint Helena hot spots can be excluded as possible sources of the Boa Vista and Cubati magmas. Rather, the extensional tectonics in the 30-20 Ma interval, long after Gondwana break-up, may be associated with the re-activation of continental-scale shear zones that channelled small batches of mantle-derived magmas.

  5. 40Ar/39Ar impact ages and time-temperature argon diffusion history of the Bunburra Rockhole anomalous basaltic achondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, Fred; Benedix, Gretchen; Eroglu, Ela.; Bland, Phil. A.; Bouvier, Audrey.

    2014-09-01

    The Bunburra Rockhole meteorite is a brecciated anomalous basaltic achondrite containing coarse-, medium- and fine-grained lithologies. Petrographic observations constrain the limited shock pressure to between ca. 10 GPa and 20 GPa. In this study, we carried out nine 40Ar/39Ar step-heating experiments on distinct single-grain fragments extracted from the coarse and fine lithologies. We obtained six plateau ages and three mini-plateau ages. These ages fall into two internally concordant populations with mean ages of 3640 ± 21 Ma (n = 7; P = 0.53) and 3544 ± 26 Ma (n = 2; P = 0.54), respectively. Based on these results, additional 40Ar/39Ar data of fusion crust fragments, argon diffusion modelling, and petrographic observations, we conclude that the principal components of the Bunburra Rockhole basaltic achondrite are from a melt rock formed at ∼3.64 Ga by a medium to large impact event. The data imply that this impact generated high enough energy to completely melt the basaltic target rock and reset the Ar systematics, but only partially reset the Pb-Pb age. We also conclude that a complete 40Ar∗ resetting of pyroxene and plagioclase at this time could not have been achieved at solid-state conditions. Comparison with a terrestrial analog (Lonar crater) shows that the time-temperature conditions required to melt basaltic target rocks upon impact are relatively easy to achieve. Ar data also suggest that a second medium-size impact event occurred on a neighbouring part of the same target rock at ∼3.54 Ga. Concordant low-temperature step ages of the nine aliquots suggest that, at ∼3.42 Ga, a third smaller impact excavated parts of the ∼3.64 Ga and ∼3.54 Ga melt rocks and brought the fragments together. The lack of significant impact activity after 3.5 Ga, as recorded by the Bunburra Rockhole suggests that (1) either the meteorite was ejected in a small secondary parent body where it resided untouched by large impacts, or (2) it was covered by a porous heat

  6. New 40Ar/39Ar ages and revised 40K/40Ar* data from nephelinitic-phonolitic volcanic successions of the Trindade Island (South Atlantic Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, G. L. C.; Bongiolo, E. M.; Geraldes, M. C.; Renac, C.; Santos, A. C.; Jourdan, F.; Neumann, R.

    2016-11-01

    The Trindade Island is located in the South Atlantic Ocean, 1170 km from the Brazilian coast and represents the eastern end of the submarine E-W Vitória-Trindade Chain. This is interpreted as the Trindade plume track beneath the South American plate during the Cenozoic. Almeida (1961) recognized five volcanogenic successions at Trindade in decreasing age: the Trindade Complex (TC) and the Desejado (DF), Morro Vermelho (MV), Valado (VF) and Paredão (PF) formations, composed of nephelinitic to phonolitic effusive-pyroclastic deposits, dykes and necks. Here, we present new 40Ar/39Ar ages and re-evaluation of available 40K/40Ar* data that, coupled with previous petrological information, allowed us to reconstruct the volcanic history of the island (i.e., 3.9-0.25 Ma) distinguishing near synchronous volcanic episodes and solving several stratigraphic uncertainties reported in the literature. The geochronological dataset show that the nephelinitic-phonolitic volcanism at Trindade was discontinuous throught time, being marked by periods of high volcanic activity and periods of quiescence, which suggests variable melt production and eruption rates. The peak of the volcanic activity occurred between 3.9 and 2.5 Ma (i.e., Lower Pliocene to Lower Pleistocene) that is represented by the TC, which correspond to the largest volume of volcanic deposits preserved in the island. The volcanic activity slows down progressively from 2.5 Ma to cease at ca. 1.6 Ma, period that is represented by the DF. This volcanism was followed by a quiescent period that lasted until the ephemeral nephelinitic volcanism of the MV (no age), VA (no age) and PF (ca. 0.25 Ma). Thus, the volcanic activity in Trindade was ceased completely at ca. 0.25 Ma, event registered in the uppermost volcanic deposits of the PF and that represents the last volcanic activity in the Brazilian territory.

  7. Carbon isotope stratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy, and 40Ar/39Ar age of the Cretaceous South Atlantic coast, Namibe Basin, Angola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strganac, Christopher; Salminen, Johanna; Jacobs, Louis L.; Polcyn, Michael J.; Ferguson, Kurt M.; Mateus, Octávio; Schulp, Anne S.; Morais, Maria Luísa; Tavares, Tatiana da Silva; Gonçalves, António Olímpio

    2014-11-01

    We present the δ13C and paleomagnetic stratigraphy for marine strata at the coast of southern Angola, anchored by an intercalated basalt with a whole rock 40Ar/39Ar radiometric age of 84.6 ± 1.5 Ma, being consistent with both invertebrate and vertebrate biostratigraphy. This is the first African stable carbon isotope record correlated to significant events in the global carbon record spanning the Late Cenomanian to Early Maastrichtian. A positive ∼3‰ excursion seen in bivalve shells below the basalt indicates the Cenomanian-Turonian Boundary Event at 93.9 Ma, during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2. Additional excursions above the basalt are correlated to patterns globally, including a negative ∼3‰ excursion near the top of the section interpreted as part of the Campanian-Maastrichtian Boundary Events. The age of the basalt ties the studied Bentiaba section to a pulse of Late Cretaceous magmatic activity around the South Atlantic and significant tectonic activity, including rotation, of the African continent.

  8. Geochemical composition, petrography and 40Ar/39Ar age of the Heldburg phonolite: implications on magma mixing and mingling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abratis, Michael; Viereck, Lothar; Pfänder, Jörg A.; Hentschel, Roland

    2015-11-01

    Differentiated magmatic rocks such as trachyte and phonolite are volumetrically subordinate to mafic volcanic rocks within the Cenozoic Central European Volcanic Province (exceptions are the East Eifel and the Rhön volcanic fields). Within the volcanic field of the "Heldburg dike swarm" (Heldburger Gangschar), the phonolite of the Burgberg near Heldburg represents the only known occurrence of differentiated magmatic rocks. However, the Heldburg phonolite is famous foremost for containing mantle xenoliths (spinel lherzolite). Former studies proposing a cogenetic relationship between the phonolite and the peridotites concluded that the phonolite magma must have evolved under upper mantle conditions. Herewith, we present petrographic and geochemical evidence for magma mixing and mingling in the Heldburg phonolite melt due to the intrusion of mantle-derived basanitic magma, which is exposed today as dikes at the foot of the Heldburg Burgberg. During this process, the mantle xenoliths were introduced into the phonolite melt as they all contain rims of basanitic magma. Extensive mingling features (e.g., schlieren layers, load casts, flame structures, mafic enclaves) are developed, indicating that the basanite and the zoned phonolitic body were melts at the time of mixing. These petrographic and geochemical indications of two coeval melts of different composition are substantiated by 40Ar/39Ar dating, revealing identical ages of ca. 15 Ma.

  9. 40Ar-39Ar and cosmic-ray exposure ages of nakhlites—Nakhla, Lafayette, Governador Valadares—and Chassigny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korochantseva, Ekaterina V.; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Buikin, Alexei I.; Hopp, Jens; Ott, Ulrich; Trieloff, Mario

    2011-09-01

    Abstract- We present 40Ar-39Ar dating results of handpicked mineral separates and whole-rock samples of Nakhla, Lafayette, and Chassigny. Our data on Nakhla and Lafayette and recently reported ages for some nakhlites and Chassigny (Misawa et al. 2006; Park et al. 2009) point to formation ages of approximately 1.4 Ga rather than 1.3 Ga that is consistent with previous suggestions of close-in-time formation of nakhlites and Chassigny. In Lafayette mesostasis, we detected a secondary degassing event at approximately 1.1 Ga, which is not related to iddingsite formation. It may have been caused by a medium-grade thermal event resetting the mesostasis age but not influencing the K-Ar system of magmatic inclusions and the original igneous texture of this rock. Cosmic-ray exposure ages for these meteorites and for Governador Valadares were calculated from bulk rock concentrations of cosmogenic nuclides 3He, 21Ne, and 38Ar. Individual results are similar to literature data. The considerable scatter of T3, T21, and T38 ages is due to systematic uncertainties related to bulk rock and target element chemistry, production rates, and shielding effects. This hampers efforts to better constrain the hypothesis of a single ejection event for all nakhlites and Chassigny from a confined Martian surface terrain (Eugster 2003; Garrison and Bogard 2005). Cosmic-ray exposure ages from stepwise release age spectra using 38Ar and neutron induced 37Ar from Ca in irradiated samples can eliminate errors induced by bulk chemistry on production rates, although not from shielding conditions.

  10. New palynology-based astronomical and revised 40Ar/39Ar ages for the Eocene maar lake of Messel (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Olaf K.; Wilde, Volker; Mertz, Dieter F.; Riegel, Walter

    2015-04-01

    The annually laminated oil shale from the Eocene maar lake at Messel (Federal State of Hessen, Germany) provides unique paleoenvironmental data for a time interval of ~640 ka during the Paleogene greenhouse phase. As a consequence of orbitally controlled changes in the vegetation in the vicinity of the lake, the lacustrine laminites can now be astronomically tuned. Dating is based on the short eccentricity amplitude modulations of the regional pollen rain and their correlation to the astronomical La2010a/La2010d solutions in combination with a revised 40Ar/39Ar age of a basalt fragment from a lapilli tuff section below the first lacustrine sediments. Depending on different newly suggested ages for the Fish Canyon sanidine used as monitor for neutron irradiation, the age for the eruption at Messel is between 48.27 ± 0.22 and 48.11 ± 0.22 Ma. This allows for the first time the exact correlation of a Paleogene lacustrine sequence to the marine record in Central Europe. The Messel oil shale becomes now slightly older than previously assumed and includes the Ypresian/Lutetian boundary that moves the base of the European Land Mammal Age Geiseltalian (MP 11) into the Lower Eocene. This opens a window for establishing an independent chronostratigraphic framework for Paleogene terrestrial records and their correlation to the marine realm. Furthermore, the study reveals that higher amounts of pollen from "wet" and thermophilous plants indicate less seasonal and more balanced precipitation and slightly higher temperatures during a well-expressed eccentricity minimum.

  11. Significance of the cosmogenic argon correction in deciphering the 40Ar/39Ar ages of the Nakhlite (Martian) meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, B. E.; Cassata, W.; Mark, D. F.; Tomkinson, T.; Lee, M. R.; Smith, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    All meteorites contain variable amounts of cosmogenic 38Ar and 36Ar produced during extraterrestrial exposure, and in order to calculate reliable 40Ar/39Ar ages this cosmogenic Ar must be removed from the total Ar budget. The amount of cosmogenic Ar has usually been calculated from the step-wise 38Ar/36Ar, minimum 36Ar/37Ar, or average 38Arcosmogenic/37Ar from the irradiated meteorite fragment. However, if Cl is present in the meteorite, then these values will be disturbed by Ar produced during laboratory neutron irradiation of Cl. Chlorine is likely to be a particular issue for the Nakhlite group of Martian meteorites, which can contain over 1000 ppm Cl [1]. An alternative method for the cosmogenic Ar correction uses the meteorite's exposure age as calculated from an un-irradiated fragment and step-wise production rates based on the measured Ca/K [2]. This calculation is independent of the Cl concentration. We applied this correction method to seven Nakhlites, analyzed in duplicate or triplicate. Selected samples were analyzed at both Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and SUERC to ensure inter-laboratory reproducibility. We find that the cosmogenic argon correction of [2] has a significant influence on the ages calculated for individual steps, particularly for those at lower temperatures (i.e., differences of several tens of million years for some steps). The lower-temperature steps are more influenced by the alternate cosmogenic correction method of [2], as these analyses yielded higher concentrations of Cl-derived 38Ar. As a result, the Nakhlite data corrected using [2] yields step-heating spectra that are flat or nearly so across >70% of the release spectra (in contrast to downward-stepping spectra often reported for Nakhlite samples), allowing for the calculation of precise emplacement ages for these meteorites. [1] Cartwright J. A. et al. (2013) GCA, 105, 255-293. [2] Cassata W. S., and Borg L. E. (2015) 46th LPSC, Abstract #2742.

  12. Tracking the timing of subduction and exhumation using 40Ar/39Ar phengite ages in blueschist- and eclogite-facies rocks (Sivrihisar, Turkey)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fornash, Katherine F.; Cosca, Michael A.; Whitney, Donna L.

    2016-01-01

    Geochronologic studies of high-pressure/low-temperature rocks can be used to determine the timing and rates of burial and exhumation in subduction zones by dating different stages of the pressure–temperature history. In this study, we present new in situ UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar phengite ages from a suite of lawsonite blueschist- and eclogite-facies rocks representing different protoliths (metabasalt, metasediment), different structural levels (within and outside of a high-strain zone), and different textural positions (eclogite pod core vs. margin) to understand the timing of these events in an exhumed Neo-Tethyan subduction zone (Sivrihisar Massif, Tavşanlı Zone, Turkey). Weighted mean in situ 40Ar/39Ar ages of phengite from the cores of lawsonite eclogite pods (90–93 Ma) are distinctly older than phengite from retrogressed, epidote eclogite (82 ± 2 Ma). These ages are interpreted as the age of peak and retrograde metamorphism, respectively. Eclogite records the narrowest range of ages (10–14 m.y.) of any rock type analyzed. Transitional eclogite- and blueschist-facies assemblages and glaucophane-rimmed lawsonite + garnet + phengite veins from eclogite pod margins record a much wider age range of 40Ar/39Ar ages (~20 m.y.) with weighted mean ages of ~91 Ma. Blueschists and quartzites record more variable 40Ar/39Ar ages that may in part be related to structural position: samples within a high-strain zone at the tectonic contact of the HP rocks with a meta-ultramafic unit have in situ UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar ages of 84.0 ± 1.3–103.7 ± 3.1 Ma, whereas samples outside this zone range to older ages (84.6 ± 2.4–116.7 ± 2.7 Ma) and record a greater age range (22–38 m.y.). The phengite ages can be correlated with the preservation of HP mineral assemblages and fabrics as well as the effects of deformation. Collectively, these results show that high-spatial resolution UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar phengite data, when considered

  13. The tectonic significance of pre-Scandian 40Ar/39Ar phengite cooling ages in the Caledonides of western Norway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, T.B.; Berry, H.N.; Lux, D.R.; Andresen, A.

    1998-01-01

    Pre-Silurian continental-margin deposits in western Norway, non-conformably overlying allochthonous continental orthogneisses retain Ordovician 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages for phengites, implying either rapid cooling immediately after a Late Ordovician orogenic event, or less likely, a slow cooling following an Early Ordovician or older orogeny. The Dalsfjord Suite-H??yvik Group basement-cover pair are probably a lateral equivalent to Late Proterozoic sandstones ('sparagmites') covering the Jotun Nappe gneisses of the Middle Allochthon in central-south Norway. The H??yvik Group underwent polyphase deformation, greenschist-facies metamorphism (Tmax <450??C) and exhumation prior to deposition of the unconformably overlying Wenlockian continental-margin deposits of the Herland Group. The H??yvik Group was only weakly metamorphosed during obduction of the Solund-Stavfjord Ophiolite and the Scandian continental collision between Baltica and Laurentia. Phengitic white micas from the H??yvik Group yield cooling ages of 446.1 ?? 3.0, 449.1 ?? 2.2 and 447.5 ?? 4.0 Ma, respectively, identical within experimental error. One sample gives a plateau over 72% of the gas analysed, whereas the other samples were slightly disturbed after initial cooling, as indicated by systematically lower apparent ages at low experimental extraction temperatures. Minor 40Ar loss probably occurred during subsequent Scandian deformation and late to post-orogenic extension. The H??yvik Group rocks were unroofed before the Wenlock time (423-428 Ma) and cooled through the temperature for argon retention in phengite at c. 447 ?? 4 Ma, indicating a maximum cooling rate between 14 and 22??C/Ma-1 through Ashgill and Llandovery times before being subjected to low-grade metamorphism during the Scandian orogeny. Rapid pre-Scandian cooling, combined with peak metamorphic conditions of 450??C or less, may indicate that the Dalsfjord-H??yvik basement-cover pair were affected by an orogenic event during the Late

  14. Variation of illite/muscovite 40Ar/39Ar age spectra during progressive low-grade metamorphism: an example from the US Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdel, Charles; van der Pluijm, Ben A.; Niemi, Nathan

    2012-09-01

    40Ar/39Ar step-heating data were collected from micron to submicron grain-sizes of correlative illite- and muscovite-rich Cambrian pelitic rocks from the western United States that range in metamorphic grade from the shallow diagenetic zone (zeolite facies) to the epizone (greenschist facies). With increasing metamorphic grade, maximum ages from 40Ar/39Ar release spectra decrease, as do total gas ages and retention ages. Previous studies have explained similar results as arising dominantly or entirely from the dissolution of detrital muscovite and precipitation/recrystallization of neo-formed illite. While recognizing the importance of these processes in evaluating our results, we suggest that the inverse correlation between apparent age and metamorphic grade is controlled, primarily, by thermally activated volume diffusion, analogous to the decrease in apparent ages with depth observed for many thermochronometers in borehole experiments. Our results suggest that complete resetting of the illite/muscovite Ar thermochronometer occurs between the high anchizone and epizone, or at roughly 300 °C. This empirical result is in agreement with previous calculations based on muscovite diffusion parameters, which indicate that muscovite grains with radii of 0.05-2 μm should have closure temperatures between 250 and 350 °C. At high anchizone conditions, we observe a reversal in the age/grain-size relationship (the finest grain-size produces the oldest apparent age), which may mark the stage in prograde subgreenschist facies metamorphism of pelitic rocks at which neo-formed illite/muscovite crystallites typically surpass the size of detrital muscovite grains. It is also approximately the stage at which neo-formed illite/muscovite crystallites develop sufficient Ar retentivity to produce geologically meaningful 40Ar/39Ar ages. Results from our sampling transect of Cambrian strata establish a framework for interpreting illite/muscovite 40Ar/39Ar age spectra at different

  15. The effect of thermal resetting and recrystallisation on white mica 40Ar/39Ar ages during retrograde metamorphism on Syros, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uunk, Bertram; Wijbrans, Jan; Brouwer, Fraukje

    2015-04-01

    White mica 40Ar/39Ar dating is a proven powerful tool for constraining timing of metamorphism, deformation and exhumation. However, in high-pressure metamorphic rocks, dating often results in wide age ranges which are not in agreement with constraints from other isotopic systems, indicating that geological and chemical processes complicate straightforward 40Ar/39Ar dating. In this research project, white mica ages from rocks of the Cycladic Blueschist Unit on Syros, Greece with contrasting rheology and strain mechanisms are compared, in order to better understand the role of deformation, recrystallization and fluid flow on 40Ar/39Ar ages of white mica during retrograde metamorphism. Resulting ages vary along different sections on the island, inconsistent with other isotopic constraints on eclogite-blueschist metamorphism (55-50 Ma) and greenschist overprinting (41-30 Ma). Two end-member models are possible: 1) Results represent continuous crystallization of white mica while moving from blueschist to greenschist conditions in the metamorphic P-T loop, or 2) white mica equilibrated in eclogite-blueschist conditions and their diffusion systematics were progressively perturbed during greenschist overprinting. The single grain fusion analyses yielded contrasting age distributions, which indicate contrasts in degree of re-equilibration during retrograde metamorphism. Step wise heating of larger grain populations resulted in flat plateau shapes, providing no evidence for partial resetting. Electron microprobe measurements of Si per formula unit, as a proxy for pressure during crystallisation, do not explain age variation within sections or on the island scale. The previously unreported north-south age trend and age ranges per sample, as shown only in the 40Ar/39Ar system of the metapelitic and marble lithologies, contains key information that will allow us to test between different scenarios for age formation. Excess argon infiltration at this stage seems to have been of

  16. Thermochronology of economic mineral deposits: dating the stages of mineralization at Panasqueira, Portugal, by high-precision 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectrum techniques on muscovite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snee, L.W.; Sutter, J.F.; Kelly, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    This study is an example of a new and powerful application of 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum dating of muscovite. It is now possible to establish time constraints necessary for solving some of the long-standing problems in economic geology. Beyond this, the unique geologic situation of Panasqueira has allowed us to quantify the thermal characteristics of muscovite. Published fluid inclusion data have been used to estimate a muscovite argon closure temperature of ~325??C during rapid cooling or short reheating and a temperature of ~270??C during slow cooling or extended reheating. Argon-loss patterns displayed by all dated muscovites resulted from reheating after original closure; the mechanism for this argon loss appears to have been argon transport by volume diffusion. Thus, 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum dating of muscovite can be used to evaluate thermal conditions controlling argon diffusion as well as age, duration, and number of episodes of mineralization. -from Authors

  17. /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar age of detrital muscovite within Lower Ordovician sandstone in the coastal plain basement of Florida: implications for west African terrane linkages

    SciTech Connect

    Dallmeyer, R.D.

    1987-11-01

    Detrital muscovite was concentrated from a core of Lower Ordovician sandstone recovered from 1282 m in the Sun Oil Company, H.T. Parker No.1 well, Marion County, Florida. The concentrate records a /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar plateau age of 504.1 +/- 2.1 Ma. The Paleozoic sedimentary section penetrated in this well is part of an extensive subsurface Lower Ordovician-Middle Devonian sedimentary succession characterized by Gondwanan paleontological affinities. The succession has been correlated with sequences of similar age in the Bove Basin of west Africa which unconformably overlie metamorphic units of the Bassaride and Rokelide orogens in Senegal and Guinea. Muscovite within these metamorphic rocks records ca. 500-510 Ma postmetamorphic /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar cooling ages and was likely a proximal source for the lower Paleozoic clastic detritus represented in the pre-Mesozoic sedimentary sequences beneath the southeastern US coastal plain.

  18. sup 40 Ar/ sup 39 Ar polyorogenic mineral age record within the southern Mauritanide orogen (M'Bout-Bakel region) West Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Dallmeyer, R.D. ); Lecorche, J.P. )

    1990-12-01

    The southern Mauritanide orogen exposed between M'Bout and Bakel is characterized by several internally imbricated, polydeformed, and variably metamorphosed infrastructural allochthons. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar incremental-release ages recorded by hornblende within undeformed granodiorite of the Guidimakha Complex suggest post-magmatic cooling through appropriate argon closure temperatures at approx 670 Ma. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages recorded by muscovite within lithologic elements of both the Guidimakha Complex and the Diala-Bouanze Series suggest initial regional metamorphism (associated with Pan-African I orogenesis) was following by cooling through muscovite argon closure temperatures between approx 600 and 620 Ma. Slight rejuvenation of muscovite argon systems occurred locally between approx 325 and 350 Ma. Muscovite and whole-rock slate/phyllite argon systems within metavolcanic and metavolcaniclastic components of the infrastructural calc-alkaline igneous complex (easternmost sectors of the M'Bout Series) record {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar plateau age of approx 300 to 320 Ma. Muscovite and whole-rock slate/phyllite argon systems within westernmost portions of the study area (western portions of the M'Bout Series) record {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar plateau ages of approx 267 to 312 Ma. All foreland units within the M'Bout-Bakel area were affected by post-Emsian folding. Effects of this tectonic activity are widespread throughout the parautochthon and western metamorphic sequences. These effects include emplacement of suprastructural ( ) allochthons and local reactivation of older thrust faults within infrastructural units.

  19. An Astronomically Dated Standard in 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, K.; Hilgen, F.; Krijgsman, W.; Wijbrans, J.

    2003-12-01

    The standard geological time scale of Berggren et al. (1995) and Cande and Kent (1995) is calibrated with different absolute dating techniques, i.e. the Plio - Pleistocene relies on astronomical tuning, and older parts of the time scale are based on radio-isotopic (40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb) calibration methods. In the new edition of the standard geological timescale (Lourens et al., to be published in 2004) the entire Neogene will rely on astronomical dating. Therefore, it is of crucial importance that all dating methods produce equivalent absolute ages when the same geological event is dated. The Mediterranean Neogene provides an excellent opportunity to compare different dating methods by isotopic dating (40Ar/39Ar, U/Pb) of volcanic ash layers intercalated in astronomically dated sediments. Here we will show that in spite of potential errors in all methods, we succeeded to intercalibrate the 40Ar/39Ar and astronomical methods, arriving at astronomically calibrated age of 28.24 +/- 0.01 Ma for the in 40Ar/39Ar geochronology commonly used standard FCT sanidine. The advantage of an astronomically calibrated FCT above a K/Ar calibrated standard is a smaller error in the absolute age due to the lack of uncertainties related to 40K and radiogenic 40Ar contents in the primary standard and a decreasing influence of errors in the decay constant (branching ratio is not required). In addition to an astronomically calibrated FCT age we propose to introduce an astronomically dated standard. A direct astronomically dated standard can be regarded as a "primary" standard and does not require intercalibration with other standards, thus reducing analytical (and geological) uncertainties. Ash layers intercalated in sedimentary sequences in the Melilla Basin, Morocco appear to be the most suitable for this purpose. A reliable astronomical time control is available and intercalated ash layers contain sanidine phenocrysts up to 2 mm. Four ash layers are not or barely affected by

  20. Dating slate belts using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and zircon ages from crosscutting plutons: A case study from east-central Maine, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanem, Hind; Kunk, Michael; Ludman, Allan; Bish, David; Wintsch, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Determining the tectonic significance of slate belts is a persistent problem in many orogenic belts because of the lack of time constraints on the age of deposition and the age(s) of cleavages. We have solved this problem in east-central Maine where the ages of the regional Acadian cleavage (S1) and local ductile fault zone cleavage (S2) were both constrained using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and the ages of crosscutting plutons. Applying 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to rocks with multiple generations of muscovite was possible because each cleavage-forming muscovite records a crystallization age rather than a cooling age due to the low grade of regional metamorphism. Evidence for metamorphic crystallization in rocks dominated by regional Acadian cleavage (S1) comes from the truncations of detrital and authigenic muscovite and chlorite grains by new muscovite and chlorite grains that define the S1 foliation. In rocks that display two foliations, the evidence comes from the truncations of chlorite and muscovite grains defining all earlier fabrics by new muscovite grains in the younger folia (S2). Step-heating experiments using the 40Ar/39Ar technique on twelve samples all yielded sigmoidal age spectra. The low-temperature steps produced a hump in the age spectra, indicating 39Ar recoil into adjacent interlayered chlorite grains, the latter interlayering confirmed by back-scattered electron imaging. Continuing steps climbed steadily from those with minimum apparent ages as young as ~381 Ma to steps with maximum ages as old as 466 Ma. The samples with the lowest minimum apparent age steps are those in which the S2 cleavage-forming mica population dominates. In contrast, the oldest apparent age steps are from samples that have the highest modal abundance of detrital micas. The Middle Ordovician age of the maximum age steps is interpreted to be the minimum cooling age of the detrital micas. The minimum 40Ar/39Ar age steps of muscovite in the samples that display only S1 cleavage

  1. New 40Ar/ 39Ar dating results from the Shanwang Basin, eastern China: Constraints on the age of the Shanwang Formation and associated biota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Huaiyu; Deng, Chenglong; Pan, Yongxin; Deng, Tao; Luo, Zhaohua; Sun, Jimin; Zhu, Rixiang

    2011-07-01

    The fluvio-lacustrine sequence of the Shanwang Basin, eastern China, preserves a rich and important terrestrial fossil fauna and flora; the exceptional preservation of these fossils reveals the dynamics of ancient mammalian ecosystems and plant biology. However, the timing of this sedimentary sequence has been the subject of debate for decades. Here we contribute to this debate by presenting the detailed results of 40Ar/ 39Ar analysis of the basalts above, below, and within the Shanwang Formation. These dates place stringent constraints on the age of Shanwang Formation and associated biota. 40Ar/ 39Ar ages obtained from basalts of the Niushan and Yaoshan Formations, which underlie and overlie the Shanwang Formation, are 21.0 ± 2.5 Ma (2σ, full external error) and 17.3 ± 1.5 Ma (2σ, full external error), respectively. The 40Ar/ 39Ar age of the basalt in the Shanwang Formation is 17-18 Ma. Given the age constraints of the basalts of the Yaoshan and Shanwang Formations, the age of the Shanwang biota is estimated to be ca. 17 Ma, late Burdigalian of the Early Miocene, indicating that the deposition of this fauna coincided with the onset of the mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum. The results provide new age constraints on the Shanwang mammal fauna, and independently support interpretations that this fauna can be assigned to chronozone MN4, and correlated with middle Orleanian of the European Land Mammal Age, and to late Hemingfordian of the North American Land Mammal Age. Biological diversity of the Shanwang Formation could reflect the global-scale mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum.

  2. 40Ar/39Ar dating of ignimbrite from Inner Mongolia, northeastern China, indicates a post-Middle Jurassic age for the overlying Daohugou Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, H. Y.; Wang, X. L.; Zhou, Z. H.; Zhu, R. X.; Jin, F.; Wang, F.; Ding, X.; Boven, A.

    2004-10-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar step heating analyses of K-feldspar derived from the ignimbrite in Inner Mongolia, China indicates that they were formed at 159.8 +/- 0.8 Ma, which provides a maximum age for the overlying fossil-bearing lacustrine deposits (Daohugou Bed). This result favors a post-Middle Jurassic (Late Jurassic or younger), rather than the Middle Jurassic age for the Daohugou Bed. Such a result is generally consistent with vertebrate biostratigraphic evidence, providing a maximum known age for the first appearance of several major animal groups such as Cryptobranchidae of Urodela (salamanders) and Maniraptora (birds and their closest dinosaurian relatives).

  3. 40Ar/39Ar Studies of Antarctic Micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxton, J. M.; Knott, S. F.; Turner, G.; Maurette, M.

    1992-07-01

    preclude their existence as small particles in space. A spallogenic origin for the 36Ar would require an unrealistically long exposure time and can be ruled out All the particles appear to have ^40Ar/^39Ar ages close to 4.5 Ga. One particle, which was step heated, has a 4.5-Ga age both steps, suggesting the particle is indeed this old. For the remainder, however, the data do not exclude a younger age and a component of trapped modern air that increases the ^40Ar/^39Ar ratio. The chondritic particles have K/Cl of 6 to 7, higher than CI chondrite (K/Cl = 0.8). However the K/Cl ratio could have been modified by weathering, especially if some of the original Cl was in a water soluble phase. We are studying a further 70 Antarctic dust particles. These have each been divided into three; one aliquot has been irradiated and will be used for ^40Ar/^39Ar dating, another will be used to measure the He content, and the remainder will be used for mineralogical studies. References Maurette, M., Michel-Levy, M. C., Kurat, G., Pourchet, M., Brandstaetter, F. & Bourot-Denise, M. (1991) Nature 351, 44-48.

  4. Tephra sequences as indicators of magma evolution: 40Ar/ 39Ar ages and geochemistry of tephra sequences in the southwest Nevada volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huysken, K. T.; Vogel, T. A.; Layer, P. W.

    2001-04-01

    Changes in rock chemistry with 40Ar/ 39Ar ages in tephra layers record the temporal and magmatic history of two volcanic systems in southwestern Nevada. Tephra layers from the Post-Grouse Canyon tephra sequence record three distinct groups. These groups are chemically distinct and have 40Ar/ 39Ar ages of 13.52±0.06, 13.31±0.18, and 12.95±0.10 Ma. The age groups correspond to three distinct chemical groups based on trace element distributions. These chemical groups cannot be related by any reasonable fractional crystallization or magma mixing model and are interpreted as distinct magma batches. The Pre-Rainier Mesa tephra sequence records two 40Ar/ 39Ar ages (12.79±0.10 and 11.84±0.18 Ma). The upper portion of this sequence is equivalent in age and chemistry to part of the overlying Rainier Mesa ash-flow sheet. The lower portion of the sequence is equivalent in age to the underlying Tiva Canyon ash-flow sheet but is chemically distinct from this sheet. The formation of this chemical group is consistent with mixing of low silica Tiva Canyon and high silica, low Th, Rainier Mesa magma. Post-Grouse Canyon magmas were most likely emplaced as a series of small, unrelated magma bodies, which allowed them to evolve independently. The mixed Pre-Rainier Mesa magma was produced by infilling of the Tiva Canyon magma chamber with Rainier Mesa-like magma after eruption of the Tiva Canyon ash-flow sheet at approximately 12.8 Ma. The upper portion of the Pre-Rainier Mesa tephra sequence represents eruption of Rainier Mesa magma less than 0.3 My. before that of the voluminous (1200 km 3) Rainier Mesa ash-flow sheet at approximately 11.71 Ma.

  5. High-precision 40Ar/^{39}Ar Ages for the Matuyama-Brunhes Reversal and the Big Lost Subchron from Lava Flows on La Palma, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Relle, M.; Singer, B.; Hoffman, K.; Battle, A.; Laj, C.; Carracedo, J.; Guillou, H.

    2001-05-01

    The timing of geomagnetic reversals, excursions or events is crucial to understanding the frequency of geomagnetic field instability. A detailed study of 36 lava flows comprising two stratigraphic sequences on the island of La Palma, Canary Islands revealed a complex record of 3 distinct geomagnetic events. The Matuyama-Brunhes (M-B) reversal is recorded in 5 transitionally magnetized lava flows from the north side of the Barranco de Los Tilos. The isochron ages for 3 of these lavas are defined by 11 incremental heating experiments and yielded a weighted mean age* of 796.3\\pm9.0 ka (2\\sigma). On the basis of paleomagnetic results and 2 imprecise K-Ar ages (Abdel-Monem et al., 1972), lavas in the south side of Los Tilos Barranco were previously thought to record the M-B reversal. The lowermost lavas have a weak remanence that may suggest transitioning field behavior. 40Ar/^{39}Ar isochrons from 4 of these flows were defined by 11 separate incremental-heating experiments, and gave a weighted mean age of 823.2\\pm8.6 ka. This anomalous, but not fully transitional, field behavior, 27\\pm17 ka prior to the M-B reversal, may evince a precursor to the M-B reversal as suggested in some marine sediment records. Further up section are two normal polarity flows that gave 40Ar/^{39}Ar isochrons of 751.9\\pm8.1 ka and 675.0\\pm15.7 ka, confirming the highly episodic nature of volcanism that preserves this geomagnetic record. Directly above these normal flows are nine transitionally magnetized lavas with VGPs over India and the section is capped by one normal polarity flow. The 40Ar/^{39}Ar isochrons of 5 lavas, including the uppermost normal flow, were defined by 14 separate experiments and gave a weighted mean age of 578.6\\pm7.8 ka. From these same transitional lavas, Quidelleur et al. (1999, EPSL) reported 3 unspiked K-Ar ages with a weighted mean of 602\\pm24 ka (2\\sigma) and proposed a new event called the "La Palma" excursion. The 40Ar/^{39}Ar age presented here is a

  6. Evidence from 40Ar/ 39Ar ages of lunar impact glasses for an increase in the impact rate ˜800 Ma ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellner, N. E. B.; Delano, J. W.; Swindle, T. D.; Barra, F.; Olsen, E.; Whittet, D. C. B.

    2009-08-01

    Geochemical and 40Ar/ 39Ar data on nine impact glasses from the Apollo 14, 16, and 17 landing sites indicate at least seven distinct impact events with ages ˜800 Ma. Rock fragments analyzed by Barra et al. [Barra F., Swindle T. D., Korotev R. L., Jolliff B. L., Zeigler R. A., and Olsen E. (2006) 40Ar- 39Ar dating of Apollo 12 regolith: implications for the age of Copernicus and the source of nonmare materials, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta,70, 6016-6031] from the Apollo 12 landing site and some Apollo 12 spherules reported by Levine et al. [Levine J., Becker T. A., Muller R. A., Renne P. R. (2005) 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of Apollo 12 impact spherules, Geophys. Res. Let., 32, L15201, doi: 10.1029/2005GL022874.] show ˜800 Ma ages, close to the accepted age of the Copernicus event, 800 ± 15 Ma [Bogard D. D., Garrison D. H., Shih C. Y., and Nyquist L. E. (1994) 39Ar- 40Ar dating of two lunar granites: The age of Copernicus, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 58, 3093-3100]. These Apollo 12 samples are thought to have been affected by material from the Copernicus event since there is a Copernicus ray going through the Apollo 12 landing site. When all of these data are viewed collectively, including an Apollo 16 glass bomb [Borchardt R., Stöffler D., Spettel B., Palme H. and Wänke H. (1986) Composition, structure, and age of the Apollo 16 subregolith basement as deduced from the chemistry of post-Imbrium melt bombs. In Proceedings, 17th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, pp. E43-E54], and in the context of diverse compositional range and sample location, there is a suggestion that there may have been a transient increase in the global lunar impact flux at ˜800 Ma. Therefore, the Copernicus impact event could have been one of many. If correct, there should be evidence for this increased impact flux around 800 Ma ago in the age statistics of terrestrial impact samples.

  7. 31+/-17 ka 40Ar/39Ar Plateau Age on the Very Low-Potassium Hat Creek Basalt Fits Stratigraphic and Geochronologic Constraints of Contiguous Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clynne, M. A.; Turrin, B. D.; Champion, D. E.; Muffler, L. P.

    2003-12-01

    The Hat Creek Basalt is a late Pleistocene low-K olivine tholeiite that floors much of the Hat Creek Valley, north of the Lassen volcanic highland in NE California. The flow erupted from a fissure trending N 10° W located 0.5 to 4.0 km SSE of Old Station and flowed north nearly 30 km, mainly through lava tubes. Paleomagnetic data indicate that the Hat Creek Basalt is a single eruptive unit with an inclination of 64.3° and a declination of 1.0° . The Hat Creek Basalt is overlain by gravel related to the last major glaciation, which ended about 15 to 17 ky ago. The Hat Creek Basalt overlies numerous andesite and basaltic andesite lava flows that are closely related geographically, stratigraphically, petrographically and geochemically and probably represent the same eruptive episode (although not necessarily the same year or century). Three of these flows have been dated by the 40Ar/39Ar method and yield concordant plateau, integrated (total fusion), and isochron ages: Little Potato Butte (1.42% K2O; 67+/-4 ka), Sugarloaf (1.85% K2O; 55+/-7 ka), and Big Potato Butte (1.62% K2O; 73+/-14 ka). The Hat Creek Basalt also overlies the basaltic andesite of Cinder Butte (1.65% K2O) with a 40Ar/39Ar plateau age of 38+/-7 ka. Given that the age of the Hat Creek Basalt is thus firmly bracketed between ˜15 ka and 38+/-7 ka, we attempted to date this low-potassium tholeiitic basalt directly. One sample produced 40Ar/39Ar data that cannot be interpreted, but a second sample (0.17% K2O) yielded concordant plateau, integrated (total fusion), and isochron ages of 31+/-17 ka, 30+/-20 ka, and 24+/-6 ka; within the time bracket determined by stratigraphic relations. These data indicate that samples of latest Pleistocene tholeiitic basalt with very low K2O can give useful 40Ar/39Ar ages. As with all isotopically determined ages, the confidence of the results are significantly enhanced when additional constraints imposed by other isotopic ages within a stratigraphic context are taken

  8. The effects of acid leaching on 40Ar/39Ar age dating results using samples from the Walvis Ridge hotspot trail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klath, J. F.; Koppers, A. A.; Heaton, D. E.; Schnur, S.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we systematically explore how acid leaching can be used to reduce the negative effects of seawater alteration on the 40Ar/39Ar age dating of submarine basalts. Koppers et al (2000) showed that acid leaching of groundmass samples generated more consistent ages as well as ages more concordant with phenocrystic mineral phases, compared to samples that were left untreated. By studying the effects of progressively increasing the strength and length of acid treatment, we will show how acid leaching of groundmass separates reduces alteration while leaving the initial eruption signature intact. Samples were chosen from the Walvis ridge hotspot trail in the southeast Atlantic. Three samples were selected based on degree and style of alteration. Two samples (basalt and basaltic andesite) appear highly altered in thin section. The basalt contains diffuse iddingsite alteration that is pervasive throughout the groundmass. The basaltic andesite displays focused secondary mineral phases within and around abundant vesicles. The third sample, a trachyte, shows relatively minor degrees of alteration in thin section. These groundmass separates were divided into four splits and treated with a progressively stronger acid and for longer duration. One split from each rock was left untreated to act as a baseline. Of the other three splits from each sample, one was treated with a mild leach (1N HCl and 1N HNO3), one a strong leach (1N HCl, 1N HNO3, 6N HCl, and 3N HNO3), and lastly the strong leach performed twice. The samples were then handpicked to remove any remaining visible alteration. The untreated samples were picked as well, removing the most distinctly altered grains. All splits were analyzed by electron microprobe, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and the incremental heating 40Ar/39Ar dating method. We will report on the results of an image analysis of microprobe backscatter images and elemental maps taken of individual groundmass grains. This analysis will show the location

  9. Preservation of ancient impact ages on the R chondrite parent body: 40Ar/39Ar age of hornblende-bearing R chondrite LAP 04840

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Righter, Kevin; Cosca, Michael A.; Morgan, Leah

    2016-01-01

    The hornblende- and biotite-bearing R chondrite LAP 04840 is a rare kind of meteorite possibly containing outer solar system water stored during metamorphism or postshock annealing deep within an asteroid. Because little is known regarding its age and origin, we determined 40Ar/39Ar ages on hornblende-rich separates of the meteorite, and obtained plateau ages of 4340(±40) to 4380(±30) Ma. These well-defined plateau ages, coupled with evidence for postshock annealing, indicate this meteorite records an ancient shock event and subsequent annealing. The age of 4340–4380 Ma (or 4.34–4.38 Ga) for this and other previously dated R chondrites is much older than most impact events recorded by ordinary chondrites and points to an ancient event or events that predated the late heavy bombardment that is recorded in so many meteorites and lunar samples.

  10. Ar-Ar_Redux: rigorous error propagation of 40Ar/39Ar data, including covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rigorous data reduction and error propagation algorithms are needed to realise Earthtime's objective to improve the interlaboratory accuracy of 40Ar/39Ar dating to better than 1% and thereby facilitate the comparison and combination of the K-Ar and U-Pb chronometers. Ar-Ar_Redux is a new data reduction protocol and software program for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology which takes into account two previously underappreciated aspects of the method: 1. 40Ar/39Ar measurements are compositional dataIn its simplest form, the 40Ar/39Ar age equation can be written as: t = log(1+J [40Ar/39Ar-298.5636Ar/39Ar])/λ = log(1 + JR)/λ Where λ is the 40K decay constant and J is the irradiation parameter. The age t does not depend on the absolute abundances of the three argon isotopes but only on their relative ratios. Thus, the 36Ar, 39Ar and 40Ar abundances can be normalised to unity and plotted on a ternary diagram or 'simplex'. Argon isotopic data are therefore subject to the peculiar mathematics of 'compositional data', sensu Aitchison (1986, The Statistical Analysis of Compositional Data, Chapman & Hall). 2. Correlated errors are pervasive throughout the 40Ar/39Ar methodCurrent data reduction protocols for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology propagate the age uncertainty as follows: σ2(t) = [J2 σ2(R) + R2 σ2(J)] / [λ2 (1 + R J)], which implies zero covariance between R and J. In reality, however, significant error correlations are found in every step of the 40Ar/39Ar data acquisition and processing, in both single and multi collector instruments, during blank, interference and decay corrections, age calculation etc. Ar-Ar_Redux revisits every aspect of the 40Ar/39Ar method by casting the raw mass spectrometer data into a contingency table of logratios, which automatically keeps track of all covariances in a compositional context. Application of the method to real data reveals strong correlations (r2 of up to 0.9) between age measurements within a single irradiation batch. Propertly taking

  11. Evidence of synmagmatic foliation in the Selawik Hills, NW Alaska, based on [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar age determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Solie, D.N. ); Layer, P.W. . Geophysical Inst.)

    1993-04-01

    Based on [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar plateau ages from various rock units in the Selawik Hills plutonic complex, northwestern Alaska, the units were emplaced in the order syenite/monzonite, followed by nepheline syenite and then quartz monzonite. There is no evidence of disturbance of the Ar isotopic system in the dated plutonic minerals, and the ages compare fairly well with previously published K/Ar data. A cooling history of about ten m.y. for the Selawk Hills rocks is suggested, based on comparison of [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages with apatite fission-track data (Murphy and Till, 1992). Comparison of hornblende plateau ages between nonfoliated and foliated syenite indicates that foliated rocks crystallized later than nonfoliated rocks, but within the initial cooling history of the complex. Foliated syenite/monzonite has mineralogy similar to nonfoliated, but with generally higher color index. Foliated textures are distributed throughout the complex, but are more prevalent to the north, proximal to a large (about 2 km[sup 2]) xenolithic metamorphic block which is bounded on the north by an east-west-trending fault. The authors suggest that synmagmatic fault movement acted as a mechanism causing plutonic foliation and resulting in possible loss of late fluid from semicrystallized syenitic magma to form kspar-rich dikes. Foundering of the xenolithic block within the magma may also have contributed to development of foliation. Continued fault movement is indicated by cataclastic deformation along the fault trace.

  12. 40Ar 39Ar age constraints on neogene sedimentary beds, Upper Ramparts, half-way Pillar and Canyon village sites, Porcupine river, east-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunk, M.J.; Rieck, H.; Fouch, T.D.; Carter, L.D.

    1994-01-01

    40Ar 39Ar ages of volcanic rocks are used to provide numerical constraints on the age of middle and upper Miocene sedimentary strata collected along the Porcupine River. Intercalated sedimentary rocks north of latitude 67??10???N in the Porcupine terrane of east-central Alaska contain a rich record of plant fossils. The fossils are valuable indicators of this interior region's paleoclimate during the time of their deposition. Integration of the 40Ar 39Ar results with paleomagnetic and sedimentological data allows for refinements in estimating the timing of deposition and duration of selected sedimentary intervals. 40Ar 39Ar plateau age spectra, from whole rock basalt samples, collected along the Upper Ramparts and near Half-way Pillar on the Porcupine River, range from 15.7 ?? 0.1 Ma at site 90-6 to 14.4 ?? 0.1 Ma at site 90-2. With exception of the youngest basalt flow at site 90-2, all of the samples are of reversed magnetic polarity, and all 40Ar 39Ar age spectrum results are consistent with the deposition of the entire stratigraphic section during a single interval of reversed magnetic polarity. The youngest flow at site 90-2 was emplaced during an interval of normal polarity. With age, paleomagnetic and sedimentological data, the ages of the Middle Miocene sedimentary rocks between the basalt flows at sites 90-1 and 90-2 can be assigned to an interval within the limits of analytical precision of 15.2 ?? 0.1 Ma; thus, the sediments were deposited during the peak of the Middle Miocene thermal maximum. Sediments in the upper parts of sites 90-1 and 90-2 were probably deposited during cooling from the Middle Miocene thermal maximum. 40Ar 39Ar results of plagioclase and biotite from a single tephra, collected at sites 90-7 and 90-8 along the Canyon Village section of the Porcupine River, indicate an age of 6.57 ?? 0.02 Ma for its time of eruption and deposition. These results, together with sedimentological and paleomagnetic data, suggest that all of the Upper

  13. XRD-based 40Ar/39Ar age correction for fine-grained illite, with application to folded carbonates in the Monterrey Salient (northern Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitz-Díaz, Elisa; Hall, Chris M.; van der Pluijm, Ben A.

    2016-05-01

    Due to their minute size, 40Ar/39Ar analysis of illite faces significant analytical challenges, including mineral characterization and, especially, effects of grain size and crystallography on 39Ar recoil. Quantifying the effects of 39Ar recoil requires the use of sample vacuum encapsulation during irradiation, which permits the measurement of the fraction of recoiled 39Ar as well as the 39Ar and 40Ar∗ retained within illite crystals that are released during step heating. Total-Gas Ages (TGA) are calculated by using both recoiled and retained argon, which is functionally equivalent to K-Ar ages, while Retention Ages (RA) only involve retained Ar in the crystal. Natural applications have shown that TGA fits stratigraphic constraints of geological processes when the average illite crystallite thickness (ICT) is smaller than 10 nm, and that RA matches these constraints for ICTs larger than 50 nm. We propose a new age correction method that takes into account the average ICT and corresponding recoiled 39Ar for a sample, with X-ray Corrected Ages (XCA) lying between Total-Gas and Retention Ages depending on ICT. This correction is particularly useful in samples containing authigenic illite formed in the anchizone, with typical ICT values between 10 and 50 nm. In three samples containing authigenic illite from Cretaceous carbonates in the Monterrey Salient in northern Mexico, there is a range in TGAs among the different size-fractions of 46-49, 36-43 and 40-52 Ma, while RAs range from 54-64, 47-52 and 53-54 Ma, respectively. XCA calculations produce tighter age ranges for these samples of 52.5-56, 45.5-48.5 and 49-52.5 Ma, respectively. In an apparent age vs ICT or %2M 1illite plot, authigenic illite grains show a slope that is in general slightly positive for TGA, slightly negative for RA, but close to zero for XCA, with thinner crystallites showing more dispersion than thicker ones. In order to test if dispersion is due to a different formation history or the result

  14. Dating slate belts using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and zircon ages from crosscutting plutons: A case study from east-central Maine, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanem, Hind; Kunk, Michael J.; Ludman, Allan; Bish, David L.; Wintsch, Robert P.

    2016-12-01

    We report the ages of cleavage development in a normally intractable lower greenschist facies slate belt, the Central Maine-Aroostook-Matapedia belt in east-central Maine. We have attacked this problem by identifying the minimum ages of muscovite in a regional Acadian cleavage (S1) and in a local ductile fault zone cleavage (S2) using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and the ages of crosscutting plutons. Our success stems from the regional low-grade metamorphism of the rocks in which each crystallization event preserves a40Ar/39Ar crystallization age and not a cooling age. Evidence for recrystallization via a pressure solution mechanism comes from truncations of detrital, authigenic, and in some rocks S1 muscovite and chlorite grains by new cleavage-forming muscovite and chlorite grains. Low-blank furnace age spectra from meta-arkosic and slaty rocks climb from moderate temperature Devonian age-steps dominated by cleavage-forming muscovite to Ordovician age-steps dominated by a detrital muscovite component. S1- and S2-cleaved rocks were hornfelsed by granitoids of ∼407 and 377 Ma, respectively. The combination of these minimum ages with the maximum metamorphic crystallization ages establishes narrow constraints on the timing of these two cleavage-forming events, ∼410 Ma (S1) and ∼380 Ma (S2). These two events coincide in time with a change in the plate convergence kinematics from the arrival of the Avalon terrane (Acadian orogeny), to a right-lateral transpression arrival of the Meguma terrane in the Neoacadian orogeny.

  15. The age of the Keystone thrust: laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar dating of foreland basin deposits, southern Spring Mountains, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, R.J.; Carr, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    Nonmarine sedimentary and volcaniclastic foreland-basin deposits in the Spring Mountains are cut by the Contact and Keystone thrusts. These synorogenic deposits, informally designated the Lavinia Wash sequence by Carr (1980), previously were assigned a Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous(?) age. New 40Ar.39Ar laser-fusion and incremental-heating studies of a tuff bed in the Lavinia Wash sequence support a best estimate age of 99.0 ?? 0.4 Ma, indicating that the Lavinia Wash sequence is actually late Early Cretaceous in age and establishing a maximum age for final emplacement of the Contact and Keystone thrust plates consistent with the remainder of the Mesozoic foreland thrust belt. -from Authors

  16. Robust 24 ± 6 ka 40Ar/39Ar age of a low-potassium tholeiitic basalt in the Lassen region of NE California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turrin, Brent D.; Muffler, L. J. Patrick; Clynne, Michael A.; Champion, Duane E.

    2007-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar ages on the Hat Creek Basalt (HCB) and stratigraphically related lava flows show that latest Pleistocene tholeiitic basalt with very low K2O can be dated reliably. The HCB underlies ∼ 15 ka glacial gravel and overlies four andesite and basaltic andesite lava flows that yield 40Ar/39Ar ages of 38 ± 7 ka (Cinder Butte; 1.65% K2O), 46 ± 7 ka (Sugarloaf Peak; 1.85% K2O), 67 ± 4 ka (Little Potato Butte; 1.42% K2O) and 77 ± 11 ka (Potato Butte; 1.62% K2O). Given these firm age brackets, we then dated the HCB directly. One sample (0.19% K2O) clearly failed the criteria for plateau-age interpretation, but the inverse isochron age of 26 ± 6 ka is seductively appealing. A second sample (0.17% K2O) yielded concordant plateau, integrated (total fusion), and inverse isochron ages of 26 ± 18, 30 ± 20 and 24 ± 6 ka, all within the time bracket determined by stratigraphic relations; the inverse isochron age of 24 ± 6 ka is preferred. As with all isotopically determined ages, confidence in the results is significantly enhanced when additional constraints imposed by other isotopic ages within a stratigraphic context are taken into account.

  17. New 40Ar/39Ar Ages for Savai'i Island Reinstate Samoa as a Hotspot Trail with a Linear Age Progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A.; Russell, J. A.; Staudigel, H.; Hart, S. R.

    2006-12-01

    The volcanic islands and seamounts of the Samoan Archipelago have long been considered problematic in terms of the hotspot hypothesis. Existing K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar measurements on subaerial samples from the Samoan islands have consistently given ages that are too young by several Myrs, conflicting with the expected linear age progression model. Previous data from the volcanic series and cones on Savai'i Island gave a range of ages between 0.2 and 2.1 Ma. This is in contrast to an age of 5.2 Ma that a Pacific plate motion of 7.1 cm/yr would predict for the onset of the shield building stage on Savai'i (Workman et al. 2004). The oldest shield ages for the islands of Upolu (2.7 My) and Tutuila (1.6 My) young eastward, toward the volcanically active Vailulu'u seamount that marks the current location of the Samoan hotspot (Hart et al. 2000; Staudigel et al. 2006). However, these ages are younger than predicted by the plate-speed model with 4.4 My and 2.7 My, respectively. The omnipresence of only young post-erosional volcanism on Savai'i has lead to extensive discussions on the origin of Samoan volcanism, and is often used as an argument against a possible hotspot and mantle plume origin. We present new 40Ar/39Ar data on volcanic samples from the deep flanks and rifts of Savai'i and a group of Samoan seamounts that were dredged during the ALIA Expedition. Twelve ages from eight different dredge locations confirm the predicted 7.1 cm/yr age progression for the Samoan hotspot. Three different volcanic samples from dredge ALIA-115, on the deepest portion of the SW flank of Savai'i Island, give indistinguishable ages (2σ confidence level) ranging from 4.99 to 5.21 Ma. In addition, a sample from dredge ALIA-128, on the NE flank of Savai'i, gives an age of 4.74 Ma. These results clearly demonstrate that the onset of the shield-building stage on Savai'i occurred much earlier than the oldest volcanics (2.1 Ma) sampled subaerially on the island. Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes and trace

  18. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar mineral ages from southwestern Penobscot Bay, Maine: Evidence for Silurian metamorphism

    SciTech Connect

    West, D.P. Jr.; Guidotti, C.V.; Lux, D.R. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The nature and timing of metamorphic events in the Coastal Lithotectonic Block of Maine remain poorly understood. Immediately west and southwest of Penobscot Bay the rocks are polymetamorphic showing evidence for at least two episodes of amphibolite facies metamorphism and later, perhaps regionally extensive, retrograde events. Hornblende mineral separates from two amphibolites din the Port Clyde area have identical Ar-40/Ar-39 plateau ages of 414.0 [+-] 3.3 and 414.0 [+-] 3.9 Ma. These ages are interpreted to reflect the time of cooling following the last significant thermal event in this area. Biotite from an amphibolite in the Port Clyde area gives a total gas age of 346.5 [+-] 3.2 Ma. Hornblende from an amphibolite 7 km to the west near Friendship gives a nearly concordant release spectrum with a plateau age of 369.0 [+-] 3.7 Ma. Coexisting biotite from this amphibolite gives a total gas age of 289.2 [+-] 2.7 Ma. Muscovite from the Waldoboro pluton has a nearly concordant release spectrum with a plateau age of 306.3 [+-] 2.2 Ma. Biotite from this sample gives a total gas age of 288.9 [+-] 2.2 Ma. The 414.0 Ma hornblende cooling ages from the Port Clyde area reflect cooling following a significant high grade Silurian thermal event. This Silurian metamorphism is the same age as tectonothermal events in the Nashoba Terrane in eastern Massachusetts, the Kingston Complex in southern New Brunswick, the Aspy Terrane in Cape Breton island, Nova Scotia, and the Hermitage Flexure in southern Newfoundland.d Thus a distinctive Silurian tectonothermal province located along the western edge of the Avalon Zone appears to extend discontinuously from Massachusetts to Newfoundland.

  19. Age and thermal history of the Geysers plutonic complex (felsite unit), Geysers geothermal field, California: A 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Grove, M.; Lovera, O.M.; Harrison, T.M.; Hulen, J.B.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Sixty-nine ion microprobe spot analyses of zircons from four granite samples from the plutonic complex that underlies the Geysers geothermal field yield 207Pb/206Pb vs. 238U/206Pb concordia ages ranging from 1.13 ?? 0.04 Ma to 1.25 ?? 0.04 (1??) Ma. The weighted mean of the U/Pb model ages is 1.18 ?? 0.03 Ma. The U-Pb ages coincide closely with 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum plateau and 'terminal' ages from coexisting K-feldspars and with the eruption ages of overlying volcanic rocks. The data indicate that the granite crystallized at 1.18 Ma and had cooled below 350??C by ~0.9-1.0 Ma. Interpretation of the feldspar 40Ar/39Ar age data using multi-diffusion domain theory indicates that post-emplacement rapid cooling was succeeded either by slower cooling from 350??to 300??C between 1.0 and 0.4 Ma or transitory reheating to 300-350??C at about 0.4-0.6 Ma. Subsequent rapid cooling to below 260??C between 0.4 and 0.2 Ma is in agreement with previous proposals that vapor-dominated conditions were initiated within the hydrothermal system at this time. Heat flow calculations constrained with K-feldspar thermal histories and the present elevated regional heat flow anomaly demonstrate that appreciable heat input from sources external to the known Geysers plutonic complex is required to maintain the geothermal system. This requirement is satisfied by either a large, underlying, convecting magma chamber (now solidified) emplaced at 1.2 Ma or episodic intrusion of smaller bodies from 1.2 to 0.6 Ma.

  20. Re-Os and 40Ar/ 39Ar isotope measurements of inclusions in alluvial diamonds from the Ural Mountains: Constraints on diamond genesis and eruption ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiginhas, Fernando; Pearson, D. Graham; Phillips, David; Burgess, Ray; Harris, Jeff W.

    2009-11-01

    The Re-Os isotope data for 20 syngenetic sulphide inclusions, recovered from 15 diamonds and the 40Ar/ 39Ar laser probe eruption ages of 7 syngenetic clinopyroxenes recovered from 5 diamonds, all from alluvial placer deposits in the Ural Mountains, have been determined. Six eclogitic sulphide inclusions, two of which coexist in the same diamond, yield an isochron age of 1280 ± 310 Ma (2 σ), with an unusually high initial 187Os/ 188Os ratio of 2.10 ± 0.58 (2 σ). The age is interpreted to date remobilisation of carbon and sulphur, and homogenisation of Os, during rift-related thermal-magmatic events that affected the East European Craton (EEC) at ca. 1.3 Ga. The high initial Os ratio suggests Re-Os evolution over a 100 to 500 Ma period within previously metasomatised lithosphere, most likely the EEC. Five eclogitic clinopyroxenes recovered from four diamonds yielded similar 40Ar/ 39Ar ages averaging 472 ± 28 Ma, which likely approximate the time of source kimberlite/lamproite eruption. This age suggests that the Ural diamonds are not likely to have derived either from the well known diamond-bearing kimberlites of the Siberian craton, nor from presently known Russian and Finnish kimberlite provinces on the EEC. The Urals placer deposits are mainly confined to 397-407 Ma sedimentary rocks along the western side of these mountains, with sediment transportation at that time generally from the north-west. Present evidence suggests the existence of an undiscovered kimberlite/lamproite source, probably on the Volgo-Uralia crustal segment of the EEC, which gave rise to the Urals diamond deposits.

  1. Radial fast-neutron fluence gradients during rotating 40Ar/39Ar sample irradiation recorded with metallic fluence monitors and geological age standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutte, Daniel; Pfänder, Jörg A.; Koleška, Michal; Jonckheere, Raymond; Unterricker, Sepp

    2015-01-01

    the neutron-irradiation parameter J is one of the major uncertainties in 40Ar/39Ar dating. The associated uncertainty of the individual J-value for a sample of unknown age depends on the accuracy of the age of the geological standards, the fast-neutron fluence distribution in the reactor, and the distances between standards and samples during irradiation. While it is generally assumed that rotating irradiation evens out radial neutron fluence gradients, we observed axial and radial variations of the J-values in sample irradiations in the rotating channels of two reactors. To quantify them, we included three-dimensionally distributed metallic fast (Ni) and thermal- (Co) neutron fluence monitors in three irradiations and geological age standards in three more. Two irradiations were carried out under Cd shielding in the FRG1 reactor in Geesthacht, Germany, and four without Cd shielding in the LVR-15 reactor in Řež, Czech Republic. The 58Ni(nf,p)58Co activation reaction and γ-spectrometry of the 811 keV peak associated with the subsequent decay of 58Co to 58Fe allow one to calculate the fast-neutron fluence. The fast-neutron fluences at known positions in the irradiation container correlate with the J-values determined by mass-spectrometric 40Ar/39Ar measurements of the geological age standards. Radial neutron fluence gradients are up to 1.8 %/cm in FRG1 and up to 2.2 %/cm in LVR-15; the corresponding axial gradients are up to 5.9 and 2.1 %/cm. We conclude that sample rotation might not always suffice to meet the needs of high-precision dating and gradient monitoring can be crucial.

  2. Spatially Resolved, Correlated Variations in Apparent 40Ar/39Ar Ages and Ca/K Ratios in Apollo 17 Impact Melt Breccia 77135

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, C. M.; Hodges, K. V.; Jolliff, B. L.; van Soest, M. C.; Wartho, J.-A.; Weirich, J. R.

    2015-07-01

    Although the Apollo 17 impact melt breccia 77135 has experienced partial Ar loss, we found that the high spatial-resolution afforded by the laser microprobe 40Ar/39Ar method allowed us to avoid materials that preferentially experienced Ar loss.

  3. Using 40Ar/39Ar ages of intercalated silicic tuffs to date flood basalts: Precise ages for Steens Basalt Member of the Columbia River Basalt Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahood, Gail A.; Benson, Thomas R.

    2017-02-01

    To establish causality between flood basalt eruptions and extinction events and global environmental effects recorded by isotopic excursions in marine sediments, highly accurate and precise ages for the flood basalts are required. But flood basalts are intrinsically difficult to date. We illustrate how 40Ar/39Ar feldspar ages for silicic tuffs intercalated with and overlying sections of Steens Basalt, the earliest lavas of the Middle Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group in the northwestern United States, provide high-precision ages that, for the first time, make it possible to resolve age differences with stratigraphic position within a section of these flood lavas. The stratigraphically lowest rhyolitic tuff, a fall deposit, yielded an age of 16.592 ± ± 0.028 Ma (FCs = 28.02 Ma), and the uppermost, the alkali rhyolite ignimbrite Tuff of Oregon Canyon, is 16.468 ± ± 0.014 Ma. The argon and stratigraphic data indicate that Steens Basalt eruptions occurred from ∼16.64 to 16.43 Ma in the southern end of its distribution. We estimate that the Steens Mountain geomagnetic reversal occurred at 16.496 ± ± 0.028 Ma (±0.18 Ma total error). Our estimates of the timing for initiation of volcanism and volumetric eruptive rates do not seem to support volcanic forcing by the initial stages of Columbia River Basalt Group eruptions as an explanation for the abrupt warming and carbonate dissolution at the beginning of the Miocene Climatic Optimum.

  4. Age of the Lava Creek supereruption and magma chamber assembly at Yellowstone based on 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb dating of sanidine and zircon crystals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matthews, Naomi E.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Calvert, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    The last supereruption from the Yellowstone Plateau formed Yellowstone caldera and ejected the >1000 km3 of rhyolite that composes the Lava Creek Tuff. Tephra from the Lava Creek eruption is a key Quaternary chronostratigraphic marker, in particular for dating the deposition of mid Pleistocene glacial and pluvial deposits in western North America. To resolve the timing of eruption and crystallization history for the Lava Creek magma, we performed (1) 40Ar/39Ar dating of single sanidine crystals to delimit eruption age and (2) ion microprobe U-Pb and trace-element analyses of the crystal faces and interiors of single zircons to date the interval of zircon crystallization and characterize magmatic evolution. Sanidines from the two informal members composing Lava Creek Tuff yield a preferred 40Ar/39Ar isochron date of 631.3 ± 4.3 ka. Crystal faces on zircons from both members yield a weighted mean 206Pb/238U date of 626.5 ± 5.8 ka, and have trace element concentrations that vary with the eruptive stratigraphy. Zircon interiors yield a mean 206Pb/238U date of 659.8 ± 5.5 ka, and reveal reverse and/or oscillatory zoning of trace element concentrations, with many crystals containing high U concentration cores that likely grew from highly evolved melt. The occurrence of distal Lava Creek tephra in stratigraphic sequences marking the Marine Isotope Stage 16–15 transition supports the apparent eruption age of ∼631 ka. The combined results reveal that Lava Creek zircons record episodic heating, renewed crystallization, and an overall up-temperature evolution for Yellowstone's subvolcanic reservoir in the 103−104 year interval before eruption.

  5. Noble gas composition and 40Ar/39Ar age in eclogites from the main hole of the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Jens; Schwarz, Winfried H.; Trieloff, Mario; Meyer, Hans-Peter; Hanel, Michael; Altherr, Rainer

    2016-10-01

    We present the first comprehensive noble gas study on eclogites. The four eclogite samples were recovered during the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling and are from two distinct profile depth sections differing in their degree of interaction with meteoric water, based on their δ 18O-values (surface related and of mantle-type). Hence, noble gas analyses offer the potential to further discriminate between shallow (meteoric) and deep (mantle) fluid sources. Noble gas compositions reveal typical crustal fluid compositions, characterized by a variable mixture of atmospheric gases with significant contributions of nucleogenic neon, radiogenic 4He*, radiogenic 40Ar*, fissiogenic 131-136Xe, and presumably bariogenic 131Xe, but no significant addition of mantle gases. This signature can be also considered to represent one endmember component of eclogitic diamonds. Concentrations of non-radiogenic noble gases are rather low, with depletion of light relative to the heavier noble gases. Eclogites from lower depth which experienced a higher degree of interaction with meteoric water also showed higher contributions of atmospheric gas compared with eclogites recovered from greater depth. This is interpreted to result from interaction with high-salinity fluids during ultrahigh pressure (UH P). It demonstrates that the atmospheric noble gas abundance is a proxy for interaction with surface related fluids. 40Ar/39Ar (inverse) isochron ages of two phengite separates (241.2 ± 0.4 Ma and 275.0 ± 1.8 Ma, 1 σ-errors) predate the main phase of UH P metamorphism (ca. 220 Ma). Biotite yields an integrated age of about 1100 Ma. These age values are interpreted to reflect the likely addition of excess 40Ar without any chronological meaning.

  6. LASER MICROPROBE **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar DATING OF MINERAL GRAINS IN SITU.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutter, J.F.; Hartung, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    A laser-microprobe attached to a mass spectrometer for **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar age determination of single mineral grains in geological materials has been made operational at the US Geological Survey, Reston, VA. This microanalytical technique involves focusing a pulsed laser beam onto a sample contained in an ultra-high vacuum chamber attached to a rare-gas mass spectrometer. Argon in the neutron-irradiated sample is released by heating with the laser pulse and its isotopic composition is measured to yield an **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar age. Laser probe **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar ages of single mineral grains measured in situ can aid greatly in understanding the chronology of many geological situations where datable minerals are present but are not physically separable in quantities needed for conventional age dating.

  7. Implications of a nonlinear 40Ar/39Ar age progression along the Louisville seamount trail for models of fixed and moving hot spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Duncan, Robert A.; Steinberger, Bernhard

    2004-06-01

    The Louisville seamount trail has been recognized as one of the key examples of hot spot volcanism, comparable to the classic volcanic Hawaiian-Emperor lineaments. The published total fusion 40Ar/39Ar data of Watts et al. [1988] showed an astonishing linear age progression, firmly establishing Louisville as a fixed hot spot in the South Pacific mantle. We report new 40Ar/39Ar ages based on high-resolution incremental heating 40Ar/39Ar dating for the same group of samples, showing a marked increase in both precision and accuracy. One of the key findings in our reexamination is that the age progression is not linear after all. The new data show a significantly decreased "apparent" plate velocity for the Louisville seamount trail older than 62 Ma but confirm the linear trend between 47 Ma and the present day (although based on only three samples over 2150 km). The most recent volcanic activity in the Louisville seamount trail has now been dated at 1.11 ± 0.04 Ma for the most southeastern seamount located at 50°26'S and 139°09'W. These results indicate that the Louisville age progression should be interpreted on the basis of both plate and hot spot motion. In this paper we examine our new results in conjunction with the numerical mantle flow models of [2004] that also predict marked deviations from simple linear age progressions. With these models we can achieve a good fit to the geometry of both the Hawaiian and Louisville seamount trails and their age progressions as well as the ˜15° paleolatitudinal shift observed by [2003] for the Hawaiian hot spot between 80 and 47 Ma. If the model is restricted to Pacific hot spots only, we can improve the fit to the nonlinear age trend for the Louisville seamount trail by allowing an additional rotation change of the Pacific plate around 62 Ma and by decreasing the initiation age of the Louisville plume from 120 to 90 Ma. This improved model features a significant eastward hot spot motion of ˜5° between 80 and 30 Ma for

  8. Southernmost Andes and South Georgia Island, North Scotia Ridge: Zircon U-Pb and muscovite {40Ar }/{39Ar } age constraints on tectonic evolution of Southwestern Gondwanaland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukasa, Samuel B.; Dalziel, Ian W. D.

    1996-11-01

    Zircon U-Pb and muscovite {40Ar }/{39Ar } isotopic ages have been determined on rocks from the southernmost Andes and South Georgia Island, North Scotia Ridge, to provide absolute time constraints on the kinematic evolution of southwestern Gondwanaland, until now known mainly from stratigraphic relations. The U-Pb systematics of four zircon fractions from one sample show that proto-marginal basin magmatism in the northern Scotia arc, creating the peraluminous Darwin granite suite and submarine rhyolite sequences of the Tobifera Formation, had begun by the Middle Jurassic (164.1 ± 1.7 Ma). Seven zircon fractions from two other Darwin granites are discordant with non-linear patterns, suggesting a complex history of inheritances and Pb loss. Reference lines drawn through these points on concordia diagrams give upper intercept ages of ca. 1500 Ma, interpreted as a minimum age for the inherited zircon component. This component is believed to have been derived from sedimentary rocks in the Gondwanaland margin accretionary wedge that forms the basement of the region, or else directly from the cratonic "back stop" of that wedge. Ophiolitic remnants of the Rocas Verdes marginal basin preserved in the Larsen Harbour complex on South Georgia yield the first clear evidence that Gondwanaland fragmentation had resulted in the formation of oceanic crust in the Weddell Sea region by the Late Jurassic (150 ± 1 Ma). The geographic pattern in the observed age range of 8 to 13 million years in these ophiolitic materials, while not definitive, is in keeping with propagation of the marginal basin floor northwestward from South Georgia Island to the Sarmiento Complex in southern Chile. Rocks of the Beagle granite suite, emplaced post-tectonically within the uplifted marginal basin floor, have complex zircon U-Pb systematics with gross discordances dominated by inheritances in some samples and Pb loss in others. Of eleven samples processed, only two had sufficient amounts of zircon for

  9. Combined K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating of the upper Jaramillo reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou, Herve; Carracedo, Juan Carlos; Kissel, Catherine; Laj, Carlo; Nomade, Sebastien; Perez Torrado, Francisco Jose; Rodriguez Gonzalez, Alejandro; Wandres, Camille

    2013-04-01

    The Jaramillo subchron was first evidenced in 1966 (Doell and Dalrymple) through the Rhyolotic domes of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico (USA). 40Ar/39Ar studies achieved by Spell et McDougall (1992), Spell et Harrison (1993), Izett and Obradovich (1994) and Singer et al. (1994) defined the base of this subchron at 1053±6 ka, and the ceiling at 986±5 ka. Channell et al. (2009) delimited the age of the Jaramillo subchron by astronomic calibration (base 1071 ka, top 990 ka). To provide additional absolute ages on this geomagnetic period, which is critical to improve our knowledge of the earth magnetic field behaviour, we have carried out a study combining paleomagnetism and isotopic dating of a lava sequence from Tenerife island. This sequence of basaltic lava flows is some 500 m thick. The first 400 m present, based on field magnetometer measurements, normal polarity lavas, with dykes of normal and reverse polarity, passing at the top to reverse polarity lavas. Preliminary K-Ar ages bracketed this sequence between 1018 ± 18 ka and 978 ± 17 ka. Therefore, the upper Jaramillo reversal at least appeared to be potentially recorded in this sequence. A more detailed paleomagnetic study was then carried out to more precisely delimit the reversal itself (see Laj et al., session EMRP3.4). We have undertaken 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating and unspiked K-Ar experiments on groundmass from four transitionally magnetized flows. The first transitional flow is K-Ar dated at 993 ± 18 ka and 40Ar/39Ar dated at 991 ± 13 ka, the second at 981 ± 17 ka (K-Ar) and 1000 ± 13 ka (40Ar/39Ar), the third at 950 ± 17 ka (K-Ar) and 1000 ± 8 ka (40Ar/39Ar) and the fourth at 984 ± 17 ka (K-Ar) and 977 ± 12 (40Ar/39Ar). 40Ar/39Ar ages and K-Ar ages (relative to FCT 28.02 Ma) are indistinguishable at 2σ. The age of the upper boundary of the Jaramillo event calculated combining 40Ar/39Ar ages and K-Ar ages is 992 ± 6 ka, in agreement with previous estimates.

  10. New 40Ar/39Ar laser single-grain ages of muscovites from mylonitic schists in the Rodna Mountains, Eastern Carpathians, Romania: correlations with microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culshaw, Nicholas; Mosonyi, Emilia; Reynolds, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Rodna Mountains afford the most internal structural window into the crystalline units of the Eastern Carpathians in Romania. The Rodna Mountains consist of Variscan metamorphic nappes that were restacked in the Alpine phase of Carpathian development forming the Subbucovinian and Infrabucovinian nappes. In order to evaluate age of deformation, ten samples were taken from the zone of greenschist facies mylonitic schist that marks the Alpine tectonic boundary between the Subbucovinian and Infrabucovinian nappes and 40Ar/39Ar laser single-grain ages determined for schistosity-forming muscovite. Microstructural assessment of quartz and muscovite distinguished two deformation events. Single-grain ages from the microstructurally most strongly reworked samples (four samples) give a tight clustering of ages at ca. 95 Ma. The least reworked schists have a broader clustering of ages spanning ca. 200-280 Ma with a late Permian peak and some samples showing outlier ages in the range 200-100 Ma. The relative development of the outliers, which correlates with evidence for increased microstructural reworking, is interpreted to mark progressive isotopic resetting. The ca. 95 Ma ages for the most reworked schists are estimates for the age of the Alpine nappe stacking. The ca. 200-280 Ma ages are similar to those of magmatism, metamorphism, and sedimentation thought to mark post-Variscan-pre-Alpine rifting and ocean basin formation in parts of the Alps and may be the thermal imprint of a related event in the Eastern Carpathians.

  11. 40Ar/39Ar ages and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions of alkaline and tholeiitic rocks from the northern Deccan Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzoli, A.; Parisio, L.; Jourdan, F.; Melluso, L.; Sethna, S. F.; Bellieni, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Deccan large igneous province in India was emplaced close to the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary (K-Pg; 66.0 Ma) and is formed by tholeiitic and alkaline rocks. Definition of the origin of Deccan magmatism and of its environmental impact relies on precise and accurate geochronological analyses. We present new 40Ar/39Ar ages from the northern sector of the province. In this area, tholeiitic and alkaline rocks were contemporaneously emplaced at 66.60±0.35 to 65.25±0.29 Ma in the Phenai Mata area, while rocks from Rajpipla and Mt. Pavagadh yielded ages ranging from 66.40±2.80 to 64.90±0.80 Ma. Indistinguishable ages for alkaline and tholeiitic magmatism, coupled with distinct major and trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions suggest that distinct mantle sources, necessary for the two magmatic series were synchronously active. The new ages are compared with previous ages, which were carefully screened and filtered and then recalculated in order to be comparable. The entire data set of geochronological data does not support a time-related migration of the magmatism related to the northward Indian Plate movement relative to the Reunion mantle plume. The main phase of magmatism, including the newly dated rocks from the Northern Deccan occurred across the K-Pg boundary, confirming a causal link between the emplacement of the province and the K-Pg mass extinction.

  12. Age of the Lava Creek supereruption and magma chamber assembly at Yellowstone based on 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb dating of sanidine and zircon crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, J. A.; Matthews, N. E.; Calvert, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    The last supereruption from the Yellowstone Plateau formed Yellowstone caldera and ejected the >1000 km3 of rhyolite that composes the Lava Creek Tuff (LCT). Tephra from the eruption blanketed much of the western United States, and is a key Quaternary chronostratigraphic marker, in particular for dating deposition of mid-Pleistocene glacial and pluvial deposits in western North America. We performed 40Ar/39Ar dating of single sanidines to delimit eruption age, and ion microprobe U-Pb and trace-element analyses of crystal faces on single zircons to characterize magmatic evolution and date near-eruption crystallization, as well as analyses of crystal interiors to date the interval of zircon crystallization. Sanidines from the two LCT members A and B yield an 40Ar/39Ar isochron date of 631 ± 4 ka (2σ). Crystal faces on zircons from both members yield a weighted mean 206Pb/238U date of 627 ± 6 ka (2σ) and have trace element concentrations that vary with eruptive stratigraphy. Zircon interiors yield a weighted mean 206Pb/238U date of 660 ± 6 ka, and reveal reverse and/or oscillatory zoning of trace element concentrations, with many crystals containing high-U concentrations and dark cathodoluminescence (CL) cores. These crystals with high-U cores are possibly sourced from 'defrosting' of melt-impregnated margins of the growing subvolcanic reservoir. LCT sanidines mirror the variation of zircon composition within the eruptive stratigraphy, with crystals from upper LCT-A and basal LCT-B having bright-CL rims with high Ba concentrations, suggesting late crystallization after addition of less evolved silicic magma. The occurrence of distal LCT in stratigraphic sequences marking the Marine Isotope Stage 16-15 transition supports the apparent eruption age of ca. 631 ka. These results reveal that Lava Creek zircons record episodic heating, renewed crystallization, and an overall up-temperature evolution for Yellowstone's subvolcanic reservoir in the 103-104 year interval

  13. Hump-shaped 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectra in K-feldspar and evidence for Cretaceous authigenesis in the Fountain Formation near Eldorado Springs, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnock, Andrew C.; van de Kamp, Peter C.

    1999-12-01

    The Fountain Formation near Eldorado Springs, CO, USA, shows evidence of alteration by hydrothermal fluids that precipitated authigenic potassium feldspar (adularia) as rims on detrital feldspars and as interstitial cement deposits. Detailed 40Ar/ 39Ar step-heating experiments of samples from the Fountain Formation reveal age spectra having a characteristic hump at laboratory temperatures between 900 and 1080°C. The humps appear to be related to the presence of adularia. Laser analyses of small grains of adularia indicate that the hump can be physically dissected, unlike age gradients found in igneous feldspars. Such behavior is consistent with the mixing of gas from two or more generations of K-feldspar, each having unique diffusion properties. The feldspars studied here indicate that two pulses of ˜150°C hydrothermal fluids migrated through the Fountain Formation at 135 and 94 Ma, prior to the main phase of Laramide tectonic activity in the region. The limited occurrence of authigenic cements suggests that reactivation of the underlying Precambrian Idaho Springs-Ralston Creek shear zone was significant enough to heat and mobilize large quantities of meteoric fluids. In addition, these data also suggest that Cretaceous movements along the Transcontinental Arch, correlated with stratigraphic events, began approximately 40 million years earlier than previously thought.

  14. The tectono-thermal evolution of the Waterbury dome, western Connecticut, based on U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dietsch, Craig; Kunk, Michael J.; Aleinikoff, John; Sutter, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Level 3 nappes were emplaced over the Waterbury dome along an Acadian décollement synchronous with the formation of a D3 thrust duplex in the dome. The décollement truncates the Ky + Kfs-in (migmatite) isograd in the dome core and a St-in isograd in level 3 nappes, indicating that peak metamorphic conditions in the dome core and nappe cover rocks formed in different places at different times. Metamorphic overgrowths on zircon from the felsic orthogneiss in the Waterbury dome have an age of 387 ± 5 Ma. Rocks of all levels and the décollement are folded by D4 folds that have a strongly developed, regional crenulation cleavage and D5 folds. The Waterbury dome was formed by thrust duplexing followed by fold interference during the Acadian orogeny. The 40Ar/39Ar ages of amphibole, muscovite, biotite, and K-feldspar from above and below the décollement are ca. 378 Ma, 355 Ma, 360 Ma (above) and 340 (below), and 288 Ma, respectively. Any kilometer-scale vertical movements between dome and nappe rocks were over by ca. 378 Ma. Core and cover rocks of the Waterbury dome record synchronous, post-Acadian cooling.

  15. 40Ar/39Ar Interlaboratory Calibration into the Holocene.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heizler, M. T.; Jicha, B.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Miggins, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in 40Ar/39Ar analytical precision for very young rocks requires collaborative efforts amongst argon geochronology labs to demonstrate age reproducibility commensurate with high precision. NM Tech (NMT), the University of Wisconsin (UW) and Oregon State University (OSU) have each dated Quaternary flux monitor standard AC-2 sanidine (~1.185 Ma), a blind sanidine described as being 50-100 ka (BS) and sanidine from the Qixiangshan (QIX) flow (~10 ka), Changbaishan volcano, China. The samples were irradiated in a single package with FC-2 sanidine (28.201 Ma) as the flux monitor and the irradiated material was distributed amongst the labs. Heizler was present during analysis at both OSU and UW and Jicha attended OSU during analysis. Physical presence was key towards gaining understanding of individual protocols and prompted valuable discussions. Analyses were carried out on single crystals using total fusion and/or step heating approaches. Age agreement was achieved within 2s uncertainty that ranged between (0.03-0.3%, 0.13-0.37% and 1.8-2.6%) for AC-2, BS and QIX, respectively. Each lab found AC-2 to vary somewhat beyond a normal distribution and to yield an age relative to FC-2 of ~1.185 Ma that is ~1.3% (~5-10 sigma) lower than some published estimates. A key cause of the variation between this study and previous results may be variable gas pressure equilibration times between extraction line and mass spectrometer coupled with variable choices to estimate time zero by other laboratories. The majority of our efforts concentrated on the QIX sanidine where prior data obtained by our labs revealed a factor of two spread in age (~11 and 23 ka) based on experiments carried out by total fusion and bulk incremental heating. By conducting single crystal age spectrum analysis we were able to mitigate effects of melt inclusion hosted excess argon and xenocrystic contamination towards obtaining analytical agreement with apparent ages near 10 ka. However, philosophical

  16. SHRIMP and 40Ar/39Ar age constraints for timing of plutonism and mineralization in the Boulder batholith

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lund, K.D.; Aleinikoff, John N.; Kunk, Michael J.; Unruh, Dan M.; Zeihen, G.D.; Hodges, W.C.; du Bray, Edward A.; O'Neill, J Michael

    2002-01-01

    The 66 Ma age for the quartz monzodiorite of Boulder Baldy and consideration of previous dating studies in the region indicate that small ca. 66 Ma plutonic systems may be common in the Boulder batholith region and especially to the east. The approximately 64 Ma porphyry copper systems at Butte and gold mineralization at Miller Mountain are indicative of regionally important mineralizing systems of this age in the Boulder batholith region. Resolution of the age and probable magmatic source of the Butte pre-Main Stage porphyry copper-molybdenum system and of the silver-rich polymetallic quartz vein systems in the northern part of the Boulder batholith documents that these deposits formed from two discrete periods of hydrothermal mineralization related to two discrete magmatic events.

  17. High-precision 40Ar/39Ar ages for the Jehol fossil-bearing formations in SE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S.; Zhang, H.; Hemming, S. R.; Fang, Y.; Mesko, G. T.

    2009-12-01

    The Jehol Biota, defined as the characteristic Eosestheria-Ephemeropsis-Lycoptera assemblage, is known to be widely distributed in East Asia. The fossils of the Jehol Biota are magnificent, exquisitely preserved and extraordinarily diverse. Since the 1990s, abundant and varied fossils, including plants, insects, salamanders, dinosaurs, pterosaurs, choristoderes, birds, mammals and freshwater invertebrates, have been discovered from the Dabeigou, Yixian and Jiufotang Formations in Inner Mongolia, and Liaoning and Hebei Provinces of NE China. Each of these Jehol fossil-bearing formations has preserved a distinct assemblage of invertebrate and vertebrate fossils. Based on major invertebrates groups, the Jehol Biota has been divided into three developing stages and a hypothesis about its distribution and spread has been proposed. There is a clear progression towards greater diversity through the three phases and it corresponds to a progressive paleogeographic expansion through time. In addition to their extensive distribution in Inner Mongolia and NE China, other strata that contain Jehol related fossils have been identified in the central and most provinces of eastern China, the Korean Peninsula, Mongolia and Siberia. However, the detailed correlation between the classic Jehol outcrops and the less-studied localities requires further work, including high-resolution ages. We are analyzing sixteen volcanic samples from Zhejiang and Anhui Provinces to establish a high-precision chronostratigraphy for the less-studied localities across SE China and adjacent regions. Our work will provide important data to test the timing and the duration of three phases of the Jehol radiation. Furthermore, the age results will allow us to understand the temporal relationship among the Jehol localities and test if the later phases of the Jehol radiation had broader geographic distributions, as inferred from existing collections.

  18. Jurassic cooling ages in Paleozoic to early Mesozoic granitoids of northeastern Patagonia: 40Ar/39Ar, 40K-40Ar mica and U-Pb zircon evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Dopico, Carmen I.; Tohver, Eric; López de Luchi, Mónica G.; Wemmer, Klaus; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Cawood, Peter A.

    2016-12-01

    U-Pb SHRIMP zircon crystallization ages and Ar-Ar and K-Ar mica cooling ages for basement rocks of the Yaminué and Nahuel Niyeu areas in northeastern Patagonia are presented. Granitoids that cover the time span from Ordovician to Early Triassic constitute the main outcrops of the western sector of the Yaminué block. The southern Yaminué Metaigneous Complex comprises highly deformed Ordovician and Permian granitoids crosscut by undeformed leucogranite dikes (U-Pb SHRIMP zircon age of 254 ± 2 Ma). Mica separates from highly deformed granitoids from the southern sector yielded an Ar-Ar muscovite age of 182 ± 3 Ma and a K-Ar biotite age of 186 ± 2 Ma. Moderately to highly deformed Permian to Early Triassic granitoids made up the northern Yaminué Complex. The Late Permian to Early Triassic (U-Pb SHRIMP zircon age of 252 ± 6 Ma) Cabeza de Vaca Granite of the Yaminué block yielded Jurassic mica K-Ar cooling ages (198 ± 2, 191 ± 1, and 190 ± 2 Ma). At the boundary between the Yaminué and Nahuel Niyeu blocks, K-Ar muscovite ages of 188 ± 3 and 193 ± 5 Ma were calculated for the Flores Granite, whereas the Early Permian Navarrete granodiorite, located in the Nahuel Niyeu block, yielded a K-Ar biotite age of 274 ± 4 Ma. The Jurassic thermal history is not regionally uniform. In the supracrustal exposures of the Nahuel Niyeu block, the Early Permian granitoids of its western sector as well as other Permian plutons and Ordovician leucogranites located further east show no evidence of cooling age reset since mica ages suggest cooling in the wake of crystallization of these intrusive rocks. In contrast, deeper crustal levels are inferred for Permian-Early Triassic granitoids in the Yaminué block since cooling ages for these rocks are of Jurassic age (198-182 Ma). Jurassic resetting is contemporaneous with the massive Lower Jurassic Flores Granite, and the Marifil and Chon Aike volcanic provinces. This intraplate deformational pulse that affected northeastern

  19. Monazite and allanite U-Th-Pb vs mica 39Ar-40Ar ages in equilibrated metasediments: closure behavior and closure temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaz, J.; Engi, M.; Berger, A.; Janots, E.; Villa, I. M.

    2009-12-01

    The art of geochronology implies identification of processes, so as to correctly interpret an isotopic age as (1) crystallization, (2) cooling, or (3) meaningless owing to inheritance and/or late mineral recrystallization. We address here a field calibration of 39Ar-40Ar ages against U-Th-Pb ages. We demonstrate that detailed petrological, micro-textural and micro-chemical investigations are a necessary prerequisite for meaningful geochronology. The Barrovian metamorphism in the Alps results from the collision of Europe and Apulia and reaches its thermal maximum (upper amphibolite facies) in the Central Alps. Age estimates for the Alpine orogeny have long been controversial, despite a multitude of studies. Based on the resetting of Rb-Sr and K-Ar ages in muscovite from polymetamorphic gneisses, Jäger [1] had proposed an age of 38±2 Ma for the Barrovian metamorphism, corresponding to a “closure temperature TC” (following [2]) of 350 °C for K-Ar in muscovite. However, a uniform Eocene age for the metamorphism in the Central Alps was in conflict already with early monazite and xenotime U-Pb ages from the same area, namely 30 Ma in the southern, and ~20 Ma in the northern part (e.g. [3]). A recent study [4] both confirmed the young monazite ages in the north (SHRIMP U-Pb of 18-19 Ma near Tmax = 570 °C), and demonstrated that ca. 30 Ma ago this part of the belt was still heating up, as allanite grew prograde near 440 °C. These results once more prove isotopic inheritance, and therefore underestimation of mica K-Ar TC, in Jäger’s [1] samples. To avoid isotopic inheritance problems we selected only Mesozoic metasediments from the northern Central Alps. We screened all samples by PTAX: many had undergone a variety of retrogression reactions and calculations show petrological disequilibrium; we favored those in near-ideal petrological equilibrium. 39Ar-40Ar ages for mica separates from equilibrium samples yield ages between 18.93±0.83 and 15.79±0.11 Ma for

  20. New 40Ar/39Ar age progression for the Louisville hot spot trail and implications for inter-hot spot motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Gowen, Molly D.; Colwell, Lauren E.; Gee, Jeffrey S.; Lonsdale, Peter F.; Mahoney, John J.; Duncan, Robert A.

    2011-12-01

    In this study we present 42 new 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating age determinations that contribute to an updated age progression for the Louisville seamount trail. Louisville is the South Pacific counterpart to the Hawaiian-Emperor seamount trail, both trails representing intraplate volcanism over the same time interval (˜80 Ma to present) and being examples of primary hot spot lineaments. Our data provide evidence for an age-progressive trend from 71 to 21 Ma. Assuming fixed hot spots, this makes possible a direct comparison to the Hawaiian-Emperor age progression and the most recent absolute plate motion (APM) model (WK08G) of Wessel and Kroenke (2008). We observe that for the Louisville seamount trail the measured ages are systematically older relative to both the WK08G model predictions and Hawaiian seamount ages, with offsets ranging up to 6 Myr. Taking into account the uncertainty about the duration of eruption and magmatic succession at individual Louisville volcanoes, these age offsets should be considered minimum estimates, as our sampling probably tended to recover the youngest lava flows. These large deviations point to either a contribution of inter-hot spot motion between the Louisville and Hawaiian hot spots or to a more easterly location of the Louisville hot spot than the one inferred in the WK08G model. Both scenarios are investigated in this paper, whereby the more eastern hot spot location (52.0°S, 134.5°W versus 52.4°S, 137.2°W) reduces the average age offset, but still results in a relatively large maximum offset of 3.7 Myr. When comparing the new ages to the APM models (S04P, S04G) by Steinberger et al. (2004) that attempt to compensate for the motion of hot spots in the Pacific (Hawaii) or globally (Hawaii, Louisville, Reunion and Walvis), the measured and predicted ages are more in agreement, showing only a maximum offset of 2.3 Myr with respect to the S04G model. At face value these more advanced APM models, which consider both plate and

  1. 40Ar/39Ar and U-series ages of a Late Pleistocene geomagnetic excursion in Western North America: The Halina Pali event in Western North America?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, B. D.; Champion, D. E.; Mortlock, R. A.; Fairbanks, R. G.; Swisher, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    Here we report 40Ar/39Ar results on two mafic flows, Swift Creek (SC) andesite (17.3 ×1.6ka), located near Mount St. Helens, WA and Tabernacle Hill (TH) basalt (16.9 ×1ka) near Fillmore UT that record paleomagnetic co-latitudes of 28° for SC and 23° for TH, respectively. The remnant directions of these two flows are on the fringe of secular variation and we consider them 'excursionoid'. Because these magnetic directions are somewhat unusual, there are limited matches in the magnetic record preserved in the Mono Lake and Lake Bonneville sediments in this time interval. The best matches to the radiocarbon (calibrated to calendar year age) dated lacustrine magnetic record are at 22 and 18 for the SC flow and 22, 19, or 17 ka for the TH flows. The closest matches for the SC and TH paleomagnetic directions are between 18 and 17 ka, which stratigraphically bracket an excursion recorded in the sediments. Pending additional analyses, our best estimate for the age of the excursion is 17.1 ×1.9ka, which is concordant with the radiocarbon-calibrated age of 17.6 ka for the excursion as determined from the age calibrated paleomagnetic record of the lacustrine sections. In addition to the 40Ar/39Ar ages on the TH flow, we also report an isochron U-Th age of 15 × 4 ka on the outer surface tufa coating, which provides a minimum constraint on the age of the TH lava flows. Discussion: Evidence of a Late Pleistocene geomagnetic excursion event is quite extensive and has been reported from several localities. The earliest report of the excursion, from the Halina Pali scarp, Hawaii, suggested an age of about 17-18 ka [1]. Subsequently, there have been additional reports and age estimates of a similar age excursional event from several other localities; Lake Imurak, Alaska, USA (17-18 ka), Hokkaido, Japan (~23 ka), Lake Baikal, Russia (~20 ka), and from Tule Lake, California, USA (~23 ka), summarized in Oda, [2] and referenced therein, and in China (17-18 ka) [3]. In conclusion

  2. Uplift and cooling history of the NW Himalaya, northern Pakistan - evidence from fission-track and /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar cooling ages

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitler, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    This study reports 145 fission-track and 21 /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar cooling ages from the Himalaya of northern Pakistan. Studies of the Himalaya are important because they provide geologists with an opportunity to test models of orogenesis in an active tectonic setting. As the Himalaya become better known and models become more quantitative, information about thermal histories and rates of uplift and erosion will be needed. The cooling ages suggest, and thermal modelling confirms, that throughout the Tertiary, the cooling history of northern Pakistan was controlled by the effects of accelerating uplift and erosion. On average, from 30 Ma to the present, uplift rates increased from less than 0.1 mm/yr to 0.4 mm/yr. This uplift and erosion, however, has been variable in space as well as time. The association of the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh Massif and Hunza with very young cooling ages and with rapid uplift maintained for a period of several million years is the most striking discovery made by this study. The location of these two areas at the heart of the Pamir-Himalaya Arc suggests that their anomalous behavior is linked in some way to a locally vigorous collision of India and Eurasia, possibly due to a promontory of Indian crust. Several of the cooling ages reported help constrain the emplacement ages of intrusives located in northern Pakistan. In addition, cooling ages from the southern Swat-Hazara region can be interpreted to give the time of final southward thrusting of the Kohistan Arc along the Main Mantle Thrust, at about 30 Ma.

  3. 40Ar/39Ar systematics and argon diffusion in amber: implications for ancient earth atmospheres

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landis, G.P.; Snee, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    Argon isotope data indicate retained argon in bulk amber (matrix gas) is radiogenic [40Ar/39Ar ???32o] than the much more abundant surface absorbed argon [40Ar/39Ar ???295.5]. Neutron-induced 39Ar is retained in amber during heating experiments to 150?? -250??C, with no evidence of recoiled 39Ar found after irradiation. A maximum permissible volume diffusion coefficient of argon in amber (at ambient temperature) D???1.5 x 10-17 cm2S-1 is calculated from 39Ar retention. 40Ar/39Ar age calculations indicate Dominican Republic amber is ??? 45 Ma and North Dakota amber is ??? 89 Ma, both at least reasonable ages for the amber based upon stratigraphic and paleontological constraints and upon the small amount of radiogenic 40Ar. To date, over 300 gas analyses of ambers and resins of Cretaceous to Recent age that are geographically distributed among fifteen noted world locations identify mixtures of gases in different sites within amber (Berner and Landis, 1988). The presence of multiple mixing trends between compositionally distinct end-members gases within the same sample and evidence for retained radiogenic argon within the amber argue persuasivley against rapid exchange by diffusion of amber-contained gases with moder air. Only gas in primary bubbles entrapped between successive flows of tree resin has been interpreted as original "ancient air", which is an O2-rich end-member gas with air-like N2/Ar ratios. Gas analyses of these primary bubbles indicate atmospheric O2 levels in the Late Cretaceous of ??? 35%, and that atmospheric O2 dropped by early Tertiary time to near a present atmospheric level of 21% O2. A very low argon diffusion coefficient in amber persuasively argues for a gas in primary bubbles trapped in amber being ancient air (possibly modified only by O2 reaction with amber). ?? 1991.

  4. 40Ar/39Ar age of the Manson impact structure, Iowa, and correlative impact ejecta in the Crow Creek member of the Pierre Shale (Upper Cretaceous), South Dakota and Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izett, G.A.; Cobban, W.A.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Obradovich, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    A set of 34 laser total-fusion 40Ar/39Ar analyses of sanidine from a melt layer in crater-fill deposits of the Manson impact structure in Iowa has a weighted-mean age of 74.1 ?? 0.1 Ma. This age is about 9.0 m.y. older than 40Ar/39Ar ages of shocked microcline from the Manson impact structure reported previously by others. The 74.1 Ma age of the sanidine, which is a melt product of Precambrian microcline clasts, indicates that the Manson impact structure played no part in the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) mass extinction at 64.5 Ma. Moreover, incremental-heating 40Ar/39Ar ages of the sanidine show that it is essentially free of excess 40Ar and has not been influenced by postcrystallization heating or alteration. An age spectrum of the matrix of the melt layer shows effects of 39Ar recoil, including older ages in the low-temperature increments and younger ages in the high-temperature increments. At 17 places in eastern South Dakota and Nebraska, shocked quartz and feldspar grains are concentrated in the lower part of the Crow Creek Member of the Pierre Shale (Upper Cretaceous). The grains are largest (3.2 mm) in southeastern South Dakota and decrease in size (0.45 mm) to the northwest, consistent with the idea that the Manson impact structure was their source. The ubiquitous presence of shocked grains concentrated in a thin calcarenite at the base of the Crow Creek Member suggests it is an event bed recording an instant of geologic time. Ammonites below and above the Crow Creek Member limit its age to the zone of Didymoceras nebrascense of earliest late Campanian age. Plagioclase from a bentonite bed in this zone in Colorado has a 40Ar/39Ar age of 74.1 ?? 0.1 Ma commensurate with our sanidine age of 74.1 Ma for the Manson impact structure. 40Ar/39Ar ages of bentonite beds below and above the Crow Creek are consistent with our 74.1 ?? 0.1 Ma age for the Manson impact structure and limit its age to the interval ?? 74.5 0.1 to 73.8 ?? 0.1 Ma. Recently, two origins for the

  5. New determinations of 40Ar/39Ar isotopic ages and flow volumes for Cenozoic volcanism in the Terror Rift, Ross Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rilling, S.; Mukasa, S.; Wilson, T.; Lawver, L.; Hall, C.

    2009-12-01

    This study provides new determinations of 40Ar/39Ar isotopic ages and flow volumes for submarine and subaerial Neogene volcanism developed within the Terror Rift, Ross Sea, Antarctica, the youngest segment of the West Antarctic Rift System. The study is based on the first dredged samples from seven seamounts north of Ross Island, as well as new data from Franklin and Beaufort Islands. The sampled foidite and basanitic lavas range in age from Quaternary (90 ± 66 ka) on a small seamount ˜10 km north of Franklin Island to 6.80 ± 0.05 Ma on Beaufort Island. These ages are consistent with ages of volcanism in both the Melbourne and Erebus Volcanic Provinces and significantly expand the documented area of Neogene magmatism in Victoria Land. There is no geographic progression of volcanism through time, but volcanism was voluminous in the Pliocene and particularly widespread during the Pleistocene. Two of the dredges sampled edifices comprised of less than 0.2 km3 of volcanic materials. The largest seamount in the study area has 58.8 km3 of volcanic material and represents growth over a period of several thousand years. Estimated minimum eruption rates range from 2 × 10-4 km3 y-1 to 2 × 10-3 km3 y-1, consistent with rates proposed for other rift systems and nearby Mt. Erebus. Recent estimates of extension magnitude for the Terror Rift correspond to minimal decompression of only 0.10 to 0.22 GPa and therefore limited melt output of a typical peridotite source.

  6. Palaeomagnetism and 40Ar/39Ar age of a Pliocene lava flow sequence in the Lesser Caucasus: record of a clockwise rotation and analysis of palaeosecular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccavari, Ana; Calvo-Rathert, Manuel; Goguitchaichvili, Avto; Huaiyu, He; Vashakidze, Goga; Vegas, Néstor

    2014-06-01

    A palaeomagnetic and rock-magnetic investigation has been carried out on a Pliocene lava flow sequence in the Djavakheti Highland in the central Lesser Caucasus in the Republic of Georgia. In addition, a 40Ar/39Ar dating and electronic microscopic studies were performed on samples of this sequence, named the Saro section, which consists of 39 successive lava flows of doleritic basalts. A characteristic magnetization could be isolated in all studied 39 flows, yielding reverse-polarity directions in all cases, a mean direction D = 202.2°, I = -60.6° (N = 39, α95 = 2.0°, k = 138) being obtained. Thermomagnetic experiments (strong-field versus temperature curves) suggested low-Ti titanomagnetites and low Curie-temperature titanomagnetites with a rather high titanium content (x ≈ 0.5-0.7) as the main carriers of remanence. Their domain structure is characterized by a mixture of single- and multidomain grains. 40Ar/39Ar dating yielded an age of 1.73 ± 0.03 Ma, interpreted as the eruption age of the uppermost lava flow of the sequence. Analysis of palaeomagnetic results and radiometric data from the present and a previous study allows two different explanations about the time of emplacement of the section: (i) The lower 36 flows of the sequence might have been emitted between the normal-polarity Reunion and Olduvai chrons, and the upper three flows after the Olduvai chron, with a long hiatus in volcanic activity of more than 150 kyr or (ii) The whole sequence has been emitted between 1.778 and 1.73 ± 0.03 Ma, after the Olduvai chron. Comparison of the palaeomagnetic results obtained in this study with the expected direction shows that while inclination values agree well, declination shows an eastward deviation of 19.2° ± 5.8°. This discrepancy can be explained with a clockwise vertical-axis rotation of the sequence, which might have been produced by extensional structures with strike-slip component, which can be found in the study area. Virtual geomagnetic pole

  7. Towards establishing high-precision 40Ar/39Ar chronologies for distal tephra archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, D. F.

    2012-12-01

    To develop further understanding of palaeoclimate change in a context of, for example, the expansion of hominin out of Africa and abrupt climate change, correlation between high-resolution terrestrial, marine and ice core archives from around the globe is key. Whereas there can be significant uncertainties in the tuning of palaeoclimate proxy records (i.e., wiggle matching) between regions, direct tephra correlations have essentially zero uncertainty, providing the correlations are robust. Tephrochronology has demonstrated tremendous potential for correlation of records across regions and construction of relative chronological tephra matrices. However absolute dating is often required for: (1) pinning of events to the geological timescale; and (2) to confirm the validity of correlations if geochemical fingerprints do not prove to be definitive. 14C dating can be used for radiocarbon-bearing sediments within which volcanic tephra are intercalated. However, the technique only extends over the last 50 ka and precision suffers dramatically with increasing age. The technique is reliant on the availability of radiocarbon-bearing material within sediments and direct comparison of 14C chronologies from marine and terrestrial settings is problematic owing to marine reservoir offset. OSL dating can also be used to date sediments above and below tephra units but uncertainties are typically too large for development of high-precision chronologies. Volcanic K-bearing distal tephra can theoretically be dated using the 40Ar/39Ar technique thereby placing direct temporal constraints on palaeoclimate records. However, in reality, distal tephra are usually fine-grained and crystal-poor, lacking mineral phases amenable to 40Ar/39Ar dating of young rocks, e.g., sanidine. Although the distal samples contain abundant K-bearing glass shards, they have been shown to provide unreliable 40Ar/39Ar ages likely due to a combination of post eruption K-loss (during glass hydration?) and 37Ar and

  8. Geological and 40Ar/39Ar age constraints on late-stage Deccan rhyolitic volcanism, inter-volcanic sedimentation, and the Panvel flexure from the Dongri area, Mumbai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu C.; Pande, Kanchan

    2014-04-01

    Post-K-Pg Boundary Deccan magmatism is well known from the Mumbai area in the Panvel flexure zone. Represented by the Salsette Subgroup, it shows characters atypical of much of the Deccan Traps, including rhyolite lavas and tuffs, mafic tuffs and breccias, spilitic pillow basalts, and "intertrappean" sedimentary or volcanosedimentary deposits, with mafic intrusions as well as trachyte intrusions containing basaltic enclaves. The intertrappean deposits have been interpreted as formed in shallow marine or lagoonal environments in small fault-bounded basins due to syn-volcanic subsidence. We report a previously unknown sedimentary deposit underlying the Dongri rhyolite flow from the upper part of the Salsette Subgroup, with a westerly tectonic dip due to the Panvel flexure. We have obtained concordant 40Ar/39Ar ages of 62.6 ± 0.6 Ma (2σ) and 62.9 ± 0.2 Ma (2σ) for samples taken from two separate outcrops of this rhyolite. The results are significant in showing that (i) Danian inter-volcanic sedimentary deposits formed throughout Mumbai, (ii) the rock units are consistent with the stratigraphy postulated earlier for Mumbai, (iii) shale fragments known in some Dongri tuffs were likely derived from the sedimentary deposit under the Dongri rhyolite, (iv) the total duration of extrusive and intrusive Deccan magmatism was at least 8-9 million years, and (v) Panvel flexure formed, or continued to form, after 63 Ma, possibly even 62 Ma, and could not have formed by 65-64 Ma as concluded in a recent study.

  9. Whole-Rock 40Ar/39Ar Step-heating Analyses, Problems and Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnke, P.; Harrison, M.; Heizler, M. T.; Lovera, O. M.; Warren, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    Whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar step-heating analyses of extra-terrestrial materials are used to constrain the impact history of the inner solar system, the formation age of the Moon, and timing of paleomagnetic fields. Despite the importance of knowing the timing of these important events, the samples we have in hand are usually disturbed through mixing, (multiple?) impact events, and perhaps recoil loss. Extra-terrestrial 40Ar/39Ar data are typically interpreted through the assignment of essentially arbitrary plateau ages rather than through a robust physical model. Although the use of models capable of quantitatively assessing diffusive 40Ar* loss in extra-terrestrial samples has been around for nearly 50 years, this early advance has been widely ignored. Here we present implications of applying a robust, multi-activation energy, multi-diffusion domain model to step-heated 40Ar/39Ar data, with temperature cycling. Our findings show that for even a single heating event, "plateau" ages are unlikely to record meaningful ages. Further, if the sample has experienced multiple heating events or contains inherited clasts, recovering a unique solution may be impossible. Indeed the most readily interpretable portion of the age spectrum is the early heating steps which represents a maximum age estimate of the last re-heating event. Our results challenge the chronologic validity of 40Ar/39Ar "plateau" ages and by extension the hypotheses that are based on this data (e.g., the Late Heavy Bombardment). Future work will require new analytical procedures, interpretative frameworks, and (potentially) the combination of multiple chronometers to derive a robust impact history for the early solar system.

  10. New 40Ar-39Ar ages for Basalts From the West Siberian Basin and Links With the Siberian Flood Basalt Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichow, M. K.; Saunders, A. D.; White, R. V.; Pringle, M. S.; Al'Mukhamedov, A. I.; Medvedev, A. Y.

    2001-12-01

    The Siberian Traps represent the world's largest subaerial flood basalt province, and may be responsible for the Permo-Triassic mass extinction at 250 Ma (e.g., Campbell et al. 1992 Science 258, 1760). The total extent of the Traps, and whether or not the volcanism is a contributor to the Permo-Triassic mass extinction, are both still matters of debate. Basaltic and gabbroic rocks occur throughout the West Siberian Basin (WSB), but are covered by a thick succession of Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments, unlike the more accessible Traps on the Siberian craton to the east. We have obtained material from three deep industrial boreholes (Hohryakovskaya, Permyakovskaya, Van Eganskaya), and show that basalts and gabbros from the WSB have ages indistinguishable from the Traps to the east. 40Ar-39Ar dating of plagioclase (from basalts) and phlogopite (from a gabbro) separates from 6 samples from three boreholes give ages of 249.3 to 250.5 Ma (plagioclase) and 253.4 Ma (phlogopite) (relative to GA1550 biotite at 98.79 Ma). The results are obtained by step heating and the apparent plateau ages include more than 90 percent of the total argon released. Two sigma errors are better than 1.0 Ma for 5 of the samples. Normalised to the same standard, these ages are in good agreement with ages obtained for the Siberian Traps (250 Ma: Renne and Basu 1991 Science 253, 176). On the basis of major and trace element data, the basalts from the WSB show affinities with the Nadezhinsky suite (Noril'sk area), which is known to immediately precede the main pulse of volcanism that extruded over large areas of the craton. Limited recovery from the boreholes indicates that the basalts were erupted subaerially or possibly into shallow water (e.g. presence of abundant, large amygdales). Lava flows are at least 20 m thick, indicating voluminous eruptions. The results from the Ar-Ar dating and chemical analysis emphasise a clear correlation between basalts from the WSB and the Siberian Traps. This

  11. Comparison of conventional K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating of young mafic volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages have been measured on nine mafic volcanic rocks younger than 1 myr from the Snake River Plain (Idaho), Mount Adams (Washington), and Crater Lake (Oregon). The K-Ar ages were calculated from Ar measurements made by isotope dilution and K2O measurements by flame photometry. The 40Ar/39Ar ages are incremental-heating experiments using a low-blank resistance-heated furnace. The results indicate that high-quality ages can be measured on young, mafic volcanic rocks using either the K-Ar or the 40Ar/39Ar technique. The precision of an 40Ar/39Ar plateau age generally is better than the precision of a K-Ar age because the plateau age is calculated by pooling the ages of several gas increments. The precision of a plateau age generally is better than the precision of an isotope correlation (isochron) age for the same sample. For one sample the intercept of the isochron yielded an 40Ar/36Ar value significantly different from the atmospheric value of 295.5. Recalculation of increment ages using the isochron intercept for the composition of nonradiogenic Ar in the sample resulted in much better agreement of ages for this sample. The results of this study also indicate that, given suitable material and modern equipment, precise K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages can be measured on volcanic rocks as young as the latest Pleistocene, and perhaps even the Holocene.

  12. 40Ar-39Ar Ages of the Large Impact Structures Kara and Manicouagan and their Relevance to the Cretaceous-Tertiary and the Triassic-Jurassic Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieloff, M.; Jessberger, E. K.

    1992-07-01

    Since the discovery of the iridium enrichment in Cretaceous- Tertiary boundary clays by Alvarez et al. (1980) the search for the crater of the K/T impactor is in progress. Petrographic evidence at the K/T boundary material points towards an impact into an ocean as well as onto the continental crust, multiple K/T impacts are now being considered (Alvarez and Asaro, 1990). One candidate is the Kara crater in northern Siberia of which Kolesnikov et al. (1988) determined a K-Ar isochrone age of 65.6 +- 0.5 Ma, regarding this as indicating that the Kara bolide is at least one of the K/T impactors. Koeberl et al. (1990) determined ^40Ar-^39Ar ages of six impact melts ranging from 70 to 82 Ma and suggested rather an association to the Campanian- Maastrichtian boundary, another important extinction horizon 73 Ma ago (Harland et al., 1982). We dated with the ^40Ar-^39Ar technique four impact melts, KA2- 306, KA2-305, SA1-302 and AN9-182. The spectra have rather well- defined plateaus, shown with highly extended age scales (Fig. 1). The plateau ages range from 69.3 to 71.7 Ma. Our data do not support an association either with the Cretaceous-Tertiary or with the Campanian-Maastrichtian boundary. We deduce an age of 69-71 Ma for the Kara impact structure. Nazarov et al. (1991) have demonstrated by isotopic hydrogen studies that the Kara bolide impacted on dry land, while the last regression at the target area before the end of the Cretaceous occurred 69-70 Ma ago. Our data are consistent with an impact shortly after the regression. We further dated impact metamorphic anorthosite samples (10BD5 and 10BD3C) of the Manicouagan crater, Canada, which may be related to the Triassic-Jurassic boundary (McLaren and Goodfellow, 1990). The samples consist of two different phases, one degassing at low temperatures yielding a plateau age of 212 Ma and another phase which was degassed during the cratering event to varying degrees with apparent ages increasing up to 950 Ma, the age of the

  13. 40Ar/39Ar laserprobe study of the Day Nui Con Voi Metamorphic Complex, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Lo, C.; Yeh, M.; Chung, S.; Lee, T.

    2009-12-01

    The garnet bearing gneiss within the Day Nui Con Voi (DNCV) Metamorphic Complex along the Red River Shear Zone (RRSZ) in North Vietnam, recorded a long tectonothermal history since the Indosinian orogeny. In-situ 40Ar/39Ar laserprobe study of biotite inclusions within garnet porphyroblasts and matrix biotites, combining with microstructural and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies, deciphered the timing and duration of thermal events. Biotites from two matrix fabrics from different deformation events show approximately similar 40Ar/39Ar age ranges in 19-24Ma, depending grain size. These matrix biotite ages are best interpreted to record a rapid cooling event associating with the left-lateral shearing event of the RRSZ. Whereas, all biotite inclusions exhibit age zoning patterns with 40Ar/39Ar ages gradually increase from 17 Ma to more than 28 Ma according to their diffusion pathways. These age variations may have resultant from a combination effect of argon retention by garnet shielding, which provides a best recorder to the metamorphic event, and argon diffusion loss along the deformed cracks during the shearing event of the RRSZ. Diffusion modeling of these age zoning indicated that the total duration of argon diffusion loss may have lasted for nearly 9 Myr and argon diffusion may have occurred sometime around 24.5Ma. These results are generally in good agreement with previous interpretation, but provide better resolution of 40Ar/39Ar age data for deciphering the history of thermal event in the DNCV Metamorphic Complex and the left-lateral shearing event of the RRSZ in Vietnam, as well.

  14. Independent 40Ar/39Ar and 14C age constraints on the last five glacial terminations from the aggradational successions of the Tiber River, Rome (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, F.; Rohling, E. J.; Florindo, F.; Jicha, B.; Nomade, S.; Pereira, A.; Renne, P. R.

    2016-09-01

    We use 13 new 40Ar/39Ar and 4 new 14C datings of volcanic deposits and organic material found within near-coastal aggradational successions deposited by the Tiber River near Rome, Italy, to integrate a larger dataset previously achieved in order to offer independent age constraints to the sea-level fluctuations associated with Late Quaternary glacial cycles during the last 450 ka. Results are compared with the chronologically independently constrained Red Sea relative sea-level curve, and with the astronomically tuned deep-sea benthic δ18O record. We find good agreements for the timings of change, and in several cases for both the amplitudes and timings of change during glacial terminations T-1, T-2, T-3, and T-5. There is one striking exception, namely for glacial termination T-4 that led into interglacial Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 9. T-4 in our results is dated a full 18 ka earlier than in the Red Sea and deep-sea benthic δ18O records (which are in good agreement with each other in spite of their independent chronological constraints). The observed discrepancy is beyond the scale of the combined age uncertainties. One possible explanation is that the documented aggradation represents an early phase, triggered by a smaller event in the sea-level record, but the thickness of the aggradational sediment sequence then suggests that the amplitude of this earlier sea-level rise is underestimated in the Red Sea and benthic δ18O records. Also, this would imply that the aggradational succession of the main T-4 deglaciation has not yet been located in the study region, which is hard to reconcile with our extensive fieldwork and borehole coverage, unless unlikely non-deposition or complete erosion. Resolving this discrepancy will improve understanding of the timing of deglaciations relative to the orbitally modulated insolation forcing of climate and will require further focused research, both into the nature and chronology of the Tiber sequences of this period, and into

  15. First-principles calibration of 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards and complete extraction of 40Ar* from sanidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Kuiper, K.; Mark, D.; Postma, O.; Villa, I. M.; Wijbrans, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar geochronology relies on comparing argon isotopic data for unknowns to those for knowns. Mineral standards used as neutron fluence monitors must be dated by the K-Ar method (or at least referenced to a mineral of known K-Ar age). The commonly used age of 28.02 ± 0.28 Ma for the Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs) (Renne et al., 1998) is based upon measurements of radiogenic 40Ar in GA1550 biotite (McDougall and Roksandic, 1974), but underlying full data were not published (these measurements were never intended for use as an international standard), so uncertainties are difficult to assess. Recent developments by Kuiper et al. (2008) and Renne et al. (2010) are limited by their reliance on the accuracy of other systems. Modern technology should allow for more precise and accurate calibration of primary K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar standards. From the ideal gas law, the number of moles of 40Ar in a system can be calculated from measurements of pressure, volume, and temperature. Thus we have designed and are proceeding to build a pipette system to introduce well-determined amounts of 40Ar into noble gas extraction lines and mass spectrometers. This system relies on components with calibrations traceable to SI unit prototypes, including a diaphragm pressure gauge (MKS Instruments), thermocouples, and a “slug” of an accurately determined volume to be inserted into the reservoir for volume determinations of the reservoir and pipette. The system will be renewable, with a lifetime of ca. 1 month for gas in the reservoir, and portable, to permit interlaboratory calibrations. The quantitative extraction of 40Ar* from the mineral standard is of highest importance; for sanidine standards this is complicated by high melt viscosity during heating. Experiments adding basaltic “zero age glass” (ZAG) to decrease melt viscosity are underway. This has previously been explored by McDowell (1983) with a resistance furnace, but has not been quantitatively addressed with laser heating

  16. Potassium Isotopic Compositions of NIST Potassium Standards and 40Ar/39Ar Mineral Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Leah; Tappa, Mike; Ellam, Rob; Mark, Darren; Higgins, John; Simon, Justin I.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the isotopic ratios of standards, spikes, and reference materials is fundamental to the accuracy of many geochronological methods. For example, the 238U/235U ratio relevant to U-Pb geochronology was recently re-determined [1] and shown to differ significantly from the previously accepted value employed during age determinations. These underlying values are fundamental to accurate age calculations in many isotopic systems, and uncertainty in these values can represent a significant (and often unrecognized) portion of the uncertainty budget for determined ages. The potassium isotopic composition of mineral standards, or neutron flux monitors, is a critical, but often overlooked component in the calculation of K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages. It is currently assumed that all terrestrial materials have abundances indistinguishable from that of NIST SRM 985 [2]; this is apparently a reasonable assumption at the 0.25per mille level (1s) [3]. The 40Ar/39Ar method further relies on the assumption that standards and samples (including primary and secondary standards) have indistinguishable 40K/39K values. We will present data establishing the potassium isotopic compositions of NIST isotopic K SRM 985, elemental K SRM 999b, and 40Ar/39Ar biotite mineral standard GA1550 (sample MD-2). Stable isotopic compositions (41K/39K) were measured by the peak shoulder method with high resolution MC-ICP-MS (Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus), using the accepted value of NIST isotopic SRM 985 [2] for fractionation [4] corrections [5]. 40K abundances were measured by TIMS (Thermo Scientific TRITON), using 41K/39K values from ICP-MS measurements (or, for SRM 985, values from [2]) for internal fractionation corrections. Collectively these data represent an important step towards a metrologically traceable calibration of 40K concentrations in primary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards and improve uncertainties by ca. an order of magnitude in the potassium isotopic compositions of standards.

  17. Revised error propagation of 40Ar/39Ar data, including covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, Pieter

    2015-12-01

    The main advantage of the 40Ar/39Ar method over conventional K-Ar dating is that it does not depend on any absolute abundance or concentration measurements, but only uses the relative ratios between five isotopes of the same element -argon- which can be measured with great precision on a noble gas mass spectrometer. The relative abundances of the argon isotopes are subject to a constant sum constraint, which imposes a covariant structure on the data: the relative amount of any of the five isotopes can always be obtained from that of the other four. Thus, the 40Ar/39Ar method is a classic example of a 'compositional data problem'. In addition to the constant sum constraint, covariances are introduced by a host of other processes, including data acquisition, blank correction, detector calibration, mass fractionation, decay correction, interference correction, atmospheric argon correction, interpolation of the irradiation parameter, and age calculation. The myriad of correlated errors arising during the data reduction are best handled by casting the 40Ar/39Ar data reduction protocol in a matrix form. The completely revised workflow presented in this paper is implemented in a new software platform, Ar-Ar_Redux, which takes raw mass spectrometer data as input and generates accurate 40Ar/39Ar ages and their (co-)variances as output. Ar-Ar_Redux accounts for all sources of analytical uncertainty, including those associated with decay constants and the air ratio. Knowing the covariance matrix of the ages removes the need to consider 'internal' and 'external' uncertainties separately when calculating (weighted) mean ages. Ar-Ar_Redux is built on the same principles as its sibling program in the U-Pb community (U-Pb_Redux), thus improving the intercomparability of the two methods with tangible benefits to the accuracy of the geologic time scale. The program can be downloaded free of charge from

  18. SHRIMP U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar age constraints for relating plutonism and mineralization in the Boulder batholith region, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lund, K.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Kunk, M.J.; Unruh, D.M.; Zeihen, G.D.; Hodges, W.C.; du Bray, E.A.; O'Neill, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    The composite Boulder batholith, Montana, hosts a variety of mineral deposit types, including important silver-rich polymetallic quartz vein districts in the northern part of the batholith and the giant Butte porphyry copper-molybdenum pre-Main Stage system and crosscutting copper-rich Main Stage vein system in the southern part of the batholith. Previous dating studies have identified ambiguous relationships among igneous and mineralizing events. Mineralizing hydrothermal fluids for these types of deposits and magma for quartz porphyry dikes at Butte have all been considered to be late-stage differentiates of the Boulder batholith. However, previous dating studies indicated that the Boulder batholith plutons cooled from about 78 to 72 Ma, whereas copper-rich Main Stage veins at Butte were dated at about 61 Ma. Recent efforts to date the porphyry copper-molybdenum pre-Main Stage deposits at Butte resulted in conflicting estimates of both 64 and 76 Ma for the mineralizing events. Silver-rich polymetallic quartz vein deposits elsewhere in the batholith have not been dated previously. To resolve this controversy, we used the U.S. Geological Survey, Stanford, SHRIMP RG ion mic??roprobe to date single-age domains within zircons from plutonic rock samples and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to date white mica, biotite, and K-feldspar from mineral deposits. U-Pb zircon ages are Rader Creek Granodiorite, 80.4 ?? 1.2 Ma; Unionville Granodiorite, 78.2 ?? 0.8 Ma; Pulpit Rock granite, 76.5 ?? 0.8 Ma; Butte Granite, 74.5 ?? 0.9 Ma; altered Steward-type quartz porphyry dike (I-15 roadcut), 66.5 ?? 1.0 Ma; altered Steward-type quartz porphyry dike (Continental pit), 65.7 ?? 0.9 Ma; and quartz monzodiorite of Boulder Baldy (Big Belt Mountains), 66.2 ?? 0.9 Ma. Zircons from Rader Creek Granodiorite and quartz porphyry dike samples contain Archean inheritance. The 40Ar/39Ar ages are muscovite, silver-rich polymetallic quartz vein (Basin district), 74.4 ?? 0.3 Ma; muscovite, silver

  19. Quaternary continental weathering geochronology by laser-heating 40Ar/39Ar analysis of supergene cryptomelane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yuexing; Vasconcelos, Paulo

    2001-07-01

    Incremental laser-heating analyses of supergene cryptomelane clusters extracted from three distinct weathering profiles from the Mary Valley region, southeast Queensland, Australia, yield reproducible and well-defined plateau ages ranging from 346 ± 15 to 291 ± 14 ka (2 σ). Precipitation of supergene cryptomelane in this period implies that relative humid climate prevailed in southeast Queensland from 340 to 290 ka, a result consistent with oxygen isotope analyses of marine sediments from Ocean Drilling Program Site 820 and with regional pollen and spore records. These results, the first report on the precise 40Ar/39Ar dating of Quaternary supergene cryptomelane, indicate that 40Ar/39Ar analysis of pedogenic minerals provides a reliable geochronometer for the study of Quaternary surficial processes useful in the study of soil formation rates, continental paleoclimates, and archaeological sites devoid of datable volcanic minerals.

  20. New 40Ar/39Ar age of the Bishop Tuff from multiple sites and sediment rate calibration for the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Pringle, M.S.; Wijbrans, J.

    2000-01-01

    Precise dating of sanidine from proximal ash flow Bishop Tuff and air fall Bishop pumice and ash, California, can be used to derive an absolute age of the Matuyama Reversed-Brunhes Normal (M-B) paleomagnetic transition, identified stratigraphically close beneath the Bishop Tuff and ash at many sites in the western United States. An average age of 758.9 ?? 1.8 ka, standard error of the mean (SEM), was obtained for individual sanidine crystals or groups of several crystals, determined from ???70 individual analyses of sanidine separates from 11 sample groups obtained at five localities. The basal air fall pumice (757.7 ?? 1.8 ka) and overlying ash flow tuff (762.2 ?? 4.7 ka) from near the source yield essentially the same dates within errors of analysis, suggesting that the two units were emplaced close in time. A date on distal Bishop air fall ash bed at Friant, California, ???100 km to the west of the source area, is younger, 750.1 ?? 4.3 ka, but not significantly different within analytical error (??1 standard deviation). Previous dates of the Bishop Tuff, obtained by others using conventional K-Ar and the fission track method on zircons, ranged from ???650 ka to ???1.0 Ma. The most recent, generally accepted date by the K-Ar method on sanidine was 738 ?? 3 ka. We infer, as others before, that many K-Ar dates on sanidine feldspar are too young owing to incomplete degassing of radiogenic Ar during fusion in the K-Ar technique and that many older K-Ar dates are too old owing to detrital or xenocrystic contamination in the larger samples that are necessary for the technique. The new dates are similar to recent 40Ar/39Ar ages of the Bishop Tuff determined on individual samples by others but are derived from a larger proximal sample population and from multiple analysis of each sample. The results provide a definitive and precise age calibration of this widespread chronostratigraphic marker in the western United States and northeastern Pacific Ocean. We calculated the

  1. First 40Ar/39Ar dating of intense Late Palaeogene lateritic weathering in Peninsular India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Nicolas J.; Beauvais, Anicet; Arnaud, Nicolas; Chardon, Dominique; Jayananda, Mudlappa

    2014-01-01

    Lateritic surface processes have shaped large platform and cratons of the tropical belt. Constraining the timing of such processes is crucial to decipher their role in cratonic morphogenesis and their response to long-term climatic change and lithospheric deformation. Weathering histories have been documented for South America, Africa and Australia, but precise time constraints of the lateritic weathering processes in South India are still lacking. We present 40Ar/39Ar ages of supergene cryptomelane (K-Mn oxide) formed in the Sandur Mn ore deposits exposed on the highest lateritic paleolandsurface that once covered the Mysore plateau and the adjacent Deccan Traps. Significant 40Ar/39Ar ages are estimated between ∼36 and ∼26 Ma from well-defined plateaus in step heating 39Ar release spectra and from best-fitted inverse isochrones. These ages constitute firm time constraints that document intense late Eocene-Oligocene lateritic weathering over Peninsular India under the influence of warm and wet climate comparable to that prevailing in tropical humid forests. These results imply that Southern India was weathered between ∼36 and 26 Ma and may have been dissected mostly in the Neogene.

  2. Step heating of 40Ar/ 39Ar standard mineral mixtures: Investigation of a fine-grained bulk sediment provenance tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanLaningham, Sam; Mark, Darren F.

    2011-05-01

    Quantitative techniques that link sediments to their sources are needed to understand a range of tectonic, climate, and anthropogenic driven Earth surface processes. Many provenance techniques exist for sand-sized material but fewer are available for fine-grained sediment archives. In this respect, bulk 40Ar/ 39Ar ages from silt-sized sediment show potential, but many questions remain about the significance of a bulk sediment 40Ar/ 39Ar age. We interrogate bulk sediment 40Ar/ 39Ar ages by step heating mixtures of well-constrained 40Ar/ 39Ar mineral standards crushed to silt-sized. Silt-sized end member components Alder Creek Sanidine, Taylor Creek Sanidine and Heidelberg Biotite all yield plateau ages within uncertainty of their coarse-grained counterparts. High-resolution step heating (as many as 43 steps) of the mineral mixtures shows that biotite degasses first at lower temperatures compared to the two sanidines that degas generally in concert. Concordant age steps develop at both low and high temperatures and the transition from the isotope signal being dominated by one mineral phase to another is clearly observed. We show that age spectra for the mineral standard mixtures can be modeled and predicted for all mixtures by assuming a (simplistic) Gaussian distributed release of Ar, and by using the degassing maxima, variance, K concentration, and 40Ar/ 39Ar age of each monitor mineral. Thus, bulk sediment 40Ar/ 39Ar ages can be robust indicators of the average cooling/crystallization age of all contributing K-bearing minerals to a depositional center. Furthermore, we discuss the potential to deconvolve individual mineral age populations by model inversion. The application of this bulk sediment provenance technique should not be considered a replacement for single grain analyses. It should be applied to environments that do not provide sand-sized sediment archives (e.g., distal terrigenous sedimentary archives) when information about source changes through time

  3. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar laser fusion and K-Ar ages from Lathrop Wells, Nevada, and Cima, California: The age of the latest volcanic activity in the Yucca Mountain area

    SciTech Connect

    Turrin, B.D. |; Champion, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    K-Ar and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Nevada, and from the Cima volcanic field, California, indicate that the recently reported 20-ka age estimate for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center is incorrect. Instead, an age of 119 {plus_minus} 11 to 141 {plus_minus} 10 ka is indicated for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. This age corrected is concordant with the ages determined by two independent isotopic geochronometric techniques and with the stratigraphy of surficial deposits in the Yucca Mountain region. In addition, paleomagnetic data and radiometric age data indicate only two volcanic events at the Lathrop Wells volcanic center that are probably closely linked in time, not as many as five as recently reported. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. 40Ar/39Ar laser fusion and K-Ar ages from Lathrop Wells, Nevada, and Cima, California. The age of the latest volcanic activity in the Yucca Mountain area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turrin, Brent D.; Champion, Duane E.; ,

    1991-01-01

    K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Nevada, and from the Cima volcanic field, California, indicate that the recently reported 20-ka age estimate for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center is incorrect. Instead an age of 119??11 to 141??10 ka is indicated for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. This age corrected is concordant with the ages determined by two independent isotopic geochronometric techniques and with the stratigraphy of surficial deposits in the Yucca Mountain region. In addition, paleomagnetic data and radiometric age data indicate only two volcanic events at the Lathrop Wells volcanic center that are probably closely linked in time, not as many as five as recently reported.

  5. Incremental Heating 40Ar/39Ar Analyses of Mono Basin Tephra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deino, A.; Hemming, S. R.; Ali, G. A.; Zimmerman, S. R.; Turrin, B. D.

    2012-12-01

    The glacially and volcanically derived sediments of the Wilson Creek Formation (Lajoie, 1968), Mono Basin, eastern California, contain an invaluable archive of hydroclimatic, volcanic, and paleomagnetic events encompassing the past ~85 ka. Accurate radioisotopic dating of this sequence, however, has been stymied by systematic problems encountered in applying C-14, U/Th, and 40Ar/39Ar methods. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the 19-plus locally derived tephra horizons within the formation has been foiled by the presence of excess argon, incorporation of older crystal components and by the difficulty of accurately measuring of the age of late Quaternary materials (Chen et al., 1996; Kent et al., 2002; Cassata et al., 2011). We have acquired detailed laser step-heating 40Ar/39Ar age spectra on individual sanidine crystals of several Wilson Creek ashes using the multiple ion counter capability of the BGC Noblesse noble gas mass spectrometer. This approach represents a breakthrough for young materials, as it allows examination of the internal argon systematics of each grain and identification of steps representing excess Ar components as distinct from primary volcanic ages. Typically, anomalously old ages occur in the first 10-50% of the 39Ar release, followed by an age 'plateau' that is generally consistent from grain to grain. This methodological advance is a result of improvements in extraction-line design and mass spectrometer manufacture (in particular, improved source ionization efficiency, utilization of low-noise ion counters, and fully simultaneous data collection of all relevant isotopes). For example, 15 single-grain step-heating experiments (8-13 steps each) have been performed on sanidine from Ash 12. All crystals yielded apparent-age plateaus in the latter stages of the release, often preceded by anomalously old steps. While the age distribution of the plateau results are unimodal and consistent, with a weighted-mean age of 42.1 ± 0.3 ka (0.7% 1σ error), the

  6. Application of the 40Ar/39Ar technique to date the Minoan Tuff, Santorini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijbrans, J. R.; Kuiper, K.; Morgan, L. E.; Klaver, M.; Vroon, P. Z.

    2012-12-01

    The age of the catastrophic eruption of the volcano of Santorini during the Bronze Age is well established from 14C dating at 3344.9 ± 7.5 a1 (uncertainties quoted as 1-σ). Application of the 40Ar/39Ar technique to products from this eruption is used here to (1) investigate the limits of the technique using conventional single collector mass spectrometry on a MAP215-50 instrument, (2) analyse sources of uncertainty to identify major contributing factors for the uncertainty of young 40Ar/39Ar ages, and (3) provide 40Ar/39Ar ages for a sample that has been previously dated via 14C and dendrochronology to further investigate issues with the accuracy of 40Ar/39Ar dating in the late Quaternary. We have separated the plagioclase fraction from the lower Minoan Tuff that immediately overlies the Cape Riva (rp6) tuff in a bay on the west coast of Thira, NW of the town of Oia. Using the calibration of 40Ar/36Ar of Lee et al.2, the decay constant recommended by Min at al.3, and the FCs age of Kuiper et al.4, we calculate an inverse isochron age of 3.7 ± 1.6 ka and a trapped 40Ar/36Ar intercept of 299.8 ± 1.2, slightly higher than the ratio for atmospheric argon of 298.56 ± 0.31, when all steps with ages > 50 ka are included in the regression. Enrichment in radiogenic 40Ar in the steps used for the isochron is extremely low, given the low concentration of K2O in plagioclase and the extremely young age. The stepwise heating approach proved useful because in all 5 replicate experiments unexpectedly high ages showed up at higher step temperatures, suggesting that in each separate some older contaminant was present. The plateaus of each of the replicate experiments had quite reproducible ages, however, and a pooled age was calculated for 23 out of 48 individual steps. The pooled age for the plateau was 17.6 ± 4.1 ka, which is high due to the slight component of excess 40Ar in the non-radiogenic component, as revealed from regression analysis. refs: 1SW Manning et al. (2006

  7. 40Ar* loss in experimentally deformed muscovite and biotite with implications for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of naturally deformed rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosca, M.; Stunitz, H.; Bourgeix, A.-L.; Lee, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of deformation on radiogenic argon (40Ar*) retentivity in mica are described from high pressure experiments performed on rock samples of peraluminous granite containing euhedral muscovite and biotite. Cylindrical cores, ???15mm in length and 6.25mm in diameter, were drilled from granite collected from the South Armorican Massif in northwestern France, loaded into gold capsules, and weld-sealed in the presence of excess water. The samples were deformed at a pressure of 10kb and a temperature of 600??C over a period 29 of hours within a solid medium assembly in a Griggs-type triaxial hydraulic deformation apparatus. Overall shortening in the experiments was approximately 10%. Transmitted light and secondary and backscattered electron imaging of the deformed granite samples reveals evidence of induced defects and for significant physical grain size reduction by kinking, cracking, and grain segmentation of the micas.Infrared (IR) laser (CO2) heating of individual 1.5-2.5mm diameter grains of muscovite and biotite separated from the undeformed granite yield well-defined 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages of 311??2Ma (2??). Identical experiments on single grains separated from the experimentally deformed granite yield results indicating 40Ar* loss of 0-35% in muscovite and 2-3% 40Ar* loss in biotite. Intragrain in situ ultraviolet (UV) laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar ages (??4-10%, 1??) of deformed muscovites range from 309??13 to 264??7Ma, consistent with 0-16% 40Ar* loss relative to the undeformed muscovite. The in situ UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar ages of deformed biotite vary from 301 to 217Ma, consistent with up to 32% 40Ar* loss. No spatial correlation is observed between in situ 40Ar/39Ar age and position within individual grains. Using available argon diffusion data for muscovite the observed 40Ar* loss in the experimentally treated muscovite can be utilized to predict average 40Ar* diffusion dimensions. Maximum 40Ar/39Ar ages obtained by UV laser ablation overlap those

  8. Call for Development of New Mineral Standards for 40Ar/39Ar Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deino, A. L.; Turrin, B. D.; Renne, P. R.; Hemming, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Age determination via the 40Ar/39Ar dating method relies on the intercomparison of measured 40Ar*/39ArK ratios of geological unknowns with those of co-irradiated mineral standards. Good analytical procedure dictates that these ratios (and the evolution of the Ar ion beams underpinning them) be as similar as practical for the greatest accuracy. Unfortunately, throughout several intervals of the geological time scale this 'best practice' cannot be achieved with existing widely used standards. Only two internationally utilized sanidine standards are available for the middle to late Cenozoic: the Alder Creek Rhyolite sanidine (ACs), at ~1.2 Ma (Turrin et al., 1994; Nomade et al., 2005), and the Fish Canyon Tuff sanidine (FCs) at ~28.2 Ma (e.g., Kuiper et al., 2008; Renne et al, 2011). The situation is even worse throughout much of the rest of the Phanerozoic, as the next oldest standard in common use is the Hb3gr hornblende standard with an age of ~1.1 Ga (Turner, 1971; Jourdan et al., 2006). We propose, as a community effort, the development a set of standards covering the entire target range of high-precision 40Ar/39Ar dating, i.e. the Phanerozoic. Their ages would be stepped in a regular fashion with no more than approximately a factor of 3 between standards, such that in the worse case the 40Ar*/39Ar ratios of standards and unknown need differ by no more than a factor of two. While somewhat arbitrary, an approximately 3 X age progression allows the entire time scale to be covered by a manageable number of standards. Anchoring the progression in the widely used ACs, FCs, and Hb3gr (in bold, below) yields the following set of suggested standard ages: 0.4, 1.2, 3.3, 9.4, 28.2, 95, 320, and 1100 Ma. A suitable standard should be highly reproducible in age at the grain-to-grain and sub-grain levels, and highly radiogenic. The mineral should be abundant and easily separated from the host rock. These criteria may be most easily achieved by focusing on sanidine phenocrysts

  9. 40Ar-39Ar age determinations of lunar basalt meteorites Asuka 881757, Yamato 793169, Miller Range 05035, La Paz Icefield 02205, Northwest Africa 479, and basaltic breccia Elephant Moraine 96008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Vera A.; Burgess, Ray; Morris, Adam

    2009-06-01

    40Ar-39Ar data are presented for the unbrecciated lunar basaltic meteorites Asuka (A-) 881757, Yamato (Y-) 793169, Miller Range (MIL) 05035, LaPaz Icefield (LAP) 02205, Northwest Africa (NWA) 479 (paired with NWA 032), and basaltic fragmental breccia Elephant Moraine (EET) 96008. Stepped heating 40Ar-39Ar analyses of several bulk fragments of related meteorites A-881757, Y-793169 and MIL 05035 give crystallization ages of 3.763 ± 0.046 Ga, 3.811 ± 0.098 Ga and 3.845 ± 0.014 Ga, which are comparable with previous age determinations by Sm-Nd, U-Pb Th-Pb, Pb-Pb, and Rb-Sr methods. These three meteorites differ in the degree of secondary 40Ar loss with Y-793169 showing relatively high Ar loss probably during an impact event ˜200 Ma ago, lower Ar loss in MIL 05035 and no loss in A-881757. Bulk and impact melt glass-bearing samples of LAP 02205 gave similar ages (2.985 ± 0.016 Ga and 2.874 ± 0.056 Ga) and are consistent with ages previously determined using other isotope pairs. The basaltic portion of EET 96008 gives an age of 2.650 ± 0.086 Ga which is considered to be the crystallization age of the basalt in this meteorite. The Ar release for fragmental basaltic breccia EET 96008 shows evidence of an impact event at 631 ± 20 Ma. The crystallization age of 2.721 ± 0.040 Ga determined for NWA 479 is indistinguishable from the weighted mean age obtained from three samples of NWA 032 supporting the proposal that these meteorites are paired. The similarity of 40Ar-39Ar ages with ages determined by other isotopic systems for multiple meteorites suggests that the K-Ar isotopic system is robust for meteorites that have experienced a significant shock event and not a prolonged heating regime.

  10. Palaeomagnetism and K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages in the Ali Sabieh area (Republic of Djibouti and Ethiopia): constraints on the mechanism of Aden ridge propagation into southeastern Afar during the last 10 Myr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audin, L.; Quidelleur, X.; Coulié, E.; Courtillot, V.; Gilder, S.; Manighetti, I.; Gillot, P.-Y.; Tapponnier, P.; Kidane, T.

    2004-07-01

    A new detailed palaeomagnetic study of Tertiary volcanics, including extensive K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating, helps constrain the deformation mechanisms related to the opening processes of the Afar depression (Ethiopia and Djibouti). Much of the Afar depression is bounded by 30 Myr old flood basalts and floored by the ca 2 Myr old Stratoid basalts, and evidence for pre-2 Ma deformation processes is accessible only on its borders. K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating of several mineral phases from rhyolitic samples from the Ali Sabieh block shows indistinguishable ages around 20 Myr. These ages can be linked to separation of this block in relation to continental breakup. Different amounts of rotation are found to the north and south of the Holhol fault zone, which cuts across the northern part of the Ali Sabieh block. The southern domain did not record any rotation for the last 8 Myr, whereas the northern domain experienced approximately 12 +/- 9° of clockwise rotation. We propose to link this rotation to the counter-clockwise rotation observed in the Danakil block since 7 Ma. This provides new constraints on the early phases of rifting and opening of the southern Afar depression in connection with the propagation of the Aden ridge. A kinematic model of propagation and transfer of extension within southern Afar is proposed, with particular emphasis on the previously poorly-known period from 10 to 4 Ma.

  11. Differential unroofing within the central metasedimentary Belt of the Grenville Orogen: constraints from 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosca, Michael A.; Essene, Eric J.; Kunk, Michael J.; Sutter, John F.

    1992-04-01

    An 40Ar/39Ar thermochronological investigation of upper greenschist to granulite facies gneiss, amphibolite and marble was conducted in the Central Metasedimentary Belt (CMB), Ontario, to constrain its cooling history. Incremental 40Ar/39Ar release spectra indicate that substantial differential unroofing occurred in the CMB between ˜ 1000 and ˜ 600 Ma. A consistent pattern of significantly older hornblende and phlogopite 40Ar/3Ar cooling ages on the southeast sides of major northeast striking shear zones is interpreted to reflect late displacement due to extensional deformation. Variations in hornblende 40Ar/39Ar age plateaus exceeding 200 Ma occur over distances less than 50 km with major age discontinuities occurring across the Robertson Lake shear zone and the Sharbot Lake mylonite zone which separate the Sharbot Lake terrane from the Elzevir and Frontenac terranes. Extensional displacements of up to 14 km are inferred between the Frontenac and Elzevir terranes of the CMB. No evidence for significant post argon-closure vertical displacement is indicated in the vicinity of the Perth Road mylonite within the Frontenac terrane. Variations of nearly 100 Ma in phlogopite 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages occur in undeformed marble on either side of the Bancroft Shear Zone. Phlogopites from sheared and mylonitized marble within the shear zone yield 40Ar/39Ar diffusional loss profiles, but have older geologically meaningless ages thought to reflect incorporation of excess argon. By ˜ 900 Ma, southeast directed extension was occurring throughout the CMB, possibly initiated along previous zones of compressional shearing. An easterly migration of active zones of extension is inferred, possibly related to an earlier, overall easterly migration of active zones of regional thrusting and easterly migration of an ancient subduction zone. The duration of extensional shearing is not well constrained, but must have ceased before ˜ 600 Ma as required by the deposition of overlying

  12. Differential unroofing within the central metasedimentary Belt of the Grenville Orogen: constraints from 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosca, M.A.; Essene, E.J.; Kunk, M.J.; Sutter, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    An 40Ar/39Ar thermochronological investigation of upper greenschist to granulite facies gneiss, amphibolite and marble was conducted in the Central Metasedimentary Belt (CMB), Ontario, to constrain its cooling history. Incremental 40Ar/39Ar release spectra indicate that substantial differential unroofing occurred in the CMB between ??? 1000 and ??? 600 Ma. A consistent pattern of significantly older hornblende and phlogopite 40Ar/3Ar cooling ages on the southeast sides of major northeast striking shear zones is interpreted to reflect late displacement due to extensional deformation. Variations in hornblende 40Ar/39Ar age plateaus exceeding 200 Ma occur over distances less than 50 km with major age discontinuities occurring across the Robertson Lake shear zone and the Sharbot Lake mylonite zone which separate the Sharbot Lake terrane from the Elzevir and Frontenac terranes. Extensional displacements of up to 14 km are inferred between the Frontenac and Elzevir terranes of the CMB. No evidence for significant post argon-closure vertical displacement is indicated in the vicinity of the Perth Road mylonite within the Frontenac terrane. Variations of nearly 100 Ma in phlogopite 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages occur in undeformed marble on either side of the Bancroft Shear Zone. Phlogopites from sheared and mylonitized marble within the shear zone yield 40Ar/39Ar diffusional loss profiles, but have older geologically meaningless ages thought to reflect incorporation of excess argon. By ??? 900 Ma, southeast directed extension was occurring throughout the CMB, possibly initiated along previous zones of compressional shearing. An easterly migration of active zones of extension is inferred, possibly related to an earlier, overall easterly migration of active zones of regional thrusting and easterly migration of an ancient subduction zone. The duration of extensional shearing is not well constrained, but must have ceased before ??? 600 Ma as required by the deposition of overlying

  13. A natural laboratory for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology: ICDP cores from Lake Van, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Jonathan; Sudo, Masafumi; Oberhänsli, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Pore water samples from ICDP Paleovan cores indicate a limited pore water exchange within Quaternary lake sediments. The core's volcaniclastic sections bear unaltered K-rich ternary feldspar and fresh to altered glass shards of predominantly rhyolitic composition. Whereas applying the 40Ar/39Ar method on feldspars resulted in ages timing a late-stage crystallization, glass shards had the potential to date the eruption. Volcanic glass is prone to modifications such as hydrous alteration (palagonitization) and devitrification (Cerling et al., 1985). These modifications affect the glass' chemistry and challenge the application of the 40Ar/39Ar method. Gaining precise radiometric ages from two phases has the potential to strengthen a climate-stratigraphic age-model (Stockhecke et al., 2014), and to significantly increase the temporal resolution on the deposition of the lake sediments. Vice versa the core's previous age model has the ability to question the reliability of 40Ar/39Ar eruption ages derived from ternary feldspars and glass shards. Multi- and single-grain total fusion on alkali feldspars from six volcaniclastic deposits resulted in Pleistocene ages that are in good agreement with the predicted age model. Feldspar phenocrysts from three ashes in the core's youngest section yielded consistent isochron ages that are significantly older than the model's prediction. Several distinct stratigraphic and paleomagnetic time markers of similar stratigraphic positions contradict to the older radiometric dates (Stockhecke et al., 2014). Partial resorption features of inherited feldspar domains and the involvement of excess 40Ar indicate incomplete degassing of older domains. To evaluate the magmatic history of the different domains EMPA mappings of trace elements that could be interpreted as Ar diffusion couples are currently conducted. Geochronology on Paleovan cores offers unique opportunities to monitor the effect of alteration on the Ar-systematics of volcanic glass

  14. Tracking the provenance of Greenland-sourced, Holocene aged, individual sand-sized ice-rafted debris using the Pb-isotope compositions of feldspars and 40Ar/39Ar ages of hornblendes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Lee F.; Bailey, Ian; Foster, Gavin L.; Allen, Georgina; Kelley, Simon P.; Andrews, John T.; Hogan, Kelly; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Storey, Craig D.

    2016-01-01

    The provenance of sand-sized ice-rafted debris (IRD) sourced from Greenland is currently difficult to determine. Such knowledge, if it could be ascertained with a high degree of certainty, could be applied to the Greenland-proximal marine records to improve both our understanding of modern-day spatial patterns of iceberg rafting and the past history of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS). Recent studies have highlighted the utility of the Pb-isotope composition of individual sand-sized feldspars and the 40Ar/39Ar ages of individual sand-sized hornblendes in this regard. However, before any such provenance toolkit can be applied to the palaeo-record, it is necessary first to determine whether this approach can be used to track the sources of known recent Greenland-proximal IRD deposition. To this end we present new records of the Pb-isotope composition and the 40Ar/39Ar ages of individual sand-sized grains of feldspars and hornblendes, respectively, from modern Greenland glacifluvial and fjord sands and Holocene to modern Greenland-proximal marine sediments. These new data demonstrate that sand-sized feldspars and hornblendes glacially eroded by the GIS exhibit distinct intra- and inter-tectonic terrane differences in their Pb-isotope compositions and ages and that these differences are clearly expressed in the geochemistry and geochronology of sand-sized IRD deposited in marine sediments around Greenland. Although overlap exists between some Greenland-proximal IRD 'source fields' defined by these data, our approach has the potential to both better understand spatial patterns of Greenland-derived IRD in the modern day as well as during past episodes of iceberg calving.

  15. Investigation of the Gardnos Impact Structure: 40Ar/39Ar Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, J. A.; Swindle, T. D.; Kring, D. A.; Melosh, H. J.

    1995-09-01

    Introduction: The Gardnos structure (Norway) [1], has recently been identified as an impact crater [2,3], despite being deformed by a series of tectonic processes [2]. The age of the structure is uncertain, although attempts to date the impact event have been made on the basis of stratigraphic relationships [2,3]. Unfortunately, these estimates differ by more than 100 million years. The first study suggested that the impact corresponded roughly with the Cambro-Ordovician boundary, ~500 Ma [2], while a second stratigraphic interpretation suggested a Precambrian age of 650 Ma [3]. To try and resolve this discrepancy, we attempted to determine the age of the structure with radiometric techniques, which typically have an error of < 10 Ma. Method: We examined three samples from the crater, in an attempt to determine the age using the 40Ar/39Ar dating method. The samples (plagioclase feldspar, alkali feldspar, and shards of gray, semi-transparent, glassy-looking material) were obtained from the suevite breccia unit of [2]. This unit should be the most promising for 40Ar/39Ar dating, since it is melt bearing, and no other unit is likely to be less affected by subsequent tectonism and sedimentation. Results: Our experiments yielded complicated age spectra interpreted to reflect a thermal event at 385+/-5 Ma and another possible event at 312+/-5 Ma (Fig. 1). All three samples yielded similar results. If the stratigraphic interpretations are correct, it thus seems clear that the impact event itself was not dated. The 385 Ma age corresponds to the end of the Caledonian Orogeny, which significantly altered this section of Norway [4]. It is suspected that late Caledonian folding occurred during this time [4], and we therefore interpret the 385 Ma age as the thermal metamorphic overprint of the Caledonian Orogeny. Another event clearly occurred afterwards, which is responsible for the 312 Ma signature. The cause of this thermal overprint has not yet been identified, since

  16. Geochronological constraints on the age of a Permo-Triassic impact event: U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar results for the 40 km Araguainha structure of central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohver, E.; Lana, C.; Cawood, P. A.; Fletcher, I. R.; Jourdan, F.; Sherlock, S.; Rasmussen, B.; Trindade, R. I. F.; Yokoyama, E.; Souza Filho, C. R.; Marangoni, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Impact cratering has been a fundamental geological process in Earth history with major ramifications for the biosphere. The complexity of shocked and melted rocks within impact structures presents difficulties for accurate and precise radiogenic isotope age determination, hampering the assessment of the effects of an individual event in the geological record. We demonstrate the utility of a multi-chronometer approach in our study of samples from the 40 km diameter Araguainha impact structure of central Brazil. Samples of uplifted basement granite display abundant evidence of shock deformation, but U/Pb ages of shocked zircons and the 40Ar/39Ar ages of feldspar from the granite largely preserve the igneous crystallization and cooling history. Mixed results are obtained from in situ40Ar/39Ar spot analyses of shocked igneous biotites in the granite, with deformation along kink-bands resulting in highly localized, partial resetting in these grains. Likewise, spot analyses of perlitic glass from pseudotachylitic breccia samples reflect a combination of argon inheritance from wall rock material, the age of the glass itself, and post-impact devitrification. The timing of crater formation is better assessed using samples of impact-generated melt rock where isotopic resetting is associated with textural evidence of melting and in situ crystallization. Granular aggregates of neocrystallized zircon form a cluster of ten U-Pb ages that yield a “Concordia” age of 247.8 ± 3.8 Ma. The possibility of Pb loss from this population suggests that this is a minimum age for the impact event. The best evidence for the age of the impact comes from the U-Th-Pb dating of neocrystallized monazite and 40Ar/39Ar step heating of three separate populations of post-impact, inclusion-rich quartz grains that are derived from the infill of miarolitic cavities. The 206Pb/238U age of 254.5 ± 3.2 Ma (2σ error) and 208Pb/232Th age of 255.2 ± 4.8 Ma (2σ error) of monazite, together with the

  17. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of submarine Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jicha, Brian R.; Rhodes, J. Michael; Singer, Brad S.; Garcia, Michael O.

    2012-09-01

    New geochronologic constraints refine the growth history of Mauna Loa volcano and enhance interpretations of the petrologic, geochemical, and isotopic evolution of Hawaiian magmatism. We report results of 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating experiments on low-K, tholeiitic lavas from the 1.6 km high Kahuku landslide scarp cutting Mauna Loa's submarine southwest rift zone, and from lavas in a deeper section of the rift. Obtaining precise40Ar/39Ar ages from young, tholeiitic lavas containing only 0.2-0.3 wt.% K2O is challenging due to their extremely low radiogenic 40Ar contents. Analyses of groundmass from 45 lavas yield 14 new age determinations (31% success rate) with plateau and isochron ages that agree with stratigraphic constraints. Lavas collected from a 1250 m thick section in the landslide scarp headwall were all erupted around 470 ± 10 ka, implying an extraordinary period of accumulation of ˜25 mm/yr, possibly correlating with the peak of the shield-building stage. This rate is three times higher than the estimated vertical lava accumulation rate for shield-building at Mauna Kea (8.6 ± 3.1 mm/yr) based on results from the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project. Between ˜470 and 273 ka, the lava accumulation rate along the southwest rift zone decreased dramatically to ˜1 mm/yr. We propose that the marked reduction in lava accumulation rate does not mark the onset of post-shield volcanism as previously suggested, but rather indicates the upward migration of the magma system as Mauna Loa evolved from a submarine stage of growth to one that is predominantly subaerial, thereby cutting off supply to the distal rift zone. Prior to ˜250 ka, lavas with Loihi-like isotopic signatures were erupted along with lavas having typical Mauna Loa values, implying greater heterogeneity in the plume source earlier in Mauna Loa's growth. In addition to refining accumulation rates and the isotopic evolution of the lavas erupted along the southwest rift zone, our new40Ar/39Ar results

  18. Evidence for shock heating and constraints on Martian surface temperatures revealed by 40Ar/ 39Ar thermochronometry of Martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, William S.; Shuster, David L.; Renne, Paul R.; Weiss, Benjamin P.

    2010-12-01

    The thermal histories of Martian meteorite are important for the interpretation of petrologic, geochemical, geochronological, and paleomagnetic constraints that they provide on the evolution of Mars. In this paper, we quantify 40Ar/ 39Ar ages and Ar diffusion kinetics of Martian meteorites Allan Hills (ALH) 84001, Nakhla, and Miller Range (MIL) 03346. We constrain the thermal history of each meteorite and discuss the resulting implications for their petrology, paleomagnetism, and geochronology. Maskelynite in ALH 84001 yields a 40Ar/ 39Ar isochron age of 4163 ± 35 Ma, which is indistinguishable from recent Pb-Pb ( Bouvier et al., 2009a) and Lu-Hf ages ( Lapen et al., 2010). The high precision of this result arises from clear resolution of a reproducible trapped 40Ar/ 36Ar component in maskelynite in ALH 84001 ( 40Ar/ 36Ar = 632 ± 90). The maskelynite 40Ar/ 39Ar age predates the Late Heavy Bombardment and likely represents the time at which the original natural remanent magnetization (NRM) component observed in ALH 84001 was acquired. Nakhla and MIL 03346 yield 40Ar/ 39Ar isochron ages of 1332 ± 24 and 1339 ± 8 Ma, respectively, which we interpret to date crystallization. Multi-phase, multi-domain diffusion models constrained by the observed Ar diffusion kinetics and 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectra suggest that localized regions within both ALH 84001 and Nakhla were intensely heated for brief durations during shock events at 1158 ± 110 and 913 ± 9 Ma, respectively. These ages may date the marginal melting of pyroxene in each rock, mobilization of carbonates and maskelynite in ALH 84001, and NRM overprints observed in ALH 84001. The inferred peak temperatures of the shock heating events (>1400 °C) are sufficient to mobilize Ar, Sr, and Pb in constituent minerals, which may explain some of the dispersion observed in 40Ar/ 39Ar, Rb-Sr, and U-Th-Pb data toward ages younger than ˜4.1 Ga. The data also place conservative upper bounds on the long-duration residence

  19. On Full Disclosure and Transparent Data Flow from 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology Measurements to Data Reduction to Online Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Arguably 40Ar/39Ar geochronology is one of the most versatile techniques available to Earth scientists today for the dating of rocks and minerals and determining the rates of geological processes on Earth and in our solar system. Over the last four decades large quantities of high (and lower) quality 40Ar/39Ar data have been produced using many different generations of mass spectrometry instrumentation. This wealth of data is only as useful as its description and availability of metadata allows. Many online data sets or compilations available in the science literature only carry the resulting product, an age and a related uncertainty in millions of years, for example. These data points are far from desirable as these don't allow recalculation against modern-day age standards, decay constants and other parameters essential in 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. Over time these data will become less useful to the research community and eventually these will be put by the wayside. In this presentation I will emphasize the need for full disclosure of all data and metadata involved in 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. I will give examples of how a complex data flow can be kept transparent from sample preparation to measurement to data reduction and eventually the uploading into online data repositories. Without the full disclosure of our data and a transparent data flow, it is evident that we cannot live up to one of the governing doctrines in the sciences, namely reproducibility of our scientific experiments and findings.

  20. 40Ar-39Ar age constraint on deformation and brittle-ductile transition of the Main Central Thrust and the South Tibetan Detachment zone from Dhauliganga valley, Garhwal Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Koushik; Chaudhury, Reetam; Pfänder, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    40Ar-39Ar data from two sets of mylonitic two-mica granites present in the Main Central Thrust (MCT) and one leucogranite from the South Tibetan Detachment (STD) of Dhauliganga valley, Garhwal Himalaya are presented. The MCT and the STD bound the High Himalayan Crystallines (HHC) and are believed to facilitate its extrusion. Field evidence of ductile deformation in the form of tight isoclinal folding and brittle deformation in the form of back thrusts and transverse fractures are observed. The STD zone shows evidence of pervasive migration of leucogranitic melt through north dipping extensional shear zones. The ∼19.5 Ma old Malari Leucogranite, present adjacent to the STD zone, experienced ductile and brittle deformation related to the tectonics of the STD. Muscovite analysis from the Malari leucogranite gives a cooling age of ∼15.2 Ma suggesting that ductile deformation in the STD zone may have ceased by ∼15 Ma. 40Ar-39Ar chronology of biotite from two mylonitic granites of the MCT yields cooling ages of 10.8 Ma and 9.7 Ma, which we correlate with activity of the MCT at ∼10 Ma that caused rapid exhumation of the HHC. 40Ar-39Ar ages of 6.4 Ma and 6.2 Ma from white mica represent newly crystallized white mica post-dating biotite cooling and indicate late stage deformation. It is inferred that, as the HHC wedge started to exhume and erode rapidly along the MCT zone at ∼10 Ma, the taper angle of the Himalayan wedge decreased to a 'sub-critical' stage. To regain the critical taper angle, the wedge underwent internal deformation in the form of back thrusts and duplex structures. Comparison of our data with earlier results from other sections of the MCT helps us envisage that the ∼6 Ma white mica ages can be correlated with this internal deformation event and also with the transition of deformation regime in the MCT zone from ductile to brittle.

  1. 40Ar/39Ar age-spectrum data for hornblende, biotite, white mica, and K-feldspar samples from metamorphic rocks in the Great Smoky Mountains of North Carolina and Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunk, Michael J.; McAleer, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    This report contains reduced 40Ar/39Ar data of hornblende, biotite, white mica and (or) sericite, and potassium-feldspar mineral separates and phyllite groundmass samples from metamorphic rocks of the Great Smoky Mountains in North Carolina and Tennessee. Included in this report are information on the location of the samples and a brief description of the samples. The data contained herein are not interpreted in a geological context, and care should be taken by users unfamiliar with argon isotopic data in the use of these results. No geological meaning is implied for any of the apparent ages presented below, and many of the individual apparent ages are not geologically meaningful. This report is primarily a detailed source document for subsequent publications that will integrate these data into a geological context. All the samples in this report were collected in and around the Great Smoky Mountain National Park in western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee.

  2. Combined U-Th/He and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of post-shield lavas from the Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Aciego, S.M.; Jourdan, F.; DePaolo, D.J.; Kennedy, B.M.; Renne, P.R.; Sims, K.W.W.

    2009-10-01

    Late Quaternary, post-shield lavas from the Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes on the Big Island of Hawaii have been dated using the {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar and U-Th/He methods. The objective of the study is to compare the recently demonstrated U-Th/He age method, which uses basaltic olivine phenocrysts, with {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages measured on groundmass from the same samples. As a corollary, the age data also increase the precision of the chronology of volcanism on the Big Island. For the U-Th/He ages, U, Th and He concentrations and isotopes were measured to account for U-series disequilibrium and initial He. Single analyses U-Th/He ages for Hamakua lavas from Mauna Kea are 87 {+-} 40 ka to 119 {+-} 23 ka (2{sigma} uncertainties), which are in general equal to or younger than {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages. Basalt from the Polulu sequence on Kohala gives a U-Th/He age of 354 {+-} 54 ka and a {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age of 450 {+-} 40 ka. All of the U-Th/He ages, and all but one spurious {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages conform to the previously proposed stratigraphy and published {sup 14}C and K-Ar ages. The ages also compare favorably to U-Th whole rock-olivine ages calculated from {sup 238}U - {sup 230}Th disequilibria. The U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar results agree best where there is a relatively large amount of radiogenic {sup 40}Ar (>10%), and where the {sup 40}Ar/{sup 36}Ar intercept calculated from the Ar isochron diagram is close to the atmospheric value. In two cases, it is not clear why U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages do not agree within uncertainty. U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar results diverge the most on a low-K transitional tholeiitic basalt with abundant olivine. For the most alkalic basalts with negligible olivine phenocrysts, U-Th/He ages were unattainable while {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar results provide good precision even on ages as low as 19 {+-} 4 ka. Hence, the strengths and weaknesses of the U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar methods are

  3. Combined U-Th/He and 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology of post-shield lavas from the Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aciego, S. M.; Jourdan, F.; DePaolo, D. J.; Kennedy, B. M.; Renne, P. R.; Sims, K. W. W.

    2010-03-01

    Late Quaternary, post-shield lavas from the Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes on the Big Island of Hawaii have been dated using the 40Ar/ 39Ar and U-Th/He methods. The objective of the study is to compare the recently demonstrated U-Th/He age method, which uses basaltic olivine phenocrysts, with 40Ar/ 39Ar ages measured on groundmass from the same samples. As a corollary, the age data also increase the precision of the chronology of volcanism on the Big Island. For the U-Th/He ages, U, Th and He concentrations and isotopes were measured to account for U-series disequilibrium and initial He. Single analyses U-Th/He ages for Hamakua lavas from Mauna Kea are 87 ± 40 to 119 ± 23 ka (2 σ uncertainties), which are in general equal to or younger than 40Ar/ 39Ar ages. Basalt from the Polulu sequence on Kohala gives a U-Th/He age of 354 ± 54 ka and a 40Ar/ 39Ar age of 450 ± 40 ka. All of the U-Th/He ages, and all but one spurious 40Ar/ 39Ar ages conform to the previously proposed stratigraphy and published 14C and K-Ar ages. The ages also compare favorably to U-Th whole rock-olivine ages calculated from 238U- 230Th disequilibria. The U-Th/He and 40Ar/ 39Ar results agree best where there is a relatively large amount of radiogenic 40Ar (>10%), and where the 40Ar/ 36Ar intercept calculated from the Ar isochron diagram is close to the atmospheric value. In two cases, it is not clear why U-Th/He and 40Ar/ 39Ar ages do not agree within uncertainty. U-Th/He and 40Ar/ 39Ar results diverge the most on a low-K transitional tholeiitic basalt with abundant olivine. For the most alkalic basalts with negligible olivine phenocrysts, U-Th/He ages were unattainable while 40Ar/ 39Ar results provide good precision even on ages as low as 19 ± 4 ka. Hence, the strengths and weaknesses of the U-Th/He and 40Ar/ 39Ar methods are complimentary for basalts with ages of order 100-500 ka.

  4. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and paleomagnetism of Independence volcano, Absaroka volcanic supergroup, Beartooth mountains, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlan, S.S.; Snee, L.W.; Geissman, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    Independence volcano is a major volcanic complex in the lower part of the Absaroka Volcanic Supergroup (AVS) of Montana and Wyoming. Recently reported Rb-Sr mineral dates from the complex give apparent ages of 91 and 84 Ma, whereas field relationships and the physical and compositional similarity of the rocks with other dated parts of the AVS indicate an Early to Middle Eocene age for eruption and deposition. To resolve the conflict between age assignments based on stratigraphic correlations and Rb-Sr dates, we report new paleomagnetic data and 40Ar/39Ar dates for Independence volcano. Paleomagnetic data for the stock and an and andesite plug that cuts the stock are well grouped, of reverse polarity, and yield a virtual geomagnetic pole that is essentially identical to Late Cretaceous and Tertiary reference poles. The reverse polarity indicates that the magnetization of these rocks is probably younger than the Cretaceous normal superchron, or less than about 83.5 Ma. Hornblende from a volcanic breccia near the base of the volcanic pile gives a 40Ar/39Ar age of 51.57 Ma, whereas biotites from a dacite sill and a granodiorite stock that forms the core of the volcano give dates that range from 49.96 to 48.50 Ma. These dates record the age of eruption and intrusion of these rocks and clearly show that the age of Independence volcano is Early to Middle Eocene, consistent with stratigraphic relations. We suggest that the Rb-Sr mineral dates from the Independence stock and related intrusions are unreliable.

  5. 40Ar/39Ar dates from the West Siberian Basin: Siberian flood basalt province doubled.

    PubMed

    Reichow, Marc K; Saunders, Andrew D; White, Rosalind V; Pringle, Malcolm S; Al'Mukhamedov, Alexander I; Medvedev, Alexander I; Kirda, Nikolay P

    2002-06-07

    Widespread basaltic volcanism occurred in the region of the West Siberian Basin in central Russia during Permo-Triassic times. New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on plagioclase grains from deep boreholes in the basin reveal that the basalts were erupted 249.4 +/- 0.5 million years ago. This is synchronous with the bulk of the Siberian Traps, erupted further east on the Siberian Platform. The age and geochemical data confirm that the West Siberian Basin basalts are part of the Siberian Traps and at least double the confirmed area of the volcanic province as a whole. The larger area of volcanism strengthens the link between the volcanism and the end-Permian mass extinction.

  6. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology of mesoproterozoic metamorphism in the Colorado Front Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, C.A.; Snee, L.W.; Selverstone, J.; Reed, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    A low-pressure metamorphic episode in the Colorado Front Range has been identified by the presence of staurolite, andalusite, cordierite, and garnet porphyroblasts overprinting earlier assemblages. The overprinting assemblages and reaction textures are most consistent with porphyroblast growth on a prograde metamorphic path with peak temperatures exceeding ~525??C. Twenty-eight 40Ar/39Ar dates on hornblende, muscovite, biotite, and microcline were used to infer the age and thermal conditions of metamorphism. Muscovite and biotite 40Ar/39Ar ages fall mainly in the interval 1400-1340 Ma, consistent with cooling through the closure temperature interval of micas (~400??-300??C) after about 1400 Ma. In contrast, hornblende apparent ages (T(c)~500??-550??C) between 1600 and 1390 Ma reflect variable retention of radiogenic argon. Forward modeling of argon diffusion shows that the distribution of hornblende and mica ages is consistent with the partial resetting of argon systematics ca. 1400 Ma by a thermal pulse reaching maximum temperatures around 550??C and decaying within <20 m.yr. These temperatures match the conditions inferred from the overprinting assemblage; thus, muscovite and biotite ages are interpreted to date the cooling phase of this metamorphic event. This late metamorphism is broadly coeval with the intrusion of ca. 1400-Ma granitic plutons in the study area and throughout the southwestern United States. However, thermal effects are observed far from pluton margins, suggesting pervasive, regional crustal heating rather than restricted contact metamorphism. Our results suggest that ca. 1400-Ma metamorphism and plutonism are manifestations of a regional thermal episode that both partially melted the lower crust and pervasively metamorphosed middle crustal rocks.

  7. 40Ar-39Ar dating of volcanogenic products from the AND-2A core (ANDRILL Southern McMurdo Sound Project, Antarctica): correlations with the Erebus Volcanic Province and implications for the age model of the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Vincenzo, Gianfranco; Bracciali, Laura; Del Carlo, Paola; Panter, Kurt; Rocchi, Sergio

    2010-05-01

    The AND-2A drillcore (Antarctic Drilling Program—ANDRILL) was successfully completed in late 2007 on the Antarctic continental margin (Southern McMurdo Sound, Ross Sea) with the aim of tracking ice proximal to shallow marine environmental fluctuations and to document the 20-Ma evolution of the Erebus Volcanic Province. Lava clasts and tephra layers from the AND-2A drillcore were investigated from a petrographic and stratigraphic point of view and analyzed by the 40Ar-39Ar laser technique in order to constrain the age model of the core and to gain information on the style and nature of sediment deposition in the Victoria Land Basin since Early Miocene. Ten out of 17 samples yielded statistically robust 40Ar-39Ar ages, indicating that the AND-2A drillcore recovered ≤230 m of Middle Miocene (˜128-358 m below sea floor, ˜11.5-16.0 Ma) and >780 m of Early Miocene (˜358-1093 m below sea floor, ˜16.0-20.1 Ma). Results also highlight a nearly continuous stratigraphic record from at least 358 m below sea floor down hole, characterized by a mean sedimentation rate of ˜19 cm/ka, possible oscillations of no more than a few hundreds of ka and a break within ˜17.5-18.1 Ma. Comparison with available data from volcanic deposits on land, suggests that volcanic rocks within the AND-2A core were supplied from the south, possibly with source areas closer to the drill site for the upper core levels, and from 358 m below sea floor down hole, with the “proto-Mount Morning” as the main source.

  8. Instrumentation development for planetary in situ 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidheiser-Kroll, B.; Morgan, L. E.; Munk, M.; Warner, N. H.; Gupta, S.; Slaybaugh, R.; Harkness, P.; Mark, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    The chronology of the Solar System, particularly the timing of formation of extraterrestrial bodies and their features, is a major outstanding problem in planetary science. Although various chronological methods for in situ geochronology have been proposed (e.g. Rb-Sr, K-Ar), and even applied (K-Ar, Farley et al., 2014), the reliability, accuracy, and applicability of the 40Ar/39Ar method makes it by far the most desirable chronometer for dating extraterrestrial bodies. The method however relies on the neutron irradiation of samples, and thus a neutron source. We will discuss the challenges and feasibility of deploying a passive neutron source to planetary surfaces for the in situ application of the 40Ar/39Ar chronometer. Requirements in generating and shielding neutrons, as well as analyzing samples are discussed, along with an exploration of limitations such as mass, power, and cost. Two potential solutions for the in situ extraterrestrial deployment of the 40Ar/39Ar method will be presented. Although this represents a challenging task, developing the technology to apply the 40Ar/39Ar method on planetary surfaces would represent a major advance towards constraining the timescale of solar system formation and evolution.

  9. Correlation diagrams in 40 Ar/39Ar dating: is there a correct choice?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Lanphere, M.A.; Pringle, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Contrary to published assertions, the 2 types of correlation diagrams used in the interpretation of 40Ar/39Ar incremental-heating data yield the same information provided the correct mathematics are used for estimating correlation coefficients and for the least squares fit. The choice is simply between 2 illustrative, graphical displays, neither of which is fundamentally superior to the other. -Authors

  10. Refining lunar impact chronology through high spatial resolution (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating of impact melts.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Cameron M; Young, Kelsey E; Weirich, John R; Hodges, Kip V; Jolliff, Bradley L; Wartho, Jo-Anne; van Soest, Matthijs C

    2015-02-01

    Quantitative constraints on the ages of melt-forming impact events on the Moon are based primarily on isotope geochronology of returned samples. However, interpreting the results of such studies can often be difficult because the provenance region of any sample returned from the lunar surface may have experienced multiple impact events over the course of billions of years of bombardment. We illustrate this problem with new laser microprobe (40)Ar/(39)Ar data for two Apollo 17 impact melt breccias. Whereas one sample yields a straightforward result, indicating a single melt-forming event at ca. 3.83 Ga, data from the other sample document multiple impact melt-forming events between ca. 3.81 Ga and at least as young as ca. 3.27 Ga. Notably, published zircon U/Pb data indicate the existence of even older melt products in the same sample. The revelation of multiple impact events through (40)Ar/(39)Ar geochronology is likely not to have been possible using standard incremental heating methods alone, demonstrating the complementarity of the laser microprobe technique. Evidence for 3.83 Ga to 3.81 Ga melt components in these samples reinforces emerging interpretations that Apollo 17 impact breccia samples include a significant component of ejecta from the Imbrium basin impact. Collectively, our results underscore the need to quantitatively resolve the ages of different melt generations from multiple samples to improve our current understanding of the lunar impact record, and to establish the absolute ages of important impact structures encountered during future exploration missions in the inner Solar System.

  11. Refining lunar impact chronology through high spatial resolution 40Ar/39Ar dating of impact melts

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Cameron M.; Young, Kelsey E.; Weirich, John R.; Hodges, Kip V.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Wartho, Jo-Anne; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative constraints on the ages of melt-forming impact events on the Moon are based primarily on isotope geochronology of returned samples. However, interpreting the results of such studies can often be difficult because the provenance region of any sample returned from the lunar surface may have experienced multiple impact events over the course of billions of years of bombardment. We illustrate this problem with new laser microprobe 40Ar/39Ar data for two Apollo 17 impact melt breccias. Whereas one sample yields a straightforward result, indicating a single melt-forming event at ca. 3.83 Ga, data from the other sample document multiple impact melt–forming events between ca. 3.81 Ga and at least as young as ca. 3.27 Ga. Notably, published zircon U/Pb data indicate the existence of even older melt products in the same sample. The revelation of multiple impact events through 40Ar/39Ar geochronology is likely not to have been possible using standard incremental heating methods alone, demonstrating the complementarity of the laser microprobe technique. Evidence for 3.83 Ga to 3.81 Ga melt components in these samples reinforces emerging interpretations that Apollo 17 impact breccia samples include a significant component of ejecta from the Imbrium basin impact. Collectively, our results underscore the need to quantitatively resolve the ages of different melt generations from multiple samples to improve our current understanding of the lunar impact record, and to establish the absolute ages of important impact structures encountered during future exploration missions in the inner Solar System. PMID:26601128

  12. Geochemistry and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the ophiolite in Northern Xinjiang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qinqin, Xu; Jianqing, Ji

    2010-05-01

    As the remnant of ancient oceanic crust, ophiolite is extremely important to reconstruct the framework of ancient ocean and continent. There are several ophiolite belts in Northern Xinjiang, assuming planar distribution, and they are generally related to different faults since Paleozoic in the outcrops. This paper presents a systematic study of geochemistry and geochronology of the gabbro, diabase and basalt of ophiolite collected from different regions in Northern Xinjiang. The intermediate and basic rocks in ophiolite show similar patterns in primitive mantle-normalized REE and trace elements diagrams with MORB and different from IAT, indicating that the ophiolite may be formed in mid-ocean ridge. Their Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions also show that they have mid-ocean ridge environment affinity. Additionally, their Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic ratios are similar respectively, suggesting the same source area, and they also have positive epsilon Nd values(4.40 ~ 8.04), which indicates they likely originate from the depleted mantle. The previous and the author's researches show that the forming time of ophiolite in Northern Xinjiang is early Paleozoic, but 40Ar/39Ar ages of gabbro, diabase and basalt are in the range of 396 ~ 226Ma (mainly from 350 to 250Ma), and no ages of early Paleozoic are gained. Moreover, this time coincides with the timing of late Paleozoic post-collisional plutonism, indicating the ophiolite in Northern Xinjiang was reworked by the late thermal events. The ophiolite widely exposed in Northern Xinjiang have similar characteristics of occurrence, lithologic association and isotopes in spite of diverse special features, which indicates that a relatively uniform and integrated source region has existed in Northern Xinjiang since Paleozoic. It is likely to infer that this source region is related with the long lasting remnant oceanic basin and the related lithosphere since Paleozoic in North Xinjiang. Key Words: Ophiolite, 40Ar/39Ar age

  13. Astronomical calibration of 40Ar/39Ar reference minerals using high-precision, multi-collector (ARGUSVI) mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D.; Matchan, E. L.; Honda, M.; Kuiper, K. F.

    2017-01-01

    The new generation of multi-collector mass spectrometers (e.g. ARGUSVI) permit ultra-high precision (<0.1%) 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of rocks and minerals. At the same time, the 40Ar/39Ar method is limited by relatively large uncertainties (>1%) in 40K decay constants and the ages of natural reference minerals that form the basis of the technique. For example, reported ages for widely used 40Ar/39Ar reference materials, such as the ca. 28 Ma Fish Canyon Tuff sanidine (FCTs) and the ca. 1.2 Ma Alder Creek Rhyolite sanidine (ACRs), vary by >1%. Recent attempts to independently calibrate these reference minerals have focused on K-Ar analyses of the same minerals and inter-comparisons with astronomically tuned tephras in sedimentary sequences and U-Pb zircon ages from volcanic rocks. Most of these studies used older generation (effectively single-collector) mass spectrometers that employed peak-jumping analytical methods to acquire 40Ar/39Ar data. In this study, we reassess the inter-calibration and ages of commonly used 40Ar/39Ar reference minerals Fish Canyon Tuff sanidine (FCTs), Alder Creek Rhyolite sanidine (ACRs) and Mount Dromedary biotite (MD2b; equivalent to GA-1550 biotite), relative to the astronomically tuned age of A1 Tephra sanidine (A1Ts), Faneromeni section, Crete (Rivera et al., 2011), using a multi-collector ARGUSVI mass spectrometer. These analyses confirm the exceptional precision capability (<0.1%) of this system, compared to most previous studies. All sanidine samples (FCTs, ACRs and A1Ts) exhibit discordant 40Ar/39Ar step-heating spectra, with generally monotonically increasing ages (∼1% gradients). The similarity in these patterns, mass-dependent fractionation modeling, and results from step-crushing experiments on FCTs, which yield younger apparent ages, suggest that the discordance may be due to a combination of recoil loss and redistribution of 39ArK and isotope mass fractionation. In contrast to our previous inferences, these results imply

  14. Cooling and inferred uplift/erosion history of the Grenville Orogen, Ontario: Constraints from 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosca, Michael A.; Sutter, John F.; Essene, Eric J.

    1991-10-01

    Stepwise 40Ar/39Ar degassing experiments of 57 mineral separates of hornblende, muscovite, biotite, and perthitic microcline have been used in conjunction with petrologic observations to place regional constraints on the postmetamorphic cooling and the inferred uplift and erosion history of the Grenville Orogen in Ontario. The 40Ar/39Ar data support an interpretation of slow, nearly uniform cooling (1°-4°C/m.y.) from temperatures of ˜500°C to below ˜150°C. In the Central Gneiss Belt (CGB) hornblendes cooled through Ar closure between 930 and 1025 Ma, whereas in the Central Metasedimentary Belt (CMB) hornblendes record the following range in 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages: 1104 Ma in the Frontenac terrane, 1007-1067 Ma in the Sharbot Lake terrane, 919-1026 Ma in the Elzevir terrane, and 972 Ma in the Central Metasedimentary Belt Boundary Zone. Regional uplift/erosion rates of 0.03-0.14 km/m.y. have been estimated for the Grenville Orogen in Ontario based on the 40Ar/39Ar data, a model retrograde P-T path for rocks of the CGB, and an upper time constraint provided by flat, overlying Cambrian and Ordovician sediments. These erosion rates are consistent with rates estimated for other Proterozoic or Archean granulite terranes but are an order of magnitude slower than active orogens such as the Alps and Himalayas. A regular variation in hornblende 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages is observed in rocks that traverse highly strained often mylonitic shear zones that separate the four major terranes of the CMB. The pattern of 40Ar/39Ar ages is interpreted to reflect late-tectonic extension, consistent with field observations in the Central Metasedimentary Belt Boundary Zone and elsewhere in the CMB. Up to 13 km of vertical displacement is inferred for some rocks in the CMB between the time they cooled below closure to argon diffusion in hornblende (˜500°C) and their exposure at the surface (˜25°C).

  15. A reconnaissance 40Ar/39Ar geochronologic study of ore-bearing and related rocks, Siberian Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Czamanske, G.K.; Fedorenko, V.A.; Simonov, O.N.; Lanphere, M.A.; Likhachev, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar age spectra of biotite from a mineralized vein in the ore-bearing, Noril'sk I intrusion and from picritic-like gabbrodolerite from the weakly mineralized, Lower Talnakh intrusion show that these bodies were emplaced at 249 ?? 2 Ma, which is not significantly different from the age of the Permian-Triassic boundary. The ore-bearing intrusions postdate the lower third of the flood-basalt sequence in the Noril'sk area and, on the basis of geochemistry, can best be correlated with lavas slightly younger than those which they cut. Thus, flood basalt was erupted at the time of the Permian-Triassic mass extinction event, although its role in this event is, as yet, ill defined. Additional new 40Ar/39Ar age data for a group of intrusive and extrusive rocks on the western margin of the Siberian craton are discussed. -from Authors

  16. High resolution 40AR/39AR chronostratigraphy of the Late Cretaceous El Gallo Formation, Baja California del Norte, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, Paul R.; Fulford, Madeleine M.; Busby-Spera, Cathy

    1991-03-01

    Laser probe 40Ar/39Ar analyses of individual sanidine grains from four tuffs in the alluvial Late Cretaceous (Campanian) El Gallo Formation yield statistically distinct mean dates ranging from 74.87±0.05 Ma to 73.59±0.09 Ma. The exceptional precision of these dates permits calculation of statistically significant sediment accumulation rates that are much higher than passive sediment loading would cause, implying rapid tectonically induced subsidence. The dates bracket tightly the age of important dinosaur and mammalian faunas previously reported from the El Gallo Formation. The dates support an age less than 73 Ma for the Campanian/Maastrichtian stage boundary, younger than indicated by several currently used time scales. Further application of the single grain 40Ar/39Ar technique may be expected to greatly benefit stratigraphic studies of Mesozoic sedimentary basins and contribute to calibration of biostratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic time scales.

  17. 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar data bearing on the metamorphic and tectonic history of western New England.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutter, J.F.; Ratcliffe, N.M.; Mukasa, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar ages of coexisting biotite and hornblende from Proterozoic Y gneisses of the Berkshire and Green Mt massifs, as well as 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar mineral and whole-rock ages from Palaeozoic metamorphic rocks, suggest that the thermal peaks for the dominant metamorphic recrystallization in western New England occurred 465 + or - 5 m.y. (Taconian). 40Ar/39Ar age data from a poorly-defined terrain along the eastern strip of the area suggests that the area has been retrograded during a metamorphism that peaked at least 376 + or - 5 m.y. (Acadian). Available age and petrological data from western New England indicate the presence of at least three separate metamorphic-structure domains of Taconic age: 1) a small area of relict high-P and low-T metamorphism, 2) a broad area of normal Barrovian metamorphism from chlorite to garnet grade characterized by a gentle metamorphic gradient and, 3) a rather narrow belt of steep-gradient, Barrovian series metamorphic rocks. Areas of maximum metamorphic intensity within the last domain coincide with areas of maximum crustal thickening in the later stage of Taconic orogeny. -L.di H

  18. A 40Ar/ 39Ar study of post-tectonic cooling in the Britt domain of the Grenville Province, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culshaw, N.; Reynolds, P. H.; Check, G.

    1991-08-01

    We report the results of a 40Ar/ 39Ar study of rocks from the Britt domain, northwestern Grenville Province. Most of the age spectra obtained for micas and amphiboles have well defined age plateaus. Typically, K-feldspars yielded spectra with age gradients and Arrhenius plots with kinks or offsets. Hence, some of the data were interpreted in terms of a multi-diffusion domain-size model. This 40Ar/ 39Ar data base (5 amphiboles, 9 micas, 4 K-feldspar), along with some recently acquired U&z.sbnd;Pb data, provide reasonable constraints on the post-peak metamorphic cooling history which began at depth in the upper amphibolite facies. Comparison of the data with exhumation paths generated by thermal models suggest that cooling, taking place over ˜ 400 Ma, was for the most part due to erosionally controlled exhumation. Although the decompression may have initiated with a short period of rapid (extensional?) uplift, the entire cooling history may have been erosionally controlled. There is an apparent difference in cooling ages between north and south in the 40Ar/ 39Ar mica and K-feldspar data for the Britt domain, which may be due to somewhat higher exhumation rates in the north and/or an elevated geotherm in the south.

  19. Petrology, 40Ar/39Ar age, Sr-Nd isotope systematics, and geodynamic significance of an ultrapotassic (lamproitic) dyke with affinities to kamafugite from the easternmost margin of the Bastar Craton, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, N. V. Chalapathi; Atiullah; Burgess, R.; Nanda, Purnendu; Choudhary, A. K.; Sahoo, Samarendra; Lehmann, B.; Chahong, Ngazipmi

    2016-04-01

    We report the mineralogy, bulk-rock geochemistry, 40Ar/39Ar (whole-rock) age and radiogenic (Sr and Nd) isotope composition of an ultrapotassic dyke from Sakri (Nuapada lamproite field) located at the tectonic contact between the easternmost margin of the Bastar craton and Eastern Ghats Mobile Belt, India. The Sakri dyke has a mineralogy which strongly resembles a lamproite sensu stricto (viz.,Ti-rich phlogopite, Na-poor diopside, Fe-rich sanidine, ulvospinel trend and Sr-rich apatite). However, its bulk-rock major element geochemical characteristics (viz., extreme silica-undersaturated nature) resemble sensu lato kamafugite from Toro Ankole, Uganda, East African Rift, and Alto Paranaiba Province, Brazil. The Sakri dyke also displays certain compositional peculiarities (viz., high degree of evolution of mica composition from phlogopite to biotite, elevated titanium and aluminum in clinopyroxene and significantly lower bulk Mg#) when compared to the ultrapotassic rocks from various Indian cratons. 40Ar/39Ar dating gave a plateau age of 1045 ± 9 Ma which is broadly similar to that of other Mesoproterozoic (i) lamproites from the Bastar and Bundelkhand cratons, and (ii) kimberlites from the Eastern Dharwar craton. Initial bulk-rock Sr (0.705865-0.709024) and Nd (0.511063-0.511154) isotopic ratios reveal involvement of an `enriched' source region with long-term incompatible element enrichment and a depleted mantle (TDM) Nd model age of 2.56 Ga straddling the Archaean-Proterozoic chronostratigraphic boundary. The bulk-rock incompatible trace element ratios (Ta/Yb, Th/Yb, Rb/Ba and Ce/Y) of the Sakri ultrapotassic dyke negate any significant influence of crustal contamination. Small-degree melting (1 to 1.5 %) of a mixed garnet-facies and spinel-facies phlogopite lherzolite can account for its observed REE concentrations. Whereas the emplacement of the Sakri ultrapotassic dyke is related to the amalgamation of the supercontinent of Rodinia, its overlapping geochemical

  20. 3-D reconstructions of subsurface Pleistocene basalt flows from paleomagnetic inclination data and 40Ar/39Ar ages in the southern part of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodges, Mary K.; Champion, Duane E.; Turrin, B.D.; Swisher, C. C.

    2012-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, is mapping the distribution of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds at the Idaho National Laboratory in three dimensions to provide data for refining numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. Paleomagnetic inclination and polarity data from basalt samples from 47 coreholes are being used to create a three-dimensional (3-D) model of the subsurface of the southern part of the INL. Surface and sub-surface basalt flows can be identified in individual cores and traced in three dimensions on the surface and in the subsurface for distances of more than 20 km using a combination of paleomagnetic, stratigraphic, and 40Ar/39Ar data. Eastern Snake River Plain olivine tholeiite basalts have K2O contents of 0.2 to 1.0 weight per cent. In spite of the low-K content, high-precision 40Ar/39Ar ages were obtained by applying a protocol that employs short irradiation times (minimizing interferences from Ca derived 36Ar), frequent measurement of various size atmospheric Ar pipettes to monitor and correct for temporal variation, and signal size dependent nonlinearity in spectrometer mass bias, resulting in age dates with resolution generally between 2 to 10% of the age. 3-D models of subsurface basalt flows are being used to: (1) Estimate eruption volumes; (2) locate the approximate vent areas and extent of sub-surface flows; and (3) Help locate high and low transmissivity zones. Results indicate that large basalt eruptions (>3 km3) occurred at and near the Central Facilities Area between 637 ka and 360 ka; at and near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex before 540 ka; and north of the Naval Reactors Facility at about 580 ka. Since about 360 ka, large basalt flows have erupted along the Arco-Big Southern Butte Volcanic Rift Zone and the Axial Volcanic Zone, and flowed northerly towards the Central Facilities Area. Basalt eruptions shifted

  1. 40Ar/(39)Ar dating of the Kapthurin Formation, Baringo, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Deino, Alan L; McBrearty, Sally

    2002-01-01

    The(40)Ar/(39)Ar radiometric dating technique has been applied to tuffs and lavas of the Kapthurin Formation in the Tugen Hills, Kenya Rift Valley. Two variants of the(40)Ar/(39)Ar technique, single-crystal total fusion (SCTF) and laser incremental heating (LIH) have been employed to date five marker horizons within the formation: near the base, the Kasurein Basalt at 0.61+/-0.04 Ma; the Pumice Tuff at 0.543+/-0.004 Ma; the Upper Kasurein Basalt at 0.552+/-0.015 Ma; the Grey Tuff at 0.509+/-0.009 Ma; and within the upper part of the formation, the Bedded Tuff at 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. The new, precise radiometric age determination for the Pumice Tuff also provides an age for the widespread Lake Baringo Trachyte, since the Pumice Tuff is the early pyroclastic phase of this voluminous trachyte eruption. These results establish the age of fossil hominids KNM-BK 63-67 and KNM-BK 8518 at approximately 0.510-0.512 Ma, a significant finding given that few Middle Pleistocene hominids are radiometrically dated. The Kapthurin hominids are thus the near contemporaries of those from Bodo, Ethiopia and Tanzania. A flake and core industry from lacustrine sediments in the lower part of the formation is constrained by new dates of 0.55-0.52 Ma, a period during which the Acheulian industry, characterized by handaxes, is known throughout East Africa. Points, typical of the Middle Stone Age (MSA), are found in Kapthurin Formation sediments now shown to date to between 0.509+/-0.009 Ma and 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. This date exceeds previous estimates for the age of the MSA elsewhere in East Africa by 49 ka, and establishes the age of Acheulian to MSA transition for the region. Evidence of the use of the Levallois technique for the manufacture of both small flakes and biface preforms, the systematic production of blades, and the use and processing of red ochre also occurs in this interval. The presence of blades and red ochre at this depth is important as blades signify a high degree of technical

  2. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the Siberian Traps, USSR: Evaluation of the ages of the two major extinction events relative to episodes of flood-basalt volcanism in the USSR and the Deccan Traps, India

    SciTech Connect

    Baksi, A.K. ); Farrar, E. )

    1991-05-01

    {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar incremental-heating studies have been carried out on three whole-rock specimens from the Siberian Traps. A basalt lava flow from the lowermost horizon yields and age of 238.4 {plus minus} 1.4 Ma (1{sigma} error). A second basalt lava flow from the top of the section, {approximately}800 m above the first specimen, yields an age of 229.9 {plus minus} 2.3 Ma, indicating that the duration of volcanism was {approximately}5{minus}10 m.y. A doleritic dike intrusive into the lower parts of the Siberian Traps contains excess argon and yields an isochron age of 234 {plus minus} 7 Ma. Critical reexamination of relevant radiometric data relating two separate episodes of flood-basalt volcanism to global faunal extinctions suggests the volcanic event forming the most voluminous sections of the Deccan Traps, India, was coincident to within {plus minus}1 m.y. with the time of the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary. However, the onset of volcanism in the Siberian Traps apparently occurred at a time postdating that of the Permian/Triassic boundary.

  3. Unique Thermal Histories from Whole-Rock 40Ar/39Ar Step-heating Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnke, P.; Harrison, M.; Heizler, M. T.; Lovera, O. M.; Warren, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Step-heating 40Ar/39Ar analysis can reveal spatial distributions of 40Ar* at the micron scale imparted by post- crystallization heating events through complex, multi-diffusion domain models. These efforts have largely focused on single-phase, terrestrial samples with only scant attention paid to multi-phase or extra-terrestrial materials. Generalizing these models to incorporate the multiple activation energies (E) expected from bulk rock samples introduces significant interpretational ambiguity. This is because the thermal crossovers explicit in multi-E cases make the age spectrum a function of the lab heating schedule in thermally disturbed samples. A further difficulty is that unique interpretation of the associated Arrhenius plot is no longer possible and a range of E's can be fitted with equal goodness of fit. In order to address these challenges, we developed a new computational approach that simultaneously inverts the Arrhenius spectra and release pattern using a variant of the Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization (APSO) algorithm for a square-pulse heating event. Our version uses a Levy Flight to break the swarm out of a local minima rather than randomly modifying a single dimension as in the original APSO. Further we explored issues of Pareto efficiency arising from fitting two fitness functions (i.e., the fit to the age spectra and to the Arrhenius plot) and found an adequate resolution to the classic inability to have a single best fit. By utilizing multiple-E samples, we are able to obtain unique thermal history solutions. Application of these methods to high resolution age spectra of the Jilin chondrite and Apollo 16 samples (North Ray Crater) and found fits of sufficiently high fidelity to constrain the absolute temperature of the thermal episode to better than ±10%.

  4. 40Ar-39Ar ages of bentonite beds in the upper part of the Yazoo Formation (Upper Eocene), west-central Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obradovich, J.D.; Dockery, D. T.; Swisher, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    Bentonite beds recorded from both outcrops and cores in the upper Eocene Yazoo Formation offer opportunities to date the uppermost Eocene of this region and to provide information on the age of the Eocene/Oligocene boundary. This report gives radiometric age dates for three bentonites sampled from the upper Yazoo Formation. Two bentonites are from outcrops near Satartia in western Mississippi and one is from a core hole at Society Ridge in west-central Mississippi. The upper bentonite at Satartia was studied independently at two laboratories using different techniques but with the same results, an age of 34.3 Ma (million years). Results from the Society Ridge bentonite gave the same age. -from Authors

  5. Single-grain 40Ar-39Ar ages of glauconies: implications for the geologic time scale and global sea level variations

    PubMed

    Smith; Evensen; York; Odin

    1998-03-06

    The mineral series glaucony supplies 40% of the absolute-age database for the geologic time scale of the last 250 million years. However, glauconies have long been suspected of giving young potassium-argon ages on bulk samples. Laser-probe argon-argon dating shows that glaucony populations comprise grains with a wide range of ages, suggesting a period of genesis several times longer ( approximately 5 million years) than previously thought. An estimate of the age of their enclosing sediments (and therefore of time scale boundaries) is given by the oldest nonrelict grains in the glaucony populations, whereas the formation times of the younger grains appear to be modulated by global sea level.

  6. Accessory mineral U-Th-Pb ages and 40Ar/39Ar eruption chronology, and their bearing on rhyolitic magma evolution in the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, J.I.; Vazquez, J.A.; Renne, P.R.; Schmitt, A.K.; Bacon, C.R.; Reid, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    We determined Ar/Ar eruption ages of eight extrusions from the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, a long-lived series of small volume rhyolitic domes in eastern California. Combined with ion-microprobe dating of crystal ages of zircon and allanite from these lavas and from granophyre geothermal well cuttings, we were able to track the range of magma-production rates over the past 650 ka at Coso. In ??? 230 ka rhyolites we find no evidence of protracted magma residence or recycled zircon (or allanite) from Pleistocene predecessors. A significant subset of zircon in the ???85 ka rhyolites yielded ages between ???100 and 200 Ma, requiring that generation of at least some rhyolites involves material from Mesozoic basement. Similar zircon xenocrysts are found in an ???200 ka granophyre. The new age constraints imply that magma evolution at Coso can occur rapidly as demonstrated by significant changes in rhyolite composition over short time intervals (???10's to 100's ka). In conjunction with radioisotopic age constraints from other young silicic volcanic fields, dating of Coso rhyolites highlights the fact that at least some (and often the more voluminous) rhyolites are produced relatively rapidly, but that many small-volume rhyolites likely represent separation from long-lived mushy magma bodies. ?? The Author(s) 2009.

  7. 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of the emplacement of the Muslim Bagh ophiolite, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Khalid; Boudier, Françoise; Gnos, Edwin; Monié, Patrick; Nicolas, Adolphe

    1995-11-01

    The obduction-related basal part of the Muslim Bagh ophiolite (Baluchistan, Pakistan) and the underlying metamorphic sequence were studied structurally which demonstrated a WSW-ENE-trending thrusting sequence for the initial obduction. 40Ar/ 39Ar measurements on amphiboles and plagioclase from the subophiolitic metamorphic rocks, and on plastically deformed and recrystallized dolerite samples from the base of the sheeted dyke complex give apparent ages between 70.7 ± 5.0 and 65.1 ± 4.1 Ma interpreted as cooling ages dating approximately the formation of the plastic deformation and obduction. The results indicate that the Muslim Bagh ophiolite represents a segment of ocean floor from the small and slow-spreading ocean branch of the Neo-Tethys located between the Indo-Pakistani and the Afro-Arabian plates. The WSW-ENE-oriented obduction of the Muslim Bagh ophiolite onto the Indo-Pakistani continental margin occurred with the convergence of the Neo-Tethys branch during the Late Cretaceous and before the Tertiary collision of the Indo-Pakistani plate with the Eurasian plate.

  8. 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology by Multi-collector Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosca, M.

    2007-12-01

    The ushering in of a new generation of multi-collector mass spectrometers for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology represents a major technological advance, but what are the true benefits of making routine measurements with such machines versus the practical aspects of additional setup and calibration? Is argon multi-collection the way of the future? Recent experiences with a three collector Nu Instruments Noblesse mass spectrometer will be presented that address these questions. One immediate observation is that electronic stability improves average precision of the isotopic measurements. For example, on any given day 100 consecutive automated air pipette measurements yield 40Ar/36Ar ratios reproducible to 0.1%. One of the great advantages of multi-collection 40Ar/39Ar geochronology is the flexibility and ease of changing detector array configurations, which is useful when measuring irradiation packages with a range of K-content or grain size. For example, in situ UV laser ablation of micas or laser step-heating single grains of amphibole may be run by peak hopping on a single detector, while single grains of muscovite may be run by laser step-heating and analyzed by multi-collection. One of the drawbacks with multi-collection is the effort required with detector calibration and intercalibration. Source and detector discrimination and mass fractionation, however can be accomplished using air pipettes as an argon reference material. A series of experiments using sanidine standards have been performed that demonstrate the reproducibility of single collector and multi-collector measurements, with some as yet unexplained shifts using different detector arrays. Finally, several examples applying multi-collection 40Ar/39Ar data collection will be given that illustrate the utility of multi-collector measurements on a variety of mineral and rock materials.

  9. An extremely low U Pb source in the Moon: UThPb, SmNd, RbSr, and 40Ar 39Ar isotopic systematics and age of lunar meteorite Asuka 881757

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Misawa, K.; Tatsumoto, M.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Yanai, K.

    1993-01-01

    We have undertaken UThPb, SmNd, RbSr, and 40Ar 39Ar isotopic studies on Asuka 881757, a coarse-grained basaltic lunar meteorite whose chemical composition is close to low-Ti and very low-Ti (VLT) mare basalts. The PbPb internal isochron obtained for acid leached residues of separated mineral fractions yields an age of 3940 ?? 28 Ma, which is similar to the U-Pb (3850 ?? 150 Ma) and Th-Pb (3820 ?? 290 Ma) internal isochron ages. The Sm-Nd data for the mineral separates yield an internal isochron age of 3871 ?? 57 Ma and an initial 143Nd 144Nd value of 0.50797 ?? 10. The Rb-Sr data yield an internal isochron age of 3840 ?? 32 Ma (??(87Rb) = 1.42 ?? 10-11 yr-1) and a low initial 87Sr 86Sr ratio of 0.69910 ?? 2. The 40Ar 39Ar age spectra for a glass fragment and a maskelynitized plagioclase are relatively flat and give a weighted mean plateau age of 3798 ?? 12 Ma. We interpret these ages to indicate that the basalt crystallized from a melt 3.87 Ga ago (the Sm-Nd age) and an impact event disturbed the Rb-Sr system and completely reset the K-Ar system at 3.80 Ga. The slightly higher Pb-Pb age compared to the Sm-Nd age could be due to the secondary Pb (from terrestrial and/or lunar surface Pb contamination) that remained in the residues after acid leaching. Alternatively, the following interpretation is also possible; the meteorite crystallized at 3.94 Ga (the Pb-Pb age) and the Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr, and K-Ar systems were disturbed by an impact event at 3.80 Ga. The crystallization age obtained here is older than those reported for low-Ti basalts (3.2-3.5 Ga) and for VLT basalts (3.4 Ga), but similar to ages of some mare basalts, indicating that the basalt may have formed from a magma related to a basin-forming event (Imbrium?). The age span for VLT basalts from different sampling sites suggest that they were erupted over a wide area during an interval of at least ~500 million years. The impact event that thermally reset the K-Ar system of Asuka 881757 must have been post

  10. Results of 40Ar/39Ar dating of phlogopites from kelyphitic rims around garnet grains (Udachnaya-Vostochnaya kimberlite pipe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, D. S.; Tomilenko, A. A.; Alifirova, T. A.; Travin, A. V.; Murzintsev, N. G.; Pokhilenko, N. P.

    2016-07-01

    40Ar/39Ar dating of phlogopite from kelyphitic rims around garnet grains from the Udachnaya-Vostochnaya kimberlite pipe in the Sakha (Yakutia) Republic (Russia) revealed that when this mineral has contact with a kimberlite melt its age corresponds (within error limits) to that of the formation of the kimberlite pipe, thus indicating that the method may be used for dating kimberlites and related rocks. In mantle xenoliths, kelyphitic phlogopites rimming garnet grains partially lose radiogenic Ar, which results in a complex age spectrum. Rejuvenation of the K/Ar system in them is determined by the thermal impact of the kimberlite melt on captured rocks.

  11. From olivine nephelinite, basanite and basalt to peralkaline trachyphonolite and comendite in the Ankaratra volcanic complex, Madagascar: 40Ar/39Ar ages, phase compositions and bulk-rock geochemical and isotopic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciniello, Ciro; Melluso, Leone; le Roex, Anton P.; Jourdan, Fred; Morra, Vincenzo; de'Gennaro, Roberto; Grifa, Celestino

    2017-03-01

    The Ankaratra volcanic field covers an area of 3800 km2 in central Madagascar and comprises of lava flows, lava domes, scoria cones, tuff rings and maars emplaced at different ages (Miocene to Recent). The volcanic products include ultramafic-mafic (olivine-leucite nephelinite, basanite, alkali basalt, hawaiite and tholeiitic basalt), intermediate (mugearite and benmoreite) and felsic rocks (trachyphonolite, quartz trachyte and rhyolite), the latter often peralkaline. The 40Ar/39Ar determinations for mafic lavas yield ages of 17.45 ± 0.12 Ma, 16.63 ± 0.08 Ma and 8.62 ± 0.09 Ma, indicating a prolonged magmatic activity. The mineralogical and geochemical variations suggest that the magmatic evolution of the alkali basalt-hawaiite-mugearite-benmoreite-trachyte series can be accounted for by removal of olivine, feldspars, clinopyroxene, Fe-Ti oxides and accessory phases, producing residual trachytic and trachyphonolitic compositions mineralogically very similar to those of other volcanic areas and tectonic settings. The Ankaratra olivine leucite nephelinites, basanites and tholeiitic basalts do not seem to be associated with significant amounts of evolved comagmatic rocks. The 87Sr/86Sr (0.70504-0.71012), 143Nd/144Nd (0.51259-0.51244) and 206Pb/204Pb (17.705-18.563) isotopic ratios of trachytes and comendite are consistent with open-system processes. However, other trachyphonolites have 143Nd/144Nd (0.51280), 206Pb/204Pb (18.648), 207Pb/204Pb (15.582) and 208Pb/204Pb (38.795) similar to those of mafic rocks, suggesting differentiation processes without appreciable interaction with crustal materials. The Ankaratra volcanism is to be directly linked to a broadly E-W-trending intracontinental extension. A large-scale thermal anomaly, associated with an anomalously hot source region, is not required to explain the Cenozoic magmatism of Madagascar.

  12. 39Ar-40Ar Dating of Eucrites and Howardites and the Early Bombardment of the HED Parent Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1993-07-01

    Eucrite and howardite meteorites are impact breccias from the HED parent body, which may have been the 520 km diameter asteroid 4 Vesta [1]. Using textural and compositional information on pyroxenes from individual clasts, [2] proposed a classification scheme based on the degree of thermal metamorphism exhibited by nearly all eucrites. In the highest grade, chemical zoning of pyroxenes has been erased and areas of impact melt sometimes have been produced. Thus, HED meteorites appear to be products of an early bombardment history of the inner portion of the main asteroid belt, just as most lunar highland rocks are products of early impact bombardment of the Moon. To determine the time period for major impacts on the HED parent body, we have measured ^39Ar-^40Ar ages for a large number of eucritic clasts from eucrites and howardites. All of these samples indicate partial to complete K-Ar chronometer resetting by several different impact events much more recent than eucrite crystallization times of ~4.45-4.55 Ga. For example, the ^39Ar- ^40Ar ages of paired eucrites Y-791186 and Y-792510 were essentially entirely reset 3.45 +- 0.05 Ga ago. A clast from Millbillillie gave a slightly older ^39Ar-^40Ar resetting age of 3.55 +- 0.02 Ga. (A similar degassing age of 3.5 +- 0.1 Ga was recently reported for Stannern [3]). Clast EET87531,21 gave a degassing age of 3.83 +- 0.05 Ga; clast EET82600 suggests an age of 3.89 +- 0.07 Ga; a clast from LEW85300 suggests a similar age to these. Several eucritic clasts gave ^39Ar-^40Ar degassing ages near 4.0 Ga. These include two clasts from EET87509 (,71 at 4.00 +- 0.05 Ga and ,74 at 3.93 +- 0.06 Ga), EET87509,24 (4.07 +- 0.02 Ga), Y-792769,68 (3.99 +- 0.04 Ga), and Y-790020,5 (4.03 +- 0.03 Ga). Clast and matrix samples from Y-75011 gave slightly different ages of 3.98 +- 0.03 Ga and 3.94 +- 0.04 Ga. Analyses of several additional eucritic clasts gave less well-defined ^39Ar-^40Ar release spectra that are consistent with this range in

  13. Late Cretaceous remagnetization of Proterozoic mafic dikes, southern Highland Mountains, southwestern Montana: A paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlan, S.S.; Geissman, J.W.; Snee, L.W.; Reynolds, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Paleomagnetic results from Early Proterozoic metabasite sills and Middle Proterozoic diabase dikes from the southern Highland Mountains of southwestern Montana give well-defined, dual-polarity magnetizations that are statistically identical to those from a small Late Cretaceous pluton that cuts the dikes. The concordance of paleomagnetic directions from rocks of three widely separated ages indicates that the Proterozoic rocks were remagnetized, probably during Late Cretaceous time. Paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, and petrographic observations from the metabasite and diabase samples indicate that remanence is carried primarily by low-Ti magnetite. Combining virtual geomagnetic poles from metabasite sills, diabase dikes, and the Late Cretaceous pluton, we obtain a paleomagnetic pole at 85.5??N, 310.7??E (K = 19.9, A95 = 9.1??, N = 14 sites) that is similar to a reference pole from the 74 Ma Adel Mountain Volcanics of western Montana. Biotite and hornblende 40Ar/39Ar isotopic dates from host basement geneiss and a hornblende from a remagnetized metabasite sill yield ages of ca. 1800 Ma; these dates probably record cooling of the southern Highland Mountains following high-grade metamorphism at 1.9-1.8 Ga. The gneiss and metabasite age spectra show virtually no evidence of disturbance, indicating that the basement rocks were never heated to temperatures sufficient to cause even partial resetting of their argon systems. Thus, the overprint magnetization of the Highland Mountains rocks is not a thermoremanent magnetization acquired during conductive cooling of nearby Late Cretaceous plutons. Remagnetization of the metabasite sills and diabase dikes was probably caused by localized thermochemical and thermoviscous effects during circulation of Late Cretaceous hydrothermal fluids related to epithermal mineralization. The absence of significant disturbance to the 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum from the remagnetized metabasite hornblende indicates that some secondary magnetizations may

  14. Volcanic history and 40Ar/39Ar and 14C geochronology of Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvert, Andrew T.; Moore, Richard B.; McGeehin, John P.; Rodrigues da Silva, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Seven new 40Ar/39Ar and 23 new radiocarbon ages of eruptive units, in support of new geologic mapping, improve the known chronology of Middle to Late Pleistocene and Holocene volcanic activity on the island of Terceira, Azores and define an east-to-west progression in stratovolcano growth. The argon ages indicate that Cinco Picos Volcano, the oldest on Terceira, completed its main subaerial cone building activity by about 370–380 ka. Collapse of the upper part of the stratovolcanic edifice to form a 7 × 9 km caldera occurred some time after 370 ka. Postcaldera eruptions of basalt from cinder cones on and near the caldera floor and trachytic pyroclastic flow and pumice fall deposits from younger volcanoes west of Cinco Picos have refilled much of the caldera. The southern portion of Guilherme Moniz Volcano, in the central part of the island, began erupting prior to 270 ka and produced trachyte domes, flows, and minor pyroclastic deposits until at least 111 ka. The northern part of Guilherme Moniz Caldera is less well exposed than the southern part, but reflects a similar age range. The northwest portion of the caldera was formed sometime after 44 ka. Several well-studied ignimbrites that blanket much of the island likely erupted from Guilherme Moniz Volcano. The Pico Alto Volcanic Center, a tightly spaced cluster of trachyte domes and short flows, is a younger part of Guilherme Moniz Volcano. Stratigraphic studies and our new radiocarbon ages suggest that most of the Pico Alto eruptions occurred during the period from about 9000 to 1000 years BP. Santa Barbara Volcano is the youngest stratovolcano on Terceira, began erupting prior to 29 ka, and has been active historically.

  15. 40Ar/39Ar constraints on the temporal evolution of Graciosa Island, Azores (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrea, Patricia; Wijbrans, Jan R.; Galé, Carlos; Ubide, Teresa; Lago, Marceliano; França, Zilda; Widom, Elisabeth

    2014-02-01

    Lava flows spanning the eruptive record of Graciosa Island (Azores archipelago) and a gabbro xenolith were dated by 40Ar/39Ar in order to constrain the Pleistocene and Holocene volcanic evolution of the island. The results range from 1.05 Ma to 3.9 ka, whereas prior published K-Ar and 14C ages range from 620 to 2 ka. The formation of the Serra das Fontes shield volcano started at minimum 1.05 Ma, and the magmatic system was active for ca. 600 ky, as suggested by the formation of the gabbro xenolith by magmatic differentiation. Evolved magmas making up the Serra das Fontes-Serra Branca composite volcano were generated at ca. 450 ka. After a period of ca. 110 ky of volcanic inactivity and erosion of volcanic edifices, volcanism was reactivated with the formation of the Vitória Unit NW platform. Later, the development of the Vulcão Central Unit started with the formation of monogenetic cones located to the south of the Serra das Fontes-Serra Branca-Vitória Unit. This volcanism became progressively more evolved and was concentrated in a main eruptive center, forming the Vulcão Central stratovolcano with an age older than 50 ka. The caldera related to this stratovolcano is older than 47 ka and was followed by effusion of basaltic magmas into the caldera, resulting in the formation of a lava lake, which ultimately spilled over the caldera rim at ca. 11 ka. The most recent eruptions on Graciosa formed two small pyroclastic cones within the caldera and the Pico do Timão cone within the Vitória Unit at ca 3.9 ka.

  16. 40Ar/39Ar dating of tourmaline as a tool for high-temperature metamorphism thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, Fred; Thern, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Tourmaline is an ubiquitous mineral, with properties making it ideal for studying metamorphic processes as well as a useful tool for a wide range of applications (e.g, magmatism, metasomatism, ore deposits [1]), mostly because it is not sensitive to chemical or mechanical alteration and is stable over a wide range of pressure-temperature conditions (up to 6 GPa and 850° C [2]). Typical metamorphic tourmaline types include dravite and shorl which, along with elbaite, belong to the alkali group [1]. The alkali group is notable because tourmalines from this group tend to incorporate trace amounts of K2O and therefore, can be dated using the 40Ar/39Ar technique. In order to understand the maximum temperature below which the K/Ar chronometer stays closed to argon loss by thermally activated diffusion, we carried out temperature controlled furnace diffusion experiments on well-behaved 40Ar/39Ar plateau-forming Archean tourmaline of 2935 ± 9 Ma [3]. Each experiment yielded an Arrhenius profile (Do vs. 1/temperature) that shows that the 39Ar data form two linear arrays with two distinct slopes. The first array only includes a few % of the total gas, has a shallow slope and shows very fast diffusivity at low temperature. We interpret these data as indicating very fast release of argon by cracks and defects. The second array of data points includes most of the gas of each experiment and forms a much steeper slope. These data yielded Ea (activation energy) values ranging from 120 to 157 Kcal/mol and D0 (pre-exponential diffusion factor) values ranging from 1.9x106 to 2.5x109 cm2/s for crystals with an average radius of 100 ± 25 μm. Three additional experiments using a laser (resulting in poor temperature control) suggest similar values although the latter experiments are considered semi-quantitative. The furnace experiments suggest that tourmaline has a weighted mean closure temperature of 804 ± 90 ° C (1σ) for a cooling rate of 10° C/Ma. Monte Carlo simulations using

  17. Regional patterns of Mesozoic-Cenozoic magmatism in western Alaska revealed by new U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar ages: Chapter D in Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska, vol. 15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Dwight C.; Miller, Marti L.; Friedman, Richard M.; Layer, Paul W.; Bleick, Heather A.; Jones, III, James V.; Box, Steven E.; Karl, Susan M.; Shew, Nora B.; White, Timothy S.; Till, Alison B.; Dumoulin, Julie A.; Bundtzen, Thomas K.; O'Sullivan, Paul B.; Ullrich, Thomas D.

    2017-03-02

    In support of regional geologic framework studies, we obtained 50 new argon-40/argon-39 (40Ar/39Ar) ages and 33 new uranium-lead (U-Pb) ages from igneous rocks of southwestern Alaska. Most of the samples are from the Sleetmute and Taylor Mountains quadrangles; smaller collections or individual samples are from the Bethel, Candle, Dillingham, Goodnews Bay, Holy Cross, Iditarod, Kantishna River, Lake Clark, Lime Hills, McGrath, Medfra, Talkeetna, and Tanana quadrangles.A U-Pb zircon age of 317.7±0.6 million years (Ma) reveals the presence of Pennsylvanian intermediate igneous (probably volcanic) rocks in the Tikchik terrane, Bethel quadrangle. A U-Pb zircon age of 229.5±0.2 Ma from gabbro intruding the Rampart Group of the Angayucham-Tozitna terrane, Tanana quadrangle, confirms and tightens a previously cited Triassic age for this intrusive suite. A fresh mafic dike in Goodnews Bay quadrangle yielded a 40Ar/39Ar whole rock age of 155.0±1.9 Ma; this establishes a Jurassic or older age for the previously unconstrained (Paleozoic? to Mesozoic?) sandstone unit that it intrudes. A thick felsic tuff in the Gemuk Group in Taylor Mountains quadrangle yielded a U-Pb zircon age of 153.0±2.0 Ma, extending the age of magmatism in this part of the Togiak terrane back into the Late Jurassic. We report three new U-Pb zircon ages between 120 and 110 Ma—112.0±0.9 Ma from syenite in the Candle quadrangle, 114.9±0.3 Ma from orthogneiss assigned to the Ruby terrane in Iditarod quadrangle, and 116.6±0.1 Ma from a gabbro of the Dishna River mafic-ultramafic complex in Iditarod quadrangle. The latter result requires a substantial age revision, from Triassic to Cretaceous, for at least some rocks that have been mapped as the Dishna River mafic-ultramafic complex. A tuff in the Upper Cretaceous Kuskokwim Group yielded a U-Pb zircon (sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe, SHRIMP) age of 88.3±1.0 Ma; we speculate that the eruptive source was an arc along the trend of the Pebble

  18. Combined oxygen, hydrogen, /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar isotopic evaluation of molybdenite mineralization, east Pioneer Mountains, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Chesley, J.T.; Snee, L.W.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Pear Lake molybdenite (moly) prospect is in the Eastern Pioneer Wilderness Area, 30 km south of the Cannivan Gulch moly deposit. It lies on a NW-SE trend with other prospects that are contemporaneous. Mineralized veins outcrop sporadically over a 4 square mile area, with a major concentration in the center of the study area. Previous studies have suggested potential moly-mineralization at depth. /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar age-spectra on hornblend (hb) from the granodiorite host rock indicate emplacement at 75.0 +/- 1 Ma, with biotite closure at 69.0 +/- .3 Ma, in the vicinity of Pear Lake. Hydrothermal muscovites from the moly-bearing veins have ages of 68.0 +/- .5 Ma. partial resetting of biotite cooling dates in the vicinity of mineralization are observed, but biotites on the outer portion of the mineralizing system are undisturbed. These relations suggest that mineralization occurred after the host pluton had cooled to below 280/sup 0/C. Quartz-magnetite isotopic temperatures are 380 to 420/sup 0/C for moly-veins. These data suggest that magmatic hydrothermal fluids operated in the upper portion of this molysystem. These isotopic data, combined with geologic mapping, suggest that the Pear Lake moly prospect resulted from a weak, short-lived magmatic hydrothermal event at depth, and is unlikely to contain economic levels of molybdenum. The combined /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar-stable isotope approach should prove useful in evaluating other hydrothermal systems.

  19. New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations and paleomagnetic results bearing on the tectonic and magmatic history of the northern Madison Range and Madison Valley region, southwestern Montana, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, K.S.; Harlan, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    Detailed 40Ar/39Ar dating and paleomagnetic analysis of dacite porphyry sills and dikes that intrude Cretaceous sedimentary rocks in the northern Madison Range in southwestern Montana show that Laramide shortening was essentially complete by ???69 Ma. A negative paleomagnetic fold test indicates that Laramide folding occurred before cooling of the dacite sills and dikes at ???69 Ma. Laramide deformation began synchronous with deposition of the Livingston Formation rocks at ???79 Ma. These results are consistent with previous observations in the region that show the onset of Laramide deformation in the northern Rocky Mountains becoming progressively younger toward the east. 40Ar/39Ar dating of additional igneous rocks in the northern Madison Valley and around Norris, Montana better define post-Laramide tectonomagmatic events in the region, including Eocene-Oligocene volcanism and Basin and Range crustal extension. Dates from three rhyolitic intrusions near Red Mountain are between 48.71 ?? 0.18 Ma and 49.42 ?? 0.18 Ma, similar to the dates from basal silicic flows of the Virginia City volcanic field (part of the southwest Montana volcanic province), suggesting that the Red Mountain intrusions may have been the sources for some of the early extrusive rocks. Magmatism in the Virginia City volcanic field became generally more mafic with time, and a ???30-Ma basalt flow near Norris is considered a late, outlying member of the volcanic field. A tuff along the east side of the Madison Valley half graben yielded a early middle Miocene date (16.2 ?? 0.19 Ma), suggesting that accelerated crustal extension and associated rapid basin sedimentation probably began in the early Miocene, slightly earlier than previous estimates.

  20. Geology and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the medium- to high-K Tanaga volcanic cluster, western Aleutians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jicha, Brian R.; Coombs, Michelle L.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Singer, Brad S.

    2012-01-01

    We used geologic mapping and geochemical data augmented by 40Ar/39Ar dating to establish an eruptive chronology for the Tanaga volcanic cluster in the western Aleutian arc. The Tanaga volcanic cluster is unique in comparison to other central and western Aleutian volcanoes in that it consists of three closely spaced, active, volumetrically significant edifices (Sajaka, Tanaga, and Takawangha), the eruptive products of which have unusually high K2O contents. Thirty-five new 40Ar/39Ar ages obtained in two different laboratories constrain the duration of Pleistocene–Holocene subaerial volcanism to younger than 295 ka. The eruptive activity has been mostly continuous for the last 150 k.y., unlike most other well-characterized arc volcanoes, which tend to grow in discrete pulses. More than half of the analyzed Tanaga volcanic cluster lavas are basalts that have erupted throughout the lifetime of the cluster, although a considerable amount of basaltic andesite and basaltic trachyandesite has also been produced since 200 ka. Major- and trace-element variations suggest that magmas from Sajaka and Tanaga volcanoes are likely to have crystallized pyroxene and/or amphibole at greater depths than the older Takawangha magmas, which experienced a larger percentage of plagioclase-dominated fractionation at shallower depths. Magma output from Takawangha has declined over the last 86 k.y. At ca. 19 ka, the focus of magma flux shifted to the west beneath Tanaga and Sajaka volcanoes, where hotter, more mafic magma erupted.

  1. Mineralogy, 40Ar/ 39Ar dating and apatite fission track dating of rocks along the Castle Mountain fault, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, W. T.; Bunds, M. P.; Bruhn, R. L.; Hall, C. M.; Murphy, J. M.

    2001-07-01

    The Castle Mountain fault is a 200-km-long, right-lateral fault that forms the northern boundary of the Cook Inlet basin and Matanuska Valley, Alaska. Fault gouge and fault rock at six localities contain the clay minerals illite, smectite, chlorite, and interstratified illite/smectite. At one locality, gouge contains deformed illite/smectite with very little wall rock chlorite contamination. Fine (<0.03 μm), medium (0.03-0.2 μm), and coarse (0.2-2.0 μm) illite/smectite from this site were dated using 40Ar/ 39Ar micro-encapsulation and laser microprobe methods. Total gas ages for the three size fractions are 28.21±0.12, 32.42±0.11 and 36.24±0.08 Ma for fine to coarse sizes respectively. Argon retention ages obtained from 40Ar and 39Ar retained in the three size fractions of illite at room temperature during neutron irradiation are 37.36±0.15, 42.11±0.14 and 47.20±0.10 respectively. Apatite fission track ages were measured in arkose at a locality on the fault 60 km west of the gouge locality. Three samples of arkose were dated: one within 10 m of the fault core, one 170 m from the fault, and one 335 m from the fault. The sample nearest to the fault yielded an age of 29.3±2.8 Ma, but it only had four track lengths at 10-13 μm. Two apatite grains from the intermediate sample yielded a pooled age of 34.3±6.1 Ma. The distant sample (25 grains counted, 101 track lengths) yielded an age of 32.0±2.9 Ma. This sample has a broad distribution of track lengths and a broad distribution of individual grain ages ranging from 14.8±5.1 to 67.8±8.8 Ma. Monte Carlo modeling of the apatite age and track length data is consistent with hydrothermal mineralization at 37-39 Ma followed by rapid uplift and cooling after 10 Ma. The 40Ar/ 39Ar total gas ages (K-Ar) are minimum ages, and the argon retention ages are maximum ages. The thermal model derived from the fission track data, and the argon retention age for the finest illite fraction of ˜37 Ma date a hydrothermal

  2. Toward a high-resolution 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Tatun Volcano Group, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesko, G. T.; Song, S.; Chang, S.; Hemming, S. R.; Turrin, B. D.

    2010-12-01

    The Tatun Volcano Group [TVG] consists of five volcanic subgroups of which ~30 edifices have been identified, all in close proximity to the densely populated Taipei Basin to its south (Song et al., 2000, Journal of the Geological Society of China, in Chinese). Evidence of eruptions is in the form of mostly lava flows, with pyroclastic flows, and ash deposition (Tsai et al., 2010, TAO), consistent with vulcanian and plinian eruptions that are only minimally preserved because of the region’s high weathering rate (Belousov et al., 2010, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research). The TVG is made up of calc-alkaline andesite, with few interspersed basaltic lava flows that bear geochemical signatures consistent with subduction volcanism, yet due to tectonic location Teng (1996, Geology) describes it as Ryukyu back-arc basin volcanism, and still others attribute volcanism here to post-collisional collapse of the Taiwan orogen (Wang et al., 1999, Tectonophysics and 2004, Journal of Petrology). Various TVG samples were previously K-Ar dated by Juang and Chen (1989, Bulletin of Central Geological Survey, in Chinese), Tsao (1994, Bulletin of Central Geological Survey, in Chinese), and 40Ar/39Ar whole rock analyses by Lee (1996, masters thesis, National Taiwan University) to suggest volcanism from 2.8-2.5Ma and then from 1.5-.22Ma after which volcanic events ceased. In contrast, radiocarbon dates obtained from charcoal in related sediment by Chen et al. (2010, TAO) and Belousov et al. (2010, Journal of Volcanology Geothermal Research) suggest volcanic activity was present at 20ka and 6ka respectively. The andesite samples are microcrystalline; therefore hand picked aliquots of groundmass from the hand magnetic fraction were subjected to several iterations of sonic rinse in glycine-based soap, then 4N HNO3, then quartz-distilled water in a preparation modified from Nicolaysen et al. (2000, EPSL). Samples were co-irradiated at the USGS facility in Denver using Alder

  3. 40Ar/39Ar Dating Reveals Multiple Generations of Mafic Dikes in Southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oconnell, K.; Davidson, C.; Singer, B.

    2004-12-01

    Seven 40Ar/39Ar whole-rock incremental heating dates of mafic dikes from the Wrangell transect in southeastern Alaska yield six concordant plateau dates of 14.7 ± 1.0 Ma, 24.7 ± 1.1 Ma, 30.1 ± 0.2 Ma, 41.8 ± 1.1 Ma, 107.5 ± 0.5 Ma, and 113.0 ± 0.7 Ma. One sample is discordant with most of the steps yielding dates >220 Ma. We also obtained a well-defined plateau date of 115.6 ± 0.3 Ma from a hornblende separate from the sample that yielded the 113.0 ± 0.7 Ma whole-rock date. The concordance of these two dates suggests that the whole-rock dates probably reflect a close approximation of the emplacement and crystallization ages of the dikes. The mafic dikes sampled for this study have distinct chilled margins and are 0.5-5 meter thick alkali-rich basalts and basaltic andesite. The dikes crosscut all ductile fabrics and define two main sets in orientation. One set strikes NNW and dips steeply to the east and the other set strikes NE with steep SE dips. Based on crosscutting relationships, the NNW dikes appear to be older and are mostly found west of Clarence Straight. The mid-Cretaceous dikes dated in this study intrude Silurian age rocks of the Alexander terrane and are confined to the western part of the Wrangell transect. The younger (14.7 - 41.8 Ma) dikes are found throughout the study area including within variably metamorphosed Jurassic-Cretaceous meta-sedimentary rocks, mid-Cretaceous plutons, and Tertiary volcanic rocks. These new dates show that mafic dikes intruded the Alexander terrane during mid-Cretaceous shortening in SE Alaska. This suggests that basaltic magmatism occurred in SE Alaska during the final accretion of the Alexander/Wrangellia terrane and during subsequent Cenozoic deformation along a transpressive to transtensional plate boundary.

  4. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronologic constraints on the tectonothermal evolution of the Northern East Humboldt range metamorphic core complex, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGrew, A.J.; Snee, L.W.

    1994-01-01

    The northern East Humboldt Range (NEHR) of northeastern Nevada exposes a suite of complexly deformed migmatitic, upper amphibolite-facies rocks in the footwall of the Ruby Mountains-East Humboldt Range (RM-EHR) detachment fault. New 40Ar/39Ar data on hornblende, muscovite, biotite, and potassium feldspar help constrain the kinematic and thermal evolution of this terrain during Tertiary extensional exhumation. Hornblende samples from relatively high structural levels yield discordant age spectra that suggest initial cooling during early Tertiary time (63-49 Ma). When coupled with petrological constraints indicating a strongly decompressional P-T-t path above 550??C, the hornblende data suggest that exhumation of the RM-EHR may have initiated in early Tertiary time, approximately coincident with the initial phases of unroofing in the Wood Hills immediately to the east and with the end of thrusting in the late Mesozoic to early Tertiary Sevier orogenic belt of eastern Nevada and western Utah. This temporal coincidence suggests that gravitational collapse of tectonically thickened crust in the internal zone of the Sevier belt could have driven the initial phases of unroofing. Thermal history during the final stage of exhumation of the NEHR is constrained by discordant hornblende cooling ages of 36-29 Ma from deep structural levels and biotite, muscovite, and potassium feldspar cooling ages of 27-21 Ma from a range of structural levels. Comparison of muscovite, biotite, and potassium feldspar cooling ages with previously published fission-track cooling ages implies very rapid cooling rates at temperatures below the closure temperature for muscovite (270??-350??C), but time gaps of > 7 m.y. between hornblende and mica cooling ages suggest that cooling at higher temperatures was more gradual. In addition, comparison of 40Ar 39Ar mica cooling ages with previously published fission-track apatite cooling ages suggests pronounced thermal gradients between the NEHR and

  5. Laserprobe 40Ar/39Ar Dating Of Strain Fringes: An Example From The Interior Of The Sevier Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, M. L.; Spell, T. L.; Hoisch, T. D.; Arriola, T.; Zanetti, K. A.

    2008-12-01

    Determining the absolute ages of deformation fabrics in metamorphic rocks is critical to understanding the nature of orogenesis in deeply exhumed ancient mountain belts. In situ isotopic analysis of fibrous strain fringes is particularly advantageous because the relationships between the analyzed mineral, deformation fabric, and isotopic age can be established, and mineral growth can be linked to the progressive strain history. Furthermore, when isotopic closure temperatures (Tc) are higher than crystallization temperatures, isotopic ages reflect deformation ages. We have applied in situ 40Ar/39Ar UV and CO2 laser techniques to dating phlogopite in quartz-phlogopite-calcite and muscovite in quartz-muscovite fibrous strain fringes in greenschist-facies metamorphic rocks from the Grouse Creek Mountains (Utah) and Black Pine Mountains (Idaho). In both cases, syntectonic mica growth occurred below the minerals Tc. Phlogopite 40Ar/39Ar ages for individual strain fringes in the Grouse Creek Mountains range from 92 Ma to 110 Ma, with the most reliable ages ranging from 101 Ma to 110 Ma (mean age, 105.0 plus or minus 5.8 Ma). Muscovite 40Ar/39Ar ages for individual strain fringes in the Black Pine Mountains range from 97 Ma to 112 Ma (mean age, 104.7 plus or minus 5.8 Ma). Strain fringes are associated with a sub-horizontal foliation and a generally N-trending elongation lineation exhibiting components of top-to-the-north simple shear and coaxial strain accommodating N-S extension and sub-vertical shortening. The new dates confirm prior correlation of fabrics between these ranges and yield a mid-Cretaceous age for the earliest ductile fabric preserved in the Raft River-Albion-Grouse Creek metamorphic core complex, in the interior (hinterland) of the retroarc Sevier orogenic belt. Mid-crustal northward flow at 105 (plus or minus 6) Ma within the interior of the Sevier orogen, coeval with east-directed shortening in the foreland and with plate convergence, records orogen

  6. Mesozoic thermal history and timing of structural events for the Yukon-Tanana Upland, east-central Alaska: 40Ar/39Ar data from metamorphic and plutonic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, C.; Lanphere, M.A.; Sharp, W.D.; Layer, P.W.; Hansen, V.L.

    2002-01-01

    We present new 40Ar/39Ar ages for hornblende, muscovite, and biotite from metamorphic and plutonic rocks from the Yukon-Tanana Upland, Alaska. Integration of our data with published 40Ar/39Ar, kinematic, and metamorphic pressure (P) and temperature (T) data confirms and refines the complex interaction of metamorphism and tectonism proposed for the region. The oldest metamorphic episode(s) postdates Middle Permian magmatism and predates the intrusion of Late Triassic (215-212 Ma) granitoids into the Fortymile River assemblage (Taylor Mountain assemblage of previous papers). In the eastern Eagle quadrangle, rapid and widespread Early Jurassic cooling is indicated by ???188-186 Ma 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages for hornblende from plutons that intrude the Fortymile River assemblage, and for metamorphic minerals from the Fortymile River assemblage and the structurally underlying Nasina assemblage. We interpret these Early Jurassic ages to represent cooling resulting from northwest-directed contraction that emplaced the Fortymile River assemblage onto the Nasina assemblage to the north as well as the Lake George assemblage to the south. This cooling was the final stage of a continuum of subduction-related contraction that produced crustal thickening, intermediate- to high-P metamorphism within both the Fortymile River assemblage and the structurally underlying Lake George assemblage, and Late Triassic and Early Jurassic plutonism in the Fortymile River and Nasina assemblages. Although a few metamorphic samples from the Lake George assemblage yield Jurassic 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages, most yield Early Cretaceous 40Ar/39Ar ages: hornblende ???135-115 Ma, and muscovite and biotite ???110-108 Ma. We interpret the Early Cretaceous metamorphic cooling, in most areas, to have resulted from regional extension and exhumation of the lower plate, previously tectonically thickened during Early Jurassic and older convergence.

  7. Additional 40Ar- 39Ar dating of the basement and the alkaline volcanism of Gorringe Bank (Atlantic Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Féraud, Gilbert; York, Derek; Mével, Catherine; Cornen, Guy; Hall, Chris M.; Auzende, Jean-Marie

    1986-09-01

    40Ar/ 39Ar step heating analyses are reported for a variety of samples from Gorringe Bank (Atlantic Ocean). Flat age spectra for two primary, igneous hornblendes of Gorringe (corresponding to an age of 143 Ma) show that the K-Ar ages obtained on these samples by Prichard and Mitchell [4] are evidently crystallization and not hybrid ages. This sustains the concept of an initiation age of 140 Ma [4] for Gorringe Bank. No support is found for Carpena's suggestion [7] that the formation of Gorringe Bank began 200 Ma ago. Secondary hornblendes from Ormonde seamount rocks appear to have formed shortly after the initiation of the Bank. Precise plateau ages on samples of two alkaline volcanics from Ormonde correspond to the older limit of the alkaline volcanism suggested by Féraud et al. [3,5].

  8. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the eruptive history of Mount Erebus, Antarctica: volcano evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, Richard P.; Kyle, Philip R.; McIntosh, William C.

    2004-12-01

    Mt. Erebus, a 3,794-meter-high active polygenetic stratovolcano, is composed of voluminous anorthoclase-phyric tephriphonolite and phonolite lavas overlying unknown volumes of poorly exposed, less differentiated lavas. The older basanite to phonotephrite lavas crop out on Fang Ridge, an eroded remnant of a proto-Erebus volcano and at other isolated locations on the flanks of the Mt. Erebus edifice. Anorthoclase feldspars in the phonolitic lavas are large (~10 cm), abundant (~30 40%) and contain numerous melt inclusions. Although excess argon is known to exist within the melt inclusions, rigorous sample preparation was used to remove the majority of the contaminant. Twenty-five sample sites were dated by the 40Ar/39Ar method (using 20 anorthoclase, 5 plagioclase and 9 groundmass concentrates) to examine the eruptive history of the volcano. Cape Barne, the oldest site, is 1,311±16 ka and represents the first of three stages of eruptive activity on the Mt. Erebus edifice. It shows a transition from sub-aqueous to sub-aerial volcanism that may mark the initiation of proto-Erebus eruptive activity. It is inferred that a further ~300 ky of basanitic/phonotephritic volcanism built a low, broad platform shield volcano. Cessation of the shield-building phase is marked by eruptions at Fang Ridge at ~1,000 ka. The termination of proto-Erebus eruptive activity is marked by the stratigraphically highest flow at Fang Ridge (758±20 ka). Younger lavas (~550 250 ka) on a modern-Erebus edifice are characterized by phonotephrites, tephriphonolites and trachytes. Plagioclase-phyric phonotephrite from coastal and flank flows yield ages between 531±38 and 368±18 ka. The initiation of anorthoclase tephriphonolite occurred in the southwest sector of the volcano at and around Turks Head (243±10 ka). A short pulse of effusive activity marked by crustal contamination occurred ~160 ka as indicated by at least two trachytic flows (157±6 and 166±10 ka). Most

  9. 40Ar/39Ar dating of microgram feldspar grains from the paired feldspathic achondrites GRA 06128 and 06129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Fara N.; Herzog, Gregory F.; Park, Jisun; Delaney, Jeremy S.; Turrin, Brent D.; Swisher, Carl C.

    2014-03-01

    40Ar/39Ar ages of single feldspar grains from the paired meteorites Graves Nunatak 06128 (GRA8; 8 grains) and 06129 (GRA9; 26 grains) are presented. Plateau ages (⩾70% of the 39Ar released) ranged from 4000 to 4600 Ma with an average 1-σ uncertainty of ±90 Ma. The most precise ages obtained were 4267 ± 17 Ma for a grain from GRA8 and 4437 ± 19 Ma and 4321 ± 18 Ma for two grains from GRA9. Isotope correlation diagrams yield less precise ages ranging from 3800 to 5200 Ma with an average 1-σ uncertainty of 250 Ma; they indicate a negligible trapped component. Plateau ages, integrated total fusion ages, and isochron ages are internally concordant at the 95% confidence level. The distribution of the plateau ages for GRA9 is bimodal with peaks at 4400 and 4300 Ma. In contrast, the plateau age distribution for GRA8 peaks at about 4260 Ma with broad wings extending toward younger and older ages. To explain the distributions of grain ages we prefer a scenario that includes a major post-formation event about 4400 Ma ago and a later melt intrusion event that heated GRA8 more than some parts of GRA9.

  10. 40Ar/39Ar chronology and paleomagnetism of Quaternary basaltic lavas from the Perşani Mountains (East Carpathians)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaiotu, C. G.; Jicha, B. R.; Singer, B. S.; Ţugui, A.; Seghedi, I.; Panaiotu, A. G.; Necula, C.

    2013-08-01

    Quaternary volcanism in the Perşani Mountains forms an Na-alkali basaltic province inside the bend area of the Carpathians in the southeastern part of Europe. Previous K-Ar ages and paleomagnetic data reveal several transitional virtual geomagnetic poles, which were tentatively associated with the Cobb Mountain subchron and a Brunhes chron excursion. We report a new paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic study coupled with 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to better constrain the age of geomagnetic reversals or excursions that might be recorded and the timing of volcanism. Of the paleomagnetic directions obtained from sampled lava flows 4 are reversed polarity, 19 are normal polarity and 16 have transitional polarity. 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages determined from incremental heating experiments on groundmass indicate that two of the reversely magnetized lavas erupted at 1142 ± 41 and 800 ± 25 ka, four of the normally magnetized lavas erupted at 1060 ± 10, 1062 ± 24, 684 ± 21, and 683 ± 28 ka, and two transitionally magnetized lavas formed at 1221 ± 11 and 799 ± 21 ka. Both the new 40Ar/39Ar ages and the paleomagnetic data suggest at least five episodes of volcanic activity with the most active periods during the Jaramillo and Brunhes chrons. This results shows that the last phases of alkalic and calc-alkaline magmatism in the South-East Carpathians were contemporaneous. The age of the older transitionally magnetized lava flow is within error of recent unspiked K-Ar and astrochronologic ages for the reversal that defines the onset of the Cobb Mountain normal polarity subchron. The age of the younger transitional lava is similar to that of an excursion that preceded the Matuyama-Brunhes polarity reversal and which has come to be known as the Matuyama-Brunhes precursor. Omitting the excursion data, the dispersion of the virtual geomagnetic poles (around 19°) is larger than the expected value around 45°N from the global compilation, but closer to the value obtained only from the

  11. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, paleomagnetism, and evolution of the Boring volcanic field, Oregon and Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, Robert J.; Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Evarts, Russell C.; Conrey, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar investigations of a large suite of fine-grained basaltic rocks of the Boring volcanic field (BVF), Oregon and Washington (USA), yielded two primary results. (1) Using age control from paleomagnetic polarity, stratigraphy, and available plateau ages40Ar/39Ar recoil model ages are defined that provide reliable age results in the absence of an age plateau, even in cases of significant Ar redistribution. (2) Grouping of eruptive ages either by period of activity or by composition defines a broadly northward progression of BVF volcanism during latest Pliocene and Pleistocene time that reflects rates consistent with regional plate movements. Based on the frequency distribution of measured ages, periods of greatest volcanic activity within the BVF occurred 2.7–2.2 Ma, 1.7–0.5 Ma, and 350–50 ka. Grouped by eruptive episode, geographic distributions of samples define a series of northeast-southwest–trending strips whose centers migrate from south-southeast to north-northwest at an average rate of 9.3 ± 1.6 mm/yr. Volcanic activity in the western part of the BVF migrated more rapidly than that to the east, causing trends of eruptive episodes to progress in an irregular, clockwise sense. The K2O and CaO values of dated samples exhibit well-defined temporal trends, decreasing and increasing, respectively, with age of eruption. Divided into two groups by K2O, the centers of these two distributions define a northward migration rate similar to that determined from eruptive age groups. This age and compositional migration rate of Boring volcanism is similar to the clockwise rotation rate of the Oregon Coast Range with respect to North America, and might reflect localized extension on the trailing edge of that rotating crustal block.

  12. Constraints on the Jurassic time scale by /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar dating of North Caucasian volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, J.C.; Lippolt, H.J.; Borsuk, A.M.

    1987-07-01

    /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar age measurements on biotites and high-temperature plagioclases of Jurassic basaltic to rhyolitic subvolcanic rocks from the Northern Great Caucasus (USSR) yielded plateau and total argon ages between 190 and 180 Ma. The dated rocks are intrusive sills, dikes and laccoliths in sediments of the middle to upper Pliensbachian and of the lower Toarcian (Lower Jurassic). Pebbles of the volcanic rocks exist in the basal conglomerates of the Aalenian (base of the Middle Jurassic). Thus, their stratigraphic age is restricted to the Lower Jurassic stages of middle to upper Pliensbachian and Toarcian. Because of the scarcity of tie-points in the Lower Jurassic, the isotopic ages of these volcanic rocks, in spite of their rather large stratigraphic range, may serve as new calibration points for the improvement of the Jurassic time-scale.

  13. Resolving the early chronology of Mono Craters volcanism with combined 238U-230Th and 40Ar/39Ar dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, J. A.; Calvert, A. T.; Marcaida, M.; Mangan, M.; Lidzbarski, M. I.; Stelten, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    California's largest locus of Pleistocene-Holocene rhyolitic volcanism is the Mono Lake-Long Valley region of eastern California. The Mono Craters chain marks the northern portion of this locus, and is composed of at least 28 individual domes of high-silica rhyolite. The record of Holocene volcanism at Mono Craters is relatively well constrained by tephrostratigraphy and radiocarbon dating. However, the timing and frequency of late Pleistocene dome emplacement is poorly resolved, with most of the chronology based on hydration-rind dating of obsidian. A well-exposed archive of late Pleistocene volcanism from Mono Craters is recorded by tephra beds (ashes numbered 1-19, youngest to oldest) of the informal Wilson Creek formation that accumulated in ancestral Mono Lake. To resolve a precise chronology for late Pleistocene volcanism at Mono Craters and tune the time-series of explosive volcanism preserved by Wilson Creek tephras, we performed ion microprobe 238U-230Th dating of allanite and zircon together with laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar dating of sanidine from rhyolite domes that yield the oldest hydration rind ages and have relatively subdued morphology. Sanidine from multiple domes, including both hornblende-biotite and fayalite-bearing rhyolite types, yield 40Ar/39Ar ages up to ca. 25 ka. Ion microprobe analyses of unpolished rims on indium-mounted allanite and zircon crystals yield U-Th isochron ages that are indistinguishable from their associated sanidine 40Ar/39Ar ages. However, the interiors of sectioned allanite crystals yield model U-Th ages that may be up to 30 kyr older than their rims. Rims on allanite and zircon from ashes 7-19 in the lower portion of the Wilson Creek stratigraphy yield isochron ages of ca. 27-62 ka [1], which are supported by ages from magnetostratigraphy [2]. Ash 3 contains titanomagnetites that are compositionally distinct from other Wilson Creek tephras, but match those in the hornblende-biotite rhyolite of dome 11. Rims on allanite and

  14. Constraints on the development of Proterozoic basins in central India from 40Ar/39Ar analysis of authigenic glauconitic minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conrad, J.E.; Hein, J.R.; Chaudhuri, A.K.; Patranabis-Deb, S.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Deb, G.K.; Beukes, N.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ages of some key stratigraphic sequences in central Indian Proterozoic basins are based predominantly on lithostratigraphic relationships that have been constrained by only a few radioisotopic dates. To help improve age constraints, single grains of glauconitic minerals taken from sandstone and limestone in two Proterozoic sequences in the Pranhita-Godavari Valley and the Chattisgarh basin were analyzed by the 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating method. Analysis of the age spectra distinguishes between ages that are interpreted to reflect the time of glauconite formation, and anomalous ages that result from inherited argon or postcrystallization heating. The analyses indicate an age of 1686 ± 6 Ma for the Pandikunta Limestone and 1566 ± 6 Ma for the Ramgundam Sandstone, two units in the western belt of Proterozoic sequences in Pranhita-Godavari Valley. Glauconite from the Chanda Limestone, in the upper part of this sequence, contains inherited 40Ar but is interpreted to reflect an age of ca. 1200 Ma. Glauconite from the Somanpalli Group in the eastern belt of the Pranhita-Godavari Valley gives an age of 1620 ± 6 Ma. In the Chattisgarh basin, glauconite from two units gives disturbed ages that suggest a period of regional heating in the Chattisgarh basin at ca. 960–1000 Ma. These new ages indicate that these sequences are 200–400 m.y. older than previously recognized, which has important implications for geochemical studies of Mesoproterozoic ocean redox conditions in addition to providing important constraints on regional tectonics and lithostratigraphy.

  15. Xenocrysts and antecrysts and their effect on the precision of 40Ar/39Ar dates of explosive volcanic eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, V.; Mark, D.; Blockley, S.; Weh, A.

    2010-12-01

    precise age on a relatively young eruption (~11 ka) we carried out >70 40Ar/39Ar dates of crystals. The sanidines were extracted from individual large pumices that were fragmented using selFrag so that the crystals remained intact. The crystals were then split into different size ranges prior to analysis on a high-sensitivity multicollector noble gas mass spectrometer (ARGUS). This approach allows us to assess how the incorporation of antecrysts and xenocrysts effect 40Ar/39Ar dates. Here we present the age ranges and discuss the results. *Research being carried out by members of the NERC funded Suigetsu 2006 Project led by Takeshi Nakagawa, Newcastle University, UK (http://www.suigetsu.org/)

  16. sup 40 Ar- sup 39 Ar dating of the Beja gabbro: Timing of the accretion of southern Portugal

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffet, G. )

    1990-11-01

    The {sup 40}Ar-{sup 39}Ar dating of the amphibole from the Beja gabbro (Southern Portugal) yields a plateau age at 336.4 {plus minus} 0.8 Ma (2{sigma} level). The corresponding calculated isotopic closure temperature is around 800C. The comparison of this temperature with the magnetic blocking temperature ({approximately}570C) allows an estimation of a probable thermoremanent acquisition age for the characteristic magnetization component of the Beja gabbro between 335Ma and 315Ma, assuming cooling rates between 10C/Ma and 100C/Ma. These results, combined wtih paleomagnetic results from the Beja gabbro and Late Paleozoic rocks from Southern Portugal (Perroud et al., 1985), suggest that the southermost part of Spain and Portugal was separated from Northern Iberia in Early Carboniferous times and was accreted to Europe during the Late Carboniferous.

  17. 40Ar/39Ar Dating of Zn-Pb-Ag Mineralization in the Northern Brooks Range, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werdon, Melanie B.; Layer, Paul W.; Newberry, Rainer J.

    2004-01-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar laser step-heating method potentially can be used to provide absolute ages for a number of formerly undatable, low-temperature ore deposits. This study demonstrates the use of this method by determining absolute ages for Zn-Pb-Ag sediment-hosted massive sulfide deposits and vein-breccia occurrences found throughout a 300-km-long, east-west-trending belt in the northern Brooks Range, Alaska. Massive sulfide deposits are hosted by Mississippian to Pennsylvanian(?) black carbonaceous shale, siliceous mudstone, and lesser chert and carbonate turbidites of the Kuna Formation (e.g., Red Dog, Anarraaq, Lik (Su), and Drenchwater). The vein-breccia occurrences (e.g., Husky, Story Creek, West Kivliktort Mountain, Vidlee, and Kady) are hosted by a deformed but only weakly metamorphosed package of Upper Devonian to Lower Mississippian mixed continental and marine clastic rocks (the Endicott Group) that stratigraphically underlie the Kuna Formation. The vein-breccias are mineralogically similar to, but not spatially associated with, known massive sulfide deposits. The region's largest shale-hosted massive sulfide deposit is Red Dog; it has reserves of 148 Mt grading 16.6 percent zinc, 4.5 percent lead, and 77 g of silver per tonne. Hydrothermally produced white mica in a whole-rock sample from a sulfide-bearing igneous sill within the Red Dog deposit yielded a plateau age of 314.5 Ma. The plateau age of this whole-rock sample records the time at which temperatures cooled below the argon closure temperature of the white mica and is interpreted to represent the minimum age limit for massive sulfide-related hydrothermal activity in the Red Dog deposit. Sulfide-bearing quartz veins at Drenchwater crosscut a hypabyssal intrusion with a maximum biotite age of 337.0 Ma. Despite relatively low sulfide deposition temperatures in the vein-breccia occurrences (162°-251°C), detrital white mica in sandstone immediately adjacent to large vein-breccia zones was partially to

  18. The Berkeley Instrumental Neutron Generator (BINGE) for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, P. R.; Becker, T. A.; Bernstein, L.; Firestone, R. B.; Kirsch, L.; Leung, K. N.; Rogers, A.; Van Bibber, K.; Waltz, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Berkeley Instrumental Neutron Generator (BINGE) facility is the product of a consortium involving the Berkeley Geochronology Center (BGC), the U.C. Berkeley Nuclear Engineering Dept. (UCB/NE), and Lawrence Berkeley (LBNL) and Lawrence Livermore (LLNL) National Labs. BINGE was initially designed (and funded by NSF) for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. BINGE uses a plasma-based deuteron ion source and a self-loading Ti-surfaced target to induce deuteron-deuterium (DD) fusion via the reaction 2H(d,n)3He, producing 2.45 MeV neutrons. The limited neutron energy spectrum is aimed at reducing recoil effects, interfering nuclear reactions, and unwanted radioactive byproducts, all of which are undesirable consequences of conventional irradiation with 235U fission spectrum neutrons. Minimization of interfering reactions such as 40Ca(n,na)36Ar greatly reduces penalties for over-irradiation, enabling improved signal/background measurement of e.g. 39Ar. BINGE will also be used for a variety of nuclear physics and engineering experiments that require a high flux of monoenergetic neutrons. Neutron energies lower than 2.45 MeV can be obtained via irradiation ports within and external to polyethylene shielding. Initial commissioning produced a neutron flux of 108 n/sec/cm2 at 1 mA source current and 100 kV anode voltage, as expected. When scaled up to the 1 A source current as planned, this indicates that BINGE will achieve the design objective neutron flux of 1011 n/sec/cm2. Further progress towards this goal will be reported. Supported by NSF (grant #EAR-0960138), BGC, UCB/NE, University of California Office of the President, and DOE through LLNL under contract #DE-AC52-07NA27344 and LBNL under contract #DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  19. A Deuteron-Deuteron Neutron Generator for 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, P. R.; Leung, K.; Becker, T.; Cassata, W. S.; Chen, A. X.; Jones, G.

    2010-12-01

    Neutron irradiation of samples for 40Ar/39Ar dating conventionally uses 235U fission reactors whose broad neutron energy spectra engender recoil phenomena, interfering reactions and radiological issues. An alternative source of neutrons with a nearly monoenergetic energy distribution can be obtained via the deuteron-deuteron (D-D) fusion process by which 2 deuterium (D) atoms are fused to create 3He and a neutron with 2.45 MeV energy. Existing neutron generators of this type have produced as much as ~109 n/s, insufficient to provide an alternative to fission reactors. We are building a novel D-D neutron generator aimed at achieving 1012-1013 n/s, featuring a toroidal deuterium plasma ion source that extracts radially inward focused D+ ion beams at 120 kV. The high energy D+ ion beam continuously loads a cylindrical titanium target to form TiD2 at the surface. Subsequent D+ ions then interact with the deuterated titanium to produce the forward biased neutrons that irradiate samples located concentrically inside the cylindrical target. The main limitation on neutron flux is posed by the challenge of cooling the target to prevent outgassing of deuterium from the titanium surface, hence a fluid-cooled Cu-backing is employed. The D-D neutrons to be produced will (1) dramatically reduce the energy (hence displacement) spectrum of recoiling activated 39Ar and 37Ar nuclides, (2) virtually eliminate unwanted interfering reactions on Ca, K, and Cl, and (3) significantly ameliorate radiological concerns due to e.g. collateral activation of Al in sample vessels and samples themselves. Reduction of recoil distances enables fine-grained materials such as clay minerals to be dated more reliably, and the reduction of interfering reactions will reduce the accuracy penalties for over- or under-irradiating samples as well as extending the viability shelf-life of irradiated samples.This project is supported by NSF.

  20. Late Miocene Thermal Evolution of the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis as Constrained by Biotite 40Ar/39Ar Thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, J.; Ji, J.; Zhou, J.; Tu, J.; Sun, D.; Han, B.; Zhong, D.

    2014-12-01

    We conducted biotite 40Ar/39Ar thermochronological research in the eastern Himalayan syntaxis and the surrounding Gangdese belt that wraps around the syntaxis, aiming to explore the overall cooling pattern and thermal evolution in this hard-to-access region. The compilation of our new dataset and published ages in the region presents a new temporal-spatial pattern: (1) Separated by the boundary faults of the eastern Himalayan syntaxis, a temporal gap at 13-7 Ma exists in the cooling history of the study area, with ages younger than 7 Ma clustering within the syntaxis, while ages older than 13 Ma distributing in the Gangdese belt. The gap could be a manifestation of the reactivated rapid cooling of the syntaxis since 7 Ma on the background of slow cooling all over the region, which temporally constrains the initial propagation of the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. (2) Ages in the syntaxis and the surrounding region show an annulus shape that younging toward Namche Barwa-Gyala Peri peak that is the core of the syntaxis, from 7-4 Ma and 4-2 Ma in the vicinities to 2-1 Ma in the core, which presents a spatially progressive acceleration in the cooling and exhumation towards the core. This observation indicates that the syntaxis experiences an inward acceleration along a vertical stalk rather than large-scale lateral propagation since late Miocene. The new findings argue that cooling revealed by biotite 40Ar/39Ar method was driven by tectonic contraction. We propose a model for the development of the Namche Barwa syntaxis that dominated by impulsive accelerating and subordinated by progressive accelerating driving by gravitational isostasy.

  1. Geology and preliminary [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar geochronology of the Sliderock Mountain volcano, south-central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Du Bray, E.A.; Harlan, S.S. )

    1993-04-01

    The Sliderock Mountain Volcano is a deeply eroded, Upper Cretaceous basaltic andesite stratovolcano complex located along the northeastern margin of the Laramide Beartooth uplift of south-central Montana. Historically, these rocks have been included in the Livingston Group and correlated with Upper Cretaceous, dominantly epiclastic sedimentary rocks of the Livingston Group in the Crazy Mountains Basin. Recent geologic mapping has identified several map units including: basaltic andesite of Derby Ridge (lava flows, and minor interbedded pyroclastic flows including welded tuff, block and ash flows, and lahars); volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks; lahar deposits; dioritic plutons and sills (including the diorite of Sliderock Mountain); basaltic andesite lavas; and basaltic trachyandesite dikes. Stratigraphic relations indicate that initial volcanic activity was dominated by eruption of the basaltic andesite of Derby Ridge. Cross-cutting relations indicate that dioritic plutons and sills are younger than the basaltic andesite of Derby Ridge and the lahars but age relations with the second set of basaltic andesite lavas are indeterminate. The volcanic and dike rocks of the stratovolcano are cpx-plag rocks, characterized by limited compositional variation, whereas intrusive rocks are hbl-plag rocks whose compositions are principally that of diorite, but range to granite. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar isotopic analysis of hornblende from the Lodgepole intrusion, a hypabyssal intrusion that may constitute part of the volcano's solidified magma chamber, gives an age of 76.2 [+-] 0.3 Ma (1[sigma]), significantly younger than a previously reported K-Ar biotite age of 82 Ma. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar analyses of sericite from weakly mineralized Au-bearing quartz veins hosted by the diorite of Sliderock Mountain give slightly younger isochron ages of 73--74 Ma indicating that gold mineralization is probably associated with the late stages of cooling of the Sliderock Mountain magma system.

  2. 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb Ages and Isotopic Data for Oligocene Ignimbrites, Calderas, and Granitic Plutons, Southern Stillwater Range and Clan Alpine Mountains: Insights into the Volcanic-Plutonic Connection and Crustal Evolution in Western Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, D. A.; Watts, K. E.; Henry, C.; Colgan, J. P.; Cousens, B.

    2014-12-01

    Calderas in the southern Stillwater Range (SSR) and Clan Alpine Mountains (CAM) were formed during the mid-Tertiary ignimbrite flareup and subsequently tilted (40->90°) by large-magnitude extension. New geologic mapping, geochemistry, and 40Ar/39Ar and SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating document 2 periods of magmatism resulting in 4 nested calderas and related granitoid plutons in sections up to 10 km thick. The first period included pre-caldera rhyolite lava domes (30(?) Ma), ~5 km of pre- and post-collapse intermediate lavas and rhyolite tuff that filled the Job Canyon caldera (~29.4 to 28.8 Ma), and the >4-5 km thick, geochemically similar IXL pluton (28.9±0.4 Ma) that intruded the Job Canyon caldera. The second period included pre-caldera rhyolite lava domes and dikes (~25.5 Ma) and 3 ignimbrite units in 3 calderas: tuff of the Louderback Mountains (low-silica rhyolite; ≥600 m thick; ~25.2 Ma); tuff of Poco Canyon (high-silica rhyolite; up to 4.3 km thick; 25.27±0.05 Ma); and ≥2000 km3 tuff of Elevenmile Canyon (trachydacite to rhyolite; up to 4.5 km thick; 25.12±0.01 Ma). The composite Freeman Creek pluton (granite, 24.8±0.4 Ma; granodiorite, 25.0±0.2 Ma) and Chalk Mountain rhyolite porphyry (25.2±0.2 Ma) and granite (24.8±0.3 Ma) plutons intruded the Poco Canyon and Elevenmile Canyon calderas. Early (30 Ma) rhyolites have the least radiogenic compositions (Sri~0.7040), whereas other units are relatively homogeneous (Sri~0.7050, ENd~0.0). Oxygen isotope compositions for SSR and CAM calderas are highly variable (d18Oquartz=5.6-8.2‰, d18Osanidine=5.5-7.0‰, d18Ozircon= 4.1-6.3‰), corresponding to a magmatic range of 5.7-7.9‰. U-Pb dating of zircons indicates homogeneous age populations and few/no xenocrysts and antecrysts. These data show that (1) thick plutons (>2-5 km) underlie compositionally and temporally related caldera-filling ignimbrites, (2) caldera-forming cycles are isotopically variable, requiring divergent magmatic sources in relatively

  3. The 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar dating of lavas from the Hilo 1-km core hole, Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, W.D.; Turrin, B.D.; Renne, P.R.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Mauna Kea lava flows cored in the HilIo hole range in age from <200 ka to about 400 ka based on 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating and K-Ar analyses of 16 groundmass samples and one coexisting plagioclase. The lavas, all subaerially deposited, include a lower section consisting only of tholeiitic basalts and an upper section of interbedded alkalic, transitional tholeiitic, and tholeiitic basalts. The lower section has yielded predominantly complex, discordant 40Ar/39Ar age spectra that result from mobility of 40Ar and perhaps K, the presence of excess 40Ar, and redistribution of 39Ar by recoil. Comparison of K-Ar ages with 40Ar/39Ar integrated ages indicates that some of these samples have also lost 39Ar. Nevertheless, two plateau ages of 391 ?? 40 and 400 ?? 26 ka from deep in the hole, combined with data from the upper section, show that the tholeiitic section accumulated at an average rate of about 7 to 8 m/kyr and has an mean recurrence interval of 0.5 kyr/flow unit. Samples from the upper section yield relatively precise 40Ar/39Ar plateau and isotope correlation ages of 326 ?? 23, 241 ?? 5, 232 ?? 4, and 199 ?? 9 ka for depths of -415.7 m to -299.2 m. Within their uncertainty, these ages define a linear relationship with depth, with an average accumulation rate of 0.9 m/kyr and an average recurrence interval of 4.8 kyr/flow unit. The top of the Mauna Kea sequence at -280 m must be older than the plateau age of 132 ?? 32 ka, obtained for the basal Mauna Loa flow in the corehole. The upward decrease in lava accumulation rate is a consequence of the decreasing magma supply available to Mauna Kea as it rode the Pacific plate away from its magma source, the Hawaiian mantle plume. The age-depth relation in the core hole may be used to test and refine models that relate the growth of Mauna Kea to the thermal and compositional structure of the mantle plume.

  4. Dating fault-generated pseudotachylytes: comparison of 40Ar/39Ar stepwise-heating, laser-ablation and Rb-Sr microsampling analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Wolfgang; Kelley, Simon; Villa, Igor

    2002-07-01

    Three different geochronological techniques (stepwise-heating, laser-ablation 40Ar/39Ar, Rb-Sr microsampling) have been evaluated for dating fault-generated pseudotachylytes sampled along the Periadriatic Fault System (PAF) of the Alps. Because pseudotachylytes are whole-rock systems composed of melt, clast and alteration phases, chemical control from both Ar isotopes (Cl/K, Ca/K ratios) and EMPA analyses is crucial for their discrimination. When applied to stepwise-heating 40Ar/39Ar analyses, this approach yields accurate melt-related ages, even for complex age spectra. The spatial resolution of laser-ablation 40Ar/39Ar analyses is capable of contrasting melt, clast and alteration phases in situ, provided the clasts are not too fine grained, the latter of which results in integrated "mixed" ages without geological information. Elevated Cl/K and Ca/K ratios were found to be an invaluable indicator for the presence of clast admixture or inherited 40Ar. Due to incomplete isotopic resetting during frictional melting, Rb-Sr microsampling dating did not furnish geologically meaningful ages. On the basis of isotopic disequilibria among pseudotachylyte matrix phases, and independent Rb-Sr microsampling dating of cogenetic (ultra)mylonites, the concordant 40Ar/39Ar pseudotachylyte ages are interpreted as formation ages. The investigated pseudotachylytes altogether reveal a Cretaceous to Miocene history for the entire PAF, consistent with independent geological evidence. Individual faults, however, consistently reveal narrower intervals of enhanced activity lasting a few million years. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer LINK server at http://dx.doi.org/10.1008/s00410-002-0381-6

  5. Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar geochronologic data from late Proterozoic mafic dikes and sills, Montana and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlan, Stephen S.; Geissman, John William; Snee, Lawrence W.

    1997-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar results from mafic dikes and sills in northwestern Wyoming and western Montana yield similar virtual geomagnetic poles and isotopic dates. In combination with paleomagnetic and geochronologic data from elsewhere in the western Cordillera, these data provide evidence for a regional mafic magnetic event at 780 to 770 Ma that affected a large area of western North America.

  6. Geochemical and 40Ar/39Ar constraints on the evolution of volcanism in the Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, Joseph P.

    The tectonic mechanisms producing Pliocene to active volcanism in eastern Papua New Guinea (PNG) have been debated for decades. In order to assess mechanisms that produce volcanism in the Woodlark Rift, we evaluate the evolution of volcanism in eastern PNG using 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology and whole rock geochemistry. Active volcanism in southeastern Papua New Guinea occurs on the Papuan Peninsula (Mt. Lamington, Mt. Victory and Waiwa), in the Woodlark Rift (Dobu Island, SE Goodenough Island, and Western Fergusson Island), and in the Woodlark Basin. In the Woodlark Basin, seafloor spreading is active and decompression melting of the upper mantle is producing basaltic magmatism. However, the cause of Pliocene and younger volcanism in the Woodlark Rift is controversial. Two hypotheses for the tectonic setting have been proposed to explain Pliocene and younger volcanism in the Woodlark Rift: (1) southward subduction of Solomon Sea lithosphere beneath eastern PNG at the Trobriand Tough and (2) decompression melting of mantle, previously modified by subduction, as the lithosphere undergoes extension associated with the opening of the Woodlark Basin. A comparison of 40Ar/39Ar ages with high field strength element (HFSE) concentrations in primary magmas indicates that HFSE concentrations correlate with age in the Woodlark rift. These data support the hypothesis that Pliocene to active volcanism in the Woodlark Rise and D'Entrecasteaux Islands results from decompression melting of a relict mantle wedge. The subduction zone geochemical signatures (negative HFSE anomalies) in Woodlark Rift lavas younger than 4 m.y. are a relict from older subduction beneath eastern Papua, likely in the middle Miocene. As the lithosphere is extended ahead of the tip of the westward propagating seafloor spreading center in the Woodlark Basin, the composition of volcanism is inherited from prior arc magmatism (via flux melting) and through time evolves toward magmatism associated with a rifting

  7. Detailed 40Ar/39Ar dating of geologic events associated with the Mantos Blancos copper deposit, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveros, Verónica; Féraud, Gilbert; Aguirre, Luis; Ramírez, Luis; Fornari, Michel; Palacios, Carlos; Parada, Miguel

    2008-03-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar geochronological method was applied to date magmatic and hydrothermal alteration events in the Mantos Blancos mining district in the Coastal Cordillera of northern Chile, allowing the distinction of two separate mineralization events. The Late Jurassic Mantos Blancos orebody, hosted in Jurassic volcanic rocks, is a magmatic-hydrothermal breccia-style Cu deposit. Two superimposed mineralization events have been recently proposed. The first event is accompanied by a phyllic hydrothermal alteration affecting a rhyolitic dome. The second mineralization event is related to the intrusion of bimodal stocks and sills inside the deposit. Because of the superposition of several magmatic and hydrothermal events, the obtained 40Ar/39Ar age data are complex; however, with a careful interpretation of the age spectra, it is possible to detect complex histories of successive emplacement, alteration, mineralization, and thermal resetting. The extrusion of Jurassic basic to intermediate volcanic rocks of the La Negra Formation is dated at 156.3 ± 1.4 Ma (2 σ) using plagioclase from an andesitic lava flow. The first mineralization event and associated phyllic alteration affecting the rhyolitic dome occurred around 155-156 Ma. A younger bimodal intrusive event, supposed to be equivalent to the bimodal stock and sill system inside the deposit, is probably responsible for the second mineralization event dated at ca. 142 Ma. Other low-temperature alteration events have been dated on sericitized plagioclase at ca. 145-146, 125, and 101 Ma. This is the first time that two distinct mineralization events have been documented from radiometric data for a copper deposit in the metallogenic belt of the Coastal Cordillera of northern Chile.

  8. WA1ms: A ∼2.61 Ga muscovite standard for 40Ar/39Ar dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, Fred; Frew, Adam; Joly, Aurore; Mayers, Celia; Evans, Noreen J.

    2014-09-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar dating technique requires the use of neutron fluence monitors (standards) to allow calculation of the age of a sample. Precise calibration of these standards is crucial to obtaining accurate ages and decreasing the uncertainties associated with 40Ar/39Ar dates. Few fully intercalibrated 40Ar/39Ar standards with a sufficient total fusion grain-to-grain reproducibility are currently in use in the argon community. For Precambrian samples, only Hb3gr hornblende (∼1.08 Ga) yields sufficient grain-to-grain reproducibility and has an appropriate age for acceptable argon isotopic ratio measurements. Here, we present chemical and intercalibration results for a new ∼2.61 Ga standard. WA1ms is a muscovite extracted from an Archaean shear zone in the Lake Johnston greenstone belt, Western Australia. In situ trace element analysis by ELA-ICPMS revealed consistent K contents, subtle zonation and intra-grain and grain-to-grain heterogeneities in Rb, Sr, Ti, and Fe but a lack of mineral inclusions.WA1ms has been investigated over 3 irradiations ranging from 25 to 40 h, in two reactors, with several disc positions and three grains sizes and has been calibrated against FCs and GA1550, and Hb3gr. Overall, we carried out 48 total fusion and 4 step-heating experiments of WA1ms crystals. Flat age spectra and average F-value (40Ar∗/39ArK) relative standard deviations ranging from of 0.43% to 0.60% (P = 0.15-0.83) for 47/48 analyses demonstrate the reproducibility of WA1ms and its suitability as a reliable 40Ar/39Ar standard. We calculated R[WA1ms/FCs] = 205.59 ± 0.25, R[WA1ms/GA1550] = 57.25 ± 0.06 and R[WA1ms/Hb3gr] = 3.9713 ± 0.014 (all with P > 0.14) allowing direct comparison between WA1ms and any standards in used in the community, provided that they have been calibrated against any of the three standards used in the calibration and regardless of the age adopted for each of these standards. The recently revised decay constant values and standard ages proposed

  9. High resolution sup 40 Ar/ sup 39 Ar chronostratigraphy of the Late Cretaceous El Gallo Formation, Baja California del Norte, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Fulford, M.M.; Busby-Spera, C. ); Renne, P.R.

    1991-03-01

    Laser probe {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar analyses of individual sanidine grains from four tuffs in the alluvial Late Cretaceous (Campanian) El Gallo Formation yield statistically distinct mean dates ranging from 74.87 {plus minus} 0.05 Ma to 73.59 {plus minus} 0.09 Ma. The exceptional precision of these dates permits calculation of statistically significant sediment accumulation rates that are much higher than passive sediment loading would cause, implying rapid tectonically induced subsidence. The dates bracket tightly the age of important dinosaur and mammalian faunas previously reported from the El Gallo Formation. The dates support an age less than 73 Ma for the Campanian/Maastrichtian stage boundary, younger than indicated by several currently used time scales. Further application of the single grain {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar technique may be expected to greatly benefit stratigraphic studies of Mesozoic sedimentary basins and contribute to calibration of biostratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic time scales.

  10. Tectonic burial and exhumation cycles tracked by muscovite and K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology in a strike-slip fault zone, central Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idleman, Lauren; Cosca, Michael A.; Heizler, Matthew T.; Thomson, Stuart N.; Teyssier, Christian; Whitney, Donna L.

    2014-02-01

    Muscovite and K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar ages from the eastern margin of the Niğde massif in central Anatolia track the timing of initial exhumation, reburial, and final exhumation and cooling of metamorphic rocks deformed within a strike-slip fault zone. Although the ages of initial and final cooling were known from previous studies, our new results document the timing of the reheating/reburial event. Muscovite from four of eight gneiss samples have Late Cretaceous 40Ar/39Ar ages that date initial cooling at ~ 75 Ma. The remaining samples have perturbed spectra that climb to Late Cretaceous ages with increasing extraction temperatures during analysis. These perturbed samples are located beneath a faulted unconformity overlain by Paleogene sedimentary deposits that were derived in part from the metamorphic rocks, then buried, metamorphosed, and deformed under greenschist facies conditions. Samples close to the faulted unconformity are more perturbed than structurally deeper samples. The age of the thermal perturbation is determined at 30 ± 5 Ma using multi-diffusion domain modeling of K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar data from two gneiss samples, one located close to the unconformity and one at a structurally deeper level. Muscovite 40Ar/39Ar results and modeled K-feldspar temperature-time histories show that the eastern margin of the Niğde massif experienced a reheating event that peaked at ~ 30 Ma. The thermal pulse has been attributed to reburial associated with transpression in the Ecemiş segment of the Central Anatolian Fault Zone along the eastern margin of the Niğde massif. Activity of this fault zone may represent a far-field expression of the onset of collision of Arabia with Eurasia in SE Anatolia.

  11. Cerro Toledo Rhyolite, Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico: {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar geochronology of eruptions between two caldera-forming events

    SciTech Connect

    Spell, T.L. |; McDougall, I.; Doulgeris, A.P.

    1996-12-01

    The Cerro Toledo Rhyolite comprises a group of domes and tephra which were erupted during the interval between two caldera-forming ignimbrites, the Tshirege Member and Otowi Member of the Bandelier Tuff, in the Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico. To provide a chronologic framework for geochemical and isotopic studies on these rhyolites, which record the evolution of the Bandelier magma system during this interval, a {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar geochronology study was undertaken. Pumice from major pyroclastic fall deposits within the rhyolite tephra and samples from the rhyolite domes were dated as well as the stratigraphically bracketing Bandelier Tuff. The {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages for the two members of the Bandelier Tuff Yield and interval of 380{+-}20 k.y. between these caldera forming eruptions. During this interval nine major pyroclastic pumice units were deposited in the sections studies, for which six yield isochron ages, one a weighted mean age, one a maximum age, and one no reliable age due to lack of sanidine. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar dates on pumice fall units within the Cerro Toledo Rhyolite tephra indicate that eruptive activity occurred at > 1.59, 1.54, 1.48, 1.37 and 1.22 Ma. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar dating of Cerro Toledo Rhyolite domes indicates these were erupted within the caldera at 1.54, 1.45, 1.38-1.34, and 1.27 Ma. The dates obtained indicate that eruptive activity occurred throughout the 380 k.y. interval between the two members of the Bandelier Tuff, but suggest that eruptions producing both tephra and domes occurred during discrete intervals at ca. 1.54, 1.48 and 1.38-1.34 Ma. 43 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. High-resolution 40Ar/39Ar study of Mount Avital, northern Golan: reconstructing the interaction between volcanism and a drainage system and their impact on eruptive styles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, Yishai; Weinberger, Ram; Calvert, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    We present a high-resolution 40Ar/39Ar data set of a volcanic complex at Mt. Avital, northern Golan, which experienced a transition from strombolian to phreatomagmatic activity. Previous studies attributed this transition to a change in the drainage basin of a nearby stream due to the damming by a lava flow, which resulted in flooding of the eruption site. In this study we determined the age of different volcanic phases and events in the history of Mt. Avital, as well as that of the damming flow, and examined the cause of the transition in light of the new 40Ar/39Ar ages. The 40Ar/39Ar results show that the history of Mt. Avital includes two main phases of volcanic activity, an early phase at ca. 800-600 ka and a late phase at 120-95 ka. Most of the activity of the late phase was continuous (within the 40Ar/39Ar error), including the transition to phreatomagmatic explosions, which occurred sometime between 115-107 ka, probably between 115-113 ka. The age of the damming flow is 115.6 ± 3.1 ka, which suggests that the volcanic activity immediately reacted to the change in the drainage basin dynamics. The activity culminated with lava flow eruptions, the latest at 100 ± 4 ka, either due to the establishment of the tuff ring levees, which prevented access of water to the eruption site, or due to the migration of activity to the northern part and then to the southern part of the complex.

  13. Direct dating of weathering phenomena by [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar and K-Ar analysis of supergene K-Mn oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Vasconcelos, P.M.; Brimhall, G.H. ); Renne, P.R.; Becker, T.A. )

    1994-03-01

    Potassium-bearing manganese oxides, cryptomelane, K[sub 1-2](Mn[sup 3+]Mn[sup 4+])[sub 8] O[sub 16] [center dot] xH[sub 2]O, and hollandite, (K,Ba)[sub 1-2](Mn[sup 3+],Mn[sup 4+])[sub 8] O[sub 16] [center dot] xH[sub 2]O, are often authigenically precipitated in weathering profiles. Dating of these phases allows timing of the progression of oxidation fronts during weathering and pedogenic processes. Potential problems in manganese oxide dating, such as Ar and/or K losses, excess argon, [sup 39]Ar loss by recoil during neutron irradiation, etc. are addressed. The K-Ar and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar analytical results indicate that Ar and/or K losses, excess [sup 40]Ar, and [sup 39]Ar recoil seem not to pose problems in manganese oxide dating. This investigation suggests that the fine scale, laser-probe [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar technique is most appropriate for dating of weathering phenomena because this technique permits identification of contaminating phases and the presence of multiple generations of weathering minerals in the inherently complex mineral assemblage characteristic of weathering profiles. K-Ar and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating of supergene K-bearing manganese oxides formed during lateritization of Archean and Proterozoic bedrocks in the Carajas Region, Amazonia, Brazil, indicates that weathering started before 72 [+-] 6 Ma. Petrographic, electron microscope, and electron microprobe investigation reveal multiple generations of manganese oxide precipitation. Age clusters at 65-69, 51-56, 40-43, 33-35, 20, 24, 12-17 Ma, and zero-age (0.2 [+-] 0.2 Ma) suggest episodic precipitation of K-Mn oxides resulting form changing weathering conditions in the Amazon throughout the Cenozoic. K-Ar and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating of supergene cryptomelane from weathering profiles in eastern Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil, suggests continuous weathering from 10 to 5.6 Ma ago, possibly reflecting local climatic conditions due to the proximity with the Atlantic Ocean.

  14. Laser /39/Ar-/40/Ar dating of two clasts from consortium breccia 73215

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichhorn, G.; Schaeffer, O. A.; James, O. B.; Mueller, H. W.

    1978-01-01

    A laser Ar-39-Ar-40 study of the components of an ANT-suite anorthositic gabbro and a black aphanite from a consortium breccia is reported. A wide range of K-Ar ages is found for the plagioclase in the anorthositic gabbro; at the centers of the largest grains is material showing the greatest age (older than 4.11 billion years) while the youngest material (3.81-3.88 billion years) is found near the grain margins. Partial outgassing of the clasts upon incorporation into the breccia could account for the age patterns. The black aphanite clast appears to be cogenetic with the aphanite that forms the breccia matrix. The time of crystallization of a lunar granite has also been measured by the laser technique.

  15. Dating transitionally magnetized lavas of the late Matuyama Chron: Toward a new 40Ar/39Ar timescale of reversals and events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Bradley S.; Hoffman, Kenneth A.; Chauvin, Annick; Coe, Robert S.; Pringle, Malcolm S.

    1999-01-01

    The K-Ar based geomagnetic polarity timescale was constructed using data from lavas and tuffs that bracketed, but rarely dated, the transitions between polarity intervals. Subsequent 40Ar/39Ar dating indicated that the ages of some polarity transitions had been underestimated by about 6%. Although the accepted ages of the polarity chron boundaries have increased, their precise temporal definition remained uncertain. We have taken a different approach and used incremental-heating techniques to obtain 18 new 40Ar/39Ar ages from basaltic lavas within flow sequences at Punaruu Valley, Tahiti, and Haleakala volcano, Hawaii. These lavas record transitional paleomagnetic directions corresponding to four mid-Pleistocene polarity reversals or events. Three lavas from Punaruu Valley previously thought to record the Cobb Mountain Normal Polarity Subchron (CMNS) gave a mean age of 1.105+/-0.005Ma, indicating that they were erupted about 76 kyr after the CMNS; this period of transitional field behavior is designated the Punaruu event. In addition, seven new 40Ar/39Ar ages from the Punaruu Valley indicate that the Jaramillo Normal Polarity Subchron (JNS) lasted about 67 kyr, starting at 1.053+/-0.006Ma and ending 0.986+/-0.005Ma. This agrees with astronomical estimates but conflicts with JNS ages proposed by Spell and McDougall [1992] and Izett and Obradovich [1994] on the basis of 40Ar/39Ar dating of rhyolite domes in the Valles Caldera. Indistinguishable 40Ar/39Ar ages of seven lavas, including one from Punaruu Valley and six from Haleakala that record broadly similar intermediate paleodirections, suggest that the Kamikatsura event occurred at 0.886+/-0.003Ma. Moreover, these data indicate that the Kamikatsura event occurred 20-40 kyr after another geomagnetic event, most probably taking place at 0.92 Ma. We designate this earlier field behavior the Santa Rosa event, adopting its name from that of a transitionally magnetized rhyolite dome which happened to figure prominently

  16. 40Ar/39Ar dates from alkaline intrusions of the northern Crazy Mountains, south-central Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlan, S. S.

    2005-05-01

    The Crazy Mountains basin of south-central Montana is a complex foreland basin that formed during the interaction of thin-skinned, decollement-style folds of the Montana thrust belt and the basement-involved folds and thrust faults of the Rocky Mountain foreland province. Near the depositional center of the basin, synorogenic strata of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation have been intruded and locally thermally metamorphosed by strongly alkaline to subalkaline Tertiary intrusive rocks. The subalkaline rocks are found mostly in the southern Crazy Mountains and form stocks (Big Timber stock, Loco Mountain stock), radiating dikes and sills. With the exception of the Ibex Mountain sill (?), the alkaline rocks are restricted to the northern Crazy Mountains. New 40Ar/39Ar dates are reported from the strongly alkaline rocks, including the Comb Creek stock and dike swarm, the Ibex Mountain sill(?), and sills from the Robinson anticline intrusive complex. The alkaline rocks of the Robinson anticline intrusive complex are exposed in the easternmost folds of the Cordilleran fold and thrust belt, but despite their arcuate and apparently folded map geometry they have been shown to post-date folding. Hornblende from a trachyte sill in the Robinson anticline intrusive complex yielded a relatively simple age spectrum with a weighted mean of 50.61 ± 0.14 Ma (2σ), which probably records the age of sill emplacement. Nepheline syenite and mafic nepheline syenites of the Comb Creek stock and a dike from its radial dike swarm, two sills from the Robinson antlicline intrusive complex, and the Ibex Mountains sill(?) gave biotite plateau dates ranging from 50.03 to 50.22 Ma, with 2σ errors of ± 0.11 to 0.19 Ma. Because these dates are from fairly small, hypabyssal intrusions, they must have cooled quickly and thus these dates closely approximate the emplacement age of the intrusions. These data indicate that the strongly alkaline intrusions were emplaced during a fairly restricted

  17. The Thermo Scientific HELIX-SFT noble gas mass spectrometer: (preliminary) performance for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barfod, D. N.; Mark, D. F.; Morgan, L. E.; Tomkinson, T.; Stuart, F.; Imlach, J.; Hamilton, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Thermo Scientific HELIX-platform Split Flight Tube (HELIX-SFT) noble gas mass spectrometer is specifically designed for simultaneous collection of helium isotopes. The high mass spur houses a switchable 1011 - 1012 Ω resistor Faraday cup and the low mass spur a digital pulse-counting secondary electron multiplier (SEM). We have acquired the HELIX-SFT with the specific intention to measure argon isotopes for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. This contribution will discuss preliminary performance (resolution, reproducibility, precision etc.) with respect to measuring argon isotope ratios for 40Ar/39Ar dating of geological materials. We anticipate the greatest impact for 40Ar/39Ar dating will be increased accuracy and precision, especially as we approach the techniques younger limit. Working with Thermo Scientific we have subtly modified the source, alpha and collector slits of the HELIX-SFT mass spectrometer to improve its resolution for resolving isobaric interferences at masses 36 to 40. The enhanced performance will allow for accurate and precise measurement of argon isotopes. Preliminary investigations show that we can obtain a valley resolution of >700 and >1300 (compared to standard HELIX-SFT specifications of >400 and >700) for the high and low mass spurs, respectively. The improvement allows for full resolution of hydrocarbons (C3+) at masses 37 - 40 and almost full resolution at mass 36. The HELIX-SFT will collect data in dual collection mode with 40Ar+ ion beams measured using the switchable 1011 - 1012 Ω resistor Faraday cup and 39Ar through 36Ar measured using the SEM. The HELIX-SFT requires Faraday-SEM inter-calibration but negates the necessity to inter-calibrate multiple electron multipliers. We will further present preliminary data from the dating of mineral standards: Alder Creek sanidine, Fish Canyon sanidine and Mount Dromedary biotite (GA1550).

  18. Coherence of the Dabie Shan UHPM terrane investigated by Lu-Hf and 40Ar/39Ar dating of eclogites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, F. M.; Groen, M.; Nebel, O.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Qiu, H.

    2009-12-01

    The Central China Orogenic Belt is the largest known ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic (UHPM) belt. Currently exposed UHP metamorphic rocks reflect subduction of massive swathes of continental crust to depths exceeding 100 km. Subsequent uplift exposed the voluminous sequence more or less intact. Deciphering responsible exhumation processes requires well constrained P-T-time paths. Most workers accept Triassic (~240 and 220-200 Ma) peak UHP metamorphism on the basis of zircon U-Pb ages in Central and Eastern Dabie Shan, while Western Dabie Shan, Qinling, North Qaidam and Altyn Tagh exhibit Ordovician (420-500 Ma) UHPM. However, contrasting reports of Carboniferous and Ordovian UHPM in Eastern Dabie Shan (Jian et al. 2001; Qiu & Wijbrans, 2006, 2008), and Ordovician, Carboniferous and Triassic (U)HPM in Western Dabie Shan (Wu et al. 2009) question this simple East-West gradient. Here, we investigate PTt-paths for localities throughout Dabie Shan to determine how far west the Triassic UHP event is documented, and how far east the Carboniferous and Ordovician events can be traced. Based on this distribution we aim to establish whether the Dabie Shan terrane is an amalgam of blocks that underwent UHPM at different times rather than a single coherent terrane. Eclogite samples are investigated for thermobarometry, Lu-Hf Grt-Cpx geochronology, and 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology. For fresh eclogites Thermocalc was used to establish equilibration conditions of the UHPM assemblage, Grt and Cpx of which were subsequently used for Lu-Hf isotope analysis. In addition, retrogressed eclogites, two fresh eclogites and two orthogneisses were analysed for 40Ar/39Ar isotope distributions in Phg, Bt, Amp and Kfs. Four fresh eclogites, all collected at reported UHP-localities confirm established PT-estimates for peak-metamorphism above the Coe-in reaction at 450-680 °C, with higher T for eastern Dabie. In one sample this is confirmed by the presence of a Coe inclusion in Cpx. Lu-Hf Grt

  19. An Ediacaran-Cambrian thermal imprint in Rajasthan, western India: Evidence from 40Ar-39Ar geochronology of the Sindreth volcanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Archisman; Pande, Kanchan; Sheth, Hetu C.; Sharma, Kamal Kant; Sarkar, Shraboni; Dayal, A. M.; Mistry, Harish

    2013-12-01

    The Sindreth Group exposed near Sirohi in southern Rajasthan, western India, is a volcanosedimentary sequence. Zircons from Sindreth rhyolite lavas and tuffs have yielded U-Pb crystallization ages of ~768-761 Ma, suggesting that the Sindreth Group is a part of the Malani magmatic event. Earlier 40Ar-39Ar studies of other Malani volcanic and plutonic rocks yielded disturbed argon release spectra, ascribed to a ~550 Ma thermal event possibly related to the Pan-African orogeny. To test and confirm this possibility, we dated two whole-rock and three feldspar separate samples of the Sindreth volcanics by the 40Ar-39Ar method. All samples yield disturbed argon release spectra suggesting radiogenic argon loss and with plateau segments at 550 Ma or 490 Ma. We interpret these as events of argon loss at 550-490 Ma related to an Ediacaran-Cambrian thermal event, possibly related to the Malagasy orogeny. The combined older and new 40Ar-39Ar results are significant in showing that whereas Ediacaran-Cambrian magmatic and metamorphic events are well known from many parts of India, they left thermal imprints in much of Trans-Aravalli Rajasthan as well. The overall evidence is consistent with a model of multiphase assembly of Gondwanaland from separate continental landmasses.

  20. Evolution of the Southwest Indian continental divergent margin: Constraints from 40Ar-39Ar dating of lateritic paleolandsurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Beauvais, Anicet; Chardon, Dominique; Arnaud, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    The western continental passive margin of Peninsular India is marked by the Western Ghats escarpment, which separates a coastal lowland from an East-dipping highland plateau and is carved both into the 63-Ma old Deccan traps and their Archean basement. Previous studies suggested establishment of the escarpment by differential erosion across an elevated rift shoulder, and thermochronologic models predicted escarpment formation from higher denudation in the coastal lowland than on the plateau until ~ 50 Ma. We provided complementary time constraints on the evolution of the passive margin by 40Ar-39Ar dating of supergene K-Mn oxides (cryptomelane) sampled in lateritic formations exposed on paleosurfaces, which are preserved as relicts on both sides of the escarpment. Three main lateritic paleosurfaces were identified in the highland at altitude ranges of 1200-1000 m (S1), 1000-900 m (S2) and 850-600 m (S3), and a lower paleosurface in the lowland at 150-50 m (S4). All the 40Ar-39Ar ages obtained on either side of the escarpment document major weathering periods for each paleosurface: 53 to 45 Ma (S1-S4) synchronously with the bauxitic weathering, 40 to 32 Ma (S2), 30 to 23 Ma (S3), and 24 to 19 Ma (S4). These ages indicate that most of the incision and dissection of plateau landsurfaces S1, S2, and S3 must therefore have taken place after 45, 32 and 23 Ma respectively, while the coastal lowland surface S4 was incised after 19 Ma. Preservation of laterites as old as 47 Ma in the coastal lowland implies that the escarpment already existed in the Mid-Eocene while intense bauxitic weathering was taking place on both sides of the escarpment. The ages obtained in the lowland are also indicative of limited erosion (~ 4 m Ma-1) at the foot of the escarpment since 45 Ma, and particularly low incipient incision of the lowland (~ 5 m Ma-1) since 19 Ma. Ages obtained on the highland plateau indicate further Neogene denudation inland but at less than 15 m Ma-1 since 45 Ma, and

  1. Argon behaviour in gem-quality orthoclase from Madagascar: Experiments and some consequences for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, N. O.; Kelley, S. P.

    1997-08-01

    into which 40Ar diffused in nature to yield apparent excess argon, but which were then filled with corresponding 39Ar during cycle heating. The K-feldspar structure illuminated by these studies is one in which argon diffuses through the lattice over distances of at least 100 pm probably via a volume diffusion mechanism to the grain boundaries. However, close to the surface argon may also diffuse along fast diffusion paths resulting from natural traps opened during sample preparation. Though restricted to very small volumes of gas in the case of the Itrongay orthoclase gem, the existence of the traps has potentially important consequences for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology applied to K-feldspars.

  2. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the Honghuaqiao Formation in SE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S.; Zhang, H.; Hemming, S. R.; Mesko, G. T.; Fang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The Jehol Biota, defined as the characteristic Eosestheria-Ephemeropsis-Lycoptera assemblage (Grabau, 1923, Bulletin of the Geological Survey of China), is widely distributed in eastern and central Asia (Li et al., 1982, Acta Geologica Sinica; Chen, 1988, Acta Palaeontologica Sinica). Abundant and varied fossils of the terrestrial Jehol Biota, including plants, insects, dinosaurs, birds, mammals, and freshwater invertebrates, have been discovered from the Dabeigou, the Yixian and the Jiufotang Formations (or their correlative strata) in northeast China from the Liaoning and Hebei Provinces and Inner Mongolia (Chen and Jin, 1999, Acta Palaeontologica Sinica). In addition, strata that may be correlative with the classic Jehol fossil-bearing formations have been identified extensively in central and eastern China, the Korean Peninsula, Mongolia, and Siberia. In the past three decades mollusk, conchostracan, ostracod, insect, fish, and plant fossils from localities in southeastern China, interpreted as related to the Jehol biota of the northeast, have been found (Mateer and Chen, 1986, Cretaceous Research; Li, 2003, Chinese Science Bulletin; Chen, Li and Batten, 2007, Geological Journal). However, a detailed correlation between the classic Jehol outcrops and the more recently found localities to the South and West has yet to emerge. Volcanic rocks from the Honghuaqiao fossil-bearing Formation in Tuzhou City of eastern Anhui Province, southeastern China provide an excellent opportunity to rectify this situation. Preliminary results of a pilot study suggest that the Honghuaqiao Formation is equivalent to the Longwanshan Formation of Anhui Province, southeastern China and the Yixian Formation, northeastern China (Chang et al., 2009, AGU abstract). Initial 40Ar/39Ar results indicate that conchostracans from the upper Honghuaqiao Formation are approximately 130 Ma. Our ongoing work aims to establish a high-resolution chronostratigraphy for Tuzhou City in Anhui Province

  3. Preservation of Sub-Microscopic Scale Structural Relics in Biotite: Implications for 40AR/39AR Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrando, M.; Di Vincenzo, G.; Ferraris, C.

    2012-12-01

    Relic crystals of magmatic biotite that undewent eclogite facies metamorphism were investigated by laser step-heating and laser in-situ 40Ar/39Ar techniques, in conjunction with SEM, EMP and TEM analyses, to elucidate the influence of recrystallization on K-Ar systematics. Samples were collected from meta-granitoids of the Gran Paradiso Massif (Western Alps), emplaced at upper crustal depths (P~0.25-0.35 GPa) in the Permian and metamorphosed at P>2.0 GPa and T~500-600°C in the Middle-Late Eocene. Two different samples, which underwent different degrees of Alpine re-equilibration, were examined. Sample JT1007 still preserves the original cm-sized magmatic quartz, k-feldspar and brown biotite (Bt 1), rarely rimmed by small green biotite crystals (Bt 2) related to Alpine metamorphism. Sample JT1008, instead, is characterized by a larger degree of Alpine re-equilibration, with static re-crystallization of the original magmatic quartz into aggregates of fine-grained polygonal crystals and common green biotite rims around brown Bt 1. Compositional profiling across Bt 1 in sample JT1007 reveals a progressive decrease in Ti content towards the crystal rims, which overlap with the composition of Bt 2. Compositional profiling across Bt 1 in sample JT1008, instead, reveals a homogeneous Ti content across the grain. This compositional pattern is mirrored by TEM investigation at the sub-micron scale, revealing a systematic zoning in Bt 1 from sample JT1007, with high-temperature magmatic politypes, surrounded by 1M politypes, still preserved in crystal cores. Crystal rims, instead, are characterized by 1M politypes only. Biotites from JT1008, instead, are homogeneous, solely consisting of 1M politypes. Infrared laser step-heating experiments on mineral separates from the two samples gave contrasting results: JT1008 yielded a flat spectrum, for more than 90% of the released 39ArK, with an error-weighted mean age of 36.5±0.3 Ma; JT1007 yielded a slightly saddle-shaped profile

  4. In-situ Ar isotope, 40Ar/39Ar analysis and mineral chemistry of nosean in the phonolite from Olbrück volcano, East Eifel volcanic field, Germany: Implication for the source of excess 40Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, Masafumi; Altenberger, Uwe; Günter, Christina

    2014-05-01

    Since the report by Lippolt et al. (1990), hauyne and nosean phenocrysts in certain phonolites from the northwest in the Quaternary East Eifel volcanic field in Germany were known to contain significant amounts of excess 40Ar, thus, show apparent older ages than the other minerals. However, its petrographic meaning have not been well known. Meanwhile, Sumino et al. (2008) has identified the source of the excess 40Ar in the plagioclase phenocrysts from the historic Unzen dacite lava as the melt inclusions in the zones parallely developed to the plagioclase rim by in-situ laser Ar isotope analysis. In order to obtain eruption ages of very young volcanoes as like Quaternary Eifel volcanic field by the K-Ar system, it is quite essential to know about the location of excess 40Ar in volcanic rocks. We have collected phonolites from the Olbrück volcano in East Eifel and investigated its petrography and mineral chemistry and also performed in-situ Ar isotope analyses of unirradiated rock section sample and also in-situ 40Ar/39Ar analysis of neutron irradiated section sample with the UV pulse laser (wavelength 266 nm) and 40Ar/39Ar analytical system of the University of Potsdam. Petrographically, nosean contained fine melt and/or gas inclusions of less than 5 micrometer, which mostly distribute linearly and are relatively enriched in chlorine than the areas without inclusions. Solid inclusions of similar sizes contain CaO and fluorine. In nosean, typically around 5 wt% of sulfur is contained. The 40Ar/39Ar dating was also performed to leucite, sanidine and groundmass in the same section for comparison of those ages with that of nosean. In each analysis, 200 micrometer of beam size was used for making a pit with depth of up to 300 micrometer by laser ablation. As our 40Ar/39Ar analyses were conducted one and half year after the neutron irradiation, thus, short lived 37Ar derived from Ca had decayed very much, we measured Ca and K contents in nosean by SEM-EDS then applied

  5. 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of latest Pleistocene (41 ka) marine tephra in the Mediterranean Sea: implications for global climate records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ton-That, Thao; Singer, Brad; Paterne, Martine

    2001-01-01

    Fifty-one 40Ar/ 39Ar laser heating analyses of sanidine crystals in the C-13 tephra layer, recovered out of a piston core raised from 3000 m depth in the Tyrrhenian Sea, yielded apparent ages between 25 and 112 ka. Twenty-four of these measurements define an age probability maximum and generate an isochron of 41.1±2.1 ka (2σ) with a 40Ar/ 36Ar intercept of 288±21 that is indistinguishable from the modern atmosphere. However, the entire population is skewed toward older apparent ages with smaller peaks at 48 ka, 55 ka, 67 ka, and 110 ka. The composition of glass shards in the C-13 tephra overlaps that of the SiO 2-rich phase of the 150 km 3 Campanian Ignimbrite which erupted from the Campi Flegrei caldera 130 km northwest of the core site. Although the 41.1±2.1 ka isochron is ˜15% older than K-Ar and 14C ages for the Campanian Ignimbrite, it is indistinguishable from recent 40Ar/ 39Ar age determinations. The Campanian Ignimbrite eruptions were also chemically similar to, and correlated with, the Y-5 ash layer - the most voluminous and widely dispersed late Pleistocene tephra in the Mediterranean region. The age of the Y-5 layer was constrained originally at 38.0±2.5 ka on the basis of astronomical dating of O-isotope stages. The 40Ar/ 39Ar ages, astronomical dating, plus chemical similarities permit correlation of the C-13 tephra layer with both the Campanian Ignimbrite and the Y-5 tephra layer. The older ages preserved in the C-13 tephra layer may reflect xenocrysts incorporated during the explosive eruption accompanying collapse of the Campi Flegrei caldera 41 ka. The C-13 tephra layer is correlated with a 10Be peak in an adjacent marine core, O-isotope stage 3.12, and immediately preceded a cooling episode corresponding to Heinrich event 4, thus the age of these features is constrained by radioisotope dating. The 41 ka peak in 10Be deposition is a global phenomenon whose age matches that of the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion. Thus, our results provide a new

  6. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and geochemical reconnaissance of the Eocene Lowland Creek volcanic field, west-central Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dudas, F.O.; Ispolatov, V.O.; Harlan, S.S.; Snee, L.W.

    2010-01-01

    We report geochronological and geochemical data for the calc-alkalic Lowland Creek volcanic field (LCVF) in westcentral Montana. 40Ar/ 39Ar age determinations show that the LCVF was active from 52.9 to 48.6 Ma, with tuff-forming eruptions at 52.9 ?? 0.14 and 51.8 ?? 0.14 Ma. These dates span the age range of vigorous Eocene igneous activity in the Kamloops-Absaroka-Challis belt. The LCVF evolved upward from basal rhyolites (SiO 2>71 wt%) to dacites and andesites (SiO 2 > 62 wt%). Compositional change parallels a transition from early explosive volcanism to late effusive activity. Four geochemical components can be detected in the rocks. A component with 206Pb/204Pb < 16.5 and epsilon;Nd near-15 is predominant in anhydrous, two-pyroxene dacites; hydrous rhyolites, rhyodacites, and dacites with epsilon;Nd below-10 are dominated by a second component; hydrous rocks with 206Pb/ 204Pb > 18.3 and epsilon;Nd>-9 contain a third component; and an andesite with low Nd content and epsilon;Nd near-9 probably contains a fourth component. The first three components probably derive from the lower and middle crust, whereas the fourth is probably from the lithospheric mantle. ?? 2010 by The University of Chicago.

  7. The sup 40 Ar/ sup 39 Ar thermochronology of the eastern Mojave Desert, California, and adjacent western Arizona with implications for the evolution of metamorphic core complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, D.A.; Harrison, T.M. ); Miller, C.F. ); Howard, K.A. )

    1990-11-10

    The application of {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar thermochronology provides information about the timing and nature of thrusting, plutonism, metamorphism, denudation, and detachment faulting. The {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages of 175 to 125 Ma from the Clipper, Piute, Turtle, Mohave, Bill Williams, and Hualapai Mountains are interpreted to be the result of a middle Mesozoic thermal event(s) caused by crustal thickening. The {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar data from the Clipper and Piute Mountains suggest that this thermal event was followed by a period of cooling at rates of 1-5C/m.y. Orogenesis culminated during the Late Cretaceous when rocks exposed in the Old Woman-Piute, Chemehuevi, and Sacramento Mountains attained temperatures >500C which reset the K-Ar systems of minerals from Proterozoic rocks. High-grade metamorphism in the Old Woman Mountains area was caused by the intrusion of the Old Woman-Piute batholith at 73 {plus minus} 1 Ma. Cooling rates following batholith emplacement in the Old Woman Mountains were {approximately}100C/m.y. between 73 and 70 Ma and 5-10C/m.y. from 70 to {approximately}30 Ma. By 30 Ma, rocks exposed in the Old Woman-Piute, Marble, Ship, Clipper, and Turtle Mountains were below {approximately}100C. The {sup 49}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages from the Sacramento Mountains suggest that mylonization caused by the onset of regional extension occurred at 23 {plus minus} 1 Ma. When extension started in the Chemehuevi Mountains, rocks exposed in the southwestern and northeastern portions of footwall to the Chemehuevi detachment fault were at {approximately}180C and {approximately}350C, respectively. Unroofing of the footwalls to detachment faults in the Sacramento and Chemehuevi Mountains resulted in average cooling rates of 10-50C/m.y. between 22 and 15 Ma.

  8. 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar dating of low grade metamorphism: examples on metabasites from Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, L.; Feraud, G.; Fuentes, F.; Delbar, M.; Morata, D.

    2003-04-01

    Dating low to very low-grade burial metamorphic assemblages is often difficult because of (1) few mineral phases compositionally suitable to apply the 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar methods, and (2) small amount in which these phases are commonly found. K-feldspar adularia, sericitic mica, and celadonite are the best known K-bearing secondary minerals. We present some successful attempts to analyse two distinct secondary phases from a same volcanic formation that allow to test the validity of the measured ages. These ages have been also compared with the crystallisation age of the volcanic rocks in which the secondary phases were lately developed. Adularia and sericite were selected from basic lava flows from a 3 to 13 km thick Cretaceous sequence from the Coastal Range of central Chile, at two different locations: the Bustamante Hill (west from Santiago), and the Cordón de Chacana, c. 80 km further north. Adularia came from a low-variance assemblage with pumpellyite, chlorite and low-albite contained in amygdules whereas sericite was present in milky-white strongly sericitized plagioclase crystals. While small clusters of rare fresh plagioclase grains from lava flows from Bustamante and Chacana displayed concordant plateau ages 119.4 ± 2.4 (2 sigma) and 118.7 ± 0.6 Ma, respectively, the adularia from the same formations gave sensibly younger ages around 94 Ma (high temperature steps), and 96.8 ± 0.2 Ma (plateau age) in Bustamante and Chacana, respectively. Sericite ages were measured in situ into single crystals of strongly transformed plagioclases. The relative proportion of sericite and plagioclase corresponding to each degasing step was monitored by measuring the Ca/K ratio (deduced from 37ArCa/39Ar_K). While intermediate ages were measured on some sericite of both sites (corresponding to a variable but permanent contribution of plagioclase on each step), a plateau age of 97.0 ± 1.6 Ma (concordant with adularia) could be obtained on a strongly sericitized plagioclase

  9. Duration of Louisville hotspot volcanism at IODP 330 sites Canopus, Burton, and Rigil via 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, B. E.; Vasconcelos, P. M.; Koppers, A. A.; Thiede, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Louisville seamount trail is a chain of intraplate volcanoes constructed over the past ~80 million years, as the Pacific plate moved 4300 km over a long-lived mantle melting anomaly. During IODP Expedition 330, over 800 m of alkaline mafic volcanic lavas, as well as interbedded and overlying sediments, were recovered from five of these seamounts in the older (~80-50 Ma) part of the chain. In this study we have undertaken geochronology of the volcanic units to provide time constraints for the magmatic evolution of the volcanoes. Sixteen of these drilled lava flows have been successfully dated using MAP-215-50 spectrometers, with six samples analyzed at Oregon State University (Koppers et al. 2012) and 12 flows analyzed at The University of Queensland. To check for consistency, two lava flows were dated at both laboratories; both samples yielded results within 2σ error. To minimize the effects of seawater alteration, only samples with well-crystallized groundmass were picked, and material cleaned via HNO3 and HCl acid pretreatment. Plateaus comprise 61 to 87% of the 39Ar released, and 40Ar/36Ar vs. 39Ar/36Ar correlation diagrams reveal all samples contained trapped argon within error of modern-day atmosphere. All ages determined are consistent with stratigraphic constraints, and we interpret the results to be reliable estimates of eruption ages. Units from Burton Guyot (site U1376A) yield ages from 70.8 × 0.5 to 64.1 × 0.5 Ma (2σ, using the atmospheric argon ratio and decay constants from Steiger & Jäger (1978) and a Fish Canyon sanidine age of 28.02 (Renne et al. 1998)). This long (~7 Ma) duration is consistent with petrologic evidence for substantial post-shield volcanic activity at this site. Meanwhile, at Canopus (site U1372A) and Rigil (sites U1373A and U1374A), lavas from the base, middle, and top of the respective volcanic piles yielded ages within analytical error. At the two deepest sites (U1372A and 1374A) 187 and 505 m of volcanic rocks were

  10. (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating of Bed I, Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania, and the chronology of early Pleistocene climate change.

    PubMed

    Deino, Alan L

    2012-08-01

    (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating of tuffs and lavas of the late Pleistocene volcanic and sedimentary sequence of Olduvai Gorge, north-central Tanzania, provides the basis for a revision of Bed I chronostratigraphy. Bed I extends from immediately above the Naabi Ignimbrite at 2.038 ± 0.005 Ma to Tuff IF at 1.803 ± 0.002 Ma. Tuff IB, a prominent widespread marker tuff in the basin and a key to understanding hominin evolutionary chronologies and paleoclimate histories, has an age of 1.848 ± 0.003 Ma. The largest lake expansion event in the closed Olduvai lake basin during Bed I times encompassed the episode of eruption and emplacement of this tuff. This lake event is nearly coincident with the maximum precessional insolation peak of the entire Bed I/Lower Bed II interval, calculated from an astronomical model of the boreal summer orbital insolation time-series. The succeeding precessional peak also apparently coincides with the next youngest expansion of paleo-Lake Olduvai. The extreme wet/dry climate shifts seen in the upper part of Bed I occur during an Earth-orbital eccentricity maximum, similar to episodic lake expansions documented elsewhere in the East African Rift during the Neogene.

  11. The sup 40 Ar/ sup 39 Ar geochronology of the Pelona schist and related rocks, southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, C.E. )

    1990-01-10

    Seventeen {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages for hornblende, celadonitic muscovite, and biotite from the Pelona, Orocopia, Rand, and Portal Ridge (POR) schists range from 39 to 85 Ma. Two muscovites and one hornblende from the Rand Schist have ages of 72 to 74 Ma, indistinguishable from the K-Ar age of 74 Ma for hornblende from a posttectonic granodiorite that intrudes the schist, but younger than the 70 Ma U-Pb age of the intrusion. Four muscovite and two hornblende ages for schist and mylonite from the East Fork area of the San Gabriel Mountains range from 55 to 61 Ma. Concordance of schist and upper plate ages confirms structural and metamorphic evidence that the Vincent thrust in the San Gabriel Mountains has not undergone significant postmetamorphic disruption. Ages from the Orocopia Mountains are 75 Ma for hornblende from nonmylonitic upper plate, 52 Ma for muscovite from structurally high Orocopia Schist that is mylonitic, and 41 Ma for muscovite from nonmylonitic Orocopia Schist. These are consistent with field evidence that the Orocopia thrust is a postmetamorphic normal fault. Muscovite and hornblende from the Gavilan Hills have ages of 48 to 50 Ma, younger than ages from the San Gabriel Mountains but similar to schist ages from the Orocopia Mountains. The geochronologic and structural complexities of the Vincent, Chocolate Mountains, Orocopia, and Rand thrusts imply that previously cited northeastward vergence may not relate to prograde metamorphism (subduction) of the POR schists. The data indicate substantial uplift of the POR schists prior to middle Tertiary detachment faulting, which confirms other geochronologic evidence of uplift in southern California and southern Arizona during the Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary.

  12. Laser-probe 40Ar/39Ar dating of strain fringes: Mid-Cretaceous synconvergent orogen-parallel extension in the interior of the Sevier orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Michael L.; Spell, Terry L.; Hoisch, Thomas D.; Arriola, Tonia; Zanetti, Kathleen A.

    2008-06-01

    UV and CO2 laser-probe 40Ar/39Ar in situ analyses of phlogopite and muscovite in fibrous strain fringes from greenschist-facies metamorphic rocks document mica growth ages at temperatures lower than their closure temperatures, and therefore directly date deformation. The new dates resolve the age of the earliest ductile fabric recorded in the Raft River-Albion-Grouse Creek metamorphic core complex of Utah and Idaho. Phlogopite was dated in quartz-calcite-phlogopite strain fringes around pyrite in Pennsylvanian-Permian rocks from the Grouse Creek Mountains (Utah) using both the UV and CO2 laser probe; muscovite was dated in quartz-muscovite strain fringes around pyrite in deformed Jurassic sills from the Black Pine Mountains (Idaho) using the CO2 laser probe. Phlogopite 40Ar/39Ar ages for individual strain fringes (Grouse Creek Mountains) range from 92 Ma to 110 Ma, with the most reliable ages ranging from 101 Ma to 110 Ma (mean age, 105.0 ± 5.8 Ma). Muscovite 40Ar/39Ar ages for individual strain fringes (Black Pine Mountains) range from 97 Ma to 112 Ma (mean age, 104.7 ± 5.8 Ma). Strain fringes are associated with a subhorizontal foliation and a generally N-trending elongation lineation exhibiting components of top-to-the-north simple shear and coaxial strain accommodating N-S extension and subvertical shortening. Midcrustal northward flow at 105 (±6) Ma within the interior of the Sevier orogen, coeval with east-directed shortening in the foreland and with plate convergence, records orogen-parallel synconvergent extension. We favor gravitational relaxation of structural culminations resulting from focused crustal shortening as a driving mechanism for orogen-parallel flow.

  13. Polychronous (Early Cretaceous to Palaeogene) emplacement of the Mundwara alkaline complex, Rajasthan, India: 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, petrochemistry and geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Kanchan; Cucciniello, Ciro; Sheth, Hetu; Vijayan, Anjali; Sharma, Kamal Kant; Purohit, Ritesh; Jagadeesan, K. C.; Shinde, Sapna

    2016-07-01

    The Mundwara alkaline plutonic complex (Rajasthan, north-western India) is considered a part of the Late Cretaceous-Palaeogene Deccan Traps flood basalt province, based on geochronological data (mainly 40Ar/39Ar, on whole rocks, biotite and hornblende). We have studied the petrology and mineral chemistry of some Mundwara mafic rocks containing mica and amphibole. Geothermobarometry indicates emplacement of the complex at middle to upper crustal levels. We have obtained new 40Ar/39Ar ages of 80-84 Ma on biotite separates from mafic rocks and 102-110 Ma on whole-rock nepheline syenites. There is no evidence for excess 40Ar. The combined results show that some of the constituent intrusions of the Mundwara complex are of Deccan age, but others are older and unrelated to the Deccan Traps. The Mundwara alkaline complex is thus polychronous and similar to many alkaline complexes around the world that show recurrent magmatism, sometimes over hundreds of millions of years. The primary biotite and amphibole in Mundwara mafic rocks indicate hydrous parental magmas, derived from hydrated mantle peridotite at relatively low temperatures, thus ruling out a mantle plume. This hydration and metasomatism of the Rajasthan lithospheric mantle may have occurred during Jurassic subduction under Gondwanaland, or Precambrian subduction events. Low-degree decompression melting of this old, enriched lithospheric mantle, due to periodic diffuse lithospheric extension, gradually built the Mundwara complex from the Early Cretaceous to Palaeogene time.

  14. On the 40Ar/39Ar Dating of Low-Potassium Ocean Crust Basalt from IODP Expedition 349, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate age dates for the basement rocks in the South China Sea (SCS) basins were lacking before the execution of International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 349 in early 2014. This left a large margin of error in estimated opening ages for the SCS and rendered various hypotheses regarding its opening mechanism and history untested, hampering our understanding of East Asian tectonic and paleoenvironmental evolution. Therefore, high-precision 40Ar/39Ar age dating lies at the heart of Expedition 349, which in particular aimed to determine the timing of the start and cessation of seafloor spreading in the SCS. In addition, the recovery of a complete seamount apron section at Site U1431 allows 40Ar/39Ar dating of abundantly present plagioclase and biotite crystals to help establish a detailed chronology of the sedimentary and volcaniclastic sequences cored. Here we present the first 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating ages on the low-potassium (~0.1-0.2 wt% K2O) and the least altered (loss on ignition < 1.5%) mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) from the SCS. Plagioclase and groundmass samples were prepared using conventional mineral separation techniques, acid-leaching and hand-picking. Analyses were carried out using a new ARGUS-VI multi-collector noble gas mass spectrometer. Ages are expected to have precisions ranging between 0.1-0.3 Ma (2σ), which will allow us to precisely and accurately date the final emplacement of basalts at Sites U1431, U1433 and U1434 in the SCS basin, just prior to the cessation of spreading as all sites were slightly offset from the relict spreading center.

  15. Chemical and physical erosion rhythms of the West African Cenozoic morphogenesis: The 39Ar-40Ar dating of supergene K-Mn oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvais, Anicet; Ruffet, Gilles; HéNocque, Olivier; Colin, Fabrice

    2008-12-01

    Chemical weathering and mechanical erosion are first-order processes of long-term tropical morphogenesis, which is still poorly deciphered for lack of time constraints. We address this issue by laser probe 39Ar-40Ar dating of generations of cryptomelane [K1-2Mn8O16, nH2O] from the manganese ore deposit of Tambao in northern Burkina Faso. This Mn deposit results from the supergene weathering of carbonate and silicate Mn protores underneath lateritic palaeolandsurfaces. It consists of an upper cryptomelane-rich domain and a lower domain where pyrolusite (β-MnO2) is the dominant Mn oxide. The oldest 39Ar-40Ar ages (59-45 Ma) are obtained on surface outcrops while the youngest ones characterize deep oxidation fronts (3.4-2.9 Ma). Apparent correlations of 39Ar-40Ar age groups with δ18O and eustatic curves allow definition of the different stages of morphogenesis. Paleocene-Eocene ages (59-45 Ma) bracket a greenhouse period propitious to bauxitic weathering. The lack of significant ages between ˜45 and 29 Ma characterizes a period dominated by mechanical erosion, during which detrital sediments, including lateritic materials, were accumulated in intracratonic basins allowing the exhumation of a new lateritic landsurface. Two major weathering periods separated by a second erosion episode (24-18 Ma) are also depicted at the end of Oligocene (29-24 Ma) and lower to mid-Miocene (18-11.5 Ma) in the upper domain, during which newly shaped land surfaces conspicuously weathered. The shorter-weathering and erosion episodes recorded in the lower domain from ˜18 to ˜2.9 Ma led to the final geomorphic changes that were conducive to the formation of glacis. The preservation of old cryptomelane (59-45 Ma) in the upper part of the ore deposit indicates a Cenozoic denudation limited to the erosion of previous bauxites, and partly, of ferricretes.

  16. Radiometric ages of the Fire Clay tonstein [Pennsylvanian (Upper Carboniferous), Westphalian, Duckmantian]: A comparison of U-Pb zircon single-crystal ages and 40Ar/39Ar sanidine single-crystal plateau ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, P.C.; Krogh, T.E.; Kwok, Y.Y.; Davis, D.W.; Outerbridge, W.F.; Evans, H.T.

    2006-01-01

    The Fire Clay tonstein [Pennsylvanian (Upper Carboniferous), Westphalian Series, Duckmantian Stage]-a kaolinized, volcanic-ash deposit occurring in Kentucky, West Virginia, Tennessee, and Virginia-is the most widespread bed in the Middle Pennsylvanian of the central Appalachian basin, USA. A concordant single-crystal U-Pb zircon datum for this tonstein gives a 206Pb/238U age of 314.6 ?? 0.9 Ma (2??). This age is in approximate agreement with a mean sanidine plateau age of 311.5 ?? 1.3 Ma (1??, n = 11) for the Fire Clay tonstein. The difference between the two ages may be due to bias between the 40K and 238U decay constants and other factors. The age of the Fire Clay tonstein has important implications for Duckmantian Stage (Westphalian Series) sedimentation rates, correlations with the Westphalian Series of Europe, Middle Pennsylvanian volcanic events, and the late Paleozoic time scale. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the eruptive history of Mount Erebus, Antarctica: summit flows, tephra, and caldera collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpel, Christopher J.; Kyle, Philip R.; Esser, Richard P.; McIntosh, William C.; Caldwell, David A.

    2004-12-01

    Eruptive activity has occurred in the summit region of Mount Erebus over the last 95 ky, and has included numerous lava flows and small explosive eruptions, at least one plinian eruption, and at least one and probably two caldera-forming events. Furnace and laser step-heating 40Ar/39Ar ages have been determined for 16 summit lava flows and three englacial tephra layers erupted from Mount Erebus. The summit region is composed of at least one or possibly two superimposed calderas that have been filled by post-caldera lava flows ranging in age from 17 ± 8 to 1 ± 5 ka. Dated pre-caldera summit flows display two age populations at 95 ± 9 to 76 ± 4 ka and 27 ± 3 to 21 ± 4 ka of samples with tephriphonolite and phonolite compositions, respectively. A caldera-collapse event occurred between 25 and 11 ka. An older caldera-collapse event is likely to have occurred between 80 and 24 ka. Two englacial tephra layers from the flanks of Mount Erebus have been dated at 71 ± 5 and 15 ± 4 ka. These layers stratigraphically bracket 14 undated tephra layers, and predate 19 undated tephra layers, indicating that small-scale explosive activity has occurred throughout the late Pleistocene and Holocene eruptive history of Mount Erebus. A distal, englacial plinian-fall tephra sample has an age of 39 ± 6 ka and may have been associated with the older of the two caldera-collapse events. A shift in magma composition from tephriphonolite to phonolite occurred at around 36 ka.

  18. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the eruptive history of Mount Erebus, Antarctica: Summit flows, tephra, and caldera collapse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harpel, C.J.; Kyle, P.R.; Esser, R.P.; McIntosh, W.C.; Caldwell, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Eruptive activity has occurred in the summit region of Mount Erebus over the last 95 ky, and has included numerous lava flows and small explosive eruptions, at least one plinian eruption, and at least one and probably two caldera-forming events. Furnace and laser step-heating 40Ar/39Ar ages have been determined for 16 summit lava flows and three englacial tephra layers erupted from Mount Erebus. The summit region is composed of at least one or possibly two superimposed calderas that have been filled by post-caldera lava flows ranging in age from 17 ?? 8 to 1 ?? 5 ka. Dated pre-caldera summit flows display two age populations at 95 ?? 9 to 76 ?? 4 ka and 27 ?? 3 to 21 ??4 ka of samples with tephriphonolite and phonolite compositions, respectively. A caldera-collapse event occurred between 25 and 11 ka. An older caldera-collapse event is likely to have occurred between 80 and 24 ka. Two englacial tephra layers from the flanks of Mount Erebus have been dated at 71 ?? 5 and 15 ?? 4 ka. These layers stratigraphically bracket 14 undated tephra layers, and predate 19 undated tephra layers, indicating that small-scale explosive activity has occurred throughout the late Pleistocene and Holocene eruptive history of Mount Erebus. A distal, englacial plinian-fall tephra sample has an age of 39 ?? 6 ka and may have been associated with the older of the two caldera-collapse events. A shift in magma composition from tephriphonolite to phonolite occurred at around 36 ka. ?? Springer-Verlag 2004.

  19. Detailed 40Ar/39Ar chronology of the Tancítaro Volcanic Field, Michoacán, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ownby, S.; Delgado-Granados, H.; Lange, R.; Hall, C. M.

    2005-12-01

    The Tancítaro volcanic field (TVF) is characterized by over 300 cinder cones and fissure fed lava flows, in addition to the ~10 shield volcanoes and 1 large andesite stratovolcano, ~60 km3 Volcán Tancítaro. The TVF is part of the larger Michoacán Guanajuato volcanic field (MGVF) in the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt, related to subduction of the Cocos plate. We report new 40Ar/39Ar age constraints on the most recent activity from Volcán Tancítaro. Previously, there was only one K-Ar date 530±60 ka for this volcano; Ban et al. (1992). It has been the site of at least two debris avalanche deposits (Capra et al., 2002; Garduno-Monroy, 1999; Ownby et al., 2004), and continues to threaten the cities of Uruapan and Apatzingán in the state of Michoacán, which have a combined population of >300,000. The most recent activity produced a thin blanket of ash (~1-5 m thick along the flanks of the volcano); this ash is tightly bracketed by dates on two nearby shield volcanoes, one underneath (268±14 ka) and the other on top (267±12 ka) of this ash layer. It appears to have triggered a large debris avalanche deposit off the steep slopes of V. Tancítaro (the distinctive ash is mixed in with this avalanche deposit), which itself is bracketed by two cinder cones, one underneath (425±45 ka) and the other on top (179±77 ka). The timing of this ash eruption is close to that for four different andesite lavas from near the summit of V. Tancítaro, which yielded ages of 251±25 ka, 241±25 ka, 228±16 ka, 223±23 ka, respectively. Other dates from the main edifice of V. Tancítaro reveal two earlier episode of activity at ~450 and ~700 ka. We also report an additional set of ~50 40Ar/39Ar ages on various cinder cones, shields, and fissure-fed flows that are peripheral to V. Tancítaro. The samples range in age from ~980 ka to the present, with no obvious breaks in time. They range continuously from 51-62 wt% SiO2, with no breaks in composition. It appears that neither dacite

  20. Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis in the eastern Beishan orogen: constraints from zircon U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Songjian; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian; Mao, Qigui

    2016-04-01

    The continental growth mechanism of the Altaids in Central Asia is still in controversy between models of continuous subduction-accretion versus punctuated accretion by closure of multiple oceanic basins. The Beishan orogenic belt, located in the southern Altaids, is a natural laboratory to address this controversy. Key questions that are heavily debated are: the closure time and subduction polarity of former oceans, the emplacement time of ophiolites, and the styles of accretion and collision. This paper reports new structural data, zircon ages and Ar-Ar dates from the eastern Beishan Orogen that provide information on the accretion process and tectonic affiliation of various terranes. Our geochronological and structural results show that the younging direction of accretion was northwards and the subduction zone dipped southwards under the northern margin of the Shuangyingshan micro-continent. This long-lived and continuous accretion process formed the Hanshan accretionary prism. Our field investigations show that the emplacement of the Xiaohuangshan ophiolite was controlled by oceanic crust subduction beneath the forearc accretionary prism of the Shuangyingshan-Mazongshan composite arc to the south. Moreover, we address the age and terrane affiliation of lithologies in the eastern Beishan orogen through detrital zircon geochronology of meta-sedimentary rocks. We provide new information on the ages, subduction polarities, and affiliation of constituent structural units, as well as a new model of tectonic evolution of the eastern Beishan orogen. The accretionary processes and crustal growth of Central Asia were the result of multiple sequences of accretion and collision of manifold terranes. Reference: Ao, S.J., Xiao, W., Windley, B.F., Mao, Q., Han, C., Zhang, J.e., Yang, L., Geng, J., Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis in the eastern Beishan orogen: Constraints from zircon U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. Gondwana Research, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j

  1. Re-evaluation of polyphase kinematic and 40Ar/39Ar cooling history of Moldanubian hot nappe at the eastern margin of the Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racek, M.; Lexa, O.; Schulmann, K.; Corsini, M.; Štípská, P.; Maierová, P.

    2017-03-01

    A structural and geochronological 40Ar/39Ar study was performed in kilometre-scale middle and lower crustal lens-shaped domains dominated by a preserved subvertical foliation, surrounded by horizontally foliated migmatites. These domains occur within the Moldanubian nappe overlying the Brunia microcontinent at the eastern margin of the European Variscides. Three main deformation phases were recognized: subvertical S2 fabric trending NW-SE in lower crustal rocks and NE-SW in mid-crustal rocks. It is reworked by HT/MT horizontal fabric S3 along margins of crustal domains and in surrounding migmatites. S3 bears a prolate NE lineation parallel to the S2-S3 intersection in the lower crustal domain. In the middle crustal units, L3 is weak, connected to oblate strain and trends NE-SW parallel to the S2-S3 intersection. D4 non-coaxial shear deformation is mainly localized at the boundary between the Moldanubian nappe and Brunia and bears strong top to the NNE shear criteria. In order to constrain kinematics of the D3 deformation, strain modelling was performed to show that the Moldanubian hot nappe was frontally thrust over the Brunia indentor. The renewed D4 tangential movement only heterogeneously reactivates the horizontal S3. This evolution is recorded in 40Ar/39Ar amphibole cooling ages, which show two statistically significant Carboniferous peaks at 342 and 332 Ma, which are also reflected by published detrital muscovite 40Ar/39Ar ages in the adjacent foreland basin. This geochronological record is correlated with progressive erosion of the topographically elevated upper crustal part of the Moldanubian nappe during D3 frontal thrusting, followed by greenschist facies D4 transpressive reactivation and subsequent erosion of high-grade parts of the nappe.

  2. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar thermochronology and thermobarometry of metamorphism, plutonism, and tectonic denudation in the Old Woman Mountains area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, D.A.; Miller, C.F.; Harrison, T.M.; Hoisch, T.D.

    1992-02-01

    Discrimination of individual tectonometamorphic events in polymetamorphosed terranes requires a comprehensive understanding of the relative timing and conditions of metamorphism and plutonism. We have applied a combination of {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39} Ar thermochronology, petrology, and thermobarometry to reconstruct the complex Early Proterozoic through early Cenozoic tectonic and metamorphic evolution of continental crust in the Old Woman Mountains area, southeastern California. Strong Mesozoic thermal events obscure the earlier history in much of the Old Woman Mountains area. In those areas where Early Proterozoic rocks underwent only lower-greenschist-facies metamorphism during the Mesozoic, thermobarometry of pelitic schists indicates that Proterozoic metamorphism occurred at 9 to 11 kbar and {approximately}700 {degrees}C. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages of hornblende from samples of interbedded Proterozoic amphibolite indicate that this high-grade metamorphism took place before 1600 Ma. The relatively high-pressure conditions of Early Proterozoic metamorphism in the Old Woman Mountains area contrast with the low-pressure granulite-facies metamorphism that occurred elsewhere in the Mojave Desert at this time. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar analyses of hornblende from Proterozoic rocks within Mesozoic shear zones and hornblende barometry from Jurassic intrusive rocks suggest that tectonism and burial of Paleozoic strata to >10 km began between 170 and 150 Ma. This tectonism resulted in regional greenschist-facies metamorphism. Late-stage mineral assemblages in Proterozoic and Paleozoic pelitic rocks in the Old Woman Mountains area indicate an increase in metamorphic grade from greenschist to upper amphibolite facies toward Later Cretaceous Plutons of the 73 Ma Old Woman-Piute batholith. Barometric calculations from garnet-bearing metamorphic rocks suggest that this Cretaceous metamorphism took place at 3.5 to 5.0 kbar in the Old Woman Mountains. 68 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. The Line Islands revisited: New 40Ar/39Ar geochronologic evidence for episodes of volcanism due to lithospheric extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. S.; Gray, L. B.; Clague, D. A.; Hein, J. R.

    2002-03-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar ages of mineral separates and whole rock samples from nine volcanic edifices in the northern Line Islands region, between latitudes 20°N and 6°N, are incompatible with single or multiple hot spot models. Instead, two major episodes of volcanism, each lasting ~5 Ma and separated by ~8 Ma, occurred synchronously over long distances, not just along the main chain but also at nonaligned edifices. Volcanism during the older episode (81-86 Ma) extended over a distance of at least 1200 km along the eastern part of the complex seamount chain. Volcanism during the younger episode (68-73 Ma) was concentrated in the western part of the chain and may have extended over a distance of >4000 km. Chemical analyses of 68 samples represent a compositionally diverse suite, including tholeiitic, transitional, and alkalic basalt, strongly alkalic basanite and nephelinite, and alkalic differentiates ranging from hawaiite to trachyte. The most diverse assemblage of rocks was recovered from a cross-trending seamount chain south of Johnston Atoll. Although compositions of rocks from the two volcanic episodes overlap, compositions from the younger episode generally are more alkalic and include a larger proportion of highly differentiated compositions. None of the samples from the older episode, but many from the younger one, contain hydrous mineral phases such as amphibole and biotite. Extensive coeval volcanism along major segments of the chain is compatible with decompressional melting of heterogeneous mantle due to diffuse lithospheric extension along pre-existing zones of weakness. Episodes of volcanism are probably related to broad upwarping of the Superswell region in the eastern South Pacific, where these lavas originated.

  4. 39Ar - 40Ar Studies of Lherzolitic Shergottites Yamato 000097 and 984028

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Shih, C.-Y.; Mikouchi, T.; Misawa, K.

    2010-01-01

    Yamato 984028 (Y984028) was discovered by the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) in 1998 and recently classified as a lherzolitic shergottite with large pyroxene oikocrysts enclosing rounded olivine and chromites. It also contains shock veining and maskelynite. Y984028 is paired with the more recent lherzolitic shergottite finds Y000027/47/97 based on similarities in mineralogy and chemistry, as well as isotopic composition. We present here the studied Ar-39-Ar-40 of Y-984028 whole rock (WR) and pyroxene (Px), in order to gain better understanding of trapped Ar components with a comparison of the possibly-paired Y000097 Ar release.

  5. 40Ar/39Ar dating of unusual minerals (tourmaline, K-richterite, yimengite, wadeite and priderite) and applicability to the geological record.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, F.; Thern, E.; Wilde, S. A.; Frewer, L.

    2012-04-01

    One of the advantages of the 40Ar/39Ar technique is that it relies on the decay of K, one of the most abundant elements in the Earth's crust. As such, many minerals can be dated with this technique, with the corresponding age data reflecting either the emplacement age or a cooling age. Here we present robust well-defined 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages obtained on a suite of minerals with variable potassium concentration which, despite their potential to unravel numerous geological problems, have seldom been (if ever; e.g. priderite) analyzed using the 40Ar/39Ar technique. Tourmaline: Multi- and single-grain aliquots of tourmaline were extracted from three sets of cross-cutting and stratiform quartz-tourmaline veins throughout the siliciclastic metasedimentary rocks of the Archean Illaara granite-greenstone belt, Western Australia [1]. Tourmaline samples yielded 9 plateau and 1 inverse isochron ages defining two distinct age populations of 2939 ± 11 Ma (P=0.64) and 2642 ± 16 Ma (P=0.50). Tourmaline deposits are a common occurrence in the geological record [e.g. 2], and the mineral may be useful in assigning minimum depositional ages (e.g. cross-cutting veins) and in dating hydrothermal fluid circulations, as well as its potential for use in detrital mineral studies. Yimengite: This mineral is a K-oxide and has been recovered from the Turkey Well kimberlite pipe, Yilgarn Craton, Australia. We obtained two concordant well-defined 40Ar/39Ar plateaus with a mean age of 2128 ± 5 Ma (P=1.0) interpreted as the emplacement age of the Kimberlite. No excess Ar is present suggesting that this mineral can be used to date Kimberlite emplacement as a viable alternative to phlogopite, which commonly retains part of its mantle history [e.g. 3, 4] thus leading to uncertainties in assigning a precise age. K-Richterite, wadeite and priderite: K-richterite is a K-bearing sodic amphibole, wadeite is K-Zr silicate and Priderite is a K-oxide. These minerals have been recovered from Wolgidee

  6. 40Ar/(39)Ar geochronology and paleomagnetic stratigraphy of the Lukeino and lower Chemeron Formations at Tabarin and Kapcheberek, Tugen Hills, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Deino, Alan L; Tauxe, Lisa; Monaghan, Marc; Hill, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    (40)Ar/(39)Ar single-crystal laser-fusion dating, K-Ar dating, and paleomagnetic reversal stratigraphy have been used to determine the chronostratigraphy of the Kabarnet Trachyte, Lukeino Formation, Kaparaina Basalt Formation, and Chemeron Formation at the sites of Kapcheberek (BPRP#77) and Tabarin (BPRP#77) in the Tugen Hills, Kenya. The succession ranges in age from 6.56-3.8 Ma. The upper Lukeino Formation at Kapcherberek, including the fauna from the site BPRP#76, was deposited during chron C3r and can be constrained to the interval 5.88-5.72 Ma. The Chemeron Formation at Tabarin includes at the base an ignimbrite and associated basal air-fall tuff with a combined age of 5.31+/-0.03 Ma. Sedimentary and volcaniclastic rocks of the Chemeron Formation which unconformably overlie the ignimbrite record chrons C3n.2n through C2Ar. The combined(40)Ar/(39)Ar and paleomagnetic data constrain the age of this sequence to 4.63-3.837 Ma. The age of the Tabarin mandible fragment (KNM-TH 13150) and associated fauna at site BPRP#77 in the Chemeron Formation is 4.48-4.41 Ma, marginally older than similar early hominids from Aramis, Ethiopia. Basin subsidence appears to be defining an overall accumulation rate of about 17 cm/ka over the 2.7 Ma represented at Tabarin and Kapcheberek, despite episodes of rapid accumulation and hiatuses.

  7. High-precision 40Ar/39Ar sanidine geochronology of ignimbrites in the Mogollon-Datil volcanic field, southwestern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McIntosh, W.C.; Sutter, J.F.; Chapin, C.E.; Kedzie, L.L.

    1990-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar age spectra have been obtained from 85 sanidine separates from 36 ignimbrites and one rhyolitic lava in the latest Eocene-Oligocene Mogollon-Datil volcanic field of southwestern New Mexico. Of the 97 measured age spectra, 94 yield weighted-mean plateau ages each giving single-spectrum 1?? precision of??0.25%-0.4% (??0.07-0.14 Ma). Replicate plateau age determinations for eight different samples show within-sample 1?? precisions averaging ??0.25%. Plateau ages from multiple (n=3-8) samples of individual ignimbrites show 1?? within-unit precision of ??0.1%-0.4% (??0.04-0.13 Ma). This within-unit precision represents a several-fold improvement over published K-Ar data for the same ignimbrites, and is similar to the range of precisions reported from single-crystal laser fusion studies. A further indication of the high precision of unit-mean 40Ar/30Ar ages is their close agreement with independently established stratigraphic order. Two samples failed to meet plateau criteria, apparently due to geologic contamination by older feldspars. Effects of minor contamination are shown by six other samples, which yielded slightly anomalous plateau ages. 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages permit resolution of units differing in age by 0.5% (0.15 Ma) or less. This high resolution, combined with paleomagnetic studies, has helped to correlate ignimbrites among isolated ranges and has allowed development of an integrated timestratigraphic framework for the volcanic field. Mogollon-Datil ignimbrites range in age from 36.2 to 24.3 Ma. Ignimbrite activity was strongly episodic, being confined to four brief (<2.6 m.y.) eruptive episodes separated by 1-3 m.y. gaps. Ignimbrite activity generally tended to migrate from the southeast toward the north and west. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Paleoclimate change in the Nakuru basin, Kenya, at 119 - 109 ka derived from δ18Odiatom and diatom assemblages and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, Andreas; Deino, Alan; Leng, Melanie; Gasse, Francoise

    2016-04-01

    A 4.5m-thick diatomite bed deposited during the cold interval of the penultimate interglacial at ~119 - 109 ka documents a period in which a deep freshwater lake filled the Nakuru basin in the Central Kenya Rift (CKR), East Africa. Palaeohydrological conditions of the basin are reconstructed for the paleolake highstand using δ18Odiatom and characterization of diatom assemblages. The age of the diatomite deposit is established by precise 40Ar/39Ar-dating of intercalated pumice tuffs. The paleolake experienced multiple hydrological fluctuations on sub-orbital (~1,500 to 2,000 years) time scales. The magnitude of the δ18Odiatom change (+/- 3‰) and significant changes in the plankton-littoral ratio of the diatom assemblage (+/- 25%) suggest that the paleolake record can be interpreted in the context of long-term climatic change in East Africa. Using 40Ar/39Ar age control and nominal diatomite-sedimentation rates we establish a simplified age model of paleohydrological vs. climatic change, from which we conclude that more humid conditions prevailed in equatorial East Africa during the late Pleistocene over a relatively long time interval of several thousands years. Then, extreme insolation at eccentricity maximum and weakened zonal air-pressure gradients in the tropics favored intensified ITCZ-like convection over East Africa and deep-freshwater lake conditions.

  9. 40Ar/39Ar dating of tuff vents in the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy): Toward a new chronostratigraphic reconstruction of the Holocene volcanic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedele, L.; Insinga, D.D.; Calvert, A.T.; Morra, V.; Perrotta, A.; Scarpati, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Campi Flegrei hosts numerous monogenetic vents inferred to be younger than the 15 ka Neapolitan Yellow Tuff. Sanidine crystals from the three young Campi Flegrei vents of Fondi di Baia, Bacoli and Nisida were dated using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. These vents, together with several other young edifices, occur roughly along the inner border of the Campi Flegrei caldera, suggesting that the volcanic conduits are controlled by caldera-bounding faults. Plateau ages of ∼9.6 ka (Fondi di Baia), ∼8.6 ka (Bacoli) and ∼3.9 ka (Nisida) indicate eruptive activity during intervals previously interpreted as quiescent. A critical revision, involving calendar age correction of literature 14C data and available 40Ar/39Ar age data, is presented. A new reference chronostratigraphic framework for Holocene Phlegrean activity, which significantly differs from the previously adopted ones, is proposed. This has important implications for understanding the Campi Flegrei eruptive history and, ultimately, for the evaluation of related volcanic risk and hazard, for which the inferred history of its recent activity is generally taken into account.

  10. (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating, paleomagnetism, and tephrochemistry of Pliocene strata of the hominid-bearing Woranso-Mille area, west-central Afar Rift, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Deino, Alan L; Scott, Gary R; Saylor, Beverly; Alene, Mulugeta; Angelini, Joshua D; Haile-Selassie, Yohannes

    2010-02-01

    (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating of tuffs and mafic lavas, tephra geochemistry, and paleomagnetic reversal stratigraphy have been used to establish the chronostratigraphy of the Pliocene hominid-bearing fossiliferous succession at Woranso-Mille, a paleontological study area in the western part of the central Afar region of Ethiopia. The succession in the northwestern part of the study area ranges in (40)Ar/(39)Ar age from 3.82-3.570 Ma, encompassed by paleomagnetic subchron C2Ar (4.187-3.596 Ma). One of the major tuff units, locally named the Kilaytoli tuff, is correlative on the basis of age and geochemistry to the Lokochot Tuff of the Turkana Basin. A hominid partial skeleton (KSD-VP-1) was found in strata whose precise stratigraphic position and age is still under investigation, but is believed to correspond to the later part of this interval. Woranso-Mille fills a significant gap in the fossil record of northeastern Africa at the time of the lower to middle Pliocene transition, when many extant species lineages of African fauna were established.

  11. New 40Ar/39Ar dating of the Clearwater Lake impact structures (Québec, Canada) - Not the binary asteroid impact it seems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Martin; Schwarz, Winfried H.; Trieloff, Mario; Tohver, Eric; Buchner, Elmar; Hopp, Jens; Osinski, Gordon R.

    2015-01-01

    The two Clearwater Lake impact structures (Québec, Canada) are generally interpreted as a crater doublet formed by the impact of a binary asteroid. Here, arguments are presented that raise important questions about the proposed double impact scenario. New 40Ar/39Ar dating of two virtually fresh impact melt rock samples from the ⩾36 km West Clearwater Lake impact structure yielded two statistically robust Early Permian plateau ages with a weighted mean of 286.2 ± 2.2 (2.6) Ma (2σ; MSWD = 0.33; P = 0.57). In contrast, 40Ar/39Ar results for two chloritized melt rocks from the ∼26 km East Clearwater Lake impact structure produced disturbed age spectra suggestive of a distinct extraneous argon component. Although individually weakly robust, age spectra corrected for the trapped argon component and inverse isochron plots for the East Clearwater melt rocks consistently yielded apparent ages around ∼460-470 Ma. No Permian signal was found in either of these melt aliquots. Our new 40Ar/39Ar results reproduce earlier 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages (∼283 Ma and ∼465 Ma, respectively) for the two impact structures by Bottomley et al. (1990) and are in conflict with a previous, statistically non-robust Rb-Sr age of 287 [293] ± 26 Ma for East Clearwater. The combined cluster of apparent ages of ∼460-470 Ma, derived from four different samples across the impact melt sheet, is very unlikely to represent a 'false age effect' due to the incorporation of extraneous argon into the melt; instead, it strongly favors a Middle Ordovician age for the East Clearwater impact and impact-induced hydrothermal chloritization. Moreover, the Clearwater impact structures are characterized by different natural remanent magnetizations testifying to separate geologic histories, an effect unexpected in the case of a Permian double impact. Whereas the West Clearwater impact affected Ordovician carbonates incorporated into the impact breccia, drill core reports from the 1960s concluded that

  12. The Eastern Pelagonian metamorphic core complex: insight from the 40Ar/39Ar dating of white micas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenker, F. L.; Forster, M.; Burg, J.-P.

    2012-04-01

    The Pelagonian Zone in continental Greece is the westernmost unit of the Internal Hellenides that constitutes a pre-alpine crystalline block in-between two oceanic domains, the Pindos in the west and the Vardar zone in the east. We present petrographic, structural and geochronological evidence for a metamorphic core complex in eastern Pelagonian. The denuded metamorphic dome extends about 20 x 15 km with the long axis striking NNW-SSE. A shallow-dipping foliation defines the structural dome. The mineralogy of the lithologies (gneiss, impure marbles and amphibolites) show metamorphic conditions that decrease from upper-amphibolite in the core to greenschist metamorphic conditions in the flanks of the dome, reflecting structural depth and thus erosion of the dome. Aligned micas and amphiboles and elongated quartz and feldspar define a prominent lineation trending SW-NE. Asymmetric structures in the XZ finite strain plane of rocks show two regional senses of shear: (i) everywhere, top-to-the-SW sense of shear (direction: 252°±30; plunge: 8°±25) associated with strain gradients from protomylonite to ultramylonite and recumbent, isoclinal and occasional sheath folds; (ii) top-to-the-E sense of shear (direction: 88°±24; plunge: 11°±12) in narrow (0.1 to 100 m) low-angle shear zones on the eastern flanks of subdomes. The 40Ar/39Ar step-heating dating technique has been applied to micas from orthogneisses from the core to the flanks of the dome to constrain its thermal and structural evolution. The micas have been separated with acoustical shockwave produced in the SELFRAG apparatus, with the advantage to liberate morphologically intact grains. The liberated grains were sieved at different grain-sizes (between 100 and 300 μm) depending on the micro-textures observed in thin-sections. Results show "plateau"-ages at ca. 100-120 Ma and at ca. 80 Ma. Interestingly, the 100-160 μm fraction of white micas in a mylonitic orthogneiss yielded slightly younger ages than

  13. Deciphering post-Deccan weathering and erosion history of South Indian Archean rocks from cryptomelane 40Ar-39Ar dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Arnaud, Nicolas; Beauvais, Anicet; Chardon, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    Since the extrusion of Deccan traps ~ 63 Ma ago, weathering and erosion processes have shaped the landscapes of this Peninsula India. This resulted in pervasive bauxitic weathering on traps and deep lateritic weathering of their basement on either side of the Western Ghats Escarpment, which separates a coastal lowland from an East-dipping highland plateau. Mn-rich lateritic profiles formed by supergene weathering of Late Archean manganiferous protores in the different greenstone belts are exposed on relict paleosurfaces, which are preserved at different elevations on the highland plateau and in the coastal lowland, allowing for direct comparison of paleosurfaces and geomorphological processes across one of the most prominent relief in the Indian peninsula. Detailed petrological and geochemical investigations of samples collected in the different Mn-rich lateritic profiles allowed for precise characterization of cryptomelane [Kx Mn8-xIV MnxIII O16, nH2O], a Mn-oxide suitable for 40Ar-39Ar dating. The ages obtained document major weathering periods at ~ 53-50 Ma, ~ 40-32 Ma, and ~ 30-23 Ma in the highland profiles, and ~ 47-45 Ma, ~ 24-19 Ma and a younger age at ~ 9 Ma in the coastal lowland profiles. The age clusters are in good agreement with major regional and global Cenozoic paleoclimatic events, e.g., the Eocene climatic optimum and the early beginnings of Asian monsoons at ~ 40 Ma. The old ages obtained both in the coastal lowland and high plateau indicate synchronous lateritic (mostly bauxitic) weathering on both sides of the escarpment. The ages also indicate that most of the incision and dissection of plateau landsurfaces must have taken place during successive periods after 45, 32 and 23 Ma, while the coastal lowland surface was only weakly incised after 19 Ma. Our results thus document post-Eocene divergent erosion and weathering histories across the escarpment since it was formed at least 47 Ma ago, suggesting installation of a dual climatic regime on

  14. Defining the Tristan-Gough Hotspot: High-Resolution 40Ar/39Ar Dating of Volcanism at Tristan da Cunha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnur, S.; Koppers, A. A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Explaining the spatial distribution of intra-plate volcanism is an important geologic problem. The Walvis Ridge is a uniquely-shaped hotspot trail in the South Atlantic that is not fully explained by the prevailing mantle plume paradigm. About halfway through its 130 Myr history, Walvis shows a morphological shift from a continuous ridge to a diffuse region of guyots arranged in two volcanic tracks. Recent volcanism at both Tristan da Cunha and Gough Island suggests these tracks are produced by two hotspots sourced from a single plume. However, the islands are located more than 400 km apart, which does not conform to our understanding of plumes as narrow, semi-stationary upwellings. It remains unclear which of the two islands better represents the current plume position. New ages from previously unstudied seamounts show that Tristan is younger than surrounding volcanism, whereas Gough appears to fit the local age progression (Schnur et al. 2014). Modern radiometric ages suggest the main island of Tristan may have been active for up to 1.3 ± 0.2 Myr (O'Connor and le Roex 1992). However, the seemingly older Inaccessible, Nightingale and Middle islands have yet to be reliably dated and could be up to 18 ± 4 Ma based on K-Ar ages (Miller in Baker et al. 1964). In order to confidently delineate the duration of volcanism at Tristan, we present the results of 29 new 40Ar/39Ar step-heating experiments on biotite, hornblende, plagioclase and groundmass separates from rocks collected on Inaccessible, Nightingale and Middle islands. Our results show that volcanism on all three islands is young, in most cases < 600 ka. Previous ages from Nightingale and Middle islands are therefore too old and should be ignored in interpretations of plume dynamics. These results also show that magma was being supplied simultaneously to both Tristan and Gough over recent geologic time. Two possible explanations for this are that (1) there is a broad plume underlying the area, with focus

  15. Rb-Sr whole-rock and mineral ages, K-Ar, 40Ar/39Ar, and U-Pb mineral ages, and strontium, lead, neodymium, and oxygen isotopic compositions for granitic rocks from the Salinian Composite Terrane, California:

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kistler, R.W.; Champion, D.E.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes new and published age and isotopic data for whole-rocks and minerals from granitic rocks in the Salinian composite terrane, California. Rubidium-strontium whole-rock ages of plutons are in two groups, Early Cretaceous (122 to 100 Ma) and Late Cretaceous (95 to 82 Ma). Early Cretaceous plutons occur in all granitic rock exposures from Bodega Head in the north to those from the Santa Lucia and Gabilan Ranges in the central part of the terrane. Late Cretaceous plutons have been identified in the Point Reyes Peninsula, the Santa Lucia and the Gabilan Ranges, and in the La Panza Range in the southern part of the terrane. Ranges of initial values of isotopic compositions are 87Sr/86Sr, 0.7046-0.7147, δ18O, +8.5 to +12.5 per mil, 206Pb/204Pb, 18.901-19.860, 207Pb/204Pb, 15.618-15.814, 208Pb/204Pb, 38.569- 39.493, and εNd, +0.9 to -8.6. The initial 87Sr/86Sr=0.706 isopleth is identified in the northern Gabilan Range and in the Ben Lomond area of the Santa Cruz Mountains, in Montara Mountain, in Bodega Head, and to the west of the Farallon Islands on the Cordell Bank. This isotopic boundary is offset about 95 miles (160km) by right-lateral displacements along the San Gregorio-Hosgri and San Andreas fault systems.

  16. Late Paleozoic deformation and exhumation in the Sierras Pampeanas (Argentina): 40Ar/39Ar-feldspar dating constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löbens, Stefan; Oriolo, Sebastián; Benowitz, Jeff; Wemmer, Klaus; Layer, Paul; Siegesmund, Siegfried

    2016-09-01

    Systematic 40Ar/39Ar feldspar data obtained from the Sierras Pampeanas are presented, filling the gap between available high- (>~300 °C) and low-temperature (<~150 °C) thermochronological data. Results show Silurian-Devonian exhumation related to the late stages of the Famatinian/Ocloyic Orogeny for the Sierra de Pocho and the Sierra de Pie de Palo regions, whereas the Sierras de San Luis and the Sierra de Comechingones regions record exhumation during the Carboniferous. Comparison between new and available data points to a Carboniferous tectonic event in the Sierras Pampeanas, which represents a key period to constrain the early evolution of the proto-Andean margin of Gondwana. This event was probably transtensional and played a major role during the evolution of the Paganzo Basin as well as during the emplacement of alkaline magmatism in the retroarc.

  17. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar geochronology of Cenozoic magmatism and faulting, Yerington and northern Wassuk Range Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Dilles, J.H. . Geosciences Dept.); Gans, P.B. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar radiometric ages ([+-] sigma) refine the ages of magmatism and both normal and strike-slip faulting in the Yerington district and to the east in the northern Wassuk Range portion of the Walker Lane. The oldest rhyolite ignimbrites (28.58 [+-] 0.04 Ma (san)) underlie the Mickey Pass Tuff. Two rhyolite ignimbrites yielded 24.66 [+-] 0.02 (san) and 24.60 [+-] 0.02 (san) Ma and lie in angular unconformity upon the [approximately]26 Ma Singatse Tuff within a NW-striking fault zone in that N. Wassuk Ra., recording the earliest tectonism in the Walker Lane here. In this area, an ignimbrite from the upper part of the Hu-Pwi Rhyodacite yielded 23.09 [+-] 0.04 Ma (bi), and is cut by faults intruded by pyroxene andesites dated at 22.16 [+-] 0.27 Ma (wr). The andesite of Lincoln Flat is closely associated with tectonism throughout the Yerington-N. Wassuk area, and yielded four ages: 14.95 [+-] 0.24 (hbl), 14.08 [+-] 0.23 (hbl), 12.85 [+-] 0.33 (hbl), and 13.83 [+-] 0.17 (hbl) Ma. The 14.95 Ma-andesite is late-tectonic, whereas the 14.08 and 12.85 Ma andesites post-date early, northwest-striking vertical (strike-slip ) and normal faults in the N. Wassuk portion of the Walker Lane. In summary, tectonism initiated in the region within the Walker Lane portion of the northern Wassuk Ra. at [approximately]25 Ma, was active between 23 and 22 Ma, and in the interval prior to 14 Ma. Rapid crustal extension migrated westward to the Yerington district, where normal faulting and 30--40 W -- tilting of the upper crust initiated at 14 Ma and proceeded rapidly for the next 1--2 m.y. This period was succeeded by normal-oblique slip and strike-slip faults bounding Wassuk Group sedimentary basins in the Wassuk Ra. at [approximately]9 Ma and synchronously tilting them 10--35 W. Since [approximately]6 Ma, modern range-front normal faults and NW-striking strike-slip faults have yielded reduced rates of crustal extension and tilting.

  18. Paleomagnetism, magnetic fabric, and 40Ar/39Ar dating of Pliocene and Quaternary ignimbrites in the Arequipa area, southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquereau-Lebti, Perrine; Fornari, Michel; Roperch, Pierrick; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Macedo, Orlando

    2008-07-01

    40Ar/39Ar ages and paleomagnetic correlations using characteristic remanent magnetizations (ChRM) show that two main ignimbrite sheets were deposited at 4.86 ± 0.07 Ma (La Joya Ignimbrite: LJI) and at 1.63 ± 0.07 Ma (Arequipa Airport Ignimbrite: AAI) in the Arequipa area, southern Peru. The AAI is a 20-100 m-thick ignimbrite that fills in the Arequipa depression to the west of the city of Arequipa. The AAI is made up of two cooling units: an underlying white unit and an overlying weakly consolidated pink unit. Radiometric data provide the same age for the two units. As both units record exactly the same well-defined paleomagnetic direction (16 sites in the white unit of AAI: Dec = 173.7; Inc = 31.2; α95 = 0.7; k = 2749; and 10 sites in the pink unit of AAI; Dec = 173.6; Inc = 30.3; α95 = 1.2; k = 1634), showing no evidence of secular variation, the time gap between emplacement of the two units is unlikely to exceed a few years. The >50 m thick well-consolidated white underlying unit of the Arequipa airport ignimbrite provides a very specific magnetic zonation with low magnetic susceptibilities, high coercivities and unblocking temperatures of NRM above 580°C indicating a Ti-poor titanohematite signature. The Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) is strongly enhanced in this layer with anisotropy values up to 1.25. The fabric delineated by AMS was not recognized neither in the field nor in thin sections, because most of the AAI consists in a massive and isotrope deposit with no visible textural fabric. Pumices deformation due to welding is only observed at the base of the thickest sections. AMS within the AAI ignimbrite show a very well defined pattern of apparent imbrications correlated to the paleotopography, with planes of foliation and lineation dipping often at more than 20° toward the expected vent, buried beneath the Nevado Chachani volcanic complex. In contrast with the relatively small extent of the thick AAI, the La Joya ignimbrite covers large

  19. Long-lived structural control of Mt. Shasta's plumbing system illuminated by 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. T.; Christiansen, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Mt. Shasta is the largest stratovolcano in the Cascade Arc, surpassed in volume only by the large rear-arc Medicine Lake and Newberry composite volcanoes. Including the material in the ~350 ka debris avalanche, it has produced more than 500 km3 of andesite and dacite from several superimposed central vents over its 700-850 kyr history. Earlier, between at least 970 to 1170 ka, the Rainbow Mountain volcano of similar composition and size occupied this latitude of the arc ~20 km further east. This shift of magmatic focus from within the arc axis (as defined by 6 Ma and younger calc-alkaline centers) to the arc front is poorly understood, but the current center's location appears structurally controlled. Most identifiable volcanic vents on Mt. Shasta lie within 1 km of a N-S line through the active summit cone. 40Ar/39Ar ages of map units occupying the vent alignment range from the Holocene (5×1 ka) current summit dome to at least the Middle Pleistocene (464×9 ka McKenzie Butte). The vast majority of eruptions have issued from central vents (Sargents Ridge, 300-135 ka; Misery Hill, 100-15 ka; and Hotlum, <10 ka), each 500 to 1000m north of its predecessor. A central vent for the pre-avalanche edifice is impossible to locate precisely, but was possibly on the same N-S trend and certainly no more than 4 km to the west, likely south of the Sargents Ridge central vent. ~15 of ~25 mapped flank vents lie on the alignment and the other ten lie west of the line. No identified volcanic vents lie east of the line until >12 km from Mt. Shasta (Ash Creek Butte, 227 ka; Basalt of McCloud River, 38 ka; The Whaleback, 102 ka), and monogenetic and polygenetic centers further east and northeast. From these observations we infer that: (1) magmas are localized along a ~20 km, long-lived, N-S trending structure running through the summit; (2) the upper crustal structure appears impermeable to magmas and resistant to dikes on its eastern side; (3) the western half of the area beneath

  20. Timing of Hydrocarbon Fluid Emplacement in Sandstone Reservoirs in Neogene in Huizhou Sag, Southern China Sea, by Authigenic Illite 40Ar- 39Ar Laser Stepwise Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesheng, Shi; Junzhang, Zhu; Huaning, Qiu; yu, Shu; Jianyao, Wu; Zulie, Long

    Timing of oil or gas emplacements is a new subject in isotopic geochronology and petroleum geology. Hamilton et al. expounded the principle of the illite K-Ar age: Illite is often the last or one of the latest mineral cements to form prior to hydrocarbon accumulation. Since the displacement of formation water by hydrocarbons will cause silicate diagenesis to cease, K-Ar ages for illite will constrain the timing of this event, and also constrain the maximum age of formation of the trap structure. In this study, the possibility of authigenic illites 40Ar- 39Ar dating has been investigated. The illite samples were separated from the Tertiary sandstones in three rich oil reservoir belts within the Huizhou sag by cleaning, fracturing by cycled cooling-heating, soxhlet-extraction with solvents of benzene and methanol and separating with centrifugal machine. If oil is present in the separated samples, ionized organic fragments with m/e ratios of 36 to 40 covering the argon isotopes will be yielded by the ion source of a mass spectrometer, resulting in wrong argon isotopic analyses and wrong 40Ar- 39Ar ages. The preliminary experiments of illite by heating did show the presence of ionized organic fragments with m/e ratios of 36 to 44. In order to clean up the organic gases completely and obtain reliable analysis results, a special purification apparatus has been established by Qiu et al. and proved valid by the sequent illite analyses. All the illite samples by 40Ar- 39Ar IR-laser stepwise heating yield stair-up age spectra in lower laser steps and plateaux in higher laser steps. The youngest apparent ages corresponding to the beginning steps are reasonable to be interpreted for the hydrocarbon accumulation ages. The weighted mean ages of the illites from the Zhuhai and Zhujiang Formations are (12.1 ± 1.1) Ma and (9.9 ± 1.2) Ma, respectively. Therefore, the critical emplacement of petroleum accumulation in Zhujiang Formation in Huizhou sag took place in ca 10 Ma. Late

  1. Evidence for pre-Taconic metamorphism in the Potomac terrane, Maryland and Virginia: Hornblende and Muscovite [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar results

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.L.; Wintsch, R.P. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Kunk, M.J.; Drake, A.A. Jr. )

    1993-03-01

    New [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar age spectra of hornblende and white mica from the Great Falls area of the Potomac terrane of Maryland and Virginia indicate pre-Taconic metamorphism. Age spectra of hornblende samples are interpreted to represent cooling from peak metamorphic conditions through their closure temperatures for argon diffusion ([approximately]500C) at about 490 Ma. These older Ordovician postmetamorphic cooling ages strongly contrast with younger post-Ordovician metamorphic cooling ages now being reported in the Blue Ridge and Goochland terranes to the west and east respectively. A late phyllitic sheen observed on rocks in the field and petrographic observations of undulose plagioclase and amphibole, and older muscovite, and kinked primary muscovite in the Bear Island Granodiorite reflect a younger retrogressive metamorphism involving the growth of secondary muscovite (Fisher's S4 ). [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar Age spectra of white micas from the Bear Island Granodiorite are complex and probably indicate both primary and secondary white mica, the latter apparently growing below the closure temperature for retention of argon in muscovite ([approximately]350C). The age spectra permit an estimate of a minimum age of 420 Ma for cooling through closure of the older generation of white mica. The above ages of hornblende and muscovite closure imply a minimum cooling rate of [approximately]2C/m.y., and exhumation rate of about 1 mm/yr. The projected time of peak metamorphism at upper amphibolite facies for the Great Falls area clearly predates the Ordovician Taconic orogeny and suggests that these rocks escaped this event and largely escaped younger Paleozoic metamorphic events, which are well documented in adjacent terranes.

  2. Paleomagnetism and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Plio-Pleistocene Boring Volcanic Field: Implications for the geomagnetic polarity time scale and paleosecular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; Fleck, Robert J.; Evarts, Russell C.; Calvert, Andrew T.

    2017-01-01

    Paleomagnetic directions and 40Ar/39Ar ages have been determined for samples of lava flows from the same outcrops, where possible, for 84 eruptive units ranging in age from 3200 ka to 60 ka within the Boring Volcanic Field (BVF) of the Pacific Northwest, USA. This study expands upon our previous results for the BVF, and compares the combined results with the current geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS). Lava flows with transitional directions were found within the BVF at the Matuyama-Brunhes and Jaramillo-Matuyama polarity boundaries, and replicate ages corresponding to these and other boundaries have been newly ascertained. Although the BVF data generally agree with GPTS chronozone boundaries, they indicate that onset of the Gauss-Matuyama transition and Olduvai subchron occurred significantly earlier than given in the current time scale calibration. Additional comparisons show that the BVF results are consistent with recent statistical models of geomagnetic paleosecular variation.

  3. Contrasting tectonothermal domains and faulting in the Potomac terrane, Virginia-Maryland - Discrimination by 40Ar/39Ar and fission-track thermochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunk, M.J.; Wintsch, R.P.; Naeser, C.W.; Naeser, N.D.; Southworth, C.S.; Drake, A.A.; Becker, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar data reveal ages and thermal discontinuities that identify mapped and unmapped fault boundaries in the Potomac terrane in northern Virginia, thus confirming previous interpretations that it is a composite terrane. The rocks of the Potomac terrane were examined along the Potomac River, where it has been previously subdivided into three units: the Mather Gorge, Sykesville, and Laurel Formations. In the Mather Gorge Formation, at least two metamorphic thermal domains were identified, the Blockhouse Point and Bear Island domains, separated by a fault active in the late Devonian. Early Ordovician (ca. 475 Ma) cooling ages of amphibole in the Bear Island domain reflect cooling from Taconic metamorphism, whereas the Blockhouse Point domain was first metamorphosed in the Devonian. The 40Ar/39Ar data from muscovites in a third (eastern) domain within the Mather Gorge Formation, the Stubblefield Falls domain, record thrusting of the Sykesville Formation over the Mather Gorge Formation on the Plummers Island fault in the Devonian. The existence of two distinctly different thermal domains separated by a tectonic boundary within the Mather Gorge argues against its status as a formation. Hornblende cooling ages in the Sykesville Formation are Early Devonian (ca. 400 Ma), reflecting cooling from Taconic and Acadian metamorphism. The ages of retrograde and overprinting muscovite in phyllonites from domain-bounding faults are late Devonian (Acadian) and late Pennsylvanian (Alleghanian), marking the time of assembly of these domains and subsequent movement on the Plummers Island fault. Our data indicate that net vertical motion between the Bear Island domain of the Mather Gorge complex and the Sykesville Formation across the Plummers Island fault is east-side-up. Zircon fission-track cooling ages demonstrate thermal equillbrium across the Potomac terrane in the early Permian, and apatite fission-track cooling ages record tilting of the Potomac terrane in the Cretaceous

  4. Tectono-thermal evolution of the Palaeoproterozoic Granites-Tanami Orogen, North Australian Craton: Implications from hornblende and biotite 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ben; Bagas, Leon; Jourdan, Fred

    2014-10-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic Granites-Tanami Orogen (GTO) hosts a number of gold deposits located in the southern margin of the North Australian Craton. The major stratigraphic succession is the Palaeoproterozoic Tanami Group which is subdivided into the Dead Bullock Formation and conformably overlying Killi Killi Formation. New geochemical data for the ca. 1864 Coora and Groundrush dolerite sills in the Dead Bullock Formation suggests that they have the same characteristics with the enriched back-arc basin basaltic rocks from the former Stubbins Formation, such as tholeiitic affinity, high TiO2 contents (0.94 to 1.24 wt.%) and low Mg# (41-45), slightly enriched LILE (Rb, Th, U, and K), weakly depleted HFSE (Nb, Ta), and relatively flat REE patterns. Their magma was generated by high degree decompressional melting (5-15%) of the asthenosphere source with an input of 3-4% subduction-related material. The petrological and geochemical similarities of igneous rocks provide new evidence for the assignment of the ca. 1864 Ma former Stubbins Formation and the Mount Charles Formations in the Dead Bullock Formation of the Tanami Group. These conclusions confirmed that the extensive Palaeoproterozoic Tanami Group was deposited in a back-arc basin environment. Hornblende and biotite 40Ar/39Ar geochronological study identified three major tectono-thermal events in the GTO since the deposition of the Dead Bullock Formation. The ca. 1840 Ma 40Ar/39Ar cooling age of metamorphic hornblende from the Coora and Groundrush dolerite sills in the Dead Bullock Formation provided precise age constraint for the first Palaeoproterozoic tectono-thermal event during the evolution of the Granites-Tanami back-arc basin. This age is highly consistent with the ca. 1850-1840 Ma subduction and peak metamorphism events in the North Australian Craton (NAC) associated with the Halls Creek Orogeny in the Halls Creek Orogen, and the Tennant Orogeny in the Tennant Creek Inlier. The 40Ar/39Ar age of 1753 ± 8 Ma

  5. Integrating 40Ar-39Ar, 87Rb-87Sr and 147Sm-143Nd geochronology of authigenic illite to evaluate tectonic reactivation in an intraplate setting, central Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Alexander W.; Uysal, I. Tonguç; Bryan, Scott E.; Hall, Chris M.; Golding, Suzanne D.

    2014-06-01

    The Warburton-Cooper basins, central Australia, include a multitude of reactivated fracture-fault networks related to a complex, and poorly understood, tectonic evolution. We investigated authigenic illites from a granitic intrusion and sedimentary rocks associated with prominent structural features (Gidgealpa-Merrimelia-Innamincka Ridge and the Nappamerri Trough). These were analysed by 40Ar-39Ar, 87Rb-87Sr and 147Sm-143Nd geochronology to explore the thermal and tectonic histories of central Australian basins. The combined age data provide evidence for three major periods of fault reactivation throughout the Phanerozoic. While Carboniferous (323.3 ± 9.4 Ma) and Late Triassic ages (201.7 ± 9.3 Ma) derive from basin-wide hydrothermal circulation, Cretaceous ages (∼128 to ∼86 Ma) reflect episodic fluid flow events restricted to the synclinal Nappamerri Trough. Such events result from regional extensional tectonism derived from the transferral of far-field stresses to mechanically and thermally weakened regions of the Australian continent. Specifically, Cretaceous ages reflect continent-wide transmission of tensional stress from a >2500 km long rifting event on the eastern (and southern) Australian margin associated with break-up of Gondwana and opening of the Tasman Sea. By integrating 40Ar-39Ar, 87Rb-87Sr and 147Sm-143Nd dating, this study highlights the use of authigenic illite in temporally constraining the tectonic evolution of intracontinental basins that would otherwise remain unknown. Furthermore, combining Sr- and Ar-isotopic systems enables more accurate dating of authigenesis whilst significantly reducing geochemical pitfalls commonly associated with these radioisotopic dating methods.

  6. Paleointensity and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of basalts at Gamarri, Ethiopia: Correlation with the Réunion subchron and Huckleberry Ridge excursion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindley, C.; Macho, A.; Tsegaye, M. A.; Feinberg, J. M.; Singer, B. S.; Jicha, B. R.; Brown, M. C.; Birke, T. K.

    2012-12-01

    Characterization of the geomagnetic field during subchrons, reversals, and excursions is vital to understanding geodynamo processes and interactions across the core-mantle boundary. Moreover, an accurate timescale for geomagnetic field instabilities is critical to global high resolution stratigraphy. The Réunion subchron and Huckleberry Ridge excursion are ideal candidates for study due to globally distributed recordings in both sedimentary and igneous rocks. We present new full-vector paleomagnetic data for 30 basaltic flows from the Gamarri volcanic section in the Afar region of Ethiopia and 11 40Ar/39Ar ages. Paleointensities were calculated using the LTD-DHT Shaw technique and results generally agree with those of Carlut et al. (1999). Two geomagnetic instabilities are recorded, an older excursion and a younger period of normal polarity within the reversed Matuyama chron. Our results show a longer duration of low (<20 μT) paleointensity in the oldest flows and more variable low paleointensity values in the younger flows, and are generally lower than Thellier-style values of Carlut et al. (1999). Relative to 28.201 Ma Fish Canyon sanidine, plateau 40Ar/39Ar ages of the youngest (GB21) and oldest (GA02) flows are 2.029 ± 0.041 (2σ) and 2.410 ± 0.130 Ma, respectively. This eruptive duration is longer than that reported by Kidane et al. (1999), where the unspiked K-Ar method yields ages for GB23 (2 flows overlying GB21) and GA02 of 2.02 ± 0.08 (2σ) and 2.14 ± 0.12 Ma, respectively. 40Ar/39Ar ages of 4 lavas within the normal polarity zone in the upper section are between 2.063 ± 0.044 and 2.118 ± 0.057 Ma, but are indistinguishable at 2σ. These flows may sample the Huckleberry Ridge excursion (2.086 ± 0.016 Ma, Singer et al. 2004), the Réunion subchron (2.153-2.115 Ma, Channell et al. 2003), or both. Given several 40Ar/39Ar ages >2.2 Ma, the older excursion in the Gamarri section is not consistent with the Réunion subchron, and can be linked to any of

  7. A laser-probe 40Ar/ 39Ar study of pseudotachylite from the Tambach Fault Zone, Kenya: direct isotopic dating of brittle faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherlock, S. C.; Hetzel, R.

    2001-01-01

    Understanding the tectonic evolution of orogenic belts and intracratonic areas depends on our ability to determine the age of tectonic features on a variety of scales. This study demonstrates the value of the laser-probe 40Ar/ 39Ar dating technique, which, if applied to fault-derived pseudotachylites, may be used to directly determine the age of brittle faults. The laser-probe technique affords high spatial resolution, enabling a greater opportunity for discriminating between pseudotachylite matrix, host-rock clasts and alteration products that are often present in varying proportions within pseudotachylites. The laser-probe 40Ar/ 39Ar technique has been applied to pseudotachylite samples from the Tambach Fault Zone (TFZ), a major NW-SE trending strike-slip fault within the Kenyan part of the Late Proterozoic/Early Palaeozoic Mozambique Belt. The pseudotachylites of the TFZ were previously thought to have formed either (i) at about 530-430 Ma, or (ii) during the Cenozoic evolution of the Kenya Rift. In the latter case, seismic slip on the rift-bounding normal fault would have generated the pseudotachylites, due to the reactivation of old NW-SE trending structures in the basement. Based on our new data, we interpret the pseudotachylite formation age to be 400 Ma. This rules out the possibility that the pseudotachylites are related to the formation of the Kenya Rift. Although the inherited basement faults may have been locally reactivated as transfer faults, reactivation of these structures during rifting did not occur beyond the margins of the Kenya Rift.

  8. Application of U/Th and 40Ar/39Ar dating to Orgnac 3, a Late Acheulean and Early Middle Palaeolithic site in Ardèche, France.

    PubMed

    Michel, Véronique; Shen, Guanjun; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Wu, Chung-Che; Vérati, Chrystèle; Gallet, Sylvain; Moncel, Marie-Hélène; Combier, Jean; Khatib, Samir; Manetti, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Refined radio-isotopic dating techniques have been applied to Orgnac 3, a Late Acheulean and Early Middle Palaeolithic site in France. Evidence of Levallois core technology appeared in level 4b in the middle of the sequence, became predominant in the upper horizons, and was best represented in uppermost level 1, making the site one of the oldest examples of Levallois technology. In our dating study, fourteen speleothem samples from levels 7, 6 and 5b, were U/Th-dated. Four pure calcite samples from the speleothem PL1 (levels 5b, 6) yield ages between 265 ± 4 (PL1-3) and 312 ± 15 (PL1-6) thousand years ago (ka). Three samples from the top of a second stalagmite, PL2, yield dates ranging from 288 ± 10 ka (PL2-1) to 298 ± 17 ka (PL2-3). Three samples from the base of PL2 (level 7) yield much younger U/Th dates between 267 and 283 ka. These dates show that the speleothems PL1 and PL2 are contemporaneous and formed during marine isotope stage (MIS) 9 and MIS 8. Volcanic minerals in level 2, the upper sequence, were dated by the (40)Ar/(39)Ar method, giving a weighted mean of 302.9 ± 2.5 ka (2σ) and an inverse isochron age of 302.9 ± 5.9 ka (2σ). Both (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating of volcanic sanidines and U/Th dating of relatively pure and dense cave calcites are known to be well established. The first parallel application of the two geochronometers to Orgnac 3 yields generally consistent results, which point to the reliability of the two methods. The difference between their age results is discussed.

  9. Application of U/Th and 40Ar/39Ar Dating to Orgnac 3, a Late Acheulean and Early Middle Palaeolithic Site in Ardèche, France

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Véronique; Shen, Guanjun; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Wu, Chung-Che; Vérati, Chrystèle; Gallet, Sylvain; Moncel, Marie-Hélène; Combier, Jean; Khatib, Samir; Manetti, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Refined radio-isotopic dating techniques have been applied to Orgnac 3, a Late Acheulean and Early Middle Palaeolithic site in France. Evidence of Levallois core technology appeared in level 4b in the middle of the sequence, became predominant in the upper horizons, and was best represented in uppermost level 1, making the site one of the oldest examples of Levallois technology. In our dating study, fourteen speleothem samples from levels 7, 6 and 5b, were U/Th-dated. Four pure calcite samples from the speleothem PL1 (levels 5b, 6) yield ages between 265 ± 4 (PL1-3) and 312 ± 15 (PL1-6) thousand years ago (ka). Three samples from the top of a second stalagmite, PL2, yield dates ranging from 288 ± 10 ka (PL2-1) to 298 ± 17 ka (PL2-3). Three samples from the base of PL2 (level 7) yield much younger U/Th dates between 267 and 283 ka. These dates show that the speleothems PL1 and PL2 are contemporaneous and formed during marine isotope stage (MIS) 9 and MIS 8. Volcanic minerals in level 2, the upper sequence, were dated by the 40Ar/39Ar method, giving a weighted mean of 302.9 ± 2.5 ka (2σ) and an inverse isochron age of 302.9 ± 5.9 ka (2σ). Both 40Ar/39Ar dating of volcanic sanidines and U/Th dating of relatively pure and dense cave calcites are known to be well established. The first parallel application of the two geochronometers to Orgnac 3 yields generally consistent results, which point to the reliability of the two methods. The difference between their age results is discussed. PMID:24349273

  10. A high-resolution 40Ar/39Ar lava chronology and edifice construction history for Ruapehu volcano, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Chris E.; Leonard, Graham S.; Townsend, Dougal B.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Wilson, Colin J. N.; Gamble, John A.; Eaves, Shaun R.

    2016-11-01

    Ruapehu is an active 150 km3 andesite-dacite composite volcano located at the southern end of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand. The growth of the present-day edifice has occurred throughout coeval eruptive and glacial histories since 200 ka. We present high-precision 40Ar/39Ar eruption ages for 46 samples and whole-rock major element geochemical data for 238 samples from lava flows. These new and existing data are interpreted in the context of geomorphologic and geologic mapping, volcano-ice interaction processes and glacier reconstructions to present an improved chronostratigraphic framework and new edifice evolution history for Ruapehu. Sub-glacial to ice-marginal effusive eruption of medium-K basaltic-andesites and andesites constructed the northern portion of the exposed edifice between 200 and 150 ka, and a wide southeast planèze as well as parts of the northern, eastern and western flanks between 160 and 80 ka. None of the dated lava flows have ages in the range of 80-50 ka, which may reflect an eruptive hiatus. Alternatively the lack of ages may be the result of erosion and burial of lavas and syn-eruptive glacial conveyance of lava flows to the ring-plain during glacial advance at 70-60 ka. From 50-15 ka edifice growth occurred via effusive eruptions onto the glaciated flanks of the volcano, resulting in construction of ice-bounded planèzes and ridges. The distribution of dated ice-marginal lavas indicates a general decrease in glacier thicknesses over this time, except for a short-lived period centred at 31 ka when peak ice cover was reached. The compositional ranges of medium- to high-K andesite and dacite lava flows within 50-35 ka eruptive packages define broadly bimodal high- and low-MgO trends. Lavas erupted at 35-22 ka have compositions that fill a transitional geochemical field between older dacites and younger andesites. Large-scale retreat of flank glaciers since 15 ka has resulted in intra-valley lava flow emplacement at elevations below

  11. NW termination of the West Cycladic Detachment System on the Lavrion Peninsula, Greece: results from mica 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, David; Dubosq, Renelle; Spalding, Jennifer; Grasemann, Bernhard; Soukis, Kostis

    2015-04-01

    The West Cycladic Detachment System (WCDS) has been mapped from the western Cycladic islands to the Lavrion peninsula, where several top-to-SSW low-angle normal faults at different structural levels are observed. The dominant detachment juxtaposes lower plate schistose to mylonitic rocks of the Kamariza Unit against the upper plate Lavrion Unit. The Kamariza Unit exhibits a NNE-SSW stretching lineation whereas the main foliation in the Lavrion Unit is a compressional crenulation cleavage with ENE-WSW to NE-SW stretching and intersection lineations. Kinematic indicators reveal top-to-SSW sense of shear, and along the detachment both units are overprinted by cataclastic deformation and high-temperature metallic ore mineralization. White mica-bearing schists and marbles were collected for microstructural and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. Quartz crystals in all samples show subgrain rotation and bulging of grains, indicated by lobate grain boundaries. These same rocks contain interconnected elongated mica crystals, which are kinked or internally deformed by C'-type shear zones. White mica is rarely prismatic, and chemical mapping highlights the chemical zonation of the muscovite. Calcite, when present, exhibits curved and tapered twins. Glaucophane and chlorite pseudomorphs of glacophane are preserved in the Lavrion Unit. New single-crystal 40Ar/39Ar geochronology on muscovite from the upper plate Lavrion Unit of the peninsula yields ages between 35-28 Ma, and together with published zircon (U-Th)/He dates of 16-12 Ma and preservation of glaucophane suggests these rocks did not witness the dominant Miocene greenschist facies deformation that characterizes the WCDS. One muscovite sample along the west coast at Thimari yielded an 40Ar/39Ar age of c. 175 Ma (duplicate analyses) and maybe part of the Sub-Pelagonian Berzekos Unit. Comparatively, the Kamariza Unit yields Early to Middle Miocene 40Ar/39Ar ages, and coupled with Late Miocene zircon (U-Th)/He ages and top

  12. 40Ar/39Ar Data for White Mica, Biotite, and K-Feldspar Samples from Low-Grade Metamorphic Rocks in the Westminster Terrane and Adjacent Rocks, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunk, Michael J.; McAleer, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    This report contains reduced 40Ar/39Ar data of white mica and K-feldspar mineral separates and matrix of a whole rock phyllite, all from low-grade metamorphic rocks of the Westminster terrane and adjacent strata in central Maryland. This report presents these data in a preliminary form, but in more detail than can be accommodated in todays professional journals. Also included in this report is information on the location of the samples and a brief description of the samples. The data contained herein are not interpreted in a geological context, and care should be taken by readers unfamiliar with argon isotopic data in the use of these results; many of the individual apparent ages are not geologically meaningful. This report is primarily a detailed source document for subsequent publications that will integrate these data into a geological context.

  13. High Spatial Resolution 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology of Impact Melt Breccias from Apollo 17 Boulders at Stations 2, 6, and 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, C. M.; Hodges, K. V.; Jolliff, B. L.; Van Soest, M. C.; Wartho, J. A.; Weirich, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Several boulders located at the bases of the North and South Massifs were among the primary field targets of the Apollo 17 mission to the Taurus-Littrow Valley on the Moon [1]. Some boulders are polylithologic, including Boulder 1 at Station 2 and the boulders at Stations 6 and 7. These boulders were the subjects of consortium studies [2, 3] that included 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to determine the ages of distinct lithologies within each boulder [e.g., 4-6]. We report new 40Ar/39Ar data for the impact melt breccias 72255, 76315, 77075, and 77135 obtained using the UV laser ablation microprobe (UVLAMP) methods of [7]. For 72255, we obtained a preliminary isochron date ca. 3814 Ma from 22 melt analyses, which is younger than published plateau dates (e.g., 3951-3835 Ma [4, 8]). Fifteen melt analyses of 76315 yield a preliminary isochron date ca. 3850 Ma, younger than the 3900 ± 16 Ma date reported by [8]. Melt analyses of 77075 yield preliminary dates between ca. 3797-3584 Ma, possibly reflecting partial loss of 40Ar. In this case, the oldest date may provide a minimum age for the formation of melt in 77075. Finally, the UVLAMP dates for the 77135 melt range from 3810-3361 Ma and corresponding Ca/K ratios range from ca. 100-6. Electron microprobe analyses of small (ca. 10s of microns wide) pockets of K-rich materials show that both K-rich glass and K-feldspar are present. The UVLAMP dates for 77135 likely reflect spatially variable 40Ar loss, consistent with published step heating results [e.g., 6]. References: [1] Schmitt (1973) Science, 182, 681-690. [2] Ryder (1993). Catalog of Apollo 17 Rocks: Volume 1 - Stations 2 and 3 (South Massif). LPI. [3] Ryder (1993). Catalog of Apollo 17 Rocks: Volume 4 - North Massif. LPI. [4] Leich et al. (1975) The Moon, 14, 407-444. [5] Cadogan & Turner (1976). LPSC, 7, 2267-2285. [6] Stettler et al. (1978). LPSC, 9, 1113-1115. [7] Mercer et al. (2015) Sci. Adv., 1, e1400050. [8] Dalrymple & Ryder (1996). JGR, 101, 26069-26084.

  14. 40Ar/39Ar dating of Quaternary feldspar: examples from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pringle, M.S.; McWilliams, M.; Houghton, B.F.; Lanphere, M.A.; Wilson, C.J.N.

    1992-01-01

    Using a continuous laser and resistance furnace, we have measured ages on Quaternary plagioclase with an absolute precision of about ??30 ka and on Quaternary sanidine with a relative precision of better than 1%. Such precision was achieved by using low-temperature heating steps to remove much of the nonradiogenic argon contamination. Plagioclase is one of the most common mineral phases in volcanic rocks; thus, these procedures will be widely applicable to many problems for which precise radiometric age control has not been available. We studied plagioclase and plagioclase-sanidine concentrates from the oldest and the three largest silicic ash-flow deposits of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, one of the world's largest and most active volcanic systems. The results are in close agreement with new magnetostratigraphic data, suggesting that existing fission-track age determinations significantly underestimate the age of older units, and shift the inception of Taupo Vaolcanic Zone volcanism back to at least 1600 ka. -from Authors

  15. Rhyolite volcanism at Öræfajökull Volcano, Iceland - geochemistry, field relations & 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Angela; Burgess, Ray; McGarvie, David; Smellie, John

    2010-05-01

    /39Ar method. Obtaining robust Ar-Ar ages for Quaternary eruptions can be a challenging process due to the small amount of radiogenic 40Ar present in young samples. To complicate matters further, both subaerial and subglacial Icelandic silicic rocks of all ages have been found to contain relatively high levels of atmospheric argon, which can result in large errors on the determined ages (Gale et al., 1966; Flude et al., 2008). Rhyolitic lavas are preferred because of their higher potassium contents compared to basalts. Feldspar phenocrysts are avoided because they give unrealistically old apparent ages (Flude, 2005), possibly from long-term pre-eruptive storage below their closure temperature, in partially crystallised magma chambers. We are tackling these challenges with a laser Ar-Ar step-heating method and stringent sample selection. Our analyses have revealed that unaltered, unhydrated microcrystalline rhyolite groundmass produces the most consistently reliable result. Using this technique we have obtained an average age of ≈115Ka for the upper subglacial rhyolite unit. We are currently using this technique to determine the age of older rhyolites in order to obtain a more detailed picture of the distribution of eruptive events compared to ice sheet activity over time. Flude, S (2005) PhD thesis, University of Manchester. Flude, S., Burgess, R., McGarvie, D.W. (2008). Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 169(3-4): 154-175. Gale, N.H., Moorbath, S., Simons, J., Walker, G.P.L., (1966). Earth Planet. Sci.Lett. 1: 284-288. Helgason, J. and R. A. Duncan (2001). Geology 29(2): 179-182. Prestvik (1979). Nordic Volcanological Institute Report 79-01, Reykjavik Selbekk, R. S. and R. G. Trønnes (2007). Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 160(1-2): 42-58. Stevenson, J., D. McGarvie, et al. (2006). Bulletin of Volcanology 68(7): 737-752.

  16. Tracking the Australian plate motion through the Cenozoic: Constraints from 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Benjamin E.; Knesel, Kurt M.; Vasconcelos, Paulo M.; Schellart, Wouter P.

    2013-09-01

    we use geochronology of Australian intraplate volcanoes to construct a high-resolution plate-velocity record and to explore how tectonic events in the southwest Pacific may have influenced plate motion. Nine samples from five volcanoes yield ages from 33.6 ± 0.5 to 27.3 ± 0.4 Ma and, when combined with published ages from 30 to 16 Ma, show that the rate of volcanic migration was not constant. Instead, the results indicate distinct changes in Australian plate motion. Fast northward velocities (61 ± 8 and 57 ± 4 km/Ma) prevailed from 34 to 30 (±0.5) and from 23 to 16 (±0.5) Ma, respectively, with distinct reductions to 20 ± 10 and 22 ± 5 km/Ma from 30 to 29 (±0.5) Ma and from 26 to 23 (±0.5) Ma. These velocity reductions are concurrent with tectonic collisions in New Guinea and Ontong Java, respectively. Interspersed between the periods of sluggish motion is a brief 29-26 (±0.5) Ma burst of atypically fast northward plate movement of 100 ± 20 km/Ma. We evaluate potential mechanisms for this atypically fast velocity, including catastrophic slab penetration into the lower mantle, thermomechanical erosion of the lithosphere, and plume-push forces; none are appropriate. This period of fast motion was, however, coincident with a major southward propagating slab tear that developed along the northeastern plate margin, following partial jamming of subduction and ophiolite obduction in New Caledonia. Although it is unclear whether such an event can play a role in driving fast plate motion, numerical or analogue models may help address this question.

  17. AR-39-AR-40 "Age" of Basaltic Shergottite NWA-3171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Park, Jisun

    2007-01-01

    North-West-Africa 3171 is a 506 g, relatively fresh appearing, basaltic shergottite with similarities to Zagami and Shergotty, but not obviously paired with any of the other known African basaltic shergottites. Its exposure age has the range of 2.5-3.1 Myr , similar to those of Zagami and Shergotty. We made AR-39-AR-40 analyses of a "plagioclase" (now shock-converted to maskelynite) separate and of a glass hand-picked from a vein connected to shock melt pockets.. Plagioclase was separated using its low magnetic susceptibility and then heavy liquid with density of <2.85 g/cm(exp 3). The AR-39-AR-40 age spectrum of NWA-317 1 plag displays a rise in age over 20-100% of the 39Ar release, from 0.24 Gyr to 0.27 Gy.

  18. High-Precision 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology and Geology of St. George Island, Pribilof Islands, Alaska: Implications for Eruption Rates in the Bering Sea Basalt Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, T. C.; Cosca, M. A.; Hamblock, J. M.; Underwood, S. J.

    2007-12-01

    New high-precision 40Ar/39Ar ages and geologic mapping establish an eruptive chronology for St. George Island, Pribilof Islands, Alaska. St. George is part of the Bering Sea basalt province (BSBP), a group of 15 late Cenozoic (mostly < 6 Ma) alkalic to tholeiitic basaltic volcanic fields widely distributed on islands in the Bering Sea, along the west coast of Alaska, and along the coast of northeast Russia. Twelve samples of washed, but otherwise untreated, whole-rock basalts from St. George were cut with a micro-wire saw into chips ~3 mm3 in size and irradiated for 40Ar/39Ar analysis. The chips were incrementally heated with a CO2 laser equipped with an integrator lens, and analyzed using a NU Instruments Noblesse mass spectrometer equipped with a Faraday cup and two ion counting electron multipliers. Detector intercalibration was done using automated air pipettes. A minimum of 20 heating steps were measured per sample, with the data often defining age plateaux. Isochron plots of the data yield ages ranging from 1.57 ± 0.04 to 2.89 ± 0.11 Ma, with trapped 40Ar/36Ar ratios ranging from 312 to 330. The stratigraphic positions of the dated rocks are known directly from field relations and there are no discrepancies between the 40Ar/39Ar ages and this sequence. Geochemical data combined with the age data indicate no progressive petrologic trends during evolution of the magmatic system, except for intermittent eruption of distinctive plagioclase-phyric basalts with low to moderate MgO contents (7 - 5 wt%) beginning at ~2.0 Ma. The new age data combined with volume estimates indicate an average subaerial eruption rate of ~107 m3km-2yr-1, which is adjusted for 3% sedimentary and ultramafic basement rocks beneath the volcanic pile, an average vesicularity of 5%, and an assumed surficial erosion value of 20%. This rate is identical to the estimate (110 m3km-2yr-1) by Mukasa et al. (JGR 112, 2007) for St. George Island. Both estimates, however, do not account for

  19. Fine-scale isotopic heterogeneities and fluids in the deep crust: a 40Ar/ 39Ar laser ablation and TEM study of muscovites from a granulite-eclogite transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boundy, T. M.; Hall, C. M.; Li, G.; Essene, E. J.; Halliday, A. N.

    1997-04-01

    Spectacular exposures on Holsnøy Island, western Norway, reveal that eclogites formed in situ from adjacent anhydrous granulites as a result of the localized infiltration of fluids. Stepwise and laser 40Ar/ 39Ar experiments on muscovite from the eclogites have been used in conjunction with electron microprobe and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis to examine the behavior of argon under high pressure metamorphism and subsequent cooling. Muscovites with 0.10-0.17Na/(Na + K) yield 40Ar/ 39Ar plateau and integrated ages in the range 450-465 Ma, 20-35 Myr older than 40Ar/ 39Ar muscovite plateau ages from adjacent eclogite samples. Laser 40Ar/ 39Ar analyses on ˜ 75 μm spots across two single muscovite grains from these samples are approximately uniform at 444.2 ± 1.9 (21 spots) and 443.3 ± 1.7 Ma (26 spots). However, incremental heating of high sodic (0.18-0.32 (Na/(Na + K)) muscovite failed to yield a plateau. Laser 40Ar/ 39Ar analyses of 100 areas from two single grains from this sample reveal complex two-dimensional patterns with variable apparent ages in the range of 445-625 Ma. Electron microprobe measurements obtained from one of the grains reveal that the paragonite content is also highly variable both parallel and perpendicular to (001). All the TEM bright field images obtained from this mica yield information consistent with a single homogeneous phyllosilicate phase, yet several of the selected area electron diffraction (SAED) analyses document locally intergrown muscovite and sodic muscovite, possibly in an exsolution relationship on a unit cell scale. Analytical electron microscopy (AEM) analyses obtained over a 5-100 nm scale on the same sample reveal great range and heterogeneity inNa/K, including pure muscovite, although no separate paragonite domains were found. In contrast, muscovite grains with consistent laser spot fusion and plateau ages show little heterogeneity inNa/K at the microprobe level. These data provide evidence of variable

  20. Geodynamic interpretation of the 40Ar/39Ar dating of ophiolitic and arc-related mafics and metamafics of the northern part of the Anadyr-Koryak region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palandzhyan, S.A.; Layer, P.W.; Patton, W.W.; Khanchuk, A.I.

    2011-01-01

    Isotope datings of amphibole-bearing mafics and metamafics in the northern part of the Anadyr-Koryak region allow clarification of the time of magmatic and metamorphic processes, which are synchronous with certain stages of the geodynamic development of the northwest segment of the Pacific mobile belt in the Phanerozoic. To define the 40Ar/39Ar age of amphiboles, eight samples of amphibole gabbroids and metamafics were selected during field work from five massifs representing ophiolites and mafic plutons of the island arc. Rocks from terranes of three foldbelts: 1) Pekulnei (Chukotka region), 2) Ust-Belaya (West Koryak region), and 3) the Tamvatnei and El'gevayam subterranes of the Mainits terrane (Koryak-Kamchatka region), were studied. The isotope investigations enabled us to divide the studied amphiboles into two groups varying in rock petrographic features. The first was represented by gabbroids of the Svetlorechensk massif of the Pekulnei Range and by ophiolites of the Tamvatnei Mts.; their magmatic amphiboles show the distribution of argon isotopes in the form of clearly distinguished plateau with an age ranging within 120-129 Ma. The second group includes metamorphic amphiboles of metagabbroids and apogabbro amphibolites of the Ust-Belaya Mts., Pekulnei and Kenkeren ranges (El'gevayam subterranes). Their age spectra show loss of argon and do not provide well defined plateaus the datings obtained for them are interpreted as minimum ages. Dates of amphiboles from the metagabbro of the upper tectonic plate of the Ust-Belaya allochthon points to metamorphism in the suprasubduction environment in the fragment of Late Neoproterozoic oceanic lithosphere in Middle-Late Devonian time, long before the Uda-Murgal island arc system was formed. The amphibolite metamorphism in the dunite-clinopyroxenite-metagabbro Pekulnei sequence was dated to occur at the Permian-Triassic boundary. The age of amphiboles from gabbrodiorites of the Kenkeren Range was dated to be Early

  1. Thermal History of the Felsite Unit, Geysers Geothermal Field, From Thermal Modeling of 40Ar/39Ar Incremental Heating Data

    SciTech Connect

    T. M. Harrison; G. B. Dalrymple; J. B. Hulen; M. A. Lanphere; M. Grove; O. M. Lovera

    1999-08-19

    An Ar-40/Ar-39 and U-Pb study was performed of the Geysers plutonic complex of the Geysers Geothermal Field in California. Sixty-nine ion microprobe spot analyses of zircons from four granite samples from the plutonic complex that underlies the Geysers geothermal field yielded Pb-207/Pb-206 vs. U-238/Pb-206 concordia ages ranging from 1.13 {+-} 0.04 Ma to 1.25 {+-} 0.04 Ma. The U-Pb ages coincide closely with Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum plateau and ''terminal'' ages from coexisting K-feldspars and with the eruption ages of overlying volcanic rocks. The data indicate that the granite crystallized at 1.18 Ma and had cooled below 350 C by {approximately}0.9-1.0 Ma. Interpretation of the feldspar Ar-40/Ar-39 age data using multi-diffusion domain theory indicates that post-emplacement rapid cooling was succeeded either by slower cooling from 350-300 C between 1.0 and 0.4 Ma or transitory reheating to 300-350 C at about 0.4-0.6 Ma. Heat flow calculations constrained with K-feldspar thermal histories and the pre sent elevated regional heal flow anomaly demonstrate that appreciable heat input from sources external to the known Geysers plutonic complex is required to maintain the geothermal system. This requirement is satisfied by either a large, underlying, convecting magma chamber (now solidified) emplaced at 1.2 Ma or episodic intrusion of smaller bodies from 1.2-0.6 Ma.

  2. Pyroclastic chronology of the Sancy stratovolcano (Mont-Dore, French Massif Central): New high-precision 40Ar/39Ar constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomade, Sébastien; Scaillet, Stéphane; Pastre, Jean-François; Nehlig, Pierre

    2012-05-01

    The Sancy (16 km2) is the youngest of the two stratovolcanoes that constitute the Mont-Dore Massif (Massif Central, France). The restricted number of high precision radio-isotopic ages currently limits our knowledge of the pyroclastic chronology of this edifice which is the source of many tephra layers detected in middle Pleistocene sequences in southeast Europe. To improve our knowledge of the building phases of this stratovolcano, we collected thirteen pyroclastic units covering the entire proximal record. We present 40Ar/39Ar single grain laser dating performed in the facility hosted at the LSCE (Gif-sur-Yvette, France). The 40Ar/39Ar ages range from 1101 ± 11 ka to 392 ± 7 ka (1σ external). Four pyroclastic cycles lasting on average 100 ka were identified (C. I to C. IV). C. I corresponds to the earlier explosive phase between 1101 ka and 1000 ka and starts about 100 ka earlier than previously thought. The second pyroclastic cycle (C. II) is the main pyroclastic episode spanning from 818 to 685 ka. This cycle is constituted of a minimum of 8 major pyroclastic eruptions and includes a major event that corresponds to a large plinian eruption at 719 ± 10 ka (1σ external) and recorded as a 1.4 m thick layer 60 km south-east of the Sancy volcano. The link between this large eruption and formation of a caldera stays however, hypothetical. The third pyroclastic cycle (C. III) found in the northeastern part of the Sancy (Mont-Dore valley) spanned from 642 to 537 ka. Finally, the youngest pyroclastic cycle (C. IV) starts at 392 ka and probably ends around 280 ka. The age versus geographic location of each pyroclastic cycle indicates three preferential directions of channeling of the pyroclastic events and/or collapse of the volcanic edifice: northwest to west (C. I), southeast (C. II) and finally north to northeast (C. III and IV). The new high precision 40Ar/39Ar age for the Queureuilh bas pyroclastic unit (642 ± 9 ka) is identical within error with the U/Pb age

  3. 40Ar/39Ar dating and paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the Lower Pleistocene sequence of Kvemo-Orozmani (Republic of Georgia): New chronological constraints for Dmanisi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomade, S.; Messager, E.; Voinchet, P.; Mgeladze, A.; Guillou, H.; Ferring, R.; Lordkipanidze, D.

    2010-12-01

    Discovery of Early Pleistocene hominid remains about 15 years ago in Dmanisi (southwestern part of the actual Republic of Georgia) provides evidence on an early expansion of hominid out of Africa as early as the Olduvai subchron period (Gabunia et al., 2001). Two other Early Pleistocene sequences only few kilometers from Dmanisi: Zemo and Kvemo Orozmani are of prime interest to improve the dating of this exceptional site. They both display similar sediments than Dmanisi, but contrary to it, they both are overly by a lava flow allowing to precisely bracketing these sequences using radio-isotopic methods. In this contribution, we present the first high precision 40Ar/39Ar dating and paleoecological reconstruction (phytoliths record) of the Kvemo-Orozmani sequence. The 40Ar/39Ar ages we obtained on the lava flow bracketing the Kvemo Orozmani sequence are: 1.83 ± 0.02Ma and 1.77 ± 0.02Ma (95% confidence, relative to the ACR2 standard at 1.194 Ma). These numerical ages place the sequence exactly at the top of the Olduvai subchron. Furthermore, the lowermost lava flow (c.a. 1.83Ma) is only marginally younger than the lava flow found below the Dmanisi site and dated at 1.85 ± 0.01Ma (Gabunia et al.,(2000)), whereas, the uppermost one displays the same age than the one covering the Zemo Orozmani sequence (Gabunia et al., 2000) located only 2km East. Phytoliths analyses (silica opal produced by plants) show that lower part of the sequence is associated with herbaceous vegetations composed of both temperate and sub-tropical taxa whereas the upper part of the sequence shows an absence of subtropical phytoliths taxa suggesting dryer condition. The shift in the phytoliths assemblage we found in Kvemo-Orozmani is similar to the one described in Dmanisi at the top of the A stratum and corresponds paleomagnetically to the top of the Olduvai subchron (Messager et al., 2010). Both numerical ages and phytoliths assemblages we obtained suggest that the Kvemo Orozmani sequence

  4. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the Valsequillo volcanic deposits, Central Mexico: Resolution of an ongoing archaeological controversy and implications for the first human colonization of the 'New World'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, Darren

    2010-05-01

    It is currently accepted that the Clovis culture was the first to migrate into the New World at 13.1 ka [1]. However, archeological evidence in the form of stone tools, linguistics, craniometrics and genetics suggest that the first Americans were ethnically diverse and a few sites dated to 15-16 ka BP challenge the 'Clovis First' model. Perhaps the biggest challenge to the 'Clovis First' model was the reported presence of human footprints within a basaltic ash (Xalnene Ash) dated to 38.04 ± 8.57 ka using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) [2]. However, Renne et al. [3] challenged the validity of the footprints by dating lapilli from the Xalnene ash using 40Ar/39Ar and reported an age of 1.30 ± 0.03 Ma (2σ). They also reported a reversed palaeomagnetic polarity for the ash, consistent with deposition during chron C1r.2r. Such antiquity casts considerable doubt on the interpretation of the impressions as human footprints. Gonzalez et al. [4] questioned the validity of the 40Ar/39Ar age and highlighted the heterogeneous nature of the lapilli as a potential problem for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. The lapilli contain abundant phenocrysts and xenocrysts. Olivine phenocrysts can be contaminated with excess Ar (40ArE) [5] and hence the dating of 40ArE-bearing lapilli and xenocrystic material may potentially produce anomalously old 40Ar/39Ar ages. Gonzalez et al. [4] also dismissed the significance of the reversed palaeomagnetic polarity as the proposed age of the ash (38.04 ± 8.57 ka) overlapped with the Laschamp Geomagnetic Excursion at 40.4 ± 1.1 ka. Subsequently there has been support for both sides of the debate. The OSL age presented was questioned [6] and reconfirmed by [7]. The OU 40Ar/39Ar laboratory showed the presence of 40ArE in the samples although they were unable to date the ash [2]. Palaeomagnetic data has both supported emplacement of the Xalnene Ash during the LGE [8,9] and at 1.3 Ma [10]. The age of the 'alleged' footprint-bearing Xalnene ash and

  5. Time relationships between volcanism-plutonism-alteration-mineralization in Cu-stratabound ore deposits from the Michilla mining district, northern Chile: a 40Ar/39Ar geochronological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveros, Verónica; Tristá-Aguilera, Dania; Féraud, Gilbert; Morata, Diego; Aguirre, Luis; Kojima, Shoji; Ferraris, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    The Michilla mining district comprises one of the most important stratabound and breccia-style copper deposits of the Coastal Cordillera of northern Chile, hosted by the Middle Jurassic volcanic rocks of the La Negra Formation. 40Ar/39Ar analyses carried out on igneous and alteration minerals from volcanic and plutonic rocks in the district allow a chronological sequence of several magmatic and alteration events of the district to be established. The first event was the extrusion of a thick lava series of the La Negra Formation, dated at 159.9 ± 1.0 Ma (2 σ) from the upper part of the series. A contemporaneous intrusion is dated at 159.6 ± 1.1 Ma, and later intrusive events are dated at 145.5 ± 2.8 and 137.4 ± 1.1 Ma, respectively. Analyzed alteration minerals such as adularia, sericite, and actinolite apparently give valid 40Ar/39Ar plateau and miniplateau ages. They indicate the occurrence of several alteration events at ca. 160-163, 154-157, 143-148, and 135-137 Ma. The first alteration event, being partly contemporaneous with volcanic and plutonic rocks, was probably produced in a high thermal gradient environment. The later events may be related either to a regional low-grade hydrothermal alteration/metamorphism process or to plutonic intrusions. The Cu mineralization of the Michilla district is robustly bracketed between 163.6 ± 1.9 and 137.4 ± 1.1 Ma, corresponding to dating of actinolite coexisting with early-stage chalcocite and a postmineralization barren dyke, respectively. More precisely, the association of small intrusives (a dated stock from the Michilla district) with Cu mineralization in the region strongly suggests that the main Michilla ore deposit is related to a magmatic/hydrothermal event that occurred between 157.4 ± 3.6 and 163.5 ± 1.9 Ma, contemporaneous or shortly after the extrusion of the volcanic sequence. This age is in agreement with the Re-Os age of 159 ± 16 Ma obtained from the mineralization itself (Tristá-Aguilera et al

  6. Paleomagnetism and 40ar/39ar Geochronology of the Plio-Pleistocene Boring Volcanic Field: Implications for the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrum, J. T.; Fleck, R. J.; Evarts, R. C.; Calvert, A. T.; Conrey, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Boring volcanic field (BVF) in western Oregon and Washington has been the subject of a recently completed investigation that included detailed geologic mapping, petrographic and geochemical analyses, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronologic and paleomagnetic studies. At least 80 monogenetic volcanic centers compose the BVF, each of which erupted small volumes of magma ranging from basalt to mafic andesite over short intervals of time. More than 140 40Ar/39Ar determinations for lava flows and intrusions in the BVF range in age from ~3100 ka to ~60 ka. Oriented samples for paleomagnetic analysis were collected at an equivalent number of localities (>160) coincident with, or within the same unit proximal to, the geochronologic sampling sites. Based on the frequency distribution of ages, the most significant episodes of Boring volcanism occurred between 2700 and 2200 ka, 1700 and 500 ka, and 350 and 60 ka. A systematic determination of the BVF's eruptive history was undertaken mainly to assess its anomalous neotectonic setting west of the Cascade arc axis, as well as the magnitude of its concomitant volcanic hazards within the greater Portland and Vancouver metropolitan areas. Our paleomagnetic and geochronologic data, however, also have significant implications for the timing of geomagnetic field reversals and excursions during the Late Pliocene and Pleistocene epochs. The BVF data are more numerous higher in the section, and they capture transitional fields at two polarity boundaries allowing precise age determinations to be made for these reversals: the Brunhes-Matuyama transition is thus dated at 773±5 ka, and the upper Jaramillo-Matuyama transition at 973±6 ka. The lower Jaramillo-Matuyama transition occurred prior to 1068±8 ka, and the normal Cobb subchron must have occurred between reversed-polarity Matuyama flows dated at 1159±14 ka and 1207±6 ka. The lower Olduvai-Matuyama transition occurred prior to 1927±4 ka, and the Matuyama-Gauss transition prior to 2616

  7. Early Pleistocene climate cycles in continental deposits of the Lesser Caucasus of Armenia inferred from palynology, magnetostratigraphy, and 40Ar/39Ar dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joannin, Sebastien; Cornée, Jean-Jacques; Münch, Philippe; Fornari, Michel; Krijgsman, Wout; Nahapetyan, Samuel; Gabrielyan, Ivan; Ollivier, Vincent; Roiron, Paul; Chataignier, Christine

    2010-05-01

    The Lesser Caucasus in Armenia is an active volcanic and tectonic zone which resulted from the collision of the Arabian and the Eurasian plates since Neogene times. The During Quaternary, Lesser Caucasus was uplifted (0.3 mm/yr; Mitchell and Westaway, 1999) and experienced extensional tectonics times. Large lakes developed in graben structures. The diatomitic sequences of the Shamb paleo-lake (South Armenia) offer a rare opportunity to give new insights of Western Asia paleo-climate. Based on macroflora analysis, Bruch and Gabrielyan (2002) proposed a cooling and drying general climate trend through Pleistocene times in relation with a general uplift of the chain. Several questions have to be answer for this poorly investigated region. Did the climate record humid glacials and arid interglacials as suggested northward in Kazakhstan? What are the vegetation and climate responses to orbital parameters and to the monsoon? Moreover the lesser Caucasus is known as the entrance way used by the first hominids in Eurasia during Pleistocene time. How was the environment at this time? We present an integrated palynological, 40Ar/39Ar isotopic and magnetostratigraphic study for the most complete section (Joannin et al., in press). 40Ar/39Ar dating of two volcaniclastic layers provided ages of 1.24 ± 0.03 and 1.16 ± 0.02 Ma. Magnetostratigraphic data show that the entire Shamb section is of reversed polarity which correlates with part of the Matuyama period (1.785-1.070 Ma). Pollen assemblages and macroremains diversity revealed an alternation of glacial and interglacial phases that are compared with climate changes inferred from the global isotopic curve. The Shamb section ranges from approximately 1.300 to 1.080 Ma in age (marine isotopic stages 40 to 31). The vegetation of the Lesser Caucasus developed in a mosaic pattern in a Pleistocene continental, mostly arid climate, similar to the present-day climate. The vegetation changes record a dominant climate response to the

  8. 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He - 4He/3He geochronology of landscape evolution and channel iron deposit genesis at Lynn Peak, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcelos, Paulo M.; Heim, Jonathan A.; Farley, Kenneth A.; Monteiro, Hevelyn; Waltenberg, Kathryn

    2013-09-01

    (U-Th)/He geochronology of authigenic goethite cements from the Lynn Peak channel iron deposit (CID), Hamersley Province, Western Australia, reveals a history of mineral precipitation ranging from ca. 33 to 14 Ma. Massive goethites from nearby weathering profiles at Roy Hill North, a possible source of detrital material during the aggradation of the Lynn Peak channels, yield (U-Th)/He results as old as ca. 64 Ma. The combination of (U-Th)/He geochronology with incremental outgassing 4He/3He studies on proton-irradiated samples reveals that Lynn Peak goethites host radiogenic 4He in low retentivity (LRD) and high retentivity (HRD) domains and that the HRDs account for most of the sample mass and have lost very little of their original 4He over geologic time. Such high retentivity is especially notable given the goethites were collected from the surface, where they were subject to significant heating by solar irradiation. Minor contamination by detrital fragments of potentially 4He-rich primary phases (e.g., rutile, ilmenite, zircon) occurs in some samples. Fortunately, the 4He/3He method permits characterization of this extraneous 4He component, which is small (<10 wt.% of the total 4He in the goethite) and can be corrected out in estimating the goethite formation age. These results indicate that the Lynn Peak channel was already aggraded and undergoing goethite cementation by ca. 33 Ma. The history of aggradation and channel cementation independently measured through 40Ar/39Ar geochronology is consistent with that obtained from the (U-Th)/He and 4He/3He record. Laser incremental-heating 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of detrital and authigenic Mn oxides, primarily cryptomelane (KMn8O16·xH2O), from the same locality in the Lynn Peak channel reveals that detrital oxides are older than ca. 44 Ma (and as old as ca. 65 Ma) and authigenic oxides are younger than ca. 35 Ma and as young as ca. 16 Ma. Authigenic cryptomelane precipitation and channel cementation occurred

  9. Episodic rapid uplift in the Himalaya revealed by sup 40 Ar/ sup 39 Ar analysis of detrital K-feldspar and muscovite, Bengal fan

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.M.; Copeland, P. )

    1990-04-01

    Detrital K-feldspar and muscovite samples from Ocean Drilling Program Leg 116 cores have been dated by the {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar technique and have depositional ages from 0 to 18 Ma. From 4 to 13 individual K-feldspars and 1 to 12 individual muscovites have been dated from 7 stratigraphic levels. In every level at least one K-feldspar and one muscovite yielded a minimum age identical, within uncertainty, to the age of deposition. These results indicate that a significant portion of the material in the Bengal fan is first-cycle detritus derived from the Himalaya. Therefore, the substantial amount of sediment deposited in the distal fan in early to middle Miocene time can be ascribed to a significant pulse of uplift and erosion in the collision zone at this time. Moreover, these data indicate that throughout the Neogene, some part of the Himalayan orogen was undergoing rapid erosion (1 to 10 mm/yr); this erosion must have been less than or equal to uplift relative to sea level. The lack of granulite facies rocks in the eastern Himalaya and Tibetan plateau suggests to us that very rapid uplift must have been distributed in brief pulses over different parts of the mountain belt. These data are incompatible with tectonic models in which the Himalaya and Tibetan plateau are uplifted either uniformly over the past 40 m.y. or mostly within the past 2 to 5 m.y.

  10. 40Ar/39Ar whole-rock data constraints on Acadian diagenesis and Alleghanian cleavage in the Martinsburg Formation, eastern Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wintsch, R.P.; Kunk, M.J.; Epstein, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    A comparison of 40Ar/39Ar age spectra of whole-rock mudstone and slate samples from the Ordovician Martinsburg Formation at Lehigh Gap, Pennsylvania, and stratigraphic and thermal constraints support an Alleghanian age for regional slaty cleavage and a late Acadian age for diagenesis in these rocks. Age spectra from mudstones have a sigmoidal shape, with slopes that climb steeply from apparent Mesozoic ages to intermediate saddle regions with Devonian apparent ages, and then climb steeply again to Late Proterozoic apparent ages. The steps with these oldest apparent ages are interpreted to be dominated by Late Proterozoic detrital muscovite. The saddle region of the mudstone samples gives very Late Silurian to earliest Devonian ages, which are maximum ages of diagenetic micas and which eliminate a Taconic age for the cleavage. The ages of the saddle regions of the slate samples containing cleavage-forming muscovite is age of this mica and requires an Alleghanian age for the cleavage. These age constraints are supported by ages of individual mica components calculated with knowledge of the total gas ages and mass fractions of the micas and by predictions from thermal modeling. We conclude that the Taconic orogeny in the Martinsburg Formation in eastern Pennsylvania was a very mild event. Not only is the cleavage in these rocks not Taconic in age, but even the mild (???100C) diagenetic growth of illite was Silurian or younger. Thus the Taconic event in these rocks is limited to loading of less than about 3 km.

  11. Growth of mica porphyroblasts under low-grade metamorphism - A Taiwanese case using in-situ40Ar/39Ar laser microprobe dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Tung; Chan, Yu-Chang; Lo, Ching-Hua; Lu, Chia-Yu

    2016-11-01

    Mica porphyroblasts, a common metamorphic microstructure, are analyzed in the slate belt of northern Taiwan where large fish-like growths are found within a meta-pyroclastics. With constraints on the time-temperature history from deposition through peak metamorphic state to exhumation, in-situ40Ar/39Ar laser microprobe dating was carried out on muscovite and corrensite fibers of mm-scale mica porphyroblasts grown on a pressure-solution seam. Because the peak metamorphic temperature and the porphyroblast formation condition (∼250 °C) remained far below the closure temperature of the K-Ar radioisotope system in muscovite, and the absence of muscovite in the mafic protolith, the dating results likely document the growth of the mica porphyroblast fabrics. The syn-kinematic nature of the analyzed porphyroblasts is confirmed by the ∼6 to ∼2.5 Ma growth ages, suggesting that the host rock was continuously deformed during the earlier two-thirds of the Taiwan Orogeny. The pattern of fiber growth, in contrast to outward-decreasing ages normally observed in peripheral recrystallization, appears random and resembles void fills in boudin openings. We postulate that syntaxial crack-seal following tensile micro-boudinage, along with slips on sub-grain boundaries, as a viable mechanism for the development of mica porphyroblasts and fish especially in lower-grade metamorphic rocks.

  12. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar evidence for delayed post-Acadian cooling in the southernmost Connecticut Valley Synclinorium

    SciTech Connect

    Moecher, D.P. . Dept. of Geological Science); Cosca, M.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Available Ar-40/Ar-39 data for the Connecticut Valley Synclinorium (CVS) of the New England segment of the Appalachian Orogen indicate rapid post-Acadian cooling. However, new data indicate this pattern does not extend the entire length of the CVS. Ar-40/Ar-39 ages obtained from hornblende and muscovite in The Straits Schist indicate delayed cooling and a more complex post-Acadian thermal history. Data for the Seymour area are consistent with the studies above for the vicinity of the Waterbury Dome. The data farther south indicate one or more of the following: (1) slow (2--3C/Ma) post-Acadian cooling and uplift through the Permian; (2) post-Acadian cooling through Hbl closure in the Mississippian with a subsequent Alleghanian metamorphism that did not exceed 500 C; or (3) post-Acadian cooling with subsequent metamorphism that approached 500 C or involved ductile recrystallization, partly resetting hornblende and totally resetting muscovite south of Derby. Petrologic evidence supporting (2) or (3) consists of widespread but not pervasive greenschist facies retrogression of Hbl + Pl + Sph assemblages in amphibolites to Act + Ep, and Grt + Ky + St assemblages in metapelites to Chl + Bt + Qz. The present data cannot resolve between (2) or (3). However, both are consistent with results of a study in the Bridgeport Synform that yield (1) a U-Pb monazite age of 296 [+-] 2 Ma from the Ansonia Leucogranite, implying the occurrence of an Alleghanian thermal event that promoted monazite growth; and, (2) a U-Pb cooling age of 360 Ma from sphene in the Pumpkin Ground Granodiorite, indicating that Alleghanian events did not exceed ca. 550 C.

  13. A palaeomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar study of late precambrian sills in the SW part of the Amazonian craton: Amazonia in the Rodinia reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elming, S.-Å.; D'Agrella-Filho, M. S.; Page, L. M.; Tohver, E.; Trindade, R. I. F.; Pacca, I. I. G.; Geraldes, M. C.; Teixeira, W.

    2009-07-01

    A new key palaeomagnetic pole (Plat. = 64.3°S, Plon. = 271.0°E, N = 14, A95 = 9.2° Q = 5) is calculated from a primary magnetization isolated in early Neoproterozoic Aguapei basic sills and dykes hosted by 1.3-1.0 Ga sedimentary rocks from the southwestern part of the Amazon craton. The characteristic remanence carried by stable, pseudo-single domain titanomagnetite shows two antipodal polarities that pass a reversals test. Magnetic anisotropy for most sites shows fabric orientations that are typical of sills, with horizontal magnetic foliations concordant to the flat-lying bedding of the host sedimentary rocks. 40Ar/39Ar analyses for one of the sills reveal a well-defined plateau age at 981 +/- 2 Myr. A tectonic reconstruction for Amazonia relative Laurentia based on this new pole `is consistent with' a position of the present northwestern part of Amazonia attached with eastern Laurentia close to Greenland at ca. 981 Ma. On basis of palaeomagnetic and geological data, we propose a scenario where Amazonia moved northeastwards along the present southeast coast of Laurentia from ca. 1200 to 980 Ma. By 980 Ma, Amazonia is placed alongside Laurentia and Baltica, in a position similar to other reconstructions of Rodinia but with a significantly different orientation.

  14. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar isotopic dates from the Cripple Creek gold-Telluride district, Colorado: Constraints on the timing of magmatism and mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, K.D.; Snee, L.W. ); Thompson, T.B. . Dept. of Earth Resources)

    1993-04-01

    The Cripple Creek district is within a Tertiary diatreme-intrusive complex, a steep-walled basin in Proterozoic pelitic and igneous rocks that is filled with terrigenous sedimentary rocks, volcanic and hydrothermal breccias, and tuffs. The orebodies occur as veins in Proterozoic and Tertiary rocks or as deposits localized within hydrothermal breccia bodies or disseminated in diatreme breccias. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dates from igneous rocks demonstrate the approximately contemporaneous emplacement of the most differentiated phonolitic rocks. Three sanidine samples from phonolite yield apparent ages ranging from 30.9 [+-] 0.1 to 31.8 [+-] 0.1 Ma (1 sigma). Biotite and sanidine age spectra from relatively less differentiated tephriphonolite are discordant; the emplacement age is estimated to be between 31.4 [+-] 0.1 and 32.5 [+-] 0.1 Ma. A maximum age of 31.5 [+-] 0.1 Ma was obtained on a whole-rock sample of trachyandesite. The mafic phonolitic rocks are relatively younger. A sample of the Isabella dike, a phonotephrite dike cutting phonolite, yields a whole-rock age of 28.7 [+-] 0.04 Ma. The data suggest that mineralization both predates and postdates emplacement of the mafic phonolitic rocks. Hydrothermal biotite in a vein cutting phonolite yields an age of 29.9 [+-] 0.1 Ma. The age spectrum of adularia from a vein cutting volcaniclastic rocks is difficult to interpret due to the presence of excess argon, but an age is estimated to be between 29.5 and 30.4 Ma. In the vicinity of the phonotephrite dike, field evidence suggests that vein mineralization postdates emplacement of the dike; potassium feldspar from potassium altered phonolite in the vicinity of mineralized rock yields ages of 28.2 [+-] 0.1 and 28.8 [+-] 0.1 Ma.

  15. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of Andaman Ophiolite: Evidence for a Pleistocene mega thrusting event within the Andaman-Nicobar Accretionary Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, K.; Ray, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    A geochronological study the Andaman ophiolite was performed along a ~120 km corridor on the eastern margin of the Andaman Islands, which forms part of the Andaman-Nicobar accretionary wedge. This Cretaceous ophiolite sequence occurs as imbricate thrust wedges overlying the Paleogene flysch and Neogene pelagic sediments. Incremental heating 40Ar/39Ar dating of three pillow basalts and a peridotite samples reveals that the ophiolite has a composite thermal history. Apparent age spectra of all the samples suggest a clear two stage evolution, with the high temperature steps (1000 to 1400oC) and the lower temperature steps (400-950oC) showing a staircase pattern and a plateau-like pattern, respectively. The apparent ages of the highest temperature steps vary from 135 Ma to 97 Ma, which appear to suggest multiple crystallization ages. Interestingly, the plateau-like spectra for the lower temperature steps yield indistinguishable ages, although with very high errors (as high as 67% at 1s), across all the samples. The isochron ages too overlap with the plateau-like ages. Thus the weighted average of the plateau-like ages of 0.9±0.3 (2s) Ma most likely represents the timing of the latest thermal resetting. Based on the above information we conclude that while different units of the Andaman ophiolite may have been formed at different times, all had seen a major thermal resetting. Considering the position of these rocks vis-à-vis the structural configuration of the Andaman-Nicobar accretionary wedge we infer that there was a mega thrusting event in the region at ~0.9 Ma which was possibly responsible for exhumation of the current outcrops of the ophiolite sequence along the east coast of the Andman Islands.

  16. Delineating the P-T-t History of Blueschist Rocks in the Ruby Terrane, Alaska using 40Ar/39Ar UV laser ablation and Lu-Hf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildgoose, M.; Roeske, S.; Vervoort, J. D.; Cosca, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Determining P-T-t paths in metamorphic rocks is inherently complicated due to the fact that peak pressure may not coincide with peak temperature, and most thermochronologic data provide an age for peak or cooling temperature. Using appropriate metamorphic minerals can be the key to unraveling the thermochronologic framework, though even on a mineral-scale, what events the mineral is recording can be complicated. The combination of in-situ 40Ar/39Ar UV laser ablation technique on white mica, infrared laser step-heating of white mica crystals, and Lu/Hf dating of co-occurring garnet are used to better understand whether single crystals of chemically heterogeneous white mica can provide reliable ages of metamorphic events. Three different thermochronologic techniques are combined to constrain the timing of burial and exhumation of blueschist rocks in the Ruby Terrane region of west-central Alaska. Use of these three techniques permits discrimination of P-T-t paths by comparing garnet (highest temperature) ages to the ages of the phengite cores and muscovite rims in white mica crystals. Blueschist facies rocks, particularly those generated in continental subduction zone systems, are common sources for assemblages that include both abundant white mica and garnets. The correlation of the garnet age to either the core or rim age from the mica can help determine whether the retrograde path of the crystal is the result of isothermal decompression or isobaric heating. These two possible paths are significant for understanding geodynamic processes of subduction zones that evolve to continental collision, such as recorded in the Ruby Terrane (RT), which lies just south of the Brooks Range in west-central Alaska. Continental crust in northern Alaska experienced extreme shortening and widespread blueschist facies metamorphism, during the Brookean orogeny, broadly from the Mid-Jurassic to the Mid-Cretaceous. The record of Cretaceous shortening accompanied by locally significant

  17. Travels of the Cache Creek Terrane: a paleomagnetic, geobarometric and 40Ar/ 39Ar study of the Jurassic Fourth of July Batholith, Canadian Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Michael J.; Symons, David T. A.; Blackburn, William H.; Hart, Craig J. R.; Villeneuve, Mike

    2003-02-01

    The Middle Jurassic Fourth of July Batholith and cross-cutting mafic dikes have been studied geochronologically, geobarometrically and paleomagnetically to estimate subsequent tectonic motion of the Cache Creek Terrane (CCT) in the northern Canadian Cordillera. 40Ar/ 39Ar hornblende ages from a granodiorite phase are similar to U-Pb zircon ages and indicate rapid cooling of the batholith upon intrusion, suggesting that the magnetization age is coincident with the 173-Ma crystallization age. Argon ages of biotite from the granodiorite and two mafic dikes have similar ages of ˜165 Ma, which dates cooling through ˜280 °C. Aluminum-in-hornblende geobarometry indicates differential uplift of the batholith across a north-south fault zone along Atlin Lake with >6 km more uplift on its eastern side. Also, the eastern side has been tilted downward to the south-southwest by ˜9°. Combined paleomagnetic data from 20 granitoid and 11 mafic dike sites yield an in situ paleopole at 55°W, 63°N ( dp=5°, dm=5°) and a tilt-corrected paleopole at 81°W, 55°N ( dp=5°, dm=6°). Compared to the 173-Ma reference pole for the North American craton, the tilt-corrected pole suggests a significant southward translation of 16.1±3.7° and a significant clockwise rotation of 107±7°. The translation estimate is similar to the Jurassic Teslin Crossing pluton in the Stikine Terrane, however, the rotation estimate is very different. This could indicate that the Cache Creek Terrane was at a similar latitude of the Stikine Terrane, but the two were not yet amalgamated.

  18. The Early Andean Magmatic Province (EAMP): 40Ar/ 39Ar dating on Mesozoic volcanic and plutonic rocks from the Coastal Cordillera, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveros, Verónica; Féraud, Gilbert; Aguirre, Luis; Fornari, Michel; Morata, Diego

    2006-10-01

    The Early Andean Magmatic Province (EAMP), consists of about 150 000 km 3 of volcanic and plutonic units in the Coastal Cordillera of northern Chile and southern Peru and represents a major magmatic Mesozoic event in the world, for which the precise age of the thick volcanic series was unknown. Thirty 40Ar/ 39Ar analyses were carried out on primary mineral phases of volcanic and plutonic rocks from northern Chile (18°30'-24°S). Reliable plateau and "mini plateau" ages were obtained on plagioclase, amphibole and biotite from volcanic and plutonic rocks, despite widespread strong alteration degree. In the Arica, Tocopilla and Antofagasta (700 km apart) regions, the ages obtained on lava flows constrain the volcanic activity between 164 and 150 Ma and no N-S migration of volcanism is observed. The uppermost lava flows of the volcanic sequence at the type locality of the La Negra Formation extruded at ca. 153-150 Ma, suggesting the end of the volcanic activity of the arc at that time. The oldest volcanic activity occurred probably at ca. 175-170 Ma in the Iquique area, although no plateau age could be obtained. The plutonic bodies of the same regions were dated between ca. 160 and 142 Ma, indicating that they were partly contemporaneous with the volcanic activity. At least one volcanic pulse around 160 Ma is evidenced over the entire investigated reach of the EAMP, according to the ages found in Arica, Tocopilla, Michilla and Mantos Blancos regions. The episodic emplacement of huge amounts of subduction related volcanism is observed throughout the whole Andean history and particularly during the Jurassic (southern Peru, northern Chile and southern Argentina). These events probably correspond to periodic extensional geodynamic episodes, as a consequence of particular subduction conditions, such as change of obliquity of the convergence, change in the subduction angle, slab roll back effect or lower convergence rate, that remain to be precisely defined.

  19. 40Ar-39Ar laser dating of ductile shear zones from central Corsica (France): Evidence of Alpine (middle to late Eocene) syn-burial shearing in Variscan granitoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Vincenzo, Gianfranco; Grande, Antonietta; Prosser, Giacomo; Cavazza, William; DeCelles, Peter G.

    2016-10-01

    The island of Corsica (France) plays a central role in any reconstruction of Western Mediterranean geodynamics and paleogeography but several key aspects of its geological evolution are still uncertain. The most debated topics include the interpretation of the Corsican orogen as the result of an east- or west-directed subduction, and the actual involvement of the Variscan basement of Corsica in the Alpine orogenic cycle. This study integrates 40Ar-39Ar laserprobe, mesostructural, microtextural, and microchemical analyses and places relevant constraints on the style, P-T conditions, and timing of Alpine-age, pervasive ductile shear zones which affected the Variscan basement complex of central Corsica, a few kilometers to the west of the present-day front of the Alpine nappes. Shear zones strike NNE-SSW, dip at a high angle, and are characterized by a dominant sinistral strike-slip component. Two of the three investigated shear zones contain two texturally and chemically resolvable generations of white mica, recording a prograde (burial) evolution: (1) deformed celadonite-poor relicts are finely overgrown by (2) a celadonite-rich white mica aligned along the main foliation. White mica from a third sample of another shear zone, characterized by a significantly lower porphyroclast/matrix ratio, exhibits a nearly uniform high-celadonite content, compositionally matching the texturally younger phengite from the nearby shear zones. Mineral-textural analysis, electron microprobe data, and pseudosection modeling constrain P-T conditions attained during shearing at 300 °C and minimum pressures of 0.6 GPa. In-situ 40Ar-39Ar analyses of coexisting low- and high-celadonite white micas from both shear zones yielded a relatively wide range of ages, 45-36 Ma. Laser step-heating experiments gave sigmoidal-shaped age profiles, with step ages in line with in-situ spot dates. By contrast, the apparently chemically homogenous high-celadonite white mica yielded concordant in-situ ages

  20. Geochronological constraints (40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb) on the thermal history of the Tolumne Intrusive Suite (Sierra Nevada, California)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundil, R.; Nomade, S.; Paterson, S. R.; Renne, P. R.

    2004-12-01

    The Tuolumne Intrusive Suite (TIS) in the Eastern Sierra Nevada is considered a type example of a batholith and represents a spectacularly exposed, protracted record of internal differentiation and plutonic assembly in a large, open-system, continental arc magma chamber. One of the recent advances in our understanding of magmatic systems is the recognition that a substantial number are constructed episodically over timescales of up to millions of years for larger plutons. The main objective of this study is to investigate the episodic growth and evolution of magmatic systems by integrating thermal, geochronologic, geochemical, and crystal size distribution (CSD) studies with ongoing field studies of the TIS. Here we present high-resolution U/Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology from the TIS (which was assembled between 93 and 85 Ma, Coleman et al., 2004) and adjacent older units in order to unravel the time scales of its assemblage and thermal history. 25 Samples were collected along a SW-NE corridor (ca 30 km) across the TIS, including older plutons to the SW (El Capitan) and the NE (Soldier Lake (SDL) and Green Lake plutons (GRL)). So far, conventional U/Pb single-zircon analyses yield weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 165.0 ± 0.3 Ma for the GRL and a preliminary age of ca. 95 Ma for the SDL, which are interpreted as emplacement ages (all uncertainties are given at the 2σ level). 40Ar/39Ar analyses were performed on two different biotite and hornblende grain size fractions (800-900μ m and 150-180μ m) from each sample. As expected, isotherms in the eastern pendant of the Sierra Nevada move towards the TIS as a result of its cooling between 85 to 80 Ma. The gradient of temperature at the time of the emplacement of the Cathedral Peak (CP) Pluton (U/Pb zircon age of ca 88 Ma, Coleman, 2004) was about 150° C to 200° C per 5 km. The western margin of the GRL (at 5 km distance from the TIS) is thermally affected by the TIS as indicated by biotite ages that are reset (ca

  1. Retrogressed lawsonite blueschists from the NW Iberian Massif: P- T- t constraints from thermodynamic modelling and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Carmona, Alicia; Abati, Jacobo; Pitra, Pavel; Lee, James K. W.

    2014-03-01

    Blueschist facies terranes in the Variscan Ibero-Armorican Arc are restricted to scarce and relatively small areas. One of these examples is the Ceán Unit, which is the westernmost exposure of the middle allochthonous sheet of the Variscan belt in the Malpica-Tui Complex (NW Iberian Massif). The Ceán Unit is a highly condensed metamorphic succession with a lower part in the blueschist facies and an upper part without H P relicts. It comprises variable proportions of glaucophane-chloritoid-bearing metapelites and mafic rocks with abundant well-preserved pseudomorphs after euhedral lawsonite. Both lithologies show systematic changes in texture and mineral composition that are spatially related depending on deformation. The metamorphic evolution of the metabasic rocks has been constrained in the P- T space through pseudosection approach and is characterised by H2O-undersaturated prograde evolution induced by the crystallisation of lawsonite. Peak conditions in the blueschist/LT-eclogite facies have been constrained at ca. 2.2 GPa and 560 °C. Exhumation-related metamorphism is characterised by a nearly isothermal decompression from the lawsonite-bearing fields to fields with stable albite at P ≈ 1 GPa. This lead to the pseudomorphism of lawsonite in the early-decompression stages, and a subsequent amphibolite-greenschist facies overprint at P < 0.8 GPa and T ≈ 440-480 °C. The preservation of the lawsonite crystal shape despite complete retrogression indicates that pseudomorphism occurred as a static process and that particular levels of the blueschist host rock were not affected by penetrative deformation during exhumation. 40Ar/39Ar step heating of phengitic muscovite from the pelitic schists interbedded with the lawsonite pseudomorph-bearing metabasic rocks yield plateau ages of ca. 363 ± 2 and 354 ± 1 Ma. The older age is interpreted as the age of the peak blueschist facies metamorphism. The age of 355 Ma is interpreted as a cooling age and is inferred to

  2. Microstructural finite strain analysis and 40Ar/39Ar evidence for the origin of the Mizil gneiss dome, eastern Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saleh, Ahmad M.; Kassem, Osama M. K.

    2012-07-01

    The Mizil antiform is a gneiss-cored culmination situated near the northern end of the Ar Rayn island arc terrane, which is the easternmost exposed tectonic unit of the Arabian Shield. This domal structure has a mantle of metamorphosed volcanosedimentary rocks belonging to the Al-Amar Group, and an igneous interior made up of foliated granodiorite-tonalite with adakitic affinity. The gneissic core has a SHRIMP U-Pb zircon age of 689 ± 10 Ma making it the oldest rock unit in the Ar Rayn terrane. An adakite diapir, formed by the melting of the subducted crust of a young marginal basin, and rising through the volcanosedimentary succession of the Ar Rayn island arc is thought to have caused the observed doming. Relatively uniform strain throughout the dome combined with strong vertical shortening and the roughly radial pattern of stretching lineation is consistent with diapirism; the absence of strain localization rules out detachment faulting as a causative mechanism. Amphibolites from the metamorphic envelope have an 40Ar/39Ar age of 615 ± 2 Ma; the age gap between core and cover is thought to reflect the resetting of metamorphic ages during the final suturing event, a phenomenon that is often observed throughout the eastern shield. Aeromagnetic anomalies beneath the Phanerozoic sedimentary cover indicate the presence of a collage of accreted terranes east of the Ar Rayn terrane that were probably amalgamated onto the Arabian margin during the latest stages of the closure of the Mozambique ocean; culminant orogeny is believed to have taken place between 620 and 600 Ma as these terrane collided with a major continental mass to the east referred to here as the eastern Arabian block (EAB). The Mizil gneiss dome is therefore considered to have formed in a convergent contractional setting rather than being the outcome of extensional post-orogenic collapse.

  3. Laser probe 40Ar/39Ar dating of pseudotachylyte from the Sudbury Structure: evidence for post-impact thermal overprinting in the North Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Lucy M.; Spray, John G.; Kelley, Simon P.

    1998-11-01

    Ten pseudotachylyte samples from the North Range of the 1850 Ma Sudbury impact structure have been analyzed by the 40Ar/39Ar laser spot fusion method. Field and petrological evidence indicate that the pseudotachylytes were formed at 1850 Ma by comminution and frictional melting due to impact-induced faulting. The cryptocrystalline to microcrystalline grain size (<30 _?m) of the pseudotachylyte matrices, and the predominance of orthoclase as the main K-bearing phase, have rendered the rocks particularly susceptible to argon loss. The age determinations range from ?1850 Ma to ?1000 Ma, with some samples yielding multiple ages that cannot be correlated with known geological events in the area. However, if the finite-difference algorithm of Wheeler (1996) is used to calculate combined argon loss and the accumulation of radiogenic argon for the K-bearing phases, it is possible to reproduce the range of observed ages. The model infers that the long-term volume diffusion of Ar has occurred and that, as a result, the Ar system cannot be treated with a conventional closure temperature approach. The algorithm requires burial of the impact structure to 5-6 km depth and 160-180 deg C at 1850 Ma, followed by exhumation at ?1000 Ma. These ages may be equated with two events: Penokean thin-skinned overthrusting in the North Range, immediately following impact, and exhumation ?850 Ma later, coincident with the Grenville orogeny to the southeast. The results suggest that, contrary to previously accepted paradigms, the North Range has been affected by a protracted period of post-impact, low-grade thermal metamorphism. If this event also involved tectonic shortening within the North Range, as has been documented for the South Range, then the original size of the Sudbury impact structure has been underestimated.

  4. Morphological modifications of the Kerguelen Islands (South Indian Ocean) in response to Neogene climate change: evidence from 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahadi, Floriane; Delpech, Guillaume; Gautheron, Cécile; Nomade, Sébastien; Pinna-jamme, Rosella; Ponthus, Léandre; Guillaume, Damien

    2016-04-01

    The processes driving erosion in geodynamic contexts in which regional tectonics is of minor importance, such as in oceanic islands, can be seen as a combination of positive/negative retroactions between climate change, isostasy or dynamic topography. The Kerguelen Islands (48-50° S, 68.5-70.5° E) are of particular interest to understand the impact of Cenozoïc climatic variations on the long-term geomorphological evolution of emerged reliefs at mid-latitudes. The Kerguelen Islands (6700 km2) are the emerged part of the vast Kerguelen oceanic plateau and reach a maximum height of 1852m asl. The archipelago is mostly made up of Oligocene basaltic traps (≈25 Ma) up to 1000m asl that are cross-cut by a dense network of large and deep valleys. The impact of glacial erosion during the last Quaternary glaciations on the landscape morphology is attested by the occurrence of U-shaped valleys, abundant moraines, erratic blocs and glacial lakes, as well as remnants of glaciers. Numerous plutonic complexes of various age (25-4.5 Ma) locally intrude theses traps and cover about 15% of the main island's surface; the largest being located in the Rallier du Baty peninsula (800 km2). This plutonic complex is mainly constituted of syenites with minor occurrence of gabbros and monzonites. The southern part of this complex has a laccolith structure with satellites plutons and formed between 13.7 and 8.0 Ma. The cooling history of syenites from the Rallier du Baty plutonic complex was investigated in order to identify one or several denudation periods and to understand the potential role of climate change on the geomorphological evolution of the islands since the Oligocene. We conducted the first thermochronological study on the Kerguelen Islands using the biotite 40Ar/39Ar thermochronometer and the apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometer (AHe). The 40Ar/39Ar ages range from 9.44 ± 0.13 Ma to 13.84 ± 0.07 Ma for the various parts of the southern complex. These ages are identical to

  5. Testing Astronomical and 40Ar/39Ar Timescales for the K/Pg Boundary Interval Using High-Resolution Magnetostratigraphy and U-Pb Geochronology in the Denver Basin of Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clyde, W.; Bowring, S. A.; Johnson, K. R.; Ramezani, J.; Jones, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate and precise calibration of the Geomagnetic Polarity Timescale (GPTS) in absolute time is critical for resolving rates of geological and biological processes which in turn help constrain the underlying causes of those processes. Numerical calibration of the GPTS was traditionally carried out by interpolation between a limited number of 40Ar/39Ar dated volcanic ash deposits from superpositional sequences with well-defined magnetostratigraphies. More recently, the Neogene part of the GPTS has been calibrated using high-resolution astrochronological methods, however the application of these approaches to pre-Neogene parts of the timescale is controversial given the uncertainties in relevant orbital parameters this far back in time and differing interpretations of local cyclostratigraphic records. The Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary interval is a good example, where various astronomical and 40Ar/39Ar calibrations have been proposed with varying degrees of agreement. The Denver Basin (Colorado, USA) contains one of the most complete stratigraphic sequences across the K/Pg boundary in the world, preserving evidence of bolide impact as well as biotic extinction and recovery in a thick stratigraphic package that is accessible by both core and outcrop. We present a series of high-precision U-Pb age determinations from interbedded volcanic ash deposits within a tightly constrained magnetobiostratigraphic framework across the K/Pg boundary in the Denver Basin. This new timeline provides a precise absolute age for the K/Pg boundary, constrains the ages of magnetic polarity Chrons C28 to C30, and provides a direct and independent test of early Paleogene astronomical and 40Ar/39Ar based timescales. Temporal calibration of fossil pollen evidence of the "fern spike" in the Denver Basin shows that plant extinctions peaked within ~50-500 years of the bolide impact and primary productivity recovered ~500-5000 years after the impact.

  6. sup 40 Ar- sup 39 Ar and K-Ar dating of K-rich rocks from the Roccamonfina volcano, Roman Comagmatic Region, Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Di Brozolo, F.R.; Di Girolamo, P.; Turi, B.; Oddone, M. )

    1988-06-01

    Roccamonfina is the northernmost Volcano of the Campanian area of the K-rich Roman comagmatic Region of Italy. It erupted a huge amount of pyroclastics and lavas belonging to both the Leucite-Basanite and Leucitite Series (LBLS) and the Shoshonite Series (SS), spread over an area of about 300 km{sup 2}. The above series correspond to the High-K Series (HKS) and Low-K Series (LKS) of Appleton (1971), respectively. {sup 40}Ar-{sup 39}Ar and K-Ar dating of samples from both series gave ages ranging from 0.656 to 0.096 Ma for the SS and from 1.03( ) to 0.053 Ma for the LBLS. These results indicate that the products of the two series were outpoured together at least between 0.7 and 0.1 Ma age, i.e. during both the so-called pre-caldera phase and the post-caldera phase of activity. The latest products of the volcanism at Roccamonfina were erupted just before the deposition of the Grey Campanian Ignimbrite, which erupted from vents located about 50 km to the south in the Phlegrean Fields near Naples and has an age of about 33,000 years. Taking into account all the available all the available radiometric data the authors conclude that Roccamonfina was active between 1.5 and 0.05 Ma ago, in excellent agreement with the stratigraphic evidence. In this same time span is concentrated the activity of all the centers of the Roman Region north of Naples.

  7. 40Ar/39Ar dating, geochemistry, and isotopic analyses of the quaternary Chichinautzin volcanic field, south of Mexico City: implications for timing, eruption rate, and distribution of volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, J. L.; Layer, P. W.; Lassiter, J. C.; Benowitz, J. A.; Macías, J. L.; Ramírez-Espinosa, J.

    2013-12-01

    Monogenetic structures located at the southern and western ends of the Chichinautzin volcanic field (Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central Mexico) yield 40Ar/39Ar ages ranging from 1.2 Ma in the western portion of the field to 1.0-0.09 Ma in the southern portion, all of which are older than the <0.04 Ma age previously established for the entire volcanic field. These new ages indicate: (1) an eruption rate of 0.47 km3/kyr, which is much lower than the 11.7 km3/kyr previously estimated; (2) that the Chichinautzin magmatism coexisted with the Zempoala (0.7 Ma) and La Corona (1.0 Ma) polygenetic volcanoes on the southern edge of Las Cruces Volcanic Range (Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt); and confirm (3) that the drainage system between the Mexico and Cuernavaca basins was closed during early Pleistocene forming the Texcoco Lake. Whole-rock chemistry and Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic data indicate heterogeneous magmatism throughout the history of Chichinautzin activity that likely reflects variable degrees of slab and sediment contributions to the mantle wedge, fractional crystallization, and crustal assimilation. Even with the revised duration of volcanism within the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field, its eruption rate is higher than most other volcanic fields of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and is comparable only to the Tacámbaro-Puruaran area in the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field to the west. These variations in eruption rates among different volcanic fields may reflect a combination of variable subduction rates of the Rivera and Cocos plates along the Middle America Trench, as well as different distances from the trench, variations in the depth with respect to the subducted slab, or the upper plate characteristics.

  8. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Fernando de Noronha Archipelago and implications for the origin of alkaline volcanism in the NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlingeiro, Gabriela; Vasconcelos, Paulo M.; Knesel, Kurt M.; Thiede, David S.; Cordani, Umberto G.

    2013-01-01

    The Fernando de Noronha archipelago, centered ~ 250 km off the northeastern coast of Brazil, is comprised of a diverse suite of alkaline volcanic rocks commonly associated with a mantle-plume origin. Although previous K-Ar determinations divide the three main volcanic formations of the archipelago (Remédios, Quixaba and São José formations) into two age groups, a few ages conflicting with the stratigraphic framework were suspected to suffer from excess argon. To evaluate the presence or absence of excess Ar and to improve the geochronological database for the archipelago, we have dated, by the laser incremental-heating 40Ar/39Ar method, the exact same hand specimens previously dated by K-Ar. The 22 samples studied here yield plateau ages for at least one of the two grains analyzed and none of the specimens contain significant excess Ar. Our results derive a chronostratigraphic sequence for the archipelago that is consistent with the earlier K-Ar determinations. The main discrepancy is related to some basanitic rocks of São José formation, interpreted as the youngest eruptive products which are in fact coeval with the oldest subareal volcanic activity at Fernando de Noronha. Our revised eruptive chronology defines a hiatus of nearly 3 Ma separating an older period of volcanism between 12.5 ± 0.1 and 9.0 ± 0.1 Ma comprising the Remédios and São José formations and a younger episode forming the Quixaba formation between 6.2 ± 0.1 and 1.3 ± 0.1 Ma. Moreover, these results confirm that much of the activity at Fernando de Noronha was contemporaneous with alkaline volcanism well onshore in northeastern Brazil, supporting the suggestion that this hotspot may be a product of small-scale, plate-driven convection in the upper mantle.

  9. New 40Ar/39Ar isotopic dates from Miocene volcanic rocks in the Lake Mead area and southern Las Vegas Range, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlan, S.S.; Duebendorfer, E.M.; Deibert, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar dates on volcanic rocks interlayered with synextensional Miocene sedimentary rocks in the western Lake Mead area and southern end of the Las Vegas Range provide tight constraints on magmatism, basin formation, and extensional deformation in the Basin and Range province of southern Nevada. Vertical axis rotations associated with movement along the Las Vegas Valley shear zone occurred after 15.67??0.10 Ma (2??), based on a 40Ar/39Ar date from a tuff in the Gass Peak formation in the southern Las Vegas Range. Basaltic magmatism in the western Lake Mead area began as early as 13.28??0.09 Ma, based on a date from a basalt flow in the Lovell Wash Member of the Horse Spring Formation. Isotopic dating of a basalt from the volcanic rocks of Callville Mesa indicates that these rocks are as old as 11.41??0.14 Ma, suggesting that volcanic activity began shortly after formation of the Boulder basin, the extensional basin in which the informally named red sandstone unit was deposited. The red sandstone unit is at least as old as 11.70??0.08 Ma and contains megabreccia deposits younger than 12.93??0.10 Ma. This results shows that formation of the Boulder basin was associated with development of topographic relief that was probably generated by movement along the Saddle Island low-angle normal fault. Stratal tilting associated with extension occurred both prior to and after 11.5 Ma.

  10. Middle Miocene rifting and volcanic history of the Berufjordor- Breiddalur region, eastern Iceland revealed by 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gans, P. B.; Askew, R. A.; Thordarson, T.

    2015-12-01

    Eighteen new 40Ar/39r incremental heating analyses of groundmass concentrates from fresh holocrystalline interiors of basalt lavas and dikes collected in an E-W, 35-km-long transect across the Berufjordor- Breiddalur region, eastern Iceland shed important new light on the Miocene spreading history and age of the Breiddalur central volcano. Despite fine-grain sizes and low K contents, most samples yield high quality ages (either simple plateaus or spectra indicative of modest recoil ± low T argon loss) with estimated uncertainties of ±0.1 to 0.2 Ma. Ages decrease monotonically westward in the eastern half of transect from 12.1 to 10.0 Ma over an 18 km distance, in excellent agreement with the estimated half spreading rate of 0.9 cm/yr. In contrast, the western 15 km of the transect (and ~ 1 km of "apparent" vertical succession), including lavas below, above and within the Breiddalur volcano shows no systematic westward younging - all lavas in this region range from 9.1 to 9.8 Ma. Ages from diabase dikes similarly range from 9.1 to 9.8 Ma, except one distinctly younger at 7.8 Ma. The simplest interpretation of the new age determinations is that up until ~9 Ma, a ≥15 km-wide rift zone/plate boundary was situated in the eastern half of the transect. The entire rift zone (including Breiddalur volcano) was then accreted to the Eurasian plate during a westward rift jump of ≥ 15 km. These types of minor jumps in the plate boundary and accretion of entire rift zones to one plate or the other may help explain the "excess width" of Iceland. Also, the data raise questions about the strict applicability of the Palmeson (1973) model, as in this case, a paleo rift zone is not reflected by a dip reversal, and "proximal" or within rift volcanic and plutonic rocks are well exposed at the present surface and are not buried by younger flows as the spreading center moves away.

  11. The geology and 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology of magmatic activity and related mineralization in the Nevados del Famatina mining district, La Rioja province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losada-Calderón, A. J.; McBride, S. L.; Bloom, M. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Nevados del Famatina mining district (NFMD) is located in La Rioja province, Argentina. This district contains porphyry-style mineralization (Nevados del Famatina) and high sulfidation veins (La Mejicana). The stratigraphic column in the NFMD begins with Cambrian siltstones which were metamorphosed during the Late Ordovician - Early Silurian and intruded by Late Ordovician-Silurian granitic rocks. These units were covered by Upper Paleozoic and Tertiary continental sedimentary rocks which are intercalated with and overlain by dacitic-rhyodacitic porphyritic rocks (Mogote Formation) emplaced during the Pliocene. All these units are covered by Pleistocene sediments and Quaternary alluvial and colluvial deposits. Magmatic activity and related mineralization in the NFMD have been dated by the 40Ar/ 39Ar technique. Step heating studies of orthoclase and biotite phenocrysts from the Mogote Formation in the NFMD suggest that the igneous rocks were emplaced around 5.0±0.3 Ma ago. However, plateau ages of biotite from the outer carapace of the subjacent granodioritic magma chamber and of muscovite from quartz-sericite alteration at both Nevados del Famatina and La Mejicana are around 3.8±0.2 Ma. Emplacement of the shallow stocks is separated from cooling of the outer carapace of the subjacent granodioritic magma chamber to temperatures below 350° C by a time span of approximately 1 Ma. During this interval, a convective hydrothermal system was established proximal to the granodioritic magma chamber, which resulted in porphyry molybdenumcoppergold mineralization adjacent to the igneous rocks and more distal high sulfidation veins located in fault zones.

  12. Cosmic markers, 40Ar/ 39Ar dating and paleomagnetism of the KT sections in the Anjar Area of the Deccan large igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtillot, V.; Gallet, Y.; Rocchia, R.; Féraud, G.; Robin, E.; Hofmann, C.; Bhandari, N.; Ghevariya, Z. G.

    2000-10-01

    Bhandari et al. [Bhandari et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 22 (1995) 433-436; Bhandari et al., Geol. Soc. Am. Spec. Paper 307 (1996) 417-424] reported the discovery of iridium-bearing sediments sandwiched between basalt flows in the Anjar area (Kutch province, India). They concluded that the signature of the K/T impact had been recorded and that onset of volcanism in the Deccan traps preceded the K/T boundary, excluding the possibility of a causal connection. This paper reports complementary analyses of Anjar outcrops by a joint Indo-French team, where we focused on cosmic markers (iridium and spinels) in the intertrappean sediments and 40Ar/ 39Ar dating and paleomagnetism of the lava flows. Anomalous Ir concentrations (up to 0.4 ng/g) are confirmed, with up to three thin and patchy enriched layers which cannot be traced throughout the exposed sections. Despite careful search, no Ni-rich spinels were found. Eight basalt samples provided 40Ar/ 39Ar results, four on plagioclase bulk samples, four on whole rocks. Spectra for whole rocks all indicate some amount of disturbance, and ages based on plagioclase bulk samples seem to be consistently more reliable [Hofmann et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 180 (2000) 13-28]. The three flows underlying the Ir-bearing sediments are dated at ˜66.5 Ma, and two overlying flows at ˜65 Ma. Magnetic analyses (both thermal and by alternating fields) uncovered clear reversed primary components in the upper flows, and more disturbed normal components in the lower flows, with evidence for an additional reversed component. There are reports [Bajpai, Geol. Soc. India Mem. 37 (1996) 313-319; Bajpai, J. Geol. Soc. London 157 (2000) 257-260] that the intertrappean sediments contain uppermost Maastrichtian dinosaur and ostracod remains above the uppermost Ir-bearing level, and may not be mechanically disturbed. We propose the following scenario to interpret these multiple field and analytical observations. Deccan trap volcanism started within

  13. High-precision (14)C and (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating of the Campanian Ignimbrite (Y-5) reconciles the time-scales of climatic-cultural processes at 40 ka.

    PubMed

    Giaccio, Biagio; Hajdas, Irka; Isaia, Roberto; Deino, Alan; Nomade, Sebastien

    2017-04-06

    The Late Pleistocene Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) super-eruption (Southern Italy) is the largest known volcanic event in the Mediterranean area. The CI tephra is widely dispersed through western Eurasia and occurs in close stratigraphic association with significant palaeoclimatic and Palaeolithic cultural events. Here we present new high-precision (14)C (34.29 ± 0.09 (14)C kyr BP, 1σ) and (40)Ar/(39)Ar (39.85 ± 0.14 ka, 95% confidence level) dating results for the age of the CI eruption, which substantially improve upon or augment previous age determinations and permit fuller exploitation of the chronological potential of the CI tephra marker. These results provide a robust pair of (14)C and (40)Ar/(39)Ar ages for refining both the radiocarbon calibration curve and the Late Pleistocene time-scale at ca. 40 ka. In addition, these new age constraints provide compelling chronological evidence for the significance of the combined influence of the CI eruption and Heinrich Event 4 on European climate and potentially evolutionary processes of the Early Upper Palaeolithic.

  14. High-precision 14C and 40Ar/39Ar dating of the Campanian Ignimbrite (Y-5) reconciles the time-scales of climatic-cultural processes at 40 ka

    PubMed Central

    Giaccio, Biagio; Hajdas, Irka; Isaia, Roberto; Deino, Alan; Nomade, Sebastien

    2017-01-01

    The Late Pleistocene Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) super-eruption (Southern Italy) is the largest known volcanic event in the Mediterranean area. The CI tephra is widely dispersed through western Eurasia and occurs in close stratigraphic association with significant palaeoclimatic and Palaeolithic cultural events. Here we present new high-precision 14C (34.29 ± 0.09 14C kyr BP, 1σ) and 40Ar/39Ar (39.85 ± 0.14 ka, 95% confidence level) dating results for the age of the CI eruption, which substantially improve upon or augment previous age determinations and permit fuller exploitation of the chronological potential of the CI tephra marker. These results provide a robust pair of 14C and 40Ar/39Ar ages for refining both the radiocarbon calibration curve and the Late Pleistocene time-scale at ca. 40 ka. In addition, these new age constraints provide compelling chronological evidence for the significance of the combined influence of the CI eruption and Heinrich Event 4 on European climate and potentially evolutionary processes of the Early Upper Palaeolithic. PMID:28383570

  15. Rates of burial and exhumation of lawsonite blueschist/eclogite in subduction zones from in situ UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar phengite geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornash, K.; Cosca, M. A.; Whitney, D. L.; Teyssier, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Lawsonite eclogites and blueschists are accessible records of processes that occur at depth in subducting slabs and can therefore provide information about the chemical and physical evolution of subduction zones. In composite blueschist-eclogite terranes, blueschists may have formed (1) by prograde metamorphism (pre-eclogite), (2) at the same P-T conditions as eclogite-facies metamorphism as a result of differences in bulk composition, H2O content, or oxidation state, or (3) from retrogression of eclogite, e.g. during exhumation. Field and petrologic observations of lawsonite eclogite and blueschist in the Sivrihisar Massif, Turkey, suggest that some blueschist formed from eclogite during exhumation in the subduction channel, whereas results from thermobarometry suggest that some blueschist formed at the same P-T conditions as eclogite. To test the age, petrologic, and tectonic relationship of coexisting eclogite and blueschist, we applied in situ UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar phengite geochronology to eclogite- and blueschist-facies rocks representing different structural positions and displaying different phengite textures and coexisting mineral assemblages. Phengite from fresh lawsonite eclogite yield an age of 93 ± 2 Ma and have the narrowest spread in ages (<12 Ma) of any rock type analyzed. Retrogressed (epidote) eclogite yields a mean weighted age of 82 ± 2 Ma. In contrast to the tightly constrained ages obtained in eclogite pods, blueschists and blueschist-facies quartzite exhibit discrete age populations ranging from 82 Ma to 110 Ma. Deformed phengite clusters from lawsonite garnet blueschist record age populations at 82 Ma and 92 Ma. Phengite from lawsonite-garnet veins and glaucophane-rich margins of eclogite pods also record 92 Ma. Omphacite-bearing lawsonite blueschist and a blueschist-facies quartzite from the same structural position contain age populations at 97 Ma and 110 Ma. These results document a sequence of events from prograde blueschist

  16. 40Ar* loss in experimentally deformed muscovite and biotite with implications for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of naturally deformed rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosca, Michael; Stunitz, Holger; Bourgiex, Anne-Lise; Lee, John P.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of deformation on radiogenic argon (40Ar*) retentivity in mica are described from high pressure experiments performed on rock samples of peraluminous granite containing euhedral muscovite and biotite. Cylindrical cores, ~15 mm in length and 6.25 mm in diameter, were drilled from granite collected from the South Armorican Massif in northwestern France, loaded into gold capsules, and weld-sealed in the presence of excess water. The samples were deformed at a pressure of 10 kb and a temperature of 600 degrees C over a period 29 of hours within a solid medium assembly in a Griggs-type triaxial hydraulic deformation apparatus. Overall shortening in the experiments was approximately 10%. Transmitted light and secondary and backscattered electron imaging of the deformed granite samples reveals evidence of induced defects and for significant physical grain size reduction by kinking, cracking, and grain segmentation of the micas.

  17. Laser Fusion 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology and Cyclostratigraphy of the Green River Formation: Testing Micro- and Meso- Scale Climate Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. E.; Pietras, J. T.; Carroll, A. R.; Singer, B.

    2001-12-01

    Climatic forcing of lacustrine sedimentation in the Green River Formation (GRF) has been inferred to operate on both annual and orbital time scales, but has never been tested using precise radioisotopic dating. We focus on implications of new 40Ar/39Ar ages from the GRF, Wyoming. From the Main, Grey, and Analcite tuffs, between 15 and 32 individual age determinations of sanidine phenocrysts yielded weighted mean ages* (+/- 2σ ) of 50.86 +/- 0.20 Ma, 50.00 +/- 0.13 Ma, and 49.02 +/- 0.15 Ma, respectively. Thus half the total thickness of the GRF in Wyoming was deposited in 1.84 +/- 0.24 m.y. Using these ages, net sediment accumulation rates in the ERDA White Mountain Core range from 150 μ /yr in the upper Wilkins Peak Member to 70 μ m/yr in the Laney Member. These yearly rates are comparable to typical lamination thicknesses (e.g., 107 μ m average in the Laney Member). Our data therefore do not exclude an annual origin for the laminations. To test for orbital forcing of depositional cyclicity, we constructed a north to south, basin-margin to basin-center cross-section for the Wilkins Peak Member between the Main and Grey tuffs. Cycles within this interval record repeated episodes of lacustrine flooding and desiccation. Cycle boundaries are marked by paleosols and/or other evidence of exposure. The number of cycles preserved between the two tuff beds increases from 14 in the north to 33 in the south due to onlap towards the northern basin margin onto amalgamated unconformities. Apparent average cycle durations decrease from ca. 61 k.y. in the north to 26 k.y. in the south. Because evidence for hiatuses persists even in the most basinward localities, true average cycle duration must be less than 26 k.y. These results are permissive of precessional forcing of sedimentation, but do not exclude even shorter periods. We conclude that individual measured sections of cyclic sediments may often be inadequate for determining true cycle periodicities, due to the generally

  18. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar analysis of supergene jarosite and alunite: Implications to the paleoweathering history of the western USA and West Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Vasconcelos, P.M.; Brimhall, G.H. ); Becker, T.A.; Renne, P.R. )

    1994-01-01

    Supergene alunite (KAl[sub 3](SO[sub 4])[sub 2](OH)[sub 6]) and jarosite (KFe[sub 3](SO[sub 4])[sub 2](OH)[sub 6]) are often precipitated during the oxidation of sulfide-bearing rocks by meteoric solutions. Dating of these phases by the [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar method allows timing of the progression of the oxidation front during chemical weathering. Fine-scale laser-heating [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating of hypogene alunite and supergene jarosites allows to precisely and accurately time hydrothermal alteration and subsequent supergene oxidation in Goldfield, Nevada. The results indicate that pervasive weathering occurred in the western USA during the Late Miocene ([approximately] 10 Ma ago). Similar application of this technique to the study of weathering and laterite formation in West Africa indicates that the last pervasive oxidation event recorded in the weathering profile in this area also occurred in the Miocene ([approximately] 13 Ma ago). The occurrence of a pervasive Mid to Late Miocene oxidation event recorded in these weathering profiles in the western USA and Africa, and also previously measured in Brazil and Chile, indicates that climatic conditions at that time were conducive to worldwide development of deep weathering sequences. Subsequent weathering processes have not been as pervasive as the late Miocene event, indicating a general climatic transition to cooler, drier climates in most of the areas studied. The results indicate that deep weathering profiles reflect past climatic conditions and may not be directly linked to the present climates.

  19. Cooling and inferred uplift/erosion history of the Grenville Orogen, Ontario: Constraints from sup 40 Ar/ sup 39 Ar thermochronology

    SciTech Connect

    Cosca, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Thermochronological ({sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar) data are presented from 76 mineral separates of hornblende, muscovite, biotite, phlogopite, and K-feldspar. Samples were selected from regionally metamorphosed gneiss, amphibolite, metasediment, marble, metagabbro and pegmatite across the two major metamorphic belts of the Grenville Province, the Central Metasedimentary Belt (CMB) and the Central Gneiss Belt (CGB). When combined with published temperature estimates for closure to argon diffusion in the phases analyzed, cooling rates from {approximately}500 C to {approximately}120 C of 1-4 C/MA are calculated across the entire Grenville Province of Ontario. Regional uplift/erosion rates for the Grenville Orogen of Ontario have been estimated from the {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar data, a retrograde P-T path for rocks of the CGB, and an upper time constraint provided by flat, overlying Cambro-Ordovician sediments. Twenty-two of the hornblendes used for thermochronology have been quantitatively analyzed for major elements by microprobe, Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} by wet chemistry, and for H{sub 2}O by manometric measurement. Water activities calculated from hornblende equilibria are typically low (<0.01) because of the exponential dilutions in hornblende (tremolite) activity required by present activity-composition models. An oxyamphibole component of 25% further reduces any amphibole component and the H{sub 2}O activity by as much as 50% below that calculated with simplifying assumption. These findings indicate that different amphibole normalization schemes have a marked effect on the activity calculated for a specific amphibole or H{sub 2}O, and should be carefully evaluated.

  20. High-resolution 40Ar/ 39Ar chronostratigraphy of the post-caldera (<20 ka) volcanic activity at Pantelleria, Sicily Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaillet, Stéphane; Rotolo, Silvio G.; La Felice, Sonia; Vita-Scaillet, Grazia

    2011-09-01

    The island of Pantelleria (Sicily Strait), the type locality for pantellerite, has been the locus of major caldera-forming eruptions that culminated, ca. 50 ka ago, in the formation of the Cinque Denti caldera produced by the Green Tuff eruption. The post-caldera silicic activity since that time has been mostly confined inside the caldera and consists of smaller-energy eruptions represented by more than twenty coalescing pantelleritic centers structurally controlled by resurgence and trapdoor faulting of the caldera floor. A high-resolution 40Ar/ 39Ar study was conducted on key units spanning the recent (post-20 ka) intracaldera activity to better characterize the present-day status (and forecast the short-term behavior of) the system based on the temporal evolution of the latest eruptions. The new 40Ar/ 39Ar data capture a long-term (> 15 ka) decline in eruption frequency with a shift in eruptive pace from 3.5 ka -1 to 0.8 ka -1 associated with a prominent paleosol horizon marking the only recognizable volcanic stasis around 12-14 ka. This shift in extraction frequency occurs without major changes in eruptive style, and is paralleled by a subtle trend of decreasing melt differentiation index. We speculate that this decline probably occurred (i) without short-term variations in melt production/differentiation rate in a steady-state compositionally-zoned silicic reservoir progressively tapped deeper through the sequence, and (ii) that it was possibly modulated by outboard eustatic forcing due to the 140 m sea level rise over the past 21 ka. The intracaldera system is experiencing a protracted stasis since 7 ka. Coupled with recent geodetic evidence of deflation and subsidence of the caldera floor, the system appears today to be on a wane with no temporal evidence for a short-term silicic eruption.

  1. Volcán Tancítaro, Michoacán, Mexico, 40Ar/ 39Ar constraints on its history of sector collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ownby, Steven; Delgado Granados, Hugo; Lange, Rebecca A.; Hall, Chris M.

    2007-03-01

    Volcán Tancítaro is a 97 ± 3 km 3 stratovolcano located in the Michoacán Guanajuato volcanic field (MGVF), part of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. Prior to this study, there was only one K-Ar date (530 ± 60 ka; [Ban, M., Hasenaka, T., Delgado-Granados, H., Takaoka, N., 1992. K-Ar ages of lavas from shield volcanoes in the Michoacán-Guanajuato volcanic field, Mexico. Geofisica Internacional 31 (4), 467-473.] and one sector-collapse event reported for this volcano in the literature [Garduño-Monroy V.H., Corona-Chavéz, P., Israde-Alcantara, I., Mennella, L., Arreygue, E., Bigioggero, B., Chiesa, S., 1999. Carta Geológica de Michoacán, scale 1:250,000. Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo.; Capra, L., Macías, J.L., Scott, K.M., Abrams, M., Garduño-Monroy, V.H., 2002. Debris avalanches and debris flows transformed from collapses in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Mexico — Behavior, and implications for hazard assessment. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 113, 81-110.]. Twenty-six new 40Ar/ 39Ar ages indicate that Volcán Tancítaro became active ≥ 793 ± 22 ka and that the most recent effusive activity occurred at 237 ± 34 ka. Two catastrophic sector-collapse events are identified and dated; the first one occurred on the west side between 694 and 571 ka, whereas the second one occurred on the east side between 261 and 238 ka. The older collapse produced a 2.3-3.4 km 3 debris-avalanche and laharic deposit spread over ˜ 567 km 2, whereas the more recent collapse left a 3-km wide, horseshoe-shaped scar on the eastern flank and produced a 3.6-7.0 km 3 debris-avalanche and laharic deposit that covers ˜ 654 km 2. Reconstruction of the main edifice of Volcán Tancítaro using ArcGIS software and digital elevation models indicates that the volume removed during the eastern sector collapse was ˜ 4.7 km 3.

  2. Evidence for an Alleghanian (Early Carboniferous to Late Permian) tectonothermal event in the New Jersey Coastal Plain basement from 40Ar/39Ar biotite data, geochemistry and gravity modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maguire, T.J.; Volkert, R.A.; Swisher, C. C.; Sheridan, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar dating of biotite from felsic orthogneiss recovered from the -3890-foot level of the Island Beach State Park (IBSP) well beneath the outer New Jersey Coastal Plain was accomplished using CO2 laser incremental-heating techniques. Over 75% of the Ar released from the incremental-heating experiment form a well-behaved plateau with a calculated age of 243.98 ?? 0.10 Ma. The new 244 Ma biotite age reported here is a cooling age younger than the metamorphic event that crystallized or reheated the biotite. We consider reheating of older biotite to be unlikely because the concordant 40Ar/39Ar spectrum upon repeated incremental laser heating showed a well-developed plateau. Thus, biotites from the IBSP gneiss are interpreted as having crystallized during a single thermal event, followed by cooling to below 300 ??C. The IBSP well falls on a structural and geophysical anomaly trend that is along strike with rocks of the Bronson Hill anticlinorium to the north of the IBSP gneiss. Locally graphitic metasedimentary schists and gneisses recovered from New Jersey wells inboard of the IBSP well gneiss correlate to similar lithologies of the Connecticut Valley synclinorium west of the Hartford basin. Our reinterpretation of the IBSP gneiss as metamorphosed dacite or dacitic tuff is consistent with a correlation to some rocks of the Bronson Hill magmatic arc east of the Hartford basin. If correct, this would imply a Late Ordovician age for the protolith of the IBSP gneiss. Reported 40Ar/39Ar biotite ages of 235-253 Ma from southwestern Rhode Island, and of 238-247 Ma from southeastern Connecticut, are interpreted as cooling ages following a tectonothermal event associated with the Alleghanian orogeny (Early Carboniferous to Late Permian). Cooling ages of Alleghanian age (Early Carboniferous to Late Permian) are not recognized west of the Bronson Hill volcanic arc in either central Connecticut or in Massachusetts. Therefore, the 244 Ma cooling age presented here, and the

  3. Magnetostratigraphy and 39Ar/40Ar studies of the Lana'i Long Volcanic Sequence (ca. 1.606+/-0.063 Ma), Hawaii, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Bervera, E.; Jicha, B.; Valet, J.

    2013-12-01

    Previous published work on Lanai indicated that the volcano was formed mainly during the Matuyama Chron (Herrero-Bervera et al., 2000). In order to constrain further the timing of the active phases of the Lanai volcano, we conducted a paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study involving a ~500-m vertical thick sequence of lava flows that were erupted between 0.76+/-0.66 Ma and 1.6+/-0.09 Ma according to previous K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating (Leonhardt et al., 2009). Low-field susceptibility versus temperature (k-T) and SIRM experiments performed on a dozen flows indicate that magnetite dominates the remanent magnetization (575°C). In a few cases, a low-temperature mineral phase (300-400°C) could reflect the presence of titanomagnetite with low Ti content, but the presence of maghemite or pyrrhotite cannot be completely excluded. Additional investigations are in progress on this matter. All specimens were step-wise demagnetized by alternating fields from 5 to 100 mT. Companion specimens from the same samples were demagnetized at 15 temperature steps. The demagnetization diagrams obtained with each technique showed a stable direction of remanence. In all cases, the characteristic (ChRM) component was clearly defined from at least seven successive directions isolated during step-wise demagnetization. The succession of the mean directions calculated for each lava flow reveals the existence of at least one polarity interval. Based on radiometric dates, they were assigned to the Gilsa, "excursion" (1.606+/-0.063 Ma). Thus, the present results, along with the radiometric ages of the lavas, indicate that the tholeiitic flows that formed the Lanai volcano were erupted over a short time period, and only during the Matuyama Chron (0.780-2.58 Ma). No eruptions have occurred during the Brunhes Chron (0.78 Ma) as previously indicated from K-Ar data on lavas in the Maunalei Gulch. The excursional VGPs from the onset of the Gilsa excursion recorded on Lanai are situated near the

  4. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of hypabyssal igneous rocks in the Maranon Basin of Peru - A record of thermal history, structure, and alteration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prueher, L.M.; Erlich, R.; Snee, L.W.

    2005-01-01

    Hypabyssal andesites and dacites from the Balsapuerto Dome in the Mara?on Basin of Peru record the thermal, tectonic, and alteration history of the area. The Mara?on Basin is one of 19 sub-Andean foreland basins. The hypabyssal rocks in the Balsapuerto Dome are one of four known occurrences of subvolcanic rocks along the deformation front in Peru. This dome is a potential petroleum structural trap. Petroleum seeps near the dome indicate that a source for the petroleum is present, but the extent and amount of petroleum development is unknown. The Balsapuerto hypabyssal rocks are plagioclase-, hornblende-, pyroxene-phyric andesites to dacites. Some parts of the dome are pervasively altered to a hydrothermal assemblage of quartz-sericite-pyrite. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology shows that thermal activity related to emplacement of these subvolcanic rocks took place between 12-10 Ma, subsequent to the major periods of Andean folding and faulting, previously assumed to have occurred about 9 Ma. Eleven argon mineral age-spectrum analyses were completed. Argon apparent ages on amphibole range from 12.7 to 11.6 Ma, and the age spectra are simple, which indicates that the ages are very close to emplacement ages. Potassium feldspar yields an argon age spectrum ranging in age from 12.5 to 11.4 Ma, reflecting the period during which the potassium feldspar closed to argon diffusion between the temperature range of 350?C to about 150?C; thus the potassium feldspar age spectrum reflects a cooling profile throughout this temperature range. This age range is consistent with ages of emplacement for the entire igneous complex indicating that an increased thermal state existed in the area for at least 1.0 m.y. Combined with the coexisting hornblende age, this rock cooled from ~580?C to ~150?C in ~1.2 m.y. resulting in an average cooling rate of 358?C /m.y. White mica, or sericite, formed as a later alteration phase associated with quartz- sericite- pyrite and propylitic alteration in some

  5. Re-Evaluation of Ar-39 - Ar-40 Ages for Apollo Lunar Rocks 15415 and 60015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Shih, C.-Y.

    2010-01-01

    We re-analyzed 39Ar-40Ar ages of Apollo lunar highland samples 15415 and 60015, two ferroan anorthosites analyzed previously in the 1970 s, with a more detailed approach and with revised decay constants. From these samples we carefully prepared 100-200 mesh mineral separates for analysis at the Noble Gas Laboratory at NASA-Johnson Space Center. The Ar-39-Ar-40 age spectra for 15415 yielded an age of 3851 +/- 38 Ma with 33-99% of Ar39 release, roughly in agreement with previously reported Ar-Ar ages. For 60015, we obtained an age of 3584 +/- 152 Ma in 23-98% of Ar39 release, also in agreement with previously reported Ar-Ar ages of approximately 3.5 Ga. Highland anorthosites like these are believed by many to be the original crust of the moon, formed by plagioclase floatation atop a magma ocean, however the Ar-Ar ages of 15415 and 60015 are considerably younger than lunar crust formation. By contrast, recently recovered lunar anorthosites such as Dhofar 489, Dhofar 908, and Yamato 86032 yield older Ar-Ar ages, up to 4.35 Ga, much closer to time of formation of the lunar crust. It follows that the Ar-Ar ages of the Apollo samples must have been reset by secondary heating, and that this heating affected highland anorthosites at both the Apollo 15 and Apollo 16 landing sites but did not affect lunar highland meteorites. One obvious consideration is that while the Apollo samples were collected from the near side of the moon, these lunar meteorites are thought to have originated from the lunar far side

  6. Comment on “40Ar / 39Ar dating of the Rajahmundry Traps, eastern India and their relationship to the Deccan Traps” by Knight et al. [Earth Planet Sci. Lett. 208 (2003) 85 99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksi, Ajoy K.

    2005-11-01

    Knight et al. presented age and chemical data on two (sets of) lava flows from the Rajahmundry area, on either bank of the Godavari River. The age and petrogenesis of these flows and their possible link to sections of the main Deccan Province are of importance to the understanding of many aspects of flood basalt volcanism. I comment on (a) the use of geochemical fingerprints for lava identification/correlation at Rajahmundry, superceding (apparent) field relations, (b) their 40Ar / 39Ar data and its refinement based on statistical tests and the alteration state of the samples (c) correlation of age data and the magnetic polarity of the lavas to the geomagnetic polarity time scale and (d) the possibility that both lavas at Rajahmundry were formed by intracanyon flows derived from ˜1000 km away.

  7. Contrasting Oligocene and Miocene thermal histories from the hanging wall and footwall of the South Tibetan detachment in the central Himalaya from 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology, Marsyandi Valley, central Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Margaret E.; Hodges, Kip V.

    1998-10-01

    In the Marsyandi valley of central Nepal, a major strand of the South Tibetan detachment system, the 18-22 Ma Chame detachment, places epidote-amphibolite to amphibolite facies calc-silicate rocks and marbles of the Tibetan sedimentary sequence on amphibolite facies pelitic gneisses and calc-silicate rocks of the Greater Himalayan sequence. Although the resulting metamorphic discontinuity is minor and sometimes cryptic, 40Ar/39Ar thermochronologic results from the area reveal that the hanging wall and footwall of the detachment had distinctive thermal histories. Hanging wall phlogopites and biotites yield cooling ages of 27.1 - 29.9 Ma, compared with footwall biotite ages of 14.1 - 16.6 Ma. U-Pb monazite thermochronology demonstrates that the Greater Himalayan sequence experienced peak amphibolite facies conditions at approximately 22 Ma, but the 40Ar/39Ar results require hanging wall metamorphism to be an Oligocene (or older) phenomenon. These events are interpreted as representing the "Neohimalayan" and "Eohimalayan" metamorphic phases proposed by previous workers in the central Himalaya. Some of the dated hanging wall phlogopites grew synchronously with development of SW vergent macroscopic folds in the Tibetan sedimentary sequence, implying that Eohimalayan metamorphism was associated with an important phase of crustal shortening in this sector of the Himalaya. Despite the intensity of Neohimalayan metamorphism below the Chame detachment, evidence for Eohimalayan metamorphism and igneous activity is preserved in the footwall rocks of the Marsyandi drainage. Inherited approximately 35 Ma monazites of either metamorphic or igneous origin have been found in the upper Greater Himalayan sequence in this area, and one hornblende separate from the uppermost footwall yields a 40Ar/39Ar age of 30.0 ± 3.0 Ma. This hornblende date and a similar result from the same structural level in the nearby Kali Gandaki valley, if robust, suggest that the duration of the

  8. Geochemical correlation and 40Ar/39Ar dating of the Kern River ash bed and related tephra layers: Implications for the stratigraphy of petroleum-bearing formations in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baron, D.; Negrini, R.M.; Golob, E.M.; Miller, D.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A.; Fleck, R.J.; Hacker, B.; Erendi, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Kern River ash (KRA) bed is a prominent tephra layer separating the K and G sands in the upper part of the Kern River Formation, a major petroleum-bearing formation in the southern San Joaquin Valley (SSJV) of California. The minimum age of the Kern River Formation was based on the tentative major-element correlation with the Bishop Tuff, a 0.759??0.002 Ma volcanic tephra layer erupted from the Long Valley Caldera. We report a 6.12??0.05 Ma 40Ar/39Ar date for the KRA, updated major-element correlations, trace-element correlations of the KRA and geochemically similar tephra, and a 6.0??0.2 Ma 40Ar/39Ar age for a tephra layer from the Volcano Hills/Silver Peak eruptive center in Nevada. Both major and trace-element correlations show that despite the similarity to the Bishop Tuff, the KRA correlates most closely with tephra from the Volcano Hills/Silver Peak eruptive center. This geochemical correlation is supported by the radiometric dates which are consistent with a correlation of the KRA to the Volcano Hills/Silver Peak center but not to the Bishop Tuff. The 6.12??0.05 Ma age for the KRA and the 6.0??0.2 Ma age for the tephra layer from the Volcano Hills/Silver Peak eruptive center suggest that the upper age of the Kern River Formation is over 5 Ma older than previously thought. Re-interpreted stratigraphy of the SSJV based on the new, significantly older age for the Kern River Formation opens up new opportunities for petroleum exploration in the SSJV and places better constraints on the tectonostratigraphic development of the SSJV. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.

  9. Eruptive History of Volcán Tepetiltic, Mexico: Evidence for Remelting of Silicic Ashflows Revealed by 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, H. M.; Lange, R. A.; Hall, C. M.; Nelson, S. A.; Granados, H. D.

    2004-12-01

    Volcán Tepetiltic (VT) is located in the northwestern part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and features an elliptical caldera (5 x 2.5 km). Previous detailed 40Ar/39Ar geochronology studies at V. Tequila and V. Ceboruco, showed that cone-building events occur within narrow time intervals (< 25 kyrs) and eruptive phases may be separated by hiatuses of more than 100 kyrs. At those volcanoes, our studies were restricted to surface flows. However, at VT, a rhyolitic Plinian eruption created a caldera which exposed ˜600 m of stratified andesitic and dacitic lava flows and thus, allowed the opportunity to study the cone-building events and compositional evolution of this arc stratocone. A suite of samples from a stratigraphic section of the southern caldera wall were dated to determine the eruptive history during construction of the stratovolcano. Samples from andesite flows at the base of the caldera wall (516 ± 11 and 529 ± 18 ka), mid-way up the wall (533 ± 32 ka) and the second highest flow of the wall (528 ± 15 ka) yielded indistinguishable ages. Similar ages were obtained from the northern rim of the caldera wall (502 ± 26 ka), an andesite flank flow north of the stratocone (552 ± 18 ka) and a vertical dike cutting flows in the southern caldera wall (505 ± 10 ka). Therefore the bulk of the edifice was built within a 20 kyr interval (given 1 sigma errors) at ˜524 ka. The stratigraphically highest sample in the caldera wall yielded an age of 231 ± 36 ka. Thus, there may have been a hiatus of >200 kyr between cone building episodes along the southern flank of the volcano. Following construction of the main stratocone (dominated by andesitic effusive activity), there was a clustering of rhyolite eruptions, including the caldera forming event which produced rhyolitic ashflow and airfall deposits. The age of the eruption is constrained by stratigraphic and cross-cutting relations. The eruption must be younger than 231 ± 36 kyr, based on the uppermost

  10. New Insights Into Volcanic Hazards in Western Mexico: Multiple Cone-Building Episodes at Arc Stratovolcanoes Revealed by 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, H. M.; Lewis-Kenedi, K.; Lange, R. A.; Hall, C. M.; Delgado-Granados, H.

    2003-12-01

    The detailed eruptive histories of two andesitic stratocones, Volcáns Ceboruco and Tequila, in the western Mexican arc have been documented using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. The volumes of these volcanoes were obtained with mapping, airphotos, and digital elevation models. The age and volume data constrain the rate and duration of major cone-building events, which bears on the longevity of the underlying upper-crustal magma chambers that fed the eruptions. The results indicate that at each stratovolcano there were two discrete cone-building events, separated by a hiatus. At V. Tequila, six samples from the edifice yielded dates (196 +/- 8, 196 +/- 19, 178 +/- 8, 191 +/- 13, 216 +/- 11, and 198 +/- 11 ka; errors are 1 sigma) with a mean eruption age of 196 +/- 12 ka. Thus the bulk of the main edifice ( ˜31 km3) erupted within 24 kyrs (at the 2 sigma level), leading to a cone-building rate of > 1.3 km3/kyr. After a hiatus of ˜110 kyrs, ˜14 km3 of andesite erupted along the NW and SE flanks of V. Tequila at 90 +/- 19 ka. The last activity at V. Tequila produced a ˜2 km3 parasitic cone at ˜60 ka. Since an eruption has not occurred in the last 60 kyrs, V. Tequila is often considered an extinct volcano. This may be the view held by the > 75,000 inhabitants of the town of Tequila located on the northern flanks. A similar history of two discrete cone-building events is found at V. Ceboruco, ˜75 km to the NW. Seven samples taken from various parts of the edifice, including the inner caldera wall, indicate an initial cone-building event at ˜45 ka in which ˜37 km3 of andesite erupted. After a hiatus of nearly 44 kyrs, a second eruptive period began ˜1000 years ago. The first eruption to occur after the hiatus was Plinian and released 3-4 km3 of dacite. In the last 1 kyr, 9.5 km3 of andesite and dacite erupted effusively, culminating in the historic 1870 flow. The sobering conclusion, in terms of volcanic hazards assessment, is that the only Plinian eruption to occur

  11. Multimillion year thermal history of a porphyry copper deposit: application of U-Pb, 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He chronometers, Bajo de la Alumbrera copper-gold deposit, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Anthony C.; Dunlap, W. James; Reiners, Peter W.; Allen, Charlotte M.; Cooke, David R.; White, Noel C.; Campbell, Ian H.; Golding, Suzanne D.

    2008-03-01

    Application of multiple chronometers (including U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology) to porphyry intrusions at the Bajo de la Alumbrera porphyry copper-gold deposit, Argentina, reveals a complex history of reheating that spans millions of years. Previous U-Pb geochronology, combined with our new 40Ar/39Ar data, shows that the multiple porphyritic intrusions at Bajo de la Alumbrera were emplaced during two episodes, the first at about 8.0 Ma (P2 and associated porphyries) and the second about a million years later (Early and Late P3 porphyries). Complex overprinting alteration events have obscured the earliest hydrothermal history of the deposit. By contrast, 40Ar/39Ar data reveal the close temporal relationship of ore-bearing potassic alteration assemblages (7.12 ± 0.13 Ma; biotite) to the emplacement of the P3 intrusions. Consistent with low closure temperatures, younger ages have been determined for associated hydrothermal alkali feldspar (6.82 ± 0.05 Ma and 6.64 ± 0.09 Ma). The temperature-sensitive Ar data also record an unexpected prolonged cooling history (to below 200°C) extending to 5.9 Ma. Our data suggest that the Bajo de la Alumbrera system underwent protracted cooling, after the collapse of the main hydrothermal system, or that one or more low-temperature (~100-200°C) reheating events occurred after emplacement of the porphyritic intrusions at Bajo de la Alumbrera. These have been constrained in part by our new 40Ar/39Ar data (including multidomain diffusion modeling) and (U-Th)/He ages. Single-grain (U-Th)/He ages ( n = 5) for phenocrystic zircon from P2 and P3 intrusive phases bracket these thermal events to between 6.9 (youngest crystallization of intrusion) and 5.1 Ma. Multidomain modeling of alkali feldspar data (from both igneous and hydrothermal crystals) is consistent with the deposit cooling rapidly from magmatic temperatures to below about 300°C, with a more protracted history down to 150

  12. The edge of time: Dating young volcanic ash layers with the 40Ar- 39Ar laser probe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Y.; Smith, P.E.; Evensen, N.M.; York, D.; Lajoie, K.R.

    1996-01-01

    Argon-40-argon-39 single-crystal dating of young (5000 to 30,000 years ago) volcanic ash layers erupted from the Mono Craters, California, shows that the method can yield meaningful ages in Holocene tephra. Because of ubiquitous xenocrystic contamination, the data do not form isochrons but plot in wedge-shaped regions on an argon isotopic diagram. The upper boundary of the region is an isochron matching the 14C-derived age of the eruption. Such contamination-related patterns may be common in dating young materials by the single-crystal method. Argon dating by this method can help refine the time scale of physical and biological evolution over the past 100,000 years.

  13. The metamorphic sole of New Caledonia ophiolite: 40Ar/39Ar, U-Pb, and geochemical evidence for subduction inception at a spreading ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluzel, Dominique; Jourdan, Fred; Meffre, SéBastien; Maurizot, Pierre; Lesimple, StéPhane

    2012-06-01

    Amphibolite lenses that locally crop out below the serpentinite sole at the base of the ophiolite of New Caledonia (termed Peridotite Nappe) recrystallized in the high-temperature amphibolite facies and thus sharply contrast with blueschists and eclogites of the Eocene metamorphic complex. Amphibolites mostly display the geochemical features of MORB with a slight Nb depletion and thus are similar to the youngest (Late Paleocene-Eocene) BABB components of the allochthonous Poya Terrane. Thermochronological data from hornblende (40Ar/39Ar), zircon, and sphene (U-Pb) suggest that these mafic rocks recrystallized at ˜56 Ma. Using various geothermobarometers provides a rough estimate of peak recrystallization conditions of ˜0.5 GPa at ˜800-950°C. The thermal gradient inferred from the metamorphic assemblage (˜60°C km-1), geometrical relationships, and geochemical similarity suggest that these mafic rocks belong to the oceanic crust of the lower plate of the subduction/obduction system and recrystallized when they subducted below young and hot oceanic lithosphere. They were detached from the down-going plate and finally thrust onto unmetamorphosed Poya Terrane basalts. This and the occurrence of slab melts at ˜53 Ma suggest that subduction inception occurred at or near to the spreading ridge of the South Loyalty Basin at ˜56 Ma.

  14. Alpha / Mendeleev Ridge and Chukchi Borderland 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology and Geochemistry: Character of the First Submarine Intraplate Lavas Recovered from the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukasa, Samuel B.; Mayer, Larry A.; Aviado, Kimberly; Bryce, Julie; Andronikov, Alex; Brumley, Kelley; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Petrov, Oleg; Shokalsky, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    At least three episodes of magmatic activity have been recognized on the basis of 40Ar/39Ar age determinations in the submarine basaltic samples dredged, drilled or grabbed with a manipulation arm from Alpha / Mendeleev Ridge and Chukchi Borderland of the Arctic Ocean by US Coast Guard Icebreaker Healy, in August-September 2008, and Russian research vessel Captain Dranitsin in August-October 2012: ca. 112 Ma, ca. 100 Ma and ca. 85-73 Ma. Major-oxide and trace-element concentrations, and Pb, Sr, Nd, and Hf isotopic ratios of the recovered lavas provide important constraints on the composition and sources for the original melts. Lavas erupted at ca. 112 Ma (Group 1) have alkali basalt major-oxide compositions. Their low degree of rare-earth-element (REE) fractionation (CeN/YbN = 1.7-2.5), combined with high overall HREE (22-24 times chondrite) and Mg# ~54, suggest derivation from a garnet-free source followed by only minimal crystal fractionation for this group. Pb-Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic systematics of the lavas (206Pb/204Pb = 18.73-18.79; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.54-15.56; 208Pb/204Pb = 38.28-38.35; 143Nd/144Nd = 0.512594-0.512610; 87Sr/86Sr = 0.709458-0.709601; 176Hf/177Hf = 0.283224), together with ratios of highly incompatible trace elements (Th/Ce = 0.09-0.11; Ce/Nb = 2.58-3.09; Th/Nb = 0.24-0.33), point toward a lithospheric source for the magmas. Eruptions at ca. 100 Ma and 85-73 Ma produced two types of lavas: low-Ti tholeiitic basalts - LT, and high-Ti alkali basalts - HT, both assigned to Group 2. This distribution of low- and high-Ti lavas is common in continental flood basalt (CFB) provinces elsewhere, and has been attributed to plume activity in some studies. The trace-element abundance patterns for these Group 2 Arctic lavas are also very similar to those of CFBs elsewhere. Their low degrees of REE fractionation (CeN/YbN = 2.0-3.3) accompanied by progressively decreasing Mg#s (from 53 to 33) suggest a garnet-free source, with the derivative magmas experiencing

  15. A Human Deciduous Tooth and New 40Ar/39Ar Dating Results from the Middle Pleistocene Archaeological Site of Isernia La Pineta, Southern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Peretto, Carlo; Arnaud, Julie; Moggi-Cecchi, Jacopo; Manzi, Giorgio; Nomade, Sébastien; Pereira, Alison; Falguères, Christophe; Bahain, Jean-Jacques; Grimaud-Hervé, Dominique; Berto, Claudio; Sala, Benedetto; Lembo, Giuseppe; Muttillo, Brunella; Gallotti, Rosalia; Thun Hohenstein, Ursula; Vaccaro, Carmela; Coltorti, Mauro; Arzarello, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Isernia La Pineta (south-central Italy, Molise) is one of the most important archaeological localities of the Middle Pleistocene in Western Europe. It is an extensive open-air site with abundant lithic industry and faunal remains distributed across four stratified archaeosurfaces that have been found in two sectors of the excavation (3c, 3a, 3s10 in sect. I; 3a in sect. II). The prehistoric attendance was close to a wet environment, with a series of small waterfalls and lakes associated to calcareous tufa deposits. An isolated human deciduous incisor (labelled IS42) was discovered in 2014 within the archaeological level 3 coll (overlying layer 3a) that, according to new 40Ar/39Ar measurements, is dated to about 583–561 ka, i.e. to the end of marine isotope stage (MIS) 15. Thus, the tooth is currently the oldest human fossil specimen in Italy; it is an important addition to the scanty European fossil record of the Middle Pleistocene, being associated with a lithic assemblage of local raw materials (flint and limestone) characterized by the absence of handaxes and reduction strategies primarily aimed at the production of small/medium-sized flakes. The faunal assemblage is dominated by ungulates often bearing cut marks. Combining chronology with the archaeological evidence, Isernia La Pineta exhibits a delay in the appearance of handaxes with respect to other European Palaeolithic sites of the Middle Pleistocene. Interestingly, this observation matches the persistence of archaic morphological features shown by the human calvarium from the Middle Pleistocene site of Ceprano, not far from Isernia (south-central Italy, Latium). In this perspective, our analysis is aimed to evaluate morphological features occurring in IS42. PMID:26457581

  16. A Human Deciduous Tooth and New 40Ar/39Ar Dating Results from the Middle Pleistocene Archaeological Site of Isernia La Pineta, Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Peretto, Carlo; Arnaud, Julie; Moggi-Cecchi, Jacopo; Manzi, Giorgio; Nomade, Sébastien; Pereira, Alison; Falguères, Christophe; Bahain, Jean-Jacques; Grimaud-Hervé, Dominique; Berto, Claudio; Sala, Benedetto; Lembo, Giuseppe; Muttillo, Brunella; Gallotti, Rosalia; Thun Hohenstein, Ursula; Vaccaro, Carmela; Coltorti, Mauro; Arzarello, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Isernia La Pineta (south-central Italy, Molise) is one of the most important archaeological localities of the Middle Pleistocene in Western Europe. It is an extensive open-air site with abundant lithic industry and faunal remains distributed across four stratified archaeosurfaces that have been found in two sectors of the excavation (3c, 3a, 3s10 in sect. I; 3a in sect. II). The prehistoric attendance was close to a wet environment, with a series of small waterfalls and lakes associated to calcareous tufa deposits. An isolated human deciduous incisor (labelled IS42) was discovered in 2014 within the archaeological level 3 coll (overlying layer 3a) that, according to new 40Ar/39Ar measurements, is dated to about 583-561 ka, i.e. to the end of marine isotope stage (MIS) 15. Thus, the tooth is currently the oldest human fossil specimen in Italy; it is an important addition to the scanty European fossil record of the Middle Pleistocene, being associated with a lithic assemblage of local raw materials (flint and limestone) characterized by the absence of handaxes and reduction strategies primarily aimed at the production of small/medium-sized flakes. The faunal assemblage is dominated by ungulates often bearing cut marks. Combining chronology with the archaeological evidence, Isernia La Pineta exhibits a delay in the appearance of handaxes with respect to other European Palaeolithic sites of the Middle Pleistocene. Interestingly, this observation matches the persistence of archaic morphological features shown by the human calvarium from the Middle Pleistocene site of Ceprano, not far from Isernia (south-central Italy, Latium). In this perspective, our analysis is aimed to evaluate morphological features occurring in IS42.

  17. Protracted tectono-metamorphic history of the SE Superior Province : contribution of 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology in the Abitibi-Opatica contact zone, Québec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoudene, Yannick; Tremblay, Alain; Ruffet, Gilles; Leclerc, François; Goutier, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Archean orogens mainly consist of greenstone belts juxtaposing deeper crustal domains of TTG-type plutonic rocks. The greenstone belts show regional folds, penetrative steeply-dipping fabrics, and localised shear zones, whereas the plutonic belts predominantly display dome structures. Concurrently, rocks in Archean orogens undergone MT/HT-LP/MP metamorphic conditions that vary, from upper to lower crustal domains, between greenschist- and granulite-facies, respectively. These structural and metamorphic variations are well-documented, but modes of deformation related to such orogens is still debated. Some studies suggest that the Archean tectonic processes were comparable to present-day plate tectonics and the Archean greenstone belts were interpreted as tectonic collages commonly documented in Phanerozoic subduction/collision zones. Alternative models propose that the Archean tectonics were different from those predicted by the plate tectonics paradigm, mainly due to the existence of a hotter mantle and a mechanically weak crust. In such models, the burying and exhumation of crustal rocks are attributed to the vertical transfer of material, resulting in the development of pop-down and domes structures. As a contribution of the study of mechanisms that might have operated during the Archean, we present a structural and metamorphic study of the contact zone between the Abitibi subprovince (ASP), which contains greenstone belts, and the Opatica subprovince (OSP), which is dominated by plutonic rocks, of the Superior Province. The 40Ar/39Ar dating of amphiboles and micas is used to constrain the age and duration of regional metamorphism and associated deformations. On the basis of seismic profiling, showing a north-dipping lithospheric-scale reflector, the ASP-OSP contact has been interpreted as the surficial trace of an Archean subduction zone. However, our structural analysis suggest that the ASP overlies the OSP and that the ASP-OSP contact does not show evidences

  18. Evolution of West Rota Volcano in the Southern Mariana Arc: Evidence from Swathmapping, Seafloor Robotics, and 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, R. J.; Tamura, Y.; Embley, R. W.; Ishizuka, O.; Merle, S.; Basu, N. K.; Kawabata, H.; Bloomer, S. H.

    2006-12-01

    West Rota volcano (WRV) is a large (25 km base), extinct submarine volcano in the southern Mariana arc. Its shallowest point lies 300m bsl; before caldera collapse WRV probably was a small island. Several bathymetric and sonar backscatter mapping campaigns reveal a large caldera, 6 x 10 km in diameter, with a maximum of 1km relief. WRV lies near the northern termination of a major NNE-trending normal fault. This and a second, parallel fault just west of the volcano separate uplifted, thick crust beneath the frontal arc to the east from subsiding, thin back-arc basin crust to the west. The youthful morphology of basin-margin faults indicate that the southern Mariana arc is tectonically active. Compared to other Mariana arc volcanoes, WRV is remarkable for 4 reasons: 1) It consists of a lower, predominantly andesite section overlain by a bimodal rhyodacite-basalt layered sequence; 2) Andesitic rocks are locally intensely altered and mineralized; 3) It has a large caldera; and 4) WRV is built on a major fault. Large calderas are commonly associated with volcanoes that erupt voluminous felsic lava (WRV rhyodacite pumice contains 72% SiO2). Such volcanoes are common in the Izu and Kermadec arcs but are otherwise unknown from the Marianas and other primitive, intra- oceanic arcs. WRV's caldera diameter of 6x10 km is large compared with Izu and Kermadec felsic calderas. Robotic seafloor examination has concentrated on understanding the volcanic history exposed in the caldera walls. One dive was carried out with ROPOS during TT167 in April 2004 (R785), followed by 4 dives with Hyperdolphin 3K during NT0517 in Oct. 2005 (HD482-484, 489). 40Ar/39Ar dating indicates that andesitic volcanism formed the lower volcanic section ca. 330,000-550,000 years ago, whereas eruption of the upper rhyodacites and basalts occurred 37,000-51,000 years ago. Four sequences of rhyodacite pyroclastics each are 20-75m thick, are unwelded, and show reverse grading, indicating submarine eruption of

  19. Constraining the alteration history of a Late Cretaceous Patagonian volcaniclastic bentonite-ash-mudstone sequence using K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, L. N.; Hofmann, H.; van der Pluijm, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    Smectite is typically considered unsuitable for radiometric dating, as argon (40Ar) produced from decay of exchangeable potassium (40K) located in the interlayer sites can be lost during fluid-rock interaction and/or during wet sample preparation in the laboratory. However, age analysis of Late Cretaceous Argentinian bentonites and associated volcaniclastic rocks from Lago Pellegrini, Northern Patagonia, indicates that, in the case of these very low-permeability rocks, the radioactive 40Ar was retained and thus can provide information on smectite age and the timing of rock alteration. This study presents isotopic results that indicate the ash-to-bentonite conversion and alteration of the overlying tuffaceous mudstones in Northern Patagonia was complete 13-17 my after middle Campanian sedimentation when the system isotopically closed. The general absence of illite in these smectite-rich lithologies reflects the low activity of K and the low temperature (<60 °C) of the formation waters that altered the parent ash.

  20. Timing of detachment faulting in the Bullfrog Hills and Bare Mountain area, southwest Nevada: Inferences from40Ar/39Ar, K-Ar, U-Pb, and fission track thermochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoisch, T.D.; Heizler, M.T.; Zartman, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Crustal extension in the Bullfrog Hills and Bare Mountain area of southwest Nevada is associated with movement along a regional detachment fault. Normal faulting in the upper plate and rapid cooling (denudation) of the lower plate were coeval with Miocene silicic volcanism and with west-northwest transport along the detachment fault. A west-northwest progression of tilting along upper plate normal faults is indicated by ages of the volcanic rocks in relation to angular unconformities. Near the breakaway, tilting in the upper plate occurred between 12.7 and 11.6 Ma, continued less strongly past 10.7 Ma, and was over by 8.2 Ma. Ten to 20 km west of the breakaway, tilting occurred between 10.7 and 10.33 Ma, continued less strongly after 10.33 Ma, and was over by 8.1 Ma. The cooling histories of the lower plate metamorphic rocks were determined by thermochronologic dating methods: K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar on muscovite, biotite, and hornblende, 40Ar/39Ar on K-feldspar, U-Pb on apatite, zircon, and sphene, and fission track on apatite, zircon, and sphene. Lower plate rocks 10 km west of the breakaway cooled slowly from Early Cretaceous lower-amphibolite facies conditions through 350??50?? to 300??50??C between 57 and 38 Ma, then cooled rapidly from 205??50?? to 120??50??C between 12.6??1.6 and 11.1??1.9 Ma. Lower plate rocks 20 km west of the breakaway cooled slowly from Early Cretaceous upper-amphibolite facies conditions through 500??50??C at 78-67 Ma, passed through 350??50?? to 300??50??C between 16.3??0.4 and 10.5??0.3 Ma, then cooled rapidly from 285??50?? to 120??50??C between 10.2 and 8.6 Ma. Upper plate tilting and rapid cooling (denudation) of the lower plate occurred simultaneously in the respective areas. The early slow-cooling part of the lower plate thermal histories was probably related to erosion at the Earth's surface, which stripped off about 9 km of material in 50 to 100 m.y. The results indicate an initial fault dip ???30?? and a 12 mm yr-1 west

  1. Relief history and denudation evolution of the northern Tibet margin: Constraints from 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He dating and implications for far-field effect of rising plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Feng, Huile; Shi, Wenbei; Zhang, Weibin; Wu, Lin; Yang, Liekun; Wang, Yinzhi; Zhang, Zhigang; Zhu, Rixiang

    2016-04-01

    How does the rising Tibetan Plateau affect its peripheral region? The current understanding of the mechanism of orogenic plateau development is incomplete and thus no consensus yet exists in this regard. However, our new 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He dataset presented in this study may shed some light on this issue. 40Ar/39Ar dating, on two vertical transects from the massif between Nuomuhong and Golmud, indicates that the Eastern Kunlun Range was built-up and exhumated during the later Triassic initially, and a minimum overburden of 11.7-14.0 km has been eroded since 220 Ma. (U-Th)/He age-elevation relationships (AERs) indicate a rapid exhumation event at 40 Ma following a long period of slow exhumation phase from late Mesozoic to early Eocene time. In this study, two scenarios - one assuming a single stage and the other assuming multiple stages of evolution history - are modeled. Modeling of a multiple stage scenario is reasonable and is able to reflect the "actual" situation, which reveals the entire denudation and relief history of the northern Tibet from late Mesozoic to the present time. After prolonged denudation before 50 Ma, a low topography ( 0.17 times the relief of the present) developed by 50 Ma with an erosion rate of 0.013-0.013+ 0.025 mm/yr. The highest relief ( 1.82 times the relief of the present) of the Cenozoic time came into being at 40 Ma with an erosion rate of 0.052 ± 0.025 mm/yr, which was possibly a result of the collision between India and Eurasia. Subsequently, the relief steadily decreased to the present level due to continued denudation. This suggests that deformation propagation from the continued convergence boundary between India and Eurasia was insignificant after the construction of the highest relief. This observation is broadly consistent with published accounts on the stratigraphic, cooling, and faulting histories of the northern Tibet margin.

  2. 39Ar/40Ar Chronology and Volumes of Eruptive Products Over the Last 1 Myr in the Tequila Volcanic Field, Jalisco, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis-Kenedi, C. B.; Lange, R. A.; Hall, C. M.; Delgado-Granados, H.

    2002-12-01

    The Tequila volcanic field, located within the western Trans-Mexican arc, covers an area of 1036 km2 and includes a central, andesitic stratocone, Volc\\­_{a}n Tequila, as well as cinder cones, domes, and fissure-fed flows. Sixty-nine high precision 39Ar-40Ar dates reveal that major activity in the Tequila volcanic field began at approximately 1 Ma. From 1 Ma to 200 ka, rhyolite (> 73 wt. % SiO2) and alkali basalt (­š 51 wt. % SiO2) were the only compositions erupted in significant volumes (29 +/- 5.7 km3 and 12 +/- 1.2 km3, respectively). At approximately 200 ka, the andesite comprising Volc\\­_{a}n Tequila erupted within 30-40 kyr, producing a volume of 30 +/- 2.0 km3. Additional andesitic flows (11 +/- 1.4 km3) erupted to the northwest and southeast of the stratocone between 140 and 20 ka. The total volume of dacite that erupted at the Tequila volcanic field is small (1.3 +/- 0.03 km3) and occurred largely (88%) within the last 70 kyrs. Unlike the andesites and dacites, the basalts and rhyolites did not erupt within narrow time intervals, but extruded over the entire last 1 Myr, producing a total volume of 12.6 +/- 1.2 km3 and 32 +/- 6.1 km3, respectively. This detailed eruptive history, combined with the observed phenocryst assemblages (0-10 vol. %) in the small-volume andesite, dacite, and alkali basalt flows, suggest that they were erupted directly from the lower (or middle) crust, without prior storage in an upper crustal chamber. In contrast, the voluminous burst of andesitic volcanism that produced the phenocryst-rich (35-45 vol. %) lavas of Volc\\­_{a}n Tequila was likely fed from a short-lived (­š 40 kyrs) upper crustal chamber. This scenario is supported by the complex, disequilibrium textures seen in the phenocryst assemblage of the Volc\\­_{a}n Tequila lavas, indicative of magma mingling within an upper crustal chamber (Wallace and Carmichael, 1994). The total volume of erupted material at the Tequila volcanic field is 89 +/- 12 km3, of which

  3. Late Visean thermal event in the northern part of the French Massif Central: new 40Ar/39Ar and Rb-Sr isotopic constraints on the Hercynian syn-orogenic extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Michel; Monié, Patrick; Pin, Christian; Maluski, Henri; Leloix, Christele

    2002-01-01

    The French Massif Central belongs to the central metamorphic domain of the European Hercynian Belt. 40Ar/39Ar mica and amphibole dates have been obtained on magmatic and metamorphic rocks from the northern part of the French Massif Central (Sioule and Brévenne-Violay series). The 336- to 337-Ma dates recorded by a granodiorite (the St. Gervais pluton) and its mylonitic border along the Ste Christine fault and the 337±5-Ma muscovite ages from the Brévenne series are consistent with the age of wrenching related to the late stage of the Hercynian compression. The remaining age spectra from the Sioule area provide ages ranging from 331 to 335 Ma that are interpreted as cooling ages related to rock exhumation after the main stages of metamorphism and deformation in the studied area. Late Visean dates widespread in North Massif Central correspond to a huge magmatic event characterized by the emplacement of "red granites", granophyres and sub-aerial acidic volcanics known as the "Tufs anthracifères" formation. Rb-Sr isotopic data from volcanic and hypovolcanic rocks from the Sioule and Montagne Bourbonnaise areas place constraints on the source of the magmas. Simple metapelite crustal melting or a major contribution from depleted mantle sources are ruled out, and instead, mantle-derived magmas were probably involved, at least as a heat source, during the Late Visean magmatism. Exhumation and cooling of metamorphic rocks below 300°C occurred contemporaneously with this Late Visean magmatism. In the geodynamic evolution of the Hercynian Belt, the Late Visean (ca. 335-330 Ma) magmatism corresponds to a major break marking the onset of post-collisional extension in the inner zone which had been thickened by collision in Latest Devonian-Earliest Carboniferous. This Late Visean extension in the inner zone which is synchronous to compression in the northern and southern forelands of the belt appears as a syn-orogenic process.

  4. Combined 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He geochronological constraints on long-term landscape evolution of the Second Paraná Plateau and its ruiniform surface features, Paraná, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffel, Silvana B.; Vasconcelos, Paulo M.; Carmo, Isabela O.; Farley, Kenneth A.

    2015-03-01

    Regional correlation of dated weathered land surfaces provides the necessary constraints to test long-term continental landscape evolution models, but major challenges remain in properly dating these surfaces. The geomorphological province of Second Paraná Plateau, Paraná State, Brazil, is a high elevation (ca. 800 m) land surface characterized by widely distributed deep saprolites and scattered lateritic profiles (e.g., Vila Velha and Serra das Almas). Prolonged exposure to weathering and erosion has promoted the pseudo-karstic and ruiniform features that are characteristic of this landscape. In this study, 40Ar/39Ar laser incremental heating geochronology on 22 grains of supergene Mn oxyhydroxides from lateritic profiles at Vila Velha yielded results ranging from 17.2 ± 0.7 to 9.1 ± 0.7 Ma. (U-Th)/He geochronology on 28 goethite grains from the same profile yielded results ranging from 36.4 ± 3.6 to 1.0 ± 0.1 Ma, with an age cluster lying within the 17.2 ± 0.7 to 7.9 ± 0.8 Ma interval. (U-Th)/He geochronology on 17 goethite grains from the Serra das Almas lateritic profile, located 20 km from Vila Velha, yield results ranging from 35.1 ± 3.5 to 14.1 ± 1.4 Ma. The combined results for the two sites reveal a common weathering history that started ca. 35 Ma, suggesting that the Second Paraná Plateau results from regional fluvial incision and denudation before ~ 35 Ma, followed by a decline in denudation rates and proportionally more intense weathering. Consistent with the laterite profile central ages, weathering was particularly intense during the Miocene (17-8 Ma). Denudation intensified after the Pliocene.

  5. 40Ar/39Ar hornblende and biotite geochronology of the Bulfat Igneous Complex, Zagros Suture Zone, NE Iraq: New insights on complexities of Paleogene arc magmatism during closure of the Neotethys Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aswad, Khalid J.; Ali, Sarmad A.; Al. Sheraefy, Ruaa M.; Nutman, Allen P.; Buckman, Solomon; Jones, Brian G.; Jourdan, F.

    2016-12-01

    In NE Iraq, the eastern edge of the Arabian plate is overlain by arc rock allochthons whose genesis and tectonic emplacement were related to the consumption and closure of the Neotethys Ocean. This paper demonstrates the occurrence of unrelated Paleogene arc rocks in two adjacent allochthons. The Bulfat Igneous Complex at Wadi Rashid (NE Iraq) is an intrusion within the Upper Allochthon Albian-Cenomanian Gimo-Qandil sequence suprasubduction zone assemblage. A thrust separates this allochthon from the underlying Lower Allochthon of the Eocene-Oligocene Walash-Naopurdan volcanic-sedimentary arc rocks. The Bulfat Igneous Complex at Wadi Rashid consists of gabbro and granitic composite intrusions in which components mingle down to a small scale. Textural relationships in the Bulfat Igneous Complex rocks indicate emplacement at high crustal levels with rapid cooling, which is consistent with amphibole geobarometry indicating crystallisation pressures between 250 and 300 Mpa. Ti-rich igneous pargasite and Ti-rich igneous Fe-biotite from gabbroic and granitic components yielded 40Ar/39Ar ages of 39.23 ± 0.21 and 38.87 ± 0.24 Ma respectively. These ages agree within analytical error and suggest coeval emplacement and rapid cooling of mafic and felsic magmas in the Eocene, in an event that was distinct and much younger than the host Albian-Cenomanian rocks. This igneous event was unrelated to formation of Cenozoic rocks in the underlying, tectonically separate, lower allochthon. The trace element signatures of the Wadi Rashi volcanic rocks show volcanic-arc characteristics for the granites and the gabbroic rocks resemble E type MORB. The presence of Eocene arc-related rocks in two allochthons suggests complexity in Paleogene subduction systems, with possibly two subduction zones operating at that time.

  6. New geologic mapping combined with geochemical, paleomagnetic, and high-precision 40Ar/39Ar analyses reveal multiple overlapping calderas formed 16.4-15.7 Ma at High Rock caldera complex, northwestern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coble, M. A.; Mahood, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    We present new evidence from 1:100,000- and 1:24,000-scale geologic mapping for the presence of at least four overlapping calderas, 24 to 40 km in diameter, that formed in an interval of only 0.7 m.y. during the mid-Miocene at High Rock caldera complex in northwest Nevada and southern Oregon. In total, an estimated minimum volume of ~725 km3 of rhyolitic magma erupted from the complex between 16.5 and 15.5 Ma, covering an area of ~9,000 km2. Rapid eruption of numerous units at volumetric rates as high as 3,000-4,000 km3/m.y., strong welding of lithic-poor ignimbrites, extensive vapor-phase alteration of lavas and ignimbrites alike, a limited range of phenocryst content and assemblage, silicification along faults, and a lack of well-exposed stratigraphic sections has hindered previous reconnaissance-scale mapping and identification of caldera centers. Calderas are located based on truncation of precaldera rhyolitic lavas by caldera topographic walls, by arcuate patterns of rhyolite lavas that erupted along buried caldera ring faults, and by the presence of pumiceous caldera lake sediments. We attribute formation of the Virgin Valley, Badger Mountain, Hanging Rock, and Cottonwood Creek Calderas to collapse on eruption, respectively, of the ca. 16.37 Ma Idaho Canyon Tuff, the 16.34 Ma Summit Lake Tuff, the 16.0 Ma Soldier Meadows Tuff, and the 15.7 Ma Tuff of Yellow Rock Canyon. Additional smaller-volume pyroclastic units erupted during emplacement of geochemically similar rhyolitic lavas. More than 60 new 40Ar/39Ar ages were obtained on ignimbrites, fall deposits, and rhyolitic, trachytic and basaltic lavas. Many of the eruptive units in the HRCC differ in age by less than 100 k.y., which, at ca. 16 Ma, requires precision at the 1-2‰ (2σ standard error) level to distinguish units using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. The high-precision of the analyses of sanidine in the rhyolites, coupled with geochemical and paleomagnetic measurements, allowed us to correlate far

  7. Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar results from the Grant intrusive breccia and coparison to the Permian Downeys Bluff Sill; evidence for Permian igneous activity at Hicks Dome, southern Illinois Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Snee, Lawrence W.

    1997-01-01

    Igneous processes at Hicks dome, a structural upwarp at lat 37.5 degrees N., long 88.4 degrees W. in the southern part of the Illinois Basin, may have thermally affected regional basinal fluid flow and may have provided fluorine for the formation of the Illinois-Kentucky Fluorspar district. The timing of both igneous activity and mineralization is poorly known. For this reason, we have dated an intrusive breccia at Hicks dome, the Grant intrusion, using 40Ar/39Ar geochronometric and paleomagnetic methods. Concordant plateau dates, giving Permian ages, were obtained from amphibole (272.1+or-0.7 [1 sigma] Ma) and phlogopite (272.7+or-0.7 [1 sigma] Ma). After alternating-field (AF) demagnetization, specimens that contain titanomagnetite-bearing igneous rock fragments give a mean remanent direction of declination (D)=168.4 degrees; inclination (I)=-8 degrees; alpha 95=8.6 degrees; number of specimens (N)=10; this direction yields a virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) at lat 54.8 degrees N., long 119.0 degrees E., delta p=4.4 degrees, delta m=8.7 degrees, near the late Paleozoic part of the North American apparent pole wander path. A nearly identical magnetization was found for the nearby Downeys Bluff sill (previously dated at about 275+or-24 Ma by the Rb-Sr method), in southern Illinois. Both AF and thermal demagnetization isolated shallow, southeasterly remanent directions carried by magnetite in the sill and from pyrrhotite in the baked contact of the Upper Mississippian Downeys Bluff Limestone: D=158.6 degrees; I=-11.8 degrees; alpha 95=3.8 degrees; N=15, yielding a VGP at lat 53.0 degrees N., long 128.7 degrees E., delta p=2.0 degrees, delta m=3.9 degrees. The paleomagnetic results, isotopic dates, and petrographic evidence thus favor the acquisition of thermal remanent magnetization by the Grant breccia and the Downeys Bluff sill during the Permian. The isotopic dates record rapid cooling from temperatures greater than 550 degrees C to less than 300 degrees C (the

  8. The Late-Holocene evolution of the Miseno area (south-western Campi Flegrei) as inferred by stratigraphy, petrochemistry and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology:Chapter 6 in Volcanism in the Campania Plain — Vesuvius, Campi Flegrei and Ignimbrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Insinga, Donatella; Calvert, Andrew T.; Lanphere, Marvin A.; Morra, Vincenzo; Perrotta, Annamaria; Sacchi, Marco; Scarpati, Claudio; Saburomaru, James; Fedele, Lorenzo

    2006-01-01

    This study on terrestrial and marine successions increases the understanding of the Late-Holocene volcanological and stratigraphical evolution of the south-western part of Campi Flegrei caldera.Stratigraphic data derived from field studies of two major tuff vents located along the coastal zone, namely Porto Miseno and Capo Miseno, clearly indicate that the Porto Miseno tuff ring slightly predates the Capo Miseno tuff cone. 40Ar/39Ar step-heating experiments, carried out on fresh sanidine separates from pumice samples, yielded a plateau age of 5090±140 yr BP for Capo Miseno and 6490±510 yr BP for Porto Miseno vent, thus confirming field observations.The volcanoclastic input derived from this recent and intense eruptive activity played a major role in the inner-shelf stratigraphic evolution of the Porto Miseno Bay deposits that have been drilled up to 40 m depth off the crater rim. The cored succession is characterised by transgressive marine deposits (mostly volcanic sand) with two intercalated peat layers (t1 and t2), dated at 3560±40 yr BP and 7815±55 yr BP (14C), respectively, interbedded with a 1–5 m thick pumice layer (tephra C). Peat layers have been chronostratigraphically correlated with two widespread paleosols onland while petrochemical analyses allowed us to correlate tephra C with the Capo Miseno tuff cone deposits.The results presented in this study imply a Late-Holocene volcanic activity that is also well preserved in the marine record in this sector of the caldera where a new chronostratigraphic reconstruction of the eruptive events is required in order to better evaluate the hazard assessment of the area.

  9. The potential of Pleistocene volcanism for constraining the palaeo-environmental history of the Arabian peninsula: 40Ar/39Ar dating of Al Wahbah maar crater, Harrat Kishb, Saudi Arabia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Wahab, Antar; Stuart, Finlay M.; Abul Maaty, Mostafa; Awad, Hesham; Kafafy, Aziz

    2013-04-01

    The Arabian peninsula is a critical region for early human migration out of Africa. Pleistocene climatic conditions have fluctuated between wet and dry extremes several times and have had a profound effect on environment and, likely, the development of human populations in the region. However, absolute chronological constraints on regional environmental and climatic changes are poor. The western margin of the Arabian peninsula is covered by 180,000 km2 of Cenozoic to Recent lava flows and related volcanic rocks that record palaeo-climatic conditions. Precise dating of these volcanic rocks has the potential to refine the climatic- environmental evolution of the region. We report a detailed geological and geochronological study of Al Wahbah maar crater (~2.2 km diameter, ~250 m deep) in Harrat Kishb, Saudi Arabia. It formed during a phreatomagmatic explosion that dissected a scoria cone on the northern wall of the crater that exposes a dolerite plug that was intruded immediately prior to crater formation. Pillow lavas at the base of the cone demonstrate that the phreatomagmatic eruption occurred during interaction between magma and a shallow lake or river, rather than groundwater. The 40Ar/39Ar age of dolerite plug (1.147 ± 0.004 Ma) reflects the time that Al Wahbah maar crater formed. More importantly it puts a firm date on the presence of abundant surface water. This study provides constraints on the timing of humid climatic conditions in the region and suggests that the Quaternary basaltic volcanism that stretches the length of the western side of the Arabian peninsula may prove to be useful for establishing the timing of palaeoclimatic changes.

  10. Ar-39-Ar-40 Ages of Two Nakhlites, MIL03346 and Y000593: A Detailed Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Jisun; Garrison, Daniel; Bogard, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Radiometric dating of martian nakhlites by several techniques have given similar ages of approx.1.2-1.4 Ga [e.g. 1, 2]. Unlike the case with shergottites, where the presence of martian atmosphere and inherited radiogenic Ar-40 produce apparent Ar-39-Ar-40 ages older than other radiometric ages, Ar-Ar ages of nakhlites are similar to ages derived by other techniques. However, even in some nakhlites the presence of trapped martian Ar produces some uncertainty in the Ar-Ar age. We present here an analysis of such Ar-Ar ages from the MIL03346 and Y000593 nakhlites.

  11. Late Palaeozoic to Mesozoic kinematic history of the Talas-Ferghana strike-slip fault (Kyrgyz West Tianshan) as revealed by 40Ar/39Ar dating of syn-kinematic white mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Yann; Alexeiev, Dmitriy V.; Kröner, Alfred; Corsini, Michel; Loury, Chloé; Monié, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    The NW-trending Talas-Ferghana Fault (TFF) in Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, is one of the largest intracontinental strike-slip faults in the world. It extends over a distance of more than 2000 km from southern Tourghai to western Tarim and exhibits a maximum dextral offset of ˜200 km during the late Palaeozoic to present. The history of the fault provides important insights for the understanding of the evolution of southern Central Asia but remains poorly constrained due to lack of reliable geochronological data. We present new Ar-Ar ages and structural data from the Kyrgyz West Tianshan, that elucidate the kinematic history of the TFF in the Palaeozoic and Mesozoic. 40Ar/39Ar ages on mylonitic white micas document a deformational history consisting of several episodes. A late Carboniferous age of 312 ± 4 Ma point to initiation of top-to-the-south and dextral transpressional deformation during a metamorphic overprint in Precambrian and Palaeozoic rocks along the northern compartment of the TFF. The main phase of dextral motion along the entire fault occurred in the Permian as suggested by minimum ages of 260-290 Ma obtained at two different locations in the NW and central parts of the TFF. Partial isotopic resetting occurred between 240 and 210 Ma and younger ages of <200-210 Ma are ascribed to late brittle reactivation and hydrothermal fluid flow in the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic times. The Jurassic trans-tensional phase is featured by emplacement of 195 ± 3 Ma pegmatitic dykes. The Ar-Ar mineral ages and structural data argue for a major phase of dextral shearing, affecting the entire region from the West Tianshan to Mongolia in the late Permian and leading to formation of almost equally spaced major NW-trending dextral strike-slip faults. The uniform character of this deformation indicates that the process of amalgamation in this part of the CAOB ended prior to the late Permian, and Central Asia evolved as a single coherent continental block since that time.

  12. Early carboniferous wrenching, exhumation of high-grade metamorphic rocks and basin instability in SW Iberia: Constraints derived from structural geology and U-Pb and 40Ar-39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, M. Francisco; Chichorro, Martim; Silva, J. Brandão; Ordóñez-Casado, Berta; Lee, James K. W.; Williams, Ian S.

    2012-08-01

    New U-Pb and 40Ar-39Ar geochronology and structural data from high- to medium grade metamorphic shear zones of the Ossa-Morena Zone, and structural data from Early Carboniferous basins (Ossa-Morena Zone and South-Portuguese Zone), place additional constraints on the Variscan tectonics in SW Iberia. A zircon U-Pb age of 465 ± 14 Ma (Middle Ordovician) measured on migmatite from the Coimbra-Cordoba shear zone is interpreted as the age of protolith crystallization. This age determination revises the information contained in the geological map of Portugal, in which these rocks were considered to be Proterozoic in age. This paper describes the evolution of Variscan wrench tectonics related to the development of shear zones, exhumation of deep crustal rocks and emplacement of magma in the Ossa-Morena Zone basement. In the Coimbra-Cordoba shear zone (transpressional), migmatites were rapidly exhumed from a depth of 42.5 km to 16.6 km over a period of ca. 10 Ma in the Viséan (ca. 340-330 Ma), indicating oblique slip exhumation rates of 8.5 to 10.6 mm/yr (Campo Maior migmatites) and 3.2 mm/yr (Ouguela gneisses) respectively. In the Évora Massif, the gneisses of the Boa Fé shear zone (transtensional) were exhumed from 18.5 to 7.4 km depth in the period ca. 344-334 Ma (Viséan), with exhumation oblique slip rates of 2.8 to 4.2 mm/yr. At the same time, the Early Carboniferous basins of SW Iberia were filled by turbidites and olistoliths, composed mostly of Devonian rocks. The presence of olistoliths indicates significant tectonic instability during sedimentation with large-scale mass movement, probably in the form of gravity slides. Deformation and metamorphism dated at 356 ± 12 Ma, 321 ± 13 Ma and 322 ± 29 Ma respectively suggests that Variscan wrench movements were active in SW Iberia during the Early Carboniferous for a period of at least 35 Ma.

  13. Assessing the volcanic hazard for Rome: 40Ar/39Ar and In-SAR constraints on the most recent eruptive activity and present-day uplift at Colli Albani Volcanic District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, F.; Gaeta, M.; Giaccio, B.; Jicha, B. R.; Palladino, D. M.; Polcari, M.; Sottili, G.; Taddeucci, J.; Florindo, F.; Stramondo, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present new 40Ar/39Ar data which allow us to refine the recurrence time for the most recent eruptive activity occurred at Colli Albani Volcanic District (CAVD) and constrain its geographic area. Time elapsed since the last eruption (36 kyr) overruns the recurrence time (31 kyr) in the last 100 kyr. New interferometric synthetic aperture radar data, covering the years 1993-2010, reveal ongoing inflation with maximum uplift rates (>2 mm/yr) in the area hosting the most recent (<200 ka) vents, suggesting that the observed uplift might be caused by magma injection within the youngest plumbing system. Finally, we frame the present deformation within the structural pattern of the area of Rome, characterized by 50 m of regional uplift since 200 ka and by geologic evidence for a recent (<2000 years) switch of the local stress-field, highlighting that the precursors of a new phase of volcanic activity are likely occurring at the CAVD.

  14. The Oldest Known Caldera Associated with the Yellowstone Hotspot: New Geologic Mapping, Geochemistry, and 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology for the Northern McDermitt Volcanic Field, Northern Nevada and Southeastern Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, T. R.; Mahood, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    McDermitt Volcanic Field (MVF) of Nevada and Oregon is one of three major caldera centers associated with Mid-Miocene Steens/Columbia River flood basalts. Pioneering geologic mapping of MVF by Rytuba and McKee (1984) and subsequent work established four main ignimbrites within the field. Our new 40Ar/39Ar ages (FCT=28.02 Ma) are 16.41±0.02 (±2σ) Ma for Tuff of Oregon Canyon, 16.35±0.04 Ma for Tuff of Trout Creek Mountains, 16.30±0.04 Ma for Tuff of Long Ridge, and 15.56±0.08 Ma for Tuff of Whitehorse Creek. We have mapped two previously unrecognized overlapping calderas that we interpret as sources for Tuff of Oregon Canyon and Tuff of Trout Creek. These ~20-km diameter calderas lie north of the well-known McDermitt Caldera; a smaller 7-km caldera that formed on eruption of the Tuff of Whitehorse Creek is nested within them. Argon ages and geochemistry of alkali rhyolite lava domes in the northern MVF define two populations: ~16.6-16.3 Ma associated with the newly recognized calderas, and ~15.5-15.3 Ma outlining the margins of the younger Whitehorse Caldera. Consistent with both ignimbrites erupting from the same evolving magma system, the high-silica alkali rhyolite Tuff of Oregon Canyon lies on compositional trends defined by the Tuff of Trout Creek, which is zoned from a moderately crystal-rich high-silica alkali rhyolite to a strongly porphyritic low-silica alkali rhyolite. They both are distinguished from the Tuff of Long Ridge from McDermitt Caldera by their higher Zr/Rb, and relatively high FeO* concentrations distinguish all MVF ignimbrites from ignimbrites from the nearby High Rock Caldera Complex, where the oldest caldera formed on eruption of the Idaho Canyon Tuff at 16.38±0.02 Ma (Coble and Mahood, in review). The Tuff of Trout Creek rests conformably on the Tuff of Oregon Canyon west and southwest of the calderas, where they overlie a thick stack of Steens Basalt lavas. To the east and southeast the two ignimbrites are separated by as much as

  15. New constraints on the subsurface geology of the Mexico City Basin: The San Lorenzo Tezonco deep well, on the basis of 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and whole-rock chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, J. L.; Layer, P. W.; Morales-Casique, E.; Benowitz, J. A.; Rangel, E.; Escolero, O.

    2013-10-01

    The San Lorenzo Tezonco deep well, drilled in 2012 by "Sistema de Aguas de la Ciudad de México" (Water Supply System of Mexico City) in the Mexico Basin to a depth of 2008 m, offers an excellent opportunity to explore the subsurface stratigraphy and general geology of the region. Unfortunately, only chipped samples from this well were recovered, which were examined and analyzed for whole-rock chemistry, 40Ar/39Ar, and U-Pb zircon geochronology, in order to reconstruct the lithology of the well. Contrary to previous deep wells of the Mexico Basin, no basement sedimentary rocks were found in this one. While the upper 70 m are composed of lacustrine sediments associated with Lake Texcoco, volcanic rocks make up the majority of the well and range in age from more than 18 Ma to 0.25 Ma. Andesitic lavas are the most abundant products of the stratigraphic column, followed by acidic products represented by dacitic and rhyolitic lavas and ignimbrite deposits. Less abundant are basaltic andesite lavas appearing in the upper and lower parts of the column. The thickest sequence of the well is represented not only by Miocene volcanic rocks ranging from 5 to 17 Ma, suggesting a period of intense volcanic activity in this area producing mainly andesitic lavas, but also by thick rhyolitic ignimbrite deposits dated at 5 Ma. These deposits suggest the presence of a caldera structure, probably buried by subsequent volcanic products and lacustrine sediments. Trace element concentrations suggest that volcanism is likely produced in a subduction environment with typical negative anomalies of Nb, Ta, Ti, and P and positive anomalies in Pb and Cs. We correlated the well units with units outcropping in mountain ranges in the surrounding area, with the recognition of the following units or formations: Eocene Andesite, San Nicolás Basaltic Andesite, Tepoztlán Formation, Miocene Volcanism, Sierra de las Cruces, and Chichinautzin Volcanic Field products. By correlating the two closest deep

  16. 40Ar/39Ar Thermochronometry of the Sisters Shear Zone, Stewart Island, New Zealand; Implications for Driving Mechanisms and Multi-Stage Breakup of the Pacific Margin of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kula, J. L.; Tulloch, A. J.; Spell, T. L.; Wells, M. L.

    2006-12-01

    New mapping, structural analysis, and thermochronometry of the Sisters Shear Zone (SSZ) indicate this detachment system played a role in continental extension leading to separation of New Zealand from West Antarctica. The SSZ extends 40 km along the southeast coast of Stewart Island, southernmost New Zealand with a footwall consisting of variably deformed 300-105 Ma granites and a hanging wall of coarse non-marine conglomerate and undeformed granite. The trace of the SSZ is subparallel to seafloor isochrons adjacent to the Campbell Plateau and stretching lineations throughout the shear zone are oriented 155/335° ± 10°; consistent with the spreading direction along the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge. Mica and K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar thermochronometry of SSZ footwall rocks indicate moderately rapid cooling (20-30°C/Ma) over the interval ~89-82 Ma followed by slow cooling. Interpretation of the moderately rapid cooling as due to tectonic denudation makes the SSZ the youngest structure yet identified in New Zealand related to Gondwana breakup. The decrease in cooling rate at 82 Ma coincides with the age of oldest seafloor adjacent to the Campbell Plateau (chron 33r), possibly reflecting the mechanical transition from continental extension to lithospheric rupture and Pacific-Antarctic ridge initiation. The orientation of the SSZ has implications for driving mechanisms of extension. Major arc/forearc terrains through South Island and Stewart Island trend northwest-southeast, and include paired plutonic belts of thick inboard arc terrain adjacent to a thin older, outboard arc belt. Crustal collapse due to the across-arc gradient in gravitational potential energy would have resulted in extension directed normal to the arc trend. The SSZ cuts the paired plutonic belts at a high angle indicating extension was not the result of gravitational collapse, but more likely driven by plate boundary forces such as microplate capture as the dynamics of subduction along the continental

  17. Ar-39-Ar-40 ages for the Apollo 15 green and yellow volcanic glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, R. R.; Warasila, R.; Delano, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The laser microprobe was used to extend the Ar-39-Ar-40 method to small, low potassium glassy objects in order to determine the ages of Apollo 15 yellow volcanic, green volcanic group A, and green volcanic group D glasses. The apparent solidification ages for these glasses are 3.62 + or -0.07, 3.41 + or -0.12, and 3.35 + or -.18 aeons, respectively. The ages for group A and d green glasses agree well with previously reported ages for aliquots of 'bulk' green glass. No significant difference in the solidification age was found between the A and D groups. The average exposure ages for the yellow and green glasses from 15426 and 15427 were indistinguishable, with ages between 300 and 275 m.y.

  18. Refinement of the time-space evolution of the giant Mio-Pliocene Río Blanco-Los Bronces porphyry Cu-Mo cluster, Central Chile: new U-Pb (SHRIMP II) and Re-Os geochronology and 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckart, Katja; Clark, Alan H.; Cuadra, Patricio; Fanning, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Representing one of the largest known (estimated >5 Gt at 1 % Cu and 0.02 % Mo) porphyry system, the Río Blanco-Los Bronces deposit incorporates at least five hypabyssal intrusive and hydrothermal centres, extending for about 5 km from the Río Blanco and Los Bronces mines in the north, through the Don Luis mine, to the Sur Sur mine, La Americana and Los Sulfatos in the south. The new geochronology data, which now include data on different molybdenite vein types, confirm the U-Pb ages of the pre-mineralisation intrusions but slightly increase their age range from 8.8 to 8.2 Ma. The distinct magmatic pulses of the mineralisation-associated porphyritic intrusives (Late Porphyries) indicate an age interval instead of the previously suggested individual ages: the quartz monzonite porphyry ranges from 7.7 to 6.1 Ma (Sur Sur 5.74 ± 0.13 Ma), the feldspar porphyry shows an interval from 5.8 to 5.2 Ma and the Don Luis porphyry from 5.2 to 5.0 Ma. The new Re-Os data on distinct molybdenite vein types confirm the protracted history of Cu(-Mo) mineralisation, inferred previously. The vein development occurred at least from 5.94 to 4.50 Ma, indicating a time-span of 1.5 Ma for the hydrothermal activity. Hydrothermal minerals dated by the 40Ar/39Ar method are generally too young to record the age of early, high-temperature mineralisation. The majority of the 40Ar/39Ar data in the Río Blanco porphyry cluster record reheating by either the youngest member of the Late Porphyry suite or the post-mineralisation dacite or rhyolite plug formations at around 4.9-4.7 Ma.

  19. High northern geomagnetic field behavior and new constraints on the Gilsá event: Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar results of ∼0.5-3.1 Ma basalts from Jökuldalur, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Døssing, Arne; Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Supakulopas, Radchagrit; Riishuus, Morten S.; Mac Niocaill, Conall

    2016-12-01

    ZAm2 (VDM of 60 ± 5Am2), which is higher than the median VADM of 16 intensity estimates from Antarctica (39 ± 7 ZAm2) from the same period. A higher northern field is also found when using less strict cut-off criteria resulting in 14 field estimates from Jökuldalur, i.e. we find support for higher field strength in the northern hemisphere as compared to the southern hemisphere during the Matuyama. Finally, we deliver a revised magneto-chronostratigraphic model of Jökuldalur and conduct an investigation of the type sections of the so-called Gilsá normal polarity event around 1.62 Ma. Our revised model is based on 11 new 40Ar/39Ar ages. No evidence is found of the existence of the Gilsá event in Jökuldalur. Instead we find that the normal polarity intervals in the type sections can both be correlated to Olduvai subchron.

  20. Using high-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to understand volcanic hazards within the Rio Grande rift and along the Jemez lineament, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerer, M. J.; McIntosh, W. C.; Heizler, M. T.; Lafferty, J.

    2014-12-01

    High-precision Ar/Ar ages were generated for late Quaternary volcanic fields in the Rio Grande rift and along the Jemez Lineament, New Mexico, to assess the time-space patterns of volcanism and begin quantifying volcanic hazards for the region. The published chronology of most late Quaternary volcanic centers in the region is not sufficiently precise, accurate, or complete for a comprehensive volcanic hazard assessment. Ar/Ar ages generated as part of this study were determined using the high-sensitivity, multi-collector ARGUS VI mass spectrometer, which provides about an order of magnitude more precise isotopic measurements compared to older generation, single-detector mass spectrometers. Ar/Ar ages suggest an apparent increase in eruption frequency during the late Quaternary within the Raton-Clayton volcanic field, northeastern NM. Only four volcanoes erupted between 426±8 and 97±3 ka. Contrastingly, four volcanoes erupted between 55±2 and 32±5 ka. This last eruptive phase displays a west to east migration of volcanism, has repose periods of 0 to 17 ka, and an average recurrence rate of 1 eruption per 5750 ka. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, west-central NM, is composed of the ~100 late Quaternary basaltic vents. Preliminary results suggest that most of the Chain of Craters, the largest and oldest part of the Zuni-Bandera field, erupted between ~100 and 250 ka. Volcanism then migrated to the east, where published ages indicate at least seven eruptio